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New Orleans Auction galleries

F I N E A RT A U C T I O N april 21, 2018


Fine Art Auction April 21, 2018 10:00 a.m. CDT

New Orleans Auction galleries

333 Saint Joseph Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70130 www.neworleansauction.com | info@neworleansauction.com | Main: 504.566.1849 | Fax: 504.566.1851 LA Auction License AB-363, Steinkamp #1265, Thomas #1833, Eichenwald #1922 | 25% Buyer’s Premium Pictured Left: Lot 202 | Front Cover: Lot 109 | Back Cover: Lot 251


Exhibition:

April 9 - 20, 2018 Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday, April 14, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Evening Reception:

Thursday, April 19, 2018, 5 - 7:30 p.m.

LOT SCHEDULE

Please note that times are approximate

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f e at u r e d p r o p e r t y: The Estate of Donald Stuart Caulkins, Sr. Brentwood, Tennessee The Estate of Mark Chapman Cat Spring, Texas The Collection of James Harris, PhD Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Deaccessioned Property from a Southern Institution The Corporate Collection of Freeport-McMoRan New Orleans, Louisiana A Private Collection Dallas, Texas A Private Collection Hilton Head, South Carolina

Pictured: Lot 232


letter from the director of fine art

“Art is an experience not an object.” —Robert Motherwell

I recently stumbled upon the above quote by Robert

Motherwell.

His

succinct

statement

captures a concept that has taken others many words to express: art serves a greater purpose. Art can make us feel a range of emotions and transport us to places that we never thought possible.

to present this carefully curated collection of

paintings, prints and sculpture. Spring is a time of reflection for me as I look forward to leaving the dreariness of winter behind and the world begins to come alive again. I think over the past year, and

reflect on the ups and downs, accomplishments

The enormous variety of pieces offered in this sale represent stories and, as Motherwell says,

experiences. Each piece has meaning beyond the surface: why was this piece created, who or what does it represent, whose hands has

it passed through? These questions lead the viewer on what can be a deeply personal journey.

Painting and sculpting is, after all, a vulnerable

kind of work. The artists have poured themselves into an image and put it out there for us to judge.

In this sale you will see 18th-century British portraits,

I believe April in New Orleans is a perfect time

French

Impressionist

and

Post-

Impressionist paintings, examples of orientalism, contemporary

Southern

regional

works

and

many others. It is a celebration of the visual arts, spanning many continents, styles and genres.

and disappointments, and am always reminded of life’s infinite possibilities.

A city as complex and layered as New Orleans

also provides a fitting backdrop for an auction as diverse as this one. It is a city steeped in history

that continues to be shaped by the many distinct cultures and individual characters that call it home. This unique landscape and flavor has made it a haven and an inspiration for artists for centuries.

I invite you to explore this catalogue with an open

mind, looking at each work and reading the notes

as they may open a window into new worlds and

hopefully peak your interest enough to inquire

further, or even better, come visit us here at New Orleans Auction Galleries.

Jelena James Director of Fine Art


donald stuart caulkins, sr. Brentwood, Tennessee

Donald Stuart Caulkins, Sr. attended St. Joseph Juniorate, Peabody, MA. Following high school, he entered the Air Force, becoming a Command Pilot with the Tactical Air Command and eventually rising to the rank of major by retirement. Caulkins served three tours in the Vietnam War, flying 86 ground attack missions targeting the Ho Chi Minh Trail in Laos and Cambodia with the 56th Special Operations Wing, Udorn, Thailand. Major Caulkins trained scores of Hmong pilots to fly the AT-28D Trojan fighter-bomber in “The Secret War� in Laos. Caulkins was awarded The Distinguished Flying Cross for displaying extraordinary aerial heroism by repeatedly attacking a heavily defended ammunition depot. Piloting the C-130 Hercules he assisted in the tactical development of JATO rockets, the Fulton Recovery System, Arctic operations, and the in-flight recovery of Corona satellite film dropped from space during the Cold War - earning two Air Medals among other decorations. Thousands of Army Airborne troops jumped from his plane during his time at Sewart Air Force Base, Smyrna, Tennessee. He was a staff member of the Inspector General, United States Air Forces (USAF) in Europe, and also at USAF Headquarters at the Pentagon, serving as the Officer of the Day for the Air Force worldwide. During his military service, he earned a Bachelor of Arts at Syracuse University; a Masters of Public Administration from University of Pittsburgh; and a law degree from George Washington University. On loan to the Justice Department he served as an Assistant Deputy Attorney General of the United States and then retired from military service. Upon relocating to Franklin, Tennessee, he served as Chief Deputy Attorney General for the State of Tennessee where he led the go team to remove Governor Ray Blanton from office and wrote the legislation establishing the compensation and benefit system for District Attorneys and Public Defenders.

Entering private practice as a trial attorney with his wife and legal assistant, Yvonne, and son, D. Stuart Caulkins, Jr., he practiced law for 25 years until retirement in 2005. New Orleans Auction Galleries is pleased to offer paintings from the Estate of Donald Caulkins, Sr.


Lot 192


1 Antwerp School (First Quarter 16th Century) “A Triptych: Adoration of the Magi, Nativity, and Rest on the Flight to Egypt” oil on shaped panels unsigned, left wing verso with “Carl Westenburger, Frankfurt, Germany” restorer label, ca. 1930’s. In conforming frames. central panel: 29” x 20‑1/2”, left wing: 29” x 9‑1/2”, right wing: 29” x 9‑1/2”, overall 38‑1/2” x 46‑1/2” Provenance: By descent in the Kilp Family, Germany; to Antonio (1885‑1959) and Carola (1895‑1967) Kilp, Weisbaden, Germany; to their daughter Carmelita Kilp Blackburn (1923‑2017), Sugar Land, Texas. $60,000‑$90,000 1 details

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The triptych offered in this sale, dedicated to the story of the Nativity, is a fine example of the Antwerp Mannerist School. This is not to be confused with the Italian Mannerists as the two vary greatly stylistically and thematically. The central panel is devoted to the scene of the “Adoration of the Magi”, which was probably the most popular of scenes executed by artists of the movement. It is flanked by the “Nativity” and “The Rest on the Flight to Egypt”. This style of painting is known for its rich use of color, extravagant scenery where Gothic and Renaissance architectural elements merge unabashedly; the asymmetrical composition; lack of harmonious perspective and scale (unlike Italian Renaissance examples); lavish costuming, and an unnatural source of light. “Adoration of the Magi”, with its inclusion of the exotic kings bearing gifts, perfectly lends itself to this theatrical tableau, creating a sense of drama and evoking an emotional response. Writing in the mid-sixteenth century, the Portuguese painter Francisco de Hollanda recorded what he claimed was Michelangelo’s opinion on the achievements of Flemish Renaissance art: “Flemish painting, slowly answered the painter, will generally speaking, please the devout better than any painting of Italy, which will never cause him to shed a tear, whereas that of Flanders will cause him to shed many.... In Flanders they paint with a view to deceiving sensual vision.... They paint stuffs and masonry, the green rivers and bridges, which they call landscapes, with many figures on this side and many figures on that....” Although the Northern Mannerists appeared before the Reformation of 1516, it is those same qualities described

by de Hollanda that appealed to the personal form of religious expression that the Protestants encouraged. The Reformation is also most likely responsible for the emergence of new, secular themes in art such as landscapes and portraiture. Whereas in the previous century, the religious and secular comingled in devotional painting, the sixteenth century witnessed a segregation of those themes. Of course, these new artistic developments could have happened without the economic prosperity. Antwerp in the early part of the 16th century emerged as the financial and trading center of Northern Europe, surpassing Bruges. This economic climate attracted artists from all over Europe, who set up workshops and produced large quantities of personal devotional works for both local consumption and export. Albrecht Durer, visiting the city in 1520, commented in his diary on the persistent carnival atmosphere on the streets of the city, especially during the Feast of Assumption of the Virgin. He also commented on the “awesomeness” of the artists guild of St. Luke, which as all other guilds in the city, was well organized and whose records give ample testimony to the sudden influx of foreign artists. The Northern Mannerist movement lasted only a few decades, although it emerged again at the turn of the century. The 17th century saw an artistic boom due to the large workshops of the popular Peter Paul Rubens and Jacob Jordaens, but as the economy began to decline toward the end of the century, Antwerp ceased to be the artistic center it once was.

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2 Follower of Ambrosius Benson (Italian/Netherlands, ca. 1495‑1550) “The Magdalene” oil on canvas unsigned. Framed. 28” x 20‑1/4”, framed 37‑1/8” x 29” $2,000‑$4,000

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3 Continental School (16th/17th Century) “Portrait of a Man Wearing a Tall Hat and a Ruff Collar” oil on canvas unsigned. Framed. 22‑1/2” x 18‑3/4”, framed 27‑1/2” x 23‑1/2” $3,000‑$5,000

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4 Follower of Gerard ter Borch the Younger (Dutch, 1617‑1681) “Portrait of a Gentleman Standing in an Interior” oil on oak panel Framed. 22‑1/4” x 18”, framed 30‑3/4” x 26‑1/2” Provenance: Collection of Grace Nichols Whitney Hoff; thence by descent. This work repeats a composition by Gerard ter Borch in the National Gallery of Art, London. $2,000‑$4,000

5 Attributed to Caspar Netscher (German, 1639‑1684) “Maiden Seated Before a Still Life of Fruit, a Landscape in the Distance” oil on canvas inscribed “C. Netscher/fecit” and dated “1674” lower right. Presented in an antique gold leaf frame. 25‑1/2” x 30”, framed 33‑1/2” x 37‑1/2”

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$6,000‑$9,000 Caspar Netscher, a German-born artist, assimilated the character of the 17th-century Dutch genre style of his master, Gerard Terborch, into portraiture, characterized by sumptuous dress and settings. Following his apprenticeship with Terborch, Netscher journeyed to Italy, studying the lighting and composition of Renaissance and Baroque masterpieces, which he incorporated into his work through the use of lighting and the diagonal composition. Through the synthesis of these two genres and styles, Netscher was able to introduce a distinctly international style to the Northern Netherlands through his adept handling of costly silks and brocades, as is evidenced in the portrait offered here. The blue taffeta and white silk fringed in lace are dramatically thrust upward in a dazzling array of textures rendered through the bravura of chiaroscuro. The finery of the woman’s dress, as it ensconces her bosom, are a still life in itself, mirroring one of the rare melons at her feet. Both are exotic beauties for the taking of the affluent connoisseurs who patronized Netscher, making him one of the most prolific Dutch artists of his time. His works are conserved worldwide in major museums, such as the National Gallery, London; Amsterdam Museum; Uffizi, Florence; and the Staatliche Museen, Berlin. 5

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6 Richard H. Hilder (British, 1813‑1852) “The Hay Wain” oil on canvas signed lower right, a “C. R. Fenton & Co., Ltd.” inventory label en verso stretcher, a “Charles Roberson/London” supplier’s stamp en verso canvas. Framed. 24‑1/2” x 20”, framed 29” x 25” Provenance: Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $1,000‑$1,500

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7 Circle of Philippe Jacques (Philip James) de Loutherbourg (French/English, 1740‑1812) “Wooded Landscape with Drovers at a Ford” oil on canvas unsigned. Framed. 39” x 29‑3/8”, framed 46” x 36” Provenance: Christie’s, London, October 31, 2001, lot 144; Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $2,500‑$4,000

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8 Continental School (18th Century) “The Boating Party” oil on canvas unsigned. Presented in a giltwood frame. 23‑1/4” x 26”, framed 33” x 36” $1,000‑$1,500

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9 Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky (Russian, 1817‑1900) “Sunset Scene with Figures and Fishing Boats on the Shore” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 14” x 18”, framed 25‑1/2” x 31” $15,000‑$25,000

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10 Circle of Jan Hackaert (Dutch, 1629‑1700) “Figures in a Mountainous Landscape” oil on canvas unsigned. Framed. 27‑1/4” x 20‑1/2”, framed 30” x 23‑3/4” $3,000‑$5,000

11 Jakob Bogdani (Hungarian/London, ca. 1660‑1724) “Exotic Birds in a Park with Hunting Dogs and a Still Life of Fruit” oil on canvas signed lower left, verso with various old auction inventory stencils in black and a “Robert Dirstein” (Ontario/New York interior designer) label. Framed. 39‑7/8” x 40‑3/4”, framed 42‑1/2” x 43‑1/2” $12,000‑$18,000

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Jakob Bogdani, a native of Presov, Hungary, moved to Amsterdam in 1684 where he was trained in the Dutch Golden Age tradition of the masters Melchior de Hondecoeter (1636‑1695) and Willem van Aelst (1627‑1683) - who specialized in still lifes with wild game and flowers. In 1688 Bogdani traveled to London, where he would remain for the rest of his life, seeking employment first with William III, Prince of Orange, before being appointed court painter to Queen Anne. Under the tutelage of the court, Bogdani achieved great success, earning commissions from some of the most esteemed aristocrats, such as Queen Mary II and Admiral George Churchill, brother of the Duke of Marlborough. Churchill, one of his chief patrons, owned the famous aviary at Windsor Park, affording Bogdani ample access to the many fine pedigree dogs and exotic birds he depicted like the fine pair of dogs and parrot in the painting offered here. Bogdani’s superb still lifes typically featured the imported goods of London’s rich maritime trade; foreign species of birds and flowers crowded his paintings with white and scarlet highlights in the fur, plume, and fruit accentuated by dark backgrounds. A painting, strikingly similar in composition, with the same pendant pair of dogs was offered at Sotheby’s, New York, January 31, 2013, as lot 195. Two additional paintings that match the description of these were offered in April 1751 in the estate sale of William Hubert of St. Martin’s Lane, London (lot 107) and in the sale of the Earl of Lichfield, Shugborough Hall, in 1842 (lot 17). Examples of his work are conserved in the Royal Collection and Fitzwilliam Museum in London and in Magyar Nemzeti Galeria in Budapest. 11

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12 Attributed to Gerrit Adriaenszoon Berckheyde (Dutch, 1638‑1698) “Shepherdess with Livestock in an Italian Landscape” oil on wood panel unsigned. Framed. 24‑1/2” x 37‑3/4”, framed 32” x 45” Provenance: Bonhams Knightsbridge, October 30, 2007, lot 354. $3,000‑$5,000 13 Giuseppe Guzzardi (Italian, 1845‑1914) “Grotta del Vino”, 1899 oil on canvas signed, dated and inscribed en verso. Presented in a modern giltwood frame. 16‑1/4” x 19‑3/4”, framed 21‑1/2” x 25‑1/2” $1,000‑$1,500

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14 Circle of Domenico Robusti Tintoretto (Italian, 1560‑1635) “Portrait of a Gentleman” oil on canvas unsigned, verso with a largely effaced red wax seal bearing the double eagle crest associated with the Habsburg family. Presented in a carved, gilded and painted frame with a brass plaque en verso, reading “Frame by Heydenryk, N.Y.C.” 26” x 22‑1/4”, framed 35‑1/2” x 31‑1/2” $5,000‑$8,000

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15 Attributed to Johann Carl Loth (German, 1632‑1698) “St. John the Baptist” oil on linen unsigned, partial handwritten label en verso. Framed. 47‑1/2” x 35‑1/8”, framed 53” x 39‑1/2” $4,000‑$7,000

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16 Manner of Guido Reni (Italian, 1575‑1642) “Mary Magdalene” oil on canvas unsigned. Presented in an antique giltwood frame. 22” x 17‑1/2”, framed 29” x 24” $1,200‑$1,800 17 Circle of Joseph Esperlin (German, 1707‑1775) “Judgment of Paris” oil on linen indistinctly signed and inscribed “pinxit...” lower left. Framed. 22‑3/8” x 36‑1/2”, framed 28‑1/4” x 42‑1/4” Provenance: By repute, Edward E. Mansur, Jr. (1917‑2001), Fort Lauderdale, Florida, thence by descent; Frederick Fine Art Gallery, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 2012; Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

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$3,000‑$5,000

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18 After Jean-Baptiste Pigalle (French, 1714‑1785) “Mercury Attaching His Winged Sandals” patinated bronze 20th century, after the 1741 monumental model exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1742 and now conserved at the Louvre, Paris. h. 17‑1/2”, w. 9”, d. 10‑1/2” $800‑$1,200 19 Manner of Viviano Codazzi (Italian, 1603‑1672) “Capriccio, Travelers Resting Amid Roman Ruins”, ca. 1800 oil on canvas unsigned. Framed. 30” x 40”, framed 37‑1/2” x 47‑1/2” Provenance: Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $5,000‑$8,000

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20 Continental School (18th Century) “Capriccio with Figures in a Classical Landscape” oil on canvas unsigned. Presented in a modern gilt frame. 35‑1/2” x 40”, framed 36‑3/4” x 47” $4,000‑$7,000 21 Charles Meynier (French, 1768‑1832) “The Last Communion of St. Louis a Tunis” ink and sepia wash on paper signed and dated lower right. Matted, glazed and framed. sight 24‑1/4” x 18‑1/4”, framed 33‑1/2” x 27” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,500‑$2,500 21

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22 After Raphael (Italian, 1483‑1520) “Madonna Della Sedia”, 19th century oil on canvas unsigned, after the ca. 1513/14 painting now conserved at the Palazzo Pitti, Florence. Presented in an elaborate antique gesso and carved giltwood frame. 29‑1/4” x 29‑1/4”, framed 53” x 43‑1/2” Provenance: Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $4,000‑$7,000

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23 one of a pair

23 two of a pair

23 Italian School (19th Century) “Unbinding of Cupid” and “Clipping Cupid’s Wing” pair of oils on canvas unsigned. Presented in matching frames. each 12‑1/2” x 17‑1/2”, framed 16‑1/2” x 21‑1/2” $1,000‑$1,500

24 French School (Second Half 18th Century) “Portrait of a Statesman” oil on canvas unsigned. Framed. 28‑3/4” x 22‑7/8”, framed 36” x 31” Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $2,000‑$4,000

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25 Russian School (18th Century) “Portrait of a Nobleman, Possibly Count Grigory Orlov (1734‑1783)” oil on canvas unsigned. Presented in a 19th-century giltwood frame. 30” x 24”, framed 40‑1/2” x 35‑1/2” $10,000‑$15,000

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A member of a politically prominent Russian noble family, Grigory Orlov was a cadet in St. Petersburg when he was noticed by the then Grand Duchess Catherine. He soon became one of her favorites, a position that was cemented when he organized the coup to overthrow her husband, Peter III. Orlov was able to deftly maneuver the vagaries and intrigues of the infamously complex Russian royal court for years, until 1771 when he returned from one of his only unsuccessful diplomatic missions to find himself essentially replaced and officially deemed a nonentity

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The insignia which Orlov displays so prominently in this portrait is the Order of the White Eagle, an honor of Polish origins. While this may seem somewhat surprising - especially when taking into account the tense diplomatic relations between Russia and Poland at the time - there was a period during Catherine’s reign when the order was annexed by the Empress. It was conferred by her to her paramours and closest personal allies. Reference: Hazelton, Alan W. “Russian Imperial Orders”, Numismatic Notes and Monographs Issue 51 New York: American Numismatic Society, 1932


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26 Circle of Jacques-Louis David (French, 1748‑1825) “Portrait of Jean-Pierre Georges Maubach (1788‑1862) and His Son”, ca. 1835‑1840 oil on canvas unsigned, partially titled in English on antique label en verso. Framed. 39‑1/2” x 32‑1/4”, framed 44” x 36‑1/2” Provenance: Sotheby’s Arcade, New York, New York, Jan. 21, 2004, lot 141.

Following the Bourbon Restoration in 1814, JacquesLouis David, the preeminent Neoclassical artist of France and “court painter” to Napoleon, sought exile in Brussels, Belgium with fellow revolutionaries and Bonapartists, who voted for the execution of King Louis XVI. In Brussels, David likely encountered Jean-Pierre Maubach, a court of appeals attorney and proprietor of Le Vrai Republicain- a newspaper sympathetic to French refugees in exile that published the works of David’s pupils in Brussels, including Sophie Fremiet, an ardent Bonapartist and wife of Francois Rude- sculptor of the Marseillaise façade on the Arc-de-Triomphe, and the Belgium born François-Joseph Navez. Given Maubach’s age in the portrait, the painting was likely executed by one of David’s pupils in the 1830s.

Literature: Biermann, Georg. “Ein wiedergefundenes Bild des Jacques Louis David”. Der Cicerone. XXI (Dec. 23, 1929), pp. 667‑669, illustrated as a work by David. $5,000‑$8,000

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27 Circle of Eugene Delacroix (French, 1798‑1863), probably Pierre Andrieu (1821‑1892) “Study for Orpheus and Eurydice”, ca. 1844 oil on canvas unsigned, stretcher and verso with various labels, including a certificate of authenticity issued by “Bouvard and Laurent, Paris” in 1911, a “Collection H. Bare” tag, “Christie’s, New York” stickers, and shipping labels in French and English. Unframed. 25‑3/4” x 34‑3/4” Provenance: As Delacroix: Bouvard and Laurent, Paris, France, 1911; Collection H. Bare, London, U.K., 1922. As Pierre Andrieu/Circle of Delacroix: Christie’s, New York, New York, October 24, 1990, lot 17; Private collection, Chicago, Illinois. Exhibited: New York, Shepherd Gallery. Nineteenth-Century European Drawings, Paintings and Sculpture. Winter 1979‑1980, no. 29. $2,000‑$4,000

This scene bears the keen influence of Eugene Delacroix, the leader of the French Romantic School, whose optical studies of color and expressive brushstroke profoundly shaped future Impressionist works. Trained in the Neoclassical style of Jacques-Louis David by Pierre-Narcisse Guerin, Delacroix ultimately rejected the academic traditions, privileging emotive expressions of color through bold brushstrokes over controlled lines and carefully modeled forms. Though beautifully rendered, classical depictions of historical and mythological scenes invoked a sense of stasis, in which the turmoil of the battle or deluge was lost on the viewer. Inspired by Peter Paul Rubens and the Venetian colorists, Delacroix created a new genre of painting, capturing the primacy of the moment through the rapid application of deep warm colors and exaggerated lighting to convey movement. This painting exemplifies all these qualities, which would explain why it was sold in Paris, London, and exhibited in New York City, as late as 1980, as a veritable work by Delacroix. In 1990, Christie’s, New York, offered it at auction for $8,000‑$12,000 as a painting by Pierre Andrieu - Delacroix’s premier assistant from 1844‑1863. Andrieu was such an accomplished artist that he collaborated with Delacroix on paintings, and later copied and restored his work, including the paintings in the library of the Senate in 1868.

