Page 1

30 years of

INSPIRATION + COMMUNITY + LEADERSHIP

2011 ANNUAL REPORT

Northern California Grantmakers 2011 Annual Report


Cover images from NCG archives, see pg 19 for details.

2011 Staff PRESIDENT & CEO

PROGRAMS

MEMBER SERVICES &

Colin Lacon

Judi Powell Director

COMMUNICATIONS

ADMINISTRATION

Suki O’Kane Director Jenny Chinn Associate

Angela Jones Program Specialist Effective Philanthropy & Family Philanthropy Exchange Lauren Maher Program Officer Collaborative Philanthropy

Julia Indovina Director Barbara Camacho Membership Associate Marisela Orta Communications Associate

Dion Ward Program Specialist Effective Philanthropy & Public Policy

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA GRANTMAKERS (NCG) is a regional association of foundations, corporate contributions programs and other public and private grantmakers. Started in 1965 and incorporated in 1981, NCG has grown to support the activity of over 150 member grantmakers active in northern California, with combined grantmaking of more than $3 billion annually. NCG enhances the effectiveness of philanthropy by supporting regional grantmakers’ efforts to learn, promote the field and connect to peers and resources. For more information visit: www.ncg.org


NCG Celebrates 30 Years F RO M CO L I N L ACO N , P R E S IDE NT & CE O

NCG President & CEO, Colin Lacon

2011, the 30 th year of Northern california grantmakers

Once again, we’re using our Annual Report to tell some of NCG’s success stories. These stories highlight our efforts to promote the field of philanthropy and to provide educational and convening opportunities for our members that enable them to learn new skills and respond to trends that affect their work. Some of these snapshots show how NCG continues to learn from and build upon our rich past. For example, in the early days of NCG, the philanthropic field lacked the gender and racial diversity that it has today. To address this issue in the 1980’s, we collaborated with other regional grantmaker associations to develop a diversity toolkit and educational programming for our members. This dialogue has continued over time, tracking trends and conducting research to support our members’ efforts to increase diversity in the field. In 2007, NCG partnered with Southern California Grantmakers and San Diego Grantmakers to launch the “Diversity in Philanthropy Initiative.” Throughout 2011, we continued our work in this area, hosting a session with Carmen Castellano, president of one of the few Latino family foundations in the country, to talk about building diversity within the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors. The philanthropic landscape is rapidly evolving and our members must respond to new trends in the field. We’ve included some stories in this annual report about NCG events that helped our members think about changes in the role of technology and the way movements are built in today’s world. During the past year, we have also focused attention on exploring our future, kicking off a strategic planning process to help us adapt to the growing and changing dimensions of grantmaking with our education, advocacy and networking services. We look forward to sharing the next 30 years with you.

2011 ANNUAL REPORT

was a time for celebration and reflection. We’ve grown a great deal since the early days of the “lunch bunch,” a group of foundation executives who met regularly during their lunch hour back before NCG officially incorporated in 1981. But even though we’ve expanded our scope and moved in new directions, NCG has stayed true to that original mission of helping our members connect personally, exchange ideas and support each other in their work.


2011 ANNUAL REPORT

2011 Leadership Board of Directors & Member Committees A N E T WO R K O F volunteer S

BOARD CHAIR

BOARD MEMBERS

James Head

Cedric Brown

Diane Parnes

Director of Programs

Chief Executive Officer

Trustee

The San Francisco Foundation

Mitchell Kapor Foundation

Silicon Valley Social Venture Fund (SV2)

VICE CHAIR

Robert Uyeki Executive Director Y & H Soda Foundation

SECRETARY

Fatima Angeles Director of Evaluation & Organizational Learning The California Wellness Foundation

TREASURER

Carla Javits President

Chris DeCardy Vice President & Director of Programs The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Christine Elbel Executive Director Fleishhacker Foundation

