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North Lake Tahoe Table Of Contents Date

Publication

11/15/2013

Outside Magazine ‐ Online

Lake Tahoe on a shoestring: Top ways to Save  Money on Your Next Tahoe Vactation  Announce by VirtualTour.com

11/15/2013

Tampa Bay Times

Lake Tahoe area welcomes skiers, boarders of  all stripes 

11/14/2013

San Jose Mercury News

11/14/2013

Contra Costa Times

Sierra ski: What's new at resorts for 2013‐14

11/14/2013

Cotra Costa Times

Travel Deals: Sierra ski, hotel

11/14/2013

Daily News

Sierra ski: What's new at resorts for 2013‐14

11/14/2013

San Jose Mercury News

Sierra ski: What's new at resorts for 2013‐14

12/13/2013

EON

11/13/2013 11/12/2013

Fox News Fox 11

11/12/2013

News Channel 2 

11/12/2013

Las Vegas Review Journal

Title

Sierra ski deals:Finding the best lift‐ticket  deals

Drive to Squaw Valley Ski Resort from San  Francisco, CA with ClipperCreek! The best ski resorts in North America No delay for ski resort openings Lake Tahoe Ski Resorts Gear Up for Season There's good news on two fronts… Lake Tahoe Winter Guide: Winter vacation  2013 ‐ 2014 Thingsa to Do and Where to Stay  Compiled by TahoesBest.com 

11/11/2013

Live ‐ PR

11/11/2013

Mountain Democrat

California rambling: Heading inside this  winter 

11/8/2013

Dallas News ‐ Online

Baby‐ friendly snow resworts cater to families

11/8/2013

Dallas News ‐ Online

11/8/2013 11/8/2013 11/7/2013

My San Antonio.com SF Gate Tahoe Daily Tribune

11/6/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

11/6/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune 

Improvements gallor across the West for the  2013‐14 ski season What's hot in Tahoe skiing this year What's hot in Tahoe skiing this year  Mega ‐ Passes hit slopes  Winter stroke: What's new at at some of Lake  Tahoe's Ski Resorts Bowl for Families raises more than $20K


North Lake Tahoe Table Of Contents Date

Publication

Title

11/6/2013

Tahoe.com

Ski Lake Tahoe: A Guide to Tahoe Ski Resorts 

11/6/2013

Liftopia ‐ Blog

11/5/2013 11/5/2013 11/5/2013 11/5/2013 11/5/2013 11/3/2013 11/2/2013

Baltimore Sun Vacation Starter.com Chicago Tribune Orlando Sentinel Sun Sentinel Contra Costa Times Lake Tahoe News

11/1/2013

Burleston Star 

11/1/2013

Daily News Crunch

11/1/2013 11/1/2013

5280 Spirit Magazine 

10/31/2013

SF Gate

10/31/2013

Sierra Sun

10/24/2013

Sierra Sun

10/22/2013

SF Gate

Stars over Northstar, Students over squaw,  California over Idaho, skiers over Utah

10/22/2013

Travel Weekly

North American ski resorts seeing increased  booking, airlift

10/22/2013

7x7 SF

Lake Tahoe Ski Resort Updates and Specials 

10/20/2013

The Sacrament Bee

Ski Season 2013: A look at what's new and  noteworthy around Tahoe and beyond

10/16/2013

KRNV News 4 

10/11/2013

Facilitiesonline.com

10/4/2013

Rocklin and Roseville Today

10/7/2013

The Weekly

9/25/2013 9/25/2013 9/25/2013

The Weekly Modern Luxury ‐ Miami Modern Luxury ‐ Riviera

Living Like a Local with the Mountain  Collective Pass. Part 1 Mega ‐ Passes hit slopes Mega ‐ Passes hit slopes Mega ‐ Passes hit slopes Mega ‐ Passes hit slopes Mega ‐ Passes hit slopes Stay at these 7 ski hubs  Snippets about Lake Tahoe  Elks finish seconda t Glen Rose Invitational  Reno and Denver: forget the resorts and stay  in a US ski hub  Change of Scenery  Spirit of Reno Tahoe Photos: the Magic Moment when first snow  falls North Lake Tahoe Truckee community  announcements $50K in grants available for North Tahoe  events

Children's art expo to raise money for art  programs Amy Nostrand joins th Lake Tahoe Covention  & Visitors Bureaus as the Director of Eastern  Regional Sales Lake Tahoe in Autumn is a good bet  The Ironman Course Gems at Culinary Grand Tasting Status Update Status Update


North Lake Tahoe Table Of Contents

`

Date

Publication

9/24/2013

Capital Public Radio

9/24/2013

Sierra Sun

9/24/2013

capradio.org

9/24/2013 9/24/2013

Modern Luxury ‐ Atlantan  Modern Luxury ‐ Angeleno

9/24/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

9/24/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

9/23/2013

News Channel 2 

9/23/2013

Triathlete Europe

9/23/2013

Sierra Sun

9/23/2013

News Channel 2 

9/23/2013

Reno Gazette Journal ‐ Online

9/23/2013

Triathlete Europe

9/23/2013

Reno Gazette Journal 

9/22/2013 9/22/2013

KOLO 8 News Now News 4 KRNV 

9/22/2013

News10

9/22/2013

San Francisco Chronicle 

9/21/2013

Reno Gazette Journal ‐ Online

9/20/2013

Capital Public Radio

9/20/2013

YubaNet.com

9/20/2013

Tahoe Quarterly ‐ Online

9/20/2013

KOLO 8 News Now

9/20/2013

News 4 KRNV

Title Off‐Season Events Attracts Visitors to North  Lake Tahoe Inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe challenges  large field of triathletes Off‐Season Events Attracts Visitors to North  Lake Tahoe Status Update Status Update Sugar Bowl ski resort wrapping up $20M in  upgrades Inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe challenges  large field of triathletes Thousands Compete in Ironman Lake Tahoe McDonald and Lundstrom Win Ironman Lake  Tahoe First Ironman Lake Tahoe goes off without a  hitch  Thousands Compete in Ironman Lake Tahoe First of 5 Tahoe Ironmans provides economic  benefit , highlights region McDonald and Lundstrom Win Ironman Lake  Tahoe Success at The Start, First of 5 Tahoe  Ironmans provides economic benefit  highlights region Ironman comes to Tahoe Close races at Tahoe IRONMAN  Plan for North Lake Tahoe highway closure  this Sunday  At high ‐ altitude Tahoe, it's always peak  season Driving near Tahoe on Sunday? Look out for  Ironman traffic changes  North Lake Tahoe Hosts Ironman  Traffic Advisory for IRONMAN Lake Tahoe Hard as Iron: Ironman Takes on Tahoe Sunday  How Spectators Can Prepare for Ironman  IRONMAN Lake Tahoe to cause traffic, road  closures


North Lake Tahoe Table Of Contents Date

Publication

9/20/2013

Reno Gazette Journal ‐ Online

9/20/2013

Sierra Sun

9/20/2013

Tahoe Quarterly ‐ Online

9/20/2013

Sierra Sun

9/20/2013

Reno Gazette Journal

9/20/2013

YubaNet.com

9/19/2013

CBS Sacramento

9/19/2013

examiner.com

9/19/2013

News Channel 2 

9/19/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

Ironman Lake Tahoe to Impact Sunday Travel

9/19/2013 9/19/2013 9/19/2013

Tahoe Quarterly Tahoe Quarterly Reno Gazette Journal

9/19/2013

News Channel 2 

9/19/2013

CBS Sacramento

9/18/2013

News 4 KRNV

9/18/2013

kcra.com

9/18/2013

Sierra Sun 

9/18/2013

Reno Gazette Journal

9/18/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

9/17/2013

The Sacrament Bee

9/17/2013

examiner.com

9/17/2013

SouthTahoeNOW.com

9/17/2013

News Channel 2 

Weekend Outlook: September 19‐22 Weekend Outlook: September 19‐22 The High 5  Preparartions Underway for Ironman Lake  Tahoe Triathalon Ironman Event Bringing Bucks to Lake Tahoe  During Offseason IRONMAN brings big economic boost to Lake  Tahoe Lake Tahoe Ironman Triathalon draws  thousands to NorCal Athletes set to race inaugural Ironman Lake  Tahoe triathalon  I'll have another Athletes set to race inaugural Ironman Lake  Tahoe triathalon  Tahoe's Ironman event forces road closures  this Sunday Lodging discouts aailable at North Lake Tahoe  locations this fall Lake Tahoe IRONMAN athletes vie for  $75,000 in prizes Inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe

Title Iron Woman: Reno's Liz Lyles will vie for  Ironman Lake Tahoe title this Sunday Athletes set to race inaugural Ironman Lake  Tahoe triathalon  Hard as Iron: Ironman Takes on Tahoe Sunday  The Perfect Venue' Iron Woman Woman's Lyles will vie for Tahoe  title at first Calif. Ironman since 2001 Traffic Advisory for IRONMAN Lake Tahoe Ironman Event Bringing Bucks to Lake Tahoe  During Offseason Reno's Liz Lylesone of the favorites at this  week's Ironman Lake Tahoe Preparartions Underway for Ironman Lake  Tahoe Triathalon


North Lake Tahoe Table Of Contents Date

Publication

9/17/2013

traiathlete

9/17/2013

News Channel 2 

9/17/2013

SouthTahoeNOW.com

9/17/2013

Tahoe Truckee Outdoor

9/17/2013

Visit Reno Tahoe

9/12/2013

Swift Commmunications inc.

9/10/2013

This Is Reno

9/9/2013 9/9/2013 9/8/2013

Reno Gazette Journal ‐ Online Reno Gazette Journal‐ Online Reno Gazette Journal

9/7/2013

Reno Rebirth 

9/4/2013

News Channel 2 

9/3/2013

Fox11

Ironman Lake Tahoe: Volunteers Needed

9/3/2013

Fox 11 

Ironman Lake Tahoe: Volunteers Needed

9/1/2013

CRN 

9/1/2013

Galena and Arrowcreek Life

9/1/2013

NBCNews.com

8/28/2013

Los Altos Town Crier

8/28/2013 8/20/2013 8/20/2013

Reno Gazette Journal The Good Life Urban Daddy

8/16/2013

Vogue

8/12/2013

Business Weekly

8/9/2013

This Is Reno

8/8/2013

Reno Gazette Journal

8/8/2013

Reno Gazette Journal

8/8/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

Title If the scenery doesn't take your breath away,  the hills and altitude will Inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe Lake Tahoe IRONMAN athletes vie for  $75,000 in prizes Ironman Lake Tahoe Triathalon is this Sunday Spectator's Guide to Ironman North Lake  Tahoe Sports Briefs  Volunteers needed for Ironman Lake Tahoe  Sept 22 Hundreds of Ironman Volunteers sought Hundreds of Ironman Volunteers sought Racing to Success Northern Nevada wins as racing events  explode in popularity Volunteers needed for IRONMAN Lake Tahoe 

Lake Tahoe Autumn Food and Wine Festival Enjoy North Lake Tahoe IRONMAN Lake Tahoe to cause traffic, road  closures Tahoe tidbits: Enjoy food, fireworks, and  outdoor activities Go Taste It On the Mountain 10 Summer Activities You Must Try California's First Aerial Treetop Park North America's Best Lakeside Retreats: From  Great Lakes to Golden Ponds  Five‐fold sales growth drives Rhanda  expansion Quicksilver Ta‐Hoe Nalue Paddle Festival  Continues Saturday and Sunday Ta‐Hoe Nalue paddleboard Festival returning  To King's Beach Lake Tahoe Shakespear Festival Ta‐Hoe Nalue paddleboard Festival returning  To King's Beach


North Lake Tahoe Table Of Contents Date

Publication

8/7/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

8/6/2013

KTVN News 2

8/1/2013

Sunset

7/30/2013

This Is Reno

7/30/2013

Fox 11

7/29/2013

YubaNet.com

7/29/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

7/29/2013

Swift Commmunications inc.

7/29/2013

Liftopia

7/23/2013

7x7 SF

7/20/2013

KOLO 8 News Now

7/17/2013

Tahoe Truckee Outdoor 

7/15/2013

Reno Tahoe USA

7/15/2013

Reno Gazette Journal

7/13/2013

RGJ ‐ Online

7/10/2013

This Is Reno

7/5/2013

KOLO 8 News Now

7/4/2013

Reno Gazette Journal

7/3/2013

Reno Gazette Journal ‐ Online

7/3/2013

Ski Curbed 

7/2/2013 7/1/2013 7/1/2013

Getaway radio Alaska Airlines Smart Meetings 

Fireworks Shows Across Northern Nevada,  Tahoe Fireworks Shows In The Truckee Meadows  and Tahoe Where to Watch 4th of July Fireworks In Ski  Country North Lake Tahoe Resort Association Enjoying Reno and Lake Tahoe Nevada: A World Within

7/1/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

Tahoe and Truckee To Celebrate The Fourth 

Title North Shore Public Meeting On Ironman Lake Tahoe  Tuesday The Real Lake Tahoe One Public Meeting on Ironman Lake Tahoe  Scheduled Public Meeting On Ironman Lake Tahoe  Tuesday Public Meeting On Ironman Lake Tahoe  Scheduled For Aug 6. Public Meeting Next Week On Ironman Lake  Tahoe Public Meeting Next Week On Ironman Lake  Tahoe How To Start SUP‐ing When You Live 1000  Miles From The Nearest Ocean  Four Foodie Reasons To Head To Tahoe Just  To Eat How Spectators Can Prepare for Ironman  Ironman Lake Tahoe Triathalon is this Sunday Spectator's Guide to Ironman North Lake  Tahoe Lake Tahoe in't just for winter Wanderlust, yoga, music festival starts  Thursday The Abbi Agency Press Release: Volunteers  needed for Ironman Lake Tahoe Sept 22 4th Of July Events In Northern Nevada Region


North Lake Tahoe Table Of Contents Date

Publication

7/1/2013

Yahoo! Travel

7/1/2013

LA Times

7/1/2013

MSN Living

6/28/2013

Reno Gazette Journal ‐ Online

6/25/2013

7x7 SF

6/25/2013

Getaway Reno ‐ Tahoe

6/24/2013 6/23/2013

Ski Curbed  Antelope Valley Press

4th Of July Fireworks And Holiday Events in  Reno/ Tahoe The 38 Essential Ski Town Hotels A Tale Of Two Tahoe

6/19/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

Incline village Community Announcements

6/15/2013

KTVN News2 

6/13/2013

Tahoe Daily Tribune

6/8/2013

LA Times

6/3/2013

The Mountain Journals

6/1/2013

Golf & Lifestyles

5/30/2013 5/21/2013

7x7 SF 7x7 SF

5/19/2013

EatDrinkExplore

5/16/2013

Nob Hill Gazette

5/15/2013

Great Tahoe Reviews

Title The Best Fourth Of July Fireworks Shows in  2013 Fourth of July: Where To Celebrate In The  West Lake Tahoe: Red, White, and Tahoe Blue 10 Ways To Cool Off The kids ( AndYourself)  This Weekend How To Do 4th of July Right In Lake Tahoe

List Of Northern Nevada Fireworks Dispals  Holiday Events Northern Lake Tahoe And Truckee  Community Announcements Big Summer for Road Trips Ahead Early Hiking Season In The Sierras ‐ Where's  the Snow? Golfer by day, gastronome by night: North  Tahoe's relaxing fall season serves up a week  of food and wine events, pairing perfectly  with a heaping helping of high sierra golf  50 Things to Do in Tahoe This Summer Memorial Day Weekend Gout, Navigators USA, Tahoe, Food Fraud Five Things to Do at Lake Tahoe this memorial  day weekend Stateline Fire Lookout Trail


OUTSIDE ONLINE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

The Best Deals of the 2014 Ski Season By: FREDERICK REIMERS

Skiing is expensive. Walk-up lift ticket prices at major resorts now routinely top $100 a day. Then there’s lodging, on-mountain lunches serving up grey burgers and limp fries for double-digit prices, and $20 pitchers at après-ski spots. With the economy on the uptick and early snowfall stoking demand, Dan Sherman, spokesman for ski-centric travel agent Ski.com, says you can’t count on resorts dropping prices mid-season. You should book early and online. Here are a few deals to get you started. 1. Check Here First An online clearinghouse for lift tickets, Liftopia has partnered with more than 250 resorts worldwide to broker excess inventory. On the slowest days, say, the Tuesday after the Presidents Day, you can save up to 80 percent at resorts like Waterville Valley, Park City, and even Aspen. If you are looking for lodging, too, Ski.com, a travel agency geared towards ski resorts, may be able to score you even better deals on hotels and airfare as well as lift tickets. Plus, despite the “.com”, they’re a phone-based outfit staffed by real people, so you can talk to a live person. “There are deals everywhere you look on the Internet,” says Sherman. “We cut through the clutter and find the one that’s right for your vacation.” The agency has arrangements with airlines, hotels and virtually every ski resort worldwide and, like airline ticket clearinghouses, can book packages based on excess inventory. They’re experts at notching deals with kids skiing free or finding the third- or fourth-night lodging free packages. “You won’t pay more with us; you’ll probably pay less, and we make turn-key vacations happen with one phone call,” says Sherman. 2. Best Ski Pass Deals: Out West


Epic Pass: The granddaddy of ski passes, the Epic gives you unlimited access to 28,797 total acres of skiing at premiere Colorado resorts, like Beaver Creek, Vail, and Breckenridge, not to mention California’s Kirkwood, Northstar, and Heavenly Valley. This year’s addition is the Canyons in Utah. Add five days at Verbier, Switzerland, Arlberg, Austria, and the eight Les 3 Vallees resorts in France and six discounted Ski-With-A-Friend tickets and the $729 is an amazing deal, especially considering a single day pass at Vail can run as much as $129. Mountain Collective: In response to Vail Resorts’ blockbuster Epic Pass, last year a passel of the West’s premiere resorts teamed up to offer the Mountain Collective. Buy it and you get two days apiece at Jackson Hole, Mammoth, Whistler Blackcomb, Aspen/Snowmass, Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows and a pair at Alta/Snowbird. That’s 12 days of riding the steepest terrain in North America. Additional benefits include 50 percent off additional ski days at those resorts and up to 25 percent discount on lodging. $379 Rocky Mountain Super Pass Plus: This one makes the most sense for riders who live on the front range and like to spend time at Winter Park, the closest major resort to Denver, or who just hate Vail resorts, none of which are included in this package. It provides unlimited days at Copper and Winter Park/Mary Jane, six days at Steamboat, and three at Monarch. Need a fix of summer skiing? The Rocky Mountain Super Pass gives you five days at Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand. $509 3. Best Ski Pass Deals: Back East The best pass for New Englanders looking to do a little local exploration, the Gold New England Pass affords access to 41 lifts and 2,343 acres of riding at New Hampshire’s Loon Mountain and Maine’s Sugarloaf and Sunday River resorts. You’ll also get four $50 tickets for friends. Travel out West for a spell, and you’ll score 10 free tickets at Utah’s Brighton, Washington’s Crystal Mountain and The Summit at Snoqualmie, or British Columbia’s Cypress Mountain, not to mention unlimited lift tickets at Montana’s Big Sky. $1,210 Don’t like those New England resorts? The Nor'Easter furnishes unlimited access to Vermont’s Mount Snow, New Hampshire’s Wildcat, Attitash, and Crotched, and Pennsylvania’s Jack Frost Big Boulder. $1,279 Mid-Atlantic residents should check out the season pass deal at Pennsylvania’sLiberty Mountain Resort, which also includes unlimited access to Whitetail and Roundtop. It also features a half-hour head start on Liberty’s lifts Thursday through Sunday and discounts at Vermont’s Stratton, Crested Butte and 10 others resorts. $649


4. Best Ski Pass Deals for College Students Students in New England should check out the 4.0 The College Student Pass. Full-time college students, or 2013 graduates, can get unlimited skiing at Killington Resort, Okemo Mountain Resort, and Pico Mountain at Killington, all located in Vermont, and Mount Sunapee Resort in New Hampshire. That’s access to 378 trails, 8,727 vertical feet, 19 terrain parks and 59 lifts. For spring break, it also includes 25 percent off multi-day lift tickets at Crested Butte Mountain Resort, in Colorado. So it’s unlikely they’d be able to actually keep the pass’ namesake 4.0 if they makes extensive use it. $369 There’s also the College New England Pass to Maine’s Sunday River, Sugar Loaf, and New Hampshire’s Loon, and unlimited free tickets for a western holiday at Montana’s Big Sky, or 10 free tickets at Utah’s Brighton, Washington’s Crystal Mountain and The Summit at Snoqualmie, or Cypress Mountain in British Columbia. $349 until November 30 Colorado students should grab the Rocky Mountain Super Pass Plus College Pass, which furnishes unlimited skiing and riding at Copper and Winter Park, six days at Steamboat, and new this year, three days at Monarch. For the summer, it includes five days at New Zealand’s Mount Ruapehu. $379 Utah college students should invest in the Canyons Youth Pass, for $429, though you have to be a Utah resident. Prefer Alta? You can get a similar pass there for $599. If you want Snowbird’s season pass, you’ll probably have to use mom and dad’s credit card—it’ll set you back $729. 5. Best Post-grad Passes East-coast resorts don’t get quite the tide of recent grads looking to ski bum as western resorts, so some of them offer great deals for 20-somethings staying closer to home. Showing they know their audience, Sugarbush titled theirs the For20s Pass: for $329. Mad River Glenn keeps the riffraff off the slopes on weekends with their 20s Midweek Pass for skiers age 19 to 29 for $299. (Enrolled college students can ski every day of the week for just $214.) 6. Cheap Eats at Home


Thai Me Up, a Thai joint and brewpub in Jackson, Wyoming isn’t slopeside, but offers a fulltime bar menu with pork sliders, buffalo potstickers, a 1/3 pound burger, and 12 other items all for under $9. Pair it with their award-wining IPA, the Smelvin. Dos Locos, at Colorado’s Keystone resort has a legendary happy hour menu. From 2:306:00 pm Monday-Thursday and til 5:30 Friday-Sunday, you can score $1.15 hard tacos, and $6 quesadillas, and BBQ pork sandwiches. Wash it down with $3.50 microbrews and $2 mystery shots. Aspen, obviously, is a pricey place. Get a reprieve at Big Wrap, a below-ground shop right across from the Gondola downtown where gourmet wraps like the Hail Caesar with roasted red peppers and pumpkin seeds will run you just $6.70 and a breakfast burrito is just $4.60. The best thing about skiing Breckenridge in Colorado? The weekday happy hour at local institutionBreckenridge Brewery. They have 2-for-1 apps and $7 pitchers weekdays between 3 and 6 pm. 7. Cheap Eats Up North It’s hard to find anything cheap anymore in Canada, so El Furniture Warehouse, in Whistler, is a genuine revelation. Everything on the menu rings up at $4.95, from the spicy chicken quesadilla to the braised beef dip sandwich to the salads, all at hearty portions. Check out Whitewater Resort in Nelson, BC, for some epic hike-to terrain, copious powder and a surprisingly great base-lodge restaurant. The hippie-run eatery Fresh Tracks Cafe has spawned three cookbooks and sports gourmet grub like the Buckwheat Soba Noodle Salad and the Chai BBQ Pulled Pork Panini. Most of it rings up in double digits, but its pretty reasonable for such premiere ingredients. 8. Best Contests Epic Race: Beginning November 22, the first 10 skiers to ski all 26 of the Epic Pass’ resorts in Colorado, California, Utah, Michigan, Minnesota, France, Austria and Switzerland, will get an Epic Pass for life. Contestants can’t ride more than one resort per day in the U.S. and two resorts a day in Europe and they must post two photos and a video from designated locations at each. Unless you are very, very wealthy or already have your corporate sponsors lined up to fund this one, you probably won’t win. The good news is that if you purchased an Epic Pass for this season, you will automatically be entered into a drawing to win a pair of the passes every year for the rest of your life without doing another thing. Win, and it’ll


afford you and a friend unlimited skiing at the Epic’s North American resorts. That plus $7,000 to get you there. Columbia Sportswear is offering a Ski Bum Scholarship to Whistler. Win three months free lodging with a pair of season passes for you and a friend, round-trip airfare for two to Vancouver, $100/day for food and a whole bunch of Columbia ski apparel. How to win: make a video showing why you should win, submit it by December 2, win the Internet vote. Ski.com is hosting a Facebook contest wherin you can win four night’s lodging at BC’s Red Mountain, a pair of 2-day lift tickets, and two day passes for Big Red Cats. How to win: apply skiing cat stickers from Ski.com to things, take photos of them, post them on Facebook. Best photos win. 9. Bunk It Even an adequate hotel room at the base of a ski resort will run you $300 a night. One alternative: old-school bunk rooms. They are low on privacy, but perfect for serious skiers focused more on making tracks than lounging in the room. There aren’t many such options left in ski country, but here are a few: The Hostel at Jackson Hole is the only inexpensive place to stay slopeside at Jackson. Private rooms start at just $69 and a bunk in the bunk room may only cost you $25. The Peruvian, at Alta’s prices, is a little deceptive since every bed includes breakfast, lunch and dinner. They also have a bunkroom for about half the rate of their regular rooms and the same access to the hot tubs. The Alta Lodge also offers dorm-style bunking starting at just $115. 10. Thrift Shopping The Thrift Shop of Aspen is famously littered with designer castoffs from the rich and famous and no small number of vintage Bogner one-piece ski suits. For more radical gear, check out Jackson, Wyoming’s Headwall Sports, a consignment shop where Jackson Hole’s legions of sponsored riders drop their spare Gore-tex shells to reap a little extra cash. With millions of shoppers churning through gear, Colorado’s Front Range recycles their stuff at Boulder Sports Recycler. 11. Best Deals for Beginners Vermont’s Sugarbush again features their incredible First Timer To Lifetimer program.


First-time riders of any age need only complete a three-lesson package for $225, and they’ll receive a free unlimited season pass (a $1600 face value) for the remainder of the season. Colorado’s Powderhorn Mountain Resort, has a similar program. Complete three lessons in two December or January blocks, or on consecutive weekends, and adults can score a season pass for $320; kids can get the same deal for $269. Once participants complete the 3-class Pass program of three lessons at Loveland Pass in Colorado, they’re rewarded with a full season pass. Starting at $310. 12. Early Season Specials II Snowbird has ski-in/ski-out lodging and lift tickets for $99/person before December 19. Buy one night at any Winter Park Resort property between November 13 and December 20 and get a second night for half-price. Or, book at least two nights of lodging at regular price and get a free kid’s (ages 6-12) lift ticket with the purchase of an adult lift ticket, valid until December 19. Steamboat’s Boat Launch pass sets you up for three days skiing between Thanksgiving and December 21 for just $129. Sun Valley’s Pre-Holiday Package runs from November 28 through December 20 and features lodging and a lift ticket for $85 per person. 13. What's Better than Free? Most resorts and nearby lodging post great deals on riding before the holidays. Jackson Hole has a free ski day for all on November 29. Pair that with the two nights lodging/two-day lift ticket deal offered by Jackson Hole Central Reservations, and you can score 3 days skiing and 2 nights lodging for an amazing $179 over that weekend. Crested Butte Mountain Resort offers free skiing on November 27. Then, until December 17, stay and ski at the Grand Lodge for just $79 per person, per night. From December 1-20, kids ages 14 and under can ski or ride for free at Arapahoe Basin. 14. Rich Kids The swanky Fairmont Chateau Whistler offers luxury ski-in and ski-out accommodations and two adult Whistler Blackcomb adult passes per room, per night. Kids under 5 eat free in The Wildflower and at The Chalet. Book by November 15 and kids will ski and rent equipment free as well. From $443 Four Seasons Vail has a Ski Free package for families that includes three-day lift tickets and rentals for up to two adults and two kids 12 or younger per room. From $530 per night American Airlines will fly your kid for free to notoriously pricey Jackson Hole, when you book an adult ticket and rooms through Jackson Hole Central Reservations.


15. Fun with Numbers Mad River Glen, in Vermont, holds its Roll Back the Clock Day on January 28, when all lift tickets will cost what they originally sold for at the mountain’s 1948 opening—$3.50. Then, on Valentine’s Day, bring your loved one to the ticket booth, kiss him or her, and you’ll each receive $14 lift tickets. Finally, on St. Paddy’s Day, March 17, lift tickets will only cost you $17, assuming you are wearing some green. Waterville Valley, in Maine, is also selling $17 tickets on March 17, though you don’t necessarily have to wear green. Tuesdays are a great day at Waterville, as throughout January, and possibly into February depending on how the Patriots play, lift tickets will cost only as much as their opponent scores the previous Sunday. As of press time the team was allowing just 19.4 points per game, 8th best in the NFL [Editor's Note: Be advised that aside from a single-game outlier against the Steelers in which New England put up 55 points, their offense has struggled and Brady has failed to complete 50 percent of his passes and hit career lows in multiple contests this year. Go Jets.] After the season ends, hope for low temps as ticket prices will match the forecasted base area low temp for that day. Best of all, on April 1, a lift ticket will cost you just $1 before taxes and fees. To commemorate The Gant hotel in Aspen’s 40th anniversary, the property is running its “40 and Climbing promotion” until December 28, featuring a different weekly offer like 40 percent lodging discounts, $40 lift tickets, or a fourth night free. Each deal will be available to book for 40 hours. 16. Midseason Deals If you are doing a ski vacation to Utah, consider booking cheaper lodging in Salt Lake and buying the Ski Salt Lake Super Pass, which will get you up to 20 percent off face value at nearby Alta, Snowbird, Brighton, and Solitude on up to 10 days of skiing during 7- or 14day windows. The more days you ski, the bigger the savings. Durango Mountain Resort, in Colorado has a Rocky Mountain Getaway package with two days of lift tickets and two nights lodging for $94 per person. Sunday River Maine’s excellently titled Two Tickets to Paradise includes one night lodging, plus breakfast, two lift tickets, and two days of ski or snowboard lessons for $129/person. 17. Best Bang For the Buck, Anytime


The East Coast anytime champ is Saddleback, Maine. A $49 face-value lift ticket gets you 1,400 feet of vert (pretty good by Eastern standards). It’s $59 on Saturdays. They also have $69/person ski and stay packages. Out West Bridger Bowl, in Bozeman, Montana, is in the same league as Alta, Jackson, and Snowbird, but lift tickets are just $51 every day. Because Steamboat has so much ski-in/ski-out condo inventory, you can book lodging for about 20 percent less than any other equivalent class of resort. Book through Ski.com. 18. Europe on the Cheap Skiing in Europe doesn’t have to mean $9 pints of beer at après. With a stunning 5,000 feet of vert, Basanko resort in Bulgaria is known for its steeps and copious snow, and for being inexpensive. Lift tickets will run you about $37/day depending on the exchange rate, and a slopeside beer will only set you back $2. Slovenia’s Vogel, near the fairy tale lake town of Bohinj, sports about 200 acres of trail and a lot of steep off-piste terrain in the rugged Julian Alps. Nightlife is relatively quiet in Bohinj, but lift tickets only cost $36. Slovakia’s, Jasna boasts 3,000 feet of vert and a new tram to go with 28 other lifts. There’s acres of intermediate terrain and plenty of untracked off-piste for experts. Lift tickets start at $37 in low-season and a three-course meal may only run you $16. 19. Spring Passes: Good Things Come to Those Who Wait Missing ski season because of an early injury, or heading south to soak up some sun? Not to worry, some of the best season-pass deals don’t show up until late season, when resorts known for big snowfalls offer amazing deals on season passes. Snowbird, which sometimes stays open well into June on the weekends, puts its season pass on sale for $400 starting March 1. The underrated Mount Hood Meadows, near Portland, Oregon, usually keeps its lifts turning until the end of April, and last year sold its Spring Pass in mid-March for $149. It’s gone on sale as early as mid-February some years. Last year, A-Basin finally closed on June 2, but riders began using their $169 spring pass on April 6. Similarly, Mount Bachelor, in Bend, Oregon, sold a Springtacular Season pass for $159 from April 1, and was open into late May.


Lake Tahoe 2013-14 Ski Resort Opening Dates Announced by TahoesBest.com 15.11.2013 17:31:02 -

There is snow on the ground in Lake Tahoe and the 2013-2014 ski & ride (snowboard language) season is underway. Several ski resorts are set to

 open within weeks and one, Boreal Mountain Resort, located just off Interstate 80 on Tahoe's North  Shore, opened on November 1st.      An early season snowfall in October got things started and temperatures have remained cold enough for  snow making equipment to pump out more white stuff and build up the ever important base. Several  resorts expect to open on November 22nd in anticipation of the Thanksgiving holiday including Heavenly  & Kirkwood on the South Shore, and Northstar on Tahoe's North Shore. Also projecting to open in  November is North Shore heavyweight Squaw (Nov. 27) with its sister resort (yes, one ticket now  includes both resorts), Alpine Meadows, opening on December 13th. Homewood, on Lake Tahoe's  beautiful West Shore, boasts Tahoe's best views and recently announced its opening date as December  13th.    For cross‐country Nordic skiers, the world famous Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area recently moved its date  up to November 29th.    A handful of the Tahoe resorts have not announced opening dates yet but likely will after the first major  winter season storm. All dates are dependent upon Mother Nature doing her thing.    Here is an updated list of the Lake Tahoe ski resort opening dates for the 2013 ‐ 2014 ski season. Happy  trails!    Announced Ski Resort Opening Dates *:  Alpine Meadows Ski Resort (North Shore) ‐ Dec. 13    Boreal Mountain Resort (North Shore) ‐ OPEN!    Diamond Peak Ski Resort (North Shore) ‐ Dec. 12    Heavenly Lake Tahoe (South Shore) ‐ Nov. 22    Homewood Mountain Resort (West Shore) ‐ Sometime in early December    Kirkwood Ski Resort (South Shore) ‐ Nov. 22    Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe (North Shore) ‐ Nov. 22    Northstar California™ Resort (North Shore) ‐ Nov. 22 


Royal Gorge XC Ski Resort (Donner Summit) ‐ TBD    Sierra‐at‐Tahoe Ski Resort (South Shore) ‐ TBD    Soda Springs Winter Resort (Donner Summit) ‐ TBD    Spooner Lake XC Ski Area (East Shore) ‐ TBD    Squaw Valley (North Shore) ‐ Nov. 27    Sugar Bowl Ski Resort (Donner Summit) ‐ Late November, Early December    Tahoe Cross Country Ski Area (North Shore) ‐ Nov. 29    Tahoe Donner Ski Area (Tahoe Donner) ‐ Dec. 13 


Edmonton’s American Medal Hope A former Edmontonian prepares to race for the U.S. in the winter Olympics If you are in Belgravia during the Christmas season, you just might see Laurenne Ross at the local gym, or maybe walking or running on the snow-blown sidewalks. Ross spends Christmases in her hometown, but she doesn’t quit training. She’s on course to ski at the Olympics in Sochi. That is, she is going to ski for the Stars and Stripes, not the red Maple Leaf. Ross is an Edmonton-born medal hope, and a member of theU.S. ski team. Last season, Ross won the super giant-slalom U.S. national title at Squaw Valley. At a World Cup downhill in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany, she got a second place finish. And the U.S. speed team got more World Cup points last year than any other nation. So, how did Ross go from Canada to the U.S.? She was born in Edmonton; when she was seven, her family relocated to Oregon, but she remained a Canadian citizen. When she was 14, she had the chance to ski at the Topolino, a top event for young skiers. But she had a problem. Because she had only a Canadian passport, she couldn’t go with the U.S. ski team. And, because she didn’t live in Canada, the Canadian team couldn’t take her. So, she got a U.S. passport, received dual citizenship and became a devoted American skier. “Ever since then, I haven’t thought about racing for Canada. Now, the American speed team is so good. The Canadian ski team has struggled for the last couple of years. With the U.S. team, I am training with the fastest girls in the world,” says Ross. Two seasons ago, she got to ski the course in Sochi, where she hopes to earn a spot on the podium. “It’s a really fun course. It’s different. It’s pretty varied terrain, definitely all kinds of hills. It’s pretty straightforward; there’s one part that’s tough. But if you ask around, the skiers will tell you it’s a lot of fun.” Many of Ross’ family members still live in Edmonton, so she comes back on a regular basis. She spends her holidays here. A grandmother lives in Victoria. So, there’s no clean break. Even though she lives in Bend, Ore., her Canadian roots still show. “I really do like coming back to Edmonton. I really like to go on long walks with my grandma. Belgravia, I really like the district. When I look at the city, that’s the part I am closest to.”


Lake Tahoe area welcomes skiers, boarders of all stripes By Marcia Biggs, Special to the Times Friday, November 15, 2013 6:19pm

SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. The daily decision over the hot breakfast buffet is always a matter of debate. It's not the "pancakes versus waffles" conundrum, but "California versus Nevada." Some vote for California as the best way to start the ski day, while others prefer Nevada. It's a matter of the best warmup runs with the least number of people, and what time the sun will hit the slopes to turn early-morning powder into slush. In the end, there is no accord. The group splits up and folks head their separate ways, with an agreement to meet at a certain midmountain lodge at a certain time for lunch. It's another day at Heavenly Mountain Resort, where spectacular skiing combines with breathtaking scenery on terrain that crosses two states. There's a lot to like about skiing at Lake Tahoe, from its diverse array of 15 alpine and 13 cross country ski areas to its lakeside villages and casino nightlife. And temperatures tend to be milder here than at some of the high-altitude resorts in the Rockies, with an average winter high of 43 degrees and mostly sunny weather. Most skiers opt to stay in South Lake Tahoe, where the casino rooms are plentiful and affordable and there's a large variety of activities, shopping and nightlife. Despite six casinos and a spreadout population of 34,000, South Lake Tahoe still remains a small Western town at heart with the usual sports bars, mom-and-pop motels and even a bowling alley. There is something quintessentially American about being at Lake Tahoe — it's as comfortable and predictable as a pair of well-worn boots. The resorts around the lake offer something for all levels of skiers and boarders — and for those who don't do either. Heavenly skiing The queen of South Lake Tahoe is the Heavenly Mountain Resort, with four base villages in both California and Nevada. Heavenly rules with the most vertical rise of any Tahoe ski resort at 3,500 feet, the highest summit elevation at 10,040 feet and the most skiable terrain at 4,800 acres, including five terrain parks.


In the center of town, a high-speed gondola sweeps skiers 2.4 miles up from street level to midmountain. The gondola makes it a breeze to avoid the parking hassles at the base lodges; lockers and lift tickets are here, too. I like the California side to start my day, where the sapphire blue lake lies below like a brilliant gem surrounded by the snow-covered Sierra Nevada Mountains. Lake Tahoe is one of North America's largest alpine glacier lakes at 22 miles long and 12 miles wide and averages 989 feet deep, which is why it won't freeze in winter. Later, from the Nevada side, I'll enjoy the vast views of the desert. It's always a yin-yang ski day at Heavenly. The mountain is a massive playground for skiers and snowboarders, who are serviced by 30 lifts, including a tram. Heavenly's intermediate runs are some of the best in the West. Advanced skiers won't be disappointed either, especially in the Killebrew Canyon area where it's rough and rugged, steep and deep. After a hard day on the slopes, there's plenty to do around South Lake Tahoe. Step over the state line into Nevada and you walk straight into Harvey's, Harrah's, MontBleu, Bill's and Horizon casinos. I never even plugged a token into a slot machine the entire week I was there with the Tampa Bay Snow Skiers & Boarders last winter, but it was fun to wander through the casinos and watch the action. On weekends, casinos bring in comedians, magic shows and other performers — not first-line acts like Vegas but recognizable names nonetheless. While there is plenty of gambling, and nightclubs for those who have the energy to party on, my ski club crowd often landed at more laid-back venues like the Tahoe Pub, across from the Heavenly gondola with an excellent variety of microbrews and pool tables downstairs and live music upstairs. Kirkwood challenges The "steep and deep" crowd usually plans to spend a day or two at Kirkwood Mountain Resort, 35 miles from Tahoe along scenic Highway 88. Kirkwood claims to have the deepest snow pack of any resort in North America with annual snowfall totaling upward of 600 inches. Kirkwood's 15 lifts carry skiers and boarders over 2,300 acres of terrain with two terrain parks. Popular with the locals, Kirkwood offers steep chutes, open bowls and plenty of powder, but also groomed runs for all levels. Keep in mind that Kirkwood is considered a Class A (most dangerous) avalanche area, so it's best to stay within bounds unless you take a guided tour. Sign up for one through Expedition: Kirkwood, the resort's new guided backcountry education program. Expert skiers with cash to burn can sign up for a snow cat tour to the backcountry area or up to the cirque where the lifts don't go. Cat tours are $225 per person for four runs; the price includes the use of a shovel, backpack, beacon and probe, as well as a brief introduction to avalanche and weather report reading, proper gear usage and general out-of-bounds protocols.


Squaw Valley for all It's a whole different scene on the north side of Lake Tahoe. The king of the North Shore is the sprawling Squaw Valley USA, with 4,000 acres, 34 lifts with a cable car and funitel (aerial lift), and three terrain parks. The site of the 1960 Winter Olympics, Squaw Valley is known for its six challenging peaks, but also has a huge beginner-intermediate complex called High Camp — surprisingly on the upper mountain and reached with ease by the cable car. Nonskiers can jump aboard the aerial tram for a breathtaking ride up to High Camp, a cool place to chill out at restaurants and apres-ski bars. Bring your swimsuit for a soak in the hot tubs, where you can savor the views of Lake Tahoe from 8,200 feet. Ah, yes. Squaw Valley is family friendly with a Kids Snowsports School and a Snoventures Center for family snow tubing, dog sledding and sleigh rides, even little snowmobiles for kids. Squaw Valley recently acquired Alpine Meadows ski resort, just 10 minutes away with 2,000 acres of skiing from wide-open groomed runs to steeps and bowls. A multiresort lift ticket is available for Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows and nearby Sierra at Tahoe; free shuttles depart from each resort every half-hour. Stylish Northstar Head to Northstar California Resort (formerly Northstar-at-Tahoe) near the town of Truckee for a more upscale scene. I like the intimate feeling of this midsize resort with its impeccable grooming and stylish village. On the slopes, about 20 lifts transport skiers across 3,170 acres of skiable terrain. The focal point of Northstar is its modern Alpine Village, centered on a skating rink with fine dining and outdoor martini bars, and an on-mountain Ritz-Carlton. Heavenly, Kirkwood and Northstar have the financial backing of corporate owner Vail Resorts, which virtually guarantees high standards both on and off the mountain. Northstar is a giant playground for kids and teens, thanks to seven freestyle terrain parks, from a Burton Progression Park for beginners to the new 500-foot-long superpipe designed by Olympic gold medalist and Northstar regular Shaun White. With Northstar's family-friendly focus, parents will appreciate amenities like children's ski and snowboard programs, a licensed day care center, and a day camp program for ages 2 through 6 that offers both on- and off-slope activities. As at all resorts around Lake Tahoe, weekends can get crowded. If you prefer to stay in town, historic Truckee is 6 miles to the south and a great place to hang your skis with its many lodgings, shops and restaurants. Fun for nonskiers Don't ski? Don't worry. Besides visiting the casinos, you can take a paddlewheel boat cruise on Lake Tahoe aboard the Tahoe Queen, go for a lakeside snowshoe or Nordic ski at Camp Richardson, or take a snowmobile excursion from Zephyr Cove.


And even if you're a hard-core ski junkie, it's worth a day off the slopes to take a ride along the western shore of the lake for the stunning vistas of Emerald Bay and Lake Tahoe. Stop for lunch at one of the small towns, among them Tahoe City, Kings Beach and Incline Village, that are fun to visit for their casinos, saloons, rock shops and art galleries. A winter getaway at Lake Tahoe is easy. It's leaving that's a challenge. Marcia Biggs is a freelance travel writer based in Safety Harbor. If you go South Lake Tahoe Tourism: tahoesouth.com. North Lake Tahoe Tourism: gotahoenorth.com. Heavenly Mountain Resort: skiheavenly.com, toll-free 1-800-220-1593. Kirkwood Mountain Resort: kirkwood.com, toll-free 1-800-967-7500. Northstar California Resort: northstarcalifornia.com, toll-free 1-800-466-6784. Squaw Valley USA: squaw.com, toll-free 1-800-403-0206. Getting there: I flew United from Tampa to Reno for around $500 and took the South Tahoe Shuttle (southtahoeexpress.com, $30 one way). If you are staying on the north shore, you can also take the North Lake Tahoe Express (northlaketahoeexpress.com, $45 one way). Auto rentals are available at Reno International Airport. Lodging: My ski club, like most large groups, stayed at a casino in South Lake Tahoe, the Horizon Casino Resort. The Horizon is perfectly fine, but pay the extra money and ask for a room in the newer part of the building. Expect prices for hotels and rental condominiums to vary considerably from week to week; best deals are generally early and late season. Look for a Deals tab on resort websites to find special packages that might include discount lift tickets. Where to eat: The breakfasts at the Driftwood in the Heavenly Mountain Village are legendary, and the lunches there are equally as good. For an outstanding view of the lake at sunset, we treated ourselves to dinner at 19 Kitchen-Bar on the 19th floor of Harvey's. Well worth it. Lift tickets: With daily lift tickets hovering around $100 at the larger resorts, those staying for a week should consider the Tahoe Local Pass, good at Heavenly, Northstar and Kirkwood. Ski more than four days and the pass, priced at $439, pays for itself. Check out epicpass.com. The pull of powder Tampa Bay area ski clubs plan dozens of trips to the Western United States, Canada and Europe, from long weekends to a full week; some are already sold out. Tampa Bay Ski Club is offering a trip March 1-8


to Lake Tahoe. Tampa Bay Ski Club (Bowen Travel): tampabayskiclub.com, (813) 289-8344. Tampa Bay Snow Skiers & Boarders: tampabaysnowskiers.com. Clearwater/St. Petersburg Ski and Sports Club: snowshark.org.


Sierra ski deals: Finding best lift-ticket prices By Janet Fullwood Correspondent POSTED: 11/14/2013 03:00:00 PM PST | UPDATED: ABOUT A MONTH AGO

These days, the best lift-ticket deals reside in the virtual world, not at the ticket window. Sugar Bowl, above, has created a ticket alliance with Sun Valley ski resort in Idaho and Grand Targhee in Wyoming. (Photo courtesy of Sugar Bowl)

Skiers and snowboarders are perpetual optimists who like to believe the coming season will bring more powder than ever before. While that's up to Mother Nature, one hard, cold fact is for sure: Peak-season rates at prominent resorts now top $100 a day at the ticket window. Snow-sports enthusiasts can just say "ouch" -- or go online to save. Taking their cues from airlines and hotels, mountain resorts are selling discounted lift tickets online and through smartphone apps, and pricing them according to anticipated demand. Many are also enlisting third-party resellers whose sophisticated platforms allow them to release a limited number of tickets at a given rate or otherwise change prices on the fly. "Because resorts can control dates and volume, they can put out deals up to 80 percent off the walk-up rate," says Ron Schneidermann, co-founder and CEO of Liftopia, a San Francisco-based site that is to snow-sports enthusiasts what Expedia is to air travelers. CONDITIONING BUYERS "The airline industry did a good job of conditioning people to book in advance," he adds, "and that's what the ski industry is doing now. The focus is on advance-purchase, online bookings, whether through the individual resort websites or us." Season passes bought early in the year (the best deals dry up after Labor Day) offer the best value for those who plan to spend a lot of time on the slopes. But for those who can't justify the cost or just want to try someplace new, advance purchase of a date-specific lift pass can bring significant savings of 10 to 60 percent.


And it's not just infrequent skiers who bite. According to Schneidermann, about one in five Liftopia customers holds a season pass to a resort other than the one for which they're buying tickets online. HOW TREND STARTED Vail Resorts, which operates three anchor properties at Lake Tahoe (Heavenly, Northstar and Kirkwood), four in Colorado and one in Utah, started the variable pricing trend almost a decade ago, when it began jiggering the cost of seasonal and daily lift tickets in relation to snow conditions and forecasted demand. On a powder day when all the lifts are open, resort guests pay top dollar. On an early- or late-season day when conditions are marginal, the price might drop by 30 percent. "We have the flexibility to go in and say we're going to match today's price with today's experience," says Russ Pecoraro, Vail's director of mountain communications. Vail doesn't release tickets to resellers, relying instead on its own retail platform and free PEAKS loyalty program to push out deals. To get the best rates at its Tahoe resorts, skiers and riders must make their purchase at least three days in advance of boarding a lift. "That window caters to Bay Area people, who are storm-watchers," says Pecoraro, referencing the resorts' bread-and-butter drive market. (In Colorado, the best-price window is seven days in advance.) SMALL RESORTS UNITE To counter Vail's corporate clout and survive during a recession complicated by drought years, another industry trend has emerged: Many small, independently owned ski areas and some larger ones are forming one-pass-serves-all alliances to lure skiers and riders into trying something new. The newest such alliance to be announced involves Sugar Bowl at Tahoe; Sun Valley, Idaho; and Grand Targhee, Wyo. "Smaller areas have to broaden their appeal; otherwise they're conceding a slice of the market to larger areas with more sophisticated programs," notes Bob Roberts, president of the California Ski Industry Association. "In the end, the consumer is better off with all these options, because they can pick and choose what they want." SIERRA-AT-TAHOE'S PLAN Sierra-at-Tahoe, the Highway 50 resort closest to Sacramento and the Bay Area, is one smaller ski area that has been especially assertive. It's partnered for the second season with Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows to provide a third venue for holders of the Tahoe Super


Pass. It's also part of the Powder Alliance, a consortium of 12 smaller resorts in nine states that share pass privileges. And it's the headline partner with Snowbomb.com, a San Francisco-based membership program that includes one free day on the slopes with purchase of its discount card and another free day for attendees of regional ski shows (Nov. 23-24 in San Jose). Consumer confusion aside, snow resorts' move to the airlines' "yield management" pricing method appears here to stay. "It's a great tool for getting more people out there at a cheaper price and for resorts to effectively market their products," says Brandon Quinn, founder of GetSkiTickets.com. Of course, there's another, often-overlooked way for snow bums to shave 15 to 20 percent off the cost of a ski day: brown-bag it. It's hard to exit a ski-area cafeteria for less than $10 or $15 per person, and for families, that can be a deal-killer. A loaf of bread, a jar of peanut butter and a few extras can feed a crowd for the price of a locker rental. Plus, you'll have a place to stash your stuff if you need to shed layers in the afternoon. Contact Janet Fullwood at travel@bayareanewsgroup.com. WEBSITES, SKI PASSES OFFER SAVINGS Liftopia.com: This website offers advance-purchase, date-specific tickets, passes, rentals and lessons at more than 250 resorts worldwide. GetSkiTickets.com: This reseller offers discounted, date-specific tickets, rentals and lessons at about 50 U.S. and Canadian resorts. Snowbomb.com: This San Francisco-based membership program ($150) includes lift tickets to Homewood, Sierra-at-Tahoe, Bear Valley and China Peak; discounts at most other California resorts; free or cut-rate rentals and services; and admission to regional ski shows (Nov.23-24 in San Jose). MountainCollective.com: $379 pass includes two tickets (12 in all) with no blackout dates at Mammoth, Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows in California; Aspen/Snowmass in Colorado; Jackson Hole in Wyoming; and Whistler Blackcomb in British Columbia. PowderAlliance.com: Consortium of 12 smaller resorts in nine Western states. Buy an anytime season pass at one of them, and get three days free at the rest. Epic Pass (www.snow.com): Vail Resorts offers multi-mountain passes specific to California and Colorado as well as a $729 Epic Pass that provides unlimited privileges at U.S. properties plus five days at ski areas in Switzerland, Austria and France. All versions come preloaded with six "ski-with-a-friend" discounted tickets for pass-holder companions. Tahoe Super Pass: Single pass, available at three price points, covers three Lake Tahoe resorts (Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows and Sierra-at-Tahoe). Includes four to six


discounted tickets for friends or family members. Check individual resort websites. Sugar Bowl/Sun Valley/ Grand Targhee: Interpass privileges with some restrictions. www.sugarbowl.com. -- Janet Fullwood, correspondent


Sierra ski: What's new at resorts for 201314 By Bob Goligoski POSTED: 11/14/2013 03:00:00 PM PST

There's good news on two fronts for Sierra skiers and snowboarders: The consensus of several long-range weather forecasts is for more snow than the region had either of the past two seasons. And the 2014 Winter Olympics a world away in Russia should have a positive effect here. "Ski resorts typically get busier during Winter Olympic years," says Pete Sonntag, vice president and general manager of Heavenly Mountain Resort. "The Olympics generate lots of excitement about winter sports that translates into more people heading for the mountains to ski and ride." After two dismal winters with little snow, Sierra winter resorts -- and the region's businesses that support them -- could use a boost. The amount of snow and rain that fell in the northern Sierra from January to the beginning of April this year was the smallest since records were first kept in 1920. The Sierra resorts recorded 7 million skier and snowboarder visits during the 2012-13 season -- down slightly from 7.3 million visits the previous season, according to Bob Roberts, CEO of the California Ski Industry Association. Still, Roberts is hopeful that a new diversity trend and aging snowboarders will help turn those numbers around. More Asians and Latinos are taking to the slopes, he says. And while snowboarding growth continues to tail off, many snowboarders who quit that sport have now taken up skiing. Here's a look at new programs, facilities and slope improvements that you will find in the Sierra this season. ALPINE MEADOWS


Now under the strong financial wing of the firm that owns next-door Squaw Valley, Alpine has expanded its snow-making system and grooming fleet. And the terrain parks will look different this winter, as the landscape has been changed to add several creative new challenges. (www.skialpine.com; 800-441-4423) BADGER PASS Most people come to Yosemite for the scenery, but in the winter a few head right for the park's Badger Pass Ski Area. Park employees have done some major work on the day lodge, including a brand new deck, to improve the experience for guests. Yosemite lodging offers a range of very low cost tent-cabin packages in the winter. (www.yosemitepark.com; 209-3728430) BEAR VALLEY The aging lodges (Bear Valley and Red Dog) have been remodeled and upgraded. The learning center for young skiers and riders has been doubled in size to handle the rapid growth of Bear's instructional programs. And this winter, all fifth-graders who maintain at least a "C" average can ski free every weekend. (www.bearvalley.com; 209-753-2301) BOREAL Take three lessons in any snowboard instruction program, and Boreal will give you a free season pass for this winter. And for the first time, the resort is offering prepurchase lift tickets. The discount lift tickets are available on Liftopia.com. (www.rideboreal.com; 530426-3666) DIAMOND PEAK Tree trimming has opened up new off-piste skiable terrain just off Crystal Ridge. The popular Last Tracks ski-party program has been expanded, so check the resort for new dates. And Diamond Peak and Homewood have announced a combo deal: Buy a season pass at either resort and you get four free nonholiday lift tickets at the other resort. (www.diamondpeak.com; 775-832-1177)


Travel deals: Sierra ski, hotel By Linda Zavoral lzavoral@mercurynews.com POSTED: 11/14/2013 03:00:00 PM PST | UPDATED: ABOUT A MONTH AGO

 A newly renovated lakefront hotel will open Dec. 12 at South Lake Tahoe -- with introductory rates for checking out the rooms. The Landing Resort & Spa, formerly the Royal Valhalla lodge, features 88 guest rooms with fireplaces, a rooftop deck, spa and salon, and Jimmy's Restaurant, serving Greek and California cuisine. Promo prices start at $149 for rooms Dec. 12-19 and $199 for rooms Dec. 20-25 (on a space available basis). 855-7005263; www.thelandingresortandspa.com.  Drivers who purchase a new Lake Tahoe license plate in California or Nevada by April 1 will receive two free lift tickets to their choice of 11 ski resorts. Under the "Plates for Powder" promotion, sponsored by the nonprofit Tahoe Fund, proceeds from the specialty license plates will go toward hiking and biking trails and watershed restoration. A California plate costs $60. Details:www.tahoeplates.com.  Stay at Aston Lakeland Village at Lake Tahoe and ski for free at nearby Sierra-at-Tahoe. The "Kids Stay Free & Ski" package includes two lift tickets for adults and two for children. Rates start at $245 per night. Details: 866-774-2924; www.astonhotels.com.  When staying slopeside at the Mammoth Mountain Inn, you'll receive one free lift ticket per day for each person on the reservation. For the "Lift + Lodging" package, rates start at $99 per person per night, based on minimum two-night stay. (Resort fee of $20 per night is extra.) Promotion valid all season. Details: www.mammothmountain.com.  If you make your reservations before Northstar's scheduled opening day of Nov. 22, you can save up to 30 percent on your stay during the 2013-14 season. Rates start at $77 per person per night for this Northstar Lodging deal. Details: www.northstarcalifornia.com.  At Homewood Mountain Resort, active-duty military personnel can ski and ride free if they present a valid military ID (except holidays, blackout dates) during the 2013-14 season. Their spouses and children get 50 percent off daytime lift tickets. On holidays, military members get 50 percent off. Details: http://skihomewood.com. Deal availability may be limited. Restrictions such as blackout dates and advance-purchase requirements may apply. Prices do not include taxes, surcharges or other fees unless noted. -- Linda Zavoral, Staff


Sierra ski: What's new at resorts for 2013-14 POSTED: 11/14/2013 03:00:00 PM PST

There's good news on two fronts for Sierra skiers and snowboarders: The consensus of several long-range weather forecasts is for more snow than the region had either of the past two seasons. And the 2014 Winter Olympics a world away in Russia should have a positive effect here. "Ski resorts typically get busier during Winter Olympic years," says Pete Sonntag, vice president and general manager of Heavenly Mountain Resort. "The Olympics generate lots of excitement about winter sports that translates into more people heading for the mountains to ski and ride." After two dismal winters with little snow, Sierra winter resorts -- and the region's businesses that support them -- could use a boost. The amount of snow and rain that fell in the northern Sierra from January to the beginning of April this year was the smallest since records were first kept in 1920. The Sierra resorts recorded 7 million skier and snowboarder visits during the 2012-13 season -- down slightly from 7.3 million visits the previous season, according to Bob Roberts, CEO of the California Ski Industry Association. Still, Roberts is hopeful that a new diversity trend and aging snowboarders will help turn those numbers around. More Asians and Latinos are taking to the slopes, he says. And while snowboarding growth continues to tail off, many snowboarders who quit that sport have now taken up skiing. Here's a look at new programs, facilities and slope improvements that you will find in the Sierra this season. ALPINE MEADOWS Now under the strong financial wing of the firm that owns next-door Squaw Valley, Alpine has expanded its snow-making system and grooming fleet. And the terrain parks will look different this winter, as the landscape has been changed to add several creative new challenges. (www.skialpine.com; 800-441-4423) BADGER PASS


Most people come to Yosemite for the scenery, but in the winter a few head right for the park's Badger Pass Ski Area. Park employees have done some major work on the day lodge, including a brand new deck, to improve the experience for guests. Yosemite lodging offers a range of very low cost tent-cabin packages in the winter. (www.yosemitepark.com; 209-3728430) BEAR VALLEY The aging lodges (Bear Valley and Red Dog) have been remodeled and upgraded. The learning center for young skiers and riders has been doubled in size to handle the rapid growth of Bear's instructional programs. And this winter, all fifth-graders who maintain at least a "C" average can ski free every weekend. (www.bearvalley.com; 209-753-2301) BOREAL Take three lessons in any snowboard instruction program, and Boreal will give you a free season pass for this winter. And for the first time, the resort is offering prepurchase lift tickets. The discount lift tickets are available on Liftopia.com. (www.rideboreal.com; 530426-3666) DIAMOND PEAK Tree trimming has opened up new off-piste skiable terrain just off Crystal Ridge. The popular Last Tracks ski-party program has been expanded, so check the resort for new dates. And Diamond Peak and Homewood have announced a combo deal: Buy a season pass at either resort and you get four free nonholiday lift tickets at the other resort. (www.diamondpeak.com; 775-832-1177) Dodge Ridge A new T-bar surface lift goes to the top of Dodge's "second summit." The lift opens up more skiable terrain in bounds and give visitors access to 1,000 vertical feet of black-diamond runs. The resort also now offers children's programs, teaching children as young as 2 to ski and as young as 3 to snowboard. (www.dodgeridge.com; 209-965-3474) Donner Ski Ranch The new expansive day lodge on the back side that was promised for last season did not quite make opening day. But the work has been completed, and it is now open. The Donner Pass area also has acquired the Tahoe Vista Inn and several homes and cabins in Tahoe Vista. Book lodging there and you get a free lift ticket. (www.donnerskiranch.com; 530-4263635)


Granlibakken Known best as a conference and lodging center, Granlibakken also boasts a noviceintermediate hill for riders and skiers, along with a slick sledding and tubing slope. This is a nice low-budget choice as a family of four can ski, ride, sled and tube for $60 for the day. Granlibakken also started making snow a year or two ago. (www.granlibakken.com; 877552-6301) Heavenly Forbes magazine rated Unbuckle at Heavenly's Tamarack Lodge as the No. 1 aprĂŠs-ski party in North America. A new bar opens at Tamarack, and the party expands out onto the patio. The Heavenly Flyer zip line, closed for several seasons, is expected to reopen this winter. The Gunbarrel Tavern and Eatery just opened at the base of the gondola. Heavenly will host the U.S. Freestyle Championships from March 28-30. (www.skiheavenly.com; 800-4328365) HOMEWOOD A lively outdoor winter beer garden opens at the resort's North Lodge. The bunny terrain in the instruction program incorporates new "sculpted" features such as berms and gullies to ease the learning curve for beginners. Check out the backcountry experience packages at the West Shore Cafe and Inn across the highway from the slopes. And see the earlier Diamond Peak summary for the Diamond-Homewood ticket deal. (www.skihomewood.com; 530-5252992) June Mountain June Mountain, which was closed last winter for financial reasons, will reopen for this season on Dec. 14. The resort, some 20 miles from Mammoth, is offering free skiing and riding for children 12 and under, every day, all season long. June officials also are developing a long-term plan of improvements for this season and future winters. (www.junemountain.com; 888-586-3686) Kirkwood Look for the K-bar, a new outdoor umbrella bar that opens on the Chair 6 side of the village. The Cornice Bar and Grill, the main center of activity in the village, has been extensively remodeled. And 60 of the best "big mountain" skiers and riders will arrive in Kirkwood this winter for the Swatch Freeride World Tour from Feb. 27-March 3. (www.kirkwood.com; 800-967-7500) Mammoth Mountain


One of the largest winter resorts in the country, Mammoth is celebrating its 60th anniversary with several improvements. The terrain parks have been beefed up, the old Mammoth Mountain Inn is undergoing a major renovation, and the new Underground Lounge nightclub is set to open for the season. Check with United Airlines on the start date for direct flights from SFO to the Mammoth airport. The resort has been selected as an official training ground for top skiers and snowboarders who will compete in the Olympics. They will hone their skills at a Mammoth event Jan. 18-19 before heading to Russia. (www.mammothmountain.com; 800-626-6684) MT. Rose The Mountain View Dining in the main lodge has been expanded, and Wi-Fi service has been improved at the Nevada resort. This is one of the best ski bargains in the Sierra because the resort and numerous hotels and motels in nearby Reno offer packages with lowcost rooms and a free lift ticket or two. (www.mtrose.com; 775-849-0704) MT. Shasta Ski Park For those who want to venture to Mt. Shasta in the Cascade mountains, the ski area just opened a 300-foot-long tubing hill with several lanes. There's no need to hike up to the top, as a new conveyor belt surface lift takes tubers up the peak. The lift also can be used by skiers and riders to access nearby slopes. (www.skipark.com; 530-926-8610) Northstar Trails have been widened and trees removed in the Promised Land area to improve skiing and riding. The slopeside Ritz-Carlton Lake Tahoe will open an al fresco dining spot called the Backyard Bar & BBQ. Northstar's Adventure, Guiding and Learning Center has new offerings, including some high adventure journeys into the backcountry. Skiers and snowboarders heading to Russia and the Olympics will stop first at Northstar for a major competitive event Jan. 9-12. (www.northstarcalifornia.com; 800-466-6784) ROYAL GORGE Royal Gorge, the sprawling Donner Summit cross-country resort, is introducing fat-tire snow-biking this winter. The resort has a new fleet of bikes with very fat tires, and guests can rent them and peddle around 10 kilometers of groomed cross-country trails. Visitors with their own fat-tire bikes can use them on the trails after paying for a trail pass. (www.royalgorge.com; 530-426-3871) Sierra-at-Tahoe


The base area gets a major face lift with the opening of a new $4.5 million general purpose structure that will include, among other things, a new restaurant and a big plaza with fire pits and live music. In the spring, the resort will stage a series of music shows, including top regional touring bands. (www.sierraattahoe.com; 530-659-7453) Squaw Valley This mega-resort continues to invest and expand. Significant snow-making additions will guard against another low-snow year, and more grooming cats have arrived. The terrain parks have numerous new features. A large yoga studio will open, and a new entertainment amphitheater has been carved out at the base. Squaw Valley also has become the first ski resort in California to install charging stations for electric cars. The stations are free and are open daily. (www.squaw.com; 800-403-0206) SUGAR BOWL As the summer edged into fall, Sugar Bowl finished building a major new triple-chair lift dubbed the Crow's Peak lift. The $3 million lift will give new lift access to advanced and expert terrain. Previously, the only way to get on those slopes was to hike up. Terrain enhancements around the lift will include two new groomed runs and some nifty tree-skiing through glades, chutes and cliffs. (www.sugarbowl.com; 530-426-9000) TAHOE DONNER Tahoe Donner, with 14 runs spread over 120 acres, has built a 700-square-foot yurt on its slopes. The yurt, which also has a large sun deck, will be used mostly as a warming hut. The area's cross-country ski center also added an intermediate cross-country trail. (www.tahoedonner.com; 530-587-9444) Contact Bob Goligoski at travel@bayareanewsgroup.com.


Tahoe icon ‘Big Joy’ remembered for smile, personality INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. — Her smile, her laugh, her generosity, her singing talent, her acting chops — there is a lot to remember about Joy Michiel. “Joy was truly a joy to work with — she always had a smile on her face, always had laughter, she was just always joyful. Her name adequately describes her personality,” said Katherine E. Hill, The Weekly’s associate publisher and editor and a colleague of Michiel’s for nine years. “She always saw the best in everyone, and she never met someone who wasn’t a friend to her … it was nice to work with someone who had such a zeal for life.” Michiel — a longtime Lake Tahoe journalist and flamboyant entertainer whose resume includes roles in off-Broadway hits and major Hollywood films — died suddenly Tuesday evening. She was 60. She collapsed at her Incline Village home at about 9 p.m., her husband, Steve Caswell, said Thursday. Michiel was rushed to St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center in Reno, but doctors were unable to save her. While an official cause of death is still being determined, an apparent blood clot in her lungs led to her collapse, Caswell said. “I miss her, I miss her already … she was just a sweetheart,” Caswell said. “I don’t think anyone ever had a bad word to say about her.” Known throughout the Reno/Tahoe area as “Big Joy,” Michiel was born June 24, 1953, in New York and moved to Southern California when she was 3. As a young adult, she spent time in New York, Hawaii and eventually San Francisco, where she met Caswell, whom she married on Feb. 15, 1987. “It’s been 26 years of holy deadlock, as we liked to call it,” Caswell said with a chuckle. “She was a sweetheart, would always do something for anybody. She had a good sense of humor; we could say things to each other that would make us laugh.” The couple moved to the North Shore of Lake Tahoe in 1990. Already armed with a strong entertainment resume, Michiel quickly made a name for herself, eventually performing annually in several fundraisers such as the Incline Star Follies and Relay For Life events.


On a larger scale, Michiel had minor roles in a handful of feature films, including the Eddie Murphy-led remake of “Dr. Dolittle” in 1998 and the 1994 Ty Cobb baseball biopic “Cobb,” starring Tommy Lee Jones. She also acted in the 1989 TV series “The New Adam-12” and the 1984 series “Partners in Crime,” among other TV commercial appearances. Theatrically, Michiel performed in several productions, including the Off-Broadway hits “Dogs” and “All American Boy” in New York, and, more locally, “Nunsense,” “A Funny Thing Happened On The Way To The Forum” and “Man of LaMancha” at the Cal Neva Resort in Crystal Bay. Further, she’s performed countless singing, cabaret and comedy shows in New York, San Francisco, Las Vegas and throughout the greater Reno/Tahoe area, as well as aboard international cruise lines. Aside from her entertainment career, Michiel was a seasoned journalist and news person, having worked in a variety of roles with The Weekly since 1991. She served as the North Lake Tahoe publication’s entertainment editor the past 20 years, and was once its editor in chief for a short time, Hill said. “We’re truly going to miss her at The Weekly,” Hill said. “We’re a very small staff, so we’re like a family … and it’s really heartbreaking when a member of your family is gone.” Michiel loved her three cats — Molly Jones, TC and Lilac — Caswell said, and was also a giving person, evidenced by the “Joy gifts” she would give out each Christmas. “A box showed up not too long ago that had windsocks in it … that was going to be her gift this year,” Caswell said. “She used to love to do that.” Michiel is immediately survived by Caswell; her step-father Craig Satterfield and his wife, Cynthia; and her step-mother, Ruth Michiel. A celebration of life will likely take place next spring, Caswell said, and details will be released as they become available. Hill said The Weekly is already working on a tribute to its fallen employee, planned for the upcoming Dec. 5 issue. Residents are encouraged to share comments and memories of Michiel at the magazine’s Facebook page, facebook.com/thetahoeweekly.