“Orpheus and Eurydice”, a mythological tale from the ancient Classics that multiple artists depicted throughout the 18th and 19th century, was a subject Delacroix visited many times, as the dramatic flight from Hades showcased his bravura of color and movement. In a rich palette of crimson, sienna and ultramarine blue suffused with light, Delacroix, or his pupil, captures the moment Orpheus leads Eurydice from the dark caves of the Underworld, breaking Hades’ edict that he not look back as she follows into the light of the living. The scene also recalls compositional similarities to Delacroix’s 1825 illustrations and sketches of Faust, Mephistopheles and the witches on Walpurgis night he created for Goethe’s tragic play Faust, which he continued to experiment with throughout the 1820s and early 1830s in works like “Witches Sabbath”, ca. 1831‑1832. In his 1823 journal, Delacroix wrote in a February entry: “Every time I look at the engravings of Faust, I am seized with a longing to use an entirely new style of painting that would consist, so to speak, in making a literal tracing of nature. The simplest poses could be made interesting by varying the amount of foreshortening.” In this painting, the Faustian influence is evident - the upward diagonal composition, executed through heavy brushstrokes and chiaroscuro, is redolent of the mountain ascent/descent, and the exceptional use of foreshortening of the souls in the lower right foreground and background reduces the dead to a shrouded mass.

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28 Ludwig Hans Fischer (German, 1848‑1915) “Cleopatra’s Barge” oil on canvas laid down on board signed lower right “Ludwig Hans Fischer, Wien”. Framed. 35” x 51”, framed 37” x 53” $10,000‑$15,000

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29 Attributed to Ignace-Henri-Theodore Fantin-Latour (French, 1836‑1904) “Venus et L’Amour” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 18” x 13‑1/8”, framed 24” x 20‑3/4” Provenance: Deaccessioned from Friends University, Wichita, Kansas; gifted to the University by the Sam and Rie Bloomfield Foundation, Newport Beach, California. $2,000‑$4,000

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30 Leonard Sarluis (French, 1874‑1949) “Muse Meditative”, 1925 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Presented in an antique hand-carved, painted and gilded Renaissance-style frame. 16‑3/4” x 13‑1/4”, framed 30” x 24” $4,000‑$7,000

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Leonard Sarluis (b. Salomon-Leon Sarluis) a prolific artist associated with the French symbolist movement, exhibited at the Salon de la Rose Croix and Salon des Artistes Français, as well as numerous galleries in Paris and London, including Bernheim Jeune and Grafton Gallery. Born into a JewishDutch family in 1874, Sarluis entered the Royal Academy of Art in the Hague at the age of seventeen, and changed his name shortly thereafter to Leonard in homage to his Renaissance idol, Leonardo da Vinci. Two years later he moved to Paris. As a talented, attractive and openly homosexual man, he was immediately accepted into the avant-garde literary and artistic circles of Oscar Wilde, Jean Lorrain, Emile Verhaeren, Puvis de Chavannes and Gustave Moreau’s pupil Armand Point, who invited him to exhibit with the Salon de Rose Croixa fraternal esoteric, religious sect for symbolist artist led by the eccentric Josephin Peladin. Sarluis embraced symbolist tenets in his art: he rejected secular outlooks and scientific theories-namely Impressionists and Post-Impressionists study of optics and plein-air observations, preferring instead to examine color from a personal emotive and spiritual perspective. Likewise, the symbolists preferred religious and allegorical/mythological subject matter over the natural world. While Sarluis’ subject matter is distinctly symbolist, his execution represents an interesting mix of Italian Renaissance and Pre-Raphaelite styles rendered with the sensitivity and psychological depth of 17th century Dutch masters. Sarluis

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was drawn to the Pre-Raphaelites’ ethereal depiction of women captured in wondrous colors of Quattrocento Italian art created through the application of thin glazes of pigment over a wet white ground that Hunt and Millais developed. The thin glazes, coupled with the heavy use of chiaroscuro in the lower foreground and background and use of sfumato-the soft, hazy blending of the woman’s features recalls Da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” and two paintings of the “Madonna of the Yarwinder.” The darker palette, elongated arc of the hand that eclipses the size of the sitter’s face, down cast eyes and the swirling green orb that surrounds her head bespeaks of a meditative vulnerability more characteristic of Northern European painting. In 1925, the same year this painting was executed, Leonard Sarluis held a solo exhibition at Galerie d’Art du Journal in Paris, which feature many of his elegant Renaissance-inspired meditative busts of women—of which this one may have been included. The review and forward to the “Exhibition Sarluis” written by Gaston de Pawlowski brilliantly captures the bravura of both this work and Sarluis’ women. “He has patiently prepared this glorious feat. This incredibly triumph, this worthy reward of an admirable career of which it appears to be the crowning achievement…. Vinci! Raphael! One will evoke these names in contemplating certain of Sarluis’ heads of women.… but what strange modernism, what fathomless mystery in these heads whose fame will only grow through the centuries.” Reference: L’Homme Libre. 13 February 1925. p. 2


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31 Jules-Felix Coutan (French, 1848‑1939) “La Renommee Equestre” bronze dore relief plaque cast signature at lower right, a “Thiebaut Freres/ Paris” foundry mark lower left, set within an integral beveled red marble support. bronze h. 24‑3/4”, w. 17‑1/2”, d. 7‑1/2”, overall h. 31‑1/2” Literature: Pierre Kjellberg. Bronzes of the 19th Century: Dictionary of Sculptors. Atglen: Schiffer Publishing, Co., 1994, same model illustrated, p. 228. $8,000‑$12,000

While still a student at l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1872, Coutan was the recipient of the prestigious Prix de Rome, which afforded him the opportunity to study in Italy for several years. Upon his return to Paris, he had his debut at the Paris Salon to much attention and acclaim. One of the most sought-after artists for grand public commissions, Coutan was known for his elegant allegorical sculptures. The wonderful bas-relief plaque presented here of an allegorical depiction of victory as a winged figure on horseback reveals the sculptor at his most masterful; the taut yet subtle muscles of the horse’s legs, the delineated feathers of the wings, and the delicate modeling which creates an interplay of light and shadow, creating a sense of depth and motion. Coutan was named a professor of art at l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts in 1900.

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33 After Jean-Jules Cambos (French, 1828‑1917) “Vainqueur” patinated bronze 20th century, plaques inscribed “Premio Presidente de la Republica” and “Vainqueur par Cambos Medaille d’Or”, with a “Garant au Titre/Paris” mark. h. 31”, w. 12”, d. 15” $1,000‑$1,500

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32 After Emile Louis Picault (French, 1833‑1915) “Escholier 14eme Siecle” patinated bronze first quarter 20th century, cast signature along back edge of self-base, title plaque at front edge. overall h. 14‑1/4”, w. 5‑3/4”, d. 4‑1/2” Provenance: Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $1,000‑$1,500

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34 Alfred Boucher (French, 1850‑1934) “Au But” patinated bronze cast signature, a “Siot-Decauville/ Fondeur/Paris” foundry mark and numbered 145L” along edge of selfbase, stamped “France” in several places along side of self-base, presented on a stepped black marble plinth. overall h. 19‑1/2”, w. 26‑1/2”, d. 13” $15,000‑$25,000

Of humble origins, Boucher was born into a farming family of less than modest means. As a young man, he entered the service of the sculptor Joseph-Marius Ramus (1805‑1888) as a gardener. Ramus saw the artistic potential in his new servant and accepted him into his studio. Boucher was never to forget this fortuitous opportunity, and served as a mentor for many young sculptors, most notably the young Camille Claudel, and was known for his generosity and philanthropy. In 1902 he formed the La Ruche studio in Montparnasse for struggling artists.

The model for the sculpture presented here was exhibited at the Paris Salon of 1886 where it was awarded a first class medal and widely admired for its exploration of the powerful, straining athletic body. A large-scale version was commissioned by the government to be prominently placed in Jardin du Luxembourg. The three figures are all modeled on studies of Boucher’s friend, the explorer PierreGabriel Bonvalot (1853‑1933), and the resultant sculpture is a masterful depiction of the desperation of the athletes to reach the finish line.

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35 Gaston Renault (French, 1851‑1933) “Le Daphnis et La Chloe”, 1881 oil on canvas signed and dated lower left. Framed. 61” x 81‑1/2”, framed 75‑3/4” x 96” Provenance: Sotheby’s, New York, April 25, 2006, lot 53. Exhibited: Salon, Paris, 1881, no. 1983; Exposition des BeauxArts, Lille, 1881, no. 1112. Literature: “Salon de 1881”. Le Musee artistique et litteraire: revue illustree. Paris: Typographie Charles Unsinger, 1881, p. 406; Manson, R. H. The Paris-Salon, 1881.... London. Edward Stanford, 1881, p. 58 (room 31). $70,000‑$140,000

Gaston Renault was an accomplished realist painted trained in the 19th century canon of the French Academy that privileged classically drawn figures executed in mythological and historical genre scenes over the avant-garde experimentation of the Romantics and later Impressionists. Renault studied with Tony Robert Fleury, a professor at the Academie Julien, Leon Bonnat, a professor at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and with William-Adolphe Bougereau, one of the penultimate proponents of French academic painting and president of the Societe des artistes francais. Renault debuted at the 1880 Salon to wide acclaim, which was quickly followed in 1881 with this epic painting of “Daphnis and Chloe.” Executed with the finesse of Bougereau, it is a modern interpretation of a Classical pastoral that celebrates

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the beauty of the human form with particular emphasis paid to the female figure- the elongated and idealized torso through subtle linear modelling is executed with a controlled palette of porcelain-like ivory and tertiary hues of viridian and taupe. The contemporary visages and hair-styles and Daphnis’ straw hat contemporize the piece which critics immediately noted. In numerous Salon reviews, the 2nd century Greek pastoral was hailed a modern day Parisian love story of young bohemians from the Faubourg in which “love laughs in their naïve eyes; they are of elegance” beyond sin. Reference: Le Musée artistique et littéraire: revue illustrée. Typographie Paris: Charles Unsinger, 1881.


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35 details

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36 Francois-Alfred Delobbe (French, 1835‑1915/20) “Feeding Her Pets” oil on canvas laid on board signed lower left, handwritten note with artist and title and “Christie’s, New York, October 30, 2002, lot 168” labels en verso. Presented in a period giltwood frame. 25‑1/2” x 21‑1/4”, framed 35” x 30” Provenance: Christie’s, New York, October 30, 2002, lot 168. $10,000‑$15,000

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38 Imre Gergely (Hungarian, 1868‑1914) “Play Time with Puppies” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 24” x 31‑1/2”, framed 33” x 39‑3/4” $2,000‑$4,000 37

37 Geza Peske (Hungarian, 1859‑1934) “Winter Sport” oil on canvas signed “Peske Geza” lower right, typewritten label with artist and title en verso. Presented in an antique frame with brass artist plaque. 28” x 20”, framed 34‑1/2” x 27” $1,000‑$1,500

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39 Adolphe Piot (French, 1850‑1910) “The Reading Lesson” oil on canvas signed lower left, “Sotheby’s, New York” labels en verso. Presented in a modern gilt frame. 34” x 26‑1/4”, framed 45‑1/2” x 37” Provenance: Sotheby's New York, New York, April 25, 2006, lot 259 $35,000‑$50,000

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40 Emile Eisman-Semenowsky (Polish/French, 1857‑1911) “Le Jeune Femme Avec La Cigarette” oil on canvas signed and inscribed “Paris” lower left. Presented in a period giltwood frame. 21‑1/2” x 15”, framed 31” x 24‑1/2” Provenance: MacDougall’s Auctions, London, England, November 27, 2006, Lot 23. $20,000‑$40,000

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41 Leon Francois Comerre (French, 1850‑1916) “La Danseuse”, 1886 oil on canvas signed and dated upper right. Presented in a giltwood frame with artist plaque. 21” x 13”, framed 23‑1/2” x 16” $4,000‑$7,000

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42 Eduardo Leon Garrido (Spanish/French, 1856‑1949) “La Condesa” oil on canvas signed upper right, “Christie’s, New York, Rockefeller Center, April 12, 2007, lot 165” labels en verso. Framed. 28‑3/4” x 24”, framed 36” x 31‑3/4” Provenance: Christie’s, New York, Rockefeller Center, April 12, 2007, lot 165. $20,000‑$40,000 43 Luis Alvarez Catala (Spanish, 1836‑1901) “Preparing for the Festival” oil on canvas signed lower left “L. Alvarez, Roma”. Framed. 25‑1/2” x 35”, framed 35” x 44‑1/2” $30,000‑$50,000

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44 Pierre Tetar van Elven (Dutch, 1828/1931‑1908) “Busy Morning on the Square”, 1866 oil on canvas signed and dated lower left corner. Presented in a period giltwood frame. 59‑1/4” x 41‑1/2”, framed 70” x 54” $20,000‑$40,000

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45 Dutch School (19th/ 20th Century) “The Recital” oil on canvas signed lower left “Van Dorem”. Framed. 32” x 25‑1/2”, framed 39‑1/2” x 33‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

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46 Rudolph Jelinek (Austrian, 1880‑1950) “The Mozart Prodigy” oil on canvas signed lower left, titled, and with artist name en verso label. Framed. 24” x 30”, framed 30‑1/2” x 36‑1/2” $1,000‑$1,500

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48 Victor Joseph Chavet (French, 1822‑1906) “Le Jouer de Flute” oil on canvas signed lower left. Presented in a period carved giltwood frame. 8‑3/4” x 6‑1/2”, framed 17‑1/4” x 14‑3/4” $3,000‑$5,000

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47 After Adrien Etienne Gaudez (French, 1845‑1902) “Lecon de Violon” patinated bronze first quarter 20th century, title plaque at side of self-base. h. 21”, w. 14‑1/2”, d. 9” $1,000‑$1,500

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50 one of a pair

50 two of a pair

49 Eugene-Henri Cauchois (French, 1850‑1911) “Still Life of Flowers in a Blue and White Vase” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 29‑1/2” x 22”, framed 41” x 33” $3,000‑$5,000 50 Jules-Alexandre Grun (French, 1868‑1934) “Still Life of Pink Roses and China Plates” and “Floral Still Life with a Glass Dish” pair of oils on canvas each signed lower left, one with a partial label en verso. Framed alike. each 24” x 19‑3/4”, framed 32” x 27‑1/2” $4,000‑$7,000

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51 Giorgio Lucchesi (Italian, 1855‑1941) “The Bountiful Grapevine” oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Presented in a giltwood and gesso frame. 55‑3/4” x 28”, framed 64‑3/4” x 36” $4,000‑$7,000 52 Friedrich Heimerdinger (German, 1817‑1882) “Grapes on the Vine and a Dragonfly” oil on oval panel signed and dated “Hamburg 1873” lower right, signed, dated and further inscribed en verso. Glazed and framed. 13‑1/4” x 11‑1/4”, framed 18‑1/2” x 16‑1/2” $1,500‑$2,500

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53 Jean-Pierre Francois Lamoriniere (Belgian, 1828‑1911) “La Vacheuse” oil on canvas monogrammed lower left, signed en verso. Framed. 10” x 12”, framed 18” x 20” Provenance: Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $2,000‑$4,000

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54 Anthonie Jacobus van Wijngaerdt (Dutch, 1808‑1887) “The Prize Sheep” oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Framed. 11‑1/2” x 15‑1/2”, framed 17‑3/4” x 21‑1/4” Provenance: Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $3,000‑$5,000

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56 Franz de Beul (Belgian, 1849‑1919) “Shepherd Returning with His Flock” oil on canvas signed lower right, verso with artist biography. Framed. 25” x 19‑1/2”, framed 28” x 23‑1/2” $1,400‑$1,800

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55 After Jules Moigniez (French, 1835‑1894) “Moutons” polished bronze of an ewe, ram and lambs grazing by a fence cast signature along edge of self-base. h. 12”, w. 16”, d. 7” $1,500‑$2,500 55

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57 George Riecke (American/New Orleans, 1848‑1930) “The Shepherd and His Flock of Sheep” oil on canvas signed lower right, a “James E. Hanna, Dealer of Works of Art and Manufacturer of Picture Frames, Detroit, MI” label en verso. Presented in a carved giltwood frame. 20‑1/4” x 30”, framed 31” x 41‑1/4” $1,500‑$2,500

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58 Andre Plumot (Belgian, 1829‑1906) “Depart des Moutons” oil on canvas signed lower left, “Slot & Zonen, Den Haag” frame label en verso. Presented in a period giltwood frame. 19‑1/2” x 28‑1/2”, framed 28‑1/2” x 38‑1/2” $5,000‑$8,000 58

59 Balthasar Paul Ommeganck (Flemish/Belgian, 1755‑1826) “Paysage et Animaux” oil on wood panel signed and dated “1825” lower right, label with artist name and title en verso. Framed. 22” x 27‑1/2”, framed 32” x 37” $3,000‑$5,000

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60 Adolph Schreyer (French/German, 1828‑1899) “Plowing the Field” pen and ink wash and gouache on paper signed lower right. Matted, glazed and framed. sight 8” x 12‑3/4”, framed 22” x 27‑1/2” $1,500‑$2,500

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61 August John Paul Bohnhorst (German, 1849‑1919) “In the Dunes” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 27‑1/4” x 43‑1/2”, framed 34‑1/2” x 51” $3,000‑$5,000

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62 Fredericus van Rossum du Chattel (Dutch, 1856‑1917) “Windmills” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 24‑3/4” x 34‑1/2”, framed 32” x 41‑1/4” $3,000‑$5,000

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63 William Shayer (British, 1787‑1879) “Fishermen Coming Ashore” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 24” x 36”, framed 32” x 44‑1/4” $3,000‑$5,000

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64 Joseph Fortune Layraud (French, 1834‑1912) “Retour de Peche” oil on wood panel signed lower right, verso with “Amsler & Ruthardt, Kunsthandlung & Antiquariat, Berlin” label. Framed. 10‑3/4” x 16”, framed 14‑1/2” x 19‑1/2” $1,200‑$1,800

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65 Henry Schouten (Belgian, 1864/67‑1927) “A Donkey Ride in the Country” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 39‑1/2” x 31‑1/2”, framed 46‑1/4” x 38‑1/4” $2,000‑$4,000

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66 Henry Schouten (Belgian, 1864/67‑1927) “At the Watering Hole” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 27‑1/2” x 39‑1/2”, framed 33” x 45” $2,000‑$4,000

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67 Leon Richet (French, 1847‑1907) “Paysanne au bord de l’Etang pres de Fontainbleau”, 1881 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right, stretcher with “C. F. Adams, South Lincoln, Mass.” inventory label. Framed. 29‑1/4” x 39‑1/2”, framed 36‑1/2” x 48” Provenance: Charles Francis Adams (1835‑1915), grandson of John Quincy Adams, the Adams Estate, South Lincoln, Massachusetts; Estate sale of Mary Ogden Adams (1843‑1934), wife of the late Charles Francis Adams, Metropolitan Storage Warehouse Galleries, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 12‑14, 1935; Sale at American Art Association, Anderson Galleries, New York, New York, January, 23, 1936, lot 61; Property of F. Schnittjer & Son (Art Dealers), New York, sale at auction through Plaza Galleries, Inc., New York, New York, January 20‑23, 1943, lot 513; Private collection, New York, thence by descent. $5,000‑$8,000

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68 Hippolyte Camille Delpy (French, 1842‑1910) “Troupeau de Moutons Traversant un Pont” oil on canvas signed lower left. Presented in a period giltwood frame. 14” x 10”, framed 20‑3/4” x 16‑1/2” $1,400‑$1,800

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69 Leon-Germain Pelouse (French, 1838‑1891) “Wooded Landscape” oil on canvas signed lower right. Presented in an antique giltwood frame. 43” x 31‑1/2”, framed 52” x 41‑1/2” Provenance: Christie’s, New York, Rockefeller Center, April 30, 2001, lot 1004; Manheim Galleries, New Orleans, Louisiana. $10,000‑$15,000

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70 Narcisse-Virgile Diaz de la Pena (French, 1807‑1876) “Ramasseuses de Bois: Foret de Fontainebleau," 1866 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Framed with brass artist plaque. 19‑1/2” x 27‑3/4”, framed 32‑1/2” x 40‑1/2” Provenance: Durand-Ruel, Paris; De Landa Collection Sale, Sotheby’s, New York, November 7, 1946, lot 86; Sotheby’s, New York, October 31, 2000, lot 16; Private collection, California; Christie’s, New York, New York, April 12, 2007, lot 135. This work was authenticated by Mrs. Rolande Miquel in 2007 through Christie’s, and will be included in the forthcoming Diaz catalogue raisonne. $60,000‑$90,000

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The Forest of Fontainebleau, the sacred hunting grounds of French kings since the 13th century, is one of the oldest forests in France and the first nature preserve in history enacted by Napoleon III in 1861. Its austere oaks, pines, limpid pools of water, plateaus and extraordinary rock formations became the wellspring of Barbizon School artists beginning in the 1830s. Young artists seeking a sylvan escape from the bustle of Paris took to plein air painting in the Forest of Fontainebleau and the surrounding fields farmed by the peasantry of the nearby village of Barbizon. Diaz, an extraordinarily talented painter of porcelain and Romantic pastiches and odalisques, was seduced by the lighting the immense oaks commanded in Theodore Rousseau’s paintings of the Forest. With his keen eye and

aptitude for quick painterly studies, Diaz not only embraced Barbizon School painting, but he also became one of its preeminent proponents. His bravura in capturing diffuse lighting in palettes of gold and sienna that scintillate on the forest floors and tree barks earned him a first-class medal at the Salon of 1848, and the award of chevalier of the Legion of Honor in 1851. The painting offered here is a fine example of his Barbizon oeuvre. Lit from above in Diaz’s characteristic framing technique, he creates an oculus through the tree canopies through which to illuminate the brush and boulders that recall the terrain near the height of Jean du Paris. Similar use of lighting with striking stylistic similarities are also observed in the work of Leon Richet, Diaz’s pupil’s painting of the Forest of Fontainebleau in lot 67.