Diane Littlefield Director of Program Investments Sierra Health Foundation

Lise Maisano Vice President Grant Programs, S.H. Cowell Foundation

REDF Foundation

Dean Osaki VICE CHAIR AT LARGE

Senior Specialist

Tessie Guillermo

Target Corporation Western Region

President and CEO ZeroDivide™

Judy Patrick President & CEO The Women’s Foundation of California

Christy Pichel President Stuart Foundation

June Sugiyama Director Vodafone Americas Foundation


ncg founding members Susan Clark and Kirke WIlson review book by 2011 Annual meeting keynote speaker, Dante chinni

Loren Brown

ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Corporate Contributions Manager

John Esterle

AAA Insurance

Executive Director

Jodi Ravel

The Whitman Institute

Group Leader-HEAL/Access

Stan Hutton

Kaiser Permanente

Senior Program Officer

BAY AREA ASSET FUNDERS NETWORK

Amanda Feinstein Senior Program Officer, Economic Security Walter and Elise Haas Fund

Karina Moreno Program Officer Y & H Soda Foundation

Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation

FAMILY PHILANTHROPY EXCHANGE

PUBLIC POLICY

Lisa Parker

Jillian Misrack Galbete

President & Executive Director

Vice President of Programs

The Lawrence Welk Family Foundation

Full Circle Fund

Rae Richman

Kate Wing

Director

Senior Program Officer

Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors

Pacific Forest and Watershed

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Lands Stewardship Council

MEMBERSHIP

ARTS LOAN FUND

Sara Davis

Julie Fry

Director of Grants Administration

Program Officer, Performing Arts

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

The William & Flora Hewlett Foundation

Joanne Greenstein Philanthropic Advisor Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors

EMERGENCY LOAN FUND

Karen Park Arts Program Manager City of San Jose, Office of Cultural Affairs

Jennifer Kawar Manager Nonprofit Finance Fund

Joel Wagner Director of Finance

2011 ANNUAL REPORT

CORPORATE CONTRIBUTIONS ROUNDTABLE


2011 ANNUAL REPORT

Financial Statement AUD I T ED AS O F DE C E MB E R 31 , 2 011

INCOME

ACTIVITIES

EARNED 5%

2011

2010

$ 768,660

$ 745,477

520,810

339,903

72,361

110,321

1,361,831

$ 1,195,701

$ 1,003,136

$ 1,018,414

INCOME

Membership Dues Contributed Income Earned Income CONTRIBUTED 38%

$

TOTAL INCOME EXPENSES

Salaries and Wages Professional Services

109,667

105,953

Non-Personnel

295,291

205,230

Grantmaking

15,000

21,074

TOTAL EXPENSES

$ 1,423,094

$ 1,350,671

TOTAL INCREASE (DECREASE)

$

$ (154,970)

MEMBERSHIP DUES 57%

(61,263)

COLLABORATIVE FUNDS AT NCG DISTRIBUTED OVER $675K INTO NINE BAY AREA COUNTIES

EXPENSES COLLABORATIVE GRANTMAKING 11%

ELF GRANTS 2%

ADMINISTRATION 15%

FUNDRAISING 4% EMERGENCY LOAN FUND 34%

GRANTMAKER EDUCATION & CONVENING 52% MEMBER SERVICES 18%

ARTS LOAN FUND 64%


2011 ANNUAL REPORT

FINANCIAL POSITION

2011

2010

$ 607,146

$ 899,470

1,803,599

1,637,897

Accounts

32,386

20,001

Contributions

101,500

55,000

Loans

556,224

622,023

(103,018)

(107,812)

2,279

2,930

$ 3,000,137

$ 3,129,509

$

$

ASSETS

Cash and cash equivalents Short-term investments Receivables

Prepaid expenses and other Office Equipment TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE LIABILITIES

Accounts Payable

7,147

2,741

Deferred membership and program fees

49,278

110,389

Payable to fiduciary groups

26,649

30,281

5,957

13,279

$89,032

$157,141

$ 2,319,768

$ 2,474,738

Accrued liabilities and other TOTAL LIABILITIES FUND BALANCE

Net Assets Board-Designated Reserve

652,600

652,600

Change in Net Assets

(61,263)

