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THHREE REE WAYS WAYS TO TO IN NCREASE CREASE YO OUR UR PR ROFITS OFITS S

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505/321 8808

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P.O. Box 564 • Stanley, NM 87056 Located 40 miles east of Albuquerque 3

OCTOBER 2012

Selling 150 Hereford Bulls Other sires include Harland Too, C Maui Jim, C Pure Gold 4215, C New Era ET, CL1 Domino 6136S, and Ribeye 88X OCTOBER 2012

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Hereford Ranch

LI DOMINO 0700 JAKE DARNELL d an EP JE E, 2 SU , M JI ne, El Paso, TX 7993 La z Pa de o se Pa 5 O RANCH: 7-2057 TEXAS/NEW MEXIC 2442 – (F) 915/87 253 5/ 91 ) (O – (H) 915/877-2535 ) 915/549-2534 (C E SU – 99 52 9JIM (C) 915/47 ds@aol.com E-mail: barjbarherefor

, Oklahoma ty un Co ds oo W : H C OKLAHOMA RAN the Rio Grande.” of t es w on ti ra pe O d “Texas’s Only Herefor

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TRADITION 119-YEAR-OLD FAMILY A UE IN NT CO LE LS TT THE DARNEL OING HEREFORD CA OF RAISING GOOD-D OCTOBER

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Cli Clifford d,, Clif Cliff & Matt Copeland N ara Viisa, exico Nara sa, New Mexico 75.633.22 f f or d 57 5.633.2251 - Clifford 7 5.633.2800 5 5.633 3.2800 - Cliff 75.633.2800 ff 575 580.336.82 580.336.82O8C4T O- BMatt ER 2012 5


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AOLC TBO U QUERQUE BER 2012

ROSWELL

LAS CRUCES

TUCUMCARI

CLOVIS8

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OCTOBER 2012

VOL 78, No. 10

USPS 381-580

TABLE OF CONTENTS NEW MEXICO STOCKMAN Write or call: P.O. Box 7127 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87194 Fax: 505/998-6236 505/243-9515 E-mail: caren@aaalivestock.com

F E AT U R E S by Callie Gnatkowski-Gibson

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Hereford - Standing the Test of Time

26

Mesalands Rodeo Team Member New World Champion

36

State Fair Results

Official publication of: ■

New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association Email: nmcga@nmagriculture.org; 2231 Rio Grande NW, P.O. Box 7517, Albuquerque, NM 87194, 505/247-0584, Fax: 505/842-1766; President, Rex Wilson Executive Director, Caren Cowan Asst. Executive Director, Michelle Frost

D E PA R T M E N T S 10

N.M. Cattle Growers’ Association President’s Letter

12

News Update

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N.M. CowBelles Jingle Jangle

32

N.M. Federal Lands Council News

44

Cowboy Heroes

51

NMBC Bullhorn

53

Market Place

54

Seedstock Guide

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING

58

Scatterin’ The Drive

Publisher: Caren Cowan Publisher Emeritus: Chuck Stocks Office Manager: Marguerite Vensel Advertising Reps.: Chris Martinez, Melinda Martinez, Contributing Editors: Carol Wilson, Callie Gnatkowski-Gibson, William S. Previtti, Lee Pitts Photographer: Dee Bridgers

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To The Point

62

Real Estate Guide

69

Estrays

68

New Mexico Livestock Board Update

71

In Memoriam

72

Ad Index

New Mexico Wool Growers, Inc. P.O. Box 7520, Albuquerque, NM 87194, 505/247-0584 President, Marc Kincaid Executive Director, Caren Cowan Asst. Executive Director, Michelle Frost ■

by Rex Wilson, President

by Mike Casabonne

by Jim Olson

by Curtis Fort

by Caren Cowan

PRODUCTION Production Coordinator: Carol Pendleton Editorial & Advertising Design: Kristy Hinds Advertising Design: Camille Pansewicz

ADVERTISING SALES Chris Martinez at 505/243-9515, ext. 28 or chris@aaalivestock.com

New Mexico Stockman (USPS 381-580) is published monthly by Caren Cowan, 2231 Rio Grande, NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104-2529. Subscription price: 1 year - $19.95 /2 years - $29.95. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Mexico Stockman, P.O. Box 7127, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87194. Periodicals Postage paid at Albuquerque, New Mexico and additional mailing offices. Copyright 2008 by New Mexico Stockman. Material may not be used without permission of the publisher. Deadline for editorial and advertising copy, changes and cancellations is the 10th of the month preceding publication. Advertising rates on request.

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www.aaalivestock.com

OCTOBER 2012

ON THE COVER . . . “Just You and Me Today” an oil painting by JaNeil Anderson. For prints of this great work and other originals and prints please contact the artist at: P.O. Box 297, Red Rock, NM 88005, email: janeil.anderson56@gmail.com or visit her website at: www.janeilanderson.com

OCTOBER 2012

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G

R

OC

C A TT L E

IATION

W MEXICO NE

O

S W E R S' A S

b y Rex Wil son NMCGA PRESIDENT

ESSAGE

Dear Fellow Members, t’s fall and the monsoons missed most of us, there are strong predictions that we will have an El Niño winter and hopefully that will set everyone for a good spring. With the election looming, it appears that our country becomes ever more divided. You can find a poll that will tell you whatever you want to hear, you just have to figure out how weighted it is and in what direction. The only sure thing we know is that if we don’t turn out rural New Mexico and America, we are facing an even tougher road in the regulatory arena and maybe legislative as well. We know that we will have at least 28 new faces in the New Mexico Legislature and that number could grow depending on the outcome of the general election. Few of us have ever headed to Santa Fe with the opportunities facing us in the 2013 Legislature. We have a chance to bring a whole new group of folks on board with our issues. That work has already started and we had a great candidate roundup at the Fall Board Meeting in late September. It was gratifying to see our members stepping up to the plate and offering support to the candidates who attended. I hope that is going on everywhere in the state. The power of working together was never more clear to me than in the past few weeks when my three sons and I joined forces to build a new set of pens. The boys and the pens are certainly something I can be proud of. With the four of us working together, the pens were not only finished in a timely manner, but they are the best set of pens I have ever had. They are better than something I could have done on my own. That same principle needs to be considered and applied in everything we do, but especially when it comes to the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association (NMCGA). The things the Association accomplishes would be next to nothing if we didn’t have a strong group of members and leaders who are willing to put their shoulders to the ground and work for the good of every ranch family in our state — not just those who are paying dues. I sometimes hear that people don’t feel they can join NMCGA unless they are asked. Although that is sure not the case, I am here to ask you now. If you are not already a member of the Association, please join today. You can do so by calling the office at 505/247-0584 or visiting our website at www.nmagriculture.org. Current members may want to visit the website, too. Michelle and the staff launched a newly designed site at the beginning of October. I also hear that participating in NMCGA is difficult for new members. If we haven’t been as welcoming as we should, we apologize for that and hope you will join us at the upcoming Joint Stockmens’ Convention slated for December 6 through 9 at the Albuquerque Marriott Pyramid North. All committee meetings, with a few exceptions, are open to any member who wishes to participate. We need everyone’s voice to create policy and to implement it. My mother used to work at the polling precinct at Ancho. One of the things she was most proud of was that our prectinct was always at 100 percent in voting. As our numbers have thinned in the country, the precinct has been consolidated into Carrizozo. I am not sure how, but Mom stills knows that our Ancho neighborhood still votes at nearly 100 percent. We need that 100 percent participate in the upcoming election, we need that 100 percent as members in NMCGA, and we need that 100 percent working on the numerous issues that face our families, our businesses and our Association every day. Hope to see you at Convention if not some place before then. We will continue to pray for rain.

I

Rex Wilson, President www.nmagriculture.org NEW MEX I CO CATTL E GR OWER S’ ASSOCI ATI ON OFFI CER S Rex Wilson President Carrizozo

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Jose Varela Lopez President-Elect Santa Fe

OCTOBER 2012

Lane Grau Vice-President At Large, Grady

Ty Bays Ernie Torrez Pat Boone SW Vice-President NW Vice-President SE Vice-President Silver City La Jara Elida

Blair Clavel Shacey Sullivan NE Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer Roy; Bosque Farms;

Bert Ancell Past President Springer;

Caren Cowan Executive Director Albuquerque


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· Clayton, NM · 575/374-2723 · Roswell, NM · 575/622-9164 · Ft. Sumner, NM · 575/355-2271 · Amarillo, TX · 806/622-2992 · McLean, TX · 806/681-4534 · Dalhart, TX · 806/249-5602 / Boise City, OK · 580/544-2460

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OCTOBER 2012

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ROSWELL LIVESTOCK AUCTION SALES, INC. AUCTION, INC. & ROSWELL LIVESTOCK AUCTION TRUCKING, INC. 900 North Garden · P.O. Box 2041 900Roswell, North Garden · P.O. Box 2041 New Mexico 88201 Roswell, New Mexico 88201 505/622-5580 575/622-5580 www.roswelllivestockauction.com

www.roswelllivestockauction.com CATTLE SALES: MONDAYS CATTLEJUNE, SALES:SEPTEMBER MONDAYS and DECEMBER HORSE SALES: APRIL, HORSE SALES: APRIL, JUNE, SEPTEMBER and DECEMBER BENNY WOOTON RES 575/625-0071, CELL 575/626-4754 WOOTON RES. 505/626-4754 SMILEY BENNY WOOTON RES 575/623-2338, CELL 575/626-6253

SMILEY WOOTON

RES. 505/626-6253

Producers hauling cattle to Roswell Livestock New Mexico Receiving Stations need to call our toll-free number for a Transportation Permit number before leaving home. The Hauling Permit number 1-800/748-1541 is answered 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Trucks are available 7 days a week / 24 hours a day

ROSWELL LIVESTOCK AUCTION RECEIVING STATIONS LORDSBURG, NM 20 Bar Livestock Highway #90 at NM #3 – East side of highway. Receiving cattle for transport 2nd & 4th weekends of each month. Truck leaves Lordsburg at 2:00 p.m. Sunday. Smiley Wooton, 575/622-5580 office, 575/623-2338 home, 575/626-6253 cell. FORT STOCKTON, TX 1816 E. 53rd Lane, Interstate 10 to exit 259A to FM 1053, 5 1/2 miles north of I-10. Turn right on Stone Rd. (receiving station sign) 1-block. Turn left on 53rd Lane – 3/4 miles to red A-frame house and corrals on right. Buster Williams, 432/336-0219, 432-290-2061. Receiving cattle: 2nd & 4th Sundays of the month. Truck leaves at 3:00 p.m. CT. PECOS, TX Hwy. 80 across from Town & Country Motel. NO PRIOR PERMITS REQUIRED. Nacho, 432/664-8942, 432/448-0129, 432/448-6865. Trucks leave Sunday at 4 p.m. CT. VALENTINE, TX 17 miles north of Marfa on Hwy. 90. Red Brown 432/4672682. Pens: 432/358-4640, cell: 432/386-2700. Truck leaves 1st and 3rd Sunday at 3:00 p.m. CT. VAN HORN, TX 800 West 2nd, 5 blocks west of Courthouse. Pancho Romero, 432/207-0324, or Pete Ojeda, 432/284-1971. Trucks leave 1st & 3rd Sunday at 3:00 p.m. CT. MORIARTY, NM Two blocks east and one block south of Tillery Chevrolet. Smiley Wooton 575/622-5580 office, 575/623-2338 home, 575/626-6253 mobile. Trucks leave Sunday at 3:00 p.m. MT. SAN ANTONIO, NM River Cattle Co. Nine miles east of San Antonio on U.S. 380. Gary Johnson 575/838-1834. Trucks leave Sunday at 3:00 p.m. MT. T or C, NM Old Greer Pens – I-24 to Exit #75 – Williamsburg – Go east to City Building – Turn right to corrals. Truck leaves at 2:00 pm Sunday. Matt Johnson, 575/740-4507 or Jeff Richter, 575/740-1684.

Enviros seek to help defend planning rule from industry challenge by SCOTT STREATER, E&E REPORTER nvironmental groups want to help the Forest Service defend itself against a federal lawsuit filed last month by a coalition of logging, ranching and off-highway vehicle (OHV) groups challenging the agency’s new planning rule for the nation’s 193 million acres of national forests and grasslands. The Western Environmental Law Center filed a motion in early September in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia on behalf of two Oregon-based conservation groups seeking to formally intervene in the lawsuit on behalf of the Forest Service. A coalition of more than a dozen industry groups claims in its August complaint that the Forest Service overstepped its authority by requiring that new forest management plans provide “ecological sustainability” and “ecosystem services” and use best available science in decisionmaking, among other charges (Greenwire, Aug. 14). The industry groups — including the American Forest Resource Council, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and BlueRibbon Coalition, an OHV users group — essentially state that the new planning rule ignores the congressional mandate to provide for multiple uses such as logging, ranching and motorized recreation. The Forest Service has said the new planning rule, which is required by the National Forest Management Act, seeks to carefully balance the interests of all stakeholder groups. But the conservation groups Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center and Oregon Wild argue that the industry lawsuit threatens that balance and could have broad implications for the agency’s ability to manage forests nationwide. “This lawsuit, if successful, could effectively ban conservation biology as a basis to help craft how we manage our national forests,” said Pete Frost, a Eugene, Ore.-based attorney for the Western Environmental Law Center who is representing the two groups. The industry lawsuit also reveals the plaintiffs’ true belief that national forestlands should be managed primarily for resource extraction, said Joseph Vaile, program director for the Ashland, Ore.-based Klamath-Siskiyou Wildlands Center. “These industry groups have a scary vision for our national forests,” Vaile said. “Never before have we seen extraction industries so clearly state that they oppose the use of science on our national forests. Through this suit, these groups hope the keys to

E

continued on page 13

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OCTOBER 2012


Enviros

continued from page 12

our national forests are handed over to private industry so they can be turned into private tree farms for their own benefit.” The Forest Service rule was finalized in March after more than two and a half years of public meetings and more than 300,000 public comments. Previous attempts to update the rule in 2000, 2005 and 2008 drew lawsuits from the Center for Biological Diversity and other environmental groups and were either enjoined or abandoned, leaving the Reagan administration’s 1982 planning rule in place. The Obama administration rule, which emphasizes watershed restoration, drew praise from major environmental and sportsmen’s groups, including former Forest Service Chief Dale Bosworth and Sen. Jeff Bingaman (D-N.M.) (E&ENews PM, March 23). “It comes as no surprise that the timber industry would like to see our national forests managed for logging,” said Doug Heiken, Oregon Wild’s conservation and restoration coordinator, “but it becomes truly bizarre when the timber industry must argue against science and in favor of crony capitalism in order to achieve their ■ desired result.”

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Hereford

and their son Clay – Herefords are a good fit, both on the commercial and purebred sides of the business. They raise registered Hereford bulls, both to market to other producers and to use on their own commercial cattle herd.

Standing the Test of Time

“We started raising Herefords because of my love of the breed,” Jimmy said. “When we were kids, Hereford was the king breed. That’s what everyone raised, continued on page 15

by CALLIE GNATKOWSKI-GIBSON or many years, Hereford was the predominant breed of cattle in this part of the country, and for good reason. These gentle, easy keeping cattle are known for their fertility and mothering ability. They will adapt to and thrive in the variety of conditions found in the Southwest, and wean a calf that holds its own in comparison to other breeds in the feedyard and at slaughter. When it comes right down to it, Hereford cattle are hard to beat.

F

From the sand hills

For the Mason family of Mason Cattle Company near Artesia – Jimmy and Bunny

2-year-old heifers at Piñon, spring of 2012

ONE OF HEREFORD’S HEREFORD'S FINEST SIRES!

UPS Domino 5216

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CE BW WW YW MM M&G MCE SC FAT REA MARB BMI$ CEZ$ BII$ CHB$ 25 23 22 21 6.8 1.7 46 70 31 54 3.7 1.5 0.081 0.40 0.19 .41 .88 .83 .82 .54 .30 .50 .62 .62 .68

Herefor Herefor efords ds B&H Herefords 

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OCTOBER 2012



   





 

 





 








To the mountains

Hereford continued from page 14

and what I grew up showing. We raise horned Herefords just because I like the way they look.” The family started raising bulls to meet the needs of area commercial cattle producers. “A lot of guys around here raise crossbred cows. Going back to my college days, I know that you need a purebred in there to keep up the vigor,” Jimmy said. “We are not into show cattle, we just want to raise good, stout, moderate sized bulls that will work in our country,” he continued. “When we buy a bull, even from northern New Mexico, it takes him a year or so to acclimatize to our country. When we turn new bulls out in these sand hills, it’s hard on them, and hard on their feet.” The Masons sell some bulls through the Roswell Bull Sale, and sell others private treaty to area ranchers. Jimmy said he wouldn’t mind raising some show steers, but it’s difficult for purebred Herefords to compete with some of the exotic breeds. “This year, they didn’t have enough steers to make a Hereford class at the New Mexico State Fair, and county fairs classify steers on hip height. My son showed Herefords, but today, English breeds are at a disadvantage in the show ring.” The breed’s gentle disposition is one important trait for the Masons. “When we bought the ranch, my wife asked what kind of cattle I wanted and I said gentle ones. I like to chase cows, but I don’t like ones that chase me!” Fertility is another strength of the breed. “You just can’t beat English cattle for fertility. Even last year in the drought, our cattle – the Herefords and the Englishinfluenced commercial cattle – all bred back,” he noted. He also cites their maternal traits. “I like the same things everyone does about the breed – their mothering ability, their milking ability. As a breed, they are good, protective mothers. We don’t have to worry about coyotes getting our calves.” Jimmy is working to build his herd, and saves most of his heifer calves as replacements. This year, he raised some nice black baldy steer calves from the commercial herd, which was good, he said, but he was hoping for higher heifer numbers. The cattle market can be a strange thing, and color still plays a big part. “Straight bred Herefords do take a little bit of a beating at the sale barn in our part of the country, just because of the color. I tell people that once you take the hide off, you can’t tell the difference.”

Ranch Function...Championship Form

Partners Phil Harvey, Jr. and Jim Bob Burnett, of B&H Herefords near Piñon, raise registered Hereford cattle that will perform in New Mexico’s rough country. Jim Bob and Phil focus on raising cattle that will do well in a tough environment. “We don’t push our bulls as hard as a lot of people do. We want our cattle to be able to work anywhere,” Phil explained. “We sell quite a few bulls to local Hope and Piñon ranchers, who run their cows in rough, rocky country with deep water, and we want our bulls to get out there and survive and work. “ The cattle run at an elevation of about 5,200 feet, on gramma grass in piñon/juniper country, similar to much of New Mexico. In addition to the registered Hereford herd, both Jim Bob and his son, Denny Kyle, run commercial cattle on the ranch and all of the cattle are managed the same way. “We handle the Hereford herd

Michael & Connie Perez 575/403-7970 Kyle Perez – 575/403-7971 Nara Visa, NM www.CandMHerefords.com Hereford Bulls - Hereford Females - Baldy Females

continued on page 16

1873

CS

2012

139 Years of Raising Quality Cattle and Horses CS Cattle Co. • 575/376-2827 Cimarron, New Mexico “Out in God’s country”

When in Colfax County visit Cimarron and the Aztec Mill Museum

“Crossing the Rayado” OCTOBER 2012

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Chase

Bar J Bar HEREFORD RANCH

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COMMERCIAL HEREFORDS

Since 1893 • Se Hable Español

TEXAS / N.M. RANCH: 5 Paseo de Paz Ln., El Paso, TX 79932 H: 915/877-2535 • O: 915/532-2442 • C: 915/479-5299 OKLA. RANCH: Woods County, OK • barjbarherefords@aol.com

575/376-2398 P.O. Box 227 Cimarron, NM 87714

HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE

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Producers of Quality & Performance Tested Brahman Bulls & Heifers “Beef-type American Gray Brahmans, Herefords, Gelbvieh and F-1s.” Available at All Times Loren & Joanne Pratt 44996 W. Papago Road Maricopa, AZ 85139 520 / 568-2811 16

OCTOBER 2012

WINSTON, NEW MEXICO Russell and Trudy Freeman

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ANFORD

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ANGUS • BRAHMAN • HEREFORDS • F1s F1 & Montana influenced Angus Cattle GARY MANFORD 505/508-2399 – 505/592-2936

Mountain View Ranch Heifers and Bulls For Sale Year Round Grace & Michael Wystrach 520/456-9052 HC1 Box 788 Elgin, Arizona 85611

Hereford continued from page 15

just like our commercial cows, other than collecting data like birth weights and weaning weights,” Jim Bob said. Cows are supplemented with a protein block through the winter, then with 20 percent protein cubes after they calve until it greens up in the spring. After the bull calves are weaned in the fall, they are fed through the winter on wheat. Bull sales begin in April and run through the fall. Jim Bob and Phil also market some heifers to commercial producers. B&H Herefords participates in the Roswell Bull Sale, but markets the majority of their bulls private treaty from the ranch. Although they have a few bulls working in registered herds, the majority of their customers are range producers. “From time to time, we’ll go to different sales with top-end cattle, when we have an animal that we think can do well,” Phil said. The mother cows at B&H Herefords are moderate framed, between 1,100 and 1,200 pounds, and their range bulls mature at between 1,800 and 2,000 pounds. “We are shooting for moderate sized, moderate framed, easy fleshing cattle. We also watch the carcass traits, and select herd sires with high marbling scores, and a good-sized ribeye,” Jim Bob explained. The goal is to produce bulls whose calves fit commercial producers’ parameters, he continued. “We want bulls that produce carcasses 600 and 800 pounds, with an eleven- to thirteen-inch ribeye, that will grade low choice.” Hardiness is one of the breed’s best traits, according to Phil. “The thing about Herefords that makes them excel is their ability to get out and rustle. They can get out and get it done when other breeds cannot. That’s where they came from, it’s in their genetic makeup.” He also cites the breed’s gentle disposition, fertility and reproductive performance. “Hereford cattle have probably as good of a disposition as any beef breed. They are easy to get along with, and easy to work,” Phil explained. “If an animal does act a little crazy, it doesn’t stay in our herd for long, but those cattle are really an exception. Disposition is a hallmark of the breed.” Both Phil and Jim Bob’s kids showed Herefords growing up. “I can remember my youngest daughter leading a two-yearcontinued on page 17


Hereford continued from page 16

old bull at a show, she was probably about five years old. That bull followed right behind her, stopped when she stopped, and the lead rope stayed slack the whole time. That’s what it is all about,” Phil remembered. Hereford genetics are a good tool for producers looking to boost their crossbreeding program, he explained. “A black baldy – Hereford/Angus cross – calf is almost unsurpassed, what they produce is hard to beat. Something in the Hereford genetics creates stronger heterosis than other breeds.” “There is not a better cow in the world than a black baldy,” Jim Bob agreed. “The steer calves can go any direction after weaning and garner premiums in all levels of the market. You can sell your black baldy females as replacement heifers, and get as much for them as you do your steer calves.” Phil also considers Hereford to be a very efficient breed. “They have optimum size and growth for this part of the country, and their feed efficiency is unparalleled. You see a lot of cattle on feed, but a lot of times it takes 40-60 days longer to get those calves where they need to be for slaughter than it does a Hereford.” Known for fertility and adaptability, Herefords are easy fleshing cattle that function in any environment and breed back with less feed and input, Jim Bob noted. “We place a lot of emphasis on fertility and fleshing ability, and work to raise cows that will give you longevity in your herd.” Phil served on the American Hereford Association Board of Directors from 1989 to 1995, and served as President in 1994. During that time, the AHA put the Certified Hereford Beef (CHB) program into place, and Phil is proud of the program’s continued on page 18

Registered Polled Herefords Bulls & Heifers FOR SALE AT THE FARM

Cañones Route P.O. Abiquiu, N.M. 87510 MANUEL SALAZAR P.O. Box 867 Española, N.M. 87532

Phone: 575/638-5434

Visit our our website! Ranch history and updates are available at

WWW.CORNERSTONERANCH.NET We have a limited selection of Hereford and Angus Bulls for Sale. The Yearlings have been at the TOP of the VALLE High Altitude Bull test this summer where they were PAP tested. Please contact us for your Sire needs.