There's good news on two fronts for Sierra skiers and snowboarders in California: The consensus of several long-range weather forecasts is for more snow than the region had either of the last two seasons. And the 2014 Winter Olympics a world away in Russia should have a positive impact here. “Ski resorts typically get busier during Winter Olympic years,” says Pete Sonntag, vice president and general manager of Heavenly Mountain Resort. “The Olympics generate lots of excitement about winter sports that translates into more people heading for the mountains to ski and ride.” After two dismal winters with little snow, Sierra winter resorts — and the region's businesses that support them — could use a boost. The amount of snow and rain that fell in the northern Sierra from January to the beginning of April this year was the smallest since records were first kept in 1920. The Sierra resorts recorded 7 million skier and snowboarder visits during the 2012-13 season — down slightly from 7.3 million visits the previous season, according to Bob Roberts, CEO of the California Ski Industry Association. Still, Roberts is hopeful that a new diversity trend and aging snowboarders will help turn those numbers around. More Asians and Latinos are taking to the slopes, he says. And while snowboarding growth continues to tail off, many snowboarders who quit that sport have now taken up skiing. Here's a look at new programs, facilities and slope improvements that you will find in the Sierra this season. ALPINE MEADOWS Now under the strong financial wing of the firm that owns next-door Squaw Valley, Alpine has expanded its snow-making system and grooming fleet. And the terrain parks will look different this winter, as the landscape has been changed to add several creative new challenges. (skialpine.com; 800-441-4423) BADGER PASS


Most people come to Yosemite for the scenery, but in the winter a few head right for the park's Badger Pass Ski Area. Park employees have done some major work on the day lodge, including a brand new deck, to improve the experience for guests. Yosemite lodging offers a range of very low cost tent-cabin packages in the winter. (yosemitepark.com; 209-3728430) BEAR VALLEY The aging lodges (Bear Valley and Red Dog) have been remodeled and upgraded. The learning center for young skiers and riders has been doubled in size to handle the rapid growth of Bear's instructional programs. And this winter, all fifth-graders who maintain at least a “C” average can ski free every weekend. (bearvalley.com; 209-753-2301) BOREAL Take three lessons in any snowboard instruction program, and Boreal will give you a free season pass for this winter. And for the first time, the resort is offering prepurchase lift tickets. The discount lift tickets are available on Liftopia.com. (rideboreal.com; 530-4263666) DIAMOND PEAK Tree trimming has opened up new off-piste skiable terrain just off Crystal Ridge. The popular Last Tracks ski-party program has been expanded, so check the resort for new dates. And Diamond Peak and Homewood have announced a combo deal: Buy a season pass at either resort and you get four free nonholiday lift tickets at the other resort. (diamondpeak.com; 775-832-1177) Dodge Ridge A new T-bar surface lift goes to the top of Dodge's “second summit.” The lift opens up more skiable terrain in bounds and give visitors access to 1,000 vertical feet of black-diamond runs. The resort also now offers children's programs, teaching children as young as 2 to ski and as young as 3 to snowboard. (dodgeridge.com; 209-965-3474) Donner Ski Ranch The new expansive day lodge on the back side that was promised for last season did not quite make opening day. But the work has been completed, and it is now open. The Donner Pass area also has acquired the Tahoe Vista Inn and several homes and cabins in Tahoe Vista. Book lodging there and you get a free lift ticket. (donnerskiranch.com; 530-426-3635) Granlibakken


Known best as a conference and lodging center, Granlibakken also boasts a noviceintermediate hill for riders and skiers, along with a slick sledding and tubing slope. This is a nice low-budget choice as a family of four can ski, ride, sled and tube for $60 for the day. Granlibakken also started making snow a year or two ago. (granlibakken.com; 877-5526301) Heavenly Forbes magazine rated Unbuckle at Heavenly's Tamarack Lodge as the No. 1 aprés-ski party in North America. A new bar opens at Tamarack, and the party expands out onto the patio. The Heavenly Flyer zip line, closed for several seasons, is expected to reopen this winter. The Gunbarrel Tavern and Eatery just opened at the base of the gondola. Heavenly will host the U.S. Freestyle Championships from March 28-30. (skiheavenly.com; 800-432-8365) HOMEWOOD A lively outdoor winter beer garden opens at the resort's North Lodge. The bunny terrain in the instruction program incorporates new “sculpted” features such as berms and gullies to ease the learning curve for beginners. Check out the backcountry experience packages at the West Shore Cafe and Inn across the highway from the slopes. And see the earlier Diamond Peak summary for the Diamond-Homewood ticket deal. (skihomewood.com; 530-5252992) June Mountain June Mountain, which was closed last winter for financial reasons, will reopen for this season on Dec. 14. The resort, some 20 miles from Mammoth, is offering free skiing and riding for children 12 and under, every day, all season long. June officials also are developing a long-term plan of improvements for this season and future winters. (junemountain.com; 888-586-3686) Kirkwood Look for the K-bar, a new outdoor umbrella bar that opens on the Chair 6 side of the village. The Cornice Bar and Grill, the main center of activity in the village, has been extensively remodeled. And 60 of the best “big mountain” skiers and riders will arrive in Kirkwood this winter for the Swatch Freeride World Tour from Feb. 27 to March 3. (kirkwood.com; 800967-7500) Mammoth Mountain One of the largest winter resorts in the country, Mammoth is celebrating its 60th anniversary with several improvements. The terrain parks have been beefed up, the old


Mammoth Mountain Inn is undergoing a major renovation, and the new Underground Lounge nightclub is set to open for the season. Check with United Airlines on the start date for direct flights from SFO to the Mammoth airport. The resort has been selected as an official training ground for top skiers and snowboarders who will compete in the Olympics. They will hone their skills at a Mammoth event Jan. 18-19 before heading to Russia. (mammothmountain.com; 800-626-6684) MOUNT Rose The Mountain View Dining in the main lodge has been expanded, and Wi-Fi service has been improved at the Nevada resort. This is one of the best ski bargains in the Sierra because the resort and numerous hotels and motels in nearby Reno offer packages with lowcost rooms and a free lift ticket or two. (skirose.com; 775-849-0704) MOUNT Shasta Ski Park For those who want to venture to Mount Shasta in the Cascade mountains, the ski area just opened a 300-foot long tubing hill with several lanes. There's no need to hike up to the top, as a new conveyor belt surface lift takes tubers up the peak. The lift also can be used by skiers and riders to access nearby slopes. (skipark.com; 530-926-8610) Northstar Trails have been widened and trees removed in the Promised Land area to improve skiing and riding. The slopeside Ritz-Carlton Lake Tahoe will open an al fresco dining spot called the Backyard Bar & BBQ. Northstar's Adventure, Guiding and Learning Center has new offerings, including some high adventure journeys into the backcountry. Skiers and snowboarders heading to Russia and the Olympics will stop first at Northstar for a major competitive event Jan. 9-12. (northstarattahoe.com; 800-466-6784) ROYAL GORGE Royal Gorge, the sprawling Donner Summit cross-country resort, is introducing fat-tire snow-biking this winter. The resort has a new fleet of bikes with very fat tires, and guests can rent them and peddle around 10 kilometers of groomed cross-country trails. Visitors with their own fat-tire bikes can use them on the trails after paying for a trail pass. (royalgorge.com; 530-426-9000) Sierra-at-Tahoe The base area gets a major facelift with the opening of a new $4.5 million general purpose structure that will include, among other things, a new restaurant and a big plaza with fire


pits and live music. In the spring, the resort will stage a series of music shows, including top regional touring bands. (sierraattahoe.com; 530-659-7453) Squaw Valley This mega-resort continues to invest and expand. Significant snow-making additions will guard against another low-snow year, and more grooming cats have arrived. The terrain parks have numerous new features. A large yoga studio will open, and a new entertainment amphitheater has been carved out at the base. Squaw Valley also has become the first ski resort in California to install charging stations for electric cars. The stations are free and are open daily. (squaw.com; 800-403-0206) SUGAR BOWL As the summer edged into fall, Sugar Bowl finished building a major new triple chair lift dubbed the Crow's Peak lift. The $3 million lift will give new lift access to advanced and expert terrain. Previously, the only way to get on those slopes was to hike up. Terrain enhancements around the lift will include two new groomed runs and some nifty tree-skiing through glades, chutes and cliffs. (sugarbowl.com; 530-426-9000) TAHOE DONNER Tahoe Donner, with 14 runs spread over 120 acres, has built a 700-square-foot yurt on its slopes. The yurt, which also has a large sun deck, will be used mostly as a warming hut. The area's cross-country ski center also added an intermediate cross-country trail. (tahoedonner.com; 530-587-9444)


Sports America to Attend Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo; Raffles Free Prizes 11/14 Read more about Sports America to Attend Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo; Raffles Free Prizes 11/14 - BWWFitnessWorld by vermont.broadwayworld.com Sports America will be attending the Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo. In celebration of kicking off the 2013/2014 ski season, with several resorts now open and others with opening day just around the corner, Sports America is raffling away daily free prizes during the Boston Ski Show November 14-17, 2013. Packages being raffled away include a two night stay at Squaw Valley and two two-day lift tickets valid at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. The second ski package that Sports America is raffling away is a two night stay at the Double Tree Breckenridge by Hilton along with two two-day interchangeable lift tickets to Breckenridge, Keystone Vail, Beaver Creek, and Keystone. For a longer stay, Sports America is raffling away a three night slope-side stay with a pair of two day lift tickets to Whitefish Mountain Resort. Additional lift tickets being raffled away include a pair of five of seven day lift tickets to Sun Valley and a pair of two day lift tickets to Crested Butte. For skiers looking for gear, Sports America is raffling away a new pair of Liquid Image All-Sports Camera Model 384 goggles. Skiers can use these hands free goggles integrated with an HD video camera while skiing, snowboarding, and engaging in other extreme sports. These make for a great way to capture the excitement on the slopes during any ski vacation. The Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo will be held the Seaport World Trade Center November 14-17, 2013.Sports America will be in booth 209 during show hours and is looking forward to meeting and greeting skiers in the Boston area. For more information about the raffle prizes and Sports America either email info(at)sportsamerica(dot)com or stop by the booth during the show. About Sports America: Sports America specializes in ski vacation packages throughout western North America. Our special contract airfares, tour operator lift tickets, special rental car and transfer rates all save you time and money. We've been providing the best information, excellent


customer service, friendly staff, great pricing and the highest quality ski vacations since 1975. Whether you're planning a ski vacation for a group of friends, a company meeting or a family vacation, one of our vacation experts will help design your perfect package. For more information, call Sports America at 800-876-8551, or visit us at http://www.SportsAmerica.com. Read more about Sports America to Attend Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo; Raffles Free Prizes 11/14 - BWWFitnessWorld by vermont.broadwayworld.com


 

Multiple Ski Packages Being Raffled Away at Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo, Compliments of Sports America   NOVEMBER 13, 2013 Sports America will be attending the Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo. In celebration of kicking off the 2013/2014 ski season, with several resorts now open and others with opening day just around the corner, Sports America is raffling away daily free prizes during the Boston Ski Show November 14-17, 2013. Packages being raffled away include a two night stay at Squaw Valley and two two-day lift tickets valid at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. The second ski package that Sports America is raffling away is a two night stay at the Double Tree Breckenridge by Hilton along with two two-day interchangeable lift tickets to Breckenridge, Keystone Vail, Beaver Creek, and Keystone. For a longer stay, Sports America is raffling away a three night slope-side stay with a pair of two day lift tickets to Whitefish Mountain Resort. Additional lift tickets being raffled away include a pair of five of seven day lift tickets to Sun Valley and a pair of two day lift tickets to Crested Butte. For skiers looking for gear, Sports America is raffling away a new pair of Liquid Image AllSports Camera Model 384 goggles. Skiers can use these hands free goggles integrated with an HD video camera while skiing, snowboarding, and engaging in other extreme sports. These make for a great way to capture the excitement on the slopes during any ski vacation. The Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo will be held the Seaport World Trade Center November 14-17, 2013.Sports America will be in booth 209 during show hours and is looking forward to meeting and greeting skiers in the Boston area. For more information about the raffle prizes and Sports America either email info(at)sportsamerica(dot)com or stop by the booth during the show. About Sports America: Sports America specializes in ski vacation packages throughout western North America. Our special contract airfares, tour operator lift tickets, special rental car and transfer rates all save you time and money. Weve been providing the best information, excellent customer service, friendly staff, great pricing and the highest quality ski vacations since 1975.


Whether youre planning a ski vacation for a group of friends, a company meeting or a family vacation, one of our vacation experts will help design your perfect package. For more information, call Sports America at 800-876-8551, or visit us at http://www.SportsAmerica.com.

 


Multiple Ski Packages Being Raffled Away at Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo, Compliments of Sports America Sports America is raffling away ski package trips to Breckenridge, Whitefish, and Squaw Valley. Lift tickets to Sun Valley and Crested Butte as well as a pair of Liquid Image goggles will also be raffled away at the Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo November 1417, 2013.   (PRWEB) November 13, 2013 Sports America will be attending the Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo. In celebration of kicking off the 2013/2014 ski season, with several resorts now open and others with opening day just around the corner, Sports America is raffling away daily free prizes during the Boston Ski Show November 14-17, 2013. Packages being raffled away include a two night stay at Squaw Valley and two two-day lift tickets valid at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. The second ski package that Sports America is raffling away is a two night stay at the Double Tree Breckenridge by Hilton along with two two-day interchangeable lift tickets to Breckenridge, Keystone Vail, Beaver Creek, and Keystone. For a longer stay, Sports America is raffling away a three night slope-side stay with a pair of two day lift tickets to Whitefish Mountain Resort. Additional lift tickets being raffled away include a pair of five of seven day lift tickets to Sun Valley and a pair of two day lift tickets to Crested Butte. For skiers looking for gear, Sports America is raffling away a new pair of Liquid Image All-Sports Camera Model 384 goggles. Skiers can use these hands free goggles integrated with an HD video camera while skiing, snowboarding, and engaging in other extreme sports. These make for a great way to capture the excitement on the slopes during any ski vacation. The Boston Ski and Snowboard Expo will be held the Seaport World Trade Center November 14-17, 2013.Sports America will be in booth 209 during show hours and is looking forward to meeting and greeting skiers in the Boston area. For more information about the raffle prizes and Sports America either email info(at)sportsamerica(dot)com or stop by the booth during the show. About Sports America: Sports America specializes in ski vacation packages throughout western North America. Our special contract airfares, tour operator lift tickets, special rental car and transfer rates all save you time and money. We’ve been providing the best information, excellent customer service, friendly staff, great pricing and the highest quality ski vacations since 1975. Whether you’re planning a ski vacation for a group of friends, a company meeting or a family vacation, one of our vacation experts will help design your perfect package.


By: Associated Press Email  Updated: Tue 8:27 AM, Nov 12, 2013 

Tahoe Ski Resorts Gear Up for Season RENO, Nev. (AP) ‐ Some Lake Tahoe‐area ski resorts have been busy making snow and say they  don't plan to delay their scheduled openings despite recent temperatures more favorable  for golf  than skiing.  Temperatures across the region have been in the 60s to near 70 degrees and are expected to  remain warm at least through Tuesday.  But overnight lows have been near or below freezing, making it possible to crank up snow  cannons and begin covering the slopes with man‐made snow.  The Reno Gazette‐Journal reports  Squaw Valley plans to open Nov. 27. Alpine Meadows is  targeting Dec. 13.  Heavenly Ski Resort started making snow Oct. 28 and will continue through the expected  opening date of Nov. 22.  Copyright 2013 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published,  broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.   

 


 

Lake Tahoe ski resorts set opening dates

RENO, Nev. (AP) - Some Lake Tahoe-area ski resorts have been busy making snow and say they don't plan to delay their scheduled openings despite recent temperatures more favorable for golf than skiing. Temperatures across the region have been in the 60s to near 70 degrees and are expected to remain warm at least through Tuesday. But overnight lows have been near or below freezing, making it possible to crank up snow cannons and begin covering the slopes with man-made snow. The Reno Gazette-Journal reports Squaw Valley plans to open Nov. 27. Alpine Meadows is targeting Dec. 13. Heavenly Ski Resort started making snow Oct. 28 and will continue through the expected opening date of Nov. 22. The Associated Press


Travel deals: Sierra ski, hotel By Linda Zavoral lzavoral@mercurynews.com

 A newly renovated lakefront hotel will open Dec. 12 at South Lake Tahoe -- with introductory rates for checking out the rooms. The Landing Resort & Spa, formerly the Royal Valhalla lodge, features 88 guest rooms with fireplaces, a rooftop deck, spa and salon, and Jimmy's Restaurant, serving Greek and California cuisine. Promo prices start at $149 for rooms Dec. 12-19 and $199 for rooms Dec. 20-25 (on a space available basis). 855-7005263; www.thelandingresortandspa.com.  Drivers who purchase a new Lake Tahoe license plate in California or Nevada by April 1 will receive two free lift tickets to their choice of 11 ski resorts. Under the "Plates for Powder" promotion, sponsored by the nonprofit Tahoe Fund, proceeds from the specialty license plates will go toward hiking and biking trails and watershed restoration. A California plate costs $60. Details:www.tahoeplates.com.  Stay at Aston Lakeland Village at Lake Tahoe and ski for free at nearby Sierra-at-Tahoe. The "Kids Stay Free & Ski" package includes two lift tickets for adults and two for children. Rates start at $245 per night. Details: 866-774-2924; www.astonhotels.com.  When staying slopeside at the Mammoth Mountain Inn, you'll receive one free lift ticket per day for each person on the reservation. For the "Lift + Lodging" package, rates start at $99 per person per night, based on minimum two-night stay. (Resort fee of $20 per night is extra.) Promotion valid all season. Details: www.mammothmountain.com.  If you make your reservations before Northstar's scheduled opening day of Nov. 22, you can save up to 30 percent on your stay during the 2013-14 season. Rates start at $77 per person per night for this Northstar Lodging deal. Details: www.northstarcalifornia.com.  At Homewood Mountain Resort, active-duty military personnel can ski and ride free if they present a valid military ID (except holidays, blackout dates) during the 2013-14 season. Their spouses and children get 50 percent off daytime lift tickets. On holidays, military members get 50 percent off. Details: http://skihomewood.com. Deal availability may be limited. Restrictions such as blackout dates and advance-purchase requirements may apply. Prices do not include taxes, surcharges or other fees unless noted. -- Linda Zavoral, Staff


Drive to Squaw Valley Ski Resort from San Francisco, CA with ClipperCreek! November 13, 2013 03:43 PM Eastern Time

AUBURN, Calif.--(EON: Enhanced Online News)--ClipperCreek announced today the installation of the new public charging stations at Squaw Valley Ski Resort, Bay Area residents can now make the trek to the mountain resort charging solely on ClipperCreek charging stations.

Coming out of the Bay Area drivers have numerous options for EV charging. EV drivers can stop in Vallejo, Suisun City, Fairfield, Vacaville, and Dixon to get a charge while enjoying some of the local sites, shopping, and restaurants. Continuing on to Davis and Sacramento there are a plethora of charging station locations to choose from. Traveling further up the hill and getting a charge in Auburn or Colfax gives drivers enough range to make it over the summit to Truckee or Squaw Valley Ski Resort. These charging stations are part of a network of over 750 charging stations ClipperCreek has installed throughout California through the Reconnect Ca grant program sponsored by ClipperCreek and the California Energy Commission. Check out the ClipperCreek web site Reconnect CA program page for a full list of locations throughout the state, additionally charging station locator services like ReCargo offer smart phone applications and interactive maps to locate EV charging. “You have multiple choices all the way to Squaw Valley with more charging stations on the way,” reports ClipperCreek Regional Business Operations Manager Erik Mason. “You can even stop at ClipperCreek’s office in Auburn where we provide free workplace and public charging right behind the facility.” Squaw Valley offers year round activities and is equally as excited to be a part of the electrification of the I-80 corridor. "We are so proud to be a part of the commitment to clean energy taking place in Northern California,” said Andy Wirth, president and CEO of Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. "Now that charging stations are available along I80 and at Squaw Valley, we are thrilled that electric car drivers will be able to make the drive from the Bay Area or Sacramento to come enjoy world-class skiing and riding, as well as year-round mountain adventures at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows.” ClipperCreek products are made in the USA, compatible with every vehicle, and automotive supply chain certified. As a leading supplier of electric vehicle charging infrastructure for over 15 years, millions of electric vehicle charge sessions have relied on ClipperCreek. Unparalleled quality, reliability, and superior customer service are core values at ClipperCreek. Visit our online store atwww.buyevse.com where we offer the widest variety of charging stations in the market.


different this winter, as the landscape has been changed to add several creative new challenges. (skialpine.com; 800-441-4423) BADGER PASS Most people come to Yosemite for the scenery, but in the winter a few head right for the park's Badger Pass Ski Area. Park employees have done some major work on the day lodge, including a brand new deck, to improve the experience for guests. Yosemite lodging offers a range of very low cost tent-cabin packages in the winter. (yosemitepark.com; 209-3728430) BEAR VALLEY The aging lodges (Bear Valley and Red Dog) have been remodeled and upgraded. The learning center for young skiers and riders has been doubled in size to handle the rapid growth of Bear's instructional programs. And this winter, all fifth-graders who maintain at least a “C” average can ski free every weekend. (bearvalley.com; 209-753-2301) BOREAL Take three lessons in any snowboard instruction program, and Boreal will give you a free season pass for this winter. And for the first time, the resort is offering prepurchase lift tickets. The discount lift tickets are available on Liftopia.com. (rideboreal.com; 530-4263666) DIAMOND PEAK Tree trimming has opened up new off-piste skiable terrain just off Crystal Ridge. The popular Last Tracks ski-party program has been expanded, so check the resort for new dates. And Diamond Peak and Homewood have announced a combo deal: Buy a season pass at either resort and you get four free nonholiday lift tickets at the other resort. (diamondpeak.com; 775-832-1177) Dodge Ridge A new T-bar surface lift goes to the top of Dodge's “second summit.” The lift opens up more skiable terrain in bounds and give visitors access to 1,000 vertical feet of black-diamond runs. The resort also now offers children's programs, teaching children as young as 2 to ski and as young as 3 to snowboard. (dodgeridge.com; 209-965-3474) Donner Ski Ranch The new expansive day lodge on the back side that was promised for last season did not quite make opening day. But the work has been completed, and it is now open. The Donner


Pass area also has acquired the Tahoe Vista Inn and several homes and cabins in Tahoe Vista. Book lodging there and you get a free lift ticket. (donnerskiranch.com; 530-426-3635) Granlibakken Known best as a conference and lodging center, Granlibakken also boasts a noviceintermediate hill for riders and skiers, along with a slick sledding and tubing slope. This is a nice low-budget choice as a family of four can ski, ride, sled and tube for $60 for the day. Granlibakken also started making snow a year or two ago. (granlibakken.com; 877-5526301) Heavenly Forbes magazine rated Unbuckle at Heavenly's Tamarack Lodge as the No. 1 aprés-ski party in North America. A new bar opens at Tamarack, and the party expands out onto the patio. The Heavenly Flyer zip line, closed for several seasons, is expected to reopen this winter. The Gunbarrel Tavern and Eatery just opened at the base of the gondola. Heavenly will host the U.S. Freestyle Championships from March 28-30. (skiheavenly.com; 800-432-8365) HOMEWOOD A lively outdoor winter beer garden opens at the resort's North Lodge. The bunny terrain in the instruction program incorporates new “sculpted” features such as berms and gullies to ease the learning curve for beginners. Check out the backcountry experience packages at the West Shore Cafe and Inn across the highway from the slopes. And see the earlier Diamond Peak summary for the Diamond-Homewood ticket deal. (skihomewood.com; 530-5252992) June Mountain June Mountain, which was closed last winter for financial reasons, will reopen for this season on Dec. 14. The resort, some 20 miles from Mammoth, is offering free skiing and riding for children 12 and under, every day, all season long. June officials also are developing a long-term plan of improvements for this season and future winters. (junemountain.com; 888-586-3686) Kirkwood Look for the K-bar, a new outdoor umbrella bar that opens on the Chair 6 side of the village. The Cornice Bar and Grill, the main center of activity in the village, has been extensively remodeled. And 60 of the best “big mountain” skiers and riders will arrive in Kirkwood this winter for the Swatch Freeride World Tour from Feb. 27 to March 3. (kirkwood.com; 800967-7500)


Mammoth Mountain One of the largest winter resorts in the country, Mammoth is celebrating its 60th anniversary with several improvements. The terrain parks have been beefed up, the old Mammoth Mountain Inn is undergoing a major renovation, and the new Underground Lounge nightclub is set to open for the season. Check with United Airlines on the start date for direct flights from SFO to the Mammoth airport. The resort has been selected as an official training ground for top skiers and snowboarders who will compete in the Olympics. They will hone their skills at a Mammoth event Jan. 18-19 before heading to Russia. (mammothmountain.com; 800-626-6684) MOUNT Rose The Mountain View Dining in the main lodge has been expanded, and Wi-Fi service has been improved at the Nevada resort. This is one of the best ski bargains in the Sierra because the resort and numerous hotels and motels in nearby Reno offer packages with lowcost rooms and a free lift ticket or two. (skirose.com; 775-849-0704) MOUNT Shasta Ski Park For those who want to venture to Mount Shasta in the Cascade mountains, the ski area just opened a 300-foot long tubing hill with several lanes. There's no need to hike up to the top, as a new conveyor belt surface lift takes tubers up the peak. The lift also can be used by skiers and riders to access nearby slopes. (skipark.com; 530-926-8610) Northstar Trails have been widened and trees removed in the Promised Land area to improve skiing and riding. The slopeside Ritz-Carlton Lake Tahoe will open an al fresco dining spot called the Backyard Bar & BBQ. Northstar's Adventure, Guiding and Learning Center has new offerings, including some high adventure journeys into the backcountry. Skiers and snowboarders heading to Russia and the Olympics will stop first at Northstar for a major competitive event Jan. 9-12. (northstarattahoe.com; 800-466-6784) ROYAL GORGE Royal Gorge, the sprawling Donner Summit cross-country resort, is introducing fat-tire snow-biking this winter. The resort has a new fleet of bikes with very fat tires, and guests can rent them and peddle around 10 kilometers of groomed cross-country trails. Visitors with their own fat-tire bikes can use them on the trails after paying for a trail pass. (royalgorge.com; 530-426-9000) Sierra-at-Tahoe


The base area gets a major facelift with the opening of a new $4.5 million general purpose structure that will include, among other things, a new restaurant and a big plaza with fire pits and live music. In the spring, the resort will stage a series of music shows, including top regional touring bands. (sierraattahoe.com; 530-659-7453) Squaw Valley This mega-resort continues to invest and expand. Significant snow-making additions will guard against another low-snow year, and more grooming cats have arrived. The terrain parks have numerous new features. A large yoga studio will open, and a new entertainment amphitheater has been carved out at the base. Squaw Valley also has become the first ski resort in California to install charging stations for electric cars. The stations are free and are open daily. (squaw.com; 800-403-0206) SUGAR BOWL As the summer edged into fall, Sugar Bowl finished building a major new triple chair lift dubbed the Crow's Peak lift. The $3 million lift will give new lift access to advanced and expert terrain. Previously, the only way to get on those slopes was to hike up. Terrain enhancements around the lift will include two new groomed runs and some nifty tree-skiing through glades, chutes and cliffs. (sugarbowl.com; 530-426-9000) TAHOE DONNER Tahoe Donner, with 14 runs spread over 120 acres, has built a 700-square-foot yurt on its slopes. The yurt, which also has a large sun deck, will be used mostly as a warming hut. The area's cross-country ski center also added an intermediate cross-country trail. (tahoedonner.com; 530-587-9444)


The best ski resorts in North America By The Active Times Published November 12, 2013 FoxNews.com

Let’s start by stating the obvious: there are a lot of great ski resorts out there. Far more, even, than the 80 we put on our initial list when we set out to pick the top picks in North America—which is why we asked for your help. The results are in. Your participation did more than help us make unkind cuts and add color commentary. It showed an appreciation for just how many ways a resort can stand out, be it through a bustling base village, frequent powder days or a superb ski school for the kids. Not surprisingly, those twin stalwarts of destination skiing, Colorado and Vermont, ran away with it. A perfect dozen from the Rocky Mountain State—including the number one spot—set the tone for resorts in western states: big. Big mountains with huge drops, sprawling ski areas that span multiple peaks, outsized terrain parks and endless buffets of winter activities and luxurious amenities. Vermont’s picks, while not as massive as their western counterparts, helped prove that the Rockies don’t have a lock on great skiing. Old standbys like Stowe and Jay Peak were popular with voters, and picks like Smugglers’ Notch, with its triple black diamond run, demonstrate that New England can satisfy even the most adrenaline-addicted powder junkie.


Not far behind was Utah—with most resorts within a few miles of each other. There was no higher concentration of incredible skiing and snowboarding on our list than in Utah’s Wasatch range, which lies between Salt Lake City and Park City. This has to do, in large part, with the Utah’s slogan, “The Greatest Snow on Earth.” Many of these resorts average around 500 inches a year—that’s over 41 feet—and as recently as 2011 some posted figures as high as 776 inches. You’d have to work very hard to run out of fresh powder there. British Columbia’s so-called “Powder Highway” gave the Canadian province a strong showing, independent of its mega-resort Whistler Blackcomb. The Lake Tahoe area of Northern California also notched three spots. In making the final list, we combined publicly available stats, other expert lists and—with added weight, of course—our own survey results.  


No delay for ski resort openings Updated: Tuesday, November 12 2013, 09:04 AM PST RENO

 

Some Lake Tahoe‐area ski resorts have been busy making snow and say  they don't plan to delay their scheduled openings despite recent  temperatures more favorable for golf than skiing. Squaw Valley plans to  open Nov. 27. Alpine Meadows is targeting Dec. 13. Heavenly Ski Resort  started making snow Oct. 28 and will continue through the expected  opening date of Nov. 22.      


Lake Tahoe Ski Resorts Gear Up for Season Posted: Nov 12, 2013 9:00 AM PSTUpdated: Nov 18, 2013 6:07 PM PST Some Lake Tahoe-area ski resorts have been busy making snow and say they don't plan to delay their scheduled openings despite recent temperatures more favorable for golf than skiing. Temperatures across the region have been in the 60s to near 70 degrees and are expected to remain warm at least through Tuesday. But overnight lows have been near or below freezing, making it possible to crank up snow cannons and begin covering the slopes with man-made snow. The Reno Gazette-Journal reports (http://on.rgj.com/1cPh6K3 ) Squaw Valley plans to open Nov. 27. Alpine Meadows is targeting Dec. 13. Heavenly Ski Resort started making snow Oct. 28 and will continue through the expected opening date of Nov. 22. Information from: Reno Gazette-Journal, http://www.rgj.com  


Tahoe-area ski resorts making snow, plan to open on time With Lake Tahoe as a backdrop, a skier  kicks up some powder in 2010 at Heavenly  Ski Resort in South Lake Tahoe, Calif.  Some Lake Tahoe‐area ski resorts will  open on time despite recent  temperatures more favorable for golf than  skiing. (AP Photo/Dino Vournas) 

ASSOCIATED PRESS  RENO — Some Lake Tahoe‐area ski resorts have been busy making snow and say they don’t  plan to delay their scheduled openings despite recent temperatures more favorable for golf  than skiing.  Temperatures across the region have been in the 60s to near 70 degrees and are expected to  remain warm at least through Tuesday.  But overnight lows have been near or below freezing, making it possible to crank up snow  cannons and begin covering the slopes with man‐made snow.  The Reno Gazette‐Journal reports Squaw Valley plans to open Nov. 27. Alpine Meadows is  targeting Dec. 13.  Heavenly Ski Resort started making snow Oct. 28 and will continue through the expected  opening date of Nov. 22. 


Lake Tahoe Winter Guide: Winter Vacation 2013 - 2014 Things to Do and Where to Stay Compiled by TahoesBest.com   11.11.2013 15:21:03 -

(live-PR.com) LAKE TAHOE, CA -- (Marketwired) -- 11/11/13 -- So let the snowball fights and sled rides ensue! With another Lake Tahoe winter only weeks away, the editors ofTahoesBest.com have put together a winter vacation guide to the upcoming snowy season. No need to stress about where to stay or what to do this winter vacation, we have it covered!

  TahoesBest.com recommends cuddling up at 3 Peaks Resort, the Pepper Tree Inn, The Ridge Resort or a vacation rental for the best winter vacation lodging options. Don't miss out on the fun and try a Lake Tahoe helicopter tour, snowmobiling, or hiring a personal chef to cook for an after ski get together.

3 Peaks Resort and Beach Club : ctt.marketwire.com/?release=1066896&id=36333 ..- South Lake Tahoe, CA Whether Grandma wants to go on a family vacation, or it's a romantic winter getaway, the 3 Peaks Resort and Beach Club has the perfect accommodations. From comfortable hotel rooms, to classy suites, to an incredible five bedroom cabin, 3 Peaks Resort and Beach Club offers a convenient Lake Tahoe location for an even more convenient low price (starting at $39).

Pepper Tree Inn : ctt.marketwire.com/?release=1066896&id=36333 .. - Tahoe City Perfectly located 2-star motel/hotel in the heart of downtown Tahoe City and just across the street from Commons Beach & the Tahoe City Marina. Guests can walk to restaurants and bars and easily drive to any of the North Shore ski resorts. Consistently high guest ratings and comments such as "great prices," "excellent value" and "scenic views." Free continental breakfast and wireless Internet make this a solid allaround choice.

The Ridge Resort : ctt.marketwire.com/?release=1066896&id=36333 .. - South Lake Tahoe, NV Situated high above Lake Tahoe amongst the towering Sierra Nevada pines, The Ridge Resort offers spectacular majestic views that will simply take your breath away. A full-service resort that offers high quality amenities, beautiful condominium style rooms, specials, packages and deals and more. Bottom line - Views, views and more views... and all just 5-minutes from South Shore's vibrant downtown.

Horizon Casino Resort - South Lake Tahoe, NV Central location, over 500 rooms, casino (with the newest and hottest slots), world-class entertainment, free


live music and dancing, bar, restaurants (buffet to gourmet), eight (yes 8) on-site movie screens -- all at an affordable price in the heart of South Lake Tahoe. Walk to Lake and Heavenly Gondola.

The Village at Northstar™ - North Lake Tahoe Luxurious condominium style accommodations are slopeside in the new Village at Northstar™ and homes & cabins available at Old Greenwood, Lake Tahoe's premier four season resort community. Specials and seasonal deals available. Best feature is you feel like you've been dropped directly into a beautiful ski village with no reason or desire to ever leave...

Vacation Rentals in Lake Tahoe : ctt.marketwire.com/?release=1066896&id=36333 ..- Offered Lake wide In Tahoe there are literally hundreds of vacation rental cabins, homes and condos located all around the Lake and in all price categories from "cheap" to "super-luxury." Vacation rentals in Lake Tahoe are perfect for groups, families trying to pack'm all in, or couples looking for a more intimate getaway. Features & amenities range from showroom quality kitchens, Jacuzzi tubs, pool tables, high tech entertainment systems to lakeside & ski-in/ski-out. $$$ Hint -- If you are with a group of any size, the cost per person, per night is often much lower with a rental when compared to a hotel or resort. Best advice -- there is always lastminute inventory available but book early if you want choices.

What to do

Reno Tahoe Helicopter Tours : ctt.marketwire.com/?release=1066896&id=36333 .. Soar through the sky with Reno Tahoe Helicopters, and enjoy the best vista in Lake Tahoe. Tour duration lasts anywhere from 10 to 60 minutes, and options include both South and North shore landmarks. View the splendor of Lake Tahoe from the clouds for $70 to $400. Children under 2 fly free!

Sierra Mountain Snowmobiling Zoom through the powder on a Lake Tahoe snowmobile! This exhilarating Lake Tahoe activity is a must try, and is an incredible way to explore the mountainous terrain. Snowmobiles can fit up to two riders, so grab a friend and zip through the snow. Cost is $50 per half hour.

Personal Chef Service Make any trip to Lake Tahoe a memorable one with Chris' Kitchen Collaborative. Personal Chef Chris A. Taylor works with patrons to compile the perfect personalized menus with exquisite service. Make this winter vacation one to remember, and invite Chris to the vacation rental to cook up something special for a dinner party (or family feast!). Chris is able to accommodate any dietary needs, and make the meal unforgettable. For more information, visit www.CKCproject.com :ctt.marketwire.com/?release=1066896&id=36333 .. .

Lake Tahoe Fishing Yes, fishing! Some of the most experienced career anglers offer guide services on Lake Tahoe year-round. It sounds nuts but it's not and the fishing is awesome in the winter with the Mackinaw season open all year.

Ski & Snowboard


Breathtaking views, majestic mountains, sunny days and over 400 inches of snow each year. If that all sounds good then pick from one of Tahoe's over 18 world-class resorts. Tahoe's popular and vibrant South Shore boasts Heavenly (one of the "big boy" resorts in acreage with terrain in both CA and NV) and Kirkwood (locals love it). On the North Shore the popular resorts are Squaw Valley (hosted the 1960 Winter Olympics), Alpine Meadows (lots of snow and now joined with Squaw for shared tickets), Sugar Bowl (easy access from the Bay Area), Diamond Peak (views...) and Northstar (families love it). Homewood is your best (only only) option on Tahoe's beautiful West Shore. All have plenty of lodging options.

About TahoesBest.com: Lake Tahoe is known for outdoor activities, pristine waters and one of the best wedding destinations in the country. TahoesBest.com is the authority on what to do, where to stay, weather updates and all the best upcoming events for any visitor. UseTahoesBest.com to find information, reviews and deals on all things Lake Tahoe from concerts to vacation rentals.

lindsey.skinner@bizx.info : mailto:lindsey.skinner@bizx.info

Contact Lindsey Skinner Editor - TahoesBest.com 800 450 7805 ext 10809 


California rambling: Heading inside this winter Snow began falling on El Dorado County’s three ski areas: Heavenly Mountain Resort, Kirkwood at Tahoe and Sierra-at-Tahoe the last week of October. With the West’s largest snowmaking system at Heavenly, snowflakes will continue to fall until the area opens — as planned presently — on Nov. 22. All that snow, however, may not be enough to keep skiers and boarders from heading inside this winter.

That’s because of what ski areas are doing to improve the après ski experience. This year, the biggest investment made at a ski area in El Dorado County is a $5 million investment been made at Sierra-at-Tahoe on U.S. 50 near Echo Summit, where a new base mountain facility is being built. Located at the bottom of the Broadway trail, the new plaza is designed to become the nucleus of Sierra Resort’s skier services and is a short distance from Easy Rider, the ski area’s super-reassuring beginner lift. The central feature of Sierra-at-Tahoe’s new plaza is a sprung structure containing 9,000 square feet of interior space, including an equipment demo center, expanded retail shop with a broader selection of snowsport fashion and gear, and Solstice, a restaurant that will feature fresh California fare, as well as California wines and craft beers. Outside, a 20,000-square-foot deck will embrace the new base lodge, with conversationinducing fire pits, lounge chairs, table service and live music performed at a concert and events venue. The concept is to induce guests to linger at day’s end and is similar to popular après ski plazas at Heavenly, Northstar and Squaw Valley USA. However, this isn’t just an “après ski” phenomenon. Social base facilities of the type Sierraat-Tahoe is building aren’t just for skiers and riders. They’re appreciated by people who don’t ski or snowboard, but who want to experience the ski lodge atmosphere. Years ago, there wasn’t much thought given to ski area base facilities. Boxy base buildings were just large enough to handle average loads of skiers who’d crowd into them midday, to brown bag it or carry trays of chili dogs to cafeteria tables stacked high with extra articles of ski clothing guarded by non-skiing friends. If these non-skiers weren’t guarding a table, they


were consigned to sit near a fireplace, reading or knitting while waiting for their skiing buddies or family members to return, then depart. For the most part, ski area managers ignored what happened inside the lodge. After all, they reasoned, skiers and riders come here for what’s happening on the mountain, not at the base facility. But then they began to recognize that a successful base facility was a profit center that didn’t need to be dependent upon how well the mountain operation was doing. Ski areas began to realize they weren’t just about snowplay, they were in the winter resort and recreation business. That meant entertaining guests not just by operating ski lifts and grooming snow, but by providing a complete winter recreation experience. Ski lodges and base facilities now have as much or more going on inside them, as is occurring on the mountain. Ice rinks at Squaw Valley and Northstar are surrounded by gas heaters or fire pits and served by waiters who deliver latte and hot chocolate orders, as music entertains and nearby attractions provide amusing diversions. Shops and art galleries engage these captive audiences, while restaurants and bars are filled with festive interactions. The nearest warm-weather comparisons to this is what happens at a major theme park. Major League Baseball comes close. An example of this is experienced atop Heavenly’s gondola at Adventure Peak. Already featuring tubing and sledding, the mountaintop winter recreation area is reopening a 3,000foot zip line this season. At nearby Tamarack Lodge, “the ultimate après ski party” happens Thursdays through Saturdays, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. at “Unbuckle.” It’s an ongoing après ski experience, complete with go-go dancers, called the Heavenly Angels. At Lakeview Lodge on Heavenly’s California side, Gunbarrel Grille has been remodeled and is being reintroduced as “Booyah’s Exotic Burgers and Brews” featuring 97 micro brews, one for every run at Heavenly. This kind of lively après ski scene is now attracting non-skiers and boarders to ski resorts who find they can have fun without ever going out onto the mountain. It’s also encouraging skiers and boarders come off the mountain whenever they’ve gotten enough runs in for the day, or when weather conditions are less than ideal. Today’s high-speed lifts mean that snow skiers and boarders make a lot more runs in a day than they used to do, years ago. Skiers and riders feel like they get their money’s worth from the cost of their lift tickets much quicker, because of high-speed and high-capacity lifts. In the past, without an inviting place to gather, if skiers and riders got tired or it got cold or blustery, they’d head down the mountain or back to their cabin. Now, they’re heading inside. That’s great for El Dorado County’s skiers and riders, its ski areas and for the county. As, every time an après ski party cash register rings, we all benefit.


John Poimiroo of El Dorado Hills is a travel writer who specializes in California destinations.  


Home > Lifestyles > Travel > Ski and Snow

Baby-friendly snow resorts cater to families By KATHY CHIN LEONG Special Contributor Published: 08 November 2013 04:28 PM Updated: 08 November 2013 04:28 PM

Ski and snowboard season beckons, but now you have a baby. Be encouraged. A great getaway can be yours at three resorts with abundant amenities for families with infants and toddlers. Telluride Ski Resort: The standout at this Colorado retreat is the chondola: an enclosed chairlift gondola. Parents and tykes can get on and off safely and thrill to mountain views. Meanwhile, you can drop off children as young as 2 months old at the Cubs Camp and nursery. Children’s ski school allows little ones to participate even if they’re not potty-trained, and the school’s glass ceiling lets you peek in. Ski-in and ski-out lodging abounds. Of note is the Peaks Resort, a 161-room hotel featuring Colorado’s largest full-service spa. The cool factor for kids is the indoor swimming pool waterslide. Where: 565 Mountain Village Blvd., Telluride, Colo. Contact: Tellurideskiresort.com Squaw Valley: Northern California’s former winter Olympics venue wows families with the SnoVentures play zone with a snack lodge, snow tubing and a snowman building area. Inside the Olympic House lodge, a kiddie space attracts wee ones with kid-size tables and chairs. Men’s and women’s restrooms feature diaper-changing stations. Squaw Valley recently poured $1.2 million into upgrading rooms at the Village at Squaw Valley, a condo-suite hotel so close to the lifts you can walk back with the baby. Forgot something? Alice’s Mountain Market is steps away; it sells six sizes of diapers, baby food and children’s medications. Where: 1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley, Calif. Contact: squaw.com


Angel Fire Resort: Owned by a Dallas family, this New Mexico favorite touts a ski-in, ski-out hotel with convenience written all over it. Relief awaits with generously sized rooms from 500 to 750 square feet with microwave ovens and refrigerators, an indoor pool and a cafe store. On the slopes, SnowBear Camp nursery cares for babes as young as 6 weeks old. New this season is a fulltime chef for the kid’s ski school and day care with emphasis on nutritious, wholesome meals. All food allergies will be taken into consideration. Take turns watching the children while the other parent skis with the Parenting Pass lift ticket, which lets two adults share. A short shuttle ride away is the resort’s Nordic Center, which has sledding, snowshoeing and snow play. Go early to borrow the center’s Snowman Making Kit with coal, scarf, carrot and buttons. Where: 10 Miller Lane, Angel Fire, N.M. Contact: angelfireresort.com Kathy Chin Leong is a freelance writer and skier based in Sunnyvale, Calif.

 


Home > Lifestyles > Travel > Ski and Snow

Improvements galore across the West for the 2013-14 ski season By WALT ROESSING Special Contributor Published: 08 November 2013 04:50 PM Updated: 08 November 2013 04:50 PM

Encouraged by the improving U.S. economy, owners of ski resorts in the West have made numerous upgrades for the coming season. Look for new high-speed chairlifts and surface lifts, ziplines, snowcats, a snow-coaster tube park and a megamillion-dollar on-mountain lodge. Walt Roessing is a California freelance writer. Colorado A blockbuster change at Breckenridge Ski Resort is the opening of Peak 6, with a high-speed, six-person chairlift soaring to a 12,300-foot summit and a fixed-grip chairlift serving the lower slopes. Those facilities join lifts on Peaks 7, 8, 9 and 10, which tower above the lively historic town of Breckenridge. Peak 6 is the first skiterrain expansion on U.S. Forest Service land in Colorado since 2008. No other new facilities, such as day lodges, hotels and restaurants, will be allowed on Peak 6 acreage. Silverton Mountain Ski Area is introducing overnight heli-touring trips for $429 per person per day. Trips include a drop-off onto a peak with a guide plus a day of skiing or snowboarding. Wolf Creek Ski Area in Pagosa Springs is replacing its Treasure Lift with a Doppelmayr detachable high-speed quad. … Winter Park Resort is offering a new Cirque Sled snowcat experience that will provide skiers and riders easier access to 1,332 acres of spectacular off-piste terrain. … Loveland Ski Area, only about an hour west of Denver — and nowhere near the Colorado town of the same name — has a Ridge Cat that again will offer free “cat skiing” access to some of its most exciting slopes. … Durango Dog Ranch will provide dogsledding from Durango Mountain Resort’s base for the first time. For 2013-14, Steamboat Ski & Resort will unveil its most significant on-mountain improvement in nearly a decade with its new multimillion-dollar Four Points Lodge. The 13,000-square-foot, two-level structure is situated at 9,716 feet in the Storm Peak-Four Peaks area. Features include indoor and outdoor fireplaces,


outside deck and a retail area. Steamboat also has added two new snow groomers and it will explore the opportunity to offer night skiing. Copper Mountain Resort is investing nearly $7 million in capital improvements. The resort is replacing its Storm King surface lift with a new surface T-bar lift, installing a new West Ridge Platter surface lift, adding four snowcats and completing the renovation of its outstanding Woodward at Copper Barn, among other projects. Utah In terms of transportation, Utah resorts excel in convenience. Eleven ski areas are less than an hour from Salt Lake City International Airport, which means more time on the slopes. Also for accessibility, there’s the Trax Green Line, a light-rail system that opened in April. Riders can make the 6-mile run from the airport to downtown Salt Lake City in just 20 minutes, then can catch a shuttle or ski bus connection to the ski areas. Snowbird Ski & Resort has completed the only new chairlift in Utah. It’s a high-speed detachable quad that replaces a two-person chairlift from 1971. Under construction: a restaurant atop the resort’s 11,000-foot Hidden Peak that’s scheduled for completion in 2014. The Snowbird tram will provide access to the restaurant. New, too, at Snowbird are guided half-day and private snowcat group tours. … Canyons Resort, now under the management of Vail Resorts, offers unlimited skiing and riding on its Epic Pass. The pass offers the same privileges at Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Arapahoe, Heavenly and Northstar — plus five days each at ski resorts in Austria, France and Switzerland. Book a stay in a mountain cottage at Robert Redford’s Sundance Mountain Resort and ski free. … Park City Mountain Resort will celebrate a half-century of skiing in 2013-14; Ski Utah’s guided Interconnect Tour on offpiste terrain for advanced and expert alpine skiers is marking its 30th year. … Deer Valley Resort is building a new run for beginner skiers, upgrading its snowmaking guns and purchasing two dozen mountain snowmobiles and three snowcats. Brighton and Solitude Mountain resorts, which are connected by the scenic Solbright Trail, have teamed to introduce the joint Big Cottonwood Ski Pass, with access to 130-plus trails and 15 lifts. Also new at Brighton is a women-only terrain park. … By building a fourth well, Snowbasin Resort has increased its snowmaking capacity to more than 615 acres. Montana, Idaho and Wyoming Bridger Bowl Ski Area in Bozeman, Mont., has completed the installation of two chairlifts for 2013-14. The $4.1 million project replaced a 1967 Riblet double chair with a pair of Skytrac triple chairlifts. Laid out in a V-shape, both new lifts have base terminals and ChairkiD loading carpets. Bridger is among five Montana destination ski resorts with “no lift lines.” The others are Big Sky, Moonlight Basin, Red Lodge and Whitefish.


Thanks to on-mountain intermediate improvements, Jackson Hole, Wyo., marked a record 502,222 skier and rider visits last season. “Only 17 to 20 resorts a year go over the 500,000 mark,” said Jerry Blann, resort president. The total could rise again in 2013-14 because Jackson Hole Air has increased the number of flights and seats into Jackson Hole Airport. Multiple resort upgrades have been completed in Idaho, which has 18 ski areas. Sun Valley Resort has installed a 620-foot-long superpipe, with a 22-foot-high wall, which makes it the largest in North America. … Schweitzer Mountain Resort has invested more than $1 million on enhancements, such as a new downhill racing course and terrain park. … Lost Trail Powder Mountain has added hundreds of acres of new terrain. … Silver Mountain Resort, home to the world’s longest gondola, has increased its ski runs total to 74. California Ski Lake Tahoe resorts continue to capture the spotlight with improvements topping $100 million. New lifts, midmountain lodges, expensive base-mountain developments and expanded terrain are further enhancing the guest experience. Upgrades at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows, which recently joined forces, exceed $46 million so far. Combined, the resorts offer access to 6,000 skiable acres, 43 lifts and 270-plus trails. Sugar Bowl Ski Resort, founded by Walt Disney, has installed the Crow’s Peak triple chairlift, which will greatly improve fall-line skiing and increase the resort’s overall terrain. The lift’s bottom terminal is positioned just above the trails of Royal Gorge Cross-Country Resort, which is North America’s largest cross-country skiing resort, with 6,000 acres of terrain plus 200 kilometers of trails. Its trails are open, too, to snowshoeing and fat-tire snow-biking. Also, the Sierra Snowkite Center will be open this winter. Northstar California Resort is home to Burton Snowboard Academy, described as a “first-of-its-kind learning program” with a link-your-turns guarantee by the lesson’s end. The resort has a snow play area designed only for the littlest “rippers,” ages 3-6. Lake Tahoe has many upscale lodging options, including lakefront resorts, world-class high-rise hotels and lively 24-hour casinos. The newest gem, scheduled to open Nov. 22, is the Landing. The 88-room hotel is three blocks from the Heavenly Village and gondola, Nevada casinos and a Tahoe lakeside marina. Conversely, there are many bargain vacation facilities, such as slopeside resort villages at Homewood, Kirkwood, Northstar and Sugar Bowl. Right now, some Lake Tahoe destination vacation properties are offering ski-and-stay packages starting as low as $79 for a lift ticket and lodging. Western Canada


Two new chairlifts featuring a detachable Doppelmayr six-pack are the highlight of $18 million in capital improvements at Whistler Blackcomb Ski Resort. Next: Blackcomb Mountain’s high-speed quad displaces a triple chair. Whistler lays claim to the most advanced high-speed lift system, with 18 express and 37 total lifts. Sun Peaks Resort, Canada’s third-largest ski area, excels in adaptive programs for individuals with a disability. … Panorama Mountain Village claims to be unique because it offers heli-skiing and snowmobiling from its village. … Fernie Alpine Resort has a new winter zipline ride. … Big White Ski Resort excels with an enormous snow-coaster tube park, high-altitude outdoor rink, 60-foot ice-climbing tower and 1,700 feet of nighttimelighted terrain. … Alberta’s Nakiska Mountain Resort has a new tubing park and a third Magic Carpet lift.

 


 

  TRAVEL

What's hot in Tahoe skiing this winter BY BILL FINK : NOVEMBER 8, 2013 

Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows: The partner resorts have expanded their grooming fleet and snowmaking capabilities, added new terrain park features, and introduced new kids' ski school programs, as well as a couple of roaming food trucks. Squaw has renovated the rental rooms in the Village, while Alpine has transformed its mid-mountain Chalet lodge into the Sierra Beer Garden, a Bavarian-themed sausage-centric offering with pressed sandwiches and plenty of beer. Sugar Bowl: Will be incorporating $20 million in overall mountain improvements, including the addition of the Crow's Peak chairlift, giving access to two new groomed runs and the gladed slopes of the Strawberry Fields area previously accessed only via hiking. They're also adding snow-biking rentals and trails to the adjacent Royal Gorge cross-country ski area. Northstar: Has expanded terrain in the Promised Land ski area, and refurbished the Big Springs Gondola with new windows, seats and racks. The Ritz-Carlton at Northstar is adding a slope-side restaurant next month, the Backyard Bar and BBQ with ribs, wood-fired pizzas, beer and craft cocktails. Diamond Peak: Will be expanding its popular Last Tracks beer and wine-tasting events to all Saturdays, February through April, and selected Fridays. Also adding expanded off-piste glade skiing terrain (don't combine the two activities, though). Sierra-at-Tahoe: Added a new base mountain plaza including a restaurant, rental shop, retail outlets and a deck with fire pits hosting live music events (on the deck, not in the fire pits). Basecamp Hotel: Recently opened boutique hotel in South Lake Tahoe with a rustic, homey theme. Located within walking distance of Heavenly gondola. www.basecamphotels.com. Rates from about $144 a night. The Landing Resort and Spa: Newly built 88-room lakeside hotel three blocks from the Heavenly gondola. www.thelandingresortandspa.com. Rates from around $169 a night. Heavenly: In the spirit of its South Lake Tahoe party vibe, Heavenly will be introducing a roving snowcat with a DJ platform pumping tunes in its terrain parks, and adding outdoor go-go dancers and an extra bar to the après scene at the on-mountain Tamarack Lodge. Homewood: Is adding to its grooming fleet with a focus on specially sculpted beginner terrain. Also will be partnering with Pacific Crest Snowcats and the West Shore Lodge for a backcountry skiing and luxury lodging package. Supersize ski passes The continuing trend in Tahoe skiing and elsewhere is the consolidation of the resort business. Ski mountains continue to merge, be acquired or create alliances with other resorts, similar to the trend in the airline industry. And like the frequent-flier programs, some Tahoe resorts are consolidating


benefits, selling season passes that include access to dozens of other resorts. Notwithstanding the fact that if you can afford to go to 26 different resorts around the world in a single season, you probably don't need a discounted pass, the linked programs can provide some good deals. (Note: Prices and benefits subject to change.) Vail Resorts' Epic Pass: Covers 26 ski mountains across five states and four countries, including Tahoe's Heavenly, Kirkwood and Northstar. They're offering a lifetime pass to the first person to ski all 26 in one season. Get busy. Pass provides unlimited access to Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Arapahoe Basin, Eldora (Colo.), Canyons (Utah), Heavenly (Calif./Nev.), Northstar, Kirkwood (Calif.), Afton Alps (Minn.), Mount Brighton (Mich). Includes five days at Verbier, Switzerland; Arlberg, Austria (St. Anton, St. Cristoph, Stuben, Züers and Lech); and Les 3 Vallées, France (Courchevel, La Tania, Méribel, Brides-les-Bains, Les Menuires, St. Martin de Belleville, Val Thorens et Orelle). $729. www.snow.com/epicpass. The Mountain Collective Pass: 12-day-ski pass including two days each at Alta/Snowbird (Utah), Aspen/Snowmass (Colo.), Jackson Hole (Wyo.), Mammoth, Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows (Calif.) and Whistler/Blackcomb (British Columbia). Also includes 50 percent off additional days at the resorts, and up to 25 percent off lodging. $379.www.mountaincollective.com. The Powder Alliance Pass: Sierra-at-Tahoe is the local resort involved with this pass covering unlimited skiing there, and three free days at 12 partner resorts in nine states: Angel Fire (N.M.), Arizona Snow Bowl (Ariz.), Bridger Bowl (Mont.), China Peak and Mountain High (Calif.), Crested Butte (Colo.), Timberline and Mount Hood (Ore.), Schweitzen (Idaho), Snowbasin (Utah), Stevens Pass (Wash.). $389. www.powderalliance.com. The Sugar Bowl Partner Pass: Covers Tahoe's Sugar Bowl as well as Idaho's Sun Valley, and Wyoming's Grand Targhee (with access to affiliated cross-country ski centers for an additional charge). From $469. www.sugarbowl.com. Homewood's Three-Generation Pass: Lonely Homewood has an offering to unite your family, at least, with one deal covering two adults, two children (5-18) and two seniors. Also gets the group four days at Diamond Peak. $1,399. www.skihomewood.com.  


New Flight to Reno-Tahoe from Portland Announced There’s a new flight to Reno-Tahoe International Airport from Portland, Ore. Alaska Airlines will fly nonstop daily air service starting Nov. 8. Alaska is offering one-way fares starting from $64* between Portland and Reno/Tahoe for those who purchase before Nov. 11. Skiers and rides who want to maximize their savings can pair the $64 flight with Squaw Valley’s Fly and Ski Free deal, where air travelers can present their boarding pass or airline luggage tag and ski or ride for free on their afternoon of arrival. Reno-Tahoe International Airport is located just 45 minutes from many of the Lake Tahoe ski resorts. The daily flight schedule is: Portland-Reno 11:10 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. Reno-Portland 1:15 p.m. – 2:50 p.m. All times based on local times zones. *General terms and conditions: Fares require a 14-day advance purchase and are available for travel Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Saturdays. All travel must be completed by Feb 28, 2014. Fares include all taxes and fees including the September 11 Security Fee. Seats are limited and may not be available on all flights or all days. A ticket purchased at an Alaska Airlines airport location or through a reservation call center will cost $15 more per person than the advertised fare. Tickets are nonrefundable but can be change for a $125 change fee. A $25 baggage fee will apply for each of the first two checked bags. Additional bags and overweight or oversize items cost $75 each. Visit www.alaskaair.com or call Alaska Airlines reservations at 1-800-ALASKAAIR for complete fare rules, including information about blackout days and other fare sale terms and conditions and checked baggage policy.


Home > Lifestyles > Travel > Ski and Snow

Baby-friendly snow resorts cater to families By KATHY CHIN LEONG Special Contributor Published: 08 November 2013 04:28 PM Updated: 08 November 2013 04:28 PM

Ski and snowboard season beckons, but now you have a baby. Be encouraged. A great getaway can be yours at three resorts with abundant amenities for families with infants and toddlers. Telluride Ski Resort: The standout at this Colorado retreat is the chondola: an enclosed chairlift gondola. Parents and tykes can get on and off safely and thrill to mountain views. Meanwhile, you can drop off children as young as 2 months old at the Cubs Camp and nursery. Children’s ski school allows little ones to participate even if they’re not potty-trained, and the school’s glass ceiling lets you peek in. Ski-in and ski-out lodging abounds. Of note is the Peaks Resort, a 161-room hotel featuring Colorado’s largest full-service spa. The cool factor for kids is the indoor swimming pool waterslide. Where: 565 Mountain Village Blvd., Telluride, Colo. Contact: Tellurideskiresort.com Squaw Valley: Northern California’s former winter Olympics venue wows families with the SnoVentures play zone with a snack lodge, snow tubing and a snowman building area. Inside the Olympic House lodge, a kiddie space attracts wee ones with kid-size tables and chairs. Men’s and women’s restrooms feature diaper-changing stations. Squaw Valley recently poured $1.2 million into upgrading rooms at the Village at Squaw Valley, a condo-suite hotel so close to the lifts you can walk back with the baby. Forgot something? Alice’s Mountain Market is steps away; it sells six sizes of diapers, baby food and children’s medications. Where: 1960 Squaw Valley Road, Olympic Valley, Calif. Contact: squaw.com


Angel Fire Resort: Owned by a Dallas family, this New Mexico favorite touts a ski-in, ski-out hotel with convenience written all over it. Relief awaits with generously sized rooms from 500 to 750 square feet with microwave ovens and refrigerators, an indoor pool and a cafe store. On the slopes, SnowBear Camp nursery cares for babes as young as 6 weeks old. New this season is a fulltime chef for the kid’s ski school and day care with emphasis on nutritious, wholesome meals. All food allergies will be taken into consideration. Take turns watching the children while the other parent skis with the Parenting Pass lift ticket, which lets two adults share. A short shuttle ride away is the resort’s Nordic Center, which has sledding, snowshoeing and snow play. Go early to borrow the center’s Snowman Making Kit with coal, scarf, carrot and buttons. Where: 10 Miller Lane, Angel Fire, N.M. Contact: angelfireresort.com Kathy Chin Leong is a freelance writer and skier based in Sunnyvale, Calif.


What's hot in Tahoe skiing this winter Bill Fink Published 1:32 pm, Friday, November 8, 2013

What's hot in Tahoe skiing this winter Bill Fink Published 1:32 pm, Friday, November 8, 2013

Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows: The partner resorts have expanded their grooming fleet and snowmaking capabilities, added new terrain park features, and introduced new kids' ski school programs, as well as a couple of roaming food trucks. Squaw has renovated the rental rooms in the Village, while Alpine has transformed its mid-mountain Chalet lodge into the Sierra Beer Garden, a Bavarian-themed sausage-centric offering with pressed sandwiches and plenty of beer. Sugar Bowl: Will be incorporating $20 million in overall mountain improvements, including the addition of the Crow's Peak chairlift, giving access to two new groomed runs and the gladed slopes of the Strawberry Fields area previously accessed only via hiking. They're also adding snow-biking rentals and trails to the adjacent Royal Gorge cross-country ski area. Northstar: Has expanded terrain in the Promised Land ski area, and refurbished the Big Springs Gondola with new windows, seats and racks. The Ritz-Carlton at Northstar is adding a slope-side restaurant next month, the Backyard Bar and BBQ with ribs, wood-fired pizzas, beer and craft cocktails. Diamond Peak: Will be expanding its popular Last Tracks beer and wine-tasting events to all Saturdays, February through April, and selected Fridays. Also adding expanded off-piste glade skiing terrain (don't combine the two activities, though). Sierra-at-Tahoe: Added a new base mountain plaza including a restaurant, rental shop, retail outlets and a deck with fire pits hosting live music events (on the deck, not in the fire pits). Basecamp Hotel: Recently opened boutique hotel in South Lake Tahoe with a rustic, homey theme. Located within walking distance of Heavenly gondola.www.basecamphotels.com. Rates from about $144 a night. The Landing Resort and Spa: Newly built 88-room lakeside hotel three blocks from the Heavenly gondola. www.thelandingresortandspa.com. Rates from around $169 a night. Heavenly: In the spirit of its South Lake Tahoe party vibe, Heavenly will be introducing a roving snowcat with a DJ platform pumping tunes in its terrain parks, and adding outdoor go-go dancers and an extra bar to the après scene at the on-mountain Tamarack Lodge.


Back to: NEWS November 7, 2013

Content for briefs is selected from e-mail submissions to Community Editor Amy Edgett at aedgett@sierrasun.com. E-mail for print submissions may be 150 words. Items are published in the print edition news space permitting. To enter community events online, visit www.tahoedailytribune.com/NorthShore/nCommunityCalendar, for entertainment www.tahoe.com. Tahoe City Downtown Association seeks members, participation The Tahoe City Downtown Association (TCDA) was founded in 2004 as a nonprofit organization of local merchants, property owners, associations, professionals, and community members who share a mission to enhance and promote a vibrant downtown center for residents and visitors. The TCDA contributes to Tahoe City’s social, economic, and environmental vitality through special events, sustainable programs, partnerships, visitor outreach, and community support. The TCDA is led by its board of directors and committees, all staffed by volunteers. There are currently openings events, membership, marketing, design and concerts (at Commons Beach) committees. TDCA welcomes participation by anyone with energy and passion. Visit www.visittahoecity.org/committees or call 530-583-3348. Silicon Mountain to meet The Silicon Mountain Group will welcome James R. Elste and Travis Schwieger of Cognitive Extension, Inc. to present “inqiri: Improving Decisions with Collective Intelligence and Collaborative Decision-Making.” There is more computing power and data than ever. James R. Elste, CEO and founder, and Travis Schwieger, chief data architect and cofounder will explore the power of collaborative decision-making and how collective intelligence can help individuals and organizations improve their decisions by leveraging the “Wisdom of the Crowd.” Learn how the inqiri solution, a new, patent-pending web application that combines collective intelligence and synthetic intelligence, can produce better options and help improve your decisions. Visit www.inqiri.com. The meeting will be on Monday, Nov. 11, 6-8 p.m. at Pizza on the Hill, in Tahoe Donner at 11509 Northwoods Blvd., Truckee. A $5 fee includes pizza, salad, and soft drinks. There will be time before and after the discussion for networking. Find Silicon Mountain on LinkedIn, Facebook and at TahoeSiliconMountain.com. Sign up for email announcements at http://bit.ly/14XGofL.


North Lake Tahoe receives 2013 Platinum Choice Award Recipients of the 10th annual Platinum Choice Award given by Bay Area-based Smart Meetings Magazine were recently announced. North Lake Tahoe Visitors Bureaus was recognized for setting exemplary standards in a range of categories including ambience, amenities, and excellence in service. Out of thousands that qualify, only 180 are selected for this honor. The North Lake Tahoe Visitors Bureaus is a marketing cooperative between the Incline Village Crystal Bay Visitors Bureau and the North Lake Tahoe Convention and Visitors Bureau. “We are pleased to be honored as one of the best in the hospitality industry by readers and editors of this prominent publication,” said Director of Sales Jason Neary, of the North Lake Tahoe Convention & Visitors Bureau. “We truly value the opportunity to work with our regional partners in introducing, and sometimes re-introducing, North Lake Tahoe to our target markets situated across the country.” The meetings program at the North Lake Tahoe Visitors Bureaus is responsible for bringing group business to North Lake Tahoe, offering professional services to encourage large/small businesses and organizations to choose North Tahoe’s alpine setting. A 20+ year resident of the region, Neary has worked for the North Lake Tahoe Convention & Visitors Bureau for the last 17 years. Visit www.gotahoenorth.com. Get involved for Follies’ sake The 21st occasionally semi-annual Truckee Follies, a tasteless theatrical revue, is once again looking for writers, actors, singers, stagehands, props, wait staff, sponsors and advertisers. The Follies will be held at the same old location, with the same old cheap seats. They seek for new as well as the same old characters to help volunteer and have fun. All those interested contact Mitch Clarin (producer) at 530-308-9124 or Mitch@MitchClarin.com or Aimee Schaller (co-director) at 530-448-6599 or aimee@schallers.net. Nevada County tax collector to visit Truckee Nevada County Treasurer and Tax Collector Tina M. Vernon will set up office in Truckee to serve Eastern County residents during peak property tax season. Property tax bills were mailed Oct. 4, and first installments are due no later than Dec. 10, 2013. The seasonal office will be located at the Truckee Sheriff substation in District V Supervisor Anderson’s office, 10879 Donner Pass Road, Ste. A. Vernon will be available Dec. 2-6, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., and is encouraging residents to drop by and pay their property taxes, ask questions, or just say “hello.”


Payments can also be made by mail, postmarked no later than Dec. 10, and sent to P.O. Box 128, Nevada City, CA 95959-0128 or made in person at the Nevada County Tax Collector’s Office, 950 Maidu Ave. in Nevada City Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., holidays excepted. The office also offers payment by credit card or by virtual check. Details can be found at www.mynevadacounty.com/nc/ttc. Tahoe Backcountry Women kick off party Nov. 13, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Alpenglow Sports, Tahoe City, slide show and season kick off party. This slide show is a look into women’s backcountry adventures from multiple perspectives and locales. Get ideas about where you’d like to adventure as women share their backcountry experiences to inspire and motivate you to get out into the backcountry this season. There will be food, drinks, and raffle prizes. Future events and organization updates will also be announced. Tahoe Backcountry Women’s mission is to gather together to ski, share stories, experiences, and education about backcountry skiing. All ages and abilities welcome. Contact whitney@alpenglowsports.com with questions. HO! HO! Holiday Wish Box needs you, today! The Holiday Wish Box needs your support. This is a wonderful holiday party for area seniors, complete with luncheon, a visit from Santa, holiday performances by local children, and presents! The Truckee Donner Senior Apartment residents will make wishes of $25. To grant one of their wishes, please call organizer “Clarence-ASC” at 530-587-5152 or e-mail xmas.wish@hotmail.com. Matching began Oct. 15, and many more are needed, to be delivered to Clarence at the TD Senior Apartment complex by Dec. 5. They will be distributed on Saturday, Dec. 14. The Holiday Wish box is not connected with the Meals on Wheels or any Sierra Senior Services programs. Many more elves are needed! Merchants are encouraged to help fill “goody bags” with product — email robin.penning@ritzcarlton.com or 530-562-3018.


Slide Into Savings of up to $100 on Ski Vacations With Southwest Vacations(SM) ORLANDO, FL--(Marketwired - November 07, 2013) - Southwest Vacations is offering travelers a savings of up to $100 off ski vacations to featured destinations including Breckenridge, Vail, Beaver Creek, Keystone, Lake Tahoe, and The Canyons. As the temperatures fall in the mountains of Colorado, Lake Tahoe, and Utah, so will the season's fresh powder snow. With great deals on vacation packages and lift tickets, travelers be skiing the slopes of Breckenridge, Vail, Lake Tahoe, or other breathtaking mountain destinations before they know it. Book a flight plus hotel plus lift ticket vacation package at select hotels in Colorado, Lake Tahoe, and Utah, and save up to $100 ($20 per night with a maximum of five nights) per reservation when using the promotion code SKISAVE100 at the time of booking. To take advantage of this ski vacation deal, travelers must book their packages between November 5, 2013 and November 18, 2013 by 6:00 p.m. Central Time for travel December 1, 2013 through March 31, 2014. Restrictions and exclusions may apply.

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1574825#ixzz2o3vY0gFG 


Gear: Going skiing? These apps will help get you there   March skiing with snow on the peaks and none in town, Park City, Utah. By Amanda St. Amand, St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Posted Nov. 07, 2013, at 2:57 p.m. Planning a vacation can be as simple or as difficult as a traveler wants to make it. Unless it’s a ski vacation. No matter how you slice it, a ski trip means a little more organizing and schlepping than something like a quick trip to the lake. But in this age of mobile and digital freedom, there’s an app for that — and by “that” we mean you can use your smartphone or tablet to plan or even book nearly everything you need for a ski trip. Want to find out how much lift tickets will set you back? Download Liftopia. Want to track how many lifts you rode or just how many vertical feet you racked up? There’s SnoCru and EpicMix out there in the app store. Hoping to pick up a few quick pointers on how, exactly, to best turn on skis or a snowboard? Skitips is one app that offers not just pointers but videos that demonstrate exactly the point being made about how to turn, or how to stop on skis. The first level of Skitips is free — more advanced apps in the series carry a modest price tag. But even the free one includes the videos. The experts shown in the videos tell people they could even use them to learn how to ski, although not everyone would agree that’s the best way to do it. Dan Sherman, marketing director at Ski.com and a veteran skier, said no matter how good an app may be, he would recommend that novice skiers turn to a professional for a lesson. “If you learn the right way from the start, that’s the way to make sure you enjoy it in the future,” Sherman said.

Resort shopping via a phone Plenty of people decide on a ski trip with a mountain already in mind — maybe friends recommended it, or an uncle owns a condo, or it’s a long-planned getaway with someone who knows about skiing making the plans. But one of the most comprehensive resources for figuring out what resort is best for you doesn’t have — or need — an app. Because ski.com works on any device, all the time.


The company redesigned its entire site in September so it automatically resizes to keep all of its depth (and see for yourself, this is a very deep site) and fit itself to your laptop, iPad, iPhone or Android. From anywhere on it, you are one click away from being able to talk to one of its 65 vacation specialists via a chat or call button after you’ve delved into what the nightlife is like in Park City, or the best places to eat at Keystone, or what non-skiing activities are available at more than 100 resorts. “If they want to go through and book everything on the site, they can,” Sherman said, adding that most of the reservations still are made over the phone. The people who work at ski.com, he said, average about 15 years at ski.com and have spent 25 years working in the ski industry. “They can tell you down to the details like which condo has a better fireplace at this resort or that one. They have been there.” (For what it’s worth: I tested the chat button on a Sunday afternoon from my iPhone 5. It worked like a charm. Same for the call button.) But ski trips require more than just a resort — and your smartphone can also be a tool for figuring out where to break for lunch, how to get from one lift to another and more. For example, Copper Mountain Resort in Summit County, Colo., is unveiling its new app for this ski season. Called Sherpa, it will tell skiers and riders which trails are groomed, where different trail intersections will lead — and it can even call ski patrol with one touch. Or there are apps for entire states, like Ski Utah — also free. It will give updated snow reports, let you know road conditions and give you webcam view from the 14 resorts in the group. And there’s the one I am most familiar with — EpicMix. It’s a creation of Vail Resorts, which includes Breckenridge, Keystone, Beaver Creek and Vail in Colorado; Heavenly, Northstar and Kirkwood in California; the Canyons in Utah; Mount Brighton in Michigan and Afton Alps in Minnesota. My season ski pass is through Vail Resorts, and I downloaded the free EpicMix app three seasons ago. What’s so great about it? It will tell you which lifts you rode, and how many times. It measures your vertical feet, provides you with trail maps, lets you race against other skiers, compare your stats to family and friends, and offers one-stop shopping for your on-mountain photos. Not that long ago, if you wanted a photograph of your group on the mountain — and it’s hard to beat that scenery — it meant posing for a photo, getting a little slip of paper with a code or number and trudging into the village to look at computer images of your proofs. With apps like EpicMix, you can see all your photos on your smartphone or iPad and decide whether you want to shell out to pay for them and get your own prints. And trying to keep track of the trails you skied or rode? Not even 10 years ago, that meant studying a trail map at day’s end and trying to remember whether you skied all the blues on this mountain, or the greens on that one.


Many of the resort apps also award digital pins, or badges, for achieving different things. Ride the same lift five times in a row? You get Deja Vu. Get in a few runs on Christmas day? Hello, Snow Elf. And I skied on Groundhog Day — earning myself the Punxsutawney pin. There are dozens and dozens available, too, including pins for racking up 50 ski days in a season, or surpassing a million vertical feet. (Um, doubtful in my immediate future.)

No app for that, yet Unfortunately, one of the drags of a ski trip for the skier or rider who rents his or her gear, instead of owning, is doing the paperwork at the rental place, then getting fitted for the gear you need. When our kids were young, this was often a trip to the rental shop at the end of a long day in the car, when everyone was tired, hungry and trying to adjust from the flatlands to the thinner air of the mountains. Wouldn’t it be great to do all that on your phone ahead of time, and walk right into the shop with all your stuff ready? Sure it would — but so far, there doesn’t seem to be an app for that. (Although you can do it online at a few places.) Just give it time, though. I’m sure it’s coming.

 


West Coast Ski Resort Deals & News 6th November 2013 | COURTNEY ROYCE NEWS REGIONS: CALIFORNIA, LAKE TAHOE, NORTH LAKE TAHOE, NORTHERN CALIFORNIA, SOUTH LAKE TAHOE, WEST COAST RESORTS IN THIS ARTICLE: ALPINE MEADOWS, DIAMOND PEAK, HEAVENLY MOUNTAIN RESORT, HOMEWOOD MOUNTAIN RESORT, KIRKWOOD, MAMMOTH MOUNTAIN SKI AREA, NORTHSTAR CALIFORNIA, SIERRA-AT-TAHOE, SQUAW VALLEY ,SUGAR BOWL RESORT

Early season snow falls and dropping temperatures mean that the ski season is just around the corner for west coast resorts. Boreal Mountain is set to open on Wednesday, Nov. 6, and Mammoth Mountain will join them on Thursday, Nov. 7, as the second west coast resort to open for the 2013/2014 season. Celebrating their 60th season, Mammoth will be offering discount lift tickets opening weekend and deals on select lodging, along with a chance to ski free opening day. The popular resort will also play host to a weekend jam packed with events, including live music on the deck, evening concerts, movie premieres and more. In other news, participating Lake Tahoe resorts are offering two free lift tickets with the purchase of a Lake Tahoe license plate in California or Nevada, thanks to the Tahoe Fund's "Plates for Powder" promotion.

