Page 1

MSc Sustainable Design Dissertation Queen University, Belfast Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering

The Potential of Green Roofs to Address Habitat Loss in Northern Ireland


The Potential of Green Roofs  to Address Habitat Loss in  Northern Ireland

MSc Sustainable Design Dissertation            Faculty of Engineering and Physical              Sciences School of Planning, Architecture and  Civil Engineering

QUEEN’S UNIVERSITY BELFAST  September 2011 

Noel Hughes                        15259021 

                     

i


ii


Abstract

The Potential of Green Roofs to Address Habitat Loss in Northern Ireland                                                               The aim of this report is to assess the potential, if any, for green roofs in urban areas to act  as habitat islands and the ability of such an approach to affect the local/regional ecology in  regards  to  both  flora  and  fauna  species.  An  investigation  into  green  roof  construction  and  the  characteristics  of  Northern  Ireland’s  natural  habitats  will  be  combined  to  evaluate  whether or not natural environments can be replicated on Northern Ireland’s rooftops. The  results  of  this  exercise  will  be  compared  to  international  examples  of  urban  green  roofing  programmes to assess the environmental value of such an undertaking in Northern Ireland.    The central goal of this report is to provide an informed argument on green roofs potential  on  Northern  Irish  ecologies  and  if  any  natural  habitat  is  capable  of  being  successfully  recreated  on  rooftops.  The  study  also  seeks  to  explore  whether  green  roofs  can  feasibly  counteract  natural  habitat  loss  in  Northern  Ireland  and  if  so  what  are  the  possible  environmental benefits to urban centre and the surrounding landscape. 

 

iii

i


Table of Contents 

Chapters and Heading of the Dissertation    Introduction  The Relationship between Green Roofs and Natural Habitats  In‐01  Green Roofs connection to Habitat Creation    In‐02  Habitat Loss in Northern Ireland       In‐03  Impact of Existing Green Roof on Surrounding Habitats  In‐04  International Approaches to Rooftop Greening        Methodology                  Chapter 1  Habitat Creation on Green Roofs        1‐01  Green Roof Components        1‐02  Structural Considerations        1‐03  Roof Slope            1‐04  Nutrients & Water Requirements      1‐05  Substrate Makeup          1‐06  Soil Depth and Planting Regiments      1‐07  Biological Limitations          1‐08  Green Roof Maintenance        1‐09  Insulating Effects of Green Roofs      1‐10  Benefits of Green Roof to the Urban Environments  1‐11  Green Roofs effect on People        1‐12  Habitats Favoured by Rooftop Environments        Chapter 2  Habitat Loss in Northern Ireland         2‐01  Tidal Marine Habitats          2‐02  Coastal Habitats          2‐03  Freshwater and Wetland Habitats      2‐04  Woodland Habitats          2‐05  Grassland Habitats          2‐06  Heathland Habitats          2‐07  Peatland Habitats                2‐08  Rate of Habitat Change        Chapter 3  Green Roofs and Created Habitats        3‐01  Sand Dunes / Shingles Banks Habitat Case Studies  3‐02  Cliffs and Slopes Habitat Case Studies      3‐03  Wetland Habitat Case Studies        3‐04  Woodland Habitat Case Studies       3‐05  Grassland Habitat Case Studies        3‐06  Heathland Habitat Case Studies        3‐07  Practical Implications of Rooftop Habitat Recreation  iv

       

       

       

…01 …02  …03  …04  …05 

…07

                       

                       

                       

…09 …10  …11  …12  …12  …13  …14  …15  …16  …16  …16  …17  …17 

               

               

               

…20 …22  …25  …28  …31  …34  …37  …40  …43 

             

             

             

…45 …47  …50  …53  …57  …60  …66  …70 

ii 


Chapter 4  Green Roof Habitat Creation for Northern Ireland          …72  4‐01  Urban Resources in Northern Ireland            …73  4‐02  Re‐establishment of Natural Habitats            …75  4‐03  Structural Viability of Green Roof Habitats          …76  4‐04  Expense of Green Roof Habitat Recreation          …77  4‐05  Northern Ireland Accommodating Green Roof Habitats                    …79      Conclusions  Are Green Roofs a Practical Ecological Recourse for Northern Ireland?      …85  Cn‐01  Green Roof and Habitats in Northern Ireland          …86  Cn‐02  Potential Benefits of Green Roof to Northern Ireland’s Urban Environments     …88  Cn‐03  Envisioned Setback to Green Roof development in Northern Ireland    …88  Cn‐04  Conclusion of Dissertation              …89        References                    …91        Appendix ‐A  Detailed Descriptions of Northern Ireland’s Natural Habitats                   …101        Appendix ‐B  Description of Northern Ireland’s Management of Sensitive Sites (MOSS) Scheme           …129 

 

v

iii


Table of Figures 

  Introduction  Figure 1 ‐ Northern Ireland Landscape 

NIEA. (2007). Northern Ireland Countryside Survey. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. [Photograph] 

Figure 2 ‐ 3 ‐ 419 Lafayette St, Manhattan 

Hurt, A.  (2003,  August  09).  Green  City.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Green_City.jpg 

Retrieved

August

22,

2011,

from

Wikipedia:

Figure 3 ‐ Lapwing breeding on the Green Roof 

Brenneisen, S. (2006). Space for Urban Wildlife: Designing Green Roofs as Habitats in Switzerland. Urban Habitats , 4  (1), 27‐36. [Photograph] (Author) 

Figure 4 ‐ Northern Ireland Grassland 

Countryside Survey.  (2007).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Countryside  Survey  UK:  London.  [Photograph] (Mark Wright) 

Figure 5 ‐ Moos Filtration Plant Wollishofen Zurich 

Gedge, D.  (2010,  March  15).  Green  Roofs  of  the  World  1  ‐  Moos  Filtration  Plant  Zurich.  Retrieved  June  21,  2011,  from Livingroofs.org: http://livingroofs.org/20100315195/green‐roofs‐of‐the‐world/moos‐zurich.html  [Photograph] (Author) 

Figure 6 ‐ Laban Dance Centre, London 

Gedge, D. (2002). Roofspace: a place for brownfield biodiversity? Ecos , 22, (3/4), 69–74. [Photograph] (Author) 

Figure 7 ‐ 47° pitched Roof Berlin‐Kreuzberg 

Köhler, M. (2006). Long‐Term Vegetation Research on Two Extensive Green Roofs in Berlin. Urban Habitats , 4 (1), 3‐ 26. [Photograph] (Author) 

Figure 8 ‐ Ufa‐Fabrik Center, Berlin‐Templehof 

Köhler, M. (2006). Long‐Term Vegetation Research on Two Extensive Green Roofs in Berlin. Urban Habitats , 4 (1), 3‐ 26. [Photograph] (Author) 

Chapter 1  Figure 1 ‐ M Central, Sydney 

Callaghan, G.  (2010,  August  19).  Gardens  in  the  sky.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  The  Australian:  http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/features/gardens‐in‐the‐sky/story‐e6frg8h6‐1225907217961 

Figure 2 ‐ Intensive Green Roof Structure 

Norphadrain® (2008)  The  inverted  roof  a  sound  construction  for  roof  decks!  [Photograph]  (Norphadrain®  Green  Roof Systems ‐ Promotional Material) 

Figure 3 ‐ Extensive Green Roof Structure 

Norphadrain® (2008)  The  inverted  roof  a  sound  construction  for  roof  decks!  [Photograph]  (Norphadrain®  Green  Roof Systems ‐ Promotional Material) 

Figure 4 ‐ PVC Waterproof Membrane 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 5 ‐ Extruded Polystyrene 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 6 ‐ Synthetic Drainage Board 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 7 ‐ Mineral/Organic Medium 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 8 ‐ Green Roof Substrate Layers 

Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2004). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland: Timber Press. 

Figure 9 ‐ 8 House, Oerestad, Copenhagen 

Carlson, D. (2010, August 10). BIG’s 8 House wins the 2010 Scandinavian Green Roof Award. Retrieved August 12,  2011,  from  David  Report:  http://davidreport.com/201008/big%E2%80%99s‐8‐house‐wins‐the‐2010‐scandinavian‐ green‐roof‐award/ 

Figure 10 ‐ Vancouver Convention 

Zemtseff, K. (2010, May 20). Wonder what a six‐acre green roof feels like? Retrieved July 28, 2011, from Seattle Daily  Journal of Commerce: http://www.djc.com/news/en/12018094.html 

Figure 11 ‐ Climatologist Stuart Gaffin at Con Edison Power Plant, Long Island City 

Moisse, K.  (2010,  February  2).  Over  the  Top:  Data  Show  "Green"  Roofs  Could  Cool  Urban  Heat  Islands  and  Boost  Water  Conservation.  Retrieved  August  12,  2011,  from  Scientific  American:  http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=green‐roof‐climate‐change‐mitigation 

Figure 12 ‐ Sedum Mat Installers 

Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2004). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland: Timber Press. 

vi

iv 


Figure 13 ‐ 70mm Sedum Roof 

Roofing Superstore. (2011). Modular Sedium Green Roof. Retrieved July 15, 2011, from roofingsuperstore.co.uk:  http://www.roofingsuperstore.co.uk/product/roofing‐accessories/environmentally‐friendly‐products/green‐ roofing‐systems/modular‐sedium‐green‐roof‐70mm‐substrate‐1‐metre‐square.html 

Figure 14 ‐ Native wildflowers on the Multanomah Building 

Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2004). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland: Timber Press. 

Figure 15 ‐ Freezing Roof Vegetation 

Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2004). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland: Timber Press. 

Figure 16 ‐ Rockefeller Centre, New York 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 17 ‐ Mountain Plain grasses and shrubs on Paul Lincke Ufer, Kreuzberg,  Germany  Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2004). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland: Timber Press. 

Figure 18 ‐ Costal Meadow grasses planted on the  Nassau Icehouse Brewery 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 19 ‐ Grass sloped roof on the Vancouver Conference Centre 

Zemtseff, K. (2010, May 20). Wonder what a six‐acre green roof feels like? Retrieved July 28, 2011, from Seattle Daily  Journal of Commerce: http://www.djc.com/news/en/12018094.html 

Figure 20 ‐ Heath Planting on Sloped Roof at Schiphol Plaza, Amsterdam Airport  Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 21 ‐ University Hospital Basel 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 22 ‐ John Deere Works, Mannheim 

Earth Pledge (2005) Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Chapter 2  Figure 1 ‐ Northern Ireland's Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty  

Countryside Survey.  (2008).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Lancaster:  Natural  Environment  Research  Council. 

Figure 2 ‐ Dundrum Bay, Down 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Coastal ‐ Sublittoral Sands and Gravels. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/sublittoral_sands_and_gravels/ 

Figure 3 ‐ Eelgrass, North Strangford Lough 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Coastal  ‐  Seagrass  Beds.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/seagrass_beds/ 

Figure 4 ‐ Millbay, Antrim 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Mudflats. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 5 ‐ Ballymacormick Point, Bangor 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Coastal ‐ Coastal Saltmarsh. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from Conservation Volunteers  Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/coastal_saltmarsh/ 

Figure 6 ‐ Strand Lough, Down 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Marine  ‐  Saline  Lagoons.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/saline_lagoons/ 

Figure 7 ‐ Northern Ireland's Marine Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

Countryside Survey.  (2008).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Lancaster:  Natural  Environment  Research  Council. 

Figure 8 ‐ Murlough Dunes, Dundrum Bay 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Coastal ‐ Coastal Sand Dunes. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from Conservation Volunteers  Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/coastal_sand_dunes/ 

Figure 9‐ Kearney, Down 

Northern Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Coastal  Vegetated  Shingle.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency. 

Figure 10 ‐ Carrick ‐a‐Rede Cliffs, Antrim 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Coastal  ‐  Maritime  Cliffs  and  Slopes.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/maritime_cliffs_and_slopes/ 

Figure 11 ‐ Northern Ireland's Coastal Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

Countryside Survey.  (2008).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Lancaster:  Natural  Environment  Research  Council. 

Figure 12 ‐ Upper Lough Erne   

7

v


CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Wetland  ‐  Eutrophic  Standing  Water.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/eutrophic_standing_water/ 

Figure 13 ‐ Tower Lake, Newtownstewart 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Wetland  ‐  Mesotrophic  Lakes.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/mesotrophic_lakes1/ 

Figure 14 ‐ Knockballymore Lough, Fermanagh 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Marl Lakes. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 15 ‐ Castle Espie, Down 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Wetland ‐Reed Bed. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from Conservation Volunteers Northern  Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/reed_bed/ 

Figure 16 ‐ Insh Marshes, Scotland 

NIEA. (2010,  March  18).  Freshwater  and  Wetlands.  Retrieved  July  23,  2011,  from  NIEA  ‐  Conserving  Biodiversity  ‐  Habitats: http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐2/freshwater_and_wetlands.htm 

Figure 17 ‐ Northern Ireland's Freshwater & Wetland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

Countryside Survey.  (2008).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Lancaster:  Natural  Environment  Research  Council. 

Figure 18 ‐ Belvoir Park Forest, Belfast 

Northern Ireland  Native  Woodland  Group.  (2008).  Northern  Ireland  Native  Woodland:  Definitions  and  Guidance.  Belfast: Forest Service NI. 

Figure 19 ‐ Bonds Glen, Derry 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Woodland ‐ Wet Woodland. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from Conservation Volunteers  Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/wet_woodland/ 

Figure 20 ‐ Glenarm Woodlands, Antrim 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Mixed Ashwoods . Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 21 ‐ Breen Oakwood, Antrim 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Woodland  ‐  Oakwood.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/oakwood/ 

Figure 22 ‐ Northern Ireland's Woodland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

Countryside Survey.  (2008).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Lancaster:  Natural  Environment  Research  Council. 

Figure 23 ‐ Wangford Warren, Suffolk 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Grassland  ‐  Lowland  meadows.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/lowland_meadows/ 

Figure 24 ‐ Little Deer Park, Antrim 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Grassland  ‐  Calcareous  Grassland.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/calcareous_grassland/ 

Figure 25 ‐ Tees Valley, Middlesbrough 

NIEA. (2010,  March  19).  Farmlands  and  Grasslands  .  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency: http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐2/farmlands_and_grasslands.htm 

Figure 26 ‐ Slievenacloy, Belfast Hills 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Grassland ‐ Purple moor grassland and rush pasture. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/purple_moor_grassland_and_rush_pasture/ 

Figure 27 ‐ Knockmore, Fermanagh 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Grassland  ‐  Limestone  Pavement.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/limestone_pavement/ 

Figure 28 ‐ Northern Ireland's Grassland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

Countryside Survey.  (2008).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Lancaster:  Natural  Environment  Research  Council. 

Figure 29 ‐ Murlough National Nature Reserve 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Peatland  ‐  Lowland  Heathland.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/lowland_heathland/ 

Figure 30 ‐ Bloody Bridge near Newcastle 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Upland Heathland. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 31 ‐ Mourne Mountains 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Montane Heath. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 32 ‐ Northern Ireland's Heathland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

Countryside Survey.  (2008).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Lancaster:  Natural  Environment  Research  Council. 

Figure 33 ‐ Fairy Water Bogs, Tyrone 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Peatland  ‐  Lowland  Raised  Bogs.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/lowland_raised_bogs/ 

8

vi 


Figure 34 ‐ Cuilcagh Mountain, Fermanagh 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Lowland Raised Bog. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 35 ‐ Corbally Fen, Down 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Wetland  ‐  Fens.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/fens/ 

Figure 36 ‐ Northern Ireland's Peatland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

Countryside Survey.  (2008).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Lancaster:  Natural  Environment  Research  Council. 

Chapter 3  Figure 1 ‐ Chicago City Hall 

GreenRoof. (2010).  Chicago  City  Hall.  Retrieved  http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=21 

August

8,

2011,

from

GreenRoof.com:

Figure 2 ‐ Murlough Dunes, Dundrum Bay 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Coastal ‐ Coastal Sand Dunes. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from Conservation Volunteers  Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/coastal_sand_dunes/ 

Figure 3 ‐ Kearney, Down 

Northern Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Coastal  Vegetated  Shingle.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency. 

Figure 4 ‐ National Trust Visitor Centre, Portstewart Strand 

GreenRoof. (2010).  National  Trust  Visitor  Centre  at  Portstewart  Strand.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=904 

Figure 5 ‐ Carrick‐a‐Rede Cliffs, Antrim 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Coastal  ‐  Maritime  Cliffs  and  Slopes.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/maritime_cliffs_and_slopes/ 

Figure 6 ‐ Gallie Craig Coffee Shop, Drummore, Scotland 

GreenRoof. (2010).  Gallie  Craig  Coffee  Shop.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com:  http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=312 

Figure 7 ‐ Castle Espie, Down 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Wetland ‐Reed Bed. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from Conservation Volunteers Northern  Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/reed_bed/ 

Figure 8 ‐ Insh Marshes, Scotland 

NIEA. (2010,  March  18).  Freshwater  and  Wetlands.  Retrieved  July  23,  2011,  from  NIEA  ‐  Conserving  Biodiversity  ‐  Habitats: http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐2/freshwater_and_wetlands.htm 

Figure 9 ‐ BMW Düsseldorf Office Building 

GreenRoof. (2010).  BMW  Düsseldorf  Office  Building.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com:  http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=500 

Figure 10 ‐ Belvoir Park Forest, Belfast 

Northern Ireland  Native  Woodland  Group.  (2008).  Northern  Ireland  Native  Woodland:  Definitions  and  Guidance.  Belfast: Forest Service NI. 

Figure 11 ‐ Bonds Glen, Derry 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Woodland ‐ Wet Woodland. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from Conservation Volunteers  Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/wet_woodland/ 

Figure 12 ‐ Glenarm Woodlands, Antrim 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Mixed Ashwoods . Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 13 ‐ Breen Oakwood, Antrim 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Woodland  ‐  Oakwood.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/oakwood/ 

Figure 14 ‐ Hundertwasserhaus, Vienna 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 15 ‐ Wangford Warren, Suffolk 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Grassland  ‐  Lowland  meadows.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/lowland_meadows/ 

Figure 16 ‐ Little Deer Park, Antrim 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Grassland  ‐  Calcareous  Grassland.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/calcareous_grassland/ 

Figure 17 ‐ Tees Valley, Middlesbrough 

NIEA. (2010,  March  19).  Farmlands  and  Grasslands  .  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency: http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐2/farmlands_and_grasslands.htm 

Figure 18 ‐ Slievenacloy, Belfast Hills   

9

vii


CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Grassland ‐ Purple moor grassland and rush pasture. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/purple_moor_grassland_and_rush_pasture/ 

Figure 19 ‐ Knockmore, Fermanagh 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Grassland  ‐  Limestone  Pavement.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/limestone_pavement/ 

Figure 20 ‐ Ducks Unlimited National Headquarters, Winnipeg, Canada 

GreenRoof. (2010).  Ducks  Unlimited  Canada  National  HQ  &  Oak  Hammock  Marsh  Interpretive  Centre.  Retrieved  August 8, 2011, from GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=463 

Figure 21 ‐ Murlough National Nature Reserve 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Peatland  ‐  Lowland  Heathland.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/lowland_heathland/ 

Figure 22 ‐ Bloody Bridge near Newcastle 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Upland Heathland. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 23 ‐ Mourne Mountains 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Montane Heath. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 24 ‐ North German Bank, Hanover, Germany 

GreenRoof. (2010).  North  German  Bank  ‐  NordLB.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com:  http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=112 

Chapter 4  Figure 1 ‐ Belfast City 

NIEA. (2010,  April  29).  Information  for  the  General  Public.  Retrieved  September  02,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment Agency: http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/de/general_public.htm 

Figure 2 ‐ Northern Ireland's Urban Centres (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Figure 3 ‐ Albert Bridge, Belfast 

NIEA. (2010, March 19). Urban Biodiversity. Retrieved Ausust 12, 2011, from Northern Ireland Environment Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/de/biodiversity/habitats‐2/urban_biodiversity.htm 

Figure 4 ‐ UFA Film Fabrik, Berlin 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Atglen, Pennsylvania : Schiffer Books. 

Figure 5 ‐ Atago Building, Tokyo 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Atglen, Pennsylvania : Schiffer Books. 

Figure 6 ‐ Canary Wharf, London 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Atglen, Pennsylvania : Schiffer Books. 

Conclusions  Figure 1 ‐ View of the David Kier Building and the greater Belfast area 

Queen's University. (2004, January 31). Belfast panorama from queens tower. Retrieved September 02, 2011, from  Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Belfast_panorama_from_queens_tower.jpg 

Figure 2 ‐ Costal Meadow grasses planted on the  Nassau Icehouse Brewery 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 3 ‐ Heath Planting on Sloped Roof at Schiphol Plaza, Amsterdam Airport  Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 4 ‐ Grass sloped roof on the Vancouver Conference Centre 

Zemtseff, K. (2010, May 20). Wonder what a six‐acre green roof feels like? Retrieved July 28, 2011, from Seattle Daily  Journal of Commerce: http://www.djc.com/news/en/12018094.html 

Figure 5 ‐ Wood Wharf, London 

Earth Pledge. (2005). Green Roofs: Ecological Design and Construction. Surrey, England: Schiffer. 

Figure 6 ‐ Wildwood Community College, Missouri, USA 

Gedge, D., & Kadas, G. (2005). Green Roofs and Biodiversity. Biologist , 52 (3), 161‐169. 

Figure 7 ‐ Modular Green Roofing System 

Green Roofs  Ireland.  (2010).  Plants.  Retrieved  September  03,  2011,  from  Green  Roofs  Ireland:  http://www.greenroofsireland.co.uk/ 

Figure 8 ‐ Dundrum Bay, Down 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Coastal ‐ Sublittoral Sands and Gravels. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/sublittoral_sands_and_gravels/ 

Figure 9 ‐ Wangford Warren, Suffolk 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Grassland  ‐  Lowland  meadows.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/lowland_meadows/ 

10

viii 


Figure 10 ‐ Little Deer Park, Antrim 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Grassland  ‐  Calcareous  Grassland.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/calcareous_grassland/ 

Figure 11 ‐ Murlough National Nature Reserve 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Peatland  ‐  Lowland  Heathland.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers Northern Ireland: http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/lowland_heathland/ 

Figure 12 ‐ Kearney, Down 

Northern Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Coastal  Vegetated  Shingle.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency. 

Figure 13 ‐ Tees Valley, Middlesbrough 

NIEA. (2010,  March  19).  Farmlands  and  Grasslands  .  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency: http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐2/farmlands_and_grasslands.htm 

Figure 14 ‐ Slievenacloy, Belfast Hills 

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Grassland ‐ Purple moor grassland and rush pasture. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/purple_moor_grassland_and_rush_pasture/ 

Figure 15 ‐ Bloody Bridge near Newcastle 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Upland Heathland. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 16 ‐ Carrick ‐a‐Rede Cliffs, Antrim 

CVNI. (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Coastal  ‐  Maritime  Cliffs  and  Slopes.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/maritime_cliffs_and_slopes/ 

Figure 17 ‐ Knockballymore Lough, Fermanagh 

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Marl Lakes. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Figure 18 ‐ Mourne Mountains   

Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Montane Heath. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency.     

11

ix


Table of Tables 

  Chapter 1  Table 1 ‐ Material Loading (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008) 

Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2008). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland: Timber Press. 

Table 2 ‐ Required Roof Loading (Adler, 1999) 

Adler, D. (1999). Metric Handbook: Planning and Design Data. Oxford: Architectural Press. 

Table 3 ‐ Required Depth (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008) 

Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2008). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland: Timber Press. 

Table 4 ‐ Green Roof Summer Temperatures 

Gaffin, S.  (2006,  July  31).  NASA  Earth  Observatory.  Retrieved  October  19,  2011,  from  Whites  Versus  Greens:  http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/GreenRoof/greenroof3.php 

Chapter 2  Table 1 ‐ Leading Causes of Tidal Marine Habitat Loss 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Table 2 ‐ Leading Causes of Coastal Habitat Loss 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Table 3 ‐ Leading Causes of Freshwater and Wetland Habitat Loss 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Table 4 ‐ Leading Causes of Woodland Habitat Loss 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Table 5 ‐ Leading Causes of Grassland Habitat Loss 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Table 6 ‐ Leading Causes of Heathland Habitat Loss 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Table 7 ‐ Leading Causes of Peatland Habitat Loss 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Table 8 ‐ Rate of Habitat Change in Northern Ireland (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009) 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Chapter 3  Table 1 ‐ Habitats Capable of Existing on Green Roofs   

Author

Table 2 ‐ Required Roof Type for Habitat Recreation  Author 

Table 3 – Imposed Roof Loading for Habitat Recreation  Author 

Chapter 4  Table 1 ‐ Extent of Urban Area in Northern Ireland (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009) 

Cooper, A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Meharg,  M.  (2002).  Habitat  Change  in  the  Northern  Ireland.  Belfast:  Environment  and  Heritage Service. 

Table 2 ‐ Size of Major Urban Centres in Northern Ireland  Multple Autors(see table)    Table 3 ‐ Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan Required Restoration of Natural Habitats  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Table4 ‐ Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan Required Re‐establishment of Natural Habitats  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Table 5 ‐ Required Roof Loading (Adler, 1999)  xii


Adler, D. (1999). Metric Handbook: Planning and Design Data. Oxford: Architectural Press. 

Table 6 – Imposed Roof Loading for Habitat Recreation  Author 

Table 7 – Building Types Capable of Carrying Habitat Roofs  Author 

Table 8 – Estimable Cost Range for Habitat Recreation  Author 

Table9 ‐ Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan Required Re‐establishment of Natural Habitats  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency. 

Table 10 ‐ Estimated Costs of introducing wide scale Habitat Roofs to Northern Ireland     

Author  

xiii

xi


xiv


Introduction

The Relationship between Green Roofs and Natural Habitats       

1

1


The aim of this report is to assess the potential, if any, for  green roofs in urban areas to act as habitat islands and the  ability  of  such  an  approach  to  affect  the  local/regional  ecology in regards to both flora and fauna species    Green  roofs  are  a  growing  part  of  urban  areas,  providing  numerous  benefits  to  built‐up  regions.  They  have  been  proven  to  be  capable  of  mitigating  the  urban  heat  island  effect (Skinner, 2006; Alexandri & Jones, 2008) and reduce  rainwater  runoff  (Graceson,  Hare,  Hall,  &  Monaghan,  2011; Keeley, 2003). There are also studies indicating that  green  roofs  can  sequester  carbon  (Getter,  Rowe,  Robertson, Cregg, & Andresen, 2009) and can increase the  Figure 1 ‐ Northern Ireland Landscape  life span of the roofs, because of the longevity added to covered roof membranes (Porsche  & Köhler, 2003). These factors will be further discussed in the first chapter of this report.    However the increase in popularity of green roofs is primarily because of the environmental  benefits  that  they  bring,  particularly  in  urban  areas  (NIEA,  2005).  This  report  will  aim  to  establish  the  possibilities  of  green  roofs  to  be  used  in  a  habitat  creation  role  in  Northern  Ireland.  While  long‐term  studies  on  small  scale  sites  have  proven  that  green  roof  can  support complex habitats in London (Gedge D. , 2002) and Basel, Switzerland (Brenneisen S.  , 2005) this study aim to gauge if a similar programme of greening would be suitable for the  conditions associated with Northern Ireland’s natural habitats.    In‐01  Green Roofs connection to Habitat Creation  English  Nature  defines  green  roofs  as  “…roofs  that  have  been  initially  planted,  as  well  as  those  that  have  been  allowed  to  colonise  and  develop  naturally”    (Grant,  Engleback,  &  Nicholson,  2003).  While  this  is  a  broad  definition,  it  can  be  said  that  the  current  generation  of  green roof were largely developed in Germany during the  1960s  (Keeley,  2003).  There  initial  reason  for  the  installation  was  to  meet  the  growing  need  for  urban  ecology  and  city  centre  gardens  in  many  German  cities,  Figure 2 ‐ 419 Lafayette St, Manhattan  principally Berlin (Johnston, 1993).     Green  roofs  are  generally  categorised  into  two  formats,  ‘Intensive’  (heavily  planted)  and  ‘Extensive’  (lightweight  planting),  based  on  their  structure  and  plant  material.  This  will  be  discussed in detail in Chapter 1. Both are capable of supporting a wide variety (all be it very  different species) of vegetation and present a potential platform for habitat creation (Francis  & Lorimer, 2011).    There are numerous examples worldwide of habitats that have been adapted and installed  on typical green roofs; these include examples form mountainous zones, coastal areas, dry  grasslands,  cliffs/scree  slopes  and  many  others.  (Lundholm,  2006;  Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).  Wet/dry  meadows  and  heath/moor  habitats  can  also  be  re‐created  on  rooftops,  when  the  drainage  is  restricted,  or  if  the  substrate  provides  sufficient  water  retention.  An  example of this recreated habitat zone is the green roof system at the water‐filtration plant  in Wollishofen, on the outskirts of Zurich (Landolt, 2001).    

2


The type  of  environment  that  is  created  on  a  green  roof  is  principally  dictated  by  the  structure of roof itself and the soil makeup, with weather and microclimate conditions being  secondary concerns (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008). The physical properties of a green roof‘s  growing  medium  will  significantly  impact  plant  growth,  plant  survival  and  water  retention  (Graceson, Hare, Hall, & Monaghan, 2011) and to these points will be discussed in chapter 1.     In  theory  given  a  high  level  of  design  and  planning,  green  roofs  can  provide  habitat  compensation  for  rare  and  endangered  species  affected  by  land‐use  changes.  Numerous  studies  for  various  parts  of  the  world  (mostly  extensive  green  roofs  in  Europe)  have  established  through  research  studies  that  green  roofs  posses  notable  ecological  compensation potential (Brenneisen S. , 2006; Jones, 2002; Kadas, 2006). A 20 year study of  extensive green roofs in Berlin illustrated that a relatively diverse species populations can be  achieved on roofs in urban areas (Köhler, 2006).     General  statistics  states  that  typically  roof  space  represents  up  to  32%  of  the  total  surface  areas  in  most urban locations (Frazer, 2005). In the Greater  London  region  it  is  estimates  that  roofs  cover  240  km2, or 16% of the land surface (Grant, 2006). While  of  course  not  all  roofs  are  suitable  for  supporting  green  roofs;  built‐up  areas  do  represent  zones  of  potential  ecological  expansion.  Many  regions  of  most  towns  and  city  can  be  simply  redevelopment  to support habitat creation. There is huge potential  Figure 3 ‐ Lapwing breeding on the Green Roof  for roof greening on industrial and commercial land on the outskirts of residential areas. It  has  been  proved  that  extensive  greening  would  lead  to  significant  improvements  in  local  bird  populations  (Brenneisen  S.  ,  2006)  an  important  factor  for  Northern  Ireland  and  its  importance for migratory bird populations (Countryside Survey, 2008).    In‐02  Habitat Loss in Northern Ireland   Northern Ireland has a wide range of habitats and species, some of which are of special note  (NIEA, 2010). The coastal regions of Northern are of international importance for waterfowl  and waders, while upland areas and bogs are renowned for their diversity in plant life and  invertebrates (NIEA, 2007).    Currently Northern Ireland is experiencing a loss of natural  habitats,  commonly  due  to  urban  expansion  and  modern  farming  practices  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  2009).  During the past decade, the UK as a whole recorded a 39%  loss  in  area  of  natural  environments  and 27%  of  ‘priority  species’  were  found  to  now  be  in  decline    (Defra,  May  2006).  In  many  parts  of  the  UK  there  has  been  a  degradation  in  markers  that  indicate  an  environment’s  health,  such  as  the  UK  butterfly  population  dropping  by  55%  in  the  last  30  years  (Defra,  April  2008)  and  major  Figure 4 ‐ Northern Ireland Grassland  declines  in  bees  and  amphibians  (Margerison,  2008).  Additionally  the  UK  bird  population  has  been  depleted  by  an  average  of  6%  in  the  last  30  years (Defra, March 2008).    Northern Ireland’s natural habitats face a number of risks. The leading cause of habitat loss  is the increase in demand for housing over the past decade (NIEA, 2007), especially for new   

3

3


housing in  coastal  regions  were  construction  was  commonly  on  virgin  land  (MOSS,  2009).  Another general treat to Northern Ireland’s ecology is species invasion. Species such as the  Zebra Mussel, Japanese Knotweed and the New Zealand Flatworm are all extremely invasive  and damaging to native wildlife (Biodiversity NI, 2011).    Habitat concerns exclusive to Northern Ireland centre around the diminishment of habitats  uniquely  indigenous  to  this  country,  primarily  wet  grasslands,  boglands  and  native  forests.  Currently  the  peat  bogs  in  Northern  Ireland  suffer  from  over  grazing,  excess  harvesting  of  turf, and the machining of peat in gardening products  (Biodiversity NI, 2011).  Additionally,  Northern  Ireland  is  one  of  the  least  wooded  countries  in  Europe,  with  only  6%  tree  cover  and  the  majority  of  woodland  is  non‐native  conifer  species  (MOSS,  2009).  Finally  the  national wet grassland are crucial for migrating bird populations and the reduction in there  range because of farming practices has had a knock on effect. The Curlew, Snipe, Redneck  and Lepwing who breed on wet grassland and bogs have declined in numbers by over 50% in  the  Last  20  years  and  the  common  House  Sparrow  population  has  declined  19%  between  1994 and 2006 (Biodiversity NI, 2011).    These statements express only a surface overview of the many issues facing the ecology of  Northern Ireland’s natural habitats. There are numerous cases where local ecosystem have  grown  and  developed  alongside  modern  developments.  A  more  in‐depth  analysis  of  the  importance  and  influences  of  habitat  types  in  Northern  Ireland  will  be  undertaken  later  in  this report.    In‐03  Impact of Existing Green Roof on Surrounding Habitats  An extensive catalogue of case studies exists demonstrating the ecological consequences of  installing green roofs. Most study either focus on flora, invertebrates or birds, there are two  reasons for this; they represent good indicator to the health to a habitat  (Defra, May 2006)  and secondly they are the principle animal that occupy roof garden (Brenneisen & Hänggi,  2006).  Although  a  fox  was  found  wander  on  the  Belfast  Castle  Court  Centre  roof  in  June  2009 (Biodiversity NI, 2009).    The ability for green roof to accommodate any plant  species is a simple matter of carful design (Burgess,  2004;  Dunnett  N.  ,  2006),  but  it  is  common  for  plants  to  naturally  migrate  to  roof  garden    and  on  occasion  extremely  rare  plant  species  have  unexpectedly been found happily living at roof level.  In  Wollishofen,  Zurich;  nine  near  extinct  orchid  species  were  found  existing  alongside  175  other  plant species on the grass roofs of four water plants.  Figure 5 ‐ Moos Filtration Plant Wollishofen Zurich  This  was  a  surprise  as  the  green  roofs  were  never  intended to be an ecological centre when they were installed in 1914  (Landolt, 2001).    Research from both America and Europe has shown that green roofs are adept at attracting  and  supporting  colonies  of  insect  species,  with  the  elevated  locating  of  the  vegetation  having a negligible impact. Green roofs on the Ford assembly Plant, in Dearborn, Michigan  was shown to become home to 29 insect species, seven spider species, and two bird species  within the first two years of its installation. (Coffman & Davis, 2005). And construction laws  in  Basel,  Switzerland  were  changed  when  a  biodiversity  study  of  seventeen  green  roofs  found 78 spider and 254 beetle species. Of which 18% of the spiders species and 11% of the 

4


beetles were found to be rare and some considered as endangered (Brenneisen S. , 2006).  These finding will be expanded upon throughout this report.    Bird species can benefit greatly from the installation of green roofs. Swifts which migrate to  Northern Ireland in late summer on their way to winter in Africa already inhabit the roofs of  many  existing  buildings  (Biodiversity  NI,  2009).  And  green  roofs  can  greatly  enhance  the  habitability of many existing structures (Grant G. , 2006). Already the sedum roof at Belfast’s  Victoria Centre is home to nesting jackdaws, blackbirds and finches (Biodiversity NI, 2009).    In‐depth  research  into  the  occupation  of  green  roofs by birds has been undertaken in London. Two  roofs  in  East  and  West  Sussex  studied  during  2004  found  that  70%  of  the  total  duration  of  all  bird  activity  involved  the  use  of  resources  provided  by  the vegetation on the roofs, i.e. birds spent most of  their  time  feeding  and  collecting  nest  material  (Burgess,  2004).  Four  species  of  high  conservation  concern and two of moderate conservation concern  were observed using the roofs. The study concludes  Figure 6 ‐ Laban Dance Centre, London  that if careful consideration is taken over the design of green roofs, then they could play an  important role in secure the future the most threatened birds species (Burgess, 2004). The  most  endangered  species  observed  on  a  green  roof  was  Black  Red  Start  (Grant  G.  ,  2006).  Between 50 and 100 breeding pairs of this highly endangered species was seen nesting (Frith  & Gedge, 2000) on the on the Laban Centre and the Creekside Centre, both in the London  Docklands.    In‐04  International Approaches to Rooftop Greening  The  potential  value  of  green  roofs  in  urban  centres has not gone unnoticed by policy makers  around  the  world.  With  their  benefits  towards  the heat island effect (Skinner, 2006; Alexandri &  Jones,  2008),  runoff  (Graceson,  Hare,  Hall,  &  Monaghan,  2011;  Keeley,  2003)  and  ecology   (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008), numerous planning  and  development  bodies  are  accommodating  and  actively  promoting  green  roofs  in  future  Figure 7 ‐ 47° pitched Roof Berlin‐Kreuzberg  building projects.    Because  of  the  extensive  body  of  research  undertaken  in  Basel  by  Dr  Stephan  Brenneisen,  the  city  has  amendment  its  building  and  construction  laws.  Now  as  part  of  the  city's  biodiversity  strategy,  green  roofs  are  now  mandatory  on  all  new  buildings  with  flat  roofs  (Brenneisen S. , 2006). Also if new green roofs exceed 500m2, then there substrates must be  composed of natural soils and accommodate vegetation which comes from the surrounding  region (Brenneisen S. , 2005).    The  London  2012  Olympics  aims  to  construct  at  least  0.4ha  (4,000m2)  of  green  roofs  on  selected buildings as part of its Biodiversity Action Plan (Olympic Delivery Authority, 2008).  And  in  Japan,  green  roofs  are  favoured  by  developers  are  the  increase  the  retail  value  of  their properties by an averaging 8%  (CABE, 2005). These and other policies will be explored  in the fourth chapter of this report.     

