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John Gilmore, Member Since 1980

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MAY 2014

VOL 80, No. 5

USPS 381-580

TABLE OF CONTENTS

F E AT U R E S NEW MEXICO STOCKMAN

20

NMS Indian Livestock Days May 14-17

Write or call: P.O. Box 7127 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87194 Fax: 505/998-6236 505/243-9515 E-mail: caren@aaalivestock.com

33

Genetic Bootstraps

34

Gary Morton ... The Painting Cowboy

39

Contestants Sought for 2014 New Mexico Beef Ambassador

42

Mid-Year Convention Schedule

54

A Fitting Moment

Official publication of: ■

New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association Email: nmcga@nmagriculture.org; 2231 Rio Grande NW, P.O. Box 7517, Albuquerque, NM 87194, 505/247-0584, Fax: 505/842-1766; President, Jóse Varela López Executive Director, Caren Cowan Deputy Director, Zach Riley Asst. Executive Director, Michelle Frost New Mexico Wool Growers, Inc. P.O. Box 7520, Albuquerque, NM 87194, 505/247-0584 President, Marc Kincaid Executive Director, Caren Cowan Asst. Executive Director, Michelle Frost ■

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING Publisher: Caren Cowan Publisher Emeritus: Chuck Stocks Office Manager: Marguerite Vensel Advertising Reps.: Chris Martinez, Melinda Martinez Contributing Editors: Carol Wilson Callie Gnatkowski-Gibson, William S. Previtti, Lee Pitts Photographer: Dee Bridgers

by Miranda Reiman by Sharon Niederman

by Mike Moutoux

D E PA R T M E N T S 10

N.M. Cattle Growers’ Association President’s Letter

12

News Update

24

N.M. CowBelles Jingle Jangle

30

Farm Bureau Minute

32

On The Edge of Common Sense

40

To The Point

44

View from the Backside

46

N.M. Federal Lands Council News

48

Cowboy Heroes

51

NMBC Bullhorn

54

Market Place

56

New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers

58

Scatterin’ The Drive

60

Ad Index

by José Varela López, President

by Mike White, President by Baxter Black

by Caren Cowan by Barry Denton by Frank DuBois

by Jim Olson

61

In Memoriam

PRODUCTION

64

Seedstock Guide

Production Coordinator: Carol Pendleton Editorial & Advertising Design: Kristy Hinds

68

Real Estate Guide

by Don Bullis

by Curtis Fort

ADVERTISING SALES Chris Martinez at 505/243-9515, ext. 28 or chris@aaalivestock.com New Mexico Stockman (USPS 381-580) is published monthly by Caren Cowan, 2231 Rio Grande, NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104-2529. Subscription price: 1 year - $19.95 /2 years - $29.95. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Mexico Stockman, P.O. Box 7127, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87194. Periodicals Postage paid at Albuquerque, New Mexico and additional mailing offices. Copyright 2008 by New Mexico Stockman. Material may not be used without permission of the publisher. Deadline for editorial and advertising copy, changes and cancellations is the 10th of the month preceding publication. Advertising rates on request.

ON THE COVER . . . “Indians and Cowboys!” Members of Laguna Pueblo’s Sedillo Cattle Growers’ Association work side by side mentoring combat veterans in the Horses For Heroes New Mexico – Cowboy Up! Program. Photo by Nancy De Santis

www.aaalivestock.com

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MAY 2014

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by José Varela L ópez

ESSAGE

NMCGA PRESIDENT

Dear Fellow Members & Industry Supporters he month of April has come and gone without any appreciable moisture that I’m aware of, but I certainly hope that someone out there received some precipitation. In the miles I logged this past month I don’t recall seeing any green-up although it was good to see plenty of last fall’s grasses nearly everywhere I went. As is normally the case these days our industry faces many challenges. What I found to be interesting though is the paradoxical nature of a great number of things we need to deal with. For instance, cattle prices are at all time highs but many of us were forced to sell off part if not all of our animals in the last few years because of the prolonged drought. At the same time, with cattle prices so high it’s nearly impossible to re-stock the herd. Then there’s the issue of the lesser prairie chicken. The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish, along with its sister agencies in Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado and Kansas took the lead in an unprecedented effort to create a rangewide management plan in the hopes of enhancing habitat for the bird and to avert a listing by the Fish and Wildlife Service which would negatively impact not only many of our members, but other industries of major importance to New Mexico and the other states mentioned. Instead, the Fish and Wildlife Service listed the lesser prairie chicken as a threatened species and also accepted the multi-state management plan. This takes the cooperative and voluntary effort and makes it a regulatory and sometimes adversarial action, even though the agency thinks it’s a good idea. As you’ll recall, the Fish and Wildlife Service has also published a Draft Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Mexican Gray Wolf, the purpose of which is to propose population increases, expand its range and make the species fully endangered in New Mexico and Arizona. The problem is that there is no sound science presented in the document to confirm the effect on cattle and elk, nor that the wolf is different from its cousins to the north. There are also a couple of water issues that come to mind. The Environmental Protection Agency is currently proposing changes to the Clean Water Act which from all appearances would give that agency regulatory oversight over basically any and all waters in the United States, including folks with Koi ponds and rain created puddles on their properties. The Environmental Protection Agency also says that agriculture is exempt, but I haven’t read the nearly 400 page document to verify that for myself. The other water issue of importance is the recent opinion issued by our state’s attorney general which states that anglers can fish in streams that traverse private property as long as there is no trespass on the private land adjoining the stream. I’ve never been accused of being the sharpest tool in the shed but it occurs to me that if you’re wading in the stream your feet are touching the streambed below, which happens to be private property, so isn’t that trespass? And finally there’s the Cliven Bundy situation in Nevada. I don’t pretend to understand the entire sequence of events that led the Bureau of Land Management to attempt a roundup of Mr. Bundy’s cattle but I did find it very disconcerting to see a government agency allow the wanton killing and burying cattle while its own agents acted in paramilitary fashion to intimidate the free speech rights of many Americans. Unfortunately, there are other issues on the table as well, issues which we will be discussing and seeking to resolve at the mid-year convention on June 8-10. I really hope you’ll join the greater agricultural community in Las Cruces next month to give your input on the solutions necessary for us to maintain a vibrant industry in New Mexico, one that continues to feed all our families and millions of others. Until next month in Las Cruces… Sincerely,

T

José Varela López

www.nmagriculture.org NEW MEXICO CATTLE GROWERS’ ASSOCIATION OFFICERS José Varela López President La Cieneguilla

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Pat Boone President-Elect Elida

MAY 2014

John Conniff Randell Major Ernie Torrez Jeff Billberry Blair Clavel Shacey Sullivan Vice-President SW Vice-President NW Vice-President SE Vice-President NE Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer At Large, Las Cruces Magdalena La Jara Elida Roy Bosque Farms

Rex Wilson Past President Carrizozo

Caren Cowan Executive Director Albuquerque


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ROSWELL LIVESTOCK AUCTION SALES, INC. & ROSWELL LIVESTOCK AUCTION TRUCKING, INC. 900 North Garden · P.O. Box 2041 Roswell, New Mexico 88201 575/622-5580 www.roswelllivestockauction.com CATTLE SALES: MONDAYS HORSE SALES: APRIL, JUNE, SEPTEMBER and DECEMBER BENNY WOOTON RES 575/625-0071, CELL 575/626-4754 SMILEY WOOTON CELL 575/626-6253 Producers hauling cattle to Roswell Livestock New Mexico Receiving Stations need to call our toll-free number for a Transportation Permit number before leaving home. The Hauling Permit number 1-800/748-1541 is answered 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Trucks are available 7 days a week / 24 hours a day

ROSWELL LIVESTOCK AUCTION RECEIVING STATIONS LORDSBURG, NM 20 Bar Livestock Highway #90 at NM #3 – East side of highway. Receiving cattle for transport 2nd & 4th Sunday of each month. Truck leaves Lordsburg on Sunday at 2:00 p.m. (MST) Smiley Wooton, 575/622-5580 office, 575/626-6253 cell. PECOS, TX Hwy. 80 across from Town & Country Motel. Jason Heritage is now receiving cattle every Sunday. For information to unload contact Jason Heritage 575/840-9544 or Smiley Wooton 575/626-6253. NO PRIOR PERMITS REQUIRED. Trucks leave Sunday at 4:00 p.m. (CST) VAN HORN, TX 800 West 2nd, 5 blocks west of Courthouse. Steve Flippen, 254/462-2028. Trucks leave 1st & 3rd Sunday at 3:00 p.m. (CST) MORIARTY, NM Two blocks east and one block south of Tillery Chevrolet. Smiley Wooton 575/622-5580 office, 575/626-6253 mobile. Trucks leave Sunday at 3:00 p.m. (MST) SAN ANTONIO, NM River Cattle Co. Nine miles east of San Antonio on U.S. 380. Receiving cattle for transport 2nd & 4th Sunday of each month. Gary Johnson 575/838-1834, 575/517-0107 cell. Trucks leave Sunday at 3:00 p.m. (MST)

USDA announces $20 million effort to reduce damage caused by feral swine ndersecretary for USDA’s Marketing & Regulatory Programs Edward Avalos has announced that USDA is kicking off a national effort to reduce the devastating damage caused by feral, or free ranging, swine. The $20 million program aims to help states deal with a rapidly expanding population of invasive wild swine that causes $1.5 billion in annual damage and control costs. “Feral swine are one of the most destructive invaders a state can have,” said Undersecretary Avalos. “They have expanded their range from 17 to 39 states in the last 30 years and cause damage to crops, kill young livestock, destroy property, harm natural resources, and carry diseases that threaten other animals as well as people and water supplies. It’s critical that we act now to begin appropriate management of this costly problem.” The Wildlife Services (WS) program of USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) will lead the effort, tailoring activities to each state’s circumstance and working closely with other Federal, State, Tribal, and local entities. WS will work directly with states to control populations, test animals for diseases, and research better methods of managing feral swine damage. A key part of the national program will include surveillance and disease monitoring to protect the health of our domestic swine. Feral swine have become a serious problem in 78 percent of all states in the country, carrying diseases that can affect people, domestic animals, livestock and wildlife, as well as local water supplies. They also cause damage to field and high-value crops of all kinds from Midwestern corn and soybeans to sugar cane, peanuts, spinach and pumpkins. They kill young animals and their characteristic rooting and wallowing damages natural resources, including resources used by native waterfowl, as well as archeological and recreational lands. Feral swine compete for food with native wildlife, such as deer, and consume the eggs of ground-nesting birds and endangered species, such as sea turtles. “In addition to the costly damage to agricultural and natural resources, the diseases these animals carry present a real threat to our swine populations,” said Avalos. “Feral swine are able to carry and transmit up to 30 diseases and 37 different parasites to livestock, people, pets and wildlife, so surveillance and disease monitoring is another keystone to this program.” As part of the national program, APHIS will test feral swine for diseases of concern for U.S. pork producers, such as classical swine fever, which does not exist in the United States, as well as

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continued on page 13

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MAY 2014


USDA

continued from page 12

swine brucellosis, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome, swine influenza, and pseudorabies. Ensuring that domestic swine are not threatened by disease from feral swine helps ensure that U.S. export markets remain open. APHIS aims to have the program operating within 6 months and funding for the comprehensive project includes, among other things: ■ $9.5 million for state projects ■ $1.4 million for establishing procedures for disease monitoring, including the development of new surveillance and vaccination methods ■ $1.5 million for WS’ National Wildlife Research Center to conduct research and economic analyses to improve control practices ■ $1.6 million for the centralization of control operations, and for making them safer and more cost-effective Initial state funding levels will be based on current feral swine populations and associated damage to resources. Because feral swine populations, like most wildlife, cross international borders, APHIS will also coordinate with Canada and Mexico

on feral swine damage management. “We’ve already begun this type of work through a pilot program in New Mexico,” said Avalos. “Through this pilot program, we have successfully removed feral swine from 1.4 million acres of land. By applying

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the techniques such as trap monitors and surveillance cameras we have developed through this pilot project, we aim to eliminate feral swine from two States every three to five years and stabilize feral swine ■ damage within 10 years.”