CORNERSTONE RANCH INC. 575-355-6621 • 575-355-2803 cornerstone@plateautel.net acornerstone@plateautel.net www.cornerstoneranch.net

Jim Bob Burnett, Phil Harvey, Wesley Burnett, Denny Kyle Burnett at Piñon OCTOBER 2012

17


Hereford

continued from page 17

ongoing success. Although the AHA was twenty years behind other breeds, he said, we came out with a program and product that really works. A number of supermarkets in New Mexico and Texas carry CHB products, and the market is growing. “It’s been very successful, which is gratifying to see both as a producer and as someone who helped develop the program.” As with Hereford cattle, he said, the CHB product is easy to recognize. “It’s a superb product. From the high end cuts of meat to hamburger, it’s almost shocking how good the meat tastes,” he said. “Hereford beef has great palatability, and it takes less time and inputs to produce.” One reason for the program’s success, he said, are the strict controls on the types of cattle that are accepted – only straight

Hereford cattle and cattle that are 50 percent Hereford 50 percent British breeds – no exotics or dairy cattle. “The controls on quality and breed make up are just not there in other programs. CHB is a superior product with unparalleled consistency, flavor and tenderness. It is hard for a similar product in the same price range to make that claim.” The Harvey family has a long history in the Hereford business. C.M. Harvey moved to El Paso from Oklahoma in 1911 and bought

TTexas exas Hereford Hereford AAssociation ssociation TTHA HA FALL FALL CLASSIC CLASSIC BULL ULL FEMALE SALE SALE & FEMALE BBuffalo uffalo Livestock Livestock Marketing, Marketing, Inc. Inc. Buffalo, Buffalo, TTexas exas October 224, October 4, 2012 2012 – 12 12 Noon Noon A SSO O UURR CE CE O F Q QUU ALI A L I TY T Y H ER E R EFO E F O RD R D S S IN I N CE C E 1 89 89 9

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Home on the range for good doin' Herefords

the family’s first ranch, the Ancho Sheep Company north of Carrizozo, in 1915. In 1924, he bought a herd of Hereford cattle and the TR brand from Thomas Fortune Ryan at Three Rivers. The Harveys registered their first Hereford in 1938, and over the years, the family operation grew to include both registered and commercial herds, ranches near Carrizozo, Alamogordo and Cloudcroft, and a farm near Las Cruces. C.M.’s grandson, Phil Harvey, Jr., got more involved with the operation in 1973 after graduating from college, and focused on improving the registered herd. Phil started using artificial insemination (AI), and started really promoting and showing the cattle. “My dad had focused on infrastructure for many years, but my interest was in the cattle,” Phil said. “We made some good progress, and developed a very good herd of cattle.” In 1996, the Harvey family decided to sell the ranching and cattle operations. At the Harvey Hereford Ranches dispersal sale, Phil and Jim Bob, who had been herdsman at the Harveys’ Las Cruces farm, bought 24 head of females, and B&H Herefords was born. “We didn’t have any advantage, we were bidding against everyone else and tried to acquire the best cows out of the sale that we could afford.” They moved their cattle to land near Lovington, then Hope, and in 2010, moved the herd to Piñon. Phil and his wife, Carlitta, live in Las Cruces; Jim Bob and his wife, Melissa, live in Artesia; and Denny Kyle and his wife, Sherida live on the ranch. Jim Bob and Denny Kyle handle the day to day operations, while Phil takes care of maintaining registrations, advertising and promotion. “Amongst us all, it gets done,” Phil said. ■


Tequesquite R A N C H Ranch work, roping and working cowhorse prospects. Come see our outstanding set of horses and meet the family. Raising quality quarter horses for over 60 years.

Av exas, New ex ew Me ex lablle e iinn TTe ma A vaila xico and Oklahoma PPASTURE, ASTURE, RANGE RANGE AND AND FORAGE FORAGE IINSURANCE NSURANCE FFOR OR H HAY AY & RANGELAND RANGELAND SSales ales C losing ––November November 15, 15, 2012 2012 Closing C overage Starts Starts JJanuary anuar y 11,, 22013 013 Coverage

SEE US ON FACEBOOK AT “TEQUESQUITE RANCH HORSE OPERATION”

Sales A Sales Agents gents — C Call all 224/7 4/7 JJPP SSENTER ENTER 806-215-5155 • sshoestring@wildblue.net 806-215-5155 hoestring@wildblue.net

LYN RAY (575) 447-2321 685 Tequesquite Lane Albert, NM 87733

Orr ccontact O ontact aany ny ooff tthe he aagents gents bbelow elow aand nd tthey hey w will ill bbee gglad lad ttoo ggive ive yyou ou m more ore iinformation: nformation: Mark M atlock Mark Matlock 206 N ustin 206 N.. A Austin Lamesa, T X Lamesa, TX 800-588-5449 800-588-5449

Becky O ffutt Becky Offutt 607 A N 1st East East 607 N.. 1st Haskell, TX TX Haskell, 800-588-3055 800-588-3055

Sam M atlock Sam Matlock 602 N Wells 602 N.. Wells Edna, TX TX Edna, 800-588-3206 800-588-3206

Michael M atlock Michael Matlock Barbara B lock Barbara Block 842 SS.. U.S. U.S. H wy 8877 842 Hwy San A ngelo, T X San Angelo, TX 866-651-1722 866-651-1722

Andrews, Smith, Lowery & Co., LLC is now a part of

Accounting & Consulting Group LLP

LOCAL FIRM

SERVICE +

BIG FIRM

RESOURCES FINALLY, SOMETHING THAT ADDS UP

Tax Planning & Preparation Third Party Retirement Plan Administration Bookkeeping / Accounting Services Long-Term Strategic Planning Profitability / Performance Improvement Forensic Accounting / Fraud Investigations Business Valuations

This merger adds 11 team members, including 5 CPAs, to our current team of well over 100 professional staff and 40 CPAs, and makes ours the largest agriculture practice in the state. Toll Free: 800.499.0407 Phone: 575.622.4667 www.acgnm.com

OCTOBER 2012

19


We would be remiss if we didn’t pay tribute to the one and only Gretchen Sammis. We lost Gretchen in August and she will never be replaced. We thank her for all she did for the Hereford business and the rest of the world. We will miss her. ((!"$ !"$ ))%$ %$ 20

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Where Quality Runs High

High Altitude & High Performance Bulls, Cows & Heifers for Sale by Private Treaty

OXO Hereford Ranches RIDGWAY, COLO. Mark Owings, Manager 970/626-5239

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MOKENA, ILL. Linda, John and Janelle Swiercinsky 708/479-5270

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HEREFORD WORKS 19941 Townline Mokena IL 60448

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2012 2012 C CATTLEMAN ATTLEMAN O OF F THE THE YEAR YEAR Reserve Space to Congratulate-Honor-Applaud

BOB OB RIICKLEFS CKLEFS Unique Hereford Products

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Call (708) 479-5270 ext. 28 or cchris@aaalivestock.com Contact Chris Contact Chris ttoday oday aatt 2243-9515 43-9515 ext. 28 or hris@aaalivestock.com

Clavel Herefords ROY, N.M.

Range Raised

HEREFORD BULLS

FOR SALE

Joe: 575/485-2591

C.J. 575/485-2543 OCTOBER 2012

21


Barber Ranch Annual Bull Sale Wednesday, November 14, 2012 Jordan Cattle Auction, San Saba, Texas

Featuring 80 Horned & Polled Hereford bulls Stout made, heavy muscled, deep ribbed bulls that have both high performance and eye appeal…straight from the renowned Barber Ranch breeding program!

Also selling • 20 Barber Ranch registered replacement females • 20 Angus bulls from Express Ranches, Yukon, OK • 10 Charolais bulls from Marti Charolais, Cleburne, TX

Express Ranches will be offering a select group of coming two-yearold registered Angus bulls with complete DNA-enhanced EPD profiles that add dollars to their offspring! Sired by breed leaders and ready to go to work. Come take advantage of a great opportunity to buy Express genetics in conjunction with Barber Ranch!

Please contact any of the ranches for more information or to receive your free Barber Ranch Bull Sale catalog, or view online at barberranch.com.

Barber Ranch Ranch (806) 235-3692 Dale Barber (806) 673-1965 Justin Barber (806) 681-5528 Mary Barber (806) 930-6917 10175 FM 3138, Channing, TX 79018 barberranch@wildblue.net • www.barberranch.com

22

OCTOBER 2012

Since 1947, Marti Charolais has been producing Charolais cattle that meet the demands of the beef industry…bulls that are easy keeping and fertile and that sire heavy weaning calves. An impressive set of their big boned, heavy muscled, sound, fertile Charolais bulls will sell Wednesday, November 14th!

2202 N. 11th St. Yukon, OK 73099 Bob Funk, Owner Jarold Callahan, Pres. (800) 664-3977 (405) 350-0044 www.expressranches.com

Marti Charolais Wes Marti (817) 645-0239 1701 CR 310 Cleburne, TX 76031 mmartichar@aol.com www.marticharolais.com OCTOBER 2012

22


Hereford Show 2012

Hereford Grand Champion Bull was JSC Open Range 2395 ET owned by Copeland & Sons LLC, Nara Visa, New Mexico

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Grand Champion Hereford Heifer was KJ DWE 968 R Tori 457Y shown by C & M Herefords and Kyle and Tonya Perez, Nara Visa, New Mexico

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Tuesday, Oct. 23,2012 23,2012 rro o v e nP rro o g rra a m fo 0Y e a ss......... AP ve fo r5 rrs Pr ove en Pr ogr gra am or 50 Ye ea ars

Offering thick, muscular, easing calving bulls who’ll give you pounds, milk & top replacements.

C & M NM Lady 7008, owned by C & M Herefords, Nara Visa, New Mexico was the Champion Cow/Calf pair

Selling Hereford & Angus: • Calving Ease Bulls • Milk and Growth Bulls •B Broadcast roadcast o on nw www.liveauctions.tv ww.liveauctions.tv • Participate Participate tthrough hrough tthis his s service ervice

Mary Strang: 800-351-5362; cell 970-270-4445 Tom & Lisa Walsh: 970-878-5879;970-270-9599

2969 RBC 8, Meeker, CO 81641 strangherefords@wreawildblue.org strangherefords@wreawildblue.org • s strangherefords.com trangherefords.com C & M Herefords, Nara Visa, New Mexico showed the Reserve Grand Champion Heifer C & M NM Lady 2052 OCTOBER 2012

23


RRaising aising tthe he rright ight kkind ind ooff H erefords ffor or the the Herefords ccommercial ommercial man. man. SSummerour ummerour Ranch Ranch ccattle attle hhave ave been been on on the the ttop op or or iinn tthe he top top tthree hree aatt tthe he FFort ort Worth Worth ccommercial ommercial ssale ale and and tthe he San San AAntonio ntonio rrange ange bbull ull sale sale ffor or years. years.

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 Visitors Always Welcome

24

OCTOBER 2012


Farm Credit of N.M. announces its focus on drought arm Credit of New Mexico (FCNM), announced in mid September that it is committed to support its customerowners and the agricultural community who are impacted by the 2012 drought. “The impacts of drought have been felt across the country, including in the state of New Mexico. We are committed to supporting our customer-owners at a time of significant challenge for agriculture,” said Al Porter, FCNM’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “While our customers are accustom to dealing with weather related volatility, we believe we must be aware of the issues that drought creates and focus on helping customers manage the impacts of this historic drought.”

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Porter said “Our customers should know that the FCNM is prepared to help them through this difficult period so they can continue to grow and be successful over the long term.” CoBank and the nation’s three other Farm Credit banks issued a joint statement on the drought. The banks said that, “despite the challenges presented by the drought, the Farm Credit System remains well positioned to meet the financial needs of the farmers, ranchers, cooperatives and other rural borrowers.” Also, CoBank, FCNM’s funding bank, announced it will contribute $1 million to Feeding America, the nation’s leading hunger relief charity. The funds will be designated to support programs in areas of the country where the bank and its affiliated associations have significant operations.

“One of the unfortunate side effects of the drought has been the growing concern over increasing prices for a variety of food products at a time when unemployment remains stubbornly high,” said Bob Engel, CoBank President and Chief Executive Officer. “We want to do our part to alleviate the downside effects of a weak economic recovery coupled with potentially higher food prices, particularly on the poor. We’re pleased to be able to underwrite Feeding America with this contribution and support their work on behalf of needy people across the country.” “Across the U.S., more than 50 million people face hunger, and rising food prices threaten to make it even harder for them to put food on the table,” said Matt Knott, Interim President and CEO of Feeding ■ America.

The Clovis Livestock Auction READY E TO SERV YOU!

CHARLIE ROGERS 575/762-4422

Marketing Team

RYAN FIGG 575/760-9301

WAYNE DENDY 575/799-4798

STEVE FRISKUP 806/786-7539

RUSTIN ROWLEY 575/760-6164

WAYNE KINMAN 575/760-3173

For weekend hauling permits, call 575/762-4422 or 575/760-9300 or any market representative

l l a C ay!CLA Tod

Horse Sales: NOVEMBER 17-18

Cattle Sale every Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. Holstein Steer Special 1st Wednesday of the month during Cattle Sale VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT

www.clovislivestockhorsesale.com 575/762-4422 OCTOBER 2012

25


Coming C oom miiin m ng n g Aga Ag aiiin n Again nnd d 22 2AAnnual 2 nnual

Roswell R oswell Brangus B rangus Bull B ull & Female Female Sale S ale

REGISTERED BULLS & FEMALES AVAILABLE HORNED & POLLED

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Registered Registered & Commercial Commercial Brangus Brangus Bulls Bulls and and FFemales emales

DARIC D ARIC & PATTY PATTY K KNIGHT NIGHT SPRINGERVILLE, AZ 928/333-3600 • CELL 928-521-9897

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Bringing B ringing yyou ou tth the he “B “ Be essstt o off the tth he Best” Be esssttt” ” “Best iin nB rra an a ngu uss! Brangus!

Sat., at., Feebruary bruarryy 23, 23, 2013 20 13 Rooswell swell L Livestock ivestock A uction, Auction, Rooswell, swell, N New ew M Mexico exico ACCEPTING CCEPTING FE EMALE MALE BRANGUS RANGUS AND AND FE EMALE MA LE BRRANGUS ANGUS--IIN NFLUENCED FLUENCED COONSIGNMENTS NSIGNMENTS For F or iinformation nformation contact: contact: Gayland Townsend Townsend Gayland Cell. 580/443-5777 or or 580/380-1606 580/380-1606 Cell. 580/443-5777 Troy Floyd Floyd 575/734-7005 575/734-7005 Troy Lack-Morrison 575/267-1016 575/267-1016 / 760-7263 760-7263 Lack-Morrison Larry Parker Parker 520/845-2411 520/845-2411 Larry

Manufacturers of a complete line of Livestock Feeds. All feeds priced Mill to Feeder.

Garcia Costilla

Rio Grande

285

522

ada

Questa

Tierra Amarilla

Tres Piedras Canon Plaza

Cebolla

Rio

84

Cha ma

Abiquiu Res.

Santa Clara Pueblo

Los Alamos

Los Alamos

doval

Alcalde

Agua Fria

ran de

Rio G

Rio Pu o erc

Bernalillo

Placitas 14 Sandia Pueblo Corrales Sandia Heights North Valley Sandia Park

Paradise Hills

Tijeras

Cowles Tesuque

Tererro

Glorieta

Eldorado at Santa Fe

Escabosa

Chilili

Las Vegas

419

Sanchez

Trujillo

Gallin as R.

104

Dilia

Dahlia

Newkirk Cuervo

Colonias

Santa Rosa

Moriarty

Clines Corners

219

Guadalupe

Pastura

Torrance

84 54

Lucy

Negra Pedernal

Silio

Encino Carnero

3

Abo

42

Vaughn

L. Sumner

Cardenas

Joffre

Buchanan

Debaca

Largo Yeso Ricard

55

Torrance Gran Quivira

Corona

285

Ramon

Gallinas

FEED MILLS 26

OCTOBER 2012

Conchas L. Conchas

McIntosh

41

Broncho Mountainair 60

Bell Ranch Trementina

Corazon

84

Anton Chico

Estancia Willard

Mosquero Sabinoso

104

Ribera Sena Villanueva

285

41

Solano

Mora R.

San Miguel

Santa Ana

Stanley

Valmora Watrous

Onava

Romeroville

Santa Fe

55

Scholle

161

San Jose Serafina

120

Harding

120

.

55

s Trujillos

ker

518

Sapello

El Porvenir

Ilfeld

Mills 39

Edgewood

Adelino

47

Levy

Mora

Optimo

San Ignacio

Ya

Wagon Mound Roy

120

Ojo Feliz

La Cueva

Pecos

Canoncito Lamy Rowe

40

Bosque Farms Isleta Pueblo Peralta Los Lunas Valencia Meadow Lake aves Tome

442

25

Gascon

Cerrillos

337

47

Holman Lucero

Ocate

os R Pec

Pajarito Bernalillo Isleta

518

25

Albuquerque

Armijo South Valley

Abbott

Guadalupita

Santa Fe

La Cienega

Zia Pueblo Santo Domingo Pueblo Domingo 44 San Felipe Pueblo Santa Ana Pueblo Madrid Algodones

Rio Rancho

Nambe

Tesuque Pueblo

White Rock

Ponderosa Jemez Pueblo Cochiti Pena Blanca San Ysidro

Springer

Miami

Colmor

Cleveland Mora

Cuyamungue

4

Jemez Springs

French

518

Truchas Espanola Chimayo Santa Cruz

San Ildefonso Pueblo

Angel Fire

Ranchos de Taos

68

Vadito Dixon Chamisal Penasco Ojo Sarco

68

Cimarron

64

75

Embudo

San Juan Pueblo

Cuba

Taos Pueblo

Carson

567

Eagle Nest

Maxwell

dian R. Cana

La Jara

44

Taos

La Madera 554

Pilar

Youngsville Canones Coyote

96

El Rito

Abiquiu Medanales

96

We deliver sacked & bulk range cubes.

Colfax

Ute Park 58

El Prado

H

38

Taos Ski Valley Valdez

Arroyo Hondo

Canjilon

Koehler

Red River

Taos

522

San Cristobal

111

Alire

Colf

Palomas Montoya

…isn’t it time you talked to Farmway?


Mesalands Rodeo Team Member New World Champion ailey Bates, 19, a member of the Mesalands Community College Rodeo Team, was recently crowned the 2012 International Indian World Champion Breakaway Roper at the 8th Annual International Indian Finals Rodeo (IIFR). The rodeo was part of the New Mexico State Fair held September in Albuquerque. This is Bates second year to compete at the IIFR on behalf of the All Indian Rodeo Cowboys Association. Bates said she has been a part of this Association all of her life. “I’ve grown up with it. My Grandpa was one of the founders of the organization when it first started. It’s always been part of my family and I’ve been committed to rodeo because of this organization,” Bates said. “It felt awesome that all of my hard work paid off and that I finally got my consistency down in one weekend. It’s just a self confidence booster.” The top 15 qualifiers in each of the five Affiliate Associations of Canada and the United States, compete at the IIFR. According to their website, the goal of the IIFR is to offer the next generation of the Indian rodeo competitors a place to compete and showcase their talents in a professional rodeo arena. Bates said she has been competing in rodeo competitions for the past 10 years in breakaway roping and team roping. She said her brother, Michael, had a major influence on her choosing to attend Mesalands and compete on the Rodeo Team. Michael was a former member of the Mesalands Rodeo Team and performed very well, qualifying for the 2008 College National Finals Rodeo (CNFR) and was a 2008 Academic All-American. Bates is starting her second year on the Mesalands Rodeo Team and is majoring in Liberal Arts. In July Bates competed at the 2012 CNFR in Casper, WY and finished 13th in the nation in breakaway roping. She also contributed to the Women’s Team finishing 4th in the nation and second in the Grand Canyon Region. Bates was also a 2012 Academic All-American recipient. “We are very proud to have Bailey at Mesalands,” Dr. Mildred Lovato, President of Mesalands said. “She has not only performed well in rodeo, but she is also an exemplary student. Congratulations Bailey! We look forward to seeing what you ■ achieve in the future.”

B

Bailey Bates: 2012 Int’l Indian World Champion Breakaway Roper

OCTOBER 2012

27


Greetings CowBelles, ctober already, and as the year winds down I want to explore the importance of the beef checkoff for producers, consumers, and promoters. In other words, its’ important to almost everyone. The beef checkoff is funded by producers to increase beef demand. The $1 per head is collected on all cattle sold and is used for producer directed promotion, research and information. New Mexico CowBelles promote beef and the beef industry every day. We do this with school programs, ranch tours, and grocery store demonstrations. We participate in the National Beef Cookoff and the Beef Booth at the NM State Fair. Both of these activities provide us an opportunity to interact one-on-one with consumers, educating them on the benefits of beef, sampling beef and demonstrating convenient, healthy beef meals.

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Programs funded by beef checkoff dollars: ■ We hold a state Beef Ambassador Contest each year and send our winners on to the National contest. This is a competitive youth public speaking program for the beef industry. It promotes the beef industry and development of leadership skills in youth. The National Beef Ambassador Program spotlights the positive impact the cattle industry has on our economy and families. This program is funded in part by beef checkoff dollars. ■ We give out information and recipes at our county fairs and health fairs. We share the twenty-nine lean cuts of beef, the My Plate dietary guidelines, the alternative U.S. beef cuts that include tri-tip and flat iron. We give the public information about the BOLD study which shows that lean beef can be good for heart health by lowering LDL cholesterol. We have data that shows that fresh beef is the number one source of protein, vitamin B-12 and zinc in the American diet. Changes in cattle breeding and fat trimming methods have resulted in increased availability of leaner beef. Today, more than two-thirds of beef sold at retail meet the government guidelines for lean. This information and research funded by beef checkoff dollars.

