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New Orleans Auction galleries

silver salt cellars

online-only sale: march 27, 2018


New Orleans Auction galleries

SILVER SALT CELLARS A SINGLE-OWNER LIFETIME COLLECTION

march 27, 2018 | 10:00 am cst

LISTED EXCLUSIVELY ON

click here to browse & bid online 333 Saint Joseph Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70130

www.neworleansauction.com | info@neworleansauction.com | Main: 504.566.1849 | Fax: 504.566.1851 LA Auction License AB-363, Steinkamp #1265, Thomas #1833, Eichenwald #1922 25% Buyer’s Premium (3% Discount For Prompt Payments Made By Cash or Check) Pictured Above: Lot 134 | Cover: Lot 128 | Back Cover: Lot 77


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introduction Salt is perhaps the oldest and most important mineral in human culture, essential for the proper function of nerves and muscles, the regulation the fluids of the body and the preservation of food in dormant months. The oldest prehistoric town in Europe – Solnitsata in Bulgaria – was a salt mine, and the mineral has figured in the oldest traditions, religions and mythologies of humankind. In Leviticus, salt and meat is likened to the covenant with God; it is no coincidence, then, that in Da Vinci’s famous “Last Supper” it is Judas who has carelessly overturned the salt cellar in front of him. These symbolic interpretations remain with us today: sharing salt is still a sign of friendship, and spilling it a bad omen. It is also, of course, the oldest known seasoning for food, and has appeared in a place of prominence on the dinner table since antiquity. In humble homes, the usual vessel for salt were simple wooden trenchers; in more affluent homes they might be of pottery or glass or (later) porcelain. In the wealthiest of homes, salt was presented in large and fantastic centerpieces of gold and silver. The best-known work of the Mannerist goldsmith Benvenuto Cellini is the magnificent gold and enamel salt cellar made for Francis I of France, depicting male and female allegorical figures of the sea and the earth: the two sources of salt. Few people could afford such extravagance, though, and among the wealthy post-Renaissance merchant class, silver became the medium of choice for the dining table. These more functional salt cellars followed the general form of the wooden trencher, and are known as “trencher” salts. These could be circular or oblong, waisted or paneled; by 1700 a canted rectangular form known as the “four square” had become the norm. The advent of the rococo saw a great change in form to the silver table salt in the 18th century. Salt cellars were raised on three legs: at first made of simple scrolls with pad feet, and later with elaborate fanciful rocaille and shells. This form, with a bulbous circular bowl, was known as a “cauldron” salt cellar because of its resemblance to the cooking vessel.

Another innovation in the 18th century was the introduction of a glass or gilding lining. The beauty and value of silver is beguiling indeed, for is it a very poor choice to hold salt, which is very destructive to silver. Salt, with moisture, can lead to permanent black spotting, pitting or complete corrosion to silver; a glass liner or gold wash on the interior would protect the salt cellar from this damage. (Even so, it is a good idea never to store salt in your salt cellars or shakers, and to empty, wash, and completely dry them after each use.) Liners were often of a brilliant blue glass made with the addition of cobalt oxide, sometimes called “Bristol” glass after the English city where it was popularized. Neoclassical designs in the last quarter of the 18th century showed this glass to great advantage, the silver cellars being pierced and cut with intricate geometric designs to reveal the rich blue glass underneath. In the 19th century, silver salt cellars followed the fancies of Victorian eclecticism and whimsy, appearing in a seemingly endless variety of forms - shells, crowns, flowers, birds, animals, carriages, etc. – often with matching salt spoons. (Salt spoons had been an innovation of the late 18th century, a refinement more of aesthetics than hygiene; “a pinch” of salt was still the common serving.) American manufacturers, with their innovative and efficient production techniques, were at the forefront of this era of novelty, and none was more prolific than the Gorham Corporation of Providence, Rhode Island. Founded in 1841 by Jabez Gorham (17921869), the company was well-known by the 1880s for its Japanese-inspired “Aesthetic” designs which combined natural motifs with mixed metals. 20th century innovations, including anti-clumping agents for salt and household climate control, saw the traditional salt cellars replaced by the modern salt shaker. The open salt is now generally seen on the most formally-set dining table. But these small and relatively inexpensive silver antiques remain a popular collector’s item, admired for their artistry in miniature and their simple functionality; they can serve not only as dishes for salt and other condiments, but also pins, jewelry, paperclips and any number of small tabletop items.


1 Good Pair of 18th-Century Austrian Silver Trencher Salts 1725, Vienna, by Matthias Asam (1664/65‑1728; Master 1697), 13 lot (.813) silver, each of traditional waisted oval, serpentine-paneled form. h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3‑3/4”, w. 2‑7/8”; 7.24 total t. oz. Literature: Waltraud Neuwirth, Wiener Silber Punzierung 1524‑1780 (Vienna: the author, 2004), p. 238. $1,000‑$1,500 1

2 18th-Century Augsburg Trencher Salt 1743‑1745, by Philipp Jakob Holeisen II (1726‑1765), of traditional shaped and waisted oval form with molded base. h. 3‑1/2”, l. 3‑5/8”, w. 3”; 2.80 t. oz. Literature: Helmut Selig, Kunst der Augsburger Goldschmiede 1529‑1868 (Munich, C. H. Beck, 1993), #2181. $400‑$700

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3 Fine Pair of Louis XV Provincial Covered Silver Salt Cellars second quarter 18th century, Avignon, probably Joseph Virgule Vilhet (Master 1740; d. 1780), each of oval trencher form with addorsed serpentine ends, waisted and decorated with a gadrooned band above and a leaf-and-dart band below, the cellar covered with a hinged coquille-form lid. h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3‑1/8”, w. 2‑1/4”; 8.90 total t. oz.

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Literature: Claude Gerard Cassan, Les Orfevres d’Avignon et du Comtat Venaissin (Vincennes: Rosay, 1984), pp. 10 & 54‑60. $1,500‑$2,500

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4 German Neoclassical Silver and Glass Double Salt Stand 1803‑1817, Berlin, by August Wilhelm Lienemann (1764‑1832; Master 1795), 12 lot (.750) silver, comprising a pair of openwork receptacles, each raised on four flat-column legs, joined to a plinth faced with ringed lion’s masques surmounted by a tapering reeded column with urn-form finial and draped with chain-link swags joined to the receptacles; fitted with a pair of cylindrical cobalt glass liners. h. 7‑3/4”, l. 6‑1/4”, w. 2‑1/2”; 7.23 t. oz. (excluding liners) Literature: Wolfgang Scheffler, Berliner Goldschmiede (Berlin: Hessling, 1968), p. 293, #1379. $400‑$700 5 Pair of French First Empire Silver and Glass Salt Cellars 1798‑1809, by Marc-Samson Jacquart (1772‑1829), Paris, first standard (.950) silver, each with a gadrooned oval frame raised on four swan’s neck-crested square column legs terminating in cloven hoof feet and joined by a lozenge-form stretcher with addorsed scroll and bellflower decoration, fitted with a conforming cobalt glass liner. h. 2‑7/8”, l. 4‑1/2”, w. 3‑5/8”; 6.88 total t. oz. (excluding liners) Literature: Catherine Arminjon, et al., Dictionnaire des Poincons de Fabricants d’Ouvrages d’Or et d’Argent de Paris et de la Seine 1798‑1838 (Paris: Imprimerie Nationale, 1991), p. 266, #2642.

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$400‑$700

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6 Pair of Continental Silver Salt Cellars

7 Pair of German Biedermeier Silver Pedestal Salt Cellars

second quarter 19th century, oval pedestal form, the bowl serpentine gadrooned with upswept ends and conforming edge, raised on an oval pedestal foot gadrooned en suite, monogrammed in the bowl “MAL”. h. 1‑3/4”, l. 2‑7/8”, w. 2‑1/4”; 2.92 total t. oz.

second quarter 19th century, 13 lot (.813) silver, each with a shallow circular bowl decorated with finely reeded band and beaded rim, raised on a conforming pedestal with cavettomolded rim, monogrammed “HE”. h. 1‑5/8”, dia. 1‑3/4”; 3.02 total t. oz.

$75‑$125

$60‑$90

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8 Pair of German Silver and Glass Salt Cellars and Spoons

9 Three Continental Silver and Glass Salt Cellars including a French Belle Epoque pair, first quarter 20th century, Saglier Freres & Cie., Paris, first standard (.950) silver, each with a circular cane-cut colorless glass bowl with plain silver banded rim; and a German rococo-style single cellar, first quarter 20th century, .800 silver, lobed oval “jardiniere” form, embossed with rococo scrolls, with shaped rim, espagnolette-crested scroll handles and raised on four integral scroll feet, fitted with a conforming glass liner with scalloped rim, frosted body and star-cut base. pair, h. 1”, dia. 1‑7/8”; single, h. 1‑3/8”, l. 3‑1/2”, w. 1‑3/4”; 0.74 total t. oz. (weighable silver)

first quarter 20th century, probably Hanau, each of oval form with an openwork gallery frame decorated with rococo scrolls, laurel bunting and crested by cherubim, with four integral feet and fitted with a conforming cobalt glass liner, together with a pair of associated figural putto spoons. cellars, h. 1‑3/8”, l. 2‑1/2”, w. 1‑3/4”; spoons, l. 2”; 2.29 total t. oz. $75‑$125

$50‑$80

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10 Twenty-Eight References on Salt Cellars and Other Silver including: George & Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, Maine: Archimedes Press, 1987) Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (London: Hennell Ltd., 1986) William Heacock & Patricia Johnson, 5,000 Open Salts: A Collector’s Guide (Torrance, CA: Patricia Johnson, 1982) Mimi Rudnick, Open Salts, Individuals and Masters: Price Guide (Topsham, Maine: Country House, 1987) Allan B. & Helen B. Smith, One Thousand Individual Open Salts Illustrated: First Book (Topsham, Maine: Country House, 1972; rpr. 1983) Allan B. & Helen B. Smith, 650 More Individual Open Salts Illustrated: Second Book (Topsham, Maine: Country House, 1973; rpr. 1977) Allan B. & Helen B. Smith, Individual Open Salts Illustrated 1977 Annual: Fifth Book (Topsham, Maine: Country House, 1977; rpr. 1984) Allan B. & Helen B. Smith, Individual Open Salts Illustrated: Seventh Book (Topsham, Maine: Country House, 1980; rpr. 1985) Allan B. & Helen B. Smith & Daniel M. Snyder, 1100 Individual Open Salts Illustrated, Individuals and Masters: Eighth Book (Topsham, Maine: Country House, 1981) Allan B. & Helen B. Smith & Daniel M. Snyder, 900 Individual Open Salts Illustrated, Individuals and Masters: Ninth Book (Topsham, Maine: Country House, 1982) Allan B. & Helen B. Smith, Open Salts Illustrated: Tenth Book (Topsham, Maine: Country House, 1984) John Culme, Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers & Allied Traders: 1838‑1914, 2 vols. (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987)

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Charles J. Jackson, English Goldsmiths and Their Marks, 2nd rev. ed. (New York: Dover, 1964) Ian Pickford, ed., Jackson’s Silver & Gold Marks, 3rd rev. ed. (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1989) Oliver Chadwick, English Silver (London: Merlin Press, 1975) Michael Clayton, Collectors Dictionary of the Silver and Gold of Great Britain and North America (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1971) Michael Clayton, Christie’s Pictorial History of English and American Silver (Oxford: Phaidon, 1985) Charles Oman, English Silversmiths’ Work, Civil and Domestic (London: H.M. Stationery Office, 1965) Dorothy T. Rainwater, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 3rd ed. (West Chester, Pennsylvania, 1986) Stephen Guernsey Cook Ensko & Dorothea Ensko Wyle, American Silversmiths & Their Marks, 4th ed., (Boston: David R. Godine, 1989) David B. Warren, Katherine S. Howe, et al., Marks of Achievement: Four Centuries of American Presentation Silver (Houston: Museum of Fine Arts, 1987) Donald L. Fennimore, Knopf Collectors’ Guide to American Antiques: Silver & Pewter (New York: Knopf, 1984) Frances Gruber Safford, Colonial Silver in the American Wing (New York: Metropolitan Museum of Art Bulletin, Summer 1983) John Luddington, Starting to Collect Silver (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1984) Peter Waldron, Price Guide to Antique Silver (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1982) Seymour B. Wyler, Book of Old Silver (New York: Crown, 1937) Sotheby’s World Guide to Antiques and Their Prices, 1986 Edition (Harmondsworth, England: Penguin, 1986) $400‑$700


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11 Pair of George II Sterling Silver Trencher Salts

12 Pair of Queen Anne Britannia Silver Trencher Salts

hallmarked London, 1736‑1737, probably James Stone (ca. 1701‑after 1722; free 1722), canted rectangular and waisted paneled form, the interior gilt, monogrammed on the underside “M*M”. h. 1‑1/8”, l. 3”, w. 2‑3/8”; 3.21 total t. oz. h 1‑1/8”, l. 2‑7/8”, w. 2‑3/8”; 3.21 total t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1707‑1708 and 1709‑1710, by “Co”, circular with waisted base, with annular band, base and rim, monogrammed on the underside “DT”. h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑7/8”; 4.78 total t. oz.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 671. $400‑$700

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 40 & 250. Notes: Although worn, these marks appear to be Grimwade mark #3508, which he lists as “not traced”. There were well over a dozen makers in the Britannia period whose surnames begin with “Co” (which letters were mandated in the silver marks), making positive identification impossible. $700‑$1,000

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13 Near Pair of Queen Anne Britannia Silver Trencher Salts

14 Pair of Queen Anne Britannia Silver Trencher Salts

hallmarked London, one 1707‑1708, by Matthew West (1664‑after 1735; free 1689), the other 1709‑1710, probably Nathaniel Lock (ca. 1666‑1749; free 1687), each domed circular form, engraved with a crest “a leopard passant gardant, charged on the neck with a label”, and monogrammed “I*G”. h. 1‑1/4” and 1‑3/8”, dia. 2‑5/8”; 3.54 total t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1713‑1714, by Joseph Clare I (1686‑1725; free 1712), circular decagonally paneled form, monogrammed “S/W*M”. h. 1‑5/8”, dia. 2‑7/8”; 3.99 total t. oz.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 584 & 696‑697. $400‑$700 Notes: Matthew West’s career as a silversmith was overshadowed by his lottery “intermediation” scheme: selling percentage shares in tickets for the expensive Dutch and German lotteries at inflated prices. He was subpoenaed by the Court of Exchequer in November 1712 for suspicion of fraud, but the scheme did not technically violate the laws against private lotteries and usury. He was responsible for both a brief boon in lottery intermediation and its subsequent suppression. The date of his death is not known, but he was still advertising his lottery scheme in 1722, and was still listed as a silversmith in 1735 (one year before a legal lottery was conducted in England to raise funds for Westminster Bridge.)