 


100 WORDS WITH SPONZO Thursday, November 7th, 2013 Sponzo lives in a bus with 18 other dudes for half of the season, you might have heard of this wild crew called the Gremlinz. He’s also one of Tahoe’s staple “dread heads”. When he’s not snowboarding you can find him giving lessons in how to party. Places you’ve worked? A&A boats in South Windsor CT, Gean Langen VW dealer in Glastonbury CT, Tow Truck Driver in Brimfield MA, Snowmaker and park crew at Killington VT, Roofer in Pittsfield VT, Snowmaker and park crew at Alpine Meadows, Park crew at Squaw. Wakeboard Instructor on Lake Tahoe and those are just the main jobs. Last trip? Where and why? A few weeks ago we took the Gremlinz bus to Denver for the world premiere of the “BusIt” movie. Something else you could of done with your life instead of snowboarding? I guess any of the jobs I listed before. I used to be really good at wakeboarding and almost moved to Orlando Florida to pursue that but snowboarding was definitely the right choice! Vehicles you want or have? I want to trade my Trailblazer in for a Pickup so it will be easier to get my sled around. Browser History? Gbp-Gbp.com The Gremlinz are always up to something and MTPLS.com for Gilaffe, Big Mouth, and Stinky Socks Words to live by? Jus Liv Near death experience? One time in Massachusetts I almost got crushed by a tractor trailer truck against a jersey barrier on the highway. I slammed on the brakes at the last second and barely got out of the way. The truck never even stopped moving over! Recent music? The new mix tape by Lil Wayne, Dedication 5 is Swag


Things to spend money on? I definitely spend a lot of money at the Crystal Bay Club and Casino in Tahoe. haha Things you lose too often? Money at the Crystal Bay Club! Places you love to visit but hate to live? I love going up to MT Hood every summer but living there all year would suck Something to watch? You should definitely watch our new movie “Busit” Something to make? I need to turn one of my Gilaffe boards in to a split board! Something to tell your kids? I will tell them about the epic winter of 2010-11. Insane! That shit was Epic! Something to support? The Sababa movement. Go to gpb-gpb.com and click on Sababa to understand more. Ideal Situation? When we (Gremlinz) finish the first Sababa Land! Something to eat? Bacon!    


New terrain park among 2013-14 features at Homewood HOMEWOOD, Calif. — When Homewood Mountain Resort opens later this year, it will make the 52nd winter season for the West Shore resort. And there will be plenty of new things in store for 2013-14. Homewood recently was awarded the Golden Eagle Award for environmental stewardship by the National Ski Areas Association. According to the resort, the award is NSAA’s highest environmental honor and recognizes exemplary environmental performance in the ski resort industry. Homewood was recognized as the top resort in the “Small Ski Area” category — resorts with fewer than 200,000 skier visits annually — for its commitment to innovative watershed management and water-quality monitoring work. As for skiing and riding, Homewood plans to expand its Smart Slopes sculpted beginner terrain for 2013-14, a concept that “incorporates man-made snow berms, gullies and other terrain features … designed to ease the learning curve for first-time and novice skiers and riders,” resort officials said Creating those terrain features will be easier with the resort’s addition this year of a PistenBully 400 Park Pro Series groomer to its fleet of snow cats, allowing for better groomed terrain on the slopes and in the resort’s terrain parks. This winter, Homewood also will unveil the new Foundation Park, described as an urbanstyle terrain park located next to the mid-mountain Big Blue View Bar. The resort’s restaurant — West Shore Café & Inn — has a new chef, Mike Davis, who comes most recently from Martis Camp, and whose resume includes The Dining Room in The Salish Lodge and Spa in the Pacific Northwest and The Waterfront Hotel in Oakland. Another new feature planned for 2013-14 is the Backcountry Experience, a $1,200 lodging package from the West Shore Café and Inn that includes a day of snowcat access with Pacific Crest Snowcats to 3,000 acres of reserved terrain.


This year, Homewood also struck a deal with Diamond Peak Ski Resort, allowing season pass holders to enjoy four days of skiing/riding at the Incline Village resort. The deal also allows Diamond Peak pass holders access at Homewood; both resorts are heralded as having the best views of Lake Tahoe among any of the region’s ski resorts. An opening date for Homewood has yet to be announced. Learn more about the resort and other features planned for 2013-14 at www.skihomewood.com.  


Homewood: Is adding to its grooming fleet with a focus on specially sculpted beginner terrain. Also will be partnering with Pacific Crest Snowcats and the West Shore Lodge for a backcountry skiing and luxury lodging package. Supersize ski passes The continuing trend in Tahoe skiing and elsewhere is the consolidation of the resort business. Ski mountains continue to merge, be acquired or create alliances with other resorts, similar to the trend in the airline industry. And like the frequent-flier programs, some Tahoe resorts are consolidating benefits, selling season passes that include access to dozens of other resorts. Notwithstanding the fact that if you can afford to go to 26 different resorts around the world in a single season, you probably don't need a discounted pass, the linked programs can provide some good deals. (Note: Prices and benefits subject to change.) Vail Resorts' Epic Pass: Covers 26 ski mountains across five states and four countries, including Tahoe's Heavenly, Kirkwood and Northstar. They're offering a lifetime pass to the first person to ski all 26 in one season. Get busy. Pass provides unlimited access to Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Arapahoe Basin, Eldora (Colo.), Canyons (Utah), Heavenly (Calif./Nev.), Northstar, Kirkwood (Calif.), Afton Alps (Minn.), Mount Brighton (Mich). Includes five days at Verbier, Switzerland; Arlberg, Austria (St. Anton, St. Cristoph, Stuben, Züers and Lech); and Les 3 Vallées, France (Courchevel, La Tania, Méribel, Brides-les-Bains, Les Menuires, St. Martin de Belleville, Val Thorens et Orelle). $729. www.snow.com/epicpass. The Mountain Collective Pass: 12-day-ski pass including two days each at Alta/Snowbird (Utah), Aspen/Snowmass (Colo.), Jackson Hole (Wyo.), Mammoth, Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows (Calif.) and Whistler/Blackcomb (British Columbia). Also includes 50 percent off additional days at the resorts, and up to 25 percent off lodging. $379.www.mountaincollective.com. The Powder Alliance Pass: Sierra-at-Tahoe is the local resort involved with this pass covering unlimited skiing there, and three free days at 12 partner resorts in nine states: Angel Fire (N.M.), Arizona Snow Bowl (Ariz.), Bridger Bowl (Mont.), China Peak and Mountain High (Calif.), Crested Butte (Colo.), Timberline and Mount Hood (Ore.), Schweitzen (Idaho), Snowbasin (Utah), Stevens Pass (Wash.). $389.www.powderalliance.com. The Sugar Bowl Partner Pass: Covers Tahoe's Sugar Bowl as well as Idaho's Sun Valley, and Wyoming's Grand Targhee (with access to affiliated cross-country ski centers for an additional charge). From $469. www.sugarbowl.com. Homewood's Three-Generation Pass: Lonely Homewood has an offering to unite your family, at least, with one deal covering two adults, two children (5-18) and two seniors. Also gets the group four days at Diamond Peak. $1,399. www.skihomewood.com.  


Winter stoke: What’s new at some of Lake Tahoe’s ski resorts Boreal Mountain Resort became the first California ski area to turn its lifts for the public when it opened the weekend of Nov.1, treating anxious snowboarders and skiers to some early season jibbing. The resort includes expanded snowmaking potential this year, which can be key to getting some early season turns. Here’s a look at what other Lake Tahoe-area ski resorts have in store for this year:

Alpine Meadows This season’s upgrades include expanded snowmaking and state-of-the-art grooming snowcats to improve snow surfaces across the mountain. The Chalet, the resort’s mid-mountain lodge, will also transform into a Bavarian-style beer garden, serving regional brews, sausage plates and raclette, a Swiss dish. The resort will also begin the Snow Rangers program, which offers season-long backcountry touring and avalanche awareness training for ski team kids ages 1218. Diamond Peak This year Diamond Peak, in Incline Village, will feature terrain-based teaching, more dates for its Last Tracks events, improved gladed skiing and riding, a reciprocal pass relationship with Homewood Mountain Resort and increased snowmaking capacity. Forest thinning during the summer helped reduce fire danger, while also adding new offpiste terrain in the trees between Battleborn and Sunnyside, located off of Crystal Ridge. The resort also added five new fan guns, boosting its snowmaking fleet by 50 percent.

Heavenly Mountain Resort Heavenly is expanding its Adventure Peak offerings at the top of the gondola to include a four-lane zip line center, a treetop canopy tour, two ropes courses and an additional 3,000-foot-long zip line as part of the resort’s Epic Discovery program, a campaign designed to connect families and non-skiers with national forests. Heavenly will also extend its Unbuckle at Tamarack après ski parties to the outdoor deck at Tamarack Lodge, with special guest DJ performances throughout the season.


Homewood Mountain Resort Homewood has expanded its grooming fleet in order to ease the learning curve for firsttime skiers and snowboarders by incorporating man-made berms and gullies as part of the resort’s Smart Slopes beginner terrain. The resort has also teamed up with Pacific Crest Snowcats to offer a new specialty lodging package, The Backcountry Experience. The resort also welcomes new Executive Chef Mike Davis to the West Shore Café and Inn this season, along with a new menu. Kirkwood Mountain Resort Kirkwood will partner with slopestyle legend Bobby Brown and Red Bull to bring twelve of the best riders together for MegaSlope 2.0 to showcase their skills on a custom-built course on the resort’s backside that will be twice the size of the Olympic course in Sochi. This resort’s ski and ride school is also embracing the latest evolution of Vail Resort’s EpicMix technology, EpicMix Academy, which provides an interactive platform for participants in ski and snowboard lessons to earn pins, track their progress and get tips on how to become more proficient on the slopes. Mt. Rose-Ski Tahoe Mt. Rose has added a few tech-friendly upgrades in the way of expanded Wi-Fi service throughout the base area and the ability to pre-purchase lift tickets and lessons in advance through a streamlined e-commerce site. Northstar California This season Northstar is renovating the cabins on its Big Springs Gondola and welcoming the Ripperoo Riglet Park for its first full season of operation. The park features specialized terrain to help 3-6 year olds become comfortable on a snowboard sooner. The resort will also host the Sprint U.S. Snowboarding and Visa U.S. Freeskiing Grand Prix Jan. 9-12. The event is one of the last Olympic qualifying events before the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi Sierra-AT-Tahoe Sierra-at-Tahoe has invested more than $4.5 million in a new base area facility and adjacent plaza that will add more than 9,000 square feet of retail space, demo centers and restaurant options. As part of the expansion, guests will be able to enjoy a new sun deck, complete with lounge chairs and fire pits. The venue will be the site of a new spring concert series showcasing touring acts from around the region. Sierra is also expanding its highly successful Yoda’s Riglet Park to include a Burton Star Wars Echo Base, which will give kids ages 7-12 the opportunity to learn how to snowboard by incorporating terrain-based teaching.


Squaw Valley Squaw has unveiled a new Wanderlust Yoga Studio building on the success of its annual Wanderlust Festival. The resort is also welcoming a fleet of Mtn Roots Food Trucks serving an eclectic mix of regionally and sustainably sourced food that can be enjoyed on nearby outdoor tables. On the slopes, families can explore the new Teaching Tykes private lessons instructing parents how to teach their little ones to ski or ride. Sugar Bowl Resort Sugar Bowl Resort is installing the $3 million Crow’s Peak chairlift, adding more than 150 acres of advanced/expert terrain, including two new groomed runs, wind-protected glades, steeps and chutes. The resort is also building a new $4.5 million Sport Haus Aquatic and Fitness Center available for use by guests staying within the resort’s snowbound village. Now entering its second year of managing the adjacent Royal Gorge Cross Country Center, Sugar Bowl continues to expand the offerings available at Royal Gorge Cross Country Center to include more than 200 km of trails, snowbike-specific trails and the Sierra Snowkite Center, the first and only resort-based snowkiting center in California. Sources: Ski Lake Tahoe, Diamond Peak Ski Resort

 


Bowl For Families raises more than $20K Tahoe Family Solutions and Bowl For Families presenting sponsors — The North lake Tahoe Bonanza, Diamonds by Shai, and Bowl Incline — are pleased to announce the prize winners in our 2013 bowl-a thon. More than $20,000 was raised on Sept. 28, as teams of bowlers gathered at Bowl Incline to support TFS. All proceeds from the event support the community initiatives of TFS in providing affordable mental health care, summer camping opportunities and homework help club at Incline Elementary school. Prize Winners: 1. Grand Prize: A 4 carat diamond tennis bracelet from “Diamonds by Shai”— Cliff Dobler 2. Most money raised: $500 Visa Gift Card — Jeremy Schweitzer 3. Most Sponsors: $250 Visa Gift Card — Jeremy Schweitzer 4. Team total money raised: Four $50 Bowl Incline Certificates — Ellie Dobler’s Team 5. High Game (211): $200 Big Water Grille Certificate —Thomas Millazo 6. Low Game (58): $100 Panache Gift Certificate — Ana Abrudon 7. High Team Score (675): Four $50 Incline Spirits and Cigars Certificates — Thomas Millazo’s Team 8. Early Bird Drawing : $200 Potlatch Gift Certificate — Lori Pommernck Bowl for Families is a key event for TFS programming, and our organization is grateful for the efforts of the Bowling Committee, all participants, prize sponsors and our lane sponsors: Incline Spirits and Cigars, The Potlatch, Sierra Verde Home Design Center, Big Water Grille, Rotary Club of Incline Village, Kissino Pasta Sauce, Village Market, Perfect Workout, Sierra Family Pharmacies, T’s Mesquite Rotissere, Perri and Gary Finch, Bowl Incline,


Dress the Part(y), North Lake Tahoe Bonanza, BSM Consulting, Rookies Sports Bar & Grill, and Susan and Mark Herron. Tahoe Family Solutions is a 501(c)3 nonprofit corporation with the objective to strengthen the family fabric in the Tahoe Basin.  


Ski Lake Tahoe: A Guide to Tahoe Ski Resorts Welcome to your one-stop resource for everything skiing and riding related in Lake Tahoe. Get ready for skiing epic powder stashes, cruisey corduroy groomers and all the snow you can handle this season.

  Lake Tahoe Ski Resort Map:


Lake Tahoe Ski Resorts: Alpine Meadows This mountain mesmerizes us with perfect powder that lingers days after a storm; grants moments of clarity on quiet traverses through snow-covered trees; and converts visitors to locals with seven open bowls, gentle, top-tobottom cruisers and forested glades.

Boreal A leader in the terrain parks, Boreal offers terrain park features throughout the mountain for all ability levels. Boreal Mountain Resort offsets 100 percent of its electricity by purchasing green power.

Diamond Peak Recognized for its family friendly atmosphere, incredible lake views and perfectly groomed runs, Diamond Peak has 655 acres of terrain with a peak elevation of 8,540 feet and a professional and welcoming staff.

Donner Ski Ranch One of California’s first ski resorts, Donner Ski Ranch is located on historic US Route 40 high atop Donner Summit. On Donner Summit you’ll find an atmosphere that is relaxing and carefree, harkening back to times past.

Granlibakken Granlibakken is family owned, occupying 74 wooded acres in a picturesque mountain valley. It is a great place to avoid the crowds of larger Lake Tahoe ski resorts, while enjoying a day of skiing right out your back door.

Heavenly Besides easy access to the South Lake Tahoe resort, visitors can enjoy the variety of amenities and facilities that are provided. On the mountain, riders and skiers can enjoy groomed runs, tree runs in the back-country and terrain park adventure.

Homewood Deemed the gem of Lake Tahoe’s West Shore by SKI Magazine, the 1,260-acre mountain offers unobstructed views of the lake and surrounding peaks. The historic setting of Tahoe’s West Shore and a family focused winter experience make Homewood unique.

Kirkwood With an average snowfall of more than 600 inches, skiers and riders can expect to find ample powder skiing and riding for their enjoyment. In 2009, Ski Magazine ranked this Sierra Crest resort as one of the nation’s top 10.

Mt. Rose Mt. Rose is the closest resort to the Reno/Tahoe International Airport, and just 25 minutes from Reno’s 17,000 hotel rooms. Mt. Rose is a good choice for the first and last day of your Lake Tahoe vacation.

Northstar California Northstar hosts many renown park events, and introduces new terrain and features in its award-winning terrain parks, which were recently ranked third in the country by readers of Transworld Snowboarding Magazine.

Sierra-at-Tahoe The 42-year-old resort focuses on family programs while offering a wide range of on-the-mountain activities with its multitude of well-received terrain parks and superpipe.

Soda Springs The welcoming small resort spirit and relaxed atmosphere of days past can still be discovered at Soda Springs, located just off I-80 at Donner Summit.

Squaw Valley USA Home to the 1960 Winter Olympics, Squaw is known for steep skiing and gorgeous views of Lake Tahoe; definitely one of the jewels of the region.


Sugar Bowl Sugar Bowl is a place of precipitous peaks, steep narrow chutes and wide open bowls. It receives more snow than almost anywhere in North America with more than 500 inches of snow per year!

Tahoe Donner Wide-open bowls, uncrowded slopes, great beginner terrain, excellent grooming and a friendly, courteous staff make it a great place to ride. The resort’s small size allows its staff to deliver the personal touch families are often looking for.

 


Alaska Airlines Kicks Off the Ski Season With More Nonstop Flights and Free Skiing Throughout the Western United States and Canada PRNW - Wed Nov 06, 10:54AM CST

SEATTLE , Nov. 6, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Alaska Airlines is rolling out great deals for skiers, snowboarders and those seeking a fun winter getaway, with new flights and discounts at major winter recreation areas throughout the West. Alaska is starting new nonstop flights between Portland and Reno/Tahoe, Calif., on Nov. 8 , between Seattle and Steamboat Springs, Colo. , on Dec. 18 , and between San Diego and Mammoth, Calif., on Dec. 19 . This is addition to the airline's increase in flights between Los Angeles and Mammoth, starting Dec. 1 , and seasonal service from Seattle and Los Angelesto Sun Valley, Idaho , starting Dec. 14 . "With Alaska Airlines' new service this winter, we now offer the most nonstop flights to the most winter resorts from the Pacific Northwest," said Joe Sprague , vice president of marketing. "And now our travelers can receive discounts and even ski free at select resort partners when they fly Alaska Airlines." Travelers simply need to show their Alaska Airlines boarding pass to receive discounts, which range from free lift tickets when accompanied with a mountain stay to free night skiing, free ski or board rental and other offers. Offers vary depending on the resort. Participating resort partners include: Eaglecrest ( Alaska ), Mammoth Mountain and Squaw Valley (Calif.), Steamboat (Colo.), Sun Valley ( Idaho ), Big Sky and Whitefish (Mont.), Mount Bachelor (Ore.), Mission Ridge (Wash.), and Big White ( Canada ). Discount offers are good today through the end of the ski season, traditionally mid-April. For complete rules and details, visit www.alaskaair.com or call 1-800-ALASKAAIR (1-800-252-7522 or TTY/TDD line 1-800-392-0228). Several of the flights will be operated by Alaska Airlines' regional partners Horizon Air, using 76-seat Bombardier Q400s, and SkyWest Airlines, using 70-seat Bombardier CRJ-700 regional jets. When flying Horizon- and SkyWest-operated flights, customers can enjoy free soft drinks and Starbucks coffee, A la Cart planeside baggage service, and complimentary Northwest wine and microbrews for passengers 21 years and older. Alaska Airlines, a subsidiary of Alaska Air Group (NYSE: ALK), together with its partner regional airlines, serves nearly 100 cities through an expansive network in Alaska , the Lower 48,Hawaii , Canada and Mexico . Alaska Airlines has ranked "Highest in Customer Satisfaction Among Traditional Network Carriers" in the J.D. Power and Associates North America Airline Satisfaction Study SM for six consecutive years from 2008 to 2013. For reservations, visit www.alaskaair.com . For more news and information, visit the Alaska Airlines Newsroom at www.alaskaair.com/newsroom .


SOURCE Alaska Air Group  


North America, Ski, Ski & Snowboard, Snowboard, Travel → 

Living Like a Local with the Mountain Collective Pass, Part 1 By Katie Coakley / @KatieCoakley / November 6, 2013

In the words of Ned Stark, “Winter is coming.” In our case, however, winter means ski season. Instead of polishing swords, we’ll be waxing boards. But, the choices to be made are just as serious: where to partake of some powdery pleasure? If you choose to align with the Mountain Collective Pass, you’ll get two days of skiing and riding in six regions in two countries and four states, which should keep your footloose and fancy free nature content. But how do you eek every last moment of pleasure from this golden opportunity? How do you roll into a new resort and know that you’re living like a local? It takes research. And stealth. And lots of bribing to get locals to give up the goods. But never fear: we’ve got you covered. Here are the tips and tricks for living like a local with the Mountain Collective Pass.

AltaSnowbird The Locals: Erme Catino, local skier and writer, living in Alta. Jonathan Scoville, front desk manager at Goldminer’s Daughter Lodge in Alta. Elisabeth Osmeloski, a nine-year resident at Snowbird who frequently works FTCL (from the chair lift).

Day One: Alta Morning

If you’re staying at a lodge at Alta, breakfast and dinners are included, so take advantage of the free fuel before you hit the slopes. Alta Java, located near the Albion Lodge is the spot for coffee and homemade pumpkin bread; order a “Susie,” a chai with a plenty of espresso. Then continue on with your day, fully charged. The Mountain

The best place to be on a powder morning is Collins Chair. The High Traverse (High T) is where everyone wants to be and, for a first-timer, it can be intimidating. Like being on a highway, everyone’s racing and once you get on, you either stay on or merge off. However, High T is also the best access to terrain like The Backside and the West Rustler area. Head to High Rustler first thing in the morning. Even if it doesn’t snow,


West Rustler gets a lot of wind and it tends to smooth out, creating great opportunities with a variety of nooks and shoots. For a taste of Alta’s old school charm, ride the Wildcat double chair for great tree skiing and a mixture of micro-terrains. Après and After

When it’s time for après, head to upstairs to Goldminer’s Daughter’s saloon for pizza, beer and views of the High T as the sun sets on the mountain. The Peruvian (known as the P-Dog to locals) has an après scene that even draws folks from Snowbird, with complimentary hors d’oeuvres and popcorn. For a stiffer drink, head to the Sitzmark at the Alta Lodge, a classic ski bar serving up cocktails and free appetizers, complete with a cozy fireplace and plenty of classic ski sweaters. Bonus Intel

Interlodge happens. This is a phenomenon that occurs when it snows so much that the road closes for avalanche control and you’re lodge-bound until it’s safe. You run the risk of receiving a fine if you leave without permission. However, this can also be an amazing experience as you’ll not only get to know your fellow lodgers, but you’ll also be primed and ready for amazing snow when you’re released.

Day Two: Snowbird Morning

Start off with breakfast at the Forklift on the Plaza Deck—it’s the closest spot to the lift at Snowbird and is famous for its dill hash browns. The Mountain

Those lines you see where everyone’s waiting for patrol to drop the ropes to Mineral Basin or Road to Provo? They can be worth it, but you’ve got to be ready for it and move fast. Have a strategy, know where you are going to drop in and don’t hesitate. If you drop in early on the first lap, do your best to make it back to the lift before the masses traverse out. Then keep moving further out on each consecutive lap. Of course, for the best secret powder stashes, you best bet is to chat up a local Bird on the lift. Many Bird locals are actually transplants from other states, so the odds of finding a connection are high. Just play it cool and maybe you’ll have a few new friends to show you the ropes (or where they drop the ropes). Après and After

Make sure to partake of après ski at the Tram Club, which is located—wait for it—under the tram. This sports bar is not only known for its après festivities, but also for its late night hours. To ease those tired muscles, take a soak in the hot tub in the Cliff Spa— there’s a $15 access fee, but it gives you access to the rooftop pool, hot tub and locker facilities to freshen up. Then head up to the Sushi Bar in the Aerie for 50% off apps from 5 p.m. – 6p.m. or check out the Martini Monday, Whiskey Wednesday and Sake Sushi Sunday specials. More in the mood for Mexican? El Chanate has half-off appetizers


from 2-5 pm, on the patio; Thirsty Thursdays is the place for $3 margaritas and $2 drafts all night long. Bonus Intel:

Didn’t get enough of Alta? Take advantage of free after 3 p.m. skiing at the resort or check out Alta’s Nordic skate track, which is free to use (rental equipment is available for about $15). It’s short, but you can make multiple loops the little hills seem like monsters if you’re not used to this alternative snow sport.

Jackson Hole The Locals: Carl Pelletier: Served as a ski host at the Village; also worked as a night auditor, which allowed him to “ski all day and cook the books all night long.” Cory Carlson, former World Cup Skier and Director of Sales and Marketing at Four Seasons Resort & Residences Jackson Hole. Andrew Whiteford, Jackson athlete and local.

Day One Morning

From Jackson, get ready for the day by making tracks to D.O.G. (Down on Glen) for a handmade, spicy, over-stuffed burrito. Burrito procured, head just down the street to Pearl Street Bagels for a large Shot in the Dark. You’re ready to drive out to the Village, but first, cruise the numerous bus stops to offer a fellow skier (or skiers) a ride. Not only is it good karma, but parking is free in the Ranch Lot if you have three or more in your car. Otherwise, parking is $5. The Mountain

If you get there early enough or the line is small, take the Tram to the summit. Once you disembark, you have two choices: take one of the longest, most amazing runs that you’ll have in your life down the Upper to Lower Hobacks. Or, from the top of the Tram, work Rendezvous Bowl down to the Sublet quad. Back on Sublet, you still might have enough time to get fresh tracks down Bivouac. If the line to the Tram is long, another option is board the Gondola. Once at the top, your goal is make your way to Thunder Quad, where you’ll have a few chances to ski fresh powder. Exit Thunder and go straight into Laramie Bowl which, when it’s full of snow or is freshly groomed is an excellent run. At the bottom of the bowl, hop on the Sublet chair. Sneak through the trees to the top of the Expert Chutes, where there are many options–don’t let the name scare you. At the bottom, pole across a small flat area to give you access to Toilet Bowl. If you find many of the inbounds lines have seen tracks, consider donning a probe, beacon and shovel and head out a boundary gate into Rock Springs.


Après and After

The last lift has closed, but before heading back into Jackson, stop by the Mangy Moose bar at the bottom of resort, which is world famous for its après scene. For a real locals’ favorite for dinner, head to Pica’s Mexican Taqueria for awesome food and outstanding margaritas or head to Pinky G’s for large slices of pizza and tall boys. After dinner, the Rose is an excellent spot for a delicious, high-end cocktail to get things started. From here, it’s off to the historic Wort Hotel’s Silver Dollar Bar to listen to live music. If you are still feeling frisky, saddle up for a few at the Cowboy Bar.

Day Two Morning

Head to Shades for morning grub and strong coffee (you might need it after last night’s shenanigans at the Cowboy Bar). Pick up your extra rider for free parking or utilize the START Bus from town and avoid driving to the mountain all together. The Mountain

Depending on the previous day’s adventures, contemplate taking the Gondola but instead of heading to skier’s right, head left towards the new Casper high speed quad. It’s quick, easy and gives access to many different types of terrain options from rolling blues to more technical moguls and trees in Moran woods. Be sure to stop into Corbet’s Cabin for a hot waffle with butter and brown sugar. When you’re ready to move on, traverse right into “the Crags” or have lunch at the Casper lodge. For more exploring, take the Teewinot lift to the Après Vous lift. Swoosh to far skier’s left and explore the wilds of Saratoga Bowl. You could explore back here for a full day, dropping boulders, hitting powder stash after powder stash and running the gates of lodge pole pines. After a couple of laps in Saratoga, take a cruiser down a groomer back to the base. Après and After

Grab a tram taco and a beer at Nick Wilson’s at the clock tower next to the Tram Dock. If you see a crowd forming, head on over as there’s a good chance that there’s a band. For the best Thai food in a 300 mile radius, check out Teton Thai, located by the Ranch Lot. It might be packed, but wait as it’s worth it. Afterwards, be sure to stop by the Snake River Brew Pub to sample one of their many tasty brews. Bonus Intel

Jackson is susceptible to temperature inversions, particularly during high pressure, and the valley will be filled with a dense, cold fog early in the mornings. Get used to looking at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort’s upper mountain web cams or the Teton Pass Web Cam to see what the weather is like above the fog. It’s common to experience a 40degree temperature swing between the base and summit of the tram. By checking out the weather cams, you can be spinning laps in the sun on the Sublette, Thunder, or Casper lifts while everyone else is drinking a second cup of coffee.


Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows The locals: Amelia Richmond, Senior Public Relations Manager for Squaw Valley & Alpine Meadows. Andy Chapman, the Chief Marketing Officer of the North Lake Tahoe Marketing Co-op.

Day One: Squaw Valley Morning

The lifts open at 9 a.m., so be sure to get a good breakfast before conquering the mountain. Depending on where you’re staying or arriving, check out Wildflour Bakery in the Olympic House base lodge and order a coffee, pizza bagel and chocolate chip cookie. Yes, it’s breakfast, but the cookie is necessary. Or, head to Mountain Nectar in The Village at Squaw Valley for a breakfast burrito. Staying around the lake? Visit the Log Cabin Caffe, home of the famous Arizona French Toast. The Mountain

On a powder day, timing is everything. For expert skiers who want a bit of glory to rehash at après, hit the KT-22 lift and tackle The Nose and huck yourself of the Fingers, the cliff band that’s located under the lift. Even if you’re not ready for this terrain, watch from the chair as it’s always a show. Advanced skiers can watch the show on the Fingers and then head to Red Dog Ridge for the best snow. The KT Saddle is also a great option on a powder day.

Photo Credit: Squaw Valley

Après and After

So you’ve mastered the mountain—head down to Le Chamois (The Chammy) to hang with the locals and perhaps score the inside scoop for the night’s revelries or the next day’s runs. For the best deal in Squaw, head to the Cornice Cantina and ask for a “shifter”: your first PBR is just $1. For the beer connoisseurs, Rocker@Squaw has 13 beers on tap, a nice selection of bottles and 22oz specials. Oh, did you happen to do some filming today? Grab a beer and utilize the Drop-In Video Zone at Rocker@Squaw, where you can upload your GoPro footage and edit it right there. For food on the go, check out the food trucks that are rumbling into Squaw: both MTN ROOTS and Mamasake have food trucks at the base. Bonus Intel

Try a Tahoe Star Tour. New this season, Tahoe Star Tours has partnered with Tahoe Adventure Company to offer star gazing snowshoe tours one Saturday a month from December through April. Tours will take place at the North Tahoe Regional Park in Tahoe Vista, CA, and will include snowshoe rental, poles, a guided snowshoe walk on easy to moderate terrain, permit fees, a laser tour of the night sky and telescopic viewing, plus hot drinks and snacks.


Day Two: Alpine Meadows Morning

Breakfast is the more important meal of the day, so make sure that you stop the Crest Café, conveniently located at the base of Alpine Meadows Road, and order the Bomb Sando for a hearty start to your day. If you’re taking the shuttle up to Alpine Meadows, stop into Treats, for some homemade breakfast lovin’. The Mountain

If the morning dawned with some beautiful Tahoe powder, be prepared to earn your turns all day long. Expert skiers will want to send a prayer down Our Father, located off of the Sherwood Chair. Advanced skiers will want to take Hot Wheels to the Back Bowls, an expansive playground on a powder day and intermediate skiers should check out Scott Ridge, off of the Scott Chair. Make plans to meet up at the Ice Bar (located at the base of the Sherwood Chair) for some hula-hooping, dancing or simply relaxing with a beer and a brat. Après and After

To soak up some sun after your day of powder runs, head to the Sundeck at the main lodge for some grilled goodness and libations. The Last Chair Bar will keep you going way past the last chair—right up until last call, as a matter of fact. If you head back down to the lake and want a once-in-a-lifetime experience, head to the Crystal Bay Steakhouse, one of Frank Sinatra’s old stomping grounds that still has the gilded luxury of bygone days. If there’s a band, stay at the Crystal Bay and dance the night away. Bonus Intel

Relax like a local – No matter where you stay, make sure to pick up a s’mores kit and roast some marshmallows under the stars. A trip to Tahoe in the winter is not complete without a s’more!


Here's Why Pinterest, Pandora, And Square Outsource Their Insanely Awesome Employee Perks Startup AnyPerk arguably provides some of the best perks to startup employees. That's likely why it has attracted some of the hottest tech companies, including Pinterest, Pandora, and Square. AnyPerk helps put startups on par with Google and Facebook when it comes to perks. For $5 per employee per month, startups can offer employees discounted items like movie tickets, gym memberships, cell phone plans, gift cards, and more. Next Monday, AnyPerk will launch a new category of perks focused on ski resorts, AnyPerk Director of Business Development Ilya Tokhner tells Business Insider. That means startups will be able to offer their employees discounted ski lift tickets at 18 of some of the top ski resorts nationwide. In northern California, AnyPerk offers discounted lift tickets from popular resorts like Heavenly, Northstar, and Kirkwood. Over on the east coast, AnyPerk is working with resorts like Killington, Sugarloaf, and Sunday River. That's all thanks to AnyPerk's Craig Bradley, who closed these deals under Tokhner's direction. AnyPerk also recently added a new transportation category, featuring perks from Lyft, Side Car, Zipcar, Getaround, Instantcab, Tickengo, FlightCar, SilverCar, and Ground Link. "There isn't a company in the transportation industry that we're not currently in talks with," Tokhner tells us. "This vertical will grow substantially over the coming months." In the last year, on average, AnyPerk has grown 30% month over month. "Now I'm not talking about any fluffy numbers here like page views or downloads, or even users," Tokhner said in a follow-up email. "I'm talking about revenue — money in the bank, a.k.a. Benjamins, cheddar, dough, paper, ducats, loot, G's, cabbage, and clams. Our revenue, for the past 12 months has been 30% m/o/m on average, and that figure is not slowing down. If anything, it's growing."

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/anyperk-offering-discounted-lift-tickets-201311#ixzz2o3M3Gjwl 


  Ten Ways to Get Ready for Ski Season Carving Up The Groomers The leaves are turning and the days are getting shorter. That means just one thing: The first ski trip is just a wax job and a blizzard away. Whether you're a gear junkie, gym rat or powder hound, it's time to warm up to the idea of winter before the snow really starts to fall. But if you aren't quite ready for winter, here are a few preseason tips and preparatory ideas to get ready for skiing and snowboarding in what hopefully will be a season packed with powder days (or at least a few more than last year). Photo caption: Tara Moore carving up the groomers at Mt. Rose Ski Resort, Lake Tahoe.

1. Go Shopping for the Latest and Greatest Winter-sports Gear There is never a shortage of innovative new gear and gadgets for skiers and snowboarders, and the 2012-13 season is looking good in this respect. For the coming winter, some of the new products that are making waves in the marketplace are the boot-tightening Booster Strap (making for more precise turns and better control), the touchscreen-friendly Outdoor Research Sensor Gloves, Loki Gear Ripcor Jackets with retractable insulation for those warm days, and the one and only Zeal Optics iON Goggle, featuring a built in high-definition video camera and an in-goggle viewfinder.

2. Comb Craigslist for Unused Used Gear There is a treasure trove of used gear on Craigslist with very low mileage. Would-be skiers and snowboarders realize that their gear has become clutter, and sell it to the highest bidder. While boots can often be iffy (sizing is difficult), skis and boards are often available for pennies on the dollar relative to what the sellers originally paid for them, and often with nary a scratch on the wax. There are also plenty of poles, jackets, and other cold-weather gear. The best Craigslist city sites for ski gear are predictably close to the slopes: Denver, Salt Lake City, and Reno. 3. Hit the Gym In ski towns, local gyms often offer ski-specific exercise classes and programs to get those ski legs ready for the slopes before it really starts snowing. Elsewhere there is no reason skiers can't put together their own ski-oriented workouts. Running, rollerblading, and using the elliptical machine are all good general ski-prep cardiovascular workouts. Squats and lunges help strengthen those allimportant quadriceps, while step-ups and deadlifts will help beef up hamstrings and glutes, likewise critical for maintaining good form on the slopes. Additionally, core-strengthening exercises such as planking and bicycling are highly recommended.


4. Try the Sweetspot Trainer The SkiA Sweetspot Trainer is one of the few products on the market designed for keeping one's ski skills sharp during the summertime. Consisting of a pair of devices that strap onto the user's ski boots, the Sweetspot Trainer features interchangeable blocks that simulate the "sweet spot" for a skier's center of gravity. Once a skier learns the sweet spot's location, they can work on making a whole range of different moves while maintaining balance. The package comes with four sizes of balance blocks aimed at beginners, intermediates, and experts, and a booklet covering training exercises. Retail price is about US$70. 5. Start off the Season with a Refresher Lesson No matter how long one has been on skis or a snowboard, there are plenty of reasons for a refresher lesson at the outset of the 2012-13 season. Besides catching bad habits at their most malleable and giving thinking points for the season ahead, and whether the goal is to shake the rust off or polish an already advanced product, there are a wide range of general lessons as well as clinics that target a specific skill, such as mogul skiing or backcountry preparedness. Many resorts offer package deals pairing lessons with season passes or lodging. 6. Book Early, with Guaranteed Snow Thanks to last season's paltry snowfall totals at many resorts, a number of resorts and lodging are offering refundable (or at least changeable) reservations and packages. The catch: They are only refundable if the snow total for the season has yet to hit a predetermined benchmark. The strategy means skiers and 'boarders are no longer booking in the face of the fickle whims of Mother Nature, and the resort is willing to share some of the risk if the snow simply isn't here. Most of these deals are pegged to totals that increase as the season progresses. For example, Teton Mountain Lodge at Jackson Hole Mountain Resort is offering a "Powder Guarantee" package: If the conditions aren't to your liking, you can change your dates and go later in the season. 7. Buy a Season Pass No matter what zip code a skier or snowboarder calls home, a season pass can be a worthwhile investment. Many resorts price peak-season lift tickets over $100, meaning the price of a $500 pass can easily be made up over one ski vacation. This season, adventurous skiers and boarders may want to look into the new Mountain Collective pass, offering two free tickets apiece at Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows in California, Jackson Hole in Wyoming, Alta in Utah, and Aspen/Snowmass in Colorado, plus discounts on subsequent lift tickets and lodging as well as other perks, for $349. Individual passes are easily had at www.liftopia.com 8. Plan a Winter Visit to a National Park Forget the glitzy ski resorts. The true soul of winter is more easily found in the national parks of the West. Only a few resorts have lift-served downhill skiing, but the peace and quiet of winter is


probably best experienced on cross-country skis or snowshoes. Take Yellowstone. In winter, it feels as if you have the park to yourself, the wildlife and geysers are as visible as ever, and the snowfrosted views are spectacular. Meditate on the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone with a fresh winter coat, and you'll find wintertime zen in no time.

9. Get off the Beaten Path Sure, the big-name marquee resorts are fun to cross off the bucket list, but skiers and snowboarders almost always get more bang for their buck at the smaller local resorts. Not only are these mom-andpop resorts a better value, you'll find fewer skiers and shorter lift lines to boot, so it becomes easy to get more runs per ski day. And the personality of a dinky little ski hill more often than not outshines the brand-name resorts, where the latest and greatest condo developments diverts the focus from where it belongs: on the slopes.

10. Pray for Snow After one of the lightest snow years in memory, it's time to pull out all of the stops and shift every last snow-centric superstition into overdrive. Do a crazy blizzard dance. Give tidings to Ullr, the Norse god of snow. Wash your car. (It always snows the day after you get it detailed.) Rub the snow buddha's belly. Or just send good vibes to the mountains. The early signs are good the Rockies saw snow several times in September but they are just that: early. We demand plenty of the white stuff from Thanksgiving to Easter. We deserve it. Photo caption: Skiing the slopes at the Alta Ski Area in Little Cottonwood Canyon, Utah.

 


By Bob Ecker, Special to Tribune Newspapers 6:31 p.m. EST, November 5, 2013

The ski resort world seems to be mirroring the American corporate landscape, with the "big boys" buying up smaller resorts through mergers and acquisitions. But before you bemoan the loss of "your" independent ski hill, keep in mind that such corporate purchases can be a good thing. Vail Resorts, KSL Capital Partners and Powdr Corp. are among corporations that have bought chunks of the ski world. One upside is that they have the resources to pour investments into their new holdings, such as stateof-the-art snow-making equipment, faster chairlifts and new dining options. Another gain: passes that let skiers sample several resorts. Thus, there are superb values out there this year. Plus, the western side of the continent already has seen a good amount of snow, and a few resorts, such as Colorado's Copper Mountain, opened Nov. 1. Many others plan to open in November, a good omen for the industry. Get a pass Make it Epic: The popular Epic Pass (epicpass.com) offered by Vail Resorts has expanded, so you can now ski at a whopping 26 resorts worldwide. The full Epic Pass, $729, allows unlimited access to all Vail Resorts properties in the United States, plus five days of skiing at selected resorts in Austria, France and Switzerland. The U.S. resorts are Arapahoe Basin, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Eldora, Keystone and Vail in Colorado; Canyons in Park City, Utah; Heavenly, Kirkwood and Northstar at Lake Tahoe, Calif.; Afton Alps in Minnesota; and Mount Brighton in Michigan. The European skiing is in Arlberg, Austria; Les 3 Vallees, France; and Verbier, Switzerland. Starting Nov. 22, there is a race for the first person to ski at all 26 resorts (epicrace.epicpass.com). The prize for the first 10: a lifetime Epic Pass. All in all, the pass is an amazing deal for people with a healthy ski appetite and a passport that needs new European stamps. The Mountain Collective: Back and better than ever, this pass is a great deal if you want to experience some of the finest resorts in North America this season. The Mountain Collective, currently $379, includes two ski days at Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows in the Lake Tahoe area of California, two days at Alta/Snowbird in Utah, two days at Aspen/Snowmass in Colorado, two days at the impressive Jackson Hole in Wyoming, two days at Mammoth in California and two days at Whistler/Blackcomb in British Columbia. More details: mountaincollective.com. Powder Alliance: All resorts aren't run by mega-corporations just yet. Twelve plucky independent ski resorts have banded together to form the Powder Alliance (powderalliance.com). This is the inaugural season for this skier's dozen group of smaller powder havens throughout the American West. The resorts are Crested Butte in Colorado; Snowbasin in Utah; Angel Fire in New Mexico; Arizona Snowbowl in Arizona; Sierra-at-Tahoe, China Peak and Mountain High in California; Timberline and Mount Hood Skibowl in Oregon; Stevens Pass in Washington; Schweitzer in Idaho; and Bridger Bowl in Montana. After buying a premium pass to one of the Powder Alliance resorts, guests then can have three free ski days at each of the other resorts. More pass love: With any full-season pass to Utah's Alta Ski Area (alta.com), Deer Valley Resort (deervalley.com), Park City Mountain Resort (parkcitymountain.com) or Snowbird Resort (snowbird.com), pass holders will get three free days of lift access at the other three mountains this season. And the Lake Tahoe area's Sugarbowl (sugarbowl.com) has teamed up with Sun Valley, Idaho (sunvalley.com), to combine higherend passes between two of America's oldest ski resorts. Ask for the Sweet Deal package.


Lake Tahoe news Lake Tahoe area resorts (nine within a short drive of the Reno/Tahoe airport) together have invested more than $100 million in capital improvements intended to enhance the guest experience with new lifts (Crow's Peak at Sugar Bowl), base renovations (Sierra-at-Tahoe), new restaurants and more. The region as a whole is gearing up in a bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics. This season, Squaw Valley (squaw.com) and Alpine Meadows (skialpine.com) have invested more than $2 million in state-of-the-art snow-making guns, new piping and system upgrades. They also have spent nearly $ 1.5 million on five state-of-the-art snow cats. Mount Rose (skirose.com), an outstanding family-friendly resort less than half an hour from the Reno airport, has begun a $23.5 million expansion and this year added almost 100 acres of terrain, expanded snow-making capabilities and built a new restaurant up top. The resort has partnered with various Reno casino properties, such as the Eldorado Hotel (eldoradoreno.com), to offer some attractive ski/stay packages. Sierra-at-Tahoe (sierraattahoe.com) has invested $4.5 million in a new 9,000-square-foot plaza in front of the South Lake resort. The plaza includes a large open deck area with fire pits, live music and lounge chairs, plus a new restaurant and retail shops. Additionally, Sierra pass holders can receive free early- and late-season lift tickets at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. The premier hotel in the region, the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe (ritzcarlton.com/laketahoe), located midmountain at Northstar, is debuting Backyard Bar & Barbecue on its patio, serving St. Louis-style ribs and other goodies. Ski Mammoth Celebrating its 60th anniversary, the huge Mammoth Mountain ski resort (mammothmountain.com) has a number of new temptations this season. The charming Lakefront Restaurant is going to a seasonal and organic menu, while fixture Chef Fred is opening the Underground Lounge below the Village Gondola. Live music will be featured at Underground, along with a bar and VIP area. But there won't be only dancing and drinking; chef Frederic Pierrel will be dishing out his "tapatizers," his unique take on tapas and appetizers. There also are added flights into the Mammoth Yosemite Airport this season on United and Alaska airlines. Kids ski free Colorado's Keystone resort (keystoneresort.com), which also opened Nov. 1, has a great deal aimed at families. Every day this season, children 12 or younger ski or snowboard for free at Keystone when staying two or more nights in one of Keystone's numerous accommodations. There are no blackout dates. "Keystone has pulled out all the stops when it comes to the best family ski experience," said John Buhler, vice president and general manager of Keystone. Keystone is about an hour from Denver International Airport. More ski tips For something different but well worth the trip, try visiting Schweitzer Mountain Resort (schweitzer.com). Located in the Selkirk Mountains outside of Sandpoint, Idaho, this lovely resort is about an hour from Spokane and about 45 minutes from the luxurious Coeur d'Alene Resort. Schweitzer is a hidden mountaintop jewel with a couple of big bowls offering serious skiing without the crowds. And if you've never skied Colorado's Telluride, put it on your list. For serious skiers, there's nothing like that rugged box canyon. Oh, Canada Whistler/Blackcomb (whistlerblackcomb.com), the largest ski resort in North America, is replacing its older Harmony high-speed quad chairlift with a new Doppelmayr high-speed six-pack, increasing the speed up to the Harmony area by 50 percent. And the Blackcomb side's new Crystal Ridge Express high-speed quad will be 65 percent faster than the existing triple chair. Besides the Crystal Ridge Express itself, the placement of this lift has changed, and the new alignment will make it quicker to return to the Glacier Express chair, accessing areas such as Blackcomb Glacier, Horstman Glacier and Spanky's. The resort also hosts one of the biggest and best lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender ski weeks in the world: Whistler WinterPRIDE, Jan. 26-Feb. 2. When in the Whistler Village, don't miss dining at Araxi, a serious fine-dining restaurant specializing in seafood.


Big White (bigwhite.com), on the inland side of British Columbia, is celebrating its 50th anniversary and offering fun ideas, such as the Groomers and Grapes package, which brings together a fine mountain experience with wine tastings in the nearby Okanagan Valley. Whether purchasing a great pass deal or just hitting the slopes for a couple of days, act soon because the prices go up as the snow comes down.  


Mega-passes hit slopes The ski resort world seems to be mirroring the American corporate landscape, with the "big boys" buying up smaller resorts through mergers and acquisitions. But before you bemoan the loss of "your" independent ski hill, keep in mind that such corporate purchases can be a good thing. Vail Resorts, KSL Capital Partners and Powdr Corp. are among corporations that have bought chunks of the ski world. One upside is that they have the resources to pour investments into their new holdings, such as state-of-the-art snow-making equipment, faster chairlifts and new dining options. Another gain: passes that let skiers sample several resorts. Thus, there are superb values out there this year. Plus, the western side of the continent already has seen a good amount of snow, and a few resorts, such as Colorado's Copper Mountain, opened Nov. 1. Many others plan to open in November, a good omen for the industry. Get a pass Make it Epic: The popular Epic Pass (epicpass.com) offered by Vail Resorts has expanded, so you can now ski at a whopping 26 resorts worldwide. The full Epic Pass, $729, allows unlimited access to all Vail Resorts properties in the United States, plus five days of skiing at selected resorts in Austria, France and Switzerland. The U.S. resorts are Arapahoe Basin, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Eldora, Keystone and Vail in Colorado; Canyons in Park City, Utah; Heavenly, Kirkwood and Northstar at Lake Tahoe, Calif.; Afton Alps in Minnesota; and Mount Brighton in Michigan. The European skiing is in Arlberg, Austria; Les 3 Vallees, France; and Verbier, Switzerland. Starting Nov. 22, there is a race for the first person to ski at all 26 resorts (epicrace.epicpass.com). The prize for the first 10: a lifetime Epic Pass. All in all, the pass is an amazing deal for people with a healthy ski appetite and a passport that needs new European stamps. The Mountain Collective: Back and better than ever, this pass is a great deal if you want to experience some of the finest resorts in North America this season. The Mountain Collective, currently $379, includes two ski days at Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows in the Lake Tahoe area of California, two days at Alta/Snowbird in Utah, two days at Aspen/Snowmass in Colorado, two days at the impressive Jackson Hole in Wyoming, two days at Mammoth in California and two days at Whistler/Blackcomb in British Columbia. More details: mountaincollective.com. Powder Alliance: All resorts aren't run by mega-corporations just yet. Twelve plucky independent ski resorts have banded together to form the Powder Alliance (powderalliance.com). This is the inaugural season for this skier's dozen group of smaller powder havens throughout the American West. The resorts are Crested Butte in Colorado; Snowbasin in Utah; Angel Fire in New Mexico; Arizona Snowbowl in Arizona; Sierra-at-Tahoe, China Peak and Mountain High in California; Timberline and Mount Hood Skibowl in Oregon; Stevens Pass in Washington; Schweitzer in Idaho; and Bridger Bowl in Montana. After buying a premium pass to one of the Powder Alliance resorts, guests then can have three free ski days at each of the other resorts. More pass love: With any full-season pass to Utah's Alta Ski Area (alta.com), Deer Valley Resort (deervalley.com), Park City Mountain Resort (parkcitymountain.com) or Snowbird Resort (snowbird.com), pass holders will get three free days of lift access at the other three mountains this season. And the Lake Tahoe area's Sugarbowl (sugarbowl.com) has teamed up with Sun Valley,


Idaho (sunvalley.com), to combine higher-end passes between two of America's oldest ski resorts. Ask for the Sweet Deal package. Lake Tahoe news Lake Tahoe area resorts (nine within a short drive of the Reno/Tahoe airport) together have invested more than $100 million in capital improvements intended to enhance the guest experience with new lifts (Crow's Peak at Sugar Bowl), base renovations (Sierra-at-Tahoe), new restaurants and more. The region as a whole is gearing up in a bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics. This season, Squaw Valley (squaw.com) and Alpine Meadows (skialpine.com) have invested more than $2 million in state-of-the-art snow-making guns, new piping and system upgrades. They also have spent nearly $ 1.5 million on five state-of-the-art snow cats. Mount Rose (skirose.com), an outstanding family-friendly resort less than half an hour from the Reno airport, has begun a $23.5 million expansion and this year added almost 100 acres of terrain, expanded snow-making capabilities and built a new restaurant up top. The resort has partnered with various Reno casino properties, such as the Eldorado Hotel (eldoradoreno.com), to offer some attractive ski/stay packages. Sierra-at-Tahoe (sierraattahoe.com) has invested $4.5 million in a new 9,000-square-foot plaza in front of the South Lake resort. The plaza includes a large open deck area with fire pits, live music and lounge chairs, plus a new restaurant and retail shops. Additionally, Sierra pass holders can receive free early- and late-season lift tickets at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. The premier hotel in the region, the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe (ritzcarlton.com/laketahoe), located midmountain at Northstar, is debuting Backyard Bar & Barbecue on its patio, serving St. Louis-style ribs and other goodies. Ski Mammoth Celebrating its 60th anniversary, the huge Mammoth Mountain ski resort (mammothmountain.com) has a number of new temptations this season. The charming Lakefront Restaurant is going to a seasonal and organic menu, while fixture Chef Fred is opening the Underground Lounge below the Village Gondola. Live music will be featured at Underground, along with a bar and VIP area. But there won't be only dancing and drinking; chef Frederic Pierrel will be dishing out his "tapatizers," his unique take on tapas and appetizers. There also are added flights into the Mammoth Yosemite Airport this season on United and Alaska airlines. Kids ski free Colorado's Keystone resort (keystoneresort.com), which also opened Nov. 1, has a great deal aimed at families. Every day this season, children 12 or younger ski or snowboard for free at Keystone when staying two or more nights in one of Keystone's numerous accommodations. There are no blackout dates. "Keystone has pulled out all the stops when it comes to the best family ski experience," said John Buhler, vice president and general manager of Keystone. Keystone is about an hour from Denver International Airport. More ski tips For something different but well worth the trip, try visiting Schweitzer Mountain Resort (schweitzer.com). Located in the Selkirk Mountains outside of Sandpoint, Idaho, this lovely resort is about an hour from Spokane and about 45 minutes from the luxurious Coeur d'Alene Resort. Schweitzer is a hidden mountaintop jewel with a couple of big bowls offering serious skiing without the crowds. And if you've never skied Colorado's Telluride, put it on your list. For serious skiers, there's nothing like that rugged box canyon.


Oh, Canada Whistler/Blackcomb (whistlerblackcomb.com), the largest ski resort in North America, is replacing its older Harmony high-speed quad chairlift with a new Doppelmayr high-speed six-pack, increasing the speed up to the Harmony area by 50 percent. And the Blackcomb side's new Crystal Ridge Express high-speed quad will be 65 percent faster than the existing triple chair. Besides the Crystal Ridge Express itself, the placement of this lift has changed, and the new alignment will make it quicker to return to the Glacier Express chair, accessing areas such as Blackcomb Glacier, Horstman Glacier and Spanky's. The resort also hosts one of the biggest and best lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender ski weeks in the world: Whistler WinterPRIDE, Jan. 26-Feb. 2. When in the Whistler Village, don't miss dining at Araxi, a serious fine-dining restaurant specializing in seafood. Big White (bigwhite.com), on the inland side of British Columbia, is celebrating its 50th anniversary and offering fun ideas, such as the Groomers and Grapes package, which brings together a fine mountain experience with wine tastings in the nearby Okanagan Valley. Whether purchasing a great pass deal or just hitting the slopes for a couple of days, act soon because the prices go up as the snow comes down.

     


Mega-passes hit slopes By Bob Ecker, Special to Tribune Newspapers 6:31 p.m. EST, November 5, 2013

The ski resort world seems to be mirroring the American corporate landscape, with the "big boys" buying up smaller resorts through mergers and acquisitions. But before you bemoan the loss of "your" independent ski hill, keep in mind that such corporate purchases can be a good thing. Vail Resorts, KSL Capital Partners and Powdr Corp. are among corporations that have bought chunks of the ski world. One upside is that they have the resources to pour investments into their new holdings, such as stateof-the-art snow-making equipment, faster chairlifts and new dining options. Another gain: passes that let skiers sample several resorts. Thus, there are superb values out there this year. Plus, the western side of the continent already has seen a good amount of snow, and a few resorts, such as Colorado's Copper Mountain, opened Nov. 1. Many others plan to open in November, a good omen for the industry. Get a pass Make it Epic: The popular Epic Pass (epicpass.com) offered by Vail Resorts has expanded, so you can now ski at a whopping 26 resorts worldwide. The full Epic Pass, $729, allows unlimited access to all Vail Resorts properties in the United States, plus five days of skiing at selected resorts in Austria, France and Switzerland. The U.S. resorts are Arapahoe Basin, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Eldora, Keystone and Vail in Colorado; Canyons in Park City, Utah; Heavenly, Kirkwood and Northstar at Lake Tahoe, Calif.; Afton Alps in Minnesota; and Mount Brighton in Michigan. The European skiing is in Arlberg, Austria; Les 3 Vallees, France; and Verbier, Switzerland. Starting Nov. 22, there is a race for the first person to ski at all 26 resorts (epicrace.epicpass.com). The prize for the first 10: a lifetime Epic Pass. All in all, the pass is an amazing deal for people with a healthy ski appetite and a passport that needs new European stamps. The Mountain Collective: Back and better than ever, this pass is a great deal if you want to experience some of the finest resorts in North America this season. The Mountain Collective, currently $379, includes two ski days at Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows in the Lake Tahoe area of California, two days at Alta/Snowbird in Utah, two days at Aspen/Snowmass in Colorado, two days at the impressive Jackson Hole in Wyoming, two days at Mammoth in California and two days at Whistler/Blackcomb in British Columbia. More details: mountaincollective.com. Powder Alliance: All resorts aren't run by mega-corporations just yet. Twelve plucky independent ski resorts have banded together to form the Powder Alliance (powderalliance.com). This is the inaugural season for this skier's dozen group of smaller powder havens throughout the American West. The resorts are Crested Butte in Colorado; Snowbasin in Utah; Angel Fire in New Mexico; Arizona Snowbowl in Arizona; Sierra-at-Tahoe, China Peak and Mountain High in California; Timberline and Mount Hood Skibowl in Oregon; Stevens Pass in Washington; Schweitzer in Idaho; and Bridger Bowl in Montana. After buying a premium pass to one of the Powder Alliance resorts, guests then can have three free ski days at each of the other resorts. More pass love: With any full-season pass to Utah's Alta Ski Area (alta.com), Deer Valley Resort (deervalley.com), Park City Mountain Resort (parkcitymountain.com) or Snowbird Resort (snowbird.com),


pass holders will get three free days of lift access at the other three mountains this season. And the Lake Tahoe area's Sugarbowl (sugarbowl.com) has teamed up with Sun Valley, Idaho (sunvalley.com), to combine higherend passes between two of America's oldest ski resorts. Ask for the Sweet Deal package.

Lake Tahoe news Lake Tahoe area resorts (nine within a short drive of the Reno/Tahoe airport) together have invested more than $100 million in capital improvements intended to enhance the guest experience with new lifts (Crow's Peak at Sugar Bowl), base renovations (Sierra-at-Tahoe), new restaurants and more. The region as a whole is gearing up in a bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics. This season, Squaw Valley (squaw.com) and Alpine Meadows (skialpine.com) have invested more than $2 million in state-of-the-art snow-making guns, new piping and system upgrades. They also have spent nearly $ 1.5 million on five state-of-the-art snow cats. Mount Rose (skirose.com), an outstanding family-friendly resort less than half an hour from the Reno airport, has begun a $23.5 million expansion and this year added almost 100 acres of terrain, expanded snow-making capabilities and built a new restaurant up top. The resort has partnered with various Reno casino properties, such as the Eldorado Hotel (eldoradoreno.com), to offer some attractive ski/stay packages. Sierra-at-Tahoe (sierraattahoe.com) has invested $4.5 million in a new 9,000-square-foot plaza in front of the South Lake resort. The plaza includes a large open deck area with fire pits, live music and lounge chairs, plus a new restaurant and retail shops. Additionally, Sierra pass holders can receive free early- and late-season lift tickets at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. The premier hotel in the region, the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe (ritzcarlton.com/laketahoe), located midmountain at Northstar, is debuting Backyard Bar & Barbecue on its patio, serving St. Louis-style ribs and other goodies. Ski Mammoth Celebrating its 60th anniversary, the huge Mammoth Mountain ski resort (mammothmountain.com) has a number of new temptations this season. The charming Lakefront Restaurant is going to a seasonal and organic menu, while fixture Chef Fred is opening the Underground Lounge below the Village Gondola. Live music will be featured at Underground, along with a bar and VIP area. But there won't be only dancing and drinking; chef Frederic Pierrel will be dishing out his "tapatizers," his unique take on tapas and appetizers. There also are added flights into the Mammoth Yosemite Airport this season on United and Alaska airlines. Kids ski free Colorado's Keystone resort (keystoneresort.com), which also opened Nov. 1, has a great deal aimed at families. Every day this season, children 12 or younger ski or snowboard for free at Keystone when staying two or more nights in one of Keystone's numerous accommodations. There are no blackout dates. "Keystone has pulled out all the stops when it comes to the best family ski experience," said John Buhler, vice president and general manager of Keystone. Keystone is about an hour from Denver International Airport. More ski tips For something different but well worth the trip, try visiting Schweitzer Mountain Resort (schweitzer.com). Located in the Selkirk Mountains outside of Sandpoint, Idaho, this lovely resort is about an hour from Spokane and about 45 minutes from the luxurious Coeur d'Alene Resort. Schweitzer is a hidden mountaintop jewel with a couple of big bowls offering serious skiing without the crowds. And if you've never skied Colorado's Telluride, put it on your list. For serious skiers, there's nothing like that rugged box canyon. Oh, Canada Whistler/Blackcomb (whistlerblackcomb.com), the largest ski resort in North America, is replacing its older Harmony high-speed quad chairlift with a new Doppelmayr high-speed six-pack, increasing the speed up to the Harmony area by 50 percent. And the Blackcomb side's new Crystal Ridge Express high-speed quad will be 65 percent faster than the existing triple chair. Besides the Crystal Ridge Express itself, the placement of this lift


has changed, and the new alignment will make it quicker to return to the Glacier Express chair, accessing areas such as Blackcomb Glacier, Horstman Glacier and Spanky's. The resort also hosts one of the biggest and best lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender ski weeks in the world: Whistler WinterPRIDE, Jan. 26-Feb. 2. When in the Whistler Village, don't miss dining at Araxi, a serious fine-dining restaurant specializing in seafood. Big White (bigwhite.com), on the inland side of British Columbia, is celebrating its 50th anniversary and offering fun ideas, such as the Groomers and Grapes package, which brings together a fine mountain experience with wine tastings in the nearby Okanagan Valley. Whether purchasing a great pass deal or just hitting the slopes for a couple of days, act soon because the prices go up as the snow comes down.  


Mega-passes hit slopes The ski resort world seems to be mirroring the American corporate landscape, with the "big boys" buying up smaller resorts through mergers and acquisitions. But before you bemoan the loss of "your" independent ski hill, keep in mind that such corporate purchases can be a good thing. Vail Resorts, KSL Capital Partners and Powdr Corp. are among corporations that have bought chunks of the ski world. One upside is that they have the resources to pour investments into their new holdings, such as state-of-the-art snow-making equipment, faster chairlifts and new dining options. Another gain: passes that let skiers sample several resorts. Thus, there are superb values out there this year. Plus, the western side of the continent already has seen a good amount of snow, and a few resorts, such as Colorado's Copper Mountain, opened Nov. 1. Many others plan to open in November, a good omen for the industry. Get a pass Make it Epic: The popular Epic Pass (epicpass.com) offered by Vail Resorts has expanded, so you can now ski at a whopping 26 resorts worldwide. The full Epic Pass, $729, allows unlimited access to all Vail Resorts properties in the United States, plus five days of skiing at selected resorts in Austria, France and Switzerland. The U.S. resorts are Arapahoe Basin, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Eldora, Keystone and Vail in Colorado; Canyons in Park City, Utah; Heavenly, Kirkwood and Northstar at Lake Tahoe, Calif.; Afton Alps in Minnesota; and Mount Brighton in Michigan. The European skiing is in Arlberg, Austria; Les 3 Vallees, France; and Verbier, Switzerland. Starting Nov. 22, there is a race for the first person to ski at all 26 resorts (epicrace.epicpass.com). The prize for the first 10: a lifetime Epic Pass. All in all, the pass is an amazing deal for people with a healthy ski appetite and a passport that needs new European stamps. The Mountain Collective: Back and better than ever, this pass is a great deal if you want to experience some of the finest resorts in North America this season. The Mountain Collective, currently $379, includes two ski days at Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows in the Lake Tahoe area of California, two days at Alta/Snowbird in Utah, two days at Aspen/Snowmass in Colorado, two days at the impressive Jackson Hole in Wyoming, two days at Mammoth in California and two days at Whistler/Blackcomb in British Columbia. More details: mountaincollective.com. Powder Alliance: All resorts aren't run by mega-corporations just yet. Twelve plucky independent ski resorts have banded together to form the Powder Alliance (powderalliance.com). This is the inaugural season for this skier's dozen group of smaller powder havens throughout the American West. The resorts are Crested Butte in Colorado; Snowbasin in Utah; Angel Fire in New Mexico; Arizona Snowbowl in Arizona; Sierra-at-Tahoe, China Peak and Mountain High in California; Timberline and Mount Hood Skibowl in Oregon; Stevens Pass in Washington; Schweitzer in Idaho;


and Bridger Bowl in Montana. After buying a premium pass to one of the Powder Alliance resorts, guests then can have three free ski days at each of the other resorts. More pass love: With any full-season pass to Utah's Alta Ski Area (alta.com), Deer Valley Resort (deervalley.com), Park City Mountain Resort (parkcitymountain.com) or Snowbird Resort (snowbird.com), pass holders will get three free days of lift access at the other three mountains this season. And the Lake Tahoe area's Sugarbowl (sugarbowl.com) has teamed up with Sun Valley, Idaho (sunvalley.com), to combine higher-end passes between two of America's oldest ski resorts. Ask for the Sweet Deal package. Lake Tahoe news Lake Tahoe area resorts (nine within a short drive of the Reno/Tahoe airport) together have invested more than $100 million in capital improvements intended to enhance the guest experience with new lifts (Crow's Peak at Sugar Bowl), base renovations (Sierra-at-Tahoe), new restaurants and more. The region as a whole is gearing up in a bid to host the 2026 Winter Olympics. This season, Squaw Valley (squaw.com) and Alpine Meadows (skialpine.com) have invested more than $2 million in state-of-the-art snow-making guns, new piping and system upgrades. They also have spent nearly $ 1.5 million on five state-of-the-art snow cats. Mount Rose (skirose.com), an outstanding family-friendly resort less than half an hour from the Reno airport, has begun a $23.5 million expansion and this year added almost 100 acres of terrain, expanded snow-making capabilities and built a new restaurant up top. The resort has partnered with various Reno casino properties, such as the Eldorado Hotel (eldoradoreno.com), to offer some attractive ski/stay packages. Sierra-at-Tahoe (sierraattahoe.com) has invested $4.5 million in a new 9,000-square-foot plaza in front of the South Lake resort. The plaza includes a large open deck area with fire pits, live music and lounge chairs, plus a new restaurant and retail shops. Additionally, Sierra pass holders can receive free early- and late-season lift tickets at Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. The premier hotel in the region, the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe (ritzcarlton.com/laketahoe), located midmountain at Northstar, is debuting Backyard Bar & Barbecue on its patio, serving St. Louis-style ribs and other goodies. Ski Mammoth Celebrating its 60th anniversary, the huge Mammoth Mountain ski resort (mammothmountain.com) has a number of new temptations this season. The charming Lakefront Restaurant is going to a seasonal and organic menu, while fixture Chef Fred is opening the Underground Lounge below the Village Gondola. Live music will be featured at Underground, along with a bar and VIP area. But there won't be only dancing and drinking; chef Frederic Pierrel will be dishing out his "tapatizers," his unique take on tapas and appetizers. There also are added flights into the Mammoth Yosemite Airport this season on United and Alaska airlines. Kids ski free Colorado's Keystone resort (keystoneresort.com), which also opened Nov. 1, has a great deal aimed at families. Every day this season, children 12 or younger ski or snowboard for free at Keystone when staying two or more nights in one of Keystone's numerous accommodations. There are no blackout dates. "Keystone has pulled out all the stops when it comes to the best family ski experience," said John Buhler, vice president and general manager of Keystone. Keystone is about an hour from Denver International Airport. More ski tips For something different but well worth the trip, try visiting Schweitzer Mountain Resort (schweitzer.com). Located in the Selkirk Mountains outside of Sandpoint, Idaho, this lovely resort is


about an hour from Spokane and about 45 minutes from the luxurious Coeur d'Alene Resort. Schweitzer is a hidden mountaintop jewel with a couple of big bowls offering serious skiing without the crowds. And if you've never skied Colorado's Telluride, put it on your list. For serious skiers, there's nothing like that rugged box canyon. Oh, Canada Whistler/Blackcomb (whistlerblackcomb.com), the largest ski resort in North America, is replacing its older Harmony high-speed quad chairlift with a new Doppelmayr high-speed six-pack, increasing the speed up to the Harmony area by 50 percent. And the Blackcomb side's new Crystal Ridge Express high-speed quad will be 65 percent faster than the existing triple chair. Besides the Crystal Ridge Express itself, the placement of this lift has changed, and the new alignment will make it quicker to return to the Glacier Express chair, accessing areas such as Blackcomb Glacier, Horstman Glacier and Spanky's. The resort also hosts one of the biggest and best lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender ski weeks in the world: Whistler WinterPRIDE, Jan. 26-Feb. 2. When in the Whistler Village, don't miss dining at Araxi, a serious fine-dining restaurant specializing in seafood. Big White (bigwhite.com), on the inland side of British Columbia, is celebrating its 50th anniversary and offering fun ideas, such as the Groomers and Grapes package, which brings together a fine mountain experience with wine tastings in the nearby Okanagan Valley. Whether purchasing a great pass deal or just hitting the slopes for a couple of days, act soon because the prices go up as the snow comes down.

     


RENO March in Reno, Nevada, isn't particularly cold. The average daily high is around 50 °F. Beige and gold, dust and sand, glittering neon and glinting glass – the entire cityscape hollers heat, revels in sunlight, and bathes in the sparkling flow of cash in and out of the casinos. At first glance, it doesn't appear to be a place you'd associate with skiing. Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts – some big, some small, all offering kneedeep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the NevadaCalifornia border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. But there are benefits to sticking around – and these are not limited to the obligatory breakfast bloody mary offered by the casinos. While I recommend the bloody marys at Peppermill hotel and casino, I was more excited about the dull sky and snow-heavy clouds overhead as we made our way up to the resort of Mount Rose. The 30-minute drive saw the dry landscape morph into pine trees, mist and great dollops of snow. We passed a car that had skidded off the road on the black ice, languishing in a ditch as police cars rallied, but we managed to arrive unscathed. The petite nature of the main lodge belied the 1,200 acres of steep terrain and superb tree runs that awaited us – chute after chute of perfect powder popping out at the base of Chuter chair, which took us to the top to do it all again. And meeting locals was a breeze as we kept bumping into the same people. It snowed all day, so we headed for the trees, which provided markers and broke up the whiteness, and when the sun finally came out for our final hour, we were treated to a glistening view of Lake Tahoe in the distance, trees resplendent in their snowy attire. The day was topped off with a pint of Shock Top (a Belgian white beer that Mount Rose skiers seem to have made their own) in the main lodge bar. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill.


Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. Another 10 minutes up the road is Diamond Peak (blink and you'll miss it) with its locals-only-know powder glades. The behemoth of North Star – 3,170 acres of terrain, superpipes, freestyle parks, shops, restaurants and bars – is an hour away. Then there's Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Kirkwood, Homewood and Heavenly. The majority of these resorts would not by themselves hold a skier's interest for a 10-day trip, but put them together and you've got an itinerary to keep even the hardiest skier entertained. Acting as the apex for all these resorts is Reno, which also probably wouldn't be enough to keep you entertained for a full trip. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless – in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's not all about endings, though. Small businesses and restaurants are pushing up in between the casinos like green shoots, and the river constantly drags your eye towards the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Java Jungle, all band posters, open mic nights and poetry readings, served up a cracking cup of organic chai. Sundance Books is a haven of fairy lights and cushy sofas in a classic revival style building – and is said to have its own ghost. The Riverwalk is the prettiest part of town, with restaurants serving organic local produce to streetside diners. And although Reno isn't a cultural hub, the Nevada Museum of Art carries some interesting exhibitions. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER Denver doesn't have the mild identity crisis that seems to afflict Reno. It's very confident of its place in the world – the gateway to the Rockies, a vibrant cultural scene mixing effortlessly with the outdoor life. The Mercury Cafe is a great example of this. While savouring a pint of Treehugger from the list of microbrews as we waited for our dinner of local veggies and organic meats, a poetry slam gave way to jazz flutes and a touch of wailing from the performance room. Its artsy vibe is mirrored in the River North area of the city – all yoga studios and raw-food restaurants. Linger is a former mortuary that's been converted into an eatery where the cocktails are as good as the panoramic view of downtown.