(154,969)

$ 2,911,105

$ 2,972,368

$ 3,000,137

$ 3,129,509

TOTAL FUND BALANCE TOTAL LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE


“The more we work with foundations to support their grantees in using technology for social change, the more it affirms that the crucial element lies in shifting organizational cultures. The tools will come and go, but investing in our people—via training and new processes—is the key strategy for changing the game.” —JEFF PERLSTEIN, director of strategic engagement, zerodivide™

#FunderTech: Tweets from the day’s session

“This NCG workshop on media skills spotlighted the potential of social media tools to amplify the capacity of groups working for social change. It was exciting and inspiring to see how nonprofits are already experimenting with and leading the way using new technology.” —SYLVIA YEE, VICE PRESIDENT OF PROGRAMS eVELYN & WALTER HAAS JR. FUND


Grantmaker Education

Taking Social Media to Scale Funding Innovation in Advocacy G RA N T M A K E R S K I L L- B U IL DING WO RKS H O P

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT

NCG kicked off 2011 by holding a number of brown-bag sessions to help our members to learn more about basic social media strategies. In late May, we were able to move from skill-building roundtable discussions to a dialogue about the importance of technology for effective non-profits and what grantmakers could do to support this work. At this session, ZeroDivide and the Mitchell Kapor Foundation presented findings from their new report, Mobilizing Communities in a Connected Age: Funding Innovation in Advocacy. Panelists, including Raven Brooks from Netroots Nation, Rashad Robinson from ColorOfChange.org and Jeff Perlstein from ZeroDivide™, talked about lessons learned from integrating technology such as Web 2.0, social media, and cloud computing into a variety of advocacy organizations. The report found that the most successful organizations had leaders that actively fostered efforts to weave technology practices throughout all aspects of their organization’s work. It recommended that nonprofits and funders look at increasing the capacity for social impact technology as a leadership development issue. The report highlighted specific ways that funders can increase the use of technology to amplify social impact, including: • • • • •

Providing grantees with access to technology consultants. Funding technology capacity over the long-term – not just “hardware or software tied to specific initiatives that expire after a defined period of time.” Taking a leadership role in helping the philanthropic community understand “the importance of funding technology.” Building a community of practice where grantees can connect with peers and industry experts. Providing staff and grantees with exposure to “new tools, trends and ideas.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: NCG Professional Development www.ncg.org/mobilizing

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT: One of NCG’s priorities is to serve as the premiere provider of grantmaker education and convening opportunities for our members. These technology sessions are examples of NCG’s Skill-Building Workshops, our professional development programs tailored to meet the needs of grantmakers in various stages of their careers.


“Alcario and I are often the only Latinos in the room when we go to conferences for family foundations. We’d like to see more diversity in those rooms – as well as in leadership positions across the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors.” —CARMEN CASTELLANO, CASTELLANO Family Foundation

“It’s a challenge to connect with other donors of color throughout the field – but it’s especially tough for younger people to make connections. That’s why it’s so wonderful to have NCG invested in hosting dialogues to begin to change this dynamic.” — ALLISON SPARKS, Program OFFICER, CHILD WELFARE, STUART FOUNDATION


Grantmaker Convening

Building Diversity in Philanthropy The Castellano Family STORI ES T H AT I NS P IR E