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Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 465. $500‑$800 The Hennells of London (Lots 15‑24) David Hennell (1712‑1785) and his son Robert Hennell (1741‑1811) were, without question, the most prolific and accomplished makers of salt cellars in the Georgian era, and their legacy continued into the 20th century, with no less than twenty of their descendants working as silversmiths. The Hennell dynasty can be traced to specialist salt maker James Roode (1685‑1721), who, in 1715 took on as an apprentice Edward Wood (ca. 1701‑1751). Earning his freedom in 1722, Wood began working as a salt maker himself, and took on his own apprentice in 1728: David Hennell, the son of Robert Hennell, a framework knitter of Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire. Hennell earned his freedom in 1735, and in March of the following year entered his first mark at his master’s premises at King's Head Court; his earliest salt cellars are all but identical to Wood’s. Scarcely three months later Hennell married Hanna Broomhead.


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15 George I Britannia Silver Trencher Salt

16 Pair of George II Sterling Silver Trencher Salts

hallmarked London, 1718‑1719, by James Roode (1685‑1721; free 1710) of canted rectangular form with waisted sides. h. 1”, l. 2‑3/4”, w. 2‑1/4”; 1.44 t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1735‑1736, by Edward Wood (ca. 1701‑1751; free 1722), of traditional canted rectangular form with concave sides. h. 1‑1/8”, l. 2‑7/8”, w. 2‑1/4”; 20.20 total t. oz.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 647.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 709.

$200‑$400

$500‑$800

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17 Set of Four George II Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

18 Pair of George II Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

hallmarked London, 1754‑1755, by David Hennell I (1712‑1785; free 1735), circular cauldron form, with wavy gadrooned rim and raised on three shell-crested scroll-andstepped-pad feet. h. 4‑3/4”, dia. 2‑7/8”; 13.33 total t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1757‑1758, by David Hennell I (1712‑1785; free 1735), circular cauldron form with wavy gadrooned rim and later floral repousse decoration, raised on three shell-crested scroll-and-stepped-pad feet, the interiors gilt. h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 2.98 total t. oz.

Literature: Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (East Grubstead, Sussex: BLA Publishing & the author, 1986). Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 543 & 753. $500‑$800

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Literature: Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (East Grubstead, Sussex: BLA Publishing & the author, 1986). Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 543 & 753. $100‑$200


19 Rare Pair of Early George III Chinsoiserie Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

20 Pair of Early George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1762‑1763, by David Hennell I (1712‑1785; free 1735), oval cauldron form, with wavy gadrooned rim, the body decorated with spiral gadroons and flutes, raised on four shell-crested scroll-and-shell feet, the interiors gilt, engraved with a crest of a dove close. h. 2”, l. 3‑1/2”, w. 2‑7/8”; 10.05 total t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1761‑1762, by David Hennell I (1712‑1785; free 1735), cauldron form with wavy gadrooned rim, decorated in the round with pagodas on an imbricate ground centering a “cabochon” cartouche, raised on three mandarin masque-crested scroll-and-shell feet, engraved on the cartouche with a crest of a fleur-de-lis, fitted with conforming cobalt glass liners. h. 2”, dia. 3‑1/4”; 8.51 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

Literature: Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (East Grubstead, Sussex: BLA Publishing & the author, 1986), p. 41, pl. 16 (illustrated). Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 543 & 753.

Literature: Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (East Grubstead, Sussex: BLA Publishing & the author, 1986), pp. 49‑52, pl. 26A-H (illustrated). Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 543 & 753.

$300‑$500

Notes: Percy Hennell’s survey of the salt cellars produced by his ancestors shows that this rare pattern was introduced at least by 1758, and revived again in the Regency when Chinoiserie once again came into fashion. $700‑$1,000

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21 Set of Four Early George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

22 Pair of Early George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

hallmarked London, 1763‑1764, by Robert Hennell I & David Hennell I (fl. 1763‑1772) , oval cauldron form with wavy gadrooned rim, decorated with wavy flutes and gadroons, raised on four shell-crested scroll-and-shell feet, engraved with the crest of De Mandeville et al. (on a mound, a stag current regardant). h. 2‑1/8”, l. 3‑1/4”, w. 2‑3/4”; 17.94 total t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1764‑1765, by Robert Hennell I & David Hennell I (fl. 1763‑1772), oval cauldron form with wavy gadrooned rim, decorated with wavy flutes and gadroons, raised on four shell-crested scroll-and-shell feet, monogrammed “AAR”, fitted with conforming cobalt glass liners. h. 2”, l. 3‑1/4”, w. 2‑3/4”; 9.07 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

Literature: Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (East Grubstead, Sussex: BLA Publishing & the author, 1986), p. 41, pl. 16 (illustrated). Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 543 & 753.

Literature: Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (East Grubstead, Sussex: BLA Publishing & the author, 1986), p. 41, pl. 16. (illustrated). Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 543 & 753.

$600‑$900

$300‑$500

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23 Pair of George III Sterling Silver and Cobalt Glass Salt Cellars

24 Pair of George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1777‑1778, by Robert Hennell I (1741‑1811; free 1763), oval form, the reticulated gallery with beaded rim and molded base, raised on four flat clawand-ball feet and fitted with a conforming cobalt glass liner (one lacking). h. 2”, l. 3‑1/4”; 2.90 total t. oz. (excluding liner) h. 2”, l. 3‑1/4”, w. 2‑1/2”; 2.92 total t. oz. (excluding liner)

hallmarked London, 1772‑1773 and 1773‑1774, by Robert Hennell I (1741‑1811; free 1763), oval galleried form with reticulated side and gadrooned rim, raised on four clawand-ball feet and fitted with a conforming cobalt glass liner, engraved with the crest of Wilkinson et al. (out of a mural coronet, a demi-unicorn). h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3‑1/8”, w. 2‑1/2”; 4.07 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

Literature: Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (East Grubstead, Sussex: BLA Publishing & the author, 1986), p. 98, pl. 79A & B (illustrated). Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 543.

Literature: Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (East Grubstead, Sussex: BLA Publishing & the author, 1986), p. 79, pl. 59A & 59B (illustrated). Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 543.

$200‑$400

$250‑$400

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25 Set of Four Early George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars with Later Spoons hallmarked London, 1762‑1763, by John Muns (ca. 1725‑1768; free 1746), with lobed and gadrooned rim and raised on three step-crested and -padded feet, together with a set of four salt spoons hallmarked Birmingham, 1876‑1877, by George Unite & Sons, with circular gilt bowl, twisted stem and figural “apostle” finial. salts, h. 1‑5/8”, dia. 2‑5/8”; spoons, l. 3”; 10.92 total t. oz. Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 604. $300‑$500

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26 Pair of Early George III Sterling Silver and Glass Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1762‑1763, by Joseph Clare II (ca. 1718‑1771; free 1750), oval form with reticulated gallery and beaded rim, raised on four claw-and-ball feet, fitted with conforming cobalt glass liners. h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3”, w. 2‑1/4”; 3.36 total t. oz. (excluding liners) Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 465.

27 Early George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellar hallmarked London, 1768‑1769, probably Elizabeth Muns, circular cauldron form, with threaded band and raised on three stepped-crested and -pad feet, the interior gilt and fitted with a later cobalt glass liner. h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 1.14 total t. oz. (excluding liner) Literature: Philippa Glanville, & Jennifer Faulds Goldsborough, Women Silversmiths, 1685‑1845: Works from the Collection of The National Museum of Women in the Arts (New York: Thames & Hudson, 1990), p. 149. Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 604.

$300‑$500

Notes: Although Elizabeth Muns is assumed to have been the widow of John Muns (see lot 25) as she entered her mark in May 1768 - two months after his death - it is to be noted that his will does not mention any wife and his estate was left to his four children, the eldest of whom was a daughter Elizabeth, not then yet of age. If she was his wife, she was likely the sister of William Wing, whom Muns named as his brother-in-law in the will. Whatever the case, Elizabeth Muns appeared to have continued the shop only a very short time, probably no more than a year. 27

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$125‑$250


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28 Pair of George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1770‑1771, by Thomas Shepherd (ca. 1748‑after 1792; free 1769), cauldron form with wavy gadrooned rim, with later repousse floral decoration centering a rococo scroll cartouche, raised on three maiden’s masque-crested scroll-andshell feet, the interior gilt, engraved with a crest of a demi-lion rampant. h. 1‑3/4”, dia. 2‑3/4”; 6.97 total t. oz. Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 657.

29 Pair of Hester Bateman (1708‑1794) Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1785‑1786, oval pedestal form with slightly upswept ends and reeded rim and outscrolled handles, raised on a conforming pedestal foot above a rectangular plinth base. h. 2‑1/2”, l. 4‑5/8”, w. 2‑3/8”; 6.83 total t. oz. Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 433 & 736. $900‑$1,200

$400‑$700

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30 Six Hester Bateman Sterling Silver Salt Spoons hallmarked London, all in the the traditional “Old English” pattern, including three with date letters 1782‑1783, 1787‑1788 and 1790‑1791, all with shovel bowl, l. 3‑5/8” to 3‑3/4”, and three without date letters but ca. 1785, one shovel bowl, one with round bowl and monogram “EK”, and one with round bowl and bright-cut decoration. l. 3‑5/8 to 4‑1/4”; 1.44 total t. oz. l. 3‑5/8 to 4‑1/4” l. 3‑5/8 to 4‑1/4”; 1.46 total t. oz. $125‑$250 31 Pair of Hester Bateman (1708‑1794) Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Associated Spoons hallmarked London, 1790‑1791, fluted and paneled navette pedestal form, with arched handles, reeded rim and base, and raised on a conforming pedestal, the interior gilt, engraved with a crest of Childers et al. (a cubit arm in armour holding a buckle), together with a pair of salt spoons, hallmarked London, 1789‑1790, in the “Old English” pattern with bright-cut decoration, monogrammed “HM+EI”. cellars, h. 3‑1/4”, l. 5‑1/2”, w. 2‑1/2”; spoons, l. 3‑3/4”; 6.83 total t. oz. Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 433 & 736. $1,000‑$1,500

30

31

16


32 Good Pair of George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

33 Pair of George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

hallmarked London, 1791‑1792, by Peter and Anne Bateman (fl. 1791‑1800), navette pedestal form with upswept ends, fluted and paneled and decorated with engraved floral swags, with molded rim, raised on a conforming pedestal foot with wrigglework edging and reeded base, fitted with conforming cobalt glass liners. h. 2‑5/8”, l. 4‑1/4”, w. 2‑1/2”; 4.25 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

London, 1786‑1787, by Henry Chawner (1764‑1851; free 1785), navette pedestal form, with upswept ends raised on a conforming pedestal foot, with beaded rim and base, engraved with a crest of a stock dove holding in its beak a branch fructed. h. 2‑3/4”, l. 4‑1/4”, w. 2‑1/2”; 5.30 total t. oz. Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 463 & 741.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 433‑434.

$250‑$400

$600‑$900

32

33

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34

35

34 Pair of George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

35 Set of Four George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

hallmarked London, 1791‑1792, by Henry Chawner (1764‑1851; free 1785), navette pedestal form, with upswept ends and raised on a conforming pedestal foot, with reeded rim and base, engraved on the body with the crest of Coock (a talbot sejant, its paw resting on an escutcheon or), fitted with conforming cobalt glass liners. h. 2‑1/2”, l. 4”, w. 2‑1/4”; 4.72 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

hallmarked London, 1794‑1795, by William Frisbee (1761‑1820; free 1712), navette pedestal form with upswept ends, with reeded rim and arched handles, raised on a conforming cavetto-domed pedestal foot with beaded rim. h. 3‑1/8”, l. 5‑1/2”, w. 2‑3/8”; 14.56 total t. oz.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 463 & 741. $300‑$500

18

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 515‑516. $600‑$900


36

36 Pair of Late George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

37 Pair of Late George III Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

hallmarked London, 1799‑1800, by John Gold (ca. 1768‑1861; free 1789), each of footed navette bowl form, with bulbous sides and upswept ends, decorated with repousse floral rococo banding and raised on four claw-and-ball feet, fitted with a conforming cobalt glass liner. h. 2‑1/4”, l. 3‑1/2”, w. 2‑3/8”; 6.55 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

hallmarked London, 1803‑1804, by Henry Nutting (1768‑1848; free 1790), bowl form, with gadrooned rim and base, with outscrolled acanthus handles, engraved on the body with the crest of a leopard’s head erased. h. 1‑1/2”, l. 4‑3/4”, w. 2‑5/8”; 6.54 total t. oz. Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 609.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 525.