Equally inspiring are the indie music venues, record shops, thrift stores and dive bars in and around East Colfax Avenue. If Pete's Satire Lounge has changed at all since Bob Dylan gigged there as a teenager before he moved to New York, it's hard to tell. But as well as being yoga mat and tattoo parlour central, Denver is arguably one of the best hubs for skiing in North America. Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain, Vail, Winter Park, Beaver Creek and Arapahoe Basin are within a two-hour drive. They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by itsEpic Pass. Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes – it is a long way to go just to ski – Denver is a great option. The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256,crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at thePeppermill Casino in Renofrom £1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. Car hire starts from £182 a week including insurance. British Airways (ba.com) flies London-Denver from £667 return in December. Hotel Monaco in Denver (+1 303 296 1717, monaco-denver.com) has doubles from $170 a nght. The Ski Lake Tahoe six-day lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS Munich Germany There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Among the best-known is Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with 59km of pistes, which includes Germany's highest peak, Zugspitze. Rail operator Bayerische Oberlandbahn offers combined train and ski-lift tickets to Bad Tölz and Lake Tegernsee. Deutsche Bahn trains also serve Bavarian Alpine resorts, including Berchtesgaden. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfügen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for off-the-beaten track adventures. muenchen.de


Geneva Switzerland The swish city of Geneva has numerous French ski sites within striking distance. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoëns, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Within two hours' drive are Paradiski, Tarentaise and Les Trois Vallées, which includes Courchevel and Méribel. skigeneva.co.uk Vancouver, Canada Vancouver, host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, has three local mountains: Grouse Mountain, Cypress Mountain and Mount Seymour. Cypress is 30 minutes from the city centre and has downhill and cross-country skiing, snowtubing and snowshoeing. Grouse is even closer: 15 minutes from downtown. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com Queenstown, New Zealand This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25 minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55 minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90 minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. newzealand.com Sapporo, Japan Japan's fifth-largest city is one of its snowiest, hosting an annual snow festival. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45 minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Kokusai (60 minutes) gets busy but has lots of quiet off-piste areas. Kiroro is 70 minutes' drive; nearby Asari is good on windy days; and lavish Tomamu is an 80minute train ride away. powderhounds.com  


RENO March in Reno, Nevada, isn't particularly cold. The average daily high is around 50 °F. Beige and gold, dust and sand, glittering neon and glinting glass – the entire cityscape hollers heat, revels in sunlight, and bathes in the sparkling flow of cash in and out of the casinos. At first glance, it doesn't appear to be a place you'd associate with skiing. Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts – some big, some small, all offering kneedeep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the NevadaCalifornia border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. But there are benefits to sticking around – and these are not limited to the obligatory breakfast bloody mary offered by the casinos. While I recommend the bloody marys at Peppermill hotel and casino, I was more excited about the dull sky and snow-heavy clouds overhead as we made our way up to the resort of Mount Rose. The 30-minute drive saw the dry landscape morph into pine trees, mist and great dollops of snow. We passed a car that had skidded off the road on the black ice, languishing in a ditch as police cars rallied, but we managed to arrive unscathed. The petite nature of the main lodge belied the 1,200 acres of steep terrain and superb tree runs that awaited us – chute after chute of perfect powder popping out at the base of Chuter chair, which took us to the top to do it all again. And meeting locals was a breeze as we kept bumping into the same people. It snowed all day, so we headed for the trees, which provided markers and broke up the whiteness, and when the sun finally came out for our final hour, we were treated to a glistening view of Lake Tahoe in the distance, trees resplendent in their snowy attire. The day was topped off with a pint of Shock Top (a Belgian white beer that Mount Rose skiers seem to have made their own) in the main lodge bar. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill.


Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. Another 10 minutes up the road is Diamond Peak (blink and you'll miss it) with its locals-only-know powder glades. The behemoth of North Star – 3,170 acres of terrain, superpipes, freestyle parks, shops, restaurants and bars – is an hour away. Then there's Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Kirkwood, Homewood and Heavenly. The majority of these resorts would not by themselves hold a skier's interest for a 10-day trip, but put them together and you've got an itinerary to keep even the hardiest skier entertained. Acting as the apex for all these resorts is Reno, which also probably wouldn't be enough to keep you entertained for a full trip. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless – in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's not all about endings, though. Small businesses and restaurants are pushing up in between the casinos like green shoots, and the river constantly drags your eye towards the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Java Jungle, all band posters, open mic nights and poetry readings, served up a cracking cup of organic chai. Sundance Books is a haven of fairy lights and cushy sofas in a classic revival style building – and is said to have its own ghost. The Riverwalk is the prettiest part of town, with restaurants serving organic local produce to streetside diners. And although Reno isn't a cultural hub, the Nevada Museum of Art carries some interesting exhibitions. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER Denver doesn't have the mild identity crisis that seems to afflict Reno. It's very confident of its place in the world – the gateway to the Rockies, a vibrant cultural scene mixing effortlessly with the outdoor life. The Mercury Cafe is a great example of this. While savouring a pint of Treehugger from the list of microbrews as we waited for our dinner of local veggies and organic meats, a poetry slam gave way to jazz flutes and a touch of wailing from the performance room. Its artsy vibe is mirrored in the River North area of the city – all yoga studios and raw-food restaurants. Linger is a former mortuary that's been converted into an eatery where the cocktails are as good as the panoramic view of downtown.


Equally inspiring are the indie music venues, record shops, thrift stores and dive bars in and around East Colfax Avenue. If Pete's Satire Lounge has changed at all since Bob Dylan gigged there as a teenager before he moved to New York, it's hard to tell. But as well as being yoga mat and tattoo parlour central, Denver is arguably one of the best hubs for skiing in North America. Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain, Vail, Winter Park, Beaver Creek and Arapahoe Basin are within a two-hour drive. They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by itsEpic Pass. Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes – it is a long way to go just to ski – Denver is a great option. The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256,crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at thePeppermill Casino in Renofrom £1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. Car hire starts from £182 a week including insurance. British Airways (ba.com) flies London-Denver from £667 return in December. Hotel Monaco in Denver (+1 303 296 1717, monaco-denver.com) has doubles from $170 a nght. The Ski Lake Tahoe six-day lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS Munich Germany There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Among the best-known is Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with 59km of pistes, which includes Germany's highest peak, Zugspitze. Rail operator Bayerische Oberlandbahn offers combined train and ski-lift tickets to Bad Tölz and Lake Tegernsee. Deutsche Bahn trains also serve Bavarian Alpine resorts, including Berchtesgaden. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfügen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for off-the-beaten track adventures. muenchen.de


Geneva Switzerland The swish city of Geneva has numerous French ski sites within striking distance. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoëns, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Within two hours' drive are Paradiski, Tarentaise and Les Trois Vallées, which includes Courchevel and Méribel. skigeneva.co.uk Vancouver, Canada Vancouver, host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, has three local mountains: Grouse Mountain, Cypress Mountain and Mount Seymour. Cypress is 30 minutes from the city centre and has downhill and cross-country skiing, snowtubing and snowshoeing. Grouse is even closer: 15 minutes from downtown. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com Queenstown, New Zealand This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25 minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55 minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90 minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. newzealand.com Sapporo, Japan Japan's fifth-largest city is one of its snowiest, hosting an annual snow festival. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45 minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Kokusai (60 minutes) gets busy but has lots of quiet off-piste areas. Kiroro is 70 minutes' drive; nearby Asari is good on windy days; and lavish Tomamu is an 80minute train ride away. powderhounds.com  


Nov 4, 2013, 4:50pm PST

Alaska Airlines books ski champ to inaugurate Tahoe route Alaska Airlines has added two new direct flight routes to its Portland International Airport itinerary. The Seattle-based carrier on Monday debuted nonstop flights between PDX and Tucson and will begin nonstop flights between Portland and Reno/Tahoe on Nov. 8. Travelers on the inaugural flight to Reno/Tahoe will get to run elbows — or skis — with 1998 Olympic gold medalistJonny Moseley. Moseley is the chief mountain host at Tahoe's Squaw Valley ski resort and recently competed on "Skating with the Stars." Alaska is offering one-way fares starting at $64 between Portland and Reno/Tahoe and $129 on the nonstop to Tucson.  


By: PRWeb  November 04, 2013 at 10:01 AM EST 

Thanksgiving in Lake Tahoe: The Best Lodging Deals to Gobble Up This Season Cooked Up by TahoesBest.com PRWeb Last week marked the coming winter with the first significant snowfall in Lake Tahoe, and with Thanksgiving around the corner now is the time to start planning holiday trips. Lake Tahoe travelers are advised to get their fill on Lake Tahoe hotel deals, so the editors of TahoesBest.com have put together a list of the besthotel deals to take a bite out of during the upcoming long Thanksgiving weekend. Snatch up deals at Forest Suites Resort, Lakeside Inn and Casino, Resort at Squaw Creek and Inn by the Lake. Forest Suites Resort - South Lake Tahoe No need to slave away in the kitchen this year, let Forest Suites Resort treat the family to a Thanksgiving dinner feast. Reserve a 2 bedroom suite for a 3 night stay and leave the cooking to the pros. Package includes an 8 lb turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, green bean casserole, dinner rolls, and pumpkin pie. No need to stress over the perfect stuffing recipe this year, but be sure to book this special quickly so you aren't the last one to the dinner table. Lakeside Inn and Casino - South Lake Tahoe Venture off the beaten path this Thanksgiving and try a not-so-common meal instead of the usual turkey and stuffing. Lakeside Inn and Casino is serving a steak and lobster package special until December 20, 2013. The editors of TahoesBest.com say start a new Thanksgiving tradition and enjoy this surf and turf special. Package includes a night stay any day of the week, two steak and lobster meals, and two breakfast specials. Resort at Squaw Creek - Squaw Valley The holiday season lights up Resort at Squaw Creek, and brings deals to the table. For families traveling to Lake Tahoe over Thanksgiving weekend Resort at Squaw Creek offers a Magical Memories Bed and Breakfastpackage, with a $199 deluxe guestroom stay and $50 in daily resort credit to spend on amenities orrestaurants. Inn by the Lake - South Lake Tahoe For a bed and breakfast extravaganza Inn by the Lake in South Lake Tahoe brings the best breakfast feast. Stay one night at Inn by the Lake and receive breakfast for two at the Bear Beach

 


Cafe. Inn by the Lake also offers complimentary bike/snowshoe use, so hope for snow and get outside adventuring around this Thanksgiving. About TahoesBest.com: Lake Tahoe is known for outdoor activities, pristine waters and one of the best wedding destinations in the country. TahoesBest.com is the authority on what to do, where to stay, weather updates and all the best upcoming events for any visitor. Use TahoesBest.com to find information, reviews and deals on all things Lake Tahoe from concerts to vacation rentals. Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/10/prweb11277947.htm  


RENO March in Reno, Nevada, isn't particularly cold. The average daily high is around 50 °F. Beige and gold, dust and sand, glittering neon and glinting glass – the entire cityscape hollers heat, revels in sunlight, and bathes in the sparkling flow of cash in and out of the casinos. At first glance, it doesn't appear to be a place you'd associate with skiing. Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts – some big, some small, all offering kneedeep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the NevadaCalifornia border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. But there are benefits to sticking around – and these are not limited to the obligatory breakfast bloody mary offered by the casinos. While I recommend the bloody marys at Peppermill hotel and casino, I was more excited about the dull sky and snow-heavy clouds overhead as we made our way up to the resort of Mount Rose. The 30-minute drive saw the dry landscape morph into pine trees, mist and great dollops of snow. We passed a car that had skidded off the road on the black ice, languishing in a ditch as police cars rallied, but we managed to arrive unscathed. The petite nature of the main lodge belied the 1,200 acres of steep terrain and superb tree runs that awaited us – chute after chute of perfect powder popping out at the base of Chuter chair, which took us to the top to do it all again. And meeting locals was a breeze as we kept bumping into the same people. It snowed all day, so we headed for the trees, which provided markers and broke up the whiteness, and when the sun finally came out for our final hour, we were treated to a glistening view of Lake Tahoe in the distance, trees resplendent in their snowy attire. The day was topped off with a pint of Shock Top (a Belgian white beer that Mount Rose skiers seem to have made their own) in the main lodge bar. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with


punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill. Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. Another 10 minutes up the road is Diamond Peak (blink and you'll miss it) with its locals-only-know powder glades. The behemoth of North Star – 3,170 acres of terrain, superpipes, freestyle parks, shops, restaurants and bars – is an hour away. Then there's Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Kirkwood, Homewood and Heavenly. The majority of these resorts would not by themselves hold a skier's interest for a 10-day trip, but put them together and you've got an itinerary to keep even the hardiest skier entertained. Acting as the apex for all these resorts is Reno, which also probably wouldn't be enough to keep you entertained for a full trip. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless – in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's not all about endings, though. Small businesses and restaurants are pushing up in between the casinos like green shoots, and the river constantly drags your eye towards the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Java Jungle, all band posters, open mic nights and poetry readings, served up a cracking cup of organic chai. Sundance Books is a haven of fairy lights and cushy sofas in a classic revival style building – and is said to have its own ghost. The Riverwalk is the prettiest part of town, with restaurants serving organic local produce to streetside diners. And although Reno isn't a cultural hub, the Nevada Museum of Art carries some interesting exhibitions. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER Denver doesn't have the mild identity crisis that seems to afflict Reno. It's very confident of its place in the world – the gateway to the Rockies, a vibrant cultural scene mixing effortlessly with the outdoor life. The Mercury Cafe is a great example of this. While savouring a pint of Treehugger from the list of microbrews as we waited for our dinner of local veggies and organic meats, a poetry slam gave way to jazz flutes and a touch of wailing from the performance room.


Its artsy vibe is mirrored in the River North area of the city – all yoga studios and raw-food restaurants. Linger is a former mortuary that's been converted into an eatery where the cocktails are as good as the panoramic view of downtown. Equally inspiring are the indie music venues, record shops, thrift stores and dive bars in and around East Colfax Avenue. If Pete's Satire Lounge has changed at all since Bob Dylan gigged there as a teenager before he moved to New York, it's hard to tell. But as well as being yoga mat and tattoo parlour central, Denver is arguably one of the best hubs for skiing in North America. Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain, Vail, Winter Park, Beaver Creek and Arapahoe Basin are within a two-hour drive. They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by itsEpic Pass. Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes – it is a long way to go just to ski – Denver is a great option. The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256,crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at thePeppermill Casino in Renofrom £1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. Car hire starts from £182 a week including insurance. British Airways (ba.com) flies London-Denver from £667 return in December. Hotel Monaco in Denver (+1 303 296 1717, monaco-denver.com) has doubles from $170 a nght. The Ski Lake Tahoe six-day lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS Munich Germany There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Among the best-known is Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with 59km of pistes, which includes Germany's highest peak, Zugspitze. Rail operator Bayerische Oberlandbahn offers combined train and ski-lift tickets to Bad Tölz and Lake Tegernsee. Deutsche Bahn trains also serve Bavarian Alpine resorts, including Berchtesgaden. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St


Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfügen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for off-the-beaten track adventures. muenchen.de Geneva Switzerland The swish city of Geneva has numerous French ski sites within striking distance. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoëns, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Within two hours' drive are Paradiski, Tarentaise and Les Trois Vallées, which includes Courchevel and Méribel. skigeneva.co.uk Vancouver, Canada Vancouver, host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, has three local mountains: Grouse Mountain, Cypress Mountain and Mount Seymour. Cypress is 30 minutes from the city centre and has downhill and cross-country skiing, snowtubing and snowshoeing. Grouse is even closer: 15 minutes from downtown. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com Queenstown, New Zealand This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25 minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55 minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90 minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. newzealand.com Sapporo, Japan Japan's fifth-largest city is one of its snowiest, hosting an annual snow festival. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45 minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Kokusai (60 minutes) gets busy but has lots of quiet off-piste areas. Kiroro is 70 minutes' drive; nearby Asari is good on windy days; and lavish Tomamu is an 80minute train ride away. powderhounds.com  


RENO March in Reno, Nevada, isn't particularly cold. The average daily high is around 50 °F. Beige and gold, dust and sand, glittering neon and glinting glass – the entire cityscape hollers heat, revels in sunlight, and bathes in the sparkling flow of cash in and out of the casinos. At first glance, it doesn't appear to be a place you'd associate with skiing. Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts – some big, some small, all offering kneedeep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the NevadaCalifornia border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. But there are benefits to sticking around – and these are not limited to the obligatory breakfast bloody mary offered by the casinos. While I recommend the bloody marys at Peppermill hotel and casino, I was more excited about the dull sky and snow-heavy clouds overhead as we made our way up to the resort of Mount Rose. The 30-minute drive saw the dry landscape morph into pine trees, mist and great dollops of snow. We passed a car that had skidded off the road on the black ice, languishing in a ditch as police cars rallied, but we managed to arrive unscathed. The petite nature of the main lodge belied the 1,200 acres of steep terrain and superb tree runs that awaited us – chute after chute of perfect powder popping out at the base of Chuter chair, which took us to the top to do it all again. And meeting locals was a breeze as we kept bumping into the same people. It snowed all day, so we headed for the trees, which provided markers and broke up the whiteness, and when the sun finally came out for our final hour, we were treated to a glistening view of Lake Tahoe in the distance, trees resplendent in their snowy attire. The day was topped off with a pint of Shock Top (a Belgian white beer that Mount Rose skiers seem to have made their own) in the main lodge bar. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with


punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill. Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. Another 10 minutes up the road is Diamond Peak (blink and you'll miss it) with its locals-only-know powder glades. The behemoth of North Star – 3,170 acres of terrain, superpipes, freestyle parks, shops, restaurants and bars – is an hour away. Then there's Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Kirkwood, Homewood and Heavenly. The majority of these resorts would not by themselves hold a skier's interest for a 10-day trip, but put them together and you've got an itinerary to keep even the hardiest skier entertained. Acting as the apex for all these resorts is Reno, which also probably wouldn't be enough to keep you entertained for a full trip. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless – in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's not all about endings, though. Small businesses and restaurants are pushing up in between the casinos like green shoots, and the river constantly drags your eye towards the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Java Jungle, all band posters, open mic nights and poetry readings, served up a cracking cup of organic chai. Sundance Books is a haven of fairy lights and cushy sofas in a classic revival style building – and is said to have its own ghost. The Riverwalk is the prettiest part of town, with restaurants serving organic local produce to streetside diners. And although Reno isn't a cultural hub, the Nevada Museum of Art carries some interesting exhibitions. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER Denver doesn't have the mild identity crisis that seems to afflict Reno. It's very confident of its place in the world – the gateway to the Rockies, a vibrant cultural scene mixing effortlessly with the outdoor life. The Mercury Cafe is a great example of this. While savouring a pint of Treehugger from the list of microbrews as we waited for our dinner of local veggies and organic meats, a poetry slam gave way to jazz flutes and a touch of wailing from the performance room.


Its artsy vibe is mirrored in the River North area of the city – all yoga studios and raw-food restaurants. Linger is a former mortuary that's been converted into an eatery where the cocktails are as good as the panoramic view of downtown. Equally inspiring are the indie music venues, record shops, thrift stores and dive bars in and around East Colfax Avenue. If Pete's Satire Lounge has changed at all since Bob Dylan gigged there as a teenager before he moved to New York, it's hard to tell. But as well as being yoga mat and tattoo parlour central, Denver is arguably one of the best hubs for skiing in North America. Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain, Vail, Winter Park, Beaver Creek and Arapahoe Basin are within a two-hour drive. They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by itsEpic Pass. Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes – it is a long way to go just to ski – Denver is a great option. The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256,crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at thePeppermill Casino in Renofrom £1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. Car hire starts from £182 a week including insurance. British Airways (ba.com) flies London-Denver from £667 return in December. Hotel Monaco in Denver (+1 303 296 1717, monaco-denver.com) has doubles from $170 a nght. The Ski Lake Tahoe six-day lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS Munich Germany There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Among the best-known is Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with 59km of pistes, which includes Germany's highest peak, Zugspitze. Rail operator Bayerische Oberlandbahn offers combined train and ski-lift tickets to Bad Tölz and Lake Tegernsee. Deutsche Bahn trains also serve Bavarian Alpine resorts, including Berchtesgaden. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St


Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfügen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for off-the-beaten track adventures. muenchen.de Geneva Switzerland The swish city of Geneva has numerous French ski sites within striking distance. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoëns, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Within two hours' drive are Paradiski, Tarentaise and Les Trois Vallées, which includes Courchevel and Méribel. skigeneva.co.uk Vancouver, Canada Vancouver, host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, has three local mountains: Grouse Mountain, Cypress Mountain and Mount Seymour. Cypress is 30 minutes from the city centre and has downhill and cross-country skiing, snowtubing and snowshoeing. Grouse is even closer: 15 minutes from downtown. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com Queenstown, New Zealand This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25 minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55 minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90 minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. newzealand.com Sapporo, Japan Japan's fifth-largest city is one of its snowiest, hosting an annual snow festival. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45 minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Kokusai (60 minutes) gets busy but has lots of quiet off-piste areas. Kiroro is 70 minutes' drive; nearby Asari is good on windy days; and lavish Tomamu is an 80minute train ride away. powderhounds.com  


RENO March in Reno, Nevada, isn't particularly cold. The average daily high is around 50 °F. Beige and gold, dust and sand, glittering neon and glinting glass – the entire cityscape hollers heat, revels in sunlight, and bathes in the sparkling flow of cash in and out of the casinos. At first glance, it doesn't appear to be a place you'd associate with skiing. Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts – some big, some small, all offering kneedeep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the NevadaCalifornia border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. But there are benefits to sticking around – and these are not limited to the obligatory breakfast bloody mary offered by the casinos. While I recommend the bloody marys at Peppermill hotel and casino, I was more excited about the dull sky and snow-heavy clouds overhead as we made our way up to the resort of Mount Rose. The 30-minute drive saw the dry landscape morph into pine trees, mist and great dollops of snow. We passed a car that had skidded off the road on the black ice, languishing in a ditch as police cars rallied, but we managed to arrive unscathed. The petite nature of the main lodge belied the 1,200 acres of steep terrain and superb tree runs that awaited us – chute after chute of perfect powder popping out at the base of Chuter chair, which took us to the top to do it all again. And meeting locals was a breeze as we kept bumping into the same people. It snowed all day, so we headed for the trees, which provided markers and broke up the whiteness, and when the sun finally came out for our final hour, we were treated to a glistening view of Lake Tahoe in the distance, trees resplendent in their snowy attire. The day was topped off with a pint of Shock Top (a Belgian white beer that Mount Rose skiers seem to have made their own) in the main lodge bar. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with


punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill. Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. Another 10 minutes up the road is Diamond Peak (blink and you'll miss it) with its locals-only-know powder glades. The behemoth of North Star – 3,170 acres of terrain, superpipes, freestyle parks, shops, restaurants and bars – is an hour away. Then there's Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Kirkwood, Homewood and Heavenly. The majority of these resorts would not by themselves hold a skier's interest for a 10-day trip, but put them together and you've got an itinerary to keep even the hardiest skier entertained. Acting as the apex for all these resorts is Reno, which also probably wouldn't be enough to keep you entertained for a full trip. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless – in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's not all about endings, though. Small businesses and restaurants are pushing up in between the casinos like green shoots, and the river constantly drags your eye towards the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Java Jungle, all band posters, open mic nights and poetry readings, served up a cracking cup of organic chai. Sundance Books is a haven of fairy lights and cushy sofas in a classic revival style building – and is said to have its own ghost. The Riverwalk is the prettiest part of town, with restaurants serving organic local produce to streetside diners. And although Reno isn't a cultural hub, the Nevada Museum of Art carries some interesting exhibitions. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER Denver doesn't have the mild identity crisis that seems to afflict Reno. It's very confident of its place in the world – the gateway to the Rockies, a vibrant cultural scene mixing effortlessly with the outdoor life. The Mercury Cafe is a great example of this. While savouring a pint of Treehugger from the list of microbrews as we waited for our dinner of local veggies and organic meats, a poetry slam gave way to jazz flutes and a touch of wailing from the performance room.


Its artsy vibe is mirrored in the River North area of the city – all yoga studios and raw-food restaurants. Linger is a former mortuary that's been converted into an eatery where the cocktails are as good as the panoramic view of downtown. Equally inspiring are the indie music venues, record shops, thrift stores and dive bars in and around East Colfax Avenue. If Pete's Satire Lounge has changed at all since Bob Dylan gigged there as a teenager before he moved to New York, it's hard to tell. But as well as being yoga mat and tattoo parlour central, Denver is arguably one of the best hubs for skiing in North America. Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain, Vail, Winter Park, Beaver Creek and Arapahoe Basin are within a two-hour drive. They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by itsEpic Pass. Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes – it is a long way to go just to ski – Denver is a great option. The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256,crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at thePeppermill Casino in Renofrom £1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. Car hire starts from £182 a week including insurance. British Airways (ba.com) flies London-Denver from £667 return in December. Hotel Monaco in Denver (+1 303 296 1717, monaco-denver.com) has doubles from $170 a nght. The Ski Lake Tahoe six-day lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS Munich Germany There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Among the best-known is Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with 59km of pistes, which includes Germany's highest peak, Zugspitze. Rail operator Bayerische Oberlandbahn offers combined train and ski-lift tickets to Bad Tölz and Lake Tegernsee. Deutsche Bahn trains also serve Bavarian Alpine resorts, including Berchtesgaden. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St


Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfügen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for off-the-beaten track adventures. muenchen.de Geneva Switzerland The swish city of Geneva has numerous French ski sites within striking distance. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoëns, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Within two hours' drive are Paradiski, Tarentaise and Les Trois Vallées, which includes Courchevel and Méribel. skigeneva.co.uk Vancouver, Canada Vancouver, host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, has three local mountains: Grouse Mountain, Cypress Mountain and Mount Seymour. Cypress is 30 minutes from the city centre and has downhill and cross-country skiing, snowtubing and snowshoeing. Grouse is even closer: 15 minutes from downtown. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com Queenstown, New Zealand This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25 minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55 minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90 minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. newzealand.com Sapporo, Japan Japan's fifth-largest city is one of its snowiest, hosting an annual snow festival. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45 minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Kokusai (60 minutes) gets busy but has lots of quiet off-piste areas. Kiroro is 70 minutes' drive; nearby Asari is good on windy days; and lavish Tomamu is an 80minute train ride away. powderhounds.com  


RENO March in Reno, Nevada, isn't particularly cold. The average daily high is around 50 °F. Beige and gold, dust and sand, glittering neon and glinting glass – the entire cityscape hollers heat, revels in sunlight, and bathes in the sparkling flow of cash in and out of the casinos. At first glance, it doesn't appear to be a place you'd associate with skiing. Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts – some big, some small, all offering kneedeep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the NevadaCalifornia border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. But there are benefits to sticking around – and these are not limited to the obligatory breakfast bloody mary offered by the casinos. While I recommend the bloody marys at Peppermill hotel and casino, I was more excited about the dull sky and snow-heavy clouds overhead as we made our way up to the resort of Mount Rose. The 30-minute drive saw the dry landscape morph into pine trees, mist and great dollops of snow. We passed a car that had skidded off the road on the black ice, languishing in a ditch as police cars rallied, but we managed to arrive unscathed. The petite nature of the main lodge belied the 1,200 acres of steep terrain and superb tree runs that awaited us – chute after chute of perfect powder popping out at the base of Chuter chair, which took us to the top to do it all again. And meeting locals was a breeze as we kept bumping into the same people. It snowed all day, so we headed for the trees, which provided markers and broke up the whiteness, and when the sun finally came out for our final hour, we were treated to a glistening view of Lake Tahoe in the distance, trees resplendent in their snowy attire. The day was topped off with a pint of Shock Top (a Belgian white beer that Mount Rose skiers seem to have made their own) in the main lodge bar. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with


punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill. Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. Another 10 minutes up the road is Diamond Peak (blink and you'll miss it) with its locals-only-know powder glades. The behemoth of North Star – 3,170 acres of terrain, superpipes, freestyle parks, shops, restaurants and bars – is an hour away. Then there's Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Kirkwood, Homewood and Heavenly. The majority of these resorts would not by themselves hold a skier's interest for a 10-day trip, but put them together and you've got an itinerary to keep even the hardiest skier entertained. Acting as the apex for all these resorts is Reno, which also probably wouldn't be enough to keep you entertained for a full trip. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless – in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's not all about endings, though. Small businesses and restaurants are pushing up in between the casinos like green shoots, and the river constantly drags your eye towards the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Java Jungle, all band posters, open mic nights and poetry readings, served up a cracking cup of organic chai. Sundance Books is a haven of fairy lights and cushy sofas in a classic revival style building – and is said to have its own ghost. The Riverwalk is the prettiest part of town, with restaurants serving organic local produce to streetside diners. And although Reno isn't a cultural hub, the Nevada Museum of Art carries some interesting exhibitions. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER Denver doesn't have the mild identity crisis that seems to afflict Reno. It's very confident of its place in the world – the gateway to the Rockies, a vibrant cultural scene mixing effortlessly with the outdoor life. The Mercury Cafe is a great example of this. While savouring a pint of Treehugger from the list of microbrews as we waited for our dinner of local veggies and organic meats, a poetry slam gave way to jazz flutes and a touch of wailing from the performance room.


Its artsy vibe is mirrored in the River North area of the city – all yoga studios and raw-food restaurants. Linger is a former mortuary that's been converted into an eatery where the cocktails are as good as the panoramic view of downtown. Equally inspiring are the indie music venues, record shops, thrift stores and dive bars in and around East Colfax Avenue. If Pete's Satire Lounge has changed at all since Bob Dylan gigged there as a teenager before he moved to New York, it's hard to tell. But as well as being yoga mat and tattoo parlour central, Denver is arguably one of the best hubs for skiing in North America. Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain, Vail, Winter Park, Beaver Creek and Arapahoe Basin are within a two-hour drive. They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by itsEpic Pass. Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes – it is a long way to go just to ski – Denver is a great option. The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256,crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at thePeppermill Casino in Renofrom £1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. Car hire starts from £182 a week including insurance. British Airways (ba.com) flies London-Denver from £667 return in December. Hotel Monaco in Denver (+1 303 296 1717, monaco-denver.com) has doubles from $170 a nght. The Ski Lake Tahoe six-day lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS Munich Germany There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Among the best-known is Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with 59km of pistes, which includes Germany's highest peak, Zugspitze. Rail operator Bayerische Oberlandbahn offers combined train and ski-lift tickets to Bad Tölz and Lake Tegernsee. Deutsche Bahn trains also serve Bavarian Alpine resorts, including Berchtesgaden. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St


Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfügen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for off-the-beaten track adventures. muenchen.de Geneva Switzerland The swish city of Geneva has numerous French ski sites within striking distance. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoëns, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Within two hours' drive are Paradiski, Tarentaise and Les Trois Vallées, which includes Courchevel and Méribel. skigeneva.co.uk Vancouver, Canada Vancouver, host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, has three local mountains: Grouse Mountain, Cypress Mountain and Mount Seymour. Cypress is 30 minutes from the city centre and has downhill and cross-country skiing, snowtubing and snowshoeing. Grouse is even closer: 15 minutes from downtown. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com Queenstown, New Zealand This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25 minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55 minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90 minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. newzealand.com Sapporo, Japan Japan's fifth-largest city is one of its snowiest, hosting an annual snow festival. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45 minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Kokusai (60 minutes) gets busy but has lots of quiet off-piste areas. Kiroro is 70 minutes' drive; nearby Asari is good on windy days; and lavish Tomamu is an 80minute train ride away. powderhounds.com  


RENO March in Reno, Nevada, isn't particularly cold. The average daily high is around 50 °F. Beige and gold, dust and sand, glittering neon and glinting glass – the entire cityscape hollers heat, revels in sunlight, and bathes in the sparkling flow of cash in and out of the casinos. At first glance, it doesn't appear to be a place you'd associate with skiing. Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts – some big, some small, all offering kneedeep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the NevadaCalifornia border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. But there are benefits to sticking around – and these are not limited to the obligatory breakfast bloody mary offered by the casinos. While I recommend the bloody marys at Peppermill hotel and casino, I was more excited about the dull sky and snow-heavy clouds overhead as we made our way up to the resort of Mount Rose. The 30-minute drive saw the dry landscape morph into pine trees, mist and great dollops of snow. We passed a car that had skidded off the road on the black ice, languishing in a ditch as police cars rallied, but we managed to arrive unscathed. The petite nature of the main lodge belied the 1,200 acres of steep terrain and superb tree runs that awaited us – chute after chute of perfect powder popping out at the base of Chuter chair, which took us to the top to do it all again. And meeting locals was a breeze as we kept bumping into the same people. It snowed all day, so we headed for the trees, which provided markers and broke up the whiteness, and when the sun finally came out for our final hour, we were treated to a glistening view of Lake Tahoe in the distance, trees resplendent in their snowy attire. The day was topped off with a pint of Shock Top (a Belgian white beer that Mount Rose skiers seem to have made their own) in the main lodge bar. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with


punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill. Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. Another 10 minutes up the road is Diamond Peak (blink and you'll miss it) with its locals-only-know powder glades. The behemoth of North Star – 3,170 acres of terrain, superpipes, freestyle parks, shops, restaurants and bars – is an hour away. Then there's Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Kirkwood, Homewood and Heavenly. The majority of these resorts would not by themselves hold a skier's interest for a 10-day trip, but put them together and you've got an itinerary to keep even the hardiest skier entertained. Acting as the apex for all these resorts is Reno, which also probably wouldn't be enough to keep you entertained for a full trip. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless – in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's not all about endings, though. Small businesses and restaurants are pushing up in between the casinos like green shoots, and the river constantly drags your eye towards the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Java Jungle, all band posters, open mic nights and poetry readings, served up a cracking cup of organic chai. Sundance Books is a haven of fairy lights and cushy sofas in a classic revival style building – and is said to have its own ghost. The Riverwalk is the prettiest part of town, with restaurants serving organic local produce to streetside diners. And although Reno isn't a cultural hub, the Nevada Museum of Art carries some interesting exhibitions. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER Denver doesn't have the mild identity crisis that seems to afflict Reno. It's very confident of its place in the world – the gateway to the Rockies, a vibrant cultural scene mixing effortlessly with the outdoor life. The Mercury Cafe is a great example of this. While savouring a pint of Treehugger from the list of microbrews as we waited for our dinner of local veggies and organic meats, a poetry slam gave way to jazz flutes and a touch of wailing from the performance room.


Its artsy vibe is mirrored in the River North area of the city – all yoga studios and raw-food restaurants. Linger is a former mortuary that's been converted into an eatery where the cocktails are as good as the panoramic view of downtown. Equally inspiring are the indie music venues, record shops, thrift stores and dive bars in and around East Colfax Avenue. If Pete's Satire Lounge has changed at all since Bob Dylan gigged there as a teenager before he moved to New York, it's hard to tell. But as well as being yoga mat and tattoo parlour central, Denver is arguably one of the best hubs for skiing in North America. Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain, Vail, Winter Park, Beaver Creek and Arapahoe Basin are within a two-hour drive. They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by itsEpic Pass. Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes – it is a long way to go just to ski – Denver is a great option. The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256,crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at thePeppermill Casino in Renofrom £1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. Car hire starts from £182 a week including insurance. British Airways (ba.com) flies London-Denver from £667 return in December. Hotel Monaco in Denver (+1 303 296 1717, monaco-denver.com) has doubles from $170 a nght. The Ski Lake Tahoe six-day lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS Munich Germany There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Among the best-known is Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with 59km of pistes, which includes Germany's highest peak, Zugspitze. Rail operator Bayerische Oberlandbahn offers combined train and ski-lift tickets to Bad Tölz and Lake Tegernsee. Deutsche Bahn trains also serve Bavarian Alpine resorts, including Berchtesgaden. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St


Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfügen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for off-the-beaten track adventures. muenchen.de Geneva Switzerland The swish city of Geneva has numerous French ski sites within striking distance. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoëns, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Within two hours' drive are Paradiski, Tarentaise and Les Trois Vallées, which includes Courchevel and Méribel. skigeneva.co.uk Vancouver, Canada Vancouver, host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, has three local mountains: Grouse Mountain, Cypress Mountain and Mount Seymour. Cypress is 30 minutes from the city centre and has downhill and cross-country skiing, snowtubing and snowshoeing. Grouse is even closer: 15 minutes from downtown. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com Queenstown, New Zealand This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25 minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55 minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90 minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. newzealand.com Sapporo, Japan Japan's fifth-largest city is one of its snowiest, hosting an annual snow festival. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45 minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Kokusai (60 minutes) gets busy but has lots of quiet off-piste areas. Kiroro is 70 minutes' drive; nearby Asari is good on windy days; and lavish Tomamu is an 80minute train ride away. powderhounds.com  


RENO March in Reno, Nevada, isn't particularly cold. The average daily high is around 50 °F. Beige and gold, dust and sand, glittering neon and glinting glass – the entire cityscape hollers heat, revels in sunlight, and bathes in the sparkling flow of cash in and out of the casinos. At first glance, it doesn't appear to be a place you'd associate with skiing. Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts – some big, some small, all offering kneedeep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the NevadaCalifornia border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. But there are benefits to sticking around – and these are not limited to the obligatory breakfast bloody mary offered by the casinos. While I recommend the bloody marys at Peppermill hotel and casino, I was more excited about the dull sky and snow-heavy clouds overhead as we made our way up to the resort of Mount Rose. The 30-minute drive saw the dry landscape morph into pine trees, mist and great dollops of snow. We passed a car that had skidded off the road on the black ice, languishing in a ditch as police cars rallied, but we managed to arrive unscathed. The petite nature of the main lodge belied the 1,200 acres of steep terrain and superb tree runs that awaited us – chute after chute of perfect powder popping out at the base of Chuter chair, which took us to the top to do it all again. And meeting locals was a breeze as we kept bumping into the same people. It snowed all day, so we headed for the trees, which provided markers and broke up the whiteness, and when the sun finally came out for our final hour, we were treated to a glistening view of Lake Tahoe in the distance, trees resplendent in their snowy attire. The day was topped off with a pint of Shock Top (a Belgian white beer that Mount Rose skiers seem to have made their own) in the main lodge bar. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with


punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill. Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. Another 10 minutes up the road is Diamond Peak (blink and you'll miss it) with its locals-only-know powder glades. The behemoth of North Star – 3,170 acres of terrain, superpipes, freestyle parks, shops, restaurants and bars – is an hour away. Then there's Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Kirkwood, Homewood and Heavenly. The majority of these resorts would not by themselves hold a skier's interest for a 10-day trip, but put them together and you've got an itinerary to keep even the hardiest skier entertained. Acting as the apex for all these resorts is Reno, which also probably wouldn't be enough to keep you entertained for a full trip. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless – in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's not all about endings, though. Small businesses and restaurants are pushing up in between the casinos like green shoots, and the river constantly drags your eye towards the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Java Jungle, all band posters, open mic nights and poetry readings, served up a cracking cup of organic chai. Sundance Books is a haven of fairy lights and cushy sofas in a classic revival style building – and is said to have its own ghost. The Riverwalk is the prettiest part of town, with restaurants serving organic local produce to streetside diners. And although Reno isn't a cultural hub, the Nevada Museum of Art carries some interesting exhibitions. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER Denver doesn't have the mild identity crisis that seems to afflict Reno. It's very confident of its place in the world – the gateway to the Rockies, a vibrant cultural scene mixing effortlessly with the outdoor life. The Mercury Cafe is a great example of this. While savouring a pint of Treehugger from the list of microbrews as we waited for our dinner of local veggies and organic meats, a poetry slam gave way to jazz flutes and a touch of wailing from the performance room.


Its artsy vibe is mirrored in the River North area of the city – all yoga studios and raw-food restaurants. Linger is a former mortuary that's been converted into an eatery where the cocktails are as good as the panoramic view of downtown. Equally inspiring are the indie music venues, record shops, thrift stores and dive bars in and around East Colfax Avenue. If Pete's Satire Lounge has changed at all since Bob Dylan gigged there as a teenager before he moved to New York, it's hard to tell. But as well as being yoga mat and tattoo parlour central, Denver is arguably one of the best hubs for skiing in North America. Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain, Vail, Winter Park, Beaver Creek and Arapahoe Basin are within a two-hour drive. They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by itsEpic Pass. Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes – it is a long way to go just to ski – Denver is a great option. The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256,crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at thePeppermill Casino in Renofrom £1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. Car hire starts from £182 a week including insurance. British Airways (ba.com) flies London-Denver from £667 return in December. Hotel Monaco in Denver (+1 303 296 1717, monaco-denver.com) has doubles from $170 a nght. The Ski Lake Tahoe six-day lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS Munich Germany There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Among the best-known is Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with 59km of pistes, which includes Germany's highest peak, Zugspitze. Rail operator Bayerische Oberlandbahn offers combined train and ski-lift tickets to Bad Tölz and Lake Tegernsee. Deutsche Bahn trains also serve Bavarian Alpine resorts, including Berchtesgaden. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St


Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfügen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for off-the-beaten track adventures. muenchen.de Geneva Switzerland The swish city of Geneva has numerous French ski sites within striking distance. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoëns, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Within two hours' drive are Paradiski, Tarentaise and Les Trois Vallées, which includes Courchevel and Méribel. skigeneva.co.uk Vancouver, Canada Vancouver, host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, has three local mountains: Grouse Mountain, Cypress Mountain and Mount Seymour. Cypress is 30 minutes from the city centre and has downhill and cross-country skiing, snowtubing and snowshoeing. Grouse is even closer: 15 minutes from downtown. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com Queenstown, New Zealand This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25 minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55 minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90 minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. newzealand.com Sapporo, Japan Japan's fifth-largest city is one of its snowiest, hosting an annual snow festival. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45 minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Kokusai (60 minutes) gets busy but has lots of quiet off-piste areas. Kiroro is 70 minutes' drive; nearby Asari is good on windy days; and lavish Tomamu is an 80minute train ride away. powderhounds.com  


RENO March in Reno, Nevada, isn't particularly cold. The average daily high is around 50 °F. Beige and gold, dust and sand, glittering neon and glinting glass – the entire cityscape hollers heat, revels in sunlight, and bathes in the sparkling flow of cash in and out of the casinos. At first glance, it doesn't appear to be a place you'd associate with skiing. Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts – some big, some small, all offering kneedeep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the NevadaCalifornia border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. But there are benefits to sticking around – and these are not limited to the obligatory breakfast bloody mary offered by the casinos. While I recommend the bloody marys at Peppermill hotel and casino, I was more excited about the dull sky and snow-heavy clouds overhead as we made our way up to the resort of Mount Rose. The 30-minute drive saw the dry landscape morph into pine trees, mist and great dollops of snow. We passed a car that had skidded off the road on the black ice, languishing in a ditch as police cars rallied, but we managed to arrive unscathed. The petite nature of the main lodge belied the 1,200 acres of steep terrain and superb tree runs that awaited us – chute after chute of perfect powder popping out at the base of Chuter chair, which took us to the top to do it all again. And meeting locals was a breeze as we kept bumping into the same people. It snowed all day, so we headed for the trees, which provided markers and broke up the whiteness, and when the sun finally came out for our final hour, we were treated to a glistening view of Lake Tahoe in the distance, trees resplendent in their snowy attire. The day was topped off with a pint of Shock Top (a Belgian white beer that Mount Rose skiers seem to have made their own) in the main lodge bar. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with


punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill. Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. Another 10 minutes up the road is Diamond Peak (blink and you'll miss it) with its locals-only-know powder glades. The behemoth of North Star – 3,170 acres of terrain, superpipes, freestyle parks, shops, restaurants and bars – is an hour away. Then there's Squaw Valley, Alpine Meadows, Kirkwood, Homewood and Heavenly. The majority of these resorts would not by themselves hold a skier's interest for a 10-day trip, but put them together and you've got an itinerary to keep even the hardiest skier entertained. Acting as the apex for all these resorts is Reno, which also probably wouldn't be enough to keep you entertained for a full trip. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless – in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's not all about endings, though. Small businesses and restaurants are pushing up in between the casinos like green shoots, and the river constantly drags your eye towards the peaks of the Sierra Nevada. Java Jungle, all band posters, open mic nights and poetry readings, served up a cracking cup of organic chai. Sundance Books is a haven of fairy lights and cushy sofas in a classic revival style building – and is said to have its own ghost. The Riverwalk is the prettiest part of town, with restaurants serving organic local produce to streetside diners. And although Reno isn't a cultural hub, the Nevada Museum of Art carries some interesting exhibitions. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER Denver doesn't have the mild identity crisis that seems to afflict Reno. It's very confident of its place in the world – the gateway to the Rockies, a vibrant cultural scene mixing effortlessly with the outdoor life. The Mercury Cafe is a great example of this. While savouring a pint of Treehugger from the list of microbrews as we waited for our dinner of local veggies and organic meats, a poetry slam gave way to jazz flutes and a touch of wailing from the performance room.


Its artsy vibe is mirrored in the River North area of the city – all yoga studios and raw-food restaurants. Linger is a former mortuary that's been converted into an eatery where the cocktails are as good as the panoramic view of downtown. Equally inspiring are the indie music venues, record shops, thrift stores and dive bars in and around East Colfax Avenue. If Pete's Satire Lounge has changed at all since Bob Dylan gigged there as a teenager before he moved to New York, it's hard to tell. But as well as being yoga mat and tattoo parlour central, Denver is arguably one of the best hubs for skiing in North America. Breckenridge, Keystone, Copper Mountain, Vail, Winter Park, Beaver Creek and Arapahoe Basin are within a two-hour drive. They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by itsEpic Pass. Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes – it is a long way to go just to ski – Denver is a great option. The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256,crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at thePeppermill Casino in Renofrom £1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. Car hire starts from £182 a week including insurance. British Airways (ba.com) flies London-Denver from £667 return in December. Hotel Monaco in Denver (+1 303 296 1717, monaco-denver.com) has doubles from $170 a nght. The Ski Lake Tahoe six-day lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS Munich Germany There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Among the best-known is Garmisch-Partenkirchen, with 59km of pistes, which includes Germany's highest peak, Zugspitze. Rail operator Bayerische Oberlandbahn offers combined train and ski-lift tickets to Bad Tölz and Lake Tegernsee. Deutsche Bahn trains also serve Bavarian Alpine resorts, including Berchtesgaden. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St


Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfügen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for off-the-beaten track adventures. muenchen.de Geneva Switzerland The swish city of Geneva has numerous French ski sites within striking distance. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoëns, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Within two hours' drive are Paradiski, Tarentaise and Les Trois Vallées, which includes Courchevel and Méribel. skigeneva.co.uk Vancouver, Canada Vancouver, host of the 2010 Winter Olympics, has three local mountains: Grouse Mountain, Cypress Mountain and Mount Seymour. Cypress is 30 minutes from the city centre and has downhill and cross-country skiing, snowtubing and snowshoeing. Grouse is even closer: 15 minutes from downtown. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com Queenstown, New Zealand This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25 minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55 minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90 minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. newzealand.com Sapporo, Japan Japan's fifth-largest city is one of its snowiest, hosting an annual snow festival. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45 minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Kokusai (60 minutes) gets busy but has lots of quiet off-piste areas. Kiroro is 70 minutes' drive; nearby Asari is good on windy days; and lavish Tomamu is an 80minute train ride away. powderhounds.com  


Home » Grab Bag » Snippets about Lake Tahoe

Snippets about Lake Tahoe ON: NOVEMBER 2, 2013, BY: ADMIN, IN: GRAB BAG, NO COMMENT

• Carson City High School grad and former Giants third baseman Matt Williams is now the manager of the Nationals. • Longtime Tahoe Resource Conservation District employee Kim Boyd was recently promoted to district manager. • In Conde Nast Traveler’s annual reader poll three ski area lodging properties made the list of top resorts in Northern California: Ritz-Carlton at Northstar (5), Westin Monache Resort at Mammoth (12), and PlumpJack Squaw Valley Inn (13). • The November issue of Ski magazine touts Basecamp Hotel, 968 Park and Stardust Lodge as worthy places to stay in South Lake Tahoe. The same issue has an interesting article on the founder of Mammoth Mountain resort. • Northstar has fired up its snowmaking guns.


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GOLF | GLEN ROSE INVITATIONAL

Elks finish second at Glen Rose Invitational RICKY MOORE POSTED: 11/01/2013 11:56:55 AM CDT

Burleson golfers Patrick Dodge, left, and Davis Farnell show off their medals from the Glen Rose Invitational. (SUBMITTED PHOTO/BURLESON STAR)

Burleson’s boys and girls golf teams were in action Oct. 15 at the Glen Rose Invitational. The Elks fired a one-day total of 304 on the course at Squaw Valley to finish second. Davis Farnell shot a 73 to lead the Elks. Patrick Dodge carded a one-day score of 75. Zach Acker and Josh Montanez each fired 78s while Ty D’Angelo and Caden Carr each shot 88s. Sarah Torres played as and individual and shot a 91.  


RENO Yet within an hour's drive of the city centre are a glut of resorts some big, some small, all offering knee-deep powder and a local feel. Like its Colorado counterpart Denver, Reno, on the Nevada-California border, is a city most skiers fly into and head straight out of to their resort of choice. Kids wet through from snow and exertion greeted parents, parents greeted each other, ski instructors had laughs with punters and the whole lodge hummed with the vibe of a community celebrating a great day on the hill. Mount Rose isn't the only place within shouting distance of Reno. But break each day into wake up, ski, night in Reno, and throw in the odd day off, and out of the neon and gambling-den mire emerges a lotus of a city. Reno is famously the place where divorce is quick and painless in the 1961 film The Misfits, Marilyn Monroe threw her wedding ring into the Truckee river which snakes through downtown. It's a far cry from Las Vegas, but offering as it does the chance to ski little-known local hills, then ditch the thermals and eat citrus-marinated tofu with swiss chard in a buzzy downtown, a trip to Reno feels like two holidays for the price of one. DENVER They all offer superb skiing and all of them except Winter Park and Copper Mountain are owned by Vail Resorts and so covered by its Epic Pass (snow.com/epicpass). Instead of spending a week in one resort, you can ski them all without buying a new pass. You can also hire skis in one resort and drop them off at the end of your trip in another. All of which points to exploration rather than hanging out in one resort. It's not a plan that will suit everyone, but if you want the freedom to ski where the snow is good and fancy seeing a bit more than snowscapes it is a long way to go just to ski Denver is a great option.


The trip was provided by Crystal Ski (0871 231 2256, crystalski.co.uk) which offers a week at the Peppermill Casino in Reno from 1,044pp for seven nights (based on two sharing) including American Airlines flights via Los Angeles. The Ski Lake Tahoe sixday lift pass (skilaketahoe.com) costs $329 and covers Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw, Sierra, Northstar and Mount Rose. The seven-days Epic Pass for Colorado (snow.com) costs $569 and covers Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, Canyons, Heavenly, Northstar, Kirkwood, Afton Alps, Mount Brighton and Arapahoe Basin FIVE MORE CITY SKI HUBS There are several ski regions within an hour or two of Munich, Bavaria's cultured capital. Ski buses go to Austrian resorts St Johann in Tirol, Hochzillertal/Hochfugen and Grossglockner-Resort, while Bavaria also has excellent backcountry skiing for offthe-beaten track adventures. Some of the Mont Blanc resorts, including Chamonix, are an hour away, as is the huge ski region of the Grand Massif (Samoens, Flaine, Les Carroz, Morillon); Grand Bornand and La Clusaz in Aravis; and Les Gets in Portes du Soleil. Whistler, North America's largest ski resort, is a two-hour drive north along the scenic Sea-to-Sky highway; buses and trains also take that route. tourismvancouver.com This is New Zealand's best ski base, with bars, bungee jumps and four ski areas. Coronet Peak, 25minutes away, has roller coaster terrain and night skiing; the Remarkables (50 minutes), is best for beginners; Cardrona (55minutes) is the biggest close to the city; and Treble Cone (90minutes) is ideal for advanced and off-piste skiers. Ski resorts within day-trip distance include Teine, 45minutes away, a mix of beginners' slopes and steep tree skiing. Rachel Dixon  


Change of Scenery

Vail Resorts’ recent expansion gives Coloradans more than one good reason to visit the Sierra Nevadas. The sun warms my shoulders as I steer a pair of newly waxed skis through a layer

of heavy snow. The wide slope unfolds below me and then fades into the azure horizon. But the brilliant swatch of color is not the bluebird sky of Colorado. In fact, it’s not the sky at all. It’s Lake Tahoe, one of the jewels of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. It’s my first time skiing in the Tahoe region, and the gentle rollers of Heavenly Mountain Resort make for a leisurely afternoon punctuated by gorgeous lake vistas and giddy slopeside snapshots. It’s difficult to describe why the 97-run, 29lift mountain is so compelling; although it’s a large ski area at 4,800 acres, the terrain is not altogether different than the lower section of Breckenridge’s Peak 7. Straddling the state line between California and Nevada, Heavenly tops out at 10,067 feet, and though it offers green- and blue-level skiers plenty of wide-open groomers to explore, serious terrain junkies may be left wanting. I, however, feel completely satisfied. Maybe it’s that I’ve escaped the daily grind for a few days. Maybe it’s that the sun—which shines here 274 days a year—is out and the snow is softening up nicely. Or maybe it’s that my eyes can’t seem to drink in enough of what is one of the most stunning views you’ll ever see on two skis. Tahoe may be beautiful, but why would I leave Colorado—we’ve got more than two

dozen resorts that don’t require a plane ticket and a rental car to reach—to hit the arguably less legendary slopes three states away? Well, because I can. Vail Resorts’ Epic Pass holders, like me, can ski at any Vail-owned resort in Tahoe—Heavenly, Northstar California Resort, or the recently acquired Kirkwood Mountain Resort—as well as Colorado’s Vail, Beaver Creek, Breckenridge, Keystone, and Arapahoe Basin resorts, plus Eldora and Utah’s Canyons (both new to the partnership). Throw in Vail’s just-purchased Midwest ski properties—


Mt. Brighton in Michigan and Afton Alps in Minnesota—and a five-free-days deal at ski areas in France, Switzerland, and Austria, and you’ve got access to 26 mountains on one season pass. Going “Epic” isn’t cheap at $709; but considering that a single-day lift ticket to a Vail ski mountain can cost more than $100, it’s practical if you’re planning to ski more than six times a year. The nearly 300,000 season passes (not all of them are Epic Passes, of course) Vail issues each year suggest a lot of folks think the company’s ever expanding real estate is worth the price of admission. Vail’s executives say the company’s expansion into Tahoe and beyond over the past decade has been strategic as much as opportunistic; it’s not about quantity, they’ll tell you, but rather, it’s about adding depth and character to its already extensive portfolio of ski mountains. (It’s also clearly about the bottom line: Vail’s net income increased 22.7 percent to $97.6 million for the third quarter of fiscal 2013, compared to the same period in 2012.) The purchase of Heavenly (on Lake Tahoe’s southeastern shore) in 2002 introduced a sprawling, mellow mountain that came with a casino and a nightlife scene new to Vail Resorts; the 2010 acquisition of Northstar California (an hour northwest of Heavenly near Lake Tahoe’s north shore) brought a luxury family atmosphere—almost like the California version of Beaver Creek—to the mix; and the addition of Kirkwood (50 minutes south of Heavenly) in 2012 delighted Epic Pass holders who prefer a no-frills mountain with gritty terrain. For me, the draws were less…well…strategic. I had my Epic Pass in hand, an open weekend on the calendar, and cheap airfare staring back at me on the computer screen. I also had a friend in San Francisco who had no problem driving a few hours northeast to rendezvous with me for a weekend of schussing. In contrast to the elegant-yet-rustic chalets that dot the hills in Colorado’s Summit

and Eagle counties, South Lake Tahoe, where Heavenly lies, boasts A-frame cottages and a woodsy shoreline reminiscent of a family camp resort circa 1960. But Heavenly is an apt name for a mountain that towers over the crystalline waters of Lake Tahoe. We hop on the gondola in Heavenly Village, which is within walking distance of South Lake Tahoe’s hotels, and gape at the views during the 2.4-mile ride to the top. We spend the day cruising unhurriedly, skiing both Nevada and California via the midmountain Sky Express chair, until we find ourselves peering over the lip of an infamous trail that is most definitelynot a cruiser: Gunbarrel. Plunge into the double-black moguls and there’s no way out. Bravado coaxes me into the minefield, and I pick my way to the bottom. My descent isn’t graceful, but it more than justifies my lunch: a beer and a build-your-own burger at Booyah’s Exotic Burgers and Brews inside the Lakeview Lodge at the top of the Gunbarrel Express lift. Our midday burger doesn’t stop us from checking out the après happenings a couple of hours later. And though I’m no stranger to Colorado’s post-powder entertainment, the Heavenly version—a midmountain weekend party at the


Tamarack Lodge just off the top of the gondola—is a different scene entirely. The discounted cocktails go down easy as a DJ spins bass-heavy tunes and go-go dancers—the “Heavenly Angels”—gyrate on an elevated stage. On the gondola ride back down the mountain, we decide to skip the casino action on Nevada’s side of town and head for Base Camp Pizza Co. in Heavenly Village to split a gourmet pie. That hustle and bustle is all but nonexistent at Vail’s newest Tahoe property, Kirkwood. About half the size of Heavenly, the avalanche-prone terrain at Kirkwood is strewn with black diamond runs and double-black chutes. Situated atop a mountain formation called the Sierra Crest, Kirkwood receives more snowfall (an average of 600 inches annually) than anywhere else in the region. Coloradans like to refer to the tucked-away mountain as the A-Basin of California. Locals are partial to a Jackson Hole comparison: rugged steeps, beckoning cornices, and the purest slice of nature you’ll encounter at any Lake Tahoe ski area. On my first lift up, I notice the tranquility—no highway snaking into my panoramic view, no gondola, no big-name hotels, no EpicMix photographers snapping my photo. Kirkwood doesn’t feel like a property aligned with Vail Resorts’ guest-centric ideals and luxe standards. But that’s the point: Visitors to this mountain come to ski, they come to ride, and that’s it. And, for now, Vail is OK with that. Exhausted from our South Tahoe adventures, we arrive in Northstar California the next day ready to treat ourselves. Northstar California, nestled into the northern shore of the lake, is, in every sense, a resort. Just walking though the base village will make you feel deliciously indulged. In the morning, my friend and I bounce from crêpe stand to waffle cart, peruse boutiques with names like “Kalifornia Jean Bar,” and put our feet up in the cabana-style seating around the ice rink for coffee and people-watching. The upscale yet family-friendly vibe is by design: Vail Resorts has invested more than $30 million in Northstar California’s infrastructure, amenities, lodging, and dining since it purchased the property nearly four years ago. That infusion of cash is obvious everywhere, including on the mountain. We ski all afternoon, sneaking down the open sides of the terrain parks in search of the new Shaun White–designed 22-foot superpipe and testing our mettle in Northstar California’s best asset—its glade runs. At the new midmountain, 700seat, LEED-certified Zephyr Lodge, I load my tray up with an Asian noodle bowl that puts most mountain-cafeteria eats to shame. Later, we splurge on après with sugar-rimmed “martinis” and herbed pommes frites on the patio of Manzanita at the Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe. All of which is the perfect precursor to a low-key dinner at TC’s Pub in the village followed by a s’mores session—all the fixin’s are available at retail locations in the village—over an outdoor fire pit beside the skating rink. As I watch my marshmallow turn golden brown, I realize I’m glad


we’ve saved the relaxing part of our trip—so distinct from the nightlife of Heavenly and the go-hard-all-day mentality of Kirkwood—for last. The next morning, I rise early to take a few solo runs. There’s almost no one on the

mountain yet, and I’m relishing the quiet of the untouched corduroy. As a Coloradan, it’s difficult to say this, but I’m loving the time away from my home slopes. It’s thrilling to have never skied these trails. I don’t know where they end or what’s around the corner or if I’ll find a powder stash I couldn’t have known was there. It’s exhilarating. It also gets me wondering about the future of Vail’s empire. Part of the draw to Tahoe right now, in the early stages of Vail’s presence there, is that these three resorts are unfamiliar to Coloradans. They’ve built their own characters over the years and thus far, as Vail Resorts has folded them into the family, managed to maintain their distinct identities. It feels like a whole new experience. Perhaps the best example is Kirkwood, which occupies its own little corner of the ski world. But the company’s ultimate goal is clear: consistency in its guest-centric policies and service-oriented standards. What that means for the allure of these mountains down the road as branding becomes stronger isn’t clear. Perhaps that brand familiarity is the appeal for Coloradans, but I can only hope that Vail Resorts finds a way to achieve that consistency while letting its charges stay true to their roots. Five or 10 years down the road, I want to visit Tahoe for a ski experience I can’t find in the Rockies—and I hope it will still be there. _____ IF YOU GO GETTING THERE

Reno-Tahoe International Airport is 70 minutes northeast of South Lake Tahoe. San Francisco International Airport is a 3.5-hour drive. LODGING Heavenly Lake Tahoe Resort Hotel, tahoeresorthotel.com; Basecamp Hotel, basecamphotels.com Northstar California Northstar Lodging & Vacation Rentals (rooms, lofts, condos, lodges),northstarcalifornia.com; Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe, ritzcarlton.com DINING Heavenly Base Camp Pizza Co., basecamppizzaco.com; Stateline Brewery &

Restaurant, statelinebrewery.com Northstar California Tavern 6330’ or TC’s Pub, northstarcalifornia.com  


Photos of October snow in the Sierra 

 


North Lake Tahoe Truckee community announcements October 31, 2013

TAHOE/TRUCKEE, Calif. — Content for briefs is selected from e-mail submissions to Community Editor Amy Edgett at aedgett@sierrasun.com. E-mail for print submissions may be 150 words. Items are published in the print edition news space permitting. To enter community events online, visit www.tahoedailytribune.com/NorthShore/nCommunityCalendar, for entertainment www.tahoe.com. Chocolate, Wine & Roses Tahoe SAFE Alliance and Project MANA are thrilled to bring supporters together on Nov. 2 at Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe to mark the 25th Anniversary of the Chocolate, Wine & Roses fundraiser. Tickets are $85/advance and $95/door. VIP tables available: $1,200 includes admission for eight guests. Only four left! Contribute to a Dollar for Dollar Cash Match: The Munson Family Foundation is awarding a $20,000 matching grant in recognition of collaboration success. Call 775-298-0169 for tickets and info. Rotary Club of Truckee to host Annual Cadillac Ball The Rotary Club of Truckee will again present the annual Cadillac Ball on Nov. 2 at the RitzCarlton, Lake Tahoe. The fall event is the club’s largest fundraiser. The Rotary Club of Truckee works to raise funds that support local organizations and projects. Since 2001, the Cadillac Ball has allowed the Rotary Club of Truckee to support more than 130 nonprofits by returning more than $600,000 to the community through a monthly grant process. The funds have supported Our Truckee River Legacy, youth and education, senior services including the Meals on Wheels program, arts and culture, and animal welfare, to name a few. The 2013 Cadillac Ball will be a black tie affair celebrating the history of the Truckee area, featuring dinner, entertainment, silent auction, “Change a Life” raffle with $10,000 grand prize, VIP lounge, live music and dancing. Dinner and “Change a Life” raffle tickets are available now, contact Ron Wulff at 530-587-8720 or any Rotary Club of Truckee member to purchase. Sponsorships are also available and limited. Visit www.cadillacball.com for additional information.


Tahoe Music Institute to host classical concert Last December the Tahoe Music Institute (TMI) set out on a quest to bring classical music to the community. The result was a recital featuring some of the best hidden classical talents from the Tahoe area. Tahoe Music Institute will host its second annual community recital on Sunday, Nov. 3, 3:30 p.m., Dockside 700 Lakefront Grill at the Tahoe City Marina. “Tahoe is full of amazing classical musicians who don’t get many opportunities to perform,” said TMI Executive Director Shauna Righellis. “It is my hope that providing these opportunities will motivate more local musicians to dust off their instruments and start sharing their passion for music with our community.” Righellis is always seeking more musicians. This year’s musical selections will include J.S Bach, Georges Bizet, Camille Saint-Saens, and W.A. Mozart, among others. Musicians will include Stephanie Fountaine on piano, Lena Meyer on French horn, Gordon Shaw on clarinet, Shauna Righellis on clarinet, Todd Holway on piano, Lorelei van Peborgh on voice and more. The recital is free and open to the public; optional donations to help fund music lessons and student supplies will be accepted at the door. For more information call 530-81-0618 or visit www.tahoemusicinstitute.com. Rubicon Pizza Fall Fundraising Feast Nov. 4, 5:30-8:30 p.m. at Rubicon Pizza Company in the Northstar Village. Rubicon Pizza Company’s employees choose a nonprofit to sponsor and raise donations for each year. The North Tahoe Family Resource Center will be this year’s recipient. Rubicon’s family of employees is putting on the annual Fall Fundraising Feast. All employees volunteer their time for the evening and donate all tips to ensure a successful charitable event. A $10 donation is suggested for Rubicon’s delectable all you can eat pizza, pasta, and salad buffet, along with a selection of beer and wine specials. An entertaining live musical performance will be donated by The McAlindin Brothers and Friends. There will also be a live raffle that consists of great prizes donated by a variety of local businesses. Visit www.rubiconpizzaco.com. Royal Gorge launches new website Royal Gorge, North America’s largest cross country resort, has launched a new website at www.royalgorge.com. Features include improved navigation, video and image gallery, dedicated webcam page, a more detailed grooming and weather report. Visitors will also enjoy an enhanced trail map, detailed information on trail and season passes, a calendar of special events and clinics, and other timely and relevant information from the resort.


With 200km of groomed trails spanning 6,000 acres of land on Donner Summit, complete with six distinct track systems and eight different warming huts, winter adventure awaits for skiers, skaters, striders, snowshoers, snowkiters and even fat tire snowbikers. With Sugar Bowl Resort in its second year as owner/operator, Royal Gorge is enjoying numerous upgrades and improvements. For further information on Sugar Bowl Resort, visit www.sugarbowl.com. Children’s artwork of IRONMAN Lake Tahoe on display The North Lake Tahoe Visitor Information Center is hosting a fundraiser for the art programs of local schools. The center is displaying hand-crafted pieces from classrooms in North Lake Tahoe and Truckee. The pieces on display, all made from recycled materials, are part of the IRONMAN Lake Tahoe 2013 Children’s Mural Project. The public is invited to view and cast votes for their favorite murals. To cast a vote for a mural purchase a $1 vote. All proceeds are donated the art program that produced the piece. The North Lake Tahoe Visitor Information Center, located at 100 North Lake Blvd. (at the Wye) in Tahoe City, will house the murals until Nov. 15, when voting will end. Additionally, four winning tickets will be drawn for the public to win one of the murals for display in their home or business. Students were asked to create pieces inspired by the dedication and strength of the IRONMAN athletes. The organizations with pieces on display are the Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe, The Lake Tahoe School in Incline, Tahoe-Truckee High School and the Sierra Expeditionary Learning School in Truckee. Genetics and evolution presentation University of California, Berkeley Professor and Director, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, Michael Nachman will address how genetics and evolution determine the complexity of life. Genomes provide the ultimate record of evolution, and evolution explains many fascinating aspects of our genomes. Hence genomics has deepened our understanding of evolution in ways Darwin never could have imagined, including how the changing climate has affected animals in the Sierra Nevada. He will speak on the learnings from an ongoing 100-year study of animal life in the Sierra. Event sponsored by the Tahoe City Rotary Club, Tuesday, Nov. 5, at 5:30 p.m., Granlibakken. This is a public event, cost of presentation and dinner is $30. All are welcome. Reservations requested ASAP via email, preferably by Nov. 1 to Ladjgd@aol.com. Reserve a seat for “Thanks for Giving”


A Food Works benefit Food Works is pleased to announce Thanks for Giving a chef event focusing on unique and delicious ideas for your Thanksgiving table. Thanks for Giving will feature Executive Chef Willy Carroll of Tahoe Mountain Club. Enjoy different turkey presentations, unusual side dishes, wine parings for each dish and delicious pies. Each guest will take home recipe cards for each dish and enjoy a relaxing buffet style dinner at Alpine Club inside the Village at Northstar. Thanks for Giving is generously sponsored by Tahoe Mountain Club on Nov. 8, 6-9 p.m. at Alpine Club inside the Village at Northstar. Tickets are $55 per person, available TMC members services at 530-550-3800. Tickets are limited, reserve today. All proceeds will benefit Food Works, a collaboration between the Glenshire Elementary PTO and the Tahoe Truckee Unified School District (TTUSD) to fund projects to enrich the culinary experiences and school meal program for all the TTUSD students. Food Works seeks community members to collaborate on this kitchen journey. For more information, call Noël Trim at 530-562-4422. Winter ski resort update at Good Morning Truckee With the recent first significant snowfall, the Nov. 12 Good Morning Truckee is a prime opportunity to learn what’s new at area resorts. The morning will start with Bob Roberts, president of the California Ski Industry Association (CSIA), with an overall update of the industry. The balance of the program will be an energizing, fast-paced line-up of reports on what’s new at 10 resorts. Good Morning Truckee is an open, public community forum presented by the Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce to provide timely and relevant information on a variety of topics and create a networking opportunity. Everyone is invited. It is held the second Tuesday of every month at Truckee Tahoe Airport, 7-8:30 a.m. Price at the door for general public is $10; Truckee Donner Chamber members $8 and includes a continental breakfast and raffle. Good Morning Truckee is presented by the Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce in partnership with sponsors Tri Counties Bank, The Office BOSS, Sierra Sun, 101.5FM Truckee Tahoe Radio, Truckee Tahoe Airport District, town of Truckee, and Red Truck. Additional sponsorships opportunities are available. For more information, contact the Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce at 530-587-8808 or e-mail info@truckee.com. NLTRA calls for grant funding applications The North Lake Tahoe Resort Association announced $50,000 of grant funding available for special events taking place in the North Lake Tahoe region of Eastern Placer County. Most individual grants will fall within the $500 to $2,500 range. All grant money is slated for marketing and public relations efforts needed to promote events. Preference will be given to events which encourage overnight stays. Fill out the Special Event Grant Application by Nov. 4, 2013. After initial review, select applicants will be asked to give the Special Events


Grant Task Force a five-minute presentation on Nov. 15, 2013. Funding notification will be given on Dec. 5, 2013. North Lake Tahoe encourages and supports events that promote the region, especially those held in typically slow or off seasons. For a copy of the application and information contact Judy Laverty at 530-581-8702 or at Judy@GoTahoeNorth.com. Best sellers and box office hits Tahoe City and Kings Beach public libraries have expanded their new book and movie collection. Stop by both libraries and check out the new “Express” collection of books and DVDs. These items are hit movies and bestselling-books available on a first come, first served basis. The items cannot be put on hold. Each library has a different assortment of items so stop by both to see what’s available. Kings Beach Library is located at 301 Secline St.in Kings Beach, call 530-546-2021. The Tahoe City Library is located at 740 North Lake Blvd., below the Eldorado Bank, call 530-583-3382.

 


$50K in grants available for North Tahoe events 

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The North Lake Tahoe Resort Association recently announced $50,000 of grant funding is available for special events taking place in the North Lake Tahoe region of Eastern Placer County. Most individual grants will fall within the $500 to $2,500 range, officials said. All grant money is slated for marketing and public relations efforts to promote events in the region, according to a press release. Preference will be given to events which encourage overnight stays. “By offering this funding to a wide variety of events we hope to showcase the diversity of North Lake Tahoe,” said Andy Chapman, director of marketing for the North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/ Resort Association. “Our experience has shown that extra money for marketing can make a great difference in turn out and profitability at special events.” Groups interested in receiving funds must fill out the Special Event Grant Application by the deadline, Nov. 4, 2013. After initial review, select applicants will be asked to give the Special Events Grant Task Force a five-minute presentation on Nov. 15. Funding notification will be given on Dec. 5, 2013. North Lake Tahoe encourages and supports events that promote the region, especially those held in typically slow or off seasons, officials said. Such objectives reduce pressure on tourism, community resources and infrastructure. For a copy of the application and information, contact Judy Laverty, the special events program manager for the North Lake Tahoe Resort Association, at 530-581-8702 or at Judy@GoTahoeNorth.com.

 


Photos of October snow in the Sierra Stargazing on snowshoes Your own personal Starry, Starry Night— you can view nebulae while snowshoeing in the Sierra. Tony Berendsen, operator of Tahoe Star Tours, leads each walk. The star guide, poet and scientist talks about the cosmos, reads poetry and lets you peek through his high-power Celestron telescope. Northstar will host four of these nights out; Tahoe Adventure Company, six others. Here’s how it looks…


FoMoInfo Tahoe Star Tours Pro Snow Since you follow Slope Dope, you already know that the new Warren Miller film, Ticket to Ride, is coming to the Bay. What you may not know is that, for the second year running, Miller and the Climate Reality Project are teaming up with I AM PRO SNOW. Their goal is “to unite people who live for winter and depend on snow for recreation, business, and their quality of life. Together, we’re telling the story of what climate change means for the season we love and building momentum to protect it.” Tahoe and Idaho: Ski ‘em both Speaking of teaming up, Tahoe’s Sugar Bowl has partnered with Idaho’s Sun Valley to let passholders ski both. This season, Sugar Bowl’s Unrestricted and Slightly Restricted season passholders ski free at Sun Valley. And for skinny skiers, Royal Gorge Cross County passholders cross-country ski free at Sun Valley Nordic Center. Combo Sugar Bowl/Royal Gorge Unrestricted and Slightly Restricted passholders have access to both. OK, that’s the last time I use the word “passholders” this week. I’m beginning to hate that word. FYI, a two-night minimum stay in Sun Valley Resort Lodging is required, and some blackouts apply. And, FYI, United Airlines has a new nonstop jet service from SFO to SUN, with daily flights beginning December 12. And finally, Sugar Bowl already has a free skiing program with Grand Targhee Resort in Wyoming. FoMoInfo click here. Salt Lake Quartet With some of America’s leading ski resorts less than an hour from the airport, Salt Lake City is making it easy to mix and match. The Ski Salt Lake Super Pass is good at four Cottonwood Canyon resorts: Alta, Brighton, Snowbird and Solitude. The single lift pass lets you ski them all. It also gives you a ticket to ride the UTA Ski Bus and TRAX light rail for free. No mo rental car 4 U. As for Salt Lake City, once my least fave American town, here’s a visual update.


