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2012 ANNUAL REPORT

Northern California Grantmakers 2012 Annual Report

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2012 Staff PRESIDENT & CEO

PROGRAMS

MEMBER SERVICES &

Colin Lacon

Angela Jones Program Specialist Effective Philanthropy & Family Philanthropy Exchange

COMMUNICATIONS

Jamie Schenker Program Specialist Peer Networks and Collaborative Philanthropy

Barbara Camacho Membership Associate

ADMINISTRATION

Myra Bicknell Director of Operations Suki O’Kane Director of Operations Jenny Chinn Administrative Associate

Julia Indovina Director of Communications & Member Services

Marisela Orta Communications Associate

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA GRANTMAKERS (NCG) is a regional association of foundations, corporate contributions programs and other public and private grantmakers. Started in 1965 and incorporated in 1981, NCG has grown to support the activity of nearly 170 member grantmakers active in northern California, with combined grantmaking of more than $3 billion annually. NCG enhances the effectiveness of philanthropy by supporting regional grantmakers’ efforts to learn, promote the field and connect to peers and resources. For more information visit: www.ncg.org

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Providing Value to Our Members Now… and in the Future F RO M CO L I N L ACO N , P R E S IDE NT & CE O

NCG PRESIDENT & CEO, COLIN LACON

IT’S BEEN A BUSY YEAR AT NCG ON MULTIPLE FRONTS. WE’VE

2012 ANNUAL REPORT

continued to fulfill our mission to help our members connect with each other, learn from each other and support each other. But we’ve also turned our attention to the future. Over the past twelve months, we’ve immersed ourselves in a strategic planning process to develop a roadmap of ways to help our members reach their goals in a changing world. Many of you participated in our “listening tour” of interviews, focus groups and surveys, and we appreciate your time and honest feedback. It’s also important to thank our dedicated board members who were committed to this process and continued to push our thinking to new levels. We made a great deal of progress, and this annual report will start to share some of the key themes that we heard during these conversations. NCG also continued to provide high-caliber skill-building and professional development programming, convening opportunities and support around the public policy issues affecting philanthropy over the year. The following pages offer snapshots of the kinds of events, briefings and opportunities that we offered to our members and the broader philanthropic field. These stories highlight the spectrum of funders that we support, including newcomers to the philanthropic field, corporate philanthropy professionals and families engaged in philanthropy. We’ve also included a story about our efforts to team up with the other California regional associations of grantmakers to visit policymakers in Washington, DC, which showcases how NCG has worked with a variety of different partners during the year. We’re proud of our work this year – and look forward to exploring new directions with you in the future.

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2012 ANNUAL REPORT

2012 Leadership Board of Directors & Member Committees A N E T WO R K O F VO LU NT E E R S

BOARD CHAIR

BOARD MEMBERS

Judy Patrick

Cedric Brown

Christy Pichel

President & CEO

Chief Executive Officer

President

The Women’s Foundation of California

Mitchell Kapor Foundation

Stuart Foundation

VICE CHAIR

Diane Littlefield

Retha Robinson

Bob Uyeki

Director of Program Investments

Director, Koshland Program

Executive Director

Sierra Health Foundation

The San Francisco Foundation

Dean Osaki

Brenda Solórzano

TREASURER

Senior Specialist

Chief Program Director

Carla Javits

Target Corporation Western Region

Blue Shield of California Foundation

Y & H Soda Foundation

President REDF

Diane Parnes Trustee

SECRETARY

Fatima Angeles Director of Evaluation and Organizational Learning California Wellness Foundation

VICE CHAIR AT LARGE

Tessie Guillermo President and CEO ZeroDivide

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Silicon Valley Social Venture Fund (SV2)

Carrie Varoquiers President McKesson Foundation


NCG MEMBERS MELISSA BOILON, LYN ISHIHARA, VIRGINIA SAPIRO AND PAT LOOMES MINGLE AT THE 2012 ANNUAL MEETING.