71 Adolphe Joseph Thomas Monticelli (French, 1824‑1886) “Romantic Fantasy” oil on canvas signed lower right, inscribed with artist name and title en verso. Presented in a frame with artist plaque. 22” x 30”, framed 27” x 35” $4,000‑$7,000

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72 Adolphe Joseph Thomas Monticelli (French, 1824‑1886) “Evening Ball” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 15‑1/4” x 24”, framed 17‑1/4” x 26” $3,000‑$5,000

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73 School of Sir Peter Lely (British, 1618‑1680) “Portrait of a Lady, Possibly Elizabeth Cromwell Southwell”, ca. 1800 oil on canvas unsigned, old auction stencil en verso stretcher. Presented in an elaborate antique and carved giltwood frame. 50” x 40‑1/2”, framed 62‑1/2” x 53” $8,000‑$12,000

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74 School of Sir Peter Lely (British, 1618‑1680) “Portrait of a Court Beauty, Possibly the Actress Nell Gwynn” oil on canvas unsigned. Presented in a gesso and carved giltwood frame. 50‑1/4” x 40‑3/4”, framed 56” x 47” $2,000‑$4,000

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75 Circle of Sir Godfrey Kneller (British, 1646‑1723) “Portrait of a Young Lady, Traditionally Identified as Mrs. Beauvoir” oil on canvas old handwritten inscription “AEtates 24/1743/ December 9th” en verso canvas, inventory stamp “379MJ” en verso stretcher. Framed. 30” x 25”, framed 40‑1/2” x 34‑1/2” $3,000‑$5,000

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76 Sir Godfrey Kneller (German/British, 1646‑1723) “Portrait of Francis, 2nd Earl Godolphin” oil on canvas initialed lower right, two old auction stencils en verso stretcher. Presented in a carved wood frame. 30” x 25‑1/2”, framed 38” x 33” Provenance: Collection of Godolphin’s tutor John Evelyn, thence by descent; Christie’s, London, November 3, 1972, lot 233; La Salle University Art Museum, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Sotheby’s, London, April 3, 1996, lot 35; Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Exhibited: Oklahoma City Art Museum, "Age of Opulence" Exhibit, 1998/9. $7,000‑$10,000

The 2nd Earl of Godolphin was the only son of Sidney Godolphin and followed his father into politics, holding a range of public appointments, including acting as a member of parliament for East Looe, Helston, Oxford, and Tregony. Under George II, he variously held the positions of Privy Councillor, Lord of the Bedchamber, and Lord Privy Seal. He married Henrietta Churchill (later 2nd Duchess of Marlborough), by whom he had five children. This painting of Francis, 2nd Earl of Godolphin is a slight variant of the “Kit-Kat” portrait by Kneller now conserved at the National Portrait Gallery, London. The series of “Kit-Kat” portraits were commissioned by the influential London club to depict its most distinguished members. Originally meant to hang in the club’s London location, these three-quarter length works, all measuring 36” x 28” are presently dispersed in several prominent English collections. A full-length portrait of the 2nd Earl, also by Kneller, now hangs in the private rooms at Blenheim Castle, The Marlborough Estate. Sir Godfrey Kneller was one of the most successful, sought-after portrait painters in 18th-century England, and held the post of official court painter until his death. Reference: Piper, David. Catalogue of the Seventeenth Century Portraits in the National Portrait Gallery. Cambridge: University Press, 1963.

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77 Studio of Sir Joshua Reynolds, P.R.A. (British, 1723‑1792) “Portrait of William, Lord Pulteney”, 1760s oil on canvas unsigned, printed label with artist, sitter and provenance en verso. Presented in an antique gilt-washed carved wood frame. 36” x 26‑3/4”, framed 43” x 34‑3/4” Provenance: M. Knoedler and Company, New York, New York; A prominent Garden District collection, New Orleans, Louisiana; thence by descent. Exhibited: Dallas Museum of Fine Arts “Four Centuries of European Painting”, October 6, 1951‑January 13, 1952, no. 21. Literature: Dallas Museum of Fine Arts Exhibition Catalogue “Four Centuries of European Painting”, October 6, 1951‑January 13, 1952, illustrated no. 21; “Four Centuries of Painting in Museum’s Fair Exhibit”. Dallas Morning News. September 21, 1951, p. II-7; Graves, Algernon and Cronin, William Vine. A History of the Works of Sir Joshua Reynolds, P.R.A. London: Henry Graves and Co., 1899, pp. 775 and 776. $6,000‑$9,000

The sitter of this portrait, William Pulteney, was from an illustrious political family and, before his untimely death from fever, there were expectations that he would surpass his relatives in position and glory. Before the age of 30, Pulteney had twice been a Member of Parliament, achieved the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel in the British Army, was named a Lord of the Bedchamber, and was the Aide de Camp to King George III. It is documented that the prodigious Sir Joshua Reynolds was commissioned to paint several portraits of the young man, including one where he is posed with his beloved hunting dog. A portrait of Pulteney by Reynolds is conserved at the Cincinnati Art Museum in Ohio.

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79 British School (Fourth Quarter 18th/First Quarter 19th Century) “Mother and Child” oil on canvas unsigned. Framed. 30‑1/4” x 25”, framed 34‑1/2” x 29‑1/2” $1,000‑$1,500

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78 British School (Fourth Quarter 18th Century) “Portrait of an Unidentified Member of the Spencer Family, Althorp House, Northamptonshire” oil on canvas unsigned. Presented in an elaborate antique gesso and carved giltwood frame. 30” x 25”, framed 43‑1/4” x 38‑5/8” Provenance: Althorp House, Northamptonshire, England; The Althorp Attic Sale, Christie’s, London, July 7, 2010, lot 459; Private dealer, London, England; Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. According to the catalogue entry from the Christie’s sale, this is a copy of a portrait conserved in the Billiard Room at Althorp House. $3,000‑$5,000

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80 Circle of Thomas Sully (British/American, 1783‑1872) “Portrait of Samuel Ladd Howell (1787‑1835)” oil on canvas unsigned, an old handwritten note with artist attribution, sitter’s name, and a Georgetown address en verso canvas. In an oval-aperture frame. 8‑3/4” x 7‑3/8”, framed 11‑7/8” x 10‑1/2” Provenance: Descended in the family of sitter, eventually to Harrison Howell Dodge, his daughter Anna, and thence by further descent; Sloans and Kenyon, June 21, 2006 auction, lot 1170A; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma collector.

A very similar portrait of Samuel Ladd Howell’s younger brother Paschall Howell is reproduced between pages 368 and 369 in Francis Howell’s 1897 family history. Samuel appears to be aged around 12-14 in the work offered here and his brother appears to be aged around 10-12 in his portrait. It is likely that the two are by the same, unfortunately unidentified, artistic hand. Reference: Howell, Francis. The Book of John Howell and His Descendants, Vol II. New York: Francis Howell, 1897

$1,500‑$2,500

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81 Ramsay Richard Reinagle, R.A. (English, 1775‑1862) “Portrait of Caroline, Henry Frederick and Emily, the Children of Henry Walker, Esq. of Blyth Hall, Nottingham, and of Clifton Park and Eastwood House, York (1775‑1860), and his wife Elizabeth Abney Walker (1786‑1850)”, ca. 1820‑1824 oil on canvas unsigned, the canvas stretcher with antique handwritten label identifying Caroline Walker (Ashton Case) as the grandmother of “Daisy Radcliffe” - Marguerite M. Daisy (nee Ashton CaseWalker) and with a “Christie’s” stamp and black inventory number “AE1994”. Presented in a period giltwood frame. 94” x 59”, framed 109‑3/4” x 74‑3/4” Provenance: Caroline E. Walker Case (1808‑1883), thence by descent to her son Henry Ashton Case, Esq. (1851‑1935); his daughter Marguerite Magdalen Daisy Ashton Case Radcliffe (1883‑1943); probably the Christie's Estate sale of her husband Everard Joseph R. H. Radcliffe, 5th Baronet (1884‑1969), Rudding Park, Yorkshire, October 16‑17, 1972. Exhibited: A matching pair of portraits attributed to Reinagle of the childrens’ parents, Henry and Elizabeth Walker, are on permanent display in Clifton Park Museum, Rotherham. The portraits were donated in 1944 by Winifred Causton, the sister of Daisy Radcliffe through whom this portrait descended. Reinagle also exhibited a portrait he painted of Henry Walker’s younger brother Joshua, Esq., M.P. (1776‑1862) with his “favourite horse” at the Royal Academy in 1824, as no. 219. $20,000‑$40,000

This portrait belongs to the illustrious peerage of the Walker family of Rotherham and Nottingham, conserved in Clifton Park and Museum and in the annals of British Industrial history. The Walker portraits of Joshua (1750-1815) and Susannah Need (17601831) painted by John Russell, and their heirs Henry (17851860) and Elizabeth Abney (1786-1850) painted by Ramsay Reinagle were donated to the museum at Clifton Park, the site of family’s main estate, in 1944 by the great-granddaughter of Henry and Elizabeth, Winifred Causton. Causton’s grandmother Caroline Elizabeth and her two siblings Henry and Emily Walker are mentioned, but they are not included further in the lineage, principally because their portraiture is not part of the Museum collection. The immense and stunning portrait offered here, which descended in the family of Winifred’s sister Marguerite Magdalen Daisy Radcliffe, nee Ashton-Case Walker (18831943), represents the missing third generation of Walkers. Painted by Reinagle around the same time that he painted the parents’ pendant portraits, its scale, size and setting are another testament to the family’s wealth and prestige. The Walker family rose to great prominence during the Industrial Revolution, becoming the iron and steel magnate of Northern England. The Walker Iron and Steel Works founded by Samuel Walker and his brothers in 1746 at Rotherham was one of the largest iron foundries in the country and supplied material for iron bridges and most of the iron cannons used by the British government until 1815. The business continued to prosper under his son Joshua and grandson Henry (1785-

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1860), who secured the commission in 1819 for the cast iron of London’s Southwark bridge. This portrait of Henry’s children painted shortly afterward prominently features the family industry. Henry Frederick (1807-1866), the family heir, holds a large iron pinch point bar that the Walker foundry produced in great quantities as it was the primary tool used for moving cannons and metal materials onto boats, bridges and rail cars, and for digging and breaking ground. In the background of the painting, the three distinct ashlar arches of the bridge at Blyth Hall are prominently displayed. Though the former owner of the estate William Melish erected the bridge in 1770, the Walker Foundry likely supplied its wrought-iron railing. The inclusion of the bridge at Blyth is all the more significant, because Henry and Elizabeth Walker resided at Blyth Hall, and did not occupy the larger property at Clifton Park until after Henry’s mother Susannah died in 1831. Another notable feature in this family portrait is the inclusion of the pen and paper that Caroline Elizabeth (1808-1883) holds. Like her mother, who was a published poet and outspoken abolitionist, Caroline was also an accomplished writer in her youth. As for Emily (1811-1845), little is known about her. She married Thomas Streatfeild Lightfoot, Esq. (1813-1895), and dies prematurely at 35. After Henry Frederick died without issue in 1866, the family estate passed to Thomas Edward Case (1848-1882), Caroline Elizabeth’s eldest son by John Ashton Case of Ince and Thingwall Hall, Lancaster (1804-1855). Following his death, it was inherited by his younger brother Henry Ashton Case (1851-1935), who adopted the name Walker.


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George Augustus Frederick was the eldest son of King George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. An intelligent, witty and charming figure, George - affectionately referred to as “Prinny” was also flagrantly extravagant, known for his outrageous excesses and wasteful spending. After his father fell severely ill, Parliament, fearing that the populace’s faith in the monarchy would weaken, made the unusual and extreme decision to name the young man Prince Regent, making him the essential head of the country. This portrait captures Prince George at the height of his Regency. Initially admired by the English people, his rambunctious, careless behavior - including a clandestine and essentially illegal marriage to the twice widowed Catholic Maria Fitzherbert

- soon became uncontrollable. Severely in debt, Parliament agreed to honor his debts only if he agreed to marry his first cousin Caroline of Brunswick. The marriage was an unmitigated disaster; both parties took an instant dislike to each other and the majority of their marriage was spent in separate countries. This impressive portrait is a copy of the 1816 painting by Sir Thomas Lawrence, which is conserved at the Vatican Museum, Vatican City. It reveals the then Prince Regent in all his glory - the lush clothing, insignia and badges of the many orders of which he was a member, the careful posturing of his figure. A later portrait completed for the King’s coronation and dated 1821, is nearly identical except for its inclusion of scarlet, ermine-edged robes.

82 After Sir Thomas Lawrence (British, 1769‑1830) “Portrait of George, Prince Regent, Later King George IV”, first quarter 19th century oil on canvas unsigned. Presented in an elaborate gesso and giltwood frame. 46” x 32”, framed 58‑1/2” x 44‑1/2” $15,000‑$25,000

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83 William Powell Frith, R.A. (British, 1819‑1909) “The Last Sunday of Charles II”, 1907 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Presented in a giltwood frame. 25” x 39‑1/2”, framed 33” x 47‑1/2” $10,000‑$15,000

“I can never forget the inexpressible luxury and profaneness, gaming and all dissoluteness, and as it were total forgetfulness of God (it being Sunday evening), which this day’s night I was witness of, the King sitting and toying with his concubines, Portsmouth, Cleveland, and Mazarine [sic], etc., a French boy singing love songs, in that glorious gallery, whilst about twenty of the great courtiers and other dissolute persons were at Basset round a long table...Six days later, was all in the Dust.” —Memoirs Illustrative of the Life and Writings of John Evelyn

The work presented here is a variant of Frith’s 1866 painting “The Last Sunday of Charles II”, and was created in the last years of the artist’s life when he frequently revisited earlier, favorite paintings. According to Frith’s own diary, he was inspired by Evelyn’s description, excerpted above, of the liveliness and hedonism of the Royal Court on one of the last days of the King’s life (Charles II fell unexpectedly ill the following day, dying several days later). The painting was exhibited at the Royal Academy, where it proved so popular a railing had to be installed to protect it from the throng of visitors. The subject lent itself well to Frith’s grandiose style, and allowed the artist to revel in the various accoutrements of the wealthy Court. References: Frith, William Powell. My Autobiography and Reminiscences, London: Richard Bentley and Son, 1887; Evelyn, John Memoirs Illustrative of the Life and writings of John Evelyn, London: Henry Colburn, 1819.

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84 Attributed to Thomas Rowlandson (British, 1756‑1827) “Shakespeare Seven Ages-Last Scene of Allsans teeth, sans eyes, sans...” watercolor and ink on paper unsigned. Presented in a modern gilt frame with artist plaque. sight 7‑1/2” x 9‑3/4”, framed 17” x 20” $1,000‑$1,500 85 British School (19th Century) “Charcoal Burners” oil on canvas unsigned, handwritten title en verso. Presented in a giltwood frame. 19” x 31‑3/4”, framed 26” x 39”

84

$1,000‑$1,500 86 Circle of Richard Westall (British, 1765‑1836) “Spring: Flora and the Zephyrs” “Autumn: Demeter and the Zephyrs” pair of oils on wood panel first quarter 19th century, each stamped “Richard Westall” and inscribed with season en verso panel. Presented in matching giltwood frames. 11” x 14‑1/2”, framed 12‑3/4” x 15‑3/4” Provenance: Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $1,000‑$1,500

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85

86 one of a pair

86 two of a pair


87 British School (19th Century) “An Allegorical Depiction of Hope” oil on canvas signed “Conti” lower right. Presented in an oval-aperture antique gesso and carved giltwood frame. 56” x 40”, framed 68‑1/2” x 53” Provenance: Sold in these rooms May 30, 2015, lot 46; Private collection. $5,000‑$8,000 We have this hope as an anchor for the soul, firm and steadfast." --Hebrews 6:19

87

The anchor as hope is a distinctly Christian symbol, used by the earliest adherents of the new religion in their mortuary carvings and catacomb decorations. These depictions were either non-figural or included stylized fish. The Victorian period, with its fascination with the dichotomy of vice and virtue and love of historic symbolism, saw a re-emergence of the anchor in illustrations, paintings, and sculpture. These 19th-century allegorical scenes, however, almost always incorporate the vaguely Classical figure of a woman holding or leaning upon an anchor, often against a seascape. The exceptional example offered here, with its color palette of rich, lush emerald greens, turquoises and teals, poses its Classically draped, wind-torn figure atop a rocky precipice against the stormy British seas.

88 British School (Second or Third Quarter 19th Century) “The Visiting Laird at the Crofter’s Cottage” oil on canvas laid down on board unsigned. Presented in a cove-molded gesso and carved giltwood frame. 28‑1/2” x 34‑3/4”, framed 38‑3/4” X 45‑3/4” $2,000‑$4,000

88

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89 James Fairman (American, 1826‑1904) “After the Storm, Edinburgh Castle” oil on canvas signed and illegibly dated lower right. Framed. 32” x 45”, framed 41‑1/2” x 54” $10,000‑$15,000

89

90 Edwin Henry Landseer (British, 1802‑1873) “Two Dogs Guarding a Ewe and Her Two Lambs” oil on canvas initialed “E.L.” lower left. Framed. 31” x 25”, framed 35‑1/2” x 30” $5,000‑$8,000

91

91 Henry Schouten (Belgian, 1864/67‑1927) “On the Scent” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 27‑1/2” x 39‑1/2”, framed 37” x 48” $5,000‑$8,000

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92 Anton Nicolaas Marie Karssen (Dutch, b. 1945) “Mischievous Puppies” oil on wood panel signed lower left. Framed. 24” x 39”, framed 28” x 44” $3,000‑$5,000

92

93 Johanna Grell (Austrian, 1850‑1934) “The Fox Hunt” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 16” x 23‑1/4”, framed 25‑1/4” x 32” $1,200‑$1,800 93

94 John McLeod (British, 1800‑1871) “The White Thoroughbred”, 1847 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Presented in an antique giltwood frame. 16‑1/8” x 22‑1/8”, framed 19‑1/4” x 25‑1/2” Provenance: Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $2,000‑$4,000

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95 Thomas Barker of Bath (British, 1769‑1847) “Along the Path” oil on canvas signed and illegibly dated lower left. Framed. 28‑1/4” x 36”, framed 35” x 43” $3,000‑$5,000 96 Edmund Johann Niemann (British, 1813‑1876) “Extensive Landscape with Winding Path over a Hillside” oil on canvas signed lower right, artist name and title on label en verso. Framed. 26” x 33”, framed 34‑1/2” x 41‑1/2” $1,000‑$1,500

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97 David Bates (British, 1840‑1921) “On the Way to Festining, North Wales”, 1898 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right, signed, dated and titled en verso canvas. Framed. 14” x 18‑1/8”, framed 19‑1/2” x 23‑1/4” Provenance: Collection of James Harris, PhD, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. $1,200‑$1,800


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98 James Webb (British, 1825‑1895) “A View of Givet, France” oil on canvas signed and dated “77” lower left, verso with “Kurt E. Schon, Ltd., New Orleans, LA” label with artist name and title. Framed with artist plaque. 30” x 50”, framed 36” x 56” $8,000‑$12,000

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99 Charles Robert Patterson (American, 1878‑1958) “In Company” oil on canvas signed lower left, “Quester Gallery, Stonington, CT” label with artist and title en verso. Framed. 49” x 54”, framed 58” x 63” $5,000‑$8,000

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100 Leon Francois Comerre (French, 1850‑1916) “Harem Dancer” oil on canvas signed lower left, “Whitford and Hughes, Fine Paintings 1880‑1930, London” and typewritten label with artist and title en verso. Presented in a giltwood frame. 32‑1/4” x 16‑1/4”, framed 43” x 26‑1/2” Provenance: Sotheby's, London, June 13, 2006, lot 234 $50,000‑$80,000

Europeans were fascinated with the exoticism of the “Orient”, with the fine porcelain, silk, textiles and spices that flooded ports due to the expansion of trade in the East in the late 17th/early 18th century through the Swedish East India Companies. Turkey, the Middle East and North Africa became synonymous with the Orient. Napoleon’s failed campaigns in Egypt and Syria fueled public interest in Egyptology that found ubiquitous expression in the French Empire-style- whereby fine and decorative arts prominently featured sphinxes, winged animals, paw feet, and hieroglyphic and geometric patterns. French colonization of Algeria and Tunisia in 1830 and 1881 respectively further aggrandized the misnomer. By the second half of the 19th century, the Orient symbolized all that was not Western European and Christian; it was a collective "other" that dazzled and afforded a fantastic reprieve from the mores and strictures of the West. Turkish, Indian and Maghrebian rugs were found in sun drenched bazaars in Tangiers and Istanbul that French painters like Kauffman and Gabani frequented, and they painted many embellished depictions for wealthy European patrons such as the “Snake Charmer” in lot 105, and the colorful tapestry rug-laden market in lot 106. The exotic fauna, spices and textiles were revered as vibrant and wild as the forbidden domestic interiors of the Ottoman Empire sultans, namely the women’s quarters (seraglios). Harems were highly eroticized by Western men as they erroneously viewed them as personal brothels for the affluent. Romantic painters, notably Gerome, Delacroix and Ingres pictorially invented the harem pastiche of the Odalisque - Turkish slaves or concubines portrayed as belly dancers or as recumbent nudes in lush interiors that often include other women bathing or in intimate embraces. Aureli ‘s “Courtesans in Waiting” and Ballesio’s “Royal Patron” in lots 102 and 103 exemplify this archetype, as does the painting offered here by Commere of the “Harem Dancer”, and also Semenousky’s “Water Carrier” in the following lot. The latter two present sultry odalisques/ belly dancers draped in golden gauze with elaborate sequined accoutrements; the first is posed before a relief of Moorish architecture bedecked in “Oriental” guilloche; and the second portrays a Western Greek or Italian peasant presented as an odalisque.