North American ski resorts seeing increased bookings, airlift Posted on: October 22, 2013   Skiing might imply cold temperatures, but North American ski resorts and the airlines that serve them seem to be blanketing the 2013-14 season in a warm-and-fuzzy vibe, making both travel and trying out multiple mountains a little easier. Vail Resorts appears to be leading the way, expanding the number of resorts that can be accessed through its Epic Pass to 26 mountains in four countries. The pass, which costs $709 for adults and $369 for ages 5 to 12, not only gives skiers access to Vail's namesake Colorado resort and California's Kirkwood Meadows but also provides five free days of skiing at a number of overseas resorts. This year, that list includes France's Les 3 Vallees, whose eight resorts and 180 chairlifts make it the world's largest ski area. Additionally, the Mountain Collective, which allows cross-skiing passes and includes Wyoming's Jackson Hole, Utah's Alta, Colorado's Aspen/Snowmass and California's Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows, added California's Mammoth Mountain, Utah's Snowbird and British Columbia's Whistler Blackcomb to its collection. In Utah, Brighton Resort and Solitude Mountain Resort are introducing the Big Cottonwood Pass for both mountains this season. Finally, season-pass holders at Idaho's Sun Valley will get free skiing at Sugar Bowl near Lake Tahoe. Meanwhile, air carriers including Alaska, United, Delta and Allegiant are going against recent trends in aviation by adding nonstop routes to mountain resorts from various U.S. cities. Reservations are up Early signs point to a promising season. As of last month, reservations for Western U.S. mountain resorts through February were up 9.7% from the same time a year earlier, while occupancy rates were up 11%, according to DestiMetrics (formerly known as Mountain Travel Research Program). DestiMetrics tracks reservations at 17 mountain-resort towns in California, Oregon, Nevada, Colorado and Utah. While noting that the reservation numbers were compiled before the partial shutdown of the federal government went into effect this month, DestiMetrics said late-season 2012-13 storms in California, Utah and Colorado generated enough momentum to more than offset concerns over the slowly


advancing economy. "We haven't seen this kind of sustained strength in the mountain lodging industry since pre-2008," DestiMetrics director Ralf Garrison said last week. "This strong booking pace leads us to believe resorts are benefitting from what we call positive snow equity among prospective mountain travelers based on the abundance of late season snow in most destinations at the end of last winter." Either way, improvements for the 2013-14 season were widespread: • In British Columbia, Whistler Blackcomb received $18 million in upgrades, including two new highspeed chairlifts and snowmaking improvements to the mountain's Crystal Zone. • In California, Mammoth Mountain, in addition to joining the Mountain Collective, will celebrate its 60th year of operation, while 20 miles north, June Mountain reopens after a one-year closure. June Mountain will also offer free skiing for kids under 13. • In Utah, Snowbird replaces the 42-year-old Gad 2 chairlift with a high-speed detachable quad, while right up the road, Alta's Rustler Lodge was renovated. In addition, Vail Resorts takes over management of Utah's Canyons Resort and its 4,000 skiable acres. • In Colorado, Vail Mountain Resort's 28-year-old Mountain Top Express chairlift will be replaced by a high-speed six-seater, increasing capacity by 33%. Breckenridge had its first expansion since 2008, widening its Peak 6 area by 543 acres, or by 23%, while adding two chairlifts. Transportation-wise, Vail/Eagle airport adds nonstop service from Toronto via Air Canada, while Aspen/Snowmass airport gets nonstop, daily service from Atlanta and Saturday service from Minneapolis-St. Paul by way of Delta. Gunnison-Crested Butte Airport gets nonstop Chicago service from United, while Telluride-Montrose Regional Airport adds nonstop service from Phoenix with Allegiant Air. Steamboat Springs Airport gets nonstop service from Seattle via Alaska Airlines and from Los Angeles via United. • Idaho's Sun Valley will get nonstop service from San Francisco Airport by way of United. • Skiers at Wyoming's Jackson Hole will be able to purchase reusable tickets (called the J Card) with radio frequency identification technology. And the resort town will receive new nonstop service from Seattle and New York Kennedy by way of Delta, while United is adding a nonstop route there from Houston. • In the Midwest, Vail Resorts recently acquired Afton Alps near Minneapolis and Mount Brighton near Detroit. Each get $10 million in upgrades, including improvements in both snowmaking equipment and terrain parks. • In Vermont, Jay Peak received $43 million worth of improvements, including a new 80,000-squarefoot hotel and base lodge and 84 new cottages.


Stowe Mountain got $3.4 million worth of snowmaking upgrades, and Killington Resort and Pico Mountain received $11 million in upgrades, including a new mountaintop lodge. 


Lake Tahoe Ski Resort Updates and Specials By Christina Nellemann on October 22, 2013 1:00 PM A screamin' deal: Take any three Snowsports School lessons at Boreal and earn a free 2013-14 season pass. Photo by Boreal Mountain.

Meteorologists in the region are predicting that this winter at Lake Tahoe will be a mild El Niño, an "average" winter season for the lake that is hinting at a bit more snow than last season. If you've noticed the indicators (early frosts, bright golden aspen leaves, dropping acorns and fat bears), so have the ski resorts. Many of the resorts in the Tahoe area are updating their ski programs and some of the resorts are making big plans for the season. Mountain Improvements Boreal and Soda Springs are already starting to make snow and are predicting an opening before the first of November, and Soda Springs has an expanded Tube Town tubing area. The Ritz-Carlton at Northstar will be opening a new slope-side restaurant this winter that will offer ski-in/ski-out outdoor dining. The Backyard Bar & BBQ will feature blues, brews and BBQ with traditional favorites including St. Louis smoked ribs, brisket and pulled pork platters cooked over an on-site smoker, wood-fired pizzas, burgers, brats, local craft beer and saloon-inspired cocktails. At Kirkwood there's also a new, sheltered, outdoor “K-Bar” with food and beverage service opening up on the Village Plaza, and a remodeled Cornice Grill at Lift 6. Donner Ski Ranch now has a day lodge on the back side of the mountain offering refreshments and hot drinks and Sierra-at-Tahoe has put $5 million into a brand new base-lodge plaza, restaurant, retail center and a deck. Sugar Bowl is restoring most of the Royal Gorge CrossCountry Ski Resort with 200 kilometers of groomed trails, rope tows and warming huts. This area will also have the new kite-powered skiing program in the Van Norden Meadow. Tahoe Donner has added a 700 square foot, slope-side warming yurt. Diamond Peak is boasting 50 percent more snow making capabilities this year, and improvements at Homewood include more facilities and outdoor seating with a lake view at the Big Blue View Bar at mid-mountain and the North Patio BBQ. At Squaw Valley andAlpine Meadows stop by the new "Mtn Roots" gourmet food truck for locally sourced food or the updated Chalet which has been turned into a Bavarian-style Beer Garden. For your après ski events, the popular “Unbuckle” parties at Heavenly are again scheduled to occur daily, with giveaways, half-price drinks and go-go dancers


on the weekends.

Ski Deals and Steals If you take three ski or ride lessons at Boreal, or two lessons at Boreal and one at Soda Springs you can score a free full season pass to either resort. At Boreal, anyone with a teen or youthseason pass can ski or ride free at five sister resorts: Copper Mountain, Killington, Bachelor, Park City and Las Vegas. Unrestricted season passes are currently available to both Sugar Bowl and Royal Gorge for $848, a midweek pass to Sugar Bowl is $249 and a one-day learn-to-ski or snowboard pass is $89. Season passes at Diamond Peak are on sale (until October 31) for $399 unrestricted and $249 midweek and include four free days skiing at Homewood, as well as four at Red Mountain in Montana (with some blackout dates). Donner Ski Ranch's new program, “Old School Days – prices from the past,” begins Jan. 2, on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. On those days, adult lift tickets are only $30 and for $15 extra you can add a full equipment rental (Feb. 19-21 are blackout dates). The Tahoe local favorite, Homewood, has a regular adult pass for $479 and a college pass for $239 with no blackout dates. Kirkwood is offering the Tahoe Local Pass for $459 or the Tahoe Value Pass for $419, and Sierraat-Tahoe has unlimited season passes ($389 for adults, $289 for college and young adults, prices good until Oct. 31) that are also good for free days at Squaw or Alpine. Mount Rose Ski Tahoe is offering specials like “Ladies’ Day Thursdays,” with $29 lift tickets plus $20 for a two-hour lesson in snowboarding, skiing or telemarking; and “Two’fer Tuesdays,” when you can score two adult lift tickets for the price of one. Mount Rose is also offering “Silver Ski Clinics” for skiers age 50 and up, from low-intermediate to advanced level. The clinic begins with a continental breakfast, followed by a skill-enhancing two-hour group lesson for only $20.

 


Ski Season 2013: A look at what’s new and noteworthy around Tahoe and beyond By Paul McHugh Special to The Bee

Published: Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013 - 12:00 am

One might imagine that it’s all about snow and nothing else. But optimism is just as valuable a resource these days for skiers, snowboarders and resort operators in and around the region. Last winter, both were in short supply. A few early storm dumps, backed up by snowmaking, enabled an adequate holiday season. But New Year’s Day led straight into the dry months that left ski conditions marginal by March, forcing an early season closure on many slopes. However, this fall meteorologists predict a mild El Niño – in other words, an “average” winter, and an improvement from the previous season. That notion is seconded by folklorists who cite signals as varied as early acorn drops, the coats on caterpillars and the gloss on black bear fur. The resorts are back to cultivating optimism and hoping for a robust run. “Last season was challenging,” said Bob Roberts,CEO and president of the California Ski Industry Association. “I’d estimate we had a fall-off of about 12 percent (from the previous year’s attendance), for a total of less than 7 million visits to our resorts. Yet economic yields were still good, since early season-pass sales now establish a solid base. And new efficiencies in services, as well as expansion into summer operations, increasingly help most resorts to stay profitable.” In preparing for the coming months, California resorts have generally been burnishing their appeal by expanding programs and making facility improvements, rather than by championing big-infrastructure additions that won headlines in seasons past. However, there are notable exceptions, including Sugar Bowland feisty up-and-comer Sierra-atTahoe.


Here’s a rundown of what’s new and noteworthy this year at Tahoe-area resorts (organized alphabetically and by ownership): Boreal and Soda Springs: Half of Boreal’s terrain at Donner Summit now has snowmaking capabilities. Guns began to roar at the end of September, with an eye on opening before Nov. 1. Full coverage on terrain parks at this snowboard/twin-tip-ski mecca is a top priority. An unrestricted, adult-season pass now goes for $249 (price will jump Nov. 1). A pass to use the sprawling Woodward Tahoe Bunker (indoor athletic training facility, with its new espresso cafe) is $289; access to both is $458. Ski/stay packages at Boreal Inn start at $89/night. As a new program this year, anyone with a teen or youth-season pass can ski or ride free at five sister resorts: Copper Mountain, Killington, Bachelor, Park City and Las Vegas. Another: Take three ski or ride lessons and get a free season pass. Soda Springs, the kid-and-family-friendly sister resort at Norden, has a completely rebuilt base lodge and expanded Tube Town, with multilane tubing runs nearly 400 feet long. Also, take one lesson here and two more at Boreal, and you’re good to go with a full season pass. Diamond Peak: Infrastructure advances include a 50 percent jump in snow-making capabilities and forest thinning for improved tree-skiing. Season passes, $399 unrestricted and $249 midweek (prices good through Oct. 31), now include four free days skiing at Homewood, as well as four at Red Mountain in Montana (with some blackout dates). The popular “Last Tracks” program (ski or ride from 2 from 4 p.m., then party with wine, craft brews and gourmet snacks at the mid-mountain Snowflake Lodge and shoot down a freshgroomed slope at 6 p.m.) has added dates. The cost is $34, or $29 for pass-holders. Reservations recommended and private groups can now book an exclusive Last Tracks event. Donner Ski Ranch: Fresh infrastructure improvements include a day lodge on the back side, serving the base of chairs 2 and 5 with refreshments and hot beverages. Affordable “Learn to Turn” ski or snowboard lessons include equipment, beginner group lesson lift ticket for adults (ages 18 and up) $68; teen (13-17) $62; child (7-12) $52. But the real headsnapper is a program called the “Old School Days – prices from the past,” which begins Jan. 2, on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. On those days, adult lift tickets cost $30. Add another $15 for full equipment rental (Feb. 19-21 are blackout dates).


Heavenly, Kirkwood and Northstar: Heavenly’s “Unbuckle” après ski parties are scheduled to occur daily, with giveaways, half-price drinks and even go-go dancers (on weekends). These festivities have grown so popular – a third of attendees ride a gondola up to the mid-mountain party and don’t even ski – that they will spill outside Tamarack Lodge and onto the deck. Celebrations of a more athletic kind light up the World Cup and Gunbarrel runs on the California side when the U.S. Freestyle National Championships return March 29-31. More Olympic-caliber athletes will jam the same location for the High-Roller Hold ’Em snowboard contest, scheduled for the first weekend in April. Brought under the umbrella of Vail Resorts two years ago, the famed “skiers’ hill” of Kirkwood is striding back to stardom. Big news here is completion of a ski-patrol/snowcat station atop Lift 10 (“The Wall”) to ensure this dramatic terrain can be opened quickly after a dump. There’s also a new, sheltered, outdoor “K-Bar” with food and beverage service opening up on the Village Plaza, and a remodeled Cornice Grill at Lift 6. You’ll also find consistently upgraded grooming, even on high-angle slopes. Expedition Kirkwood will offer back-country tours, lessons and trips. EpicMix Academy allows skiers and snowboarders – and their instructors – to link and track their progress at visits to all of Vail’s 10 resorts in California, Utah, Colorado, Minnesota and Michigan. And yes, an Epic Season Pass grants access to all of these ($709). The economy-minded can focus on California sites with a Tahoe Local Pass ($459) or Tahoe Value Pass ($419). Northstar’s on-the-ground improvements include the opening of more tree-skiing areas and widened trails around the Promised Land express lift and a new slope-side, outdoor restaurant at the Ritz-Carlton, dubbed “The Backyard Bar & BBQ,” that will serve up blues, brews and wood-fired oven pizzas. Also, take an early peek at high-flying Olympic athletes as they arrive to vie at this North Shore resort Jan. 6-12 for the Sprint U.S. Snowboarding (slope-style and half-pipe) and Visa U.S. Freeskiing Grand Prix events, held on the mid-mountain terrain. Expect competitors to go all-out at this qualifier.


Homewood: Improvements include more facilities and outdoor seating at the Big Blue View Bar at mid-mountain (with some of the best views of Tahoe, weather permitting) and the North Patio BBQ, at the north base area. Plus, the resort has brought a new creativity to its season passes: a regular adult pass ($479) and college pass ($239) have no blackout dates; there’s a family pass that covers two adults and two youths ($999), and even a Heritage pass covering two adults, two youths and two seniors ($1,299). Adult and senior pass holders also score: In addition to guest pass and rental discounts, they receive four days of free skiing at Diamond Peak (some blackouts), plus unlimited skiing at Red Lodge Mountain and five free days at Whitefish (both in Montana), and 50 percent discounts offlift tickets at Alta in Utah. Mount Rose: The great hope of establishing new ski terrain for this Nevada resort remains in the planning phase. So this season, improvements are modest: expanded mountain-view dining, better access to parking, wider Wi-Fi coverage. The big deals are the deals. Specials that include: “Ladies’ Day Thursdays,” with a $29 lift tickets(purchased online), plus $20 for a two-hour lesson in snowboarding, skiing or telemarking; or “Two’fer Tuesdays,” when you can score two adult lift tickets for the price of one. The resort also offers “Silver Ski Clinics” in which skiers ages 50 and up, from lowintermediate to advanced level, can enhance skills and learn new movement patterns for the modern skis. The clinics begin with a continental breakfast, followed by a two-hour group lesson, for $20. Sierra-at-Tahoe: This resort on the Sierra’s western slope has just put $5 million into enhancing guest experience with a new base-lodge plaza, restaurant, retail center and deck. Unlimited season pass holders ($389 for adults, $289 for college and young adults, prices good until Oct. 31) will also score dozens of free ski/ride days at Squaw or Alpine (black-outs apply) as well as three days each at 11 other resorts, including Snowbasin, Crested Butte, Mountain High and Angel Fire.


On select powder days, pass holders can get on lifts up to 30 minutes early, to score the first runs under the “Early Loads” program. Its snowboarding camp kids ages 3-6, The Burton Star Wars Experience, has been expanded from Yoda’s Riglet Park to include a facility for 7- and 8-year-olds called Echo Base. Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows: The trend to link resorts so skiers and boarders can get more bang for their pass-buck continues, as demonstrated by Squaw’s “Super Tahoe Pass” which grants unrestricted access to Squaw and nearby Alpine Meadows (now linked by shuttle) as well as Sierra-at-Tahoe on the west slope. CEO Andy Wirth (check out his star turn as an “Undercover Boss” on YouTube) utilizes guest surveys to fine-tune investments in the resort’s $70 million, five-year “Renaissance” plan. Last year, that plan built the Big Blue Express and Mountain Meadow lifts. This year, it produced the new Wanderlust Yoga Studio at the end of the Village. Other innovations include new food trucks, named “Mtn Roots,” serving gourmet, locally sourced grub in lots at Squaw and Alpine; the transformation of Alpine’s mid-mountain lodge, The Chalet, into a Bavarian-style Sierra Beer Garden; and program innovations such as “Teaching Tykes,” a workshop that helps parents instruct their toddlers in taking up skiing and snowboarding. Sugar Bowl/Royal Gorge — This midsize, cooperatively owned outfit on the west side of Donner Summit tends to be praised more for its classy style than its grandeur. But this season, the resort makes several eye-catching advances. A new Crow’s Peak Lift now accesses a 7,954-foot summit with a fixed-grip, triple-chair to open up 1,600 more acres of terrain laced by a pair of intermediate as well as several diamond and double-diamond runs. Good tree-skiing is included at no extra charge. Other improvements include a youth academy that opens in December and a sport house and yoga facility that opens in February with a two-lane lap pool that will be ready by next summer. Meanwhile, the restoration of adjacent partner Royal Gorge Cross-Country Ski Resort proceeds apace.


All of its 200 kilometers of groomed trails, warming huts, and rope tows should be open this season, managed from the remodeled Summit Station lodge. Fresh attractions include kitepowered skiing on Van Norden Meadow, mountain bikes with snow tires and revival of the famed Gold Rush race in March. Three ski trails hook up Royal Gorge with Sugar Bowl; they’re also connected by a new, unrestricted season pass to both resorts for $848. At the other end of the spectrum, a midweek pass to Sugar Bowl is $249, and a one-day learn-to-ski or snowboard pass (gear, lesson and lift ticket) is $89. Tahoe-Donner: This tranquil resort on the north side of I-80 near Truckee combines a 120-acre downhill area with two lifts, and a cross-country area with 100 kilometers of groomed trail. It prides itself as place for families to learn both sports. Added this year is a 700-square-foot, slope-side warming yurt and a revised and enhanced instruction curriculum.

 


Children's art expo to raise money for art programs NORTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. (KRNV & MyNews4.com) -- The North Lake Tahoe Visitor Association is hosting a fundraiser for art programs for three schools and the Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe. Students from each of the organization created hand made murals about the IRONMAN triathlon. The public can buy a vote for $1 and vote for their favorite mural. The vote also represents an actual donation of $1 to that school's art program. The North Lake Tahoe Visitor Information Center, located at 100 North Lake Blvd (at the Wye) in Tahoe City, will house the murals until November 15 when voting will end. Additionally, four winning tickets will be drawn for the public to win one of the murals for display in their home or business.

 


LAKE TAHOE, California & Nevada — Last month, Lake Tahoe Convention & Visitors Bureaus reported the hiring of sales & marketing professional Amy Nostrand as their Director of Eastern Regional Sales, and to promote Lake Tahoe as a travel destination for meetings and conferences. Nostrand's extensive experience spans 25 years, and includes leading regional sales teams for Kansas City and Baltimore and hotel experience with Marriott, Westin and Hyatt Hotels and Resorts. Nostrand is charged with helping ensure that association and business executives alike are made aware of Lake Tahoe's diversity of hotel and meeting space set in a pristine and exciting destination. “With her wide range of experience with hotels and destination marketing organizations, we feel that Amy is perfect to relay the message that Lake Tahoe is superb for business events and meetings,” said Bill Hoffman, executive director of the Incline Village Crystal Bay Visitors Bureau. Confident that she can deliver the message that Lake Tahoe is more than a two-season travel destination, and one that provides superb —and diverse – options for a business setting all year round, Nostrand exclaims “We have so many choices when it comes to unique space for planning sessions, strategic meetings and team-building events. It truly doesn’t get any better than this when it comes to building unforgettable business experiences.” Nostrand has been nominated for two top-notch sales awards and was selected as Manager of the Year at the Grand Hyatt Washington in 1994.

 


Lake Tahoe in Autumn is a good bet  Posted: Friday, October 04, 2013 | Jeffrey Weidel  

   

  Once Jeremy Gorup visited Lake Tahoe, he was convinced that he needed a  permanent change of address.  Gorup grew up in the urban agglomeration of New York City and was a  successful businessman for many years in the enchanting Gulf Coast region of  Florida. "I just fell in love with this place. It's hard to beat Lake Tahoe," says  Gorup, displaying a convincing smile of a man who is extremely content.  Another thing that's hard to beat right now on the north shore of Lake Tahoe is  some great lodging deals as the region takes a deep breath following another  busy summer, before shifting gears and getting into winter mode.  Relaxing, family‐friendly atmosphere at Franciscan Lakeside Lodge Gorup is the  general manager of the Franciscan Lakeside Lodge, one of many spots that  reside adjacent to the beautiful waters of Lake Tahoe. Some of the Franciscan's  rooms are so close to the Lake that dipping one's feet in water requires only a  30‐yard walk.  The lodge has a peaceful, private beach that stretches about one‐half mile. And  its large, heated swimming pool is reportedly the largest on the north shore.  Beach volleyball, ping pong and a horseshoe pit are other popular activities at  the Franciscan. The remainder of the Franciscan lodging is across Highway 28, a  sometimes busy thoroughfare that winds along the Lake through little towns  like Kings Beach, Incline Village and Tahoe Vista, where the Franciscan is 


located. "There's a real spirit to the Franciscan," explains Gorup. "We're family  here. We actually know people's names because they've been coming here for  so long."  And Franciscan guests back up the claim. Many of them have been booking  vacations at the Franciscan for so long that now their grandchildren are  accompanying them.  Most of the 64 rooms at the Franciscan are affordable ‐ starting at around $100  ‐ clean, comfortable and are equipped with a full kitchen and cozy outside deck  to take in the sights. The rooms range from a studio to a four‐bedroom house.  As summer winds down and fall arrives, one of the best times to visit Lake  Tahoe is now. Why?  Autumn in Tahoe takes on the slow pace that people think of as vacation  speed. It's a time when traffic thins, prices fall, and the lake remains warm  enough for a comfortable swim.  Lodging prices drop in fall season  Prices at the Franciscan will fall Oct. 1. There are also reduced prices at the  nearby Tahoe Sands Resort and Red Wolf Lakeside Lodge.  Another right‐on‐the‐lake location is family‐owned Ferrari's Crown Resort,  which offers lakefront lodging on Kings Beach at a hotel that has been family‐ owned and operated since the 1950s.  If one wants luxury accommodations, that's available as well. The Ritz‐Carlton  Lake Tahoe, the Hyatt Regency in Incline Village, the Resort at Squaw Creek,  and the villages at both Northstar California and Squaw Valley are among the  choices.  The Ritz‐Carlton Lake Tahoe's "Discover With You" deal offers a $100 hotel  credit, free breakfast and complimentary S'mores with a room booking. The  Resort at Squaw Creek provides a free night of lodging when you stay three  nights or more. And the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe's popular Lakeside Cottages  and West Shore Café drop their rates for fall season bookings.  Couples can find quiet bed and breakfasts deep on the West Shore. Visitors  with a hankering for late‐night music can book a room at one of Crystal Bay's 


casinos to catch a night of live music and enjoy some gambling. And vacation  rentals around Tahoe City can be found for half price throughout the fall. 

Dining at Crystal Bay Steak House  The affordable accommodations leave more money to spend on dining. For a  treat, visitors can take a little step back in time and dine at the Crystal Bay  Steak House. The old‐style Crystal Bay Casino harbors the classy steakhouse  that does some impressive table‐side Caesar salads, desserts, and specializes in  a delicious streak and lobster dinner.  Crystal Bay Steak House, located off Highway 28 just over the California border,  features an extensive menu and great wine list. And once you've completed  dinner, it's only a short stroll to the gaming tables.  If burgers are your thing, don't pass up a visit to Burger Me, a locals spot on  the outer edge of downtown Truckee. There's a variety of juicy burgers on the  menu and make sure to order the sweet potato fries and one of their thick  milkshakes. 

Incline Village Golf Course a great track  There's plenty of activity in Lake Tahoe ‐ hiking, biking, boating, fishing,  kayaking, and more. A favorite pastime here is golf. And a good choice this fall  is the Incline Village Golf Course, which is a gorgeous track that is in terrific  shape. The holes are diverse, the greens are quick, and the views often  stunning. And if you don't like playing a traditional golf course, Incline Village  has a spectacular 18‐hole executive, par‐3 course that is as good as it gets.  Visit  www.gotahoenorth.com/lodging for a comprehensive list of lodging options in  North Lake Tahoe. 

 


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Status Update Misty Milioto | Photo: Jason Dewey, Don Riddle and Chris Kamman | September 25, 2013

Where to ski, where to stay, where to shop and where to play—it’s the annual lowdown on the latest upgrades at our favorite slopes East and West.

Heavenly Mountain Resort is a skier’s paradise, thanks to 97 trails—plus intense backcountry terrain—across 4,800 acres in California and Nevada.

With a name that harkens back to Aspen’s mining days, Hotel Jerome’s new restaurant, Prospect, features a sleek aesthetic (designed by locally based Rowland+Broughton Architecture and Urban Design), plus a hearty menu of reimagined classic fare from Executive Chef Rob Zack.

The redesigned lobby at The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch is just part of the extensive $15 million renovation that was completed this summer.

Big Sky Resort’s village scene comes to life at night.

Enjoy a relaxing après-ski soak in the Spa Montage Deer Valley’s whirlpool.

The newly renovated Topnotch Resort, located in Stowe, Vt., is the go-to spot for the East Coast ski elite. As in nature itself, each ski season brings a whole host of changes, expected and not—from newly built hotels to classic resort renovations, as well as mountain modifications and new modes of transportation to get you where you’re going. So, for even the most seasoned travelers and area aficionados, checking in on classic haunts and investigating emerging hot spots is par for the course. We’ve researched the finer points of what makes up an ultimate winter wonderland experience— focusing on new developments in seven of our top ski states—think of these packed pages as your personal guide to mapping out your ideal itineraries for the ski season. With three separate ski regions as diverse as California itself (North Lake Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe and Mammoth Lakes), the Golden State’s beaches aren’t the only natural wonder worth crowing about. Lake Tahoe alone boasts nine premier ski resorts surrounding its namesake waters, and the area continues to benefit from more than $100 million worth of capital improvements. Throw in the nonstop nightlife on the Nevada side of the lake, and you’ve got an action-packed powder locale popular with a ski set looking for a social scene more sophisticated and sexy than fireside hot cocoa. North Lake Tahoe Mountain Measures With more than 6,000 acres of terrain—the largest skiable acreage accessed by a single lift ticket in the lower 48 states—Alpine Meadows (skialpine.com) and Squaw Valley (squaw.com) are now entering year three of a five-year, $70 million enhancement plan. This season, $8 million worth of improvements include the new 1,000-square-foot Wanderlust Yoga Studio Squaw Valley and a $150,000 face-lift to the concert amphitheater at Squaw Valley’s KT Base Bar.


Meanwhile, the region’s highest base resort, Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe (mtrose.com)—located within a 25-minute drive from Reno—recently announced plans for a $23.5 million expansion that will add nearly 100 acres of terrain, new chairlifts, increased snowmaking capabilities and a mountaintop restaurant. Following last year’s $30 million enhancements, Northstar California Resort (northstarcalifornia.com) is renovating the cabins on its Big Springs Gondola, making the ride a comfy one from the Village at Northstar to the Day Lodge at midmountain. Not to be outdone, Sugar Bowl Resort (sugarbowl.com) is installing the $3 million Crow’s Peak triple chairlift, adding more than 150 acres of advanced terrain to its existing 1,500 total acres and building the $4.5 millionSport Haus Fitness and Aquatic Center. The Royal Gorge Cross Country Ski Resort has also added snow bike‐specific trails and the first resortbased snowkiting center in the state. Après-Ski As part of its capital improvements for the 2013-14 ski season, Northstar is introducing Tavern 6330’, located slopeside near the Big Springs Gondola. With a crave-worthy menu of American classics (like hot chowder and a 16-ounce prime rib), plus a wide selection of wines, microbrews and signature cocktails, the patio scene starts early and goes late. Northstar has also begun offering private cabana service (complete with fire pits, s’mores and an assortment of cocktail sniffers) at the resort’s always popular ice-skating rink. South Lake Tahoe Mountain Measures Those who need a short break from skiing will enjoy Heavenly Mountain Resort’s (skiheavenly.com) new Epic Discovery program, featuring two ropes courses, a canopy tour and a zip-line center. Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort (sierraattahoe.com) has invested $4.5 million in a new base plaza, complete with retail space, a live-music venue, indoor and outdoor seating, and fire pits. Even more exciting, the resort recently joined the Powder Alliance (powderalliance.com), a new group of 12 resorts—Angel Fire Resort(angelfireresort.com), Arizona Snowbowl (arizonasnowbowl.com), Bridger Bow (bridgerbowl.com), China Peak (skichinapeak.com), Crested Butte (skicb.com), Mountain High (mthigh.com), Mt. Hood Skibow (skibowl.com), Schweitzer Mountain Resort (schweitzer.com), Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort, Snowbasin Resort (snowbasin.com), Stevens Pass (stevenspass.com) and Timberline (timberlineresort.com)—that offers anyone who buys an anytime season pass to one of these ski resorts an additional three days at each of the other partner resorts (for a total of 33 free days!). Getting There The newly constructed Interstate 580 provides a direct route from the Reno-Tahoe International Airport to the South Lake Tahoe resorts, meaning it’s easy to fly in and hit the hill—all on the same day. Mammoth Lakes Mountain Measures Mammoth Mountain Ski Area (mammothmountain.com) has joined The Mountain Collective (themountaincollective.com), which grants slope-goers access to more than 30,000 acres, 186 lifts and 1,281 trails on 12 mountains at AltaSnowbird (alta.com; snowbird.com), Aspen/Snowmass(aspensnowmass.com), Jackson Hole (jacksonhole.com), Mammoth Mountain, Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows and Whistler Blackcomb (whistlerblackcomb.com). The pass includes two days at each sought-after resort (for a total of 12 days), unlimited 50-percent discounts on additional days and a 25-percent discount on lodging. In other news, Mammoth Mountain’s neighboring resort, June Mountain (junemountain.com), is reopening in mid-December with full winter operations. Après-Ski Lakefront Restaurant’s (tamaracklodge.com) new head chef, Bobby Brown, is offering seasonal dishes, featuring domestic game and local produce. And The Westin Monache Resort, Mammoth’s (westinmammoth.com) new executive chef, Jeremy Graham, brings classical French techniques combined with a fusion of European and Asian cuisine to the hotel’s Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge. Bleu Handcrafted Foods is a new cheese and charcuterie shop, featuring West Coast cheese from farmstead dairies, plus craft beers and boutique wines. Opening in early winter, Mammoth Rock ’n’ Bowl will combine a bowling alley, golf simulators, and an upscale restaurant and lounge. Upping the hip Hollywood vibe at Mammoth Mountain is Underground Lounge, a club that gives expected trappings like live music, a VIP area and specialty cocktails a decidedly alpine twist. Getting There Mammoth Yosemite Airport boasts flights from Atlanta to San Diego on Alaska Airlines(alaskaair.com) and service from Atlanta to Orange County on Delta Airlines (delta.com). United Airlines(united.com) is also offering two


connecting daily flights from San Francisco four days per week, and Alaska is offering two nonstop daily flights from Los Angeles six days per week. Long-loved for its bluebird skies, a variety of terrain and seemingly limitless powder, the wide array of ultraluxe resorts in Aspen and the famous Back Bowls of Vail have made Colorado among the top ski destinations in the United States, especially among the swankier set. Arapahoe Basin Après-Ski Offering the longest ski season in Colorado (from mid-October to early July), and the highest skiable terrain in North America (summit elevation is 13,050 feet), Arapahoe Basin (arapahoebasin.com) always keeps the party going longer than anywhere else—often with the help of bacon Bloody Marys from the 6th Alley Bar, a staple hangout that’s getting a $1 million renovation (slated to reopen later this year as 6th Alley Bar & Grill) with expanded space, a horseshoeshaped bar and additional seating. Aspen Stay Hotel Jerome (hoteljerome.aubergeresorts.com), now owned by Auberge Resorts, is the place to mingle with Aspen’s elite. This season, enjoy its completed, extensively redesigned and historic restoration by Rowland+Broughton Architecture and Urban Design. The Living Room lounge/bar provides more space for socializing, while its American bistro, Prospect, features substantial dishes with locally sourced ingredients from Executive Chef Rob Zack. All-new is the Auberge Spa. (Fear not: The legendary J-Bar remains virtually untouched.)The hotel is also offering two Winter Auberge Adventures: a heli-skiing experience in the San Juan Mountains (guests fly from Aspen to Telluride and enjoy six guided helicopter ski runs), followed by an après-ski celebration; or privately guided ski sessions with Jonny Moseley (the only skier to have medaled in both the X-Games and the Olympics) or with Tommy Moe (a former World Cup alpine ski racer, and Olympic gold and silver medalist). At Aspen’s only ski-in/ski-out hotel, The Little Nell (thelittlenell.com), Holly Hunt (who remodeled the hotel’s guest rooms in 2009 and the lobby in 2011) is bringing her signature sleek and clean lines to the hotel’s six VIP suites (two of which will be completed by the start of ski season). Après-Ski In addition to the newly opened Chefs Club by Food & Wine, The St. Regis Aspen Resort(stregisaspen.com) recently opened its signature restaurant, Trecento Quindici Decano. Guests can enjoy traditional handmade pasta and focaccia with a contemporary twist from Executive Chef Thomas Riordan. In addition to an extensive selection of Italian wines, the hotel offers two exclusive private-label house wines. Getting There Delta Air Lines (delta.com) has added daily nonstop seasonal service to Aspen/Pitkin County Airport from Atlanta. Breckenridge Mountain Measures The biggest news in the ski industry this year is the Peak 6 expansion at Breckenridge Ski Resort (breckenridge.com)—the largest development of its kind at a United States ski resort in more than a decade. Breck will now have an additional 543 acres of heart-pounding terrain (400 acres of lift-served terrain and 143 acres of hike-to terrain), which represents a 23-percent increase in overall skiable acreage. The expansion provides more above-tree-line terrain for intermediate and expert skiers, 10 new trails, three new bowls and two new lifts (one four-person fixed grip lift that provides access from Peak 7 and one six-person high-speed lift that provides access above the tree line). Copper Mountain Mountain Measures Copper Mountain (coppercolorado.com) is investing more than $7 million in capital improvements, including a replacement Storm King surface lift that provides access to Spaulding Bowl, Upper Enchanted Forest and Copper Bowl. Steamboat Springs Après-Ski Steamboat Springs (steamboat.com) is opening the new multimillion-dollar Four Points Lodgethis ski season. The nearly 13,000-square-foot, two-level building will be home to a 200-seat restaurant with an outdoor grill, flat-screen TVs and an indoor bar. Telluride Stay Telluride Ski Resort (tellurideskiresort.com) recently acquired the Inn at Lost Creek(innatlostcreek.com), a luxury skiin/ski-out boutique hotel located slopeside in Mountain Village. The property’s new Siam’s Talay Grille offers fresh seafood,


handmade sauces, hand rolls, lettuce wraps and specialty cocktails. Hotel Madeline Telluride (hotelmadelinetelluride.com)—also ski-in/ski-out—is set to unveil a new entrance adorned with a pair of fire pits and a new art collection (with pieces for sale at the artists’ studio prices). The hotel’s signature restaurant, Restaurant REV, is adding a street entrance, while the newly enhanced outdoor seating and a new fire pit at the hotel’s hip SMAK Bar provide the perfect place to grab a microbrew or handmade cocktail. Getting There Allegiant Air (allegiantair.com) is offering two weekly nonstop flights from both Phoenix and Los Angeles to Montrose Regional Airport, and additional air service is now being provided by other airlines to MTJ from Atlanta. Vail/Beaver Creek Mountain Measures Vail Mountain Resort (vail.com) is opening two new chairlifts this ski season to increase time spent on the hill: a high-speed, six-person lift to replace the Mountaintop Express Lift (#4) from mid-Vail to the Patrol Headquarters area (increasing lift capacity by 33 percent); and a fixed-grip triple lift to replace the fixed-grip double Gopher Hill Lift (#12) (increasing lift capacity by 50 percent to the Golden Peak area and Vail Village). Stay Four Seasons Resort and Residences Vail (fourseasons.com) recently remodeled three residences that are now available getaways. Each custom-designed abode includes a fully equipped kitchen and dining area. Choose from a fivebedroom with game room, a three-bedroom with large outdoor terrace, or a one-bedroom with lavish media room (that can sleep up to six people). The resort also recently re-launched Flame, a modern mountain steakhouse that now features tableside steak-carving and inventive dishes like the signature bison pot stickers. The Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa (beavercreek.hyatt.com) is spending $4 million to upgrade its 190 guest rooms, and it’s also offering a new gourmet après-ski experience at 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill. Parties of eight to 10 can book a private chef’s table for a Colorado-inspired handmade cocktail lesson—combined with a variety of small bites and a five-course dinner with wine pairings. The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch (ritzcarlton.com) reopened this summer after an extensive $15 million renovation to its 180 guest rooms and suites, lobby, great room and other public spaces. Expect an ambience in keeping with The RitzCarlton brand—think sophisticated furnishings and contemporary paintings by local artists. The ski-in/ski-out hotel will also unveil a new restaurant and lounge prior to the ski season. The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Vail (theresidencesvail.com) has introduced a collection of 10 designer residences—known as The Lionshead Collection—that are available for vacation rental or for sale. Each residence features personally selected finishes from acclaimed Colorado designers, including Eddy Doumas, who will unveil four new residences for the collection this season. Après-Ski Vail’s new place to be is Leonora, located at The Sebastian-Vail (thesebastianvail.com). Enjoy tapas, crudo and Alpine-bistro cuisine—featuring fresh, local and organic ingredients, all paired with wines from around the globe. Or, if you’re skiing at Beaver Creek Mountain (beavercreek.com), pick a roosting spot at Talons, the European-inspired, 17,000-square-foot restaurant that replaces Red Tail Camp at the confluence of Larkspur Bowl, Grouse Mountain and Birds of Prey. Enjoy gourmet dishes like the Kasseler Rippchen casserole or Colorado lamb burger. The Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa at Beaver Creek Mountain (westinriverfrontbeavercreek.com) has opened its signature restaurant, Maya. Grab a seat on the deck overlooking the Eagle River, and enjoy chef Richard Sandoval’s traditional Mexican dishes with a contemporary twist. Be sure to try one (or several) of the 100-plus agave-based spirits and house-infused tequilas. Getting There Delta Air Lines is adding extra Saturday service from Atlanta to Eagle County Airport from Feb. 15 to March 29. Big Sky Mountain Measures Big Sky Resort (bigskyresort.com) has enhanced the skiing experience at the Explorer, Shedhorn, Dakota and Challenger areas through forest-glading efforts this past summer, and skiers can expect to find a revved up scene in the Mountain Mall area at the base of the lifts, thanks to a $750,000 investment. Après-Ski Moonlight Basin Resort (moonlightbasin.com) welcomes Head Chef Chris Rennau to Jack Creek Grille. Chef Rennau studied environmental science at Montana State University and previously worked under chefs who taught him the


importance of keeping food local and sustainable. As a result, he is sourcing as many ingredients as possible from local purveyors. Highlights of the new menu include the Montana wagyu rib-eye and the local grass-fed bison burger, plus a wide selection of wines, microbrews and cocktails. Meanwhile, the Moonlight Basin Spa will make a body happy with the watermelon basil creme body bliss treatment or the buffalo greens and agave nectar toning body wrap. Getting There Delta Air Lines recently added nonstop flights from Atlanta to Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, making the once challenging trek to Montana so much easier. Known as the Gem of the Mountains, Idaho rightfully claims its place among popular ski destinations. In addition to epic scenery and glorious powder, Idaho is home to 18 ski resorts with a combined 18,500 skiable acres and 28,000 feet of vertical drop. One of our treasured local ski spots, Sun Valley Resort, offers up some exciting news this season. Sun Valley Mountain Measures Adrenaline junkie alert: Sun Valley Resort’s (sunvalley.com) Dollar Mountain just installed a new 620foot-long, 22-foot-high superpipe—the largest in North America! But fear not, novices—Dollar’s otherwise gentle and treeless terrain is perfect for beginners and intermediate skiers looking to perfect their form. Plus, the mountain’s SnowSports School added a Terrain Based Learning Program this season, a technique that combines traditional teaching approaches with the popular Adventure/Discovery model. Après-Ski Gary Cooper and Ernest Hemingway put nearby Ketchum on the map in the 1940s and ’50s, and it’s still a big draw for celebrities—many of whom center themselves at Zenergy (zenergyts.com), a world-class health club and spa that just doubled its size and capacity. Now 48,000 square feet, it’s never difficult to book an acupuncture appointment or massage treatment, or register for yoga and tennis. Afterward, treat yourself right at Ketchum’s new restaurant, Enoteca (ketchum-enoteca.com), a reliable source for artisanal cheeses, house-cured meats, wood-fired pizza, and locally sourced trout and lamb. Billed as “the greatest snow on Earth,” Utah’s variety of challenging slopes at 14 amazing resorts (the majority of which are located within one hour of Salt Lake City International Airport) are blanketed with an average 500 inches of dry, powdery snow each year—making this particular playground a go-to for skiers whose happiness hinges on reliable hill conditions. Park City Mountain Measures Deer Valley Resort (deervalley.com) is investing $4.5 million to upgrade its snowmaking and grooming capabilities, plus trail grading upper Deer Hollow on Little Baldy peak for better accessibility for beginning skiers. Stay The St. Regis Deer Valley (stregisdeervalley.com) is opening a 650-square-foot pavilion on its outdoor Mountain Terrace, which will feature rustic wooden tables surrounding a fire pit, a flat-screen TV and live music from regional musicians. The space will play host to a number of culinary experiences, including the popular7452 Bloody Mary Clinics. Spa Montage Deer Valley (spamontage.com) offers the new 120-minute thermastone facial and kur (freezing blanket) body treatment. It begins with a soak in a hydrotherapy tub filled with mountain herbs and hot water (reaching 105 degrees), followed by a full body wrap in a kur and a balancing thermastone facial. After you’re nice and relaxed, head over to chef Viet Pham’s new restaurant, Fire and Water, located on the corner of Main Street and Heber Avenue in Park City. Slated to open in time for ski season, the restaurant will focus heavily on hearthsmoked and grilled seafood dishes, plus smoked and aged meats. Snowbird Mountain Measures In addition to joining The Mountain Collective this year, Snowbird (snowbird.com) is offering half-off ski tickets and free valet to travelers within 24 hours of arriving in Salt Lake City via plane. The resort is also expanding its Snowcat Skiing for Nature experience, a guided backcountry ski tour for advanced and expert skiers. Home to more than 15 ski resorts, Vermont has the most expansive skiing experience on the East Coast. For starters, there’s Jay Peak Resort, which averages almost 380 inches of annual snowfall—the most of any eastern ski resort. Then there’s Killington Resort, boasting more than 70 miles of diverse terrain spread across six peaks, and Stowe Mountain Resort, which offers the highest elevation in Vermont at 4,395 feet—making this state a must-stop destination for anyone considering a classic New England winter vacation.


Jay Mountain Measures Jay Peak Resort (jaypeakresort.com) recently invested more than $40 million in its Stateside area revitalization plan to include a new 80,000-square-foot base lodge, pub and restaurant; the Elan Rental Center; and the 85room State Side Hotel—all scheduled to open by December. The resort is also adding 84 new mountain cottages in December and January. Killington Mountain Measures Killington Resort (killington.com) has embarked on a $9.7 million project that includes a new Peak Lodge, increased snowmaking and grooming capabilities, and upgrades to the K-1 Gondola. Meanwhile, nearby Pico Mountain (picomountain.com) is getting the $1.3 million Andrea Mead Lawrence Lodge. Both ski areas are also adding more than 200 combined trails—all accessed on one lift ticket. Stowe Stay Discover Vermont hospitality at the world-class Topnotch Resort (topnotchresort.com), located just a few miles from Stowe Mountain Resort (stowe.com). It recently reopened after a multimillion-dollar refurbishment, including a new lobby bar and restaurant, The Roost; a second redesigned restaurant, Flannel; a renovated lobby; improved outdoor terrace areas; a refreshed indoor tennis center; and redesigned guest rooms.

 


Status Update Misty Milioto | Photo: Jason Dewey, Don Riddle and Chris Kamman | September 25, 2013

As in nature itself, each ski season brings a whole host of changes, expected and not—from newly built hotels to classic resort renovations, as well as mountain modifications and new modes of transportation to get you where you’re going. So, for even the most seasoned travelers and area aficionados, checking in on classic haunts and investigating emerging hot spots is par for the course. We’ve researched the finer points of what makes up an ultimate winter wonderland experience—focusing on new developments in seven of our top ski states—think of these packed pages as your personal guide to mapping out your ideal itineraries for the ski season. With three separate ski regions as diverse as California itself (North Lake Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe and Mammoth Lakes), the Golden State’s beaches aren’t the only natural wonder worth crowing about. Lake Tahoe alone boasts nine premier ski resorts surrounding its namesake waters, and the area continues to benefit from more than $100 million worth of capital improvements. Throw in the nonstop nightlife on the Nevada side of the lake, and you’ve got an action-packed powder locale popular with a ski set looking for a social scene more sophisticated and sexy than fireside hot cocoa. North Lake Tahoe Mountain Measures With more than 6,000 acres of terrain—the largest skiable acreage accessed by a single lift ticket in the lower 48 states—Alpine Meadows (skialpine.com) and Squaw Valley (squaw.com) are now entering year three of a five-year, $70 million enhancement plan. This season, $8 million worth of improvements include the new 1,000-square-foot Wanderlust Yoga Studio Squaw Valley and a $150,000 face-lift to the concert amphitheater at Squaw Valley’s KT Base Bar. Meanwhile, the region’s highest base resort, Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe (mtrose.com)—located within a 25-minute drive from Reno—recently announced plans for a $23.5 million expansion that will add nearly 100 acres of terrain, new chairlifts, increased snowmaking capabilities and a mountaintop restaurant.


Following last year’s $30 million enhancements, Northstar California Resort (northstarcalifornia.com) is renovating the cabins on its Big Springs Gondola, making the ride a comfy one from the Village at Northstar to the Day Lodge at midmountain. Not to be outdone, Sugar Bowl Resort (sugarbowl.com) is installing the $3 million Crow’s Peak triple chairlift, adding more than 150 acres of advanced terrain to its existing 1,500 total acres and building the $4.5 millionSport Haus Fitness and Aquatic Center. The Royal Gorge Cross Country Ski Resort has also added snow bike‐specific trails and the first resort-based snowkiting center in the state. Après-Ski As part of its capital improvements for the 2013-14 ski season, Northstar is introducing Tavern 6330’, located slopeside near the Big Springs Gondola. With a crave-worthy menu of American classics (like hot chowder and a 16-ounce prime rib), plus a wide selection of wines, microbrews and signature cocktails, the patio scene starts early and goes late. Northstar has also begun offering private cabana service (complete with fire pits, s’mores and an assortment of cocktail sniffers) at the resort’s always popular ice-skating rink. South Lake Tahoe Mountain Measures Those who need a short break from skiing will enjoy Heavenly Mountain Resort’s (skiheavenly.com) new Epic Discovery program, featuring two ropes courses, a canopy tour and a zip-line center. Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort (sierraattahoe.com) has invested $4.5 million in a new base plaza, complete with retail space, a live-music venue, indoor and outdoor seating, and fire pits. Even more exciting, the resort recently joined the Powder Alliance (powderalliance.com), a new group of 12 resorts—Angel Fire Resort(angelfireresort.com), Arizona Snowbowl (arizonasnowbowl.com), Bridger Bow (bridgerbowl.com), China Peak (skichinapeak.com), Crested Butte (skicb.com), Mountain High (mthigh.com), Mt. Hood Skibow (skibowl.com), Schweitzer Mountain Resort (schweitzer.com), Sierra-atTahoe Resort, Snowbasin Resort (snowbasin.com), Stevens Pass (stevenspass.com) and Timberline (timberlineresort.com)—that offers anyone who buys an anytime season pass to one of these ski resorts an additional three days at each of the other partner resorts (for a total of 33 free days!). Getting There The newly constructed Interstate 580 provides a direct route from the RenoTahoe International Airport to the South Lake Tahoe resorts, meaning it’s easy to fly in and hit the hill—all on the same day. Mammoth Lakes Mountain Measures Mammoth Mountain Ski Area (mammothmountain.com) has joined The Mountain Collective (themountaincollective.com), which grants slope-goers access to more than 30,000 acres, 186 lifts and 1,281 trails on 12 mountains at AltaSnowbird (alta.com; snowbird.com), Aspen/Snowmass(aspensnowmass.com), Jackson Hole (jacksonhole.com), Mammoth Mountain, Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows and Whistler Blackcomb (whistlerblackcomb.com).


The pass includes two days at each sought-after resort (for a total of 12 days), unlimited 50percent discounts on additional days and a 25-percent discount on lodging. In other news, Mammoth Mountain’s neighboring resort, June Mountain (junemountain.com), is reopening in mid-December with full winter operations. Après-Ski Lakefront Restaurant’s (tamaracklodge.com) new head chef, Bobby Brown, is offering seasonal dishes, featuring domestic game and local produce. And The Westin Monache Resort, Mammoth’s (westinmammoth.com) new executive chef, Jeremy Graham, brings classical French techniques combined with a fusion of European and Asian cuisine to the hotel’s Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge. Bleu Handcrafted Foods is a new cheese and charcuterie shop, featuring West Coast cheese from farmstead dairies, plus craft beers and boutique wines. Opening in early winter, Mammoth Rock ’n’ Bowl will combine a bowling alley, golf simulators, and an upscale restaurant and lounge. Upping the hip Hollywood vibe at Mammoth Mountain is Underground Lounge, a club that gives expected trappings like live music, a VIP area and specialty cocktails a decidedly alpine twist. Getting There Mammoth Yosemite Airport boasts flights from Atlanta to San Diego on Alaska Airlines(alaskaair.com) and service from Atlanta to Orange County on Delta Airlines (delta.com). United Airlines(united.com) is also offering two connecting daily flights from San Francisco four days per week, and Alaska is offering two nonstop daily flights from Los Angeles six days per week. Long-loved for its bluebird skies, a variety of terrain and seemingly limitless powder, the wide array of ultraluxe resorts in Aspen and the famous Back Bowls of Vail have made Colorado among the top ski destinations in the United States, especially among the swankier set. Arapahoe Basin Après-Ski Offering the longest ski season in Colorado (from mid-October to early July), and the highest skiable terrain in North America (summit elevation is 13,050 feet), Arapahoe Basin (arapahoebasin.com) always keeps the party going longer than anywhere else—often with the help of bacon Bloody Marys from the 6th Alley Bar, a staple hangout that’s getting a $1 million renovation (slated to reopen later this year as 6th Alley Bar & Grill) with expanded space, a horseshoe-shaped bar and additional seating. Aspen Stay Hotel Jerome (hoteljerome.aubergeresorts.com), now owned by Auberge Resorts, is the place to mingle with Aspen’s elite. This season, enjoy its completed, extensively redesigned and historic restoration by Rowland+Broughton Architecture and Urban Design. The Living Room lounge/bar provides more space for socializing, while its American bistro, Prospect, features substantial dishes with locally sourced ingredients from Executive Chef Rob Zack. All-new is the Auberge Spa. (Fear not: The legendary J-Bar remains virtually untouched.)The hotel is also offering two Winter Auberge Adventures: a heli-skiing experience in the San Juan Mountains (guests fly from Aspen to Telluride and enjoy six guided helicopter ski runs), followed by an après-ski celebration; or privately guided ski sessions with Jonny Moseley (the only skier to have


medaled in both the X-Games and the Olympics) or with Tommy Moe (a former World Cup alpine ski racer, and Olympic gold and silver medalist). At Aspen’s only ski-in/ski-out hotel, The Little Nell (thelittlenell.com), Holly Hunt (who remodeled the hotel’s guest rooms in 2009 and the lobby in 2011) is bringing her signature sleek and clean lines to the hotel’s six VIP suites (two of which will be completed by the start of ski season). Après-Ski In addition to the newly opened Chefs Club by Food & Wine, The St. Regis Aspen Resort(stregisaspen.com) recently opened its signature restaurant, Trecento Quindici Decano. Guests can enjoy traditional handmade pasta and focaccia with a contemporary twist from Executive Chef Thomas Riordan. In addition to an extensive selection of Italian wines, the hotel offers two exclusive private-label house wines. Getting There Delta Air Lines (delta.com) has added daily nonstop seasonal service to Aspen/Pitkin County Airport from Atlanta. Breckenridge Mountain Measures The biggest news in the ski industry this year is the Peak 6 expansion at Breckenridge Ski Resort (breckenridge.com)—the largest development of its kind at a United States ski resort in more than a decade. Breck will now have an additional 543 acres of heart-pounding terrain (400 acres of lift-served terrain and 143 acres of hike-to terrain), which represents a 23-percent increase in overall skiable acreage. The expansion provides more abovetree-line terrain for intermediate and expert skiers, 10 new trails, three new bowls and two new lifts (one four-person fixed grip lift that provides access from Peak 7 and one six-person highspeed lift that provides access above the tree line). Copper Mountain Mountain Measures Copper Mountain (coppercolorado.com) is investing more than $7 million in capital improvements, including a replacement Storm King surface lift that provides access to Spaulding Bowl, Upper Enchanted Forest and Copper Bowl. Steamboat Springs Après-Ski Steamboat Springs (steamboat.com) is opening the new multimillion-dollar Four Points Lodgethis ski season. The nearly 13,000-square-foot, two-level building will be home to a 200-seat restaurant with an outdoor grill, flat-screen TVs and an indoor bar. Telluride Stay Telluride Ski Resort (tellurideskiresort.com) recently acquired the Inn at Lost Creek(innatlostcreek.com), a luxury ski-in/ski-out boutique hotel located slopeside in Mountain Village. The property’s new Siam’s Talay Grille offers fresh seafood, handmade sauces, hand rolls, lettuce wraps and specialty cocktails. Hotel Madeline Telluride (hotelmadelinetelluride.com)—also ski-in/ski-out—is set to unveil a new entrance adorned with a pair of fire pits and a new art collection (with pieces for sale at the artists’ studio prices). The hotel’s signature restaurant, Restaurant REV, is adding a street entrance, while the


newly enhanced outdoor seating and a new fire pit at the hotel’s hip SMAK Bar provide the perfect place to grab a microbrew or handmade cocktail. Getting There Allegiant Air (allegiantair.com) is offering two weekly nonstop flights from both Phoenix and Los Angeles to Montrose Regional Airport, and additional air service is now being provided by other airlines to MTJ from Atlanta. Vail/Beaver Creek Mountain Measures Vail Mountain Resort (vail.com) is opening two new chairlifts this ski season to increase time spent on the hill: a high-speed, six-person lift to replace the Mountaintop Express Lift (#4) from mid-Vail to the Patrol Headquarters area (increasing lift capacity by 33 percent); and a fixed-grip triple lift to replace the fixed-grip double Gopher Hill Lift (#12) (increasing lift capacity by 50 percent to the Golden Peak area and Vail Village). Stay Four Seasons Resort and Residences Vail (fourseasons.com) recently remodeled three residences that are now available getaways. Each custom-designed abode includes a fully equipped kitchen and dining area. Choose from a five-bedroom with game room, a threebedroom with large outdoor terrace, or a one-bedroom with lavish media room (that can sleep up to six people). The resort also recently re-launched Flame, a modern mountain steakhouse that now features tableside steak-carving and inventive dishes like the signature bison pot stickers. The Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa (beavercreek.hyatt.com) is spending $4 million to upgrade its 190 guest rooms, and it’s also offering a new gourmet après-ski experience at 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill. Parties of eight to 10 can book a private chef’s table for a Coloradoinspired handmade cocktail lesson—combined with a variety of small bites and a five-course dinner with wine pairings. The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch (ritzcarlton.com) reopened this summer after an extensive $15 million renovation to its 180 guest rooms and suites, lobby, great room and other public spaces. Expect an ambience in keeping with The Ritz-Carlton brand—think sophisticated furnishings and contemporary paintings by local artists. The ski-in/ski-out hotel will also unveil a new restaurant and lounge prior to the ski season. The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Vail (theresidencesvail.com) has introduced a collection of 10 designer residences—known as The Lionshead Collection—that are available for vacation rental or for sale. Each residence features personally selected finishes from acclaimed Colorado designers, including Eddy Doumas, who will unveil four new residences for the collection this season. Après-Ski Vail’s new place to be is Leonora, located at The SebastianVail (thesebastianvail.com). Enjoy tapas, crudo and Alpine-bistro cuisine—featuring fresh, local and organic ingredients, all paired with wines from around the globe. Or, if you’re skiing at Beaver Creek Mountain (beavercreek.com), pick a roosting spot at Talons, the European-inspired, 17,000-square-foot restaurant that replaces Red Tail Camp at


the confluence of Larkspur Bowl, Grouse Mountain and Birds of Prey. Enjoy gourmet dishes like the Kasseler Rippchen casserole or Colorado lamb burger. The Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa at Beaver Creek Mountain (westinriverfrontbeavercreek.com) has opened its signature restaurant, Maya. Grab a seat on the deck overlooking the Eagle River, and enjoy chef Richard Sandoval’s traditional Mexican dishes with a contemporary twist. Be sure to try one (or several) of the 100-plus agavebased spirits and house-infused tequilas. Getting There Delta Air Lines is adding extra Saturday service from Atlanta to Eagle County Airport from Feb. 15 to March 29. Big Sky Mountain Measures Big Sky Resort (bigskyresort.com) has enhanced the skiing experience at the Explorer, Shedhorn, Dakota and Challenger areas through forest-glading efforts this past summer, and skiers can expect to find a revved up scene in the Mountain Mall area at the base of the lifts, thanks to a $750,000 investment. Après-Ski Moonlight Basin Resort (moonlightbasin.com) welcomes Head Chef Chris Rennau to Jack Creek Grille. Chef Rennau studied environmental science at Montana State University and previously worked under chefs who taught him the importance of keeping food local and sustainable. As a result, he is sourcing as many ingredients as possible from local purveyors. Highlights of the new menu include the Montana wagyu rib-eye and the local grassfed bison burger, plus a wide selection of wines, microbrews and cocktails. Meanwhile, the Moonlight Basin Spa will make a body happy with the watermelon basil creme body bliss treatment or the buffalo greens and agave nectar toning body wrap. Getting There Delta Air Lines recently added nonstop flights from Atlanta to Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, making the once challenging trek to Montana so much easier. Known as the Gem of the Mountains, Idaho rightfully claims its place among popular ski destinations. In addition to epic scenery and glorious powder, Idaho is home to 18 ski resorts with a combined 18,500 skiable acres and 28,000 feet of vertical drop. One of our treasured local ski spots, Sun Valley Resort, offers up some exciting news this season. Sun Valley Mountain Measures Adrenaline junkie alert: Sun Valley Resort’s (sunvalley.com) Dollar Mountain just installed a new 620-foot-long, 22-foot-high superpipe—the largest in North America! But fear not, novices—Dollar’s otherwise gentle and treeless terrain is perfect for beginners and intermediate skiers looking to perfect their form. Plus, the mountain’s SnowSports School added a Terrain Based Learning Program this season, a technique that combines traditional teaching approaches with the popular Adventure/Discovery model. Après-Ski Gary Cooper and Ernest Hemingway put nearby Ketchum on the map in the 1940s and ’50s, and it’s still a big draw for celebrities—many of whom center themselves at Zenergy (zenergyts.com), a world-class health club and spa that just doubled its size and


capacity. Now 48,000 square feet, it’s never difficult to book an acupuncture appointment or massage treatment, or register for yoga and tennis. Afterward, treat yourself right at Ketchum’s new restaurant, Enoteca (ketchum-enoteca.com), a reliable source for artisanal cheeses, housecured meats, wood-fired pizza, and locally sourced trout and lamb. Billed as “the greatest snow on Earth,” Utah’s variety of challenging slopes at 14 amazing resorts (the majority of which are located within one hour of Salt Lake City International Airport) are blanketed with an average 500 inches of dry, powdery snow each year—making this particular playground a go-to for skiers whose happiness hinges on reliable hill conditions. Park City Mountain Measures Deer Valley Resort (deervalley.com) is investing $4.5 million to upgrade its snowmaking and grooming capabilities, plus trail grading upper Deer Hollow on Little Baldy peak for better accessibility for beginning skiers. Stay The St. Regis Deer Valley (stregisdeervalley.com) is opening a 650-square-foot pavilion on its outdoor Mountain Terrace, which will feature rustic wooden tables surrounding a fire pit, a flat-screen TV and live music from regional musicians. The space will play host to a number of culinary experiences, including the popular7452 Bloody Mary Clinics. Spa Montage Deer Valley (spamontage.com) offers the new 120-minute thermastone facial and kur (freezing blanket) body treatment. It begins with a soak in a hydrotherapy tub filled with mountain herbs and hot water (reaching 105 degrees), followed by a full body wrap in a kur and a balancing thermastone facial. After you’re nice and relaxed, head over to chef Viet Pham’s new restaurant, Fire and Water, located on the corner of Main Street and Heber Avenue in Park City. Slated to open in time for ski season, the restaurant will focus heavily on hearth-smoked and grilled seafood dishes, plus smoked and aged meats. Snowbird Mountain Measures In addition to joining The Mountain Collective this year, Snowbird (snowbird.com) is offering half-off ski tickets and free valet to travelers within 24 hours of arriving in Salt Lake City via plane. The resort is also expanding its Snowcat Skiing for Nature experience, a guided backcountry ski tour for advanced and expert skiers. Home to more than 15 ski resorts, Vermont has the most expansive skiing experience on the East Coast. For starters, there’s Jay Peak Resort, which averages almost 380 inches of annual snowfall—the most of any eastern ski resort. Then there’s Killington Resort, boasting more than 70 miles of diverse terrain spread across six peaks, and Stowe Mountain Resort, which offers the highest elevation in Vermont at 4,395 feet—making this state a must-stop destination for anyone considering a classic New England winter vacation. Jay Mountain Measures Jay Peak Resort (jaypeakresort.com) recently invested more than $40 million in its Stateside area revitalization plan to include a new 80,000-square-foot base lodge,


pub and restaurant; the Elan Rental Center; and the 85-room State Side Hotel—all scheduled to open by December. The resort is also adding 84 new mountain cottages in December and January. Killington Mountain Measures Killington Resort (killington.com) has embarked on a $9.7 million project that includes a new Peak Lodge, increased snowmaking and grooming capabilities, and upgrades to the K-1 Gondola. Meanwhile, nearby Pico Mountain (picomountain.com) is getting the $1.3 million Andrea Mead Lawrence Lodge. Both ski areas are also adding more than 200 combined trails—all accessed on one lift ticket. Stowe Stay Discover Vermont hospitality at the world-class Topnotch Resort (topnotchresort.com), located just a few miles from Stowe Mountain Resort (stowe.com). It recently reopened after a multimillion-dollar refurbishment, including a new lobby bar and restaurant, The Roost; a second redesigned restaurant, Flannel; a renovated lobby; improved outdoor terrace areas; a refreshed indoor tennis center; and redesigned guest rooms.  


(Sacramento, CA) Tuesday, September 24, 2013 North Lake Tahoe has seen a dramatic rise in the number of visitors this year... in what is usually a very slow time for business. Events like this past weekends Ironman and other races have helped push visitation up over last year. Andy Chapman of the North Lake Tahoe Resort Association says per room revenue is up 80% and occupancy is up 40%. The association has focused on bringing in events during the slow season. Its single largest expenditure is marketing. Chapman says the money that is spent on marketing is returned by event visitors who pay hotel taxes known as Transient Occupancy Taxes or T.O.T. “So it is really this reinvestment and the circulation of these dollars investing them into programs that relate back to driving TOT and visitation in the region,” said Chapman. The hope is that those visitors decide to come back when there isn’t a big event too.  


Status Update Misty Milioto | Photo: Jason Dewey, Don Riddle and Chris Kamman | September 24, 2013 The newly renovated Topnotch Resort, located in Stowe, Vt., is the go-to spot for the East Coast ski elite. As in nature itself, each ski season brings a whole host of changes, expected and not—from newly built hotels to classic resort renovations, as well as mountain modifications and new modes of transportation to get you where you’re going. So, for even the most seasoned travelers and area aficionados, checking in on classic haunts and investigating emerging hot spots is par for the course. We’ve researched the finer points of what makes up an ultimate winter wonderland experience—focusing on new developments in seven of our top ski states—think of these packed pages as your personal guide to mapping out your ideal itineraries for the ski season. With three separate ski regions as diverse as California itself (North Lake Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe and Mammoth Lakes), the Golden State’s beaches aren’t the only natural wonder worth crowing about. Lake Tahoe alone boasts nine premier ski resorts surrounding its namesake waters, and the area continues to benefit from more than $100 million worth of capital improvements. Throw in the nonstop nightlife on the Nevada side of the lake, and you’ve got an action-packed powder locale popular with a ski set looking for a social scene more sophisticated and sexy than fireside hot cocoa. North Lake Tahoe Mountain Measures With more than 6,000 acres of terrain—the largest skiable acreage accessed by a single lift ticket in the lower 48 states—Alpine Meadows (skialpine.com) and Squaw Valley (squaw.com) are now entering year three of a five-year, $70 million enhancement plan. This season, $8 million worth of improvements include the new 1,000-square-foot Wanderlust Yoga Studio Squaw Valley and a $150,000 face-lift to the concert amphitheater at Squaw Valley’s KT Base Bar. Meanwhile, the region’s highest base resort, Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe (mtrose.com)—located within a 25-minute drive from Reno—recently announced plans for a $23.5 million expansion that will add nearly 100 acres of terrain, new chairlifts, increased snowmaking capabilities and a mountaintop restaurant. Following last year’s $30 million enhancements, Northstar California Resort (northstarcalifornia.com) is renovating the cabins on its Big Springs Gondola, making the ride a comfy one from the Village at Northstar to the Day Lodge at midmountain.


Not to be outdone, Sugar Bowl Resort (sugarbowl.com) is installing the $3 million Crow’s Peak triple chairlift, adding more than 150 acres of advanced terrain to its existing 1,500 total acres and building the $4.5 million Sport Haus Fitness and Aquatic Center. The Royal Gorge Cross Country Ski Resort has also added snow bike‐specific trails and the first resort-based snowkiting center in the state. Après-Ski As part of its capital improvements for the 2013-14 ski season, Northstar is introducing Tavern 6330’, located slopeside near the Big Springs Gondola. With a crave-worthy menu of American classics (like hot chowder and a 16-ounce prime rib), plus a wide selection of wines, microbrews and signature cocktails, the patio scene starts early and goes late. Northstar has also begun offering private cabana service (complete with fire pits, s’mores and an assortment of cocktail sniffers) at the resort’s always popular ice-skating rink. South Lake Tahoe Mountain Measures Those who need a short break from skiing will enjoy Heavenly Mountain Resort’s (skiheavenly.com) new Epic Discovery program, featuring two ropes courses, a canopy tour and a zip-line center. Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort (sierraattahoe.com) has invested $4.5 million in a new base plaza, complete with retail space, a live-music venue, indoor and outdoor seating, and fire pits. Even more exciting, the resort recently joined the Powder Alliance (powderalliance.com), a new group of 12 resorts—Angel Fire Resort (angelfireresort.com), Arizona Snowbowl (arizonasnowbowl.com), Bridger Bow (bridgerbowl.com), China Peak (skichinapeak.com), Crested Butte (skicb.com), Mountain High (mthigh.com), Mt. Hood Skibow (skibowl.com), Schweitzer Mountain Resort (schweitzer.com), Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort, Snowbasin Resort (snowbasin.com), Stevens Pass (stevenspass.com) and Timberline (timberlineresort.com)—that offers anyone who buys an anytime season pass to one of these ski resorts an additional three days at each of the other partner resorts (for a total of 33 free days!). Getting There The newly constructed Interstate 580 provides a direct route from the RenoTahoe International Airport to the South Lake Tahoe resorts, meaning it’s easy to fly in and hit the hill—all on the same day. Mammoth Lakes Mountain Measures Mammoth Mountain Ski Area (mammothmountain.com) has joined The Mountain Collective (themountaincollective.com), which grants slope-goers access to more than 30,000 acres, 186 lifts and 1,281 trails on 12 mountains at AltaSnowbird (alta.com; snowbird.com), Aspen/Snowmass (aspensnowmass.com), Jackson Hole (jacksonhole.com), Mammoth Mountain, Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows and Whistler Blackcomb (whistlerblackcomb.com). The pass includes two days at each sought-after resort (for a total of 12 days), unlimited 50percent discounts on additional days and a 25-percent discount on lodging. In other news, Mammoth Mountain’s neighboring resort, June Mountain (junemountain.com), is reopening in mid-December with full winter operations.


Après-Ski Lakefront Restaurant’s (tamaracklodge.com) new head chef, Bobby Brown, is offering seasonal dishes, featuring domestic game and local produce. And The Westin Monache Resort, Mammoth’s (westinmammoth.com) new executive chef, Jeremy Graham, brings classical French techniques combined with a fusion of European and Asian cuisine to the hotel’s Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge. Bleu Handcrafted Foods is a new cheese and charcuterie shop, featuring West Coast cheese from farmstead dairies, plus craft beers and boutique wines. Opening in early winter, Mammoth Rock ’n’ Bowl will combine a bowling alley, golf simulators, and an upscale restaurant and lounge. Upping the hip Hollywood vibe at Mammoth Mountain is Underground Lounge, a club that gives expected trappings like live music, a VIP area and specialty cocktails a decidedly alpine twist. Getting There Mammoth Yosemite Airport boasts flights from Atlanta to San Diego on Alaska Airlines (alaskaair.com) and service from Atlanta to Orange County on Delta Airlines (delta.com). United Airlines (united.com) is also offering two connecting daily flights from San Francisco four days per week, and Alaska is offering two nonstop daily flights from Los Angeles six days per week. Long-loved for its bluebird skies, a variety of terrain and seemingly limitless powder, the wide array of ultraluxe resorts in Aspen and the famous Back Bowls of Vail have made Colorado among the top ski destinations in the United States, especially among the swankier set. Arapahoe Basin Après-Ski Offering the longest ski season in Colorado (from mid-October to early July), and the highest skiable terrain in North America (summit elevation is 13,050 feet), Arapahoe Basin (arapahoebasin.com) always keeps the party going longer than anywhere else—often with the help of bacon Bloody Marys from the 6th Alley Bar, a staple hangout that’s getting a $1 million renovation (slated to reopen later this year as 6th Alley Bar & Grill) with expanded space, a horseshoe-shaped bar and additional seating. Aspen Stay Hotel Jerome (hoteljerome.aubergeresorts.com), now owned by Auberge Resorts, is the place to mingle with Aspen’s elite. This season, enjoy its completed, extensively redesigned and historic restoration by Rowland+Broughton Architecture and Urban Design. The Living Room lounge/bar provides more space for socializing, while its American bistro, Prospect, features substantial dishes with locally sourced ingredients from Executive Chef Rob Zack. All-new is the Auberge Spa. (Fear not: The legendary J-Bar remains virtually untouched.)The hotel is also offering two Winter Auberge Adventures: a heli-skiing experience in the San Juan Mountains (guests fly from Aspen to Telluride and enjoy six guided helicopter ski runs), followed by an après-ski celebration; or privately guided ski sessions with Jonny Moseley (the only skier to have medaled in both the X-Games and the Olympics) or with Tommy Moe (a former World Cup alpine ski racer, and Olympic gold and silver medalist). At Aspen’s only ski-in/ski-out hotel, The Little Nell (thelittlenell.com), Holly Hunt (who remodeled the hotel’s guest rooms in 2009 and the lobby in 2011) is bringing her signature sleek


and clean lines to the hotel’s six VIP suites (two of which will be completed by the start of ski season). Après-Ski In addition to the newly opened Chefs Club by Food & Wine, The St. Regis Aspen Resort (stregisaspen.com) recently opened its signature restaurant, Trecento Quindici Decano. Guests can enjoy traditional handmade pasta and focaccia with a contemporary twist from Executive Chef Thomas Riordan. In addition to an extensive selection of Italian wines, the hotel offers two exclusive private-label house wines. Getting There Delta Air Lines (delta.com) has added daily nonstop seasonal service to Aspen/Pitkin County Airport from Atlanta. Breckenridge Mountain Measures The biggest news in the ski industry this year is the Peak 6 expansion at Breckenridge Ski Resort (breckenridge.com)—the largest development of its kind at a United States ski resort in more than a decade. Breck will now have an additional 543 acres of heartpounding terrain (400 acres of lift-served terrain and 143 acres of hike-to terrain), which represents a 23-percent increase in overall skiable acreage. The expansion provides more abovetree-line terrain for intermediate and expert skiers, 10 new trails, three new bowls and two new lifts (one four-person fixed grip lift that provides access from Peak 7 and one six-person highspeed lift that provides access above the tree line). Copper Mountain Mountain Measures Copper Mountain (coppercolorado.com) is investing more than $7 million in capital improvements, including a replacement Storm King surface lift that provides access to Spaulding Bowl, Upper Enchanted Forest and Copper Bowl. Steamboat Springs Après-Ski Steamboat Springs (steamboat.com) is opening the new multimillion-dollar Four Points Lodge this ski season. The nearly 13,000-square-foot, two-level building will be home to a 200-seat restaurant with an outdoor grill, flat-screen TVs and an indoor bar. Telluride Stay Telluride Ski Resort (tellurideskiresort.com) recently acquired the Inn at Lost Creek (innatlostcreek.com), a luxury ski-in/ski-out boutique hotel located slopeside in Mountain Village. The property’s new Siam’s Talay Grille offers fresh seafood, handmade sauces, hand rolls, lettuce wraps and specialty cocktails. Hotel Madeline Telluride (hotelmadelinetelluride.com)—also ski-in/ski-out—is set to unveil a new entrance adorned with a pair of fire pits and a new art collection (with pieces for sale at the artists’ studio prices). The hotel’s signature restaurant, Restaurant REV, is adding a street entrance, while the newly enhanced outdoor seating and a new fire pit at the hotel’s hip SMAK Bar provide the perfect place to grab a microbrew or handmade cocktail. Getting There Allegiant Air (allegiantair.com) is offering two weekly nonstop flights from both Phoenix and Los Angeles to Montrose Regional Airport, and additional air service is now being provided by other airlines to MTJ from Atlanta.