Lisa Handley

ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Community Relations Director

John Esterle

Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP

Executive Director The Whitman Institute

FAMILY PHILANTHROPY EXCHANGE

Tiffany Price Director of Assistance and Managing Mitchell Kapor Foundation

Rae Richman Director Bay Area Office Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (RPA)

Wendy Todd Program Director

Pat Krackov Program Officer Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Megan McTiernan Executive Director Thomson Family Foundation

Marin Community Foundation

EMERGENCY LOAN FUND PUBLIC POLICY

Jillian Galbete Vice President Community Investments Full Circle Fund

Kate Wing

MEMBERSHIP

Program Officer

Sara Davis

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

Director of Grants Administration

ARTS LOAN FUND

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation

BAY AREA ASSET FUNDERS NETWORK

2012 ANNUAL REPORT

CORPORATE CONTRIBUTIONS ROUNDTABLE

Jennifer Kawar Director Nonprofit Finance Fund

Andrea Small Controller BSR

Karen Park

Joanne Greenstein

Office of Cultural Affairs

Philanthropic Advisor

City of San Jose

Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors

Shelley Trott Sr. Program Officer Kenneth Rainin Foundation

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2012 ANNUAL REPORT

Financial Statement AUD I T ED AS O F DE C E MB E R 31 , 2012

INCOME

ACTIVITIES

EARNED 6%

2012

2011

$ 735,400

$ 768,660

417,771

520,810

71,145

72,361

$ 1,224,316

$ 1,361,831

$ 801,822

$ 1,003,136

Professional Services

201,453

109,667

Non-Personnel

306,055

295,291

INCOME

Membership Dues CONTRIBUTED 34%

Contributed Income Earned Income TOTAL INCOME EXPENSES

Salaries and Wages MEMBERSHIP DUES 60%

Grantmaking

4,880

15,000

TOTAL EXPENSES

$ 1,314,209

$ 1,423,094

TOTAL INCREASE (DECREASE)

$ (89,893)

$ (61,263)

COLLABORATIVE FUNDS AT NCG DISTRIBUTED OVER $675K INTO NINE BAY AREA COUNTIES

EXPENSES ELF GRANTS 1%

MEMBER SERVICES 19%

COLLABORATIVE PROGRAMS 9%

EFFECTIVE PHILANTHROPY 45%

EMERGENCY LOAN FUND 27%

ADMINISTRATION 24%

FUNDRAISING 3%

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ARTS LOAN FUND 72%


2012 ANNUAL REPORT

FINANCIAL POSITION

2012

2011

Cash and cash equivalents

$ 511,199

$ 607,146

Short-term investments

2,000,000

1,803,599

Accounts

24,278

32,386

Contributions

71,500

101,500

383,132

556,224

(71,442)

(103,018)

ASSETS

Receivables

Loans Prepaid expenses and other Office Equipment TOTAL ASSETS

1,628

2,279

$ 2,920,295

$ 3,000,137

$

$

LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE LIABILITIES

Accounts Payable

5,682

7,147

Deferred membership and program fees

51,060

49,278

Payable to fiduciary groups

47,137

26,649

Accrued liabilities and other TOTAL LIABILITIES

11,569

5,957

$115,448

$89,032

$ 2,258,505

$ 2,319,768

652,600

652,600

FUND BALANCE

Net Assets Board-Designated Reserve

(106,258)

(61,263)

TOTAL FUND BALANCE

Change in Net Assets

$ 2,804,848

$ 2,911,105

TOTAL LIABILITIES & FUND BALANCE

$ 2,920,295

$ 3,000,137

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What can you expect in the future from NCG: • New opportunities for deeper engagement • New opportunities for collaboration • New opportunities to leverage the power of our network • Continuing opportunities for learning and skill-building

STRATEGIC PLANNING

“As our field continues to shift and grow, collaboration and shared learning becomes increasingly important. I’m excited to be part of NCG’s new focus on empowering and supporting groups of our members to take the lead in selecting issues where we can increase our impact by working together.” —JUDY PATRICK, NCG BOARD CHAIR AND PRESIDENT OF THE

“This process broadened our thinking about how we support the greater giving community.

WOMEN’S FOUNDATION OF CALIFORNIA

With our members, we can build a more flexible, interactive network that invites broader philanthropic participation.” — COLIN LACON

PRESIDENT & CEO, NCG

“A key reminder from this process was that we need to take advantage of our location in and around Silicon Valley and more widely employ smart technology tools in our program and leadership work.” —DIANE PARNES NCG & SILICON VALLEY SOCIAL VENTURE FUND BOARD MEMBER

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STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS

Strategic Planning Process

NCG’s Role in the Future E VO LV I N G WIT H T H E F I E L D O F P H ILANT H RO PY