5

5


However the most comprehensive standards for  green  roof  growing  media  can  currently  be   found  in  Germany  (FLL,  2002).The  German  guidelines  are  regularly  used  by  the  green  roofing  industry  throughout  Europe  and  the  UK  as they provide excellent information on creating  growing  media,  vegetation  growing  conditions,  water  retention  requirements  and  load  capacity  (FLL, 2002). These benchmark were built‐up over  the past number of decades, as the German have  a  widespread  use  of  green  roofs  because  of  Figure 8 ‐ Ufa‐Fabrik Centre, Berlin‐Templehof  policy,  like  those  in  Berlin,  where  green  roofs  were  required  to  be  constructed  on  apartments  roof  between  1983  until  1996  (Köhler,  2006).         

6


Methodology

Aims and Objectives of the Report  

7

7


As stated the aim of this report is to assess the potential to of green roofs to negate natural  habitat loss in Northern Ireland, by providing an alternative to traditional methods of habitat  recreation and maximise the benefit of urban areas to the local flora and fauna. This will be  done through a series of examinations and comparative exercise.    The  initial  task  is  to  investigate  the  limitations  place  on  habitat  creation  by  the  physical  conditions  of  a  roof  structure.    This  undertaking  will  provide  a  knowledge  base  for  the  development  of  habitats  at  roof  level  and  highlight  the  types  of  ecosystems  naturally  adapted to the circumstances of Northern Ireland’s rooftops.    This undertaking will be combined with an examination into the current condition of natural  habitats in Northern Ireland, examining their requirement, features and characteristics that  classifies them as a unique eco‐zone. This undertaking will establish the feasibility of which  environments can be recreated at roof level.    On completion of these two undertakings, a list of habitations that are capable of existing on  roofs  in  Northern  Ireland  will  be  generated.  This  will  then  inform  the  second  part  of  this  report  on  the  connotation  of  building  such  environments  in  Northern  Ireland’s  urban  centres.    The latter chapters of this dissertation will consist of an examination into case study green  roof  projects.  These  examples  will  consist  of  high  quality  examples  of  habitat  recreation  rooftops, demonstrating the practical requirements of green roof construction.     Finally  the  discussion  and  analysis  of  the  information  produced  in  this  report  will  be  discussed, and the implications of the information produced in this report and the role that  local government can have on the combination of ecology and the built environment.    The  final  goal  of  this  report  is  to  provide  an  informed  argument  on  green  roofs  potential  effect  to  the  Northern  Ireland  ecology  and  where  any  natural  habitat  is  capable  of  being  successfully  recreated  on  rooftops.  Qualify  whether  green  roofs  can  first  feasible  counteraction the habitat loss in Northern Ireland and secondly if embarking upon such an  exercise  would  produce  a  gainful  environmental  benefit  to  urban  centre  and  the  surrounding landscape.       

8


Chapter 1 

Habitat Creation on Green Roofs     

9

20


Figure 1 ‐ M Central, Sydney 

Green roofs are a relatively new building element in  Northern  Ireland,  with  few  examples  of  fully  realised grass or vegetation covered roofs existing in  the  province  (Biodiversity  NI,  2011).  However  the  implementation  of  green  roofs  is  a  mature  part  of  the construction industry within continental Europe,  particularly  Germany  (Gedge  &  Kadas,  2005).  For  example  during  2001,  14%  of  all  new  flat  roofs  constructed  in  Germany  were  green  roofs,  accounting  for  13.5million  m2  as  part  of  national  and  regional  environmental  legislation  (Earth  Pledge, 2005). 

Completed examples of green roofs in Northern Ireland represent a limited level of ambition  in regard to ecological resource creation (Gedge & Kadas, 2005). With the predominant form  of green roofs consisting of thin, prefabricated vegetation mats (Emilsson, 2003). Examples  of purpose developed habitat rooftops are sporadic, with a limit number of examples in the  UK (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    Rooftops, especially those in dense urban centres, are a challenging environments for both  flora  and  fauna  species.  Habitat  that  are  created  often  have  to  accommodate  period  of  drought,  excessive  temperature  ranges  and  wind  exposure;  element  that  may  be  alien  in  their  natural  settings  (White  &  Snodgrass,  2003).  In  practice,  rooftop  micro‐climates  vary  greatly depending local conditions and urban typology (Dunnett, 2006). However as mention  during  the  introduction,  the  physical  attributes  of  a  green  roof’s  construction  will  have  a  greater  impact  on  the  range  of  supportable  species  than  the  local  roof  level  climate  conditions  (Brenneisen  S.  ,  2006;  Köhler,  2006).  This  will  be  further  discussed  throughout  this chapter    1‐01  Green Roof Components  As  briefly  mentioned  during  the  introductory  chapter  there  are  two  prevailing  forms  of  green roof structure, ‘Intensive’ and ‘Extensive’. While there are a number of variations of  these  systems  the  following  descriptions  are  representative  of  the  prevailing  structural  makeup of a green roof.    Intensive Green Roofs are the typical construction method for roof gardens  and grass roof because they are capable of supporting complex vegetation  such as groundcovers, small trees and shrubs. These roofs often possess a  substrate  (soil)  layer  deeper  than  20cm  and  typically  require  irrigation  systems, maintenance and additional reinforcement to the building’s roof  structure to support the live loading of the plant material. (Oberndorfer, et  al., 2007).   Figure  2  ‐  Intensive  Green   Roof Structure  Extensive  Green  Roofs  are  lighter  than  ‘Intensive’  roofs.  With substrate layers with thicknesses below 20cm, and are generally planted  with  sedum  and  herbaceous  species  such  as  mosses.  These  roof  require  minimal  or  no  irrigation  and  no  additional  strengthen  to  a  typical  roof  structure.  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008;  Oberndorfer,  et  al.,  2007).  Also  extensive green roofs do not necessarily require a flat roof, but can exist at  an angle of up to 40 degrees. (Gedge & Kadas, 2005)  Figure  3  ‐  Extensive Green Roof Structure   

10

21 


In practice, a greater variety of planting can occupy intensive green roofs because of their  deeper soil layers (Lundholm, 2006), however the shallow substrate of extensive green roofs  can  be  advantages  to  specialised  habitats  such  as  rocky,  scree  and  sand/grave  based  ecosystems (Dunnett N. , 2006).    All  green  roofs  are  comprised  of  the  Waterproof Membrane Insulation  following layers.   Waterproof Membrane   Root  Protection  Barrier;  to  prevent root penetration   Insulation      Figure 5 ‐ Extruded Polystyrene    Drainage  and  Retention  Layer;  Figure 4 ‐ PVC Waterproof Membrane  Drainage Layer Substrate  which  may  or  may  not  act  as  a  water reservoir for vegetation   Growing  Medium/Substrate;  varying in material and depth   Vegetation  The thickness and weight of green roofs  Figure 6 ‐ Synthetic Drainage Board    Figure 7 ‐ Mineral/Organic Medium    can  differ  significantly  depending  on  the chosen planting. The divergence of  physical properties of a roof’s structure  due  to  the  required  habitat  recreation  shall be explored during this chapter.  Figure 8 ‐ Green Roof Substrate Layers    1‐02  Structural Considerations  Green  roofs’  impose  a  weight  loading  on  its  buildings  structure,  this  value  fluctuates  from  inconsequential  for  extensive  roofs  to  the  requirement  of  additional  structural  support  for  heavily planted intensive roofs (Peck & Kuhn, 2000).    kg/m2  lb/sq.ft Extensive  roofs  are  relatively  Substrate Materials  Gravel  16‐19  8.4‐9.9 lightweight  and  are  generally  within  19  9.9  the normal load‐bearing capacity of the  Pebbles  6.5  3.3  majority  of  modern  roofs  (Köhler,  Pumice  18  9.4  2006).  Extensive  substrates  with  Brick (solid with mortar)  Sand  18‐22  9.4‐11.4 depths  of  5‐15cm  will  increase  the  18  9.4  loading  on  roof  by  between  70kg/m2‐ Sand and Gravel Mixed  Topsoil 17‐20  8.9‐10.4 170kg/m2 (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).  Water  10  5.3    Lava  8  4.1  The  greater  substrate  depths  and  Permute  5  2.54  vegetation  densities  of  intensive  roofs  Vermiculite  1  0.51  are the principle reason for their larger  Light Expanded Clay Granules  3‐4  1.5‐2.0 imposed  loading.  A  comparatively  Table 1 ‐ Material Loading (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008) shallow topsoil layer of 10‐15cm can add 500kg/m2 to a roofs weight (Kingsbury, 2001); the  added  loading  of  intensive  roofs  range  between  290kg/m2  and  970kg/m2  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury, 2008).    BS6399 Category (General Fig)  N/m2 kg/m2 Within  the  UK,  roof  weight  is  Domestic  1.5 153 controlled  by  British  Standard  6399;  Offices  2.5 255 this states the required strengths for  Retail  4.0 408 roofing  system  (Adler,  1999).  While  Warehousing  2.0 204 the  data  on  green  roof  loading  is  Factories, Workshops 5.0 510 Table 2 ‐ Required Roof Loading (Adler, 1999) 

11

22


highly individualistic, an argument can be made that lightweight extensive green roof can be  installed  on  the  majority  of  Northern  Ireland  roofs  without  the  need  for  additional  strengthening  (Peck  &  Kuhn,  2000).  The  most  common  roof‐greening  technique  is  the  installation of thin, prefabricated vegetation mats. These mats have a soil substrate layer of  about 4cm (1.6in) and weigh around 50‐60kg/m2 (Emilsson, 2003), safely in the load capacity  of even domestic roof structures.    1‐03  Roof Slope  Public  perception  of  green  roofs  is  that  they  can  only  occupy  flat  roof  spaces  (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  However  there  are  numerous  examples  of  green  roofs,  which  have  been  constructed  on  prominent slopes.    The  ability  of  a  green  roof  to  withstand  the  shear  forces  imposed  by  residing  on  an  angle  is  controlled  by  the  friction  coefficient  between  the  two  smoothest  structural  elements,  typically  membrane  interfaces.  Unaltered  a  green  roof  can  resist  creep  at  Figure 9 ‐ 8 House, Oerestad, Copenhagen slopes no steeper than 9.5O or 2:12 (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    Slippage  can  be  counteracted  by  the  use  of  horizontal  strapping,  laths,  battens,  or  grids,  increasing  the  potential  gradient  to  30O  or  7:12  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).  With  specialised  growing  mediums,  stake  and  appropriate  plant  selection  it  is  possible  to  achieve  slopes  over  35O  (ZinCo,  2011).  In  his  2006  report  on  Berlin  green  roofs,  Mannfred  O Köhler recorded buildings with 47  grass roof (Köhler, 2006).  Figure 10 ‐ Vancouver Convention    1‐04  Nutrients & Water Requirements  Through the use of stress‐tolerant planting on green roofs the need for additional nutrients  is generally unnecessary (Brenneisen S. , 2006; Köhler, 2006). If a green roof is design as a  natural habitat and not subject to excessive landscape management, a natural equilibrium in  the roof’s nutrient cycle will develop, with the decay of dead stems and leaves feeding new  growth (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008). Conversely if a roof undergoes heavy pruning, mowing  and  the  removal  of  plant  litter,  plant  feeding  may  be  required  every  two  year  with  slow  release  nutrient  packs  (White  &  Snodgrass,  2003).  The  requirement  for  even  low  levels  of  landscape  management  would  be  rare  on  any  roof  design  to  recreate  natural  habitats,  so  add  nutrients  would  not  be  typically  required  (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  However  recreational  roof  gardens  are  typically  highly  managed  environments  and  will  require  similar  maintenance as specialised horticulture gardens   (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    Research has proven that a reliably consistent water supply  is more important to plant species diversity, than substrate  depth  on  all  green  roofs  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).  Characteristically  there  are  difference  in  the  type  of  vegetation found in urban centres and the surrounding rural  habitats.  Inner  city  plant  species  tend  to  be  more  adapted  to dry conditions (Köhler, 2006). Thusly it is recommended  that  urban  green  roofs  incorporate  systems  to  address  periods  of  relative  drought  (White  &  Snodgrass,  2003).  A  number  of  studies  by  Stephen  Brenneisen  in  Switzerland  have shown that plant vitality and invertebrate diversity can  Figure  11  ‐  Climatologist  Stuart  Gaffin  at  Con  Edison Power Plant, Long Island City 

12

23 


be directly compared to the moisture level in a roof’s substrate (Brenneisen S. , 2001).    A  number  of  systems  are  available  for  green  roof  irrigation,  most  including  some  form  of  rainwater storage and recycling systems (Miller, 2003). However as green roofs possess the  ability to retain a high rate of rainwater (Graceson, Hare, Hall, & Monaghan, 2011; Keeley,  2003),  many  roof  substrate  systems  store  water  in  a  drainage  layer  below  their  growing  medium. Research programmes recorded that a 6cm (2.4in) vegetation layer retains 67% of  rainwater  and  a  12cm  (4.8in)  growth  media  with  a  mix  of  grasses  and  herbs  retains  70%  (Scholz‐Barth, 2001), making the need for irrigation redundant. This property of green roofs  in urban regions will be discussed later on in this chapter.    It  is  important  to  note  that  the  need  for  additional  irrigation  and  nutrients  is  dictated  by  local environmental conditions (Peck & Kuhn, 2000), substrate make‐up (Francis & Lorimer,  2011)  and  most  importantly  the  type  of  green  roof  environment  one  desires  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).  The  Laban  Dance  Centre  has  created  a  habitat  for  rare  bird  species  through  the  use  of  an  extensive  gravel  roof  that  requires  no  maintenance  (Frith  &  Gedge,  2000).    1‐05  Substrate Makeup  The knowledge base of the horticultural industry has revealed that the physical properties of  a  substrate  will  have  a  significant  impact  on  the  growth  rates  and  survivability  of  planted  vegetation  (Blythe  &  Merhaut,  2007).  A  roofs  substrate  layer  will  effect  water  retention,  nutrient requirement (Miller, 2003) and root temperature (White & Snodgrass, 2003). There  are notable differences between the substrates of extensive and intensive roofs.    Extensive green roof are characterised by shallow substrate layer  and are associated with a low biological diversity (Brenneisen S. ,  2006). Typically populated by sedum, grasses, herbs and mosses  (Emilsson, 2003), installed on mats of non‐organic mineral fibres  which  have  moisture  holding  capacity  that  mimics  organic  materials (Hitchmough, 1994).  Figure 12 ‐ Sedum Mat Installers    Natural soil is not advisable for lightweight extensive roofs, due to their inherent weight and  high fertility (which encourages vigorous and unsustainable growth). Medium to low fertility  is also a requirement for the development of diverse meadow vegetation, a viable option for  habitat recreation on extensive green roofs (Miller, 2003).     Options for intensive substrates range between mixtures of organic  material  and  natural  or  artificial  soils  (Snodgrass.  &  Snodgrass,  2006).  Studies  of  green  roofs  in  Zurich,  Switzerland,  have  shown  that natural soils in substrates can benefit biodiversity, due to the  acclimatisation  of  local  flora  and  fauna  to  native  soils  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury, 2008). Artificial soils, made from material such as sand  Figure 13 ‐ 70mm Grass Roof  and lava rock, have also proven to be excellent at promoting plant  growth because of their tailored nature (Hitchmough, 1994).    The level of plant (Grant G. , 2006) and invertebrate diversity (Brenneisen S. , 2006) can be  directly  related  to  the  soil  depth,  age,  establishment  of  planting  and  the  nature  of  a  substrate,  for  both  extensive  and  intensive  roofing  systems  (Miller,  2003).  Typically  the  species range of green roofs naturally evolves with time, through establishment and natural  species  migration  and  colonisation  (Brenneisen  S.  ,  2006).    Presently the  level  of  industrial   

13

24


data within  horticultural  is  sufficient  to  meet  green  roof  construction  needs  (Blythe  &  Merhaut,  2007);  unfortunately  it  has  be  state  that  the  crossover  of  experience  to  the  building profession is questionable (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    1‐06  Soil Depth and Planting Regements  Continuing on from the importance of substrate composition, the depth of a roof’s substrate  layer also influences planting options. This is due to the requirements of root growth and the  ability  of  a  substrate  to  protect  its  root  system  from  environmental  stresses,  namely  temperature extremes (White & Snodgrass, 2003).    The  importance  of  substrate  depth  is  primarily  Soil Depth  Planting Possibilities  an  issue  concerning  intensive  green  roofs  as  0‐5cm  Sedum/Moss communities extensive  generally  do  not  exceed  20cm  (0‐2in)  (Oberndorfer, et al., 2007).   5‐10cm  Dry meadow communities   (2‐4in)  Low‐growing drought‐ The temperature ranges in Europe has prescribe  tolerant Perennials  that  thin  substrate  (under    3cm)  can  only  Grasses/Alpines  support sedum and moss species, medium depth  Small Bulbs  substrates  (5‐8cm)  are  capable  of  maintaining  a  10‐20cm  Semi‐extensive mixtures  wider  range  of  grasses,  herbs  and  sub‐shrubs.  of low to medium dry  (4‐8in)  habitat Perennials  Depths  of  above  50cm  are  required  for  trees  to  Grasses and Annuals  be grown (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).  Small Shrubs    Lawn/Turf Grass  Designing green roofs so that they have a varying  20‐50cm  Medium shrubs  substrate depths and drainage regimes, creating  (8‐20in)  Edible Plants  a  mosaic  of  microhabitats  (both  on  and  below  Generalist Perennials and  the  surface  soil  layer)  has  been  shown  to  Grasses  facilitate  the  colonisation  of  a  green  roof  by  a  50+cm  Small Deciduous Trees and  more  diverse  range  of  flora  and  fauna  species  (20+in)  Conifers  (Brenneisen S. , 2006).  Table 3 ‐ Required Depth (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008)    An  important  discussion  is  ongoing  between  the  uses  of  native  or  alien  plant  in  green  roof  developments  (Dunnett,  2006)  especially  as species invasion is a concern for Northern Ireland, as mention in  the  introductory  chapter.  The  use  of  local  planting  can  potentially  promote  the  occupation  of  a  roof  by  local  fauna  (Brenneisen  S.  ,  2006);  unfortunately  many  native  species  are  highly  invasive  and  dominant and may lead to a reduced planting diversity (Clement &  Foster,  1994).  Alternatively,  many  exotic  species  may  be  ideally  suited  to  the  environment  created  by  the  particular  microclimate  Figure  14  ‐  Native  wildflowers  on  the conditions of a green roof (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).  Multanomah Building    Studies undertaken in Switzerland have presented evidence that in dense urban areas; fauna  species,  especially  birds,  will  dominate  rooftops  which  has  similarities  to  their  natural  habitats  regardless  to  the  proximity  to  matching  ecosystems  (Frith  &  Gedge,  2000).  Urban  biodiversity  strategy  can  advise  on  the  appropriate  plant  strategies,  based  on  regional  species research (Brenneisen S. , 2006).    Planting methods for green roofs are as varied as those for conventional gardens. Extensive  roofs  utilise  vegetation  mats,  seeds  and  bulbs  regularly  being  subject  to  monoculture  planting.  While  intensive  roofs  are  capable  of  availing  of  potted  and  transplanted  plants 

14

25 


(Dunnett &  Kingsbury,  2008).  Spontaneous  or  natural  colonisation  occurs  frequently  on  all  green  roof  type,  with  has  led  to  the  occupation  of  rare  and  unexpected  plant  species  (Landolt,  2001),  as  described  in  the  introductory  chapter.  This  issue  will  be  discussed  in  further detail in chapter 4.    1‐07  Biological Limitations  Academic studies have illustrated a number of limitations of green roofs in regards to their  biological  opportunities  when  directly  compared  to  ground  level  urban  brownfield  sites  (Brenneisen  &  Hänggi,  2006).  While  certain  aspects  of  green  roofs  can  be  improve  with  careful  design  and  consideration  of  local  environmental  assets  (Brenneisen  S.  ,  2006),  a  number of constrains are characteristic to rooftop habitats.    The shallow nature of substrates on roofs, limit the ability of  deep‐rooted  plants  to  extract  moisture,  it  also  means  that  root systems will be subject to the extremes of temperature  (Boivin,  Lamy,  Gosselin,  &  Dansereau,  2001).  In  order  to  survive Northern Ireland temperature ranges, the planting of  green roofs need to capable of surviving a wide variation in  thermal  exposures,  as  roof  substrates  are  not  thermally  stable  (Snodgrass.  &  Snodgrass,  2006;  White  &  Snodgrass,  Figure 15 ‐ Freezing Roof Vegetation  2003).    The air/soil mixture level in roof substrates are lower than those of ground soil, this is partly  due  to  the  difference  between  the  artificial  and  natural  earth  layers  (Oberndorfer,  et  al.,  2007), but principally the lack of burrowing invertebrates and earthworms (Brenneisen S. ,  2006). Such invertebrates have difficulties surviving on green roofs due to the limited depth  of  the  substrate;  perishing  during  temperature  extremes.  Because  earthworms  are  the  fundamental  for  the  aeration  of  subsoil,  this  places  server  restrictions  on  plant  diversity  (Miller,  2003).The  practice  of  adding  lava  rock,  pumice,  gravel,  broke  brick  or  concrete  to  roof substrate are utilised, allowing  air to penetrate soil layers (Schradera & Boningb, 2006).    The value of a green roof as a biological resource is  restricted by its size, often hindering the potential of  natural  colonisation  of  a  roof  by  new  plant  species  (Brenneisen  &  Hänggi,  2006).  English  Nature  published  a  report  in  2003  that  stated  while  individual  green  roofs  offer  local  environmental  benefits;  any  significant  contribution  to  the  wider  environmental  quality  will  only  become  apparent  once  a  critical  mass  of  urban  roof  space  is  greened  (Grant, Engleback, & Nicholson, 2003). A 2009 study  Figure 16 ‐ Rockefeller Centre, New York  of  a  business/retail  park  in  the  Netherlands  investigated  the  potential  for  a  series  of  green  roof  islands  as  a  means  to  negate  the  debilitating effect of size limitation. An increase in the local districts wildlife was recorded,  with the reason being stipulated the green roofs were acting as areas of ecological sanctuary  (Snepa,  Van  Ierland,  &  Opdama,  2009).  The  issues  ecological  viability  on  small  green  roofs  will be further discussed later on in this report.    A more general barrier to the creation of roof level artificial habitats is poor expectation and  a lack of ambition in regard to the development of green roofs (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).  The UK construction industry currently possess no form of building control standards; high   

15

26


costs rates and a highly limited number of demonstration examples within the UK to provide  confidence  in  the  economic  and  environmental  benefits  of  green  roofs  (Dunnett,  2006).  These factors combine to create a limited appetite for the adoption of green roofs amongst  the UK public (Earth Pledge, 2005).    1‐08  Green Roof Maintenance  While  a  completely  maintenance  free  green  roof  is  an  unachievable  goal,  extensive  and  semi‐extensive  roofs  generally  require  highly  limited  upkeep  (White  &  Snodgrass,  2003).  There are four aspects to green roof maintenance; feeding, plant protestation, drainage and  weeding  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).  Plant  nutrients  and  drainage  has  been  previously  discussed in this chapter.    Pests  and  diseases  are  a  minor  problem  form  green  roofs,  partially  because  of  the  stress  tolerant nature of typical planting. The principle risk is fungal diseases from an accumulation  of tree leaves (Groundwork, 2011). More importantly, green roofs are highly susceptible to  wind‐blown  seeding  and  can  be  colonised  by  unwanted  or  invasive  species.  Care  must  be  taken  during  weeding  to  insure  tree  and  shrub  seedlings,  such  as  Birch  and  Willow,  or  annuals  like  corn  or  wheat  do  not  become  established  as  they  can  dominate  other  plants  and damage the roof membrane (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    1‐09  Insulating Effects of Green Roofs  Research  has  shown  that  green  roofs  are  capable  of  delaying  thermal  influence  and  providing  an  insulating  effect  in  cold  temperatures.  This  effect  remaining  constant  in  substrate depths between 120mm and 300mm and is greatest in roofs with substrates over  400mm.  It  is  important  to  note  that  green  roofs  are  insignificant  in  effecting  indoor  air  temperatures during summer temperature highs (Yoshimi & Altan, 2011).    1‐10  Benefits of Green Roof to the Urban Environments  While individual green roofs will offer local environmental benefits, the advantages of green  roofs can affect a large urban area if a significant proportion of roof space is greened, with  some attributes of green roofs requiring a critical mass of greenery to be become apparent  (Grant, Engleback, & Nicholson, 2003).    Green Roofs and Heat Island Effect/Urban Air Quality/Carbon Sequestering  The  surface  temperatures  of  green  roofs  are  significantly  less  than  those  of  conventional  roofs  during  summer,  and  studies  have  shown  that  if  a  large  area  of  a  city’s  roofs  are  greened  they  can  reduce  the  ‘heat  island  effect’  (Skinner,  2006;  Alexandri  &  Jones,  2008),  this  is  the    principle  reason  for  development  of  green  roofs  in  cities  such  as  Tokyo  (Tokyo  Metropolitan Government, 2002) and Chicago (City of Chicago, 2010), these case studies will  be further discussed in Chapter 4. This effect is due to the reduced heat reflectance from the  surface of green roofs (Szokolay, 2008) and lower air temperatures because of the expiration  of the planting (Skinner, 2006; Alexandri & Jones, 2008).   During the Penn State 2003 study, Gaffin  and  his  collaborators  measured  the  temperatures  on  both  green  and  dark  roofs. Both kinds of roofs warmed during  the day and cooled overnight. While dark  roofs  cooled  slightly  more  overnight,  however,  they  warmed  up  much  more  during  the  day  than  their  green  counterparts.  At their warmest,  the  dark  o roofs reached  roughly  70 C,  whereas  the  green  roofs  only  reached  about  40oC.  (Gaffin, 2006). 

Table 4 ‐ Green Roof Summer Temperatures  The  ability  of  combining  the  respiration  of  plant  to  a  buildings  structure  also  directly  influence the air quality and CO2 content of the surrounding urban area. The combined area 

16

27 


of leaves  from  the  numerous  plant  species  found  on  typical  green  roofs  creates  a  large  surface  area  capable  of  filtering  out  dust,  pollutants  and  some  forms  of  airborne  viruses  (Doernach, 1979; Brookes, 1984). Furthermore there is growing evidence for the capacity of  green roofs to act as carbon stores. Studies conducted on extensive green roofs in Michigan  and  Maryland;  found  that  they  were  actively  sequestered  375gC/m2  (Getter,  Rowe,  Robertson, Cregg, & Andresen, 2009).     Green Roofs and Rainwater Retention  The water retention rate of green roofs is one of the most researches aspects of green roofs  and  is  one  of  the  documented  reasons  for  Berlin  developing  green  roofs  (Earth  Pledge,  2005);  this  case  study  will  again  be  discussed  in  Chapter  4.  Lightweight  moss  and  heather  extensive roofs have a retention rate of 18L/m² (Optigreen, 2011), and a grass roof can hold  30‐80L/m² (Optigreen, 2011). Green roofs also reduce the immediate discharge of rainwater  to 25% that of conventional roofs (Kӧhler, 1989).   1‐11  Green Roofs effect on People  While this report is concentrated on issues regarding the biological effects of green roofs, in  regards  to  Northern  Ireland’s  native  flora  and  fauna,  they  also  have  a  psychological  and  physiological impact on people.    Numerous studies in hospitals, such as St. Luke’s Science Centre in Japan have shown a link  between  the  calming  effects  between  green  plants  can  shorten  patients’  recovery  times  (Earth Pledge, 2005). The introduction of planting to a building’s roof will reduce pollutants,  dust  particles  and  increase  the  humidity  of  air  in  a  structure  which  has  been  proven  to  enhance people’s mood and physical responsiveness (Crowther, 1994) and cause a reduction  in employee absenteeism as a result of “healthier” buildings (Keeping, 1996).     A  study  of  employee  satisfaction  in  a  building  that  with  access  to  a  green  roof  in  the  Netherlands;  found  that  the  majority  of  employees  used  (89%)  and  appreciated  (92%)  the  space (Jókövi, Bervaes, & Böttcher, 2002). There are more subtitle psychological benefits of  green roof planting, for example the increase signing of wildlife can be beneficial to people,  especially to those in office blocks with regular feel a disconnection with the outside world  (Coppin, 1990; Natural Economy Northwest, 2008).    1‐12  Habitats Favoured by Rooftop Environments  The  environmental  conditions  at  roof  level  favour  the  application  of  a  number  of  habitat  treatments  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).  Elements  associated  with  urban  centres,  such  as  relative  differences  in  temperature  and  rain  distribution  when  compared  to  rural  area,  places  requirement  on  plant  selection  (Murray,  McCann,  &  Cooper,  1992).  The  following  habitats present qualities which are applicable to ecological specification on green roofs.    Plant  species  that  are  acclimatised  to  the  shallow  soil,  scree  Mountainous Vegetation  slopes or rock faces of mountainous environments possess the  potential  to  successful  occupy  a  green  roof  (Dunnett,  2006).  While  rock  face  habitats  may  be  slow  to  develop  on  rooftop,  high altitude meadow wildflowers rapidly colonise north‐facing  roof sections (Grant G. , 2006).        Figure 17 ‐ Mountain Plain grasses and shrubs  on Paul Lincke Ufer, Kreuzberg,  Germany     

17

28


Costal Vegetation 

Figure 18 ‐ Costal Meadow grasses planted on  the  Nassau Icehouse Brewery 

Limestone Vegetation

Figure 19 ‐ Grass sloped roof on the  Vancouver Conference Centre 

Shrub & Heath Vegetation 

Figure 20 ‐ Heath Planting on Sloped Roof at  Schiphol Plaza, Amsterdam Airport 

Arid Vegetation 

Figure 21 ‐ University Hospital Basel

Reed Bed Vegetation

Figure 22 ‐ John Deere Works, Mannheim 

18

Maritime and  coastal  habitats  place  a  broad  range  of  environmental stress on local vegetation. In order to survive in  such  ecosystems,  plants  must  be  capable  of  surviving  in  free‐ draining  sandy  soil,  be  tolerance  to  situation  of  both  drought  and  heavy  wind  exposure  (CVNI,  2011).  Additionally  the  continuous exposure to salt‐laden air has created plant species  tolerant  to  airborne  city  pollutants  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).      The shallow soils that cover limestone  slabs support a variety  of  grasses,  mosses  and  shrubs.  The  limited  space  for  root  growth  as  well  as  grazing  pressure  often  means  that  many  plant species have become dwarfed (Northern Ireland Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  A  diverse  range  of  stress‐tolerant  vegetation  has  developed  on  limestone  rich  soils,  resulting  in  an array of planting option for green roofs (White & Snodgrass,  2003).    Habitats  that  exist  in  exposed  locations  have  developed  an  array  of  low  dense  vegetation,  in  lowland  situations  these  include drought‐tolerant shrubs and woody plants and grasses  (Gates,  1980),  and  at  higher  latitudes  heaths  and  mosses  are  abundant (Cooper & McCann, 2001). All of which are capable  of  populating  rooftop  environments.  Because  of  the  thin  soil  and  exposed  aspects  of  these  habitats,  their  flora  and  fauna  can  rapidly  adapt  to  condition  on  most  green  roofs  (Brenneisen S. , 2006).  Vegetation that is capable of surviving the harsh temperature  ranges  and  drought  conditions  of  both  natural  and  manmade  arid  environment  are  capable  of  existing  unmodified  at  roof  level  (Larson,  Matthes,  Kelly,  Lundholm,  &  Gerrath,  2004).  Many of these habitats are dominated by one flora species and  are adapted to exist in isolation, thusly are easily capable of be  transplanted  to  a  green  roof  setting  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).      Providing a high water retention level at roof level it is possible  to  encourage  the  development  of  reeds  and  wetland  grasses  on  green  roofs.  This  habitat  type  has  been  exported  to  rooftops  to  meet  a  growing  need  of  to  conserve  and  clean  water  discharge  in  many  regions  (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  The  minimal  soil  requirements  and  the  ability  to  recycle  nutrients  in  water  runoff,  results  in  the  ability  of  flora  and  fauna  that  requires  a  permanent  waterlogged  environment  to  now  exist  on green roofs (Coffman & Davis, 2005).      

29 


Northern Ireland and Green Roof Habitat Recreation 

The following  table  illustrates  the  explored  connections  between  the  habitats  capable  of  surviving on green roofs and the requirements of natural habitats in Northern Ireland.       

Habitats favoured  by Green Roofs

Northern Ireland  habitats capable of  addapting to Green  Roofs

Habitats Commonly  Recreated on Green  Roofs

Habitats Promoted  by Ease of  Construction and  Financing

Coastal Vegetation

Arid Vegetation

Reed Bed  Vegetation

Mountainous Vegetation

Limestone Vegetation

Shrub & Heath   Vegetation

19

30


Chapter 2 

Habitat Loss in Northern Ireland      

20

20 


The objective of this chapter is to examine the nature and extent of habitat loss in Northern  Ireland.  Additionally  the  attributes  and  properties  of  individual  habitat  categories  located  across  Northern  Ireland  will  be  studied.  The  physical  environment  and  microclimate  associated  with  urban  roof  level  locations  present  factors  which  the  recreation  of  habitat  will have to accommodate. The result of this will mean that some habitat types will never be  capable  of  occupying  a  building’s  roof  because  of  the  incapability  with  the  environmental  condition associated with green roofs.    In addition to investigate the reasons  for habitat loss in Northern Ireland,  this chapter  will  explore the requirements, features and characteristics that classify each habitat as a unique  ecosystem  and  each  habitat  type  will  be  assess  for  there  to  potential  to  acclimatise  in  a  green roof location.    There  are  seven  groupings  for  land  based  habitats  in  Northern  Ireland,  Coastal,  Marine,  Wetland, Woodland, Grassland, Heathland and Peatland. Each contains a number of specific  ecosystems, with their own associated flora and fauna.  

Figure 1 ‐ Northern Ireland's Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (Countryside Survey, 2008)    Additional agricultural and urban habitats will receive some analysis within this chapter, as  they  affect  the  quality  of  surrounding  natural  habitats.  The  fact  that  these  habitats  are  artificially  created  or  highly  managed  does  not  mean  they  are  without  ecological  merit,  agricultural  (Countryside  Survey,  2008)  and  urban  (Gibson,  1998;  Gedge  &  Kadas,  2005;  Harvey, 2001) areas can support a diverse array of flora and fauna species, all be it limited  when compared to natural habitats (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009). Urban ecology will  be further discussed in Chapter 4.    Agricultural  and  horticultural  land  represents  the  bulk  of  land  use  in  Northern  Ireland,  encompassing 44% of the national landmass, with urban areas representing 5% of land use  (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).        

21

21


2‐01 Tidal Marine Habitats  The  marine  life  off  the  coast  of  Northern  Ireland  is  extremely  rich  and  diverse.  And  the  actions  of  the  sea  have  a  great  impact  on  the  habitats  that  are  directly  connected  to  the  coastline  (NIEA,  2010).  The  habitats  associated  with  coastal  tides  are  one  of  the  most  susceptible ecosystems to the affects of global warming and alterations to the seas. (Randall,  2004).    The  soil  layer  of  these  habitats  provide  for  aquatic  vegetation  (Den  Hartog,  1970)  plus  various species of worms, invertebrates, and isopods  (National Museums Northern Ireland,  2010)  all  reliant  on  the  saline  environment.  Many  habitats  also  act  as  nursery  regions  for  many fish species (CVNI, 2011).    Because  of  the  richness  of  aquatic  life  within  tidal  habitats,  these  areas  have  come  to  support a significant volume of bird species. The mudflats at Strangford Lough alone support  over  70,000  birds  annually  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2003).Thank  to  this  fact,  Northern Ireland’s tidal seagrass zones represent an important resource in the diet of many  nationally important species (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    The principle habitats associated with marine tidal environments are:  Tidal Sand/Shingle/Gravel Shores  Tidal Shores Seagrass Beds  Tidal beaches and sandbanks that  have developed in shelter section  of the coastline (Northern Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005)  Seagrass Beds  Areas  of  shallow,  sheltered  tidal  sediments  that  have  been  Figure 2 ‐ Dundrum Bay, Down  Figure 3 ‐ Eelgrass, North Strangford Lough  occupied  by  aquatic  seagrass  Mudflats Saltmarshes  species (CVNI, 2011)  Mudflats  A  intertidal  habitat  created  by  sedimentary  deposition  of  low  energy  waves,  particularly  found  in  estuaries  and  other  sheltered  areas  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Figure 4 ‐ Millbay, Antrim  Figure 5 ‐ Ballymacormick Point, Bangor  Action Plan, 2003)  Saline Lagoon  Saltmarshes  Areas  where  vegetation  has  become  established  on  tidal  mudflats  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005)  Saline Lagoon    Bodies  of  seawater  that  have  Figure 6 ‐ Strand Lough, Down  become  disconnected  from  the  sea (CVNI, 2011)            22

For more information on individual Tidal Marine Habitats, please see Appendix A 

22 


Saline Lagoon 

Saltmarshes

Mudflats

Seagrass Beds 

Tidal Sandy, Shingle  & Gravel Shores 

While beach  shores  occur  all  along  Northern Ireland’s coastline, other tidal  habitats  have  a  more  limited  range.  Mudflats,  Seagrass  Beds  and  Saltmarshes  all  occupy  in  low  energy  coastal  environments  predominately  along  the  eastern  coast,  in  estuaries  and sheltered areas such as sea loughs,  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2003).  Saline  lagoons  can  be  both  naturally  of  artificially  constructed  and  small  brackish  pools  are  frequent  around  the  coast  in  saltmarshes,  however large bodies of brackish water  Figure 7 ‐ Northern Ireland's Marine Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008)  are rare (Bamber, Gilliland, & Shardlow, 2001).    Rate of Habitat Loss  No significant data exists on the rate of habitat gain/loss due to the changing nature of tidal  habitats,  with  the  exception  for  saltmarshes  which  is  estimated  to  occupy  a  250ha  region,  comprise 0.5% of the total UK habitat area (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005)    The  active  threats  and  leading  causes  of  tidal  habitat  loss  in  Northern  Ireland  are  well  documented (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005). These are listed below.                  Causes of Habitat Loss     Agricultural Improvement               Climate Change             Disease               Fishing Activities         Grazing               Human Activities           Human Construction Schemes                Physical Disturbance             Pollution       Reclamation              Reduction in Ground Quality           Root Destruction              Species Invasion          Table 1 ‐ Leading Causes of Tidal Marine Habitat Loss            

23

23


Ability to be recreated on a Green Roof  Tidal Marine habitats present a series of problems when considered for relocation to a green  roof setting. The principle issues are:    Recreating a Costal Wetland Environment  Green roofs which support freshwater wetland habitats are currently commercially available  (Earth Pledge, 2005); any permanently waterlogged rooftop provides nutrients and minerals  through  a  closed  loop  water  circulation  system  (Coffman  &  Davis,  2005).  Such  a  system  could be adapted to utilise a saline water mixture.    Corrosive Nature of Brackish Water  Salt  is  corrosive  to  most  building  materials.  While  there  are  materials  that  are  capable  of  withstanding  salt  exposure,  this  will  add  significant  cost  and  maintenance  requirements  to  any proposed green roof system (Deplazes, 2008).    Replicating the Actions of the Tide  The  action  of  tidal  forces  to  provide  resource  and  shape  marine  coastal  habitats  is  the  principle feature of these environments (NIEA, 2010).    From the aspect of habitat recreation, an alternative for the role played by costal tides does  not exist (Gilbert & Anderson, 1998). This is means that no matter the success in recreating  the water conditions, tidal habitats will not be practical on green roofs. An exception exists  in regards to saline lagoons as this habitat type is not reliant on tidal forces. However issues  of size and weight in relation of a static body of water needs to be addressed, these will be  discussed in section 2‐03 on freshwater lakes.      Tidal Marine Habitats on Green Roofs  Incompatible 

                       

24

Tidal Sand/Shingle/Gravel  Shores  Seagrass Beds    Mudflats    Saltmarshes    Saline Lagoon             

Possible

Highly Suitable 

Tidal habitats require a number of resources   (Gilbert &  Anderson,  1998)  that  would  be  impracticable  or  impossible  to  replicate  on  a  green  roof.  For  this  reason  tidal habitats are predominantly incompatible with green  roofs  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).  However  Saline  lagoon  habitats  are  possible,  with  the  limiting  factor  of  salt corrosion, and dead loading imposed by a large body  of brackish water (Deplazes, 2008).    It  is  important  to  note  that  green  roof  can  act  in  a  supporting role to tidal habitats as is the case with Ducks  Unlimited  National  Headquarters  and  Conservation  Centre  in  Winnipeg,  Canada  which  acts  as  bird  nesting  ground  around  the  Oak  Hammond  Marsh  (Earth  Pledge,  2005).   