Vail/Beaver Creek Mountain Measures Vail Mountain Resort (vail.com) is opening two new chairlifts this ski season to increase time spent on the hill: a high-speed, six-person lift to replace the Mountaintop Express Lift (#4) from mid-Vail to the Patrol Headquarters area (increasing lift capacity by 33 percent); and a fixed-grip triple lift to replace the fixed-grip double Gopher Hill Lift (#12) (increasing lift capacity by 50 percent to the Golden Peak area and Vail Village). Stay Four Seasons Resort and Residences Vail (fourseasons.com) recently remodeled three residences that are now available getaways. Each custom-designed abode includes a fully equipped kitchen and dining area. Choose from a five-bedroom with game room, a threebedroom with large outdoor terrace, or a one-bedroom with lavish media room (that can sleep up to six people). The resort also recently re-launched Flame, a modern mountain steakhouse that now features tableside steak-carving and inventive dishes like the signature bison pot stickers. The Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa (beavercreek.hyatt.com) is spending $4 million to upgrade its 190 guest rooms, and it’s also offering a new gourmet après-ski experience at 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill. Parties of eight to 10 can book a private chef’s table for a Coloradoinspired handmade cocktail lesson—combined with a variety of small bites and a five-course dinner with wine pairings. The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch (ritzcarlton.com) reopened this summer after an extensive $15 million renovation to its 180 guest rooms and suites, lobby, great room and other public spaces. Expect an ambience in keeping with The Ritz-Carlton brand—think sophisticated furnishings and contemporary paintings by local artists. The ski-in/ski-out hotel will also unveil a new restaurant and lounge prior to the ski season. The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Vail (theresidencesvail.com) has introduced a collection of 10 designer residences—known as The Lionshead Collection—that are available for vacation rental or for sale. Each residence features personally selected finishes from acclaimed Colorado designers, including Eddy Doumas, who will unveil four new residences for the collection this season. Après-Ski Vail’s new place to be is Leonora, located at The Sebastian-Vail (thesebastianvail.com). Enjoy tapas, crudo and Alpine-bistro cuisine—featuring fresh, local and organic ingredients, all paired with wines from around the globe. Or, if you’re skiing at Beaver Creek Mountain (beavercreek.com), pick a roosting spot at Talons, the European-inspired, 17,000-square-foot restaurant that replaces Red Tail Camp at the confluence of Larkspur Bowl, Grouse Mountain and Birds of Prey. Enjoy gourmet dishes like the Kasseler Rippchen casserole or Colorado lamb burger. The Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa at Beaver Creek Mountain (westinriverfrontbeavercreek.com) has opened its signature restaurant, Maya. Grab a seat on the deck overlooking the Eagle River, and enjoy chef Richard Sandoval’s traditional Mexican dishes with a contemporary twist. Be sure to try one (or several) of the 100-plus agave-based spirits and house-infused tequilas.


Getting There Delta Air Lines is adding extra Saturday service from Atlanta to Eagle County Airport from Feb. 15 to March 29. Big Sky Mountain Measures Big Sky Resort (bigskyresort.com) has enhanced the skiing experience at the Explorer, Shedhorn, Dakota and Challenger areas through forest-glading efforts this past summer, and skiers can expect to find a revved up scene in the Mountain Mall area at the base of the lifts, thanks to a $750,000 investment. Après-Ski Moonlight Basin Resort (moonlightbasin.com) welcomes Head Chef Chris Rennau to Jack Creek Grille. Chef Rennau studied environmental science at Montana State University and previously worked under chefs who taught him the importance of keeping food local and sustainable. As a result, he is sourcing as many ingredients as possible from local purveyors. Highlights of the new menu include the Montana wagyu rib-eye and the local grassfed bison burger, plus a wide selection of wines, microbrews and cocktails. Meanwhile, the Moonlight Basin Spa will make a body happy with the watermelon basil creme body bliss treatment or the buffalo greens and agave nectar toning body wrap. Getting There Delta Air Lines recently added nonstop flights from Atlanta to Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, making the once challenging trek to Montana so much easier. Known as the Gem of the Mountains, Idaho rightfully claims its place among popular ski destinations. In addition to epic scenery and glorious powder, Idaho is home to 18 ski resorts with a combined 18,500 skiable acres and 28,000 feet of vertical drop. One of our treasured local ski spots, Sun Valley Resort, offers up some exciting news this season. Sun Valley Mountain Measures Adrenaline junkie alert: Sun Valley Resort’s (sunvalley.com) Dollar Mountain just installed a new 620-foot-long, 22-foot-high superpipe—the largest in North America! But fear not, novices—Dollar’s otherwise gentle and treeless terrain is perfect for beginners and intermediate skiers looking to perfect their form. Plus, the mountain’s SnowSports School added a Terrain Based Learning Program this season, a technique that combines traditional teaching approaches with the popular Adventure/Discovery model. Après-Ski Gary Cooper and Ernest Hemingway put nearby Ketchum on the map in the 1940s and ’50s, and it’s still a big draw for celebrities—many of whom center themselves at Zenergy (zenergyts.com), a world-class health club and spa that just doubled its size and capacity. Now 48,000 square feet, it’s never difficult to book an acupuncture appointment or massage treatment, or register for yoga and tennis. Afterward, treat yourself right at Ketchum’s new restaurant, Enoteca (ketchum-enoteca.com), a reliable source for artisanal cheeses, house-cured meats, wood-fired pizza, and locally sourced trout and lamb. Billed as “the greatest snow on Earth,” Utah’s variety of challenging slopes at 14 amazing resorts (the majority of which are located within one hour of Salt Lake City International Airport) are blanketed with an average 500 inches of dry, powdery snow each year—making this particular playground a go-to for skiers whose happiness hinges on reliable hill conditions.


Park City Mountain Measures Deer Valley Resort (deervalley.com) is investing $4.5 million to upgrade its snowmaking and grooming capabilities, plus trail grading upper Deer Hollow on Little Baldy peak for better accessibility for beginning skiers. Stay The St. Regis Deer Valley (stregisdeervalley.com) is opening a 650-square-foot pavilion on its outdoor Mountain Terrace, which will feature rustic wooden tables surrounding a fire pit, a flat-screen TV and live music from regional musicians. The space will play host to a number of culinary experiences, including the popular 7452 Bloody Mary Clinics. Spa Montage Deer Valley (spamontage.com) offers the new 120-minute thermastone facial and kur (freezing blanket) body treatment. It begins with a soak in a hydrotherapy tub filled with mountain herbs and hot water (reaching 105 degrees), followed by a full body wrap in a kur and a balancing thermastone facial. After you’re nice and relaxed, head over to chef Viet Pham’s new restaurant, Fire and Water, located on the corner of Main Street and Heber Avenue in Park City. Slated to open in time for ski season, the restaurant will focus heavily on hearth-smoked and grilled seafood dishes, plus smoked and aged meats. Snowbird Mountain Measures In addition to joining The Mountain Collective this year, Snowbird (snowbird.com) is offering half-off ski tickets and free valet to travelers within 24 hours of arriving in Salt Lake City via plane. The resort is also expanding its Snowcat Skiing for Nature experience, a guided backcountry ski tour for advanced and expert skiers. Home to more than 15 ski resorts, Vermont has the most expansive skiing experience on the East Coast. For starters, there’s Jay Peak Resort, which averages almost 380 inches of annual snowfall—the most of any eastern ski resort. Then there’s Killington Resort, boasting more than 70 miles of diverse terrain spread across six peaks, and Stowe Mountain Resort, which offers the highest elevation in Vermont at 4,395 feet—making this state a must-stop destination for anyone considering a classic New England winter vacation. Jay Mountain Measures Jay Peak Resort (jaypeakresort.com) recently invested more than $40 million in its Stateside area revitalization plan to include a new 80,000-square-foot base lodge, pub and restaurant; the Elan Rental Center; and the 85-room State Side Hotel—all scheduled to open by December. The resort is also adding 84 new mountain cottages in December and January. Killington Mountain Measures Killington Resort (killington.com) has embarked on a $9.7 million project that includes a new Peak Lodge, increased snowmaking and grooming capabilities, and upgrades to the K-1 Gondola. Meanwhile, nearby Pico Mountain (picomountain.com) is getting the $1.3 million Andrea Mead Lawrence Lodge. Both ski areas are also adding more than 200 combined trails—all accessed on one lift ticket.


Stowe Stay Discover Vermont hospitality at the world-class Topnotch Resort (topnotchresort.com), located just a few miles from Stowe Mountain Resort (stowe.com). It recently reopened after a multimillion-dollar refurbishment, including a new lobby bar and restaurant, The Roost; a second redesigned restaurant, Flannel; a renovated lobby; improved outdoor terrace areas; a refreshed indoor tennis center; and redesigned guest rooms. c   


Status Update Misty Milioto | Photo: Jason Dewey, Don Riddle and Chris Kamman | September 24, 2013

Where to ski, where to stay, where to shop and where to play—it’s the annual lowdown on the latest upgrades at our favorite slopes East and West.

Heavenly Mountain Resort is a skier’s paradise, thanks to 97 trails—plus intense backcountry terrain—across 4,800 acres in California and Nevada.

With a name that harkens back to Aspen’s mining days, Hotel Jerome’s new restaurant, Prospect, features a sleek aesthetic (designed by locally based Rowland+Broughton Architecture and Urban Design), plus a hearty menu of reimagined classic fare from Executive Chef Rob Zack.

The redesigned lobby at The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch is just part of the extensive $15 million renovation that was completed this summer.

Big Sky Resort’s village scene comes to life at night.

Enjoy a relaxing après-ski soak in the Spa Montage Deer Valley’s whirlpool.

The newly renovated Topnotch Resort, located in Stowe, Vt., is the go-to spot for the East Coast ski elite. As in nature itself, each ski season brings a whole host of changes, expected and not—from newly built hotels to classic resort renovations, as well as mountain modifications and new modes of transportation to get you where you’re going. So, for even the most seasoned travelers and area aficionados, checking in on classic haunts and investigating emerging hot spots is par for the course. We’ve researched the finer points of what makes up an ultimate winter wonderland experience— focusing on new developments in seven of our top ski states—think of these packed pages as your personal guide to mapping out your ideal itineraries for the ski season. With three separate ski regions as diverse as California itself (North Lake Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe and Mammoth Lakes), the Golden State’s beaches aren’t the only natural wonder worth crowing about. Lake Tahoe alone boasts nine premier ski resorts surrounding its namesake waters, and the area continues to benefit from more than $100 million worth of capital improvements. Throw in the nonstop nightlife on the Nevada side of the lake, and you’ve got an action-packed powder locale popular with a ski set looking for a social scene more sophisticated and sexy than fireside hot cocoa. North Lake Tahoe Mountain Measures With more than 6,000 acres of terrain—the largest skiable acreage accessed by a single lift ticket in the lower 48 states—Alpine Meadows (skialpine.com) and Squaw Valley (squaw.com) are now entering year three of a five-year, $70 million enhancement plan. This season, $8 million worth of improvements include the new 1,000-square-foot Wanderlust Yoga Studio Squaw Valley and a $150,000 face-lift to the concert amphitheater at Squaw Valley’s KT Base Bar. Meanwhile, the region’s highest base resort, Mt. Rose Ski Tahoe (mtrose.com)—located within a 25-minute drive from Reno—recently announced plans for a $23.5 million expansion that will add nearly 100 acres of terrain, new chairlifts, increased snowmaking capabilities and a mountaintop restaurant.


Following last year’s $30 million enhancements, Northstar California Resort (northstarcalifornia.com) is renovating the cabins on its Big Springs Gondola, making the ride a comfy one from the Village at Northstar to the Day Lodge at midmountain. Not to be outdone, Sugar Bowl Resort (sugarbowl.com) is installing the $3 million Crow’s Peak triple chairlift, adding more than 150 acres of advanced terrain to its existing 1,500 total acres and building the $4.5 millionSport Haus Fitness and Aquatic Center. The Royal Gorge Cross Country Ski Resort has also added snow bike‐specific trails and the first resortbased snowkiting center in the state. Après-Ski As part of its capital improvements for the 2013-14 ski season, Northstar is introducing Tavern 6330’, located slopeside near the Big Springs Gondola. With a crave-worthy menu of American classics (like hot chowder and a 16-ounce prime rib), plus a wide selection of wines, microbrews and signature cocktails, the patio scene starts early and goes late. Northstar has also begun offering private cabana service (complete with fire pits, s’mores and an assortment of cocktail sniffers) at the resort’s always popular ice-skating rink. South Lake Tahoe Mountain Measures Those who need a short break from skiing will enjoy Heavenly Mountain Resort’s (skiheavenly.com) new Epic Discovery program, featuring two ropes courses, a canopy tour and a zip-line center. Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort (sierraattahoe.com) has invested $4.5 million in a new base plaza, complete with retail space, a live-music venue, indoor and outdoor seating, and fire pits. Even more exciting, the resort recently joined the Powder Alliance (powderalliance.com), a new group of 12 resorts—Angel Fire Resort(angelfireresort.com), Arizona Snowbowl (arizonasnowbowl.com), Bridger Bow (bridgerbowl.com), China Peak (skichinapeak.com), Crested Butte (skicb.com), Mountain High (mthigh.com), Mt. Hood Skibow (skibowl.com), Schweitzer Mountain Resort (schweitzer.com), Sierra-at-Tahoe Resort, Snowbasin Resort (snowbasin.com), Stevens Pass (stevenspass.com) and Timberline (timberlineresort.com)—that offers anyone who buys an anytime season pass to one of these ski resorts an additional three days at each of the other partner resorts (for a total of 33 free days!). Getting There The newly constructed Interstate 580 provides a direct route from the Reno-Tahoe International Airport to the South Lake Tahoe resorts, meaning it’s easy to fly in and hit the hill—all on the same day. Mammoth Lakes Mountain Measures Mammoth Mountain Ski Area (mammothmountain.com) has joined The Mountain Collective (themountaincollective.com), which grants slope-goers access to more than 30,000 acres, 186 lifts and 1,281 trails on 12 mountains at AltaSnowbird (alta.com; snowbird.com), Aspen/Snowmass(aspensnowmass.com), Jackson Hole (jacksonhole.com), Mammoth Mountain, Squaw Valley/Alpine Meadows and Whistler Blackcomb (whistlerblackcomb.com). The pass includes two days at each sought-after resort (for a total of 12 days), unlimited 50-percent discounts on additional days and a 25-percent discount on lodging. In other news, Mammoth Mountain’s neighboring resort, June Mountain (junemountain.com), is reopening in mid-December with full winter operations. Après-Ski Lakefront Restaurant’s (tamaracklodge.com) new head chef, Bobby Brown, is offering seasonal dishes, featuring domestic game and local produce. And The Westin Monache Resort, Mammoth’s (westinmammoth.com) new executive chef, Jeremy Graham, brings classical French techniques combined with a fusion of European and Asian cuisine to the hotel’s Whitebark Restaurant, Bar and Lounge. Bleu Handcrafted Foods is a new cheese and charcuterie shop, featuring West Coast cheese from farmstead dairies, plus craft beers and boutique wines. Opening in early winter, Mammoth Rock ’n’ Bowl will combine a bowling alley, golf simulators, and an upscale restaurant and lounge. Upping the hip Hollywood vibe at Mammoth Mountain is Underground Lounge, a club that gives expected trappings like live music, a VIP area and specialty cocktails a decidedly alpine twist. Getting There Mammoth Yosemite Airport boasts flights from Atlanta to San Diego on Alaska Airlines(alaskaair.com) and service from Atlanta to Orange County on Delta Airlines (delta.com). United Airlines(united.com) is also offering two connecting daily flights from San Francisco four days per week, and Alaska is offering two nonstop daily flights from Los Angeles six days per week.


Long-loved for its bluebird skies, a variety of terrain and seemingly limitless powder, the wide array of ultraluxe resorts in Aspen and the famous Back Bowls of Vail have made Colorado among the top ski destinations in the United States, especially among the swankier set. Arapahoe Basin Après-Ski Offering the longest ski season in Colorado (from mid-October to early July), and the highest skiable terrain in North America (summit elevation is 13,050 feet), Arapahoe Basin (arapahoebasin.com) always keeps the party going longer than anywhere else—often with the help of bacon Bloody Marys from the 6th Alley Bar, a staple hangout that’s getting a $1 million renovation (slated to reopen later this year as 6th Alley Bar & Grill) with expanded space, a horseshoeshaped bar and additional seating. Aspen Stay Hotel Jerome (hoteljerome.aubergeresorts.com), now owned by Auberge Resorts, is the place to mingle with Aspen’s elite. This season, enjoy its completed, extensively redesigned and historic restoration by Rowland+Broughton Architecture and Urban Design. The Living Room lounge/bar provides more space for socializing, while its American bistro, Prospect, features substantial dishes with locally sourced ingredients from Executive Chef Rob Zack. All-new is the Auberge Spa. (Fear not: The legendary J-Bar remains virtually untouched.)The hotel is also offering two Winter Auberge Adventures: a heli-skiing experience in the San Juan Mountains (guests fly from Aspen to Telluride and enjoy six guided helicopter ski runs), followed by an après-ski celebration; or privately guided ski sessions with Jonny Moseley (the only skier to have medaled in both the X-Games and the Olympics) or with Tommy Moe (a former World Cup alpine ski racer, and Olympic gold and silver medalist). At Aspen’s only ski-in/ski-out hotel, The Little Nell (thelittlenell.com), Holly Hunt (who remodeled the hotel’s guest rooms in 2009 and the lobby in 2011) is bringing her signature sleek and clean lines to the hotel’s six VIP suites (two of which will be completed by the start of ski season). Après-Ski In addition to the newly opened Chefs Club by Food & Wine, The St. Regis Aspen Resort(stregisaspen.com) recently opened its signature restaurant, Trecento Quindici Decano. Guests can enjoy traditional handmade pasta and focaccia with a contemporary twist from Executive Chef Thomas Riordan. In addition to an extensive selection of Italian wines, the hotel offers two exclusive private-label house wines. Getting There Delta Air Lines (delta.com) has added daily nonstop seasonal service to Aspen/Pitkin County Airport from Atlanta. Breckenridge Mountain Measures The biggest news in the ski industry this year is the Peak 6 expansion at Breckenridge Ski Resort (breckenridge.com)—the largest development of its kind at a United States ski resort in more than a decade. Breck will now have an additional 543 acres of heart-pounding terrain (400 acres of lift-served terrain and 143 acres of hike-to terrain), which represents a 23-percent increase in overall skiable acreage. The expansion provides more above-tree-line terrain for intermediate and expert skiers, 10 new trails, three new bowls and two new lifts (one four-person fixed grip lift that provides access from Peak 7 and one six-person high-speed lift that provides access above the tree line). Copper Mountain Mountain Measures Copper Mountain (coppercolorado.com) is investing more than $7 million in capital improvements, including a replacement Storm King surface lift that provides access to Spaulding Bowl, Upper Enchanted Forest and Copper Bowl. Steamboat Springs Après-Ski Steamboat Springs (steamboat.com) is opening the new multimillion-dollar Four Points Lodgethis ski season. The nearly 13,000-square-foot, two-level building will be home to a 200-seat restaurant with an outdoor grill, flat-screen TVs and an indoor bar. Telluride Stay Telluride Ski Resort (tellurideskiresort.com) recently acquired the Inn at Lost Creek(innatlostcreek.com), a luxury skiin/ski-out boutique hotel located slopeside in Mountain Village. The property’s new Siam’s Talay Grille offers fresh seafood, handmade sauces, hand rolls, lettuce wraps and specialty cocktails. Hotel Madeline Telluride (hotelmadelinetelluride.com)—also ski-in/ski-out—is set to unveil a new entrance adorned with a pair of fire pits and a new art collection (with pieces for sale at the artists’ studio prices). The hotel’s signature restaurant, Restaurant REV,


is adding a street entrance, while the newly enhanced outdoor seating and a new fire pit at the hotel’s hip SMAK Bar provide the perfect place to grab a microbrew or handmade cocktail. Getting There Allegiant Air (allegiantair.com) is offering two weekly nonstop flights from both Phoenix and Los Angeles to Montrose Regional Airport, and additional air service is now being provided by other airlines to MTJ from Atlanta. Vail/Beaver Creek Mountain Measures Vail Mountain Resort (vail.com) is opening two new chairlifts this ski season to increase time spent on the hill: a high-speed, six-person lift to replace the Mountaintop Express Lift (#4) from mid-Vail to the Patrol Headquarters area (increasing lift capacity by 33 percent); and a fixed-grip triple lift to replace the fixed-grip double Gopher Hill Lift (#12) (increasing lift capacity by 50 percent to the Golden Peak area and Vail Village). Stay Four Seasons Resort and Residences Vail (fourseasons.com) recently remodeled three residences that are now available getaways. Each custom-designed abode includes a fully equipped kitchen and dining area. Choose from a fivebedroom with game room, a three-bedroom with large outdoor terrace, or a one-bedroom with lavish media room (that can sleep up to six people). The resort also recently re-launched Flame, a modern mountain steakhouse that now features tableside steak-carving and inventive dishes like the signature bison pot stickers. The Park Hyatt Beaver Creek Resort and Spa (beavercreek.hyatt.com) is spending $4 million to upgrade its 190 guest rooms, and it’s also offering a new gourmet après-ski experience at 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill. Parties of eight to 10 can book a private chef’s table for a Colorado-inspired handmade cocktail lesson—combined with a variety of small bites and a five-course dinner with wine pairings. The Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch (ritzcarlton.com) reopened this summer after an extensive $15 million renovation to its 180 guest rooms and suites, lobby, great room and other public spaces. Expect an ambience in keeping with The RitzCarlton brand—think sophisticated furnishings and contemporary paintings by local artists. The ski-in/ski-out hotel will also unveil a new restaurant and lounge prior to the ski season. The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Vail (theresidencesvail.com) has introduced a collection of 10 designer residences—known as The Lionshead Collection—that are available for vacation rental or for sale. Each residence features personally selected finishes from acclaimed Colorado designers, including Eddy Doumas, who will unveil four new residences for the collection this season. Après-Ski Vail’s new place to be is Leonora, located at The Sebastian-Vail (thesebastianvail.com). Enjoy tapas, crudo and Alpine-bistro cuisine—featuring fresh, local and organic ingredients, all paired with wines from around the globe. Or, if you’re skiing at Beaver Creek Mountain (beavercreek.com), pick a roosting spot at Talons, the European-inspired, 17,000-square-foot restaurant that replaces Red Tail Camp at the confluence of Larkspur Bowl, Grouse Mountain and Birds of Prey. Enjoy gourmet dishes like the Kasseler Rippchen casserole or Colorado lamb burger. The Westin Riverfront Resort & Spa at Beaver Creek Mountain (westinriverfrontbeavercreek.com) has opened its signature restaurant, Maya. Grab a seat on the deck overlooking the Eagle River, and enjoy chef Richard Sandoval’s traditional Mexican dishes with a contemporary twist. Be sure to try one (or several) of the 100-plus agave-based spirits and house-infused tequilas. Getting There Delta Air Lines is adding extra Saturday service from Atlanta to Eagle County Airport from Feb. 15 to March 29. Big Sky Mountain Measures Big Sky Resort (bigskyresort.com) has enhanced the skiing experience at the Explorer, Shedhorn, Dakota and Challenger areas through forest-glading efforts this past summer, and skiers can expect to find a revved up scene in the Mountain Mall area at the base of the lifts, thanks to a $750,000 investment. Après-Ski Moonlight Basin Resort (moonlightbasin.com) welcomes Head Chef Chris Rennau to Jack Creek Grille. Chef Rennau studied environmental science at Montana State University and previously worked under chefs who taught him the importance of keeping food local and sustainable. As a result, he is sourcing as many ingredients as possible from local purveyors. Highlights of the new menu include the Montana wagyu rib-eye and the local grass-fed bison burger, plus a wide


selection of wines, microbrews and cocktails. Meanwhile, the Moonlight Basin Spa will make a body happy with the watermelon basil creme body bliss treatment or the buffalo greens and agave nectar toning body wrap. Getting There Delta Air Lines recently added nonstop flights from Atlanta to Bozeman Yellowstone International Airport, making the once challenging trek to Montana so much easier. Known as the Gem of the Mountains, Idaho rightfully claims its place among popular ski destinations. In addition to epic scenery and glorious powder, Idaho is home to 18 ski resorts with a combined 18,500 skiable acres and 28,000 feet of vertical drop. One of our treasured local ski spots, Sun Valley Resort, offers up some exciting news this season. Sun Valley Mountain Measures Adrenaline junkie alert: Sun Valley Resort’s (sunvalley.com) Dollar Mountain just installed a new 620foot-long, 22-foot-high superpipe—the largest in North America! But fear not, novices—Dollar’s otherwise gentle and treeless terrain is perfect for beginners and intermediate skiers looking to perfect their form. Plus, the mountain’s SnowSports School added a Terrain Based Learning Program this season, a technique that combines traditional teaching approaches with the popular Adventure/Discovery model. Après-Ski Gary Cooper and Ernest Hemingway put nearby Ketchum on the map in the 1940s and ’50s, and it’s still a big draw for celebrities—many of whom center themselves at Zenergy (zenergyts.com), a world-class health club and spa that just doubled its size and capacity. Now 48,000 square feet, it’s never difficult to book an acupuncture appointment or massage treatment, or register for yoga and tennis. Afterward, treat yourself right at Ketchum’s new restaurant, Enoteca (ketchum-enoteca.com), a reliable source for artisanal cheeses, house-cured meats, wood-fired pizza, and locally sourced trout and lamb. Billed as “the greatest snow on Earth,” Utah’s variety of challenging slopes at 14 amazing resorts (the majority of which are located within one hour of Salt Lake City International Airport) are blanketed with an average 500 inches of dry, powdery snow each year—making this particular playground a go-to for skiers whose happiness hinges on reliable hill conditions. Park City Mountain Measures Deer Valley Resort (deervalley.com) is investing $4.5 million to upgrade its snowmaking and grooming capabilities, plus trail grading upper Deer Hollow on Little Baldy peak for better accessibility for beginning skiers. Stay The St. Regis Deer Valley (stregisdeervalley.com) is opening a 650-square-foot pavilion on its outdoor Mountain Terrace, which will feature rustic wooden tables surrounding a fire pit, a flat-screen TV and live music from regional musicians. The space will play host to a number of culinary experiences, including the popular7452 Bloody Mary Clinics. Spa Montage Deer Valley (spamontage.com) offers the new 120-minute thermastone facial and kur (freezing blanket) body treatment. It begins with a soak in a hydrotherapy tub filled with mountain herbs and hot water (reaching 105 degrees), followed by a full body wrap in a kur and a balancing thermastone facial. After you’re nice and relaxed, head over to chef Viet Pham’s new restaurant, Fire and Water, located on the corner of Main Street and Heber Avenue in Park City. Slated to open in time for ski season, the restaurant will focus heavily on hearthsmoked and grilled seafood dishes, plus smoked and aged meats. Snowbird Mountain Measures In addition to joining The Mountain Collective this year, Snowbird (snowbird.com) is offering half-off ski tickets and free valet to travelers within 24 hours of arriving in Salt Lake City via plane. The resort is also expanding its Snowcat Skiing for Nature experience, a guided backcountry ski tour for advanced and expert skiers. Home to more than 15 ski resorts, Vermont has the most expansive skiing experience on the East Coast. For starters, there’s Jay Peak Resort, which averages almost 380 inches of annual snowfall—the most of any eastern ski resort. Then there’s Killington Resort, boasting more than 70 miles of diverse terrain spread across six peaks, and Stowe Mountain Resort, which offers the highest elevation in Vermont at 4,395 feet—making this state a must-stop destination for anyone considering a classic New England winter vacation. Jay Mountain Measures Jay Peak Resort (jaypeakresort.com) recently invested more than $40 million in its Stateside area revitalization plan to include a new 80,000-square-foot base lodge, pub and restaurant; the Elan Rental Center; and the 85-


room State Side Hotel—all scheduled to open by December. The resort is also adding 84 new mountain cottages in December and January. Killington Mountain Measures Killington Resort (killington.com) has embarked on a $9.7 million project that includes a new Peak Lodge, increased snowmaking and grooming capabilities, and upgrades to the K-1 Gondola. Meanwhile, nearby Pico Mountain (picomountain.com) is getting the $1.3 million Andrea Mead Lawrence Lodge. Both ski areas are also adding more than 200 combined trails—all accessed on one lift ticket. Stowe Stay Discover Vermont hospitality at the world-class Topnotch Resort (topnotchresort.com), located just a few miles from Stowe Mountain Resort (stowe.com). It recently reopened after a multimillion-dollar refurbishment, including a new lobby bar and restaurant, The Roost; a second redesigned restaurant, Flannel; a renovated lobby; improved outdoor terrace areas; a refreshed indoor tennis center; and redesigned guest rooms.

 


Greyson Howard Special to the Sun September 24, 2013

Sugar Bowl ski resort wrapping up $20M in upgrades Crews work on the new $3 million Crow's Peak chairlift this past summer at Sugar Bowl Resort. The lift will allow skiers and riders easy access to the resort's Strawberry Fields terrain. Located west of Truckee atop Donner Summit, Sugar Bowl Resort first opened in 1939. To learn more, visit www.sugarbowl.com NORDEN, Calif. — A new chairlift, a new campus, a fitness and aquatic center and continued upgrades at Royal Gorge are in the works for Sugar Bowl Resort this winter. The $20 million project chalks up to about 10 times the average Sugar Bowl spends in a year, making it a significant investment at one of the West’s oldest ski resorts. “It was time,” said John Monson, director of sales and marketing for the resort. “Nobody else was putting in a lift accessing new terrain; the academy was in need of a new facility and we’re just maintaining the momentum with Royal Gorge.” From the skier and snowboarder perspective, the biggest improvement is the new Crow’s Peak Chairlift, accessing terrain previously reachable only by hiking on the western edge of the resort, Monson said. That terrain, including Strawberry Fields, adds up to 1,000 vertical feet. The $3 million fixed-grip triple chairlift, while not as fast as new detachable lifts, can operate regardless of foul weather. The resort aims to have it spinning at 9 a.m. all season long, Monson said. Previously, skiers and snowboarders hiked from the Disney chairlift up to Crow’s Peak to access the terrain, and had to traverse out early to get back to a lift. They will now be able to ride top to bottom, including new groomed runs in addition to the famous off-piste terrain. “The tree skiing is going to be mint,” Monson said. “And the new lift should help spread people out even more on big days.”


The lift should be ready on the first day of the season, he said. SUGAR BOWL ACADEMY Sugar Bowl Academy, which has outgrown its current home atop Old Highway 40, will get a new building in the village. It will be able to house 75 student athletes, providing classrooms, a dorm, cafeteria, library, common area and sports area. “It’s going to be the only ski-in, ski-out campus in the nation,” Monson said. “Their emphasis is not only placing athletes on the US Ski Team, but placing students in the nation’s finest universities.” Academy athlete/students also benefit from learning from four-time Olympian, X Games gold medalist and World Cup Champion Daron Rahlves, Sugar Bowl’s ski ambassador. The $12 million campus will be open for the 2013-14 school year. “The new campus at Sugar Bowl Resort will definitely put us on par with the best sports academies in the world,” said Tracy Keller, head of the Sugar Bowl Ski Team and Academy. FITNESS, AQUATIC CENTER For Sugar Bowl homeowners, lodge guests and academy student athletes, the new Sport Haus Fitness and Aquatic Center is scheduled to be open by spring. The $4.5 million facility will have a lap pool, yoga studio, fitness facilities, outdoor hot tubs and spa treatment rooms, Monson said. “It will be great for homeowners in the snow-bound village, for dry-land training for the academy, summer use and kid’s camps,” Monson said. Located in the Mt. Disney side of the resort, near Village Hall, the center will be accessible to homeowners in the new Summit Crossing homesites. ROYAL GORGE In its second year of running Royal Gorge, Sugar Bowl continues to improve the 6,000-acre cross-country ski resort, with things like better grooming, better signage, new events and other activities. “When I met with focus groups on how best to run Royal Gorge, they said: ‘grooming, grooming, grooming.’” Monson said. “While Royal Gorge can boast 200 kilometers of trails, how much of that used to be groomed? We’re going to do all we can to groom it all, every night.”


Users will find it easier to get around those 200 kilometers with new signs, a smartphone app and a new, more accurate, trail map. Other improvements include enhance food and beverage options at the lodge, warming huts and LED signs for weather updates and events information. Other options in Van Norden Meadow will include a second year of snow kiting, as well as fattired snow bikes, with their own trails to explore, Monson said. Sugar Bowl also plans to bring back the once-illustrious Gold Rush cross-country ski race. The upgrades will help Sugar Bowl stand out in an increasingly competitive ski resort market, Monson said. “Sugar Bowl is a classic,” Monson said. “Sometimes old school has negative connotations, but the last I checked, skiing has always been pretty awesome, and we’re trying to preserve that flavor.” — Greyson Howard is a freelance reporter living in the Truckee area.  


NORTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. — More than 2,600 triathletes splashed into the steely water of Lake Tahoe for a 2.4-mile swim early Sunday morning, shrouded in an eerie, uninviting mist and surrounded by freshly snow-capped peaks. And that wasn’t even the cold part. After completing her swim, Truckee’s Kara LaPoint climbed out of the water and was greeted by the frigid bite of air, lingering over the land from the previous day’s storm. She pushed on — wet, cold, determined — to discover that the plastic bags covering her bike seat and handlebars had frozen overnight. “Oh my gosh, it was cold,” said LaPoint, who powered through the brisk morning to capture the overall women’s age-group title — a feat that earned her a spot in the Ironman World Championship and qualified her for a professional license. “It was definitely a different scene than most Ironmans. But it was actually really beautiful when we started the swim, because we could see the snow on the mountains and all the steam coming off the water. It was really picturesque.” So began the inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe triathlon, which challenged athletes to the core with its bone-chilling start and demanding, high-elevation course. Despite its difficulties, however, the race drew praise from even the most beaten-down of participants. “It was epic. I’ve raced four continents, and this might be my favorite race,” said Kevin Taddonio of Folsom, as he walked out of the finish chute on shaky legs. “It was difficult, but there was great crowd support, and this is just a perfect venue.” “It was a very, very difficult course,” said Ironman pro Chris McDonald of Australia, who took the overall win in just under nine hours, 8:55:14. “Biking over Brockway Summit the second time was incredibly hard. There were just so many factors — from the altitude to the cold morning to the course, Lake Tahoe was awesome.”


Fellow Ironman pro Joe Gambles, an Australian who lives and trains out of Boulder, Colo., called the course “incredible” after finishing third overall, about seven minutes behind McDonald. “I’ve done (Ironman) Wisconsin, which is actually one of the hardest ones, and it was a breeze compared to today,” he said. “I hurt today.” They were far from the only ones to feel the pain. Ironman Lake Tahoe sold out all 2,600 entries within 19 hours, with participants from across the globe jumping at the opportunity to compete in California’s first full-distance Ironman since 2001. The race began with the swim off the shore of Kings Beach. It then sent athletes on an arduous, 112-mile bike leg that made two and a half loops from Kings Beach through Tahoe City and Truckee, over 7,200-foot Brockway Summit and back around to Squaw Valley. It finished with a marathon run, 26.2 miles, from the Village at Squaw Valley to Tahoe City and back (with a shorter second lap). Among the giant field of competitors were more than a dozen Lake Tahoe and Truckee residents, led by LaPoint’s standout performance. LaPoint, a regular top contender in the Tahoe race scene, posted a time of 11:03:01 to win both her 25-29 age group and the overall among amateur women. She hoisted her arms in the air upon reaching the finish, elated with her result, and relieved not to be running anymore. “I definitely wanted to do well, and I knew I had some advantages being from here; it felt like I could be pretty strong. But I was definitely a little shocked to come across the line as the first amateur,” said LaPoint, who had completed four Ironman-distance races before Sunday. “You just never know in such a long race like that. So many things can happen. It’s all about what you do on race day, and I was fortunate to have things come together. So I’m psyched.” Athletes agreed that the cold morning and the bike leg set the race apart from other Ironmans. Aside from the cold, the elevation taxed their lungs, as did the steep climbs over Brockway Summit and through Martis Camp, which is on private property and could not be trained prior to the race. “It was very difficult, very steep,” Taddonio said of the Martis Camp stretch, which he said climbed a 10- to 12-percent grade up to Big Springs near Northstar. “It was a brutal day,” said Jami Min of Truckee, who, as she’s done many times over the past decade, entered the race with her husband Sherwick. “Sherwick and I have done a lot of Ironmans, and this was probably the most difficult, even compared to Hawaii. It was just the temperatures were so cold, and we were not dressed well enough to keep our bodies warm. We had a lot of cramping and difficulty because of that.” Sherwick even had ice form on his bare legs at the start of the bike.


“I couldn’t even drink on the bike because my mouth wasn’t working,” he said, adding that he was “humbled” by the race in spite of all his Ironman finishes, and local training. “In hindsight, we should have worn leg-warmers because our skin was exposed. Usually on the run I feel much better; that’s usually one of my strengths. But I just never came around.” Sherwick, who said he’s “never been so sore,” finished 24th in his competitive 45-49 age group in a time of 11:46:10. Jami finished 10th in her 40-44 group, in 12:54:16. “We’re both pretty happy and satisfied, because that was difficult,” Sherwick said. Among other local finishers, Jason Collin of South Lake Tahoe finished 23rd in his 40-44 age group in a time of 11:40:12, Annica Bryan of Tahoe City was 14th in her 40-44 group in 13:00:40, Rob Kronkhyte of Tahoe City was 12th in his 55-59 group in 13:36:38, and 70-yearold Jim Meskimen of Truckee was first among the 70-74 men’s field in 13:55:10. Rob Laurie of Incline Village finished in 12:40:06, which was good enough for 63rd place in his 45-49 age group, while Michael Chador finished in 13:58:54, Sarah Clement finished in 14:07:56, Rachel Crus in 14:30:40, Valli Murnane in 16:07:18, and Wendy Kronkhyte in 16:45:47. Former Major League Baseball player Eric Byrnes, who owns a second home in Martis Camp and has competed in the last few Donner Lake Triathlons, finished in 11:37:05. Even with all its difficulties, most Ironman Lake Tahoe participants said they hope to return next year for another round of punishment. “The most amazing part was just how many community members were out there cheering,” LaPoint said. “It was absolutely awesome hearing so many people cheering for myself and other racers. It was super motivating and made me really excited.”  


NORTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. — More than 2,600 triathletes splashed into the steely water of Lake Tahoe for a 2.4-mile swim early Sunday morning, shrouded in an eerie, uninviting mist and surrounded by freshly snow-capped peaks. And that wasn’t even the cold part. After completing her swim, Truckee’s Kara LaPoint climbed out of the water and was greeted by the frigid bite of air, lingering over the land from the previous day’s storm. She pushed on — wet, cold, determined — to discover that the plastic bags covering her bike seat and handlebars had frozen overnight. “Oh my gosh, it was cold,” said LaPoint, who powered through the brisk morning to capture the overall women’s age-group title — a feat that earned her a spot in the Ironman World Championship and qualified her for a professional license. “It was definitely a different scene than most Ironmans. But it was actually really beautiful when we started the swim, because we could see the snow on the mountains and all the steam coming off the water. It was really picturesque.” So began the inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe triathlon, which challenged athletes to the core with its bone-chilling start and demanding, high-elevation course. Despite its difficulties, however, the race drew praise from even the most beaten-down of participants. “It was epic. I’ve raced four continents, and this might be my favorite race,” said Kevin Taddonio of Folsom, as he walked out of the finish chute on shaky legs. “It was difficult, but there was great crowd support, and this is just a perfect venue.” “It was a very, very difficult course,” said Ironman pro Chris McDonald of Australia, who took the overall win in just under nine hours, 8:55:14. “Biking over Brockway Summit the second time was incredibly hard. There were just so many factors — from the altitude to the cold morning to the course, Lake Tahoe was awesome.”


Fellow Ironman pro Joe Gambles, an Australian who lives and trains out of Boulder, Colo., called the course “incredible” after finishing third overall, about seven minutes behind McDonald. “I’ve done (Ironman) Wisconsin, which is actually one of the hardest ones, and it was a breeze compared to today,” he said. “I hurt today.” They were far from the only ones to feel the pain. Ironman Lake Tahoe sold out all 2,600 entries within 19 hours, with participants from across the globe jumping at the opportunity to compete in California’s first full-distance Ironman since 2001. The race began with the swim off the shore of Kings Beach. It then sent athletes on an arduous, 112-mile bike leg that made two and a half loops from Kings Beach through Tahoe City and Truckee, over 7,200-foot Brockway Summit and back around to Squaw Valley. It finished with a marathon run, 26.2 miles, from the Village at Squaw Valley to Tahoe City and back (with a shorter second lap). Among the giant field of competitors were more than a dozen Lake Tahoe and Truckee residents, led by LaPoint’s standout performance. LaPoint, a regular top contender in the Tahoe race scene, posted a time of 11:03:01 to win both her 25-29 age group and the overall among amateur women. She hoisted her arms in the air upon reaching the finish, elated with her result, and relieved not to be running anymore. “I definitely wanted to do well, and I knew I had some advantages being from here; it felt like I could be pretty strong. But I was definitely a little shocked to come across the line as the first amateur,” said LaPoint, who had completed four Ironman-distance races before Sunday. “You just never know in such a long race like that. So many things can happen. It’s all about what you do on race day, and I was fortunate to have things come together. So I’m psyched.” Athletes agreed that the cold morning and the bike leg set the race apart from other Ironmans. Aside from the cold, the elevation taxed their lungs, as did the steep climbs over Brockway Summit and through Martis Camp, which is on private property and could not be trained prior to the race. “It was very difficult, very steep,” Taddonio said of the Martis Camp stretch, which he said climbed a 10- to 12-percent grade up to Big Springs near Northstar. “It was a brutal day,” said Jami Min of Truckee, who, as she’s done many times over the past decade, entered the race with her husband Sherwick. “Sherwick and I have done a lot of Ironmans, and this was probably the most difficult, even compared to Hawaii. It was just the temperatures were so cold, and we were not dressed well enough to keep our bodies warm. We had a lot of cramping and difficulty because of that.” Sherwick even had ice form on his bare legs at the start of the bike.


“I couldn’t even drink on the bike because my mouth wasn’t working,” he said, adding that he was “humbled” by the race in spite of all his Ironman finishes, and local training. “In hindsight, we should have worn leg-warmers because our skin was exposed. Usually on the run I feel much better; that’s usually one of my strengths. But I just never came around.” Sherwick, who said he’s “never been so sore,” finished 24th in his competitive 45-49 age group in a time of 11:46:10. Jami finished 10th in her 40-44 group, in 12:54:16. “We’re both pretty happy and satisfied, because that was difficult,” Sherwick said. Among other local finishers, Jason Collin of South Lake Tahoe finished 23rd in his 40-44 age group in a time of 11:40:12, Annica Bryan of Tahoe City was 14th in her 40-44 group in 13:00:40, Rob Kronkhyte of Tahoe City was 12th in his 55-59 group in 13:36:38, and 70-yearold Jim Meskimen of Truckee was first among the 70-74 men’s field in 13:55:10. Rob Laurie of Incline Village finished in 12:40:06, which was good enough for 63rd place in his 45-49 age group, while Michael Chador finished in 13:58:54, Sarah Clement finished in 14:07:56, Rachel Crus in 14:30:40, Valli Murnane in 16:07:18, and Wendy Kronkhyte in 16:45:47. Former Major League Baseball player Eric Byrnes, who owns a second home in Martis Camp and has competed in the last few Donner Lake Triathlons, finished in 11:37:05. Even with all its difficulties, most Ironman Lake Tahoe participants said they hope to return next year for another round of punishment. “The most amazing part was just how many community members were out there cheering,” LaPoint said. “It was absolutely awesome hearing so many people cheering for myself and other racers. It was super motivating and made me really excited.”  


11 p.m.: IRONMAN Lake Tahoe 11 p.m.: IRONMAN Lake Tahoe

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Thousands Compete in Ironman Lake Tahoe Posted: Sep 23, 2013 12:47 AM PST Updated: Sep 30, 2013 1:41 PM PST

Thousands of competitors from all over the world signed up for the first-ever Ironman triathlon in the Tahoe area. Officials in North Tahoe say all of the 2,600 spots were sold out in just 18 hours. The event is set to be in the area for the next several years in a five-year contract. The competition brings out the best athletes who tested their physical and mental skills. On Sunday, they had to swim 2.4 miles in Lake Tahoe at Kings Beach during a chilly morning. Then, they had to ride a bicycle 112 miles around the area. To finish things off, they ran 26.2 miles. As these athletes did some last-minute training in North Lake Tahoe, they may have gotten injured or cramped up. That's why certified experts with Active Release Techniques (A.R.T.) were at Ironman to volunteer their time for the competitors. A.R.T. specializes in soft-tissue massages for athletes, and they travel to a number of other Ironman events nationwide. Crew members say they've worked on about 500 competitors before the Tahoe race. "Usually, while they're training on their bike, or they're running, and they get some kind of spasm, or a cramp," said Marilyn Britton, a chiropractor, who is also a volunteer with A.R.T. "Or, they feel their range of motion has gotten limited that can't use all their force for the run or their bike, that's when they come in." Officials say the event is expected to have a $10 million economic impact to the area.


"We're seeing our local sporting goods stores, we're seeing our restaurants, of course, our lodging properties doing significantly better than they ever have in the month of September," said Sandy Evans-Hall, C.E.O. of the North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/Resort Association. A few local businesses who were set up at Ironman Lake Tahoe told me being there is great exposure for them. "It's been really good to get a diverse crowd and get those people that really kind of tell our story with the branding -- the outdoors and getting out there and having fun," said Jordan Basile, owner of Tahoemade. "It just gives us so much more money into the local economy," said Jason Spruit, manager with California 89 in Truckee, California. "Especially, at this time of year, which is normally a slow time of year for us." For more information: http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/events/americas/ironman/lake-tahoe.aspx#axzz2fHKeVatK Written by Adam Varahachaikol  


OLYMPIC VALLEY, Calif. — Despite some worrisome weather — lake-level rain and highelevation snow Saturday and freezing temperatures Sunday morning — a damper couldn’t be put on the inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe. “There was a little bit of concern (Sunday) morning because of the air temperature, but it warmed up enough and the roads dried up enough that we had an on-time start,” said Andy Chapman, chief marketing officer for the North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/Resort Association. More than 2,500 athletes entered the fog-layered waters of Lake Tahoe at 6:30 a.m. Sunday to complete their 2-loop, 2.4-mile swim, kicking off the first full-distance Ironman event in California in more than a decade. “In the end, the weather we had was colder than ideal, but doable, as we were able to have a successful race,” said Keats McGonigal, Ironman Lake Tahoe race director. Despite the cold, thousands of spectators watched and cheered from the lake’s shores in Kings Beach, waving homemade signs, ringing cowbells and shouting words of encouragement such as “good job.” The crowds continued their support as the athletes exited the water and hopped on their bikes to complete the 112-mile road course. As the athletes whizzed by in front of the Squaw Valley entrance heading toward Truckee, Highway 89 was flanked by supporters, including coach Nicole Drummer of Colorado Springs, Colo. “It’s been going very well,” she said, commenting on the race. “Where to drop things off, how to get to different places — there wasn’t any confusion for us. It seems like a very well-organized, first-time event.” The only improvement spectator Becky Henning, of Kansas City, Mo., suggested was for parking in Kings Beach.


“The parking — it was very congested yesterday (Saturday) with the bike check-in,” she said. “Other than that it’s been great.” On race day, people noted that they hit traffic, but it wasn’t too bad. “Certainly there are some road impacts,” Chapman said. “It’s a little slow getting out of Kings Beach and back over to Truckee, but that’s to be expected.” Highway 28 east and westbound in Kings Beach from Fox Street to Highway 267 was closed early Sunday for athlete safety. Other major closures included Highway 89 north from Fairway Drive in Tahoe City and Squaw Valley Road; and Highway 267 southbound from Northstar Drive to Commonwealth Drive. “There’s always things you can improve on in an inaugural event,” said McGonigal, adding that Ironman will look closely at traffic impacts when planning next year’s race. While some roads were closed on race day, businesses were not. “Business has been phenomenal,” said Will Welch, assistant manager of Fireside Pizza Co. in Squaw Valley. “It’s been awesome. We saw an impact starting Thursday afternoon.” That momentum carried into Sunday. Some diners ate their pizza outside to watch the athletes run through the Village at Squaw Valley as part of the event’s third-leg, 26.2-mile run. “It’s fantastic,” said Josh Holm, manager of Parallel Mountain Sports in Squaw, referring to business that came during the typical Tahoe shoulder season. “It’s wonderful for the communities; it’s wonderful for Squaw.” Early event predictions had Ironman generating an estimated $10 million in revenue for the economy, while attracting about 10,000 people — both athletes and supporters — to the area. Chapman said the event “absolutely” lived up to those predictions. “It’s something we anticipated and expected, and it’s nice to see it actually come together,” he said. McGonigal echoed that message of success. “For an inaugural event in Lake Tahoe, it was very successful based on feedback from athletes, volunteers and community,” he said. “(We’re) really excited by how it went.” Sunday marked California’s first full-distance Ironman triathlon since 2001. The premier adventure race company last year inked a five-year contract with Lake Tahoe. “I’m glad they’re here for the next (four) years,” Welch said. “I think every year, it’ll just keep growing.”


Ex-MLB outfielder Eric Byrnes talks about Ironman: Former-baseball outfielder Eric Byrnes talks about finishing Ironman Lake Tahoe on Sunday. Byrnes is a native of Truckee and played 10 years in Major Leage Baseball. Written by

Emerson Marcus emarcus@rgj.com

It appeared to be a perfect match, the Ironman racing series and Lake Tahoe. In fact, many were surprised the pairing hadn't occurred already. But the first Ironman Lake Tahoe and its roughly 2,700 competitors finished Sunday afternoon under sunny skies at Squaw Valley. The race navigated through and around Lake Tahoe, taking competitors on a 2.4-mile swim, 112mile bike ride and 26.2-mile run - for a total of 140.6 miles. ...  


The weeks leading up to the inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe were filled with discussion about how difficult the new course would be on the athletes, but the final hours focused solely on the weather conditions. Saturday’s weather in Lake Tahoe featured frigid winds, rain and then snow. The temperature stayed in the low 30s throughout the night, making many athletes nervous about staying warm out of the water and onto the bike for Sunday’s race. Race organisers made the decision Sunday morning to let the swim, bike and run take place as planned. Though the morning was chilly, conditions were better than Saturday and the temperature reached the mid60s. In the end it was Australia’s Chris McDonald and Sweden’s Asa Lundstrom who claimed the well-earned victories. The Men’s Race France’s Romain Guillaume led the men out of the water and into the frigid air with a time of 51:36. Joe Gambles (AUS), Paul Ambrose (GBR), Maik Twelsiek (GER) and Matt Lieto (USA) followed him closely into transition. T1 was unique for an Ironman as even the top pros took their time to ensure that they were properly dressed for the temperatures on the bike. The top men all spent well over four minutes in the transition before taking on the 112-mile bike course. Through the first quarter of the bike, Gambles led the way for a group that included Twelsiek, Lieto and Guillaume. Ambrose, who was originally part of that group, struggled to keep pace and eventually dropped out, citing trouble breathing on the bike as the reason. Eventually, Twelsiek made the decision to break away from the others and had a gap of 1:25 at mile 50. The German held a 90-second lead over Mcdonald and a 6:24 lead over Gambles coming off of the bike. Twelsiek managed to maintain the gap through the first 10 miles of the marathon, but eventually he faded and opened the door for a steady-running McDonald. By mile 14, Twelsiek’s lead stood at only 12 seconds as McDonald was preparing to make the pass. The Australian, known as “Big Sexy” in the triathlon community, took the top spot and didn’t look back. He capped his day off with a 2:59:40 marathon to take the 8:55:14 victory. Despite losing the lead to McDonald, Twelsiek was able to regain some momentum and held on to second position, finishing in 8:57:53. Gambles earned the final podium spot in 9:02:55.


The Women’s Race American Dede Griesbauer celebrated her birthday by exiting the swim in first position in a time of 55:12. The conditions showed in the rest of the women’s swim times, with no other pro exiting the water in under one hour. It was Catriona Morrison who was second out of the swim (1:00:02). Like the men, the women took a significant amount of time in transition before starting the tough bike ride. Griesbauer maintained her position at the front for the first 25 miles, but was being chased by a fast-riding Lundstrom. By mile 41, Lundstrom took over the top spot and held a lead of two minutes over Morrison, with Griesbauer 3:22 back and Angela Naeth (CAN) 4:15 back. Coming into T2, Lundstrom’s lead stood at 1:43 over an even faster riding Jeanne Collonge (FRA). Third into transition was Naeth, who is also known for her strong cycling skills. Lundstrom struggled to find a solid pace early in the marathon and Collonge overtook her within the first few miles. As both Collonge and Lundstrom maintained steady paces in first and second, respectively, Morrison was running the strongest, but with a significant deficit to make up on the faster cyclists. As the three neared the finish line it became evident that Morrison wouldn’t be able to catch the two leaders. It also became clear that Collonge did not have the victory wrapped up. It rarely happens in Ironman that a leader will surrender the lead on the marathon and then get it back, but that’s exactly what happened. As Collonge started her last mile, Lundstrom passed her and excelled to the finish line to earn the Ironman victory. Collonge finished in second, 50 seconds back. Morrison rounded out the top three at 10:03:38. Ironman Lake Tahoe Results Top 5 Men 1. Chris McDonald (AUS) 8:55:14 2. Maik Twelsiek (GER) 8:57:53 3. Joe Gambles (AUS) 9:02:55 4. Kirill Kotsegarov (EST) 9:04:39 5. Kevin Taddonio (USA) 9:09:09 Top 5 Women 1. Asa Lundstrom (SWE) 9:58:53 2. Jeanne Collonge (FRA) 9:59:43 3. Catriona Morrison (SCO) 10:03:38 4. Elizabeth Lyles (USA) 10:08:41 5. Angela Naeth (CAN) 10:10:47  


 

  RENO, Nev. -- More than 2,500 triathletes from around the world gather at Lake Tahoe and Squaw Valley today. They have until midnight to finish the famed Ironman race. "You couldn't pick a more inspirational place to hold a race that brings us so much inspiration," Sandy Hall,CEO of the North Tahoe Chambers CVB and Resort Association. "These people are absolutely amazing." Triathletes who swim 2.4 miles, bike for another 12 and then finish off with a marathon run. They come from all over the world, 38 countries and all 50 states, travel to North Tahoe where they train and acclimate themselves for the big day. "It wasn't just a weekend event and everybody just leaves and goes home ; this is the kind of event where people really made the Tahoe lifestyle their own," Hall said.


It's a long way from home in Sweden for Asa Lundstrom. She's been training in Tahoe for three weeks in preparation of her sixth Ironman competition . "it's probably one of the most challenging but probably one of the most scenic, Lundstrom said. "I haven't raced with so many climbs in a race before so I didn't know what to expect in my performance. I was just hoping that I could finish." It all paid off, she placed first in the women's race. "I'm not sure I got it yet because it feels a little bit unreal," she said. "I can be nothing but satisfied. I did my best every second so I am satisfied." She also says it won't be the last that Tahoe will be seeing of her. "People here in North Lake Tahoe are just so friendly and the training possibilities here are are really good. According to North Tahoe chamber of Commerce, the competition has brought in $10,000,000 to $12,000,000 in this week alone. "It has been one of those gifts that keeps on giving," Hall said. "We've had 12,000 to 15,000 come to this event." People including athletes, families , spectators and volunteers, all of which is good news for resorts during the off-season. Chris McDonald of Austin, TX taking first place overall today. Reno resident Liz Lyles was the number four finisher in the women's category. The Ironman competition will stay in North Tahoe for the next four years.

 


Close races at Tahoe IRONMAN

Published: 9/22 11:23 pm Share Updated: 9/23 12:24 am LAKE TAHOE (IRONMAN NEWS RELEASE) – Chris McDonald (AUS) and Asa Lundstrom (SWE) both recorded IRONMAN titles in the picturesque setting of IRONMAN Lake Tahoe. McDonald earned his sixth IRONMAN crown with a finish time of 8:55:14, while Lundstrom earned her second title with a time of 9:58:53. Both the men’s and women’s pro races were not determined until late in the race and resulted in some terrific action during the run. In the men’s race, emerging out of the settled mist on Lake Tahoe, Romain Guillaume (FRA), Joe Gambles (AUS), Paul Ambrose (AUS), Maik Twelsiek (GER) and Matt Lieto (USA) came out of the water within 13 seconds of each other. On the bike, Twelsiek took control of the men’s race as he forged his way to the lead late in the first half of the bike. Gambles appeared content to shadow Twelsiek until Chris McDonald (AUS) and Guillaume forced the pace. Coming into transition, Twelsiek carried a tentative 1:30 advantage over McDonald, while Gambles slipped to well over six minutes off the leaders pace over the late miles of the bike. Hitting the run, Twelsiek looked strong and held the lead throughout the first 13 miles, however the German succumbed to McDonald’s relentless pressure from behind just before mile 14. McDonald finished off the marathon strong and went on to capture the IRONMAN Lake Tahoe title, making this his second IRONMAN win in four weeks. Twelsiek hung on to second with his 8:57:53 clocking, while Gambles finished third with his 9:02:55 clocking. Top five professional men’s results are below:


1. Chris McDonald AUS 08:55:14 2. Maik Twelsiek GER 08:57:53 3. Joe Gambles AUS 09:02:55 4. Kirill Kotsegarov EST 09:04:39 5. Kevin Taddonio USA 09:09:09 In the women’s race, veteran Dede Griesbauer (USA) celebrated her 42nd birthday by dominating the swim and carried a 4:50 advantage over Catriona Morrison (GBR) and over six minutes on Angela Naeth (CAN), Jeanne Collonge (FRA), and Asa Lundstrom (SWE). Griesbauer relinquished the lead to Lundstrom after 25 miles, with Morrison, Naeth and Collonge biking strong and closing the gap to the front of the race. The field jockeyed for position behind Lundstrom throughout the remainder of the race but it was Lundstrom who dismounted her bike first, with Collonge following her into T2 a half minute back, while Naeth found herself coming off the bike in third in her first IRONMAN, 4:12 off the leaders pace. Lundstrom initially built up over a two minute advantage over Collonge in this first three miles but the lead didn’t last long as Collonge ran her way into the lead at five miles. The battle between the two waged on for the remainder of the run that saw Collonge’s lead expand at one point to over two minutes. Lundstrom’s perseverance proved to be her asset today as she clawed her way back to the front of the race, and had eliminated all but 20 seconds as the women’s race reached 24 miles. Collonge surrendered the lead to Lundstrom in the final mile of the run, and went on to claim the victory. Coming into the finish line chute in second, Collonge finished with a 9:59:43 time, just 51 seconds short of the win. Closing the podium was Morrison with her 10:03:38 finish time. Top five professional women’s results are below: 1. Asa Lundstrom SWE 09:58:53 2. Jeanne Collonge FRA 09:59:43 3. Catriona Morrison GBR 10:03:38 4. Elizabeth Lyles USA 10:08:41 5. Angela Naeth CAN 10:10:47 One of more than 30 events in the global IRONMAN Series, IRONMAN Lake Tahoe featured a two-loop, 2.4-mile swim in the pristine waters of Lake Tahoe at King’s Beach. Athletes went through a lakeside transition before starting a two-loop 112-mile bike course that traveled along the lake into Tahoe City before following the Truckee River past Squaw Valley and into the town of Truckee. From there, the course turned south back toward Lake Tahoe, had a short loop in Martis Camp, continued past Northstar and climbed to Brockway Summit. After a descent back down to Kings Beach, athletes completed a second loop, and then a final, flat 17 miles to finish the bike course at Squaw Valley, home to the 1960 Winter Olympics. With a transition at Squaw, runners proceeded along the Truckee River bike path into Tahoe City, and continued south along the shores of Lake Tahoe to a turnaround in historic Homewood, Calif. The largely flat run course traversed one of the most scenic lake vistas in the world before finishing along the


cobbled corridors of the Village at Squaw Valley. The event offered a total professional prize purse of $75,000 and 50 coveted slots to the 2014 IRONMAN World Championship, taking place on Oct. 11 in Kailua-Kona, Hawai`i.  


Plan for North Lake Tahoe highway closures this Sunday 11:08 AM, Sep 20, 2013   |   1  comments    

KINGS BEACH, CA - Caltrans reminds there will be some highway closures this Sunday, Sept. 22 in the North Lake Tahoe area due to the Ironman Lake Tahoe race. News10 traffic The eastbound Interstate 80 off-ramp to Highway 89/267 (Exit 188B) and the Highway 267 onramp to westbound I-80 will both be closed from 6:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Motorists will be redirected to the westbound I-80 on-ramp from Donner Pass Road or to eastbound I-80, where they can turn around at Overland Trail (Exit 190) and head west. Northbound Highway 89 will be closed from Fairway Drive in Tahoe City to Squaw Valley Road from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on race day. Southbound Highway 267 will be closed from Northstar Boulevard to Kingswood/Commonwealth Drive in Kings Beach from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Highway 28 will be closed in both directions in Kings Beach from Fox Street to the Highway 267 intersection from 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Caltrans' highway electronic message signs will be activated prior to the race to alert drivers of the closures in addition to roadside message boards set up by race organizers. There will be traffic-control operators and CHP officers stationed at intersections all around the course during the race. Detours will be available. All of the road closures will be lifted by 5:30 p.m. California Department of Transportation /News10/KXTV  


 

At high-altitude Tahoe, it's always peak season By: Bill Fink September 22,2013 I'm hanging like a Halloween pumpkin from a wire 50 feet off the ground, crooked grimace on my face as I dangle in the wind. Kids scurry around me like squirrels in the trees, bridges and zip lines that make up the Squaw High Ropes course. I hear a band in the distance and catch a glimpse of vendor tents serving seasonal treats at a Squaw Village festival. Autumn around Lake Tahoe is considered to be a less-appealing "shoulder season" sandwiched between the popular water and hiking activities of summer and winter's snow sport vacations. But smaller crowds, cheaper rates and a full calendar of festivals, food and fun make fall a great time to spend a weekend at Lake Tahoe - whether you're admiring the foliage or getting stuck up in it. Treetops and trails While the Lake Tahoe area landscape is dominated by evergreens, there's still plenty of opportunity to discover scenic fall colors. The appropriately named Fallen Leaf Lake above the southwest shore of Lake Tahoe is a prime leafing destination. Hikes near the lake range from a take-your-kids stroll on a wide trail from the campground, to a quad-shattering 9-mile slog with a 3,000-vertical-foot ascent to the peak of Mount Tallac. I recently hiked the first segment of the Mount Tallac trail, and was rewarded within the first halfhour with ridgeline views of two lakes and widely varied swaths of flora. I was also punished


with a few ankle-twisting stumbles on loose rocks as I admired these views, so if you get off the beginner trails, be aware of your surroundings - and of the subject-to-change fall weather patterns. For a fall foliage family photo shoot, head north of Lake Tahoe to the Aspen Grove Trail at Tahoe Donner. The easily accessible, relaxing trail runs from Tahoe Donner's Equestrian Center to a huge grove of aspens. If your timing is right, the trees will be bursting with colors from pumpkin orange to lemon yellow and candy-apple red. Tahoe colors peak anytime from late September to November, so call ahead for the latest reports. Once staring at trees from below loses its allure, clip into a harness at one of Tahoe's high ropes courses. The Squaw Valley Adventure Center and its partner, the Treetop Adventure Park at Granlibakken Resort, each enable even small kids to safely scamper across swinging rope bridges, plummet down zip lines and clamber up vertical pitches among towering trees. It's easy to become philosophical about your place in nature when swinging from a small wire high above the forest floor. Forage like a bear Like the local bears who load up on food prior to a long winter hibernation, fall visitors to Lake Tahoe will be able to gorge themselves on seasonal offerings from restaurants eager to attract customers. The 10th annual Truckee Wine Walk, Oct. 5-6, lets you forage through town for wine tastings, vendor treats and savory snacks. On Oct. 19, the Ritz-Carlton at Northstar hosts a Harvest Beer Dinner with cider tasting and a candy apple bar. On most evenings, the Ritz "marshmologist" will help guests combine exotic ingredients to create unique s'mores over their outdoor fire pits. For a genuine fall harvest, stop by farmers' markets in Truckee Regional Park (Tuesday mornings) or at Tahoe City's Commons Beach (Thursday mornings). And check local listings in publications like the Tahoe Weekly for seasonal restaurant deals. Bratwurst Toss


Tahoe's fall festivals and events provide a nearly nonstop series of seasonal attractions, ranging from the serious to the silly. Those with appropriate talents can compete at Squaw Valley's Oktoberfest on Sept. 28 in the traditional Bavarian triathlon of yodeling, keg-rolling and a bratwurst toss. For families, Tahoe Donner's third annual fall festival on Oct. 13 features a pumpkin patch maze, bobbing for apples, pony rides, a giant inflatable slide and an archery range (hopefully not near the inflatable slide). And nothing says fall like a doomed expedition, so be sure to join Truckee's events (Oct. 5-6) commemorating the ill-fated Donner Party. Through interpretive walk talks and a museum visit, you'll discover interesting history of the area and experience some new hiking trails - and feel more appreciative of Tahoe's fall dining opportunities.

If You Go WHERE TO STAY Resort at Squaw Creek: 400 Squaw Creek Road. (530) 583-6300. www.squawcreek.com. Hotel near Squaw Village with variety of fall activity offerings, including fly fishing lessons. Rates start at $220 per night. Cedar House Hotel: 10918 Brockway Road, Truckee. (866) 582-5655. www.cedarhousesporthotel.com. Appropriately woody and stylish hotel hidden off the road south of Truckee, with top-notch Stella Restaurant. From $160 a night.

WHERE TO EAT Manzanita Restaurant: 13031 Ritz Highlands Court, Truckee. (530) 562-3000. www.manzanitalaketahoe.com. Signature high-end restaurant at the Ritz Carlton, with new executive chef, serving locally sourced food and hosting a fall beer dinner. Entrees average about $30.


Pianeta Restaurant: 10096 Donner Pass Road, Truckee. (530) 587-4694. Cozy Italian restaurant on old Truckee main street with rib-sticking meals good for a cool fall night. Pastas from about $16.

WHAT TO DO High Ropes Courses: The Ropes Course is near Squaw's Olympic Village Inn. Treetop Adventure Park at Granlibakken Resort is south of Tahoe City. (530) 583-7673. www.northtahoeadventures.com. Squaw: $35 for a two-hour session. Granlibakken: $45. Open weekends through fall, weather permitting. Fallen Leaf Lake hiking trails: www.fs.usda.gov/Internet/FSE_DOCUMENTS/stelprdb5176362.pdf Squaw Valley Fall Festivals: www.squaw.com. Tahoe Donner Hiking and Festivals: www.tahoedonner.com.

MORE INFORMATION North Lake Tahoe Tourism: www.gotahoenorth.com. Truckee Tourism and Events: www.truckee.com.  


North Lake Tahoe Hosts 'Ironman' By  Ky Plaskon (Sacramento, CA)   Friday, September 20, 2013  

Hundreds of Ironman triathletes swim at Lake Tahoe’s Kings Beach every morning. Will Grant has been here six weeks and spent a lot of money. “I will probably spend by the time I leave here, $3,00 to $4,000, easy,” Grant says. Some 12,000 people are expected to spend $12 million in one week. Andy Chapman of the North Lake Tahoe Resort Association says the money has been rolling in all summer. “I call it the lycra factor. The lycra factor has exploded, you see them on the road all day long,” Chapman says. Behind the scenes, 3,000 volunteers prepare backpacks, bike racks, tents and provide general athlete support. Ironman Director Keats McGonigal says the race takes community endurance too.

“Keeping people excited year after year when there is traffic impacts and some of the other things that happen on race day can sometimes be a challenge,” McGonigal says. The Ironman has a 5 year contract at Tahoe, but McGonigal says most host communities keep the race coming back for more than a decade.  


KINGS BEACH , CA - While the athletes prepare for the upcoming Ironman triathlon, spectators can begin preparing for viewing the event. Spectators can park their cars at Squaw Valley and ride a free shuttle bus to Kings Beach, according to an official with Ironman. Participating athletes will be riding the shuttle buses as well. As a result, priority seating will be given to the athletes, according to an official with Ironman. Ironman officials say the shuttle buses will transport spectators to Kings Beach from 4:30 a.m. to 6:00 a.m. Spectators can return to Squaw Valley via shuttle bus from 9:45 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Spectators wanting to watch the swim can do so from Kings Beach State Park. Spectators will be able to park their car at Kings Beach Elementary School and then walk a few blocks to the beach, according to an official with Ironman. Spectators are able to watch the athletes on the bike course at either the entrance to Squaw Valley under the Olympic flame or in Kings Beach at the Corner of 267 and 28, according to an official with Ironman. Athletes can also be watched from Donner Pass Road through old town Truckee. Squaw Valley Village is where spectators can stand to watch the athletes run toward the finish line, according to Ironman officials. Ironman officials say spectators are not allowed to cross the finish line or enter the finish chute with the participating athletes. For more information, read the spectators guide on the Ironman Lake Tahoe website .  


Published: 9/20 4:38 pm Share Updated: 9/20 5:59 pm NORTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. (KRNV & MyNews4.com) -- IRONMAN Lake Tahoe is set to take place this Sunday, September 22, 2013, and with it will come traffic and some temporary road closures. For the quickest and easiest access through the area, start on HWY 267 North to HWY 80 East, take Exit 190 (Pioneer Trail) and then get back on HWY 80 West, and take 89 South, Exit 185 to arrive at Squaw Valley. There will be limited and temporary road closures throughout the day. However, all roads will return to normal by 5:30 p.m. For a complete listing of road closures visit the IRONMAN website. Due to the limited road space it is not recommended to try to follow any athletes by car during the race. IRONMAN Lake Tahoe, which features a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and 26.2-mile run, begins with a swim at King’s Beach. After cyclists pedal through Truckee and over Brockway Summit, they finish at the Village at Squaw Valley. For more information on the race visit: www.IronmanLakeTahoe.com  


Triathlete Liz Lyles is projected to be a top finisher in this year's Ironman at Lake Tahoe. Written by

Scott Oxarart soxarart@rgj.com

When Reno resident Liz Lyles competed in her first triathlon in 2001, she rode a mountain bike through the hills of Mission Bay, Calif. Her competitors - decked out in professional bikes, jerseys, gloves, shoes, shorts and helmets watched as Lyles passed them by. "I didn't know anything about road bikes and wheels and aerodynamics," Lyles said. "I got a few expletive comments like, 'Holy ...' as I was passing them on a mountain bike with the most subpar gear you've ever seen." ...  


About the time many Tahoe residents assume a comfy football-watching position Sunday morning, some 2,600 triathletes will be thawing out along on a 112-mile bike course, having already tackled a chilling, 2.4-mile swim in Lake Tahoe. And they’ll be just getting started. The North Lake Tahoe area is gearing up to host California’s first full-distance Ironman triathlon since 2001 — Ironman Lake Tahoe — which begins in Kings Beach in the wee hours of Sunday morning and wraps up 17 hours later in the Village at Squaw Valley. It’s kind of a big deal. The race, which sold out all 2,600 entries in 19 hours, has drawn thousands of visitors to the area, providing a significant economic boost in a typically slow time of year. Athletes from 45 states and 14 countries will be represented. “I think in a lot of ways it’s the perfect venue for us,” Keats McGonigal, race director for Ironman Lake Tahoe, said about the North Lake Tahoe and Truckee area, which has a contract to host the event for three years, with a two-year extension. “It’s a destination area where people like to come to visit or race. And the spectacular beauty that we’re able to showcase kind of sets it apart. Then, obviously, having Squaw Valley and the atmosphere that we’re going to be able to create at the finish line is going to be a highlight for this event, for sure.” Like all Ironman events, it won’t be easy. Keats said the Ironman Lake Tahoe course is the highest in elevation among the 12 full-distance Ironman races in North America, ranging from about 6,200 feet at lake level to 7,200 feet atop Brockway Summit. “Obviously the altitude poses an increased challenge for the athletes, and this course does have some good hills on the bike course that are certainly going to be a challenge,” Keats said.