IN 2012, NCG PARTICIPATED IN A STRATEGIC PLANNING PROCESS TO

identify the best ways to support our members and help them achieve maximum impact in the future. Over the year, we worked with Arabella Advisors to solicit input from more than 70 stakeholders through interviews, written feedback, an online forum, surveys, an in-person focus group and charrettes. We reached out to a wide range of individuals, including current and former board members, current NCG members, potential NCG members and partner organizations. All of the feedback consistently pointed to the importance of networking in today’s philanthropic world and how this has greatly evolved as a result of changing giving models, new technology and emerging markets. Moving forward, NCG will explore new ways to help our sector connect and collaborate with each other. We want to take our existing networking and convening expertise to a new level, redefining how we think about and use networking for maximum impact. In 2013, we’ll continue to offer our skill-building and educational programming and we will increase our focus on adding opportunities for member-driven engagement and collaboration throughout our work.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: www.ncg.org/planning

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“Participants get a comprehensive overview of the many aspects of grantmaking that you literally can’t get anywhere else … not even on-the-job training will provide a grantmaker with the skills they can learn quickly at NGI.” —ANGELA JONES, NCG PROGRAM SPECIALIST

“The people I met at NGI count among my most trusted colleagues, just as NCG President and CEO Colin Lacon promised in the opening minutes of the 2012 program.” —JESSICA WEARE, MICROSOFT CITIZENSHIP COORDINATOR AND 2012 NEW GRANTMAKERS INSTITUTE ALUM

STRATEGIC PLANNING

“We confirmed that NCG’s professional development opportunities for novice program officers are valued by our members. However, we also learned that there is a demand for more activities and opportunities that meet the needs of experienced philanthropists and seasoned CEOs.” —FATIMA ANGELES, NCG BOARD MEMBER AND DIRECTOR OF EVALUATION AND ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING AT THE CALIFORNIA WELLNESS FOUNDATION

“This workshop has heightened my comfort level in non-profit finance. As I review hundreds of proposals a year, it is essential that I am confident in my grantmaking skills including understanding how to read financial statements.” —AIMEE ENG, PROGRAM OFFICER, THOMAS J. LONG FOUNDATION AND 2012 NEW GRANTMAKERS INSTITUTE ALUM 10 10


Grantmaker Education

New Grantmakers Institute L E A RN I N G E SS E NT I AL S K I L L S & ST RAT E G IE S TO SUCC E E D IN P H IL ANT H R O PY

IN APRIL, NCG HELD ITS ANNUAL NEW GRANTMAKERS INSTITUTE (NGI),

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT

a two-day workshop designed to help new grantmakers gain the expertise needed to thrive in philanthropy. Over 45 professionals attended the training to learn about topics such as the legal aspects of grantmaking and how to spot red flags in grantee financial statements. The curriculum for the workshop was created through a partnership between the Council of Foundations and the Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers. This year’s session included new topics such as reading financial statements and using social media in philanthropy. The workshop provided these new grantmakers with the valuable opportunity to develop a network of peers. They also interacted with prominent leaders in the field of philanthropy who served as NGI faculty. Seasoned veterans such as Judy Belk, Senior Vice President at Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors; David Greco, Western Region Vice President at the Nonprofit Finance Fund and Colburn Wilbur, a Trustee at The David and Lucile Packard Foundation, were able to tell personal stories about their own experiences as part of the training.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: www.ncg.org/NGI2012

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT: One of NCG’s priorities is to serve as the premiere provider of

grantmaker education and convening opportunities for our members. The New Grantmakers Institute is one of NCG’s Skill-Building Workshops, our professional development programs tailored to meet the needs of grantmakers in various stages of their careers.

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“The combination of understanding your values, your goals, your strengths and your limitations, and being comfortable with taking some risks – that’s a good recipe for high impact giving.” —INGER BRINCK, PANELIST AND DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMS, WOMEN’S FOUNDATION OF CALIFORNIA

“Four institutional values – originality, empathy, integrity and courage – guide the Levi Strauss Foundation’s long-haul commitment to advance justice and improve the lives of disadvantaged people. I’m delighted to see funders come together and explore how values-driven approaches can drive ‘outsized’ impact and meaningfully address the most vexing social issues of our time.” —DANIEL LEE, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LEVI STRAUSS FOUNDATION

Responsive Philanthropy

challenging grantmakers to strengthen communities

“The energy during this event was high, playful and had a spirit of camaraderie that was refreshing.” —HEATHER BERNIKOFF, PROGRAM OFFICER, CALIFORNIA CONSUMER PROTECTION FOUNDATION