H N121016 | 320+/320+/- acre HN121016 acre Former Former Dairy Dairy M uleshoe, TX TX (13 mi west of Muleshoe) Muleshoe,

Lender owned Cow capacity of the dairy was 3,500 head • 810 heifer lockups • Irrigation wells • Hospital barn and Commodity barn • Scales • •

October 16th at 11am CT held on LLocation: ocation: h eld o n site site Tranzon Hanley Hanley | Fiske Fiske Hanley Hanley IIII, Tranzon II, TTX X Lic Lic ##11740 11740 | 10% 10% B BPP

TTRANZON.COM RANZON.COM 28

OCTOBER 2012

800-377-0213 080-377-0213

DATES TO REMEMBER Oct. 1 – Membership Drive begins Oct. 15 – CowBelle of the Year Nominations Due Nov. 15 – Annual Reports due to President-Elect (50 copies) Volunteer Time Sheets due to President Dec. 6-9 – Joint Stockmen’s Meeting, NMCB Board of Directors & General Membership Meeting, Albuquerque Marriott Pyramid North Dec. 7 – NM CowBelles Board of Directors Meeting Dec. 8 – NM CowBelles General Membership/Awards/Officer Installation ■ Last month the Beef Checkoff presented a Beef Story Webinar for consumers. This webinar provided an opportunity to learn more about beef nutrition, choices, safety, cattle care, and environmental impacts of beef. They also held a Heart Healthy Beef Twitter Party with information about BOLD. All of these programs and the information we hand out are funded by checkoff dollars. Take a look at your grocer’s meat department and you will see some good

continued on page 29


Jingle Jangle

continued from page 28

news about beef – nutrition facts on the package or a nearby poster. The beef industry is proud to be a leader in providing consumers with beef nutrition information. Checkoff funded research proves that a nutrition labeling program increases consumer loyalty and meat sales. Next time you prepare a Beef Cook off winning recipe, see the NM Beef Ambassador at an event, share with a friend or neighbor information about the BOLD research, give a demonstration at your local grocery store, or talk to the public at the State Fair remember that it was all because of the Beef Checkoff! – Beverly Butler, NMCB President The September 6 meeting of the Chamiza CowBelles was called to order by President Gloria Petersen at the Elephant Butte’s Ivory Tusk Restaurant with 13 members present. Minutes from the previous meeting were read and approved with one correction. The reason for charging group for a vendor booth at the Elephant Butte Days after this year is because other vendors felt they shouldn’t have to pay if CowBelles didn’t. However, no one is available to work this year’s Elephant Butte

days, so the event is moot. Dolores gave the treasurer’s report and it was also approved. Michelle Shivers sent a transcript of her classes for this semester so Dolores was instructed to send the $500 scholarship check to NMSU. The bill for fair booth ($25) was sent to Jodell which she paid and will be reimbursed for. Jodell reported that there is a possibility that group will not be supplied with a table this year. Gloria volunteered to work all three days of the fair if other people would set up and take down the booth. Jodell, Susan, and Cathy volunteered to set up the booth and agreed to meet at the fairgrounds at 10 a.m. on Thursday, October 11. Myra and Mel Tepper donated a large afghan for the Cowbelles to use as a raffle item. Several people turned in beef raffle ticket money and lots of Bullocks’ receipts. Thank you! There will be no meeting in October because of the County Fair. Submitted by Cathy Pierce With nine members present, Lariat CowBelles met Sept. 5, at the Rabbit Ears Café. A thank you card was received from Lyn Greene for Lariat’s donation to help with the agriculture insert in the Albuquerque Journal – “A Centennial Celebration of NM Agriculture.” A thank you card

was received from the Kimsey family for the donation to the Pat Nowlin Memorial Scholarship Fund in memory of their son, David. A card of acknowledgement was received from Anne Ferguson for the memorial donation to the Pat Nowlin Memorial Scholarship Fund. The 4th of July pie sale was successful. Lyndi Owensby, daughter of Raymond and Kathy Owensby of Folsom, NM, is the 2012 winner of the Lariat Scholarship. Lyndi is a graduate of Des Moines High School and a junior at New Mexico State University, majoring in Animal Science. Mia Encinias won Mini Beef Showmanship at the Union County Fair. She received an engraved halter from Lariat CowBelles. The Mid-Year Board Meeting at Ruidoso was discussed. Jeff Witte was this year’s Man of the Year. The July meeting of ANCW in Denver was discussed. Kathryn Malcolm-Callis was recognized as 2012 Promoter of the Year. The presentation Serve Safe was given that describes the Food Safety process that should be followed before serving food from home, concession stands, etc. ANCW membership has diminished. They are considering changing their logo. The 2012 Educator of the Year was received by a Calcontinued on page 30

YAVAPAI BOTTLE GAS

928-776-9007 Toll Free: 877-928-8885 2150 N. Concord Dr. #B Dewey, AZ 86327

Visit us at: www.yavapaigas.com dc@yavapaigas.com

YAVAPAI COUNTY'S OLDEST LOCALLY OWNED PROPANE COMPANY SAME OWNER SAME VALUES SINCE 1987 "START WITH THE BEST - STAY WITH THE BEST"

OCTOBER 2012

29


Jingle Jangle

continued from page 29

ifornia ANCW member. October dues for CowBelles should be paid on or before the October meeting. This year’s timesheets are due then also. Lariats will hostess the Extension meeting in Clayton on October 9, 10, and 11. Election of Lariat officers for Vice-President and Secretary are due by the November meeting. The terms are two years each. An article was circulated from Beef magazine “Addressing the Emotion of Animal Welfare.” The Annual 5 States Round-Up will be held September 26, at the Clayton Air Park. This year’s theme is Advocacy in Agriculture. Speakers will be Polly Rhuland from Cattlemen’s Beef Board; Tammi Didlot, President of ANCW and Oklahoma Cattlewomen; Dalene Hodnett, New Mexico CowBelles Secretary and Director of Communications and Media Relations, New Mexico Farm and Livestock Bureau; and Marianne Rose, Masters of Beef Advocacy Alumnus, New Mexico CowBelles Historian and Lariat CowBelles Reporter and Historian. There will be a continental breakfast, a barbecue beef luncheon by Burt Ancell, a style show by Espy’s/3 West, a silent auction, and door prizes. Vendors will be Espy’s/3 West, Glad-

stone Mercantile, Mary’s Flowers, Stanley Home Products, and Mary Coffman. Booths may be set up on Tuesday, October 25 starting at 1:30 p.m. and must be in place by 8 a.m. October 26. Grab bag items in stapled paper bags and silent auction items must be at the air park by 2 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25; group needs 11 white twin bed flat sheets for curtains and set up help for 1:30 p.m. at the air park on that Tuesday. The next regular meeting of Lariat CowBelles, after the 5 States Round-Up, will be Wednesday, October 17, at Rabbit Ears Café. Respectfully submitted, Marianne Rose The Otero CowBelles had their Sept. meeting in Tularosa with Tena Beanblossom hosting with four guests, Ellen Jessen, Joe Ben Sanders, Debbie Lewis, and Shawna Hillebrand in attendance. Joe Ben Sanders, local historian gave a talk on the early days of Otero County; he has written several books about the area and was an interesting speaker. Shawna became the first new member for 2013. Welcome, it is so very nice to have young women become Otero CowBelles and want to work for the betterment of the BEEF industry. Otero County will have a county display booth at the State Fair this year as

a hard working group of CowBelles and others have gotten together to make the display and President Rupe and Estelle Bond will set up the display on the 11th and then help Madalynn Lee with the Beef Council booth on the 12th and 13th. The Otero CowBelles will donate a book to the library in Dell City in memory of deceased member, Virginia Brownfield. We will participate with the county extension clubs when they have their annual meeting October 20 by having a table there to showcase beef information. Work is continuing on health fairs, etc. The annual bazaar, to benefit the Boys’ and Girls’ Ranches will be held at Roma Duncan’s home in Tularosa November 1. Members are encouraged to bring at least two homemade (if possible) items to be auctioned off and to bring guests. Several members are making plans to attend the 5-States meeting in Clayton Sept. 26. It is always an informative and fun meeting. Submitted by Barbara Wagner, sec. The Chuckwagon CowBelles met on Patriot’s Day, September 11, 2012, in Mountainair with 13 members, one 2-yearold member, and one guest present with Toni Barrow presiding. It was decided to continued on page 31

30

OCTOBER 2012


Jingle Jangle

continued from page 30

accept the minutes from the August meeting as mailed. The November meeting will be held on the FIRST Tuesday at Babbi’s house, which is Election Day. The group was reminded that September 18 and 19 are Chuckwagon’s State Fair days. The Pumpkin Patch in Rio Rancho on October 27 and 28 was mentioned, and Sharon King, NMCB President-elect, would very much appreciate any help with this booth. Vera Gibson announced the 4-H fundraiser on October 20. She would like for CowBelles to come and distribute information to the public. It will take place at the Ag Science Center in Los Lunas from 11:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. The Christmas party is slated to be at Tierra del Sol in Belen and the October meeting will be at the Shaffer Hotel in Mountainair. The group decided to donate $50 to the Mountainair Friends of the NRA. Phyllis Hawley then introduced Berta Espinosa-Moore with the Torrance County Project Office (TCPO). Berta gave a program on the Home Visitation program at the Torrance County Project Office. She said she visits families to inform them about infant mental health and about programs and resources available to them. She

emphasized the poverty in the Estancia area and said that her office accepts diapers, formula, and toy donations. Marilyn Mignery gave a brief history on the creation of the TCPO. She said it was conceived by the Extension Office to bring communication between the agencies. Berta said that the Home Visitation Program is about keeping the family healthy. There was discussion about the program serving undocumented or illegal aliens. There was also discussion about the need for this kind of program. There was discussion about young prison inmates who are pregnant and how this project can assist them. Respectfully submitted by Babbi Baker The Powderhorn CowBelles met south of Newkirk in September. Mike Kull, President of The Ranches, gave an update on the ranch. He and his wife Nikki, have been with the Ranch for 42 years. He stated that the New Mexico CowBelles were supporters when the Ranch was started in 1944; they were there in 1952 when they almost declared bankruptcy because the founder was killed in a plane crash, and they have remained staunch supporters through all the years since. He expressed his deep appreciation. The present economy has affected The Ranches.

The Department of Animal & Range Sciences is part of the College of Agricultural, Consumer & Environmental Sciences

,1. ,+ #!*-1/ !+(*!) &!#()(0(%/ ',1/% Students can major in Animal or Rangeland Resources and are provided with the very best of “hands on” academic instruction by our faculty. Fully equipped labs allow students access to cutting-edge research in: LIVESTOCK NUTRITION / GENETICS / PHYSIOLOGY / ENDOCRINOLOGY / MEAT SCIENCE / WOOL / TOXICOLOGY / WATERSHED & RANGELAND ECOLOGY / WEED & BRUSH CONTROL / PLANT SYSTEMATICS / GRAZING MANAGEMENT

The Department also offers preveterinary studies – our graduates have a high acceptance rate into veterinary medicine programs. We offer graduate degrees at the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy levels. The M.S. or Ph.D. in Animal Science can emphasize nutrition or physiology, and offers a Ph.D. in Range Science to study range management, range ecology and watershed management.

The Chihuahuan Desert Rangeland Research Center (The College Ranch) – 64,000 acre ranch just outside of Las Cruces The Corona Range & Livestock Research Center – 28,000 acre ranch & facilities in Corona, NM Student organizations, including a Block & Bridle Club, Pre-Vet Club, Range Club, Horsemen’s Association, Therapeutic Riding Club, & Judging Teams

. ,'+ !*-"%)) 2 . (* ,// 2 '00- !#%/ +*/1 %$1 !#!$%*(#/ !+./

They accept no government money, depend on the generosity of individuals and many organizations and businesses. They are impacted by the cost of myriad regulations, state and national. The closing of Girls’ Ranch in 2008 saved a million dollars a year and the sale of the Pippin Ranch in Clovis allowed the purchase of property and establishment of the newest program, Mountain View Ranch. They are in good financial shape, but their aim is to increase the efficiency of the operation and establish reliability for the long haul. At present they are in the process of developing 380 acres within the ranch boundaries for agricultural use and are fortunate to have a donor for this. The aim is to become as self-sufficient as possible and be able to withstand hard times which may be in the future. The boys and girls have been living together for two years and are as normal as any family. The school is self-contained and very successful. Mike said that a common misconception is that the children are juvenile delinquents, when the truth is that almost all are victims of a family in crisis. A good example is Mike Romero, Mary’s husband, who is at present the Chairman of the Board of Directors of The Ranches. At one time in the 60s he lived at the Ranch. Mike told us that he was the oldest of five children. He was twelve when his mother became very ill and he and a younger brother entered the ranch, later followed by the other three children. They were there until he was sixteen and they were able to be reunited with their mother. The ranch was much smaller then, about 50 boys, and they lived in three buildings, elementary, junior high and high school. In many ways it was primitive compared to now, but he remembers the loving care and guidance they received. During the business meeting, Powderhorn decided to participate in Winterfest this year, Karen Kelling, Sandy McKenna, Nancy Schade and Ellen Vaughan were appointed as a committee to work out details and report back to the members. Four members are planning to attend 5-States. The October meeting will be held at Abby Hofman’s home for the meeting and lunch and then will tour Mesa College in Tucumcari. Sandy McKenna had baked a delicious birthday cake with one candle for Dorothy Vaughan to blow out as group sang “Happy Birthday”. Dorothy Vaughan, Secretary New Mexico CowBelles: Thank you to all who have submitted their news to “Jingle Jangle”. Please send minutes and/or newsletters to: Jingle Jangle, Janet Witte, 1860 Foxboro Ct., Las Cruces, NM 88007 or email: janetwitte@msn.com the 14th of each month. OCTOBER 2012

31


NEW MEXICO

Federal

Lands News

T

he Hage case has been one of the most closely followed by federal land ranchers over the last several years. It involved Nevada rancher Wayne Hage’s dispute with the Forest Service and BLM that ended with their taking of his private property rights to water, grazing and improvements associated with them. The Federal Court of Claims upheld the property rights and awarded the Hage Estate $14.2 million in damages and interest. As Frank reported last month, the feds appealed, and a three-judge panel vacated the damage award. As legal experts have reviewed the ruling it appears that it was not a complete loss because it did not overturn the recognition of property rights. The Hage’s have reportedly requested an en banc hearing before the full 13judge panel of the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The hope is that the full panel will

be more objective than the three who vacated the original Claims Court damage award. In a parallel case, Reno Federal District Court Judge Robert C. Jones found BLM and Forest Service administrators to be in contempt of court and ordered them to personally pay $33,000 in damages should the government not compensate the Hage’s and third parties involved. In addition Judge Jones found Forest Service Region 4 Director Harv Forsgren to be lying to the court and Nevada FS head Jean Higgins to be less than truthful. After those findings were announced several others slated to testify declined to do so. Before transferring to Region 4 in 2007, Forsgren served as FS Region 3 Director in Albuquerque over forests in Arizona and New Mexico. Judge Jones says his full opinion will be published by early

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October. The insanity of the Endangered Species Act continues. The US Fish and Wildlife Service has announced plans to declare 838,232 acres as Jaguar critical habitat. Environmentalists want several times as much which is no surprise. There have been Jaguar sightings in extreme southeastern Arizona and the boot heel of New Mexico over the years. A Scientific American article quotes Jaguar experts who say the cat’s real habitat starts miles south of the border in Mexico and continues into Central and South America. They say the designation is a waste of resources that could be better used conserving Jaguar habitat south of the border. If approved, critical habitat designation will give the Center for Biological Diversity another avenue to push for land use restrictions and collect from lawsuits. That has also been the enviros pattern and practice with the wolf reintroduction. There are several suits either pending or threatened over northern gray wolves. WildEarth Guardians latest nuisance suit has cost New Mexico over $200,000 in legal fees defending the NM Department of Game and Fish authority to regulate trapping in the Mexican wolf recovery area. The administration recently announced plans to fast track development of solar and wind energy across the west on Defense Department and BLM lands. The Defense Department is expected to contribute 16 million acres to such projects. One of the largest is a Wyoming wind farm that will cover 220,000 acres. That is a mind boggling 350 sections of windmills. The next largest project is a 75-section wind farm in Arizona. There are several large solar projects proposed for California most of which pose serious conflicts for environmentalists. Solar farms are green energy but they aren’t environmentally friendly. These will destroy endangered desert tortoise habitat that was used to stop grazing in California’s deserts. This is another opportunity for green groups to demonstrate their hypocrisy by lack of opposition to these boondoggles to protect continued on page 33

32

OCTOBER 2012


NMFLC

continued from page 32

the tortoise they were so concerned about just a few short years ago. Ruidoso is facing water shortages as a result of this summer’s fires. Some of the community’s water supply comes from surface water. Since the fires the runoff in the streams and lakes is so full of ash and silt that it cannot be made safe to drink. Ultimately the damage to the watershed will even depress the recharge of groundwater aquifers. This has been one of the worst fire seasons ever across the West. Drought and an exceptionally hot summer had a lot to do with it but Federal mismanagement of our National Forests is largely responsible for the conditions that made them susceptible to so many huge, destructive wildfires. Although they will never admit it, the treehuggers and their lawyers are in large part responsible for the sorry condition of most of our National Forests. Environmental groups are skilled at producing PR campaigns that play to emotions and demonize their opponents. If you believe their propaganda you would think anyone who doesn’t agree with them wants our kids to breathe diesel smoke and drink muddy sewer water. In reality the smoke we were breathing this summer and the filthy water full of ash, silt and burnt logs in lakes and streams in New Mexico and across the western states is courtesy of these same groups and their supporters in Washington. Those of us who are involved in production agriculture either directly or indirectly as part of an associated industry or group have a closer relationship with our natural surroundings than the environmental activists who run these groups ever will. We know that gives us a better understanding of natural processes and what works and what doesn’t. We can’t afford the luxury of believing in fantasies when it comes to the environment. If it doesn’t rain we have to deal with reality of drought. If we don’t manage our forests, they will burn. If we turn large predators loose they will kill livestock and wildlife. We end up dealing with the results of stupid government policy. It is way past time for that to stop. Political parties treat their platforms like they are irrelevant if they are criticized and like governing documents if they happen to be popular. Either way at least they are an indication of party philosophy. Here are some excerpts from the Democrats: “We affirm the science of cli-

mate change, commit to significantly reducing the pollution that causes climate change, and know we have to meet this challenge by driving smart policies that lead to greater growth in clean energy generation and result in a range of economic and social benefits.” “We understand that global climate change may disproportionately affect the poor, and we are committed to environmental justice.” And from the Republicans: “Experience has shown that, in caring for the land and water, private ownership has been our best guarantee of conscientious stewardship, while the worst instances of environmen-

tal degradation have occurred under government control. By the same token, the most economically advanced countries – those that respect and protect private property rights – also have the strongest environmental protections, because their economic progress makes possible the conservation of natural resources.” You can decide which of those positions makes more sense. I don’t believe we have ever seen a statewide race with as much money spent on political ads by environmental groups continued on page 57

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OCTOBER 2012

33


Longhorn Show 2012

Proverbs 16-3

CATTLE SALE Every Thursday at 11 a.m. SPECIAL COW SALE Last Thursday of every month at 10 a.m. SPECIAL DAIRY HEIFER SALE 2nd Tuesday of every month at 11 a.m.

Texas Longhorn Grand Champion Trophy Steer was Rafter 2J, Austin, Texas, owned by Kenneth Metervier, Datil, New Mexico

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Goober JKW owned by Kristi Wilson, Capitan, New Mexico, was Texas Longhorn Reserve Grand Champion Trophy Steer

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Grand Champion Haltered Texas Longhorn Bull was Rafter 2J Braveheart owned by Double Bar S, Anthony, New Mexico

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OCTOBER 2012

Texas Longhorn breeders focus on the family, starting showmen at an early age!


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OCTOBER 2012

OCTOBER 2012

35


2012 Market Steer Show Judge Jeff Sargent, WHR Shorthorns, Texas

Reserve Grand and Champion Chianina Steer Morgan McCall, Santa Fe County

Grand and Crossbred Champion Steer Matthew Dylan Crane, San Juan County

36

Champion Angus Steer Any Gardner, Dona Ana County

Champion Charolais Steer John (Trey) Yates, Eddy County

Champion Shorthorn Steer Dylan Smyer, Luna County

Champion Limousin Steer Coby Valentine, Curry County

Champion Maine Anjou Steer Brad Casper, Valencia County

Champion Simmental Steer Sydney Gardner, Dona Ana County

Reserve Champion Angus Steer Ryan Miller, Grant County

Reserve Champion Charolais Steer Bradi Harral, Torrance County

Reserve Champion Shorthorn Steer Colton Law, Rio Arriba County

OOCCT TOOBBEERR 22001112


Reserve Champion Chianina Steer Sydney Gardner, Dona Ana County

Reserve Champion Limousin Steer Jonathan Beard, Dona Ana County

Reserve Champion Maine Anjou Steer Koby Cone, Roosevelt County

Reserve Champion Simmental Steer Megan Miller, Grant County

Koby Cone (r) was named Master Showman after winning Novice, Junior and Senior Showmanship Championships two times each. Pictured with Koby is Lisa Runyan presenting the Caviness Champion Showmanship traveling trophy.

Reserve Champion Crossbred Steer Caleb McCall, Santa Fe County

Congratulations ... to all the exhibitors, parents, grandparents, siblings, aunts, uncles & everyone else who made the livestock industry in New Mexico proud!

Champion Steer Showmanship: Novice Champion (seated left) Kindal K. Smith; standing (l to r, left) Lisa Runyan, 2nd place Cooper Autrey; 3rd place Megan Miller; Junior Champion (seated r) Kade Hopkins; standing right (l to r) 2nd place Baily Rhea Smith; 3rd place Aubrey Brandenberger; standing center (l to r) Senior Champion Koby Cone; 2nd place Ryan Montoya, 3rd place Mikaela (Kaly) Cone. O C T O B E R 2 0 1 21

37


BECAUSE WEANING SHOULDN’T BE STRESSFUL ON YOU.