After climbing out of the water at Kings Beach, fresh off a 2.4-mile swim around a rectangular course, athletes will take to their bikes for the next 112 miles. The bike course, which is circled twice, is a giant loop from Kings Beach through Tahoe City, along the Truckee river and through downtown Truckee, over Brockway Summit and back down through Kings Beach, past Tahoe City again to Squaw Valley. The race ends with a marathon-distance run, 26.2 miles, from Squaw to Tahoe City and back. Athletes must hit cutoff times on each leg — two hours, 20 minutes in for the swim; 10 hours, 30 minutes after the official start for the bike; and 17 hours total. The first wave of racers starts at 6:30 a.m. With 50 qualifying slots for the Ironman World Championship in Hawaii up for grabs — not to mention a $75,000 professional prize purse — Ironman Lake Tahoe has drawn some of the world’s top pros and age-group participants alike. Big-name pros include Australians Joe Gambles and Chris McDonald, Terenzo Bozzone of New Zealand, Angela Naeth of Canada, and Americans Dede Griesbauer and Jessica Jacobs, among others. All are past Ironman champions. Along with the stacked pro contingent, more than 20 athletes from the Lake Tahoe and Truckee area are signed up, including 70-year-old Jim Meskimen of Truckee, who competed in the inaugural World’s Toughest Triathlon in 1983 and has completed three Ironman events in three different countries. Rob Kronkhyte, 57, of Tahoe City also secured himself an entry amid the registration rush. Sunday’s race will mark his third Ironman triathlon. He said he’s as prepared as he’s going to be, having trained on the course “too many times” already. Nevertheless, the reality of covering 140.6 miles in a day remains daunting. “I am a little anxious, yeah, but I’m ready. I’m a little concerned about the weather, but so is everybody,” said Kronkhyte, as the National Weather Service is forecasting a chance of showers Saturday and temperatures in the upper 30s in Kings Beach Sunday morning. Sunday’s high is 59 degrees. “The temperature is supposed to be cold on Saturday, and there’s a chance of snow on the peaks, which can be crazy scary for swimming.” Kronkhyte said he’s shooting for 13 hours, allowing himself an hour and 20 minutes on the swim, six hours for the double bike loop, and four and a half hours for the run. Truckee husband-wife duo Sherwick and Jami Min, meanwhile, will enter the race together, as they have in more than a dozen other Ironman triathlons over the past decade-plus. Both said they feel confident entering the race, particularly after all the hard training they’ve poured into it. “Actually, not really,” Jami said when asked if she was nervous. “Yes because I haven’t done an Ironman since 2011. But no because we spent so much recon on the course. And we’ve also experienced a variety of weather this year while training, from hot to cold to windy, so we’re equipped and ready to go, no matter what.”


“It varies by day,” Sherwick said of his anxiousness. “But besides the training and all that stuff, mentally I think we’ll be some of the few people out there that will just be enjoying the whole day — because we know this area, and we love the course. We’re going to enjoy every minute of it.” Sherwick said he thinks he can match his personal record of 9 hours, 52 minutes, which he recorded on an Ironman Austria course that he compared to Ironman Lake Tahoe. Jami is shooting for her own personal record, which is 10 hours, 23 minutes. “In all honesty, I feel like there’s no reason why I couldn’t have a personal record here, even though everyone else has been saying to expect to be a half-hour slower,” Sherwick said. “I feel like this course is very well suited to us.” No matter how much time elapses, both Mins said they plan to celebrate their finishes with a pint of Guinness in hand. In fact, a celebratory libation was a common answer among the local participants — right up there with sleep.  


IRONMAN Tahoe athletes, from left to right, Catriona Morrison, Dede Griesbauer, Angela Naeth, Jessica Jacobs, former Oakland A’s outfielder Eric Byrnes, Joe Gambles, Chris McDonald, Paul Ambrose, Maik Twelsiek Thousands of athletes from around the world will push their bodies to the limit this Sunday with the Inaugural IRONMAN Lake Tahoe. Nearly 2,700 racers will face the rough waters of Tahoe with a 2.4 mile swim in Kings Beach. They will then hop on their bikes to make two loops around Truckee via highways 89 and 267—a 112 mile ride finishing in Squaw Valley. Finally, racers will run 26.2 miles along the Truckee River bike path before ending up in Squaw. IRONMAN athletes have traveled great distances to compete. While 97 percent of athletes are from United States, 30 nations will be represented, including Germany, Australia and England. Within the U.S., 48 states are sending athletes, 63 are Californians. Professional athletes will compete for a $75,000 prize, while age group competitors are vying for 50 qualifying spots for the 2014 IRONMAN World Championship in Kailua Kona, Hawaii. More than 3,000 volunteers will support the athletes along the way. An estimated 10,000 friends and family are expected to cheer on the athletes.


Keats McGonigal, operation manager for the World Triathlon Corporation estimates $15 million in revenue will come into the area because of this event. This estimation accounts for athletes, volunteers, spectators, and IRONMAN staff spending money on hotels, restaurants, tour/recreation and other local businesses. Additionally, the IRONMAN Foundation is donating $50,000 for the local community which will benefit North Lake Tahoe Fire Department, Squaw Valley Fire Department, KidZone Museum, Tahoe Cross Country Ski Education Association, Awaken INC and Tahoe Nordic Search and Rescue. The IRONMAN Foundation also started the Newton Running Triathlon Team this year, which will have 12 members competing on Sunday. The team is supporting Keep Tahoe Blue and spent time cleaning the Lake shore this morning. The team s expected to raise an estimated $16,000 to help protect, restore and advocate for the health of the Lake Tahoe Basin. Lake Tahoe will benefit more than just financially from IRONMAN. “Communities that embrace IRONMAN receive inspirational stories and motivation to pursue their own goals in life. IRONMAN shows people that dreams can come true if you put the time and dedication into your passions,� says McGonigal. IRONMAN signed a five-year contract with Tahoe.

Athlete Highlight IRONMAN hosted a panel of eight professional triathletes along with former Major League Baseball player Eric Byrnes, giving us a chance to get inside the heads of the athletes.

Catriona Morrison Morrison is a 35-year-old triathlete from Scotland. She is recovering from Achilles tendon surgery she had last year. This year, Morrison won first in BH Zarautz Triathlon, first in the St. Croix 70.3 and second in the 70.3 Norway. She also took gold in the Texas IRONMAN in 2011. Morrison says her favorite race moment was in the BH Zarautz when during the bike, her chain broke. She sat on the side of the course for 45 minutes before her chain was fixed. Both her coach and her husband said was too far behind and should give up. However, Morrison did not know how far behind she was and continued racing. She won the race.


Dede Griesbauer Griesbauer was born in New Jersey, and swam for Stanford University. She went on to work on Wall Street for eight years. In 2005, she quit her job as vice president at MFS Investment Management to pursue racing. Since becoming a professional athlete she has won the IRONMAN UK and IRONMAN Brazil. In 2011, she crashed in Ironman Germany, leaving her with a broken elbow, two broken ribs, a broken pelvis and hip. Despite being told she would never walk again, Griesbauer placed 2nd in a 70.3 the next year.

Griesbauer remembers training at the Air Force Academy where she saw the saying, “the air is rare” along the wall. “So every time you breathe you see that dang thing on the side of the wall. And it’s true, you will feel it… Practice what it is going to make your lungs feel like. As Jessica said, once you go anaerobic, it’s hard to get that settled feeling back. So, like any Ironman you need to pace yourself and stay within yourself.”

Angela Naeth Naeth grew up in Northern British Columbia and raced her first triathlon in 2007. In 2008 she turned pro. In 2013, she’s placed first in three 70.3’s. This will be Naeth’s first full IRONMAN.

Naeth talks about what her morning routine will look like on Sunday. “I’ll have a lot of butterflies, that’s for sure. Typically, you should wake up three hours before the race. Right away just get some food in me, I’ll still to some fluid food. Get that in me right away, I just need to digest that quickly. I definitely have coffee, I like my morning coffee so that’s not going away anytime soon. Then get done to race start, just get everything ready. I’ll probably have my wetsuit on already because I want to stay as warm as possible… Just kind of take slow and relaxed, obviously I’ll be nervous but it will be a good nervous.”

Jessica Jacobs A Wisconsin native Jacobs, got hooked on triathlons in 2003 while serving in U.S. Army. Since her first Ironman, she has accomplished a lot in the sport. She finished the World Championship Ironman in 11:51 in 2005, ten weeks after she gave birth to her daughter. She has won the IRONMAN Florida in 2010 and 2011, and taken gold in IRONMAN Wisconsin in 2011.


When asked how she is training differently to account for altitude, Jacobs says, “I didn’t do anything differently but with coming here, you just definitely go into certain sections of the race a little more tentative with some of the climbing. Once you pop, once you go into anaerobic it is much more difficult to come back from it and put together a great bike and a killer run. You have to respect nature a lot more here.”

Eric Byrnes Byrnes is a former MLB outfielder who has played for the Oakland A’s, the Colorado Rockies, Baltimore Orioles, Arizona Diamondbacks and Seattle Mariners. He now lives in Martis Camp. Byrnes did his first triathlon in 2010 and has finished three Ironman’s since then.

Byrnes told us the story of his first triathlon. “I showed up with my surfing wetsuit, did not know how to swim freestyle, literally almost drowned in the water and thought I was going to die. I ended up getting on my bike which was a beach cruiser. I wasn’t bringing the beach cruiser to be cool, it was my only bike.”

Joe Gambles Gambles is an Australian native who has been racing since he was 16. He has won multiple Ironman 70.3 and the Ironman Wisconsin in 2010. Gambles competed in Las Vegas just two weeks ago.

Gambles talks about how Las Vegas helped prepare him for Sunday. “I feel ready but Ironman; its a different beast. I feel like I’ve gotten close to my potential at 70.3 distance but Ironman is a whole different ball game.”

Chris McDonald Another Aussie native, McDonald has been racing professionally since 2004. He did his first Ironman in 2002.


McDonald talks about racing in cold weather on Sunday, “I was actually saying to someone the other day, I normally wish I was one of these 150 pounds guys but thankfully on Sunday I think it is pretty good I’m not 150 pounds.

Paul Ambrose Ambrose is also an Australian native who has been racing triathlons since 2000. He has placed first in the IRONMAN Australia and Ironman Louisville.

For Ambrose, the Ironman Australia was his most memorable race. “That race meant a lot to my hometown. It was one of the first races I got introduced to… I got to have a lot of my close friends and family come up and watch me.”

Maik Twelsiek Twelsiek is a triathlete from Germany. He has won multiple IRONMAN titles including winning Wisconsin twice. His wife, Hillary Biscay, is also a triathlete.

He raced two weeks before in Wisconsin and has spent the last two weeks recovering rather than training. “(I was asking Hillary) which race I should do, Wisconsin or Tahoe and she was like, ‘yeah both.’” Traffic Information Highway 28 Eastbound and Westbound will be closed from 6:30 a.m. until 9:30 a.m.

Highway 89 North from Tahoe City to Squaw Valley will be closed from 7 a.m. until 5:30 a.m.

Highway 267 Southbound from Northstar to Commonwealth Drive will be closed from 7:30 a.m. until 4:00 p.m.

All closed roads will be open by no later than 5:30 p.m.


More traffic information can be found here. - See more at: http://tahoequarterly.com/2013/09/hard-as-iron-ironman-takes-on-tahoesaturday/#sthash.IRocdhsl.dpuf  


Traffic Advisory for IRONMAN Lake Tahoe

Published on Sep 20, 2013 - 12:55:11 PM By: GoTahoeNorth.com NORTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. September 20, 2013 – IRONMAN Lake Tahoe is set to take place this Sunday, September 22, 2013. While there are various routes motorists can take to circumvent the IRONMAN race course, it is best to traverse the areas between the race start at Kings Beach and the finish at Squaw Valley without interfering with the bike path. For the quickest and easiest access through the area, start on HWY 267 North to HWY 80 East, take Exit 190 (Pioneer Trail) and then get back on HWY 80 West, and take 89 South, Exit 185 to arrive at Squaw Valley. There will be limited and temporary road closures throughout the day. However, all roads will return to normal by 5:30 p.m. For a complete listing of road closures visit the IRONMAN website. Due to the limited road space it is not recommended to try to follow any athletes by car during the race. IRONMAN Lake Tahoe, which features a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and 26.2-mile run, begins with a swim at King's Beach. After cyclists pedal through Truckee and over Brockway Summit, they finish at the Village at Squaw Valley. For more information on the race visit: www.IronmanLakeTahoe.com  


LAKE TAHOE (CBS13) — Cooler weather this weekend comes as the high country readies for the Ironman Triathlon, which is expected to bring big business to Lake Tahoe. From packed restaurants to hotels that are all booked, to sporting goods stores selling Ironman accessories, millions of dollars are coming into Lake Tahoe from around the world. Another picture-perfect Tahoe day had no clouds in the sky, as triathletes trained in the chilly water. They’re bracing for cooler temperatures. Dave Polivy wrapped up another busy day at Tahoe Mountain Sports at a time of the year when sales usually slump. “We’re looking at our sales as much as doubling this week this week for sure,” he said. The 2013 event is bringing in 2,600 athletes, 10,000 spectators and big bucks. Officials project and $8 to $10 million economic impact. Hotel occupancy is up 20 percent year over year, and hotel revenue per room is up 40 percent. Mark and Darla Hall came from Oklahoma to cheer on their daughter Lindsey. “It’s beautiful here; it’s just really pretty,” Darla said. Another Mark crossed a much larger pond to compete: the Atlantic Ocean. “I’ve been competing for 31 years,” said Mark Kleanthous. “I’ve done 35 Ironman races. I’ve come all the way from London, England to enjoy the breathtaking view of Lake Tahoe.” He’s ready to tackle a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride and a marathon run.


“Looking forward to an amazing race — probably my toughest,” Kleanthous said. The race begins early Sunday in Kings Beach and wraps up 17 hours later in the village at Squaw Valley.  


 

Ironman Lake Tahoe, Liz Lyles, Squaw Valley

Jeffrey WeidelSF Skiing Examiner Advertisement September 19, 2013


Liz Lyles won’t be skiing at Squaw Valley for a while. However, she’s back at Lake Tahoe’s famed ski resort for another reason this week: The Ironman. Squaw Valley ski resort will serve as the epicenter of activity for the world-class triathlon, with both the second transition and the finish being held at the resort. More than 2,300 athletes will be in the North Lake Tahoe area this week for Ironman, a full triathlon that will have competitors running 26.2 miles, biking 112 miles and swimming for 2.4 miles. The sold-out event will have the events spread from Lake Tahoe to Squaw Valley and Truckee. There are 13 age divisions from age 18 to 80 as well as professional and physically challenged divisions. Fifty winners from the event will qualify for the Championship Ironman in KailuaKona, Hawaii in October 2014. Lyles lives in Reno and very familiar with the setup of the Ironman course. Squaw Valley sponsors Lyles, who skies with her family at Squaw during the winter to cross-train. She is expected to be a top finisher in the Lake Tahoe event. At last year’s Ironman Wisconsin, Lyles already qualified for Kona earlier this year and will also be making appearances at the triathlon training camps to be held at Squaw Valley next summer. Fans could find Lyles training almost daily on Tahoe’s North Shore, getting ready for this Sunday. Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows ski resort have two employees competing in Ironman Lake Tahoe. Long-time Squaw employees Dawn Gaffney and Rob Kronkhyte will both compete on home turf in Sunday’s competition. Gaffney is a mother of two who will be running her first official Ironman competition, though she completed the Vineman two years ago for her 40th birthday. Kronkhyte is an accomplished ultra-runner who has competed in the Western States 100 Mile Endurance Run five times and will also compete in the XTERRA World Championships off-road triathlon at the end of October.  


 

Preparations Underway For Ironman Lake Tahoe Triathlon Posted: Sep 19, 2013 12:18 AM PST Updated: Sep 24, 2013 6:49 PM PST

Preparations are underway for the world-famous Ironman triathlon, set to debut in the Lake Tahoe area this Sunday. Event officials say they sold out of the more than 2,600 spots in just over one day, to competitors from all over the world! It's a competition that will test the body and mind to the max. "Getting a lot of rest and taking care of the body," said Darren Mounts of Sacramento, California. "Hydrating, and doing everything you can to be ready on race day, come Sunday." The competitors will have to endure a tough course in the high-altitude. They'll swim 2.4 miles at Kings Beach. Then, they'll get on their bikes and ride for 112 miles. "And, if they weren't tired enough from that, then they get to do a 26.2 mile marathon along the Truckee River trail," said Keats McGonigal, Ironman Lake Tahoe Race Director. The North Lake Tahoe Resort Association (NLTRA) says the event is contracted to be in the area for the next five years. "We've been working on all this for almost two years, and we're so excited Ironman's almost here," said Andy Chapman, Chief Marketing Officer with the NLTRA. "I fully anticipate if this works out the way everybody thinks it should, it'll be here for much longer than that." Chapman told me the event is estimated to have a $10 million economic impact to the area.


I asked McGonigal why the Tahoe area is an ideal place to host an event like the Ironman triathlon: "The mountains and the venues are spectacular," he said. "We can showcase that to our athletes and create a fantastic athlete experience as a result of the natural beauty that's here." Information on road closures in the area on Sunday: http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist3/wsc/pio/pr/index.php?action=getPressRelease&id=492 North Lake Tahoe Resort Association: http://www.gotahoenorth.com/ Ironman Lake Tahoe: http://www.ironman.com/triathlon/events/americas/ironman/lake-tahoe.aspx#axzz2fKjo1mjC Written by Adam Varahachaikol  


Margaret Moran / mmoran@sierrasun.com | Signs like this one on Highway 28 in Kings Beach have been up throughout the region for several days, notifying drivers of Ironman traffic impacts planned this Sunday. KINGS BEACH, Calif. — With more than 2,500 athletes taking to the roads this Sunday for Ironman Lake Tahoe, drivers can expect road closures, traffic delays and detours. “We ask for your cooperation and understanding on race day as you travel around the North Lake Tahoe and Truckee areas,” regional officials said. “(We) ask that you proceed with caution and allow for additional travel time to your destination.” Athletes are encouraged to park at Squaw Valley and ride shuttle buses to Kings Beach. Spectators will be allowed to ride the bus with athletes, but priority will be given to athletes, according to Ironman officials. Buses will take approximately 20-30 minutes to travel from Squaw Valley to Kings Beach. Athlete buses will operate from 4:30 a.m. to 5:30 a.m. Spectator buses will operate until 6 a.m. Shuttle buses are free. Return buses from Kings Beach to Squaw Valley for spectators will operate from 9:45 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Due to traffic impacts, the return trip to Squaw Valley could take 60 minutes or more. For safety purposes, the following major roads will be impacted: ROAD CLOSURES Highway 28 eastbound and westbound, Fox Street to Highway 267 in Kings Beach, 6:30 to 9:30 a.m. Detour: Use Fox to Speckled streets. Highway 89 north, Fairway Drive in Tahoe City to Squaw Valley Road, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.


Highway 267 southbound, Northstar Drive to Commonwealth Drive in Kings Beach, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Downtown Donner Pass Road, Spring to Bridge streets, 6:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Highway 89/I-80 eastbound off-ramp, 6:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Highway 89/I-80 westbound on-ramp, 6:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Several residents roadways on the North Shore and in Truckee will also be impacted. To view the full Ironman Lake Tahoe’s traffic impact guide, go to www.ironman.com. Go to the “races” tab, and click on “Ironman” to select the Ironman Lake Tahoe race. At the top of the Lake Tahoe race page, click on the “traffic impact guide.” TART SERVICE On Sunday, TART will operate on a modified schedule. Passengers that day can ride free of charge. Buses will serve some of the normal eastbound North Shore runs between Crystal Bay Stateline and Tahoe City. The remaining routes will run in a counter-clockwise loop: Tahoe City-Kings Beach-Incline Village-Kings Beach-Truckee via Highway 267-Squaw Valley-Tahoe City-West Shore-Tahoe City. Service will run from 6 a.m. to 7:25 p.m. There will be gaps in service on route portions near Kings Beach from 7 to 9 a.m. due to the race, however. To view the modified Sunday TART schedule, go to www.placer.ca.gov/tart. Click on the “modified route and schedule” link in the pink box.  


KINGS BEACH, Calif. (KRNV & MyNews4.com) ‐‐  The end of September is usually a slow time for Tahoe  Mountain Sports in Kings Beach.     It's not quite ski season but the summer crowd is gone. But this year is different.     "Every day just gets busier and busier and it's been a lot of fun," said owner Dave Polivy.    When he heard IRONMAN was coming to Lake Tahoe, bringing 2,600 triathletes and an expected 10,000  spectators with it, he knew it would mean a boost in business.    "When we heard this was coming, we knew it was going to be good," he said. "We wanted to make sure  we were providing the product athletes wanted but also some fun and educational things for them too."    He's offering wet suit demos, book signings, and athlete seminars, hoping to bring more foot traffic  through his doors.    "We expect it to pick up quite a bit as we head into Thursday, Friday and Saturday."    Andy Chapman, chief marketing officer of the North Lake Tahoe Resort Association said athletes started  coming to Tahoe last weekend, training at Kings Beach, Truckee and Squaw Valley and staying in local  motels and hotels.    "This has really helped keep our business profile high and the economic impact high coming through  September," he said.     He estimated an $8 to $10 million impact on local businesses, but it could even be more.    "Folks have been coming up here, spending multiple days here earlier in the season training," said  Chapman. "So overall we think it's in the $15 million range."    And that economic boost is something Polivy said he's already starting to see.     


"As I've talked to my neighbors and other business owners, friends, they're all seeing the same thing. So  I think it's great for the region."     2,600 triathletes are expected to compete in the 2.4 mile swim, 112‐mile bike ride and 26.2 mile run. 


Lake Tahoe Ironman Triathlon draws thousands to NorCal Event expected to bring $8M to $10M to region UPDATED 9:17 PM PDT Sep 18, 2013

  TRUCKEE, Calif. (KCRA) —On Sunday, more than 2,500 athletes will stand in the sand of Lake Tahoe's north shore, feeling the cool chill in the air, ready to swim the frigid waters to start one of the most grueling endurance events known – the Lake Tahoe Ironman Triathlon.

The race will include a 2.4-mile swim starting at the Kings Beach State Recreation Area, a 112-mile bike ride and a full marathon. The start Once the gun sounds, the athletes will enter the water, swimming two full laps around the buoyed course.


Then, they exit the swim and complete a lakeside transition to the 112-mile bike course, which covers the Resort triangle. It takes riders to Tahoe City, through the Truckee River corridor, following the Truckee River past Squaw Valley and into the town of Truckee. Next, the course turns south back toward the lake, rolling past NorthStar California and starting the climb to Brockway Summit, a 7,200-foot elevation. The athletes then transition from the 112-mile ride to run a marathon, winding 26.2 miles along the Truckee River. Those three events are raced in that order and without a break. The event ends at Squaw Valley, home to the 1960 Winter Olympics. Local impact Officials announced the Tahoe Ironman a year ago. The event sold out within 18 hours. The North Lake Tahoe Resort Association expects 10,000 fans to watch the all-day race. The Tahoe region signed a five-year deal to host the Ironman. "Like paddleboarding, kayaking, hiking, biking and of course, skiing, this event is part of the Tahoe area's brand," Chief Marketing Officer Andy Chapman said. "We’ve been working on bringing this event here for two years." The north shore is expecting a huge economic impact. "We are thinking $8 (million) to $10 million alone this weekend," Chapman told KCRA 3. Squaw Resort CEO Andrew Wirth said the event is boosting the local economy during a time that is typically slow. "It creates a huge economic boost, particularly this time of year," Wirth said. "Late September, early October, the interest in the area drops off." The region is reporting a 40 percent increase in hotel rentals, compared to a year ago. Local restaurants and businesses also hope to cash in. "We are ready for it. We are opening a little early for the bloody mary crowd," said Tom Ballou, of the Bar of America in Truckee. "A lot of people have been talking it up. These sports events are a new twist to the area, rather than skiing or water sports." Ironman road closures According to the state Department of Transportation, closures will include: - Northbound Highway 89 from Fairway Drive in Tahoe City to Squaw Valley Road, from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. - Southbound Highway 267 from Northstar Boulevard to Kingswood/Commonwealth Drive in Kings Beach, from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. - Both directions of Highway 28 in Kings Beach, from Fox Street to the Highway 267 intersection, from 6:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.


- Eastbound Interstate 80 offramp to highways 267/89 and the Highway 89 onramp to westbound I-80, from 6:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Access to residential streets from those listed highways will be closed at several locations, as well. Detours will be available. Caltrans officials advised motorists to drive with caution through the course areas that are open, and to allow for additional travel time.

Read more: http://www.kcra.com/news/local-news/news-sierra/lake-tahoe-ironman-triathlon-draws-thousands-tonorcal/-/12970852/22012038/-/11peuo7z/-/index.html#ixzz2ke2wyzPw 


 

The Abbie Agency

Jeffrey WeidelSF Skiing Examiner Advertisement September 17, 2013 Think a visit to Lake Tahoe is only appropriate during ski season or the summer months? Think again.


As summer winds down to a close and fall arrives, one of the best times to visit Lake Tahoe is now. Why? Autumn in Tahoe takes on the pace that people think of as vacation speed – traffic thins, prices fall, and the lake remains warm. These ingredients combine to offer visitors a chance to get in a fall vacation before the snow flies at a substantial discount from summer high-season prices, all while experiencing Tahoe in one of its most laid back and breathtaking seasons. It’s not too difficult waking up to this: Golden fall colors border Tahoe trails, the lake turns to glass, and crisp mornings give way to warm fall days. And swimming in the Lake doesn’t require a wet suit – it’s still warm! North Lake Tahoe offers a variety of lodging that fits all styles of vacationers, including familyfriendly cabins and lodging in Tahoe Vista and Kings Beach. Choices include a private, lakefront cabin at the Franciscan Lakeside Lodge in Tahoe Vista, where prices fall be as much as $120 on the first day of October. There are also reduced prices at the nearby Tahoe Sands Resort and Red Wolf Lakeside Lodge. Another right-on-the-Lake location is at family-owned Ferrari’s Crown Resort, which offers lakefront lodging on Kings Beach at a hotel that has been family-owned and operated since the 1950s. If one wants luxury accommodations, that’s available as well. The Ritz-Carlton Lake Tahoe, the Hyatt Regency in Incline Village, the Resort at Squaw Creek, Northstar California, or a lakefront suite at the West Shore Café are among the choices. The Ritz-Carlton Lake Tahoe’s “Discover With You” deal offers a $100 hotel credit, free breakfast and complimentary S’mores with a room booking. The Resort at Squaw Creek offers a free night of lodging when you stay three nights or more. And the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe’s popular Lakeside Cottages and West Shore Café drop their rates for fall season bookings. Couples can find quiet bed and breakfasts deep on the West Shore. Visitors with a hankering for late-night music can book a room at one of Crystal Bay’s casinos to catch a night of live music and enjoy some gambling. And vacation rentals around Tahoe City can be found for half price throughout the fall. These deals allow vacationers to take a break from peak summer lodging prices and the middleof-summer crowds summer, and relax during Lake Tahoe’s under-rated “shoulder season.” For a full listing of Lake Tahoe’s fall lodging deals, visit: http://www.gotahoenorth.com/cool-deals For a comprehensive list of lodging options in North Lake Tahoe, visit: http://www.gotahoenorth.com/lodging


Inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe Posted: Sep 17, 2013 4:09 PM PST Updated: Sep 24, 2013 6:49 PM PST I recently met up with Liz Lyles at her work. In fact, anywhere outside is considered her office. But on this day she was at Montreux Country Club where she teaches spinning and weights. It was 1 in the afternoon and already she had ridden her bike and gone on a run. After our interview, she will swim. Liz is a pro triathlete. And amazingly, she started this career just one year ago. "I went and signed up for Ironman Wisconsin which was in September and just took place last week and I went out and won my first Ironman with a sub 3 marathon off the bike so I set the course record on the run." She's now training for the inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe. Like all Ironman events it's a 2.4 mile swim. A 112 mile bike ride followed by a marathon at 26.2 miles. She trains 25 hours a day while being a full time mom to a 3 and 5 year old. "For example, Tuesday I had a 6 hour bike ride so I taught here at 6am, went home and got the kids dressed for school, fed, dropped them off to school, came home, got my biking gear on, went up and did two and a half loops of the Ironman Lake Tahoe course, come home, plus I had to coordinate who's picking them up at school." This Reno resident is hoping to win our hometown Ironman race. She considers it her home course and she knows very well. "I can't tell you how many times I've ridden the course. I know every bump in the road, every tree, every crack. I know that course." Her goal time is around 9 hours 30 minutes. A respectable time proving Liz has become one of the top triathletes in the world. 3 weeks after Ironman Lake Tahoe, she will compete at the world championship race in Kona. She figures she has 5 more years of serious racing and wants to see just how far she can push her body. Written By Wendy Damonte  


Nearly 2,500 athletes are headed to the North Lake Tahoe area this week for IRONMAN, a full triathlon which will have them running 26.2 miles, biking 112 miles and swimming for 2.4 miles. The sold out event will have the events spread from Lake Tahoe to Squaw Valley and Truckee. There are 13 age divisions from age 18 to 80 as well as professional and physically challenged divisions. Fifty winners from the event will qualify for the Championship IRONMAN in KailuaKona, Hawaii in October, 2014. The positive financial impact is already being felt by businesses around the site of the first full IRONMAN in California since 2001, and the first in Lake Tahoe. An estimated $8 to $15 million will be spent in the area by athletes, spectators and organizers. Athletes paid a minimum of $675 each to participate. They start arriving on Thursday and depart after the awards ceremony at Squaw Valley on Monday.  


 

Tuesday, September 17, 2013 Ironman Lake Tahoe Triathlon is this Sunday More than 2,500 athletes will compete in the inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe this Sunday. Ironman Lake Tahoe is the first California Ironman Triathlon since 2001. Registration for the event was last summer and filled to capacity within 24 hours. The event begins with a 2.4 mile swim at Kings Beach State Recreation Area at 6:30am. Top athletes will complete the swim and ride out on their bikes in about 45 minutes. The 112 mile bike ride is a clockwise loop through Tahoe City, Truckee, and back to Kings Beach. On the third loop, athletes ride to Squaw Valley where they transition to the run. The 26.2 mile run is primarily on the bike trail that leads to Tahoe City.

Ironman Lake Tahoe, September 22, 2013.

The finish line is in the Village at Squaw Valley where the winner should cross around 2:45pm. The race ends at midnight. The best viewing areas will be at Kings Beach in the morning, Historic Truckee from 9:00am to 4:00pm (Truckee Viewing Party with closed streets) and the finish line at Squaw Valley. The final hour at the finish line is my favorite time to watch. The expressions of joy and displays of courage from the final finishers are inspiring.


Traffic impact: Downtown Truckee will close the streets from 6:30am to 3:30pm. Northstar street closures on Big Springs Drive (SB) and Highlands View Drive (SB). Northshore Tahoe will have rolling closures from 6:30am to 5:30pm. Tahoe Rim Trail parking on Brockway Summit (SB) will be closed. Hwy 89 North from Tahoe City to Squaw Valley will be closed 7:00am to 5:30pm Hwy 267 South from Northstar Blvd. to Kings Beach will be closed 7:30am to 4pm Car traffic is basically counter-clockwise on the course while cyclists loop the course in a clockwise direction. Complete traffic information is at Ironman Lake Tahoe. The event will reportedly pump millions of dollars into the local economy.  


Spectator’s Guide to Ironman North Lake Tahoe It’s race week of the inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe! Cheer on the insanely fit Ironman athletes as they compete in a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile run race. The event takes place September 22, with 2,500 athletes competing for a slot in the Ironman World Championships and a piece of the $75,000 purse. These athletes are excited to compete in stunning Lake Tahoe… after all, the event registrations sold out in less than 24 hours!


Here are some of the best places to watch the event according to Ironmon event producers: BEST PLACE TO WATCH THE SWIM: Kings Beach State Park, athletes will enter the swim from Kings Beach State Park, and Transition is in the parking lot adjacent to the beach. The best place to park will be at Kings Beach Elementary School, a few short blocks from the beach off Steelhead Ave. BEST PLACE TO WATCH THE BIKE: Spectators have a number of great places to watch athletes on the bike course. Spectators can watch athletes at two “hot corners� where athletes will pass multiple times. One is at the entrance to Squaw Valley under the Olympic flame where you can see your athlete pass three times. The


second will be in Kings Beach at the Corner of 267 and 28 where athletes will be starting their day on the bike, and then passing 3 additional times. The Town of Truckee will also be having a street celebration closing down Donner Pass road thru old town Truckee with the athletes racing down the middle of the street. There will be live music, activities for kids and adults, and food at restaurants adjacent to the course. BEST PLACE TO WATCH THE RUN: The run course has a number of lively spots to catch your athlete multiple times. The Squaw Valley Village will be an ideal location, close to the finish line, with food, music, the Ironman Village expo, and athletes making multiple passes in the area before finishing. Easy parking also makes this an ideal location to spend the day. The “hot corner” under the Olympic flame will also be a location where athletes can be cheered on three times on the bike, and 4 times on the run. Be sure to hop over to Reno before or after the race – it’s close enough that the Ironman runners could probably run there! Posted by Christina Erny on September 17th, 2013 No Comments Tags: events, Ironman, Ironman Lake Tahoe, Lake Tahoe, north lake tahoe

 


NORTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. — North Lake Tahoe is seeking volunteers to aid competitors in the inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe triathlon Sept. 22. Volunteers will help direct the competitors, provide environmental protection and more throughout the entire course. Volunteers comprise a critical element of the Ironman Lake Tahoe race. While competitors dive into the water in North Lake Tahoe, volunteers will ready changing tents for the biking portion. Competitors change clothes after the swimming segment, which is followed by a biking segment along the lake shore, over Brockway Summit into Truckee and then a loop around Squaw Valley. The final segment of the triathlon is a run up the Truckee River and back into Squaw Valley; during that time, volunteers will provide competitors with water, directions and more. Volunteers also will be necessary at the beginning of each leg of the triathlon for smooth transitions. Ironman Lake Tahoe needs about 300 additional volunteers to help with this event. Positions include bike and gear handlers, crowd control, environmental services and directional guides. Interested volunteers are eligible for priority registration for Ironman Lake Tahoe 2014, which opens at 8 a.m. Sept. 23. For more information, contact Sean Sweeney, volunteer director of Ironman Lake Tahoe, at laketahoe@ironmanvolunteers.com For more information about North Lake Tahoe, visit GoTahoeNorth.com. For the best bargains, including lodging, check out the “Cool Deals” tab, updated daily. North Lake Tahoe is a 45minute drive from Reno-Tahoe International Airport, two hours from Sacramento International Airport and just over three hours from San Francisco International Airport. Visitor information centers are at 100 N. Lake Blvd. in Tahoe City, Calif., and 969 Tahoe Blvd. in Incline Village, Nev.  


As summer winds down and fall beckons, Lake Tahoe is scheduled to host a plethora of events featuring food, wine and activities. • 21st Annual Great Lake Tahoe Sternwheeler Race, 10 a.m. Saturday. The race pits the South Shore’s two Mississippi paddlewheelers, The Tahoe Queen and the M.S. Dixie II, in a 4-mile race along the shoreline to determine the Tahoe Cup and lake supremacy. Passengers can join the party aboard either boat. Tickets are $25, including brunch. For more information, visit tahoesouth.com/events. • Farm to Peak Dinner Series, Homewood Mountain Resort, 4 p.m. Saturday. The five-course dinner begins with a champagne toast while riding the Quail Chair chairlift up to the top of Homewood Mountain. Dinner features local, seasonal cuisine, wine and special guest chef Kellan Hori of Kellan’s Kitchen. Tickets are $150. For more information, visit skihomewood.com/lake-tahoe-events. • Fourth Annual Sample the Sierra Farm-to-Fork Festival, 1-5 p.m. Sunday. Held on Ski Run Boulevard in South Lake Tahoe, the festival features wines from the Sierra’s David Girard Vineyards, Shadow Ranch Winery and Crystal Basin Cellars. The event includes booths with handmade products, live entertainment and cooking demonstrations. For more information, visit samplethesierra.com. • Labor Day Weekend Fireworks Extravaganza, 8:30 p.m. Sunday. The fireworks are visible from all over town, including from boats on the lake, Nevada Beach, Timber Cove Marina, Bijou Community Park, the Tallac Historic Site, the summit of Mount Tallac, Edgewood Tahoe and Lakeview Commons at El Dorado Beach. For more information, visit www.tahoesouth.com. • 28th Annual Autumn Food and Wine Festival in The Village at Northstar, Sept. 6-8. The festival includes cooking seminars, competitions, wine tastings, the Bike to the Beach Bash & BBQ, the Pedals & Pinot bike tour and a live concert with Joe Craven. Some events are free; ticket prices for others vary. For more information, visit northstarcalifornia.com. • Tahoe Geotourism Expo 2013, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sept. 7 and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 8. The expo showcases environmentally friendly activities and adventures at Lakeview Commons at El Dorado Beach. Activities include paddleboard yoga, kayak tours, wildlife viewing, Washoe cultural ceremonies, water science demonstrations, heritage hikes and more. For more information, visit tahoeexpo.com.


• Tour de Tahoe – Bike Big Blue, Sept. 8. The 72-mile ride benefits the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Start times vary. For more information, visit bikethewest.com/tour-de-tahoe. • Lake Tahoe Marathon, Sept. 27-29. Participants can run, walk, swim, paddle or pedal one or more of the 30-plus events over the course of the weekend. For more information, visit laketahoemarathon.com. • “Nine & Dine” at the Resort at Squaw Creek. After nine holes on the course, golfers can enjoy a prixfixe three-course dinner in the Six Peaks Grille for $59 per person. For more information, call (530) 581-6637. • Gunbarrel Tavern & Eatery, Heavenly Village. Chefs Billy McCullough and Ricky Sausser oversee the recently opened restaurant, which serves new American cuisine using primarily local, sustainable ingredients. Signature items include the Tuna Tower, Crispy Berkshire Pork Belly Salad, Pulled Duck Sliders and PBR Beer Can Chicken. For more information, visit gunbarreltavern.com.


With summer waning, we thought we’d turn our attention away from the ocean and over to the underappreciated lake. Maybe it’s for a late August getaway or an early fall weekend trip, but either way, Vogue.com found eight stunning spots to relax by North America’s prettiest swimming holes.


KINGS BEACH, Calif. — The Quicksilver Ta-Hoe Nalu Paddle Festival hits the crystalline waters of North Lake Tahoe Aug. 9-11 in Kings Beach, Calif. The family-friendly event features distance and beginner races, live music by Mama’s Cookin’, sand castle building contests and more than $10,000 in cash and prizes, as well as an attempt to set the world record for the most people doing yoga on a stand-up paddleboard (SUP). Thousands are expected to attend the annual event, and will have a chance to win a getaway package that includes a semi-custom-designed Wet Woody paddleboard ($2,200 value) from Lakeshore Paddleboard Company, a Quicksilver Waterman Collection Gear package ($600 value) and a Nature’s Bakery snack/swag pack. In addition, Nevada-based Nature’s Bakery will sponsor an on-site Instagram photo booth and will be handing out samples. The Wet Woody paddeboard was named after the drink of the same name available at Gar Woods restaurant. The 22-pound board is constructed with a hollow core. “Being locals to the Reno-Tahoe area, we have innovated and created specific designs for the flat-water lifestyle,” Sean Adlao, president and CEO of Lakeshore Paddleboard Company, said. “We are very proud to support the local Ta-Hoe Nalu event and help spread the enjoyment of the fastest-growing water sport in the world.” For an event schedule and other information, visit www.tahoenalu.com.


It’s touted as the longest-running stand-up paddleboard race in the world. Quiksilver’s Ta-Hoe Nalu Stand Up Paddle Festival, which has evolved from a modest race with 34 participants in 2007 to a three-day event with multiple races and hundreds of athletes, will take over the shores of Kings Beach this Friday through Sunday. Aside from the 500-plus racers slated to compete, thousands of spectators are expected to attend the family-friendly event, which starts at 6:30 p.m. Friday with a concert on the beach by Mama’s Cookin’. A total of seven races will take place throughout the day Saturday and Sunday, as well as numerous demonstrations and clinics. The event includes distance and beginner races, sand castle building contests and more than $10,000 in cash and prizes. Competition will include a 10-mile distance race, a 2-mile beginner race, a grom race, a four-person relay, a 4-mile open race and, of course, the elite finals on Sunday, which are expected to draw some of the best paddleboarders on the planet. A world-record attempt for most people doing a yoga move on a stand-up paddleboard will also take place Saturday at 11 a.m. A giveaway package at the festival includes a semi-custom “Wet Woody” paddleboard from Lakeshore Paddleboard Company named after the well-known drink from Gar Woods. The board is uniquely constructed with a hollow core and weighs only 22 pounds, according to organizers. For a full event schedule and more information, visit www.tahoenalu.com.


North Shore’s oldest and largest stand-up paddleboard festival takes place this weekend when Quiksilver’s Ta-Hoe Nalu Stand Up Paddle Festival kicks off in Kings Beach State Park Friday. Thousands are expected to attend the annual family friendly event, which starts at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9 with a concert on the beach by Mama’s Cookin’. Numerous races, demonstrations and clinics take place throughout the day Saturday and Sunday. The event includes distance and beginner races, sand castle building contests and more than $10,000 in cash and prizes, according to press release from organizers. A world record attempt for most people doing a yoga move on a stand-up paddleboard will also take place at 11 a.m. Saturday. A giveaway package at the festival includes a semi-custom “Wet Woody” paddleboard from Lakeshore Paddleboard Company named after the well-known drink from North Lake Tahoe restaurant, Gar Woods. The board is uniquely constructed with a hollow core and weighs only 22 pounds, according to organizers. For a full event schedule and more information about the Ta-Hoe Nalue Paddle Festival, visit www.tahoenalu.com. Lake Tahoe Action


A public meeting will be held on Tuesday night concerning next month's Ironman Lake Tahoe triathlon and its impact on area traffic and lodging. The sold-out Ironman Lake Tahoe race will bring 2,500+ triathletes to the area on September 22nd. It's the first full length Ironman race held in California since 2001. To voice your opinion, just go to the North Lake Tahoe Event Center in Kings Beach at 5:30pm Tuesday. "With an event of the magnitude of Ironman Lake Tahoe there are certain unavoidable parking and traffic concerns. This community meeting is a chance for North Lake Tahoe residents to hear firsthand how to maximize business opportunities and to minimize impacts as much as possible," says Andy Chapman, Director of Marketing for the North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/Resort Association. "North Lake Tahoe is proud to host Ironman Lake Tahoe and we believe this meeting will help organizers and community members work together to make this world-class athletic event run smoothly and efficiently." Ironman Lake Tahoe Race Director Keats McConigal, assistant director Todd Jackson and course director David Reid will be in attendance to answer questions from residents. The course runs throughout most of Lake Tahoe. It starts at Kings Beach State Recreation Area and cyclists will pedal through Truckee and over Brockway Summit before finishing in Squaw Valley. Athlete check-in will begin on Thursday, September 19 and the race will take place three days later. Top finishers in Ironman Lake Tahoe will be awarded 50 age-group slots in the 2014 Ironman World Championship. For more information on the race go to www.IronmanLakeTahoe.com


IRONMAN NEWS RELEASE NORTH LAKE TAHOE, CALIF. – The IRONMAN Lake Tahoe community meeting will be held on Aug. 6 at 5:30 p.m. at the North Tahoe Event Center in Kings Beach. North Tahoe will be hosting the first full distance IRONMAN in California since 2001 on Sept. 22.. The event has sold out, and more than 2,500 triathletes are expected to compete. The meeting will focus on the overall event as well as traffic impact the triathlon will have on North Lake Tahoe communities. IRONMAN Lake Tahoe Race Director Keats McConigal, assistant director Todd Jackson and course director David Reid will be in attendance at the meeting. The three will go over traffic concerns, race impacts and the huge economic benefit the race will have on the area. Following the presentation there will be time for audience questions. Community members who attend the meeting will hear firsthand how bringing the IRONMAN to Tahoe will impact the community. The triathlon has already benefited the local and regional economy, and many resorts have already sold out hotel rooms for the race weekend. “With an event of the magnitude of IRONMAN Lake Tahoe there are certain unavoidable parking and traffic concerns. This community meeting is a chance for North Lake Tahoe residents to hear first hand how to maximize business opportunities and to minimize impacts as much as possible,” said Andy Chapman, director of marketing for the North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/Resort Association. “North Lake Tahoe is proud to host IRONMAN Lake Tahoe and we believe this meeting will help organizers and community members work together to make this world-class athletic event run smoothly and efficiently.” The course runs throughout most of North Lake Tahoe. It starts at Kings Beach State Recreation Area and cyclists will pedal through Truckee and over Brockway Summit before the event ends at Squaw Valley. Athlete check-in will begin on Thursday, Sept. 19, and the race will take place throughout the day of Sept. 22. Top finishers in IRONMAN Lake Tahoe will be awarded 50 age-group slots in the 2014 IRONMAN World Championship. For more information on the race visit www.IronmanLakeTahoe.com.


NORTH LAKE TAHOE, Calif. July 29, 2013 – The IRONMAN Lake Tahoe community meeting will be held on August 6, 2013 at 5:30 p.m. at the North Tahoe Event Center in Kings Beach. North Tahoe will be hosting the first full distance IRONMAN in California since 2001 on September 22, 2013. The event has sold out, and more than 2,500 triathletes are expected to compete. The meeting will focus on the overall event as well as traffic impact the triathlon will have on North Lake Tahoe communities. IRONMAN Lake Tahoe Race Director Keats McConigal, assistant director Todd Jackson and course director David Reid will be in attendance at the meeting. The three will go over traffic concerns, race impacts, and the huge economic benefit the race will have on the area. Following the presentation there will be time for audience questions. Community members who attend the meeting will hear firsthand how bringing the IRONMAN to Tahoe will impact the community. The triathlon has already benefited the local and regional economy, and many resorts have already sold out hotel rooms for the race weekend. "With an event of the magnitude of IRONMAN Lake Tahoe there are certain unavoidable parking and traffic concerns. This community meeting is a chance for North Lake Tahoe residents to hear first hand how to maximize business opportunities and to minimize impacts as much as possible," said Andy Chapman, Director of Marketing for the North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/Resort Association. "North Lake Tahoe is proud to host IRONMAN Lake Tahoe and we believe this meeting will help organizers and community members work together to make this world-class athletic event run smoothly and efficiently." The course runs throughout most of North Lake Tahoe. It starts at Kings Beach State Recreation Area and cyclists will pedal through Truckee and over Brockway Summit before the event ends at Squaw Valley. Athlete check-in will begin on Thursday, Sept. 19 and the race will take place throughout the day of Sept. 22, 2013. Top finishers in IRONMAN Lake Tahoe will be awarded 50 age-group slots in the 2014 IRONMAN World Championship. For more information on the race visit: www.IronmanLakeTahoe.com


KINGS BEACH, Calif. — A community meeting has been scheduled to allow public feedback on traffic impacts and other factors associated with the inaugural Ironman Lake Tahoe event. On Sept. 22, North Lake Tahoe will host the first full distance Ironman in California since 2001. The event has sold out, and more than 2,500 triathletes are expected to compete. Ironman Lake Tahoe Race Director Keats McConigal, assistant director Todd Jackson and course director David Reid will attend a public meeting scheduled for Tuesday, Aug. 6, at 5:30 p.m. at the North Tahoe Event Center in Kings Beach. “The three will go over traffic concerns, race impacts, and the huge economic benefit the race will have on the area,” officials said in a press release, adding that audience questions will be taken. The triathlon has already benefited the local and regional economy, as many resorts have sold out hotel rooms for the race weekend, said Andy Chapman, director of marketing for the North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/Resort Association. “With an event of the magnitude of Ironman Lake Tahoe there are certain unavoidable parking and traffic concerns. This community meeting is a chance for North Lake Tahoe residents to hear first hand how to maximize business opportunities and to minimize impacts as much as possible,” Chapman said. “… We believe this meeting will help organizers and community members work together to make this world-class athletic event run smoothly and efficiently.” This will be the only public meeting regarding the race and potential traffic impacts, officials said. The course will throughout most of North Lake Tahoe all day on Sept. 22. It starts at Kings Beach State Recreation Area, and cyclists will pedal through Truckee and over Brockway Summit before the event ends at Squaw Valley. Top finishers will be awarded 50 age-group slots in the 2014 Ironman World Championship. For information visit, www.IronmanLakeTahoe.com.


Stand Up Paddleboarding, or SUPing, is widely regarded as one of the fastest growing sports in the world, attracting enthusiasts of all ages. From paddlers seven years to 77 years old, SUPing is gaining popularity due to its short learning curve and the many health benefits including core strengthening, overall toning, balance and endurance. It’s no wonder that SUPing has quickly become a popular activity on the beaches of the United States— but what about us mountain folks? How are we going to enjoy this latest and greatest board-focused experience in our landlocked states? Not to worry. There are plenty of opportunities to SUP, even when you live 1000 miles from the nearest ocean. Here’s a handy primer for how –and where—to SUP in the mountains.

Ask the Pros (Take a Lesson) While SUPing is fairly easy to learn, it’s always a good idea to start off with a lesson. Find a reputable company that has certified instructors and sign up for an introductory paddle. On a lake or reservoir, you can learn the basics in an hour; to SUP on a river, beginner lessons last for about 2.5 hours or longer. Felix Placer of Stand Up Paddle Colorado, the only river outfitter dedicated to SUPing in Colorado, says


that a lesson is highly recommended for river SUPing because of the various elements that you’ll encounter on a river. A lesson will teach you paddling techniques, river dynamics, safety and more. Where to Go (Find Some Water) You may live many miles from the nearest ocean, but chances are you have a body of water in your vicinity. Lakes and reservoirs are ideal for beginning SUP as the water tends to be flat and calm. RJ Murray, owner of Three Brothers Boards, suggests that you “choose a location with calm water, without much wind. Even small waves can create unnecessary angst for a beginning SUPer.” Kings Beach in North Lake Tahoe is a wide open beach with few rocks, making it a great location for first timers. Be sure to check out the rules and regulations at your local reservoir. While many are water sport friendly, some reservoirs ban swimming and other water sports. Lake Dillon in Dillon, Colorado, recently announced that it would allow SUPing (waterskiing is still forbidden). Your other option is to head to the river. River paddling and lake/reservoir paddling are different propositions. While they share similar steps for learning, there are things that you have to deal with on a river that don’t happen on a lake. For example, a river has currents, eddys and rocks—elements that probably won’t be an issue in a lake or reservoir. Rivers are considered by many to be the final frontiers of SUPing, but you don’t have to be an expert to ride (mini) rapids. River SUPing can be appreciated by the first-time paddler or experienced water person looking to experience new challenges. There are great stretches of the Colorado and Arkansas Rivers that are ideal for beginning SUPers.

What to Bring (Gear List) SUPing doesn’t require a lot of equipment, but it does require some specialized gear, namely a board and a paddle. Here’s what you’ll need: 

For river paddling, an inflatable board is preferable in order to deal with possible collisions with rocks, branches or other floating debris without damaging the board. A solid wood or fiberglass board is appropriate for lake or reservoir paddling. Your board should also have a leash, like ones used for surfing or snowboarding, attached.

A paddle


Because the Coast Guard considers SUPs as “small craft under oar,” paddlers must wear a personal floatation device (PFD).

When paddling in a river, a helmet is also necessary for safety.

A wet suit is a good idea if you’re going to be in cold water. If you’re starting in warmer water, a bathing suit with quick dry shorts and a water-appropriate top like a rash guard is appropriate attire.

Sunscreen

Sunglasses with a strap

Hat

Water bottle

Waterproof camera

If you have a dry bag, bring it. It can be strapped onto the front of your board and hold small items like your sunscreen, camera and water bottle.

Size Matters (Choose a Board) Just like your skis or snowboard, different types of SUP boards are built for different conditions. Some standup paddleboards are designed for flat water like lakes or reservoirs; others are constructed for oceans or rivers. Rocks are a factor when paddling on a river; most companies use inflatable boards when river paddling so that if you happen to hit a rock, the boards aren’t damaged. Starting out with an instructor will take the guess work out of choosing a board, making sure that you have the right equipment for the water conditions and your body size and type.


Most boards are between 10.5’ and 12’ long. While longer boards tend to be more stable, they can also be unwieldy and heavy for shorter folks. Talk to your instructor or the board shop to get the appropriate size. Paddle length is also very important. You paddle should rise eight to 10 inches above your head when you’re on land. “This ensures that you won’t overextend your reach when paddling or end up with a too-short paddle, causing you to hunch. Both of these scenarios can lead to back problems,” explains Murray. Get On Up (Tips for Starting) Though an instructor will share the best tips and technique for SUPing, if you want to look like a natural when you hit the water, Murray offers these tips: 

Start out on the board on your knees, getting used to the feel of the paddle and how it moves through the water. When you feel comfortable, rise to your feet.

Make sure to keep your feet about shoulder-width apart for your best balance. Do NOT lock your knees!

If you feel a bit unsteady, bend your knees to gain balance or sink down to your knees and just kneel on the board until you feel steady once again.

Party On (SUP Festivals to Attend) Now that you’re a certified SUPer, there are a host of opportunities to take to the water and meet some new friends. SUP festivals are a great way to meet other SUPers and often include bands and other entertainment. Here are a few tried and true mountain SUP festivals to put on your calendar: 

Adirondack SUP Festival in Saranac Lake, NY has SUP racing, SUP yoga and onshore clinics for the entire family

Tahoe Nalu at Kings Beach State Park in Lake Tahoe, CA has live music, Polynesian dancers and sand castle building contests in addition to distance and relay races.

Paddlefest in Buena Vista, CO marks the beginning of paddle (and watersport) season in Colorado with races, movie premieres and a gear swap in addition to the SUPing.


With the abundance of fall produce comes the time to eat that bounty at the top of a mountain…or on a golf course, next to a rushing creek, or right on the shores of Lake Tahoe. There will be several food and wine festivals happening during the last gasp of summer up at the lake, as well as one on the South Shore will include what is known as the Tahoe lobster, the crawfish. The Boil 'n Fry Festival in Stateline takes place on August 24th and will feature the hard-shelled, pinching creatures raised up out of the depths by the Tahoe Lobster Company. For $15 you can gorge on crawfish and local BBQ, play lawn games, cool off in a dunk tank and listen to music from Arden Park Roots and the Infamous Swanks. The Homewood Mountain Resort hosts its second Farm to Peak Dinner Series on August 31. This fivecourse dinner begins with a champagne toast while riding the Quail Chair chairlift up to the top of Homewood Mountain and features local, seasonal cuisine, wine and special guest chef Kellan Hori of Kellan's Kitchen. The dinner is $150 per person and chairlift loading begins at 4 pm. The 28th Annual Autumn Food and Wine Festival at Northstar is held September 6-8. This year's festival includes cooking seminars, competitions, wine tastings and other events like the Bike to the Beach Bash & BBQ, Pedals & Pino, and a live concert with Joe Craven. Some events like the Raw Foods Seminar with Chef Steph are free, but the Take a Hike! trail food tasting and hike is $40. The Resort at Squaw Creek offers their "Nine & Dine" deal throughout the rest of the summer and fall. After a scenic nine holes on the course, golfers can then enjoy a prix fixe three-course dinner in the Six Peaks Grille for only $59 per person.


Take in a deep breath. Take in the sky, the crisp mountain air. Listen to the rhythm of water in the distance, the beating of your heart. Breathe out. Open your eyes. This is Wanderlust. During the four-day Wanderlust Festival, thousands will flock to Squaw Valley at Lake Tahoe for an elevated experience in wellness, yoga, spirituality, music and collective community. Returning to its birthplace for its fifth season, the fest will feature a smorgasbord of activities, including yoga, meditation, dance, hiking, rafting, farm-to-table dining, inspirational speakers and uplifting music by dozens of performers including Moby, DJ Drez, Gramatik and Quixotic. Wanderlust also will open its doors to its first permanent yoga studio at the resort, Wanderlust Yoga Squaw Valley. The studio will embrace Wanderlust’s emphasis on nature by incorporating the outdoors with yoga courses by offering yogis the opportunity to practice on the mountain or to finish with bike rides, hikes, lake swimming or skiing and riding in the winter. Returning every year since its inception, yoga instructor and storyteller Sianna Sherman plans on inspiring participants with her base views of Tantra, a mystical and spiritual practice. She said she wants to share her beliefs on radical self-love and the power of community. “This life is the invitation to our greatness, our bravery and our vulnerability opening into true intimacy,” Sherman said. “I wish for all practitioners to be ignited from within and carry this light home to their families, homes and communities. While yoga and music are a large focus of the festival, nature and food closely are tied to the fest’s philosophy of well-being of the whole individual. Joel Salatin, a third-generation organic farmer whose farm, Polyface Farm, recently was featured in the documentary “Food, Inc.,” said he will discuss the importance of natural food growth, both individually and as a nation. Salatin and Sherman both believe that Wanderlust offers participants the opportunity to change something within themselves for the greater good. Now, close your eyes, bow your head. Place your hands together in front of your heart. And in acknowledgment of one soul to another, say, “Namaste.”


RENO, NV - Here is a list of some of the many celebrations scheduled for the 4th of July in the northern Nevada area. If you'd like us to consider listing another event, please email news@kolotv.com.


Here are fireworks scheduled Thursday for RenoSparks and beyond. Note that times can be flexible, depending on the wind. Sparks: Following the Star-Spangled Sparks event, fireworks will shoot off of John Ascuaga’s Nugget about 9:45 p.m. Reno: The fireworks will go off about 9 p.m. from Wingfield Park, where the Reno Municipal Band will be orchestrating the music for them. Carson City: “Fourth of July Spectacular Fireworks” will be shot over Mills Park following the family carnival after dark. Virginia City: The 25-minutes long Fireworks Spectacular is set in the Comstock hills after dusk. Incline Village/Crystal Bay: Red White and Tahoe Blue events run all day. Fireworks go up after dark at Incline Beach. Tahoe City: Fireworks begin at dusk on Commons Beach in downtown Tahoe City but can be viewed from various locations around the Northwest shore. Fallon’s Picnic in the Park: The parade begins at 10 a.m. and travels through town. The picnic and other festivities start at 10:30 a.m. at the Churchill County Fairgrounds. Fireworks will be shot off at Rattlesnake Raceway about 8:45 or 9 p.m., as soon as it is dark. NO FIREWORKS ALLOWED Although it is legal to purchase fireworks in some locations outside of Washoe County, it is illegal to possess or use fireworks, including sparklers, and or pyrotechnics within Reno and Sparks, the Lake Tahoe Basin and on Bureau of Land Management lands. In addition, campfires are not permitted on National Forest beaches or in the general forest and fire restrictions are in place on public lands managed by BLM, including campfires outside of a developed fee campground or picnic area.


'MURICA!! Doesn't it feel good to say it?!? Yes, ma'am. Well, not only can you scream "'Murica!" all the long holiday weekend long, but you can also see exploding balls of colors paint the sky in your favorite ski town right, white, and 'Murican blue. Unfortunately, the extremely dry and wildfire-prone conditions in Aspen, Telluride, and Crested Butte have shut down the fireworks celebrations there, but there's plenty of shows going down elsewhere in ski country tonight, the 4th, and throughout the weekend.


7/2/2013

*Getaway Radio Show - Call In # 530-544-8255 *9:10 - 9:15 Getaway Radio - Intro Facebook/PMG.com - Hall and Wrye Sponsors *Weekend Wrap-Up _*-Lake Tahoe Reggae Fest -Race The Lake of the Sky -Fire Break Hike under the Gondola *_A Look at Today’s Show - All about 4th of July Events and Fireworks _*-CVVA call-in -RSCVA call-in -North Lake Tahoe Resort Association call-in -Tahoe South call-in _9:17 - 9:23 AJ Frels with Carson Valley Visitors Authority 9:23 - 9:29 Ben McDonald with Reno Sparks Convention & Visitors Authority 00:00 Commercial Break *9:30 - 9:36 Andy Chapman with North Lake Tahoe Resort Association *9:36 - 9:44 Mike Frye with Tahoe South & “Lights on the Lake” 9:44 - 9:45 Close planmygetaway.com Hall and Wrye Sponsors


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umulus clouds dot the sky above as I enjoy an early summer stroll along Reno’s Raymond I. Smith Truckee River Walk. This city’s reputation may be based on neon and nightlife, but there is a more subtle side to the high-desert Northern Nevada metropolis that I love to explore, including a visit to this pleasant walking park that runs along the Truckee River corridor and features galleries, hotels, restaurants and shops. The riverwalk district is one of the hidden gems of this city that is known for its warm hospitality, natural beauty and endless supply of recreational opportunities. For instance, in the spring, you can enjoy a round of golf in Reno and minutes later be swooshing down the ski slopes at a nearby Lake Tahoe area resort, such as Alpine Meadows or Squaw Valley. Four distinct seasons and an average of more than 300 days of sunshine per year make the Reno–Lake Tahoe area an ideal location in which to live, work and play. Long known as “The Biggest Little City in the World,” Reno continues to grow, now boasting a population of about 230,000. The famous moniker, which is depicted in neon lights in an arch By Mikalee Byerman over Virginia Street in Reno’s downtown, accurately describes the city’s unique combination of big-time fun and small-town charm. However, Reno is also changing in a number of ways. Sure, the city center still bustles with activity from hotels and casinos. But reinvention is the new focus for Reno, as the city accentuates its distinctive arts scene, a growing number of excellent restaurants, and abundant outdoor fun, including many family activities.

Enjoying

Reno and Lake Tahoe Attractions abound in this vibrant area

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Nature’s Playground

This iconic neon arch

features the City of Despite its desert location, Reno enjoys Reno's longtime motto. plenty of water activities, with the Truckee River running through the heart of the city. A paddlewheel boat plies the waters of Considering the Truckee’s location in Emerald Bay during a Reno, it’s perhaps no surprise that the river cruise on Lake Tahoe. provides a wonderland for water lovers. The Truckee River Whitewater Park, at downtown Reno’s Wingfield Park, attracts many kayakers during the summer months. My family and I often come here to marvel at the amazing maneuvers and stunts on display at the park’s racing course and 11 pools. Water—1 billion gallons of it, to be precise—is also the main draw at the Sparks Marina, a 77-acre lake in Sparks (Reno’s sister city) that is located about five miles east of Whitewater Park. The lake draws fishing enthusiasts, windsurfers, sailors and swimmers. For those who prefer water hazards to windsurfing, there are dozens of quality golf courses, all within a short drive of Reno. One local favorite is the LakeRidge Golf Course, a championship layout located less than five miles south of Reno’s downtown. Designed by Robert Trent Jones Sr., LakeRidge features water on

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One of my brood’s favorite events is the Artown festival in July. The monthlong celebration is in its 18th year and boasts more than 500 events that include art, dance, music, theater, visual arts and more. The Artown festival takes place in venues all over the city and is the centerpiece of a busy summer season. Another highlight is the Hot August Nights festival, which cruises into town August 6–11. One of the premier classic-car festivals in the world, it draws hundreds of thousands of spectators to watch a parade of mint-condition classic rides, enjoy top entertainers from the 1950s, ’60s and ’70s, and take part in many activities, including a series of classic-car auctions. Rancho San Rafael Regional Park in northern Reno will be the scene of The Great Reno Balloon Race, September 6–8. Nearly 100 hot-air balloons fill the skies and race in various competitions for a total of $12,000 in prizes. The same weekend as the balloon race, historic Virginia City, located 26 miles south of Reno, will be hosting races of a different kind: the International Camel Races. That’s right—camel races. Rookie riders straddle these gangly ungulates and traverse the desert landscape, urged on by cheers and chortles from the audience.

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11 holes and is best known for the par-3 15th hole. Golfers stand on a tee box set atop a rocky ridge 140 feet above a pond and aim at an island green guarded by trees and bunkers. Beyond the events and outdoor activities, Reno is also gaining a reputation as a center for new and innovative restaurants. Favorite locations include the trendy SoDo Restaurant and Bar (creative American cuisine), Fuego (mouthwatering Latin tapas), Crème Cafe (divine crepes) and its sister restaurant Süp (unique soups and sandwiches). Campo is one of the stars of the nouveau-dining landscape. Owned by James Beard “Best Chef in the West” nominee Mark Estee, the restaurant is known for its use of organic produce and ingredients grown by local farms. A great way to take part in the area’s expanding food scene is to attend the weeklong gastronomic celebration Reno Bites, October 21–27. The event will include about 30 of the city’s restaurants and celebrate all things culinary—from food trucks to chef competitions and more.

Nearly 100 colorful west. We drive out of Carson City and and creative hot-air turn west onto Highway 50 to begin the balloons will fill area 16-mile climb to Lake Tahoe, leaving skies during the annual sage-brushed valleys behind and welcom- Great Reno Balloon Race, September 6–8. ing tall-timbered mountains. After one last sweeping highway curve, we see the The 41st-annual Lake majestic lake beyond. Tahoe Shakespeare Festival will perform at “Wow,” my 10-year-old daughter Sand Harbor State Park exclaims from the backseat during a this July and August. recent trip. “It’s absolutely gorgeous.” My family members aren’t the only ones amazed by Lake Tahoe’s splendor. Its unique beauty and sheer scale continue to enchant people from near and far. A few weeks after my family getaway to the lake, I’m sitting on

Tranquil Treasure

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For those interested in venturing outside Reno, one of the area’s most famous attractions is Lake Tahoe, the second-largest alpine lake in the world. This natural wonder also happens to be a favorite destination for our family trips. Leaving Reno, we travel 30 miles south to Carson City, where we visit the silver-domed State Capitol, the depot of the historic Virginia & Truckee Railroad, and even see a group of hang gliders descending from the Sierra Nevada to the 131

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Juneau the back deck of the Lone Eagle Grille at the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort, Spa and Casino on the lake’s North Shore. I’m talking with visitor Lynn Boyd about what attracts her to Lake Tahoe. As we discuss the area, I enjoy the crisp mountain air and the delightful scent of pine on the breeze. The property is tucked into a forested area where all views are aptly oriented toward the lake. “I come here because of this,” says the Dallas, Texas, native as she gestures toward the lake’s blue-green waters that sparkle in the seemingly constant sunshine. “The mountains, the tranquility, the accommodations—this is the ideal vacation spot,” says Boyd, who, along with her husband, Mark, frequently stays at Lake Tahoe. The Texas couple enjoys the many contrasting identities of the lake, which straddles the Nevada-California border. At the north end of the lake—home to quiet, charming communities such as Incline Village that emphasize the spectacular surroundings—the Boyds enjoy picnics, hikes and the local restaurant scene. To the south, which boasts a more vibrant gaming and entertainment atmosphere, they’re regulars at Heavenly Mountain Resort, one of many ski areas offering shopping and year-round attractions. They also enjoy the sunset dinner-and-dance cruises aboard the MS Dixie II, a paddlewheel boat that explores the suitably named verdant waters of Emerald Bay. “There’s so much to do, year-round,” Boyd says. “We’ve been all the way around this lake so many times, I can’t even tell you. And we just keep coming back.”

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Tahoe’s Many Activities As the Boyds have discovered, there are numerous ways to explore this lake. While drivers can follow a scenic roadway that circles the lake, hikers and mountain bikers often choose the 165-mile Tahoe Rim Trail. This spectacular route meanders along peaks and through small canyons, providing frequent soaring, bird’s-eye views of the lake. A less strenuous way to enjoy a breathtaking view of the lake and surrounding area is to ride the gondola up Heavenly

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STAY Atlantis Casino Resort Spa: 3800 S. Virginia St., Reno; 800-723-6500; atlantiscasino.com. Reno’s luxury concierge tower hotel features an award-winning spa. Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort, Spa and Casino: 111 Country Club Drive, Incline Village; 775-832-1234; laketahoe.hyatt.com. Located in northern Lake Tahoe, the resort offers spa services and private cruises. MontBleu Resort Casino & Spa: 55 Highway 50 S., Lake Tahoe; 888-829-7630; montbleuresort.com. Located on Lake Tahoe’s southern shores, the resort is known for offering top entertainment. Peppermill Resort Spa Casino: 2707 S. Virginia St., Reno; 775-826-2121; peppermillreno.com. The downtown resort features the Spa Toscana.

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DINE Bite American Tapas: 907 Tahoe Blvd., Incline Village; 775-831-1000; bitetahoe. com. A popular north Lake Tahoe bistro known for its eclectic menu. Campo: 50 N. Sierra St., Reno; 775-737-9555; camporeno.com. Chef/owner Mark Estee gives Italian-American cuisine a new twist. Charlie Palmer Steak Reno: Located inside the Grand Sierra Resort, 2500 E. Second St., Reno; 800-501-2651; charliepalmer.com. This steak house is known for fine food and an excellent wine list. MacDuff’s Public House: 1041 Fremont Ave., South Lake Tahoe; 530-542-8777; macduffspub.com. A local favorite that features wood-fired pizza. OTHER ATTRACTIONS Triple-A All-Star Baseball: Reno Aces Ballpark, 250 Evans Ave., Reno; 775-3347000; renoaces.com/allstar. See Major League Baseball’s future stars during the 2013 Triple-A All-Star events being held July 13–16, culminating with the all-star game on July 17. Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum: 490 S. Center St., Reno; 775-786-1000; nvdm.org. An interactive museum full of exhibits that will engage children and parents. Wild Island Family Adventure Park: 250 Wild Island Court, Sparks; 775-359-2927; wildisland.com. The adventure park features waterslides, bowling, black-light miniature golf, go-karts and more. —M.B.

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border the lake. One of the area’s best is Edgewood Tahoe Golf Course, a George Fazio design on the southeastern shore. The Edgewood offers a picture-perfect setting, great golf and beautiful lake views. It is also the annual host of the American Century Celebrity Golf Championship, with this year’s tournament taking place July 16–21. Celebrities expected to tee it up at the televised event include Michael Jordan, Michael Phelps and Ray Romano, to name just a few. Other summer events that have become increasingly popular include the Red, White and Tahoe Blue, a weekend-long July Fourth celebration that culminates with a fireworks show over the lake. There is also the Lake Tahoe SummerFest, a three-week festival in August that combines classical music with fine arts and theater productions. One of the most unique arts settings in the area belongs to the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival, where audiences watch the Bard’s plays on an outdoor stage located on the shores of the lake. Now in its 41st year, the acclaimed festival will perform Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream from July 12 to August 25 at Sand Harbor State Park in the North Shore’s Incline Village. From the scenic surroundings of Lake Tahoe, I drive out of the Sierra Nevada and back down to Reno. The beauty of the trip reminds me, once again, how lucky I am to live in this area. From the breathtaking scenery to the exciting special events involving everything from classic cars to camels, there’s something for everyone in the northern Nevada region. Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote, “Life is a journey, not a destination.” In Reno and Lake Tahoe, both the journey and the destination reveal a splendor all their own. Mikalee Byerman is a Reno-based freelance writer.

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Planners can choose from a plethora of attractive options Visit the old Basque country! Cruise the canals of Venice! Climb the Eiffel Tower! Stroll along the Ponte Vecchio bridge! That may sound like a travel brochure for a European vacation, but all these experiences are available in the great state of Nevada. The Silver State will celebrate its 150th year of statehood in 2014, and Gov. Brian Sandoval recently announced a new slogan, "A world within. A state apart," which seeks to capture the state's one-of-a-kind appeal. "The slogan comes close to conveying Nevada's natural, cultural and human resources," explains Chris Moran, public relations specialist for the Nevada Commission on Tourism. "We're a little bit different, but just about everything you might want can be found here. If you're trying to create a fun meeting where people have a lot of options, you can't go wrong with Nevada." The idea of a "world within" seems fitting for Nevada, as the state's modern history was forged by a confluence of settlers from Europe, Asia and Latin America.Nevada now has a sizable Basque population, particularly in the northern part of the state; many residents in Douglas, Mineral and Pershing counties are of Mexican ancestry; Washoe County has many Irish Americans; Americans of English descent form pluralities in Churchill, Eureka, Lincoln, Lyon and White Pine counties; and Germans form a majority in Humboldt County. Las Vegas is home to rapid-growing ethnic communities such as Scandinavians, Italians, Poles, Spaniards, Greeks and Armenians. Largely African American neighborhoods now are found in Las Vegas and Reno. Las Vegas also has one of America's most prolific Asian American communities, and has a Chinatown area consisting mostly of Chinese and Taiwanese residents. During the past 20 years, many immigrants from South Asia and Latin America came to Las Vegas seeking employment in the gaming and hospitality industries, but farming and construction are the city's biggest employers of immigrant labor. While Nevada has quite an ethnic diversity, over the past two decades, the state has become worldly in another way—by transforming from a kitschy gambling mecca into a vibrant, busy hub for worldclass restaurants and hotels.