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Grantmaker Education

Creating Values-Driven Philanthropy UN LOC KI N G T H E S E C R E T TO H I G H IMPACT G IVING

GRANTMAKERS WENDY TODD AND TRINA VILLANUEVA AT THE 2012 NCG ANNUAL MEETING

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT

AS STATE AND FEDERAL BUDGETS SHRINK ACROSS THE COUNTRY, THE

philanthropic sector is often called upon to fill in the gaps. In March, over 35 colleagues from private, family, corporate and public foundations gathered at the San Francisco Foundation to hear how a number of local funders are working to leverage limited resources to create greater philanthropic impact. Panelists such as Cedric Brown from the Mitchell Kapor Foundation, Daniel Lee from the Levi Strauss Foundation and Ray Colmenar from the California Endowment discussed strategies for aligning a foundation’s values with its philanthropic practice to create positive and sustainable change. The session highlighted examples of unique programs that embody specific foundation values such as developing internal monitoring systems, incorporating racial equity analysis into grantmaking, and supporting state-level policy efforts.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: www.ncg.org/vdp

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT: One of NCG’s priorities is to serve as the premiere provider

of grantmaker education and convening opportunities for our members. Creating ValuesDriven Philanthropy: The Secret to High Impact Giving is an example of NCG’s Briefings & Gatherings, our interactive sessions that introduce grantmakers to concepts in effective philanthropy, new developments in grantmaking and updates on policy issues and legislation. 13


“Corporations are powerful platforms of convergence: employees, markets, communities - local and global. This is what businesses know how to do. This work has a moral dimension, but we shy away from it. It enhances the business imperative. Employees don’t check at the office door the person they want to be. Nor should you or I.” —PETER KAROFF, CHAIRMAN OF THE PHILANTHROPIC INITIATIVE

Tweets from 2012 NCG Corporate Philanthropy Institute NorCal Grantmakers @NorCalGrant

Is there a revolution or an evolution happening today in corporate #philanthropy? That’s what we’ll explore today. #csr #NCGcpi NorCal Grantmakers @NorCalGrant

Peter Karoff: Corporations are powerful platforms for convergence: employees, markets, communities––local and global. #NCGcpi NorCal Grantmakers @NorCalGrant

Peter Karoff: People don’t check at the office door the person they want to be. Nor should you or I. #NCGcpi NorCal Grantmakers @NorCalGrant

Question: How do you balance talking about your good work as a corporation w/assumption that publicizing news is self-serving? #NCGcpi NorCal Grantmakers @NorCalGrant

Peter: That’s the box you’re in based on the level of trust you have w/community. What you have to do has to be really excellent. #NCGcpi

“The terms ‘social innovation’ and ‘social entrepreneurship’ may be new to some in our field. CPI provided the venue for us to explore these new ideas, understand why they are important and how they fit with our work.” —LISA HANDLEY, FORMER ORRICK, HERRINGTON & SUTCLIFFE FOUNDATION DIRECTOR AND CHAIR OF NCG’S CORPORATE CONTRIBUTIONS ROUNDTABLE STEERING COMMITTEE

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Grantmaker Convening

2012 Corporate Philanthropy Institute L AUN C HI N G A “ CO R P O R AT E S O CIAL (R)E VO LU T IO N”

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT

TO SOLVE THE WORLD’S MOST PRESSING PROBLEMS, PEOPLE ARE developing businesses with social missions, adopting entrepreneurial strategies to further their community agenda and engaging entire companies to address social problems. This trend has significant implications for how companies do business and how they go about their community engagement. In June, over 55 corporate philanthropy professionals gathered for the Corporate Philanthropy Institute (CPI) where they could explore many new ideas and concepts in social innovation, ranging from social entrepreneurship to shared value to B corporations. In the opening plenary speech, Peter Karoff, chairman of The Philanthropic Initiative, talked about how the corporate grantmaking landscape is shifting and underscored the importance of recognizing that there is no one way to do this kind of work. After his speech, a diverse slate of presenters talked about different models and approaches being used in this arena, including the McKesson Foundation‘s soon-to-launch Giving Comfort program, which aligns naturally with the company’s expertise in the healthcare industry; Mission Hub, which provides a physical space where social entrepreneurs can come together to exchange ideas; Hewlett Packard’s discussion of new strategies for engaging employees; and the Council on Foundations’ report on new approaches to enhance corporate philanthropy. The CPI closed with an exciting discussion with Starbucks and GOOD/Corp & Purpose, two of the visionary organizations in the social innovation arena who are leveraging corporate philanthropy and social media to build social movements.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: www.ncg.org/CPI2012