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100

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101 Emile Eisman-Semenowsky (Polish/French, 1857‑1911) “Water Carrier”, 1891 oil on wood panel signed and localized “Paris” lower right, signed, dated and further inscribed en verso that the painting was commissioned in 1891 by “Messrs. Craig and Evans, Paris”. Framed. 22” x 14‑3/4”, framed 29‑1/8” x 22‑1/8” $12,000‑$18,000

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102 Giuseppe Aureli (Italian, 1858‑1929) “The Courtesans in Waiting” watercolor signed and localized “Roma” lower left. Matted, glazed and framed. sight 21” x 30”, framed 34” x 43” $1,500‑$2,500

102

103 Francesco Ballesio (Italian, 1860‑1923) “A Royal Patron” watercolor signed and localized “Roma/Tivoli” lower right, titled on brass artist plaque. Matted, glazed and framed. 21” x 29”, framed 33” x 40” $7,000‑$10,000

103

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104

104 Friedrich Perlberg (German, 1848‑1921)

105 Giuseppe Gabani (Italian, 1846‑1899)

106 Karl Kaufmann (Austrian, 1843‑1901/05)

“The Evening Prayer, Thebes, Egypt”

“The Snake Charmer”

“Algiers Market”

oil on wood panel signed and inscribed “Munchen” lower left, signed and inscribed in German and “Christie’s, New York, October 22, 2008, lot 84” labels en verso. Framed with brass artist’s plaque and dated “1893”. 15” x 30”, framed 18‑1/2” x 33‑1/2”

oil on wood panel signed and inscribed “Roma” lower right, “Christie’s, New York, Rockefeller Plaza, April 22, 2004, lot 213” and “C. S. Studios, Fine Art Pictures Restorers, Abbey Road, Devon” labels en verso. Presented in a period giltwood frame. 11‑1/4” x 18‑1/2”, framed 22” x 29‑3/4”

oil on panel signed lower right, titled en verso. Framed. 14‑1/8” x 17‑5/8”, framed 18‑5/8” x 22‑1/4”

Provenance: Christie’s, New York, New York, October 22, 2008, lot 84

Provenance: Christie’s, New York, New York, April 22, 2004, lot 213 ; Shapiro Auctions, New York, New York, September 26, 2015, lot 524.

$5,000‑$8,000

$18,000‑$25,000

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$1,000‑$1,500


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106

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107 Italian Carved Marble of “David” first quarter 20th century, after the 1501/4 monumental sculpture by Michelangelo (Italian, 1475‑1564) now conserved at the Galleria dell’Accademia in Florence, Italy, presented on a carved marble columnar pedestal with floral vine and stylized reed motif. overall h. 66”, w. 11‑1/2”, d. 11‑1/2” $3,000‑$5,000

108 Italian Patinated Bronze of “Discobolus” first half 20th century, after the 1st century AD Roman sculpture (itself a copy of a lost 5th century BCE Greek work by Myron) now conserved by the Museo Nazionale Romano and displayed in the Palazzo Massimo, on an oval marble plinth. overall h. 26‑1/2”, w. 18”, d. 12” $1,000‑$1,500

108

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109 John William Godward (British, 1861‑1922) “Waiting for the Procession”, 1890 oil on canvas signed and dated mid-left along marble edge, a “Winsor & Newton/London” canvas stamp en verso. Framed. 13” x 9”, framed 19‑1/4” x 15” Provenance: Sotheby’s, New York, October 23, 1997, lot 91; M.S. Rau Antiques, New Orleans, Louisiana; Private collection. Literature: Swanson, Vern. John William Godward: The Eclipse of Classicism. Antique Collectors' Club: Suffolk, 1997, pp. 179-180, illus. 11. $25,000‑$40,000 109

Along with Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912) and Sir Frederic Leighton (1830-1896), John William Godward was acknowledged as one of the most successful proponents of Victorian Neo-Classicism, specifically what was loosely and unofficially referred to as the marble school. Inspired by the art, architecture, and antiquities of ancient Rome and Greece, Godward painstakingly studied every aspect of his paintings to ensure they were as accurate as possible. This meticulous attention to detail is evident in the exquisite painting presented here. The classically draped figure is leaning against a delicately gray-veined cream marble parapet. Every pleat and fold of cloth is clearly delineated, and the lush weightiness of the fabric is played against the luminous smoothness of the marble.

As with almost all of Godward’s paintings, the background is intentionally vague in its characteristic and, therefore, the locale is unidentifiable – as its true role is to act as a foil to the beauty and gracefulness of the figure and the architectural edifice with which she is so elegantly framed. Little is known of Godward’s schooling and education, though it is believed that he spent some time in the offices of the architect William Hoff Wontner, a family friend, from whom he likely learned the rudiments of technical architectural drawing – a skill which was to be of crucial significance in his later chosen style and subject. In 1887 he exhibited for the first time at the Royal Academy, to nearly instantaneous critical acclaim, and Godward spent the next several decades as a popular and highly sought-after artist.

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110 George Washington Nicholson (American, 1832‑1912) “View of San Marco, Venice” oil on canvas signed lower left. Presented in an antique giltwood frame. 20” x 36”, framed 29” x 45” $4,000‑$7,000

111 Henri Duvieux (French, ca. 1855‑1920) “Piazza San Marco, Venice” oil on wood panel signed lower left, “Latouche, 34, Rue Lafayette, Paris, Toiles, Tableaux et Couleurs, Encadrements” stamp en verso. Presented in an antique giltwood frame. 7‑1/2” x 9‑1/2”, framed 16” x 18” $2,500‑$4,000

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112 Frederick Arthur Bridgman (Alabama/France, 1847‑1928) “An Idle Moment, Two Beauties by the River”, 1901 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Framed. 25” x 36”, framed 30‑1/2” x 41‑1/2” $8,000‑$12,000

112

113 Emil Carlsen (Danish/American, 1848‑1932) “The Kitchen Maid” oil on canvas laid on board signed lower left. Framed. 20” x 16”, framed 24” x 21” $3,000‑$5,000

113

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114 Gaetano Capone (American, New York, 1845‑1920) “Wooded Landscape” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 24” x 34”, framed 29‑1/2” x 39‑3/4” $3,000‑$5,000 114

115 Frank Benjamin DeHaven (American/New York, 1856‑1934) “A Country Road”, 1894 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Presented in an antique giltwood frame with brass artist plaque. 18” x 26”, framed 24” x 31‑3/4” $1,000‑$1,500

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116 A. Thomas (American, 19th Century) “Camping on the Banks of a River” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 41” x 29‑3/4”, framed 47” x 36” $5,000‑$8,000

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117 Birger Sandzen (Swedish/Kansas, 1871‑1954) “Basilio (Portrait of Basilio Herrera)”, 1947 oil on board signed, titled, dated and inscribed en verso. Framed. 24” x 20”, framed 29‑3/4” x 25‑3/4” Provenance: Descended to the artist’s daughter Margaret Sandzen Greenough; to Dr. Horace H. Porter, Tulsa, Oklahoma, prior 1970 and descended in family; to private collector through The Birger Sandzen Memorial Gallery, Lindsborg, Kansas, 2007. $30,000‑$50,000

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118 Birger Sandzen (Swedish/Kansas, 1871‑1954) “Pine Trees” oil on paper board signed lower right. Presented in a modern frame. 9‑1/4” x 11”, framed 16” x 18” $15,000‑$25,000

118

119 Henry August Schwabe (American/New Jersey, 1843‑1916) “The Cowboy”, 1908 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Framed. 35‑1/4” x 27‑1/4”, framed 42‑1/2” x 35‑1/2” $7,000‑$10,000

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120 Henry Jackson (American, 1924‑2011) “Steer Roper - Hard and Fast (Bustin’ One)”, 1959 patinated bronze cast signature, dated, titled and copyright marked along right edge of self-base, a number “9” at left edge, on a black marble plinth. overall h. 13‑1/2”, w. 23”, d. 14‑1/2” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $4,000‑$7,000

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121 Morris Rippel (American/New Mexico, 1930‑2009) “Alonzo”, 1981 egg tempera on panel signed and dated lower right, signed, titled and dated en verso. Presented in a rustic wood frame. 13” x 22”, framed 21‑1/2” x 30” Provenance: The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $2,000‑$4,000

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122 Joseph H. Sulkowski (American/Tennessee, b. 1951) “Quail Hunting Over Palmettos”, 1993 oil on canvas signed and dated lower left. Presented in a custom frame affixed with artist plaque. 46” x 72”, framed 54” x 80‑1/2” $10,000‑$15,000

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123 Jose Roig (Spanish/Argentinian, 1898‑1968) “Tarde Tranquila - Mina Clavero” oil on board signed lower right, signed and titled en verso, “Galeria Argentina” label en verso. Framed. 23‑1/2” x 27‑3/4”, framed 33” x 37” $1,000‑$1,500 123

124 Chauncey F. Ryder, N.A. (American, 1868‑1949) “Rocky Landscape” oil on canvas signed lower right. Presented in a modern frame. 12” x 16”, framed 19‑1/2” x 23‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

124

125 Chauncey F. Ryder, N.A. (American, 1868‑1949) “Mountainous Landscape” oil on canvas signed lower left. Presented in a modern frame with brass artist plaque. 12” x 16”, framed 19‑1/4” x 23” $2,000‑$4,000

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126 Chauncey F. Ryder, N.A. (American, 1868‑1949) “Isabella Mountains in Tennessee” oil on masonite signed lower right, titled and exhibition labels en verso. Presented in a modern frame with brass artist plaque. 12” x 15‑3/4”, framed 19‑3/4” x 23‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

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127 Chauncey F. Ryder, N.A. (American, 1868‑1949) “River at Hartsville” oil on canvas signed lower left, titled and “Keny & Johnson Gallery, Columbus, Ohio” label en verso. Presented in a modern frame. 12” x 16”, framed 18” x 21‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

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128 Johann Berthelsen (Danish/American, 1883‑1972) “Madison Square, Early Evening”, ca. mid-1940s oil on canvas board signed lower right and titled on brass artist plaque. Presented in a frame custom-made by the artist’s wife. 20” x 16”, framed 25‑3/4” x 21‑3/4” A special thank you to Mr. Lee Berthelsen, the artist’s son, for his assistance with cataloguing the painting. $7,000‑$10,000

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129 Guy Carleton Wiggins, N.A. (American, 1883‑1962) “Winter at the Plaza (Grand Army)” oil on canvas board signed lower right, signed and titled en verso. Framed. 12” x 16”, framed 16‑1/2” x 20‑1/2” This painting has been authenticated by the artist’s son, Guy Arthur Wiggins, and is accompanied with a letter dated October 9, 2012. $10,000‑$15,000

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130 Emile Albert Gruppe (American/Massachusetts, 1896‑1978) “A Snowy Winter Day” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 30” x 32”, framed 35‑1/2” x 37” $4,500‑$7,000 130

131 James Knox (Scottish/New York, 1866‑1942) “Woodland Snow” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 20” x 24‑1/4”, framed 28” x 33‑3/4” $2,500‑$4,000 131

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132 Carle John Blenner (American, 1862‑1952) “Bouquet of Phlox in a Blue Aesthetic Vase” oil on board signed mid-left. Framed. 42” x 30‑1/2”, framed 50” x 37” $3,500‑$5,000 132

133 Jose Bumanlag David (American/Philippines, 1909‑1990) “Cathedral of St. Mary and St. John, Manila, Philippines”, 1934 oil on canvas board signed and dated lower right, titled and further inscribed en verso. Framed. 14” x 19”, framed 16‑1/2” x 21‑3/4” $1,200‑$1,800 133

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134 Thomas Pollock Anshutz (American, 1851‑1912) “Seated Male Figure with a Water Jug” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 32” x 26”, framed 38‑1/2” x 32‑1/2” $3,000‑$5,000

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135 Frederick Judd Waugh (American/New Jersey, 1861‑1940) “Breaking Waves” oil on masonite signed lower right. Presented in a modern giltwood frame. 18” x 24”, framed 21‑1/2” x 27‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

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136 James Topping (British/Illinois, 1879‑1948) “Cabins in the Mountains” oil on canvas board signed lower left. Framed. 14” x 16”, framed 17‑3/4” x 19‑3/4” $1,000‑$1,500

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137 Arthur Clifton Goodwin (American, 1864‑1929) “New England Landscape” pastel on paper signed lower left. Matted, glazed and framed. sight 17‑1/4” x 21‑3/4”, framed 27” x 32” $1,000‑$1,500 137

138 Wolf Kahn (American, b. 1927) “Village Scene” pastel on paper signed lower right. Matted, glazed and framed. sight 12‑3/4” x 16”, framed 20‑1/2” x 23‑3/4” $2,500‑$4,000

138

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139 Rolla Sims Taylor (American/Texas, 1872‑1970) “Texas Bluebonnets”, ca. 1930 oil on canvas signed lower right. Presented in a period giltwood frame. 12” x 16”, framed 16‑3/4” x 21” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,500‑$2,500

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140 Dennis Allen Lustick (American, b. 1953) “Landscape #2”, 1974 oil on masonite signed and dated lower right. Framed. 9‑1/2” x 13‑3/4”, framed 11‑5/8” x 15‑3/4” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,000‑$1,500

140

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141 William Aiken Walker (American/South Carolina, 1839‑1921) “Man and Woman on a Horse” oil on board signed lower left. Unframed. 9‑1/4” x 12‑1/4” To be included in John Fowler’s forthcoming catalogue raisonne. $8,000‑$12,000 141

142 William Aiken Walker (American/South Carolina, 1839‑1921) “Young Boy on a Mule” oil on board signed lower left. Unframed. 9‑1/4” x 12‑3/8” To be included in John Fowler’s forthcoming catalogue raisonne. $6,000‑$9,000 142

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143 William Aiken Walker (American/South Carolina, 1839‑1921) “Hunting Dog” oil on canvas signed lower right. Presented in a giltwood frame. 17” x 14”, framed 22‑1/2” x 19‑1/2” Provenance: Alonzo Lansford (1910‑1978), former director, artist and restorer at the Delgado Museum of Art (now the New Orleans Museum of Art), New Orleans, Louisiana; Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. Literature: Illustrated in the preface of August P. Trovaioli and Roulhac B. Toledano, William Aiken Walker: Southern Genre Painter. Gretna: Pelican Publishing, 2008. $20,000‑$40,000

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An avid sportsman, William Aiken Walker enjoyed the recreational pursuits of hunting and fishing. The artist frequently traveled to southern resorts with the intent of selling his paintings to wealthy vacationing tourists and would join his patrons on hunting excursions. Walker painted nature mortes of fish and game as well as dog hunting scenes. This portrait of a "Hunting Dog" reflects Walker's admiration for the hound's abilities in the field and is signed by the artist on a blade of grass. Ref: Trovaili, August P. and Roulhac B. Toledano, Wiliam Aiken Walker: Southern Genre Painter, Gretna: Pelican Publishing Co, 2008.


144 William Aiken Walker (American/South Carolina, 1839‑1921) “Cotton Pickers in the Field” oil on artist board signed lower left, pencil inscribed “Field” en verso. Framed. 9” x 12”, framed 16” x 19” To be included in John Fowler’s upcoming catalogue raisonne. $10,000‑$15,000 144

145 Attributed to Washington Bogart Cooper (American/Tennessee, 1802‑1888) “Portrait of John Waters and Mollie (or Mallie) Waters”, ca. 1860 oil on canvas unsigned. Presented in a period giltwood and gesso frame. 60” x 48”, framed 75‑3/8” x 60” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $3,000‑$5,000 This portrait was attributed in 1982 to Washington Bogart Cooper by James C. Kelly of the Tennessee State Museum, an acknowledged authority on the artist. A portrait painter of many notable Tennessee families, the sitters in this painting are children of Dr. John Waters (ca. 1790‑1867) and Ann M. Rawlings Waters (1826‑1910) who lived and are buried in Nashville, Tennessee.

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146 Alexander John Drysdale (American/Louisiana, 1870‑1934) “Dawn over the Lily Pond” oil wash on paper signed lower right. Matted, glazed and framed. 19‑1/2” x 20‑1/2”, framed 29‑1/2” x 39‑1/2” $2,500‑$4,000

146

147 Alexander John Drysdale (American/Louisiana, 1870‑1934) “Sunset on the Bayou” oil wash on canvas board signed lower left. Matted, glazed and framed. sheet 14‑3/4” x 19‑3/4”, framed 23‑3/4” x 28” $2,500‑$4,000

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148 After John James Audubon (American, 1785‑1851) “Red-headed Woodpecker”, no. 6, pl. XXVII, from Birds of America (1826‑1838) hand-colored engraving with aquatint by Robert Havell, watermarked “J Whatman/1833”, verso frame with “W. Graham Arader III” gallery label. Float-mounted and attractively framed. sheet 38” x 26”, framed 49‑3/8” x 36‑7/8” $3,000‑$5,000

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149 Knute Heldner (Swedish/Louisiana, 1875‑1952) “Moonlight Seascape”, 1936 oil on canvas signed and dated lower left. Framed. 20‑1/4” x 25‑1/4”, framed 25‑1/2” x 30‑1/2” Provenance: Purchased from the artist; Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $3,000‑$5,000 149

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150 August Norieri (American/New Orleans, 1860‑1898) “Along Lake Pontchartrain”, 1897 oil on linen signed and dated lower right. Framed. 18‑1/8” x 30‑1/8”, framed 24” x 36” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana; by descent in the family. $15,000‑$25,000

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Born into a middle class New Orleans Italian-American family, August Norieri merged his fascination with the boats and life along the Mississippi River and Lake Pontchartrain with his talent as an artist. His brother Baptiste worked as a tugboat captain and a bar pilot, and provided the artist with insight into the waterways of southern Louisiana. In 1880, Norieri began his studies with the local artist Andres Molinary, who was known for his landscape and genre paintings. Molinary’s studio was a favorite gathering place for the local and visiting artists, and Norieri would have been a frequent guest of his mentor. Despite his untimely death in 1898 at the age of 38, Norieri had an accomplished career including exhibiting with The National Academy of Design, The Art Association of New Orleans and The Creole Exhibit of the American Exposition in 1885. This charming painting “Along Lake Pontchartrain” provides a glimpse of daily life at the end of the nineteenth century with a view of sailboats in the distance as a fisherman walks with pole in hand along the shore and two men chat in the shade of the live oak tree.


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151 Morris Henry Hobbs (American/Louisiana, 1892‑1967) “Landscape from MacDowell Colony Dining Room, New Hampshire” oil on canvas signed lower left. Presented in a period frame. 24” x 27”, framed 30‑3/4” x 33‑1/4” $2,000‑$4,000

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152 Clarence Millet (American/Louisiana, 1897‑1959) “Bayou Teche” oil on canvas signed lower left, signed and titled “Teche Pastoral” en verso canvas, and with old handwritten inventory note en verso frame. Framed. 30” x 40”, framed 37‑3/4” x 47‑3/4” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $6,000‑$9,000 Clarence Millet was one of the few Southern Regionalist artists to receive national acclaim from critics and collectors during his lifetime, and was the only such artist to be named an Associate of the prestigious National Academy of Design, an honor which was conferred in 1943.

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His earliest artistic training was through his association with Robert Grafton and Louis Oscar Griffith, both of whom had spent considerable time in France and who exposed the young man to the tenets of Impressionism, a style which instantly appealed to his sensibilities. Millet’s light-drenched canvases were rendered in precise, quick brushstrokes and proved especially effective at successfully capturing the atmosphere of the Louisiana landscape. The painting presented here of Bayou Teche - a location the artist was to revisit throughout his career - is a clear example of the artist at his most adept and accomplished; the deep verdant greens and browns of the large tree with its dripping Spanish moss which are deftly juxtaposed against the blues, lavenders, and grays of the slightly overcast sky; the composition which allows the magnificence of the natural scenery to shine; the broad brushstrokes which create a sense of vibrancy and vitality.