Calf Scramble

Th There’ T her ere re’ re’ e’’s e’s s a CRY CRYS RY YST YST STA S TAL TA ALLY YX Y X® Ba Ba arrre rrrre re ell fo fforr Th That hat at. t

2012 Calf Scramble Champions (l to r) third place overall, and second place Scramble Showmanship Austin Powell, Valencia County; second place overall and third place in Scramble Showmanship Brina Riley, Torrance County; and overall Calf Scramble Champion Trenton Jones, Curry, County

Special Thanks To These SPONSORS Who Make The Calf Scramble Possible! Farm Credit of New Mexico / Express UU Bar Ranches / New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau / New Mexico Cattle Growers & NMCGA Jr. Association / 4-H Youth Development / Bureau of Land Management / Mike & Helen White / Ag New Mexico, PCA, ACA / Eddy County Farm Bureau / TO Ranch / Bell Ranch / Alisa Ogden / Bernalillo County Farm & Livestock Bureau / Lea County Farm & Livestock Bureau / Trina B. Sanchez Farm & Ranch / US New Mexico Federal Credit Union / New Mexico Jr. Livestock Foundation / Gila Livestock Growers Association / T & T Trailers

The ladies took the Junior Heifer Showman Championships. (l to r) Senior, Kay Love; Junior, Bailey Rhea Smith; and Novice Mia Encinias

38

OCTOBER 2012


2012 NMCGA Showmanship

New Mexico Junior Cattle Growers’ Showmanship Contest Winners(l to r) New Mexico Department of Agriculture Director/Secretary Jeff Witte; Novice Winner, Kindal Smith; Junior Winner Bailey Rhea Smith; Senior Winner John (Trey) Yates; Judge Brady Ragland; and Boe Lopez, NMCGA Young Cattlemen's Leadership Committee Chairman

D

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Dan or Daina Wade

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Champion "All Other Breeds" Bull was a Red Angus, Redman Majestic 625Y, shown by Jessica Lewis, Gilbert, Arizona

GIVE RONNIE OR LARRY A CALL TODAY! Champion "All Other Breeds" Female was KR Miss 3151 LT Easy Pro owned by Jordan and Abby Spindle, Stanley, New Mexico and shown by Abby Spindle.

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Reserve Champion "All Other Breeds" Female was LGCC Boardwalk 12Y, shown by Mia Encinias, Clayton, New Mexico

RONNIE TINDELL P.O. Box 100 • Rincon, NM 87940 575/267-5000

RINCON

OCTOBER 2012

39


New Mexico Bred & Raised Steer Show We want to th a everyone who nk made a monetary don a donated supp tion, lies, gave their time or helped in any way to p ut on this show.

Grand Champion New Mexico Bred & Raised Steer was shown by Derek Cosper and bred by Jerald Cosper. Pictured with Cosper are (l to r) Michelle Frost, New Mexico Cattle Growers' Association; New Mexico Department of Agriculture Director/Secretary Jeff Witte and Judge Brady Ragland, Lubbock, Texas

New Mexico Bred & Raised Steer Show Sponsors Banner Sponsors: New Mexico Department of Agriculture Hi Pro Feeds New Mexico Cattle Growers Pfizer Animal Health Duncan Livestock Runyan Cattle C & J Traders Bradley Supply T & M Fuels Bruhn Enterprises Gold Sponsors: Barham Family Ranch Copper Cowbells Farmway Feed & Equipment Farm Credit Services Jim & Ben Doherty Purina Mills-Gary Creighton Double J Cattle-John & Janet Griffiths Tiffany Dowell & Denton Dowell TS Show Steers - Truman Smith Donors: Corky & Cathy Fernandez LC Maines Lane & Cheryl Grau MWI Veterinary Supply Diamond Arrow Ranch - Boe Lopez Donations in Memory of: Johnny Paiz given by Storm & Darlene Gerhart 40

OCTOBER 2012

Reserve Grand Champion New Mexico Bred & Raised Steer was shown by Mikaela Cone and was bred by Mike Cone. Pictured with Cone are (l to r) Michelle Frost, New Mexico Cattle Growers' Association; New Mexico Department of Agriculture Director/Secretary Jeff Witte and Judge Brady Ragland, Lubbock, Texas

New Mexico Bred & Raised Steer Show Results Class / Place / Exhibitor / Breeder Class 1: 1. Madison Smith / Jim & Ben Doherty, 2. Brannon Mobley Duncan / LivestockJim,Ty, & Kyle Duncan 3. Ryan Montoya / Jim & Ben Doherty 4. Ryan Miller / Duncan Livestock – Jim,Ty, & Kyle Duncan 5. Aleahna Branch / Denton & Tiffany Dowell 6. Colton Law / Copeland & Sons LLC 7. Tanner Caldwell / Phillip Anderson 8. Kristin Sloan / Metzger Maines & Show Steers Class 2: 1. Travis Metzger / Metzger Maines & Show Steers 2. Trey Yates / Runyan Show Steers 3. Kindal Smith / Ute Creek LivestockWes & Jackie Smith 4. Annalies Mobley / Denton & Tiffany Dowell 5. Shooter Hill / TS Show Steers 6. Aleahna Branch / Double J – John & Janet Griffiths 7. Kristin Grau / Grau Ranch – Lane Grau Class 3: 1. Mikaela Cone / Mike Cone 2. Brad Cosper / Shane Lutrick Show Cattle

3. Brendon Lockmiller / Copeland & Sons LLC 4. Savannah Kircher / Storm Gerhart 5. Treyson Runyan / Jim & Ben Doherty 6. Clell Bays / Drummond Livestock – Tracy Drummond 7. Maria Stout / Lowery Show Steers Class 4: 1. Tayler Fraze / Runyan Cattle 2. Tayler Fraze / Duncan Livestock-Jim,Ty, & Kyle Duncan 3. Kaitlin Grau / Grau Ranch – Lane Grau 4. Treyson Runyan / Jim & Ben Doherty 5. Paige Hunter / Copeland & Sons LLC 6. Makayla Richardson / Gary Hathorn 7. Kodi Cox / Leslie Pugmire Class 5: 1. Derek Cosper / Jerald Cosper 2. Jordan Spindle / Spindle Show Steers 3. Dylan Valentine / Brett Valentine 4. Brina Riley / Metzger Maines & Show Steers 5. Chantry Borden / Blackburn Farms 6. Tristan Chavez / TS Show Steers 7. Jared Garcia / Metzger Maines & Show Steers


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OCTOBER 2012

41


2012 NMSF Judging Contest Winners (A) Novice Winners: Rayna Fite, Shawn Agar, Megan Miller, Sydney Fite picture 183 – Novice Winner

A.

(B) Junior Winners: Back Row - Micah Crist, Wade Cauzza, Conner Cox, Zoe Walker, & Chantry Borden Front Row - Sayer Shape, Abby Spindle, Daniel Lujan, Ryan Miller

B.

(C) Senior Winners: Back Row – Tori Null, Sage Ward, Daniel McCauley, Ralf LeSueur, Zack McCauley, Ky Drummond Front Row – Lynnae Allen, Jasi Roberts, Delaney Hanagan, Kelsey Cartwright (D) Novice Winner: Layton Allen High Point Reasons Winner: Daniel McCauley (not pictured)

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2012 Angus Show

Champion New Mexico Angus Bull was BRR My Design 1380 owned by Carl Whitney, Bull Run Ranch, Datil, New Mexico

New Mexico Champion Heifer was BRR Sugar 2777 owned by Carl Whitney, Bull Run Ranch, Datil, New Mexico

Grand Champion Angus Bull was Aztec Moose 4 shown by Terry Van Hilsen, Gilbert, Arizona

Cooper Hall, Artesia, New Mexico exhibited the Grand Champion Angus Heifer A&B Stacy 1415 AAA

Available in 6', 8' 9', 10', 11', 12' 13' Lane Thompson • 806/662-5937 email: redmud@wildblue.net

Mia Encinias, Clayton, New Mexico, owned the Reserve Grand Champion Angus Heifer Mia's Pride-301 de la Gloria

FFIVE IVE ST STA STATES ATES Box 2266, Box 66, Clayton, Clayton, NM NM 88415 88415 SALE SALE BARN BARN 575/374-2505 575/374-2505 Manager, KKenny enny Dellinger, Dellinger, M anager, 5575/374-7761 75/374-7761 Watts W atts Line Line 11-800/438-5764 -800/438-5764

LLIVESTOCK IVESTOCK AUCTION AUCTION

A ctive bbuyers uyers oonn aall ll cclasses lasses of of cattle. cattle. Active SStocker tocker ddemand emand within within excellent excellent w heat wheat ppasture grass ddemand. asture and and grass emand. SSupporters upporters of of of your your cchoice. hoice. FFour our vaccination program program of vaccination supported by by area area aactive ctive ppacker acker bbuyers, uyers, supported feedlots oonn these these feeder feeder ccattle. attle. Receiving Receiving feedlots station aavailable. vailable. station SSheep heep sale sale 2nd 2nd ttoo last last Wednesday Wednesday every every month! month!

W WE EA APPRECIATE PPRECIATE YOUR YOUR BUSINESS! BUSINESS! www.fivestateslivestockauction.com w ww.fivestateslivestockauction.com Bull Run Ranch, Datil, New Mexico, exhibited the Reserve Grand Champion Angus Bull BRR Regal Dom 2738 OCTOBER 2012

43


My Cowboy Heroes

Bobbi Jeen “In the Beginning” OLSON here was Rodeo. It started as a contest between cowboys to see who was the best roper and rider. Soon it evolved into ranches competing against each other to see who had the best cowboys — much like a ranch rodeo of today. Before long, organized events were taking place in towns like Prescott, Arizona which claims to have the world’s oldest rodeo (started in 1888) and Payson, Arizona who argues they have the world’s oldest continuous rodeo (started in 1884). Then you have Pecos, Texas who claims the right to the world’s first rodeo (1883) but history tells us that William F. Cody (AKA Buffalo Bill) staged his first Wild West Show (which also had rodeo events) in 1882 at North Platte, Nebraska. But wait! There is more; Santa Fe, New Mexico also claims the first rodeo based on a letter dated 1847 written by Captain Mayne Reid from Santa Fe to a friend in Ireland: “At this time of year, the cowmen have what is called the round-up, when the calves are branded and the fat beasts selected to be driven to a fair hundreds of

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miles away. This round-up is a great time for the cowhand, a Donnybrook fair it is indeed. They contest with each other for the best roping and throwing, and there are horse races and whiskey and wines. At night in clear moonlight, there is dancing on the streets.” Many will argue exact historic dates of the sport, but none will doubt the birth of rodeo was a contest of the cowboy. In the early 1900s, rodeos were largely unorganized and scattered. The events as we know them today were mostly acts mixed in with wild west shows — which were more common at the time than a rodeo, as thought of in today’s terms. As a matter of fact, rodeos and wild west shows enjoyed a parallel existence in the early days and one was really not much different than the other (they even had a lot of the same stars and contestants). Many towns held annual “rodeos” but these shows were more commonly known as cowboy contests, stampedes, frontier days celebrations and of course, wild west shows. The term rodeo was not widely

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used until organization started to infiltrate the sport (in 1929). While rodeo had become a way of life for a select few in its earliest days, there was no standard to the event schedule, rules, judging, etc. You might have a steer roping sandwiched between an Indian relay race and a shooting exhibition. Then they might go on with saddle broncs and steer wrestling followed by the “chicken pull” and trick roping. It’s been said there were over a hundred different events or acts to choose from, including a unique event held each year at Chicago where mounted cowboys went to lake Michigan, were floated out on a barge, and were then forced off, having to swim their horses several hundred yards back to shore! The first one back was the winner. Buffalo Bill Cody obviously had the most recognizable wild west show, and his show was more act and less rodeo, but rodeos of the day were a lot more wild west show than you think of in terms of your typical rodeo today. These shows were very entertaining and popular with the crowds. However, cowboys competing in these performances were not thought of like a modern independent cowboy athlete is today. The organizers thought cowboys should be happy with cowboy wages and payouts for winning events were reflective of this mindset. At the time, cowboy wages were about a dollar per day ($30 a month). So if a cowboy could win (or was paid) that much, or sometimes even up to $100 for winning an event, he ought to be happy — and most were. Many cowboys from back in those days have been quoted as saying that winning a hundred dollars or so at a rodeo was more money than they had ever seen at one time in their whole life and that is what got them hooked on the shows. There were problems with this system however. Cowboys still had to pay an entrance fee, much like today, and the amount of fees paid by the contestants was not continued on page 45

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OCTOBER 2012


Heroes continued from page 44

reflected in the winning payout. Then there was the problem of each producer or town having their own ideas of how the show should be run and which events to include. There was little standard in judging the riding events and rules varied from place to place. Then there were always those few who worked the system to their advantage and sometimes winners were determined before the show even started! (Unofficially of course.) Accusations of bribes and crooked judges ran high. The rodeo cowboy became disgusted with this situation over time. It took a while, but he finally realized he was the star of the show; folks paid to see him perform, and he was not getting a fair share. There were thousands of dollars being made on some of the bigger shows from ticket sales and contestant entry fees, but only a few hundred would be paid back to the winners. This was fine for a few, but it was starvation for the overall lot. Just enough was being paid out to keep them coming back, with hopes it would be their turn to win the next show; kind of like dangling the proverbial carrot. All of this changed however in 1936. That was the year professional rodeo was born. Rodeo organization was actually started in the northern states in 1929 with the formation of the Rodeo Association of America (RAA). This association was made up of managers and producers and did not include the cowboy in decision making and therefore was often contentious, seldom recognized and eventually it was merged with the Cowboys Turtle Association (CTA). They called themselves “turtles” because they were slow to organize but eventually stuck their heads out. They were the first cowboys to have a say in how the show ran. In 1945, the Cowboys Turtle Association changed their name to the Rodeo Cowboys Association (RCA) and in 1975 it was changed to the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA). It was Boston Garden, 1936, and the cowboys were fed up with one Colonel William T. Johnson of Texas; promoter and organizer of major rodeos such as Madison Square Garden and the Boston show. While Johnson had a knack for producing spectacular shows and attendance was usually high, he refused to listen to the complaints of the cowboy. So they went on strike, demanded their entrance fees be added to the payout and that standard rules and judging be implemented. Johnson was livid and told the cowboys

to leave the grounds; he would put on a show without them. As they rode out of Boston Garden, a-horseback, the press was there taking pictures. The press sympathized with the cowboys and the public was soon on their side. That night Johnson attempted to put on the performance using stable hands, grooms and wild west performers. The cowboys sat in the audience and booed. It became such a spectacle, with a poor performance, that the audience joined the cowboys in their disapproval. The Boston committee told Johnson to stop the show and work with the cowboys. Johnson said, “I’ll drive my stock into the bay before I give in to their demands!” Cowboy Hugh Bennett, one of the strike organizers hollered, “We’ll sad-

dle up and help you!” Johnson eventually agreed to negotiate when the managers of the Garden told him to come to an agreement with the cowboys or he would be thrown out as well. Negotiations lasted throughout the night and into the next day, however, an agreement was finally reached. The seed of professional rodeo had been planted. There were sixty-one men who signed the original document which eventually led to the formation of the Cowboys Turtle Association that fateful day in Boston. Only one of those men remain alive at the time of this writing; he was a contestant at the Boston Garden show that October/November 1936. ■ More next month . . .

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CContact ontact CChris hris ttoday oday aatt 2243-9515 43-9515 eext. xt. 2288 oorr cchris@aaalivestock.com hris@aaalivestock.com OCTOBER 2012

45


2012 State Fair Honors Ag Families New Mexico Department of Agriculture Jeff Witte made the award presentation to the Sutherlands, assisted by Governor Susana Martinez

The Sutherlands 2012 Farm Family of the Year

The New Mexico State Fair has named New Mexico’s Farm Family of the Year for 2012: Allen and D’rese Sutherland of Sutherland Farms in the state’s Four Corners area. The Sutherlands own and operate a farm and onfarm retail store in the Animas River Valley north of Aztec. They grow and sell a variety of crops, including sweet corn and pumpkins. The green chile they grow is highlighted during the Animas River Green Chile Festival held every September on the farm. The Sutherlands are also involved in agri-tourism – that’s the idea that agriculturally-based operations and activities can bring visitors to a farm or ranch for learning and fun. Spring and fall field trips bring area schoolkids to Sutherland Farms. “Our mission is to promote agriculture to those who might not otherwise have a chance to experience it,” the Sutherlands said. Allen and D’rese are the perfect guides for such an experience. After growing up in farming and ranching families, they started farming on their own in the Estancia Valley in 1978. They relocated to the Animas River Valley in 1993. The Sutherlands’ son Bobby, daughter-in-law Shelley, daughter Amanda, and five grandchildren (Autumn, SteviRae, Dylan, Derek and Hallie) also work in the family business. Market manager Jeanne Sweet has been with the family for 14 years. Other family members and many friends volunteer their time and are an invaluable resource, according to the Sutherlands. 46

OCTOBER 2012

The family works with organizations to educate the community of the benefits of locally grown food and the importance of agricultural sustainability. The Sutherlands say that they get a lot of support from area residents, “which is why we’re able to do what we enjoy.” Jim McCauley’s 2012 Ranch Family of the Year

uring this New Mexico Centennial Year at a time when it seems our country is more divided than it has been since the 1860s, the significance of recognizing the importance of the traditions of agriculture and ranching and their families along with the part the State Fair plays in bridging rural and urban communities has never been more important. Their spirit of cooperation and community is something that the entire nation needs to embrace. The 2012 State Fair Ranch Family of the Year is one of those families who have been in the Southwest from its beginnings, with Jim McCauley family settling in Grant County in 1904. Connie Riggs McCauley family had come to Cochise County Arizona 25 years before that. These families helped feed other early settlers as well as the soldiers at Ft. Bowie while the Apaches were still considered dangerous. Four generations of the McCauley family attended the 2012 State Fair, with some of them selling animals in the sale. While ranching has been the focus of the McCauley family for generations, Jim served his country during World War II. Connie’s mother was a founding member of The Cowbelles and her father, John Stark served as president of the New Mexico Cattle Growers’

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Association in 1960 through ‘62. Things usually fall behind a bit on the ranch in September. The State Fair is on and there are animals to show and people to see, so the McCauley’s hit the road from Cliff to Albuquerque. Over the years Jim and Connie’s kids and grandkids have done everything from riding bulls and broncs and roping, to football, basketball, wrestling and Little League. The most enjoyment has come from 4-H and FFA. They have won state contests in livestock judging, wool judging and ag. mechanics. The first trip to the state fair was in the 1960s with two homegrown steers. A year or two later Joe showed the Reserve Grand Champion pig. The champion was shown by Howard McCall, and champion pair of pigs was shown by Congressman Steve Pearce. What a vacation for ranchers! Jim passed away in 2010. Today the family includes Connie, their five children, and a house full of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Caren Cowan, New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association, made the award presentation to the McCauley’s, assisted by Governor Susana Martinez and New Mexico Department of Agriculture Director/Secretary Jeff Witte.


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2012 Santa Gertrudis Show

Santa Gertrudis Best of Polled and Champion Heifer Calf was O/X Mia, show by Briana Montano, Las Vegas, New Mexico \

Grand Champion Santa Gertrudis Female was O/X Morgan and her calf O/X Mia, owned by Briana Montano, Las Vegas, New Mexico

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Reserve Grand Champion Santa Gertrudis Female was RDF Pay Day shown by Red Doc Farm, Belen, N.M.

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Grand Champion Santa Gertrudis Bull was Red Doc Muscle owned by Red Doc Farm, Belen

Red Doc Farm, Belen, New Mexico, exhibited the Reserve Grand Champion Bull, Red Doc Bar Light

2012 Rocky Mountain Santa Gertrudis Rancher of the Year was Warren Harris, Albuquerque

48

OCTOBER 2012


2012 Junior Heifer Show

Supreme Champion Junior Heifer and Champion Maine Anjou Heifer was Drummonds Kathryn owned by Ky Drummond, Reserve, New Mexico

Aubrey Brandenberger, Claunch, New Mexico, showed the Champion Angus Junior Heifer, JB Miss Marathon 117

Reserve Supreme Champion Junior Heifer and Reserve Champion Maine Anjou was Bentley shown by John (Trey) Yates, Artesia, New Mexico

Champion Hereford Junior Heifer was TRL Dominette Bridger YD59 exhibited by Wyatt Armstrong, Hagerman, New Mexico

KR Miss 3151 Lt Easypro 1104, owned by Abby Spindle, Stanley, New Mexico, was the Champion Charolais Champion Brahman Junior Heifer was Miss WCC Mucho 325 owned by Henry James, Lovington, New Mexico

Hayley Magness, Hobbs, New Mexico, exhibited the Champion Shorthorn Junior Heifer LSC Demi Belle

Champion Chianina Junior Heifer was LGCC Boardwalk 124 shown by Mia Encinias, Clayton, New Mexico

HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME!

HENARD RANCHES Champion "All Other Breeds" Heifer was shown by Brina Riley, Estancia, New Mexico

OSCAR 路 575/398-6155 BOX 975, TATUM, NEW MEXICO 88267 MRS. PAT 路 PLAINS, TX MRS. ROBERT 路 LOVINGTON, NM OCTOBER 2012

49


COMMITMENT. RESPONSIBILITY. SELF ESTEEM. ACCOMPLISHMENT. These are the values taught by the New Mexico Boys & Girls Ranches for 68 years. Every year, there are hundreds of children from troubled backgrounds that need our help. We provide the opportunity to see life as it can be. Because we do not accept government funding, we depend on the support of people like you. We need your help to do more.

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Keep the tradition of caring alive by giving today!

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Guiding Children, Uniting Families – Since 1944 New Mexico Boys and Girls Ranches, Inc. sP.O. Box 9, Belen, NM 87002 NEW MEXICO BOYS RANCH sNEW MEXICO GIRLS RANCH s0)00).YOUTH RANCH FAMILIES FOR CHILDREN s4(%NEW MEXICO FAMILY CONNECTION 50

OCTOBER 2012


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A. Madalynn Lee of Otero CowBelles. B. You’re never too young to learn the value of nutritional beef! C. Otero CowBelle Estelle Bond assists a fairgoer with her “Beef Trivia” quiz. D. The news about BOLD – Beef in an Optimum Lean Diet – is brightly displayed in the NM State Fair Beef Booth. E. Otero CowBelle President Debi Rupe informs fairgoers about beef. F. A northern New Mexico teacher shows the world her love of beef. G. While serving beef samples at the Beef Booth, NMBC representative Lana Schulte gets a surprise interview from KOB-TV 4 reporter Eddie Garcia.

D.

E.

F.

C.

OCTOBER 2012

51


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NM C Ce en nttte ennial Bran nd d Bo B oo o ok o k a Colle ecccttto orr’’s De D eligh htt

I

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2012 – 2013 D I R E C T O R S — CHAIRMAN, Jim Bob Burnett (Producer); VICE-CHAIRMAN, Darrell Brown (Producer); SECRETARY, Bernarr Treat (Producer). NMBC DIRECTORS: Bruce Davis (Producer); Alicia Sanchez (Purebred Producer); David McSherry (Feeder); Mark McCollum (Feeder); Milford Denetclaw (Producer); Jonathan Vander Dussen (Dairy Producer);

FEDERATION DIRECTOR, Jane Frost (Producer) U.S.M.E.F. DIRECTOR, David McSherry BEEF BOARD DIRECTORS, Tammy Ogilvie (Producer), Wesley Grau (Producer).