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT: One of NCG’s priorities is to serve as the premiere provider

of grantmaker education and convening opportunities for our members. The Corporate Contributions Roundtable is one of our affinity networks, which allows corporate foundation staff the opportunity to connect with their peers to learn best practices in philanthropy. 15


Five trends that are slowly reshaping the landscape: • Deep budget deficits at local, state and federal levels • Fundamental tax reform at the federal level which will affect how the incentive structure works for how charity in philanthropy operates • Deeply dysfunctional [read polarized] political system at the federal level • Idea that 2010 Citizens United Supreme Court case has dramatically changed campaign finance • Boundary blurring going on across all sectors: nonprofit, for-profit and government

“There is so much I learned today about what is possible … How do we take our model and think about it in a different way to still be able to effect social change for good?” —KIKI MILLS JOHNSTON CEO, FULL CIRCLE FUND

“An awful lot has changed in the way we use private resources for public good. And the way we think about philanthropy. There has been an explosion in social businesses and changes in political roles and the role of technology, and we’re trying to understand the whole.” —LUCY BERNHOLZ PROJECT LEADER, #RECODING GOOD

“The philanthropic sector must be involved in mapping out this emerging space and highlighting what policies and practices are actually having an impact in creating more public good.” —JAMES HEAD, VICE PRESIDENT OF PROGRAMS AT THE SAN FRANCISCO FOUNDATION

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Grantmaker Convening

#ReCoding Good COM I N G TO GE T H E R FO R T H E 2 012 NCG A N N UA L ME E T I NG

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT

THE SOCIAL ECONOMY IS MEANT TO CAPTURE ALL THE WAYS THAT

private resources are used to produce public good. In the past, the bulk of this work was contained within the world of nonprofits and philanthropy. As the ways to work have diversified and created a new social economy, the rules for guiding this economy need to be created as well. Do the rules and norms that shape how we use private resources for public good – many of which are decades old and predate the digital era – still apply? To explore answers to this question, NCG brought Lucy Bernholz and Rob Reich, leaders of #ReCoding Good, part of the Project on Philanthropy, Policy and Technology at Stanford University, to share their thinking about the changing landscape, what it means to #ReCodeGood and what the possible effects are for the philanthropic field.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: www.ncg.org/ReCodeGood

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT: One of NCG’s priorities is to serve as the premiere provider of

grantmaker education and convening opportunities for our members. Our annual meeting gives all of our members the chance to connect with their peers.

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“It is possible to successfully manage your wealth for impact and profit in a manner that aligns with your philanthropic goals. When coupled with a thoughtful approach to grantmaking, this emerging strategy can help families to work across generations and invest for a better world.” —DR. JULIA BALANDINA-JAQUIER, AUTHOR OF THE “GUIDE TO IMPACT INVESTING FOR FAMILY OFFICES AND HIGH NET WORTH INDIVIDUALS”

STRATEGIC PLANNING

“Looking ahead, NCG absolutely must connect with new generations of individual donors in mutually beneficial partnerships – either through forwardthinking channels or more traditional philanthropic institutions – to advance our mission of enhancing the effectiveness of philanthropy.” — CEDRIC BROWN,

NCG BOARD MEMBER AND CEO OF THE MITCHELL KAPOR FOUNDATION

NCG MEMBERS JUSTIN DAVIS, JAMIE SCHENKER AND SANDRA TREACY ENJOY THE DISCUSSION AT THE 2012 ANNUAL MEETING

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Grantmaker Convening

Impact Investing and Family Philanthropy D EL I V ER I NG A O N E -T WO P U N C H

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT

WEALTHY FAMILIES, THEIR FOUNDATIONS AND FAMILY OFFICES ARE expressing growing interest in impact investing as an effective solution for combining their philanthropic aspirations with their financial objectives. In July, the NCG Family Philanthropy Exchange and The National Center for Family Philanthropy held “Impact Investing and Family Philanthropy,” the first webinar in the new Family Philanthropy Webinar Series. Dr. Julia Balandina-Jaquier, a seasoned impact investor and author of the “Guide to Impact Investing for Family Offices and High Net Worth Individuals,” provided participants with practical guidelines and concrete tools on this topic. She also shared an array of personal stories from over 40 philanthropic families involved in impact investing, highlighting their successes, learning, mistakes and best practices in order to provide an entryway to impact investing for private investors and philanthropists who seek to make a greater social and financial impact.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: www.ncg.org/ImpactInvestFPE

DIRECT ENGAGEMENT: One of NCG’s priorities is to serve as the premiere provider

of grantmaker education and convening opportunities for our members. The Family Philanthropy Exchange is one of our affinity networks allowing family foundation staff the opportunity to connect with their peers to learn best practices in family philanthropy.