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Westall Ranches, LLC Registered Brangus Bulls & Heifers Ray & Karen Westall, Owners • Tate Pruett, Ranch Manager

P.O. Box 955, Capitan NM 88316 Cell 575.365.6356 • Ranch 575.653.4842 email – taterfire@hotmail.com


NMCGA Cattleman of the Year featured at Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum he New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum has a new display that pays tribute to the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association Cattleman of the Year. The award was given in November to Stirling Spencer of Lincoln County. The exhibit panel will be on display in the museum’s lobby through the end of the year when the 2014 honoree is recognized. “We’re grateful for the opportunity to partner with the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association to create this annual display,” said Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum Director Mark Santiago. “We’re a museum about people and heritage and we’re proud to help honor Stirling Spencer.” Spencer is a fourth-generation rancher and the great-grandson of the first Governor of New Mexico, William C. McDonald,

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who owned the ranch where Spencer still lives. His service to his community and state includes two terms as a Lincoln County Commissioner, the director of the Coalition of Arizona/New Mexico Counties, and former board member of the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum. He also has served with the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association Board, the Cattlegrowers Foundation, the Production Credit Association, the Tom & Evelyn Linebery Policy Center at New Mexico State University, and the NMSU Corona Ranch Advisory Board. A former Cowbelle “Man of the Year,” he currently serves as the Lincoln County Probate Judge. He is devoted to assisting young people in the cattle industry through FFA, 4-H, fairs and many other avenues, as well as furthering the causes of the cattle industry and helping other cattlemen. The New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces is a 47-acre facility that helps preserve the unique and exhibit history of agriculture in New Mexico. Livestock exhibits feature six different breeds of beef cattle, and the museum has a Horse & Cattle Barn, Sheep & Goat Barn, Dairy Barn, Greenhouse, Theater and Gift ■ Shop.

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Minnie Lou Bradley 2014 Saddle & Sirloin Portrait Gallery inductee

analysis of herd grazing habits using GPS information was implemented. The program of adding water sources, rotation grazing and brush and weed reduction has resulted in significant ranch resiliency in the face of recent record droughts. Her ranch has been recognized as a model of stewardship by Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and by Dow Agri Services, among others. Mrs. Bradley has been honored as a Master Breeder by Oklahoma State University and is one the nation’s Top 50 U.S. Beef Industry Leaders, according to Beef Magazine. Her Bradley 3 Ranch’s DNA identification program, begun in 1994, has made their Angus bulls highly sought after by commercial producers looking for superior genetics with proven carcass merit. In 2013 the ranch was recognized by the Beef Improvement Federation’s Seedstock Producer of the Year Award. Her lifelong habit of leadership began at an early age. In 1949, Mrs. Bradley was the first woman to major in Animal Husbandry at Oklahoma A&M, and she went on to earn her degree. She was the first woman to win the High Individual Overall award at the National Collegiate Livestock Judging Contest. She served as American Angus Association Board member (1997 to

fficials of the Kentucky State Fair Board have announced that the 2014 Saddle & Sirloin Portrait Gallery inductee is Minnie Lou Bradley of Childress County, Texas. For those involved in animal agriculture, this selection is a very high honor. It is bestowed by the Saddle and Sirloin award committee based on service to and impact on the livestock industry. The portrait gallery is the livestock industry’s hall of fame and is housed at the Kentucky Exposition Center. Minnie Lou Bradley is a rancher, a progressive land steward, a purebred Angus master breeder, and a renowned livestock industry leader. Mrs. Bradley and her husband Bill purchased 3,300 acres in the Texas Panhandle in 1955 and began the Bradley 3 Ranch. Today the expanded 10,000 acre Bradley 3 Ranch continues under the management of her daughter Mary Lou and son-in-law James Henderson. Beginning in 1997, Mrs. Bradley embarked on a land improvement program that began with brush and weed control and water management. Eventually,

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2003) and went on to be the AAA Vice President in 2004. She then became the first-ever female President of the association in Minnie Lou Bradley sharing 2005. some of her vast knowledge The Sadwith a Texas Christian University Ranch dle & SirManagement student. loin portrait presentation will take place on November 16 at the 41st annual North American International Livestock Exposition. The expo, which is held annually at the Kentucky Exposition Center, is scheduled for November 9 through 21 in 2014. The Saddle & Sirloin Portrait Gallery is curated by the Kentucky State Fair Board and is displayed throughout the Kentucky Exposition Center in Louisville, Kentucky. The collection includes nearly 350+ oil paintings and dates back to the turn of the ■ last century.

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Court Misses the Mark on ESA Settlement Ruling ouse Natural Resources Committee Chairman Doc Hastings (WA-04) issued a statement regarding the federal court ruling upholding the Obama Administration’s closed-door Endangered Species Act (ESA) settlement agreement with the Center for Biological Diversity & WildEarth Guardians: “I’m disappointed with today’s court ruling that upholds the Administration’s mega-settlement with litigious environmental groups to make listing decisions for hundreds of species behind closed-doors and in a rushed, arbitrary time-frame. Over 160 new species have already been added to the list just since these settlements. In many cases, such as the White Bluffs Blad-

H

derpod in my district, or in the Lesser Prairie Chicken listed just last week, legitimate concerns have been raised about the science or the lack of state or local government involvement. The potential listings of even more species, including the Greater Sage Grouse, could have devastating job and economic impacts across the entire country. Listing decisions should be made in an open, transparent manner and based on the best available science and data. This decision today proves even more why common sense legislation to curb these lawsuits and closed-door settlement agreements will do more to aid endangered species than lawyers and courtrooms. That’s why I and other colleagues will work to advance targeted legislation to improve and update the ESA by focusing on trans■ parency and species recovery.”

HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME!

HENARD RANCHES OSCAR · 575/398-6155 BOX 975, TATUM, NEW MEXICO 88267 MRS. PAT · PLAINS, TX MRS. ROBERT · LOVINGTON, NM

The Clovis Livestock Auction READY E TO SERV YOU!

CHARLIE ROGERS 575/762-4422

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RYAN FIGG 575/760-9301

DARYL HAWKINS 575/760-9300

STEVE FRISKUP 806/786-7539

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WAYNE KINMAN 575/760-3173

For weekend hauling permits, call 575/762-4422 or 575/760-9300 or any market representative

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For Better or For Worse – Spring (Fire Season) has Arrived in New Mexico by DOUG CRAM, EXTENSION WILDLAND FIRE SPECIALIST or better or for worse, it is spring time in New Mexico. Spring brings warmer temperatures and fewer jackets, longer days to spend more time outside, and field conditions suitable for planting red/green chile. Spring also brings increased tree and grass pollens, allergies, tax day, and high rotations per minute on the anemometer. In regards to the latter, good days to fly a kite are also good days for wildfire propagation. High winds characterized by sustained velocities > 20 miles per hour are a common dominator (along with low humidity) among weather conditions on days when homes are lost to wildland fire. In and of itself, fire is neither better nor worse. However, losing a home to wildfire, a largely preventable event, is notably for the worse. Unfortunately, each year across the West

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homes are lost to wildland fire Table 1. Notable fires in New Mexico. (Table 1). Some of these homes YEAR FIRE NAME ACRES NOTES are located in the “back forty”, 1950 Capitan Gap ~17,000 Bear cub singed by fire, but most are located in the but survives “wildland urban interface”, a 1951 McKnight ~48,000 Largest recorded wildfire moniker widely used to in NM at the time describe the interface between ~48,000 280 structures burned 2000 Cerro Grande the back forty and urban subincluding 250 homes divisions. Research conducted 2008 Trigo ~13,700 59 homes burned here at New Mexico State Uni2011 Las Conchas ~156,000 63 homes burned versity (Cram et al. 2006) 2011 Donaldson ~100,000 Rangeland fire along with results from other 2012 Whitewater-Baldy ~289,000 12 homes burned in Willow Creek national research projects Little Bear ~44,000 254 buildings burned 2012 have corroborated the thesis 2013 Tres Lagunas ~10,200 that wildland fire behavior and 2013 Thompson Ridge ~24,000 severity in the back forty can 2013 Silver ~138,700 be reduced by modifying sur2013 Jaroso ~11,100 face and canopy fuel loads 2014 ? ? (Martinson and Omi 2013). As such, it stands to reason that if fire behavior can be changed in the back interesting findings was that many homes forty and in the wildland urban interface, it burned not as a result of towering flames (and radiant heat) from the head fire, but can also be changed in your back yard. As noted above and according to inves- rather from embers landing of flammable tigative research (see the “Cohen Files”), material. Embers or “firebrands” can many of the homes lost to wildfire were travel up to 1 mile ahead of the head fire preventable. Over the last 25 years, when resulting in numerous simultaneous igniresearchers looked at how and why homes tions. Of course, once ignition has been were lost during wildfire events, they were achieved, if there is additional flammable able to identify commonalities leading to continued on page 28 ignition and propagation. One of the most

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NMSU to host Indian Livestock Days May 14-17 in Albuquerque roducing the highest quality of beef is as important to Native American cattle producers as it is to others, and those Native producers will have the opportunity next month to learn more about the guidelines provided by the national and New Mexico Beef Quality Assurance program that can help accomplish that goal. During the New Mexico Indian Livestock Days conference, May 14-16 at the Route 66 Casino and Hotel west of Albuquerque on Interstate 40, Native American producers will have the opportunity to learn the BQA guidelines and test for certification. “Through the years, our Native American livestock producers have gained information at the Indian Livestock Days that has helped them to improve their herd and quality of meat produced, and to stay

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informed on vital issues.” said Kathy Landers, McKinley County Extension agricultural agent and chairperson for the one of the larger conferences hosted by New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service. “We have had a lot of interest in the BQA program, including offering the certification test.” The New Mexico BQA Program asks producers, veterinarians and all others involved in the production of beef to use common sense, reasonable management skills and accepted scientific knowledge to avoid defects in the product delivered to the consumer. Areas of discussion will include trichmoniasis management, BVD vaccination program, herd management during drought, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis,

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D V E RT I S E

in the New Mexico Stockman. Call: 505/243-9515.

leptospirosis, campylobacteriosis and calf vaccination programs. NMSU Extension agricultural agents and specialists, as well as private industry experts, have designed sessions addressing many issues that producers are facing. The drought and wildland fires are very real threats to the survival of livestock operations, and that fact has shaped the conference agenda this year. The conference will begin at 1 p.m. Wednesday, May 14. During the afternoon, presentations will be made on drought management and being fire wise. Updates will also be presented by the Intertribal Ag Council, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resource Conservation Service, New Mexico Cattle Growers Association and National Cattlemen’s Association. Thursday, May 15, the main theme will be Beef Quality Assurance. “Providing the best quality beef to consumers is the goal of producers,” Landers said. “To accomplish that, the national program, Beef Quality Assurance, has provided guidelines for beef cattle production. BQA certification helps producers receive the best price for their cattle.” continued on page 21


Indian Livestock Days continued from page 20

The BQA track of the conference will begin Thursday morning outdoors, where demonstrations will be conducted. After lunch, further information will be shared indoors and those wishing to become BQA certified will have an opportunity to take the test. After the test, a presentation will be given on the marketing of BQA cattle. For those not interested in the BQA programs, there will be presentations indoors on food sovereignty and gardening, improving sheep and goat herds, and water management. Friday, May 16, herd health will be the theme of the day. Presentations will be on dealing with Trichomoniasis – known commonly as Trich; answering the ques-

tion of restocking herds or not; and dealing with the impact of wolves on range herds. The event will close with a presentation by Labatt Food Services regarding processing Navajo produced beef for sale on the reservation. The registration fee is $75. Registration deadline is May 1. Online registration and payment available at www.indianlivestock.nmsu.edu or by mail at McKinley CES, 2418 E. Hwy. 66, PMB 470, Gallup, NM, 87301. Make money orders payable to McKinley CES; no personal checks will be accepted. Route 66 Casino Hotel registration may be made at 1-866/352-7822. Deadline for special room rate is May 1. Ask for the â–  Livestock 2014 group rate of $69.