For more information contact: New Mexico Beef Council, Dina Chacon-Reitzel, Executive Director 1209 Mountain Rd. Pl. NE, Suite C, Albuquerque, NM 87110 505/841-9407 • 505/841-9409 fax • www.nmbeef.com

52

OCTOBER 2012


the ▼

MARKE T place ▼

New & Used parts, Tractor & Farm Equipment. Salvage yard: Tractors, Combines, Hay & Farm Equipment.

To place your Marketplace advertising, please contact Chris Martinez at 505/243-9515 ext 28 or email: chris@aaalivestock.com

Order Parts On-line:

▼ ▼ ▼

www.kaddatzequipment.com

Verification V eriffiication Premium Premium O Opportunities pportunities Age Age aand nd Source Source NHTC NHTC NE3 NE 3 Grass Grass Finished Finished

Weanlings, Yearlings, 2 & 3 Year Olds

FOR SALE —————— BARBARA LIVINGSTON O: 713/632-1331 • C: 832/265-2673 blivingston@harrisoninterests.com BECKY COOK Ranch: 281/342-4703 • C: 832/452-4280 www.harrisonquarterhorseranch.com

C omplete Complete C ompliant Compliant C ompatible Compatible www.technitrack.com ww w ww w w.technitrack.com

p processedverified.usda.gov rocessedverified.usda.gov

6602-989-8817 02-989-8817

N NOVEMBER OVEMBER STOCKMAN STOCKMAN Celebrating the

2 2012 012 C CATTLEMAN ATTLEMAN OF OF THE THE Y YEAR EAR Reserve Space to Congratulate-Honor-Applaud

BOB OB RIICKLEFS CKLEFS

F For or Jobs Jobs Well Well D Done one

CContact ontact Chris Chris today today aatt 243-9515 243-9515 ext. ext. 2288 oorr chris@aaalivestock.com chris@aaalivestock.com

DESERT SCALES & WEIGHING EQUIPMENT

ROUND WATER TROUGHS ➤ ➤ ➤

Plate Steel Construction Plate Steel Floors Pipeline Compatible

Truck Scales Livestock Scales Feed Truck Scales SALES, SERVICE & INSTALLATIONS

1-800/489-8354 602/258-5272

FAX

602/275-7582

www.desertscales.com

05/281-9860 • 800/832-0603 800/832-0603 wwww.sandiatrailer.com ww.sandiatrailer.com • 5505/281-9860

SALES AND SERVICE

Mixing / Feeding Systems Trucks / Trailers / Stationary Units BRIAN BOOHER 915/859-6843 • El Paso, Texas CELL. 915/539-7781

LANDON WEATHERLY • Cell. 806/344-6592 SNUFFY BOYLES • Cell. 806/679-5885 800/525-7470 • 806/364-7470 www.bjmsales.com 3925 U.S. HWY 60, HEREFORD, TX 79045

OCTOBER 2012

53


the ▼

MARKET ▼

place

Tom Growney Equipment ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

505/884-2900

▼ ▼ ▼

Phillips has M Mesa e s a TTRACTOR, RACTOR, IINC. NC.

Williams Windmill, Inc. New Mexico Ranch Items and Service Specialist Since 1976 New Mexico Distributor for Aermotor Windmills 575/835-1630 • Fax: 575/838-4536 Lemitar, N.M. • williamswindmill@live.com

YAVAPAI BOTTLE GAS

928-776-9007 Toll Free: 877-928-8885 2150 N. Concord Dr. #B Dewey, AZ 86327

Visit us at: www.yavapaigas.com dc@yavapaigas.com

8800/303-1631 00/303-1631 ((NM) NM) FULL-LINE FULL-LINE KUBOTA KUBOTA D DEALER EALER 33826 826 44th th St., St., NW NW • Albuquerque, Albuquerque, NM NM 87107 87107 Office Office 5505/344-1631 05/344-1631 • Fax Fax 505/345-2212 5 0 5 /3 4 5 -2 2 1 2 www.mesatractor.com w w w . m e s a t r a c t o r . co m

ROBERTSON ROBERTSON L IVESTOCK LIVESTOCK D DONNIE ONNIE R ROBERTSON OBERTSON Certified C errttiffiied Ultrasound Ultrasound T Technician echnician Registered, Re R egistered, Commercial Commercial and and F Feedlot eedlot !

EMMONS EMMONS

MMartin artin EEnterprise nterrpprriise

CLAY EMMONS 541 St. Hwy. 75 N, Fairfield, TX 75840

clayemmons@hotmail.com

254 / 716-5735

Three New Mexico Brands For Sale

!

5 515 15 N. N. P Prince rince St. St. M8 8101 Clovis, Clovis, N NM 88101 5 75-763-0151 575-763-0151 m me@plateautel.net e@plateautel.net

$

!!!!

UGC Certi tifi fied

#

! " #

! !

" !

CARTER’S CLivestock A R T E R ’ S Livestock EEquipment quipment

Three Separate Brands Master Nos. 02678, 49403, 49404 RHC RHH • LHC LHH • LRC LSH

Best offer. Will sell separately or all three. 505/235-1100 505/822-9301

54

OCTOBER 2012

• MADE M A D E WITH W I T H PPRIDE R I D E IN I N AAMERICA MERICA •

M MRS. RS. W W.J. .J. C CARTER ARTER 9 928/567-4010 28/567-4010

PHILLIPS DIESEL CORP. I-25 & Hwy. 6, Los Lunas, NM

505/865-7332

OLD O LD H HEAVY EAVY EQUIPMENT E QUIPMENT FARM F ARM EQUIPMENT EQUIPMENT DISTANCE D ISTANCE NO PROBLEM N O P ROBLEM CALL C ALL 5 505-220-4982 05-220-4982 C CELL ELL 505-489-8139 MESSAGE MESSAGE 505-489-8139

!

$

YANMAR DIESEL

WE W E B BUY UY STEEL STEEL FOR SCRAP SCRAP FOR

"START WITH THE BEST - STAY WITH THE BEST" Since 1987

ULTRASOUND ULTRASOUND

Generator Sets & Pumps

6 675 75 S. S. Main Main C Camp amp V Verde, erde, AZ AZ 86322 86322

A Monfette Construction Co.

Drinking Water Storage Tanks 100 – 11,000 Gallons In Stock NRCS Approved

Heavy Duty Black Polyethylene Prompt Statewide Delivery 8' Poly Drinkers, Too! ALSO: Underground Tanks! Please call for your BEST SERVICE & VALUE. Cloudcroft, NM • 1-800/603-8272 NMwatertanks.com


the

SEEDSTOCK

Please call us at 505/243-9515 to list your herd here.

guide

Grant Mitchell • 505/466-3021

Weanlings, Yearlings & Riding Horses www.singletonranches.com

Bradley Bradley 3 R Ranch Ra anch L Ltd. td. w www.bradley3ranch.com ww.bradley3ranch.com R Ranch-Raised anch-Raised A ANGUS NGUS Bulls Bulls ffor or Ranchers Ranchers Since Since 1955 1955

Annual Annual Bull Bull Sale Sale February 2013 F ebruary 16, 16, 2 013

P.O. Box 215 Jewett, Texas 75846 www.txshorthorns.org txshorthorns@earthlink.net 903/626-4365

a att the tth he R Ranch anch NE NE o off E Estelline, stteelline, TX TX M .L. Bradley, Bradley, 8 06/888-1062 806/888-1062 M.L. FFax: ax: 8 06/888-1010 • C Cell: ell: 940/585-6471 940/585-6471 806/888-1010

M

ANFORD

PRIVATE TREATY

C A T T L E

ANGUS • BRAHMAN • HEREFORDS • F1s F1 & Montana influenced Angus Cattle

RED ANGUS

Bulls & Replacement Heifers 575-318-4086

432-283-1141

2022 N. Turner, Hobbs, NM 88240

www.lazy-d-redangus.com

GARY MANFORD 505/508-2399 – 505/592-2936

O

GRRA RAU AU CH HAROLAIS HA AROLAIS

U R A D V E RT I S E R S make this magazine possible. Please patronize them, and mention that you saw their ad in ...

G rady, N ew Mexico Mexico Grady, New B reeding P erformance Charolais Charollaais SSince ince 1965 1965 Breeding Performance

RAISING D EPENDABLE RAISING DEPENDABLE SEEDSTOCK THAT THAT IS IS SEEDSTOCK LINEBRED FOR FOR INCREASED INCREASED LINEBRED HYBRID VIGOR VIGOR HYBRID FOR FOR 4 47 7 YEARS! YEARS!

505/243-9515

ELGIN BREEDING SERVICE E

EBS

C CALL ALL FFOR OR YOUR YOUR P PROVEN ROVEN PROFIT PROFIT MAKERS!!! MAKERS!!!

B

S

Box 68, Elgin, TX 78621 512/285-2019 or 285-2712 Fax 512/285-9673 www.elginbreeding.com

• Semen collection • Custom breeding service • Semen storage & shipping • Breeding supplies • Semen sales catalog • Embryo services for N.M.

Westall W estall R Ranches, anches, L LLC LC

Registered R egistered B Brangus rangus B Bulls ulls & H Heifers eifers • Brinks Brinks & Robbs Robbs B Bloodlines loodlines Ray R ay & Karen Karen Westall, Westall, Owners Owners / Tate Tate Pruett, Pruett, Ranch Ranch Manager Manager

E

B

S

EBS WEST

Box 696 Capitan, NM 88316 575/354-2929 Fax 575/354-2942 W.H. Cardwell, DVM Quality Control Brad Cardwell President Brenda Cardwell Vice-President Hillary Voelker Manager, EBS

Call C all us us ALL ffor or ALL yyour our B rangus Brangus n eeds! needs!

P.O. Box P.O. Box 955, 955, Capitan Capitan NM NM 88316 88316 • Ce Cell: ell: 575.365.6356 575.365.6356 • Ranch: Ranch: 575.653.4842 575.653.4842 • email: email: taterfire@hotmail.com aterfire@hotmail.com

V

Wesley G rau Wesley Grau 575/357-8265 • C 75/760-7304 575/357-8265 C.. 5 575/760-7304 Lane Grau Grau Lane 575/357-2811 • C. C. 575/760-6336 575/760-6336 575/357-2811

V

na Thatcher, Arizo

ality Represents Qu The Brand that angus Bulls & Females Br k Registered Blac H:: 928/3 H 928//3348-8918 48- 8918 • bjc b j c md@c m d @c ableone.net a b l e o n e .n e t OCTOBER 2012

55


w w w . m cg i n l e y r e d a n g u s . c o m

Bulls & Females MARSHALL McGINLEY 575/993-0336 Las Cruces, NM

Bulls and Heifers 575/773-4770

C Bar R A N C H SSLATON, L A T O N , TTEXAS EXAS

lais arolai Chharo C Anngguus &A ls Buullls B

TREY W WOOD O 806/789-7312 CLARK WOOD 806/828-6249 • 806/786-2078

Rick and Maggie Hubbell Mark Hubbell

RANCH RAISED

Quemado, NM hubbell@wildblue.net

MOUNTAIN RAISED

WINSTON, NEW MEXICO Russell and Trudy Freeman

575/743-6904

KAIL RANCHES Quality Registered Romagnola and Angus Bulls & Replacement Females Disposition and Birth Weight a given. STOP BY – SEEING IS BELIEVING! R.M. Kail, Owner 307/367-3058

Raul Munoz, Manager 575/461-1120

P.O. Box 981 • Conchas, NM 88416 State Hwy. 104-3 miles north, mile marker 66

56

OCTOBER 2012

!

"

CORRI ENTE BEEF IS SANCT IONED BY SLOWFOOD USA

Producers of Quality & Performance Tested Brahman Bulls & Heifers “Beef-type American Gray Brahmans, Herefords, Gelbvieh and F-1s.” Available at All Times Loren & Joanne Pratt 44996 W. Papago Road Maricopa, AZ 85139 520 / 568-2811

Reg i s t er ed CORRI ENT E B ULL S Ex cell ent f o r Fir st Cal f Hei f ers

CAT ES ES R RANC A NCH CH WA GON M WAGON MOUND, OUND, N NEW EW M MEXICO EXICO 575/ 666- 2360 575/666-2360 w w w . c at esr an c h . c o m www.catesranch.co


Casey BEEFMASTERS SIXTY PLUS YEARS

*.)-0 ! *.)-0 ",- '%##" '%##" ",-

**(" (" / &") &")

*'"( )$"+"#*+!, )$"+"#*+!, *( *( *'"(

Coyote Ridge Ranch Herefords

Total Performance Based on a Strong Foundation of Working Mothers

18300 Weld County Rd. 43, LaSalle, CO 80645 Jane Evans Cornelius • 970/284-6878 Hampton & Kay Cornelius • 970/396-2935 www.coyoteridgeherefords.com

www.CaseyBeefmasters.com Watt, Jr. 325/668-1373 Watt50@sbcglobal.net Watt: 325/762-2605

AGBA

American Galloway Breeders Association

w www.AmericanGalloway.com ww.AmericanGalloway.com

PUT P UT YOUR YOUR HERD HERD B BACK ACK T TO O WORK. WORK. G Galloway alloway ggenetics enetics aare re iideal deal ffor or today’s today’s low low iinput nput market market d emands. demands.

TREATY P PRIVATE RIVATE TREATY R eg. Herefords Herefords Reg. Alan Richardson A lan R ichardson 8806/333-0624 06/333-0624 44438 438 F FM M 33212 212 • D Dalhart, alhart, T TX X 779022 9022 8806/384-2110 06/384-2110

High Y ielding ccarcass F Feed eed E Efficient fficient • High Yielding arcass w /Minimal B ack Fat Fat • E asy Fleshing w/Minimal Back Easy Fleshing • M Moderate oderate M Mature ature Size Size • L Low ow B BW W

9970-405-5784 70-405-5784 E Email: mail: AGBA@midrivers.com AGBA@midrivers.com

Registered Polled Herefords Bulls & Heifers FOR SALE AT THE FARM

Cañones Route P.O. Abiquiu, N.M. 87510 MANUEL SALAZAR P.O. Box 867 Española, N.M. 87532

Phone: 575/638-5434

* Ranch Raised * Easy Calving * Gentle Disposition ORDER QUALITY BEEF! Go to www.santaritaranching.com for Information About Our Business & Our Grass Fed, Locally Grown Beef! Andrew & Micaela McGibbon 8200 E. Box Canyon Rd., Green Valley, AZ 85614 • 520/ 393-1722 • az_beef@yahoo.com

NMFLC

continued from page 33

in support of a candidate as we have seen for Martin Heinrich in this campaign. They were all emotional appeals with no real facts to support the premise of the ad. Most of the Heather Wilson ads were based on appeals to logic. This year there is a clear choice between two very different directions for the country. On the issues most important to the future of those of us to whom natural resources and their use are important this election is crucial. All the political pundits agree that voter turnout will decide this one. We don’t have the resources to fund slick media campaigns for our causes or candidates. But we can still influence the outcome by making sure we get people to either vote early or absentee or show up on election day. Study the issues and decide which candidate’s positions more closely match your own and vote. And make sure all your friends, neighbors and relatives do the same. Most of New Mexico is still in one stage or the other of some serious drought. The promised summer monsoons came up way short. Forecasts are for a weak El Niño this winter and spring with a chance for above normal moisture late this year and the first half of 2013. Sooner would be better but if it can’t be in time for this year’s growing season it’s better late than never. All we can do is cut back where we have to and take care of the country so it can recover when the rains come. Until next time, pray for rain and God’s ■ blessing on us all.

Read this issue on the Internet! OUR WEBSITE HAS A BRAND NEW LOOK! The Livestock Industry's Most-popular Website! www.aaalivestock.com OCTOBER 2012

57


Vermejo Summer 1974 by CURTIS FORT

y late April we began to gather and brand calves in the winter range and push them above the drift fence. All those canyons we wintered in were fenced half way down so we threw the cattle below the fence in January and back above in the spring. The cowboys spent long but good days working those canyons and burning a WS on the calves. We drifted the cattle closer to headquarters and eventually 30 miles more to the high country. By May 1st we were still branding and pushing those cows and calves toward headquarters and beyond. Charlie Price, a good friend of mine from Tatum where I was raised, showed up to visit as he’d just graduated from high school. He is all cowpuncher, same as his brothers Sid and Sterling, and their Dad, Tommy. Tommy was a hero of mine, and my Dad’s good friend, as they had neighbored for years. A few of us cowpunchers loaned Charlie mounts because he can handle anything you choked down. We enjoyed having him work with us for a couple of weeks. All the herds of cows, calves and bulls were finally pushed up the Bernal or Gold Creek trails to eventually arrive in that high range of good grass, big creeks and pretty country. One day we were driving a bunch by Mary’s Lake (named for the movie star Mary Pickford). She, along with Doug Fairbanks and others, owned Vermejo in the late twenties and thirties. A big Hereford bull decided to head for other ranges and before you knew it, here came Charlie, mounted on a big dun horse. He ripped a loop on that bull’s horns, waved the slack to him, and the rope sure got tight when Mr. Bull hit the end of it! I was proud of Charlie for catching him. Jim Taylor, who always had a hungry loop, picked up both hocks and went to the end of it! Two or three of us bailed off and had to grunt hard to tail that brute over and put some dirt in his eyes. Mr. Hereford bull decided it

B

would be better with the herd than dealing with those punchers. We spent some long days pushing those pairs closer to the summer range. We were always laughing and joking around as it was good to be on horseback, or as my friend Tommy Pearson of the San Simon outfit says, “. . . just riding a pretty horse and letting your feet hang down.” As most big cow outfits, the Vermejo realized the cowpunchers had been locked down since Christmas with winter feeding, calving, and spring roundup. They agreed that everyone should celebrate the Fourth of July and be thankful for our freedoms. From the RO’s in Arizona, to the Fork’s in Texas, the Fourth is celebrated with a rodeo. Riding rank horses and roping . . . that’s a cowpuncher’s life . . . and they love it. Prescott, Arizona and Pecos, Texas still argue, both claiming to have been the first to have a rodeo, and they both have a big one on the Fourth. I like the way Will James tells it in one of his books, and it’s probably the way rodeos started. He tells that when shipping their cattle on the railroads, big outfits would camp within a few miles of each other at railheads. They dayherded their cattle while they waited their turn to load the train. This took several days, so with idle time, cowboys held roping and riding contests. The LX outfit bet the LS outfit they could ride any of their outlaws and vice versa, and pretty soon the Hash Knife’s and XX outfits did the same. So you had a contest of real cowpunchers doing what they did at work every day. Vermejo let everyone off for several days. The Fourth of July Rodeo, at Cimarron, NM, is one of those special events to celebrate the holiday. They open with our national anthem, then a prayer thanking God for our freedoms and those who gave their lives for this nation. It still goes on today. If you want to meet real cowpunchers, their wives and families, they’ll be there.

Just go to the Fourth of July Rodeo, at Cimarron or other cow towns. We all got back to work and it was a good time to start on the broncs. The high country camp men packed salt and watched for cows with “brisket,” a disease from the high elevation. They put out horse tracks everyday. As with most high country outfits, the time to start those broncs was in July, when it was as warm as it would be in that range. We had been prowling after the Fourth, as most of the cattle were in the high country. But it was a riding job so we were always on horseback, which was good. Jud had taken over the ramrod position since Bill John went to run an outfit at Clayton, New Mexico. One day when we were catching fresh horses, we could tell he couldn’t figure what powder to shoot. Then he lit up like a light bulb as we finished saddling up. He told us to hit a trot and find the mares and colts and see how they were doing! He said he’d seen ‘em a month ago up around the state line. The fact was that the grass was lush everywhere, the elk kept big holes in the fence and that all the pastures were big, so, who knew where they were? Ronny, Frosty and I covered lots of country looking for the mares and their colts. It was pleasant as there was green grass, cool weather and we were a-horseback. We would cut their sign, but we knew they were okay and somewhere on the outfit. About the second day we rode in around 6:00 p.m. and were unsaddling. We had just put our saddles on the racks in the saddle house with our wet blankets on top, rolled a smoke, and Jud drove up to quiz us about our luck at finding the mares. He knew they were out there and we knew it was just busy work, but when we said we were getting closer he said, “Ah, hell, there’s an ocean on both sides of ‘em, so continued on page 59

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OCTOBER 2012


Scatterin’ continued from page 58

they’re okay.” It was time to start riding the broncs to replenish the remuda! Ronny was the bronc stomper, and Jud told me to “swamp” for him. That meant for me to help him forefoot, get them saddled and after Ronny made the first few rides, I would put some miles on them. Starting around August 1st, Ron and I met at the saddle house, saddled a couple of top mounts and hit a high trot to the Castle Rock Camp, seven or eight miles west of headquarters. Castle Rock was a big camp with corrals, houses etc., all of big logs in the middle of a beautiful open area. There were patches of big pines at the foot of the Vermejo Mountains, and it looked like everyone’s idea for the setting of the “dream” ranch. Ron and I came into one of the big traps, gathered those broncs and hit the corrals with them the first try without spilling them. They were just past two years old, had been slightly halterbroke when weaned, and besides being castrated in June, were out in the big range. They didn’t realize it was time

for them to earn their way on the Vermejo and they’d find out soon that they were here for a purpose. So one at a time we tied up a hind leg, sacked them out, put a saddle on them and Ron stepped aboard. He liked riding those colts. He could ride a bucking horse but still had a way with those young horses. After a few saddles, I

would start putting a ride on them after I’d helped him saddle a new one. Just before noon I’d go to the camp house to get the wood cook stove going and we’d have some fried taters and elk. Then we’d wash it down with fresh coffee and back to the broncs. We kept our bedrolls and some groceries at the camp house with a pickup, so we could come to headquarters a couple times a week. Ron and I enjoyed each other’s company as we rode those colts out through the pines and on bigger circles up in the aspens. We talked about Will James, Kit Carson and many more of our heroes who had put out tracks in that same range. We kept a couple of our top mounts over at Castle Rock but we went through most of August riding those young horses and putting miles on them. We were in a mighty pretty mountain range, always seeing elk, deer, turkey, and pretty often, bear. It was a good August and ■ one I’ll never forget.

Left To Right: Charlie Price on “Hoover”, Jim Taylor on “Sonny”, Lloyd Bowen on “Troubles.” Vermejo Ranch, Summer, 1974.

OCTOBER 2012

59


C IA TION

W MEXICO NE

G

R

O

C A TT L E

Io the Point

On Being Tardy . . .