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IN 2012 NCG PROVIDED 52 DIFFERENT SKILL BUILDING WORKSHOPS & PHILANTHROPY, ISSUE & POLICY BRIEFINGS INCLUDING:

Annual California Budget Project Analysis • Bay Area Asset Funders Network Meeting: Building a Base for Asset-Building Policies and Strategies • AFJ Advocacy Grantmaking workshop • New Grantmakers Institute • Financial Analysis 101 • Corporate Philanthropy Institute (CPI): Corporate Social (R)evolution • Financial Analysis 201 [East Bay] • Financial Analysis 201 [South Bay] • Communication Series Part 1: How Can Foundations Effectively Work with Their Grantees • Communication Series Part 2: How Foundations Can Effectively Work With Media for Social Impact • Financial Analysis for Grantmakers 101 • An Introduction to Nonprofit Finance Fund’s Financial SCAN • Financial Analysis For Grantmakers 201 • NCG Communications Series Part 3 | Evaluating Your Communications: Are Your Efforts Having Real Impact? • Finding Common Ground, Valuing Different Views • Building the Capacity of California’s Diverse Communities: The Community Leadership Project • Catalysts for Change: How California Nonprofits Can Deliver Services and Transform Communities • Seizing the Moment for Reform: Building an Effective Criminal Justice Movement in CA in Age of Realignment • Creating Your Giving Identity: Tools and Tips for Next Gen Philanthropists • From the Source: Working With A Living Donor • Creating Values-Driven Philanthropy: The Secret to High Impact Giving • Diversity Series - Hidden Bias • Diverse Voices in Family Giving • Investing California: Making an Impact on Education Policy in • FPE Family Philanthropy Forum: Ins and Outs of Site Visits • At the Wheel: Women in Family Philanthropy • Diversity Series: Kellogg’s Racial Healing Initiative • Influencing Our Built Environment: Creating Healthy, Sustainable Communities • Youth Voice: Supporting Youth to Promote Systems Change • Bay Area Asset Funders Network: Savings at Scale: Ideas, Trends and Emerging Opportunities • Celebrating Milestones in Family Philanthropy • Film Series Part 1: We Were Here • Impact Investing and Family Philanthropy: A One-Two Punch • Leveraging Limited Dollars for Impact • Bay Area Asset Funders Network: Higher Education - An Asset Building Strategy in Peril? • Diversity Series : D5 Diversity in Philanthropy in all Dimensions • Performance Review: Evaluating the Family Foundation CEO • Family Philanthropy Forum: The Ins and Outs of Funding Film and Media • California Philanthropy’s Role in Leveraging Federal Dollars: Dept of Education • California Philanthropy’s Role in Leveraging Federal Dollars: HUD • Family Philanthropy Forum: Avoiding Leaky Pipes: Enhancing Donor-Grantee Collaboration • Creating Shared Value: Linking Social Progress to Business Success • Generating Change: Promising Practices for Investing in Grantee Leadership • Working Together For Common Purpose: Family Offices and Family Philanthropy • Bay Area Asset Funders Network: Higher Education - Building Assets for Very Low Income Families • Family Philanthropy Forum: 2012 Docket Tales 20


IN 2012 NCG PROVIDED 18 MEMBER GATHERINGS & CONVENINGS INCLUDING:

NCG Annual Meeting: #ReCode Good • Leadership Conversation with COF President and CEO Vikki Spruill • Joint Affinity Network Holiday Party • CCR Roundtable • School Based Health Center Funder Advisory Meeting • NCG New Member Orientation and Mixer • BABIP: State of the Race Conference & Gala Reception • School Based Health Center Funder Roundtable • NCG Book Club: Pale Horse, Pale Rider; The Optimists Daughter; Salvage the Bones; The Fixer; The Moviegoer • Discussion with Governor’s Advisor on Realignment • Measuring the Networked Nonprofit: Meet the Authors 2121