24 


2‐02 Coastal Habitats  Northern Ireland’s coastal regions are noted for their rich biodiversity. More than 75% of the  coastline  is  protected  by  some  form  of  international  or  national  conservation  order  (NIEA,  2010).  The  Northern  Ireland  coastline  is  650km  in  length  supporting  a  wide  diversity  of  natural  environments  and  wildlife    (NIEA,  2010).  The  flora  and  fauna  found  in  habitats  associated  with  coastal  habitats  can  vary  vastly  over  short  distances;  this  is  due  the  soil  composition and local geography (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).     The physical differences between the coastal habitats of Northern Ireland are considerable,  however their soil layers have a number of similarities, both being nutrient poor and have  deficiencies  in  there  supply  of  fresh  water  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).   Nonetheless many coastal habitats support a diverse array of species. For example, the sand  dunes at Dundrum, Co. Down supports 55 species of bees, ants and wasps, 213 species of  moths  and  21  species  of  butterflies  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  And  Northern  Ireland’s  cliffs  are  an  important  habitat  for  breeding  seabirds,  and  support  bird  populations which are of international importance (CVNI, 2011).      The principle habitats associated with costal environments are:  Sand Dunes  Sand Dunes Vegetated Shingles  Sand  dunes  occur  when  a  beach  has  the  significant  tidal  power  to  allow  sand  to  dry  out  complete.  The  dry  sand  is  then  blown  landwards  by  the  wind,  where  it  accumulates  into  dunes   (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Figure 8 ‐ Murlough Dunes, Dundrum Bay  Figure 9‐ Kearney, Down  Plan, 2005).  Cliffs and Slopes    Vegetated Shingles Banks  Vegetable  shingle  banks  occupy  the landward side of shores when  coastal areas have powerful tides  that  push  singles  and  aggregate  beyond  the  high  tide  mark  (National  Museums  Northern  Figure 10 ‐ Carrick ‐a‐Rede Cliffs, Antrim  Ireland, 2010).  Cliffs and Slopes  Consists  of  cliff  top  grassy  meadows  and  vegetated  scree  slopes  and  cliff  faces,  but  the  vegetation on cliffs can vary vastly over short distances; this is due the soil composition and  local geography (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).                     

For more information on individual Coastal Habitats, please see Appendix A 

25

25


26

Cliffs and Slopes 

Shingles Banks 

Sand Dunes 

Sea  cliffs  occur  all  along  the  Northern  Ireland  coast  and  it  is  estimated  that  there  is  approximately  3000ha  of  sand  dunes; with the area of vegetated sand  dunes  being  between  1300ha  and  1500ha  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  With  the  largest  dune  systems  located  along  the  north  and south‐east coasts, namely in north  Antrim and South Down.  (CVNI, 2011).  Shingle  banks  are  an  incredibly  rare  habitat  in  Northern  Ireland  with  an  estimated  extent  of  50ha  (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).   Figure 11 ‐ Northern Ireland's Coastal Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008)    Rate of Habitat Loss  Sea cliffs are one of the few natural habitats that have shown no significant habitat loss in  recent  years  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005),  in  fact  the  flora  of sea  cliffs  are  one  of  the  few  habitats  that  remain  largely  undamaged  by  modern  human  activities  (National  Museums  Northern  Ireland,  2010).  And  the  range  of  coastal  sand  dunes  has  decreased by 2.4% or 1500ha between 1998 and 2007 (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).  Shingle banks have undergone the large decline of coastal habitats; between 1991 and 1998  a habitat loss of 32% (29ha) was recorded in Northern Ireland (Murray, McCann, & Cooper,  1992).    The  below  table  shows  the  leading  causes  of  coastal  habitat  loss  in  Northern  Ireland  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005)            Causes of Habitat Loss     Agricultural Improvement         Erosion           Fall in Water Table           Grazing      Land Development         Natural Erosion         Recreational Activities     Sea Defence Works         Sediment Extraction          Species Invasion Table 2 ‐ Leading Causes of Coastal Habitat Loss                   26 


Ability to be recreated on a Green Roof  Habitats associated with coastal locations possess a number of qualities which are attractive  to their recreation on urban rooftop locations. The principle issues are:    Shallow Nutrient Poor Soils  The soil layers of costal habitats consist of free‐draining sandy or gravel soil which is typically  nutrient  poor  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Substrates  of  green  roofs,  especially those of lightweight extensive roofs, possess a similar soil structure as beach and  cliff face environments (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).     Hardy Resilient Vegetation  The vegetation of cliffs and aggregate shores already actively colonise urban areas, such as  pavements, walls, roofs, and lawns (Lundholm & Marlin, 2006). Studies have shown that of  the  range  of  species  that  naturally  occupy  green  roofs  are  disproportionately  drawn  from  rocky  and  costal  habitats  (Brenneisen  S.  ,  2006).  The  conditions  of  coastal  location  have  created plant species which are high adapted to the conditions of towns and cities, such as  limited and poor quality soil etc. (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    Exposure to Weather Extremes  The  typical  topology  and  hard‐surface  environment  of  urban  areas  reflect  those  of  cliffs,  slopes  and  exposed  gravel  flats  found  along  Northern  Ireland’s  coasts  (Grant  G.  ,  2006).  Additionally, the exposure to wind and temperature conditions in cities are similar to coastal  habitats (Larson, Matthes, Kelly, Lundholm, & Gerrath, 2004).       Coastal Habitats on Green Roofs  Incompatible

           

Sand Dunes    Vegetated Shingles Banks    Cliffs and Slopes         

Possible

Highly Suitable 

The requirement  of  both  flora  and  fauna  to  survive  in  exposed conditions on limited nutrients and water supply  has  created  species  that  are  predisposed  to  exist  within  the confines of a green roof  (Gilbert & Anderson, 1998).    Additional  then  ability  of  the  habitat  to  be  recreated  on  lightweight extensive green roofs will allow a wider range  of  building  to  support  a  recreated  coastal  habitat  (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).  

 

27

27


2‐03 Freshwater and Wetland Habitats  Northern Ireland has an extensive network of freshwater habitats, such as lakes, ponds and  wetlands.  There  are  more  than  1,600  lakes  in  Northern  Ireland,  ranging  in  size  from  small  ponds  to  Lough  Neagh,  the  largest  freshwater  lake  in  the  British  Isles  (NIEA,  2010).    Also  most  of  Northern  Ireland’s  lakes  are  fringed  by  fen,  marsh  and  swamp;  these  wetlands  provide  countless  benefit  to  local  ecosystems.  For  example  they  help  prevent  flooding  by  slowing down and absorbing regional water sources and maintaining summer water flows by  gradually release stored water to rivers and streams (NIEA, 2010).    The  areas  surrounding  lake  habitats  are  important  for  non‐migratory  bird  species  and  international  important  populations  of  migratory  wader  and  wildfowl  species  (CVNI,  2011).With reed beds and grazing marshes noted as containing a poor diversity in vegetation  species, but support a rich array of fauna adapted to wetlands, notably breeding birds  . All  freshwater  and  wetland  habitats  are  commonly  rich  with  freshwater  invertebrates  and  plants species, UK wide over 700 species of invertebrates are associated with reed beds and  marshes (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    The principle habitats associated with freshwater and wetland environments are:  Eutrophic Waters  Eutrophic Waters Mesotrophic Lakes   standing  water  Eutrophic  describes a body of water with a  high  nutrient  content  (nitrogen  and  phosphate). Most  of  Northern  Ireland’s  larger  lakes  such  as  Lough  Neagh  and  Lough  Beg and Lough Erne are regarded  Figure 12 ‐ Upper Lough Erne  Figure 13 ‐ Tower Lake, Newtownstewart  as  eutrophic  (Northern  Ireland  Marl Lakes Reed Beds  Habitat Action Plan, 2005).  Mesotrophic Lakes   Mesotrophic  lakes  are  a  body  of  water  with  a  medium  nutrient  content.  Both  mesotrophic  and  eutrophic  lakes  support  an    overlapping  body  of  flora  and  Figure 14 ‐ Knockballymore Lough, Fermanagh  Figure 15 ‐ Castle Espie, Down  fauna species due to their similar  Floodplain Marsh  chemical  composition  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).    Marl Lakes  Marl  lakes  are  natural  lakes  which  occur  at  low  altitude  and  contain  highly  alkaline  water  Figure 16 ‐ Insh Marshes, Scotland  Marl  lake  water  bodies  are  characterised  by  very  clear  water  but  has  a  low  nutrient  status  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action Plan, 2005).  Reed Beds  A wetland habitat that is dominated by Common Reeds and other tall flowering plants which  are  adapted  to  growing  in  wet  conditions.  Reed  beds  are  widely  distributed  along  the  margins of water bodies, streams, river and other forms of wetlands and bogs (CVNI, 2011).  Floodplain Grazing Marsh 

28

28 


Wetland marshes characteristically connected  to large slow‐moving rivers and lakes.  Much  of these habitats were formerly wet woodlands, fens or reed beds or redundant agricultural  land that has flooded (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005). 

Floodplain Marsh 

Reed Beds 

Marl Lakes 

Mesotrophic Lakes  

Eutrophic Waters 

For more information on these Habitats , please see Appendix A    The majority (72%) of Northern Ireland  lakes  have  a  surface  area  of  less  than  2ha  and  represent  only  1.2%  of  the  total water surface in Northern Ireland.  The five largest lakes represent 89% of  the  total  natural  water  volume  of  Northern  Ireland  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Wetland  habitats  such  as  reed  beds  and  grazing  marshes  are  widely  distributed  along  the  margins  of  water  bodies,  streams,  river  and  other  forms  of  waterlogged  environments  such  as  Figure 17 ‐ Northern Ireland's Freshwater & Wetland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008) fens and bogs. In Northern Ireland, they  are especially associated with lowland areas around the large lakes and drumlins (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).     Rate of Habitat Loss  The  total  extent  of  lakes  and  other  bodies  of  freshwater  within  Northern  Ireland  is  estimated at 940 km2 (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005). Between 1998 and 2007,  there was a 1% reduction in the  Causes of Habitat Loss          national  extent  of  these  Agricultural Activities      Climate Change      habitats (CVNI, 2011).          Drainage         Discharge      The rate of wetland habitat loss           between  1998  and  2007  was  Dredging    Forestation of Habitat          more  severe.  The  total  are  of           wetland  habitats  within  Habitat Fragmentation     Northern  Ireland  is  estimated  Land Development        at  47,255ha  or  3%  of  Northern  Natural Habitat Evolution           Ireland,  this  reduced  by  10%  Nutrient Enrichment        between  1998  and  2007  Pollution           (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  Poor Habitat Management           2009).     Recreational Activities             Sea Defence          The  adjacent  table  shows  the  Species Invasion           leading  causes  of  freshwater  Table 3 ‐ Leading Causes of Freshwater and Wetland Habitat Loss and wetland habitat loss in Northern Ireland (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005)         

29

29


Ability to be recreated on a Green Roof  Freshwater and Wetland habitats present both challenges and opportunities of green roofs.  The principle issues are:    Large Water Bodies at Roof Level  While numerous examples of pond at roof level exists (Earth Pledge, 2005), the majority of  freshwater bodies in Northern Ireland range between 1ha and 2ha (Northern Ireland Habitat  Action Plan, 2005) this means that artificial freshwater bodies will never be large enough to  support the flora and fauna associated with freshwater lakes  (Gilbert & Anderson, 1998).    Wetland Environment at Roof Level  Artificial  wetland  habitat  are  currently  commercial  available  and  there  exist  a  growing  market for recreated wetland habitats on green roofs in continental Europe to aid in building  cooling  and  rainwater  discharge  fees  (Earth  Pledge,  2005),  this  adoption  of  wetland  green  roof in Germany will be further discussed in chapter 3.   Freshwater and Wetland Habitats on Green Roofs  Incompatible 

         

Eutrophic Waters    Mesotrophic Lakes     Marl Lakes    Reed Beds    Floodplain Grazing Marsh     

Possible

Highly Suitable 

While artificial  lakes  are  unlikely  to  be  created  at  roof  level,  green  roofs  can  provide  habitats  that  will  accommodate  the  flora  and  fauna  associated  with  freshwater bodies.  Again the example of Ducks Unlimited  National  Headquarters  and  Conservation  Centre  in  Canada,  described  in  section  2‐01,  show  cases  this  principle (Earth Pledge, 2005).  The ability of green roofs  to  support  freshwater  lake  habitats  will  be  further  discussed in chapter 3.    Reed  beds  and  wet  grassland  are  currently  being  successfully  implemented  on  green  roofs  (Coffman  &  Davis, 2005). 

30

30 


2‐04 Woodland Habitats  Northern Ireland is the least wooded country in Europe. The average coverage of woodland  in Europe is 44%, in Northern Ireland it is only 6% of the total land area (NIEA, 2010). Native  forests  consist  of  broadleaf  trees,  such  as  are  Alder,  Downy  Birch,  Hazel,  Ash,  Oak,  and  Rowan (Northern Ireland Native Woodland Group, 2008).  The annual loss of leafs promotes  flora  on  the  forest  floor,  such  as  woodland  flowers  (National  Museums  Northern  Ireland,  2010).  There  are  few  examples  of  native  woodland  surviving  in  Northern  Ireland,  the  best  example  are  located  in  the  nature  reserves  at  Rostrevor  in  Down;  Breen  in  Antrim;  and  Boorin  Wood  in  Tyrone  (National  Museums  Northern  Ireland,  2010).  Modern  commercial  forests  are  planted  with  non‐native  species,  such  as  conifers,  which  provide  good  habitat  opportunities for some species, for instance the red squirrels and hen harrier but are not as  biologically diverse as semi‐natural woodland (NIEA, 2010).    Woodlands are not limited to one soil condition and are capable of developing on nutrient  rich, mineral based, acidic or nutrient‐poor peat soils (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan,  2005).  Many  habitats  will  transition  from  their  existing  state  to  shrub  land,  and  finally  woodland  if  left  to  naturally  evolve.  Forestation  is  sited  cause  of  habitat  loss  for  wetland,  grassland,  heath  and  bog  ecosystems  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  2009),  as  mention  in  other sections of this chapter.    The principle habitats associated with woodland environments are:  Wet Woodlands  Native Woodlands Wet Woodlands  An  assortment  of  woodland  and  scrubs  which  occupy  seasonally  flooded  or  waterlogged  land  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan, 2005)  Mixed Ashwood  Forests  located  on  base  rich  Figure 18 ‐ Belvoir Park Forest, Belfast  Figure 19 ‐ Bonds Glen, Derry  soils,  generally  dominant  by  Ash  Mixed Ashwood Oakwood  species,  typically  accompanied  by  Oak,  Downy  Birch  and  Hazel  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan, 2005)  Oakwood  Woodland  dominated  by  native  Oaks  supported  by  smaller  tree  Figure 20 ‐ Glenarm Woodlands, Antrim Figure 21 ‐ Breen Oakwood, Antrim species such as Holly, Rowan and  Hazel (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).  For more information on individual Woodland Habitats, please see Appendix A    The total extent of native broadleaf woodlands in Northern Ireland is estimated at 81,699ha  or  fewer  than  6%  of  the  total  land  area  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  2009).  The  area  of  broadleaf  forests  in  Northern  Ireland  currently  outmatches  that  of  introduced  conifer  forests, by 21,000ha (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).         

31

31


Oakwood

Mixed Ashwood 

Wet Woodlands 

Wet woodlands  occur  across  Northern  Ireland  in  scattered  locations,  at  areas  typically  3‐5ha.  Recent  estimates  place  the extent of wet woodlands to occupy  an  area  of  2,600ha  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Ashwood  forests  occupy  the  basalts  regions  of  Antrim,  the  limestone  basins  of  Fermanagh,  and  sites  in  the  Sperrins  and County Down and Armagh, with an  estimated range of 3,430ha,  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Northern  Ireland’s  oak  woodlands  are  concentrated in the north east, in rocky  Figure 22 ‐ Northern Ireland's Woodland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008)  and  wet  areas  with  slightly  base  soil  (CVNI,  2011),  their  extent  is  estimated  at  2,350ha  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).    Rate of Habitat Loss  Between 1998 and 2007 a 9% increase in both wet woodland and mixed ash wood habitats  was recorded, and an 11% increase in the area of oak forests throughout Northern Ireland  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005). Over the same period a reduction of 2% was  seen  in  Conifer  forests  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  2009).  The  total  area  of  broadleaf  forests  in  Northern  Ireland  increase  by  nearly  29%  between  1998  and  2007,  the  second  largest  expansion  of  land  use  in  Northern  Ireland  during  this  period,  surpassed  only  by  housing which increased by 30% (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).  As mentioned earlier in  this section, forestation is cited as a cause of habitat loss rather than succumbing to it (NIEA,  2010).    The below table shows the leading treats to woodland habitats in Northern Ireland, however  as  stated  broadleaf  forests  have  shown  strong  growth  in  recent  years  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005)                Causes of Habitat Loss       Air Pollution       Climate Change      Deforestation         Disease     Fall in Water Table           Grazing     Habitat Fragmentation           Illegal Dumping           Nutrient Enrichment       Poor Habitat Management     Poor Water Quality         Species Invasion Table 4 ‐ Leading Causes of Woodland Habitat Loss

32

32 


Ability to be recreated on a Green Roof  Woodland habitats require a number of important issues to be addressed if they are to be  recreated within a green roof environment. The principle issues are:    Shallow Soil and Root Depth  The root depth requirement of certain tree species can be significant (Gilbert & Anderson,  1998). While substrate depths of 500mm to over a metre are recommended depending on  tree species, method of using root balls and plastic strapping to induce dwarfism in planted  trees  are  commonly  required  (GreenRoof,  2010).  Unfortunately  the  reduce  root  area  increase the maintenance, water and nutrient requirements of the green roof (Earth Pledge,  2005), as described during chapter 1.    Weight of Mature Trees  The  addition  of  tree  species  to  a  green  roof  will  impose  a  considerable  extra  load  on  a  buildings structure (Gilbert & Anderson, 1998). A building will have to support in excess of  1000kg/m2  (Earth  Pledge,  2005),  a  requirement  which  while  achievable,  is  grossly  beyond  typical roof loading requirements (Adler, 1999).    Meeting  the  requirements  of  a  tree’s  weight  will  add  additional  cost  and  possibly  require  structural strengthening if trees are included in retrofitted green roofs (GreenRoof, 2010). In  addition to placing a practical limit on the size of planted trees (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    Woodland  Habitats on Green Roofs  Incompatible

     

Wet Woodlands    Mixed Ashwood    Oakwood   

Possible

Highly Suitable 

Example of  trees  plant  on  green  roofs  currently  exist  (Earth  Pledge,  2005;  GreenRoof,  2010)  and  will  be  discussed  in  detail  during  chapter  3.  However  these  examples also show the limitations of planting such large  scale vegetation at roof level. 

       

33

33


2‐05 Grassland Habitats  Grasslands  are  the  most  abundant  habitat  types  in  Northern  Ireland;  agriculture  grassland  encompasses  almost  60%  of  the  land  area  of  Northern  Ireland  (NIEA,  2010).  Native  grasslands are less agriculturally productive than managed land and are generally restricted  to  low  value  upland  areas,  which  typically  consist  of  waterlogged  and  thinner  soils.  The  natural  grasslands  of  Northern  Ireland  are  dependent  on  low  intensity  domestic  livestock  occupation  or  traditional  farming  practices  to  preserve  their  diversity  of  short  and  slow  growing and flowering grasses (NIEA, 2010).    Grasslands  are  area  heavily  dominated  by  herbs  and  fine‐leaved  grasses  with  a  lack  of  tall  vegetation  such  as  trees,  shrubs  and  other  dense  bushes  or  bracken  species  (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005). With local fauna comprising  principally of invertebrates  such as butterflies and beetle species. Grasslands support a less diverse range of vertebrate  species  than  other  habitats  described  in  this  chapter,  but  are  occupying  but  nationally  important colonies of Irish Hare and Skylark (CVNI, 2011).    The principle habitats associated with grassland environments are:  Lowland Dry Acid Grasslands  Lowland Acid Grasslands Calcareous Grasslands  Occurring  on  nutrient  poor,  free  draining soils which are based on  acid  rocks  or  shallow  deposits  of  sands and gravels (NIEA, 2010)  Calcareous Grasslands  Species‐rich  grassland  occurring  Figure 24 ‐ Little Deer Park, Antrim  Figure 23 ‐ Wangford Warren, Suffolk  on  shallow,  lime  rich  soils  the  Lowland Meadows Rush Pastures  majority  of  which  derive  from  chalk  and  limestone  rocks  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan, 2005)  Lowland Meadows  Areas  of  unfertilised  grassland  Figure 26 ‐ Slievenacloy, Belfast Hills  who’s  soil  layers  consist  of  well  Figure 25 ‐ Tees Valley, Middlesbrough  Limestone Pavements  drained mineral soil, supporting a  rich variety of herbs with few tall  plant  species  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005)  Purple  Moor‐grass  &  Rush  Pasture  Occur  on  poorly  drained,  usually  Figure 27 ‐ Knockmore, Fermanagh  acidic  soils  in  lowland  areas  exposed to high rainfall (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005)  Limestone Pavements  Areas of exposed limestone stable which support grass species and plants adapted to rocky  habitats (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005)              34

For more information on individual Woodland Habitats, please see Appendix A 

34 


Limestone Pavement 

Purple Moor‐Grass  

Lowland Meadows 

Calcareous Grassland 

Dry Acid Grassland 

Natural grasslands  occur  across  all  of  Northern Ireland, commonly located on  land  with  low  agricultural  value  (NIEA,  2010). Lowland dry acid grasslands area  rare and highly scattered, concentrated  in  County  Down  and  Armagh  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  2009)  and  limestone  pavement  are  restricted  to  west  Fermanagh  (CVNI,  2011).  The  remaining  grassland  habitats  are  located  across  County  Down,  Antrim,  Derry  and  Tyrone,  with  the  plains  of  Armagh  and  south  Fermanagh  dominated  by  commercial  agriculture  Figure 28 ‐ Northern Ireland's Grassland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008)  land (Countryside Survey, 2008).    Rate of Habitat Loss  Between  1998  and  2007  an  extensive  reduction  in  all  natural  grassland  habitats  was  recorded, losing 12.5% of their area. The only exception is calcareous grasslands which seen  a 2% increase (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009). Many types of grassland are reliant on the  implementation  of  low‐intensity  grazing  to  prevent  the  re‐colonisation  of  a  region  from  shrubs  and  woodland  (Corbett,  2003).  Forestation  and  the  loss  of  land  to  housing  development and other building projects are cited as the leading causes of habitat loss for all  grasslands.  The  table  below  presents  the  principle  reason  for  grassland  habitat  loss  in  Northern Ireland (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005)                  Causes of Habitat Loss          Agricultural Improvement       Airborne Pollutants              Climate Change           Forestation of Habitat             Grazing       Habitat Fragmentation                 Human Activities            Land Development     Land Infilling              Natural Erosion           Poaching               Poor Habitat Management          Quarrying             Recreational Activities     Table 5 ‐ Leading Causes of Grassland Habitat Loss

35

35


Ability to be recreated on a Green Roof  Grass  covered  roofs  have  a  long  history  of  usage  as  a  building  treatment  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008),  because  of  this  the  requirements  for  grasses  to  successfully  occupy  rooftops are comprehensively understood (Oberndorfer, et al., 2007). The following are the  primary issue in regards to the simulating natural grassland habitats on rooftops.    Soil Requirements  The  variation  in  soil  composition  of  natural  grasslands  is  considerable,  ranging  from  acidic  gravels to lime‐rich soils (NIEA, 2010). However because of the experiences of the ecological  roofing and the horticulture industry with creating grass dominated environments, the soil  condition  for  all  grassland  habitats  can  be  replicated  within  artificial  roof  ecosystems,  provided the correct systems are implemented (Blythe & Merhaut, 2007).    Species Selection  The most popular planting species for green roofs are variants of sedum, grasses, herbs and  mosses  (Emilsson,  2003).  Commercial  grass  seeds  are  abundant  on  both  the  construction  and  landscaping  markets  (White  &  Snodgrass,  2003).  As  introduce  of  alien  species  to  a  is  regarded as a leading degrading factor to natural grassland, recreated grassland habitats on  rooftops  must  take  measures  to  restrict  the  planting  of  unwanted  flora  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury, 2008).     Habitat Management Requirements  Because  of  the  importance  of  low  level  grazing  to  maintain  the  diversity  and  health  of  a  natural  grassland  (NIEA,  2010),  a  similar  intensity  of  habitat  maintenances  will  need  to  be  replicated  when  a  grassland  ecosystem  is  relocated  to  roof  level.  Maintenance  requirements, as described in chapter 1, will need to be considered when installing a grass  roof (Frith & Gedge, 2000).    Micro‐climate, Exposure and Natural Plant  Colonisation  Numerous  studies  and  built  examples  have  shown  that  both  flora  and  fauna  species  can  readily  colonise  green  roofs  if  the  roof  micro‐climate  replicate  there  natural  environment  (Brenneisen S. , 2006). This factor in combination with the adaptability of urban vegetation  (Larson, Matthes, Kelly, Lundholm, & Gerrath, 2004) can result in a grass roof being invaded  by  more  resilient  plant  species    (Landolt,  2001).  This  issue  will  be  discussed  further  in  chapter 3.    Grassland Habitats on Green Roofs  Incompatible

          36

Lowland Dry Acid Grassland    Calcareous Grassland    Lowland Meadow    Purple Moor & Rush Pasture    Limestone Pavement   

Possible

Highly Suitable 

The creation  of grass environments on roofs is a mature  building  process  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).  And  the  establishment  of  habitats  that  replicate  natural  grasslands  is  limited  only  local  conditions  and  design  ability  (White & Snodgrass, 2003). 

36 


2‐06 Heathland Habitats  The  heaths  of  Northern  Ireland  have  a  wide  habitat  range;  common  to  high  mountain  regions  but  also  extend  to  lowland  and  coastal  areas.  The  common  characteristic  of  all  heathlands  is  that  that  are  based  on  nutrient‐poor,  heavily  mineralised  soils  and  thin  peat  (NIEA,  2010).  Heathlands  are  an  internationally  rare  and  threatened  habitat,  and  the  total  UK habitat range represents a significant proportion of the global resource (Northern Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2003).     Heaths  provide  opportunities  for  numerous  mosses,  mountain  grasses  and heathers  which  have evolved in wetland and blanket bog species, in addition to a verity of dwarf shrubs and  conifer  trees  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2003).  But  are  categorised  as  being  lower  in  flora  diversity  other  ecosystems  described  in  this  chapter,  due  to  the  underlying  soil, however are commonly occupied by a diverse range of insects and other invertebrate  species  (NIEA,  2010).  Endangered  vertebrate  species  such  as  the  Irish  Hare  and  ground  nesting birds like the Curlew, Chough, Red Grouse, Hen Harrier and Skylark all rely on heaths  as are feed and breeding grounds (NIEA, 2010).     The principle habitats associated with heathland environments are:  Lowland Heaths  Lowland Heaths Upland Heaths  Heathland that are situated below  the  upper  altitude  limit  of  cost  effective  agricultural  practices,  this  is  generally  below  300m  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan, 2003)  Figure 29 ‐ Murlough National Nature Reserve  Figure 30 ‐ Bloody Bridge near Newcastle  Upland Heaths  Mountainous Heaths  Reside  above  the  altitude  limit  of    the majority of Northern Ireland’s  farms,  typically  between  300m  and  600m,  the  habitat  is  based  upon  thin  mineral  or  peat  soil,  usually with substrates layers less  than 0.5m deep (NIEA, 2010)  Figure 31 ‐ Mourne Mountains  Mountainous Heaths  Northern Ireland is the southern extreme of the natural range for montane or alpine heath  habitats.  These  heaths  occur  widely  in  the  Highlands  of  Scotland  at  altitudes  over  600m,  above the natural tree line (NIEA, 2010).  For more information on individual Heathland Habitats, please see Appendix A 

Heathland  habitats  tend  to  be  highly  fragmented  and  restricted  to  small  areas  (NIEA,  2010).    Lowland  and  Upland  heaths  have  a  largely  confined  range,  occupying  the  slopes  of  the  Mourne Mountains, the Ring of Gullion,  Rathlin Island and narrow coastal strips  in  Down,  Antrim  and  western  Fermanagh (NIEA, 2010). The estimated  5,000ha  of  lowland  heaths  are  general  linked  fens,  dominating  areas  of  Down  and  Armagh  (Cooper,  McCann,  &   

Figure 32 ‐ Northern Ireland's Heathland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

37

37


Mountainous Heaths 

Upland Heaths 

Lowland Heaths 

Rogers, 2009).  Mountainous  heaths  are  limited  to  the  highest  summits  of  the  Mourne  Mountains and the Sperrin Mountains, as Northern Ireland is the southernmost example of  this habitat internationally (NIEA, 2010).    Rate of Habitat Loss  Because  of  the  high  elevation,  poor  soils  quality  and  harsh  climate  of  Northern  Ireland’s  heaths,  these  habitats  are  not  heavily  threatened  by  encroaching  farming  land  (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003). However heaths have been targeted as areas of building  and  infrastructure  development,  resulting  in  extensive  habitat  loss  (CVNI,  2011).  The  development  of  forests  on  commercially  low  value  heathland  is  another  leading  cause  of  habitat  loss  (NIEA,  2010).  Also  climate  change  is  cited  as  a  leading  cause  of  mountainous  heaths,  this  is  exasperated  by  the  habitat  being  at  its  southern  extent  in  Northern  Ireland  (NIEA,  2010).  The  impact  of  climate  change  is  Northern  Ireland  is  predicted  to  be  much  smaller than in Britain and will have a less significant impact on local habitats  (Coll, Maguire,  & Sweeney, 2009).    The Northern Ireland Countryside Survey has estimated that lowland heaths have lost 11%  of  its  total  area  between  1992  and  1998.  Considerable  losses  in  upland  heaths  areas  have  occurred during the same period, an estimated 20% of wet upland heaths, and 28% of dry  upland heaths (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009). The below table lists the leading treats to  heathland habitats in Northern Ireland (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003)                Causes of Habitat Loss      Agricultural Improvement           Climate Change      Fires        Forestation of Habitat         Grazing      Land Development        Natural Erosion         Nutrient Enrichment       Recreational Activities       Species Invasion    Table 6 ‐ Leading Causes of Heathland Habitat Loss   Ability to be recreated on a Green Roof  Heaths  exhibit  a  number  of  attributes  that  are  applicable  to  green  roofs,  due  to  their  geographical and environmental requirements to develop (NIEA, 2010).The principle issues  are:    Mixture of Waterlogged and Dry Soil Conditions  Heather  and  mosses  dominated  areas  have  high  water  retention  capabilities  (NIEA,  2010),  this ability to retain moisture and the variations in water levels across a small area has been  shown  to  aid  in  creating  a  diverse  range  of  flora  and  fauna  species  on  green  roofs  (Brenneisen S. , 2006). As describe in chapter 1.  38

38 


Predominantly Monoculture Vegetation  The  exclusive  use  of  a  single  plant  species  or  group  of  related  species  is  a  hallmark  of  lightweight extensive green roofs (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008). A common planting method  is  to  utilise  vegetation  mats,  where  dense  groundcover  species  are  combines  with  a  non‐ organic fibres which mimics organic materials (Hitchmough, 1994), as discussed in chapter 1.    The  most  common  commercial  species  are  sedum;  however  the  technology  can  easily  be  applies to moss and heather planting (Cooper & McCann, 2001), creating a cheap system of  recreating heathland habitats.    Fragmented and High Altitude Locations  The  ability  of  heathland  to  thrive  in  exposed  and  isolated  environments  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2003) makes this habitat ideal for relocation to roof top environments.  The  micro‐climate  condition  of  the  majority  of  rooftops  in  Northern  Ireland  (Dunnett  N.  ,  2006)  replicates  the  natural  environmental  conditions  of  natural  heather  habitats  (Gates,  1980).    Heathland  Habitats on Green Roofs  Incompatible 

     

Lowland Heaths    Upland Heaths    Mountainous Heaths   

Possible

Highly Suitable 

Heathland habitats  support  lightweight  tolerant  ground  vegetation which is accustomed to shallow slightly acidic  soils (NIEA, 2010).    The predominant form of green roofs construction in the  UK,  prefabricated  vegetation  mats  (Emilsson,  2003);  present  an  opportunity  for  an  existing  technology  to  be  use for habitat recreation (Grant G. , 2006). 