$400‑$700

$250‑$400

37

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38

38 Pair of Late Georgian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1810‑1811, by William Eaton II (1788‑1845; free 1810), rounded rectangular cauldron form, with applied gadrooned rim and rocaille corners, raised on three acanthus-crested lion’s paw feet, the interior gilt, engraved on the body with a crest: “out of a mural crown a cubit arm, vested and cuffed, holding a cutlass”. h. 1‑1/2”, l. 3‑1/2”, w. 2‑3/4”; 9.67 total t. oz. Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 499 & 747. $300‑$500 39 Regency Sterling Silver Master Salt Cellar hallmarked London, 1811‑1812, by John Houle (ca. 1784‑1850; free 1807), circular cauldron form, with wavy gadrooned rim, the body decorated with applied seashell gadroons and raised on three acanthus-scroll feet, fitted with the original conforming sterling silver liner and engraved on the underside with the badge of the clan McKay; together with an associated “shell-and-twig” master salt spoon re-cast from an 1812 Robert Garrard example. cellar, h. 2‑5/8”, dia. 4‑1/4”; spoon, l. 3‑7/8”; 14.08 total t. oz. Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 552 & 754. Notes: John Houle was apprenticed to Paul Storr, the Regency’s finest silversmith, in 1798 and earned his freedom in 1807. (Even though a silversmith, like his master Storr he gained his freedom through the Vintner’s Company, reflecting the tradition that it was not the trade but the “freedom of the city” which granted a tradesman the right to work.) He was known for his skilled chasing on silverwork, and took seven apprentices (two of them his sons). $500‑$800

20

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40

40 Good Pair of Regency Paul Storr (1771‑1844) Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

41 Pair of Regency Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

hallmarked London, 1815‑1816, each of fluted panel bombe form, the gadrooned rim sectioned with leaf and shell motifs, raised on three elaborate acanthus-crested paw feet, the interior gilt, engraved with a crest of a lion sejant, its paw resting on cross pattee (possibly Bales of Norton). h. 2‑1/4”, dia. 3‑7/8”; 16.94 total t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1815‑1816, by Joseph Craddock & William Ker Reid (fl. 1812‑1829), circular cauldron form, with applied rocaille rim and raised on three acanthus-crested shell feet, the interior gilt, engraved with the crest of Ball et al. (out of a crown, a cubit arm erect grasping a handgrenade, fired in cross). h. 2‑3/8”, dia. 3‑3/8”; 7.73 total t. oz.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 672 & 768.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 477 & 639.

$1,800‑$2,500

$250‑$400

41

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42

42 Set of Four Early Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

43 Pair of Early Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and George IV Spoons

hallmarked London, 1838‑1839, by Mary & Richard Sibley (fl. 1836‑1838), retailed by Robert Makepeace & Co., cauldron form, with wavy gadrooned rim, the body elaborately decorated with engraved and flat-chased rococo shells and scrolls on imbricate and diapered grounds, raised on four shell-crested scroll-and-stepped-pad feet, the interiors gilt, engraved with the crest of Moses et al. (a cock regardant proper) and monogrammed “JM”. h. 2”, dia. 3‑1/4”; 16.13 total t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1844‑1845, by Edward Cornelius Farrell (1774‑1850), cauldron form with wavy gadrooned rim, decorated with applied floral bunting and lion’s masque-crested paw feet, the interior gilt, together with a pair of George IV “King’s” pattern salt spoons, hallmarked London, 1824‑1825, by John William Blake, monogrammed “JLD”. cellars, h. 2‑1/4”, dia. 3‑1/2”; spoons, l. 4‑3/8”; 22.51 total t. oz.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), p. 658.

Literature: Arthur G. Grimwade, London Goldsmiths, 1697‑1837: Their Marks and Lives, Third Edition (London: Faber & Faber, 1990), pp. 506 & 747.

$500‑$800

$500‑$800

43

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44 Pair of Victorian Sterling Silver Chinoiserie Salt Cellars

45 Suite of Four Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1871‑1872, by Robert Hennell IV (1826‑1891; free 1849), with coquille-form bowl raised on three dolphin feet, the interior gilt. h. 1‑3/8”, l. 2‑1/2”, w. 2‑1/4”; 4.45 total t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1867‑1868, by Hunt & Roskell (fl. 1843‑1897), footed bowl form, the body with slightly waisted collar and shaped and applied rococo-scroll rim, decorated in the round with repousse scenes of village life, raised on four demimandarin feet, the interior gilt. h. 2‑3/8”, dia. 3”; 10.05 total t. oz.

Literature: Percy Hennell, Hennell Silver Salt Cellars, 1736 to 1876 (East Grubstead, Sussex: BLA Publishing & the author, 1986), pp. 25‑26. John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), pp. 226‑227.

Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), pp. 245‑247.

Notes: Robert Hennell IV was the great-great grandson of David Hennell I (see lots 17‑20), and head of the Hennell firm 1868‑1877. Compare the design of this set to that of a later example by Hukin and Heath; see lot 49.

$400‑$700

$200‑$400

44

45

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46

47

46 Three Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

47 Victorian Cased Sterling Silver Salt and Pepper Set

including a pair hallmarked Sheffield, 1883‑1884, by Harrison Brothers & Howson, oval bowl form with upswept ends, the lower half spiral gadrooned, with reeded squared handles, rim and base; and a single cellar hallmarked London, 1881‑1882, by Holland, Son & Slater (fl. ca. 1878‑1883), bowl form, oval with reeded rim and gadrooned lower half. pair, h. 1‑5/8”, l. 3‑1/8”, w. 1‑3/8”; single, h. 1‑1/4”, l. 2‑1/8”, w. 1‑5/8”; 2.82 total t. oz.

hallmarked London, 1885‑1887, by Charles Stuart Harris (fl. 1852‑1897), in the Raj taste, including a pair of bowl-form salt cellars and a single footed urn-form pepper caster, each decorated with elaborately chased fern and flower scrolls centering a circular cartouche, with a leaf-and-dart band above and gadrooned band below, presented in the original fitted plum velvet- and ruched satin-lined cartouche-shaped case, h. 2‑7/8”, w. 8‑1/2”, d. 6‑1/4”. cellars, h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑1/8”; caster, h. 3‑3/4”, dia. 1‑5/8”; 4.64 total t. oz.

Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), pp. 214‑215 & 235. $75‑$125

24

Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), pp. 212‑213. $200‑$400


48 Cased Pair of Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Spoons

49 Four English Sterling Silver Salt Cellars including: A Victorian example, hallmarked London, 1888‑1889, by Hukin & Heath (fl. 1895‑1904), with coquille-form bowl raised on three dolphin feet, h. 1‑1/4”, l. 2‑1/2”, w. 2‑1/8”. Another Victorian example, hallmarked Birmingham, 1895‑1896, by James Fenton (fl. 1852‑after 1920), circular cauldron form, with twisted and beaded rim and raised on three rocaille “King’s”-shape feet, h. 7/8”, dia. 1‑3/4”. A George V example, hallmarked Birmingham, 1910‑1911, by John Rose (1852‑1927), in the form of an early Georgian Irish two-handled cup, h. 1‑3/4”, w. 2‑3/4”, dia. 1‑7/8”. Another George V example, the hallmarks rubbed, but probably Birmingham, 1919‑1920, by Charles Edwin Turner (1859‑1943), circular cauldron form with tall waisted collar and raised on three pad feet, h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 1‑7/8”. 3.15 total t. oz.

hallmarked Sheffield, 1885‑1886, by Atkin Brothers (fl. 1853‑1925), with a pair of crown-shaped basket salts with gilt interior and spherical finial, decorated with engraved ferns, with the original pointed and beaded handle salt spoons with gilt bowls, presented in an aqua ruched satin- and indigo velvet-lined fitted leather case with retailer’s stamp of F. Hollinshed, Jersey, w. 6‑1/2”. cellars, h. 2”, dia. 2‑3/8”; spoons, l. 2‑5/8”; 2.15 total t. oz. Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), p. 19. $200‑$400

Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), p. 243. Kenneth Crisp Jones, The Silversmiths of Birmingham and Their Marks, 1750‑1980 (London: N.A.G. Press, 1981), pp. 315, 328, 350 & 353. Notes: See lot 45 for an earlier inspiration for the Hukin & Heath cellar. $100‑$200

48

49

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50

50 Pair of Late Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars with American Spoons

51 Pair of Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1890‑1891, by William Evans (fl. 1864‑1894), each of cauldron form, with wavy gadrooned rim, decorated with repousse flowers and a rococo cartouche, raised on three rocaille-crested double pad feet, monogrammed “JJR”, fitted with a conforming cobalt glass liner. h. 1‑3/4”, dia. 3‑1/8”; 6.36 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

hallmarked Birmingham, 1890‑1891, by Hayes Brothers, cauldron form, decorated with spiral gadroons and raised on three ball feet, the interior gilt, together with a pair of American sterling silver salt spoons with beaded spatulate and gilt circular bowl. cellars, h. 1”, dia. 1‑7/8”; spoons, l. 2”; 1.23 total t. oz. Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), p. 223. Kenneth Crisp Jones, The Silversmiths of Birmingham and Their Marks, 1750‑1980 (London: N.A.G. Press, 1981), pp. 212, 343 & 374.

Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), p. 150. $125‑$250

$50‑$80

51

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52

53

52 Set of Four Cased Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1892‑1893, by Wakely & Wheeler (fl. 1884‑present), each of oval footed bowl form, decorated with repousse floral banding centering a cartouche, fluted calyx and galleried rim, with a flat, conforming foot, the interiors gilt, monogrammed “C”, presented in the original fitted plum velvet- and ruched satin-lined fitted shield-form case with retailer’s stamp of Sarmon O’Neill, Belfast, h. 3”, w. 9‑5/8”, d. 7‑5/8”. h. 1‑3/4”, l. 2‑3/4”, w. 2‑3/8”; 7.72 total t. oz. Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), pp. 295‑296.

53 Pair of Late Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1893‑1894, by Edward Hutton (W. Hutton & Sons), circular cauldron form, with beaded rim and raised on three shell-crested stepped pad feet. h. 1‑1/8”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 3.36 total t. oz. Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), pp. 247‑249. $100‑$200

$250‑$400

27


54 Unusual Pair of Late Victorian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked London, 1895‑1896, by Stokes & Ireland, Ltd. (fl. 1892‑1925), pedestal form, the ovoid body with two oval cut-outs forming an integral basket handle, raised on a conforming pedestal foot, with reeded rims and base. h. 2‑1/2”, l. 3”, w. 1‑7/8”; 4.02 total t. oz. Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), p. 435. $250‑$400 54

55 Pair of Victorian “Diamond Jubilee” Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Later Spoons hallmarked Birmingham, 1896‑1897, by William Augustus Devenport (1856‑1920), each shaped and stamped in the form of St. Edward’s crown, raised on three ball feet, together with a pair of wavy-bowl, ball-finial salt spoons, hallmarked Birmingham, 1903‑1904, by William Henry Leather (1852‑1919). cellars, h. 3‑1/4”, l. 2‑1/2”, w. 2‑3/8”; spoons, l. 2‑1/4”; 1.16 total t. oz. Literature: Kenneth Crisp Jones, The Silversmiths of Birmingham and Their Marks, 1750‑1980 (London: N.A.G. Press, 1981), p. 372. $60‑$90

56 Edwardian Sterling Silver Salt Cellar

55

hallmarked Sheffield, 1901‑1902, by James Dixon & Sons (fl. 1835‑1920), in the Georgian taste, circular cauldron form, with gadrooned rim and raised on three maiden’s masquecrested shell-and-scroll pad feet, fitted with a conforming cobalt glass liner. h. 1‑3/4”, dia. 2‑3/4”; 3.47 t. oz. (excluding liner) Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), pp. 121‑123. Notes: Compare the maiden’s masque-crested legs on this example to the period Georgian pair by Thomas Shepherd; see lot 28. $150‑$300 56

28


57

58

57 Cased Set of Four Edwardian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Spoons

58 Pair of Cased Edwardian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Spoons

hallmarked London, 1901‑1902, by Wakely & Wheeler (fl. 1884‑present), Monteith form, each hemispherical with a molded and shaped rim and ogee-domed footring, the interiors gilt, together with the original “lancet” salt spoons, presented in the original fitted indigo velvet- and ruched satin-lined fitted shield-form case with retailer’s stamp of Alfred W. Butt, Chester, h. 3”, w. 9‑5/8”, d. 7‑5/8”. cellars, h. 1‑3/4”, dia. 2‑1/4”; spoons, l. 3”; 6.45 total t. oz.

hallmarked Birmingham, 1901‑1902, by Henry Williamson Ltd. (fl. 1898‑1931), the cellars of navette bowl form, stamped with bands of rococo scrolls, together with a pair of ball-finial salt spoons, hallmarked Birmingham,1900‑1901, by William Devenport, presented in a fitted, indigo velvet- and satin-lined rectangular case, l. 6‑1/2”, w. 3”. cellars, h. 5/8”, l. 2‑1/4”, w. 1‑5/8”; spoons, l. 2‑1/8”; 0.61 total t. oz.

Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), pp. 295‑296. $400‑$700

Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), pp. 489‑490. $100‑$200

29


59 Pair of Edwardian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked Birmingham, 1903‑1904, by William Aitken (1855‑1917), circular footed bowl form, in the Huguenot “cut card” style, with embossed band and applied vertical flat balusters, with everted rim and raised on a waisted foot-ring; fitted with a conforming colbalt glass liner (one lacking). h. 4‑5/8”, dia. 2‑3/8”; 3.37 total t. oz. (excluding liner) Literature: John Culme, The Directory of Gold & Silversmiths, Jewellers and Allied Traders 1838‑1914, v. I (Woodbridge, Suffolk: Antique Collectors’ Club, 1987), p. 6. Kenneth Crisp Jones, The Silversmiths of Birmingham and Their Marks, 1750‑1980 (London: N.A.G. Press, 1981), p. 371.