O

S W E R S' A S

by Caren Cowan, Exec. Director, New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Assn.

here used to be a saying in Cochise County that when the Cowans arrived, you could close the door because no one else was coming. That wasn’t because the Cowans were so important – it was because they were generally late. Whenever we went almost anywhere there was always a crisis that had to be dealt with first. Haul a load of water, heifers to be checked, or the absolute best one was that if we were going to a rodeo or a steer show, the lights on the trailer always required an overhaul. Generally that was in the middle of the night and there was not great certainty that they would work for the entire trip. One of my favorite stories was when Daddy was supposed to be a pallbearer at someone’s last gathering. As he and mother skidded into the parking lot just in time for Daddy to take his place in the procession, Mother took a bit more time. As she encountered the funeral director, she made a comment about Daddy being late to his own funeral. “Not if I have anything to do with it,” he retorted. I have had the terrible habit of being late for most of my life. Often it was not a little late, but really late. A friend noted the other day that people who were habitually late were generally that way always. Luckily, and embarrassingly, I had another friend who did a pretty good job of breaking me to lead and be on time. Sometime soon after I went to work for the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association (NMCGA), I was called to the New Mexico Department of Agriculture in Las Cruces for a briefing on the new concept of carbon credit trading. As usual, there seemed there was something pressing at the office I needed to do before I started the drive down, so I left about an hour later than I should have. No big deal I thought, I wasn’t too interested in the subject anyway. I called Jeff Witte’s assistant Yvonne Alexander to tell her that I was running late. I suggested they start the meeting without me and I would catch up when I got there. That was not what Jeff decided to do. When I walked in, an hour late, there was a

T

60

OCTOBER 2012

room full of people who had been cooling their heels waiting for me for that hour. Totally mortified I sat down and pulled out my knitting as the meeting started. The seat left for me was near the speaker. I guess I doubly offended him. At the end of his presentation I began asking questions on how the credits would be handled on federal and state trust lands. He looked down at me and said, “so you WERE paying attention.” While I haven’t managed to work the “15 minutes early or you are late concept” into my scheduling, my arrivals are timed much closer to the beginning of appointments. The reasons for these stories are twofold. First, for those of you who are habitually late, there is hope for you and I don’t really recommend Mr. Witte’s option for learning your lesson. It would be much less painless if you just started planning better on your own. But the main reason is to encourage everyone to vote EARLY. This is one election that we cannot afford to miss or let anyone stay home. It is not impossible for there to be a snow or ice storm on Election Day and you’d just be better off to go ahead and vote early. “Get The Lead Out”

The old phrase used to tell people to hurry up has a new meaning these days according to Emily Miller, a senior editor for the Opinion pages at The Washington Times. Should President Obama win in November, Miller writes, it’s a certainty he’ll try once again to ban lead ammunition. Just two months after he moved into the White House, the National Park Service suddenly announced it was banning lead bullets from its parks. The blowback from sportsmen was intense, so the agency backed down. Mr. Obama surely will exert “more flexibility” in a second term to accomplish this backdoor assault on the Second Amendment. Senator Jon Tester (D-MT) introduced a bill to make sure that can’t happen. Just before the Senate adjourned in late September to go campaigning, the body voted

84 to 7 to take up the Sportsmen Act during the November 13 lame-duck session. It’s a priority for a number of pro-hunting groups, including the National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF). “The threat to ban use of traditional ammunition without sound science is the most significant threat facing the firearms and ammunitions industries today,” NSSF senior vice president Larry Keane told The Washington Times. “If the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) were to ban traditional ammunition using the Toxic Substances Control Act, it would destroy the ammunition industry in the U.S., crater conservation funding and create massive supply shortages for consumers.” The ban is a priority for radical groups like PETA, the Humane Society and Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) that want legislation to prohibit anything but “nontoxic bullets.” This is mostly an excuse to sue ammo manufacturers out of business. In June, CBD filed suit against the EPA for not addressing the “toxic lead in hunting ammunition that frequently poisons our wildlife.” Opponents are ridiculing CBD’s “Get the Lead Out” campaign. “The notion that you can get lead out of the environment showed these people should not have passed their high-school chemistry test,” said Mr. Keane. “Lead is in the periodical table. There is no more lead in the environment than there was 100 years ago.” Don Saba, a research scientist and National Rifle Association board member, said that these groups are deliberately attempting to confuse the public into thinking the lead in bullets is the same as lead paint that is harmful to children. “The lead that is used in ammunition is metallic lead and is a very inert material that does not dissolve in water and it is not absorbed by plants or animals,” Dr. Saba explained. “There is a tremendous toxicity difference between the highly inert metallic lead used in ammunition and the highly toxic lead compounds used in legacy leaded paints.” continued on page 61


Point

continued from page 60

The ammunition demonized by the self-styled environmentalists happens to fund highly successful animal-conservation efforts. The Pittman-Robertson Act of 1937 set up an excise tax, now 11 percent, on ammunition and long guns and 10 percent for handguns. The resulting $7 billion in revenue over the years has gone toward restoring habitats for wild turkey, bald eagle, duck, elk and antelope populations. America’s ammunition industry works on high volume and thin margins, manufacturing 9 billion cartridges a year, 95 percent of which have lead components. Lead is used in bullets because it is the perfect material — dense, heavy, soft and inexpensive. Asked for an alternative, Winchester Ammunition engineer Mike Stock replied, “We’d use gold if it was cheap enough to make bullets.” The NSSF estimates a lead ban would result in tens of thousands of jobs lost as prices would necessarily rise 190 percent. Mr. Obama has killed enough jobs in his first term. The last thing our economy needs is another assault on successful businesses. continued on page 70

OCTOBER 2012

61


REAL ESTATE GUIDE

the â&#x2013;ź

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guide To place your Real Estate advertising, please contact Chris at 505/243-9515, ext. 28 or email chris@aaalivestock.com

YORK RANCH ~ GRANTS, NEW MEXICO A premier working cattle ranch located on the Continental Divide, consisting of 34,000 acres of deeded land plus an additional 136,000 acres of state and Bureau of Land Management grazing leases. Carrying capacity is estimated at 2,300 animal units making WKHUDQFKDSRVLWLYHFDVKĂ RZRSHUDWLRQ7KHUDQFKLVERUGHUHGE\ Wilderness areas and a National Monument. A ranch highlight is the excellent hunting for trophy elk, antelope, mule deer and other wild JDPH,QDGGLWLRQQXPHURXV$QDVD]L,QGLDQDUWLIDFWVFDQEHIRXQGRQ WKHUDQFK&RQWDFW5REE9DQ3HOW

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The “100 Ranch” – located in central NM, northwest of Carrizozo. Rated at 1,200 animaall units. Comprised of deeded, state & federal lands, a total of approx. 55,850 acres or 87 sections. A wide variettyy of terrain & forage combine to make this a productive & scenic operation. Wildlife includes elk, mule deer, & antelope aallong with quail & dove. The “SO Ranch” – located just north of Roy in northeastern N NM M. This ranch is comprised of deeded, state & U.S. Forest Service National Grasslands, with a total of approx. 14,680 acres or 23 sections. Most of the grasslands are fenced separately. This is open rolling country, best suited for summer yearlings but cows can be run if desired. Carrying capacittyy varies: about 250 AUs to 300 AUs, or 850 to 1,200 yearlings during the summer season dependent upon the length of the grazing term & the conditions. A few mule deer but maaiinly antelope are present. The “10 Section Huunnting Ranch” – located in southern Harding Counttyy not far from Logan & Ute Lake. This is a rugged ranch, has an ideaall habitat for wildlife, mainly mule deer, turkey & quail with a few lion & bear from time to time. Most of the ranch is deeded. The mesa lands are interspersed with canyons which have numerous dirt tanks. Very scenic with lots of trees & a wide variety of grasses & browses. The “5 Section” – is a small operation located just southeast of Moriarty. It is open, aallmost level country & has about 50 acres of water rights but is not currently being farmed. It has 1,365 deeded acres & 1,810 acres of state lease.

TERRRRREELL LAANND & LIIVVVEESTOCK COMMPPAANNY

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

NEW R RA AN A NCH OFFERINGS

W-R RANCH 18,560 Acres Miles NEE of NM 2200 M iles N of Roswell, Roswell, N M 680 680 DDeeded eeded AAcres cres State 117,900 7,900 State LLease ease AAcres cres 9927 27 BBLM LM AAcres cres 3300 00 AAnimal nimal Units YYear ear Long Long Units NNewly ewly rremodeled emodeled SSouthwestern outhwestern HHome ome

GGood ood water; water; windmill & windmill submergible tanks tanks submergible GGood ood fences; fences; 4-strand bbarbwire arbwire 4-strand $$1,800,000 1,800,000

CHARLES CHARLES BENNETT BENNETT Uni U nitted ed C Country ountry / V Vis isttaa N Nu ueeva vaa,, IInc. nc. ((575) 575) 3 356-5616 56-5616 • w www.vista-nu ww.vista-nueeva vaa.com .com

Arroyo Sanchez Ranch has 160 deeded acres w/1800 acre N.M. state grazing lease. Perimeter fenced, dirt tanks, pipeline drinkers. Price is $398,750 OR increase the size of this ranch to 4,735 acres w/285 deeded acres and price is $750,000. Sombrero Ranch, Trujillo, N.M.: 1,442 deeded acres has 2 pastures. Perimeter fenced, 3 cold water wells, 2 dirt tanks and springs in the coolie. This has been a successful 30 cow/calf operation for many years. Asking $575,358. La Cueva Canyon Ranch: 1,595 deeded acres w/240 acres of BLM. Very scenic parcel has tall pines resources, canyon springs, good dirt tanks, new fence on NE corner. Turkeys, deer and other native species abound. Price is $990,333 Owner may carry. Middle Canyon Ranch: 1,440 deeded acres lies adjacent to La Cueva Canyon ranch. Has playa dirt tanks, spring water in the canyon bottom, gramma grasses and tall pine resources. Good access and incredible views. Buy 3,035 deed acres and more available! Call for details. Price: $768,800 for 1,440 acres. Ledoux, N.M.: 60 acre dry land terraced farm is perimeter fenced, has overhead electric on site. Past crops are winter wheat, spring oats, alfalfa, barley and feed grasses. ~7 acres is sub-irrigated. Located ½ mile north of Ledoux. Priced reduced to $240,000 owc. Dilia, N.M.: 35 deeded acres irrigated farm land for sale at $548,000. 35 ac ft of ditch rights go w/sale plus farm equipment. Its fenced, has stocked fish pond, m/h on site and community water and septic. Owner takes 1,200 alfalfa bales per cutting. Price is $548,000 Owner is motivated and will carry. Stanley, N.M.: 77 acres plus nice mfg home is fenced and cross fenced, has 3 pastures, 1 trap, loafing sheds, hay storage and tack room. Nice horse operation. Priced to sell. Bobcat Pass 720 acres for sale at $5,500,000, includes water rights and elk permits!

KEN AHLER REAL ESTATE CO., INC. 1435 S. St. Francis Drive, Suite 210, Santa Fe, NM 87505

Ofc.: 505/989-7573 • Toll Free: 888/989-7573 • Mobile: 505/490-0220 Email: kahler@newmexico.com • Website: www.SantaFeLand.com

OCTOBER 2012

63


REAL ESTATE GUIDE

KEITH BROWNFIELD

Mathers Mathers Realty, Realty, Inc. Inc.

ASSOC. BROKER keithbro@zianet.com

mathersrealty.net

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,67(' $7 MATHERS REALTY, INC. 2223 E. Missouri, Las Cruces, NM 88001 575/522-4224 Office • 575/522-7105 Fax • 575/640-9395 Cell

O’NEILL O’NELAND, I L L L AND, L LLC LC

P.O. 145 P.O. Box Bo x 1 45 Cimarron, NM C imarro n, N M 87714 87714 575/376-2341 5 75/376-2341 Fax: F ax : 575/376-2347 575/376-2347 lland@swranches.com and@swranches.co m

www.swranches.com www.swranches.co m

G Good o o d iinventory n v e n t o ry iinn the t h e Miami, Mi am i , Springer, S p ri n g e r, Maxwell Max we l l & Cimarron Ci m arro n area. are a. Great Gre at year-round ye ar-ro un d climate c l i m at e ssuitable ui t ab l e ffor o r horses. h o rse s. Give Gi v e yourself yo urse l f & yyour o ur horses h o rse s a break b re ak & come c o m e oonn uupp ttoo tthe h e Cimarron Ci m arro n Country Co un t ry. Miami raining Facility. Ideal M iami H Horse orse T Training Facility. Ideal hhorse orse ttraining raining facility facility w w/large /large 4 bedroom bedroom 3 bbathroom athroom approx approx 33,593 ,593 sq sq ftft home, home, 248.32 248.32 ++/-/- ddeeded eeded acres, acres, 2208 08 irrigation irrigation shares, shares, 330' 0' X 660' 0' metal metal ssided ided sshop/bunkhouse, hop/bunkhouse, 8 sstall tall barn barn w /tack rroom, oom, 7 sstall tall bbarn arn w /storage, w/tack w/storage, 1100 stall stall open open sided sided barn barn w/10 w/10 ftft alley, alley, 2 sstall tall loafing loafing shed, shed, 14 14 111' 1' x 224' 4' Run-In Run-In SShelters, helters, 1135' 35' Round Round Pen, Pen, Priefert Priefert ssix ix horse horse ppanel anel walker. walker. M any m ore ffeatures eatures & Many more improvements. All All you you need need for for a serious serious improvements. of hhorse orse ooperation peration in in serious serious hhorse orse ccountry ountry of Miami M iami N ew Mexico. Mexico. A dditional 1150 50 acres acres New Additional aavailable vailable oonn south south sside ide of of rroad. oad. M iami is is Miami aatt tthe he pperfect erfect yyear ear rround ound horse horse training training eleelevvation ation ooff 6,200. 6,200. Far Far eenough nough south south ttoo hhave ave mostly mild Convenient m ostly m ild winters. winters. C onvenient to to I-25. I-25. rivate eaven. V ery pprivate Miami Heaven. Very M iami Horse Horse H aapprox. pprox. 4,800 4,800 ssq. q. ft. ft. ddouble-walled ouble-walled aadobe dobe 4 bed., bed., 3 bath bath hhome ome w /many ccustom ustom feafeaw/many ttures, ures, 777.5 7.5 +//-- ddeeded eeded acres acres & 77.25 77.25 +//-w ater shares, shares, llarge arge 7 stall stall horse horse barn, barn, llarge arge water iinsulated nsulated m etal sshop, hop, large large haybarn/equiphaybarn/equipmetal $1,700,000, pplus m ent sshed, hed, aallll for for $1,700,000, ment lus an an aadditional dditional 160+/160+/- ddeeded eeded aacres cres w/142 w/142 $560,000 ((subject water subject ttoo w ater shares shares avail. avail. $560,000 ppurchase urchase of of 777.5 7.5 +//-- ddeeded eeded acre acre pparcel.) arcel.)

Miami View. 8800 +//-- deeded Mountain deeded M iami M ountain View. aacres cres w /80 w ater sshares hares & hhouse. ouse. w/80 water $687,000. $687,000. Miami. M iami. 1100 ++/-/- ddeeded eeded acres, acres, aawesome wesome hhome, ome, ttotal otal rremodel, emodel, awesome awesome views views $310,000. $310,000. Miami M iami LLookout. ookout. 8800 +/+/- ddeeded eeded acres, acres, water, w ater, buried buried utilities utilities aawesome wesome vviews. iews. $395,000. $395,000. Miami WOW. M iami W OW. BBig ig hhome ome in in SSanta anta FFee SStyle tyle great great for for ffamily amily oonn 3 aacres. cres. $299,000. $299,000. Miami M iami Tangle Tangle Foot. Foot. 110.02 0.02 ++/-/- deeded deeded w/water meter. aacres cres w /water sshares hares & m eter. $150,000. $150,000. Maxwell 40 +/+/- ddeeded eeded aacres cres 2200 00 water water M axwell 2240 $315,000. ery pprivate. sshares hares & home, home, vvery rivate. $315,000. Maxwell. M axwell. 119.5 9.5 +/+/- ddeeded eeded aacres, cres, water, water, ooutbuildings, utbuildings, great great horse horse sset et up. up. $$269,000. 269,000. Tract. FFrench rench T Tr ract. 774.17 4.17 ++/-/- deeded deeded acres, acres, water, w ater, remodeled remodeled hhouse. ouse. Great Great bbuy. uy. ,900. 0. $239,9 Canadian River. C anadian R iver. 339.088 9.088 ++//- ddeeded eeded w/nice aacres, cres, w /nice rranch anch hhome ome & rriver. iver. $$288,000. 288,000. Tract. FFrench rench T Tr ract. 440.00 0.00 ++/-/- ddeeded eeded acres, acres, $95,000. water, meter. w ater, water water m eter. Build B ild ttoo suit. Bu suit. $95,000.

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BAR M REAL ESTATE New Mexico Properties For Sale... POKER LAKE RANCH – 12,000± Deeded acres located on the north slope of the Capitan Mountain in Southeastern NM. 300 to 400 AUs yearlong. Good water Distribution, wonderful views along with excellent mule deer hunting. Call for price. LK RANCH – 5,000± acres located in SE New Mexico on Chaves/Lincoln County line, 164 animal units, new improvements, three wells. Very accessible and easy to manage. $985,000

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Scott McNally, Qualifying Broker Roswell, NM 88202 Office: 575-622-5867 Cell: 575-420-1237

MARANA BRANCH

SCOTT THACKER, Assoc. Broker • PO Box 90806 • Tucson, AZ 85752 Ph: 520/444-7069 • Email: ScottThacker@Mail.com ww.AZRanchReaIEstate.com • www.SWRanch.com

New Listing! Carefree and Cave Creek Forest Allotments – Portal, AZ: Well priced grass & mountain ranch. USFS rated at 185 head for 6 mo. 40 acres deeded. This ranch adjoins the Split Rock Ranch. Asking $155,000 REDUCED! Cactus Ridge Ranch: San Manuel, AZ: 48-head year-long. Very nice bunkhouse on the state. 7 acres deeded. Ranch might be a candidate for FSA. Asking $295,000 Pomerene Ranch – Benson AZ, 81 head yearlong, 92 Acres Deeded, 7650 acres AZ State Lease, nice ranch with many new improvements. Ask Scott Thacker about the current FSA loan, EQIP Projects, & the Range Rest Rotation payments. Asking $425,000 IN ESCROW! Broken Arrow Ranches: Western Arizona: 2 contiguous ranches (North Clem & Saddle Mountain). Historically strong steer ranches w/large ephemeral increases during the winter. 71 Deeded Acres plus BLM & State Leases. Nice Manufactured Home. Beloat Ranch – Rainbow Valley AZ, 300 head BLM & State Lease. Ranch located in

LING!G! SELLIN are SEL ches are Ranche Ran king ookin buyeersrs lloo lified buy qualifie ny qua many have ma We We hav ’re you’re all uuss iiff you se ccall hess.. PPleleaase rancche for for ran INGG!! ELLLIN ing SSEL iderring onsside ccon

the Western AZ desert, basic housing on State Land, well developed & maintained. No deeded. Asking $615,000 Marana Farm – 130 Acre farm, 22 acres irrigated, pecans & pastures, 2 shops, nice large house, spa, pool & huge tree lined pond. Great lifestyle ranch, Close to Tucson & convenience. Asking $995,000 New Listing! The Historic Fourr Ranch – Dragoon AZ: 225 Head Year-Long on 1200 Deeded Acres, State and Forest leases. Perfect mix of a functioning cattle ranch, rich history, and amazing headquarters. 4 Houses plus a main house and an indoor swimming pool. The ranch might be a guest ranch or large family estate. Asking $2,800,000 Split Rock Ranch – Paradise AZ.: 6,000 acres deeded, 200 head year long, State, BLM, Forest, Increased AG production could be developed, basic ranch housing, beautiful setting. Asking $3,631,800

All properties are listed by Arizona Ranch Real Estate, Cathy McClure, Designated Broker

A Arizona rizona R Ranch anch R E A L E S TAT E


REAL ESTATE GUIDE

UlEY HUGOF CLOVISCo. - SINCE 1962-

LAN

D SALES

Brokers in New Mexico, Texas & Colorado. Ranches and Farms are our Specialty. 575/763-3851 MARVIN C. HUGULEY

LLC

Selling New Mexico RICHARD RANDALS Qualifying Broker

We may not be the biggest, the fanciest or the oldest but we are reliable & have the tools. O: 575/461-4426 • C: 575/403-7138 • F: 575/461-8422

TOM SIDWELL Associate Broker

nmpg@plateautel.net • www.newmexicopg.com • 615 West Rt. 66, Tucumcari, NM 88401

RICKE C. HUGULEY

575/799-3485

575/799-3608

RANCH SALES AND APPRAISALS

SERVING THE RANCHING INDUSTRY SINCE 1920

O

U R A D V E RT I S E R S make this magazine possible. Please patronize them, and mention that you saw their ad in ...

505/243-9515

1507 13TH STREET LUBBOCK, TEXAS 79401 (806) 763-5331

Bar M Real Estate SCOTT MCNALLY www.ranchesnm.com 575/622-5867 575/420-1237

Laura Riley Justin Knight

505/330-3984 505/490-3455

Specializing in Farm and Ranch Appraisals

Ranch Sales & Appraisals

" $ $ www.michelethomesteadrealty.com

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UNDER CONTRACT! 33 Section Ranch East of Hagerman, NM $920,000 4,995 all Deeded Ranch south of Wagon Mound. Elk Permits $2,300,000

Cherri Michelet Snyder Qualifying Broker 920 East 2nd, Roswell, NM 88201 Office: 575/623-8440 Cell: 575/626-1913

FARMS, RANCHES, DAIRIES, HORSE & COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES — Satisfied Customers Are My Best Advertisement —

OCTOBER 2012

65


REAL ESTATE GUIDE

Scott Land co.

PAUL McGILLIARD Murney Associate Realtors Cell: 417/839-5096 • 800/743-0336 Springfield, MO 65804

1301 Front Street Dimmitt, TX 79027 Ben G. Scott/ Krystal M. Nelson–Brokers

1-800/933-9698 day/night www.scottlandcompany.com www.texascrp.com

www.Paulmcgilliard.murney.com

R Ranch anch & FFarm arm R Real eal Estate Estate

ATTENTION LLAND AND OOWNERS WNERS: W We hhave sold ld ranches h andd other th related properties in the Southwestern United States since 1966. We advertise extensively & need your listings (especially larger ranches). See our websites and and please please give give uuss a ccall all to to ddiscuss iscuss tthe he llisting isting ooff yyour our property. property. websites We hhave ave a 11031 031 BBuyer uyer ffor or a $$2,000,000 2,000,000 – $4,000 $4,000,000 0,000 +//-- rranch a nc h We entral, SSouthern outhern oorr NNorth orth TTexas, exas, Wester Western & Cent Central tral Oklahoma. Oklahoma. inin CCentral,

J James ames B. B. S Sammons ammons IIII II C Coldwell oldwell Banker Banker de de Wetter Wetter Hovious, Hovious, Inc. Inc. 55662 662 N. N. Mesa Mesa St. St. • El El Paso, Paso, TX TX 79912 79912 C Cell: ell: 9915/491-7382 15/491-7382 E E-mail: -mail: jjim@jimsammonsiii.com im@jimsammonsiii.com W Web: eb: www.jimsammonsiii.com www.jimsammonsiii.com

RANCH R ANCH SSALES ALES PP.O. .O. B Box ox 1077 1077 Ft. Ft. Davis, Davis, Texas Texas 79734 79734

NEED NE N EEEEED D RANCH RA R AN NC C CH H LEASES LLEA EEA A SSEEESS & NEE ASE PASTURE PPA ASSTU U UR RREE FOR FFO O R 22012 01122 STTTU TUR URE OR

MAJOR RANCH REALTY RANDELL MAJOR Qualifying Broker

D V E RT I S E

DAVID D AVID P. P. D DEAN EAN R Ranch: anch: 4432/426-3779 32/426-3779 Mobile: Mobile: 4432/634-0441 32/634-0441 www.availableranches.com

rmajor@hughes.net www.majorranches.com

Cell: 575-838-3016 Office: 575-854-2150 Fax: 575-854-2150

P.O. Box 244 585 La Hinca Road Magdalena, NM 87825

in the New Mexico Stockman. Call: 505/243-9515.