photo courtesy of the Castellano family

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT

in september, NCG’s Family Philanthropy exchange

held their Stories that Inspire program, this time featuring Carmen Castellano of the Castellano Family Foundation, one of the few Latino family foundations in the country. In 2001, Carmen and her husband, Alcario, cashed in a $141 million Lotto ticket, the largest Super Lotto Plus single-ticket-holder payout in the 25-year history of the California State Lottery. Sharing her story with NCG’s family foundation members, Carmen recalled immediately finding a pad of paper and a pen so that she could make a list of all the organizations to which they could give money. In a talk full of inspiring stories about her parents and her childhood in a multicultural neighborhood, Carmen talked about conducting research about philanthropy and finding that not nearly enough philanthropic dollars were being allocated to communities of color. Six months after winning the Lotto, the family established the Castellano Family Foundation to support Latino arts, culture and leadership in an effort to address that deficit. Carmen noted that supporting diversity shouldn’t end with grantmaking. The Castellano Family Foundation also encourages their grantees to diversify their boards and staff so that they have the cultural competency to work with the diverse communities they serve. She encouraged NCG members to use this type of approach to help increase diversity in the philanthropic and nonprofit sectors.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: NCG’s Family Philanthropy Exchange www.ncg.org/fpe

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT: One of NCG’s priorities is to serve as the premier provider

of grantmaker education and convening opportunities for our members. The Family Philanthropy Exchange is one of our affinity networks, which allows family foundation staff the opportunity to connect with their peers to learn best practices in family philanthropy.


DIRECT ENGAGEMENT

“This exciting event challenged our thinking about how movement building has changed in recent years—and how funders can support them.” SANDRA BASS, PROGRAM OFFICER, population & reproductive health THE david & lucile packard foundation

Van Jones on changes in movement building : “How change happens, is changing…[We have to] recognize there’s terminology we don’t have. Occupy Wall Street isn’t a movement. It’s a swarm.”

“You can have a lot of energy, it doesn’t mean you have power.”

“At some point, you need to go from anger to answers or it sours.”


Grantmaker Education

Responding To Occupy Wall Street I M P L I C AT I O NS & O P P O RT U NIT I E S FO R PH ILANT H RO PY

photo courtesy by Steve rhodes of sfist.com

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT

In November, NCG & the Compton Foundation co-sponsored a session with Van Jones, a leading national social activist, nonprofit leader and president of Rebuild the Dream, to discuss the implications of the Occupy Wall Street movement and the opportunity for a coordinated philanthropic response. Katherine Fulton, president of the Monitor Institute, led the conversation in a packed room at the Mitchell Kapor Foundation. Jones’ interest in Occupy Wall Street had evolved from researching the Tea Party movement and exploring the structural commonalities between the two to discern the changes taking place in how social and political movements are being built. As Jones pointed out, “There is no Tea Party. You can’t get in a cab and say, ‘Take me to Tea Party headquarters because there are no headquarters…The Tea Party is an open-sourced brand that affiliates use, but don’t own.” During the talk, he described how the Tea Party talks about individualism, but acts as a collective body. For example, the Tea Party’s “Contract From America” was written by approximately 50,000 people working online through a wiki. Jones explained that progressive movements use the opposite formula: they talk about solidarity, yet act individually. If progressive groups could learn to act collectively, their efforts could have a much bigger impact. Occupy Wall Street is proof that this strategy is effective. Jones also pointed to the millennial generation as one of Occupy’s key ingredients. They are the biggest generation in American history and a tech-savvy group interested in using technologies in unforeseeable ways. He compared their impact to the Baby Boomers’ influence on the Civil Rights Movement. Jones made the case that the Occupy movement is about economic change and that change will only be possible through the use of technological innovation and social entrepreneurship, which the philanthropic sector can help support. He ended with a list of ideas for funders who want to support the Occupy movement, including going to a protest to understand its language and needs, supporting organizations that can serve as a bridge between protestors and policymakers and bolstering small groups who are already working with Occupy. DIRECT ENGAGEMENT: One of NCG’s priorities is to serve as the premiere provider of

grantmaker education and convening opportunities for our members. This session with Van Jones is an example of NCG’s Briefings & Gatherings, our interactive sessions that introduce grantmakers to concepts in effective philanthropy, new developments in grantmaking issue areas, and updates on policy issues and legislation.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: NCG’s Briefings & Gatherings www.ncg.org/briefings A Conversation With Van Jones Write-up www.ncg.org/occupy