             

39

39


2‐07 Peatland Habitats  Peatlands are areas of waterlogged soil containing a high quantity of organic matter, which  has accumulated over thousands of years. The laying down of peat is an ongoing process at  approximately  1cm  every  10  years  (NIEA,  2010).  The  types  of  bog  land  which  develops  depend on a variety of local environmental and geographical conditions, such as climate, soil  type and typology (NIEA, 2010). The climate of Northern Ireland provides the ideal climate  conditions  for  peat  formation,  due  to  high  rainfall,  cool  summers  and  high  atmospheric  humidity (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003). Blanket bogs in Ireland, represent 8%  of the world’s total habitat area (CVNI, 2011).    Naturally peatlands support a variety of highly specialist plants, many of which are national  priority  species.  The  most  abundant  vegetation  includes  Sphagnum  Bog  Mosses  and  other  plants adapted to waterlogged conditions (CVNI, 2011). Also the waterlogged conditions of  peatland  habitats  are  ideally  situated  for  flora  and  fauna  species  which  posses  an  aquatic  phase  in  their  life  cycle,  such  as  dragonflies.  Invertebrates  such  as  beetles,  moths  and  dragonflies are better adapted to bog land environments, with few mammal species, apart  from  the  Irish  Hare,  Red  Deer,  Foxes  and  the  Pigmy  Shrew,  permanently  residing  within  peatlands  (NIEA,  2010).  Additionally  the  lack  of  predators  and  human  disturbance  makes  peatlands  an  idyllic  environment  for  wading  and  nesting  bird  species  such  as  the  Skylark  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    The principle habitats associated with peatland environments are:  Lowland Raised Bog  Lowland Raised Bog Blanket Bog  The  gradually  filling  of  shallow  lakes  to  create  peat  based  ecosystems,  located  primarily  in  altitudes  below  150m  and  are  characteristically  are  surrounded  by  mineral  based  soils  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  Figure 33 ‐ Fairy Water Bogs, Tyrone  Figure 34 ‐ Cuilcagh Mountain, Fermanagh  2003)  Fens   Blanket Bog  Bog  lands  which  develop  in  response to the very slow rate at  which plant material decomposes  under  waterlogged  conditions,  and  have  the  ability  to  cover  an  Figure 35 ‐ Corbally Fen, Down entire  landscape  (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003)  Fens  Peatlands that receive the majority of their water and nutrients from ground water sources  and naturally occur in river valleys and poorly drained basins. Are generally considered the  starting form of lowing raised bogs (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005)                40

For more information on individual Peatland Habitats, please see Appendix A 

40 


Fens

Blanket Bog 

Lowland Raised Bog 

Bogs and  fen  occur  throughout  Northern Ireland (CVNI, 2011). Lowland  raised  bogs  are  concentrated  around  the  drumlins  of  the  Fermanagh  lowlands  and  raised  bogs  more  widespread  in  the  northwest  of  Northern  Ireland,  around  the  Antrim  Plateau  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2003).  Fens  are  similarly  spread  across  Northern  Ireland,  typically  associated  with  wetlands  and  lakes (CVNI, 2011).      Figure 36 ‐ Northern Ireland's Peatland Habitats (Countryside Survey, 2008)  Rate of Habitat Loss  Relatively  few  areas  of  peatland  in  Northern  Ireland  have  remained  unaffected  by  human  activities,  of  the  160902ha  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  2009)  of  bog  land  only  15%  has  remained  intact;  with  drainage  for  agriculture  effecting  10%  and  46%  be  cut  for  fuel  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003). Compared to the degradation of bogs the total  loss of habitat is relatively small, with only a 2% reduction in area between 1998 and 2007  (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009). The peat industry is the principle cause of habitat loss,  particularly in lowland raised bogs as they are more accessible than blanket bogs (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    Fens have similarly suffered with a  decrease  in  territory  of  18%  (484ha)  between  1988  and  1998  (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009),  with  forestation  and  invasion  of  shrubs being the leading causes of  habitat  loss  (Northern  Ireland  Causes of Habitat Loss  Habitat Action Plan, 2003).      Agricultural Improvement        Climate Change  The adjacent table lists the primary      Drainage  contributor  to  peatland  habitat     Fires    loss  in  Northern  Ireland  (Northern     Forestation of Habitat    Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).       Grazing        Illegal Dumping           Land Development       Land Infill         Natural Erosion            Nutrient Enrichment        Peat Cutting      Peat Milling          Pollution           Recreational Activities        Shrub‐land  Encroachment          Soil Mineral Leaching        Table 7 ‐ Leading Causes of Peatland Habitat Loss     

41

41


Ability to be recreated on a Green Roof  Peatland  present  a  number  of  challenges  in  term  of  recreation,  whether  by  traditional  means  or  on  green  roofs,  because  of  their  unique  geology  and  chemical  makeup  (NIEA,  2010).The principle issues are:    Waterlogged Environment  Recreation  of  waterlogged  environments  which  is  dominated  by  reed  beds  flora  is  an  existing  roofing  method,  common  in  Germany  (Earth  Pledge,  2005)  and  will  be  further  discussed in chapter 3. An acidic wetland ecosystem is possible with the appropriate water  systems.    Invertebrate Dominated Fauna  Bogs  and  Fens  support  a  diverse  array  of  insect  species,  several  of  which  are  extinct  or  threatened  outside  of  Northern  Ireland  (CVNI,  2011).  Invertebrates  (in  addition  to  birds)  have been shown to highly adaptable to relocation and spontaneously colonising green roof  that  mirror  their  natural  habitats  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008;  Brenneisen  S.  ,  2006),  as  described in the previous chapter and will be expanded upon in chapter 3. Green roofs are  capable of support the majority of peatland fauna in addition to flora species (Brenneisen S.  , 2006).    Soil Makeup  Peat  soil  is  an  acid  waterlogged  substance,  high  in  organic  material  (NIEA,  2010),  both  lowland raised bog and  blanket bogs are commonly milling for peat as it is a  common soil  nutrient in the horticulture industry (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    It would be unsustainable to propose the creation of bog habitats, if natural peatland will be  consumed  in  the  production  of  commercial  acidic  soil  (Gilbert  &  Anderson,  1998).  While  there  are  alternative  methods  of  creating  acidic  substrates  with  high  concentrations  of  organic materials using municipal solid waste (MSW) compost and dry sewage sludge, this a  immature horticultural systems (Ingelmo, Canet, Ibañez, Pomares, & García, 1998).    Peatland Habitats on Green Roofs   

Lowland Raised Bog    Blanket Bog    Fens 

 

       

42

Incompatible

Possible

Highly Suitable 

The inability to sustainably replicate the soil condition of  peatlands  will  negate  any  benefits  of  producing  bog  and  fen habitats on Northern Ireland’s roofs.    Again  green  roof  can  be  considered  as  supporting  habitats  for  bog  species,  such  as  the  wetland  habitat  on  created  on  the  BMW  Düsseldorf  Office  Building  (GreenRoof,  2010)  ,  which  will  be  further  discussed  in  chapter 3. 

42 


2‐08 Rate of Habitat Change  While  the  threat  to  individual  habitat  types  has  been  discuss  under  each  habitat  segment.  The  primary  cause  of  habitat  loss  through  Northern  Ireland  is  human  activities,  principally  due  to  converting  land  to  agricultural  use  and  the  expansion  of  rural  settlements  (NIEA,  2002). The rate of new rural structure being constructed doubled between 1998 and 2007,  with predominantly lowland habitats being consumed by such developments. These habitats  where  typically  small  semi‐natural  grasslands  which  were  part  of  larger  habitat  mosaics  (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).    Other  common  reasons  of  habitat  loss  or  transition  were  the  expansion  of  woodland  and  shrub habitats into open exposed lands, outcompeting local vegetation (Cooper, McCann, &  Rogers,  2009).Climate  change  was  universally  sited  as  a  future  concern  with  the  annual  rainfall predicted to increase by 3‐5% by the 2050s and temperatures increase by 0.7OC to  2.6OC in Northern Ireland (NIEA, 2002).    The  table  below  describes  the  rate  of  habitat  loss/gain  in  Northern  Ireland  between  1998  and 2007 (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009)    Habitat Type  Coastal Habitats  Costal Rock  Costal Sediment  Freshwater and Wetland Habitats  Standing Open Water Rivers & Streams  Wetland, Marsh & Fen Woodland Habitats  Broadleaved/Mixed & Yew Woods  Coniferous Woodland Grassland Habitats  Neutral Grassland  Calcareous Grassland Acid Grassland  Heathland Habitats  Heath (Dwarf shrub)  Bracken ‐ Dense  Peatland Habitats  Bog  Agricultural Habitats Improved Grassland  Arable and Horticulture  Highland Habitats  Mountainous  Inland Rock  Urban Habitats  Urban/Built up Areas Roads / Tracks & Hard Embankments  Total 

ha

% of N.I.

Habitat Change  Between  1998‐ 2007 

1581 1995

0.11 0.14

61332 5495 47255

4.33 0.39 3.34

‐453 +105  ‐5680 

81699 60617

5.77 4.28

+18193 ‐1518 

231116 1802 10369

16.32 0.13 0.73

‐32786 +37  ‐2954 

16751 2645

1.18 0.19

+2842 ‐439 

160902

11.36

‐3314

573010 48917

40.47 3.46

+18028 ‐8295 

735 5450

‐ 0.39

‐ ‐2520 

74098 30951 1415986

5.23 2.19

+17251 +1503 

ha

% Change 

+18193 ‐1518 

+28.65 ‐2.44

 

‐0.73 +1.96 ‐10.73 +28.65 ‐2.44 ‐12.42 +2.12 ‐22.18 +20.43 ‐14.25 ‐2.02 +3.25 ‐14.50 ‐ ‐31.62 +30.35 +5.10

Table 8 ‐ Rate of Habitat Change in Northern Ireland (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009)

     

43

43


Northern Ireland and Green Roof Habitat Recreation 

The following  table  illustrates  the  explored  connections  between  the  habitats  capable  of  surviving on green roofs and the requirements of natural habitats in Northern Ireland.       

Habitats favoured  by Green Roofs

Coastal Vegetation

Northern Ireland  habitats capable of  addapting to Green  Roofs

Habitats Commonly  Recreated on Green  Roofs

Habitats Promoted  by Ease of  Construction and  Financing

Tidal Marine  Habitats Saline Lagoon 

Coastal Habitats  Sand Dunes Vegetated Shingles Banks Cliffs and Slopes

Arid Vegetation Wetland Habitats  Reed Beds Floodplain Grazing Marsh

Reed Bed  Vegetation

Woodland   Habitats  Wet Woodlands Mixed Ashwood Oakwood

Mountainous Vegetation

Grassland Habitats  Lowland Dry Acid Grassland Calcareous Grassland Lowland Meadow Purple Moor & Rush Pasture Limestone Pavement

Limestone Vegetation

Heathland   Habitats  Lowland Heaths Upland Heaths Mountainous Heaths

Shrub & Heath   Vegetation

Peatland Habitats  Lowland Raised Bog Blanket Bog Fens

44

44 


Chapter 3 

Green Roofs and Created Habitats   

45

45


A wealth  of  research  data  exists  that  supports  the  perception that green roofs in heavily built up areas  can  support  a  relatively  diverse  level  of  flora  and  fauna  species  (Köhler,  2006).  The  purpose  of  this  chapter is to present examples of completed green  roofs, which demonstrates the scope of habitat that  have been created on green roofs and illustrate the  value  a  successful  green  roof  can  have  on  the  surrounding ecology.     Figure 1 ‐ Chicago City Hall The  specific  construction  details  of  green  roofing  systems  and  whether  they  complement  or  clash  with  the  equivalent  natural  environment  shall be discussed. The table below show the range of natural habitats in Northern Ireland  that have the potential to be replicated on green roofs.  Northern Ireland Habitats which can be readily adapted to Green Roofs  Coastal Habitats  Grassland  Habitats  Sand Dunes   Lowland Dry Acid Grassland   Vegetated Shingles Banks   Calcareous Grassland   Cliffs and Slopes   Lowland Meadow     Purple Moor & Rush Pasture  Wetland Habitats   Limestone Pavement   Reed Beds     Floodplain Grazing Marsh  Heathland  Habitats     Lowland Heaths   Upland Heaths   Mountainous Heaths  Northern Ireland Habitats that can be created on Green Roofs with  additional Considerations  Marine Habitats  Peatland Habitats  Saline Lagoon   Lowland Raised Bog     Blanket Bog  Woodland  Habitats   Fens   Wet Woodlands     Mixed Ashwood  Table 1 ‐ Habitats Capable of Existing on Green Roofs (Author)     Each  section  of  this  chapter  will  examine  existing  attempts  to  recreate  a  specify  habitat,  these examples will be assessed on their cost, structural makeup and ecological impact.    The aim of this undertaking is to refine the list of Northern Ireland habitats which can exist  on  a  rooftop  to  those  which  are  practical  to  replicate  on  green  roofs.  The  finding  of  this  chapter, in addition to previous chapters will provide material for the discussion of whether  green roofs can play a role in habitat preservation in chapter 4.               

46

46 


3‐01 Sand Dunes / Shingles Banks Habitat Case Studies  Flat  gravel  roofs  are  a  common  roof  typology  within  many  urban  centres;  the  material  makeup of such roof already shows some similarities with many coastal environments. The  free‐draining sandy and gravel covering presents environmental conditions, such as periods  of drought and heavy wind exposure (Grant, 2006), which are common to sand dunes and  shingles banks (CVNI, 2011).    As  mentioned  in  section  1‐12,  the  stress  tolerance  Sand Dunes  vegetation  associated  with  coastal  locations  is  ideal  for  rooftop occupation (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008). The lack of  complex  soil  layer  in  sand  and  shingle  beach  heads    (National Museums Northern Ireland, 2010) also means that  it  is  possible  to  construct  artificial  soil  which  have  the  capability of mimicking organic beach material (Hitchmough,    1994).  This  presents  opportunities  to  reduce  the  need  for  Figure 2 ‐ Murlough Dunes, Dundrum Bay  the  removal  of  natural  sand  or  gravel  soils  in  habitat  Vegetated Shingles recreation projects.     Recent field  research into how plant species spontaneously  colonized  urban  areas  and  habitats  (such  as  pavements,  walls,  roofs,  lawns  and  roofs)  originate  disproportionately  from coastal and rocky habitats (Lundholm & Marlin, 2006).      Figure 3‐ Kearney, Down      An important example of a green roof working to support coastal  dunes  and  beach  heads  is  the  National  Trust  Visitor  Centre  at  Portstewart  Strand.  A  building  designed  by  Donnelly  O’Neill  Architects  is  located  next  to  a  two  mile  stretch  of  protected  beach  and  sand  dunes.  The  green  roof  is  a  400m2  extensive  sedum roof, which is expected to be colonised by local dune grass  in  the  future  (GreenRoof,  2010).This  project  is  one  of  the  few  attempts of habitat recreation at roof level in Northern Ireland.            Figure  4  ‐  National  Trust  Visitor  Centre, Portstewart Strand         

47

47


Sechelt Justice Services Centre 

The Sechelt  Justice  Services  Centre  is  located  Location Sechelt, Canada  2003  adjacent  to  the  Pacific  Ocean  in  British  Completion Date District of Sechelt  Columbia  and  is  an  example  of  a  low‐impact,  Client  Architect Johnston Davidson  site‐specific  roof  design.  The  roof  was  Landscape Architect Sharp & Diamond  New  developed to replace the coastal dune meadow  New Build/Retrofit Extensive  that was consumed during the building process,  Green Roof Type 2 Roof Size 465m   mimicking the local soil conditions and optimise  Roof Coverage 40%  Soil Medium 60% Black Pumice  the exposure to sunlight and prevailing winds.  and 40% Soil    Amendment  The  roof  is  populated  by  native  costal  grass  Soil Depth 75mm  2 £46/m   species  and  selected  non‐native  plants  such  as  Cost 2 Weight 73.2kg/m   sedum, mosses and herbs (Earth Pledge, 2005).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The construction method utilised by the Sechelt Justice Services Centre shows promise for  the recreation of sand dunes / shingles banks habitats here in Northern Ireland.   The  roofing  systems  use  a  lightweight  structure  that  is  within  the  structural  tolerances of the majority of Northern Irelands buildings (Adler, 1999).   An  artificial  soil  substrate  supports  coastal  grasses,  using  pumice  rock  and  plant  nutrient supplements.   A mixture of native grasses and alien mosses and herbs are planted on the rooftop.  The mixture of native/non‐native species on Northern Ireland rooftops will have to  be  done  in  conjunction  with  the  appropriate  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan  and  the  national  Biodiversity  Action  Plan    (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).     

48

48 


University Hospital of Basel 

While  every  building  in  Basel  hospital  complex  Location Basal, Switzerland    has a green roof, only the roof of Clinic One was  Completion Date 1999  University Hospital  specially  designed  as  a  test  site  for  urban  bird  Client  of Basel   habitat creation. The roof is covered with sandy  Architect n/a   loam  and  gravel  from  the  nearby  riverbank,  Landscape Architect Stephan Brenneisen  New  shaped into small hills and perches that are the  New Build/Retrofit Green Roof Type Extensive  preferred  train  of  insect‐hunting  birds  (Earth  2 Roof Size 1,860m   Pledge, 2005).  Roof Coverage 60%  Soil Medium 60% sand and    gravel; 40% topsoil  The  green  roof  has  become  frequented  by  an  with stones and  unexpected  range  of  bird  species;  Black  humus      90mm   Redstarts,  Wagtails,  Rock  Doves  and  House  Soil Depth 2 £10/m   Sparrows  (typically  mountainous,  rural  species)  Cost 2 Weight 146.5kg/m   dominate  the  roofscape,  with  common  urban  species  rarely  observed.  Studies  has  have  proposed  that  in  dense  urban  areas  where  vegetation and food is scarce; migratory birds select rooftops which resemble their natural  feeding and nesting habitats (Brenneisen S. , 2006).    A number of native grasses were planted during the construction of the roof; however the  majority of vegetation has grown from seeds deposited by birds (Earth Pledge, 2005).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Clinic One building illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   There exists a readiness by both flora and fauna species to habitat rooftop habitats,  when the roof provides resources similar to their natural habitats.    The  University  Hospital  of  Basel  represents  a  successful  recreated  habitat,  which  required a low financial investment.   The ability of plant species to colonise green roofs through seed dispersal by birds,  highlights  the  natural  transition  of  rooftops  vegetation  in  response  to  the  residing  fauna species. This makes the Clinic One building an example of an artificial habitat  roof reaching a level of symbiosis with local wildlife.    

49

49


Laban Dance Centre 

The brown roof on the Laban Dance Centre was  Location London, England    constructed  using  debris  found  onsite  during  Completion Date 2002   Laban Dance Centre   the  construction  process.  Brick  and  Concrete  Client  Herzog & de  were  crushed  and  stacked  unevenly  across  the  Architect Meuron   roof  to  simulate  a  waterfront  gravel/shingle  Landscape Architect Vogt Landscape  Architects   bank  supported  by  local  dry  grassland  New Build/Retrofit New   vegetation,  which  was  once  common  to  the  Green Roof Type Intensive Rubble  Thames  (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  The  building  won  Roof   2 400m   the  RIBA  'building  of  the  year'  award,  and  Roof Size 33%  Herzog  &  de  Meuron  won  the  Stirling  Prize  for  Roof Coverage Soil Medium Rubble   the  Laban  Dance  Centre  building  in  2003  Soil Depth 120‐150mm   2 Cost £22/m   (GreenRoof, 2010).  Weight Not available    The rooftop at the Laban Dance Centre has been designed to support the endangered Black  Redstart bird species, one of the most endangered birds in the UK (Earth Pledge, 2005).  The  success of the roof in providing a nesting ground for the Black Redstart has encouraged the  adoption  of  ecological  green  roofs  by  neighbouring  buildings  (Frith  &  Gedge,  2000);  the  issues of ecological roof in London will be expanded upon in chapter 4.        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Laban Dance Centre illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   The Laban Dance Centre is another example of a successful habitat roof project.   The nesting of the Black Redstart and use of the building as a part of their feeding  area,  demonstrates  that  green  roofs  can  play  an  important  role  in  aiding  in  conservation methods.   A  use  of  recycled  construction  material  (crushed  brick  and  concrete)  within  the  artificial  soil  substrate  showcases  a  more  sustainable  approach  to  green  roof  planting.  Crush  building  material  used  in  the  aggregate  layer  of  green  roofs  is  not  wide utilised within the UK construction sector (Graceson, Hare, Hall, & Monaghan,  2011).     

50

50 


3‐02 Cliffs and Slopes Habitat Case Studies  An  estimated  528  hectares  of  coastal  cliffs  and  slopes  surround  Northern  Ireland  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  2009),  a  diverse  array  of  flora  and  fauna  species  inhabit  these  environments, dominating areas of high exposure and limited soil (CVNI, 2011).    The  widespread  presence  of  hard‐surfaced  environments  Cliffs and Slopes  within  built‐up  areas  and  their  colonisation  by  species  adapted  to  rocky  habitats  has  lead  to  the  emergence  of  the  ‘Urban Cliff Hypothesis’. This planning ecology concept states  that  development  of  urban  areas  is  more  complex  than  a  simply destruction of natural habitat; rather original habitats  are  replacement  by  artificial  habitats  that  function,  both  structurally and biologically, like rocky outcrop and cliff tops    Figure 5 ‐ Carrick‐a‐Rede Cliffs, Antrim  (Larson, Matthes, Kelly, Lundholm, & Gerrath, 2004).     The combination of resilient plant species and a natural affiliation between cliff habitats and  urban structure, creates a wide number of both flora and fauna species that can readily be  applied to many rooftops (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008; Lundholm & Marlin, 2006).      An  example  of  an  interesting  combination  of  cliff  habitats  and  green  roof  environments  is  the  Gallie  Craig  Coffee  Shop  at  Drummore,  Stranraer,  in  Scotland.  The  tourist  building  was  designed  by  IB  MacFadzean  Architects  whose  green  roof  is  integrated  into  the  cliff  face.  A  turf  roof  allows  the  building  to  blend  into  the  contours  of  the  land,  reducing  any  detrimental  visual effect on the landscape (GreenRoof, 2010).    While  this  is  a  very  direct  representation  of  the  combination  of  cliff  and  rooftop  habitats,  the  examples  does  showcase  that  a  direct comparison between the two habitats on ecological terms  can be made.                    Figure  6  ‐  Gallie  Craig  Coffee  Shop, Drummore, Scotland 

51

51


ACROS Fukuoka                                The  Asian  Crossroads  over  the  Sea  (ACROS)  Location Fukuoka, Japan   building  is  a  public/private  development  in  the  Completion Date 1995  Client  Dal‐lchi Mutual Life  centre  of  Fukuoka  city,  adjacent  to  the  Tenjin  Mitsui Real Estate   Central  Park.  The  aim  of  the  design  was  to  Architect Emilio Ambasz   create public space equal to the land lost due to  Landscape Architect Nihon Sekkei  Takenaka  the  buildings  footprint.  15  vegetated  terraces  Corporation   dominated  the  structures  south  façade,  with  New Build/Retrofit New   access to the building’s interior at each floor.  Green Roof Type Intensive   2 Roof Size 930m     Roof Coverage 80%  The  majority  of  the  planting  species  are  Soil Medium Rubble   indigenous  to  Japan,  mostly  hardy  grasses  and  Soil Depth 300‐600mm   Not available  perennial  flowers,  with  some  non‐native  Cost Not available  annuals and perennials used for their aesthetics  Weight (Earth Pledge, 2005).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The construction method implemented by the ACROS Building presents the following points  for habitat recreation.   A  high  percentage  of  the  land  consumed  by  the  buildings  footprint  has  been  replaced  by  rooftop  vegetation,  however  this  was  a  design  requirement  as  the  structure is located in a dense urban area with few open spaces or public greenery  (GreenRoof, 2010).   The design of the ACROS Building showcases its rooftop vegetation as a prominent  part of its primary façade.   The soils substrate layer of the ACROS Building uses a rubble soil system similar to  the Laban Dance Centre; however this report was unable to find out if any recycled  material was used in the construction process.     

52

52 


3‐03 Wetland Habitat Case Studies  A  growing  market  for  organic  water  filtration  systems  (such  as  reed  beds  and  willow)  has  encouraged  the  emergence  of  wetland  habitats  on  many  rooftops  (Oberndorfer,  et  al.,  2007). There is over an estimated 5,000 constructed wetlands in Germany, used primarily to  treat  residential  and  municipal  wastewater  in  areas  where  a  connection  to  the  central  sewage treatment system is too costly.  The adoption of wetland rooftops has followed suit.  (Earth Pledge, 2005), the issues of green roof adoption in Germany will be further discussed  in chapter 4. This report was unable to establish if a wetland roof has ever been attempted  in Northern Ireland.    Wetland  plants  clean  and  filter  water  naturally;  Reed Beds  microorganisms  in  the  root  systems  and  in  wetland  soil  absorb  and  breakdown  contaminants,  metabolising  them  into nutrients (Earth Pledge, 2005). Additionally the minimal  soil requirements and the ability to recycle nutrients in water  runoff, results in the ability of flora and fauna that requires a  permanent waterlogged environment that can exist on green    roofs  with  appropriately  designed  drainage  layers  and  Figure 7 ‐ Castle Espie, Down  irrigation systems (Coffman & Davis, 2005).  Floodplain Marsh    The  ability  of  rooftops  to  contain  large  bodies  of  water  is  limited.  Partly  due  to  the  additional need  for  waterproofing  any  underling  structure,  but  also  the  weight  a  substantial  volume of water imposes.      Figure 8 ‐ Insh Marshes, Scotland The  largest  example  of  a  body  of  water  within  an  artificial  roof  wetland  habitat  recreation;  is  the  120m2  miniature  lake  around  a  penthouse  suite  of  the  BMW  Düsseldorf  Office  Building.  The  rooftop  habitat  created  by  leading  green  roof  manufacture  ZinCo  GmbH,  is  an  intensive  roof  garden  and  large  pond  located  20  metres  above  ground  on  the  roof  of  the  BMW  office  building  in  Düsseldorf (GreenRoof, 2010).    While  the  ability  of  static  bodies  of  water  to  exist  at  roof  level  is  limited (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008), however the capacity to apply  wetland grasses and reed species is a more applicable and mature  roofing approach (Coffman & Davis, 2005).              Figure 9 ‐ BMW Düsseldorf Office Building                  

53

53


KPMG Building 

During  a  programme  of  building  renovations,  a  Location Dusseldorf,  wetland environment was created on the roof of  Germany    2003  the  parking  complex  in  KPMG  Dusseldorf.  The  Completion Date Client  KPMG   wetland  was  a  renovation  of  a  previous  Architect Eckhard Gardenier   ornamental pool which would regularly become  Landscape Architect Ulrich Zens    New   choked  with  algae  due  to  the  high  phosphate  New Build/Retrofit Green Roof Type Intensive   level of the tap water used to feed the habitat.  2 Roof Size 4,100m     Roof Coverage 67%  topsoil for grasses;  The wetland uses a mixture of plant species that  Soil Medium lava mixed with  are  current  marketed  with  organic  rainwater  zeolite for wetlands  filtration  systems  and  expanded  into  a  larger  Soil Depth 300‐ 400mm   2 £660/m   natural  system.  The  roof  contains  a  well,  grass  Cost Not available  landscaped area, an artificial swamp plus stream  Weight and the original pond. The well collects rainwater, which is pumped to an irrigation system  for the landscaped area and the stream which feeds the swamp which drain into the pond.  The  water  bodies  are  lined  with  volcanic  rocks,  which  further  filter  the  water  and  anchor  reed species.    The habitat has shown to support a complex array of insect and bird species. In addition to  this,  the  roofing  treatment  has  saved  the  building  occupiers  money  through  reduction  in  storm water fees and heat/cool costs (Earth Pledge, 2005).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The KPMG building illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   A mosque of habitat condition has been created on the KPMG roof, which has been  proven  that  a  mix  of  habitats  types  on  a  single  roof  increases  overall  biodiversity   (Brenneisen S. , 2006).   The water pumping system used by the KPMG buildings is complex and will have an  impact of the maintenance and operation cost of the roof.   The  construction  costs  and  structural  weight  of  the  wetland  roof  is  considerable    when compared to other grassland habitat roofs. 

54

54 


Possmann Cider Company                     

        During  a  series  of  schemes  to  modernise  its  Location Frankfurt, Germany     1993  factory,  the  Possmann  Cider  Company  required  Completion Date Client  Possmann Company  an  alternative  system  to  cool  its  fermentation  Architect Siegfried Ziepke   tanks because of Germany’s high water charges.  Landscape Architect Not available    New Build/Retrofit Retrofit  Green Roof Type Intensive  In 1993, the company installed a similar wetland  2 Roof Size 3,000m   green wetland roof as the system use at KPMG,  Roof Coverage 100%  creating a closed loop cooling system. Rainwater  Soil Medium None ‐ hydroponic  n/a  collected  by  the  wetland  is  directed  to  the  Soil Depth Not available  fermentation  tanks  and  circulated  back  to  the  Cost Weight Not available  roof. Plants thrive in the warmer water and the  dense shaded root systems quickly cool the water.     The wetland has become populated by local bird species and a 1999 study showed that 20  new plant species had established themselves on the roof (Earth Pledge, 2005).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Possmann Cider Company illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   The company states that the wetland roof treatment has an annual saving of £3,6501  in the buildings cooling cost (Earth Pledge, 2005). Displaying wetland green roof as a  means of sustainable building cooling.   This  roof  type  combines  sustainable  technologies,  namely  a  grey  water  rainwater  storage system to reduce the need for mains water to feed the roof environment.   The  adaption  of  hydroponic  plant  feeding  methods  has  completely  removed  the  need for an artificial soil substrate.   The Possmann Cider Company is an example of a habitat roof naturally colonised by  a local bird species.                                                                   1

Figure converted from stated value ($6,000) 

55

55


John Deere Works 

The manufacturing and assembly process at the  Location Mannheim,  John  Deere  factory  in  Mannheim,  Germany  Germany       2003  produces  an  extensive  volume  of  wastewater  Completion Date Client  John Deere    due  to  its  metal  cutting  systems.  Previously  all  Architect John Deere    wastewater  in  the  factor  was  sent  to  a  Landscape Architect John Deere    Retrofit  treatment  plant  and  discharged  to  the  New Build/Retrofit Green Roof Type Intensive  municipal sewer system at a significant fee.  2 Roof Size 42m     Roof Coverage 65%  None ‐ hydroponic  The  company  did  not  have  the  require  ground  Soil Medium Soil Depth 50mm   level  land  to  support  a  natural  treatment  2 Cost £330/m   2 system,  so  rooftop  system  were  explored.  The  Weight 341.8kg/m   roofing technique employed by the John Deere  factory, does not utilise a soil base in order to limit the weight on the pre‐existing structure.    The plant life receives nutrient from a 50mm deep hydroponic system. The designers of the  roof system have found that a combination of Sedges, Rushes and Irises species are the most  effective in the breakdown of carbon and nitrogen compounds in discharge water and can  accumulate  and  remove  suspended  phosphates  and  heavy  metals  particles  through  their  root  systems  (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  Green  roofs  can  remove  over  95%  of  cadmium,  copper  and lead in retained water  they also  remove 16% of zinc and dramatic reduce the level of  water soluble Nitrogen (Schmidt, 1990).      Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The John Deere factory illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   Again the John Deere factory uses a hydroponic plant feeding system   A  wetland  habitat  roof  system  was  used  in  the  John  Deere  factory  to  reduce  the  water discharge of the metal works, unlike the Possmann Cider Company which was  driven by the reduction of cooling costs.    Both  the  wetland  roofs  systems  of  the  Possmann  Cider  Company  and  John  Deere  factory  were  designed  as  energy  saving  habitats,  dedicated  purely  to  their  relationship  with  their  connected  buildings.  This  may  present  conflicting  design  drives; between building sustainability and habitat recreation.  

56

56 


3‐04 Woodland Habitat Case Studies  While it is unexpected to have woodland habitats at roof level many examples exist (Peck &  Kuhn,  2000).  Trees  and  large  bushes  are  exclusive  to  intensive  green  roofs  and  have  the  highest visual impact of any planting; however a number of factors need to be considered  when creating woodland habitats    Native Woodlands  Wet Woodlands The  weight  of  any  planted  tree  must  be  calculated,  as  they  induce  a  considerable  concentrated  load  which  can  greatly  increase  during  high  winds  due  to  the  addition  of  tipping  momentum  under  wind    Figure 11 ‐ Bonds Glen, Derry  Figure 10 ‐ Belvoir Park Forest, Belfast  pressure  (Francis  &  Lorimer,  Mixed Ashwood  Oakwood 2011).   Trees  with  smaller leaves  and a relatively small crown offer  the best wind resistance, and the  minimum  soil  depth  for  small  trees  is  approximately  500mm.  To  counteract  the  debilitating  factors of high winds and shallow    Figure 12 ‐ Glenarm Woodlands, Antrim  Figure 13 ‐ Breen Oakwood, Antrim soils it is necessary to anchor the  root ball to the roof structure below (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    Irrigation systems are also crucial for the survival of tree on green roofs because of reduced  root  systems;  they  need  a  continuous  flow  of  water  to  meet  a  tree’s  nutrient  and  water  requirements (White & Snodgrass, 2003). Additionally tree dominated rooftops are heavily  affected  by  restricted  size,  due  to  a  combination  of  the  volume  of  single  plants  and  the  typical area of many roofs (Brenneisen & Hänggi, 2006).      Despite  these  restriction  successful  woodland  habitats  can  exist  within  a  green  roof  environment,  all  be  it  in  a  heavily  managed  format  (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  An  extreme  example  of  the  combination  of  tree  habitat  and  building  is  the  Hundertwasserhaus,  an  apartment  block  in  Vienna,  Austria  by  the  artist  Friedensreich  Hundertwasser.  The  building  possesses  an  earth  covered  roof  supporting  numerous  grasses  and  large  trees, many of which have sprouted from inside rooms with their  trunks  protruding  through  the  roof  structure  and  having  limbs  extending  from  windows.  The  structure  supports  a  total  of  250  trees and bushes (Earth Pledge, 2005).    While structures accommodating tree habitat do not go to such  planting  extremes  as  the  Hundertwasserhaus,  tree  require  care  consideration before planting.      Figure 14 ‐ Hundertwasserhaus, Vienna           

57

57


The Patterson Garden 

The  rooftop  garden  of  Glen  Patterson  at  third  Location Vancouver, Canada    2003  floor level in the Escala Tower in the Vancouver  Completion Date Glen Patterson  harbour  district  was  designed  to  resemble  a  Client  Architect K.M. Cheng  costal wet forest. The roof supports a number of  Architects   Nakano Landscape  transplanted  mature  trees,  mostly  Black  and  Landscape Architect Design     White  Pines  and  Maple,  Cypress  and  evergreen  New Build/Retrofit New   Oak  species  (in  addition  a  Gnarled  Japanese  Green Roof Type Intensive   2 185m   Maple  aged  at  over  a  100years),  an  artificial  Roof Size Roof Coverage 100%  pond  and  stream  and  a  number  of  species  of  Soil Medium black pumice  dwarf  rhododendrons  and  mountain  hemlocks  pebbles; graded  sand; coconut  as groundcover planting.  fibres; zeolite    Soil Depth 300mm (600mm for  Two  years  before  the  completion  of  the  tree roots)   Not available  building, trees to be relocated to the roof were  Cost Roof strengthened  excavated  and  their  roots  cut  back  to  3‐foot  Weight to load‐bearing of  2 diameter planting balls, to allow the plants time  1220kg/m   to adapted to the compact environments of the  roof.  Additionally  shortly  before  being  replanted  at  roof  level  the  root  balls  were  bound  tightly with plastic strapping, using bonsai9 techniques, to restrain root growth (GreenRoof,  2010).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Patterson Garden illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   A  600mm  substrate  (a  substantial  soil  depth  for  a  roofing  system)  is  needed  to  support tree species that have undergone induced stunted grown and dwarfism to  adapt to roof conditions.   Special consideration was given during the roof’s construction to accommodate the  additional weight imposed by the planted trees (Earth Pledge, 2005).   The roof has a purpose built automatic irrigation system to supply the water needs  of the garden (Earth Pledge, 2005).   The  rooftop  was  design  as  an  ornamental  garden  not  a  natural  habitat  recreation  with all trees species cloud pruned to a 900mm (Earth Pledge, 2005).      58

58 


Roppongi Hills 

Roppongi  Hills  in  the  centre  of  Tokyo  was  Location Tokyo, Japan      2003  conceived  as  an  experimental  urban  Completion Date Roppongi 6 Chrome  development. In  combination with a number of  Client  Redevelopment  other  schemes,  the  developments  green  spaces  Association   Cionran & Partners   was  envisaged  as  a  way  to  revitalize  the  Architect Yohji Saski   residences  of  downtown  Tokyo,  who  were  Landscape Architect & Dan Pearson      categorised as have high levels of depressed.  New Build/Retrofit New   Green Roof Type Extensive &    Intensive   Presently  Roppongi  Hills  represents  26%  of  2 Roof Size 13,285m   greens  pace  in  central  Tokyo.  The  scheme  Roof Coverage 26%  contains  a  number  of  green  rooftops,  with  the  Soil Medium Soil;   Artificial aggregates;  Keyakizaha building supporting a rice paddy with  Sedum mats   a parameter tree line (GreenRoof, 2010).  Soil Depth 30‐1200mm   Cost Not available    2 Weight 97.6kg/m       Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Roppongi Hills illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   A requirement for additional structural props was needed to be installed in order to  stabilise the planted tree species (Earth Pledge, 2005).   Rainwater  storage  in  combination  with  a  drib  irrigation  system  was  developed  to  provide water and nutrients for the roof habitat (Earth Pledge, 2005).   Again  the  Roppongi  Hills  was  designed  as  an  ornamental  garden  rather  than  a  natural  habitat,  the  majority  of  the  Roppongi  Hills  is  a  combination  of  traditional  Japanese and Japanese‐British style gardens (Earth Pledge, 2005).     

59

59


3‐05 Grassland Habitat Case Studies  Grasses are common on many green roofs; many roof designs state that mimicking natural  meadows is their primary goal (Budge, 2009). The shallow roots systems and the pressures  imposed  by  grazing  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005)  have  created  a  diverse  range of stress‐tolerant vegetation that is capable of adapting to a green roof environment  (White & Snodgrass, 2003).    While  certain  grassland  habitats  Lowland Acid Grasslands  Calcareous Grasslands will require intensive soil layer to  support  their  principle  species  (CVNI, 2011; White & Snodgrass,  2003),  lightweight  extensive  green  roofs  are  capable  of  providing  for  many  grassland    Figure 16 ‐ Little Deer Park, Antrim  Figure 15 ‐ Wangford Warren, Suffolk  habitats  (Larson,  Matthes,  Kelly,  Lowland Meadows  Rush Pastures Lundholm, & Gerrath, 2004).    Many  of  the  grasslands  in  Northern  Ireland  rely  on  a  variation of a shallow mineral soil  (NIEA, 2010) these conditions are    Figure 17 ‐ Tees Valley, Middlesbrough  Figure 18 ‐ Slievenacloy, Belfast Hills  replicable within the substrate of  Limestone Pavements  extensive  green  roofs  (Dunnett  N. , 2006).    Grass roof habitats are a  mature  green  roofing  treatment,  with  a  number  of  examples  of  grass  covered  green  roofs  which  have    Figure 19 ‐ Knockmore, Fermanagh been  proven  to  provide  for  surrounding wildlife or support rare species (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    An  example  of  the  statement  is  the  Ducks  Unlimited  National  Headquarters  and  Conservation  Centre  in  Winnipeg,  Canada  which  contains  a  grass  roof,  this  example  has  been  previously  mention in the freshwater habitats conclusions of chapter 3. This  is  an  example  of  habitat  recreation  that  provides  resources  for  nesting birds from the adjacent Oak Hammond Marsh which has  many parallels to Lough Neagh (GreenRoof, 2010).         

60

Figure 20  ‐  Ducks  Unlimited  National Headquarters, Winnipeg, Canada 

60 


Hill House 

To  comply  with  strict  planning  requirement  for  Location La Honda, California  1979  building  within  a  ‘scenic  corridor’,  a  buried  Completion Date George & Adele  dwelling  was  designed  for  the  Norton  family.  Client  Norton    The house used a system of concrete/ fieldstone  Architect Jersey Devil  Design/Build   retaining walls and sod covered roof to create to  Landscape Architect Jersey Devil  minimal impact building.  Design/Build    New Build/Retrofit New   Extensive  The  roof  was  cover  with  Winter  Rye  and  local  Green Roof Type 2 232m   wildflowers  with  boundary  of  the  sloped  roof  Roof Size Roof Coverage 100%  landscaped  with  Honeysuckle  vines  and  Oak  Soil Medium 50% road base and  50% topsoil    trees (GreenRoof, 2010).  Soil Depth 200mm     2 Cost £650/m   2   Weight 439.4kg/m     Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Norton Hill House illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   The Hill House is an example of a semi‐buried structure; while his will allow for the  colonisation  of  additional  fauna  species  it  will  not  affect  the  rate  of  flora  and  invertebrate species (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).   A mixture of commercially available road aggregate and natural topsoil was used in  the development of this roof system; a sustainably questionable material mixture.   The  direct  connection  between  the  building  roof  and  surrounding  natural  environment was an imposed design feature. 