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For meeting and convention planners, Nevada is a practical choice because it has a mystique and accessibility that few other states can match. Just ask Deborah Washington, convention chair for the International Perfume Bottle Association, a group of collectors from around the world. For her latest meeting in Las Vegas, about 20 percent of her attendees came from other countries—more than usual, Washington says, thanks to a high number of direct flights from Europe. "The fact that this event was in Las Vegas was obviously a reason a lot of people came," she says. "The international visitors loved getting to go to places like Hoover Dam, and going to shows by Elton John and David Copperfield. These are people they've heard about, and they can actually see them here." It's no accident that there are so many international flights to Las Vegas. "Global is the growth area for us, so we keep stimulating the attraction of Las Vegas by the branding we do around the world," says Chris Meyer, CEM, CMP and vice president of sales for the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority (LVCVA). "We have offices in 13 countries, and our in-house staff speaks a total of 36 languages.We keep meeting with airline partners to increase our international lift as a destination, to make it as easy as possible for people to travel one-stop or nonstop to Las Vegas." Nevada offers all sorts of options and attractions, from the peaks around Lake Tahoe to the pool parties along the Las Vegas Strip, not to mention plenty of ghost towns, dude ranches, nightclubs, ski slopes and other highlights in between. The following is an overview of some of the options available for all groups, foreign and domestic.

RENO While it isn't on the same massive scale as Las Vegas, Reno has evolved into a thriving city in its own right. It is relatively affordable, not to mention accessible by car from the San Francisco Bay Area—and just a half-hour drive from the base of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. "People often don't understand that we are a four-season resort destination," says John Leinen, vice president of convention and tourism sales for the Reno-Sparks Convention and Visitors Authority (RSCVA). "People look at us as a small Las Vegas, and don't realize we are sitting in the high desert in the Sierra Nevadas. You can ski at any of our 18 ski resorts or golf at any of our 50 courses, and you can see concerts by performers such as The Who, Elton John and Maroon 5, all in one day."


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Reno offers several features not found in Las Vegas, including Truckee River Whitewater Park, a white-water rafting and kayaking center in the heart of downtown. The city is also home to the world's tallest outdoor climbing wall (164 feet), which is the centerpiece of a new hotel. The stylish Whitney Peak Hotel has more than 200 guest rooms, an 800-plus capacity concert venue called Cargo, and meeting and banquet facilities. A meeting in Reno could include an outing to a Reno Aces AAA baseball game or an evening reception at the Nevada Museum of Art. For outdoor activities, "within a day you can go fly fishing, whitewater rafting and mountain climbing," Leinen says."Other options are horseback riding, golfing, hot-air ballooning and helicopter rides. You can arrange a trip to Lake Tahoe and ride on the MS Dixie. You can go on adventurous excursions just a half-hour from downtown. The cool thing is that we've got such a wide variety." Reno-Tahoe properties have invested more than $500 million in recent years, much of that going to meetings and room infrastructure at properties including Grand Sierra Resort, Peppermill Resort Spa Casino and Atlantis Casino Resort Spa. "Our products are really in excellent shape and there have been some great investments through challenging times," Leinen says. "We have nine hotels with between 800 and 2,000 guest rooms." The RSCVA manages an array of facilities that can be used for events, including the Reno-Sparks Convention Center, Reno Events Center, Reno- Sparks Livestock Events Center, Wildcreek Golf Course and National Bowling Stadium, the "Taj Mahal of Tenpins." And some of the bestknown restaurants in the city carry on the heritage of the earliest European settlers, including Louis' Basque Corner, a stalwart establishment where the servers wear authentic Basque costumes. Diners, seated family-style at long tables, feast on dishes such as oxtail and tripe while drinking picon punch, a Basque specialty. For a higher-end option, there's Campo, which features organic, local and seasonal ingredients and recently was dubbed one of the best new restaurants in America by Esquire. In case you need another incentive, the RSCVA has an offer called "Good Value/Good Values."Qualified planners who submit an RFP, book a nocost site inspection or book a meeting in the destination receive a donation in their group's name to the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation, ASPCA or American Red Cross, with values ranging from $50-$1,000.

LAKE TAHOE In 2012, USA Today readers voted Lake Tahoe "America's Best Lake." It's easy to see why: Located about 60 miles southwest of Reno, it is North America's largest alpine lake and is surrounded by snowcapped peaks. The lake's shores are accessible for gatherings of all kinds, from a conference in a hotel-casino to a winter board meeting or summer team-building retreat.


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The hotels around Lake Tahoe are centered in two primary areas, commonly referred to as North Tahoe and South Tahoe. The north shore includes Incline Village/Crystal Bay and is located only about 30 minutes from Reno. The south shore (centered around the town of Stateline, home to the largest casino hotels) is located about 90 minutes away, on the other end of the lake. Both towns straddle the state border between Nevada and California; most hotels and all casinos are on the Nevada side. Hotel options run the gamut, from the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort, Spa and Casino in Incline Village, an elegant property with more than 50,000 sq. ft. Of meeting space, to Harrah's Lake Tahoe in Stateline, an 18-story hotel tower that welcomes performers such as Vanilla Ice and Jefferson Starship. Around the lake are some unique properties open to groups, including Thunderbird Lodge, a historic estate with more than 3,000 sq. ft. Of meeting space.You can also arrange team building through resources including Tahoe Adventure Learning Institute, which offers training, consulting and outdoor adventures such as ropes courses. Tahoe is a world-class destination for skiing, snowboarding, snowmobiling, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing, so if you are planning a winter meeting, be sure to carve out time for people to hit the slopes and ask ski area employees about discounts on lift tickets.


Lastly,compete in the people’s choice Patriotic Costume Contest 5:30-6 p.m. for a prizes donated by North Lake Massage & Skin Care, Sierra Shirts & Shades and other prizes in men, women, and children categories. Register at the Beach Party venue from 2-5 p.m. For more information or to volunteer visit www.NorthTahoeBusiness.org or call 530-546-9000. Cakes on the Lake, July 4 On July 4, 8-10:30 a.m. the Boys & Girls Club of North Lake Tahoe will serve pancakes, sausage, and strawberries on the deck of the North Tahoe Event Center in Kings Beach. This spectacular venue overlooking Lake Tahoe will only be topped by the pancake breakfast. The kids will be there to help. Proceeds support the more than 1,000 young people who attend the Club each year. Meet family, friends, tourists, and enjoy this special annual event which has been happening for more than 20 years! Truckee Fourth of July Parade The quintessential display of small town Americana. This festive and fun-filled event is always a favorite and a true Truckee tradition. Some popular parade entries will include the Sierra Highlanders bagpipe band, and the Truckee River Drill Team ready to showcase their “precision” work complete with vintage skis and their uniforms of Sorels, Hawaiian shirts, and zinc oxide. Truckee’s July 4 parade begins at 10 a.m. at the Tahoe Truckee Unified School District parking lot at the west end of town, and progresses down Donner Pass Road into historic Truckee, ending around noon. This year’s parade theme is Celebrating Truckee’s 150 Years Since Establishment and 20 Years of Incorporation. Grand Marshals this year are Ruth Geresy and Mike Horn. Both were named Citizens of the Year in January by Interclub, comprised of numerous area service organizations including the Sunrise Rotary Club, Rotary Club of Truckee, Soroptimist International of Truckee Donner, Truckee Optimist, and the Truckee Lions. Among many accomplishments, Ruth was recognized for being the guiding force to creating The Relay for Life of Truckee-Tahoe six years ago, and Mike has been instrumental in the annual wood cutting project that benefits seniors every winter. The Parade is produced by the Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce in partnership with the Town of Truckee. Judges this year are Truckee Mayor Carolyn Dee, Chamber Chair of the Board Robb Etnyre and his wife Karen, and Chelsea Walterscheid, the Chamber’s 2012 Volunteer of the Year. Returning as Master of Ceremonies is the always popular Jim Simon. The Chamber is thankful to the many community businesses, organizations and individuals that are supporting this year’s parade through a sponsorship. Contact the Truckee Donner Chamber of Commerce at 530-587-8808 or e-mail info@truckee.com. Fireworks in Tahoe City Thursday July 4, 67th Annual Fourth of July fireworks show in downtown Tahoe City off Commons Beach. This annual event is supported entirely by the community and fundraising efforts of the Tahoe City Downtown Association. For questions, information or for those wishing to make a donation e-mail: info@visittahoecity.com or call 530-583-3348. Meeks Bay pancake breakfast The Meeks Bay Volunteer Firefighters Association will hold its 45th Annual Pancake Breakfast on Saturday and Sunday, July 6 and 7. This popular fundraising event has been called “the best of its kind”


TAHOE/TRUCKEE, Calif. — The Fourth of July Festivities abound in North Lake Tahoe and Truckee. Find following a few highlights, for more listings visit www.gotahoenorth.com, www.NorthTahoeBusiness.org, www.visittahoecity.org, www.truckee.com, and www.redwhitetahoeblue.org. Take part in Tahoe Maritime Museum Boat Parade Last year Tahoe Maritime Museum celebrated the Fourth of July with you on the lake in the Museum’s first July 4 Boat Parade. They are doing it again and want you to be part of the fun. Call or email Christine at 530-525-9253, ext. 104 or christine@tahoemaritime.org. Meet in front of Commons Beach in Tahoe City (don’t go in too close, it is shallow), just west of the Tahoe City Marina at 11:45 a.m. The parade will start at noon and cruise down the west shore, ending in front of Obexer’s Marina. When you arrive in front of Commons beach (near the buoy field) look out for Stardust, the museum’s ride boat and she will lead the parade down the west shore ending in the waters near Obexer’s Marina. If you are on the beach look out for the line of museum and member boats and wave hello! Fun Contests and Cool Prizes at Fireworks & Beach Party The North Tahoe Business Association will host the July 3 Fireworks & Beach Party with activities starting at 2 p.m. at North Tahoe Event Center in Kings Beach. Fireworks will burst over the Kings Beach State Recreation Area at 9:30 p.m. Throughout the day, as a fireworks fundraiser, the Beach Party will feature DJ “Chango,” live music by One Track Mind, a beer garden, food vendors, a dunk tank, face painting, balloon artist, and Big Top Tahoe performances. No ticket is needed. There are also three fun contests planned; sand castle building, watermelon eating and patriotic costume contests. Participants are needed for all three contests. The Sand Castle Contest will take place from 2-5:30 p.m. with teams of up to four people each competing for prizes. The winning team will be selected at 6 p.m. and announced at 7:30 p.m. and will receive lunch for four at The Grid Bar & Grill and paddleboard rentals from Tahoe Paddle and Oar and Adrift Tahoe. Produce Plus will sponsor a Watermelon Eating Contest 4:30-5 p.m. Participants will race to eat a quarter of a watermelon with no hands! Register from 2-4 p.m. at the Beach Party venue; limited to the first 10 contestants per age group. Prizes donated by Tahoe Mountain Sports and Olympic Bike Shop.


in the area, and draws repeat visitors year after year. Proceeds from the breakfast benefit the Volunteer Firefighters Association that donates much-needed equipment to the Meeks Bay Fire Protection District. Breakfast will be served from 8 a.m. to noon on the holiday weekend and will include pancakes, famous Meeks Bay Fire jumbo sausages, applesauce, milk, coffee, orange juice, and plenty of butter and maple syrup to make the meal complete! Meeks Bay T-shirts, sweats, aprons, and other logo items will be available for purchase as well as the best selling Meeks Bay Fire Ladies Auxiliary Cook Book. “Fire Chief” helmets will be available for the “little chiefs” visiting the station. Breakfast is $9 for adults (over 12 years), $6 for children (6-11 years), and free for little ones under 5 years. Meet the firefighters, get information on defensible space and home safety, and see the fire engines and apparatus. All will be on display for inspection by “children” of all ages, so bring the whole family to the popular West Shore summer family event. Meeks Bay Fire Station #61 is located on Highway 89 in Meeks Bay. Truckee Tahoe AirFair & Family Festival Saturday July 6, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Truckee Tahoe Airport. Young adventure sports enthusiasts from Pemberton Aerosports will highlight Melissa Pemberton, 28, in an Edge540 Aircraft and husband Rex flying his wing suit during the opening ceremony. The event is free to the public and so is parking. Bounce house and face painting, live music, kids’ activities, food court and beer garden. Rich Perkins will show off his L39 Albatros jet called The Firecat; Eddie Andreinin will fly his one-of-akind, completely restored 1944 Stearman biplane, and the Red Star Formation Flying Team will soar in YAK 52s. Triple Ace World War II Fighter Pilot Clarence “Bud” Anderson will be the AirFair’s Grand Marshal and featured speaker. Visit www.truckeetahoeairfair.com.


Lake Tahoe, Nev. When/where: Lake Tahoe has several shows with "Lights on the Lake," the largest taking place in Tahoe South, Calif., on July 4, beginning at 9:45 p.m. How much does the display cost? Undisclosed. How long will it last? 25 minutes What makes it one of the coolest shows in the nation? Watching the fireworks burst and then dance onto the water while illuminating the sky, combined with the hip nightlife scene, outdoor recreation playground, cool summer breeze, and backdrop of the Sierra as the sun sets makes it one of the most memorable and must-see events in the West.


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Hot enough for you? It’s been my experience that when temperatures rise, everyone in the house gets a little crankier. With temperatures topping 100 degrees, here are 10 ways to keep the family cool this weekend and beyond: 1. Lake Tahoe: This one’s a no-brainer, so we’ll put it first. When it’s hot here, it’s 10 degrees or so cooler at the lake. This makes it a good time to hit Sand Harbor or Kings Beach. Expect slow-moving traffic, particularly so close to the July 4 holiday. If the beaches are crowded, head over to Emerald Bay and Vikingsholm Castle off Highway 89; it’s a shaded and pleasant hike down to the castle, and there are plenty of resting spots. In addition, you’ll find shade at the Tallac Historic Site, which includes the Baldwin Estate, the Pope Estate and Valhalla. The site is at Heritage Way and Highway 89 in South Lake Tahoe. Also, Sugar Pine Point State Park is holding an inaugural Community Fitness Day with a 10K walk or 1.5K kayak event beginning between 8 a.m. and noon Saturday; find out more at www.sierrastateparks.org. 2. Water parks: The Lazy 5 Water Play Park, Wild Island and the Carson Valley Swim Center all offer some cooling-off time. Wild Island is open 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. The Gaspari Water Play Park at Lazy 5 Regional Park, ideal for younger kids, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Sunday; closed Mondays and


Tuesdays. The Carson Valley Swim Center, 1600 Highway 88 in Minden, www.cvswim.com, is worth the drive. The center includes indoor pools, diving boards, water slides and an indoor activity pool. 3. Museums: The Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum and the Nevada Museum of Art are airconditioned, so your kids can learn a little something while cooling off. This week is Rocket Week at the Discovery; starting Monday, it’s Chicken Week — yes, with live chickens in a coop in the atrium. At the Nevada Museum of Art, “Voces y Visiones” runs through July 7. 4. Libraries: “Dig Into Reading,” the summer reading program where kids can earn prizes, runs through Aug. 31. But there’s more than books at Washoe County libraries. For instance, the Anime Film Festival kicks off at 2 p.m. Saturday at the South Valleys library, featuring the PG film, “Castle in the Sky.” 5. Truckee River: The river offers a place to get your feet wet and cool off. The kids can play safely — wearing life vests and with adult supervision — in certain parts of the river, such as the eddy northeast of the kayak park downtown. Be aware that the river can be dangerous and proper precautions should be taken. 6. Movies: “Monsters University” and “World War Z” started last week, and they’re still available this weekend along with “Man of Steel.” Also check the schedule at the Grand Sierra Cinema for $3 movies. 7. Be active indoors:Just because the kids are indoors doesn’t mean they need to be sitting around. Pump it Up, Jump Man Jump, EZ Air, Roller Kingdom and RockSport all are air-conditioned. Pump it Up has added open bounce sessions this weekend. RockSport has kids climbs on Saturday and Sunday. Roller Kingdom offers Morning Zoo for little kids. Call or check websites for times and costs. 8. Truckee and Donner: Head for the hills to cool off. Tahoe Donner Equestrian Center offers riding, plus there’s hiking on Donner Summit and swimming at Donner Memorial State Park. While you’re at the state park, visit the Emigrant Trail Museum to learn about the history of the area and the people who came into this part of the Sierra. 9. Reservoirs: Boca and Stampede reservoirs offer nearby places to play along the beach and in the water. The beaches are a little rocky for sun-bathing, but it’s doable. You’ll see signs just before hitting Truckee. 10. Hike up: This is the weekend for Mount Rose, the Tahoe Rim Trail, Spooner Summit or Donner Summit, or anywhere else you can hike out of the heat.


There's something special about watching Fourth of July fireworks over the water and mountains of Lake Tahoe. However, the lake on Independence Day can become a zoo of both boats and cars, so if you want to get to the lake for the weekend, here are the beaches where the fireworks are going to be. Pick your beach early and enjoy the explosions from a prime spot. Be sure to bring your own low chair and blanket and warm clothing for after dark. Kings Beach Start the celebration early on July 3rd with a beach party and fireworks at the Kings Beach State Recreation Area on the North Shore. From 2 to 10 pm the beach will be home to live music, food, a beer garden and dunk tank, a watermelon eating contest and a sand castle building contest, and a patriotic costume contest. The fireworks will start at 9:30 pm. South Shore The largest and most popular event, Star Spangled Fourth – Lights on the Lake, was recently recognized


by NBC's Today show as one of the country's top Fourth of July celebrations. The American Pyrotechnics Association rates South Shore’s celebration of fire and light one of the top five displays in the nation. This year's show is scheduled for 9:45 and can viewed from several places around the lake: Nevada Beach, Lakeview Commons/El Dorado Beach, Timber Cove Marina, Bijou Community Park, the Tallac Historic Site and the beach in front of the Edgewood-Tahoe golf course. Incline Village On the 4th, the sky will be lit up with the Best Fireworks in the Country, sponsored by the Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe Resort, Spa and Casino and part of the Red, White & Tahoe Blue event. The show will launch from Incline Beach at around 9:30 pm. which will open to the public at 8 pm. The fireworks will be presented by Ken Lantis and his magnificent Lantis Fireworks crew. The event is free, but donations for future shows are encouraged. Tahoe City Tahoe City will fire off fireworks from Commons Beach on the 4th at around 9 pm during their 66th Annual Independence Day Celebration. Tahoe City is also accepting donations for their community fireworks show. Truckee Truckee's celebration starts at 10 am on the 4th with a historic Fourth of July parade that marches down Donner Pass Road into downtown. The fireworks will be at Donner Lake's West End Beach at 9 pm.


Independence Day is right around the corner and there are tons of events going on! To make things easier, Getaway Reno/Tahoe has complied a list of events around all of Reno/Tahoe including North Lake Tahoe, South Lake Tahoe, Carson Valley, Carson City, Reno, Sparks and Virginia City. We’ve highlighted the Fireworks around the area and top holiday events that continue into the weekend. Enjoy and Happy 4th of July! If you find this helpful, share it with your friends! North Lake Tahoe and Incline Village Fireworks Three different Firework displays will kick off this year’s Independence Day Celebration in North Lake Tahoe and Incline Village. Fireworks and Party in King’s Beach July 3rd 2:00pm – till close Start with a beach party at 2:00pm at the North Tahoe Event Center deck. Enjoy DJ’s, live music, food, beer garden and vendors. The fireworks display will begin at 9:30pm. Red, White and Tahoe Blue in Incline Village July 4th Events ALL DAY Get ready to enjoy 28 different events in Incline Village & Crystal Bay to include parades, concerts, veterans tribute, Wine & Cheese, Beer & Brats, Community Fair and more. Fireworks display begins around 9:30pm. Incline Beach is a great viewing spot. For detailed event info visit: redwhiteandblue.org Fireworks at Tahoe City at Commons Beach July 4th around 8:30pm Arrive early to get a great spot on Commons Beach. Bring a blanket and picnic to enjoy a great fireworks show that begins at dusk on Commons Beach. Holiday Weekend Activities: 4th of July Boat Parade, West Shore July 4th at 12:00pm Watch the Tahoe boat parade, led by boats from Tahoe’s Maritime Museum collection and it’s members. Leave at Commons Beach and cruises to the West shore to Obexer’s Marina, Homewood. Beerfest and Bluegrass Festival at Northstar California July 6th 3:00pm – 7:00pm


Visit the Village at Northstar for this great festival, featuring live music, over 30 local breweries, children’s events and more. Made in Tahoe Festival at Squaw Valley July 4th – July 6th 2:00pm – 8:00pm Celebrate local music, art and culture, including local vendors from around the area. Check out the kid zone with a climbing wall, slack lines, paintball and more. For more information about North Lake Tahoe Events – visit gotahoenorth.com Reno, Sparks and Virginia City Star Spangled Sparks at Sparks Marina Park Thursday, July 4th 6:00am – 3:00pm The region’s longest firework display are set off from the roof of John Ascuaga’s Nugget while spectators celebrate on Victorian Square below. Enjoy live entertainment for the whole family, kid’s area and food vendors. Virginia City’s Fourth of July Celebration Thursday, July 4th 9:00am – 10:00pm Don’t miss Virginia City’s 25 minute firework show starting at dusk. Earlier in the day you can catch the 4th of July Parade, “Red, White & You” Wine Walk, and the Second Amendment Celebration Concert. Holiday Weekend Activities: Biggest Little City Wing Fest at Silver Legacy Resort Casino July 4th – July 6th All Day Events Taste the “Best Wings in the West” with live music all weekend long. Competitors are competing for cash prizes too. Laugh watching an amateur wing-eating contest and shop local vendors. For more info visit silverlegacyreno.com Artown – Whitney Myer – Rollin’ On The River at Wingfield Park Friday, July 5th 5:30pm – 8:30pm The entire month of July is dedicated to the arts and music brought to you by Artown. This 4th of July Weekend, enjoy Free live music events all weekend long. Don’t miss Local Celebrity, Whitney Myer, performing live at Wingfield Park. For more info about Artown events visit renoisartown.com For more information about events happening in Reno, Sparks & Virginia City go to visitrenotahoe.com South Lake Tahoe Fireworks & Holiday Events Lights on The Lake – 4th of July Fireworks Extravaganza – this is considered to be the largest fireworks display on the West. Enjoy the Sierra Nevada Mountains as a beautiful backdrop to the 25-minute display choreographed show to hit songs by artists including Dave Matthews Band, Fun, Toby Keith, Steve Miller and more. Find fun firework shapes this year; jellyfish, stars, butterflies and smiley faces. Show begins at 9:45pm Best viewing spots: El Dorado Beach, Nevada Beach, Timber Cove Marina, Bijou Community Park, Edgewood Tahoe. M.S. Dixie & Tahoe Queen cruises are sold out but they are offering tickets aboard the Tahoe Paradise call – 1-800-23-TAHOE for reservations. Holiday Weekend Activities: Rolling Chrome/Tahoe Thunder Car Show at Heavenly Village July 4th – 7th – Events All Day A Classic car and hot rod show the entire family to enjoy. It’s Free and located in Heavenly Village Heavenly Village FREE Summer Concert Series at Heavenly Village July 5th 2:00pm – 9:00pm Rock to summer holiday jams from Connor Bors and Groovebox.


The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) at Valhalla Art, Music and Theatre Festival July 5th – 7th Begins at 7:30pm In 97 minutes guests will be exposed to all 37 of Shakespeare’s plays by 3 actors. This will be fun, witty and fast-paced. valhallatahoe.com The Wayans Brothers – Shawn and Marlon at MontBleu Theater July 6th Doors 8:00pm. Get ready for a long night of laughs as these comical siblings take the stage at MontBleu. DJ Pauly D Celebrates his Birthday at PEEK Nightclub at Harrah’s Tahoe July 5th 10:30pm The Jersey Shore star, Pauly D, returns to party in Lake Tahoe for his Birthday Celebration at Peek Nightclub. The Fab Four at Harrah’s South Shore Room July 6th 7:30pm This Beatles Tribute Band will rock the house and bring back memories. They’re considered to be “The Best Beatles Show in The World.” For more information about events and shows in Tahoe South visit tahoesouth.com Carson City and Carson Valley Freedom 5K Fun Run/Walk and Yankee Doodle Chalk Artfest at Heritage Park July 4th 7:00am – 12:00pm Town of Gardnerville and Main Street Gardnerville are putting on this years celebration! Come dressed in your best patriotic colors and enjoy a walk/run around the area. Carson Valley Arts Council & East Fork Gallery have put together a fun event too. Watch as people draw, enjoy local vendors and kids 12 and under can visit the “Family Chalk Doodle Fun Zone.” Carson Valley Lions Club is cooking up a delicious “Pancake Breakfast” so come hungry and eat breakfast there! For more info visit mainstreetgardnerville.org Family Night at the Carnival and Fireworks Spectacular in Carson City July 3rd – 4th 5:00pm – 10:00pm Enjoy a family night at the Carnival starting at 5:00pm until 10:00pm on July 3rd at Mills Park. All rides are only $1. The fun doesn’t stop there, on Independence Day at Mills Park, enjoy a fireworks show set to music set to start around dusk. Tune-in to Magic 95.5. For more info call 775-687-4680. Holiday Weekend Activities: Movies in The Park at Heritage Park July 5th Start time around 8:30pm Pack a picnic and blanket and get ready for a movie in the park. All movies are family friendly. Show starts at dusk. For more info call 775-782-8027 Ribmaster Rumble at Carson Station Hotel Casino July 5th 12:00pm – 9:00pm and July 6th 10:00am – 8:00pm Time for the 2nd Annual Rib Cook Off. Save your appetite for rib cookers, vendors, live music outside, rib eating contest, kids watermelon eating contest and more. For more info call 775-883-0900 Genoa Bar’s Summer Music Series and Sweet Sippin’ Sunday July 7th 1:00pm – 4:00pm Does it get any better than live music and sippin’ on something sweet on a Sunday? Don’t miss this anticipated monthly event to celebrate Independence Day. For details visit their Facebook Page Genoa’s Sweet Sippin Sundays For more information about Carson Valley visit visitcarsonvalley.org and for Carson City go to visitcarsoncity.com


Welcome to the first-ever edition of Curbed Ski's Hotel 38 map, your answer to the question, "Where should I stay in ski country?" We've curated the top ski town hotels from East to West, from Stowe to Tahoe, and all the way North to Whistler. While largely of the luxurious nature, we've also made sure to include a range, from classic top-notch hotels like the Four Seasons, The Arrabelle at Vail Square, and The Little Nell, to boutiques like the Lumiere and Dunton Hot Springs to B&B's like the Glacier Wall Inn and Vermont's Pitchen Inn that are loaded with personality. Keep in mind that the order follows not from best to worst, but simply from East to West.


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INCLINE VILLAGE, Nev. — Content for the weekly community briefs section is selected from e-mail submissions to editor@tahoebonanza.com. Please include the 5w’s: who, what, when, where and why, website and contact information. Bowl Incline to celebrate 25th Bowl Incline will celebrate their 25th anniversary under current management on Saturday, June 22, beginning at noon. The celebration will consist of drink and bowling specials, live music with local favorite band Jacked Up and a complimentary barbecue by Brimm’s Catering. The Waldman/Wegener families greatly appreciate the support of the Tahoe community, and their long-time, loyal employees and would like to say “thank you.” Bowl Incline opened for business in October, 1965 as Tahoe Forest Bowl. Incline Village General Improvement District later purchased the facility and changed the name to Bowl Incline. The late Sam Waldman and his wife Lorri purchased Bowl Incline in June of 1988. Their son David managed the center until 1998. The center is currently owned and operated by Sam and Lorri’s daughter Mindy and her husband Curt Wegener. Curt and Mindy moved to Incline Village and became involved with the family business in June, 1992. Vote for Most Beautiful Drive in America Known to many as the “Most Beautiful Drive in America,” Lake Tahoe’s East Shore drive is in the running to be a featured location in Season Two of the American Detours web series. For the rest of this month voters will determine where the American Detours crew will be headed next. One voter will even win a $2,500 gift card. To cast your vote visit the American Collectors Insurance Facebook page at www.facebook.com/americancollectors. Voting ends July 1, 2013 at 11:59 a.m., EST. Toccata’s Summer Solstice Serenade Tahoe Symphony Orchestra and Chorus will kick off its 8th Summer MusicFest with “TOCCATA-Summer Solstice Serenade” concert series June 20-25. The program opens with Vivaldi’s seldom performed Concerto for Two Horns in F major, RV 538, with Bruce Kanzelmeyer and Lori Roy as soloists, and continues with guest flutist Josue Casillas performing CPE Bach’s Concerto in D minor. Organist David Brock will interpret Josef Reinberger’s Concerto for Organ in F major, and performs as continuo player for J.S. Bach’s Cantata BWV 82 Ich habe genung, featuring tenor Daniel Paulson. Maestro James Rawie will conduct all performances. The performances are Thursday June 20, 7 p.m. at St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church, 341 Village Blvd., Incline Village; Friday, June 21, 7 p.m. at Trinity Church, 200 Island Ave., Reno and Tuesday, June 25, 7 p.m., St. Theresa Church, 1041 Lyons Ave., South Lake Tahoe.


Tickets are available at the door or www.ToccataTahoe.com. General admission is $25 adults, $20 seniors, $5 students aged 19 to 23 with valid ID. Preferred seating is $35 and $15 for youth/students. Youth under 19 years of age are admitted free, in non-reserved seating, to most regular season concerts in 2013. All performances are supported by the Kling Family Foundation. TOCCATA’s 8th Season Summer MusicFest continues with the celebration of TOCCATA’s 8th Anniversary, July 7-14 featuring Mozart’s Coronation Mass, Saint-Saens Piano Concerto #2 and Beethoven’s 8th Symphony. For more information or preferred seating, email ToccataTahoe@gmail.com, call 775-3139697, or visit www.ToccataTahoe.com. Incline Village Library News Display cases: Tahoe Rim Trail. Online Resource of the Month is Rocket Languages: Language learning online with your library card. Rocket Languages is an award-wining, interactive, and comprehensive language learning system. Interactive online and downloadable lessons, games, and more. Complete language learning programs for 10 languages as well as ESL. Through Aug. 31, 2013 Summer Reading Program. “Dig Into Reading” for younger children, “Beneath the Surface” for teens, and “Groundbreaking Reads” for adults. Sign up at any public library. Readers keep track of their reading and earn rewards. There will also be programs for kids and families. All programs are free of charge. June 20, 4-5 p.m. The Great Sparacino: Magic by Bill. Be captivated by Bill “The Great Sparacino,” blending sleight of hand, comedy and music. June 22 and 29, noon-1 p.m. E-book Cafe. Bring your mobile devices (smart phone, e-reader or tablet) and receive hands-on assistance to download audio and e-books. June 21, 2-4 p.m. Lifescapes. Writing program where seniors are given an opportunity to write and share their memories. New members welcome. Lifescapes is a project sponsored by the Washoe County Library System (WCLS), Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), and the Dept. of English, UNR. June 26, 4-4:45 p.m. Story Time. Children of all ages are welcome at story time for stories, songs, games, and crafts. June 27, 1-2 p.m. Young scientists practice chemistry and physics. Target audience: Ages 8-12, limited to 28 participants. June 30, 4-5 p.m. Sustainable Tahoe: The 8 Worlds of Tahoe. Join Jacquie Chandler, executive director of Sustainable Tahoe, for an overview of the Tahoe Expo. The 2013 Tahoe Expo will take place on Sept. 7 and 8. Visit www.washoecountylibrary.us. Incline Village Library, 845 Alder Ave., Incline Village, 775-832-4130. Parasol Open House Parasol Tahoe Community Foundation invites the community to celebrate 17 years of community on Thursday, June 20, 4:30-7 p.m. at the Donald W. Reynolds Community Non-Profit Center. Hors d’oeuvres, ice cream by Susie Scoops and refreshments will be served during the Open House. They will honor Community Fund Grant recipients, the Philanthropist of the Year and Agency of the Year. Award presentations and raffle will begin at 6 p.m. For more information contact Jean Eick, communications manager at jeane@parasol.org or call 775-298-0184. Library Patrons, Partner for a Periodical Have a favorite hobby? Love to read about exotic destinations? The Washoe County Library offers an annual opportunity for the public to make sure popular and favorite periodicals are available. Patrons can partner with the library by “adopting” a periodical — paying for a one-year subscription. The “Adopt a Periodical” drive start runs through Aug. 11, 2013. Visit your neighborhood library and ask to see a list of magazine titles. Make your selection, fill out a gift form and write a check. The “sponsored” magazines will begin arriving at the library by January 2014. Donations are tax-deductible. Magazine subscriptions cost as little as $15 per year and cover a wide range of subjects – everything from Brides, Cat Fancy, Field & Stream and Ladies Home Journal to National Geographic, Nickelodeon, Skiing and Seventeen. Donors wishing to contribute larger amounts may choose to underwrite a business


publication such as Value Line or Barron’s National Business and Financial Weekly. Specific needs vary by branch. For further information please ask at your local library, call 775-327-8338 or email chillyard@washoecounty.us. UC Davis Tahoe Docent Training Do you enjoy science, learning new information, and sharing your knowledge? Would you like to become a local expert on research taking place at Lake Tahoe? Attend the UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center’s 2013 Docent Training. Community volunteers are needed to give tours at education centers in Incline Village and Tahoe City. Free training prepares volunteer docents for the Education Team. Snacks will be provided at each session. Copy of the UC Davis Docent Training Manual provided. No prior experience is necessary. The third training on July 9, starts with a boat ride aboard the UC Davis Research Vessel John LeConte, finishing at the UC Davis Tahoe City Field Station. Space aboard the boat is limited and will be available on a first-come basis. Attendance at all three training sessions is strongly recommended. RSVP for the training at 775-881-7566 or e-mail antoy@ucdavis.edu. North Lake Tahoe Fourth of July Celebration Catch any of three lakeside fireworks displays at Kings Beach (July 3), Incline Village (July 4), or Tahoe City (July 4) by night. For a full list of events, go towww.gotahoenorth.com. Fireworks and Party in Kings Beach, July 3. Kick the afternoon off with a beach party starting at 2 p.m. at the North Tahoe Event Center deck that includes a DJ, live music, food, beer garden and vendors. Then, at approximately 9:30 p.m. the skies light up with a dazzling fireworks display over Lake Tahoe. The fireworks are free to the public. Red White and Tahoe Blue. Incline Village’s Independence Day festival since 2007, Red, White and Tahoe Blue has 28 events in Incline Village and Crystal Bay, including a parade and concerts and one of the nation’s best fireworks displays July 4 at Incline Beach. Fireworks at Tahoe City, July 4. Fireworks begin at dusk on Commons Beach in downtown Tahoe City, but can be viewed from various locations around the Northwest shore. Arrive early to picnic. Fourth of July Boat Parade, West Shore, July 4. Join the parade of Tahoe Maritime Museum members’ boats, led by boats from the museum’s collection, leaving Commons Beach at noon on a cruise down the West Shore to Obexer’s Marina, Homewood. Guitar Is A Many Flavored Thing The Seventh International Sierra Nevada Guitar Festival and Competition gears up to bring a five-day full immersion in the art of the guitar at Lake Tahoe, July 10-14. Festival attendees will have the opportunity to listen to an array of guitar music styles ranging from classical to contemporary, Gypsy jazz and Cuban, performed and taught by local and international virtuosos, including Exaudi Duo, Mobius Trio, Gonzalo Bergara Quartet, Yuri Liberzon and Matthew Fish. They’ll also be able to take part to workshops and lectures, check out the latest in luthier’s handcrafted instruments. All events take place at St.Patrick’s Episcopal, Incline Village. The Sierra Nevada Guitar Festival At Lake Tahoe is the premier organization presenting Classical Guitar Concerts, Festivals and Educational Events in Northern Nevada, Lake Tahoe and Walnut Creek. For more information visit www.sierraguitar.org. Lake Tahoe Music Festival in the Works


Thanks to all the kind words and support from friends and patrons, the Lake Tahoe Music Festival Board of Directors has a renewed energy and a new plan. Presenting four concerts this summer, the Festival will return to its grass roots and will revitalize and reinvent tradition at Lake Tahoe. On July 9, 10, 12 and 13, music lovers will enjoy outdoor classical music in spectacular settings around the Lake and in Truckee. Returning Music Director Timm Rolek, has put together the Orchestra Academy consisting of a recognized soloist who will mentor 14 young professionals as they present four evenings of “Serenades at Sunset.” To enjoy this “revival” lineup of performances purchase tickets at www.tahoemusic.org or cash will be accepted at the gate. Call the West Shore Café at 530-525-5200, and they will prepare your picnic basket or save you a spot for an unforgettable dinner prior to the concert on July 12. The price of the ticket for the July 9 concert at a private residence includes barbecue picnic and champagne. Donations to support and continue the Lake Tahoe Music Festival are greatly appreciated and may be mailed to Lake Tahoe Music Festival, PO Box 7, Truckee, CA 96160, or on the website. Interested volunteers should call 530-388-8272. Take chairs and blankets for picnics prior to the concert. Gates open 5 p.m. and concerts begin at 6:30 p.m. D.G. Menchetti Young Shakespeare Bring a little culture and lots of memorable moments into your family’s life with a family-riendly, onehour performance adaptation of William Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” presented as part of the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival’s D.G. Menchetti Young Shakespeare Program. The 2013 D.G. Menchetti Young Shakespeare production, an adaptation of the Festival’s mainstage offering, is designed with the young audience member in mind and runs July 29-Aug. 8 at Sand Harbor State Park in Incline Village and a variety of other outdoor venues throughout the Reno and Lake Tahoe region. Now in its 12th year, the D.G. Menchetti Young Shakespeare Program has entertained more than 50,000 children and their families over its history. Each year, the program affords aspiring young actors the opportunity to work with theater artists in a professional environment and perform at multiple venues. Over a four-week period, with eight-hour days, the students receive hands-on experience in acting, movement, voice and stage craft. In addition to the student performers, the cast also includes professional actors, designers and stage managers. To reserve free Young Shakespeare tickets call 800-74-SHOWS. Visit www.LakeTahoeShakespeare.com. Groups of 10 or more call 775-832-1616. Lake Tahoe SummerFest to Celebrate Orchestral Music New and returning visitors to Lake Tahoe can once again enjoy compelling musical performances among the majestic pines at the Lake Tahoe SummerFest 2013, Aug. 2-18 on the campus of Sierra Nevada College in Incline Village. The Lake Tahoe SummerFest Orchestra is comprised of 40 virtuoso musicians individually invited from the great orchestras of North America and beyond - the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the symphonies of San Francisco, Seattle, Vancouver, and the Leipzig Gewandhaus, among others. This summer, Maestro Joel Revzen will be joined by six renowned soloists including: Frederica von Stade, mezzo soprano; Jennifer Koh, violinist; Benjamin Hochman, pianist; Meredith Clark, harpist; Demarre McGill, flutist; Chris Brubeck, composer and trombonist. “We are so pleased to continue the magic created by last year’s inaugural SummerFest concert series,” said Madylon Meiling, Lake Tahoe SummerFest founder and chair. “In the same intimate concert environment, we’re adding ‘TalkBack,’ an opportunity for post-concert discussions with Maestro Revzen and the musicians.”


From Beethoven to Brubeck, classical music will once again be celebrated. A 500-seat acoustically designed concert tent will offer pure sound without amplification, and tiered seating for unencumbered sightlines. The concert evening will be enhanced by featured local food and select wines. SummerFest Concerts will be held the weekends of Aug. 2-4, Aug. 9-11 and Aug. 16-18. Orchestra programs are Friday evenings at 7 p.m., and family concerts are Sunday afternoons at 4 p.m., with musical selections for adults and children to enjoy together. On Saturday evenings at 7 p.m., chamber music concerts highlight the virtuosity of individual orchestra members performing in an intimate setting. Individual ticket prices are $75, $50 and $25. A VIP Subscription for all nine concerts with premium seating includes a reception with Maestro Revzen and members of the orchestra and keepsake mementos. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.tahoesummerfest.org, or call 775832-1606. Find them on Facebook at Facebook.com/LakeTahoeSummerFest. Tickets Available 2013 Lake Tahoe Concours d’ Elegance Tickets are now available online for the 2013 Lake Tahoe Concours d’ Elegance Wooden Boat Show and all social events in honor of Wooden Boat Week. The Lake Tahoe Concours d’ Elegance will celebrate its 41st anniversary Aug. 9-10 at the Sierra Boat Company in Carnelian Bay, Calif., with the Alan Furth Collection as this year’s Marque Class. Discounted rates are available when purchased in advance online. Wooden Boat Week social events such as the Opening Night Gala, have limited seating and tend to sell out early. The Foundation suggests purchasing tickets for all such social events in advance to guarantee availability. Visit www.laketahoeconcours.com. Woodie Over the Bottom, Aug. 12, 9 am. This year the Tahoe Yacht Club to present fun time and distance rally and lunch is open to all wooden boat owners. Event at Sugar Pine Point Sate Park Pier. Ticket includes race, two lunch tickets and two drink tickets. No Host Bar and live Music! Mahogany Magic, Aug. 13, 6:30 p.m. One last get-together of Wooden Boat Week, lakeside under the stars, starting with the famous “table setting”competition! Bring an appetizer, salad or desert to share and bring a blanket or camp chairs for the slide show at dusk. Free beer and wine. Contact Tahoe Yacht Club for more information at 530-581-4700. Help Save The Whittell Waterfalls Win a dinner cruise aboard the Thunderbird Yacht and save a piece of Lake Tahoe history. Having raised $260,000 to date, the nonprofit Thunderbird Lodge Preservation Society needs $40,000 to begin restoration of the Whittell Waterfalls at Lake Tahoe’s Castle-in-the-Sky: the Thunderbird Lodge. The Preservation Society will raffle an exclusive evening. Two lucky winners may each send a party of six for a “Secrets of the Castle Tour,” followed by an east shore cocktail cruise on the 55’ mahogany speedboat, Thunderbird, and a three-course dinner on the terrace with wine pairings. Tickets must be purchased by June 30. The two winning tickets will be drawn on July 1, 2013. A minimum of 100 tickets must be sold for the drawing to take place. No more than 400 entries will be permitted. Wealthy and eccentric Captain George Whittell, Jr. built his summer estate on Lake Tahoe’s east shore in the 1930s. The Thunderbird Lodge Preservation Society is restoring the waterfalls to their former glory.


There are several fireworks displays and other events planned for the 4th of July holiday across northern Nevada. Here's a list of some of the festivities: If you're looking to watch a professional fireworks display this holiday, the Rail City is hosting its annual ‘Star Spangled Sparks' fireworks show on the Fourth of July. Artown is also hosting a fireworks show at Wingfield Park that night in downtown Reno. Lake Tahoe will hold a fireworks show on July 4th at 9:30pm at Tahoe Keys Marina. Virginia City is holding a parade, fireworks show and concert starting at noon. The Comstock Cowboys concert starts at 5pm and the fireworks start at dark after that concert. From the Virginia City Fourth of July committee: Virginia City's Fourth of July Celebration, culminating with a 25-minute long Firework Spectacular set in the Comstock hills of northern Nevada, includes the Fourth of July Parade, the Red White and YOU Wine Walk, a period costumed baseball game in Miners Park where kids can swim in the newly remodeled pool, and the Comstock Cowboys Second Amendment Concert. Throughout the day, visitors can shop, ride the train, visit museums, or take in the lively atmosphere unique to historic Virginia City. Schedule of Events 9 a.m. – Booth opens selling raffle tickets, wine walk tickets and event t-shirts


11 a.m. – Devil's Gate Gunfighters comedy show at C and Union Streets12 p.m. – Parade begins, expected to last approximately an hour and a half 1 p.m. – Red White and YOU Wine Walk begins, continues until 6 p.m. 1:30 p.m. – Larry Elliott, as Uncle Sam, performs music and stories 6 p.m. – Free concert, Second Amendment Celebration Concert in Delta Parking lot 7 p.m. – Raffle and live auction 7:45 p.m. – Second Amendment Celebration Concert continues After Dark – Fireworks Spectacular For more information on Virginia City, Nev., visit www.visitvirginiacitynv.com or call the Virginia City Tourism Commission (VCTC) at 775-847-7500. Also --The 601 Vigilance Committee in conjunction with Comstock Visions, Inc. will be hosting the first annual Shoot-Out on the Hill. The event begins immediately following the Fourth of July Parade and ends at 6:00 p.m. It will be held across from the Fourth Ward School. Proceeds benefit Comstock charities. Shoot like a real cowboy! Tickets to the event are $30 each and limited to the first 200 participants. Each person will be shooting real guns with real bullets; 10 pistol shots, 10 rifle shots, and 6 shotgun. Proper use of firearms will be provided. Use of guns, ammunition, and safety equipment is included in fee. Each shooter will receive a commemorative bandana and will have the opportunity to purchase a souvenir photograph. Participants must be at least 21 years of age. Shooting demonstration by champion shooter: Shooting demonstration by California champion SASS (Single Action Shooting Society), "Bobcat Tyler" (Tyler Renville). Fun awards with unusual prizes given. After the event, awards will be announced at the Second Amendment Concert with David John and the Comstock Cowboys. Tickets and parking: Tickets will be sold for $30 each beginning at 10:00 a.m. at ticket booths in front of the Ponderosa and the Bucket of Blood saloon. Shuttles will be available from the Ponderosa and the Bucket of Blood saloon; there will be no parking at the event site. From the Virginia City Fourth of July committee: From the City of Sparks: Star Spangled Sparks presented by The Chamber kicks off at 6 a.m. and goes till 3 p.m. at the Sparks Marina and includes free tethered hot air balloon rides, all-ages talent show, Model Dairy Milk Carton Boat Regatta, and much more. The fun is extended at Victorian Square in downtown Sparks from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. when the region's longest, most spectacular fireworks display ignites from the roof of John Ascuaga's Nugget while thousands of revelers celebrate on the plaza below. Live entertainment for the whole family, a car show, a kid's area and an array of food choices complete the evening. PARKING AND ROAD IMPACTS DURING THE FIREWORKS EVENT: Complimentary shuttles will provide round-trip transportation from Legends at Sparks Marina to Victorian Square during the event. Shuttles will pick up guests in the large dirt lot between Fudruckers and Popeye's starting at 6 p.m. Shuttles will run continuously throughout the event until after the fireworks show. Several streets in and around Victorian Square will close as they meet their capacity: • Victorian Avenue will close between Pyramid Way and 14th Street at 8 p.m.


• C Street westbound from Pyramid will be closed by 6:00pm, and 10th and 11th Streets between C Street and Victorian Avenue will also close by 6:00pm. • Once the Nugget's parking garage and the two City parking garages (C Street & 10th Street, and next to the Cinema) are full, there will be no vehicular access to those garages. • Eastbound Prater Way from 15th Street will close after the firework show for approximately 30 minutes. POTENTIAL WIND DELAY COMMUNICATIONS For updates on any potential wind delays on the evening of the event, please tune into KKOH News Talk 780. Updates will also be posted on John Ascuaga's Nugget Casino Resort's Facebook page: www.facebook.com/janugget, or tweeted from the Nugget's Twitter handle @janugget. KEEP IT SAFE Pets that are not certified service animals are not permitted on Victorian Square during events. Leashed pet are welcome at the Marina. For the enjoyment and safety of all, please leave pets at home. BBQs are also not permitted downtown or at Sparks Marina. From the City of Sparks From Squaw Valley: Celebrate Independence Day with a full week of music and events at Squaw Valley. The week kicks off with the summer's first Bluesday concert on Tuesday, July 2 featuring Chris Cain. Come Wednesday, July 3, Squaw is hosting free outdoor yoga and music from 6-7 p.m. in front of the resort's new Wanderlust Yoga Studio. Thursday, July 4 brings a free outdoor showing of Men In Black 3 to The Village at Squaw Valley. Fourth of July Weekend also brings the inaugural Made in Tahoe Festival to Squaw Valley. Held Thursday, July 2 through Saturday, July 4, the festival is a celebration of Lake Tahoe's local arts and culture, including three full days of live music by some of the region's biggest bands. Guests looking for the perfect place to celebrate Fourth of July Weekend can stay at The Village at Squaw Valley, located right at the base of the mountain. The Village offers spacious suites for the holiday weekend starting at $163 per person/per night. Price based on double occupancy for a one bedroom unit. For more information or to book a room, call 1-866-818-6963 or see www.squaw.com/the-village/lodging. Tuesday, July 2; 6-8:30 p.m. Bluesdays featuring Chris Cain Fourth of July celebrations kick off on Tuesday with the summer's first Bluesday featuring live music in The Village and on-mountain savings. During the day, guests can enjoy all that High Camp has to offer with great tram discounts ($10 off adult tram tickets, $5 off kid, youth and senior tram tickets). Evening brings a free blues concert to The Village featuring Chris Cain, as well as great deals on food and drinks from local vendors. More details: www.squaw.com/things-to-do/events-calendar/bluesdays-at-squaw. Wednesday, July 3; 6-7 p.m. Free Outdoor Yoga with Yoga Squaw'd featuring DJ Om Jah In keeping with the spirit of Wanderlust's fusion of yoga and music, yogis can join Yoga Squaw'd for a free community yoga session on July 3 led by lululemon ambassador Sherry McConkey and featuring DJ Om Jah. The class will run from 6-7 p.m. outside of Squaw's new Wandlerlust Yoga Studio on First Street in The Village at Squaw Valley. The class is part of Yoga Squaw'd, Squaw's new free community yoga program offered on Wednesday evenings throughout the summer. More info: www.squaw.com/thingsto-do/events-calendar/free-wednesday-yoga.


Thursday, July 4; 8:30 p.m. Free Outdoor Movie Series featuring Men in Black 3 Families can snuggle up under the stars while enjoying Men in Black 3 on the big screen in the Events Plaza at The Village at Squaw Valley. Blankets and warm clothes are recommended. More details: www.squaw.com/things-to-do/events-calendar/free-outdoor-summer-movie-series. Thursday, July 4 – Saturday, July 6 Made In Tahoe Festival This Fourth of July Weekend, visitors and locals alike can celebrate all things Tahoe at Squaw's Made in Tahoe Festival. The festival will feature three days of great local music as well as a full vendor village of local businesses and artisans. Kids can head to the Kid Zone next to the Funitel to check out free slacklining, croquet and bean bag toss as well as Squaw's new outdoor climbing wall. More info: www.squaw.com/things-to-do/events-calendar/made-tahoe-festival. See below for the full music line-up for the Made in Tahoe Festival. Thursday, July 4 2-3:30 p.m. - Peter Joseph Burtt & the King Tide 4-6 p.m. - Jelly Bread 6:30-8 p.m. - Mamas Cookin' Friday, July 5 2-2:45 p.m. - JJ Von Briesen 3-3:45 p.m. - Truckee Tribe 4-5:45 p.m. - Drop Theory 6:15-8 p.m. - Jeff Jones & The Bank Saturday, July 6 2-2:50 p.m. - Neva 3-5 p.m. - The Trey Stone Band feat. Kendall Naughton 5:15-6:15 p.m. - Truckee Trashion Show 6:30-8:00 p.m. - Matt Reardon with Black Sunshine From Squaw Valley From the Bureau of Land Management: The California Trail Interpretive Center will be open to celebrate the 4th of July Holiday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. At 11 a.m. there will be a reading of the Declaration of Independence, a trail wedding, and readings from emigrant journals about how those traveling on the trail celebrated the holiday. Following at 1p.m., will be a black powder demonstration showcasing a few historic guns, as well as a second reading of the Declaration of Independence and a trail wedding. Staff and volunteers will add to the Trail experience by dressing in period clothing. Visitors can view a replica of the Independence Rock, so named because it was the site of many 4th of July celebrations and at least a few emigrant weddings that occurred along the California Trail. Overlanders on the way to California in the mid 1800's, aware they were leaving the United States behind, had no intention of forgetting their heritage and traditions. The California Trail Interpretive Center, operated by the Bureau of Land Management, is located 8 miles west of Elko, at Hunter exit 292. Visit, www.blm.gov/cv5c, our Facebook page at California Trail Interpretive Center Association or call (775) 738-1849 for more information.


From the Bureau of Land Management From Silver Legacy Just another fun contest with proceeds going to "Make A Wish" Foundation! This outstanding nonprofit organization grants the wishes of children diagnosed with a life-threatening medical condition…on average every 38 minutes! Come on downtown Thursday through Saturday, July 4-6 from 12:00-8:00 p.m. for Silver Legacy's "Flickin' Chicken" contest. The entry fee is just $5 unless participants bring a canned food item for the Food Bank Northern Nevada and the entry fee is waived! Assisting another amazing local cause! Here's how this fun contest works…participants purchase 4 rubber chickens and simply toss as many as possible onto the target disc. And the prizes? Fling 1 chicken and get any part of the chicken on the disc and walk away with a Chicken Wing Festival t-shirt, limit 1 per participant. The more chickens touching the disc the more valuable the prizes! Sorry, no team play and you must be 21 years of age or the prize is awarded to a parent or guardian. Flickin' chickens for fun, fantastic prizes and a great cause! Don't miss out on all the excitement going on at Silver Legacy! To learn more visit us online at www.silverlegacy.com, by calling 1-800-MUST-SEE (6878733) or 775-325-7401. From Silver Legacy From Nevada Division of State Parks Fort Churchill State Historic Park is offering a variety of events in July, including a history talk and cannon firing on the 4th of July, and a night hike. The park's per-vehicle entrance fee is $7 with a $2 discount for Nevada residents; the events are free. Buckland Station is $1 per person; children 12 and under are free. Cash and checks are accepted. Contact Kim Clawson at 775-577-4880 or at bucklandstation@hotmail.com for more information. July 4: History Talk and Cannon Firing Learn about the history of Fort Churchill State Historic Park, sample hardtack and discover what life was like for soldiers stationed here in the 1860s. There will be a Springfield black powder rifle and cannon firing demonstration. After the cannon firing, there will be an adobe brick making demonstration. WHEN: Thursday, July 4, at 10 a.m. WHERE: Fort Churchill is located approximately eight miles south of Silver Springs, NV on Highway 95A. Turn onto Fort Churchill road and follow the signs into the park. This program will be held beside the museum, next to the cannons. July 6: Night Hike Look for scorpions and learn a few new constellations! Reservations are required for this hike and are limited to 30. Meeting location is made known upon reservation. To make reservations, call 775-577-4880 or e-mail at bucklandstation@hotmail.com, leaving your name, phone number and how many in your party. This hike will be approximately 0.6 miles long and will last about an hour. Participants should bring water, good shoes, warm clothes and insect repellant. Red flashlights are recommended as they do not negatively affect night vision. Dogs are not permitted on this hike. WHEN: Saturday, July 6, at 8:30 p.m. WHERE: Fort Churchill is located approximately eight miles south of Silver Springs, NV on Highway 95A. Turn onto Fort Churchill Road and follow the signs into the park.


From Nevada Division of State Parks From the Tahoe Players Association Tahoe Players Association is pleased to present the wildly popular Les Miserables on three stages Village Green July 5th, John Ascuaga's Nugget July 25, 26, 27, and 28, and Sand Harbor August 19th for the 2013 summer season. Starting off with a much anticipated premiere with Red, White, and Tahoe Blue on July 5th at village green on a 40 foot stage. Tickets are only $10.00 for students, and $35.00 for general seating. Please bring a low back chair and prepare to be dazzled under the stars by this incredible show as never seen before. The performances Directed by Lily Baran and original choreography by Michelle Michelsen, with a 16 piece orchestra lead by "Opera" Joe Mckesson. "Victor Hugo stated that Les Miserables would be relevant so long as social ailments such as poverty exist, this completely original interpretation of this cautionary tale will shed light on the issues that still torment society today." says Baran. The talent and passion the people involved in this production possess is unparalleled and a beautiful sound and sight to behold. Please join us for what is sure to be nothing short of a magical evening, Do you hear the people sing? Tickets being sold at: The Chamber of Commerce, Tunnel Creek Lodge, I.V. Coffee Lab, Karma Upscale Resale, Goldfish Properties, and Big Water Grille For online tickets please visit: TahoePlayers.org Both organizations are 501(c)(3) non-profit * Les Miserables contains mature content not reccomended for children under 13 From the Tahoe Players Association


TAHOE/TRUCKEE, Calif. — Content for briefs is selected from e-mail submissions to Community Editor Amy Edgett at aedgett@sierrasun.com. E-mail for print submissions may be 150 words. Items published in the print edition news space permitting. Weston recieves recognition On Tuesday, June 4 Rob Weston owner of West Shore Sports in Homewood was recognized for his exemplary volunteer support to the California State Parks. Rob donates 140 hours annually to the parks and sponsors the Full Moon Snowshoe Hikes and Full Moon Kayak Tours at Sugar Pine Point State Park. Since 2003 these hikes and tours have generated $27,000 in revenue for the Sierra State Parks Foundation, which are used to support the State Park’s Interpretive Programs. Rob was also involved in the restoration of the 1960 Olympic Cross Country Ski Trails at Sugar Pine Point State Park. He was instrumental in raising funds and in 2010 coordinated the purchase of a new grooming machine for the Cross Country Ski trails. Visit https://sierrastateparks.org. North Lake Tahoe Hires The Abbi Agency The North Lake Tahoe Marketing Cooperative has hired Nevada-based digital engagement firm The Abbi Agency to conduct its destination travel and tourism public relations campaigns. The agency began work on the account in May of this year. North Lake Tahoe Marketing Cooperative is a coordinated marketing effort between the North Lake Tahoe Chamber/CVB/Resort Association, and the Incline Village Crystal Bay Visitors Bureau. The decision to hire The Abbi Agency was determined by the firm’s extensive travel PR experience and strategic, creative approach to tourism communications. The Abbi Agency, a digital engagement firm based in Reno, Nev., with satellite offices in Las Vegas, has extensive experience working in destination travel and ski resort public relations. The Abbi Agency has begun its campaigns for the North Lake Tahoe Marketing Cooperative by focusing on summer events, meetings and conventions, outdoor recreation and food and wine offerings in the region. Over the summer, the firm will implement strategic communications plans for the fall and winter seasons. UC Davis Tahoe City Field Station Open House Join UC Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center (TERC) for an Open House at the Tahoe City Field Station (Historic Hatchery) at 2400 Lake Forest Road, Saturday, June 15, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tour the historic building, talk to TERC scientists about their work, and learn something new about Lake Tahoe. Local garden clubs will be on hand to give plant selection and gardening advice, and Red Truck of Truckee will sell food and beverages.


The UC Davis Tahoe City Field Station has evolved from its origins as a state fish hatchery to its current function as a field station for UC Davis researchers at Lake Tahoe. The Field Station houses the Eriksson Education Center, native plant demonstration garden, a small laboratory facility, and the equipment necessary for researchers to boat on, dive in, and scientifically examine Lake Tahoe. For more information about the Open House, Green Thumb Gardening Series or volunteer opportunities, contact Kelsey Poole at 775-881-7560 ext. 7402 or klpoole@ucdavis.edu, or visit http://terc.ucdavis.edu/calendar/. Bear Brunch at Sugar Pine Point State Park Celebrate Dad June 16 and treat him to a day at the park to learn about our Lake Tahoe Bears while enjoying brunch on the beautiful grounds of the Helman-Ehrman Estate. Chief Ranger Brian Barton will share his knowledge of the California black bear in a fun and entertaining event suitable for the family, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Cost is $20 adults and $10 kids 12 and under. Space is limited. Make a reservation at 530-583-9911. Workshop on the Draft Squaw Creek Restoration Plan Tuesday, June 18, 6-9 p.m., Squaw Valley Public Service District Community Meeting Room, 305 Squaw Valley Road (same building as the SV Fire Station). Squaw Valley Real Estate, LLC will co-host a workshop with the Friends of Squaw Creek to preview a draft conceptual plan of the Squaw Creek Restoration Plan, and to collect feedback from stakeholders. Experts on the topic have been invited to participate. It is anticipated Phase 1 of the proposed Village at Squaw Valley project will break ground in the summer of 2015. As a component of Phase 1 of the four-phase project, Squaw Valley Real Estate will restore Squaw Creek along the project boundary’s north reach. Balance Hydrologics, Inc., will present details for improving elements of Squaw Creek. The Friends of Squaw Creek (FoSC) is a grassroots organization formed in 2002. FoSC works collaboratively with Squaw Valley Real Estate, regulatory agencies, riparian landowners, and the local community to seek opportunities to enhance the watershed. IRIE Rafting Company to present “Boating for Benefit” On selected days June through September, IRIE Rafting Company will donate 100 percent of profits of rafting trips on the Lower Truckee River Gorge to selected nonprofits. IRIE Rafting believes in supporting nonprofits who work to create community, provide service to those in need, open opportunities, and give individuals a hand up, not a hand out. Join them in supporting the incredible work of their beneficiaries, book now at www.raftirie.com or e-mail info@raftirie.com. June 20, Adventure Risk Challenge, www.arcprogram.org; July 16, The Zawadisha Fund, www.zawadisha.org; Aug. 9, CR Johnson Foundation, www.crjohnson.org; Sept. 7, Project GO, www.projectgo.org. Golf Pro Shop remodeled A ribbon-cutting event at Tahoe Donner Association’s Golf Pro Shop was held Friday, June 7, to celebrate the opening of the newly remodeled and expanded pro shop. Joining Tahoe Donner’s general manager Robb Etnyre, board members Tom Johns, Jim Stang and former board member Jay Lempinen participated in the ribbon-cutting. Other Tahoe Donner representatives such as Forrest Huisman, director of capital projects, and Ed Leinenkugel, director of golf, along with Truckee representatives including Truckee Mayor Carolyn Wallace Dee were present as well. The new pro shop is now approximately 500 square-feet larger and the T-9 Grill also doubled in sized as part of the remodel.


6/19/13

Big summer for road trips ahead - latimes.com

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Big summer for road trips ahead With gas prices down and confidence in the economy up, lots of Americans are expected to take road trips this summer. Comments

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www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-summer-travel-20130608,0,5608496.story

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6/19/13

Big summer for road trips ahead - latimes.com

Hea v y t r a ffic slow s t h e n or t h bou n d la n es of t h e 5 Fr eew a y a t t h e 1 4 Fr eew a y befor e t h e lon g La bor Da y w eek en d la st y ea r . Mor e A m er ica n s pla n t o t a k e t r ips by ca r t h is su m m er t h a n la st , a T r ipA dv isor su r v ey sa id. (Kir k McKoy , Los A n g eles T im es / A u g u st 3 1 , 2 0 1 2 )

By Hugo MartĂ­n, Los Angeles Times June 8, 2013 ,5:00 a.m .

Carniv al Trium ph debacle taking toll on cruise industry

Scrape the bugs off your windshield and check your radiator coolant because the next few months are stacking up to be one of the top summers for road trips in years. With consumer confidence up, fuel prices down and frustration over airline fees growing, Americans are expected to hit the road in big numbers over the next few months, rolling to such hot spots as Las Vegas, the Grand Canyon and Lake Tahoe.

www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-summer-travel-20130608,0,5608496.story

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6/19/13

Big summer for road trips ahead - latimes.com

Travel experts and surveys conducted in the last few weeks point to a season of busy freeways and crowded roadside attractions.

TSA knife ban to rem ain

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"People are recession weary and are saying we have a Godgiven right to take a vacation and we are going to take it," said Andy Chapman, a spokesman for the North Lake Tahoe Resort Assn., where summer hotel reservations are already up nearly 50% compared with last year. Three in four summer travelers said they would be taking a trip by car, up from 70% who said they planned to drive last summer, according to a survey of more than 1,200 Americans taken by the travel website TripAdvisor. A survey by the travel website Expedia found that 14% of travelers said they were more likely to take a summer road trip this year than last year because of an improving economy. "I think we are going to see a little more of those longer trips," said Jim Rogers, chief executive of Kampgrounds of America, a Montana-based franchise with more than 400 campgrounds throughout North America. "It's not going to be just the weekend trips." Summer reservations at KOA campgrounds across the country are up 14% compared with the same period last year, and Rogers attributes the rise to declining fuel prices and rising confidence in the economy.

"It's not going to be a tsunami or a tidal wave, but it will be a definite wave," he said of the road trip trend. At Lake Tahoe, Chapman said more visitors are expected to drive because vacationers are increasingly bringing outdoor gear such as paddle boards and mountain bikes, which can be expensive to load on a plane. "The drive is also part of the vacation," he said. "You get to see some of the desert scenery on your way here." www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-summer-travel-20130608,0,5608496.story

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6/19/13

Big summer for road trips ahead - latimes.com

For Mike Shaub, an aircraft maintenance manager at Edwards Air Force Base, road trips are a way to connect with his 12-year-old daughter, Liberty. The two drive each summer to Oregon for a fishing and camping trip. "One of my favorite reasons to drive is the quote I often hear from my daughter: 'Dad? Can we stop there? That looks interesting,'" he said. "Things like that make me favor driving over a flight any day." Colleen Cardas, the owner of a high-end audio supply company in Austin, Texas, plans to take a twoweek road trip to New England with her boyfriend, Marc Phillips. The couple intend to visit audio equipment dealers along the way and hunt down the best hamburger joints in America, she said. "We will be packing about 1,000 pounds of equipment," Cardas said. "It's always less expensive to drive." High fuel prices are the biggest deterrent to travelers considering a road trip, according to the Expedia survey. So, declining gasoline prices may represent a green light for travelers hoping to hit the road this summer. In the Los Angeles area, the average price for a gallon of regular gas is $3.99, which is about a nickel less than last week and about 20 cents cheaper than in the same week last year, according to the Auto Club. "We see driving being a strong trend because it is the cheapest way to go if you have three or more people with you," said Marie Montgomery, a spokeswoman for the Auto Club of Southern California. If past years are any indicator, she said, gas prices should remain stable at least through August. KOA and other roadside businesses expect the extra road traffic to mean more spending this summer. Of those who plan to travel this summer, 53% said they would spend about the same amount as last year and 25% said they would spend more, according to the survey by TripAdvisor. Airlines for America, the trade group for the nation's airlines, predicted 209 million Americans will fly this summer, up 1% from last summer. The trade group said most of the growth would come from travel on international flights. For those who fly, the cabins will be more crowded and the tickets more expensive this summer. The airline trade group predicts nearly 87% of airline seats will be filled this summer. About 79% were filled in the first two months of the year, according to the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-summer-travel-20130608,0,5608496.story

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6/19/13

Big summer for road trips ahead - latimes.com

The average price of a domestic airline ticket is expected to be up 4% compared with last summer, according to a study by the travel website Hotwire. hugo.martin@latimes.com Copy r ig h t Š 2 0 1 3 , Los A n g eles T im es Comments

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June 3, 2013, Lake Tahoe, California Greetings hikers, although I’ve been semi-absent from the blogosphere lately, I promise I haven’t been neglecting my hiking, writing or my photography. Over recent weeks I’ve been hard at work editing a photo project and writing about hiking for the Examiner.com. (click for a link to my latest article) So far I’ve published 5 articles, mainly about Bay Area (SF) hiking, but most recently I’ve written about North Lake Tahoe trails. I was approached by a Reno-based PR firm a few weeks ago to see if I’d be interest in writing about that subject. Since I was planning a trip anyways, it didn’t take much prodding to sell me on the idea. The only difference is that they were interested in North Lake Tahoe, while my personal preferences have generally drawn me towards trailheads further south along the lake, Carson Pass, and a few spots along highway 50 (Pyramid Creek/Horsetail Falls). So in a way, this assignment was fortuitous in that it forced me onto trails and terrain that I otherwise might never have tried. With a list of about 20 hikes and a short list of 5 recommended hikes to further winnow the choices, I mapped out a rough itinerary, planning to do two shorter hikes as I drove in from the Bay Area (a Tuesday), and one longer hike on my full day (Wed.) before driving back home on the third morning. I’ll discuss my last hike because it was my favorite of the three. In a future post I’ll write & post photos of the day 1 hikes. Fo my main hike, initially I was going to hike Marlette Lake on the east (Nevada) side , but decided instead on a hike up General Creek Trail through Sugar Pine Point State Park north of Meeks Bay on the California side. I did the hike on May 22nd, and even at this relatively early date, the trails were clear of snow. By contrast, in 2011, I had to turn around on the Mt. Tallac trail past Cathedral Lake in mid-July because of snow on the trail. But rather than rue the lack of snow, I early blooms of groundsel, snow plant, and balsam root.


I’m also going to start with some minor negatives on the General Creek hike. Although for others, especially less experienced hikers, what I perceive as negatives could very well be positives. The first couple of miles are flat and on a what looks like a fire road. In the winter, this section is a snowshoe/cross country skiing loop that follows the trails that were used for the biathlon and crosscountry events in the 1960 Winter Olympics. It makes for an easy walk, an excellent jog or mountain bike ride when clear of snow. If you’re looking for an ass kicking or a training hike for Mt. Whitney or Half Dome, try the Bayview or Eagle Falls Trails into Desolation Wilderness a little further south (I’ll be writing about Eagle Falls/Dicks Lake/Velma Lakes later in the week).

Although the General Creek Trail eventually gets difficult about five miles in, the early section of trail meanders through meadows and mixed pine forest, roughly following General Creek. For me, the real hiking began when the main trail forked off from the loop and started to ascend single track towards Lily Pond and Lost Lake. Once on this section, the forest closes in some, but not as extreme as Mirkwood (Lord of the Rings) or as sinister as the apple-throwing trees of Oz.


As most of my friends and readers of my blog and Facebook posts know, I’m a sucker for wildflowers and I spent a good amount of time crouched in the dirt and underbrush trying to get definitive photos of arrowleaf balsam-root and single-stemmed groundsel. I also came across a good number of snow plant, spreading phlox and an occasional meadow penstemon. While still not a lung-buster, the spur to Lily Pond was short, but I can’t really say rewarding climb. The pond is aptly named, as it was covered in water lilies. Unfortunately, because of tree shoots, bushes and undergrowth that crowd the shore, it’s very difficult to find an enjoyable view of the pond itself. I did find one small portal at the far end of the pond where I could get a passable photo. If I make a return trip, I’ll save my energy and continue west towards Lost Lake and Duck Lake. Once I backtracked to the main trail, the path became steeper and more challenging, especially when the trail crossed over to the south side of General Creek more than a mile further up the trail. At this crossover, instead of a bridge, there’s a log and rock ford that isn’t obvious at first. It’s at this point after the ford that inexperienced or out of shape hikers might have a bit of difficulty. The ground becomes more uneven and a bit of rock scrambling is necessary. For me, this is where it gets to be fun.


It’s also at this point that you start nearing the top of the canyon/ravine. The trail also becomes rockier and emerges onto a glacial shelf with large boulders and erratics, and twisted gnarled pines. Shortly after taking these two photos, about six miles into my hiking day, I reached a junction of trail. A turn to the left would’ve led me on to Lost Lake, the terminus of the GC Trail. Because of my propensity to stop, wax poetic and take photos along the way, I felt it was getting too late to go the rest of the way to the lake. Instead, I found a wind-sheltered spot among the granite and a copse of trees to eat some lunch and enjoy the views around me. As it does with many hikes, especially out and back ones, the return trip to my car seemed to be twice as long as the ascent. But it was an immensely enjoyable hike. I will say that I do prefer the trails leading from the Mt. Tallac, Eagle Falls and Bay View trailheads, mainly because they start climbing immediately and a hiker can reach beautiful alpine lakes just a mile or two into the hike.


6/18/13

Great Tahoe Views: Stateline Fire Lookout Trail

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GREAT TAHOE VIEWS: STATELINE FIRE LOOKOUT TRAIL This trail is one of the least known and hiked areas of the lake By Christina Nellemann; published Wednesday, May 15th, 2013 Tahoe Expert

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Many people come to the Lake Tahoe area to go hiking in the mountains around the lake. From most of these hiking trails you can find incredible views of the big, blue lake and the surrounding forests. One of the most overlooked hiking trails may have one of the best vantage points on the North Shore. The Stateline Fire Lookout is not really covered on any of the local trail maps, but within a quarter of a mile you can have some of the best views of the lake at over 7,017 feet. It's a great hike for kids too.

www.10best.com/destinations/nevada/tahoe/articles/great-tahoe-views-stateline-fire-lookout-trail/

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6/18/13

Great Tahoe Views: Stateline Fire Lookout Trail

You can see the entire North Shore from the trail Photo Credit: Jodi Womack - flickr The trail starts out as a fire road (used by fire vehicles) then becomes a paved trail up to the top of the lookout. There are several signs along the trail that have historical information about the Lake Tahoe area. From the lookout, you can see Crystal Bay and the Brockway area and the Tahoe Basin, the pine trees dropping down from the summit which is covered with large granite boulders. During the winter, this trail is also available for snowshoeing. To find this trail in Crystal Bay, NV, turn up Reservoir Road between the Tahoe Biltmore Lodge and the old Tahoe Mariner casinos, then turn right at the firehouse. Continue up the hill until you reach a point where a steeper U.S. Forest Service road doubles back to the left above you. Follow this for a quarter mile beyond the green metal gate to the parking lot. When parking, make room for other cars to turn around and don't block the gate. Like

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About Christina Nellemann: Christina Nellemann enjoys the shorter hikes in the Tahoe area. Read more ab out Christina Nellemann here. for all of Christina's fresh Tahoe content Connect w ith Christina via: Blog | Facebook | Tw itter | Google+

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