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Henderson recognized at HLSR Intercollegiate Meats Judging Contest Awards Breakfast t the recent Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo (HLSR) Intercollegiate Meats Judging Contest Awards Breakfast James Henderson and John Bellinger were honored for their years of service with the contest. The HLSR has named its traveling trophy for the senior division the “James Henderson Award.” The A-division trophy (Junior College) was named for John Bellinger in 2012. Henderson and Bellinger were instrumental in starting the HLSR Intercollegiate Meats Contest at HLSR thirty-five

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years ago. Henderson served as its Superintendent for thirty-two years. This collegiate contest led the way for the HLSR 4-H and FFA contests to become established as well. Since the inception of the Intercollegiate Meats Contest thousands of students have competed in the contest. Many of these students have become active in the livestock and meats industry and utilize their judging experience in their careers today. James Henderson is an owner of Bradley 3 Ranch, Memphis and Clarendon,TX and works as the Ranch’s Operations and Genetic Manager. John Bellinger owns Food Safety Net Laboratories and Agri-West exporters both based in San ■ Antonio, TX.

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What What You Need to Know You Need to Know Now About Your Family’s Now About Your Family’s Health Insurance FROMHealth BOB HOMER, Insurance New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Insurance from Bob Homer, New Mexico Cattle Administrators Growers’ Insurance Administrators

HereARE are the answers to the five HERE THE ANSWERS TO most THE FIVE MOST ASKED asked questions I hear from New Mexico stockmen: QUESTIONS I HEAR FROM NEW MEXICO STOCKMEN

Q. I’m over 65 and have Medicare and a Medicare supplement policy, do I need to do anything? A. No action is necessary. If you want to change your Medicare supplement plan for next year, you must make your change between October 15 and December 7, 2014.

Q. I’m under 65 and am currently covered by health insurance what are my options? 1. If you are covered by an employer group policy, no action is required unless your employer is changing the company plan or discontinuing the plan. 2. If you are under 65 and have individual (non-group) coverage for you and your family or you have your own small group plan. a. If your policy was purchased before March 2010 and you have not made changes to the policy [no increased deductible, etc], this policy is grand fathered and you can keep it as long as the insurance company keeps renewing that plan. b. Your policy was purchased after March 2010. If your policy is from Blue Cross Blue Shield or Lovelace, you can keep it until Dec. 1, 2014. You will have to select a new plan after that date. 3. If you are covered under the New Mexico Cattle Growers member group policy with Blue Cross Blue Shield, your coverage will continue until August 1, 2014. You will be alerted to any proposed changes in your plan by June 1, 2014.

Q. I do not have health coverage, what are my options? a. Sign up by March 31, 2014, for a policy that will begin on April 1, 2014 with one of the following companies: i. Blue Cross Blue Shield ii. Presbyterian iii. New Mexico Health Connections iv. Molina (only for those eligible for Medicaid) b. How do you do it? Call our office: 1-800/286-9690 or 505/828-9690 or email me at rhomer@financialguide.com

Q. If you want to know if you & your family qualify for a government subsidy, go to www.kff.org [Kaiser Family Foundation]. Robert L. Homer & Associates, LLC. New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Insurance Administrators Ask for Barb: 800/286-9690 505/828-9690 Fax: 505/828-9679 IN LAS CRUCES CALL: Jack Roberts: 575/524-3144

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MAY 2014

Q. I do not want any coverage, what are my options? a. Penalty for 2014 = $95 per adult and $47.50 per child or 1% of your family income, whichever is greater. b. Penalty for 2016 = $695 per adult and $347.50 per child or 2.5% of your family income, whichever is greater.

Dependability & service to our members for over 36 years.

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Calendar May 12 - 14 / AgriFuture Educational Institute, Albuquerque May 14 - 16 / Indian Livestock Days, Rt. 66 Casino June 8 - 10 / Mid Year, Las Cruces July 30 - Aug 2 / ANCW Summer Meeting, Denver Dec 4 - 7 / Joint Stockmen’s Convention, Albuquerque Feb 4 -7 / ANCW Winter Meeting, San Antonio

Dear Cowbelles, s I was preparing this letter for May I ran across this quote by Og Mandino. I love it and it is so appropriate for achieving and maintaining positive attitudes in our day to day lives. “Welcome every morning with a smile. Look on the new day as another special gift from

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your Creator, another golden opportunity to complete what you were unable to finish yesterday. Be a self-starter. Let your first hour set the theme of success and positive action that is certain to echo through your entire day. Today will never happen again. Don’t waste it with a false start or no start at all. You were not born

American Water Surveyors uses seismoelectric survey instruments that are designed specifically to detect electrical signals generated by the passage of seismic impulses through layered rocks, sediments and soils. The design of our surveying equipment is portable and effective. In the past the only option to find groundwater has been by drilling, often with a water witch, picking the spot to drill—and that can be costly if your result is a dry well. Now there’s a better way, using science and physics. If you’re a farmer, rancher, home owner or developer contact American Water Surveyors today to find out more about our very affordable service. American Water Surveyors has been in business over seven years. We have conducted over 400 surveys in 15 states: Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, Kentucky, Colorado, Arkansas, Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina and Illinois. We can go anywhere. We are proud members of the National Groundwater Association and have an “A+” rating with the Better Business Bureau.

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to fail.” Our March workshops were a great success. I would like to compliment my team members Dalene, Anita, Carolyn and Lyn for their dedication of time and efforts in making this achievement possible. I fully understand that the travel time is a real challenge. I would also like to give kudos to each local that hosted the meetings as well to thank all who attended. A special shout out to the Sacaton and Chuckwagon for their combined efforts. They certainly “Bridged the Gap” as attendance was phenomenal. Be sure to greet each day with a smile. Continue to “Bridge the Gap” in everything you do and you’ll be amazed at the results. – Madalynn The Chuckwagon CowBelles met at the Old Mill restaurant in Estancia on April 8, 2014 with 13 members and guest in attendance. Toni Barrow called for a reading of the February minutes. Vera Gibson gave the treasurer’s report. There was discussion about finances concerning the district workshop. Toni reported that there was an added charge of $200 by the facility. There was discussion about this. Toni then read thank you notes from the NMCB officers. She also read a thank you from Camino Retirement Apartments thanking Chuckwagon for the donation. She informed the group of an article in the paper that misrepresents how much water it takes to produce a hamburger. It was decided to donate $50 to help send a student to the 2014 AgriFuture School. There was discussion about the All-Indian Livestock conference May 14-16, 2014 at the Route 66 Casino. Chuckwagon will have a table there. Toni announced that Babbi has finished the next book and will bring copies to the May meeting. She also said that the next meeting will be at Tommie Aber’s in

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Jingle continued from page 24

Jarales. Vera has Jr. Livestock fund raiser tickets for sale. Lyn said that the July meeting date should read “the 8th” and not “the 9th.” Meeting adjourned at 12:45 p.m. Respectfully submitted by Babbi Baker BorderBelles met March 26, 2014 and will be raffling a Shoofly limited edition print for a fundraising raffle. The print will be 1st place, a $100 beef gift certificate for 2nd and a $50 beef gift certificate for 3rd. The tickets will be $2 each or three for $5. Kim Allen is the chair for beef for father’s day. The group will have a booth at Pepper’s Supermarket and will be giving out the prizes that day in feed bags. The group rejoined the Deming Luna County Chamber of Commerce. The scholarship recipient has been chosen and will be presented to Brannick Sweetser by the McSherry Siblings in honor of their father, GX McSherry. From the February Meeting: it was decided to have a booth at the fair and there was discussion of setting up a permanent display at Pepper’s Supermarket. Respectfully submitted, Tamara Hurt, Reporter The meeting of Chamiza Cowbelles was called to order at on April 3, 2014 by President Gloria Petersen in the atrium at Elephant Butte Inn with five members present. Minutes from the previous meeting were read and approved. The treasurer was absent from this meeting. A report was given regarding the district meeting from those present who attended. Jodell presented an inventory of saleable items on hand and suggested ordering additional license plates. Gloria announced that Ag Day will be held on April 25 and volunteers are needed to help prepare and serve lunches. The local purchased a case of the new brand napkins. Gloria and Jodell will re-package them for selling to individuals. All agreed that the paper quality has improved on the new napkins. A representative from Elephant Butte Inn spoke briefly regarding catering the meal for district meeting next year. Chamiza Cowbelles will host the district meeting in 2015. Gloria will contact the Inn with a definite date later. Gloria brought a receiver hitch cover to the meeting to show group and to ask if we should order some for resale. The cover shows the State of New Mexico with the word “beef” written across the front. However, because the cover is rather hefty, shipping may be quite expensive. It was decided to place 26

MAY 2014

this receiver hitch cover on display at fair booth and take orders from anyone wanting to purchase one. The Truth or Consequences annual fiesta will be held the first weekend in May. One of the Cowbelles requested beef tickets be printed early in order to sell some at this fiesta. Gloria suggested a workday soon to print, number, staple, and perforate enough tickets for this event. Scholarship applications will be arriving soon and a decision will be made next month. Gloria emphasized the importance of volunteer time sheets and encouraged everyone to keep track of volunteer hours. Submitted by Cathy Pierce The Copper CowBelles of Silver City met at noon on March 11, 2014 at the Red Barn; hostess Pat Hunt and Kim Clark with 23 in attendance. Guest Speaker Tammy Ogilvie spoke on the beef industry’s long range plan to improve the domestic consumer preference for beef, capitalized on global growth opportunities, strengthen the image of beef and the beef industry, protect and enhance the freedom to operate, improve industry trust and openness, relationships and position the U.S. cow herd for growth. Group decided to donate $100 to Agri-Future; if the group has a member interested in attending it was decided to cover the $200

registration fee. Shindig; theme “Spring Round Up”; caterer will be Lorraine Angle, tickets for reserved table will be $240 a table with eight seats, general admission is $30 per person in advance and $35 at the door. Outlets to sell on Saturday only will be Aunt Judy’s Attic and Western Bank. Auction items can be dropped off at Aunt Judy’s Attic. The plan is to have one table dedicated to the Scholarship art and others for jewelry, baskets, homemade goodies, etc. Decorations work day at Beverly Medford’s on Saturday, March 29 to make straw bales for center pieces. Dessert Table: Rosella chairperson requested finger foods such as cookies, cupcakes, candies, and brownies, also to keep Easter and spring in mind for treats. April 5 Dutch Oven Cook-off at Glenwood, April 22 and 23 Ranch Days at McKeens ranch at Alma, NM volunteers are welcome. Saturday, May 31 Wild Wild West Rodeo kick off would like the CCB to help out at the Farmers Market along with the 4-H and other Ag related persons. The group decided to give a donation of $50 to the Pat Knowlin Scholarship Fund in the name of Mary Sweetser. Respectfully submitted by Kathy Davis The Otero CowBelles met at Pepper’s Grill April 3. There were 16 members and one guest in attendance. Dr. Jodi Bennett, a native of Otero County returned to her home after being away for 71 years. This 89-year-old lady holds a doctorate in archaeology and has served in the armed forces, traveled to many different countries, been an interpreter for the military. The CowBelles hope to have Dr. Jodi present a more elaborate program on her exciting life at the June meeting. Otero CowBelles have been busy promoting BEEF in the school system. In March Traci Curry presented “Steak for Supper” program at Oregon Elementary. The program included the Dr. Seuss story of the same name, and teaches students about ranchers, conservation, types of cattle and where they live, cuts of beef and the myriad of beef by-products such as adhesives, medicines, cosmetics and many more. With the Otero CB cooking and serving the beef stew to the fourth grade classes and to teachers. Debi Rube VP of Otero CB, presented Ms. Dorsey, the principal, with books and lesson plans that can be used by the school to expose the students to ranching and agriculture. Pres. Linda Mitchum, Estelle Bond and Debi Rube worked at the Chaparral Middle School Health Fair continued on page 27


Jingle continued from page 26

where they presented different aspects of beef using the WOW That Cow theme and nutritional value of the 29 cuts of beef. Even the teachers were in awe of all of the many things that cows do for everyone. Coming up in the immediate future is the Culinary Class demonstration featuring “Hamburger: Versatile, Nutritious and Budget Friendly”. Rancher Pat Jones, is scheduled to speak at Oregon School for career day. May will find the group working at the Kids Kows and More event at the fairgrounds in addition to cooking beef brisket and beans for the Old Timer’s Day in Cloudcroft. The news of CowBelles being willing to participate in almost any event that gives the group the opportunity to tout the value of beef and agriculture seems to be spreading rapidly. Estelle brought four packages of the new napkins and they were sold immediately. Submitted by Barbara Wagner

There Are Not Cowboys Without Good Horses. Feature YOUR horses in the August 2014 New Mexico Stockman HORSE ISSUE!