61

61


Heinz 57 Centre 

The green roof on the Heinz 57 Centre was part  Location Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania   of the refurbishment of the long abandonment  2001  building  located  on  the  fringe  of  Pittsburgh  Completion Date Client  623 Smithfield  historic quarter (Earth Pledge, 2005).  Associates     Architect Burt Hill Koser    Rittlemann  The  high  masonry  walls  that  surround  the  Associates   garden  have  created  a  sheltered  micro‐climate  Landscape Architect Burt Hill Koser  Rittlemann  which  has  led  to  a  more  diverse  range  of  Associates  vegetation.  The  roof  is  populated  by  a  number  New Build/Retrofit Retrofit  of  flowering  wildflowers  and  sedum  species,  Green Roof Type Extensive  2 1,115m   with  an  all  year  round  blooming  cycle  (Earth  Roof Size Roof Coverage 33%  Pledge,  2005).  The  plant  list  includes  35  Soil Medium 90% mineral;   separate plant species, which ranges from low‐ 10% organic     120mm   growing groundcover plants like sedum to taller  Soil Depth 2 £105.50/m   vegetation  such  as  Anthemis  and  Carex  Cost 2 Weight 146.5kg/m   (GreenRoof, 2010).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Heinz 57 Centre illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   No irrigation system is use on the Heinz 57 Centre; instead the roof drainage layer  can  hold  30%  of  its  volume  in  rainwater  (representing  55%  of  predicted  annual  rainwater).  This  water  retention  rate  is  in  line  with  German  FLL  standards  (Earth  Pledge, 2005).   The roof structural systems is an example of what can be achieve at the low building  costs and roof loading scale for grass roof habitats.   The  high  masonry  walls  of  the  Heinz  57  Centre  shows  that  through  appropriate  building design it is possible mitigate the effects of exposed rooftops or even alter  the conditions of a green roof through the creation of microclimates   

62

62 


Chicago City Hall 

In  conjunction  with  an  Environmental  Location Chicago. Illinois   2001  Protection  Agency  programme  to  negate  the  Completion Date City of Chicago   urban heat island effect and to improve city air  Client  Architect William McDonough  quality, Mayor Richard M. Daley and the City of  + Partners   Chicago  began  construction  of  an  exhibition  Landscape Architect Conservation Design  Forum   semi‐extensive  green  roof  on  The  Chicago  City  New Build/Retrofit Retrofit  Hall in April 2000 (GreenRoof, 2010).  Green Roof Type Extensive &    Intensive  2 2,045m   The  garden  was  a  retrofit  development  on  the  Roof Size Roof Coverage 56%  century  old  city  Hall  and  is  not  accessible  to  Soil Medium Commercial growth  members of the public.  The roof supports both  media  100mm  native  and  non‐native  plant  species,  with  has  Soil Depth 150mm  been  organised  in  a  number  of  colour  related  450mm   2 planting beds (Earth Pledge, 2005).  Cost £300/m   2 Weight 100mm=146.5kg/m   2 150mm=293kg/m   2 The  City  Hall  rooftop  garden  has  over  150  450mm=439.5kg/m species,  in  addition  to  100  woody  shrubs,  40  vines and 2 trees, Cockspur Hawthorn and Prairie Crab‐apple (GreenRoof, 2010).    Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication   The Chicago City Hall illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   It is stated that the city  hall has an annual saving of £3,0502 in general utility cost  due to the cooling effect and rainwater retention provided by the grass roof (Earth  Pledge, 2005).   Supplemental irrigation systems has been added to the roofs systems to aid in the  establishment  of  plants  as  well  as  provide  supplemental  water  during  extreme  periods of drought (GreenRoof, 2010).   The research into the reduction of heat island effect and green roofs is still ongoing;  however published figures state that there is a 15oC difference between the green  roof  and  neighbouring  black  tar  roofs  in  the  height  of  summer  (City  of  Chicago,  2010).                                                                 2

Figure converted from stated value ($5,000) 

63

63


Moos Water Filtration Plant 

The  Moos  Water  Filtration  Plant  near  Zurich  Location Zurich, Switzerland  1914  built in 1914 (one of the first reinforce concrete  Completion Date Client  City of Zurich   structures  in  the  region)  supports  nine‐acres  of  Architect Not available  species rich rooftop meadows. These roofs were  Landscape Architect Not available  Retrofit  not  designed  as  a  green  roof,  but  as  a  New Build/Retrofit Intensive  sand/gravel/soil roof to add in the cooling of the  Green Roof Type 2 Roof Size 9,290m   building and plants have naturally colonised the  Roof Coverage 100%  space over the buildings lifetime.   Soil Medium Topsoil and humus  Soil Depth 200mm     Cost Not available  The  three  oldest  roofscapes  cover  Weight 2 488.2kg/m   approximately  3  hectares  and  provide  habitat  for  175  different  plant  species,  including  9  species  of  orchids  (GreenRoof,  2010),  including  6,000 specimens of Orchis Morio, an orchid species thought to be extinct in the area (Earth  Pledge, 2005).    The roofs are currently under consideration to be granted environment protection orders by  the regional government (Earth Pledge, 2005).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Moos Water Plant illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   The  roof’s  structure  presents  excellent  evidence  for  the  longevity  of  green  roofs  (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008)  and the ability of green roofs to be naturally colonised  by unexpected species (Brenneisen, 2006).   The  soil  substrate  consists  of  5cm  of  sand  and  gravel  as  a  drainage  layer,  with  between 15cm and 20cm of topsoil. This again raises questions of sustainability and  the sourcing of substrate material mixture.     

64

64 


Vancouver Conference Centre 

Also  known  as  the  Vancouver  Convention  Location Vancouver, Canada    Centre  West,  this  building  includes  a  six‐acre  Completion Date 2008  BC Pavilion  green  roof  designed  to  replicate  British  Client  Corporation  Columbia costal grassland, which is currently the  Architect LMN Architects   largest in Canada and the largest non‐industrial  Landscape Architect PWL Partnership  New  living  roof  in  North  America.  The  building  was  New Build/Retrofit Green Roof Type Intensive  awarded  an  LEED  Platinum  rating  on  Roof Size 2 24,281m   completion,  the  first  conference  centre  in  the  Roof Coverage 58%  Engineered Soil;  world  to  achieve  such  a  rating  (GreenRoof,  Soil Medium sand, organic   2010).  medium, lava rock    Soil Depth 300mm  Not available  The  green  roof  is  landscaped  with  more  than  Cost Weight Not available  400,000 specimens of native plants and grasses  from  the  Gulf  Islands,  including  Sea  Thrift  and  Beach  Strawberry,  which  provides  natural  habitat  to  birds,  insects  and  small  mammals.  An  important  design  principle  for  the  green  roof  was  that  no  peat  moss  be  use  in  the  soil  makeup  (Budge,  2009),  as  such  the  roof  medium  is  based  on  dredged  dockland  sands  and  recycled  organic  material  (GreenRoof,  2010).  This  is  because  the  client  required  that  no  existing  habitats  be  damaged  in  the  production of the soil layer for the new green roof (Budge, 2009).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Vancouver Convention Centre illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   A design decision was made not to use peat moss in the development of the roof’s  soil  substrate.  As  such  recycled  aggregate  and  organic  matter  gathered  from  the  building’s kitchen and landscaping activities (Budge, 2009).   The  building  is  an  example  of  the  discovery  that  meadow  wildflowers  were  more  abundant  on  the  north‐facing  section,  and  annual  species,  although  present,  were  less prevalent than on the south‐facing section (Grant G. , 2006).   The  Vancouver  Convention  Centre  is  an  example  of  a  large  scale  green  roof  developed specifically for the purposes of habitat replacement within an urban area. 

65

65


3‐06 Heathland Habitat Case Studies  The  dominance  of  a  limited  number  of  species  within  a  small  area,  the  reliance  on  a  nutrient‐poor,  heavily  mineralised  soils  in  addition  to  an  adaption  for  a  fragmented  and  restricted  habitat  range  (NIEA,  2010);  presents  numerous  feature  of  heathland  that  make  them  a  viable  candidate  for  habitat  recreation  projects  within  Northern  Ireland’s  urban  roofscape.     A  continuous  exposure  to  Lowland Heaths  Upland Heaths environmental  stresses  has  spawned  an  array  of  low  dense  vegetation,  drought‐tolerant  shrubs  (Gates,  1980),  and  heaths  (Cooper  &  McCann,  2001);  all  evolved  to  cope  with    Figure 21 ‐ Murlough National Nature Reserve  Figure 22 ‐ Bloody Bridge near Newcastle  the  condition  that  are  present  Mountainous Heaths  on many rooftops.    There exists a growing industrial  trend  to use  heath,  mosses and  sedum  roofs  are  method  of  reducing  rainwater  runoff  across  the  world  (Earth  Pledge,    Figure 23 ‐ Mourne Mountains  2005).  And  because  of  the  thin  soils requirements, heathland species can flourish on the substrate of lightweight extensive  (Brenneisen,  2006).  Additionally  the  natural  tendency  for  heaths  to  be  near  mono‐culture  plants  in  isolated  locations  (NIEA,  2010),  a  clear  parallel  exists  between  the  natural  conditions of heaths and the leading method of plant extensive green roof through sedum or  moss vegetation mats (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).      Many  buildings  already  use  heath  and  moss  extensive  roof  on  small isolated sections of roof, because of their ability to created  at little structural or monetary cost and survive with relatively no  maintenance (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    An  example  of  this  is  the  North  German  Bank  (Nord  LB0)  in  Hanover,  Germany  by  Behnisch,  Behnisch  &  Partner  Architects.  The  building  supports  13  heath  and  moss  extensive  roofs  and  two  larger  intensive  roofs.  The  generous  use  of  heath  roofs  is  cosmetic; creating a more visually pleasing environment for the  buildings  occupants  looking  out  the  structure  exclusively  glass  facades (GreenRoof, 2010).            Figure  24  ‐  North  German  Bank,  Hanover, Germany     

66

66 


Life Expression Chiropractic Centre 

The rooftops of the Life Expression Chiropractic  Location Sugarloaf,  Pennsylvania   Centre  was  installed  for  its  functional  aspect  of  2001  temperature  regulation  and  runoff  control,  in  Completion Date Client  Life Expression  addition  to  the  visual  quality  of  the  roof  Wellness Centre   Van der Ryn  vegetation  to  blend  into  the  surrounding  rural  Architect Architects   Appalachian  Valley  (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  The  Landscape Architect Roofscapes Inc.   unique  roof  design  and  planting  allows  New Build/Retrofit New  rainwater  runoff  to  discharge  along  the  full  Green Roof Type Extensive  2 557.5m   length of the building’s eaves, creating a curtain  Roof Size Roof Coverage 100%  effect  of  falling  water  during  heavy  rain  Soil Medium 90% mineral; 10%  (GreenRoof, 2010).  organic  Soil Depth 120mm     2 Cost £46/m   The  roof  is  planted  with  a  variety  of  native  Weight 2 137kg/m   mosses and sedum species (Earth Pledge, 2005).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Life Expression Chiropractic Centre illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   The  green  roof  demonstrates  the  ability  of  lightweight  extensive  roofs  to  support  dense low‐growing groundcover on a sloped roof ranging from 14o to 30o, believed  to be one of the steepest green roofs in North America (GreenRoof, 2010).   No  irrigation  system  was  installed  on  the  roof;  rather  the  growing  medium  was  designed to retain an estimated 55% of the annual rainfall (Earth Pledge, 2005).   Any innovative approach was taken to protect the roof from wind erosion while the  plant  species  established  themselves.  A  medium  surface  with  a  photodegradable  wind blanket mesh was installed to cover the sprouting vegetation, which has since  degraded (Earth Pledge, 2005).     

67

67


Schiphol Plaza 

Schiphol  Plaza  at  Amsterdam  airport  has  its  Location The Vague, The  Netherlands   green  roof  designed  to  reflect  the  condition  of  Completion Date 1994  surrounding flat plains. The expanse of heath and  Client  Amsterdam Airport  sedum  species  has  a  wide  degree  of  seasonal  Schiphol   Benthem Crouwel  colour  change  acting  as  visual  aesthetic  for  Architect NACA   traveller  who  utilise  the  underline  train  station  Landscape Architect Andriaan Geuze,  and airport terminal. The green roof also acts as  West 8    New  a measure to reduce water runoff in line with the  New Build/Retrofit Green Roof Type Extensive  airports  environmental  policies  (Earth  Pledge,  2 Roof Size 8,100m   2005).  Roof Coverage 90%  Soil Medium Not available    30mm   Construction  of  the  green  roof  consisted  of  the  Soil Depth 2 Cost £26/m   2 installation  of  pre‐vegetated  mats  of  moss  and  Weight 45kg/m   sedum  bound  together  with  coir  fibre  (made  from  the  husks  of  coconuts),  which  absorb  rainfall  and  contain  a  mineral‐based  substrate  that provides plant nutrients and eliminates the need for soil (GreenRoof, 2010).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Schiphol Plaza illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   The Schiphol Plaza can showcase an example of a large scale green roof developed  specifically to replicate a mountainous habitat that surrounds the built up area.   The  planting  choices  and  roof  structure  is  extremely  lightweight  green  roofing  approach,  being  less  than  a  third  of  the  loading  requirement  of  the  UK’s  domestic  buildings, 45kg/m2 compared to 153 kg/m2 (Adler, 1999).       

68

68 


Somoval Garbage Treatment Plant 

The  Somoval  treatment  plant  in  Monthyon  is  Location Monthyon, France    1997  located less than a mile from the Paris city limits  Completion Date Somoval   and  contains  a  4‐acre  green  roof  to  add  in  the  Client  Architect S’PACE   minimal visual impact of the structure.  Landscape Architect Not available  New Build/Retrofit New    Extensive  The vibrant sedum and moss roof was designed  Green Roof Type 2 Roof Size 15,329m   to  allow  the  building  to  better  blend  into  the  Roof Coverage Not available  surrounding  countryside  after  complaints  by  Soil Medium Commercial growing  medium      local  residents.  The  roofs  vegetation  turns  from  Soil Depth 70mm   red  into  summer  to  a  green  during  winter  and  Cost 2 £14.50/m   2 provides  an  insulation  effect  for  treatment  the  Weight 178kg/m   plant (Earth Pledge, 2005).        Significance to Northern Ireland Habitat Replication  The Somoval Treatment Plant illustrates the following points for habitat recreation   The Somoval Treatment Plant is another example of a large green roof designed to  replicate and blend in with a surrounding mountainous habitat.   The low construction cost of the Somoval Treatment Plant is noteworthy, being the  second lowest costing of all the presented case studies.   Again  the  Somoval  Treatment  Plant  is  an  example  of  a  large  roof  at  a  scope  with  contains extensive planting.           

69

69


3‐07 Practical Implications of Rooftop Habitat Recreation  The  research  undertaken  in  the  development  of  this  chapter  has  provided  a  number  of  values  in  regards  to  the  physical  and  economical  attributes  associated  with  habitat  recreation on building rooftops.    The following table details the type of environments capable of be recreated depending on  the type of green roof installed.      Recreated Habitat Type   Roof type    Coastal  Extensive &    Intensive        Woodland  Intensive only        Wetland  Intensive only        Grassland  Extensive &    Intensive        Heathland  Extensive     Table 2 ‐ Required Roof Type for Habitat Recreation        The  following  table  details  the  associated  structural  loading  in  regard  to  what  form  of  habitat type has been developed on a building’s roof.      Recreated Habitat Type   Weight/m2    Coastal  75 ‐ 145kg        Wetland  350kg        Woodland  1250kg        Grassland  150 ‐ 490kg        Heathland  45 ‐ 180kg    Table 3 – Imposed Roof Loading for Habitat Recreation      And finally the last table demonstrates a typical cost range to the construction and planting  of an artificial habitat at roof level.      Recreated Habitat Type  Cost/m2    Coastal  £10‐£45        Wetland  £300‐£600    Grassland  £100‐£650    Heathland  £15‐£45  Table 4 – Estimable Cost Range for Habitat Recreation 

70

70 


Northern Ireland and Green Roof Habitat Recreation 

The following  table  illustrates  the  explored  connections  between  the  habitats  capable  of  surviving on green roofs and the requirements of natural habitats in Northern Ireland.     

Habitats favoured  by Green Roofs

Coastal Vegetation

Northern Ireland  habitats capable of  addapting to Green  Roofs

Tidal Marine  Habitats Saline Lagoon 

Habitats Commonly  Recreated on Green  Roofs

Habitats Promoted  by Ease of  Construction and  Financing

Coastal Habitats 

Coastal Habitats  Sand Dunes Vegetated Shingles Banks Cliffs and Slopes

Arid Vegetation Wetland Habitats  Reed Beds

Wetland Habitats 

Floodplain Grazing Marsh

Reed Bed  Vegetation

Woodland   Habitats  Wet Woodlands Mixed Ashwood Oakwood

Mountainous Vegetation

Grassland Habitats 

Woodland Habitats

Lowland Dry Acid Grassland Calcareous Grassland Lowland Meadow Purple Moor & Rush Pasture Limestone Pavement

Limestone Vegetation

Heathland   Habitats 

Grassland Habitats 

Lowland Heaths Upland Heaths Mountainous Heaths

Shrub & Heath   Vegetation

Peatland Habitats  Lowland Raised Bog Blanket Bog

Heathland   Habitats 

Fens

71

71


Chapter 4 

Green Roof Habitat Creation for Northern Ireland   

72

72 


The previous  chapter  focused  on  examples  of  environments  created  on  green  roofs  to  provide  information  on  the  practicality  of  habitat  creation  on  green  roofs.  The  final  chapter  of  this  report  is  designed to refine the number of viable green roof  habitats  to  those  which  are  most  feasible  to  be  applied  to  the  existing  urban  areas  in  Northern  Ireland.  This  task  will  utilise  the  information  and  findings  revealed  in  previous  chapters  of  this  document,  in  order  to  gauge  the  consequences  of  Figure 1 ‐ Belfast City  applying roof greening across Northern Ireland.    The combined endeavours of the previous chapters have generated information supporting  the ability of green roofs to meet the habitat requirements of Coastal, Wetland, Woodland,  Grassland  and  Heathland.  This  is  further  promoted  by  the  environmental  conditions  of  Northern  Ireland  which  presents  a  preference  for  Cliff/Costal,  Wetland,  Grassland,  and  Heathland vegetation on our rooftops.    This chapter aims to examine the ability of Northern Ireland’s urban areas to support green  roof  habitats  and  briefly  explore  the  physical,  monetary  and  municipal  influences  over  the  development of rooftop habitats.      4‐01  Urban Resources in Northern Ireland  Northern  Ireland  is  a  region  dominated  by  agricultural  land;  with  44%  of  the  national  landmass  consumed  by  improved  grassland  and  horticulture  plantations  (Cooper,  McCann,  & Rogers, 2009). With a population density half that of the UK, 122people/km2 to the UK’s  255.6/km2    (Pointer,  2005),  Northern  Ireland  is  a  relatively  un‐urbanised  country.  The  Northern  Ireland  Countryside  Survey  2007  concluded  that  only  5%  of  Northern  Ireland’s  landmass consists of human settlements (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).  Urban Habitats    Urban/Built up Areas  Roads / Tracks & Hard Embankments 

ha

% of  N.I. 

74098 30951 

5.23 2.19 

Habitat ha  Change  Between   1998‐ +17251  2007  +1503 

% Change  +30.35  +5.10 

Table 1 ‐ Extent of Urban Area in Northern Ireland (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009)

The  urban  centres  of  Northern  Ireland  are  primarily  concentrated  in  the  area  surrounding  Lough  Neagh  (Countryside  Survey,  2008).  The  Belfast  Metropolitan  area  is  the  largest  urban  centre,  representing  22%  of  the  total  urbanised  land  in  Northern  Ireland  (Pointer,  2005).  Growth  in  urban  areas  over  the  past  number of decades throughout Northern  Ireland  has  predominantly  been  at  the  expense  of  agricultural  and  natural  grassland  habitats  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers, 2009).   

Figure 2 ‐ Northern Ireland's Urban Centres (Countryside Survey, 2008) 

73

73


While urbanised  zones  are  a  minority  land  use  type,  they  are  not  without  an  ecological  value  (Wheater,  1999).  Urban  wildlife  habitats  consists  of  any  ecological  niches  found  within  a  built  up  area,  such  as  buildings,  hard  surfaces,  and  any  open  brownfield  or  green  spaces  (NIEA, 2010).     Urban  ecological  habitats  are  based  on  managed  green  spaces  (parks  and  gardens  (Wheater,  1999))  and  naturally  seeded  urban  areas  or  industrial  sites  (demolition  sites,  railway  lands  or  undeveloped  Figure 3 ‐ Albert Bridge, Belfast industrial  land  (Harvey,  2001)).  These  habitats  support  a  large  number  of  plants,  invertebrates  and  bird  species,  especially  in  the  suburbs  (National  Archives,  1995).  For  example both Herring and Black‐backed Gulls are now commonly found nesting on the roofs  of many buildings; flat roofs in particular are favoured as breeding grounds. Additionally the  Albert Bridge in Belfast provides a safe roosting site for thousands of Starlings (NIEA, 2010).    The most important characteristic of urban areas is that they are compromised of a dense  mosaic  of  habitats.  This  mixture  of  habitats  within  a  limited  location  gives  rare  ground‐ nesting invertebrates and other fauna species a mixture of breeding site, foraging areas and  shelter need to sustain their occupation (National Archives, 1995). Green roofs are a building  treatment  that  will  augment  the  existing  ecological  resources  provided  by  urban  habitats  with a simulated natural environment, expanding the relationship between flora and fauna  species and the built environment (Gedge & Kadas, 2005).    Estimated Rooftop Area in Northern Ireland  Through  a  combination  of  information  sources  (the  Northern  Ireland  Countryside  Survey  2007,  the  Ordnance  Survey  NI  and  EU  reports)  and  publish  work  by  Lance  Frazer;  the  following approximation of the total area of roof space in Northern Ireland has been made.  These figures will feature in further discussion on the implementation of green roofs within  Northern Ireland.    Total Urban Area of Northern Ireland  Estimated Roof space 

741km2  (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009)  255km2                                                           (Frazer, 2005)1 

Estimated Rooftop Area of Northern Ireland Urban Centres    Belfast Metropolitan Area2   162km2          (Pointer, 2005)    Estimated Roof space  52km2             (Frazer, 2005)          2 Derry City Area  25km  (Monaghan, 2011)    Estimated Roof space  8km2              (Frazer, 2005)          Newry City Area  9km2                 (OSNI, 2011)    Estimated Roof space  2.9km2             (Frazer, 2005)          2                 Armagh City Area  5km  (OSNI, 2011)    2             Estimated Roof space  1.7km  (Frazer, 2005)      Table 2 ‐ Size of Major Urban Centres in Northern Ireland                                                             

1 2

Based on the statistic that typically roof space represents up to 32% of the total surface areas in an urban area 

Encompasses the Belfast Urban Area, Castlereagh Urban Area, Greenisland Urban Area, Holywood Urban Area, Lisburn Urban 

Area, Newtownabbey Urban Area and Milltown (Lisburn LGD) 

Additional Information  

74

Lisburn City Area:   Estimated Roof space:  

 

57km2 (Boyde, 2011)  18km2 (Frazer, 2005) 

74 


4‐02 Re‐establishment of Natural Habitats  As part of the Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, which has been discussed in chapter 2  and  appendix  A,  a  number  of  reports  into  individual  habitat  types  were  commissioned.  These  documents  described  the  condition  of  Northern  Ireland’s  natural  habitats  but  also  presented goals for the rehabilitation and future expansion of natural ecosystems.    While these documents discuss a number of factors effecting individual habits (such as key  features,  range  and  causes  of  habitat  loss)  which  were  utilised  in  previous  chapters,  they  also  detail  requirements  for  future  habitat  conservation  programmes  proposed  to  be  completed by 2015. These figures are detailed in the tables below.       Habitat to be restored by 2015    Habitat Type   ha  km2    Saltmarshes  100  1          Sand Dunes  1150  11.5    Vegetated Shingles Banks  25  0.25          Floodplain Grazing Marsh  50  0.5          Wet Woodlands  70  0.7    Mixed Ashwood  90  0.9    Oakwood  60  0.6          Limestone Pavement  220  2.2          Fens  50 0.5   Table 3 ‐ Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan Required Restoration of Natural Habitats   While  green  roofs  cannot  play  a  direct  role  in  the  restoration  of natural  habitats,  the  case  studies of chapter 3 have illustrated that green roof habitats can recreate the condition of a  number  of  existing  ecosystems.  The  multiple  examples  in  chapter  3,  showcases  a  type  of  environments possible and will be further discussed later on in this chapter.    Habitat to be re‐established by 2015    Habitat Type   ha  km2    Wet Woodlands  140  1.4    Mixed Ashwood  180  1.8    Oakwood  120  1.2          Lowland Dry Acid Grasslands  5  0.05    Calcareous Grasslands  10  0.1    Lowland Meadows  10  0.1          Lowland Heaths  130  1.3    Upland Heaths  100  1    Mountainous Heaths 25 0.25   Table 4 ‐ Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan Required Re‐establishment of Natural Habitats   The  figures  stated  above,  describe  a  requirement  for  traditional  methods  of  habitat  recreation, and were not envisioned to be applied to urban habitat recreation projects, let   

75

75


alone rooftop environments. This stated the investigations undertaken by chapter 1 and 3,  illustrate  willingness  by  flora  and  fauna  species  to  colonise  rooftop  habitats,  when  they  provide resources similar to their natural habitats (Frith & Gedge, 2000).    Because of this fact, an argument can be made that rooftop habitats can have a place in the  national recreation programs of certain natural habitats  (Brenneisen S. , 2006).        4‐03  Structural Viability of Green Roof Habitats  By combining the legal structural requirements for roofs under British Standards 6399 and  the  information  gather  on  completed  green  roof  habitat  projects  within  chapter  3,  a  comparison can be made between typical building usage and the types of habitat roofs they  can support.    UK Roof Structural Requirements (Adler, 1999)    BS6399 Category   N/m2  kg/m2    Domestic  1.5  153    Offices  2.5  255    Retail  4.0  408    Warehousing  2.0  204    Factories, Workshops  5.0  510    Table 5 ‐ Required Roof Loading (Adler, 1999) These  figures  represent  the  general  structural  requirements  for  all  new  builds  in  the  UK.  While alternative values exist for buildings with specific usage, the above standards are the  most  common  strength  for  the  building  category.  These  values  are  the  legally  required  minimum  for  any  construction  system  (Adler,  1999),  so  are  reliable  reflections  of  the  strength of Northern Ireland’s buildings.    Range of Green Roof Weight Loads    Recreated Habitat Type   Weight/m2    Coastal  75 ‐ 145kg        Wetland  350kg        Woodland  1250kg        Grassland  150 ‐ 490kg        Heathland  45 ‐ 180kg    Table 6 – Imposed Roof Loading for Habitat Recreation  It is important to note that the above values are derived from completed examples of green  roofs,  a  number  of  which  are  detailed  in  chapter  3.  Green  roof  weight  range  are  typically  organised  by  the  type  of  roofing  structure  (extensive,  intensive,  etc)  and  not  ecological  environments,  however  the  weight  of  any  green  roof  is  calculated  individually  before  installation commences and do not rely on generic or industry stated data.    An alternative body of data on the weight ranges of green roofs can be obtained from the  German  Landscape  Research,  Development  and  Construction  Society  guidelines  (Forschungsgesellschaft  Landschaftsentwicklung  Landschaftsbau  [FLL])  and  specific  product  guidelines. 

76

76 


Heathland

Grassland

Woodland

Wetland

Coastal

Habitat  

Types of Habitat Roofs capable of occupying Non‐Reinforced Structures           Building Type      Domestic             Offices            Retail         Warehousing            Factories, Workshops      Table 7 – Building Types Capable of Carrying Habitat Roofs    Through  cross‐comparison  of  the  two  above  tables  and  an  understanding  of  the  range  of  habitats that are structurally viable on Northern Ireland’s building stock can be achieved.    Coastal, Grassland and Heaths are the most accommodating to a building’s structure as they  are comprised of lightweight vegetation. Conversely woodland habitats, with their weighty  planting are outside the structural norms of nearly all of Northern Ireland’s structures.    Wood  roofs  are  considered  to  impose  a  load  of  700‐1300kg/m²  (Optigreen,  2011)  placing  them  beyond  the  structural  requirement  of  all  typical  structure,  because  of  this  woodland  habitats  are  restricted  to  reinforced  roofs  only.  Additionally  the  water  retention  rate  of  wood roofs is estimated at between 95‐99%, translating into a possible further 180‐320L/m²  of rainwater to structurally accommodate (Optigreen, 2011).    The typical architecture of Northern Ireland’s is dominated by pitched roof structures. While  green roofs can occupy the slopes common to most roofs, these systems require additional  support  and  an  associated  weigh.  Pitched  lightweight  sedum/moss/heather  roofs  weight  100‐130kg/m² (Optigreen, 2011) and grassed pitch roofs generally impose a loading of 160‐ 190kg/m²   (Optigreen,  2011).  These  figures  present  Coastal  and  Heath  habitats  as  structurally viable options on non‐strengthen domestic roof within Northern Ireland.        4‐04  Expense of Green Roof Habitat Recreation  With  the  information  gained  during  the  third  chapter,  detailing  examples  of  successfully  developed green roof habitats. An approximation can be made for the general financial cost  associated with any programme to facilitate rooftop habitat creation in Northern Ireland.    Green Roof Construction Costs    Recreated Habitat Type   Cost/m2    Sand Dunes / Shingles Banks   £10‐£45      Wetland  £300‐£600    Grassland  £100‐£650      Heathland  £15‐£45    Table 8 – Estimable Cost Range for Habitat Recreation   

77

77


Because of the subjective nature of the building process, the above financial costing figures  are to be considered representative prices only. These values are based on the information  used  in  generating  the  datasets  in  chapter  3,  and  are  all  based  on  complete  green  roof  projects.    Habitat to be re‐established by 2015    Habitat Type   ha  km2    Wet Woodlands  140  1.4    Mixed Ashwood  180  1.8    Oakwood  120  1.2        Lowland Dry Acid Grasslands  5  0.05    Calcareous Grasslands  10  0.1    Lowland Meadows  10  0.1        Lowland Heaths  130  1.3    Upland Heaths  100  1    Mountainous Heaths 25 0.25   Table 9 ‐ Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan Required Re‐establishment of Natural Habitats   The  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan  proposes  areas  of  habitat  recreation  to  be  achieved  by  2015,  which  was  discussed  earlier  in  this  chapter  in  section  4‐02.  These  government  targets  for  natural  habitat  expansion  are  a  fitting  goal  for  a  large  scale  programme  for  the  adoption  of  habitat  green  roofs.  The  areas  of  proposed  habitats  re‐ established  are  negligible  when  compared  to  the  total  area  of  roof  space  throughout  Northern Ireland, as shown in section 4‐01.      Rooftop Habitat Recreation Costs    Habitat Type   km2  Cost    Lowland Dry Acid Grasslands  0.05 £5million ‐    £32.5million    Calcareous Grasslands  0.1  £10million ‐    £65million    Lowland Meadows  0.1  £10million ‐    £65million        Lowland Heaths  1.3  £19.5million ‐    £58.5million    Upland Heaths  1  £15million ‐    £45million    Mountainous Heaths  0.25 £375,000 ‐    £1.125million    Table 10 ‐ Estimated Costs of introducing wide scale Habitat Roofs to Northern Ireland   The above pricing is an estimated value of developing the corresponding natural habitats on  rooftops  in  Northern  Ireland  to  meeting  the  goals  of  the  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan. These figure were arrive at by applying the expected cost per metre of green roofs to  the require habitat expansion require under the Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan.   

78

78 


The initial  costs  related  to  the  development  of  green  roof  habitats  are  significantly  larger  than  those  of  traditional  habitat  recreation  efforts,  with  the  recreation  of  calcareous  grasslands  estimated  at  £40‐1500/ha  (Gilbert  &  Anderson,  1998).  However  green  roof  typically  exists  the  same  length  as  their  supporting  building,  with  the  green  roofs  at  Moos  Water  Filtration  Plant  installed  in  1914  (Brenneisen,  2006)  and  the  ‘Derry  and  Toms’  department store in Kensington High Street, London installed in 1938  (Scrivens, 1980) being  good examples. Whereas subsidising farmers to create natural habitats is licences in 5 year  contracts under Northern Ireland’s Management of Sensitive Sites (MOSS) annual payment  scheme (MOSS, 2002), the MOSS system is further expanded upon in Appendix B.        4‐05  Northern Ireland Accommodating Green Roof Habitats  The  ability  of  green  roofs  to  promote  habitat  recreation  and  urban  ecological  diversity  depends on factors associated with  the local authority. A number of models exist to allow  municipal authorities to develop green roofs within their area.     An  example  of  the  influence  local  government  has  over  green  roof  adoption  is  Basel,  Switzerland.  The  implementation  of  a  course  of  ecological  research  projects  into  the  biodiversity potential of green roofs in the city ultimately led to the amendment of the city’s  building  and  construction  laws  (Nature  and  Landscape  Conservation  Act  §  9;  Building  and  Planning  Act  §  72).  Currently  as  part  of  Basel's  biodiversity  strategy,  green  roofs  are  now  mandatory on new buildings with flat roofs. (Brenneisen S. , 2006) And for green roofs over  500m2,  the  substrates  must  be  composed  of  natural  soils  and  come  from  the  surrounding  region (Brenneisen S. , 2005).    Northern  Ireland  can  take  note  of  the  policies  regarding  green  roof  development  in  large  cities  around  the  world.  Large  international  cities  cope  with  similar  urban  scales  and  potential development programmes that would result in a national implementation  plan  if  applied to Northern Ireland.        Berlin  The city government of Berlin began to promote green roofs in  order  to  reduce  the  city’s  water  consumption  and  as  a  response  of  a  growing  environmental  consciousness  among  the  city’s  inhabitants  (Earth  Pledge,  2005),  this  was  briefly  mentioned in section 1‐10.    Green roofs first appeared in Germany in the 1880’s, during a  period  of  rapid  industrialisation  when  numerous  tenement  Figure 4 ‐ UFA Film Fabrik, Berlin  blocks  were  built  to  house  a  growing  work  force.  Inexpensive  tar  roofs  were  common  but  were  highly  flammable.  To  combat  this  risk,  tar  roofs  were  covered  with  layer  of  sand  and  gravel,  accidentally  creating  an  excellent  growing  medium  allowing  for  the  natural  colonisation  of  the  roof  space  (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  The  modern  move  toward  green  roofs  began  in  the  1970’s  with  the  convergence  of  a  growing  environmentalism movement, urban renewal programs and the rediscovery of Berlin’s 19th  century green roofs (Darius & Drepper, 1984).   