Southwest New Mexico Farms and Ranches 5 5.34 .34 AC CRE FARM <.914(&9*) 4++ !&>1*8 > 4&) .3 *86:.9* 6 7*&9 1.991* +&72 +47 >4:7 > )7*&2 -42* 2* 478*8 478*8 4 &3.2&18 &114<*) &114<*) "*1*5-43* 477 &3.2&18 "*1*5-43* *1*(97.( *1*(97.( &;&.1&'1* &;&.1&'1* <3*7 <3*7 +.3&3(.3, +.3&3(.3, &;&.1&'1* &;&.1&'1* 4(&9*) 4 1 8.302 AC CRE RE FA ARM RM 114(&9*) 4++ *&:9.+:1 .77.,&9.43 18.302 ++ ..,-<&> ,-<&> ..3 3 & *8& *8& *&:9.+:1 84:984:9- ;&11*> ;&11*> +&72 +&72 <.9<.9.77.,&9.43 < *11 &;*) &;*) 74&) 74&) ,&8 ,&8 *1*(97.( <*11 )*,7** *1*(97.( 9*1*5-43* 9*1*5-43* )*,7** ;.*<8 ;.*<8 MA AHONEY HONEY PA ARK RK – : :89 2.1*8 "-* &(7*8 89 2.1*8 84:9-*&89 84:9-*&89 4+ 4+ *2.3, *2.3, "-* 5745*79> 5745*79> (438.898 (438.898 4+ 4+ &5574= &5574= &(7*8 **)*) **)*) &(7*8 &(7*8 "-.8 &(7*8 !9&9* !9&9* *&8* *&8* &(7*8 "-.8 -.8947.( -.8947.( 5745*79> 5745*79> .8 .8 14(&9*) 14(&9*) -.,-.,- :5 :5 .3 .3 9-* 9-* 147.)& 147.)& 4:39&.38 4:39&.38 +*&9:7*8 +*&9:7*8 & 5&70 )**5 ,7&88*8 <.951*39.+:1 4&0 "-* <4:1) 3) **5 , 7&88*8 < 4:1) &0 //:3.5*7 :3.5*7 ((4;*7*) 4;*7*) ((&3>438 &3>438 " 5&70 11.0* *99.3, ((4;*7*) 4;*7*) ..3 .0* 88*99.3, .9- 5 1*39.+:1 4 -* (&991* (&991* &&11492*39 11492*39 < '* -*&) $.1)1.+* .3(1:)*8 .3(1:)*8 )**7 )**7 .'*= ,7*&9 .'*= /&;&1.3& /&;&1.3& 6:&.1 6:&.1 )4;* )4;* "-.8 "-.8 7&7* '* &&5574= 5574= -*&) #% #% $.1)1.+* 7&7* /*<*1 /*<*1 <4:1) <4:1) 2&0* 2&0* & ,7*&9 1.991* <.9;.*<8 -42* 42* 8.9* 8.9* 8*(43) 8*(43) 94 94 343* 343* 1.991* 7&3(7&3(- < .9- ; .*<8 & SAN 2.1*8 84:984:9- 4+ 4+ *2.3, *2.3, 43 *&89 4+ 4+ .,-<&> .,-<&> AN JU UAN AN RANCH ANCH – 4(&9*) 2.1*8 *&89 41:2':8 41:2':8 .,-<&> .,-<&> 43 4(&9*) 5574=.2&9*1> &(7*8 &(7*8 !9&9* &(7*8 (438.89.3, (438.89.3, 4+ 4+ &5574=.2&9*1> &5574=.2&9*1> !9&9* *&8* *&8* &(7*8 **)*) **)*) 5574=.2&9*1> :3(4397411*) -*&) &11492*39 <4:1) <4:1) '* '* &5574= &5574= 841&7 54<*7*) 54<*7*) 894(0 894(0 <*118 <*118 <.9<.9*&) #% #% "-*7* "-*7* &7* &7* 841&7 :3(4397411*) "-* "-* (&991* (&991* &11492*39 2*9&1 2.1*8 "-* -&8 ).;*78* .1*8 5.5*1.3* 5.5*1.3* " 1&3)8(&5* (438.89.3, (438.89.3, 4+ 4+ -.,-.,-* 7&3(7&3(- &8 & ;*7> ;*7> ) .;*78* 1&3)8(&5* 2*9&1 8947&,* 8947&,* 9&308 9&308 &5574=.2&9*1> &5574=.2&9*1> A 2 24:39&.3 4&0 )*8*79 4 &0 (4;*7*) (4;*7*) (&3>438 (&3>438 24:39&.3 ,7&881&3)8 "-*7* "-*7* .8 .8 51*39.+:1 51*39.+:1 24:39&.3 +449-.118 +449-.118 )*8*79 ,7&881&3)8 24:39&.3 5*&08 5*&08 )**5 )**5 /:3.5*7 /:3.5*7 <.1)1.+* 6:&.1 )4;* <.1)1.+* .3(1:).3, .3(1:).3, )**7 )**7 .'*= .'*= //&;&1.3& &;&1.3& 6 :&.1 ) 4;* 26.47-A 2 6.47-ACRE CRE FA ARM RM +47 &(7*8 &(7*8 8:7+&(* 8:7+&(* <&9*7 <&9*7 4++ !-&1*2 !-&1*2 4143> 4143> 4&) 4&) 47)*78 47)*78 9-* 9-* .4 .4 7&3)* 7&3)* 7.;*7 7.;*7 +47 8&1* 8&1* 4++ 7.,-98 &(7*8 8:551*2*39&1 8:551*2*39&1 ,74:3) ,74:3) <&9*7 <&9*7 77.,-98 .,-98 7.,-98 &(7*8 57.2&7> 57.2&7> 27.50 (7*8 (7*8 (7*8 4+ 97&(98 97&(98 @ (7*8 (7*8 (7*8 @ <.11 <.11 27.50 Acre Acre Farm Farm - 438.898 438.898 4+ 8*11 8-&7*) 8-&7*) .77.,&9.43 .77.,&9.43 <*11 <*11 422:3.9> 422:3.9> <&9*7 <&9*7 *1*( *1*( 8*11 8*5&7&9*1> 8*5&7&9*1> :11 :11 97.( &2:3*? 4&) 4&) 94 94 &)/4.3.3, &)/4.3.3, 5745*79> 5745*79> **&:9.+:1 &:9.+:1 +&72 +&72 97.( 9*1*5-43* 9*1*5-43* ,&8 ,&8 43 43 &2:3*? 1&3) ;.*<8 84:9!&3 .*<8 "&0* "&0* ..,-<&> ,-<&> 84:9- 994 4! &3 ..,:*1 ,:*1 1&3) ,7*&9 ,7*&9 24:39&.3 24:39&.3 ;&11*> ;&11*> ; *&89 477 884:943 412*3&8 477 ++.789 .789 77.,-9 .,-9 4 4:9- 4 3 &&88 4 12*3&8 9-*3 9-*3 11*+9 *+9 4 *&89 47 47 1*+9 1*+9 43 43 ..,-<&> ,-<&> *&89 43 *&89 4 3 &2:3*? &2:3*? 94 94 *3) *3) 4+ 4+ 5&;*2*39 5&;*2*39

““If If you y o u aare re interested interested in in ffarm arm lland and oorr ranches ranches in in New N ew Mexico, Mex ico , give giv e me me a call” call” 66

OCTOBER 2012

DAN DELANEY REAL ESTATE, LLC 3318 18 W. W. Amador Amador Avenue Avenue Las Cruces, NM L as C ruces, N M 88005 88005 ((O) O) 5575/647-5041 75/647-5041 ((C) C) 5575/644-0776 75/644-0776 nmlandman@zianet.com n mlandman@zianet.com www.zianet.com/nmlandman w ww.zianet.com/nmlandman


REAL ESTATE GUIDE

Nancy A. Belt, Broker Cell 520-221-0807 Office 520-455-0633 Jesse Aldridge 520-251-2735 Rye Hart 520-455-0633 Tobe Haught 505-264-3368 Sandy Ruppel 520-444-1745

Committed To Always Working Hard For You! RRANCHES ANCHES / FFARMS ARMS ead DDouble ouble CCircle ircle RRanch, anch, EEagle agle 411 HHead 411 CCreek, reek, AAZZ USFS USFS Allotment, Allotment, 13 13 ac ac of of deeded, 44-BR, -BR, 2-story 2-story rock rock home, home, bbarn, arn, deeded, corrals, & outfitters outfitters camp. camp. HHQQ centrally centrally corrals, located iinn a secluded secluded draw. draw. W ell located Well improved with with 16 16 large large ppastures, astures, 336+ 6+ improved miles ooff new new ffencing, encing, 3300 miles miles ooff new new miles pipeline wwith ith sseveral everal m ajor solar solar ppumpumppipeline major ing ssystems, ystems, additional additional wwater ater storage storage & ing 1.5M ww/horses /horses & numerous drinkers. drinkers. $$1.5M numerous eequipment. quipment. TTerms erms **NEW* NEW* 3316 16 HHead ead RRanch, anch, nnear ear SSocorro, ocorro, NNM, M, +/-2663 cenic acres acres ooff ddeeded, eeded, /-2663 sscenic 1917 aacres cres NM NM State State lease, lease, 24,582 24,582 1917 acres BBLM. LM. Solid Solid working, working, cattle cattle ranch ranch inin acres good llocation ocation w/excellent w/excellent access. access. a good Good m browse & ggrass. rass. 1120,000 20,000 Good mixix ooff browse gallons of of water water storage, storage, pipelines, pipelines, gallons wells, dirt dirt ttanks. anks. HQ HQ w/home, w/home, ggood ood ccororwells, rals iinn the the foothills foothills of of the the Ladron Ladron M tns. rals Mtns. $$1,400,000 1,400,000 **REDUCED* R EDUCED* ++//--128 128 HHead ead FFlying lying DDiamond iamond RRanch anch, Klondyke, Klondyke, AAZZ ++/-1500 /-1500 deeded acres, acres, SState tate & ((2) 2) USFS USFS Grazing Grazing deeded Leases. Main Main residence, residence, gguesthouse, uesthouse, Leases. barn, hay hay barn, barn, & ccorrals orrals at at HHQ. Q. Good Good barn, 1,300,000 access, inin a great great location. location. $$1,300,000 access, 5522 HHead ead RRanch, anch, SSan an SSimon, imon, AAZZ – GGreat reat GGuest uest RRanch anch PProspect rospect Pristine, Pristine, & pprivate, rivate, only 12 12 miles miles from from I-10. I-10. Bighorn Bighorn sheep, sheep, only ruins, pictographs. pictographs. 1480 1480 acres acres of of deeddeedruins, ed, 5522 head, head, BLM BLM llease, ease, hhistoric istoric rrock ock ed, house, new new cabin, cabin, springs, springs, wells. wells. house, $$1,500,000 1,500,000 TTerms. erms. **SOLD* SOLD* 2250–400+ 50–400+ HHead ead Cattle Cattle Ranch Ranch Sheldon, Sheldon, AAZZ – 11,450 ,450 ddeeded eeded aacres, cres, ++//3300 ssections ections BBLM, LM, 1150+ 50+ aacres cres iirrigated rrigated ffarm arm lland. and. NNice ice HHQQ iincludes ncludes two two rrock ock hhomes, omes, ggood ood sset et ooff steel steel sshipping hipping & hhorse orse ccorrals, orrals, bbarn.. arn..

SOLD

150 150 Head Head VF VF Ranch, Ranch, NW NW of of Willco Willcox,x, AZ AZ – AAtt tthe he bbase ase ooff tthe he W inchester Winchester M ountains. +//-950 -950 ddeeded eeded aacres, cres, 99,648 ,648 Mountains. SState tate GGrazing razing LLease. ease. SSmall mall 1 bbedroom edroom hhome, ome, ccorrals, orrals, wwell, ell, aand nd eelectric lectric aatt hheadeadqquarters. uarters. GGreat reat ccountry. ountry. GGood ood m mixix ooff $1,100,000. bbrowse rowse & ggrass. rass. $1,100,000.

*SOLD* *SOLD* 130 130 Head Head Sundown Sundown Ranch, Ranch, southeast southeast of of Sonoita, Sonoita, AZ AZ – 984 984 Deeded Deeded Ac Ac, 22700 700 AAcc UUSFS SFS GGrazing razing Lease. Lease. VVintage intage rranch anch hhome, ome, bbunk unk hhouse, ouse, eexcelxcelllent ent working working ccorrals, orrals, bbeautiful eautiful rrolling olling $988,000. ggrasslands rasslands wwith itih ooaks. aks. $988,000.

SOLD

*SOLD* *SOL D* 320 320 Ac Ac Farm, Farm, Kansas Kansas Settlement, ettlement, AZ AZ – TThis his wworking orking ffarm arm hhas as 22–120 –120 aacre cre ZZimmatic immatic PPivots, ivots, oone ne pplanted lanted iinn BBermuda, ermuda, a nnice ice ssite ite bbuilt uilt hhome, ome, llarge arge wworkshop orkshop & hhay ay barn. barn. 5 iirrigation rrigation wwells, ells, 2 ddomestic omestic wwells. ells. LLots ots ooff ppossibilities. ossibiblities. GGrow row a vvariety ariety ooff ccrops, rops, ppecans ecans oorr ppistaistacchios; hios; or or ppasture asture ccattle, attle, ffenced enced aand nd ccross ross $1.1 M. M. ffenced. enced. $1.1

1177 hhead ead BBLM LM aallotment, llotment, pprivate rivate rretreat, etreat, ttwo wo wwells. ells. VVery ery rremote emote & eextremely xtremely sscenic cenic ww/sycamores, /sycamores, ccottonwoods ottonwoods & $ 2 8 5 ,0 0 0 bbeautiful eautiful rrock ock fformations. ormations. $285,000 Termss.. Terms

Open Bo x A rr o w Ranc h, Mc Int o sh , New Mex i c o

*SOLD* D* Greenlee Greenlee CCounty ounty, AAZ,Z, 1139 39 HHead ead *SOL Ranch Ranch – YYear-long ear-long USFS USFS ppermit ermit w/two w/two rroom oom lline ine ccamp, amp, barn barn & ccorrals orrals aatt HHQ. Q. emote horseback RRemote horseback rranch anch w/limited w/limited vvehicular ehicular access. access. Sheldon, Sheldon, AZ. AZ.

D L O S D SOL

335 335 Head Head Ranch, Ranch, Greenlee Greenlee County County, AZ AZ – eeded NNear ear DDouble ouble CCircle ircle RRanch. anch. ++//- 2200 DDeeded omes, bbarn arn & ooutbuildutbuildaacres, cres, ww/two /two hhomes, iings. ngs. 5588 SSections ections UUSFS SFS ggrazing razing ppermit. ermit. GGood ood vvehicular ehicular aaccess ccess ttoo tthe he rranch anch – ooththeerwise rwise tthis his iiss a horseback horseback rranch. anch. SScenic, cenic, $850,000 ggreat reat ooutfitters utfitters pprospect. rospect. $850,000 Wickenburg, Wickenburg, AAZZ – 216 216 Head Head Cattle Cattle Ranch. Ranch. SScenic, cenic, lush lush high high ddesert esert vvegetaegetattion. ion. 1103 03 ddeeded eeded aacres, cres, SState, tate, BBLM LM & 33,100 ,100 acres acres pprivate rivate llease. ease. W ell wwatered atered Well prings & wwells. ells. AAbundant bundant ww/tanks, /tanks, ssprings ffeed, eed, nnumerous umerous ccorrals orrals & great great ssteel teel $ 8 5 0 ,0 0 0 . sshipping hipping pens. pens. $850,000. *REDUCED *REDUCED TO TO $350,000* $350,000* +/- 60 60 Head Head Cattle Cattle Ranch Ranch Bisbe Bisbee/McNeal, e/McNeal, AAZZ – ggrazing razing lleases eases HHQQ oonn 2244 44 aacres cres ooff ppri-rivvate ate lland and iincluding ncluding llog og hhome, ome, bbunk unk hhouse, ouse, ccorrals, orrals, hhay ay bbarn, arn, wwell, ell, aarena, rena, Purchase ttack ack hhouse ouse & sstorage torage ssheds. heds. Purchase HQ HQ on on 966 966 acres acres & llease ease ffor or $$500,000. 500,000. *REDUCED* *REDUCED* Young, Young, AZ, AZ, 65+ 65+ Acres Acres – UUnder nder tthe he M ogollon RRim, im, ssmall mall ttown own Mogollon ccharm harm & m ountain vviews. iews. 22100 100 ss.f., .f., mountain 3 BBR, R, 2 BBath ath hhome, ome, 2 BBRR ccabin, abin, hhistoric istoric rrock ock hhome ome ccurrently urrently a m useum, sshop, hop, & museum, bbarn. arn. EExcellent xcellent oopportunity pportunity ffor or hhorse orse ffarm, arm, bbed ed & bbreakfast, reakfast, oorr lland and ddevelopevelopcres ffor or $$1,070,000; 1,070,000; m ent. +//-- 6655 aacres ment. hhome ome & oother ther iimprovements. mprovements. $424,500. $424,500. *REDUCED *REDUCED TO TO $240,000* $240,000* Santa Santa Teresa Teresa Mtns, Mtns, Fort Fort Thomas, Thomas, AZ AZ – 2200 00 aacre cre PPlus lus

N EW MEXICO MEXICO PROPERTIES PROPERTIES NEW LListed isted CCooperatively ooperatively with with Action Action Realty, Realty, CCliff, liff, NM, NM, Dale Dale SSpurgeon, purgeon, Broker Broker AAnima nimaas,s, NM, NM, ++//- 1100 00 aacre cre Farm, Farm, wwith ith ++//- 9900 iirrigated rrigated acres, acres, fflood lood iirrigated rrigated Main ww/concrete /concrete ditches. ditches. M ain hhome, ome, ssecond econd hhome, ome, guest guest house, house, shop, shop, horse horse bbarns arns $325,000. oother ther buildings. buildings. $325,000.

*SOLD* D* +/-300 +/-300 Head Head Cattle Cattle Ranch, Ranch, *SOL Virden, NM +//-- 4010 Vir 4010 ddeeded eeded acres, acres, +//-2277 ssec ec BLM, BLM, 44.5 .5 ssec ec NNM M SState tate Lease. Lease. HHQQ iincludes ncludes 2 BBR, R, 1 bath, bath, site site bbuilt uilt hhome ome on on 10 10 irrigated irrigated acres. acres. W ell Well wwatered atered ranch. ranch.

SOLD

Frank Franklin, lin, NM, M, 28 28 Acre Acre Farm Farm – 1199 Acres Acres ooff water water rrights ights from from Franklin Franklin I.D., I.D., 5 BBR, R, $150,000 3 bath bath Mfg. Mfg. hhome, ome, ccorrals. orrals. $150,000 Terms Terms.s. H HORSE ORSE PPROPERTIES/LAND ROPERTIES/LAND W** +/- 4480 Oracle **NEW NNEW EW 80 AAcres cres OOracle, racle, AAZZ – OOne ne ooff the the last last rremaining emaining llarge arge parcels. parcels. CCurrently urrently operating operating as as a ssmall mall ccattle attle ooperation. peration. Great Great prospect prospect for for ffuture uture ddevelopment evelopment inin a ddesirable esirable location. location. FFenced enced with with a wwell, ell, eelectric lectric power, power, aand nd $2,500,000. ttwo wo mfg. mfg. homes homes – $2,500,000.

Combo ffarm arm & rranch anch • Combo on 5,217 5,217 deeded deeded aacres cres on Three homes, homes, barns, barns, outbuildings outbuildings • Three Corrals w/scales, w/scales, loading loading chute chute lot lot • Corrals feed llot ot & feed ivots, 4 wells wells •7P Pivots, Pastures hhave ave nnon-freeze on-freeze tub/tanks tub/tanks • Pastures Planted iinn ooats, ats, alfalfa, alfalfa, • Planted sudan/haygrazer & permanent permanent ppasture asture sudan/haygrazer 450 C YL, 3300 00 calves calves for for 4 m ths., • 450 CYL, mths., 1100 00 replacement replacement hheifers eifers

$5,500,000 $5,500,000

*REDUCED* UCED* Irrigated Irrigated FFarm, arm, SSt.t. DDavid, avid, *RED AZ AZ 115+ 5+ aacre cre pparcel, arcel, nnew ew 3 BR, BR, 2 Bath Bath ccustom ustom hhome ome overlooking overlooking pond, pond, iirrigated rrigated ffarm arm ffields, ields, 120 120 pecan pecan ttrees; rees; IIndoor ndoor sswimming wimming pool; pool; guest guest house; house; studio; studio; rroot oot cellar; cellar; wworkshop; orkshop; machine machine & hay hay $650,000. $790,000 $650,000. ssheds. heds. $790,000 W illcoxx,, AAZZ 4400 AAcres cres – GGreat Willco reat views views inin every every ddirection, irection, power power to to tthe he property. property. $$85,0 85,0000. 00.