59

$100‑$200 60 Pair of Edwardian Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked Sheffield, 1907‑1908, by Robert Fead Mosley & Co. (fl. 1864‑1935), in the neoclassical taste, reticulated navette pedestal form, with outscrolled ends and beaded wavy rim, the body with embossed floral swags, raised on an oval gadrooned pedestal base, fitted with conforming cobalt glass liners. h. 2‑1/8”, l. 4‑7/8”, w. 2‑1/2”; 4.48 total t. oz. (excluding liners) $200‑$400 61 Pair of George V Sterling Silver Salt Cellars hallmarked Birmingham, 1912‑1913, by Joseph Gloster Ltd. (fl. ca. 1880‑1978), each of oval bowl form, with gadrooned body, waisted collar and shaped and everted rim, fitted with a conforming cobalt glass liner. h. 1‑1/4”, l. 2‑1/2”, w. 1‑5/8”; 1.92 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

61

Literature: Kenneth Crisp Jones, The Silversmiths of Birmingham and Their Marks, 1750‑1980 (London: N.A.G. Press, 1981), pp. 237 & 312. $75‑$125

60

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62 Pair of George V Art Nouveau Silverplate and Glass Salt Cellars the design registered 1913, of bulbous concave square section, with opposing strapwork scroll handles at two corners, fitted with square cobalt glass liners. h. 2‑3/8”, w. 3‑7/8”, d. 2‑5/8” $50‑$80

63 Twelve British Sterling Silver Salt Spoons

62

including: Edinburgh, ca. 1800, by William Robertson, “Pointed Old English” handle, monogrammed “L”, l. 4” London, 1807‑1808, by Urquart & Hart, “Old English” handle, monogrammed “H”, l. 3‑7/8” London, 1810‑1811, by Eley, Fearn & Chawner, “Fiddle” handle, with engraved crest, l. 4‑1/8” Birmingham, 1831‑1832, by Jos. Willmore, shaped handle and shovel bowl, l. 3‑1/4” (two spoons) Birmingham, 1884‑1885, by Walker & Hall, beaded oval handle, l. 2‑3/4” Birmingham, 1900‑1901, by William Devenport, ball end handle, l. 2‑1/8” Birmingham, 1919‑1920, by Levi & Salaman, “Old English” handle, l. 2‑3/4” Sheffield, 1930‑1931, by Cooper Brothers & Sons, “Old English” handle, l. 2‑3/4” London, 1935‑1936, by the Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Co. Ltd., “Old English” handle, l. 3‑1/2” London, 1937‑1938, by F. Higgins & Sons Ltd., “Old English” handle, l. 3‑1/2” London, 1950‑1951, by Israel Freeman & Son, “Hanoverian” handle, l. 2‑5/8” 2.88 total t. oz. $125‑$250 The Gorham Company of Providence, Rhode Island was one of a handful of American silversmithing concerns to bridge the Industrial revolution of the 19th century, going from the traditional craft of handcrafted silver to mechanical manufacture. Growing from the original silversmith’s shop of Jabez Gorham (1792-1869), by 1852 the company was one of the leading silver manufacturers and probably the largest maker of silver salt cellars in the United States. Certainly they are the only firm whose silver salt cellars have been the subject of a monograph: George and Carolyn Tompkins’ Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes. With information culled from the Gorham Archives at the John Hay Library at Brown University, the Handbook details model number, design dates, images and other information on over 450 salt cellars manufactured by Gorham. (Though the work is not exhaustive; see lots 79, 86, 89, 92 and 104.) A copy of the Handbook is offered in lot 10.

63

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64

64 Assembled Set of Four Coin Silver Salt Cellars

65 Pair of Gorham Coin Silver Salt Cellars

ca. 1855, three by Gorham and one by Eoff & Shepard, for Ball, Black & Co., New York, New York, with hemispherical bowl with molded rim and raised on three stepped pad feet, two with gilt interior and engraved “Read”. h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 2‑3/4”; 8.96 total t. oz.

Model #3, introduced ca. 1856, cauldron form, decorated with repousse floral scroll cartouches, with wavy gadrooned rim and raised on three acanthus-crested pad feet, the interiors gilt, each monogrammed on one cartouche “G”. h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑1/8”; 2.82 total t. oz.

Notes: The Gorham examples have no model number, and are not illustrated in Tompkins’ catalogue. The Eoff & Shepard example, however, which is clearly an original mate to one of the Gorham salts, dates them with reasonable precision and suggest that the design was one of Gorham’s earliest.

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 35, pl. 3. Notes: The repousse decoration here appears to be a contemporaneous after-market addition: a good example of a 19th-century retailer’s enhancement of a supplier’s wares for his customer’s taste.

$125‑$250

$125‑$250

65

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66 Pair of Gorham Coin Silver Salt Cellars

67 Suite of Four Gorham Coin Silver Salt Cellars

Model #GM4, introduced ca. 1856, cauldron form, decorated with repousse flowers and wavy gadrooned rim, raised on three acanthus-crested paw feet and fitted with a cobalt glass liner. h. 1‑3/8”, dia. 2”; 2.50 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

Model #GM11, introduced ca. 1857, cauldron form, with acanthus-and-anthemion rim and raised on three ram’s masque-crested cloven feet, monogrammed “ALL”. h. 1‑3/4”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 9.17 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 36, pl. 11.

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 35, pl. 4.

$250‑$400

$100‑$200

66

67

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68

69

68 Pair of Gorham Coin Silver Salt Cellars

69 Two Pairs of Gorham Coin Silver Salt Cellars

Model #20 [#GM12], introduced ca. 1857, oval cauldron form, decorated with repousse cartouches, with wavy gadrooned rim and raised on four ram’s masque-crested cloven feet, monogrammed “ATC”. h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3‑1/8”, w. 2‑3/8”; 5.02 total t. oz.

Model #41, introduced in 1859, each of pedestal form, the hemispherical bowl with guilloche decoration and gilt interior, raised on a gadrooned foot, one pair with gilt bowl and engraved “Nellie”, the other pair with plain interior and monogrammed “AMcLF”. h. 1‑3/4”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 7.14 total t. oz.

Notes: This pair does not match Model #20 listed in Tompkins’ catalogue, and, but for the repousse work (which may be a retailer’s addition), corresponds exactly to Model #GM12 (see Tompkins, p. 36, pl. 12). $125‑$250

34

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 42, pl. 40. $200‑$400


70 Pair of Cased Gorham Coin Silver Salt Cellars Model #41, introduced in 1859, each of pedestal form, the hemispherical bowl with guilloche decoration and gilt interior, raised on a gadrooned foot, together with a pair of Gorham “Josephine” salt spoons, all monogrammed “BBL”, presented in a waisted oval green velvet- and cream satinlined fitted case, the interior lid with applied retailer’s stamp of James Conning (1813‑1872), Mobile, Alabama, h. 2‑1/4”, w. 8”, d. 3‑1/8”. cellars, h. 1‑3/4”, dia. 2‑1/2”; spoons, l. 3‑5/8”; 3.52 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 42, pl. 40; case p. 127, pl. 449 & 460.

70

$300‑$500 71 Pair of Gorham Coin Silver Salt Cellars Model #41, the pattern introduced in 1859, pedestal form, the hemispherical bowl decorated with repousse trailing grapevines centering a cartouche, with molded and beaded rim and ogee-domed pedestal foot, monogrammed “ECC”. h. 3‑7/8”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 2.95 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 42, pl. 41 (variant). $125‑$250 72 Unusual Near Pair of Gorham and G. Sharp Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

71

Gorham Model #120, introduced in 1860, together with a near-identical example by George Sharp (1819‑1904) of Philadelphia, each in the Renaissance Revival taste with ovoid bowl supported by three acanthus-scroll legs and with applied beaded rim. h. 2‑1/8” and 2‑1/4”, dia. 2‑3/8”; 3.99 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 43, pl. 47. Catherine B. Hollan, Philadelphia Silversmiths and Related Artisans to 1861 (McLean, VA: Hollan Press, 2013), pp. 182‑183. Notes: This “near” pair shows the similarity of design between two different manufacturers: Gorham and George Sharp. The Gorham example is about 1/8” taller than the Sharp, and has twice as many applied “beads” on the rim; there are subtle differences in the decorative detail of the legs as well. The Gorham design can be dated by its model number to 1860, but as Sharp was working both before and after that date, it is impossible to know who copied the design from whom.

72

$100‑$200

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73

73 Good Pair of Gorham “Medallion” Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Associated Spoons

74 Good Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Renaissance Revival Salt Cellars

retailed by J. E. Caldwell & Co., the salts Model #340, introduced in 1862, oval pedestal basket form with upswept ends, the fixed handle mounted with an openwork ribboncrested portrait medallion of Zeus, above the conforming foot, the interior gilt, together with a pair of John Wendt “Medallion” salt spoons. cellars, h. 3‑1/4”, l. 3‑5/8”, w. 2‑5/8”; spoons, l. 3‑1/2”; 4.76 total t. oz.

Model #440 [#GM33], introduced ca. 1863, this pair with date mark of 1869, with bucket-shaped bowl and molded rim with patera-decorated merlons, the whole raised on three figural feet of rampant lions, their paws resting on a shield, all above a canted and concave molded triangular base. h. 2‑3/4”, dia. 3‑1/2”; 9.89 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 61, pl. 131.

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 46, pl. 64.

Notes: Tompkins records this impressive pair as model #GM33 according to the Gorham archives, and dating circa 1870. This present lot, however, is marked with Model number 440 and date mark of 1869. The 440 number would fit more closely with the 400 series of 1863, and closely resembles tripodal griffin salt #420 (see Tompkins, p. 47).

$500‑$800

$800‑$1,200

36

74


75 Pair of Gorham Coin Silver Salt Cellars Model #70 (variant), introduced ca. 1865, tub form, with guilloche banding centering triangular cartouches, with U-shaped handles and raised on four ball feet, the interior gilt, each monogrammed on one cartouche, “SN to EK”. h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 2‑3/4”; 3.57 total. t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 48, pl. 75.

75

$125‑$250

76 Cased Pair of Gorham Coin Silver Salt Cellars Model #521, introduced in 1866, pedestal form with milled band and stepped foot, together with a pair of sterling silver Gorham “Medallion” spoons, presented in a plum velvet- and satinlined shield-form embossed leather case, the interior lid with gilt retailer’s stamp of Benedict Brothers, New York, New York, h. 2‑5/8”, w. 7”, d. 5‑1/4”. cellars, h. 1‑5/8”, dia. 2‑1/2”; spoons, l. 3‑5/8”; 3.22 total oz.

76

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 49, pl. 77; case p. 128, pl. 463. $200‑$400

77 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver “Aesthetic” Salt Cellars Model #550, introduced in 1868, pedestal form with shallow conical rim decorated with wrigglework banding and applied butterflies, monogrammed “TA” conjoined. h. 2‑1/8”, dia. 2‑3/4”, w. 3‑3/4”; 4.75 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 55, pl. 93. $200‑$400 77

37


78 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #531, introduced in and with date mark of 1869, pedestal form, the ovoid bowl with cavetto-molded rim and with trifurcated lily leaf-mounted bar handles. h. 2‑5/8”, w. 3‑1/4”, dia. 2‑1/4”; 3.76 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 56, pl. 101. $150‑$300 79 Five Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

78

pedestal form, including: Model #735, introduced in 1869, this example with date mark for 1875, with conical sides and molded rim above a flat foot-ring, h. 7/8”, dia. 1‑5/8”. Model #1340, introduced in 1877, this example with date mark of 1878, the waisted thistle-form bowl with narrow beaded band and raised on an ogee-domed foot, monogrammed “S”, h. 1‑5/8”, dia. 2‑1/2”. Model #478A, with date mark of 1914, retailed by Spaulding & Co., Chicago, Illinois, the octagonally paneled bowl with molded rim and raised on a conforming domed foot, h. 1‑5/8”, dia. 2‑3/8”. Model #A2148, introduced in 1901, the octagonally paneled bowl with molded rim and raised on a conforming pedestal foot, h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2”. Model #1112, introduced in 1949, the bulbous bowl with molded rim and ogee-domed foot-ring, h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 2‑3/8”. 5.33 total t. oz.

80 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #815, introduced in and with date mark for 1869, squat conical form with reeded bands and handles, raised on four winged scroll pad feet. h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑5/8”, w. 3‑1/4”; 4.45 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 66, pl. 160. Notes: The 1872 introduction date of this model given in Tompkins appears to be an error. The date code on this pair - B - corresponds to 1869, and stylistically they more closely resemble the earlier 800 series pattern numbers of 1869 (see Tompkins, p. 57) than the later 800 series of 1872 (see Tompkins, p. 66). $150‑$300

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 56, pl. 103; p. 75, pl. 214; p. 99, pl. 354; p. 112, pl. 430. Notes: Model #478A is not listed in Tompkins’ Handbook, although it has a bowl identical to that on 1917’s model #A5767 but variant foot; see Tompkins, p. 108, pl. 407. Also, Tompkins notes that model #1112 was fitted with a cobalt liner, lacking in the present lot. $150‑$300

80

79

38


81 Good Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #880, introduced in 1869, this pair with date mark of 1870, each in the form of a realistically detailed washtub with incised staves and reeded bands, with pateramounted swing-ring handles, each with an alight butterfly. h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑5/8”, w. 4”; 4.85 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 59, pl. 119.