79

79


In 1975 the German Landscape Research, Development and Construction Society guidelines  (Forschungsgesellschaft  Landschaftsentwicklung  Landschaftsbau  [FLL])  was  developed  providing  universal  standards  for  the  construction  and  quality  of  green  roofs.  This  has  become  a  worldwide  recognised  standard  for  green  roof  construction  (Gedge  &  Kadas,  2005).    During  the  1980’s  the  West  Berlin  government  began  a  grant  program,  following  the  successful completion of a demonstrator project which tested the aesthetic, environmental  and  public  health  benefits  of  greening  an  entire  city  block.  The  greening  programme  reimbursed residents for roughly half of the  total cost of green roof installation, between3  £23/m2  and  £47/m2.  The  grant  subsidises  succeeded  in  promoting  the  construction  of  63,500m2 of extensive green roofs in Berlin between 1983 and end of the scheme in 1997   (Koehler & Schmidt, 1997).    In  1984,  a  federal  court  ruling  introduced  increased  transparency  in  water  utility  billing,  because  of  this  base  water  levies  were  removed  and  freshwater  consumption  and  storm  water removal fees were introduced (Earth Pledge, 2005). Due to the water retention rate of  green  roofs  and  the  delay  in  rainwater  runoff  (Graceson,  Hare,  Hall,  &  Monaghan,  2011;  Keeley,  2003),  green  roofs  were  largely  adopted  in  subsequent  new  developments  (in  conjunction  with  the  grant  system)  as  a  means  to  reduce  a  buildings  water  costs    (Keeley,  2003).    Presently Berlin implements a landscape master‐plan called the Biotope Area Factor (BAF). A  plan  which  assigns  targets  for  the  amount  of  greenery  that  should  exists  on  individual  properties.  The  plan  is  non‐prescriptive  about  the  form  of  urban  greenery  required,  but  property owners and developers must meet the target to be issued building permits (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  Green  roofs  have  become  a  popular  method  of  meeting  a  buildings  BAF  target  and  help  progress  the  mainstreaming  of  green  roofs  within  Germany  (Dunnett  &  Kingsbury, 2008).        Tokyo  The  green  roofs  of  Tokyo  have  been  developed  to  take  advantage  of  ability  of  green  roofs  to  reduce  the  heat  island  effect (Skinner, 2006; Alexandri & Jones, 2008)as described in  section 1‐10. Because of six decades of urban expansion, and  that  only  14%  of  Tokyo’s  land  area  retains  any  greenery,  the  climate  of  Tokyo  has  become  more  tropical  in  the  past  25  years; driven principally by a growing heat island effect due to  the hard surfaces of the densely populated city (Earth Pledge,  Figure 5 ‐ Atago Building, Tokyo  2005).    The temperature increase of Tokyo is five times faster than the global warming rate because  of the local heat island effect4. The  city’s biodiversity has changed as well, tropical species  such as palm trees and wild parakeets have colonised parkland. Additionally, dengue fever                                                               3

 Converted for original value of 60DM/m2 and 120DM/m2    The  mean  annual  temperature  of  downtown  Tokyo  increased  by  3oC,  compared  to  a  1.6oC  rise  in  New York  4

80

80 


outbreaks began to occur after humid summers, due to the new tropical climate of central  Tokyo (Brooke, 2002).    A 2001 Environment Ministry study found that the high percentage of impermeable surfaces  in  Tokyo  was  directly  contributing  to  the  city’s  warming.  The  study  recommended  a  widespread  urban  greening  programme,  including  tree  planting,  park  expansions  and  the  proposed construction of 30km2 of green roofs (Morishita, 2002).    In order to address the need to add greenery to Tokyo, a subsidy programme began in 2002,  which succeeded in greening 7,000m2 of Tokyo’s roofs, one‐fifth of which were retrofitted to  existing  buildings  (MSNBC  News,  2002).  Furthermore  amendments  were  made  to  building  laws  which  mandated  the  installation  of  green  roofs  on  all  newly  constructed  building.  Private building larger than 1,000m2  and public buildings larger than 250m2 must cover 20%  of  rooftop  with  greenery  or  face  an  annual  penalty  of  £1,6005  (Tokyo  Metropolitan  Government, 2002).    In the first year of its implementation, the net total of green roofs in Tokyo almost doubled,  from  52,428m2  in  2001  to  104,412m2  at  the  end  of  2002,  achieved  principally  by  private  developments  (Tokyo  Metropolitan  Government,  2002).  Because  of  the  success  of  this  legislation; the requirement for 20% green roof coverage was extended to multiple‐dwelling  housing schemes in 2003 (Earth Pledge, 2005).    Green  roofs  have  become  commonplace  on  new  developments  in  Tokyo,  partly  due  to  government  policy  but  and  the  realisation  green  roofs  can  improve  property  values.  Developers  have  begun  to  install  elaborate  roof  gardens,  which  significantly  increase  the  rents they can charge for their buildings (Earth Pledge, 2005).        London Docklands  On  a  macro  scale  green  roofs  were  advanced  in  London  to  reconcile  biodiversity  conservation  with  aspects  of  urban  renewal  along  the  Thames  docklands,  but  more  specifically  they came to public attention because of birds (Frith & Gedge,  2000).    The  brownfield  sites  around  the  Deptford  Power  Station  and  the  Deptford  Creek  were  areas  that  supported  a  number  of  endangered species, such as Linnets and the ‘Humble Bumble’  Bee whose primary habitat is urban brownfield site (Scholfield  Figure 6 ‐ Canary Wharf, London  & Waugh, 2003).    But it was the Black Redstart, one of Britain most endangered avian species, which brought  the  topic  of  urban  habitat  conservation  to  the  public’s  attention  (Dunnett  N.  ,  2006).  A  number of locations along the Thames are important nesting site for the Black Redstart and  are legally protected.     However under UK conservation law at the time, these habitats were only protected while  birds were nesting on the site. Due to this loophole developers were legally allowed to begin                                                               5

Converted for original value of ¥200,000 

81

81


construction after  breeding  season  (Grant,  2006).  A  number  of  developments  within  the  Thames  docklands  proceeded  against  environmental  protests,  yet  positively  some  early  dockland  projects  engaged  with  local  ecologists  and  the  1996  London  Biodiversity  Partnership,  to  create  environmentally  sensitive  structures.  Early  examples  are  the  Greenwich 2000 project, the Creekside Centre and the highly regarded Laban Dance Centre  (Gedge D. , 2002). The success of reconciling building projects and local ecology within these  projects  at  Deptford  Creek  became  a  feature  of  the  2002  England  Biodiversity  Strategy  (DEFRA, 2003).    Thanks  to  the  public  interest  in  the  Black  Redstart  and  the  success  of  dockland  ecological  roofing projects; the green roof movement in London is focused on biodiversity benefits. The  dominance  of  biodiversity  policy  within  the  London  docklands  area  differs  from  other  UK  legalisation  regarding  green  roofs.  However  it  is  important  to  note  that  there  is  no  overarching green roof policy in London, as in Berlin and Tokyo (Earth Pledge, 2005).    Interestingly  green  roofs  have  been  more  readily  promoted  by  private  developers,  motivated by a combination of aesthetic and ecological concerns. The private developers of  Canary  Wharf  have  retrofit  some  of  the  areas  skyscrapers  green  under  the  advisement  of  ecologist  in  addition  to  implementing  a  local  green  roof  action  plan.  In  2001,  5,000m2  of  green  roofs  were  installed  throughout  Canary  Wharf  and  the  development  possesses  the  highest  green  roof  in  Europe,  at  the  32  story  Barclays  HQ  at  One  Churchill  Place  (Gedge,  2008).    A positive recent policy development comes in the form of the Biodiversity Action Plan for  the London 2012 Olympics. The various stadiums and athletes village developments aim to  construct at least 0.4ha (4,000m2) of green roofs (Olympic Delivery Authority, 2008).    London  is  an  example  of  green  roof  policy  which  heavily  promotes  the  ecological  and  biodiversity attributes of adopting green roofs. However the actual implementation of green  roofing  and  building  policy  with  London  is  not  as  robust  as  Berlin  or  Tokyo  (Earth  Pledge,  2005). But does showcase that private developers can promote green roofs independently  for a local authority (Gedge, 2008).      Implication for Northern Ireland  The  principle  similarity  of  the  methods  to  promoting  green  roofs  discussed  is  the  combination  of  some  form  of  government  funding  and  a  need  to  meet  an  environmental  concern (Koehler & Schmidt, 1997; Tokyo Metropolitan Government, 2002).    Berlin  shows  the  success  in  providing  government  grant  and  countering  this  with  rising  municipal  rates  to  change  building  trends  (Gedge  &  Kadas,  2005).  The  example  of  Tokyo  illustrates  an  alternative  to  grants,  by  imposing  building  penalty  fees  and  allowing  private  sector  developer  to  adapt  to  a  force  change  in  the  building  market  (Morishita,  2002).  Northern Ireland can take inspiration for both approaches to develop a system which suits  the distinct requirement of the local building fabric.    The development of green roofs along the London docklands demonstrates a methodology  where a local authority takes a secondary role in the development of ecological roofs (Earth  Pledge,  2005).  The  installation  of  green  roofs  in  the  Deptford  Creek  area  was  due  to  pressures place on developers by local environmental activists. While green roofs are not as 

82

82 


popular in London as Berlin and Tokyo (Gedge, 2008), it is possible for green roofs to gain  favour without the backing of local government.    If green roof are to be promoted by national or local policies in Northern Ireland, they must  be  in  keeping  with  the  existing  environmental  and  biodiversity  strategies  namely  the  Environment  (Northern  Ireland)  Order  2002,  the  Northern  Ireland  Biodiversity  Action  Plan  and the Northern Ireland Biodiversity Strategy (NIEA, 2010).     

83

83


Northern Ireland and Green Roof Habitat Recreation 

The following  table  illustrates  the  explored  connections  between  the  habitats  capable  of  surviving on green roofs and the requirements of natural habitats in Northern Ireland.           

Habitats favoured  by Green Roofs

Coastal Vegetation

Northern Ireland  habitats capable of  addapting to Green  Roofs

Tidal Marine  Habitats Saline Lagoon 

Habitats Commonly  Recreated on Green  Roofs

Habitats Promoted  by Ease of  Construction and  Financing

Coastal Habitats 

Coastal Habitats  Sand Dunes Vegetated Shingles Banks Cliffs and Slopes

Arid Vegetation Wetland Habitats  Reed Beds

Wetland Habitats 

Coastal Habitats 

Floodplain Grazing Marsh

Reed Bed  Vegetation

Woodland   Habitats  Wet Woodlands Mixed Ashwood Oakwood

Mountainous Vegetation

Grassland Habitats 

Woodland Habitats

Grassland Habitats 

Lowland Dry Acid Grassland Calcareous Grassland Lowland Meadow Purple Moor & Rush Pasture Limestone Pavement

Limestone Vegetation

Heathland   Habitats 

Grassland Habitats 

Lowland Heaths Upland Heaths

Heathland   Habitats 

Mountainous Heaths

Shrub & Heath   Vegetation

Peatland Habitats  Lowland Raised Bog Blanket Bog

Heathland   Habitats 

Fens

84

84 


Conclusions

Are Green Roofs a Practical Ecological Recourse for Northern Ireland?       

85

85


The purpose of this report was to investigate the potential of green roofs to address habitat  loss  in  Northern  Ireland.  By  exploring  the  factors  contributing  to  habitat  loss,  the  characteristics that differentiates individual ecosystem and the ecological traits of Northern  Ireland’s  urban  centres;  this  report  intended  to  explore  whether  these  attributes  were  compatible with the known biological qualities of green roofing systems.    The  number  of  complete  green  roofs  in  Northern  Ireland  is  low  as  a  percentage  of  our  overall  building  stock  while  habitats  on  rooftops  are  more  common  in  other  parts  of  the  world, particularly central Europe (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008). The concept of using green  roofs  to  reinforce  local  ecology  has  been  tried  and  tested  in  numerous  studies  in  multiple  cities (Brenneisen S. , 2006; Frith & Gedge, 2000). Because of the case studies presented in  chapter 3 and 4, it is has been established that green roofs, given the appropriate substrate  and  design  (Köhler,  2006),  can  prove  to  be  an  invaluable  resource  to  local  flora  and  fauna  (Grant, 2006).    Due to the wealth of precedence on artificial habitats created on green roof, some of which  are discussed in chapter 1 and 3, this report has extensively addressed the issue of whether  or  not  a  green  roof    ‘can’    mimic  a  natural  ecosystem.  The  examples  of  the  Laban  Dance  Centre in London, ACROS Centre in Fukuoka Japan, and the Moos Water Filtration Plant near  Zurich, discussed in sections 3‐01, 3‐02 and 3‐05 respectively, has shown the readiness for  both native flora and fauna species to be both supported by and enhanced by green roofs  though  active  colonization  (Clement  &  Foster,  1994;  Frith  &  Gedge,  2000).  The  remaining  issue  of  how  can  Northern  Ireland  utilise  green  roofing  methods  to  address  the  environmental requirements of its native environments shall now be discussed.     

Figure 1 ‐ View of the David Kier Building and the greater Belfast area 

      Cn‐01  Habitat Green Roof for Northern Ireland  The  combined  content  of  chapters  1,  2  and  3  generated  a  list  of  habitats  that  can  occupy  green roof environments while remaining ecologically viable. The analysis and discussion of  chapter  4  further  refined  this  list  of  possible  habitats  into  ecosystems  that  are  structurally  feasible and cost effective to the majority of the built environment within Northern Ireland’s  urban settings.   

86

86 


The natural habitats associated with Coastal, Heathland and Grassland environments are the  biological  networks  that  present  the  most  opportunity  for  the  adoption  to  a  rooftop  situation in Northern Ireland.    Coastal Habitats 

Figure 2 ‐ Costal Meadow grasses planted on  the  Nassau Icehouse Brewery 

Grassland Habitats

Heathland Habitats 

Figure 3 ‐ Grass sloped roof on the Vancouver  Conference Centre

Figure 4 ‐ Heath Planting on Sloped Roof at  Schiphol Plaza, Amsterdam Airport

The potential of these habitats to be adapted to existing roof structure throughout Northern  Ireland  is  the  primary  reason  that  this  report  highlights  them  as  possessing  the  greatest  potential  to  meet  the  needs  to  counteract  natural  habitat  loss  or  support  existing  ecosystems.    Coastal and Heather habitats are capable of existing on extremely lightweight structures and  grassland  habitats  requiring  lightweight  to  medium  strength  structure  depending  on  the  type  of  soil  substrates  required  (Adler,  1999;  Dunnett  &  Kingsbury,  2008).  Similarly  the  financial costs of Coastal and Heather habitats are extremely low with grasslands being low  to medium in the spectrum of building expenditures (Earth Pledge, 2005). The three habitat  types described represent the most effective habitats to be implemented on the majority of  green roof conversion projects in Northern Ireland.    The  number  of  research  projects  (Snepa,  Van  Ierland,  &  Opdama,  2009;  Grant,  2006),  lessons  from  the  building  laws of Basil, Berlin and Tokyo and private developments  such  as  Canary  Wharf  the  planned  Wood  Wharf  parks   (Brenneisen  S.  ,  2006;  Earth  Pledge,  2005)  have  shown  that urban expansion can be integrated with ecologically  considered greening mechanisms.     Additionally,  studies  have  proven  that  adding  extensive  green  roofs  on  industrial  and  commercial  land  on  the  outskirts of residential areas (briefly discussed in section  In‐01) , can greatly improve the ecological resources in an  urban area (Brenneisen S. , 2006), and this policy could be  encouraged  in    Northern  Ireland.  The  size  restriction  of  habitat green roofs is one of their primary limiting factors  (Brenneisen  &  Hänggi,  2006).  The  close  proximity  of  Figure 5 ‐ Wood Wharf, London  building and typically common ownership at some period  in the developments construction, presents opportunities for a mosaic of habitat green roofs  to be created on industrial parks (Snepa, Van Ierland, & Opdama, 2009). Previous research  has  shown  that  the  combination  of  small  green  roofs  to  create  habitat  corridors  will  significantly  contribution  to  wider  environmental  quality    (Grant,  Engleback,  &  Nicholson,  2003).    These  factors  further  reinforce  the  ability  of  Coastal,  Heathland  and  Grassland  habitats  to  become a potential part of Northern Ireland’s urban environments.   

87

87


Cn‐02 Potential Benefits of Green Roof to Northern Ireland’s Bird Populations  Many natural habitats in Northern Ireland are critical to a variety of avian species, nationally  supporting over 200 bird species, not including rare and migratory species  (Biodiversity NI,  2011).  There  has  been  widespread  decline  in  the  bird  population  of  Northern  Ireland,  the  common  House  Sparrow  has  declined  19%  during  1994‐2006  and  the  Curlew,  Snipe,  Redneck and Lepwing species have declined by over 50% in the last 20 years (NIEA, 2010). It  is estimated that the total number of birds in the UK has reduced by 6% in the last 30 years  (Defra,  March  2008),  with  the  RSPB  recording  a  decrease  of  40%  in  farmland  bird  populations over the same period (RSPB, 2006).    Examples of completed projects in chapter 3 have shown  the  adaptability  of  bird  species  to  green  roof  habitats.  Additionally,  as  mentioned  in  section  Cn‐01,  there  is  research  supporting  extensive  green  roofs  in  industrial  estates  and  business  parks  as  high  value  ecological  resources for local bird populations (Brenneisen S. , 2006).  Many  of  Northern  Ireland’s  towns,  which  are  in  the  breeding and feeding range of migratory and native birds,  Figure 6 ‐ Wildwood Community College, Missouri, USA

can be  retrofitted  to  support  these  populations.  Buildings  such  as  the  Clinic  One  at  University  Hospital  of  Basel,  Laban  Dance  Centre  in  London  and  the  Ducks  Unlimited  National Headquarters and Conservation Centre in Winnipeg, described in section 3‐01, 3‐01  and 3‐05 respectively, illustrate the ability of birds to dominate roof spaces which resemble  their natural habitat.    Green  roofs  have  the  potential  to  play  an  important  role  in  Northern  Ireland’s  bird  conservation  schemes,  especially  in  urban  centre.  The  value  of  green  roofs  to  bird  populations is already recognised by the RSPB, who have issued guidelines for bird habitats  on green roofs (RSPB, 2011).      Cn‐03  Envisioned Setback to Green Roof development in Northern Ireland  While  it  is  the  opinion  of  the  researcher  that  green  roofs  present  a  clear  potential  for  the  creation  of  natural  habitats  in  the  urban  areas of Northern  Ireland,  there  are  a  number  of  obstacles that are currently preventing any wide scale adoption of green roofing systems    Commercial Planting opposed to Natural Planting   The  most  extensively  used  planting  on  green  roofs  in  the  northern  hemisphere  is  sedum,  due to their shallow rooting, tolerance to cold and drought (Snodgrass. & Snodgrass, 2006).  Even  intensive  roofing  system  use  a  selection  of  commercially  available  grass,  mosses  and  herbs  (Dunnett & Kingsbury, 2008).    Internationally  there  exist  different  policies  on  the  importance of using native planning on green roofs. One  school  of  thought  is  the  use  of  local  soil  and  vegetation  will  encourage  the  development  of  habitation  of  a  rooftop  (Brenneisen,  2006),  with  the  opposing  methodology  stating  that  rooftops  possess  different  micro‐climates  to  ground  level  habitats  and  should  be  treated  as  such  (Dunnett  N.  ,  2006).  Regardless  of  this  debate,  the  current  commercial  available  planting  Figure 7 ‐ Modular Green Roofing System  systems  produced  by  Northern  Ireland’s  horticultural  industry  are  dominated  by  sedum  88

88 


species, with  supplementary  variants  of  wildflowers  and  meadow  grass  (Green  Roofs  Ireland, 2010).    Many  ecological  reports  support  the  replacement  of  sedum  roofs  with  local  groundcover  planting  (Grant  G.  ,  2006),  however  commercially  Northern  Ireland  is  not  in  a  position  to  meet  this  request.  The  approach  of  National  Trust  Visitor  Centre  at  Portstewart  Strand,  described  in  section  3‐01,  illustrates  a  stop  gap  solution  to  the  lack  of  native  planting  available  for  green  roofing.  The  building  uses  a  sedum  roof  which  is  expected  to  become  colonised  and  hopefully  dominated  by  the  surrounding  native  sand  dune  grasses  (GreenRoof,  2010).  Until  native  species  are  introduced  to  commercial  horticulture  in  Northern Ireland, green roofs will be dominated by alien vegetation.      Lack of Social Drivers for Green Roof Adoption   The  rapid  adoption  of  green  roofs  in  cities  such  as  Berlin  and  Tokyo  was  made  possible  through the culmination of social, political and financial drivers (Earth Pledge, 2005). It is the  view of the researcher that the current socio‐political climate of Northern Ireland does not  support the possibility of any form of large scale adoption or favouring of green roofs.    The  water  saving  qualities  of  greening  roofs  are  irrelevant  to  Northern  Ireland.  Water  charges  in  Northern  Ireland  are  based  around  three  models;  a  standing  charge  based  on  supply pipe size; a variable charge based on the volume of water used; or unmeasured and a  fixed standing charge is issued (NI Water, 2011). So there is no financial incentive for build  occupant to commission green roofs because there are no financial penalties for excessive  rainwater  runoff.  Secondly  the  climate  of  Northern  Ireland  and  the  small  scale,  low  height  and  low  density  of  its  urban  areas  does  not  produce  excessive  ‘heat  islands’.  The  ‘heat  islands’ of Northern Ireland are considered to be 1oC for small town, and Belfast is believed  to have a 2oC heat island effect (Morris, 2007). This is softened by the temperature range of  Northern  Ireland  and  the  future  effects  of  climate  change,  which  has  been  predicted  as  much smaller in Ireland than in Britain (Coll, Maguire, & Sweeney, 2009). Resulting in a low  probability  for  green  roofs  to  be  widely  implemented  in  Northern  Ireland  in  order  to  combated excessive summer temperatures.    The only remaining socio‐political concern that can affect any future urban greening policy is  one based on promoting biodiversity and urban wildlife. The current political landscape does  not present any strong champions for this agenda. Because of these factors the political and  social environment does not look likely to promote any urban greening methods in the near  future.      Cn‐04  Concluding Statement  The goal of this report was to ascertain if green roofs could play a role in addressing habitat  loss in Northern Ireland. And the content of this report has provided adequate evidence that  they  are  capable  of  supporting  a  range  of  habitats  of  Northern  Ireland  that  are  currently  threatened in their natural settings.     While arguments can be made for the ability of green roofs to sustain replicant habitats of  Woodland  and  Wetlands  districts,  the  potential  of  Coastal,  Heathland  and  Grassland  environments  to  be  applied  to  existing  structures  across  Northern  Ireland  elevates  these  habitats  as  the  principle  candidates  for  habitat  reconstruction  in  urban  areas.  Additionally  the  opportunity  of  green  roofs  in  Northern  Ireland  to  provide  safe  breeding  ground  for   

89

89


internationally important  bird  populations  is  a  valid  reason  in  itself  to  promote  green  roof  adoption.    However,  without  some  form  of  government  support,  either  in  the  form  of  grants  or  favourable building policies, the wide scale implementation of a habitat focused green roofs  will  find  a  limited  appeal  about  the  Northern  Ireland  populace.  A  study  commissioned  by  English Nature and published in 2003 concluded that “Although individual green roofs offer  local environmental benefits, any significant contribution to wider environmental quality is  only likely to become apparent once a more substantial area of town and city roof space has  been  greened.  Such  a  programme  will  require  political  commitment  and  concerted  action  underpinned by science, technical expertise and good design. In order to refine the design of  green  roofs  for  biodiversity  conservation,  some  further  research  and  experimentation  is  required.”  (Grant,  Engleback,  &  Nicholson,  2003)  This  statement  accurately  describes  the  current status of green roofs in Northern Ireland.      Coastal Habitats  Sand Dunes 

Grassland Habitats Lowland Grasslands Calcareous Grasslands

Figure 9 ‐ Wangford Warren, Suffolk

Figure 10 ‐ Little Deer Park, Antrim

Figure 11 ‐ Murlough National Nature  Reserve

Lowland Meadows

Rush Pastures

Upland Heaths 

Figure 13 ‐ Tees Valley,  Middlesbrough

Figure 14 ‐ Slievenacloy, Belfast Hills

 

Limestone Pavements

Figure 8  ‐  Murlough  Dunes,  Dundrum  Bay

Vegetated Shingles 

Cliffs and Slopes  Figure 12‐ Kearney, Down

Figure 16 ‐ Carrick ‐a‐Rede Cliffs,  Antrim

   

90

Heather Habitats Lowland Heaths 

Figure 17 ‐ Knockmore, Fermanagh

Figure 15 ‐ Bloody Bridge near  Newcastle

Mountainous Heaths

Figure 18 ‐ Mourne Mountains  

90 


References    

 

   

  

    

   

Adler, D. (1999). Metric Handbook: Planning and Design Data. Oxford: Architectural  Press.  Alexandri, E., & Jones, P. (2008). Temperature decreases in an Urban Canyon due to  Green  Walls  and  Green  Roofs  in  Diverse  Climates.  Building  and  Environment,  43,  480–493.  Bamber,  R.,  Gilliland,  P.,  &  Shardlow,  E.  (2001).  Saline  Lagoons:  A  guide  to  their  management and creation. London: English Nature.  Biodiversity  NI.  (2009,  June  16).  Shopping  Safari.  Retrieved  July  11,  2011,  from  Biodiversity  NI:  http://www.biodiversityni.com/news_events.aspx?title=News&dataid=361966  Biodiversity  NI.  (2011).  Biodiversity.  Retrieved  June  16,  2011,  from  Biodiversity  Northern Ireland: http://www.biodiversityni.com/biodiversity.aspx  Blythe, E., & Merhaut, D. (2007). Grouping and comparison of container substrates  based  on  physical  properties  using  exploratory  multivariate  statistical  methods.  Hortscience 42(2): 353‐363., 2(42), 353‐363.  Boivin,  M.,  Lamy,  M.,  Gosselin,  A.,  &  Dansereau,  B.  (2001).  Effect  of  Artificial  Substrate  Depth  on  Frezing  Injury  of  Six  Herbaceous  Perennials  Grown  in  a  Green  Roof System. Hort Technology, 2, 409‐412.  Boyde,  J.  (2011,  August  22).  Marketing  Co‐ordinator;  Lisburn  City  Council.  (N.  Hughes, Interviewer)  Brenneisen,  S.  (2001).  Vögel,  Käfer  und  Spinnen  auf  Dachbegrünungen—  Nutzungsmöglichkeiten  und  Einrichtungsoptimierungen.  Basel,  Switzerland:  Geographisches  Institut  Universität  Basel  and  Baudepartement  des  Kantons  Basel‐ Stadt.  Basel,  Switzerland:  Geographisches  Institut  Universität  Basel  and  Baudepartement des Kantons Basel‐Stadt.  Brenneisen,  S.  (2005).  Biodiversity  Strategy  on  Green  Roofs.  3rd  Annual  Greening  Rooftops for Sustainable Cities. Washington DC: Green Roofs for Healthy Cities.  Brenneisen, S. (2006, December). Space for Urban Wildlife: Designing Green Roofs as  Habitats in Switzerland. Urban Habitats, 4(1), 27‐36.  Brenneisen, S. (2006, December). Space for Urban Wildlife: Designing Green Roofs as  Habitats in Switzerland. Urban Habitats, Volume 4(Number 1), 27‐36.  Brenneisen, S. (2006, December). Space for Urban Wildlife: Designing Green Roofs as  Habitats in Switzerland. Urban Habitats, Volume 4(Number 1), 27.  Brenneisen,  S.,  &  Hänggi,  A.  (2006).  Begrünte  Dächer—ökofaunistische  Charakterisierung  eines  neuen  Habitattyps  in  Siedlungsgebieten  anhand  eines  Vergleichs  der  Spinnenfauna  von  Dachbegrünungen  mit  naturschutzrelevanten  Bahnarealen  in  Basel.  Mitteilungen  der  Naturforschenden  Gesellschaften  beider  Basel, 9, 88–98.  Brooke,  J.  (2002,  August  13).  Heat  Island:  Tokyo  is  in  Global  Warning's  Vanguard.  New York Times.  Brookes,  J.  a.  (1984).  Designing  with  Plants  2:  The  Function  of  Plants.  Architects  Journal.  Budge,  D.  M.  (2009,  August  2).  Vancouver's  6  Acre  Living  Green  Roof.  Retrieved  August 11, 2011, from Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OX0JHdVd27o  Burgess,  H.  (2004,  May).  An  assessment  of  the  potential  of  green  roofs  for  bird  conservation in the UK. Submitted for the assessment of BSc Hons Geography. 

91

91


 

          

 

   

92

CABE. (2005). Does money grow on trees? London: Commission for Architecture and  the Built Environment.  City of Chicago. (2010). Monitoring the City Hall Rooftop Garden's Benefit. Retrieved  August  21,  2011,  from  City  of  Chicago  Office  Site:  http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/doe/supp_info/monitoring_the_cityhal lrooftopgardensbenefit.html  Clement, E., & Foster, M. (1994). Alien Plants of the British Isles. London: Botanical  Society of the British Isles.  Coffman,  R.,  &  Davis,  G.  (2005).  Insect  and  Avian  Fauna  Presence  on  Ford’s  River  Rouge  Plant.  Greening  Rooftops  for  Sustainable  Communities  Conference.  Washington D.C: Sustainable Communities Conference.  Coll,  J.,  Maguire,  C.,  &  Sweeney,  J.  (2009).  Biodiversity  and  Climate  Change  in  Ireland. Maynooth & Belfast: Department of Geography & EnviroCentre.  Cooper,  A.,  &  McCann,  T.  (2001).  The  Northern  Ireland  Countryside  Survey  2000.  Belfast: Environment and Heritage Service.  Cooper,  A.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Rogers,  D.  (2009).  Northern  Ireland  Countryside  Survey  2007. Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  Coppin,  N.  a.  (1990).  Use  of  Vegetation  in  Civil  Engineering.  London:  Construction  Industry Research and Information Association.  Corbett, P. (2003). Grassland Habitats. Belfast: Environment and Heritage Service.  Countryside  Survey.  (2008).  Countryside  Survey:  UK  Results  from  2007.  Lancaster:  Natural Environment Research Council.  Crowther, D. (1994). Health Considerations in House Design. Cambridge: Cambridge  University.  CVNI.  (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Coastal  ‐  Coastal  Sand  Dunes.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/coastal_sand_dunes/  CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Coastal ‐ Maritime Cliffs and Slopes. Retrieved July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/maritime_cliffs_and_s lopes/  CVNI.  (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Coastal  ‐  Seagrass  Beds.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/seagrass_beds/  CVNI.  (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Coastal  ‐  Sublittoral  Sands  and  Gravels.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/sublittoral_sands_and _gravels/  CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Grassland ‐ Calcareous Grassland. Retrieved July 20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/calcareous_grassland/  CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Grassland ‐ Limestone Pavement. Retrieved July 20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/limestone_pavement/  CVNI.  (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Marine  ‐  Saline  Lagoons.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/saline_lagoons/  CVNI.  (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Peatland  ‐  Lowland  Heathland.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/lowland_heathland/ 

92 


 

  

         

     

CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Peatland ‐ Lowland Raised Bogs. Retrieved July 20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/lowland_raised_bogs/  CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Wetland ‐ Eutrophic Standing Water. Retrieved July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/eutrophic_standing_ water/  CVNI.  (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Wetland  ‐  Fens.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/fens/  CVNI.  (2011).  Priority  Habitats  ‐  Wetland  ‐Reed  Bed.  Retrieved  July  20,  2011,  from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/reed_bed/  CVNI. (2011). Priority Habitats ‐ Woodland ‐ Oakwood. Retrieved July 20, 2011, from  Conservation  Volunteers  Northern  Ireland:  http://www.cvni.org/biodiversity/index.php/Habitats/habitat/oakwood/  Darius, F., & Drepper, J. (1984). Rasendaecher in West Berlin. Das Gartenamt, 33, 5;  309‐315.  DEFRA.  (2003).  Working  with  the  Grain  of  Nature.  London:  Department  for  the  Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.  Defra.  (April  2008).  Populations  of  Butterflies  in  England.  London:  Engalnd  Biodiversity Strategy Indicators.  Defra.  (March  2008).  Populations  of  Wild  Birds  in  England.  .  London:  England  Biodiversity Strategy Indicators.  Defra.  (May  2006).  The  UK  Biodiversity  Action  Plan:  Highlights  from  the  2005.  London: UK Biodiversity Partnership.  Den Hartog, C. (1970). The Seagrasses of the World. Amsterdam: North Holland.  Deplazes,  A.  (2008).  Constructing  Architecture:  Materials,  Processes,  Structures;  a  Handbook. Zurich: Birkhauser Verlag.  Doernach, R. (1979). On the Use of Biotectural Systems. Gardens and Landscaping,  452‐457.  Dunnett,  N.  (2006).  Green  Roofs  for  Biodiversity:  Reconciling  Aesthetics  with  Ecology. Fourth Annual Greening Rooftops for Sustainable Communities Conference,  Awards and Trade Show. Boston: The Cardinal Group.  Dunnett,  N.  (2006).  Sheffield’sGreenRoofForum:  A  Multi‐Stranded  Programme  of  Green  Roof  Infrastructure  Development  for  the  UK.  Fourth  Annual  Greening  Rooftops for Sustainable Communities Conference, Awards and Trade Show. Boston:  The Cardinal Group.  Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2004). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland:  Timber Press.  Dunnett,  N.,  &  Kingsbury,  N.  (2008).  Planting  Green  Roofs  and  Living  Walls.  Cambridge.: Timber Press.  Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2008). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland:  Timber Press.  Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2008). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland:  Timber Press.  Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2008). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland:  Timber Press.  Dunnett, N., & Kingsbury, N. (2008). Planting Green Roofs and Living Walls. Portland:  Timber Press. 

93

93


                  

  

94

Earth Pledge.  (2005).  Green  Roofs:  Ecological  Design  and  Construction.  Surrey,  England: Schiffer.  Earth  Pledge.  (2005).  Green  Roofs:  Ecological  Design  and  Construction.  Atglen,  Pennsylvania : Schiffer Books.  Emilsson,  T.  (2003).  The  Influence  of  Establishment  Method  and  Species  Mix  on  Plant Cover. Greening Rooftops for Sustainable Communities. Toronto: The Cardinal  Group.  FLL.  (2002).  Guideline  for  the  Planning,  Execution  and  Upkeep  of  Green‐roof  Sites.  Bonn: Forschungsgesellschaft Landschaftsentwicklung Landschaftsbau.  Francis,  R.  A.,  &  Lorimer,  J.  (2011,  January).  Urban  Reconciliation  Ecology:  The  potential of living roofs and walls. Journal of Environmental Management, 92, 1429‐ 1437.  Frazer, L. (2005). Porous Pavements. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press.  Frazer, L. (2005). Porous Pavements. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press.  Frith,  M.,  &  Gedge,  D.  (2000).  The  black  redstart  in  urban  Britain;  a  conservation  conundrum? British Wildlife, 8, 381–388.  Gates, D. (1980). Biophysical Ecology. New York: Springer.  Gedge, D. (2002). Roofspace: a place for brownfield biodiversity? Ecos, 22, (3/4), 69– 74.  Gedge,  D.  (2008,  September).  Promoting  Green  Roofs  and  Biodiversity.  Retrieved  September  02,  2011,  from  Green  Roofs  and  Biodiversity:  http://www.dustygedge.com/greenroofs.html  Gedge,  D.,  &  Kadas,  G.  (2005,  July).  Green  Roofs  and  Biodiversity.  Biologist,  52(3),  161‐169.  Getter,  K.  L.,  Rowe,  D.  B.,  Robertson,  G.  P.,  Cregg,  B.  M.,  &  Andresen,  J.  A.  (2009).  Carbon Sequestration Potential  of Extensive Green  Roofs. Environmental Science  &  Technology(43), pp. 7564‐7570.  Getter,  K.,  Rowe,  D.,  Robertson,  G.,  Cregg,  B.,  &  Andresen,  J.  (2009).  Carbon  Sequestration  Potential  of  Extensive  Greenroofs.  Environmenta  lScience  and  Technology, 43, 7564–7570.  Gibson,  C.  (1998).  Brownfield  Red  Data:  The  values  Artificial  Habitats  have  for  Uncommon Invertebrates. English Nature, Research Report No.273.  Gilbert,  O.  L.,  &  Anderson,  P.  (1998).  Habitat  Creation  and  Repair.  Oxford:  Oxford  University Press.  Graceson, A., Hare, M., Hall, N., & Monaghan, J. (2011). Characterising the mineral  components  of  green  roof  growing  media.  1st  National  Green  Roof  Student  Conference (pp. 1‐9). Sheffield: University of Sheffield.  Graceson, A., Hare, M., Hall, N., & Monaghan, J. (2011). Characterising the mineral  components  of  green  roof  growing  media.  1st  National  Green  Roof  Student  Conference. Sheffield: University Of Sheffield.  Graceson, A., Hare, M., Hall, N., & Monaghan, J. (2011). Characterising the mineral  components  of  green  roof  growing  media.  1st  National  Green  Roof  Student  Conference. Sheffield: School of Architecture, The University of Sheffield.  Grant, G. (2006). Extensive Green Roofs in London. Urban Habitats, 4, 51‐65.  Grant,  G.  (2006,  December).  Extensive  Green  Roofs  in  London.  Urban  Habitats,  4,  pp. 51‐65.  Grant, G., Engleback, L., & Nicholson, B. (2003). Green roofs: their existing status and  potential  for  conserving  biodiversity  in  urban  areas.  English  Nature(Research  Report), p. Report No 498. 

94 


                     

Green Roofs  Ireland.  (2010).  Plants.  Retrieved  September  03,  2011,  from  Green  Roofs Ireland: http://www.greenroofsireland.co.uk/  GreenRoof. (2010). ACROS Fukuoka Prefectural International Hall. Retrieved August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com:  http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=476  GreenRoof. (2010). BMW Düsseldorf Office Building. Retrieved August 8, 2011, from  GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=500  GreenRoof.  (2010).  Chicago  City  Hall.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=21  GreenRoof.  (2010).  Ducks  Unlimited  Canada  National  HQ  &  Oak  Hammock  Marsh  Interpretive  Centre.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com:  http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=463  GreenRoof.  (2010).  Gallie  Craig  Coffee  Shop.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=312  GreenRoof. (2010). Heinz 57 Center/Gimbels Building Restoration. Retrieved August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com:  http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=159  GreenRoof.  (2010).  Laban  Dance  Centre.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=549  GreenRoof. (2010). Life Expression Wellness Center. Retrieved August 8, 2011, from  GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=80  GreenRoof.  (2010).  Moos  Water  Filtration  Plant  .  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=680  GreenRoof.  (2010).  National  Trust  Visitor  Centre  at  Portstewart  Strand.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com:  http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=904  GreenRoof.  (2010).  North  German  Bank  ‐  NordLB.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=112  GreenRoof.  (2010).  Schiphol  Plaza  at  AMS.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com: http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=87  GreenRoof.  (2010).  Vancouver  Convention  Centre  Expansion  Project.  Retrieved  August  8,  2011,  from  GreenRoof.com:  http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=545  Groundwork.  (2011).  Green  Roof  Code  of  Best  Practice  for  the  UK.  Sheffield:  Groundwork Sheffield & Environment Agency.  Harvey,  P.  (2001).  The  East  Thames  Corridor:  A  Nationally  Important  Invertebrate  Fauna Under Threat. British Wildlife, 12, 91‐98.  Hitchmough, J. (1994). Urban Landscaping Management. Sydney: Incata Press.  Ingelmo, F., Canet, R., Ibañez, M. A., Pomares, F., & García, J. (1998, February). Use  of  MSW  compost,  dried  sewage  sludge  and  other  wastes  as  partial  substitutes  for  peat and soil. Bioresource Technology, 63(2), 123‐129 .  Johnston,  J.  (1993).  Building  Green  :  a  guide  to  using  plants  on  roofs,  walls  and  pavements. London: London Ecology Unit.  Jókövi, E., Bervaes, J., & Böttcher, S. (2002). Recreational use of green business sites:  an inventory of the opinions of employees and neighbours [in Dutch]. Wageningen:  Alterra Report 518. Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Centre.  Jones,  R.  A.  (2002).  Tecticolous  invertebrates:  A  preliminary  investigation  of  the  invertebrate fauna on ecoroofs in urban London. English Nature.  Kadas, G. (2006, December). Rare Invertebrates Colonizing  Green  Roofs in London.  Urban Habitats, Volume 4(Number 1), 66. 