Stockmen’s Stockmen’s Realty Realty iiss ppleased leased ttoo a announce nnounce the the a addition ddition of of SANDY SANDY R RUPPEL UPPEL ttoo our our team. team. SSandy andy h has as b been een iinvolved nvolved in in the the h horse, orse, cattle cattle & rranching anching industry industry ffor or many many yyears ears & w wee a are re eexcited xcited to to w welcome elcome her her aboard! aboard!

www.stockmensrealty.com w ww.stockmensrealty.com — RAN NC NCH CH HE E ES S • LAND • FARMS OCTOBER 2012

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Feral Swine – A Growing Problem for New Mexico here is no question that feral swine are a growing problem in New Mexico. In addition to spreading disease, the animals destroy pasture and fences, prey on livestock and wildlife and compete for forage and water and spread invasive weeds. Due to the potential risk feral swine pose to animal health, the New Mexico Livestock Board – charged with protecting the health of New Mexico’s livestock industry – recently passed a rule designating the species a pest and clarifying that feral swine are not considered livestock or protected as livestock in the state. Feral swine can carry numerous diseases – including tuberculosis, brucellosis,

T

and foot and mouth disease – which could have a huge impact on livestock in New Mexico. “It’s only a matter of time before we have a serious disease outbreak due to our growing population of feral swine,” said Dr. Dave Fly, New Mexico State Veterinarian. “They are scavengers, so they pick up everything that’s around. They have a high propensity to carry disease, and we know they are proliferating.” Wildlife Services, an agency under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) tests a portion of the feral swine killed in New Mexico for disease. Feral

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swine in some parts of the United States have been found to carry H3N2, the swine influenza virus, although it has not yet been found in New Mexico. However, Neospora caninum, a protozoan parasite which causes abortions in cattle and is believed to be the leading cause of abortions in dairy cattle has been found in New Mexico’s feral swine. “This parasite is something that producers should be aware of, and it certainly has the ability to impact New Mexico’s livestock industry,” said Alan May, State Director of Wildlife Services. Each year, feral hogs cause over $1 billion in damages nationwide. Females can have up to two litters each year, and in New Mexico, their range has expanded from 2 to 17 counties in the past seven years. “There is absolutely nothing good about feral hogs,” May said. “They are a public health threat, as well as an environmental and economic disaster. In other areas of the country where they’ve had feral hogs for a while, hunters have begun to realize that these invasive, beasts are not an opportunity, they are a very serious problem.” Feral swine have have gradually spread across the country, and are now found in almost every state. In New Mexico, the arid climate and lack of water has helped keep population densities down – an advantage

575/539-2615 (Fax & Phone) continued on page 69

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NMLB

continued from page 68

when it comes to control and/or eradication. Currently, many populations in the state are found in river corridors, including the Pecos River, Canadian River, and in the Rio Grande valley, but they are quickly expanding their range. Although there is no active eradication work going on in New Mexico at this time, Secretary of Agriculture Jeff Witte recently formed a task force to bring together state, federal and industry agencies and organizations on the issue. The group is currently working on a statewide eradication plan. “Everyone agrees that New Mexico has a problem but, as with most new initiatives, funding is the issue,” May noted. The sooner action can be taken, the better results will be for the state. “This is a good opportunity to get a handle on the situation. If we took aggressive action now, we could push them back, or at least hold them to certain areas in the state,” Fly said. “However, if we don’t take action soon, the population will get to the point that we can’t get rid of them.” “Right now, eradication is doable, but the longer we wait, the more problems we are going to have and the more difficult eradication will be,” May agreed. Even with limited funding, state and federal agencies, tribes, and sportsmen’s organizations are pooling their resources and cooperating to address localized damage caused by feral swine, and to try and prevent this destructive species from spreading to new areas. Helping people deal with problem wildlife is part of the job for Wildlife Services, and the agency will help people with feral swine problems on a case-by-case basis. They are especially interested in hearing about new, or unmapped, populations. To request Wildlife Services’ assistance with feral swine damage, or to report feral swine in new areas, people may call the Wildlife Services state office at ■ 505/346-2640.

estrays

October 8, 2012

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following described estray animals have been taken under the provisions of Chapter 77, Article 13 of New Mexico Statutes Annotated 1978, and sold for the benefit of the owners of said estrays as provided by law. The proceeds will be subject to claims and proof of ownership as provided by law. New Mexico Livestock Board · Myles Culbertson, Dir. · Albuquerque, N.M.

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AlphaGraphics A lphaGraphics Albuquerque Albuquerque 3 3700 700 O Osuna suna R Rdd N NE, E, SSte te 5 515 15 AAlbuquerque, lbuquerque, N NM M8 87109 7109 5 505-888-2679 05-888-2679 design020@alphagraphics.com design020@alphagraphics.com OCTOBER 2012

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Point

continued from page 61

The Dirty Little Secret . . .

“We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) (collectively referred to as the ‘‘Services’’ or ‘‘we’’), propose to revise

"

!

our regulations pertaining to impact analyses conducted for designations of critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (the Act). These changes are being proposed as directed by the President’s February 28, 2012, memorandum, which directed us to take prompt steps to revise our regulations to provide

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that the economic analysis be completed and made available for public comment at the time of publication of a proposed rule to designate critical habitat.” —Preamble to FWS–R9–ES–2011–0073, Proposed Federal Rulemaking published Aug. 24, 2012. If this is all you read about this proposed rules change, you’d think, “OK, no big deal this makes sense. We want the economic impact analysis of Federal rules to be complete—otherwise why bother. We also want to see that complete analysis before the public comment period so we can actually comment on the estimated cost and impact of proposed rules.” But according to a newly released Stoel Rives analysis of the impact and implications of the proposed critical habitat rules change, the secret is you would be mistaken. Critical habitat protection has been one of the most controversial and intrusive provisions of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), write Jim Hunt, theenergycollective.com . The goal of the provision was to avoid doing more harm to endangered species thus giving them an opportunity to sustain themselves. The ESA says Federal agencies may not take actions that destroy or adversely affect critical habitat. There is nothing wrong with this goal, but the way it has been applied has resulted in situations where the designation amounts to a virtual taking of private property for a public purpose. This critical habitat designation provision also creates opportunity for abuse of discretion if Federal agencies or environmental interveners use it to coerce outcomes that undermine the economics of proposed projects. We often refer to this as NIMBY or other pejoratives, but they are symptoms of a Federal environmental regulatory process that is out of balance. The review of the real implications of this proposed rules change is a good case study in the creeping process of environmental GOTCHA played out by rulemaking. To balance the coercive potential of critical habitat designation, the Stoel Rives analysis reminds us that the ESA requires Federal agencies to “consider potential economic, national security, and other relevant impacts”. This includes economic impacts to private landowners and developers. And in cases where this balancing of interests finds that there are more economic, national security or other benefits from doing so the Federal Agencies “may exclude an area from critical habitat” if those benefits outweigh the benefits of continued on page 73

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inMemoriam Clarence McKnight “Bill” Bogle, 93, Dexter, passed away, surrounded by his family at his home on August 15, 2012. He was born March 20, 1919 to Hal Green Bogle and Inez Fay Bogle in Kenton, Tennessee and moved with his parents the following year to Dexter, where he lived all his life. He graduated from Hagerman High School in 1936 and Vanderbilt University in 1940. He met his life-long bride Berneice at a soda shop in Hagerman, and they were married on January 9, 1943. Berneice and Bill lived in Dexter where he was a farmer and rancher. They reared five children, Mary Lynn Bogle, Stuart McKnight Bogle, Donald Hal Bogle, Beverly Ann Bogle Coots and Scott Gilmore Bogle and had nine grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. Bill’s sons and daughters live in Chaves County where they work in the family agricultural business, with the exception of Mary Lynn who is an attorney in Roswell and Artesia. Bill’s life was devoted to his family, his church and his community. Johnny Paiz Jr., 55, Portales, passed away September 9, 2012 at his home surrounded by his family and friends. Johnny was born August 14, 1957 to Johnny and Josie Paiz in Portales. He graduated from Dora High School in 1975. On June 27, 1981 he married Jeanell Sharp in Moriarty, NM. They made their home in Portales. He was employed by Ritchie Brother Auctioneers selling industrial equipment worldwide. He was active in the show cattle industry and an avid supporter of the New Mexico Bred Steer Show at the New Mexico State Fair. Johnny is survived by his wife, daughter, Jewlie (husband, Justin) Kerns; son, Kody Paiz and a granddaughter, Zoey Kerns. He is also survived by his parents, siblings, Larry (wife, Josephine) Paiz, Kathy Paiz, Pete (wife, Mary) Paiz, numerous nieces and nephews, and all his Ritchie Brothers family. Roy Donald Taylor, 79, Rogers, passed away August 29, 2012 in Portales. Roy was born on March 13, 1933, in Childress, Texas to the home of Ella and Rupert D. Taylor. He grew up on a ranch in Santa Rosa. He served in the Army during the Korean War. Through the years he had worked on numerous ranches in New Mexico and Wyoming. Roy had also worked on various construction jobs and at feed

yards, but ranch life and “cowboying” was what he loved. On July 16, 1976, he married Kathy Ellis. He was a member of the Causey Church of Christ. Roy is survived by his wife, Kathy; nine sons, Kirk (wife, Crystal), Durango, Colorado; Robert (wife, Kwana) Tatum; Donald, Pennsylvania; Matthew (wife, Rachel), Hooker, Oklahoma, Donnie, Florida; Roy Jr., Christopher, Mitchell, and Ricky, all of Guymon, Oklahoma; four daughters, Beth (husband, Leslie) Thomas, Snyder, Texas, Jimmie Lou Harvey, and Twilla Taylor, both of Florida and Ramona Finkeldi, Garden City, Kansas; numerous grandchildren; two brothers, Bill (wife, Peggy) Taylor; Ruidoso Downs; and Jim (wife, Susan) Taylor, Whitewater, Colorado; a sister, Roberta Garcia, Las Vegas; an a uncle, Tex Taylor, Santa Rosa; as well as numerous other relatives. Richard Shaw, 93, Springer, passed away on August 6, 2012. He was born on August 11, 1918 in Rankin, Oklahoma to Bernard Bliss and Lura Jane Shaw. Soon after his birth his family moved to Harding County. Richard married Lavona Pauline Schell in 1941. They moved to Colfax County in 1945 where they farmed and ranched until retirement and a move to Springer in 1981. He served on the Colfax County Home Administration and the ASCS Boards for several years and on the Board for the Springer Electric Coop from 1969 until 1989. He served as chairman for several years. Richard was honored by the American American Society of Range Management for his stewardship of range lands. He is survived by three sons, Don L. (wife, Barbara), Springer; Richard L. (wife, Barbara), and Gary D. (wife, Jackie) all of Mills, as well as 11 grandchilren, six greatgrandchildren and numerous nieces and nephews. Bob Shafer, 88, Carrizozo, passed away August 3, 2012, in Ruidoso. He was born February 12, 1924 at Buffalo, New York and lived all of his life in Lincoln County. He served in the Navy during World War II. He was a former Lincoln County Commissioner, former member of the Carrizozo School Board, a member of the Carrizozo Masonic Lodge #41, the Scottish Rite and Carrizozo Country Club. He was a rancher and attended Trinity United Methodist Church. He married

Jane Gallacher on May 5, 1946. He is survived by his wife, Jane; two sons, Scott, Carrizozo and Billy Bob, Claunch; two sisters, Janet Mae Young, Denver and Betty Barrick, Lubbock; and five grandchildren. Jack Verhines, 80, Artesia, passed away on September 9, 2012. He was born May 30, 1932 in Roswell to William Carl Verhines and Mary Lynn (Scott) Verhines. He married Corinne Aaron on May 30, 1953 they were sweethearts for 59 years. He is survived by his wife; his son Scott (wife, Cathy Cobb Verhines), Albuquerque; daughter Carla Dungan (husband, Neal), Carlsbad; as well as two siblings, his brother Bill (wife, LaGene), Roswell; and sister Kathleen West (husband James), Ft. Sumner. He is also survived by four grandchildren and one great-grandchild. He attended Roswell High School and Eastern New Mexico University on a football scholarship. He served in the US Army during the Korean Conflict. After the army he returned to Texas Tech University in Lubbock and then completed his civil engineering degree (BSCE, 1958) from the University of New Mexico. He was a part of the New Mexico consulting engineering community for over 40 years providing engineering services to cities, counties, state and federal agencies, and private clients statewide. He started his career with Hughes Oil Company, worked for Mann Engineering and Smith Engineering Company and served as President of Scanlon and Associates for 30 years. The family would like to extend a special thanks to the caregivers attt The Good Life Assisted Living Complex and the Landsun Homes Health Service Center in Carlsbad. Tracy Lee Self, 64, Yuma, Arizona, died July 22, 2012, at Yuma Regional Medical Center. Born January 8, 1948, in Roy, New Mexico, he was a police officer and veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. Robert Lee Burns, 81, Nara Visa, passed away on August 19, 2012. He was born and raised at Nara Visa to James and Willie Burns. He attended school in Nara Visa and graduated High School from Regis High in Denver. He also graduated from Regis University. After serving in the Korean War from 1951-1953, he was awarded the Purple Heart. He married Pat continued on page 74 OCTOBER 2012

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A Accounting & Consulting Group Ltd. . . .19 Ag New Mexico FCS ACA . . . . . . . . . . .79 Ken Ahler Real Estate Co., Inc . . . . . . . .63 Alphagraphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 American Galloway Breeders Assn . . . . .57 American Water Surveyors . . . . . . . . . . .47 Arizona Ranch Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . .64 Artesia Trailer Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 B B & B Farm Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 B & H Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Ken Babcock Sales . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Bar G Feedyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Bar J Bar Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4, 16 Bar M Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64, 65 Barber Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Tommy Barnes Auctioneer . . . . . . . . . . .54 Beaverhead Outdoors . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 BJM Sales & Service, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Border Tank Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Bovine Elite LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Bradley 3 Ranch LTD . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Brands/Leon Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Jeff Byrd for Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 C C & M Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 C Bar Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Carter Brangus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Carter’s Livestock Equipment . . . . . . . .54 Casey Beefmasters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Cates Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Cattleman’s Livestock Commission . . . .34 Caviness Packing Co Inc . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Centerfire Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 Don Chalmers Ford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Chase Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Clavel Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Clovis Livestock Auction . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Coba Select Sires . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Coldwell Banker de Wetter Hovios . . . . .66 Coleman Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . . .21, 57 Conniff Cattle Co., LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Copeland & Sons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Cornerstone Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Cox Ranch Herefords . . . . . . . . . . .16, 56 Coyote Ridge Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 CPI Pipe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Craig Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Crystalyx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 CS Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 D D & S Polled Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 D Squared Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 David Dean/Campo Bonito . . . . . . . . . .66 Decker Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

ADVERTISERS’ INDEX

Dan Delaney Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Desert Scales & Weighing Equipment . .53 Dry Creek Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 E Elgin Breeding Service . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Emmons Ultrasound Services . . . . . . . . .54 F FBFS / Monte Anderson . . . . . . . . . . . .47 FBFS / Larry Marshall . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Farm Credit of New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . .8 Farmway Feed Mill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 Five States Livestock Auction . . . . . . . . .43 Freeman Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Fury Farms Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 G Giant Rubber Water Tanks . . . . . . . . . .43 Grau Charolais . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Tom Growney Equipment Inc . . . . .54, 78 H Harrison Quarter Horses . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Headquarters West Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Henard Ranches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16, 49 Hereford Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Hill Country Brangus Breeders Assoc. . . .27 Hi-Pro Feeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Hubbell Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56, 70 Hudson Livestock Supplements . . . . . . .74 Huguley Co. Land Sales . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Hutchison Western . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 J J3 Cattle Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Steve Jensen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Joe’s Boot Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59, 61 K Kaddatz Auctioneering & Farm Eq. . . . .53 Kail Ranches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 King Hereford Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 L L & H Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60 Lakins Law Firm PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Lazy D Red Angus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Lazy Way Bar Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Lowry Show Calves . . . . . . . . . . . . .55, 74 M Major Ranch Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Manford Cattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16, 55

Martin Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Mason Cattle Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 Mason & Morse (York Ranch) . . . . . . . .62 Mathers Realty Inc. / Keith Brown . . . . .64 Matlock & Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Paul McGillard / Murney Assoc. . . . . . . .66 McGinley Red Angus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Merrick’s Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Mesa Feed, Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Mesa Tractor, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33, 54 Michelet Homestead Realty . . . . . . . . . .65 Chas S. Middleton & Son . . . . . . . . . . .65 Monfette Construction Co . . . . . . . . . . .54 Mountain View Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 N New Mexico Cattle Growers Insurance . .35 New Mexico Hereford Association . . . . .20 NMSU Animal & Range Sciences . . .29, 31 New Mexico Property Group . . . . . . . . .65 New Mexico Purina Dealers . . . . . . . . . .80 Nine Cross Hereford Ranch . . . . . . . . . .23 No-Bull Enterprises LLC . . . . . . . . . . . .60 O Jim Olson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44 O’Neill Land LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 OXO Hereford Ranches . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 P Paco Feed Yard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Phillips Diesel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 PolyDome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 Pratt Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16, 56 Priddy Cattleguards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69

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S Sandia Trailer Sales & Service . . . . . . . .53 Santa Rita Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Scott Land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Scrap Steel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Sci-Agra Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76

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continued from page 70

including it in the designation. See why this is so contentious? The case law is littered with conflicting decisions in these matters. And that too creates opportunities for mischief. Here we can even sympathize with Federal bureaucrats trying to write rules that will apply to all when a decision in one Federal court may be at odds with a decision interpreting the same provision differently in another. That is what apparently provoked this proposed rulemaking. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, the most overturned court in the nation, adopted a “baseline approach” to critical habitat designation which allowed the Federal agencies to consider only ‘incremental impacts’ in their economic impact analysis of critical habitat designation. The practical effect of the ruling in the Western states where it was applicable was to enable the agencies to calculate the cost of a rule using minor additional administrative costs rather than the total regulatory burden. The result , of course, was much more critical habitat was found to pass the cost benefit test and many more landowners were suing to stop it in Federal court. In the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals the same question was litigated and appealed with the opposite result. The Tenth circuit said the baseline incremental approach used in the Ninth Circuit was unlawful precisely because it ignored the full cost of regulatory burdens in measuring the overall cost and benefits of the critical habitat designation as required by the ESA. So what? So the proposed rulemaking seeks to adopt the Ninth Circuit opinion allowing this incremental baseline approach and reject the Tenth circuit opinion. If this proposed rule is adopted it surely will be litigated to the DC circuit where Federal rules are appealed and perhaps then onto the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Burns on December 27, 1954. They had four children, Jimmy (wife, Liz) Nara Visa; John, New York City; Barbara Stoll (husband. Rick) Indiahoma, Oklahoma; and Kellee Clark (husband, Terry) Fort Belvoir, Virginia and nine grandchildren. He was a third generation rancher in Nara Visa area. He was active in the Sacred Heart Catholic church, over his lifetime he was a volunteer firefighter, served on the Nara Visa Community Center Board, Nara Visa Cemetery Association, Amistad School Board, Knights of Columbus, the Southwestern Electric Board, and was a member of the New Mexico Cattle Growersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Association. Marvin Polley, 102, of Tempe, Arizona, passed away peacefully at his home on September 12, 2012. Marvin was born to Bert and Sarah Polley in Bisbee, Arizona on May 6, 1910. Mr. Polley and his son, Art, owned the Mashed O Ranch southwest of Deming for many years. Marvin is survived by his youngest son; Ronald C. Polley (wife, Marion), by two grandsons, four step-grandchildren, eight great-grandchilcontinued on page 75

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In Memoriam continued from page 74

dren, and by two great-great-grandchildren. Lee B. Kapus, 76, Cedaredge, Colorado, passed away September 16, 2012 after a valiant battle with cancer. She was born September 1, 1936 in Basin, Wyoming and grew up in a military family. Lee spent three of those years in Germany. She graduated from High School in Brookfield, Illinois and moved to Denver, Colorado the next day. Lee and Bob Kapus married March 24, 1956. Lee is survived by her husband -and their children Robin Laurie Dunn (husband, Aubrey) Roswell; Diana Robinson (husband Brian) Missoula, Montana; Jim Kapus (wife, Jennifer) Denver; and Lisa Kapus, Avondale, Arizona; eight grandchildren and one greatgranddaughter. She was a talented and prolific producer of quilts, knitting, embroidery, and many other needlework skills. She used her talents to give many gifts of love to several organizations for premies, veterans, firefighters and others. Ronald Luis Anthony, 76, Portales, passed away on August 9, 2012 in an auto accident. He was born on July 19, 1936, in Hobbs to John Thomas and Ruby Naioma (Vaughn) Anthony. Ronald graduated from Elida High School and attended Eastern New Mexico University with a bachelor degree in Science. Shortly after graduating from Eastern he married Glenda Charlene Parrish and they enjoyed 53 years together. He was active in the AMPI, and the ENMACC and numerous church boards and committees. He was a member of the Elida First United Methodist Church. Everyone knew him as a family man and he loved being with and playing with his grandkids. Ronald just plain had a big heart for everyone. Like his brother Fred, he loved collecting Antique cars and driving them in parades. George “Buddy” F. Tigner, 74, Magdalena, passed away on Aug. 14, 2012, after a lifetime of ranching, raising children and serving others. He was born on Oct. 19, 1937, in El Paso, Texas, to Fletcher C. Tigner and Cleo M. Holder Tigner. Buddy was raised on the family ranch between Deming and Silver City. He graduated from New Mexico State University in 1959, where he majored in agriculture and minored in English. He taught agriculture at Deming High School from 1959 to 1962 and Socorro High School from 1962 to

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1965. Buddy also served in the National Guard. In 1963 his family relocated to the present family ranch in Magdalena. He met and married his wife, Deborah Farmer in 1972. They raised six children and ranched in the Magdalena area for over 40 years. He loved ranching and being a steward of the land. He always said his greatest success was his children and grandchildren. He is survived by his wife, Deborah; his six children; 22 grandchildren; brother, James Tigner, Hartville, Missouri.; and sister, Patricia Moses, Sandia Park. His children and their spouses are Fletcher and Heidi Tigner of Magdalena, Mary Anne and Jory Mirabal of Magdalena, Erin and Matt Napier of Albuquerque, Sarah and Jason Valenzuela of Sandia Park, Carrie and Dustan Sant of Magdalena, Becca and Stetson Herrera of Magdalena. Joseph Michael Hervol, 95, Deming, passed away quietly at home August 14, 2012. Joe was one of eleven children born to Frank Joseph and Mary Theresa Hervol on October 31, 1916 in Gunter, Texas. In 1936, Joe, along with his father and three brothers left Wilson, Texas where they were dry land farming and moved to Deming during the Homestead Act. Joe married Eva Burdie Burton in 1941 in Lordsburg. On March 8, 1942 Joe enlisted in the Army at Fort Bliss. He was then sent to Hawaii where he helped rebuild the destruction in the aftermath of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. From Hawaii, he spent the next three years reclaiming multiple islands on the Asian Front of WW II. Upon his discharge from the Army, Joe spent the next few years working for the El Paso Natural Gas Company. In 1947, Joe joined his brother Frank A. Hervol in Deming where they spent the next five decades farming and ranching together. Together, Joe and Eva raised three children, Joe is survived by his sister in law, JoeAnn Hervol Tidwell, his three children, Mike, Ruby Jean and David, and two grandchildren, many many nieces, nephews, and great-nieces and nephews. Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note: Please send In Memoriam announcements to: Caren Cowan, N.M. Stockman, P.O. Box 7127, Albuquerque, NM 87194, fax: 505/998-6236 or email: caren@aaalivestock.com. Memorial donations may be sent to the Cattlegrowersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Foundation, a 501(c)3, tax deductable charitable foundation serving the rights of ranch families and educating citizens on governmental actions, policies and practices. Cattlegrowers Foundation, Inc., P.O. Box 7517, Albuquerque, NM 87194.


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