81

$400‑$700

82 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #222, introduced in and with date mark of 1870, pedestal form, with milled gadrooned rim and arched triangular handles, monogrammed “EM” conjoined. h. 2‑1/4”, dia. 2‑1/4”, w. 3‑5/8”; 3.85 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 61, pl. 133. $100‑$200 82

83 Gorham Sterling Silver Novelty Salt Cellar Model #1136, introduced in 1871, this example with date mark of 1872, in the form of a realistic camp cauldron with swing handle and four peg feet, decorated with wrigglework banding and monogrammed “W”. h. 1‑3/4”, dia. 2‑3/8”; 1.95 t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 65, pl. 153. Notes: Tompkins notes that this model was originally accompanied by a silver “branch” tripod (lacking in the present lot) which suspended the salt. $200‑$400 83

39


85 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #1080, introduced in 1872, this pair with date mark of 1877, pedestal form, the hemispherical bowl with laurel banding, with matte finish and gilt interior, together with a pair of carved mother-ofpearl salt spoons, l. 1‑7/8”. h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 1‑1/2”; 1.58 total t. oz. (excluding spoons) Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 67, pl. 165. 84

$100‑$200 86 Four Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

84 Three Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

including: Model #1115, introduced in and with date mark of 1872, bowl form, the everted and rolled rim with matte finish and decorated with pricked and brightcut banding, h. 5/8”, dia. 1‑3/4”. Model #S1782, introduced ca. 1885, saucer form, with diamond-cut glass bowl and silver-gilt scalloped rim with beaded edge, h. 3/4”, dia. 3‑5/8”. Model #A8137, introduced ca. 1915, waisted bowl form with rolled rim and four ball feet, the interior gilt, h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 2‑1/4”. Model #36, introduced in 1942, this example with date mark for 1949, footed bowl form, the hemispherical bowl with everted gadrooned rim and raised on an ogee-domed foot-ring, h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑3/4”. 2.78 total t. oz. (weighable silver)

Model #220, introduced in 1872, pedestal form with squared arched handles and beaded rim, two engraved “Stoughton & Lizzie / to / ‘Myla’”. h. 1‑7/8”, dia. 2‑3/8”, w. 3”; 4.24 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 66, pl. 159. $125‑$250

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 68, pl. 171; p. 82, pl. 256; p. 112, pl. 36. Notes: Model #A8137 is not listed in Tompkins’ catalogue; Tompkins also notes that model #36 was fitted with a clear liner, lacking in the present lot. $125‑$250

85

40

86


87 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #1215, introduced in 1873, this pair with date mark for 1874, Providence, Rhode Island, cauldron form, with brightcut and wrigglework banding sectioned by six applied concentric circular medallions and centering an engraved cartouche, raised on a short flared foot-ring, monogrammed “SE”, conjoined. h. 1‑3/4”; dia. 2‑3/4”; 5.10 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 70, pl. 183. $200‑$400

87

88 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #1300, with date mark for 1874, bowl form, with squat conical lower half and bulbous upper half, with bright-cut and applied reeded banding, the interior gilt. h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 3”; 4.76 total t. oz. Notes: This pair is not illustrated in Tompkins’ Handbook, but the model number indicates that it was introduced in 1874. It appears an inverted version of model #1245; see Tompkins, p. 71, pl. 192. $150‑$300

88

89 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver ParcelMatte-Gilt Salt Cellars Model #1425, with date mark for 1877, pedestal form, the hemispherical bowl with flared rim decorated with reed-andpalmette band, with step-domed foot. h. 7/8”, dia. 1‑7/8”; 1.23 total t. oz. Notes: This attractive pair is not listed in Tompkins’ Handbook, though its varied textured surfaces are very much in keeping with Gorham’s Aesthetic and Japonaise designs of the late 1870s. $60‑$90

89

41


90

90 Rare Set of Four Gorham “Japonaise” Parcel-Gilt Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #1521, introduced in 1870, this set with date mark of 1880, footed saucer form, the bowl of each engraved with variant Japanese motifs, parcel-gilt and satin-finished. h. 5/8”, dia. 1‑5/8”; 1.99 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 76, pl. 218. $200‑$400

92

92 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

91

91 Good Gorham Aesthetic Sterling Silver and Copper Salt Cellar Model #B10, introduced in and with date mark for 1879, bowl form, with hammered finish and applied silver and copper fish above “barnacle” banding around the base, the interior gilt. h. 7/8”, dia. 1‑7/8”; 1.06 t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 77, pl. 227. $100‑$200

42

Model #1815, with date mark of 1881, bowl form with horizontal reeded band and vertical reeded rim, the interior gilt, monogrammed “EAW”. h. 7/8”, dia. 1‑5/8”; 1.07 total t. oz. Notes: This model is not listed in Tompkins’ Handbook, but the model number suggests an introduction date contemporaneous with the date mark of 1881; see Tompkins, p. 80. $40‑$70


94 Two Gorham “Narragansett”-Style Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #2030, introduced in 1883, clamshell form supported by two clamshell feet, with one matching spoon. cellars, l. 2‑5/8”, w. 1‑5/8”; spoon, l. 3”; 1.81 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 81, pl. 249. 93

$125‑$250 95 Trio of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

93 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

Model #2150, introduced in 1885, two with date mark of 1888, cauldron form, with repousse floral decoration and shell-and-anthemion rim, raised on three shell-crested pad feet, the two 1888 examples inscribed on the underside “L. M. Jones”, the other with no date mark and monogrammed on the underside “JCW”. h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 5.84 total t. oz.

Model #1820, introduced in 1882, footed bowl form with embossed diaper band, fitted with colorless glass liners. h. 7/8”, dia. 1‑5/8”; 1.00 total t. oz. (excluding liners) Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 80, pl. 244.

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 82, pl. 257.

Notes: Although Tompkins notes this design as introduced in 1882, the date code on the pair - N corresponds to 1881.

$125‑$250

$40‑$70

94

95

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96

97

96 Five Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars including: Model #2155, introduced in 1885, this example with date mark of 1888, bowl form, decorated with spiral “teardrop” gadroons, with wavy rim, h. 7/8”, dia. 2‑3/8”. Model #2215, introduced in 1888, this example with date mark for 1891, bowl form, with embossed floral band above gadrooned lower half, with gauffered rim, h. 1”, dia. 1‑3/4”. Model #2240, introduced in 1888, this example with date mark for 1890, bowl form, with fluted body and serpentinescalloped rim, h. 1”, dia. 1‑5/8”. Model #2625, introduced in and with date mark for 1891, bowl form, decorated with embossed stylized “blossom” gadroons between narrow beaded bands, with serpentine-scalloped rim, h. 1”, dia. 2”. Model #2660, introduced in and with date mark of 1892, oval bowl form, with gadrooned calyx, acanthus shoulders and applied “C”-scroll rim; monogrammed “AHS”, h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3‑1/8”, w. 2‑3/8”. 5.04 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 83, pl. 258; p. 85, pl. 274 & 275; p. 85, pl. 275; p. 90, pl. 301; & p. 91, pl. 308. $125‑$250

44

97 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver and Red-Flashed Glass Salt Cellars Model #2515, introduced in 1889, this pair with date mark of 1890, oval form with elaborate openwork gallery of Vitruvian scrolls, urns and dolphins centering a satyr, raised on six acanthus feet and fitted with a conforming red-flashed glass liner. h. 1‑1/2”, l. 3‑1/4”, w. 2‑1/4”; 3.11 total t. oz. (excluding liners) Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 87, pl. 285. Notes: The intricate milled openwork gallery of this model was used on both circular (#2510) and canted rectangular (#2520; see lot 101) versions; all were available with red-flashed or cobalt liners. $100‑$200


98

98 Three Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars cauldron form, including: Model #2525, introduced in 1889, this example with date mark for 1891, oval, the lobed body with conforming scalloped rim and raised on four shellcrested threaded pad feet, monogrammed “WCH”, h. 1‑1/2”, l. 3‑1/8”, w. 2‑1/2”. Model #2200, introduced in 1890, this example with date mark of 1896, oval, with shell-and-palmette rim and raised on four shell-crested stepped-pad feet, monogrammed “EPS”, h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3‑7/8”, w. 2‑1/2”. Model #A2150, introduced in and with date mark of 1900, circular, with shell-and-palmette rim and raised on three shell-crested stepped-pad feet, monogrammed and dated “JGJ / 1902”, h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑1/2”. 6.23 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 87, pl. 286; p. 88, pl. 289; p. 98, pl. 351. $125‑$250

99

100 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Spoons Model #2480, introduced in 1890, navette form, with embossed gadrooned rim and base and anthemion ends, raised on four shell-crested pad feet, together with a pair of Gorham “Chippendale” salt spoons, monogrammed “G”. cellars, h. 4‑1/4”, l. 4‑3/8”, w. 2‑1/4”; spoons, l. 3‑3/8”, 4.24 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 88, pl. 293.

99 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #2385, introduced 1890, this pair with date mark for 1891, bowl form, with repousse floral banding, wavy rim and gilt interior. h. 1‑1/8”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 2.30 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 88, pl. 292. $50‑$80

100

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101

103

$125‑$250 101 Trio of Gorham Sterling Silver and Red-Flashed Glass Salt Cellars Model #2520, introduced in 1890, one with date mark of 1892, the others 1893, canted rectangular form with elaborate openwork gallery of Vitruvian scrolls, urns and dolphins centering a satyr, raised on eight acanthus feet and fitted with a conforming red-flashed glass liner. h. 4‑3/8”, l. 3”, w. 2‑3/8”; 5.66 total t. oz. (excluding liners) Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 89, pl. 295. Notes: See lot 97 for a similar design. $150‑$300

102 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #2550, introduced in 1890, this pair with date mark of 1893, bowl form with shaped and embossed rococo rim. h. 5/8”, dia. 3”; 1.28 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 89, pl. 297. $75‑$125 103 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #2610, introduced in and with date mark for 1892, bulbous rounded rectangular form, with fluteand-gadroon sides and everted scalloped rim with embossed floral bouquets, raised on four rocaille feet, monogrammed on the side “LMG”. h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3‑1/2”, w. 2‑3/4”; 5.50 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 91, pl. 306. $125‑$250

102

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104 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #2635, introduced in 1892, this pair with date mark of 1893, ball-footed bowl form, with quarter-lobed bowl and everted and embossed floral rococo scroll rim. h. 1”, dia. 2‑7/8”; 2.22 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 91, pl. 307.

104

$100‑$200 105 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #A1026, introduced ca. 1899, retailed by Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, navette form with rolled and everted wavy rim, decorated with embossed rococo scrolls, cartouches and flowers and raised on four integral feet en suite, monogrammed “B”, fitted with a conforming colorless glass liner. h. 1‑1/2”, l. 3‑1/4”, w. 2‑1/2”; 2.62 total t. oz. (excluding liners) Notes: This model is not listed in Tompkins’ Handbook, but design similarities to other A-prefixed examples in the low 1000s (e.g. A1016 and A1021) suggest an 1899 date. See Tompkins, p. 97, pl. 343 and 344.

105

$100‑$200 106 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #A2432, introduced in 1901, oval bowl form with wavy beaded rim and gilt interior. h. 1‑1/4”, l. 3‑1/4”, w. 2‑1/4”; 1.58 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 99, pl. 355. $75‑$125

106

107 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #A2433, introduced in 1902, navette bowl form, with embossed rococo scroll sides and shell ends, one monogrammed “B”. h. 1‑1/8”, l. 3‑3/4”, w. 2‑3/8”; 1.65 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 100, pl. 363. $50‑$80

107

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108 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #A2967 C, introduced in 1902, pedestal form, the bulbous body with bead-and-bobbin rim and square pedestal foot. h. 1‑5/8”, dia. 2‑1/4”; 2.28 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 101, pl. 365. $75‑$125

109

109 Five Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars circular bowl form, including: Model #A4070, introduced in 1903, a pair, bulbous circular form with rolled and slightly everted rim, one monogrammed “R”, h. 3/4”, dia. 1‑1/2”. Model #A4063, introduced in 1925, a set of three, plain with reeded rim and base, h. 1/2”, dia. 1‑5/8”. 1.65 total t. oz.

110 Trio of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars Model #A4062, introduced in 1904, footed bowl form, with waisted collar and everted rim and integral foot-ring en suite, two monogrammed “F”. h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 3.20 total t. oz.

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 101, pl. 369; p. 109, pl. 417.

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 102, pl. 374.

$40‑$70

$75‑$125

110

48

108


111

111 Pair of Gorham/Durgin Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

112 Three Gorham “Plymouth” Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

Model #215, introduced in 1905, cauldron form, the hemispherical bowl with gadrooned rim and raised on three ram’s masque-crested cloven feet. h. 1‑7/8”, dia. 2‑3/4”; 6.19 total t. oz.

Model #A2812, introduced in 1905, one with date mark of 1910, two with date mark of 1915, pedestal form and “turtleback” section, with reeded rim, the 1910 example monogrammed “P”. h. 2‑1/8”, l. 3‑1/4”, w. 2”; 4.11 total t. oz.

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 103, pl. 380.

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 104, pl. 382.

$125‑$250

$100‑$200

112

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113

113 Four-Piece Gorham Sterling Silver Salt and Pepper Set Model #A5551/4, introduced in 1906, comprising a pair of oval salt cellars, and a pair of pepper casters, with a pierced floral gallery and fitted with conforming cobalt glass liners, the salts with ball feet, the casters with “bun” caps. cellars, h. 1‑1/4”, l. 1‑7/8”; casters, h. 2‑3/8”, dia. 1”; 2.09 total t. oz. (excluding liners) Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 104, pl. 385. $125‑$250

114 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver and Cut Glass Salt Cellars Model #2735, introduced in 1910, each with a circular galleried frame with openwork wavy scrolls between beaded bands and raised on three rocaille feet, fitted with the original cane pattern cut glass liners, together with a pair of Whiting/Gorham “Old King” salt spoons, engraved “Fole. R.”. cellars, h. 2”, dia. 2‑3/4”; spoons, l. 3‑1/4”; 3.03 total t. oz. (excluding liners)

114

115 Pair of Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Spoons Model #A5802, introduced in 1919, footed bowl form, quarter lobed and decorated with floral rococo panels, with embossed leaf-and-dart torus rim and domed foot-ring en suite, together with a pair of Gorham “Imperial Chrysanthemum” salt spoons with gilt bowls, monogrammed “LAS”. cellars, h. 2”, dia. 2‑5/8”; spoons, l. 3‑1/2”; 4.06 total t. oz. Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 108, pl. 408. $125‑$250

Literature: George and Carolyn Tompkins, The Handbook of Gorham Open Salt Dishes (Rockport, ME: Archimedes Press, 1987), p. 105, pl. 392. $125‑$250

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115


116 Thirty-One Gorham Sterling Silver Salt Spoons including: Two “Deli” (ca. 1880), l. 3‑1/2” Two “Chantilly” (1895), l. 2‑3/4” Six “Strasbourg” (1897), l. 2‑3/4” Four “Buttercup” (1899), l. 2‑3/4” One model H125 (ca. 1900), monogrammed “CHP”, l. 3‑1/4” Two “Old French” (1905), l. 2‑3/4” Two “Fairfax” (1910), l. 2‑1/2” One “Old Colony” (1926), monogrammed “ML”, l. 2‑3/4” Two “King Edward” (1936), l. 2‑3/4” Two “English Gadroon” (1939), l. 2‑3/4” Three “Melrose” (1948), l. 2‑3/4” Four “La Scala” (1964), l. 2‑3/4” 5.53 total t. oz. $125‑$250

116

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117 Seven 19th-Century American Coin and Sterling Silver Salt Spoons including: James Fenno, Lowell, MA, “Fiddle Swell Tipt” (ca. 1840), monogrammed “LND”, l. 3‑5/8” John S. Putnam, Buffalo, NY, “Fiddle” (ca. 1840), engraved “Crossman”, l. 3‑3/8” John Polhamus, New York, NY, “Armour” (1845), monogrammed “ELD”, l. 3‑5/8” Newell Harding, Boston, MA, “Fiddle Swell Tipt” (ca. 1860), monogrammed “DJG”, l. 3‑1/2” Henry Hebbard, New York, NY, “Grecian” (1862), monogrammed “P”, l. 3‑5/8” William T. Gale, Boston, MA, “Thread” (ca. 1870), engraved “Mary”, l. 3‑3/4” (two spoons) 2.11 total t. oz. $100‑$200 118 Pair of Philadelphia Coin Silver Salt Cellars second quarter 19th century, by Robert and William Wilson (fl. ca. 1825‑1846), pedestal form, each with a coquille-form bowl raised by an acanthus scroll above an acanthus-frond base. h. 2”, l. 2‑5/8”, w. 2‑1/2”; 3.86 total t. oz. Literature: Barbara McLean Ward and Gerald W. R. Ward, eds., Silver in American Life: Selections from the Mabel Brady Garvan and Other Collections at Yale University (New York: American Federation of Arts, 1979), p. 171, item 179. Catherine B. Hollan, Philadelphia Silversmiths and Related Artisans to 1861 (McLean, VA: Hollan Press, 2013), pp. 220‑221. Notes: An identical pair of Wilson Brothers salts are conserved in the Mabel Brady Garvan collection at Yale University, and were exhibited in the April 1979‑May 1982 American Federation of Arts traveling exhibit “Silver in American Life”.