CHRIS MARTINEZ • chris@aaalivestock.com • 505/243-9515, ext. 28

New Mexico CowBelles: Thank you to all who have submitted their news to “Jingle Jangle”. Please send minutes and/or newsletters to: Jingle Jangle, Janet Witte, 1860 Foxboro Ct., Las Cruces, NM 88007 or email: janetwitte@msn.com the 14th of each month.

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Aggie Notes

continued from page 18

fuel available for combustion, the fire will grow. Common culprits for catching embers and carrying flames include flammable material adjacent to or attached to the house (e.g., wood piles, decks, wood siding, vegetation, etc.). Subsequent to these investigations, researchers synthesized their findings and provided home owners with relatively simple and common sense steps that if implemented, would greatly increase the likelihood of their home surviving a wildfire. Today, these findings and recommenda-

tions have been packaged together in relatively easy to digest formats by numerous nationally recognized non-profit groups (for example, see FireWise® and Ready, Set, Go). The material is targeted at homeowners and communities interested in being better prepared for wildfire. All the programs take similar approaches to preparing the house and yard for wildfire. Specifically, the first step is to “fortify” the house. For example, roofs have been identifies as the first priority area to address because of their high potential for ignition from embers when roofing materials and condition are suspect (e.g., 25-year old

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wood shake shingles that have long since lost their fire rating and may even be shrouded in pine needles or other dead vegetation). Beyond the roof, there are a handful of specific areas that need to be inspected and potentially fortified such as siding material, decks, and vent openings. Dead vegetation on roofs and in gutters is another Achilles heel that embers will exploit in a wildfire situation. Fortunately, simple maintenance can alleviate this problem area. Follow the program link listed above or search for similar wildfire preparedness programs for specific and detailed information on preparing the home and landscape for wildfire. Once the home has been strategically adapted to resist embers, the fuel in the yard or landscaping must be modified to prevent fire and flames from being able to move across the property and come in contact with the house. The common sense approach to meet this objective is to break the yard up into fuel reduction zones starting closest to the home and then working out. For example, “Zone One” is generally described as extending out 30 feet from the house in all directions. Within this zone, recommendations include the following: remove all dead and dying vegetation; remove leaf litter from yard, roof and gutters; trim tree canopies to keep branches at least 10 feet from structures and other trees; remove “ladder fuels” to create a separation between lowlevel vegetation and tree branches; relocate wood piles away from house; remove or prune vegetation near windows; and remove combustible material and vegetation from around and under decks. Zone Two, which extends 30–100 feet away from the house, has additional guidelines (see links above for more details). Contrary to perception, aesthetically pleasing landscaping is still possible while following the suggested guidelines. Recently, the fire preparedness message has extended beyond private property to the neighborhood and community scale. Similar to the home and yard approach, information has been prepared and published on how to effectively organize neighborhoods and communities to be prepared for wildfire (for example, see Fire Adapted Communities). Taking a proactive approach and scaling up preparedness from the home, to the yard, to the neighborhood, to the community is a classic “grass roots approach.” The next logical direction or focus for a community speakcontinued on page 37

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Saginaw Rancher Re-Elected TSCRA President; Group Installs New Directors he Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (TSCRA) installed new officers during the closing session of the 137th Annual Cattle Raisers Convention in Fort Worth. Pete Bonds, Saginaw, was elected president; Richard Thorpe, Winters, first vice president; Robert McKnight, Fort Davis, second vice president; and Eldon White, Fort Worth, executive vice president. “The continued determination and commitment of cattle raisers is needed as our industry looks to the future,” said Bonds. “It is an honor to serve as president of TSCRA and I look forward to working with our members to ensure the strength and stability of the Texas cattle industry.” Bonds operates the Bonds Ranch headquartered in Saginaw. He became a TSCRA director in 1992 and was elected second vice president in 2011. Thorpe is owner and operator of Mesa T Ranch, headquartered in Winters. Thorpe became a TSCRA director in March 2006. The newest TSCRA officer is Robert McKnight. McKnight raises registered and commercial Herefords and crossbred cattle on ranch land in Jeff Davis, Brewster, Presidio, Reeves and Crane counties. He became a TSCRA director in 1989. New directors were also elected at convention. New directors are Kevin Busher, Winters; Brooks Hodges, Guthrie; James Palmer, Roaring Springs; Claudia Wright, Richmond. New executive committee members include Crawford Edwards, Fort Worth; Jay Evans, Austin; Coleman Locke, Hungerford; and James L. Donnell, Fowlerton. Barrett Clark, Breckenridge; Steve Lewis, San Antonio; Evalyn Moore, Richmond; and Les Nunn, Pauls Valley, Okla.; and Tom Roach III, Amarillo, were elected as honorary directors. All members with honorary titles serve ■ as ex officio members of the board.

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Farm Bureau Minute

Words of Wisdom from the New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau by Mike White, President, NM F &LB

Ideas and Elbow Grease irst I would like to say thank you to the New Mexico legislators who showed their support for our states’ farmers and ranchers by passing HB51, the Right to Farm Bill. The bill, which is sitting on the Governor’s desk waiting for her signature, eliminates the word “improperly” from one sentence in the current Right to Farm Act language. The current statute leaves it open to debate for lawyers as to what are improper operating procedures on an agriculture operation. This is a win for our members and we appreciate those of you who made Round House visits or called your lawmakers to encourage them to support the bill. However, with that being said, it is far

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from the revisions that are truly needed to remove the threat of nuisance lawsuits that have currently been filed and will probably be filed against businesses in New Mexico. Senate Bill 229 introduced by Senator Phil Griego and supported by NMFLB offers revisions to the Right to Farm Act which are comprehensive and would take care of the problem of nuisance lawsuits filed to harm agriculture in New Mexico once and for all. Democracy works in this nation, but it is not a spectator sport. This was a text book example of the impact farmers and ranchers can have when we come together to exercise our influence. Grassroots movements will always have powerful

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momentum. We have several pieces of legislation for the next session which we want to put forward, but we will need your HELP and VOICE to make it happen. We plan on making a major push through you, our members, to revise the Right to Farm Act and will call on you to talk directly to your Senators and Representatives before and during the next session as to the importance of this legislation for your livelihood. The world is run by the people who show up! Government is too big and important to be left to the politicians, and because of that your personal influence becomes more important as we move forward in this political season. At last count, 11 members of the NM House of Representatives have declared their intent to retire. So at least 15 percent of the chamber will turn over in the next election. That represents a tremendous opportunity for those of us in agriculture to make a difference for our industry. We can help elect lawmakers who understand our issues and will work to defend food production in New Mexico and if possible put some more boots under the table. If you don’t wish to run for office yourself then please volunteer to help with campaigns, use your online and in-person social networks to inform your friends and neighbors about desirable candidates, and then offer them a ride on election day. HB51 was not a slam dunk. It took a lot of persuading to get it passed. Let’s make our job easier during the next session by working during the interim to inform our elected officials as to our issues and electing those who will protect New Mexico agriculture. Thank you for being a great Ag-vocate. ■

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in the New Mexico Stockman. Call: 505/243-9515. 30

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High Price of Food? ow should we as food producers interpret the media’s looming concern about headlines saying “Rising Food Prices Bite Budgets!” Examples given from previous 12 months’ list of percentages increases show: Ground Beef 4.9%, Eggs 5.7%, Tomatoes 6.9%, Pork Sausage 8.7%, Potatoes 9.2%, Fresh Fish 9.9% and Oranges 12.2%. The cause of the increases are different; from drought, freezing weather, disease, government regulations, EPA, loss of farm ground to suburbia, etc. It all boils down to a reduction of product vs. its demand. We producers justify the prices of the basic commodity, food, because it has lagged

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unfairly behind almost all other life essentials such as oil, wood, coal, ore, and fresh water. We repeat the statistic that people in our nation spend less than 10% of their income on food, 40% of it eating out. That is lower than either housing, transportation or health care which together account for 52%. And the Department of Labor who did the survey didn’t even include income tax! Another factor is that with most foodstuffs, the farmer’s cut is less than the grocer or restaurant middlemen, from 5% for grain products (bread) to 50% for milk. And that’s eating at home. Anyone who eats out 40% of the time and complains about the cost of french fries, orange juice, hamburger, Ben & Jerry’s or Starbucks is hard to take seriously. In addition, today’s modern middle income shoppers are

A Family Affair in the Witte House. 4-H was

never a choice in the Witte household. It was a mandate. Even the choice of projects wasn’t our own: one day my uncle showed up with a couple of goats, so the family built a little wood house and a fence. The truth is, 4-H was the best decision that Jennifer and I never had to make. 4-H is more than an after school club, it’s a lifestyle that builds lasting family values and an opportunity to build a new generation. ~ Jeremy Witte 2011-2012 NM 4-H State President

2012-2013 ASNMSU Senator representing the College of ACES Senate Parliamentarian

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NEW MEXICO 4-H FOUNDATION 13008 Gray Hills NE, Albuquerque NM 87111 MAY 2014

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2013-2014 ASNMSU Director of Governmental Affairs

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accustomed to “Seasonal” fresh produce always being available. If it’s not available in the produce section they can find it canned, bottled or frozen on the shelves. Still others are willing to pay more if they think it is organic. We are very spoiled shoppers. However, single parent families working two jobs or those who are receiving welfare and/or unemployment checks are much more aware of the increase in the price of food. To our credit the Farm Bill aids 46.7 million Americans (1 in 5) that are receiving food stamps to the tune of $72 billion a year, to ensure that none go hungry. This life saving program, as well as all of the entitlement programs, are paid for by the taxes collected from the 90% who are working. It is not the government that makes money, the government takes money from those who earn it and redistributes it. The jobless and the middle income groups are less affected by the food prices. But caught in the vice are those singleparent, geographically challenged, lowmiddle income Americans holding down a job and paying their own way. These workin’ moms do shop thriftily and if the price of salmon or strawberries or asparagus or chuck roast is too high, they can do without. The supermarket is full of nutritious, generic brand, fresh meat and vegetables that are affordable, especially if you know how to cook. However, these workin’ moms are tempted by the ease and low cost of “fast food” meals vs the ever-present exhaustion that accompanies the effort of fixing a home-cooked meal for the kids at the end of a work day. Nothing is easy. So what about the “Rising Food Prices Bites Budgets?” Most producers do their best to grow their crop as cheaply and efficiently as they can. They like to make a profit, sometimes they get lucky and sometimes they go broke, but the consumer never runs out of something to eat.