“In one of our meetings, an agency staff member remarked that ‘having philanthropic support is a sign of credibility.’ What a great compliment to our sector.” —JULIA INDOVINA, DIRECTOR, MEMBER SERVICES AND COMMUNICATIONS, NCG

STRATEGIC PLANNING

“The research showed that our members see great value in having NCG connect disparate types of funders around common policy objectives. We will be looking for more opportunities for NCG to be the policy, legislation and regulatory voice for philanthropy in California.” — TESSIE GUILLERMO,

NCG BOARD MEMBER AND PRESIDENT & CEO, ZERO DIVIDE

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Promoting the Field of Philanthropy

2012 Foundations on the Hill BRI N G I N G P H I L ANT H R O PY TO WAS H INGTO N, DC

PROMOTION OF THE FIELD

EACH YEAR, GRANTMAKERS HEAD TO WASHINGTON, DC TO MEET WITH

policymakers during an event called “Foundations on the Hill.” In 2012, the three California regional associations decided to attend this event as a single California delegation. Most participants go to Capitol Hill to meet with members of Congress and their staff. However, the California delegation took a slightly different approach this year. They made it a priority to meet with agency staff who were responsible for areas of government that impact some of the issues on which our members work. For example, the Obama Administration has created the Neighborhood Revitalization Intiative, an interagency collaboration between the Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Education, Justice, Treasury, and Health and Human Services agencies. This collaboration is intended to make it easier for local leaders to access support for cradle-to-career educational programs, public safety strategies and community health center improvements. The California delegation secured meetings with three of these four agencies to discuss opportunities for philanthropic collaboration, federal funding, appropriate connections to staff and resources, and to share some of the work that funders in California are doing in their respective areas of interest. In addition to these meetings, the California delegation met with staff in the offices of Senator Dianne Feinstein and Senator Barbara Boxer as well as the DCbased lobbyists in the California Governor’s Office.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: http://www.ncglists.org/ news/?p=3892

PROMOTION OF THE FIELD: One of NCG’s priorities is to strengthen its capacity in public

policy, as a provider of policy-related grantmaker education and as an effective policy link and resource for the northern California grantmaker community. This trip to Washington, DC is one example of our efforts to become a more comprehensive policy resource for our members.

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TRACKING AND TRENDS

“As an NCG member, the Annual CA Budget Analysis program is one of the events that I find most useful as a grantmaker and an engaged CA resident. The presentations are always high quality and informative. I never miss it.” —JAMIE ALLISON-HOPE, SENIOR PROGRAM OFFICER, S.H. COWELL FOUNDATION

VOTERS TO FACE TOUGH CHOICES ON BUDGET

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San Jose Mercu

NCG, SCG and SDG have signed on to the Vote with Your Mission Campaign, a CalNonprofits nonpartisan effort that seeks to increase the number of people voting with the ideals and values that they bring with them into the nonprofit sector.

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Tracking & Trends

The Annual California Budget Project Analysis E XA M I N I NG T H E IMPAC T O N STAT E AND LO CAL PRO G RAMS A N D SERV IC E S

TRACKING AND TRENDS

ON JANUARY 5, 2012, GOVERNOR JERRY BROWN RELEASED HIS

proposed 2012-2013 fiscal year budget five days ahead of schedule. His $92.6 billion budget was designed to bridge a $9.2 billion deficit through a combination of spending cuts and tax increases as the state worked to find the path towards fiscal stability. In early February, over 30 NCG members gathered at the SFSU Downtown Center to hear Jean Ross, Executive Director of the California Budget Project, provide timely analysis of how this budget might impact the provision of services to children, families and communities in our region. She also provided an overview of some of the proposed ballot measures that were on the table and the proposed “trigger cuts” that could be made if state revenue projections were not met. After her presentation, Trent Rhorer, Executive Director of the San Francisco Human Services Agency, joined the conversation to provide a local perspective on how the changes to CalWorks would affect the social services programs under his agency’s purview.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE VISIT: www.ncg.org/CBP2012

TRACKING AND TRENDS: One of NCG’s priorities is to look ahead at the changing

environment and prepare our members to respond to trends that could have negative effects on the stability of communities in Northern California. This briefing is part of our Tracking and Trends programming.