117

$200‑$400

118

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119

119 Three American Coin Silver Salt Cellars

120 Reed & Barton Gilt Metal “United States” Salt and Pepper Set

third quarter 19th century, unmarked, including a pair, pedestal form, circular with octagonally lobed bowl and raised on an ogee-domed pedestal foot, with milled beaded rim and leaf-and-shell base; and a single example, dated 1852, pedestal form, the lobed bowl with beaded rim and raised on a pedestal foot with milled palmette-banded base, monogrammed and dated “EJJ / 1852”. pair, h. 2‑1/4”, dia. 3‑1/8”; single, h. 1‑3/4”, dia. 2‑7/8”; 5.32 total t. oz.

third quarter 19th century, Taunton, Massachusetts, model #4764/5‑S, including a pair of pedestal salt cellars and pair of baluster pepper casters, each with rope-twist banding and decorated with applied medallions of a flag-mantled and displayed eaglecrested American escutcheon, the salts additionally with two trident-mantled and addorsed dolphin-crested plaques reading “United States”, all raised on a waisted base above four anthemion feet. cellars, h. 2‑5/8”, dia. 3‑3/4”; casters, h. 6‑7/8”, dia. 2‑1/2”

$125‑$250

Literature: Dorothy T. Rainwater, Martin Fuller & Colette Fuller, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 5th ed. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2004), pp. 193‑197. Notes: This set is reported to have been part of the deck saloon service of the SS United States, launched in 1864 and wrecked off Cape Romain, South Carolina in 1881. $300‑$500

120

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121 American Sterling Silver Salt Cellar third quarter 19th century, William B. Durgin Co., Concord, New Hampshire, model #60, oval cauldron form, the bulbous body decorated with repousse flowers and rococo scrolls, with acanthus and palmette rim and raised on four ram’s masquecrested cloven feet. h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3”, w. 2‑3/8”; 4.07 t. oz. Literature: Charles S. Parsons, New Hampshire Silver (Exeter: Adams Brown, 1983), pp. 96‑97. $100‑$200 121

122 Pair of Wood & Hughes Coin Silver Salt Cellars third quarter 19th century, New York, New York, pedestal form, the saucer-shaped bowl with conical collar and vertically reeded band, with reeded triangular stirrup handles en suite, raised on a steep double-domed pedestal, the interior gilt and fitted with a cobalt glass liner (one lacking). h. 2‑1/4”, dia. 2‑5/8”, 4.24 total t. oz. Literature: Margaret K. Hofer et al., Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York (New York: D. Giles, 2011), pp. 158 & 336 $150‑$300 123 Pair of Wood & Hughes Coin Silver Salt Cellars third quarter 19th century, New York, New York, oval cauldron form, decorated with rococo-scroll cartouches, two void and two diapered, with wavy gadrooned rim and raised on four lion’s masquemounted paw feet. h. 1‑5/8”, l. 3”, w. 2‑3/8”; 5.87 total t. oz.

122

Literature: Margaret K. Hofer et al., Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York (New York: D. Giles, 2011), pp. 158 & 336. $200‑$400

123

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124

124 Pair of Wood & Hughes Coin Silver Salt Cellars third quarter 19th century, New York, New York, circular trencher form, each with a pair of Egyptian masque medallion-mounted squared arch handles, with guilloche rim and molded and beaded base. h. 2‑7/8”, dia. 2‑3/8”; 3.67 total t. oz. Literature: Margaret K. Hofer et al., Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York (New York: D. Giles, 2011), pp. 158 & 336. $200‑$400 125 Good Philadelphia Coin Silver Salt Cellar third quarter 19th century, by Peter L. Krider (1820‑1895), the basin-form bowl with gilt interior and supported by three monopodal herons with wings displayed and above a sharply waisted triangular plinth base. h. 2‑1/4”, dia. 2‑5/8”; 3.48 t. oz. Literature: Catherine B. Hollan, Philadelphia Silversmiths and Related Artisans to 1861 (McLean, VA: Hollan Press, 2013), pp. 110‑111.

125

$125‑$250 126 Near Pair of American Coin Silver Salt Cellars third quarter 19th century, by George Sharp (1819‑1904) for Bailey & Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, pedestal form, oval with upswept ends and raised on a conforming foot, the interiors gilt, monogrammed “ESH”. h. 2‑1/2”, l. 3‑7/8”, w. 2‑1/4”; 4.14 total t. oz. Literature: Catherine B. Hollan, Philadelphia Silversmiths and Related Artisans to 1861 (McLean, VA: Hollan Press, 2013), pp. 9‑10 & 182‑183. $150‑$300 126

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127 Pair of American Coin Silver Salt Cellars third quarter 19th century, oval cauldron form, the bulbous body with rope-twist rim and raised on four large rocaille-scroll feet, monogrammed “HB”. h. 2‑1/2”, l. 2‑3/4”, w. 2‑1/4”; 3.61 total t. oz. $125‑$250

127

128 Unusual American Sterling Silver Salt Cellar fourth quarter 19th century, by William B. Kerr & Co., Newark, New Jersey, retailed by Lebolt & Co., Chicago, Illinois, cauldron form, with beaded rim and gilt interior, raised on three large “Green Man” masque-crested acanthus feet, joined by rococo scroll and floral swags, monogrammed “M”. h. 2”, dia. 2‑3/4”, w. 3‑3/8”; 2.41 t. oz. Literature: Dorothy T. Rainwater, Martin Fuller & Colette Fuller, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 5th ed. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2004), pp. 126‑127. 129

$200‑$400

129 Pair of American Sterling Silver Salt Cellars fourth quarter 19th century, by Black, Starr & Frost, New York, New York, model #250, pedestal form, the octagonally paneled bowl with waisted and molded rim and gilt interior, raised on a conforming pedestal foot. h. 2‑1/8”, dia. 3”; 4.61 total t. oz. Literature: Dorothy T. Rainwater, Martin Fuller & Colette Fuller, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 5th ed. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2004), pp. 31. Margaret K. Hofer et al., Stories in Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New York (New York: D. Giles, 2011), pp. 178‑179 & 312. 128

56

$150‑$300


132 Three American Sterling and Silverplate Salt Cellars footed bowl form, including: Tiffany & Co. sterling silver model #4374, introduced in 1875, this example before 1861, New York, New York, circular, the shallow bulbous bowl decorated with broad floral acanthus gadroons, raised on a wide foot with embossed acanthus rim, monogrammed on the underside “BWN”, h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 2‑1/4”. Unmarked American sterling silver model #210, fourth quarter 19th century, oval, the bulbous body decorated with repousse floral banding centering opposing oval cartouches, with wavy gadrooned rim and raised on a conforming domed foot-ring, h. 1‑1/4”, l. 2‑7/8”, w. 2‑1/4”. Weidlich Bros. Mfg. Co. silverplate model #3853, first quarter 20th century, Bridgeport, Connecticut, circular, the bulbous bowl with robust spiral acanthus gadroons, raised on a waisted foot-ring, h. 1‑7/8”, dia. 2‑7/8”. 2.97 total t. oz. (sterling only)

130

130 Pair of American Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

$100‑$200

ca. 1900, cauldron form, with finely beaded rim and raised on three ball feet. h. 3/4”, dia. 1‑1/2”; 0.82 total t. oz. $40‑$60

131 Good Pair of American Arts & Crafts Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Spoons first quarter 20th century, by Marcus & Co., New York, New York, model #9, pedestal form, the shallow octagonal bowl with Greek-key rim, raised on a waisted and domed circular foot banded en suite, the whole with “hammered” finish, together with the original salt spoons with octagonal bowls and modified “fiddle” handle. cellars, h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 3”; spoons, l. 3‑1/4”; 3.33 total t. oz. Literature: Dorothy T. Rainwater, Martin Fuller & Colette Fuller, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 5th ed. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2004), p. 148. $200‑$400 131

132

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133

133 “Narragansett”-Style Salt Cellar and Spoon

134 Pair of Figural Water Lily Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Associated Spoons

ca. 1900, the bowl unmarked, the spoon Gorham Corp., Providence, Rhode Island, model #2, in the form of a realistic oyster shell, decorated with applied “barnacles” and single inverted shell foot, the spoon with shell-form bowl, ribboned “branch” handle and crab finial, the bowl acid engraved “Sea Bright NJ”. cellar, h. 1‑1/2”, l. 4‑3/4”, w. 2‑1/2”; spoon, l. 5”; 3.91 total t. oz.

ca. 1900, salt cellars by Whiting Mfg. Co., Providence, Rhode Island, in the form of a parcel-gilt and satin-finished blooming water lily attached by its stem to a lily pad base, together with a pair of Durgin Co., Concord, New Hampshire, salt spoons with bulrush handle and lily pad bowl. cellars, h. 1‑3/4”, l. 3‑1/8”, dia. 2‑1/2”; spoons, l. 4”; 6.00 total t. oz.

Literature: Chris A. McGlothlin, Gorham Spoons: Sterling Souvenirs from a Bygone Era (Louisville, KY: Rock Springs Press, 2017), pp. 342‑344.

Literature: Patricia Johnson, 5,000 Open Salts: A Collector’s Guide (Torrance, CA, the author, 1982), pp. 204 (illustrated) & 265, item 4162. Dorothy T. Rainwater, Martin Fuller & Colette Fuller, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 5th ed. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2004), pp. 274‑275.

Notes: McGlothlin notes that the set here was probably an almond set, and came in two sizes. “Crab Spoon #2” was cast in pieces and hand assembled, so that no two are exactly identical. It was known with at least four bowl variations.

$300‑$500

$150‑$300

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134


135 Pair of Whiting Sterling Silver Salt Cellars fourth quarter 19th century, Providence, Rhode Island, model #5851, bowl form, the broad rim embossed with gadroons and floral threading, the interior gilt and monogrammed “EMA”. h. 3/4”, dia. 3”; 1.63 total t. oz. Literature: Dorothy T. Rainwater, Martin Fuller & Colette Fuller, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 5th ed. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2004), pp. 274‑275. $60‑$90 136 Pair of Durgin Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

135

first quarter 20th century, Concord, New Hampshire, retailed by Bailey, Banks & Biddle, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, model #1690, circular bowl form, the everted and rolled rim embossed with flowers and scrolls, monogrammed “S”. h. 7/8”, dia. 2‑3/4”; 1.67 total t. oz. Literature: Charles S. Parsons, New Hampshire Silver (Exeter: Adams Brown, 1983), pp. 96‑97. $40‑$60 137 Pair of Durgin Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

136

first quarter 20th century, Concord, New Hampshire, model #151, retailed by Harris & Shafer, Washington, D.C., pedestal form, the hemispherical bowl decorated with applied laurel rim and floral swags, raised on a domed pedestal foot with laurel band en suite. h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 2‑3/8”; 3.60 total t. oz. Literature: Charles S. Parsons, New Hampshire Silver (Exeter: Adams Brown, 1983), pp. 96‑97. $75‑$125 138 Pair of Durgin Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

137

first quarter 20th century, Concord, New Hampshire, model #206, oval trencher form, with molded basal edge, monogrammed “MGMacF”. h. 1”, l. 3‑1/8”, w. 2‑1/2”; 3.22 total t. oz. Literature: Charles S. Parsons, New Hampshire Silver (Exeter: Adams Brown, 1983), pp. 96‑97. $100‑$200

138

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139 S. Kirk & Son Sterling Silver Salt Cellar and Spoon mid-20th century, Baltimore, Maryland, model #58, cauldron form, with everted rim decorated with repousse flowers, raised on three acanthus-crested pad feet, fitted with a colorless glass liner and accompanied by a “Repousse” pattern salt spoon. cellar, h. 1‑1/2”, dia. 2‑5/8”; spoon, l. 3”; 2.38 total t. oz. (excluding liner) Literature: Jennifer Faulds Goldsborough, Silver In Maryland (Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1983), pp. 155‑162. $100‑$200 140 Pair of S. Kirk & Son Sterling Silver Salt Cellars second quarter 20th century, Baltimore, Maryland, model #3, cauldron form, decorated with repousse flowers, with applied laurel rim and raised on three acanthus-crested pad feet, fitted with a red-flashed cut glass liner with scalloped rim (one liner lacking), monogrammed on the underside “ABM”, and accompanied by two “Repousse” pattern salt spoons. cellars, h. 1‑5/8”, dia. 2‑1/2”; spoons, l. 3”; 4.76 total t. oz. (excluding liner)

139

Literature: Jennifer Faulds Goldsborough, Silver In Maryland (Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1983), pp. 155‑162. $150‑$300 141 Pair of S. Kirk & Son Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Spoons mid-20th century, Baltimore, Maryland, model #59A, trencher form, decorated with a wide floral repousse band, together with a pair of “Repousse” pattern salt spoons. cellars, h. 7/8”, dia. 1‑7/8”; spoons, l. 2‑3/8”; 2.88 total t. oz. 140

Literature: Jennifer Faulds Goldsborough, Silver In Maryland (Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1983), pp. 155‑162. $125‑$250