9515, ext. 28 tinez 505/243Call Chris Mar @aaalivestock.com email: chris


Genetic Bootstraps Beef producers & the power of selection to shape industry’s future by MIRANDA REIMAN, CERTIFIED ANGUS BEEF ou decide. Each time you buy a bull, keep a heifer or cull a cow, you choose a future for your herd and, collectively, for a beef industry that is either blessed or burdened with high prices. “I don’t want record prices because of the lowest beef supplies in 50-some-odd years, said a University of Missouri livestock economist. “I want the highest price because demand is pulling us along.” Most everybody in the cattle business would want what Scott Brown wants. There were certainly nods of agreement at the Midwest Section, American Society of Animal Scientists meetings. Brown said history, economic modeling and consumer-preference studies point the way to make that happen, speaking at the Harlan Ritchie Beef Symposium during those meetings. Analysts are good at looking into demand caused by price, income levels and available substitutions, “but there are other factors we economists don’t often deal very well with: taste and preferences,” he said. “Those can cause that demand function to shift, either to the left—which is not good news for the industry—or to the right,” Brown said. “Shifting that demand curve to the right is always important for us.” Marbling level is a clear indicator of probable satisfaction, he noted. “If we’re at the low end of the marbling side, the probability of a consumer having a good experience is not very high,” Brown said. “The last thing you want to do is spend money on what is perhaps the most expensive meat product, and not have a good experience.” But is there enough producer incentive to target these higher marbling levels? “That Prime premium relative to Choice has been very attractive as of late,” and during a time of sluggish growth in the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP). Besides more dollars, a real bonus for aiming that high is “a lot less volatility,” Brown said.

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“Certain times of the year, we probably have plenty of Choice cattle and we’re not paying much more for them relative to Selects, and at other times we’re tight on Choice supplies,” he said. To that seasonality, add decisions by large-scale retailers and you have a recipe for variation in the signals. Overall U.S. beef demand hit a bottom in 1997, followed by brief recovery before sliding again since 2004. “Changing that is a huge step in getting back to 100 million or 105 million head of cattle in this country,” Brown said. From 2004 to 2008, total consumer expenditures on Choice beef was fairly constant at $25 billion. “But in 2010, 2011, 2012, we’ve seen a nice increase,” he said. “At the same time, we have not seen much recovery in Select expenditures.” Prime trends are similar to that of Choice. “We often talk about consumers ‘buying down,’ going to McDonald’s instead of those steakhouses,” Brown said. “When you look at the graphs this way, you don’t get quite that same picture.” While U.S. demand remains uncertain,

globally the picture is a little brighter. “In 2012, we were actually down in terms of U.S. beef export quantity, but if we instead look at it on a value basis, we’re still growing,” he said. “That tells me we’re shipping more and more higher-valued products out of the United States, and that’s likely going to continue.” Half of the world’s population will have 6 percent more disposable income in the immediate future. Brown said they’re going to demand higher-quality products. Beef’s alternatives are simple: Either it plods along the same path, or it breaks out and follows a path like that of poultry in the 1980s and ’90s, or the recent boom in the corn business. “You may not like it from a policy standpoint,” he said, “but they generated new demand for their products and, guess what? It’s not going to go away anytime soon.” The drought has given the beef industry a clear way to choose its destiny. “We have a chance to rebuild that cowherd with better genetics,” Brown said. “And I don’t want to undersell that those who jump early are the ones who are going ■ to get the benefits of adopting.”

Proverbs 16-3

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Gary Morton The Painting Cowboy

Spur Ranches. “I don’t have to research much, “ he says. “I’ve lived it. Every artist paints who he is. Being out there and living it works its way into the art.” “I take pictures while I’m working, whenever it doesn’t interfere with the job by SHARON NIEDERMAN at hand, but no picture I paint is an exact s Gary Morton a cowboy who paints or a copy of a photo.” After he gets back to the painter who cowboys? Somehow, he has studio and reflects on the photos of the found a way to remain devoted to both experience, the elements mix as the passions. “Being an artist and being a cow- images suggest ideas and assemble themboy are both full time jobs. Without a selves in his imagination. If one word doubt, cowboying is more fun than paint- characterizes his work, it is honesty. Gary’s ing,” admits the highly successful western paintings are realistic, accurate and his artist, who works from his studio about fif- attention to detail allows him to be honest teen miles north of Las Vegas, NM. “For to himself and the people he paints. about 25 years, day work, branding and Unlike many artists, he doesn’t mind weaning, kept me sane.” describing his work methods in detail; “My Looking back, it’s clear that his years of medium is acrylics there are several reacowboying, including three stints at the sons. Acrylics have been around as a fine Bell Ranch, eight months living in a tent art medium for well over fifty years. They on the Mescalero Apache Reservation, and have been tested extensively for durability calling an old cabin on the Valles Grande and longevity and proven to be a permahome, are the inspiration and motivation nent high quality medium. Acrylic is water for the body of his artwork. based and relatively easy to keep clean and By 2002 Morton had spent 25 years as a neat. It can be used like a watercolor or an full-time artist when oil paint or a combinathe love of the life tion of the techniques. I brought him back to “I don’t just paint began with watercolor as ranching as manager a child and it just feels for myself, but to natural for the CR Ranch near for me to use a Las Vegas. Then in honor the working water medium. My 2008 he was awarded paintings can be on gescowboy.” the grazing lease on soed board, canvas, or the Valles Caldera paper. I enjoy the differNational Preserve where he and a cowboy ent effects that can be achieved by using crew cared for 2000 yearlings through the various surfaces. summer. “Once the composition is finalized and In 2009 he acquired the summer graz- the drawing completed I start applying ing lease on the Mescalero Apache Reser- paint. This is done with a series of glazes vation, where he and a crew cared for 4700 to achieve correct color and value. I try to yearlings. In 2011 Morton came full circle completely cover the entire surface as and returned to the Bell Division of Silver quickly as possible. It is difficult to make

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adjustments and corrections until the entire painting is roughed in. It is a process of correcting mistakes, pushing and pulling, softening and sharpening until the painting looks right.” To the question: How long does it take him to complete a work, he responds: “A lifetime and two weeks.” Morton grew up in Tucumcari, surprisingly, and not on a ranch. His closest connection with ranching life was through his dad, who sold farm implements. He recalls a meeting in the Tucumcari Pontiac dealership that led to his first job on the Bell Ranch. His qualification for the job was his experience riding bareback broncs in

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Gary Morton's "Free" ... the sun has just risen over the hill, the air is fresh, the drive is coming together, a good horse to ride and plenty of space to be Free... was featured on the April Stockman cover.

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Gary Morton

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rodeo during his high school years. “Do you ride broncs?” the man from the Bell wanted to know. “Yes,” he replied. Once he got to the ranch, he found out otherwise, but wagon boss Leo Turner was impressed

a great time for me. I fell in love with cowboy life, working outdoors, the beautiful vistas, the horses and cattle.” While sharing the bunkhouse with the small group of cowboys who remained over the winter, he struck up a friendship with another western artist to be, sculptor

Morton explains his “wet saddle blanket theory ... Just like you have to ride a horse a lot to train him & keep taking off those wet saddle blankets, you have to paint a bunch of pictures to become the artist you want to be ...” by Gary’s spirit and “made a cowboy out of him.” “I grew up there,” the artist says. “It was

Curtis Fort. “One of the guys had a TV,” Morton says, “and one night there was a program on PBS about Charlie Russell. I

"Happy Cowboy" is a recent Morton painting done as a fund raiser for the Horses For Heroes - Cowboy Up program. The happy cowboy is sporting the purple wild rag which is the honor bestowed when a military hero completes the program.

had always enjoyed art as a kid, but after that, I started trying to paint cowboy life on the Bell.” He kept at painting, and he kept at cowboying, ultimately becoming wagon boss of the Bell Ranch. He and Fort formed the short-lived Working Cowboy Artists. Through this organization, they brought their work to Albuquerque and exhibited it adjacent to New Mexico Cattle Growers’ meetings, and met their peers. Eventually, both men moved to the Hondo Valley where their careers expanded. “Times were good to us. The oil business was good then, and we sold quite a bit,” Morton says. With exposure, he started doing invitational shows around the country. Photos of him cowboying added to his reputation. as he exhibited in Texas, Colorado, and Arizona and his circle widened. Morton explains his “wet saddle blanket theory” of artistic ability. “Just like you have to ride a horse a lot to train him and keep taking off those wet saddle blankets, you have to paint a bunch of pictures to become the artist you want to be, I can’t tell you how many thousands of paintings I’ve done,” he says. One of the paintings he is most proud of hangs outside the governor of New Mexico’s office in the Roundhouse. Morton was commissioned by the NM Legislture in 1990, along with eleven other New Mexico artists, to do artwork for the newly-renocontinued on page 37

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Aggie Notes

Gary Morton

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vated State Capitol. These works became the foundation of the State Capitol Art Collection. The painting is 4' x 8' of the CR Ranch near Las Vegas. A cowboy is on the rimrock overlooking the Gallinas River canyon, and Hermit’s Peak can be seen in the background. When Morton delivered the painting in 1991, then Governor Bruce King saw it and requested it hang outside his office. It has been there ever since. Along the way, Morton has made time for public service and served on many boards. In addition to being one of the founding directors of the Working Ranch Cowboys Association and serving as VicePresident and President, he remains a WRCA Director and chairman of rules and sanctioning. He is also one of the founders of the WRCF, Working Ranch Cowboys Foundation, and currently serves as Chairman. He was on the New Mexico Arts Commission for eight years and served as Chairman. In 1995, Governor Gary Johnson appointed Gary as Director of the Office of Cultural Affairs in Santa Fe. Altogether, he has served four Governors of New Mexico in various capacities. His work has been exhibited at too many museums to list, but notably, he has shown at the Hubbard Museum in Ruidoso Downs, the Gene Autry Museum in Los Angeles, the New Mexico Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe and the Albuquerque ■ Museum.

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ing with one voice regarding being prepared for wildfire is the back forty upon which they may rely for drinking water, forage, timber, aesthetics, and recreational/economic opportunities (e.g., tourists, hunting). For example, “My home, my yard, my neighborhood, and my community are prepared for wildfire, is my back forty prepared?” Consider taking the opportunity this spring to prepare your home and yard and beyond for the better, less wildfire takes it for the worse. Recently, Rio Arriba County conducted three Extension programs within the county designed to provide residents hands-on-information regarding how to prepare their house, home and yard for wildfire. Call Doug Cram, 575/6468130, Extension Wildfire Specialist, to arrange a similar opportunity for your county. Note: wildland fire preparedness is applicable across the state, not just in ■ forested domains.