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153 William “Bill” Traylor (American/Alabama, ca. 1854‑1949) “Four Figures and Basket in Blue” pencil, tempera and conte crayon on cardboard unsigned, “Gallery Ricco/Maresca, New York” and “Carl Hammer Gallery, Chicago” labels with artist and title en verso. Framed. 11” x 11”, framed 18‑3/4” x 18‑1/4” $60,000‑$90,000

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154 William “Bill” Traylor (American/Alabama, ca. 1854‑1949) “Man on Stand” poster paint on cardboard unsigned, “Hirschl & Adler, Modern, New York”, “Galerie Montenay, Paris” and “Carl Hammer Gallery, Chicago” labels with artist and title en verso. Framed. 15” x 13”, framed 22‑3/4” x 20‑3/4” $30,000‑$50,000

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155 Enrique Alferez (Mexican/Louisiana, 1901‑1999) “Gaucho” patinated bronze on a carved wood base. overall h. 15”, w. 6‑1/4”, d. 4‑1/8” Provenance: Purchased from the artist; Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $8,000‑$12,000

A native of Mexico who was to become one of New Orleans’ most iconic artists, Alferez received his earliest training in the studio of his father, a European-trained sculptor of religious figures. At the tender age of 12, he was kidnapped by forces loyal to Francisco “Pancho” Villa and spent the next seven years serving under the General during the devastating Mexican Revolution; he managed to escape in 1920 and fled to Texas. He eventually enrolled in the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, studying under Lorado Taft and training in the then waning Beaux-Art style. It wasn’t until the emergence of Art Deco that Alferez truly found his distinctive style of angular planes which adeptly reduce the human form to its most essential elements. His works, whether sculpture or drawing, are redolent of the influences of his Mexican childhood, an inspired combination of Pre-Columbian relics, Catholic symbolism, and the remnants of Colonialism. The work presented here, of the South American cow-herder, is a wonderful example of the sculptor at his most accomplished - employing the fewest lines possible, Alferez easily conveys the pride and dignity of his subject.

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156 Noel Rockmore (American/Louisiana, 1928‑1995) “Mother Goose” oil on paper signed lower right. Matted, under plexiglass and framed. sight 24” x 17‑1/2”, framed 32‑1/2” x 27” Provenance: The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,000‑$1,500

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157 George Valentine Dureau (American/Louisiana, 1930‑2014) “Pulcinella”, 2006 oil on gallery-wrapped canvas signed lower right, signed, titled, and dedicated “Feb 2007 for Rosario Civello” en verso. Unframed. 60” x 47‑7/8” Provenance: Commissioned from the artist; Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $10,000‑$15,000

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159 Jose-Maria Cundin (Spanish/Louisiana, b. 1938) “Portrait of a Man” oil on canvas unsigned, verso with “Bienville Gallery, New Orleans” label with artist name. Matted, glazed and presented in a modern frame. sight 8‑3/4” x 6‑1/2”, framed 17‑1/2” x 14‑1/4” $2,000‑$4,000

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158 George Valentine Dureau (American/Louisiana, 1930‑2014) “Untitled - Interior”, 1962 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Presented in a thin gallery frame. 25” x 20”, framed 25‑3/4” x 20‑3/4”

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Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,200‑$1,800

160 Jose-Maria Cundin (Spanish/Louisiana, b. 1938) “Subversive Situation Number 41”, 1986 oil on canvas signed and dated lower center. In a thin gallery frame. 36‑1/2” x 47”, framed 36‑3/4” x 48‑1/4” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $15,000‑$25,000

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161 Jean Seidenberg (American/Louisiana, b. 1930) “Portrait of Mignon”, 1959 oil on canvas signed and dated “1/17/59” mid-left. Framed. 29‑1/2” x 35”, framed 30‑1/2” x 36‑3/4” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $2,000‑$4,000

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162 James Michalopoulos (American/Louisiana, b. 1951) “Untitled”, 1999 oil on canvas monogrammed lower left, signed and dated en verso. In the original artist frame. 30” x 24”, framed 31‑1/4” x 25” $4,000‑$7,000

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163 James Michalopoulos (American/Louisiana, b. 1951) “Untitled” oil on canvas signed lower left “Mitchell”. In the original artist frame. 24” x 30”, framed 25” x 31‑1/4” $4,000‑$7,000 163

164 James Michalopoulos (American/Louisiana, b. 1951) “Domicilia”, 1993 oil on canvas signed lower left, titled, signed and dated en verso. In the original artist frame. 48” x 23‑1/2”, framed 49‑1/2” x 25” $5,000‑$8,000

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165 James Michalopoulos (American/Louisiana, b. 1951) “Doris”, 1991 oil on canvas initialed lower left, titled en verso stretcher, signed “Mitchell” and dated en verso canvas. In the original artist frame. 36” x 24”, framed 37” x 25” $3,000‑$5,000

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166 James Michalopoulos (American/Louisiana, b. 1951) “Small But Smart”, 1997 oil on canvas signed lower left, signed, titled and dated with artist’s label en verso. In the original artist frame. 40” x 30, framed 41” x 31” $5,000‑$8,000

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167 George Rodrigue (American/Louisiana, 1944‑2013) “A Moment in Time: Three Beauties and a Photographer Under a Tree” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 30” x 40”, framed 48‑1/4” x 38” $20,000‑$40,000

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168 George Rodrigue (American/Louisiana, 1944‑2013) “Family Portrait Beneath a Live Oak” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 40” x 30”, framed 36‑1/2” x 46‑1/2” $20,000‑$40,000

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169 James R. Lamantia (American/Louisiana, 1923‑2011) “Landscape”, 1963‑64 oil on canvas signed and dated twice en verso. Presented in a period frame. 12” x 18”, framed 16‑1/4” x 22‑1/4” $1,000‑$1,500

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170 Zella Funck (American/Louisiana, 1917‑2009) “Abstract Landscape” oil on canvas inscribed with artist name and address en verso. Presented in a thin gallery frame. 24” x 30”, framed 24‑1/2” x 30‑1/2” $1,000‑$1,500

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171 James R. Lamantia (American/Louisiana, 1923‑2011) “Abstract Landscape”, 1959 oil on canvas signed and dated en verso. Framed. 21” x 30”, framed 22‑1/2” x 31‑1/2” $1,200‑$1,800

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172 George Valentine Dureau (American/Louisiana, 1930‑2014) “Cityscape” watercolor and ink on paper signed lower mid-right. Framed. sight 7” x 15”, framed 13‑1/2” x 21” $1,000‑$1,500

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173 James R. Lamantia (American/Louisiana, 1923‑2011) “Porta della Salute, Venice”, 1959 ink and watercolor on paper vertically signed and dated lower right, an “Orleans Gallery, New Orleans, Louisiana” label en verso frame. Glazed and framed. sight 25‑3/4” x 39‑1/4”, framed 30” x 44‑1/8” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,500‑$2,500

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174 Ida Rittenberg Kohlmeyer (American/Louisiana, 1912‑1997) “Segment Series #9”, 1987 oil and mixed media on canvas signed, titled and dated on label en verso. Framed. 11” x 6‑1/2”, framed 17” x 11‑1/2” $3,000‑$5,000

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175 David Harouni (American/Louisiana, b. 1962) “King” oil on gallery-wrapped canvas signed lower left. Unframed. 22‑1/2” x 26‑1/4” Provenance: David Harouni Gallery, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,500‑$2,500 176 William (Bill) Ludwig (American/Louisiana, 1935‑2011) “Three Faces Emerging” three polished and patinated bronzes 1978‑1983, largest with incised signature and dated “87”, smaller two with incised signatures and one numbered “44/50” and the other dated “83”. one h. 11”, w. 21”, two h. 11‑1/2”, w. 5‑7/8” $1,000‑$1,500 175

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177 Louise Guidry (American/Louisiana, b. 1930) “Rie’s Dream” acrylic on gallery-wrapped canvas signed lower right. Unframed. 36” x 36” $1,800‑$2,500 178 Louise Guidry (American/Louisiana, b. 1930) “Temple Wall” acrylic on gallery-wrapped canvas signed lower right. Unframed. 36” x 36” $1,800‑$2,500 179 Melissa Bonin (American/Louisiana, Contemporary) “Will-o-the-Wisp”, 2016 oil on gallery-wrapped canvas signed lower right, signed, titled and dated en verso. Unframed. 40” x 30” $3,000‑$5,000 179

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180 Emery Clark (American/New Orleans, b. 1950) “Sunset”, 1991 watercolor and mixed media on paper signed and dated lower right. Matted, glazed and framed. sight 30” x 46”, framed 46‑1/2” x 63” $1,500‑$2,500

181 Terry Weldon (American/Louisiana, b. 1947) “Stele Disc - Worn” metal with enamel signed, titled and further inscribed on artist label en verso. Fitted for hanging. dia. 45” 180

Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,400‑$1,800

182 William Tolliver (American/Mississippi, 1951‑2000) “Louisiana Bayou Landscape with Swans” oil on canvas board signed lower right. Framed. 45‑1/2” x 90‑1/2”, framed 53” x 98‑1/2” Provenance: Commissioned from the artist; Private collection, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. $3,000‑$5,000

183 William Tolliver (American/Mississippi, 1951‑2000) “Louisiana Bayou Landscape with a Bridge” oil on canvas board signed lower right. Framed. 45‑1/2” x 90‑1/2”, framed 53” x 98‑1/2” 181

Provenance: Commissioned from the artist; Private collection, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. $3,000‑$5,000

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184 Marie Laurencin (French, 1883‑1956) “Trois Jeunes Filles et Un Chien” oil on canvas signed upper right. Framed. 13” x 23‑3/4”, framed 23” x 31‑1/4” Provenance: Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Manheim, East Hampton, New York; Christie’s, New York, New York, November 6, 2008, lot 247. $60,000‑$90,000

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Laurencin was one of the most significant women artists associated with the Cubist movement. A friend and associate of Pablo Picasso, George Braque, and Guillaume Apollinaire, she was often reduced to little more than a footnote to Cubism, frequently referred to as muse rather than artist. Contrary to many contemporary – and later – writings, Laurencin had begun painting long before she was exposed to the avantgarde art community of which she was to become such an important member. Even her earliest works reveal aspects of her distinctive style; carefully composed intimate scenes of female figures, executed in pure colors with almost aggressive accents of black; features which are all more indicative of the Fauvist movement. The sometimes jarring angularity of many Cubist paintings is missing from her work, and her figures are subtly curved.

The work presented here is a wonderful example of Laurencin at her most engaging and accomplished. The delicately flowing figures are carefully rendered in broad swaths of color contained within a few precisely chosen black lines. The colors are cool and bright blues, yellows and pinks, Laurencin’s preferred palette. The central figure gazes directly and assertively at the viewer, while the two flanking figures are more internally involved with their own movements. There is a sense of energy and vivacity which is indicative of Laurencin’s mature style. Reference: Ott, Elizabeth. "Memories of Bilitis". Genders, Number 36, 2002.; Glueck, Grace, "The Woman as Artist". The New York Times, September 25, 1977.

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185 Marc Chagall (Russian/French, 1887‑1985) “Arrival of Dionysophanes” from Daphnis and Chloe, 1961 lithograph in colors on Arches paper pencil signed and numbered “12/60” lower margin. Matted, glazed and framed. 16‑3/4” x 12‑3/4”, framed 32‑1/2” x 17‑1/8” Provenance: Swann Galleries, New York, New York, March 5, 2009, lot 92. Literature: Mourlot, Fernand. The Lithographs of Chagall, 1962‑1968. Boston Book Shop: Boston, 1969, no. 344. $15,000‑$25,000

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186 Marc Chagall (Russian/French, 1887‑1985) “Les Maries dans le Ciel”, 1981 tempera, ink and crayon on masonite board signed upper right, the reverse with Christie’s and French framer labels; accompanied by a letter of authenticity from the Comite Marc Chagall. Framed. 13‑7/8” x 10‑5/8”, framed 19‑3/8” x 16” Provenance: Hotel Drouot, Paris, December 21, 2000, lot 49; Christie’s, New York, New York, May 7, 2008, lot 453. $500,000‑$800,000

“In our life there is a single color, as on an artist’s palette, which provides the meaning of life and art. It is the color of love. Perhaps my art is a blue soul breaking in upon my pictures.” —Marc Chagall

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“Les Maries dans le Ciel” embodies the magical, dreamlike poetry of Marc Chagall’s work. It is a symphony in blue, the color of love that saturated his soul, and it celebrates three of the most recurring themes painted by the artist: lovers, musicians and the crowded rooftops of his childhood village in Vitebsk, Belarus (then part of the Russian Empire), where Chagall met his young bride Bella Rosenfeld. All three are harmonized in a wash of ultramarine, cerulean and green beneath a pale moonlight and bridal trellis accented by the brilliant red of its canopy and by the bouquet of the flower bearer. Bella was Chagall’s endless muse and ultimate raison d’etre as an artist. She represented a purity of love that spilled forth in his paintings, defying gravity and perspective, causing figures to soar through the skies and objects to dance in tandem in a kaleidoscope of colors and forms. As Chagall stated in his autobiography My Life: "All I had to do was open my window and in streamed the blueness of the sky, love and flowers with her [Bella]. She has long been haunting my paintings, the great central image of my art.” Long after Chagall’s native village was destroyed in the Russian Revolution, two world wars and its Jewish population almost halved; long after Bella died suddenly in America as a war emigre in 1944, the song of Bella and his beloved Belarus live on as the leitmotif of “Les Maries dans le Ciel.” Painted nearly forty years later when Chagall was well over ninety years old, their memory persists in recurring symbols and images that bear witness to the past in vignette-like psalms that sing of life; the cadence of the ensemble further visualized by the celestial cellist and courtyard flutist. As Chagall once wrote, “Color is all. When color is right, form is right. Color is everything, color is vibration like music; everything is vibration.” References: Chagall, Marc. My Life. London: Peter Owen Publishers, 1965; Wullschlager, Jackie. Chagall: A Biography. New York: Knopf, 2008; Chagall, Marc. Marc Chagall on Art and Culture, edited Benjamin Harshav. Stanford University Press, 2003.


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187 David Burliuk (Ukranian/New York, 1882‑1967) “Florida Canal”, 1948 oil on canvas laid down on masonite signed and dated lower left, titled “Florida” lower right. Framed. 12” x 16”, framed 19‑3/4” x 23‑1/2” Provenance: Shannon’s, Milford, Connecticut, May 1, 2008, lot 229. $8,000‑$12,000 187

188 Yvonne Canu (French, 1921‑2007) “St. Tropez” oil on canvas signed lower left, titled on brass artist plaque, typewritten label en verso, “Meinhard Galleries, Houston, Texas” label on frame backing. Framed. 12‑3/4” x 16”, framed 19” x 22‑1/2” Provenance: Sotheby’s, New York, New York, October 7, 2008, lot 231. $10,000‑$15,000

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190 Zygmunt (Sigmund) Menkes (Polish/New York, 1896‑1985) “Still Life with Sunflowers and Chair”, ca. 1940 oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 30” x 22”, framed 40‑1/4” x 32‑1/4” $4,000‑$7,000 189

189 Hermine David (French, 1886‑1971) “Rue de Ville” oil on board signed lower left, Sotheby’s, New York, October 7, 2008, lot 40, “Robinet Freres Specialite d’Emballage et Transport, Paris” and “David Bendann’s Fine Art Rooms, Baltimore” labels en verso. Framed. 29” x 23‑3/4”, framed 32‑1/2” x 27” Provenance: Sotheby’s, New York, New York, October 7, 2008, lot 40. $2,500‑$4,000

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191 Jean Dufy (French, 1888‑1964) “L’Oree du Bois”, 1922 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Framed. 31‑3/4” x 25‑1/2”, framed 43” x 37” Provenance: Sotheby’s, New York, New York, October 7, 2008, lot 66. Literature: Bailly, Jacques. Catalogue Raisonne of Jean Dufy's Work, vol. 2. Paris: Editions Jacques Bailly, 2010. $20,000‑$40,000

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192 Maximilien Luce (French, 1858‑1941) “Bord de la Chalouette, Moulineux”, 1904 oil on artist board signed and dated lower left, titled en verso with various gallery and shipping labels. Presented in a modern frame. 14‑3/4” x 11‑3/4”, framed 22‑1/4” x 19‑1/4” Provenance: Paul Martin, his sale, Versailles, France, June 2, 1960, lot 72; Hammer Galleries, New York, New York, 1966, inv. no. 19799; Trosby Galleries, Palm Beach, Florida; Bonham’s, New York, New York, May 7, 2015. Literature: Bazetoux, Denise. Maximilien Luce, catalogue raisonne de l’oeuvre peint, vol. 2. Paris: Editions JBL, 1986, p. 307, no. 1235. $30,000‑$50,000

Born into a family of modest means to a railway clerk and a mother whose family was from peasantry origins, Luce always had a deep predilection for the working class. After serving in the military for four years, Luce began his artistic career as an engraver, before turning to painting full time in 1883, when employment opportunities for engravers became scarce, due to advancements in printmaking. Influenced by the Impressionists who advocated pleinair studies, Luce took multiple day trips to the outskirts of Paris - painting the changing effects of sunlight on the woodlands and fields through the juxtaposition of colors quickly applied in wet overlapping impastos through rapid short brush strokes. A fine example of this is the work offered here, which portrays the wooded bank of the Chalouette River in Moulineux, a commune in Ile-de-France, 70 kilometers southwest of Paris. Between 1900 and 1905, Luce painted several sylvan landscapes of the Moulineux region, including “Route de Campagne a Moulineux” sold in these rooms on July 17, 2010 as lot 394. In these works, Luce elucidates the depth of the shaded foliage through layered tertiary blues and greens offset by warm yellows, beiges and pinks created through the mixture of complementary colors.

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193 Andre Jolly (French, 1882‑1969) “Le Village Ensoleille” oil on canvas signed lower left, signed and titled en verso, Sotheby’s, New York labels en verso. Framed. 24‑1/4” x 20”, framed 31‑3/4” x 27‑1/4” Provenance: Sotheby’s, New York, New York, October 7, 2008, lot 260. $5,000‑$8,000

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194 Elisee Maclet (French, 1881‑1962) “Paris, Les Arches du Pont Marie”, ca. 1915 oil on artist board signed lower right. Framed. 20‑7/8” x 25‑1/2”, framed 30” x 34‑1/2” Provenance: Christie’s, New York, New York, September 21, 2010, lot 175. Jean Paul Villain confirmed the authenticity of this painting through Christie’s in 2010. $4,500‑$7,000

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195 Maurice Utrillo (French, 1883‑1955) “Rue a Ivry”, 1924 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right. Framed. 21” x 27‑5/8”, framed 30” x 36‑1/2” Provenance: Dr. A. Roudinesco, Paris (by 1962); Parke-Bernet Galleries, Inc., New York, October 10, 1968, lot 57; Christie’s, London, 3 July 1979, lot 81; Christie’s, New York, November 6, 2008, lot 272. Literature: Petrides, Paul. L’Oeuvre Complet de Maurice Utrillo, vol. 2. Paris, 1962, vol. II, p. 424, no. 1073 (illustrated, p. 425). $140,000‑$180,000

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Utrillo was the ultimate bohemian. He was born in Montmartre out of wedlock to Suzanne Valadon, an acrobat, who turned to modelling for artists after a fall from the trapeze ended her circus career. Valadon achieved much notoriety/infamy as one of the premier models for Renoir, Degas, Puvis de Chavannes, Toulouse-Lautrec and Morisot, as she could not determine if her son was the offspring of the first three aforementioned artists or by a lesser known one named Boissy. When Maurice was eight, Valadon’s friend, the Spanish art critic Miguel Utrillo, legally recognized him as his son although few believed him to be. Rumor has it that after Renoir and Degas denied paternity, Utrillo said that he would be happy to put his name to the work of either artist. Valadon studied under Degas and went on to become a talented artist in her own right and ultimate mentor to her son. After the young Utrillo turned to truancy and alcoholism in his teenage years, Valadon encouraged him to take up painting and shared a studio with him. Aside from her training, Utrillo was self-taught. Shy by nature, he preferred to work with pictures and post cards than with models and portraits. He depicted the streets, windmills, and attractions of Montmartre experimenting with cubism and post-impressionist impastos that attracted the attention of art dealers and further popularized the art district. After 1910, Utrillo’s work received wide

By the 1920s, he had a lucrative career on the international market and was awarded the Cross of the Legion of Honor by the French Government in 1928. Some of Utrillo’s most prolific and highly regarded work was produced between these decades; between his white period (1909-1914)- where he depicted walls, roads and other building facades in heavy zinc white impastos that he often mixed with plaster to create thicker textures, and the cloisonnism period (1914-1925)- where Utrillo depicted, in the style of Bernard and Gaugin, large flat patches of bright color enclosed within black tracery that recalls medieval cloisonné. “Rue a Ivry”, offered here, is a masterpiece that embodies the best of both periods. The textured chalky building side with the street advertisement and wall of white that give rise to a stucco apartment building are characteristic of the white period. The somber and relatively monochromatic buildings and unpaved street are punctuated by the rotund backsides of the pedestrians and by the brilliant orange siding and green shutters lined in black, creating geometric patterns that pictorially collapse the foreground and background while still suggesting depth in space.

acclaim and was exhibited regularly at the Salon d’Automne and Salon des Independents.