95

95


          

        

 

96

Keeley, M.  (2003).  Green  Roof  Incentives:Tried  and  true  Techniques  from  Europe.  Toronto: Green Roofs for Healthy Cities.  Keeping,  M.  &.  (1996).  The  ‘Green’  Refurbishment  of  Commercial  Property.  Facilities, Vol. 14 Iss: 3/4, 15 ‐ 19.  Kingsbury, N. (2001, June). Roofing veldt. The Garden, 446‐449.  Koehler,  M.,  &  Schmidt,  M.  (1997).  Hof,  Fassaden  und  Dachbegruenung.  Landschaftsentwicklung und Umweltforschung, 105, 1‐177.  Köhler,  M.  (2006,  December).  Long‐Term  Vegetation  Research  on  Two  Extensive  Green Roofs in Berlin. Urban Habitats, 4(1), 3‐26.  Kӧhler, M. (1989). Ecological Analysis of Extensive Green Roofs. Letters to the Society  for Ecology, 249‐255.  Landolt,  E.  (2001).  Orchideen‐Wiesen  in  Wollishofen  (Zürich):  ein  erstaunliches  Relikt  aus  dem  Anfang  des  20.  Jahrhunderts.  Vierteljahresschrift  der  Naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Zürich, 146(2–3), 41–51.  Larson,  D.  W.,  Matthes,  U.,  Kelly,  P.,  Lundholm,  J.,  &  Gerrath,  J.  (2004).  The  Urban  Cliff Revolution. Toronto: Fitzhenry & Whiteside.  Lundholm, J. (2006). Green Roofs and Facades: a Habitat Template Approach. Urban  Habitats, 4, 87–101.  Lundholm,  J.,  &  Marlin,  A.  (2006).  Habitat  origins  and  microhabitat  preferences  of  urban plant species. Urban Ecosystems, 9, 139–159.  Margerison,  C.  (2008).  A  Response  from  the  British  Ecological  Society  and  the  Institute of Biology to the Environmental Audit Committee Inquiry in to ‘Halting UK  Biodiversity Loss’. London: The British Ecological Society.  Miller,  C.  (2003).  Moisture  Mamagement  in  Green  Roofs.  Greening  Rooftops  for  Sustainable Communities. Toronto: The Cardinal Group.  Morishita,  Y.  (2002,  March  19).  Interest  in  Growing  in  Roof  Gardens.  The  Yomiuri  Shimbun.  Morris, C. (2007). Fuel Poverty, Climate and Mortality in Northern Ireland 1980‐2006.  Belfast: Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency.  MOSS.  (2002).  Management  of  Sensitive  Sites:  Explanatory  Leaflet.  Belfast:  Environment and Heritage Service.  MOSS.  (2009).  Management  of  Sensitive  Sites  Habitat  Sheet  ‐  Coastal.  Belfast:  Department of the Environment.  MOSS.  (2009).  Management  of  Sensitive  Sites  Habitat  Sheet  ‐  Woodlands.  Belfast:  Department of the Environment.  MSNBC  News.  (2002,  August  21).  Tokyo  turns  rooftops  into  gardens.  Retrieved  September 02, 2011, from Heat Island Effect: http://www.voy.com/61461/145.html  Murray,  R.,  McCann,  T.,  &  Cooper,  A.  (1992).  A  Land  Classification  and  Landscape  Ecological Study of Northern Ireland. University of Ulster, Coleraine: Department of  the Environment NI and Department of Environmental Studies.  National Archives. (1995, December). UK Biodiversity Action Plan. Retrieved August  22,  2011,  from  Habitat  Statement:  http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110303145213/http://ukbap.org.uk/U KPlans.aspx?ID=754  National  Museums  Northern  Ireland.  (2010).  Native  woodland.  Retrieved  July  19,  Northern  Ireland:  2011,  from  Flora  of  http://www.habitas.org.uk/flora/habitats/nativewoodland.htm  National Museums Northern Ireland. (2010). Sea Cliffs. Retrieved July 19, 2011, from  Flora of Northern Ireland: http://www.habitas.org.uk/flora/habitats/seacliff.htm 

96 


      

  

      

Natural Economy  Northwest.  (2008).  The  economic  value  of  green  infrastructure.  London: Natural Economy Northwest.  NI  Water.  (2011).  Water  Charges.  Retrieved  September  04,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland Water: http://www.niwater.com/watercharges.asp  NIEA.  (2002).  Northern  Ireland  Biodiversity  Strategy.  Belfast:  Department  of  the  Environment.  NIEA.  (2005,  March).  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan:  Calcareous  Grassland.  Retrieved  June  13,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/calcareousgrass_pdf.pdf  NIEA.  (2007).  Northern  Ireland  Countryside  Survey.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland  Environment Agency.  NIEA.  (2010,  July  20).  Coast  &  Sea.  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/coast.htm  NIEA.  (2010,  March  19).  Farmlands  and  Grasslands  .  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/farmlands_and_grasslands.htm  NIEA.  (2010,  March  18).  Freshwater  and  Wetlands.  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/freshwater_and_wetlands.htm  NIEA. (2010, March 19). Heathlands. Retrieved July 18, 2011, from Northern Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/heathlands.htm  NIEA. (2010, April 29). Information for the General Public. Retrieved September 02,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/de/general_public.htm  NIEA. (2010, March 19). Lowland Dry Acid Grasslands. Retrieved July 23, 2011, from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/farmlands_and_grasslands/lowland_dry_acid_grasslands.htm  NIEA.  (2010,  March  11).  Lowland  Heath.  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/heathlands/lowland_heath.htm  NIEA.  (2010,  July  20).  Marine  Habitats.  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/coast/marinehabitats.htm  NIEA.  (2010,  March  19).  Montane  Heath.  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/heathlands/montane_heath.htm  NIEA.  (2010).  Northern  Ireland  Priority  Habitats.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland  Enviroment Agency.  NIEA.  (2010,  March  19).  Peatlands.  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/peatlands.htm  NIEA.  (2010,  March  30).  Species.  Retrieved  July  12,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment Agency: http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/sap_uk.htm  NIEA.  (2010,  March  11).  Upland  Heath.  Retrieved  July  18,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/heathlands/upland_heath.htm 

97

97


                       

98

NIEA. (2010,  March  19).  Urban  Biodiversity.  Retrieved  Ausust  12,  2011,  from  Northern  Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/de/biodiversity/habitats‐2/urban_biodiversity.htm  NIEA. (2010, March 18). Woodlands. Retrieved July 18, 2011, from Northern Ireland  Environment  Agency:  http://www.doeni.gov.uk/niea/biodiversity/habitats‐ 2/woodlands.htm  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Blanket Bog. Belfast: Northern Ireland  Environment Agency.  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Lowland Heathland. Belfast: Northern  Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2003). Lowland Raised Bog. Belfast: Northern  Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2003).  Mudflats.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland  Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2003).  Seagrass  Beds.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2003).  Upland  Heathland.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Calcareous  Grassland.  Belfast:  Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Coastal and Floodplain Grazing Marsh.  Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Coastal  Saltmarsh.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Coastal Sand Dunes. Belfast: Northern  Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Coastal  Vegetated  Shingle.  Belfast:  Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Eutrophic  standing  waters.  Belfast:  Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Fens.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland  Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Limestone  Pavements.  Belfast:  Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Maritime  Cliff  and  Slope.  Belfast:  Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Marl  Lakes.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland  Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Mesotrophic  Lakes.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Mixed  Ashwoods  .  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Purple Moor‐grass and Rush Pastures.  Belfast: Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Reed  Beds.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland  Environment Agency.  Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan. (2005). Sublittoral Sands and Gravels. Belfast:  Northern Ireland Environment Agency.  Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan.  (2005).  Wet  Woodland.  Belfast:  Northern  Ireland Environment Agency. 

98 


       

           

Northern Ireland  Native  Woodland  Group.  (2008).  Northern  Ireland  Native  Woodland: Definitions and Guidance. Belfast: Forest Service NI.  Oberndorfer,  E.,  Lundholm,  J.,  Bass,  B.,  Coffman,  R.,  Doshi,  H.,  Dunnett,  N.,  et  al.  (2007).  Green  Roofs  as  Urban  Ecosystems:  Ecological  Structures,  Functions,  and  Services. Bioscience, 57, 823–833.  Olympic  Delivery  Authority.  (2008).  Olympic  Park  Biodiversity  Action  Plan.  London:  Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games ltd.  Optigreen.  (2011).  Green  Roof  "Landscape  Roof".  Retrieved  September  02,  2011,  from  System  Solutions:  http://www.optigreen‐ greenroof.com/SystemSolutions/Landscape‐Roof.html  Optigreen.  (2011).  Green  Roof  "Light‐weight  Roof".  Retrieved September  02,  2011,  from  System  Solutions:  http://www.optigreen‐ greenroof.com/SystemSolutions/Light‐weight‐Roof.html  Optigreen.  (2011).  Green  Roof  "Nature  Roof".  Retrieved  September  02,  2011,  from  System  Solutions:  http://www.optigreen‐greenroof.com/SystemSolutions/Nature‐ Roof.html  Optigreen. (2011). Green Roof "Pitched Roof". Retrieved September 02, 2011, from  System  Solutions:  http://www.optigreen‐greenroof.com/SystemSolutions/Pitched‐ Roof.html  OSNI. (2011). Map Console ‐ Digital Measurement. Retrieved August 19, 2011, from  Ordnance  Survey  of  Northern  Ireland  ‐  Map  Shop:  http://maps.osni.gov.uk/MapConsoleProducts.aspx?Category=Services&type=Digital %20Measurement  Peck, S., & Kuhn, M. (2000). Design Guidelines for Green Roof. Toronto: Environment  Canada.  Pointer,  G.  (2005).  Focus  on  People  and  Migration.  London:  The  Office  of  National  Statistics.  Porsche,  U.,  &  Köhler,  M.  (2003).  Life  cycle  costs  of  green  roofs:  A  comparison  of  Germany, USA, and Brazil. World Climate and Energy Event. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  Randall,  R.  E.  (2004).  Management  of  coastal  vegetated  shingle  in  the  United  Kingdom. Journal of Coastal Conservation, Volume 10, Number 1, 159‐168, DOI.  RSPB. (2006, September). Farmland birds and agri‐environment schemes in the New  Member  States.  Retrieved  June  13,  2011,  from  RSPB:  http://www.rspb.org.uk/Images/crex_tcm9‐134831.pdf  RSPB.  (2011,  August  22).  Protecting  nest  sites  in  roofs:  Green  Roofs.  Retrieved  September  02,  2011,  from  The  Royal  Society  for  the  Protection  of  Birds:  http://www.rspb.org.uk/advice/helpingbirds/roofs/green_roofs.aspx  Schmidt, M. &. (1990). The Importance of Roofs Covered with Vegetation for Urban  Ecology. Building Green: A Guide to using Plants on Roofs, Walls and Pavements, 12.  Scholfield, J., & Waugh, M. (2003). Brownfield?, Greenfield?; The Threat to London's  Unofficial Countryside. London: London Wildlife Trust.  Scholz‐Barth, K. (2001). Green Roofs: Stormwater Management from the Top Down.  International Journal of Remote Sensing, 19(2), 2085‐2104.  Schradera,  S.,  &  Boningb,  M.  (2006).  Soil  formation  on  green  roofs  and  its  contribution to urban biodiversity with emphasis on Collembolans. Pedobiologia, 50,  347—356.  Scrivens, S. (1980). Derry and Toms: Case Study of Roof Gardens. Architects Journal.  Skinner,  C.  J.  (2006).  Urban  Density,  Meteorology  and  Rooftops.  Urban  Policy  and  Research, Volume 24(Issue 3), 355 ‐ 367 . 

99

99


       

100

Snepa, R., Van Ierland, E., & Opdama, P. (2009). Enhancing biodiversity at business  sites: What are the options, and which of these do stakeholders prefer? Landscape  and Urban Planning(91), pp. 26–35.  Snodgrass.,  E.,  &  Snodgrass,  L.  (2006).  Green  Roof  Plants:  a  Resource  and  Planting  Guide. Portland: TimberPress.  Szokolay,  S.  (2008).  Introduction  to  Architectural  Science:  The  Basis  of  Sustainable  Design. Oxford: Architectural Press.  Tokyo  Metropolitan  Government.  (2002).  Rooftop  Greenery  Measures;  The  Environment in Tokyo. Tokyo: Tokyo Metropolitan Government.  Wheater, C. P. (1999). Urban Habitats. London: Routledge.  White,  J.,  &  Snodgrass,  E.  (2003).  Extensive  Green  Roof  Plant  Selection  and  Characteristics.  Greening  Rooftops  for  Sustainable  Communities.  Toronto:  The  Cardinal Group.  Yoshimi,  J.,  &  Altan,  H.  (2011).  Experimentations  of  the  effects  of  green  roofs  on  building  thermal  environments  in  a  cold  climate.  1st  National  Green  Roof  Student  Conference. Sheffield: School of Architecture, The University of Sheffield.  ZinCo. (2011). Extensive Green Roofs. Retrieved August 11, 2011, from ZinCo Global  Website:  http://www.zinco‐ greenroof.com/EN/greenroof_systems/extensive_green_roofs.php 

100 


Appendix A 

Detailed Descriptions of Northern Ireland’s Natural Habitats  

 

101

101


Tidal Sandy, Shingle and Gravel Shores 

Coastal sandy  and  gravel  shores  occur  in  a  wide  variety  of  environments  and  are  common  in  Northern  Ireland  waters  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005). The habitat develops  in  a  range  of  physical  environments,  from  sheltered  beaches  to  mobile  sandbanks.  The  sediments  layer  may  be  very  thick  but  in  large  areas  of  Northern  Ireland,  may  only  form  small  deposits  covering  the  bedrock  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Figure 1 ‐ Dundrum Bay, Down  The  habitat  typical  starts  with  gravel  beds  in  coastal  water  deeper  than  10m  and  continues  towards  boulder  slopes  and  gravel  plains  inshore (Erwin, Picton, Connor, Howson, Gilleece, & Bogues, 1986). Extensive gravel shores  are  found  in  a  number  of  areas  around  the  Northern  Ireland  coast.  They  tend  to  occur  in  places where strong tidal currents or wave action prevent the deposition of finer material.     Sand  and  Gravel  shore  can  support  a  number  of  marine  animal  species  such  as  polychete  worms,  isopods,  and  crabs  (CVNI,  2011).  These  shorelines  may  have  a  fairly  diverse  flora  occupation above the high water mark. Below the high tide mark, disturbance to the shingle  and  the  salinity  of  the  ground  will  prevent  any  growth  of  significant  plant  life.  (National  Museums Northern Ireland, 2010).        The  2005  Habitat  Action  Plan  for  Northern  Ireland’s  sandy  and  gravel  shores has  set  the  following  targets for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the extent of a representative range of sub‐littoral sands and gravel habitats and associated  communities in Northern Ireland  Maintain  the  condition  of  a  representative  range  of  sub‐littoral  sands  and  gravel  habitats  and  associated communities in Northern Ireland 

102

102 


Seagrass Beds 

Seagrasses are  a  type  of  submerged  aquatic  vegetation  that  have  evolved  from  terrestrial  plants and have become specialized to live in the  marine  environment.  Seagrass  beds  develop  in  shallow,  sheltered  tidal  sediments  and  in  Northern  Ireland  are  confined  to  sea  loughs  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2003),  such  as  Strangford  Lough,  Lough  Foyle  and  Belfast Lough (CVNI, 2011).    Seagrasses  are  a  unique  group  of  plant  species,  Figure 2 ‐ Eelgrass, North Strangford Lough  they  are  the  flowering  plants  that  are  fully  adapted  to  a  marine  environment,  there  are  approximately  60  species  of  seagrass  existing  today (Den Hartog, 1970). Five seagrass species are found in Northern Ireland; three species  of eelgrass and two species of tassel weed (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    Seagrass beds are considered to be highly productive habitat as they support a wide variety  of flora and fauna in addition to acting as a nursery for a many fish species. Seagrass beds  can support an extensive volume of different animals, one hectare of seagrass may support  up to 125 million small vertebrates and 10,000 fish (CVNI, 2011).    Seagrass  beds  are  an  important  food  resource  for  wintering  wildfowl.  This  tidal  seagrass  zones  represent  an  important  resource  in  the  diet  of  many  nationally  important  species,  such  as  Mute  Swans,  Whooper  Swans,  Light‐bellied  Brent  Geese  and  Wigeon  (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).        The 2003 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s seagrass beds has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat  Maintain the extent of seagrass beds in Northern Ireland waters Maintain the quality of seagrass beds in Northern Ireland waters Maintain the distribution of seagrass beds in Northern Ireland waters Where feasible, restore lost, damaged or degraded seagrass beds These targets are reliant on surveys to be undertaken to ascertain the extent, quality and distribution  of seagrass beds in Northern Ireland 

 

103

103


Mudflats

Figure 3 ‐ Millbay, Antrim 

Mudflats are  intertidal  habitats  created  by  sedimentary  deposition  in  low  energy  coastal  environments,  such  as  mud  silt  and  clay.  These  habitats  are  particularly  found  in  estuaries  and  other  sheltered  areas  such  as  sea  loughs  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).     Typically  mudflats  can  cover  a  large  area,  often  being  several  kilometres  in  width  and  often  being  located  between  the  low  tide  water  mark  and  vegetated  saltmarshes.  Mudflats  play  an  important role in protecting saltmarshes as they  absorbing wave energy (CVNI, 2011). 

Mudflats  are  characterised  as  areas  of  high  biological  productivity  and  are  capable  of  supporting a large volume of organisms. However this wealth of fauna is marked low species  diversity with few rare species, particularly amongst microorganisms and lower food chain  animals  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2003).  While  mudflats  may  appear  to  be  deficient  in  plant  cover,  they  do  possess  extensive  mats  of  microalgae  which  support  numerous  species  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2003).  And  where  the  shore  is  made up of mud or fine silt, certain flowering plants adapted to growth in saline conditions  can thrive between low and high water marks (National Museums Northern Ireland, 2010).    Mudflats in combination with other tidal habitats are of great national importance to large  numbers  of  bird  and  fish  species.  These  environments  are  crucial  feeding,  resting  and  breeding  grounds  for  internationally  important  populations  of  waterfowl.  The  mudflats  at  Strangford  Lough  support  over  70,000  birds  annually,  making  it  the  most  important  sea  lough in Northern Ireland for waterfowl (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).        The 2003 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s mudflats has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat   Maintain the extent of mudflats and associated plant and animal communities in Northern Ireland  Maintain the condition of mudflats and associated plant and animal communities in Northern Ireland Where appropriate, enhance the extent and condition of mudflats in Northern Ireland 

104

104 


Saltmarshes

Saltmarshes  form  when  vegetation  becomes  established  and  thusly  stabilises  sheltered  tidal  mudflats,  they  typically  occupy  the  areas  between  spring  and  neap  tide  on  adjoining  mudflats.  Saltmarshes  consist  of  a  series  of  island  of  low‐growing  plants  separated  by  narrow  channels  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  They  can  be  found  at  estuaries,  saline  lagoons  or  behind  barrier  islands.    Figure 4 ‐ Ballymacormick Point, Bangor  Saltmarsh  is  a  rare  habitat  in  Northern  Ireland;  this may be due to smaller tidal ranges than the UK and Republic of Ireland. As a result there  are  fewer  potential  areas  for  saltmarshes  to  establish  themselves,  saltmarsh  in  Northern  Ireland  comprise  only  0.5%  of  the  total  UK  habitat  area  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan, 2005) or 250ha (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    The  largest  areas  of  saltmarsh  in  Northern  Ireland  are  the  Roe  Estuary  in  Lough  Foyle,  around  Strangford  Lough,  at  Ballycarry  in  Larne  Lough,  the  Bann  Estuary  and  Mill  Bay  in  Carlingford Lough. These five sites account for 90% of the saltmarsh area of Northern Ireland  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Saltmarshes  provided  for  a  range  of  organisms,  in  particular  specialist  plant  communities  and their associated animals. They provide a valuable resource for wading birds and wildfowl  as  they  act  as  high  tide  refuges  for  birds  feeding  on  adjacent  mudflats.  They  also  provide  breeding  sites  for  waders,  gulls  and  terns,  and  are  a  source  of  food  for  passerine  birds  particularly in autumn and winter (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Northern Ireland is one of the most important regions in the UK for wintering wildfowl, due  to its mild winter climate and abundance of wetland. Strangford Lough is considered to be  Northern Ireland’s major coastal site for migrant and wintering waterfowl with 20,000 birds  migrating there every year. It also supports 25 national important waterfowl species, three  of which are international protected (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    A  number  of  specialist  invertebrate  species  are  associated  with  saltmarshes  in  Northern  Ireland  such  as  the  Rove  Beetle,  a  Priority  Species  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s saltmarshes has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat  Maintain the current extent of saltmarsh at 250ha Maintain the area of saltmarsh in favourable condition at 135ha By 2015, restore to favourable condition an area of saltmarsh in unfavourable condition (100ha.) 

           

105

105


Saline Lagoon 

Saline lagoons are bodies of seawater that have  become  disconnected  from  the  sea.  The  environment  of  these  lagoons  where  is  neither  marine  nor  freshwater  but  may  vary  from  brackish  to  fully  or  hyper‐saline  (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Saline lagoons can be both naturally of artificially  constructed.  Natural  lagoons  occur  when  a  barrier such as a sand or shingle bar separated a  lagoon  from  the  sea.  Artificial  lagoons  are  Figure 5 ‐ Strand Lough, Down  frequently  created  when  engineering  works  cut  off  part  of  an  estuary  or  bay  from  direct  tidal  influences  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan, 2005).    Although small brackish pools are frequent around the coast in saltmarshes, larger bodies of  brackish  water  are  rare.  There  are  only  30  reported  saline  lagoons  in  Northern  Ireland  (Bamber, Gilliland, & Shardlow, 2001). Strand Lough in Down, is an example of a large body  of semi‐saline water (CVNI, 2011).    The variations in the salinity of individual lagoons entails distinctiveness in local their flora  and fauna. Each pool represents a limited opportunity for vegetation and animals, and often  has to be highly specialised to cope with the environmental conditions (National Museums  Northern  Ireland,  2010).  Thus  the  presence  of  such  a  degree  of  specialist  flora  or  fauna  makes  the  conservation  of  saline  lagoons  important  in  maintaining  biodiversity  (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).     Saline  lagoons  are  often  an  important  habitat  for  large  numbers  of  wildfowl  and  waders,  provide  important  locations  for  high  tide  roosts  and  offer  habitats  for  migrating  birds  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    The habitat is also favoured by a number specialised marine species but flora and fauna. The  lagoon cockle, (a filter feeding bivalve), that is often found submerged in the soft sediments  of the lagoon (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005). And for plant life, a mixture of  freshwater  and  marine  plant  life  occupies  saline  lagoons.  The  fringe  vegetation  of  these  bodies  of  water  are  similar  to  freshwater  ponds  and  lakes,  with  additional  marine  species  such  as  ‘beds’  of  Tassel  Weeds  and  the  seagrass  Spiral  Tassel  Weeds,  both  of  which  are  protected by separate habitat action plans (CVNI, 2011).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s saline lagoon has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat  Maintain the extent of saline lagoons and associated plant and animal communities in Northern  Ireland  Maintain the condition of saline lagoons and associated plant and animal communities in Northern  Ireland  Create lagoon habitat to offset losses. (Although it is not clear how much of this habitat has been lost,  it is apparent that there has been a loss. An interim target of 2ha by 2010 has been set, initially based  on the requirement of UK habitat action plan) 

106

106 


Sand Dunes 

Sand dunes occur when a beach is large enough  or  has  the  significant  tidal  power  to  allow  sand  to  dry  out  complete  between  high  tide  points.  The  dry  sand  is  then  blown  landwards  by  the  wind,  where  it  accumulates  into  dunes.  Dunes  are  then  stabilised  by  plant  life  which  grows  through  the  hardened  sand  (CVNI,  2011).  The  largest dune systems are located along the north  and  south‐east  coasts,  namely  in  north  Antrim  and  South  Down.  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action Plan, 2005)  Figure 6 ‐ Murlough Sand Dunes at Dundrum Bay   Little  to  no  new  dunes  are  currently  forming  around  Northern  Ireland  at  present,  the  formation  of  sand  dunes  is  not  continuous  and  existing  coastal  dunes  were    formed  thousands  of  years  ago  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  The  area  between  Lough Foyle and the Bann Estuary has some of the oldest recorded dunes in Ireland, at over  5000 years.    Dune  habitats  are  typically  nutrient  poor  and  have  deficiencies  in  there  supply  of  fresh  water;  however  this  has  created  a  high  diversity  of  specialised  plants  and  fauna  specials.  Murlough  Dunes  at  Dundrum,  Co.  Down  supports  55  species  of  bee,  ant  and  wasp  (which  equates  to  33%  of  Irish  fauna),  213  species  of  moth  (48%  of  Northern  Irish  fauna)  and  21  species of butterfly, roughly 71% of Northern Irish butterfly fauna (Northern Ireland Habitat  Action Plan, 2005).    The  EHS  estimated  there  is  approximately  3000ha  of  sand  dunes  in  Northern  Ireland;  however the area of vegetated sand dunes is estimated to be somewhere between 1300ha  and 1500ha (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s sand dunes has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat  Maintain the current extent of sand dunes at 1500ha Maintain the area of sand dunes in favourable condition at 300ha By 2015, restore to favourable condition an area of sand dune in unfavourable condition (1150ha.) 

 

107

107


Vegetated Shingles Banks 

Vegetable shingle  banks  occupy  the  landward  side on coastal shores when local conditions suit  there formation. Shingle banks are typically long  strips  that  cover  a  small  total  area  and  while  they  occur  throughout  the  costal,  there  is  a  concentration  on  the  northeast  shoreline,  namely  the  Mournes  Coast  and  Rathlin  Island  (National Museums Northern Ireland, 2010).    An  estimated  50ha  of  vegetated  shingle  occurs  in  Northern  Ireland  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Figure 7 ‐ Kearney, Down Action  Plan,  2005).  Of  this,  approximately  30ha  are  considered  stable.  These  areas  support  a  range  of  plant  communities,  including  scrub  and grassland, often rich in lichens. It is these areas of stable shingle that are the main focus  of  this  habitat  action  plan.  Currently  48ha  of  vegetated  shingle  habitat  are  protected  by  Areas of Special Scientific Interest (ASSI) notification in Northern Ireland.    Shingle  banks  are  naturally  broken  up  by  sea  action  and  are  subject  to  occasional  disturbance  by  storms.  This  disturbance  prevents  most  land  plants  from  effectively  colonising  them  (NIEA,  2010).  However  above  the  high  water  mark  a  fairly  diverse  flora  exists. Below high water mark tidal disturbance of the shingle and the salinity prevents any  growth of vascular plants. Shingle banks are partially important for several species that are  scarce  in  Northern  Ireland,  such  as  oyster  plant  and  sea  cabbage  (National  Museums  Northern Ireland, 2010).       

The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s vegetable shingle banks has set the following  targets for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the current extent of coastal vegetated shingle at 50ha Maintain the area of coastal vegetated shingle in favourable condition at 25ha By 2015, restore to favourable condition as much as is practical, of the remainder of the resource i.e.  25ha 

108

108 


Cliffs and Slopes 

It is  estimated  that  the  length  of  Northern  Ireland’s  coastline  is  650km  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005),  with  500km  of  this  comprising  of  coastal  cliffs  and  slopes.  The  Northern  Ireland  Countryside  Survey  2000,  give  an approximation of the total area of the habitat  to  be  528  hectares  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  2009).    The  vegetation  on  cliffs  can  vary  vastly  over  short  distances;  this  is  due  the  soil  composition  Figure 8 ‐ Carrick ‐a‐Rede Cliffs, Antrim  and  local  geography  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action Plan,  2005). Northern Ireland’s cliffs are an  important habitat for  breeding seabirds  which can reach numbers of international importance. There are seabird colonies on many  stretches of the Down and Antrim coasts.    There is a wide range of coastal breeding birds associated with cliff habitats; these include  the priority species such as the Chough and Twite. The cliffs on Rathlin Island provide nesting  sites  for  nationally  important  colonies  of  Guillemot  and  Kittiwake  and  the  internationally  important Razorbill (CVNI, 2011).    Maritime cliff habitats have been in decline during the past century for much of Britain and  Ireland (CVNI, 2011). However in Northern Ireland, no significant losses have been recorded  between  1991‐1998  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005),  in  fact  the  flora  of  sea  cliffs  is  one  of  the  few  habitats  largely  undamaged  by  modern  human  activities  (National  Museums Northern Ireland, 2010).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s maritime cliff and slope has set the following  targets for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the current extent of all maritime cliff and slope at 500km Maintain the area of maritime cliff and slope in favourable condition at 250km By 2015, restore to favourable condition 225km of maritime cliff and slope in unfavourable condition

 

109

109


Eutrophic Waters 

Eutrophic standing  water  describes  a  body  of  water with a high nutrient content (nitrogen and  phosphate). Most  of  Northern  Ireland’s  larger  lakes  such  as  Lough  Neagh  and  Lough  Beg  and  Lough Erne are regarded as eutrophic (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  The  Environment  and  Heritage  Service  (EHS)  states  that  the  area  of  eutrophic  standing  water  in  Northern  Ireland  is  approximately  940  km2.  This  is  comprised  mainly  of  the  five  largest  lakes  in  Northern Ireland, which represent less than 0.3%  Figure 9 ‐ Eutrophic Water, Upper Lough Erne  of the total lake numbers but contribute 89% of  the total national water volume (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    The  high  nutrient  levels  make  these  bodies  of  water  are  very  productive  and  have  a  high  biodiversity.  Plankton  and  algae  are  plentiful  and  together  with  the  submerged  vegetation  they support a large variety of species, during summer it is common for a dense population  of algae to accumulated, making the water green (CVNI, 2011).    Dragonflies,  water  beetles,  stoneflies  and  mayflies  are  found  in  eutrophic  standing  water  habitats. A number of fish and eel species are common and eutrophic water supports some  of  the  few  amphibians  that  reside  in  Northern  Ireland  for  example  frogs  and  newts  (CVNI,  2011).    The areas surrounding eutrophic water are important for bird species, non‐migratory species  such as Whooper Swan, Tufted Duck, Cormorant and Graylag Geese, in addition to migratory  wader and wildfowl species all rely of these habitats for feeding and breeding (CVNI, 2011).       

The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s eutrophic standing water has set the following  targets for the conservation of the habitat  Restore to Good Ecological Status all eutrophic standing waters by 2015, in line with the WFD 

         

110

110 


Mesotrophic Lakes  

Mesotrophic and  eutrophic  lakes  support  an  overlapping body of flora and fauna species. This  is due to their similar chemical makeup (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005);      eutrophic  denotes  a  high  level  of  nitrogen  and  phosphate,  with  mesotrophic  showing  a  moderate  level  and  finally  oligotrophic  lakes,  which  contain  low  levels of nutrients (NIEA, 2010).    According  to  the  UK  Habitat  Action  Plan  mesotrophic  lakes  are  relatively  infrequent;  Figure 10 ‐Tower Lake, Newtownstewart, Omagh however  Northern  Ireland  contains  a  high  proportion of the  total  UK resource.  Mesotrophic lakes are generally represented  by small  body of water, the two largest mesotrophic lake sites in Northern Ireland are Lough Melvin  (2100 ha) and Upper Lough Macnean, however the majority (72%) of Northern Ireland lakes  have a surface area of less than 2ha (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Mesotrophic  lakes  supports  a  higher  diversity  of  submerged  aquatic  plants  than  any  other  type  of  standing  water,  countered  by    the  characteristically  clear  waters  of  mesotrophic  lakes  giving  rise  to  low  levels  of  growth  in  planktonic  and  filamentous  algae  (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    This  habitat  type  contains  a  variety  of  fish  species,  generally  a  mix  of  coarse  and  salmon  species,  but  it  is  typical  for  several  fish  species  to  have  been  introduced  and  become  established as part of the biodiversity associated with these lakes (CVNI, 2011).    Lough  Melvin  is  the  only  recorded  site  to  support  the  Arctic  Char  in  Northern  Ireland  in  addition to three distinct races of brown trout and the Atlantic salmon (CVNI, 2011).    It  is  important  to  note  that  mesotrophic  lakes  contain  a  high  proportion  of  nationally  rare  aquatic plants, like the white water‐lily, the yellow water‐lily and several pondweeds species  (CVNI,  2011).  Other  species  supported  by  mesotrophic  lakes  include  important  groups  of  dragonflies,  water  beetles,  stoneflies  and  mayflies,  otters,  Whiteclawed  Crayfish,  Globeflower, and Chaffweed.        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s mesotrophic lakes has set the following targets  for the conservation of the habitat  Restore to Good Ecological Status all mesotrophic lakes by 2015, in line with the WFD 

111

111


Marl Lakes 

Figure 11 ‐ Knockballymore Lough, Fermanagh 

Marl lakes  are  natural  lakes  which  occur  at  low  altitude  (over  60%  of  Northern  Ireland’s  lakes  occur at altitudes of less than 100m); they differ  from  other  lakes  by  highly  alkaline  water  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  These lakes typical lie in drumlin basins receiving  water as run‐off from the drumlin slopes; thusly  the majority of marl lakes in Northern Ireland are  mainly  concentration  in  south  east  Fermanagh.  Northern  Ireland  marl  lakes  are  relatively  small,  averaging  about  2.5  ha  in  the  marl  lake;  the  largest  is  Lough  Inver  in  Fermanagh  at  13ha  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005). 

Marl lake water bodies are characterised by very clear water but has a low nutrient status.  The  high  clarity  of  water  creates  excellent  condition  for  aquatic  plants,  but  the  base‐rich  chemistry  of  the  water  presents  few  nutrients  to  support  phytoplankton  and  other  fauna  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Marl  lakes  sustain  a  similar  range  of  flora  and  fauna  as  other  lake  types,  with  macro  invertebrates  being  well  represented,  particularly  groups  like  dragonflies,  water  beetles,  stoneflies  and  mayflies  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Some  inter‐drumlin  marl  lakes  are  regionally  important  for  the  diversity  of  their  pondweeds  including  rare  species like the fen pondweed (CVNI, 2011).       

The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s marl lakes has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat  Restore to Good Ecological Status all marl lakes by 2015, in line with the WFD

   

112

112 


Reed Beds 

Reed beds  describe  wetland  habitats  that  are  dominated  by  the  Common  Reed  and  other  tall  flowering plants which are adapted to growing in  wet  conditions.  There  are  two  forms  of  reed  beds;  reed  swamps  which  are  permanently  waterlogged and reed fen where the water level  is  below  the  ground  surface  in  summer  and  are  more botanically diversity (CVNI, 2011).    Reed  beds  are  widely  distributed  along  the  margins  of  water  bodies,  streams,  river  and  Figure 12 ‐ Castle Espie, Down  other  forms  of  wetlands  and  bogs.  In  Northern  Ireland, they are especially associated with lowland areas around the large lakes and drumlin  wetlands. Several large (over 10ha) reed beds occupy the catchment areas of Lough Neagh  and Lough Erne, in addition to an estimated 40 sites, greater than 2ha, in Down and Armagh  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    UK wide, there has been a considerable loss in reed bed habitats, with a reduction in area of  40%  between  1945  and  1990  (Hawke  &  José,  1996).  It  is  believed  that  the  habitat  has  diminished  by  a  similar  amount  during  the  same  period  in  Northern  Ireland,  the  2000  Northern  Ireland  Countryside  Survey  reported  that  the  habitat  range  has  remained  stable  between 1988 to 1998 (Cooper, McCann, & Meharg, 2002).    Reed  beds  in  Northern  Ireland  are  generally  unmanaged  with  their  coverage  limited  by  water‐levels and nutrient supply. The habitat is defined as being a vegetation species‐poor  environment, but support a rich array of fauna adapted to wetlands, notably breeding birds  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    A wide range of wetland fauna benefits from the resources provided by reed beds, especially  where they are located near to fens or open water. UK wide reports state that at least 700  species  of  invertebrates  can  be  associated  with  reed  beds;  with  64  insect  species  partially  dependent  on  reed  and  some  40  species  of  insect  feed  solely  on  reed  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    A  rapidly  growing  level  of  research  and  installation  of  reed  beds  is  accruing  as  they  are  a  natural filtration system for waste water. Currently there are a number of schemes looking  at  reed  bed  technology  for  a  variety  of  purposes  aimed  at  sewage  and  waste  water  treatment, industrial effluent, and agricultural run‐off (CVNI, 2011).       