nonprofit

turnaround

collaborative economic access: the

workshop

strategies

democracy

creating

disparate

an

for

in

communities

equitable

impact

of

power

to

increasing food

the

of

on

and

color

economy

foreclosure

people

political

food

addressing

households

and

communities of color funder dialogue on program related

7 3

investments you’re hiring an intern now what? immigration as a wedge issue implications for funders 10 years after 9/ 11: dialogue on arab middle eastern muslim and asian communities confronting bullying and cyberbullying: what role can funders play? foundation center open house stories that onspire: the castellano family’s philanthropic journey supporting

veterans

and

taking

national

priorities

local

the decline of local civic journalism: new ideas for media grantmaking a conversation with van jones: philanthropic s u p p o r t f o r m o v e m e n t b u i l d i n g - t h e t e a p a r t y, o c c u p y w a l l st re e t a n d p h i l a n t h ro py fa m i l y p h i l a n t h ro py exc h a n g e 2 01 1 docket tales funding progressive organizations: managing the risk annual meeting corporate contributions roundtable

IN 2011 NCGmPROVIDED a k i n g i t w o r37 k oDIFFERENT p t i m i z i n g t e c BRIEFINGS h n o l o g y t o o l sAND f o r GATHERINGS corporate

g i v i n g p rOVER o g r a m 700 s i n d PARTICIPANTS ependent sector WHICH CONVENED

discussion group living

with the gates foundation corporate philanthropy institute changing

environment,

communities

in

a

new

connected

opportunities age:

funding

mobilizing

innovation

in

advocacy aging america and why it matters to your mission balancing data and desire: the science and art of family giving

fostering

grantmaking:

civil

trust

discourse

and

instinct

and in

tolerance family

intuitive

philanthropy

keeping grantmakers and grant seekers from drowning in paperwork do more than give: the six practices of donors who change the world values to action at the graustein memorial fund relief and recovery: what grantmakers need to

know

about

japan

the

future

of

philanthropy

rating

systems: what’s in it for you? family mission statements: building a solid foundation for your family ethics in family philanthropy: right vs. right decision-making discretionary g ra n t s : e n co u ra g i n g p a r t i c i p at i o n …o r p a n d o ra ’s b ox? s m a l l schools movement: lessons learned from transforming new york city’s high school ncg connects: the federal budget and its impact on the nonprofit sector connecting the dots on the budget deal: beyond politics - navigating the new reality


1 1

annual california budget analysis social media brown bag strategy social

media

fundraising

brown

financial

bag

analysis

201: assessing financial health

IN 2011 NCG PROVIDED 11 SKILL-BUILDING

WORKSHOPS THAT SERVED NEARLY 400 PEOPLE

of nonprofits full day advanced nonprofit financial assessment case studies building is not buying: a model of strategic grantee engagement new grantmakers institute annual california budget analysis: with

follow-up

nonprofit

webinar

finance

fund


“NCG can serve a unique and necessary regional role by monitoring issues of potential impact to the sector, sharing information on pending items of concern, and when necessary, speaking in defense of the sector.” —DANIEL ZINGALE, SENIOR VP, HEALTHY CALIFORNIA, THE CALIFORNA ENDOWMENT

Public Policy Philanthropy Digest

In 2011, NCG launched a collaborative effort with San Diego Grantmakers and Southern California Grantmakers to produce a quarterly newsletter that highlights policy updates at the federal and state level. This year, the Public Policy Philanthropy Digest covered topics such as changes in IRS regulations, issues over Congressional redistricting and issues with both the federal and California state budgets.