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196 Gaston Balande (Spanish/French, 1880‑1971) “La Maison” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 15” x 17‑3/4”, framed 23‑1/2” x 26‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

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197 Gaston Balande (Spanish/French, 1880‑1971) “Vue de Village” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 15” x 17‑1/2”, framed 23‑1/2” x 26‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

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198 Elisee Maclet (French, 1881‑1962) “Rue de Montmartre” oil on canvas signed lower left, an “Alexander Kahan, New York” label en verso. Framed. 19‑3/4” x 25‑1/2”, framed 27‑1/4” x 33” Provenance: Galerie Charpentier, Paris, France; Alexander Kahan Fine Arts, New York, New York. $6,000‑$9,000

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199 Elisee Maclet (French, 1881‑1962) “Moulin de la Galette, Montmartre” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 22‑1/2” x 21”, framed 29” x 28” $6,000‑$9,000

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200 Francois Gall (French, 1912‑1987) “Bouquet de Fleurs” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 24‑1/2” x 20”, framed 29” x 24‑1/4” Provenance: Estate of Simon Kaplan; Sotheby’s, New York, New York, October 7, 2008, lot 265. $4,000‑$7,000

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201 Hugues Claude Pissarro (French, b. 1935) “La Route de Marly-le-Roi” oil on canvas signed lower right, signed and titled en verso. Framed. 25‑3/4” x 31‑7/8”, framed 25” x 39‑1/4” Provenance: Christie’s, New York, New York, February 14, 2008, lot 147. Hugues Claude Pissarro confirmed the authenticity of this painting through Christie’s in 2008. $8,000‑$12,000

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202 Leon de Smet (Belgian, 1881‑1966) “Bouquet de Fleurs”, 1917 oil on canvas signed and dated lower left, verso with various labels, including two exhibition labels, one titled in French and numbered “379”, a “Latem-Deurle (Belgium)” exhibition label, and Christie’s labels. Framed. 22” x 27‑1/4”, framed 30‑1/8” x 35‑1/4” Provenance: Galerie Robert Finck, Brussels, Belgium; Sotheby’s, New York, New York, May 9, 2007, lot 209. Exhibited: Museum Leon de Smet, “Leon De Smet, 1881‑1981, Herdenkingstentoonstelling (Memorial Exhibition)”, no. 30; Latem-Deurle, Belgium, June 14‑July 12, 1981; Galerie Robert Finck, Brussels, Belgium, 1981, no. 17. Literature: Leon de Smet, 1881‑1981, herdenkingstentoonstelling: tentoonstelling ingericht door Latemse Kunstkring en de Stichting Leon de Smet ... van 14 juni tot 12 juli 1981, Artiestenzolder van het Gemeentehuis te Sint-Martens-Latem. Museum Leon de Smet, 1981. $90,000‑$120,000

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A native of Ghent, de Smet was born into an artistic family; his father was a decorative painter and his older brother Gustave was an acclaimed artist and one of the proponents of Flemish Expressionism. He attended the Royal Academy of Fine Art (now a part of Hogeschool Gent) where he first encountered the Luminist School, a neo-Impressionist movement that emphasized the effects of light; he eventually became a member of the “Vie et Lumiere” group which included the artist Théo van Rysselberghe (1862-1926). De Smet had his first exhibition in his hometown in 1901 – by 1910 he was taking part in international exhibitions where his work was enthusiastically received. During WWI, de Smet fled to England where he made a highly profitable living by accepting commissions for society portraits. He never strayed from his Luminist origins, however, even when exhorted to do so by his fellow artists. The exquisite still life presented here is an example of de Smet at his most masterful. He has employed a complex palette that deftly plays with the warm crimsons, oranges and golds of the flowers against the cool blues, lavenders and pinks of the background. The resulting, light-infused, work is compelling in its vibrancy; in lesser hands such a juxtaposition could be disastrous.


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203 Jean-Gabriel Domergue (French, 1889‑1962) “Soleil aux Courses”, 1948 oil on masonite signed lower right, titled by the artist en verso; accompanied with a letter of authenticity from Noe Willer. Framed. 28‑5/8” x 23‑1/2”, framed 36” x 31” Provenance: St. Germain-en-Laye (SGL) Encheres, April 6, 1997; Private collection, Texas. Literature: This painting will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonne on Domergue in preparation by Noe Willer. $10,000‑$15,000

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Born in 1889 at the height of the French Belle Epoque - the golden age of art, technology and commercial prosperity, Domergue was greatly influenced by all the splendors the period produced. Paris was its epicenter. With its balls, parks, galleries and grand boulevards lined with impressive shops brimming with fashionable accessories in their window fronts, it was a veritable spectacle to be had, one that gave rise to the term flaneur/boulevardier - the urban explorer, who voyeuristically seeks artistic inspiration from people watching, particularly the “ladies of the evening”. Often referred to as “grand courtesans”, “demi-mondaines” or “coquettes”, these attractive women were born of meager origins. Instead of becoming maids or washwomen, they sought vocations in the performing arts as actresses, singers, ballerinas and dancers, achieving not only fame and status in society through wealthy art patrons, but also independence - as working class women they were able to frequent public events, like the racetrack featured here, without chaperones. Emile Zola, Edouard Manet, Edgar Degas and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec immortalized this archetype, which left a lasting impression on the young Domergue. Following his studies at Ecole Nationale

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Superieure des Beaux-Arts where he won the Second Prize of Rome in 1913, Domergue honed his artistic eye on “ladies of the evening”, perfecting what he called the modern “pinup” - women with swan-like necks, wide seductive eyes, and thin elongated bodies influenced by the Romantic odalisque - they invited viewers to look upon them with awe and longing. According to Domergue, they were to be imbibed with the same airiness and effervescent sparkle as champagne. “Soleil aux Courses” exemplifies Domergue’s style. The beautiful dame is poised coyly at the racetrack with her field binoculars - an invitation for all to see. The racetrack, which Domergue painted numerous times, presented another ideal opportunity for the flaneur to eye the spectacle of fillies and ladies alike. References: “Jean-Gabriel Domergue: Biographie”. Galerie de Souzy. Web. Accessed March 27, 2018; Soyer, GerardLouis. Jean-Gabriel Domergue, l’Art et la Mode. Paris: Editions Sous le Vent, 1984.


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204 Marcel Dyf (French, 1899‑1985) “Jeunne Femme Songeant” oil on canvas signed mid-right, verso with an inventory label. Presented in an attractive frame affixed with artist plaque. 21‑3/4” x 18‑1/8”, framed 29‑5/8” x 26” Provenance: Kurt E. Schon, Ltd., New Orleans, Louisiana. $2,000‑$4,000

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205 Jacques Renard (Lejeune) (French, 1930‑2003) “Femme Lisant sur le Banc” signed lower right verso with printed artist biography. Framed. 19‑3/4” x 15‑3/4”, framed 26‑1/4” x 22” $3,000‑$5,000

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206 Jacques Renard (Lejeune) (French, 1930‑2003) “La Femme” oil on canvas signed lower left “Jac. Lejeune”. Framed. 40‑1/4” x 28‑1/2”, framed 49” x 38‑1/4” $6,000‑$9,000

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207 Le Pho (Vietnamese/Paris, 1907‑2001) “Beauty amid the Garden Flowers” oil on canvas signed and inscribed lower right. Framed. 18‑1/4” x 14‑7/8”, framed 28‑1/2” x 25‑1/4” Provenance: Doyle, New York, New York, November 5, 2013, lot 51. $18,000‑$25,000

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208 Henri Joseph Pauwels (Belgian, 1903‑1983) “Tea in the Garden” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 32” x 40”, framed 41‑3/4” x 49‑3/4” $3,000‑$5,000

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209 Henri Joseph Pauwels (Belgian, 1903‑1983) “Picking Flowers” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 32” x 38”, framed 42” x 47‑1/2” $3,000‑$5,000

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210 Louis van der Pol (Dutch, 1896‑1982) “In the Dressing Room” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 37” x 34”, framed 44” x 41” $2,000‑$4,000

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211 Grigori Efimovich Gluckmann (Russian/California, 1898‑1973) “Great Expectations” oil on wood panel signed lower right, titled on “Dalzell Hatfield Galleries, Los Angeles” label en verso. Framed. 22‑1/2” x 24”, framed 32” x 33‑1/2” Provenance: Bonhams, San Francisco, California, June 15, 1995, lot 4296; Christie’s, New York, New York, April 18, 2007, lot 102. $100,000‑$150,000

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An emigre several times over, Gluckmann was born in Vitebsk, Belarus (then part of Russia), a contemporary of that town’s most famous son, Marc Chagall. He enrolled at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, studying for several years under Abram Arkhipov (1862‑1930), before fleeing to Berlin during the Russian Revolution. He soon made his way to Paris, where he began to exhibit in earnest - at the Galerie Druet, Galerie Charpentier, Salon d’Automne, amongst numerous others. In 1941 he fled once again, this time to New York to escape the Nazis. He eventually permanently settled in Los Angeles. Gluckmann painted a variety of subjects, from the almost obligatory atmospheric Parisian street scenes, to coy nudes and voluptuous still lives, but it was his luminous, glowing depictions of ballerinas which captured the attention and admiration of critics and collectors alike. Employing the laborious technique espoused at the Moscow School of Art, Gluckmann used numerous layers of paint - allowing each layer to dry completely before the application of the next. This resulted in works with an intense depth of color. The success of this technique is evident in the work presented here, where the various textures of the fabrics - the layers of tulle of the skirt, the satin of the shoes, the silk of the ribbons - are clearly delineated.


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212 Antoine Blanchard (French, 1910‑1988) “Les Grands Boulevards, Paris en 1900” oil on canvas signed lower right, signed, titled and stamped “Antoine Blanchard, Paris” en verso. Framed. 13” x 18”, framed 21” x 25‑7/8” Provenance: Larsen Art Auction, Scottsdale, Arizona, October 22, 2016, lot 58. $3,000‑$5,000 212

213 Paul Renard (French, 1941‑1997) “Les Bouqinistes, Paris” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 10‑1/2” x 16”, framed 16” x 21‑1/2” $1,500‑$2,500

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214 Niek van der Plas (Dutch, b. 1954) “Cafe de Flore, Paris” oil on wood panel signed lower right and en verso. Framed. 17” x 30”, framed 25‑1/4” x 38” $2,000‑$4,000

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215 Niek van der Plas (Dutch, b. 1954) “De Thames, London” oil on wood panel signed lower right, titled lower left, signed, titled and inscribed en verso. Framed. 16” x 19”, framed 23” x 26‑1/2” $1,500‑$2,500

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216 Niek van der Plas (Dutch, b. 1954) “Naples Beach” oil on wood panel signed lower right and signed and titled en verso. Framed. 24” x 39‑1/2”, framed 31” x 47” $4,000‑$7,000

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217 Willem Heytman (Dutch, b. 1950) “Riding Donkeys on the Beach” oil on canvas signed lower right. Framed. 24” x 30”, framed 30‑3/4” x 36‑1/2” $1,500‑$2,500

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218 Claude Cahill Cooper (British, b. 1941) “Beach Scene” oil on wood panel signed lower right. Framed. 12” x 16”, framed 16‑5/8” x 20‑5/8” $1,000‑$1,500

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219 Willem Heytman (Dutch, b. 1950) “Avenue Champs Elysees, Arc de Triomphe, Paris” oil on canvas signed lower right, titled and stamped “Atelier Heytman” en verso. Framed. 29‑1/2” x 39‑1/2”, framed 39” x 49” $3,000‑$5,000

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220 Willem Heytman (Dutch, b. 1950) “Vue de Paris” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 20” x 28”, framed 26‑1/2” x 34‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

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221 French School (20th Century) “Bridge over Seine, Paris” oil on canvas illegibly signed lower right. Framed. 24” x 36”, framed 28‑3/4” x 40‑1/2” $1,000‑$1,500

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222 Nadezda Alexeeva-Blinova (Russian, b. 1958) “The Harvest through the Trees”, 2004 oil on canvas signed, titled and dated en verso. Framed. 31‑1/8” x 27‑1/2”, framed 36‑3/4” x 33” $1,000‑$1,500 222

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223 Honig Krebepz (German, Active Late 19th/Early 20th Century) “Winter Sunset” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 38” x 28”, framed 47‑1/2” x 37‑1/4” $8,000‑$12,000

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224 Minas Avetisyan (Armenian, 1928‑1975) “Village Scene” oil on panel signed and dated lower right, verso with an incised inscription. Framed. 23‑1/2” x 18”, framed 28” x 23” $7,000‑$10,000

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225 Aleksander Titovets (Russian/Texas, b. 1960) “View of St. Petersburg” oil on canvas signed and titled en verso. Framed. 29” x 41”, framed 24” x 36” $1,000‑$1,500

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226 Jan Jans (Dutch, 1893‑1963) “Holland American Line”, 1959 oil on canvas signed lower left and signed and dated en verso. Framed. 31‑1/2” x 47‑1/2”, framed 37‑1/2” x 53‑1/4” $2,000‑$4,000

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227 H. de la Cour (Belgian, 19th/20th Century) “Harbor Scene” oil on canvas signed lower left. Framed. 24” x 36”, framed 32” x 43‑1/2” $1,000‑$1,500 227

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228 Dom Gregory de Wit (Belgian, 1895‑1978) “Adam”, 1935 oil on canvas signed and dated “2‑11‑35” mid-right. Framed. 47‑1/2” x 39‑1/2”, framed 51” x 43” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $3,000‑$5,000

229 Dom Gregory de Wit (Belgian, 1895‑1978) “Madonna”, 1935 pastel and pencil on paper signed and dated “6.1.35” lower right. Matted, glazed and framed. sight 32‑1/4” x 19‑1/2”, framed 44‑1/2” x 31‑3/4” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $2,000‑$4,000

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A native of the Netherlands, Gregory de Wit entered the Benedictine Abbey at Mont Cesar, Louvain, Belgium in 1913, and was ordained several years later. His superiors, noticing and appreciating his artistic abilities, sent the young monk to study at the Royal Academy at Arts, Brussels and the Munich Academy of Fine Arts. De Wit took part in his first exhibition in 1923, where he received numerous accolades. He soon began to travel to various Benedictine Abbeys, where he worked on murals, paintings, and other religious decorations. In the 1940s he spent some time working in various religious houses across Louisiana, eventually ending up at St. Joseph’s Abbey near Covington where he remained for over five years creating a large mural of the Last Supper. The existing examples of de Wit’s work reveal an idiosyncratic stylistic approach which interestingly and successfully combines aspects of Art Deco, Mexican murals, and Orthodox icons. His slightly weighty figures, with their accentuated (almost exaggerated) musculature, have an almost sculptural quality. Employing blocked areas of rich color combined with thick, dark lines, de Wit creates a stark juxtaposition, a technique especially effective for works - whether murals or his largescale figural paintings – which are meant to be seen from a distance. 229

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230 Leonard Tsuguharu Foujita (Japanese/French, 1886‑1968) “Nu Assis” etching with aquatint from the “Les Femmes” series, pencil signed lower right and inscribed “HC 9/10” lower left. Matted, glazed and framed. 27‑15/16” x 19‑15/16”, framed 29‑1/4” x 21‑3/4” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,500‑$2,500

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231 Rene Portocarrero (Cuban, 1912‑1985) “Santa Barbara”, 1963 oil on academy board signed and dated lower right. Framed. 19‑1/4” x 9‑1/2”, framed 28‑1/4” x 18” Provenance: Private collection, Florida. $5,000‑$8,000

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“The religious work of Portocarrero has an enriching element in its paradoxical character, with angels with atrophied wings that will make the celestial flight difficult, but not impossible.” -Ramon y Sergio Cernuda Rene Portocarrero, one of the most important Cuban artists of the 20th century, advocated a national art that drew its inspiration from its Afro-Cuban roots. A native of Havana, Portocarrero was a prodigious autodidactic; he was a painter, sculptor, ceramicist, scene designer, muralist and illustrator, whose scope and range of art in the Caribbean rivals that of Pablo Picasso in Europe. He exhibited throughout the Caribbean, the Americas and Europe, making close acquaintances with Fidel Castro and Peggy Guggenheim. He produced copious public works for Cuban prisons, hospitals and theaters. His commitment to improving lives through communal art was recognized by the Bulgarian and Polish Governments, as well as earning him many prestigious honors, including a seat on UNESCO’s International Association of Fine Art, the “Felix Varela” prize from Cuba, and the “Aztec Eagle” - Mexico’s highest award. Portocarrero’s works are conserved worldwide in leading institutions and museums, including paintings of Santa Barbara that resemble the one offered here. Santa Barbara was a saint/spirit that Portocarrero visited numerous times. Her feast day, December 4, is one of the most important festival days in Cuba, as it is also shared with Chango, the Yorubian Lord of Fire and Lightening, a semi-divine intermediary between God and human beings. In the 16th century, when the Spanish shipped enslaved Yorubians and Nigerians from West Africa to the new world, they were forced, among other indignities, to convert to Catholicism. From indentured labor and faith, the indigenous spirits (orichas) became syncretized with the saints, allowing various West African tribes to preserve elements of their cultural beliefs in a hostile environment. Spanish Colonial planters mistakenly characterized the worship of indigenous gods under the guise of saints as “Santeria” a deviant form of prayer that privileges idolatries of saints over that of Christ. Following the Cuban Revolution, Santeria was revitalized as a recognized religion of Cuba and spread beyond the Spanishspeaking Caribbean. Santa Barbara was widely revered. Her life of suffering and perseverance became a metaphor for enslaved personages. Incarcerated in a tower for having converted to Christianity, she remained true to her faith through trials of torture in which her own father tried to burn her at the stake, and was struck down by lightning when that failed. As the patron saint of artillerymen, military engineers, miners and others who work with explosives, she embodied revolution and empowerment. In Santeria, Chango the powerful male spirit of lightning, thunder, war and dance, depicted in red and white with a crown, is assimilated with the female saint, becoming a symbol of fertility and rebirth. In this work Portocarrero celebrates the Santa Barbara of Santeria creating a spiritual carnality that beats to the drum of a multicultural Cuba - that a Cuban critic succinctly summarized: “His pen and brush will give us virgins and Santa Barbara, Christ and cathedrals of a baroque vocabulary that is tropical and joyful, where even tragic themes like crucifixions become joyful, with butterflies announcing their resurrection and female angels that delight with their [voluptuous] curves.” References: Sergio Cernuda, Ramon y. “Rene Portocarrero: lo spiritual en su obra.” Cubancuentro. August 14, 2014. Web. September 21, 2017; Bondil, Nathalie. Cuba: Art and History from 1868 to Today. Montreal: Museum of Fine Arts, 2008.


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232 Dame Elisabeth Jean Frink, R.A. (British, 1930‑1993) “Bird Man IV”, 1959 patinated bronze from an edition of six, this casting unnumbered, cast signature along edge of self-base, a “Rental Gallery Baltimore Museum of Art” label at bottom. h. 28‑1/4”, w. 9”, d. 9‑1/4” Provenance: According to label, collection of Bertha Schaefer, New York, New York; On loan to the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland; Private collection. Literature: Ratuszniak, Annette, ed. Elisabeth Frink: Catalogue Raisonne of Sculpture, 1947‑1993. London: Beaux Arts in association with the Frink Estate, 2013. Model illus. p. 68, #FCR70 (CR 1984). $30,000‑$50,000

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233 Anthony Quinn (American, 1915‑2001) “Hands over Head”, 1988 polished bronze cast signature, dated, numbered “5/8”, and with an “Empire Bronze Art” foundry mark along back edge, on a black stone square base sculpture h. 24”, overall h. 27”, w. 14”, d. 14” $4,000‑$7,000

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234 one of two

234 Romare Bearden (American/North Carolina, 1911‑1988) “Home to Ithaca” (Odysseus Series) and “The Fall of Troy” (Odysseus Series), both 1979 two color screen prints each pencil signed lower right and numbered “69/125” lower left. Both matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. images 15” x 24”; 18” x 33‑3/4”, framed 24” x 32‑1/4”; 27” x 32‑1/4” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana.