The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s reed beds has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat  Maintain the total extent of reed bed in Northern Ireland at 3,200ha Where favourable, maintain the condition of reed bed in Northern Ireland Achieve favourable condition of 95% of reed bed which lies within designated sites, by 2015  For stands outside ASSIs, secure favourable condition over, as near as practicable, 100% of the reed  bed resource in Northern Ireland, by 2015 

113

113


Floodplain Grazing Marsh 

Grazing marshes  are  divided  into  two  main  categories;  coastal  and  floodplain  grazing  marches.  Coastal  grazing  marshes  occur  in  flat  coastal areas frequently behind natural barriers,  typically sand dunes, and coastal defences (often  resulting from reclaimed saltmarsh or mudflats).  Floodplain  grazing  marshes  are  connected  to  large  slow‐moving  rivers  and  lakes.  Much  of  these  habitats  were  formerly  wet  woodlands,  fens or reed beds repurposed for agricultural use  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).  Figure 13 ‐ Insh Marshes, Scotland    Grazing  marshes  are  commonly  residual  habitats  resulting  from  redundant  agricultural  practices that were more widespread in the past, with the hallmark features of this habitat  type relying on some form of maintenance (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).    Inland floodplain grazing marshes are more widespread in Northern Ireland than the rest of  the UK. The habitat characteristically occurs in flat low‐lying areas in combination with other  wetland  habitats,  for  instance  lakes  and  fens.  Based  on  the  Northern  Ireland  Countryside  Survey 2000, the area of species‐rich wet grassland in Northern Ireland is believed to cover  1.0% of the country, estimated to be 13,808ha (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).    Although much of Northern Ireland’s grazing marshes are inclined to be somewhat poor in  the  diversity  of  vegetation  species,  several  notable  flora  species  which  have  a  restricted  habitat  range  in  Ireland  do  reside  in  grazing  marshes.  Notable  species  are  the  Whorled  Caraway, Tubular Water‐Dropwort, Water Violet and Flowering Rush, Marsh Pea, and Irish  Lady’s‐Tresses Orchid (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    The environment also provides resources for an array of important breeding and wintering  waterfowl such as snipe, lapwing, redshank and curlew. Additionally the  pools and ditches  within  the  habitat  are  commonly  rich  with  freshwater  invertebrates  and  plants  species  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Because  of  its  importance  to  breeding  waterfowl,  the  habitat  has  been  the  subject  to  numerous surveys over the past few decades. These species have exhibited al long running  population  decline(Donaghy  &  Mellon,  1999),  in  line  with  a  rapid  area  decline  of  28%  in  grazing marshes between 1991 and 1998, due to drainage schemes and related agricultural  improvement (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s coastal and floodplain grazing marshes has set  the following targets for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the total extent of coastal and floodplain grazing marsh in Northern Ireland  Where favourable, maintain the condition of coastal and floodplain grazing marsh in Northern Ireland Achieve favourable condition of 95% of coastal and floodplain grazing marsh which lies within  designated sites, by 2015  For stands outside ASSIs, secure favourable condition over, as near as practicable, 100% of the coastal  and floodplain grazing marsh resource in Northern Ireland by 2015  Restore 50ha of coastal and floodplain grazing marsh by 2015 Restore a further 50ha of coastal and floodplain grazing marsh by 2020

114

114 


Wet Woodlands 

Wet woodlands  describe  an  assortment  of  woodland  and  scrub  forms  that  occupy  on  waterlogged  or  seasonally  flooded  land.  The  timber species that inhabitant wet woodlands is  quite  diverse,  usually  being  dominated  by  Willow,  Alder  or  Downy  Birch,  but  also  includes  Ash  or  Oak  on  the  drier  margins  of  the  habitat  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Willow  scrub  woodlands  are  the  most  extensive  wet  woodland  community  in  Northern  Ireland,  Figure 14 ‐ Bonds Glen, Derry  they  often  occur  as  an  initiate  woodland  colony  prior  to  the  development  of  a  more mature  habitat  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).    Wet  woodlands  are  not  limited  to  one  soil  condition  and  are  capable  of  developing  on  nutrient‐rich  mineral,  acid  soils  and  nutrient‐poor  peat  soils.  The  common  factor  in  there  development  is  that  they  typical  occupy  the  fringes  of  a  primary  water,  a  lake  or  bog  for  example  and  frequently  occur  in  conjunction  with  other  woodland  habitats  (Northern  Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    The precise extent of wet woodland in the UK is unclear, but it is estimated to be between  50,000 ‐ 70,000ha (JNCC, 2001). Unfortunately with the extensive historic forest clearance in  Northern  Ireland  has  resulted  in  the  current  national  wet  woodland  resource  being  of  relatively  recent  origin  (typically  less  than  100  years  old).  Wet  woodlands  are  currently  a  scattered  habitat,  inclined  to  be  small  than  3‐5  ha  in  size  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Recent  estimates  place  the  extent  of  wet  woodlands  in  Northern  Ireland  to  occupy an area of 2,600ha. Positively the NICS 2000 has indicated a 9% range increase in the  wet woodlands and shrubs between 1988 and 1998 (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).    Generally  wet  woodlands  are  unmanaged  and  are  often  used  for  grazing  and  shelter  by  livestock.  Nevertheless  the  habitat  is  noted  as  an  excellent  resource  for  insects  and  other  invertebrates,  like  snails  and  spiders.  Furthermore  these  wet  environments  support  a  very  large number of species, providing cover and breeding sites for otters and are of value for  bats and a number of breeding birds many of which are now rare in Northern Ireland (CVNI,  2011).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s wet woodlands has set the following targets for  the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the area of all wet woodlands in Northern Ireland at least 2,600ha Maintain the current area of all ancient or long‐established semi‐natural wet woodlands  Maintain condition, where favourable, of the existing resource Achieve favourable condition of 1650ha of wet woodland by 2015 Restore 60ha of former wet woodland on ancient and long‐established woodland sites by 2010  Restore a further 70ha of former wet woodland on ancient and long‐established woodland sites by  2015  Establish 120ha of wet woodland by 2010 Establish a further 140ha of wet woodland by 2015

 

115

115


Mixed Ashwood 

The categorisation of mixed ashwoods is applied  to an expansive range of forests located on base‐ rich  soils,  in  the  case  of  Northern  Ireland  this  is  the  basalts  region  of  County  Antrim  and  the  limestone  basins  in  County  Fermanagh,  with  more periodical sites in the Sperrins and County  Down  and  Armagh  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action Plan, 2005).    Ash  is  generally  the  dominant  species,  although  locally oak, downy birch and even hazel may be  Figure 15 ‐ Glenarm Woodlands, Antrim  the  most  abundant  species  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005). Ashwood ground flora is particularly rich and varied because of  fertility  nature  of  the  soils  and  a  forest  canopy  which  doesn’t  cast  dense  shade,  such  as  Wood Anemone, Bluebell, Primrose and Ramsons (wild garlic) (CVNI, 2011).    In  general,  mixed  ashwoods  are  unmanaged  in  Northern  Ireland  often  being  utilised  for  grazing and shelter by livestock (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    It is estimated that the total area of ashwoods in the UK is 67,500ha, however this is only an  estimate  as  there  is  no  precise  data  (JNCC,  2001).  Similarly  the  estimated  area  of  mixed  ashwoods in Northern Ireland is a minimal 3,430ha, with 3,300ha in private ownership and  130ha  in  public  ownership  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  The  NICS  2000  survey present positive information on the extent of ashwoods, with a 9% increase between  1988 and 1998 (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s mixed ashwoods has set the following targets for  the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the total area of all mixed ashwoods in Northern Ireland at 3,430ha Maintain the current area of all ancient or long‐established semi‐natural mixed ashwoods  Maintain condition, where favourable, of the existing resource Achieve favourable condition of 2000ha of mixed ashwoods by 2015 Restore 80ha of former mixed ashwoods which has been converted to plantation on ancient or long‐ established woodland sites by 2010  Restore a further 90ha of former mixed ashwoods which has been converted to plantation on ancient  or long‐established woodland sites by 2015  Establish 160ha of mixed ashwoods by 2010 Establish a further 180ha of mixed ashwoods by 2015

               

116

116 


Oakwood

Oak forests  were  once  common  across  Europe  and  Ireland  (CVNI,  2011).These  forests  are  characterised  populated  by  native  oaks  like  Sessile  Oak  and  Pedunculate  Oak  and  Downy  Birch, the habitat normally contains smaller tree  species,  tree  species  such  as  Holly,  Rowan  and  Hazel  are  common  within  the  forest  canopy  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Northern  Ireland’s  oak  woodlands  are  concentrated in the north east, on less base‐rich  soils, in rocky and wet locations (CVNI, 2011).  Figure 16 ‐ Breen Oakwood, Antrim    Oak trees are an important commodity for the forest dwelling flora and fauna. A individual  oak tree is recorded at be capable of supporting over 350 different species of insect, (much  more  than  any  other  tree)  as  well  as  an  abundance  of  lower  plants  such  as  fungi,  ferns,  mosses  and  lichens  (CVNI,  2011).  The  range  of  plants  living  at  ground  level  in  oak  woods  varies according to the underlying soil type and degree of grazing; but Bluebell, Bramble and  fern  communities,  through  to  grass,  Bracken  and  moss  dominated  areas  are  common  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Similar to other forest types, the exact are of oakwood forests in the UK is uncertain, but it is  gauged  at  between  70,000  ‐  100,000ha  (JNCC,  2001).  With  the  extrapolated  Northern   Ireland  oak  woods  occupies  an  area  of  2,350ha,  with  an  approximate  2,000  ha  in  private  ownership and 350 ha in public ownership (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).The  NICS  2000  has  reported  a  11%  increase  to  the  habitat  range  between  1988  and  1998  (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).    Oaks  can  live  more  than  500  years,  with  the  production  of  acorns  taking  up  to  80  years  (CVNI, 2011).         The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s oak woods has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat  Maintain the total area of all oak woods in Northern Ireland at 2,350ha Maintain the current area of all ancient or long‐established semi‐natural oak woods  Maintain condition, where favourable, of the existing resource Achieve favourable condition of 1600ha of oak woods by 2015 Restore 60ha of former oakwood which has been converted to non‐native plantation on ancient and  long‐established woodland sites by 2010  Restore a further 60ha of former oakwood which has been converted to non‐native plantation on  ancient and long‐established woodland sites by 2015  Establish 120ha of oakwood by 2010  Establish a further 120ha of oakwood by 2015

       

117

117


Lowland Dry Acid Grasslands 

Lowland dry  acid  grassland  habitats  generally  occur on nutrient‐poor, free‐draining soils which  are  based  on  acid  rocks  or  shallow  deposits  of  sands  and  gravels  (NIEA,  2010).  When  acid  grasslands are located in highland locations they  are  often  a  species  poor  product  of  former  heathland.  However  when  correctly  managed,  lowland dry acid grasslands are generally species  rich,  with  a  wide  range  of  grasses,  herbs,  dwarf  shrubs,  lichens  and  mosses  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005). 

Figure 17 ‐ Wangford Warren, Suffolk 

The most characteristic herb and grass species are Heath Bedstraw, Sheep’s Sorrel, Sheep’s  Fescue, Common Bent, Pill Sedge and Tormentil. Dwarf shrubs, such as Heather and Bilberry  can also be present, as are brightly coloured and unusual fungi, like the Wax‐Cap, Fairy‐Clubs  and Earth‐Tongues (NIEA, 2010).    Lowland dry acid grasslands are rare in Ireland and the UK, with the total area of the habitat  in Northern Ireland only estimated at 674ha with only small concentrations in Co. Down and  Armagh.  The  territory  of  these  grasslands  is  highly  scattered,  with  examples  tending  to  be  small  occupying  on  rocky  knolls  or  as  part  of  other  more  dominant  grasslands  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Individual  instances  would  seldom  have  an  area  exceeding 0.25ha (Corbett, 2003).    The  habitat  also  occurs  as  lawns  associated  with  old  gardens,  church  yards  and  other  amenity  areas  where  regular  cutting  and  absence  of  nutrient  inputs  has  resulted  in  very  leached and as a result, relatively acid soils (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    The  habitat  range  has  undergone  substantial  decline  over  much  of  the  Britain  and  Ireland  over  the  past  century.  The  decline  has  been  mostly  due  to  agricultural  intensification  and  forestation  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Approximately  7%  of  species‐rich  dry grassland were lost to development projects in Northern Ireland between 1991 and 1998  (Cooper,  McCann,  &  Rogers,  2009),  although  it  is  not  clear  how  much  of  this,  if  any,  was  lowland dry acid grassland.        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s lowland dry acid grasslands has set the following  targets for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the total extent of lowland dry acid grassland in Northern Ireland at 674ha  Maintain condition, where favourable, of the existing resource Achieve favourable condition of all significant stands of lowland dry acid grassland within ASSIs by  2010  For stands outside ASSIs, achieve favourable condition over 75% of the resource by 2015  Re‐establish 5ha of lowland dry acid grassland at carefully targeted sites by 2010

          118

118 


Calcareous Grasslands 

Calcareous grasslands  are  species‐rich  grassland  occurring on shallow, lime ‐rich soils the majority  of  which  derive  from  chalk  and  limestone  rocks  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  These  habitats  were  originally  created  when  woodland  was  cleared  and  rely  on  grazing  or  other  management  to  prevent  shrubs  from  re‐ colonising the region (NIEA, 2010).    All  calcareous  grassland  in  Northern  Ireland  occur  in  highland  location,  where  as  lowland  Figure 18 ‐ Little Deer Park, Antrim  calcareous grasslands occur in the rest of the UK.  The majority of calcareous grassland occurs in the limestone uplands of County Fermanagh,  with most examples occur above 150m altitude with only small pockets o f the habitat found  at lower elevations (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Calcareous  grasslands  are  a  significant  habitat  for  several  species,  particularly  butterflies.  Numerous Northern Ireland priority species reside in these environments, namely Irish Hare,  Skylark,  the  ‘Small  Blue’  Butterfly,  Dingy  Skipper  Butterfly, Irish  Eyebright,  Dense  Flowered  Orchid,  the  Hoverfly  and  a  selection  of  mosses.  Of  these  species,  Irish  Eyebright,  Dense  Flowered Orchid and Autumn Gentian are found nowhere else in the UK.    Calcareous  grasslands  in  Northern  Ireland  typically  occur  as  components  of  larger  habitat  ranges,  which  are  generally  managed  as  rough  grazing  land  for  domestic  livestock.  (CVNI,  2011) This results in the habitat being fragmented in areas such as Antrim.  The NICS 2000  places an approximate value of 936ha for the extent of the habitat type  (Northern Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    Like many other important habitats, calcareous grasslands has undergone significant decline  in recent years, but there is very little data available to tell us exactly how much. This decline  can  be  mainly  attributed  to  scrub  invasion  or  changes  in  management  to  more  intensive  practices (CVNI, 2011).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s calcareous grasslands has set the following  targets for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the total extent of calcareous grassland in Northern Ireland at 936 ha Maintain condition, where favourable, of the existing resource Achieve favourable condition of all significant stands of calcareous grassland within ASSIs and SACs by  2010  For stands outside ASSIs, achieve favourable condition over 75% of the resource by 2015  Re‐establish 10 ha of calcareous grassland at carefully targeted sites by 2010

         

119

119


Lowland Meadows 

Lowland meadows  are  areas  of  agricultural  unimproved  grassland  which  contains  few  high  plant species, like trees and a minimal coverage  by bushes (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan,  2005).  The  soil  layers  of  these  habitats  are  generally composed of well‐drained mineral soil,  with  the  habitat  characteristically  supporting  a  rich variety of herb species.    There  are  no  significant  concentrations  of  Figure 19 ‐ Tees Valley, Middlesbrough  lowland  meadow  in  Northern  Ireland,  but  often  reside  on  relatively  steep  hill  slopes.  The  habitat  is  typically  fragmented  and  is  often  restricted to small parts of fields where agricultural operations are difficult (Northern Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  A  noteworthy  number  of  lowland  meadow  sites  in  Northern  Ireland survives as hay meadow and are a result of the traditional agricultural practices for  hay production (CVNI, 2011).    There is a wealth of low lying vegetation inhabitant lowland meadows, concentration around  herbs and fine‐leaved grasses. herb species such as Meadow Vetchling, Common Knapweed  and different types of fine‐leaved grasses like the Common Bent, Red Fescue and a variety of  scarce  and  declining  plants  such  as  the  Butterfly‐Orchid  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan, 2005).    Important  fauna,  both  vertebrates  and  invertebrates  species,  rely  upon  lowland  meadows  for example Skylarks, Corncrake and the Irish Hare, all of which are Northern Ireland priority  species (CVNI, 2011).    In the UK the area of lowland meadows of conservation value has declined by 95% since the  1930  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Areas  of  traditional  species‐rich  hay  meadows in Northern Ireland may have declined by as much as 97% over the last 50 years,  with  the  area  covered  decreased  by  20%  since  1991.  Only  a  minority  (13%)  of  lowland  meadows  are  considered  to  be  of  a  high  ecological  quality,  which  relates  into  an  area  estimate  of  937ha  of  high  quality  habitat  in  Northern  Ireland  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action Plan, 2005).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s lowland meadows has set the following targets  for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the area of lowland meadow in Northern Ireland at 937ha Maintain condition, where favourable, of the existing resource Achieve favourable status of all significant stands of lowland meadow within ASSIs by 2010  For stands outside ASSIs, achieve favourable condition over 75% of the resource by 2015  Re‐establish 10ha of lowland meadow at carefully targeted sites by 2010

   

120

120 


Purple Moor‐grass & Rush Pastures 

Purple moor‐grass and rush pastures are habitat  types that occur on poorly drained, usually acidic  soils in lowland areas of high rainfall in Western  Europe  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005). Northern Ireland contains a large portion  of  the  European  resource  and  is  estimated  to  contain  a  third  (18,700ha)  of  the  total  UK  area.  This  habitat  comprises  approximately  1.2%  of  the total land area of Northern Ireland, with over  half of this sum occurring within the Fermanagh  Figure 20 ‐ Slievenacloy, Belfast Hills  district (CVNI, 2011).    Examples  of  more‐grass  and  rush  pastures  in  Northern  Ireland  are  difficult  to  define  as  it  encompass  a  wide  range  of  species,  determined    locally  by  an  assortment  of  factors  including soil condition, aspect and management practices (Northern Ireland Habitat Action  Plan, 2005). However, they play an important role in providing areas where different priority  species  can  live,  feed  and  breed;  this  includes  birds  such  as  the  Skylark,  Curlew,  and  the  Reed Bunting. These territories provide for a series of UK priority flora (Blue‐Eyed Grass and  the  Irish  Lady’s‐Tresses  Orchid)  and  fauna  species  such  as  the  Irish  Hare,  Marsh  Fritillary  Butterfly and the Common Ground Beetle (CVNI, 2011).       

The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s purple moor‐grass and rush pastures has set the  following targets for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the total extent of purple moor‐grass and rush pastures in Northern Ireland at 18,919ha  Maintain condition, where favourable, of the existing resource Achieve favourable condition of all significant stands of purple moor‐grass and rush pastures within  ASSIs and SACs by 2010  For stands outside ASSIs, achieve favourable condition over 75% of the resource by 2015 

   

121

121


Limestone Pavements 

In the UK there is less than 3,000 hectares of this  rare  landscape  and  in  Northern  Ireland  limestone  pavement  is  restricted  to  west  Fermanagh.  Where,  limestone  pavement  occurs  within  8  main  localities  the  largest  of  which  are  Crossmurrin,  Western  Marlbank  (70‐100ha)  and  Noon’s  Hole  Knockmore  (100ha)  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  However  larger areas of Limestone Pavement occur within  Southern  Ireland  in  areas  such  as  the  Burren  in  Galway and Clare (CVNI, 2011).  Figure 21 ‐ Knockmore, Fermanagh    There are three broad types of limestone pavement described in the UK; open, wooded and  scrubby,  however,  in  Northern  Ireland  wooded  limestone  pavement  is  largely  absent  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    The limestone surface typically supports grass species and plants adapted to rocky habitats  or  have  no  vegetation  cover,  mosses and  liverworts  are  often  prominent  in  exposed  areas  (CVNI,  2011).  The  shelter  proved  by  the  limestone  grikes  often  support  taller  plants  more  lime and calcium based woodlands and include herbs, occasional shrubs such as Hazel and  ferns such as Brittle Bladder and Hart’s Tongue (CVNI, 2011). The lack of good soil, space for  root  growth  as  well  as  grazing  pressure  often  means  that  any  trees  or  shrubs  that  are  present are often stunted or dwarfed (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2005).    The open pavement provides a habitat for upland grassland vertebrate species such as the  Irish  Hare  and  the  Skylark  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  Other  fauna  that  occupy  the  open  pavements  areas  are  the  Cuckoo,  Wrens,  Common  Lizard  and  Stoats.  Invertebrate  species  include  a  range  of  less  common  insects,  moths  and  butterfly  species  (CVNI, 2011).        The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s limestone pavements has set the following  targets for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the extent of limestone pavement in Northern Ireland at 220ha Where favourable, maintain the area of limestone pavement in favourable condition  Achieve 200ha of limestone pavement in favourable condition by 2015 Achieve 220ha of limestone pavement in favourable condition by 2020

       

122

122 


Lowland Heaths 

Lowland Heaths  are  defined  as  heathland  that  are  situated  below  the  upper  altitude  limit  of  cost  effective  agricultural  practices,  this  is  generally  below  300m.  Thusly  these  environments  supports  a  range  of  flora  and  fauna  not  found  in  upland  heaths.  Lowland  heathland  is  characterised  by  the  dominating  presence  of  dwarf  shrubs  such  as  Heather  and  Bell Heather. These heaths exist in both dry and  wet  environmental  conditions,  with  most  Figure 22 ‐ Murlough National Nature Reserve  heathlands  being  25‐90%  of  wet  heaths  species  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    High  quality  lowland  heathlands  are  usually  structurally  diverse  supporting  plants  such  as  the  Cross‐leaved  Heath  and  Purple  Moor‐grass,  and  the  Black  Bog‐rush.  Dwarf  shrubs  like  heathers,  Western  Gorse  and  trees  such  as  Scots  Pine  are  common  (CVNI,  2011).  Lowland  heathland  is  a  very  important  habitat  for  invertebrates  like  the  Keeled  Skimmer  Dragonfly  and  the  water  beetles  and  endangered  species  like  Curlew,  Irish  Hare,  Chough,  Marsh  Fritillary Butterfly and Skylark can also be spotted (CVNI, 2011).    Lowland  heathlands  are  an  internationally  rare  and  threatened  habitat,  and  the  total  UK  habitat range represents a significant proportion (58,000ha correspond to about 20%) of the  global  total  area  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2003).  The  Northern  Ireland  Countryside Survey has estimated that the area of lowland heathland in Northern Ireland is  in the range of 5,000ha, with no habitat loss to dry and an 11% loss of wet lowland heaths  between 1992 and 1998 (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).    Within  Northern  Ireland,  lowland  heathland  is  generally  fragmented  and  restricted,  largely  confined  to  the  lower  slopes  of  the  Mourne  Mountains  and  the  Ring  of  Gullion,  Rathlin  Island  and  narrow  coastal  strips  in  Down  and  Antrim.  Small  areas  of  lowland  heaths  are  linked to a number of fens in Down and Armagh (NIEA, 2010).        The 2003 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s lowland heathlands has set the following targets  for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the current extent and overall distribution of all existing lowland heathland (5,000ha)  Achieve appropriate management on all lowland heathland within ASSIs so that it is in or approaching  favourable condition by 2010  Improve by management, all existing lowland heathland currently in unfavourable condition  Encourage the re‐establishment by 2010 of a further 130 ha of lowland heathland 

 

123

123


Upland Heaths 

Figure 23 ‐ Bloody Bridge near Newcastle 

Upland heaths  reside  in  the  heathland  zones  above the upper altitude marker of the majority  of  Northern  Ireland’s  farms  and  the  country’s  mountainous  regions,  typically  between  300m  and  600m.  The  habitat  is  based  upon  thin  mineral  or  peat  soil,  usually  with  substrates  layers  less  than  0.5m  deep  (NIEA,  2010).  In  Northern  Ireland,  blanket  bog  covers  much  of  the  shallow  upland  landscape,  relegating  heathland  habitats  to  steeper  slopes  where  the  fall of land is too sharp or soil too deep for peat  accumulation  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan, 2003). 

Upland  heaths  dominated  with  same  dwarf  shrubs  as  their  lowland  counterparts  with  the  addition of a number of blanket bog plant species, as the two habitats occupy similar ranges  (NIEA,  2010).  Fauna  species  are  also  shared  by  all  habitats  providing  feeding  grounds  and  shelter  to  the  rare  priority  species;  Argent  and  Sable  Moths,  Sword‐Grass  Moths,  Red  Grouse, Curlew, Hen Harrier and the Irish Hare (NIEA, 2010).    Upland  heathland  is  particularly  prevalent  in  the  Antrim  Hills,  Sperrin  Mountains,  Mourne  Mountains,  Ring  of  Gullion  and  the  scarp  slopes  of  western  Fermanagh,  where  some  important heathland sites straddle the border with the Republic of Ireland (Northern Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    No  comprehensive  assessment  in  the  extent,  distribution  or  condition  of  the  upland  heathlands  in  Northern  Ireland  exists,  but  its  extent  is  estimated  at  58,500ha  (Cooper,  McCann, & Rogers, 2009), with the total upland heathland resource in the UK between 2 and  3 million hectares (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    Unfortunately  there  has  been  considerable  upland  heathland  loss  in  recent  times,  an  estimated  20%  of  wet  heaths,  and  28%  of  dry  heath  pastures  have  been  lost  in  Northern  Ireland between 1992 and 1998 (Cooper, McCann, & Rogers, 2009).        The 2003 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s upland heathlands has set the following targets  for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the current extent and overall distribution of upland heathland which is currently in  favourable condition  Achieve appropriate management on all upland heathland within ASSIs so that it is in or approaching  favourable condition by 2010  Improve by management at least 50% of upland heathland currently in unfavourable condition  outside ASSIs by 2010  Seek to increase dwarf shrubs to at least 25% cover where they have been reduced or eliminated due  to inappropriate management. A target of 2,000 ha is proposed for such restoration by 2010  Initiate management to re‐create 100 ha of upland heathland by 2010 where heathland has been lost  due to agricultural improvement or afforestation, with a particular emphasis on reducing  fragmentation of existing heathland 

Mountainous Heaths 

124

124 


Seek to increase dwarf shrubs to at least 25% cover where they have been reduced or eliminated due  to inappropriate management. A target of 2,000 ha is proposed for such restoration by 2010  Initiate management to re‐create 100 ha of upland heathland by 2010 where heathland has been lost  due to agricultural improvement or afforestation, with a particular emphasis on reducing  fragmentation of existing heathland 

  Mountainous Heaths 

Northern Ireland  is  located  at  the  southern  extreme  of  the  natural  range  for  montane  or    alpine heath habitats. These heaths occur widely  in  the  Highlands  of  Scotland  at  altitudes  over  600m,  above  the  natural  tree  line  (NIEA,  2010).  Over  90%  of  the  total  UK  montane  heaths  (approximately 600,000 ha) occurring in Scotland  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    The distribution of montane heaths is influenced  heavily  by  local  environmental  factors  (climate,  Figure 24 ‐ Mourne Mountains  altitude, aspect, slope and maritime influences),  and  unlike  Scotland  where  these  habitats  are  largely  undisturbed,  the  montane  heaths  in  Northern  Ireland  are  highly  impacted  by  sheep  grazing  and  hill  walking,  especially  the  Mourne Mountains (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    The  vegetation  is  influenced  by  a  cold  and  wet  climate,  thin  soils  and  steep  rocky  ground  (NIEA,  2010).  Due  to  the  strong  winds  at  high  altitudes,  shrubs  can  only  grow  5‐10cm  in  height  and  several  arctic  species  (Stiff  Sedge,  Dwarf  Willow  and  a  number  of  Clubmosses)  which are adapted to harsh climatic occupy these heathlands (NIEA, 2010).    In Northern Ireland, the flora of these areas is restricted to dwarf‐shrub heaths, moss heaths  and  montane  grasses,  however  in  Scotland  where  national  latitude  is  more  situated  to  montane heaths; there is a greater diversity in plant species (Northern Ireland Habitat Action  Plan, 2003).     Invertebrates adapted to cold environments reside in montane heaths such as beetles and  especially of the Linnaeus beetle, which are rare in the rest of Europe (NIEA, 2010)    The distribution of montane heathlands in Northern Ireland is limited to the highest summits  of the Mourne Mountains, Dart Mountain and Sawel Mountain in the Sperrin Mountains and  the summit of Cuilcagh Mountain in west Fermanagh (NIEA, 2010).        

124

The 2003 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s mountainous heathlands has set the following  targets for the conservation of the habitat  Maintain the extent of all existing mountainous heath Achieve appropriate management on all mountainous habitats (150ha) so that it is in or approaching  favourable condition by 2015  Encourage the restoration by 2010 of 25ha of degraded mountainous heath in the Mourne Mountains

         

125

125


Lowland Raised Bog 

Lowland raised bogs are peat based ecosystems,  which develop primarily in altitudes below 150m  and  as  a  formation  feature  are  surrounded  by  mineral  based  soils.  The  climate  of  Northern  Ireland,  the  Republic  of  Ireland  and  north‐ western  Britain  possess  ideal  climate  conditions  for  peat  formation,  due  to  high  rainfall,  cool  summers  and  high  atmospheric  humidity  (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    The  lowland  landscape  of  Northern  Ireland  is  Figure 25 ‐ Fairy Water Bogs, Tyrone  principally  comprised  of  drumlins  and  glacial  boulder clays, thus resulting in poorly drained soils along the major the national river basins.  Because  of  the  levels  of  continuously  waterlogged  soil  in  Northern  Ireland,  a  regular  occurrence exists of the anaerobic conditions that are necessary for the formation of peat.  Thusly  Northern  Ireland  contains  a  proportionally  high  quantity  of  lowland  raised  bogs  (CVNI, 2011).    Lowland raised bogs support a variety of specialist plants and national priority species. The  most  abundant  vegetation  that  exists  in  raised  bogs  includes  Sphagnum  Bog  Mosses  and  other plants adapted to waterlogged conditions, such as the Cotton Grasses, Great Sundew,  Cranberry and Bog Rosemary (CVNI, 2011). A distinctive range of rare and localised animals  which  are  supported  by  raised  bogs  include  breeding  waders,  Skylark  and  a  variety  of  invertebrates, such as the Large Heath Butterfly (CVNI, 2011).    The area of lowland raised bog in the UK that has remained unaffected by human activities is  remarkable  small.  An  estimated  94  %  of  raised  bogs  in  the  UK  have  been  spoilt  by  human  activities  (6,000ha  out  of  95,000ha),  in  Northern  Ireland  the  figure  is  2,000ha  out  of  25,000ha (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).        The 2003 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s lowland raised bogs has set the following targets  for the conservation of the habitat.  Maintain the current extent and overall distribution of near natural intact lowland raised bog in  Northern Ireland, estimated at 1,600ha  Ensure that the condition of the current near natural intact lowland raised bog is maintained where  favourable. Improve the condition of those areas that are unfavourable through the establishment of  appropriate management regimes and hydrological conditions  Establish where practicable, appropriate hydrological and management regimes for intact areas which  are in a degraded state (< 10 % Sphagnum Cover), but still retain nature conservation interest  (c400ha). By 2015, aim to achieve management conditions that are conducive to the restoration of  degraded intact lowland raised bog towards favourable condition  By 2005, identify areas, timescales and targets for the conservation, improvement or restoration of  significantly altered lowland raised bog, including those areas formerly cutover for fuel, improved for  agriculture or planted with trees  By 2006, initiate restoration projects for priority sites according to the agreed timescales 

 

126

126 


Blanket Bog 

Blanket bogs  are  a  restricted  and  endangered  peatland  habitat  of  global  importance.  Blanket  bogs  form  in  cool,  wet,  oceanic  climate  and  currently are one of  the  most extensive habitats  in the UK and Ireland.  The blanket bog region in  Ireland, represent 8% of the world’s total habitat  area (CVNI, 2011).    Blanket bog peat accumulates in response to the  very  slow  rate  at  which  plant  material  decomposes  under  waterlogged  conditions,  with  Figure 26 ‐ Cuilcagh Mountain, Fermanagh  an  ability  to  cover  an  entire  landscape,  even  developing  on  slopes  of  up  to  300m.  Although  most  widespread  in  the  wetter  west  and  north regions of Northern Ireland, it also occurs in the Mourne Mountains (Northern Ireland  Habitat Action Plan, 2003). The most extensive regions of blanket bog are inclined to occur  at altitudes in excess of 200m and thusly are concentrated in the Antrim Plateau, the Sperrin  Mountains and the Fermanagh drumlins (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).    These  bogs  are  capable  of  supporting  a  wide  range  of  animals,  insects  and  birds.   Invertebrates  that  are  common  to  boglands  include  mayfly  and  stonefly  larvae  as  well  as  dragonfly  and  damselfly  larvae.   Whirligig  beetles,  Pondskaters  and  Water  Boatmen  are  common  water  insects.  Raised  bogs  are  not  heavily  populated  by  mammals,  although  the  Irish Hare, Foxes and the Pigmy Shrew are occasional occupants (CVNI, 2011).    The total extent of blanket bogs in the UK amounts to just under 1.5 million hectares, with  Northern  Ireland  contributing  an  estimated  140,000ha  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan, 2003). About 15% (22,000ha) of the Northern Ireland blanket bogs remains intact, with  10% (14,000ha) having been drained  and 46% (64,400ha) hand‐cut for fuel.  The remaining  29  %  (40,600ha)  of  blanket  bog  vegetation  is  considered  severely  degraded  and  is  considered too spoilt to merit restoration (Northern Ireland Habitat Action Plan, 2003).        The 2003 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s blanket bogs has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat.  Maintain the current extent and overall distribution of blanket bog currently in favourable condition Improve the condition of those areas of blanket bog which are degraded but readily restorable so that  the total area in or approaching favourable condition by 2010 is 36,000ha  Introduce management regimes to improve the condition of a further 38,000ha of degraded blanket  mire by 2015, resulting in a total of 74,000ha (i.e. around 75% of the total extent of favourable or  restorable blanket mire) in or approaching favourable condition. Blanket bog targeted for restoration  or improvement will include extensive areas cutover for fuel and in some instances areas used for  agriculture and forestry 

127

127


Fens

Fens are  peatlands  that  receive  the  majority  of  their  water  and  nutrients  from  rock  and  ground  water  sources.  Naturally  occur  in  river  valleys,  poorly drained basins, along lake margins and in  river  flood‐plains  (Northern  Ireland  Habitat  Action  Plan,  2005).  The  water  table  in  fens  sits  close  to  or  above  the  ground  surface  and  in  which  the  water  itself  is  more  nutrient‐rich  and  base‐rich, than that of a bog (National Museums  Northern Ireland, 2010).  Figure 27 ‐ Corbally Fen, Down    Fens  are  ecologically  considered  the  begins  of  boglands,  as  fens  are  covered  by  mats  of  floating plants and moss which start to slowly decompose to form the basis of the layers of  peat (CVNI, 2011). The term fen covers various ecosystems based on waterlogged peat soils  that  differ  on  several  points.  Based  on  each  fens  specific  designation,  a  wide  range  of  variations  in  water  height,  pH  of  the  water  or  the  nutrient  status  of  the  water,  can  occur  (National Museums Northern Ireland, 2010).Fens facilitate more than two hundred different  flora species, however the type of vegetation inhabiting a fen depend on whether a fen is  classified as ‘poor’ or ‘rich’ (CVNI, 2011).     ‘Poor‐fens’ arise in upland locales and have their water and nutrients feed from sandstone  or  granite  rocks.  These  environments  are  dominated  by  Sphagnum  Bog  mosses,  Purple  Moor‐Grass,  Bottle  Sedge  and  the  smaller  sedges,  such  as  Star  Sedge  and  Common  Sedge  (CVNI, 2011).    ‘Rich‐fens’ reside within a restricted range and mostly occur in lowland areas where they are  fed by mineral enriched waters. The variety  of vegetation is frequently much more diverse  than ‘poor‐fens’; including Bog Pimpernel, Meadow Thistle, Saw Sedge, Marsh Helleborine,  Blunt‐Flowered  Rush,  Grass‐of‐Parnassus,  Common  Butterwort,  Black  Bog‐Rush  Sand  Bladderworts (CVNI, 2011).    Northern Ireland’s fens play a particularly important role for invertebrates in the UK context,  several  species  which  are  extinct  or  threatened  in  the  rest  of  the  UK  occur  here.  These  include  dragonflies  such  as  the  Irish  Damselfly,  beetles  such  as  the  Whirligig  beetle,  the  Water beetle, the Pond Skater and the Carabid beetle (CVNI, 2011).    The  Northern  Ireland  Countryside  Survey  2000  estimated  that  fens  occupy  an  area  of  2,950ha,  with  a  decrease  in  territory  of  18%  (484ha)  between  1988  and  1998  (Cooper,  McCann, & Rogers, 2009).       The 2005 Habitat Action Plan for Northern Ireland’s fens has set the following targets for the  conservation of the habitat  Maintain the total extent of fen in Northern Ireland at 3,000ha Where favourable, maintain the condition of fen in Northern Ireland Achieve favourable condition of 95% of fen which lies within designated sites, by 2015  For stands outside ASSIs, secure favourable condition over, as near as practicable, 100% of the fen  resource in Northern Ireland, by 2015  By 2015, restore 50ha of fen  By 2020, restore a further 50ha of fen 

128

128 


Appendix B 

Description of Northern Ireland’s Management of Sensitive Sites (MOSS) Scheme     

129

129


MOSS is  a  voluntary  scheme  administered  by  Environment  and.  Heritage  Service  (EHS),  which  is  designed  to  ensure  the  proper  ecological  management  of  land  within  Area  of  Special Scientific Interest (ASSI).    Farmers must agree to a programme of natural habitat recreation/restoration or to leave an  ecological  important  area  fallow  minimum  of  5  years.  Participants  in  the  scheme  are  required  to  works  which  adding  the  upkeep  of  their  registered  natural  habitat.  While  keeping records of the work carried out, in addition to allowing access to the habitat to EHS  staff at all reasonable times (MOSS, 2002).    For  this,  participants  will  receive  an  annual  payment  (after  an  EHS  inspection)  with  additional  bonus  on  each  anniversary  of  the  signing  of  the  agreement.  The  EHS  also  comments  to  review  the  levels  of  payments  for  each  habitat  every  three  years  and  with  contribute  to  assist  with  the  initial  capital  costs  of  when  establishing  any  new  habitats  (MOSS, 2002).    The following are the annual payments under the MOSS system      Habitat Type   Payment/ha  Payment/m2    Saltmarsh      £80  0.8p          Sand Dunes      £80  0.8p    Vegetated Shingle    £80  0.8p  Maritime Cliff Slope      Reedbeds        Wet Woodland      Mixed Ash Woodland     Oakwood      Parkland        Lowland Dry Acid Grassland  Calcareous Grassland    Lowland Meadow    Purple Moor Grass and Rush  Pastures       Limestone Pavement      Dry Heath     

Wet Heath          Mountainous Heath      Raised Bog      Blanket Bog      Fens          Buffer zone ‐ Wildlife Corridors   130

£80

£110 £95  £95  £95  £50 

0.8p

 

1.1p 0.95p  0.95p  0.95p  0.5p 

£140 £140  £140  £140 

1.4p 1.4p  1.4p  1.4p 

£110

1.1p

£50 for 1‐100ha  £25>100ha  £50 for 1‐100ha  £25>100ha  £50  £70  £50  £110  £345 ‐ £385 

0.5p for 1‐100ha  0.25p>100ha  0.5p for 1‐100ha  0.25p>100ha  0.5p    0.7p  0.5p  1.1p    3.45p ‐ 3.85p 

130 


The Potential of Green Roofs to Address Habitat Loss in Northern Ireland  

A report to assess the potential, if any, for green roofs in urban areas to act as habitat islands and the ability of such an approach to af...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you