141

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142

142 Three American Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

144 Seven Small American Silver and Glass Salt Cellars

including: Baldwin & Miller model #43, second quarter 20th century, Newark, New Jersey, retailed by Black, Starr and Gorham, New York, New York, cauldron form, with molded rim and raised on three shell-crested trefid pad feet, monogrammed “HAO’B”, h. 1‑1/4”, dia. 2‑1/8”. Dunkirk Silversmiths, Inc. model #165F, mid-20th century, Meriden, Connecticut, pedestal form, the shallow saucer bowl with embossed floral scroll rim and raised on a double ogee-domed foot, h. 1‑3/8”, dia. 3‑1/8”. Whiting model #3941, ca. 1915, Providence, Rhode Island, bowl form, the everted rim embossed with shelland-scroll banding, the interior gilt, h. 7/8”, dia. 3”. 3.30 total t. oz.

including an unmarked set of three, second quarter 20th century, bowl form, with tapering paneled sides, fitted with a molded light amethyst glass liner (one lacking), h. 5/8”, dia. 1‑1/4”; another set of three, second quarter 20th century, Webster Co., North Attleboro, Massachusetts, bowl form with reticulated gallery (one with variant pattern), fitted with a conforming colorless glass liner, h. 7/8”, dia. 1‑7/8”; and a single silver deposit glass salt cellar, ca. 1900, the maker’s mark rubbed, but possibly Wymble Mfg. Co., Newark, New Jersey, bowl form, the squat cylindrical colorless glass body decorated with openwork engraved silver overlay, h. 3/4”, dia. 1‑1/2”. 1.06 total t. oz. (weighable silver) $50‑$80

$100‑$200 143 Pair of American Sterling Silver Salt Cellars second quarter 20th century, by M. Fred Hirsch Co., Inc., Jersey City, New Jersey, model #486, pedestal form, the bulbous bowl with gadrooned rim and raised on a waisted pedestal foot with rim en suite. h. 2‑1/8”, dia. 2‑1/2”; 4.15 total t. oz. Literature: Dorothy T. Rainwater, Martin Fuller & Colette Fuller, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 5th ed. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2004), p. 107. $100‑$200

143

144

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146

145 Pair of American Sterling Silver Salt Cellars third quarter 20th century, by Fisher Silversmiths, Jersey City, New Jersey, model #758, pedestal form, the bucketform body raised on a conforming domed pedestal foot, with gadrooned rim and base. h. 4‑5/8”, dia. 2‑1/4”; 2.12 total t. oz. Literature: Dorothy T. Rainwater, Martin Fuller & Colette Fuller, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 5th ed. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2004), p. 77. 145

$50‑$80 146 Set of Four American Sterling Silver Salt Cellars

147 Set of Six Sterling Silver Salt Cellars and Spoons

mid-20th century, by the Meriden Britannia division of International Silversmiths, Meriden, Connecticut, model #S42, octagonal bowl form, lobed with reeded rim. h. 5/8”, w. 2‑5/8”; 2.31 total t. oz.

62

Literature: Dorothy T. Rainwater, Martin Fuller & Colette Fuller, Encyclopedia of American Silver Manufacturers, 5th ed. (Atglen, PA: Schiffer, 2004), pp. 158‑158.

contemporary, American, the cellars of coquille form, each crested with a putto playing one of six different musical instruments, raised above a foliate standard and gadrooned circular foot with black plastic disc base, with six salt spoons with coquille bowl and twist-stem. cellars, h. 2”, dia. 1‑5/8”; spoons, l. 1‑3/4”; 6.48 total t. oz. (including plastic elements)

$125‑$250

$125‑$250

147


148 Twenty-Three American Named Pattern Sterling Silver Salt Spoons including: One Kirk, “Repousse” (1820), l. 2‑3/8” Two Tiffany, “Palm” (1871), l. 3‑5/8” Four Stieff, “Rose” (1892), l. 2‑3/4” Two Towle, “Old Colonial” (1895), l. 2‑1/4” One Dominick & Haff, “No. 10” (1896), l. 2‑1/4” Two Towle, “Georgian” (1898), l. 2‑1/4” Two Towle, “King’s” (1904), l. 2‑3/8” One Lunt, “John Hancock” (1911), monogrammed “L”, l. 2‑1/8” One Watson, “Martha Hilton” (1914), monogrammed “MEC”, l. 3” One Wallace, “Rose Point” (1934), l. 2‑3/8” Two Towle, “Old Master” (1942), l. 2‑3/8” One Wallace, “Romance of the Sea” (1950), l. 2‑1/4” Three Stieff, “Williamsburg Shell” (1970), l. 3” 4.31 total t. oz. $125‑$250

149 Thirty-Five American and Other Sterling Silver Salt Spoons

148

including: Six Heer-Schofield lancet handle, l. 2‑3/4” Six Paye & Baker rococo handle, l. 2‑1/8” One Webster threaded handle, l. 2‑1/2” One Heer-Schofield “Baltimore Rose”, l. 2‑5/8” Two Elmcroft “Fiddle”, l. 2‑3/8” And unmarked pieces: One spatulate handle, monogrammed “S”, l. 3” One Colonial Revival, monogrammed “W”, l. 2‑3/4” One Art Nouveau handle, l. 2‑3/4” One ball finial and twist stem, l. 2‑1/4” One ring finial and twist stem, l. 2‑1/8” One thread and scroll, l. 2” One rococo handle and shell bowl, l. 2” One “Lily”, l. 2‑3/8” One rococo handle, l. 2‑3/4” One threaded handle, l. 2‑1/2” Two ball finial, l. 3‑1/8” Two Art Deco with shell bowl, l. 2” Two lancet handle, l. 2‑3/8” Three “Onslow” with shell bowl, l. 3‑1/8” 5.19 total t. oz. $125‑$250

149

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1. Introduction (a). These Conditions of Sale (“Conditions of Sale”) contain all the terms governing Auctions (defined below) conducted by Cakebread Art Antiques Collectables, Inc. d/b/a New Orleans Auction Galleries (“NOAG”), and all the terms under which NOAG and the Seller (defined below) of a Lot (defined below) contract with the Buyer (defined below). These Conditions of Sale may be amended by posted notices or oral announcements made during the Auction. (b). Under these Conditions of Sale, the following capitalized terms are defined as follows: • An “Auction” is a public auction conducted by NOAG, at which Bidders may place Bids to purchase one or more Lots offered for sale by NOAG. An Auction takes place over one or more days and includes separate auctions of one or more Lots within an event conducted by NOAG; • The “Auctioneer” is the auctioneer calling the Auction conducted by NOAG; A “Bid” is a bid made by a party at the Auction to purchase a Lot; • A “Bidder” is (i) a person making a Bid at the Auction (whether in person, through an absentee bid, through electronic or internet means, or through telephone bidding); and/or (ii) a person who attends the Auction and registers to make a Bid (whether in person, through an absentee bid, through electronic or internet means, or through telephone bidding); • A “Buyer” is the party that commits to purchase a Lot by submitting the Winning Bid at Auction; • “Buyer’s Premium” is defined in Section 4 below; • “Catalogue” is the Auction catalogue utilized by NOAG to list the Lots offered at Auction; • The “Estimates” are the high and low estimates of value for each Lot set forth in the Catalogue presented by NOAG in connection with the Auction or otherwise set forth and/or announced at the Auction; • The “Hammer Price” for a Lot is the amount of the Winning Bid at the Auction, as announced by the Auctioneer, exclusive of commissions, Buyer’s Premium, expenses, and any taxes or other charges; • A “Lot” is specific item of property offered for sale at Auction; The “Reserve” is defined in Section 3 below; • The “Purchase Price” is defined in Section 4 below; A “Sale” of a Lot occurs when a Winning Bid is declared at Auction for the Lot; • The “Seller” of a Lot is the party who consigned the Lot with NOAG for purposes of selling the Lot, or is otherwise the seller of the Lot; • The “Winning Bid” is, as to a particular Lot, the Bid recognized by the Auctioneer as the highest and best Bid for that Lot.

(c). Except as otherwise stated, NOAG acts as consignment agent for the Seller. The contract for the sale of the Lot is therefore made between the Seller and the Buyer. (d). By bidding at the Auction as a Bidder or Buyer, and/or by your signature below, you agree to be bound by these terms.

2. Before the Auction (a). ALL SALES ARE “AS IS, WHERE IS” WITH NO EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES WHATSOEVER. (i) NEITHER NOAG NOR THE SELLER PROVIDES ANY GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY AS TO THE NATURE, DESCRIPTION, GENUINENESS, PROVENANCE, IMPORTANCE, OR CONDITION OF THE LOT. All Sales and Auctions are without any representation or warranty of any kind by NOAG or the Seller. Bidders and Buyers are responsible for satisfying themselves concerning the condition of the Lots and the matters referred to in the catalogue entry, the Condition Report, or in any other statement or writing provided. All Sales are final and are “AS IS WHERE IS.” (ii) No warranty of redhibition. ANY WARANTY AGAINST REDHIBITORY DEFECTS IS WAIVED AND EXCLUDED. NOAG and Seller provide absolutely no warranty against redhibitory defects, including without limitation: (x) any defects rendering a Lot useless or its use inconvenient; and (y) any defects diminishing the usefulness of a Lot; and any such warranties are waived and excluded. In addition, NOAG and Seller provide no warranties, guarantees, or representations as to whether a Lot is fit for its ordinary use, fit for Buyer’s intended use or for Buyer’s particular purpose. (iii) No warranty against eviction. ANY WARRANTY AGAINST EVICTION IS WAIVED AND EXCLUDED. In the event that Buyer is evicted from possession of whole or part of the Lot, neither NOAG nor Seller have any duty whatsoever to return any part of the Purchase Price to Buyer. Buyer is buying at Buyer’s sole risk and peril as to third parties who may claim rights in the Lot after the Sale. (iv) No warranty as to authorship. NOAG does not make any express or implied warranty as to authorship of works of art and fine art. No statement in the Catalogue or elsewhere, orally or in writing, shall be construed as an express or implied warranty, representation or limitation of liability as to authorship. Any such warranty is WAIVED. (v) No warranty of peaceful possession, etc. The following warranties are waived and excluded: the absence of hidden defects, peaceful possession, and ownership. NOAG and Seller provide absolutely no warranty that the Lot is free from hidden defects, or for peaceful possession, or for ownership. (vi) No other warranties. None of the Seller, NOAG, or any of NOAG’s officers, employees or agents, give any representation, warranty or guarantee or assume any liability of any kind in respect of any Lot with regard to merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, description, size, quality, condition, attribution, authenticity, rarity, importance, medium, provenance, exhibition history, literature or historical relevance. Except as required by local law, any express or implied warranty of any kind whatsoever is excluded by this Section 2(a). (b). Examination of property / Condition Reports. Prospective Buyers and Bidders are strongly advised to examine personally any property in which they are interested, before the Auction takes place. As a convenience, Bidders may request that NOAG produce a Condition Report (“Condition Report”) for a Lot, which, if produced, will provide additional detail concerning the condition of the Lot as observed by NOAG’s staff. NOAG reserves the right to decline to produce a Condition Report for any specific Lot, for any reason and in NOAG’s sole discretion. Rev. 01/04/17


(c). Catalogue and other descriptions. (i) All statements made by NOAG as to condition, authorship, period, culture, source, origin, measurement, quality, rarity, provenance, importance, or historical relevance, whether in the Catalogue entry for the Lot, in the Condition Report, and/ or in a bill of sale, or made orally or in writing elsewhere, are qualified statements of opinion only and are not to be relied on as statements of fact. Such statements do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by NOAG of any kind. References in the Catalogue entry or the Condition Report to damage or restoration are for guidance only and should be evaluated by personal inspection by the Bidder or a knowledgeable representative. The absence of such a reference does not imply that an item is free from defects or restoration, nor does a reference to particular defects imply the absence of any others. (ii) Without limiting the foregoing, none of the Seller, NOAG, or any of NOAG’s officers, employees or agents, are responsible for the correctness of any statement of whatever kind concerning any Lot, whether written or oral, nor for any other errors or omissions in description or for any faults or defects in any Lot. (iii) Any Estimates provided should not be relied on as a statement that this is the price at which the item will sell or its value for any other purpose. Any written or oral appraisal, Estimate or other statement of NOAG or our representatives with respect to the estimated or expected selling price of any Lot of Property is a statement of opinion only and shall not be relied upon by Bidders or prospective Bidders as a prediction or guarantee of the actual selling price. (iv) NOAG shall not be liable for any errors or omissions in catalogue or other descriptions of the Property. Neither NOAG nor the Seller is responsible in any way for errors and omissions in the catalogue, or any supplemental material. (d). Further acknowledgement. As a Bidder and prospective Buyer, you further agree and acknowledge that: (i) You are not relying on NOAG’s skill or judgment in selecting to purchase any Lot; (ii) No oral or written statements in the Auction Catalogue, Condition Report, or elsewhere are the cause of or reason behind your purchase of any Lot; and you would have incurred such purchase regardless of any oral or written statements about condition, attribution, kind, quality, value, or authorship made in the catalogue or elsewhere; (iii) NOAG did not and could not have known that condition, attribution, kind, quality, expressed value, or authorship is the cause or reason why you decide to purchase any Lot; (iv) Your purchase of any Lot is not intended to gratify a nonpecuniary interest; and (v) NOAG did not know, nor should it have known, that any oral or written statement about a Lot in the catalogue, Condition Report or elsewhere would cause a nonpecuniary loss to a Buyer.