234 two of two

$2,000‑$4,000

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235 Romare Bearden (American/North Carolina, 1911‑1988) “Jazz II Deluxe”, 1980 color screen print pencil signed lower right, pencil numbered lower left “60/200”. Double-matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sight 27‑3/4” x 38”, framed 35‑1/2” x 46” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,500‑$2,500

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236 James Rosenquist (American, 1933‑2017) “Miles” from America: The Third Century, 1975 lithograph in colors pencil signed and dated lower right, numbered “XIX/ XXV, H.C.” and titled lower left, verso with “Joan E. Kaplan Fine Contemporary Art, New York, N.Y.” label. Float-mounted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sheet 30” x 22”, framed 37‑1/4” x 28‑1/4” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,000‑$1,500 236

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237 Roy Lichtenstein (American/New York, 1923‑1997) “Bicentennial Print” from America: The Third Century, 1975 lithograph in colors pencil numbered “H.C. 19/25”, pencil signed and dated “’75” lower right. Double-matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sight 26‑1/4” x 19”, framed 31‑1/2” x 24‑1/4” Provenance: The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $3,000‑$5,000

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238 Pierre Soulages (French, b. 1919) “Eau-Forte XXXII” etching with aquatint signed in pencil lower right, numbered “36/100” lower left. Matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sight 21‑1/2” x 28‑1/4”, framed 29” x 36” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $3,000‑$5,000 239 Pierre Soulages (French, b. 1919) “Eau-Forte Xb”, 1957 etching pencil signed lower right, numbered “23/65” lower left. Double-matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sight 25‑3/4” x 20”, framed 34‑1/4” x 28‑1/4” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $7,000‑$10,000 239

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240 Louise Nevelson (Russian/American, 1899‑1988) “Night Tree”, 1972 lead intaglio relief on paper Pace Editions, Inc., New York, N.Y., pencil signed, dated and numbered “104/150” and titled lower margin. Fitted with plexiglass and framed. 29” x 24”, framed 30‑1/4” x 25” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $2,000‑$4,000

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241 Helen Frankenthaler (American/New York, 1928‑2011) “Harvest”, 1976 lithograph in colors pencil signed and dated lower right, numbered “16/43” lower left. Matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sight 22” x 18‑1/2”, framed 29‑3/4” x 26‑1/2” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $3,000‑$5,000

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242 Ellsworth Kelly (American/New York, 1923‑2015) “Colored Paper Image XX (Brown Square with Blue)”, from “Colored Paper Images” series, 1976 colored and pressed paper pulp pencil signed and embossed “E.K.” lower right, numbered in pencil “4/22” lower left, printed by Tyler Graphics, Ltd., Bedford Village, N.Y.” verso with “Joan E. Kaplan, New York, N.Y.” label. Matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sight 31” x 30”, framed 39” x 37‑1/4” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $3,000‑$5,000

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243 Alexander Calder (American, 1898‑1976) “Homage to the Sun” lithograph in colors pencil signed lower right and notated “E.A.” lower left, a “Joan E. Kaplan Fine Contemporary Art, New York, N.Y.” label en verso. Float-mounted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sheet 26” x 38‑1/2”, framed 37‑1/4” x 48‑1/4” Provenance: The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,500‑$2,500

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245 Edward Ruscha (American, b. 1937) “America Whistles” from America: The Third Century, 1975 lithograph in colors on Arches wove paper signed and dated in pencil lower right, numbered “H.C. XIX/ XXV”, Cirrus Editions blind stamp lower left. Published by Cirrus Editions, Los Angeles, as one plate in a portfolio of five prints titled America: The Third Century. Double-matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sight 30” x 22‑1/4”, framed 37‑1/2” x 28‑1/4” Provenance: The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,000‑$1,500

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244 Sonia Terk Delaunay (French/American/Russian, 1885‑1979) “Untitled” etching and aquatint pencil signed lower right and notated “E.A.” lower left, a “Joan E. Kaplan Fine Contemporary Art, New York, N.Y.” label en verso. Matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sight 21‑1/2” x 17”, framed 29‑1/4” x 24‑1/2” Provenance: The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,000‑$1,500

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246 Natvar Prahladji Bhavsar (Indian/American, New York, b. 1934) “Ketu II” acrylic on canvas signed, dated and titled en verso, with “Max Hutchinson Gallery, New York, N.Y.” gallery label. Presented in a silvered artist frame. 83‑1/2” x 78‑1/2”, framed 84‑1/2” x 79‑1/2” Provenance: Max Hutchinson Gallery, New York, New York; The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $14,000‑$18,000

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247 Natvar Prahladji Bhavsar (Indian/American, New York, b. 1934) “Vrata II”, 1976 acrylic on canvas signed, titled and dated en verso, with “Max Hutchinson Gallery, New York, N.Y.” label. Presented in a thin gallery frame. 72” x 57”, framed 73” x 58” Provenance: Max Hutchinson Gallery, New York, New York; The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $15,000‑$25,000

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248 Natvar Prahladji Bhavsar (Indian/American, New York, b. 1934) “Vindhya” paint gun on paper unsigned, verso with “Joan E. Kaplan, New York, N.Y.” label. Float-mounted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. 46” x 43‑1/2”, framed 55‑3/4” x 51‑1/4” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,000‑$1,500 248

249 Brian Cobble (American/New Mexico, b. 1953) “41st Street” charcoal on paper verso with “Meredith Long & Co., Houston, TX” label with artist and title. Matted, fitted with plexiglass and framed. sight 29‑1/2” x 42‑1/2”, framed 39” x 51” Provenance: The corporate collection of FreeportMcMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $1,000‑$1,500 249

250 Edward Estlin Cummings (American/New York/New Hampshire, 1894‑1962) “Mountain Road” oil on canvas unsigned, dated en verso “Sept. 6 ‘47”. Framed. 30” x 40”, framed 31” x 41” Provenance: Watson/deNagy Co., Houston, Texas; Meredith Long & Co., Houston, Texas; The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $2,000‑$4,000 250

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251 Milton Clark Avery (American/New York, 1885‑1965) “Evening Shadows” oil on board signed en verso, “Gallery of the Masters, St. Louis, MO” label en verso with artist and title. Presented in a silvered and gold-toned cove-molded frame with artist plaque. 9” x 8”, framed 16” x 14‑1/2” Provenance: The corporate collection of Freeport-McMoRan, New Orleans, Louisiana. $15,000‑$25,000

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252 Aurelio Garcia (Mexican, 19th/20th Century) “El Descubrimiento del Pulque (The Discovery of Pulque)” after Jose Maria Obregon (Mexican, 1832‑1902) transfer-photographic print on onyx signed and dated “1895” lower right, titled lower left. dia. 23‑3/4” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,000‑$1,500 The story of “The Discovery of Pulque” concerns a young woman named Xochitl who, led forward by her parents, is offering Tecpancaltzin, the King of Tula, a gourd filled with the drink, called pulque, that she discovered. The painting by Jose Maria Obregon was exhibited at the National Fine Arts School, Mexico City, in 1869 and immediately became an iconic work for both Mexicans and tourists desiring a souvenir. The enterprising owner of a successful marble and stone factory in Puebla, Manuel Oliman Galindo, profited from the painting’s popularity. He exhibited a wide variety of onyx wares at numerous world’s fairs and won a gold medal at the 1899 Exposition Universelle in Paris.

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253 Romeo Tabuena (Filipino/Mexican, 1921‑2015) “Pamilya”, 1974 oil on masonite signed and dated upper left. Unframed. 16‑7/8” x 19‑1/4” $4,000‑$7,000 253

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254 Richard Childers (American/Texas, 20th Century) “Cosmic Black and White”, 1972 acrylic on canvas signed, dated and titled en verso. Unframed. 65” x 95‑1/2” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,000‑$1,500

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255 Horia Damian (Romanian/Paris, 1922‑2012) “Hexagonal Blue”, 1959 oil on canvas verso with several exhibition labels including “Museum of Modern Art, Carnegie Institution, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania” and “The American Federation of Arts, New York”, each with artist name, title and dimensions. Presented in a thin contemporary frame. 72‑7/8” x 70‑7/8”, framed 74” x 72‑1/4” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $5,000‑$8,000

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256 James Hendricks (American/Arkansas, 1938‑2017) “Teal Vistas”, 1990 acrylic on canvas signed, dated and further inscribed “Homage to Anton Bruckner” en verso. Unframed. 84” x 108” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,000‑$1,500

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257 James Little (American/Tennessee, b. 1952) “Umber Drift #1”, 1973 encaustic on canvas signed and dated lower left and en verso canvas. Unframed. 79‑1/4” x 58‑1/4” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $5,000‑$8,000

258 Zita Feger Querido (American/Austrian, 1917‑2003) “Manhattan”, 1950 oil on canvas inscribed en verso stretcher “Querido”, with “The House of Heydenryk, New York, N.Y.” framer’s label. Framed. 28” x 108”, framed 30” x 110” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,500‑$2,500 257

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259 John Evans (American/Massachusetts, b. 1945) “Boston Common”, 1976 oil on canvas unsigned. Unframed. 60” x 76‑1/2” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $2,000‑$4,000 260 Marge Catherine Ward (American/Louisiana, 1933‑2013) “Blue” and “Introspection” 259

pair of patinated bronzes former with verdigris patination, enhanced with metal screws, incised signature and dated “80” at lower back edge, on an integral black carved wooden plinth, latter with cast signature and dated “1980” lower back, on an integral white carved wooden plinth. former overall h. 15‑3/4”, w. 9‑3/4”, d. 7”, latter overall h. 14‑1/4”, w. 8”, d. 8‑1/4” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,200‑$1,800

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261 Janet Stayton (American/Louisiana, b. 1939) “Landscape with Figure #2”, 1962 oil on canvas signed lower right, titled, inscribed with artist name and address on exhibition label en verso. Presented in the original artist frame. 62‑1/2” x 47”, framed 64” x 48‑1/2” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,000‑$1,500 261

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262 Richard B. Copeland (American, 20th Century) “Self-Propelled Canada Goose”, 1984 assemblage of carved oak and iron signed and dated “5‑84” along proper right edge of goose. overall h. 76”, w. 59‑1/2”, d. 12” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,000‑$1,500

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263 Andre Harvey (American/Florida, 1941‑2018) “Gamecock - Floyd’s Finest” patinated bronze cast signature, copyright mark and a “Tallix, Beacon, New York” foundry mark along front edge of self-base, on a carved walnut base with incised signature, title, copyright mark, foundry mark, date and number “30/60” at bottom. h. 13‑1/4”, w. 11”, d. 6‑1/2” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $2,000‑$4,000 A primarily self-taught artist, Harvey was inspired by an abstract sculpture he saw in a gallery window while on a trip to France. Once back home, he convinced a local artisan to teach him the rudiments of welding and later worked as an unpaid apprentice in the studio of the Delaware sculptor Charles Parks (1922‑2012). Harvey soon began to produce bronze works, utilizing the time-consuming lost wax technique, which allowed for the high level of detail and precision for which his sculptures are so well-known. 263

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264 G. Patrick Riley (American/Oklahoma, 20th Century) “Body Meditation #2”, 1971 assemblage of bamboo, wire, armadillo carapace, leather and ginger root h. 120”, w. 68” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,000‑$1,500 The mixed media artist Patrick Riley creates complex assembled masks and sculptures, referencing the motifs and symbols of earlier cultures. Inspired by his childhood visits to the museum on the campus of St. Gregory’s University in his native Oklahoma, where he was first exposed to African ritual masks and the art of taxidermy, he utilizes the various natural materials available.

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265 Kieff Antonio Grediaga (Spanish, b. 1936) “Unicornio #1”, 1970 polished bronze incised signature and marked “EA” along front edge, on a white marble square plinth. overall h. 13‑1/2”, w. 5”, d. 5” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,200‑$1,800 266 Gary Hearne (American, b. 1949) “Untitled”, 1975 assemblage of carved and joined cherry on a pine base, carved signature along back edge of base. overall h. 74‑1/2”, w. 23”, d. 7” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,000‑$1,500

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267 Curtis Scott (American/Texas, Contemporary) “Lake Sahara”, 1971 acrylic on canvas signed en verso stretcher. Presented in the original thin gallery frame. 66” x 90”, framed 66‑3/4” x 91‑3/4” Provenance: Deaccessioned property of a Southern institution. $1,500‑$2,500

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268 Pedro Friedeberg (Mexican, b. 1937) “Hand Chair” gilt-painted, carved and joined wood carved signature along back of top edge of base. h. 33”, w. 16”, d. 20” Together with “Crepusculo con Molusculo”, color lithograph, pencil signed, titled and numbered “52/90”, sheet 22‑1/2” x 22‑3/4”, framed 27‑1/4” x 27‑1/2”, and Pedro Friedeberg, edited by Deborah Holtz and Juan Carlos Mena. 268

$6,000‑$9,000

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269 Justin Garcia (American/Texas, Contemporary) “Untitled Abstraction” oil and mixed media on canvas signed en verso. Unframed. 28” x 54” $3,500‑$5,000

269

270 Paul Kelpe (German/American, 1902‑1985) “Still Life with Bottles, Glass and Grater” oil on wood panel signed lower left. Framed. 19‑1/4” x 35”, framed 21” x 36‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

270

271 Mihail Chemiakin (Russian, b. 1943) “Hermitage Suite I - Masquerade at St. Petersburg”, 1994 serigraph on canvas signed lower right, numbered “E.A. 2/25” lower left. Framed. 35” x 25”, framed 38‑3/4” x 28‑3/4” $1,500‑$2,500

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272 Rolph Scarlett (American, 1889‑1984) “Untitled Composition” oil on linen signed lower right. Framed. 30” x 25”, framed 35” x 30” $1,500‑$2,500

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273 Menachem Helholz-Our (Israeli, 1911‑2008) “Haifa”, 1956 oil on canvas board signed and titled lower left, signed, titled and dated en verso. Framed. 18” x 24”, framed 23‑3/4” x 29” Provenance: Christie’s, New York, New York, February 11, 2009, lot 91. $3,000‑$5,000 273

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274 Elena Kallistova (Russian, b. 1964) “My Friend’s Birthday”, 1997 oil on canvas signed and dated lower right, signed, titled and dated in Russian en verso. Framed. 39” x 31”, framed 44‑3/4” x 37‑1/2” $2,000‑$4,000

274

275 Leonid Sokov (Russian/New York, b. 1941) “Marilyn Monroe and Joseph Stalin” hand-colored silkscreen signed lower right, numbered “10/98” lower left. Presented in a contemporary frame. 22” x 31”, framed 26” x 35” $1,500‑$2,500

275

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276 Charles Fazzino (American/New York, b. 1955) “Another Day - Another Dollar” 3‑D silkscreen-serigraph signed in pencil lower right, titled lower center, numbered lower left “107/300DX”; accompanied by a Certificate of Authenticity from Museum Editions, Ltd., Publisher. Matted, glazed and framed. sight 33‑1/2” x 28”, framed 43‑1/4” x 36‑1/4” $1,000‑$1,500

277 Hunt Slonem (American, b. 1951) “Lorikeets”, 1998 oil on canvas panels signed, titled and dated en verso. overall 36” x 72” $7,000‑$10,000

276

277

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278 Nabil R. Nahas (American/Lebanese, b. 1949) “Spangled” acrylic and synthetic pumice on board signed “N. R. Nahas” and titled en verso. Unframed. 60” x 48” $60,000‑$90,000 278

A Lebanese native, the internationally acclaimed contemporary artist Nabil Nahas spent his formative years in Cairo and Beirut, before leaving for the USA to attend university. He earned a BFA from Louisiana State University in 1971 and an MFA from Yale University in 1973. Although Nahas is schooled in Western abstract painting techniques, his work is influenced by his homeland’s traditions of vibrant colors and arabesque patterns derived from the natural environment. The sea star pattern, present in many of his works, was inspired by a walk down a beach on Long Island after Hurricane Bob in 1991. The early paintings were made utilizing real starfish, but he soon realized that he could cast the forms in acrylic paint.

174

Nahas states, "As the paintings developed, it almost became an abstract entity - their crawling and creeping and destructive nature giving way to more celestial reading." Lot 278 in our April Fine Art auction is a wonderful example of the sea-inspired works by the artist. A tactile, visually multidimensional work, it invokes a sense of mystery, fear and awe of the deep oceans. Nahas’s paintings are in numerous public collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Tate, London; and the British Museum, London. In 2013 Nahas was awarded the National Order of the Cedar for services to Lebanese culture, an honor rarely given to visual artists.


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279

279 Robert Arthur Goodnough (American, 1917‑2010) “Gray Statement”, 1972 acrylic and oil on canvas signed, titled and dated en verso. Presented in a contemporary thin silvered frame. 74” x 74”, framed 74‑1/4” x 74‑1/4” Literature: Goodnough, Abbeville Press, New York, 1982, illustrated p. 151. $5,000‑$8,000

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280 Otis Dare Huband, Jr. (American/Texas, b. 1933) “Fall Foliage” oil on canvas signed lower right, signed and titled en verso. Presented in a thin gallery frame. 60” x 45”, framed 61” x 46” $1,500‑$2,500

281 Dale Chihuly (American, b. 1941) Six-Piece Tabac Basket Set, Seattle, WA, 2000 blown glass with black and oxblood lip and body wraps, the smallest element signed and dated. smallest: h. 4”, overall dia. 4‑1/2”, largest bowl: h. 5”, overall dia. 17‑1/2”, tallest: h. 10‑3/4”, overall dia. 9‑1/4” $9,000‑$12,000

280

281

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282 Kathy Callahan (American, b. 1969) “Andy Warhol and His Brillo Box”, 1990 painted wood signed, dated and numbered “2/25” along back of seat. h. 51‑3/4”, w. 24‑3/4”, d. 18” $1,000‑$1,500

283 Emilio Sanchez (Cuban/American, 1921‑1999) “Casita” oil on canvas initialed lower left. In a thin gallery frame. 60” x 60”, framed 61‑3/4” x 61‑1/2” Provenance: Private collection, New Orleans, Louisiana. $15,000‑$25,000 The Cuban-born Emilio Sanchez was acclaimed for his series of large-scale, intentionally flat, architectural renderings that revel in the interplay of light and shadow. His slightly abstracted and often abruptly truncated structures are elegantly reduced to their essential lines and colors, emphasizing their inherent patterns. Exulting in the seemingly mundane - a Cuban beach house, Brooklyn bodega, or a suburban porch - Sanchez’s distinctive style of thick, dark lines juxtaposed with blocks of color, reveals the striking beauty of the often overlooked.

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284 Frank Worth (American, 1923‑2000) “Frank Sinatra in Front of the Sands Casino” limited edition archival pigment print numbered “31/75” and with “Frank Worth Estate” blind stamp lower right. Matted, glazed and framed. sheet 19‑7/8” x 23‑7/8”, framed 27‑1/4” x 33” $1,200‑$1,800 284

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Conditions of Sale: ALL SALES ARE “AS IS, WHERE IS” WITHOUT ANY WARRANTIES WHATSOEVER. PLEASE SEE SECTION 2(a) BELOW IN WHICH ANY AND ALL EXPRESS AND IMPLIED WARRANTIES (INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY WARRANTY AGAINST REDHIBITORY DEFECTS) ARE WAIVED.

1. Introduction (a). These Conditions of Sale (“Conditions of Sale”) contain all the terms governing Auctions (defined below) conducted by Cakebread Art Antiques Collectables, Inc. d/b/a New Orleans Auction Galleries (“NOAG”), and all the terms under which NOAG and the Seller (defined below) of a Lot (defined below) contract with the Buyer (defined below). These Conditions of Sale may be amended by posted notices or oral announcements made during the Auction. (b). Under these Conditions of Sale, the following capitalized terms are defined as follows: • An “Auction” is a public auction conducted by NOAG, at which Bidders may place Bids to purchase one or more Lots offered for sale by NOAG. An Auction takes place over one or more days and includes separate auctions of one or more Lots within an event conducted by NOAG; • The “Auctioneer” is the auctioneer calling the Auction conducted by NOAG; A “Bid” is a bid made by a party at the Auction to purchase a Lot; • A “Bidder” is (i) a person making a Bid at the Auction (whether in person, through an absentee bid, through electronic or internet means, or through telephone bidding); and/or (ii) a person who attends the Auction and registers to make a Bid (whether in person, through an absentee bid, through electronic or internet means, or through telephone bidding); • A “Buyer” is the party that commits to purchase a Lot by submitting the Winning Bid at Auction; • “Buyer’s Premium” is defined in Section 4 below; • “Catalogue” is the Auction catalogue utilized by NOAG to list the Lots offered at Auction; • The “Estimates” are the high and low estimates of value for each Lot set forth in the Catalogue presented by NOAG in connection with the Auction or otherwise set forth and/or announced at the Auction; • The “Hammer Price” for a Lot is the amount of the Winning Bid at the Auction, as announced by the Auctioneer, exclusive of commissions, Buyer’s Premium, expenses, and any taxes or other charges; • A “Lot” is specific item of property offered for sale at Auction; The “Reserve” is defined in Section 3 below; • The “Purchase Price” is defined in Section 4 below; A “Sale” of a Lot occurs when a Winning Bid is declared at Auction for the Lot; • The “Seller” of a Lot is the party who consigned the Lot with NOAG for purposes of selling the Lot, or is otherwise the seller of the Lot; • The “Winning Bid” is, as to a particular Lot, the Bid recognized by the Auctioneer as the highest and best Bid for that Lot.

(c). Except as otherwise stated, NOAG acts as consignment agent for the Seller. The contract for the sale of the Lot is therefore made between the Seller and the Buyer. (d). By bidding at the Auction as a Bidder or Buyer, and/or by your signature below, you agree to be bound by these terms.