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Youth Contestants Sought for 2014 New Mexico Beef Ambassador Contest hroughout the state of New Mexico there are many outstanding youth, ages 12-20, who could pursue the opportunity to become the next voice for the NM beef industry by competing in the NM Beef Ambassador Program Contest to be held at the Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum in Las Cruces, June 8, 2014 in conjunction with the NM Cattle Growers, NM CowBelles, and the NM Farm & Livestock Bureau Joint Summer Conference. Senior and junior age state winners will then be eligible to compete in the National Beef Ambassador Program (NBAP) Contest slated for September 25-26, 2014 in Denver, Co. The National Beef Ambassador Program is managed by the American National CattleWomen, Inc. and funded, in part, by America’s Beef Producer CheckOff Program through the Cattleman’s Beef Board. The NBAP strives to assist youth in educating consumers and students about beef nutrition, food safety and stewardship practices of the beef industry. The state level contest is directly sponsored by the NM CowBelle organization, with additional support from the NM Beef Council, the NM Cattle Growers’, local NM CowBelle women and NM ranchers. Senior age contestants must be 17, but not over 20 years of age by September 1, 2014. During the state contest, a panel of judges will critique a 5 – 8 minute speech presented by the contestant. The speech must be factually based on a beef industry

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RESERVE YOUR

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topic that is developed through personal research. The state contest will also include a 250-word written response to a published news article regarding the beef industry, as well as participation in a mock media interview and a consumer promotion activity. The national contest does not include the speech presentation, but requires that educational outreach in the form of youth presentations, social media or campus events be conducted before the national contest deadline of September 1. The junior level contest is open to youth between the ages of 12 and 16 and consists of the same competition categories as the senior age contestants. The senior and junior winners will receive monogrammed award jackets and shirts and will be eligible for an expense paid trip to compete in the National Beef Ambassador Program Contest. The NM senior winner may also apply for a $500 college scholarship from the NM CowBelles upon fulfillment of his or her responsibilities as a NM Beef Ambassador. Each of the top five national winners will be awarded $1,000 award, after national requirements are completed, along with a total of $5,000 in cash prizes from the American National Cattle

Women and other sponsors. The top three junior division national winners each receive cash prizes and individual category awards. The five-person national team will have the opportunity to travel across the U.S. educating consumers, peers, students, and producers about the beef industry as they participate in state fairs, beef industry events, and other venues as diverse as the Boston Marathon and the National Harbor Food and Wine Festival to more traditional consumer agriculture events such as the Today’s Agriculture exhibit, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, which is billed as the largest indoor consumer agriculture show in the nation. For a complete copy of the national contest rules and study materials go to the National Beef Ambassador website at www.nationalbeefambassador.org. To receive an entry form, brochure and additional contest information contact the NM Beef Ambassador Chair, Shelly Hathorn, at the address below. Entry forms are due June 1, 2014 to: Shelly Hathorn, NM Beef Ambassador Chair, San Juan County Extension Office, 213A South Oliver Drive, Aztec, NM 87410, 505/334-9496 (wk) or 575/447■ 7447 (cell), shporter@nmsu.edu

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2014 9515, ext. 28 tinez 505/243Call Chris Mar @aaalivestock.com email: chris MAY 2014

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C IA TION

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Over the Top . . .

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by Caren Cowan, Exec. Director, New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Assn.

live under a black helicopter . . . big one. But I heard something the other night that makes me look like . . . well I am not sure what, but it certainly contemplated a greater conspiracy than I have ever considered. There is a theory out there that forest fires are being set by aliens. Not the illegal two-legged kind that cross our border with Mexico. We already know for sure they are responsible for some catastrophic fires. These people were talking space aliens. The claim is that the Waldo Canyon Fire in Colorado in 2012 was caused by something unknown dropping from the sky. The television program went on to note that a UFO was seen above the fire right along with helicopters during the fire. According to the Denver Post months after the fire, the conclusion was that the fire was human caused but without a tip or confession there would never be anyone caught. But why would space aliens be starting fires on Earth? Well, they have an answer to that. They are trying to drive humans from the planet. If there was an explanation as to why space aliens want to drive us from this planet, I fell asleep before they got there. I do have trouble subscribing to this theory . . . although I don’t think it is a far stretch to consider that eco-terrorists or other terrorists may use forest fires to drive people from the land. As we move deeper into fire season I pray that we may escape the killing fires that have plagued the West for the past several years.

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What did we ever do . . . To cause the New Mexico Attorney General’s (AG) office to dislike property owners in general and agriculture specifically? The validity of this question is no conspiracy theory. It is a three strikes and you are out tale. As I hope everyone is aware, New Mexico’s agricultural exemption for workers’ compensation has been under attack for many years. The office of the Attorney General had the opportunity to solve the issue and didn’t. The efforts of the Center 40

MAY 2014

on Law & Poverty included the filing of a lawsuit in State District Court claiming workers compensation payment for a few individuals. The case was misfiled. It should have been filed via the Workers’ Comp Administration as set out by state law. Under the previous state administration, the defense of the suit was handed over to the AG. Rather than immediately filing a motion to dismiss the case because it was in the wrong court, the AG’s office allowed the case to proceed. It gets worse.

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Rather than mount a defense or even consult with anyone in the ag community, the AG’s office stipulated (agreed to) some 372 “facts” about agriculture, including a statement that agriculture had routinely abused its workers for 100 years. It doesn’t even take a good guess to know what the outcome of that case was. This is an issue that the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association and its sister organizations are still fighting in the courts. Then last year the AG’s office got involved in the humane horse slaughter issue, spending hundreds of thousands of state tax dollars in an effort to see that horses will continue to suffer and die terrible deaths. The issue was in the federal courts, where the anti-human folks lost, so the AG took it to State District Court where it remains. Not only were state dollars used, but attorneys from the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) were allowed to represent New Mexicans before the Environmental Improvement Board. The latest slap in the face (or something worse) is an AG’s opinion that sets the stage for huge conflict between landowners and trespassers. Attorney General Gary King’s nonbinding legal “opinion” holds no force of law, finds that people can fish in privately owned streams as long as they don’t set foot on stream banks. People can wade upstream or downstream on to YOUR property. According to the opinion written by a staff attorney and signed by King says “walking, wading or standing in a stream bed is not trespassing.” Walking, wading or standing in a stream bed all infer that there is something below the water but it apparently isn’t property according to the AG. “This opinion reverses decades of actual practice,” Garrett VeneKlasen, the New Mexico Wildlife Federation’s executive director, said in a statement, “and we all — sportsmen, landowners, the Game and Fish Department — need some time to

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needs.

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assess the implications and figure out how to implement the changes. For starters, we’ll need to implement an intensive stream-steward program, widespread educational and outreach effort to anglers and landowners to prevent conflicts. This is not going to be an easy transition, but it is a red-letter day for New Mexico anglers.”

Elections are coming! If you didn’t have a reason to be sure and vote in the upcoming New Mexico Primary Election slated for June 3, 2014, I hope you have now. Registration for the primary is open until May 6. And, please don’t assume that all of your family, friends, neighbors and business associates are registered or that they make it to the polls. Ask them. If they are not registered, get them registered. Offer a ride to the polls. Do what it takes to get their vote in the ballot box. But before that, be sure you know the candidates and what they stand for. Make sure they know you and what you stand for. EVERY office is important and if we don’t do our part to make sure the best person wins, shame on us and we have nothing to complain about. On the federal level, who is supporting the hijacked version of the Senate Grazing Improvement Act that takes grazing permits from 10 years to 1 to 20 years with many new requirements; that codifies the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for grazing; that allows for 25 allotments annually to be permanently retired? Who is supporting the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks Monument that will impact 9,000 head of cattle, not counting calves, and 1,158,391 acres of comingled federal, state, and private lands in just one New Mexico County? Who is supporting turning the Valles Caldera National Preserve over the National Park Service? Who is taking the fight to the U.S. Forest Service for New Mexico ranchers? Who is fighting against the federal government turning vicious predators loose in larger numbers with no compensation for the loss of property not to mention spiritual and peaceful enjoyment? Who is fighting for the humane treatment and dignity of horses? Who will fight to protect our water rights? I could go on, but you get the picture. If we want to complain about our plight, we must hold our elected officials accountable for their actions and hold ourselves accountable for doing EVERYTHING we can to elect people who represent OUR

If that’s what it takes . . . The plight of ranching families in the West is getting some long overdue attention thanks to Cliven Bundy. Like most other issues in the “popular” media you can read anything you want about Mr. Bundy ranging from him and his family being heroes for their valiant stand against the federal government to claims that he is a dead beat rancher. Unfortunately if Mr. Bundy had done everything the federal government told him to do, he would be out of business just like the other 52 ranches that were once in Clark County Nevada . . . just like thousands of other ranching families that have been driven from the land across the West. Mr. Bundy admits that he hasn’t paid fees to the federal government. Mr. Bundy has lost his fights in the courts. He reached the point that he had no other choice and he stands for what he believes. I admit that on that Friday night when the national television news was focusing on some of the folks who rallied to help the Bundys that I was a wee bit nervous about the looks of some of those bushy headed fellows. I had forgotten Grandmother’s

advice about not judging a book by its cover. The next morning when the news was the mounted cowboys carrying our nation’s flag, I couldn’t have been prouder. I was sick to my stomach when Sheriff Richard Mack told the media that same day that the plan was to put the women in front if it looked like the feds were going to start shooting. I know what he was trying to say, but he should have enough media sense at this point in his life to know that the sound bite was going to stop just where it did. As we look back at this war we have been fighting for well over 20 years just for the right to be here, I do wonder what the outcomes if there had been a Mr. Bundy sooner. It pains me to remember what Mr. Klump looked like in an orange jumpsuit and shackles in Federal District Court in Tucson. It makes me sick to remember what it was like sitting in Federal District Court in Albuquerque as we heard Kit Laney get sentenced to federal prison. It got worse as I helped Sherry from the court room only to have some radical environmentalist try to shove papers in her face. The coward ran before the men could continued on page 43

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New Mexico Cattle Grower’s Association / New Mexico CowBelles / New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau Mid-Year Meeting & New Mexico State University Short Course New Mexico Wool Growers Annual Convention

June 8-10 / Las Cruces, New Mexico / Las Cruces Convention Center TENTATIVE SCHEDULE SUNDAY, JUNE 8, 2014 8:30 a.m. Bud Eppers & Les Davis Memorial Golf Tournament- NMSU Golf Course All afternoon/evening events will be at the Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum

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1:30 p.m. CowBelle’s Beef Ambassador Contest 3:00 p.m. Greg Peterson Social Media Workshop 3:30 p.m. Cattlegrowers’ Foundation Meeting 5:00 p.m. Welcome Reception 6:00 p.m. Candidate Forum 7:00 p.m. YF& R Social

MONDAY, JUNE 9, 2014

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All events at the Las Cruces Convention Center 7:30 a.m. Registration 8:00 a.m. Opening General Session 8:00 a.m. Silent Auction Opens 8:15 a.m. Keynote Address / Greg Peterson 8:45 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Ag Policy / Short Course / Risk Management, GMOs, Water & More 9:00 a.m. CowBelles Board of Directors Meeting / General Session 9:00 a.m. Juniors Depart for Tour 10:00 a.m. NMWGI Membership Meeting 11:45 a.m. Ladies Luncheon 12:00 noon Joint NMCGA / NMFLB / NMWGI Luncheon 1:15 p.m. – 4:45 Property Rights / Short Course Monument & Wilderness & More 1:15 p.m. Ag in the Classroom Volunteer Training, New Mexico Ag in the Classroom & NMFLB 3:00 p.m. NM Sheep & Goat Council Meeting 3:15 p.m. NMFLB Women’s Committee

3:30 p.m. Junior Recreation 4:00 p.m. Young Farmers & Ranchers Committee 5:00 p.m. NMCGA Policy Session 6:30 p.m. Attitude Adjustment 7:00 p.m. Joint Awards Dinner/ Dance to the Yarbrough Band Cakewalk Dance

TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 2014 7:30 a.m. Joint NMCGA / NMWGI / NMFLB Worship 8:30 a.m. Opening General Session 8:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. Natural Resources Policy / Short Course / Wildlife, Endangered Species, Grazing & More 9:00 a.m. NMWGI Issues Update 10:45 a.m. Young Cattlemen’s Leadership Committee 12:00 noon Joint NMCGA / NMWGI / NMFLB Luncheon Scholarship Presentations 1:15 p.m. NMFLB County President Meeting 1:15 p.m. NMCGA Board of Directors Meeting General Session

SPEAKERS INCLUDE — Nick Dranias – Goldwater Institute Director of Policy Development & Constitutional Government Marita Noon – Citizens Alliance for Responsible Energy Myles Culbertson – The Culbertson Group Barry Bushue – GMOs Greg Peterson – One of the Peterson Brothers Danielle Quist – American Farm Bureau Federation Brett Crosby – Custom Ag Solutions ... and many more!


More Opportunity!