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Inspiration, Community & Leadership

2012 Members & Donors

LIFETIME MEMBER Caroline Tower

ORGANIZATIONS

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Give Something Back Give2Asia Goggio Family Foundation Lisa and Douglas Goldman Fund Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund Mimi and Peter Haas Fund Walter and Elise Haas Fund Crescent Porter Hale Foundation The Hearst Foundations Clarence E. Heller Charitable Foundation The Hellman Family Foundation The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley Horizons Foundation Humboldt Area Foundation The James Irvine Foundation George F. Jewett Foundation Jewish Community Endowment Fund The Ken and Judith Joy Family Foundation Junior League of San Francisco Kaiser Permanente Kalliopeia Foundation Mitchell Kapor Foundation W. K. Kellogg Foundation The Kimball Foundation Koret Foundation Leavens Foundation Dean & Margaret Lesher
Foundation Thomas J. Long Foundation The Marcled Foundation Marin Community Foundation McKesson Foundation

2010 ANNUAL REPORT

AAA Insurance Adobe Foundation Akonadi Foundation Jenifer Altman Foundation Atkinson Foundation Bank of America Foundation Bank of Marin Banks Family Foundation S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation Blue Shield of California Foundation The Bothin Foundation Frank H. and Eva B. Buck Foundation Cal Humanities California Bar Foundation California Consumer Protection Foundation The California Endowment California HealthCare Foundation California HIV/AIDS Research Program The California Wellness Foundation Candelaria Fund Marguerite Casey Foundation Chamberlin Family Foundation JPMorgan Chase & Co. The Christensen Fund Cisco Systems Foundation City of Berkeley, Civic Arts Program City of Oakland, Cultural Arts and Marketing Division City of Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission City of San Francisco, Arts Commission

City of San Francisco, Department of Children, Youth & Their Families City of San Francisco, Grants for the Arts City of San Francisco, Mayor’s
Office of Housing, Community Development Division City of San Jose, Office of Cultural Affairs The Clorox Company College Access Foundation of California Columbia Foundation Community Foundation of Santa Cruz County Compton Foundation S. H. Cowell Foundation William H. Donner Foundation Dunspaugh-Dalton Foundation The Durfee Foundation East Bay Community Foundation eBay Foundation Family Philanthropy Advisors Firelight Foundation First 5 Alameda County First 5 Solano Children and Families Commission Fledgling Fund Fleishhacker Foundation The Flora Family Foundation The Ford Foundation Foundation for Youth Investment Friedman Family Foundation Full Circle Fund Gagarin Trust Gap Foundation Genentech Foundation The Wallace Alexander Gerbode Foundation


2010 ANNUAL REPORT

NCG MEMBERS ENJOY THE 2012 ANNUAL MEETING

The Springcreek Foundation W. Clement and Jessie V. Stone Foundation Levi Strauss Foundation Stuart Foundation Morris Stulsaft Foundation Stupski Foundation SV2 Target Corporation TCC Group, SF Office The Thomson Family Foundation Tides Foundation TomKat Charitable Trust Union Bank United Way of the Bay Area Wayne and Gladys Valley
Foundation VanLobenSels/RembeRock
Foundation Vodafone Americas Foundation The Walther Foundation Lawrence Welk Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation The Whitman Institute The Women’s Foundation of California Zellerbach Family Foundation ZeroDivide™

2012 ANNUAL REPORT

The Joseph R. McMicking Foundation Media Democracy Fund Metta Fund Microsoft Corporation Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Moss Adams Foundation Oracle USA, Inc. Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe Foundation
 Pacific Gas and Electric Company The David and Lucile
Packard Foundation The Lucile Packard
Foundation for Children’s Health Pajaro Valley Community
Health Trust Penney Family Fund Philanthropic Ventures
Foundation Lisa & John Pritzker Family Fund Kenneth Rainin Foundation Rappaport Family Foundation REDF The Richmond Community
Foundation Rockefeller Philanthropy
Advisors Rosenberg Ach Foundation Rosenberg Foundation Salesforce.com Foundation The San Francisco
Foundation Charles Schwab
Foundation Shinnyo-en Foundation Sierra Health Foundation Silicon Valley Community
Foundation Silver Giving Foundation May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust Sobrato Family Foundation Y & H Soda Foundation The Special Hope Foundation

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Northern California Grantmakers Annual Report

FIND US ONLINE AT WWW.NCG.ORG NCG offices are located at 625 Market Street, Suite 300 San Francisco, California 94105 tel 415.777.4111 | fax 415.777.1714

2012 Northern California Grantmakers Annual Report  
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