“We live in a time when the philanthropic climate changes almost daily. One area where this change occurs is in public policy. It is important that our electeds in Sacramento have relationships within our sector and develop a deeper understanding of our work. NCG is taking on the charge to make our sector more visible to policy makers, to develop stronger relationships in Sacramento and to follow the legislation and regulation more closely.” —JUDY PATRICK, PRESIDENT & CEO, WOMEN’S FOUNDATION OF CALIFORNIA


Promoting the Field of Philanthropy

Building Relationships with Policymakers A FO C US O N I SS U E S W IT H S E C TO R-W IDE IMPACT

PROMOTION OF THE FIELD

In SEPTEMBER, NCG STAFF AND BOARD SPENT THE DAY IN

Sacramento, visiting state legislators at the State Capitol and holding a board meeting at the Sierra Health Foundation’s Nonprofit Innovation Center. The goal for the visit to the State Capitol was to build working relationships with policymakers in order to position NCG as a resource for connecting the public sector to philanthropy and as a partner in shared efforts to strengthen the communities of California. We met with staff from the offices of Senator Mark Leno (District 3), Senate President pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (District 6), Senator Loni Hancock (District 9) and Speaker of the Assembly, John A. Pérez (Assembly District 46). These visits were a very successful first step in laying the groundwork for relationship-building between our sectors. Since we are focused on many of the same issues as our state legislators, we will be working more and more closely with legislative staff in Sacramento to stay on top of ongoing budget conversations, legislative priorities and possible opportunities for public-private collaboration. During the NCG board meeting in Sacramento, the board members dug more deeply into the question of what NCG’s role is in the policy arena. After conducting some research, the board decided to revive the “Legs & Regs” function of the Public Policy Committee. This committee will lead efforts to track policy issues and build relationships with policymakers. When particular legislative or regulatory issues have sector-wide impact, this group will recommend that NCG respond on behalf of its members. To strengthen our sector, provide transparency and enable effectiveness, the Public Policy Committee will continue to explore new ways to build bridges between policymakers and grantmakers and to respond to issues related to philanthropy and our communities. PROMOTION OF THE FIELD: One of NCG’s priorities is to strengthen its capacity in public

policy, as a provider of policy-related grantmaker education and as an effective policy link and resource for the northern California grantmaker community. The visits to the State Capitol, the “Legs & Regs” sub-committee and the Public Policy Philanthropy Digest are examples of our efforts to become a more comprehensive policy resource for our members.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: NCG Goes to Sacramento www.ncg.org/sacramento NCG Public Policy Committee www.ncg.org/ppc


TRACKING AND TRENDS

“Turning 30 means maturity and poise. It also means a realization that you are not yet even halfway through your journey, but with your maturity you can look back and learn from your mistakes and apply them to your tomorrows. Turning 30 is about your future because your past is small in comparison.”

“30 is when you know who you are but [are] still exploring many possibilities.”

NCG Members Share—What Did Turning 30 Mean to You: Turning 30 was scary, until I crossed the threshold, then I realized that I was just hitting my stride...go for it NCG!

“That you have enough experience on which to reflect and from which to learn and have time to experience new things and go in different directions.”

“NCG must recognize the growing dimensions of grantmaking approach and practice, and be prepared to serve and lead a new configuration of grantmakers for effective and impactful giving.” —COLIN LACON, PRESIDENT & CEO nORTHERN CALIFORNIA GRANTMAKERS


TRACKING AND TRENDS

Tracking & Trends

Exploring the Future of NCG ST RAT EG I C V I S I O NING

The past few years have seen dramatic shifts in the field of

philanthropy, including the range of people who participate in philanthropy, the increased importance of networks as a tool for social change, and the larger scale of challenges the field seeks to address. NCG must make corresponding changes in how we provide education, advocacy and networking opportunities to our members. To explore our role in the future, NCG identified some key questions that must be answered: •

How do we provide value to the field of philanthropy?

How do we provide value to its members?

What changes are on the horizon for philanthropy?

What do these changes mean for our members?

How can we help our members explore and adapt to these changes?