3. At the Auction (a). Registration before bidding / Bidding requirements. In order to be accepted as a Bidder and allowed to place a Bid, all Bidders must meet all of the following requirements: (i) A Bidder must complete and sign the attached registration form and provide identification to NOAG; (ii) NOAG may require the production of bank or other financial references or any other additional information; (iii) When making a Bid, a Bidder is accepting personal liability to pay the Purchase Price in full in the event that the Bidder submits the Winning Bid, unless it has been explicitly agreed in writing with NOAG before the auction of the Lot that the Bidder is acting as agent on behalf of an identified third party acceptable to NOAG, and that NOAG will only look to that principal for payment (iv) All Bids are to be made in U.S. currency unless agreed upon between NOAG and the Bidder; and (v) At NOAG’s sole discretion, NOAG may require any Bidder to post a cash deposit in an amount set by NOAG at its sole discretion. Such deposit may include, without limitation, a deposit of 25% of the Maximum Bid (or another amount set in NOAG’s sole discretion) in the case of Absentee Bids (defined below). (b). Refusal of admission / Rejection of Bidders. NOAG has the right, at its complete discretion, to refuse admission to the premises or participation in any Auction. NOAG reserves the right to reject any Bidder for any reason whatsoever and in NOAG’s sole discretion. (c). Absentee bids / Telephone bids. (i) As a convenience to Bidders, NOAG may allow a Bidder to submit an absentee bid (“Absentee Bid”) or telephone bid (“Telephone Bid”) by filling out (in full) the section of the attached registration form marked “Absentee Bids / Telephone Bids.” In order to submit an Absentee Bid or Telephone Bid for an Auction, that registration form must be filled out and submitted to NOAG no later than 5:00 p.m. central time on the last business day before the commencement of the Auction. (NOAG reserves the right to accept late Absentee Bid or Telephone Bid submissions in NOAG’s sole discretion.) All Absentee Bid submissions must include a maximum bid amount (“Maximum Bid”). (ii) If an Absentee Bid is submitted and accepted, at the time of the auction of the affected Lot, the Auctioneer or other NOAG staff will place the Absentee Bid at the amount of the opening bid amount, and will increase the amount as necessary until the earlier of (x) the Absentee Bid is the Winning Bid; or (y) the amount reaches the Maximum Bid. All such actions in this paragraph are at the sole discretion of the Auctioneer and/ or NOAG. If NOAG receives Absentee Bids on a particular Lot with identical Maximum Bid amounts, and at the Auction these are the highest bids on the Lot, the Lot will be sold to the person whose Absentee Bid was received and accepted first. In the event of a tie bid between an Absentee Bid and a Bid submitted by a Bidder physically present at the Auction (or a Telephone Bid), the Lot will be sold to physically present Bidder (or bidder submitting the Telephone Bid).

Rev. 01/04/17


(iii) If a Telephone Bid is submitted and accepted, at the time of the auction of the affected Lot, NOAG staff shall attempt to contact the Bidder using the telephone number provided. If successfully contacted, the Bidder shall then be afforded the opportunity to place a Bid on the Lot by telephone. Telephone Bids may be recorded. By submitting a Telephone Bid, the Bidder consents to the recording of the conversation and the placing of the Bid. (iv) Execution of Absentee Bids and Telephone Bids is a free service undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the Auction and neither NOAG nor the Auctioneer shall have any liability for failing to execute an Absentee Bid or Telephone Bid or for errors and omissions in connection therewith. (d). Video or digital images. At some Auctions there may be a video or digital screen. Errors may occur in its operation and in the quality of the image and we do not accept liability for such errors. NOAG reserves the right to video tape and record proceedings at any Auctions. Any personal information obtained will be held in confidence by NOAG but may be used or shared with our affiliates and marketing partners for customer analysis purposes and to help us to tailor our services to buyer requirements. Any Bidder attending an Auction in person who does not wish to be video-taped may make arrangements to make a Telephone Bid in accordance with Section 3(c) above. (e). Reserves. All Lots are offered subject to a reserve, which is the confidential minimum price below which the Lot will not be sold (the “Reserve”). The Reserve for a Lot will not exceed the low Estimate for that Lot. The Auctioneer may open the bidding on any Lot below the Reserve by placing a bid on behalf of the Seller. The Auctioneer may continue to bid on behalf of the Seller up to the amount of the Reserve, either by placing consecutive bids or by placing bids in response to other bidders. Notwithstanding the foregoing, a Lot may be sold at a Hammer Price below the Reserve, at the discretion of the Auctioneer and NOAG, in any manner consistent with the agreement between NOAG and the Seller. (f). No bidding by Seller. Under no circumstances shall Seller (as agent or principal), whether by itself or through its representatives, employees or agents (except as through the Auctioneer as set forth in Section 3(e) above), enter or cause to be entered a Bid on Seller’s Lot. (g). Auctioneer’s discretion. The Auctioneer has the right at his or her absolute and sole discretion to refuse any Bid, to advance the bidding in such a manner as he or she may decide, to withdraw or divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots, and in the event of any error or dispute, to determine the Winning Bid, to continue the bidding, to cancel the Sale or to reoffer and resell the Lot or item in dispute. If any dispute arises after the Sale, NOAG’s sale record is conclusive. Unless otherwise announced by the Auctioneer at the time of Sale, all Bids are per Lot as numbered in the Catalogue and no Lot shall be divided for Sale. NOAG and/or the Auctioneer may withdraw any Lot at any time before such Lot is offered at Auction, for any reason and in their sole and absolute discretion. (h). Successful bid and passing of risk. The Auctioneer shall have absolute discretion in determining the Winning Bid and the striking of the Auctioneer’s hammer marks the acceptance of the highest and best bid as the Winning Bid and the conclusion of a contract for sale between the Seller and the Buyer. Risk and responsibility for the Lot but not its title passes to the Buyer immediately upon announcement of the Winning Bid at the Auction. (i). Post-auction sale. In the event that there is no Winning Bid at Auction for a Lot, or the Lot is withdrawn from the Auction, or the Sale is cancelled for non-payment pursuant to Section 4(g) below, NOAG may sell the Lot at public or private sale at any time thereafter, in a manner consistent with the agreement between Seller and NOAG. (j). NOAG assumes no responsibility for failure to execute Bids for any reason whatsoever.

4. After the Auction (a). In order to consummate and complete the Sale, the Buyer must tender payment in full of all of the following amounts (all such amounts together being the “Purchase Price”) to NOAG: (i) the Hammer Price; and (ii) the “Buyer’s Premium” consisting of a premium of 25% of the Hammer Price (discounted to 22% if the method of payment is by check, cash, or wire transfer [subject to a $30 fee for domestic wires and a $60 fee for international wires] by the end of the day on the fifteenth calendar day following the conclusion of the Auction) up to and including a Hammer Price of $200,000 and 10% of the amount by which the Lot’s Hammer Price exceeds $200,000; and (iii) Any applicable Louisiana, state, local, and federal or other taxes, calculated as required by law. Any documentation of tax exemption must be provided by the Bidder contemporaneously with the execution of the attached registration form. (b). Payment and passing of title. The Buyer and any other Bidders are responsible for contacting NOAG for Auction results during the week after the conclusion of the Auction. Subject to the provisions of Section 4(i) below which may require earlier payment, the Buyer must pay the full Purchase Price no later than 4:30 pm central time on the fifteenth calendar day following the conclusion of the Auction. Payments may be submitted during business hours to: New Orleans Auction Galleries, 333 St. Joseph Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70130, Telephone number: 504-566-1849. Payments may be made by certified check, cash, wire transfer, or credit card (Visa, Mastercard, and American Express). Payments will be accepted by non-certified check only in NOAG’s sole discretion, from Buyers that have been qualified by NOAG in NOAG’s sole discretion. Title to the Lot does not pass to the Buyer until the full amount of the Purchase Price has been tendered and received by NOAG in good cleared funds, even in circumstances where the Lot has been released to the Buyer. (c). Credit Cards. Your signature on this form constitutes permission to charge the full amount of the Purchase Price on your credit card, if you are the Buyer on a Lot and payment is not received within five business days of the close of the Auction. Your signature on this form also constitutes permission to charge the full amount of Storage Charges (defined below), if and when accrued, on a periodic basis on your credit card. (d). Release of Lot to Buyer. No Lot will be released to the Buyer unless and until NOAG receives full payment of the Purchase Price, and such payment has cleared and NOAG has received confirmation of all funds owed. At its sole discretion, NOAG may release a specific Lot at any time, notwithstanding the foregoing provision. In addition, NOAG may require that Lots not be released until the Buyer has cleared additional checks in NOAG’s sole discretion, including without limitation, any anti-money laundering or antiterrorism financing checks to NOAG’s satisfaction. In the event that a Buyer fails to complete any anti-money laundering or anti-terrorism financing checks to NOAG’s satisfaction, NOAG shall be entitled to cancel the Sale and take any other action permitted or required under applicable law. In addition, notwithstanding the foregoing, Lots cannot be released until after the conclusion of the Auction. (e). Export/Import license and Dealers. It is the Buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any relevant export or import license. The denial of any license or any delay in obtaining licenses shall not justify the rescission of any sale nor any delay in making bill payment for the Lot; and shall not limit or alter any of the obligations of the Buyer herein. Dealers purchasing for resale must enter appropriate their Dealer Resale Number on the attached registration form and provide NOAG with proper documentation. Rev. 01/04/17


(f). Storage charge. Subject to the foregoing provisions, any Lot that is not picked up by the end of the day on the fifteenth calendar day following the conclusion of the Auction is subject to an additional storage charge of $5.00 per Lot per day (“Storage Charge”) for as long as the Lot is stored at NOAG’s facilities. The outstanding amount of this Storage Charge must be paid in full (in addition to the Purchase Price) before such Lot will be released to the Buyer. Such Storage Charge accrues on a daily basis and is billed monthly. All items handled or stored will be at the Buyer’s risk. NOAG is not liable for any damage to Lots after the conclusion of the Auction. (g). Remedies for non-payment. If the Buyer fails to make payment in full of the Purchase Price in good cleared funds within the time required by Section 4(b) above, or payment in full of any applicable Storage Charge when incurred, NOAG shall be entitled in its absolute discretion to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies (in addition to asserting any other rights or remedies available by law): (i) to charge outstanding amounts to the Buyer’s credit card; (ii) to charge interest at the rate of one and one-half percent (1.5%) per month (but not to exceed the highest amount chargeable under applicable law); (iii) to hold the Buyer liable for the total amount due and to commence legal proceedings for its recovery together with interest, legal fees and costs to the fullest extent permitted under applicable law; (iv) to exercise any other remedy or remedies available under the law, including but not limited to a second sale of said item in accordance with the provisions of applicable law, including the subsequent enforcement of any deficiency against the initial buyer; (v) to cancel the sale; (vi) to resell the property publicly or privately on such terms as we shall think fit; (vii) to pay the Seller an amount up to the net proceeds payable in respect of the amount bid by the defaulting Buyer; (viii) to set off against any amounts which NOAG may owe the Buyer in any other transactions, the outstanding amount remaining unpaid by the Buyer; (ix) where several amounts are owed by the Buyer to NOAG, in respect of different transactions, to apply any amount paid to discharge any amount owed in respect of any particular transaction, whether or not the Buyer so directs; (x) to reject at any future Auction any Bids made by or on behalf of the Buyer or to obtain a deposit from the Buyer before accepting any Bids; (xi) to exercise all the rights and remedies of a person holding security and/or privilege over any property in our possession owned by the Buyer, whether by way of pledge, security interest or in any other way, to the fullest extent permitted under Louisiana law (including without limitation under La. Civil Code art. 3247, La. R.S. 10:7-209 and 10:7-210 and other applicable law), or (xii) to take such other action as NOAG deems necessary or appropriate. In connection with the item (xi) above, the Buyer will be deemed to have granted such security to NOAG and NOAG may retain the affected Lot and any property of the Buyer as collateral security for such Buyer’s obligations to NOAG and to the Seller

If we resell the property under Section 4(g)(vi) above, the Buyer shall be liable for payment of any deficiency between the total amount originally due to us and the price obtained upon resale as well as for all costs, expenses, damages, legal fees and commissions and premiums of whatever kind associated with both sales or otherwise arising from the default. If we pay any amount to the Seller under paragraph (vii) above, the Buyer acknowledges that NOAG shall have all of the rights of the Seller, however arising, to pursue the Buyer for such amount. (h). Shipping and packing. All shipping, packing, and transportation of Lots from NOAG’s facilities is the responsibility of Buyer. NOAG may, as a courtesy, assist Buyer with necessary arrangements, but by doing so, NOAG assumes no responsibility or liability for shipping, packing, moving, or transportation, including without limitation damage to Lots, damage to Buyer’s vehicle, or any personal injury of any persons involved. (i). Earlier payment may be required. For any specific Lot, and notwithstanding the provisions of Section 4(b) above, NOAG may require, in its sole discretion, that the Hammer Price for the Lot be paid immediately upon the striking of the Auctioneer’s hammer and announcement of the Winning Bid, with the balance of the Purchase Price being due by the close of the Auction.

5.Copyright The copyright in all images, illustrations and written material produced by or for NOAG relating to a Lot including without limitation the contents of the Catalogue, is and shall remain at all times the property of NOAG and shall not be used by the Buyer or Bidder, nor by anyone else, without our prior written consent. NOAG and the Seller make no representation or warranty that the Buyer of a Lot will acquire any copyright or other reproduction rights in it.

6. Severability If any part of these Conditions of Sale is found by any court to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, that part shall be discounted and the rest of the conditions shall continue to be valid to the fullest extent permitted by law.

7. Data Collection In connection with the operation of our auction business, NOAG may need to seek personal information from Bidders or obtain information about Bidders from third parties (e.g., credit checks from banks). Such information will be processed and kept by us in confidence. Some of Bidders’ personal data may also need to be shared with third party service providers (e.g., shipping or storage companies) for Bidders’ benefit. By participating in an Auction, you agree to all previously stated disclosure.

8. Law and Jurisdiction The rights and obligations of the parties with respect to these Conditions of Sale, the conduct of the Auction and any matters connected with any of the foregoing shall be governed and interpreted under the laws of the State of Louisiana. By bidding at the Auction and/or through execution of the attached registration form, the Bidder consents to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of the State of Louisiana and the Federal courts of the United States of America located in the Eastern District of Louisiana.

Rev. 01/04/17


64

Silver Salt Cellars | Online-Only Auction  

The sale includes over 165 lots of single, pairs and groups of salt cellars, including 65 Gorham examples, early 18th century English, Frenc...

Silver Salt Cellars | Online-Only Auction  

The sale includes over 165 lots of single, pairs and groups of salt cellars, including 65 Gorham examples, early 18th century English, Frenc...