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be called. Could we have done more? Should we have done more? There is no comfort in the fact that the timing probably wasn’t right in terms of the feelings of Americans toward their government that has completely run amuck; that we didn’t have the access to social media at that time and that few knew what was really happening on the ground. And, let’s face it, it was us as individuals who were being harmed. One of things that the Cowan girls were taught as children was never to run from a fight or a storm. If someone was in need, you ran to help them. It would do us all well to remember that lesson. With all due respect to the folks I have worked for and loved over the years, I cannot tell you the number of times that I have had a call to ask how to handle a situation. They didn’t want to raise a fuss, they just wanted quietly to handle their business on their own and could just use a little advice. They were sure they could work it out with whatever the authority was. Generally it wasn’t six months until the manure had hit the fan and some of the opportunity for the best resolution was gone. We always seem to think we can handle a situation better than the neighbor did when faced with the same challenge. The question was asked at a recent regional meeting, what we can do to keep things from happening to us that are harming folks in other areas. My answer is to run as fast as you can to the folks who are suffering and offer everything you might have to aide them . . . it won’t be long before it is you.

Don’t Fence Me In Not enough space this month, but New Mexico’s fence out law is under attack again. There are steps being taken by communities and counties around the state. Stay tuned!

Regional Meetings As you read this we will have completed a full set of regional meetings, plus a New Mexico Wool Growers Annual Meeting and wolf meetings in Winston and Glenwood. The participation in these meetings was almost overwhelming. We had great crowds at every meeting and plenty of lively discussion. Thank you to everyone that attended! We have some new members as a result and a stronger band of warriors.

The first ever AgriFuture Educational Institute will be held May 12 to 14 at the Embassy Suites in Albuquerque. There is still time to late register. Just go to www.nmagriculture.org and look on the column on the left side. The Annual Indian Livestock Days will be May 14 through 16 at the Rt 66 Casino just west of Albuquerque on I-40. The Mid-Year for New Mexico Cattle Growers’, New Mexico Wool Growers, New Mexico CowBelles, New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau and New Mexico Federal Lands Council will be held June 8 through 10 in Las Cruces. Events will be held at the New Mexico State University Golf Course (there isn’t a University of New Mexico course in Las Cruces), the Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum and the Las Cruces Convention Center. Registration materials will be hitting mail and email boxes soon. Have you purchased YOUR NMCGA jacket, vest, tie or scarf? Help celebrate NMCGA’s 100th Birthday with NMCGA ■ apparel!

There Are Not Cowboys Without Good Horses.

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The Department also offers pre-veterinary studies – our graduates have a high acceptance rate into veterinary medicine programs. We offer graduate degrees at the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy levels. The M.S. or Ph.D. in Animal Science can emphasize nutrition or physiology, and offers a Ph.D. in Range Science to study range management, range ecology and watershed management.

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Besides that he was short, had a bald head, pointy ears, and a pointy nose. He never went with the crowd and valued freedom above all else. One thing about it is you s i d e always got an honest opinion whether you wanted one or not. He was great fun as he was a leprechaun that could make smoke come out of his ears and pull a fifty cent piece out of yours. I remember the day well when I was five years old, my grandfather was shoeing a horse and I was handing him his tools. At the same time I handed him a rasp the horse jerked and he dropped it handle first on my big toe. It really hurt so I started to cry. My grandfather told me not to cry when I got hurt, but to get mad instead. While he was trying to get me to think about something besides my aching toe he taught me how to get mad when something hurt me. The first thing he said was you need to learn some swear words. The first thing he taught me was “Son of a B….h”. He would say the phrase and then he would have me repeat it. Each time I repeated it I had to use more gusto. Finally after about the tenth time I was growling it. He told me to remember that next time I got hurt and I would feel better much

The View

from the back

Holy Crap & Other Religious Overtures by BARRY DENTON y grandfather was a great philosopher and taught me many things of great use in my life. This quaint Irishman that I grew up around was neither quiet nor quaint. He was small, wiry, hard as nails, and always had an opinion.

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quicker by swearing than by crying. The only warning he gave me was not to let the women hear me say it. He said women had a tendency to capture and cure you of it. I asked him why I couldn’t say it around women and he explained that women were not part of the secret club. Of course, I asked him what the secret club was. He said that he had discussed this matter with God and it was only for men and boys. My grandfather continued to explain that he had gotten a pass from God for men and boys that are working with livestock. Now, I was glad that I belonged to the secret club that had a pass on swearing. I was also glad that my grandfather knew God well enough to negotiate a contract with him. He also stressed to me that it could only be used in extreme situations such as when a twelve hundred pound horse was standing on your foot or a mad mother cow was mowing you down. Cheese and rice was another catch phrase I learned to use early on. Needless to say I was quite proud of my new found secret club. About a month went by and the new formula was working quite well. When I got upset about something I started getting mad instead of crying. I liked it a whole lot better and my grandmother was quite astonished at the sudden change. All you serious Christian cowboys and girls, don’t get me wrong here. I’m not condoning swearing. I am merely pointing out that God probably has a sense of humor about it. If he did not have a sense of humor he would not have created cowboys or horseshoers. They themselves are a very funny lot. Think about some big time preachers that you know of. Say you had the Pope at your fall works and he was mounted on some colt that was pretty good, but bucked once in awhile. The Pope is out there roping a few calves one morning and dragging them to the fire. The Pope has been sitting chilly and getting by on that colt pretty well. Both of them are even starting to relax a little. When he gets to the seventh one that morning the calf doubles back and gets the rope under that colts tail. Of course, off they go bucking across the flat. The Pope is now pulling leather with one hand, but his other is froze to the dallies. Certainly a good cowboy would have gotten rid of his dallies on the first jump, but the Pope is pretty green as there are continued on page 45

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not many cattle at the Vatican anymore. Pretty soon that old colt is bogging his head so low that he ejects the Pope, but his dallies come loose and wrap around his arm. When he hits the hard rocky ground and the cactus, just what is he saying? Does it dawn on him to say prayers or is he temporarily in the state of anti prayer as most cowboys would be? Here is another true scenario for you to think about. I’m just substituting Billy Graham for the guy that this really happened to. Say you are at a thoroughbred farm putting training plates on yearlings for the first time and you have Billy Graham helping you. Now Billy doesn’t shoe a lot of horses so you have him handing you tools that first day. Remember that thoroughbred yearlings are normally about sixteen hands tall and pretty waspy when they first bring them out of the pasture. I have had them kick the nippers out of my hand with a back foot when I’ve been working on a front foot. I’ve also had them kick my hat off. They are long legged and quicker than anything you have ever seen. I’m working on a hind foot and ol’ Billy is in front of me handing me tools. In the blink of an eye that colt jerks his foot away from me, throws me forward, and nails Billy in the private area. He is unable to speak for a long time, but what words and phrases are going through his mind in regard to the colt? Is he cursing or forgiving? I have every respect for the Pope and Mr. Graham and they are truly fine examples of human beings. However, my contention is, have they ever been subjected to livestock on a daily basis? Do they know about the pact with God and the secret club? Hopefully this holy crap has brought ■ you some answers in your life.

Arizona National Elects Board of Directors he Arizona National Livestock Show held their annual Board Meeting on March 21 where they officially approved the newly elected Board of Directors. Each year, approximately one-third of the Arizona National Livestock Show board is elected to a three year term. The newly elected board members are Heidi Beljean, Jerry Black, DVM, Jarold Callahan, Gary Childs, Steve Chucri, Jack Doughty, Peggy Fiandaca, Brian Hanger, Steve Le Valley, Ron Pint, Robert Shuler, Steve Todd, Dr. Shane Burgess and Jim Williams. The new board members will join current board members Bill Brake, Patrick Bray, Don Butler, Marilyn Harris, Ken Johnson, Lance Knight, Dave Schafer, Hal Vinson, Mary Williams, Kelly Wright, Janice Bryson, David Feenstra, Galyn Knight,

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David Kennedy, Kathy McCraine, Jim O’Haco, Kevin Rogers, Cliff Saylor, Terry Van Hilsen and Linda Vensel. The Executive Committee members are President, Jim Loughead; President-Elect, Dean Fish; Vice President of Livestock, Tim Cooley; Vice President Special Events, Scott Loughead; Secretary/Treasurer, Cindy Tidwell Shelton; Member-At-Large, Galyn Knight and Member-At-Large, Robert Shuler. Michael Bradley, Executive Director shared “The leadership of the Arizona National is dedicated to our membership and volunteers as they continue to actively support the organizations important efforts. We are further encouraged by the active and recently engaged interest demonstrated by the Board of Directors in the development of our Strategic Plan as we establish carefully outlined goals in Growing the Future. The important work that will be accomplished by the Board’s Strategic Planning Task Force will be available on our website in the fall of 2014”. ■

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NEW MEXICO

BY FRANK DUBOIS

Federal

Lands News My column this month asks some preliminary questions about the “Cattle Battle” in Nevada. s I finish this column the feds have backed off the Bundy Ranch and released the cattle back to the Bundy Family. I was pleased when this became a national story because finally the light was being shown on federal land management and TV pundits were actually discussing such things as grazing permits, grazing fees and BLM’s approach to law enforcement. However, many of the folks commenting on the situation were very confused about public lands law. This is my attempt to clarify some of the issues and to ask questions that I believe need answers.

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Who “owns” these lands? This will not make some of my friends happy, but the feds do. Why would a private property loving, limited government advocating, animal like myself say this? Because whether I like it or not it’s in our State Constitution. The New Mexico Constitution was adopted by a Constitutional Convention on November 21, 1910 and ratified by a vote of the people on January 21, 1911. Article XXI, Sec. 2 of that Constitution states: The people inhabiting this state do agree and declare that they forever disclaim all right and title to the unappropriated and ungranted public lands lying

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within the boundaries thereof . . . Nevada and other western states have similar language. Before you start throwing rocks at our forefathers, please remember these lands were to be disposed of, just like they had been in states east of the Mississippi River. No one in 1911 dreamed that sixty-five years later the Congress would change national policy from disposal to retention and that over a hundred years later the feds would still control 30 percent of the state’s land area.

BLM’s law dogs Is the BLM in compliance with the intent of Congress by relying on federal employees to conduct these types of law enforcement actions? Let’s turn to FLPMA, Section 303(c)(1): When the Secretary determines that assistance is necessary in enforcing Federal laws and regulations relating to the public lands or their resources he shall offer a contract to appropriate local officials having law enforcement authority within their respective jurisdictions with the view of achieving maximum feasible reliance upon local law enforcement officials in enforcing such laws and regulations. (Emphasis mine) The “shall” and the “maximum feasible reliance” indicates it was Congressional intent the BLM use local law enforcement. Ah, but some will say this was a federal court order concerning federal lands, so surely it takes federal officials to carry it out. Nope. Again turning to Section 303(c)(1) of FLPMA, we find when local officials enter into a contract to “enforce federal laws and regulations” they are specifically authorized to do just that and much more. In the performance of their duties under such contracts such officials and their agents are authorized to carry firearms; execute and serve any warrant or other process issued by a court or officer of competent jurisdiction; make arrests without warrant or process for a misdemeanor he has reasonable grounds continued on page 47

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NMFLC continued from page 46

to believe is being committed in his presence or view, or for a felony if he has reasonable grounds to believe that the person to be arrested has committed or is committing such felony; search without warrant or process any person, place, or conveyance according to any Federal law or rule of law; and seize without warrant or process any evidentiary item as provided by Federal law. Section 303 of FLPMA is the “Enforcement Authority” part of the statute and the first option authorized by Congress is the contract with local law enforcement, which again is to be relied upon to the “maximum feasible” extent.

Livestock trespass law Speaking of law enforcement, why don’t the federal agencies utilize state trespass laws like other landowners? The New Mexico Livestock Board is authorized by statute to impound trespass livestock, plus their inspectors are certified law enforcement officers. Nevada has similar laws. All this means federal land management agencies can contract with the County Sheriff to provide for “public

safety” and they can contract with the New Mexico Livestock Board to impound and remove any trespassing livestock. No need for 200 federal officers, helicopters and attack dogs. The feds use state brand laws, they comply with state water, hunting and transportation law. So why not state livestock trespass law?