In 2012, NCG will use these questions to create a map for the future that recognizes these changes, identifies who we seek to serve, and articulates what we can effectively provide to those people and institutions.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: NCG Planning www.ncg.org/planning

TRACKING AND TRENDS: As NCG seeks to serve as the representative voice of

philanthropy in the region, we must recognize the growing dimensions of grantmaking approach and practice. Programs and resources must be rationalized to create value for a range of structures for engaged giving. The Strategic Planning process is a central way the organization will look ahead at the changing environment and be prepared to serve and lead a new configuration of grantmakers and their reach for effective and impactful giving.


OVER THE YEARS A GLIMPSE BACK INTO ncg aRCHIVES

NCG ARTICLES OF INCORORATION, 1981

A NEW PARTNERSHIP, 1983 FIRST REPORT OF NCG’S ARTS LOAN FUND DETAILING ACTIVITIES AND GRANTEE AND FUNDER EXPERIENCES

PERSPECTIVES ON COLLABORATIVE FUNDING, 1985 REVIEW OF THE WIDE-RANGING COLLABORATIVE ACTIVITIES NCG MEMBERS HAD BEEN INVOLVED IN TO DATE

WHAT WE’VE LEARNED, 1995 NCG’S TASK ON HOMELESSNESS RETROSPECTIVE ON SIX YEARS OF GRANTMAKING

EARTHQUAKE BULLETIN: FINAL REPORT, 1990 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF LOMA PRIETA REPORT OUTLINING DISASTER RELIEF AND RESPONSE EFFORTS


AND todAY IN 2011 NCG CONVENED AS A NETWORK OF 154 INSTITUTIONS & more than 1,600 iNDIVIDUALS

THEY COLLECTIVELY GAVE OVER $3 BILLION REPRESENTING 46% OF ALL GIVING IN CALIFORNIA

‌}­

24%

38% LOCAL

NATIONAL

16%

STATEWIDE

14%

REGIONAL

8%

INTERNATIONAL

THEY REPRESENT

THEY SUPPORT

A DIVERSE RANGE OF GIVING TYPES:

A VARIETY OF ISSUE AREAS:

FAMILY FOUNDATIONS

36%

PRIVATE FOUNDATIONS

18%‌

CORPORATE FOUNDATIONS

OTHER TYPES

16&

Social Justice EDUCATION econmic development

& culture Health arts HUMAN SERVICES children & youth

environment SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

‌{­

10%

GOVERNMENT GRANTMAKERS

7%

COMMUNITY FOUNDATIONS

6%

PUBLIC FOUNDATIONS

6%

‌}­

PHILANTHROPIC ADVISORS 3% PUBLIC CHARITIES 3% FOCUS FUNDS 1% GIVING CIRCLES 1% INTERMEDIARIES 1% DONOR ADVISED FUNDS 1% FEDERATED FUNDS 1% OPERATING FOUNDATIONS 1%


Inspiration, Community & Leadership

2011 Members & Donors INCLUD I N G FO U NDING ME MB E R S O F NCG FRO M 1981 & ADDIT IO NAL CO NT RIB U TO RS

Gap Inc. The Fred Gellert Family Foundation Genentech Foundation The Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation Give Something Back Give2Asia Lisa and Douglas Goldman Fund Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund Joanne and Peter Haas, Jr. Fund Mimi and Peter Haas Fund Walter and Elise Haas Fund Crescent Porter Hale Foundation The Hearst Foundations Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation The Hellman Family Foundation The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley Horizons Foundation Humboldt Area Foundation The James Irvine Foundation George Frederick Jewett Foundation Jewish Community Endowment Fund The Ken and Judith Joy Family
 Foundation Junior League of San Francisco Kaiser Permanente Kalliopeia Foundation Mitchell Kapor Foundation W. K. Kellogg Foundation The Kimball Foundation David L. Klein, Jr. Foundation Koret Foundation