2. Before the Auction (a). ALL SALES ARE “AS IS, WHERE IS” WITH NO EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES WHATSOEVER. (i) NEITHER NOAG NOR THE SELLER PROVIDES ANY GUARANTEE OR WARRANTY AS TO THE NATURE, DESCRIPTION, GENUINENESS, PROVENANCE, IMPORTANCE, OR CONDITION OF THE LOT. All Sales and Auctions are without any representation or warranty of any kind by NOAG or the Seller. Bidders and Buyers are responsible for satisfying themselves concerning the condition of the Lots and the matters referred to in the catalogue entry, the Condition Report, or in any other statement or writing provided. All Sales are final and are “AS IS WHERE IS.” (ii) No warranty of redhibition. ANY WARANTY AGAINST REDHIBITORY DEFECTS IS WAIVED AND EXCLUDED. NOAG and Seller provide absolutely no warranty against redhibitory defects, including without limitation: (x) any defects rendering a Lot useless or its use inconvenient; and (y) any defects diminishing the usefulness of a Lot; and any such warranties are waived and excluded. In addition, NOAG and Seller provide no warranties, guarantees, or representations as to whether a Lot is fit for its ordinary use, fit for Buyer’s intended use or for Buyer’s particular purpose. (iii) No warranty against eviction. ANY WARRANTY AGAINST EVICTION IS WAIVED AND EXCLUDED. In the event that Buyer is evicted from possession of whole or part of the Lot, neither NOAG nor Seller have any duty whatsoever to return any part of the Purchase Price to Buyer. Buyer is buying at Buyer’s sole risk and peril as to third parties who may claim rights in the Lot after the Sale. (iv) No warranty as to authorship. NOAG does not make any express or implied warranty as to authorship of works of art and fine art. No statement in the Catalogue or elsewhere, orally or in writing, shall be construed as an express or implied warranty, representation or limitation of liability as to authorship. Any such warranty is WAIVED. (v) No warranty of peaceful possession, etc. The following warranties are waived and excluded: the absence of hidden defects, peaceful possession, and ownership. NOAG and Seller provide absolutely no warranty that the Lot is free from hidden defects, or for peaceful possession, or for ownership. (vi) No other warranties. None of the Seller, NOAG, or any of NOAG’s officers, employees or agents, give any representation, warranty or guarantee or assume any liability of any kind in respect of any Lot with regard to merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, description, size, quality, condition, attribution, authenticity, rarity, importance, medium, provenance, exhibition history, literature or historical relevance. Except as required by local law, any express or implied warranty of any kind whatsoever is excluded by this Section 2(a). (b). Examination of property / Condition Reports. Prospective Buyers and Bidders are strongly advised to examine personally any property in which they are interested, before the Auction takes place. As a convenience, Bidders may request that NOAG produce a Condition Report (“Condition Report”) for a Lot, which, if produced, will provide additional detail concerning the condition of the Lot as observed by NOAG’s staff. NOAG reserves the right to decline to produce a Condition Report for any specific Lot, for any reason and in NOAG’s sole discretion. Rev. 01/04/17


(c). Catalogue and other descriptions. (i) All statements made by NOAG as to condition, authorship, period, culture, source, origin, measurement, quality, rarity, provenance, importance, or historical relevance, whether in the Catalogue entry for the Lot, in the Condition Report, and/ or in a bill of sale, or made orally or in writing elsewhere, are qualified statements of opinion only and are not to be relied on as statements of fact. Such statements do not constitute a representation, warranty or assumption of liability by NOAG of any kind. References in the Catalogue entry or the Condition Report to damage or restoration are for guidance only and should be evaluated by personal inspection by the Bidder or a knowledgeable representative. The absence of such a reference does not imply that an item is free from defects or restoration, nor does a reference to particular defects imply the absence of any others. (ii) Without limiting the foregoing, none of the Seller, NOAG, or any of NOAG’s officers, employees or agents, are responsible for the correctness of any statement of whatever kind concerning any Lot, whether written or oral, nor for any other errors or omissions in description or for any faults or defects in any Lot. (iii) Any Estimates provided should not be relied on as a statement that this is the price at which the item will sell or its value for any other purpose. Any written or oral appraisal, Estimate or other statement of NOAG or our representatives with respect to the estimated or expected selling price of any Lot of Property is a statement of opinion only and shall not be relied upon by Bidders or prospective Bidders as a prediction or guarantee of the actual selling price. (iv) NOAG shall not be liable for any errors or omissions in catalogue or other descriptions of the Property. Neither NOAG nor the Seller is responsible in any way for errors and omissions in the catalogue, or any supplemental material. (d). Further acknowledgement. As a Bidder and prospective Buyer, you further agree and acknowledge that: (i) You are not relying on NOAG’s skill or judgment in selecting to purchase any Lot; (ii) No oral or written statements in the Auction Catalogue, Condition Report, or elsewhere are the cause of or reason behind your purchase of any Lot; and you would have incurred such purchase regardless of any oral or written statements about condition, attribution, kind, quality, value, or authorship made in the catalogue or elsewhere; (iii) NOAG did not and could not have known that condition, attribution, kind, quality, expressed value, or authorship is the cause or reason why you decide to purchase any Lot; (iv) Your purchase of any Lot is not intended to gratify a nonpecuniary interest; and (v) NOAG did not know, nor should it have known, that any oral or written statement about a Lot in the catalogue, Condition Report or elsewhere would cause a nonpecuniary loss to a Buyer.

3. At the Auction (a). Registration before bidding / Bidding requirements. In order to be accepted as a Bidder and allowed to place a Bid, all Bidders must meet all of the following requirements: (i) A Bidder must complete and sign the attached registration form and provide identification to NOAG; (ii) NOAG may require the production of bank or other financial references or any other additional information; (iii) When making a Bid, a Bidder is accepting personal liability to pay the Purchase Price in full in the event that the Bidder submits the Winning Bid, unless it has been explicitly agreed in writing with NOAG before the auction of the Lot that the Bidder is acting as agent on behalf of an identified third party acceptable to NOAG, and that NOAG will only look to that principal for payment (iv) All Bids are to be made in U.S. currency unless agreed upon between NOAG and the Bidder; and (v) At NOAG’s sole discretion, NOAG may require any Bidder to post a cash deposit in an amount set by NOAG at its sole discretion. Such deposit may include, without limitation, a deposit of 25% of the Maximum Bid (or another amount set in NOAG’s sole discretion) in the case of Absentee Bids (defined below). (b). Refusal of admission / Rejection of Bidders. NOAG has the right, at its complete discretion, to refuse admission to the premises or participation in any Auction. NOAG reserves the right to reject any Bidder for any reason whatsoever and in NOAG’s sole discretion. (c). Absentee bids / Telephone bids. (i) As a convenience to Bidders, NOAG may allow a Bidder to submit an absentee bid (“Absentee Bid”) or telephone bid (“Telephone Bid”) by filling out (in full) the section of the attached registration form marked “Absentee Bids / Telephone Bids.” In order to submit an Absentee Bid or Telephone Bid for an Auction, that registration form must be filled out and submitted to NOAG no later than 5:00 p.m. central time on the last business day before the commencement of the Auction. (NOAG reserves the right to accept late Absentee Bid or Telephone Bid submissions in NOAG’s sole discretion.) All Absentee Bid submissions must include a maximum bid amount (“Maximum Bid”). (ii) If an Absentee Bid is submitted and accepted, at the time of the auction of the affected Lot, the Auctioneer or other NOAG staff will place the Absentee Bid at the amount of the opening bid amount, and will increase the amount as necessary until the earlier of (x) the Absentee Bid is the Winning Bid; or (y) the amount reaches the Maximum Bid. All such actions in this paragraph are at the sole discretion of the Auctioneer and/ or NOAG. If NOAG receives Absentee Bids on a particular Lot with identical Maximum Bid amounts, and at the Auction these are the highest bids on the Lot, the Lot will be sold to the person whose Absentee Bid was received and accepted first. In the event of a tie bid between an Absentee Bid and a Bid submitted by a Bidder physically present at the Auction (or a Telephone Bid), the Lot will be sold to physically present Bidder (or bidder submitting the Telephone Bid).

Rev. 01/04/17


(iii) If a Telephone Bid is submitted and accepted, at the time of the auction of the affected Lot, NOAG staff shall attempt to contact the Bidder using the telephone number provided. If successfully contacted, the Bidder shall then be afforded the opportunity to place a Bid on the Lot by telephone. Telephone Bids may be recorded. By submitting a Telephone Bid, the Bidder consents to the recording of the conversation and the placing of the Bid. (iv) Execution of Absentee Bids and Telephone Bids is a free service undertaken subject to other commitments at the time of the Auction and neither NOAG nor the Auctioneer shall have any liability for failing to execute an Absentee Bid or Telephone Bid or for errors and omissions in connection therewith. (d). Video or digital images. At some Auctions there may be a video or digital screen. Errors may occur in its operation and in the quality of the image and we do not accept liability for such errors. NOAG reserves the right to video tape and record proceedings at any Auctions. Any personal information obtained will be held in confidence by NOAG but may be used or shared with our affiliates and marketing partners for customer analysis purposes and to help us to tailor our services to buyer requirements. Any Bidder attending an Auction in person who does not wish to be video-taped may make arrangements to make a Telephone Bid in accordance with Section 3(c) above. (e). Reserves. All Lots are offered subject to a reserve, which is the confidential minimum price below which the Lot will not be sold (the “Reserve”). The Reserve for a Lot will not exceed the low Estimate for that Lot. The Auctioneer may open the bidding on any Lot below the Reserve by placing a bid on behalf of the Seller. The Auctioneer may continue to bid on behalf of the Seller up to the amount of the Reserve, either by placing consecutive bids or by placing bids in response to other bidders. Notwithstanding the foregoing, a Lot may be sold at a Hammer Price below the Reserve, at the discretion of the Auctioneer and NOAG, in any manner consistent with the agreement between NOAG and the Seller. (f). No bidding by Seller. Under no circumstances shall Seller (as agent or principal), whether by itself or through its representatives, employees or agents (except as through the Auctioneer as set forth in Section 3(e) above), enter or cause to be entered a Bid on Seller’s Lot. (g). Auctioneer’s discretion. The Auctioneer has the right at his or her absolute and sole discretion to refuse any Bid, to advance the bidding in such a manner as he or she may decide, to withdraw or divide any Lot, to combine any two or more Lots, and in the event of any error or dispute, to determine the Winning Bid, to continue the bidding, to cancel the Sale or to reoffer and resell the Lot or item in dispute. If any dispute arises after the Sale, NOAG’s sale record is conclusive. Unless otherwise announced by the Auctioneer at the time of Sale, all Bids are per Lot as numbered in the Catalogue and no Lot shall be divided for Sale. NOAG and/or the Auctioneer may withdraw any Lot at any time before such Lot is offered at Auction, for any reason and in their sole and absolute discretion. (h). Successful bid and passing of risk. The Auctioneer shall have absolute discretion in determining the Winning Bid and the striking of the Auctioneer’s hammer marks the acceptance of the highest and best bid as the Winning Bid and the conclusion of a contract for sale between the Seller and the Buyer. Risk and responsibility for the Lot but not its title passes to the Buyer immediately upon announcement of the Winning Bid at the Auction. (i). Post-auction sale. In the event that there is no Winning Bid at Auction for a Lot, or the Lot is withdrawn from the Auction, or the Sale is cancelled for non-payment pursuant to Section 4(g) below, NOAG may sell the Lot at public or private sale at any time thereafter, in a manner consistent with the agreement between Seller and NOAG. (j). NOAG assumes no responsibility for failure to execute Bids for any reason whatsoever.

4. After the Auction (a). In order to consummate and complete the Sale, the Buyer must tender payment in full of all of the following amounts (all such amounts together being the “Purchase Price”) to NOAG: (i) the Hammer Price; and (ii) the “Buyer’s Premium” consisting of a premium of 25% of the Hammer Price (discounted to 22% if the method of payment is by check, cash, or wire transfer [subject to a $30 fee for domestic wires and a $60 fee for international wires] by the end of the day on the fifteenth calendar day following the conclusion of the Auction - note that there is no discount for LiveAuctioneers and Invaluable bidders) up to and including a Hammer Price of $200,000 and 10% of the amount by which the Lot’s Hammer Price exceeds $200,000; and (iii) Any applicable Louisiana, state, local, and federal or other taxes, calculated as required by law. Any documentation of tax exemption must be provided by the Bidder contemporaneously with the execution of the attached registration form. (b). Payment and passing of title. The Buyer and any other Bidders are responsible for contacting NOAG for Auction results during the week after the conclusion of the Auction. Subject to the provisions of Section 4(i) below which may require earlier payment, the Buyer must pay the full Purchase Price no later than 4:30 pm central time on the fifteenth calendar day following the conclusion of the Auction. Payments may be submitted during business hours to: New Orleans Auction Galleries, 333 St. Joseph Street, New Orleans, Louisiana 70130, Telephone number: 504-566-1849. Payments may be made by certified check, cash, wire transfer, or credit card (Visa, Mastercard, and American Express). Payments will be accepted by non-certified check only in NOAG’s sole discretion, from Buyers that have been qualified by NOAG in NOAG’s sole discretion. Title to the Lot does not pass to the Buyer until the full amount of the Purchase Price has been tendered and received by NOAG in good cleared funds, even in circumstances where the Lot has been released to the Buyer. (c). Credit Cards. Your signature on this form constitutes permission to charge the full amount of the Purchase Price on your credit card, if you are the Buyer on a Lot and payment is not received within five business days of the close of the Auction. Your signature on this form also constitutes permission to charge the full amount of Storage Charges (defined below), if and when accrued, on a periodic basis on your credit card. (d). Release of Lot to Buyer. No Lot will be released to the Buyer unless and until NOAG receives full payment of the Purchase Price, and such payment has cleared and NOAG has received confirmation of all funds owed. At its sole discretion, NOAG may release a specific Lot at any time, notwithstanding the foregoing provision. In addition, NOAG may require that Lots not be released until the Buyer has cleared additional checks in NOAG’s sole discretion, including without limitation, any anti-money laundering or antiterrorism financing checks to NOAG’s satisfaction. In the event that a Buyer fails to complete any anti-money laundering or anti-terrorism financing checks to NOAG’s satisfaction, NOAG shall be entitled to cancel the Sale and take any other action permitted or required under applicable law. In addition, notwithstanding the foregoing, Lots cannot be released until after the conclusion of the Auction. (e). Export/Import license and Dealers. It is the Buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any relevant export or import license. The denial of any license or any delay in obtaining licenses shall not justify the rescission of any sale nor any delay in making bill payment for the Lot; and shall not limit or alter any of the obligations of the Buyer herein. Dealers purchasing for resale must enter appropriate their Dealer Resale Number on the attached registration form and provide NOAG with proper documentation. Rev. 01/04/17


(f). Storage charge. Subject to the foregoing provisions, any Lot that is not picked up by the end of the day on the fifteenth calendar day following the conclusion of the Auction is subject to an additional storage charge of $5.00 per Lot per day (“Storage Charge”) for as long as the Lot is stored at NOAG’s facilities. The outstanding amount of this Storage Charge must be paid in full (in addition to the Purchase Price) before such Lot will be released to the Buyer. Such Storage Charge accrues on a daily basis and is billed monthly. All items handled or stored will be at the Buyer’s risk. NOAG is not liable for any damage to Lots after the conclusion of the Auction. (g). Remedies for non-payment. If the Buyer fails to make payment in full of the Purchase Price in good cleared funds within the time required by Section 4(b) above, or payment in full of any applicable Storage Charge when incurred, NOAG shall be entitled in its absolute discretion to exercise one or more of the following rights or remedies (in addition to asserting any other rights or remedies available by law): (i) to charge outstanding amounts to the Buyer’s credit card; (ii) to charge interest at the rate of one and one-half percent (1.5%) per month (but not to exceed the highest amount chargeable under applicable law); (iii) to hold the Buyer liable for the total amount due and to commence legal proceedings for its recovery together with interest, legal fees and costs to the fullest extent permitted under applicable law; (iv) to exercise any other remedy or remedies available under the law, including but not limited to a second sale of said item in accordance with the provisions of applicable law, including the subsequent enforcement of any deficiency against the initial buyer; (v) to cancel the sale; (vi) to resell the property publicly or privately on such terms as we shall think fit; (vii) to pay the Seller an amount up to the net proceeds payable in respect of the amount bid by the defaulting Buyer; (viii) to set off against any amounts which NOAG may owe the Buyer in any other transactions, the outstanding amount remaining unpaid by the Buyer; (ix) where several amounts are owed by the Buyer to NOAG, in respect of different transactions, to apply any amount paid to discharge any amount owed in respect of any particular transaction, whether or not the Buyer so directs; (x) to reject at any future Auction any Bids made by or on behalf of the Buyer or to obtain a deposit from the Buyer before accepting any Bids; (xi) to exercise all the rights and remedies of a person holding security and/or privilege over any property in our possession owned by the Buyer, whether by way of pledge, security interest or in any other way, to the fullest extent permitted under Louisiana law (including without limitation under La. Civil Code art. 3247, La. R.S. 10:7-209 and 10:7-210 and other applicable law), or (xii) to take such other action as NOAG deems necessary or appropriate. In connection with the item (xi) above, the Buyer will be deemed to have granted such security to NOAG and NOAG may retain the affected Lot and any property of the Buyer as collateral security for such Buyer’s obligations to NOAG and to the Seller

If we resell the property under Section 4(g)(vi) above, the Buyer shall be liable for payment of any deficiency between the total amount originally due to us and the price obtained upon resale as well as for all costs, expenses, damages, legal fees and commissions and premiums of whatever kind associated with both sales or otherwise arising from the default. If we pay any amount to the Seller under paragraph (vii) above, the Buyer acknowledges that NOAG shall have all of the rights of the Seller, however arising, to pursue the Buyer for such amount. (h). Shipping and packing. All shipping, packing, and transportation of Lots from NOAG’s facilities is the responsibility of Buyer. NOAG may, as a courtesy, assist Buyer with necessary arrangements, but by doing so, NOAG assumes no responsibility or liability for shipping, packing, moving, or transportation, including without limitation damage to Lots, damage to Buyer’s vehicle, or any personal injury of any persons involved. (i). Earlier payment may be required. For any specific Lot, and notwithstanding the provisions of Section 4(b) above, NOAG may require, in its sole discretion, that the Hammer Price for the Lot be paid immediately upon the striking of the Auctioneer’s hammer and announcement of the Winning Bid, with the balance of the Purchase Price being due by the close of the Auction.

5.Copyright The copyright in all images, illustrations and written material produced by or for NOAG relating to a Lot including without limitation the contents of the Catalogue, is and shall remain at all times the property of NOAG and shall not be used by the Buyer or Bidder, nor by anyone else, without our prior written consent. NOAG and the Seller make no representation or warranty that the Buyer of a Lot will acquire any copyright or other reproduction rights in it.

6. Severability If any part of these Conditions of Sale is found by any court to be invalid, illegal or unenforceable, that part shall be discounted and the rest of the conditions shall continue to be valid to the fullest extent permitted by law.

7. Data Collection In connection with the operation of our auction business, NOAG may need to seek personal information from Bidders or obtain information about Bidders from third parties (e.g., credit checks from banks). Such information will be processed and kept by us in confidence. Some of Bidders’ personal data may also need to be shared with third party service providers (e.g., shipping or storage companies) for Bidders’ benefit. By participating in an Auction, you agree to all previously stated disclosure.

8. Law and Jurisdiction The rights and obligations of the parties with respect to these Conditions of Sale, the conduct of the Auction and any matters connected with any of the foregoing shall be governed and interpreted under the laws of the State of Louisiana. By bidding at the Auction and/or through execution of the attached registration form, the Bidder consents to the exclusive jurisdiction of the courts of the State of Louisiana and the Federal courts of the United States of America located in the Eastern District of Louisiana.

Rev. 01/04/17


New Orleans Auction Galleries

333 Saint Joseph Street, New Orleans, LA 70130 | 504-566-1849 | Fax: 504-566-1851 | info@neworleansauction.com

ABSENTEE / TELEPHONE BID FORM Name (Please Print): ______________________________________________

Date: ______________________

Business Name: ______________________________________________________________________________ Dealer Resale # (Dealers must also sign official State of Louisiana document): _______________________________ Address: ____________________________________________________________________________________ City: _____________________________________________

State: ____________ ZIP: ___________________

Telephones: Work (_____)_____________ Home (______)______________ Fax (______)_______________ E-mail Address: _________________________________________________________________________________ Conditions of Sale: Conditions of sale are as set forth in the applicable New Orleans Auction Galleries catalogue. Placing a telephone bid and/or absentee bid in the auction constitutes acceptance of all Conditions of Sale posted by NOAG as amended by any posted notices or oral announcements during the sale.

Lot #

Bid Amount (not including buyer’s premium) OR Telephone Number to Call:

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ VISA / MasterCard #: ____________________________________________ Expiration Date: _____________ CVV #: _______________ I have read and agree to the Conditions of Sale. I agree that a buyer’s premium will be charged on each lot purchased at 25% up to and including $200,000 plus 10% of the hammer price greater than $200,000. For purchases made by cash, check or wire transfer [subject to a $30 fee for domestic wires and a $60 fee for international wires], the buyer’s premium shall be discounted 3% of this 25%. Your signature on this form constitutes permission to charge successful bids to your credit card, including the 25% buyer’s premium, if payment is not received within five days of the auction.

Signature (Required): ___________________________________________________________________ Please fax this form by 5:00 p.m. the day before the auction to 504-566-1851 or scan and email to info@neworleansauction.com 


Susan D. Sarofim CEO

Tessa Steinkamp Director of Auctions

Ashton Thomas President

Jelena Restovic James Director of Fine Art

Ireys Bowman General Consignments

Greg S. Kowles General Consignments

Kim Lemon Fine Jewelry Specialist

Michele Carolla Fine Art Specialist

Nicole Casi, PhD Fine Art Specialist

Rebecca Moss Asian Arts Specialist

Thomas Halverson American Furniture Specialist

Burke Designer

Taylor Eichenwald Marketing & Public Relations

Charles C. Cage Silver Specialist & Office Manager

Colleen Ryan Director of Human Resources

AUCTIONEERS

CONSULTANTS

Tessa Steinkamp, #1265 Ashton Thomas, #1833 Taylor Eichenwald, #1922 Michael DeGeorge, #1774

Ellen McKenzie English & Continental Furniture Ira Savoie Independent Certified Gemologist Appraiser

ADMINISTRATION Christa Ougel Denise Haik Office Administration Graphic Designer Gary Michael Gittelson Bettina Bausa Graphic Designer Photographer Grace Connors Manager of Cakebread Auction

OPERATIONS Cedric Roberts | Sean Ranson Bennie Amos | Eddie Daigrepont Emmitt Kendrick, Jr. Gerald Hampton | Juanita Bazile Sol Carter | Thomas Johnson David Abney | James Collins


Fine Art Auction | April 21, 2018  

Over 250 lots of paintings, prints and sculpture from Old Masters to contemporary

Fine Art Auction | April 21, 2018  

Over 250 lots of paintings, prints and sculpture from Old Masters to contemporary