2010 ANNUAL REPORT

City of San Francisco Arts Commission Caroline Tower City of San Francisco, Department of Children, Youth & Their Families Organizations City of San Francisco, Grants for the AAA Insurance Arts AdminiTrust LLC City of San Francisco, Mayor’s
Office of Adobe Foundation Housing, Community Development Division Akonadi Foundation City of San Jose, Office of
 Cultural The Jenifer Altman Foundation Affairs Atkinson Foundation The Clorox Company Foundation Bank of America Foundation College Access Foundation of California Bank of Marin Columbia Foundation Banks Family Foundation Community Foundation of Santa Cruz S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation County Blue Shield of California Foundation Compton Foundation The Bothin Foundation S. H. Cowell Foundation Frank H. and Eva B. Buck Foundation William H. Donner Foundation California Bar Foundation Dunspaugh-Dalton Foundation California Consumer Protection The Durfee Foundation Foundation East Bay Community Foundation Cal Humanities eBay Foundation The California Endowment The Endurance Fund California HealthCare Foundation California HIV/AIDS Research Program EF (formerly Entrepreneurs Foundation) The California Wellness Foundation Family Philanthropy Advisors Firelight Foundation Candelaria Fund First 5 Alameda County Marguerite Casey Foundation First 5 Solano County Chamberlin Family Foundation Fledgling Fund JPMorgan Chase & Co. Fleishhacker Foundation The Christensen Fund The Flora Family Foundation Cisco Systems The Ford Foundation City of Berkeley, Civic Arts Program French American Charitable Trust City of Oakland, Cultural Arts & Friedman Family Foundation Marketing Division City of Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Full Circle Fund Commission Gagarin Trust

LIFETIME MEMBER


2010 ANNUAL REPORT

ncg members enjoy the 2011 annual meeting

Shinnyo-en Foundation Sierra Health Foundation Silicon Valley Community
Foundation Silver Giving Foundation Patricia D. & William B.
Smullin Foundation Sobrato Family Foundation Y & H Soda Foundation The Special Hope
Foundation The Springcreek Foundation W. Clement and Jessie V.
 Stone Foundation Levi Strauss Foundation Stuart Foundation Morris Stulsaft Foundation Stupski Foundation SV2 Target Corporation TCC Group, San Francisco Office The Thomson Family
 Foundation Tides Foundation TomKat Charitable Trust Union Bank United Way of the Bay Area Wayne and Gladys Valley
Foundation VanLobenSels/RembeRock
Foundation Vodafone Americas Foundation The Walther Foundation Lawrence Welk Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation The Whitman Institute The Women’s Foundation
 of California Zellerbach Family
Foundation ZeroDivide™

2011 ANNUAL REPORT

Leavens Foundation Dean & Margaret Lesher
 Foundation Thomas J. Long Foundation The Marcled Foundation Marin Community Foundation McKesson Foundation The Joseph R. McMicking Foundation Media Democracy Fund Microsoft Corporation Gordon and Betty Moore
 Foundation Moss Adams Foundation Open Society Foundations Oracle USA, Inc. Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe Foundation
 Pacific Forest and
Watershed Lands
 Stewardship Council Pacific Gas and Electric Company The David and Lucile
Packard Foundation The Lucile Packard
Foundation for Children’s Health Pajaro Valley Community
Health Trust Penney Family Fund Philanthropic Ventures
Foundation John & Lisa Pritzker Family Fund Quixote Foundation Kenneth Rainin Foundation Rappaport Family Foundation REDF The Richmond Community
Foundation Rockefeller Philanthropy
Advisors Rosenberg Foundation Salesforce.com Foundation The San Francisco
Foundation The Charles Schwab
Foundation


Northern California Grantmakers Annual Report 30 years of INS P IR AT IO N

+ CO MMU NIT Y + LE ADE RS H IP

FIND US ONLINE AT WWW.NCG.ORG NCG offices are located at 625 Market Street, Suite 300 San Francisco, California 94105 tel 415.777.4111 | fax 415.777.1714

Northern California Grantmakers 2011 Annual Report  

Our 2011 Annual Report celebrates all that NCG has accomplished serving the philanthropic community over the last 30 years, and turns the co...

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