Additional questions on the Cattle Battle in Nevada Why did the Sheriff conduct “behind the scenes” negotiations instead of using his authority to prevent this overreach by the feds from ever happening? Why is the jurisdiction issue never brought up? Which entity, the feds or the state, exercises exclusive legislative jurisdiction over the BLM lands in question here? (See Art. I, § 8, Cl 17 of the U.S. Constitution which limits federal jurisdiction). Just where does the BLM get the authority to have official LEOs? In a recent GAO report the BLM cites an Executive Order for their authority, but they don’t provide the EO number so the text can be reviewed. Several articles referred to the FBI being on the scene. Who requested the FBI involvement and in fact how many total federal employees were involved and from

what agencies? Why did the feds declare a “no-fly zone” over the area? Was it really to protect federal employees or was it to keep media choppers out of the air? Prior to the decision to stand down, what intelligence was gathered by the feds, by whom was it obtained, how was it gathered and what role did it play in the decision to stand down? We have seen the pictures showing BLM weapons, helicopters and attack dogs. Just how large is the BLM arsenal with respect to weapons, ammo, dogs, vehicles, drones and other devices and supplies? The same question should be asked of the Forest Service, Park Service, Fish & Wildlife Service and the EPA. Seems like the more questions I ask the more come to mind. Let’s hope we get some answers and let’s watch and see what the fed’s next move will be. I can’t help but believe they want to put Cliven Bundy in jail just like they did Kit Laney. Till next time, be a nuisance to the devil and don’t forget to check that cinch. Frank DuBois was the NM Secretary of Agriculture from 1988 to 2003, is the author of a blog: The Westerner (www.thewesterner.blogspot.com) and is the founder of The DuBois Rodeo Scholarship (http://www.nmsu.edu/~duboisrodeo/).

Two miles north of Corona on US54, at NMSU sign turn east on Torrance County CO20 (University Road) and travel 8 miles to ranch entrance, turn right, follow signs to SWCRS. Visit www.corona.nmsu.edu

for more information & downloadable map with directions. Contact: Shad Cox 575-849-1015 shadcox@nmsu.edu

MAY 2014

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My Cowboy Heroes by JIM OLSON

Bobbi Jeen “The Wise OLSON Prospector” ne day, high in the Sierras, an old prospector came across a large gold nugget in a stream. It was as big as your fist! He also found a much smaller, but still very respectable sized nugget next to it. He immediately packed his burro and headed for town with his new treasures. Hard work and perseverance had paid off! As he approached town, after a long three-day hike from the high country, the prospector spotted a local shifty character, a fast talker who never seemed to be at work, but always talked big plans. The man approached the prospector with a quick buck on his mind, as it was well known around the area that when the prospector came to town, he usually had gold with him. “Sir, can you spare some gold dust? You see, I haven’t eaten in days and my wife and children, why, they’re hungry too!” begged the slacker. Without batting an eye, the prospector pulled the smaller nugget out and offered it to the him. However, in the process, the swindler got a good look at the much

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larger nugget in the man’s pack. Greed reached out and handed over the treasure. took over! “You seem to be very needy of this, perhaps The man excitedly talked about what he it will solve your woes,” was all he said. could do if he only had a stake. Why, with a Then he turned around and headed back nugget as big as that one, he’d be on easy towards the hills. street the rest of his life. He could make a The slacker could not believe his good fortune. His wife would wear the finest fortune! He’d really pulled one over on that clothes. His children could get the best ‘ol prospector. Now, he would have it all! He education. He would hob-nob with the happily raced for town to throw around the important folk in weight of his new town! He laid it on found fortune. The wise ol’ real thick. A few weeks went by . . “Sir, if you prospector smiled and . would only let me Back at the stream, said, “Finding that borrow THAT while panning for nugget, I would nuggets on a sunny kind of treasure is surely repay you afternoon high in the when I could. I easy. Why it’s much Sierras, the prospector would invest it and the town man easier than finding a spotted make us both a coming towards him. nice profit!” The He was shocked. big gold nugget.” sly man begged— Either he had come to on and on he went. beg for more The old man knew in his heart it was all nuggets—or perhaps, just perhaps, the a lie, however, something inside told him man was actually here to pay him back like to give it up. Incredibly, the ol’ prospector he promised. Either way, he waited to see what would come about. “I am so glad to have finally found you. I have been looking for you for days,” puffed the exhausted man. “What may I help you with?” asked the prospector. “I come for treasure,” the man sheepishly admitted. “But I have not found any other nuggets since I last saw you,” said the prospector, “I already gave you all I had.” “I have come for something far greater than a gold nugget,” said the man. Puzzled, the ‘ol prospector queried, “Well then, what is it you want?” “You see, it’s like this. When I talked you into giving me all that gold, I thought I would never see an unhappy day again, the rest my life. I thought it would buy me prestige and happiness. I showed it around town. Folks wanted to be around me, buy me drinks. Some asked for money, others

Ride on down to ...

WESTERN TRADING POST Cowboy & Indian Collectibles

403 N. Florence St. Casa Grande, AZ 85122 520.426.7702

TotallyWestern.com continued on page 49

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Heroes

continued from page 48

tried to con me out of it. It brought me much attention, both good and bad. But I was not happy. Well, maybe I was happy for a while, but it faded. I was constantly worrying and in fear of losing it. “But you—you gave up your most prized possession and then came back to the mountains to work again while I stayed in town, living the so-called highlife. Why did you give me the nugget? I beg of you—give me a truthful answer.” The prospector thought about it and said, “Because you seemed like you needed it more than me and something inside told me to do so. It seemed to be of great importance for you to be a rich man. It made me feel good to see you so happy. In the mean time, I have what I need. “And, I figured with a little hard work and perseverance, I’d get another one. But that is not so important because I love what I do. For me, the search is as much fun as the find. I know that money in the bank does not ultimately determine how happy I am. I am happy every day just living the life I love.” “That is exactly the kind of treasure I now seek,” said the man. “I want to know

how to be the kind of person who can be happy giving away his things to those who need them more than he does. I want to be happy no matter the size of my bank account. I want to be happy in my every day pursuits, not depending upon some future ‘prize’ to ‘hopefully’ bring me happiness. I want to be the kind of person who does not need the approval and admiration of others to find happiness in himself. I want to find the kind of happiness that could not be bought with that large gold nugget. I would gladly trade all the gold in the world to find this kind of treasure. After all, I sure as heck did not find happiness in the gold alone.” The wise ol’ prospector smiled and said, “Finding that kind of treasure is easy. Why it’s much easier than finding a big gold nugget. To find what you are looking for, to be happy, rich or poor, high or low, in good times or bad—you must first find God— and that is easy because He is everywhere. Then follow His instructions—you will hear them from within if you listen closely. The rest, why it’ll just fall into place.” This is an old fable, retold in my own words with my own spin on it. I hope you enjoyed it as I felt compelled to share it ■ with you here.

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Dairy Producers of New Mexico ANNUAL CONVENTION

June 6-7, 2014 Ruidoso, NM FRIDAY, JUNE 6 8a.m. .................... Producer’s Meeting ............................... Ruidoso Convention Center, Room 5 8a.m.-2 p.m. .......... Silent Auction ............................... Ruidoso Convention Center, Room 1 9a.m.-3 p.m. ......... Trade Show ..................................... Ruidoso Convention Center

11a.m.-1 p.m. ....... Lunch 2 p.m. ................... Door prize drawings 4p.m-8p.m. .......... Reception .......................................... The Lodge at Sierra Blanca

SATURDAY, JUNE 7 7:30 a.m. .............. Golf Tournament ............................... Inn of the Mountain Gods ...................................... Golf Course For more information/forms call 1-800-217-COWS or email dpnm@juno.com MAY 2014

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BEEF

COUNCIL

bullhorn NMBC Sponsors Training Day for Education Program Presenters

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NM Beef Council Sponsors Keynote Speaker at NM Association of Nutrition and Dietetics Annual Meeting

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NM BEEF COUNCIL cont. from page 51

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Despite Supply Concerns, Red Meat Exports Remain Strong in New Year

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Beef Checkoff Testifies at the 2015 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Meeting

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Checkoff Helps Bring Checkoff Helps Bring Schmacon Market Schmacon toto Market

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2013 – 2014 DIRECTORS — CHAIRMAN, Darrell Brown (Producer); VICE-CHAIRMAN, Bernarr Treat (Producer); SECRETARY, Alicia Sanchez (Purebred Producer). NMBC DIRECTORS: Bruce Davis (Producer); David McSherry (Feeder); Mark McCollum (Feeder); Milford Denetclaw (Producer); Jonathan Vander Dussen (Dairy Producer); Tamara Hurt (Producer).

FEDERATION DIRECTOR, Darrell Brown (Producer) U.S.M.E.F. DIRECTOR, David McSherry BEEF BOARD DIRECTORS, Tammy Ogilvie (Producer), Wesley Grau (Producer).

For more information contact: New Mexico Beef Council, Dina Chacón-Reitzel, Executive Director 1209 Mountain Rd. Pl. NE, Suite C, Albuquerque, NM 87110 505/841-9407 • 505/841-9409 fax • www.nmbeef.com

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A Fitting Monument by MIKE MOUTOUX In the dry land stands the monument of a dreamer It is a testament to hope; to years of yearning Standing tall above the grasses, rocks and scrub oak Below a cloudless sky and sun so brightly burning No babbling brooks sing here, just silent sand arroyos Few linger here at all; fewer still would stake a claim Only fools and dreamers could love this barren land It does not suffer fools; dreamers love it just the same ‘Twas the Homestead Act that brought him here to dream and sweat It was the solitude and grass that made it feel right But there were months when precious rains were non-existent Each cloudless day brought another worried weary night All that changed when the Aermotor windmill was delivered The well was dug, the tower raised; each rod and gear in place The wind blew as always, but now it turned a shiny fan And both the cowman’s heart and his dreams begin to race The cowman would talk about that day for years to come How the blades spun, the rods squeaked, how he paced and paced And then water, precious water, poured from pipe to trough Giving hope a thing a man could actually taste Within weeks trails appeared around the water trough As thirsty critters, one by one, found the water there of course Not just cows, but antelope and fox and deer drank there The tower, a beacon, led them to their water source The story of the dreamer is old but not forgotten The tower still stands although its working years are spent A testament to his hope and years of yearning For a dreamer and cowman, a most fitting monument. The Aermotor company sold its first windmills in 1888; they still make them today. It is not uncommon to see their mills in our part of the country. Many of the Forest Service towers were manufactured by the same company. 54

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the ▼

MARKE T place ▼

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55


New Mexico’s Old Times and Old Timers

The Rynerson-Slough Duel here were numerous man-to-man gunfights in the Old West, although few of them were anything like the gunfights portrayed on television and in the movies. Neither was the fatal fight between William Rynerson and John Slough in December 1867 at Santa Fe. Few agree on the details of that affair of honor. William Logan Rynerson was born in Kentucky in 1828 and arrived in California in 1852. Ten years later he volunteered for service in the 1st California Infantry and, as a sergeant, marched off to New Mexico. The Union Army’s California Column, of which the 1st was a part, was a response to Confederate Army’s incursions into the New Mexico territory early in the Civil War. Rynerson served until 1866 and was mustered out at Mesilla, New Mexico, with the rank of captain or lieutenant colonel,

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depending on the source. He chose to remain in New Mexico after the war and he invested in mining claims near the town of Pinos Altos, which was then a part of Doña Ana County. He also became interested in politics and was elected to the Territorial Legislature. Historian Marc Simmons described Rynerson as a “sensitive, combative individual who often wore his long frock coat draped over his shoulders in the style of Count Dracula.” John P. Slough was probably born in Ohio around 1830. He moved to Denver in the 1850s and practiced law there. When the Civil War began, at the request of Colorado Governor William Gilpin, he organized the 1st Colorado Volunteers and became the regimental commander. Slough’s troops were instrumental in turning back the Confederate invasion of

By DON BULLIS . . . Don Bullis is the author of ten books on New Mexico. Go to www.DonBullis.biz for more info.

New Mexico at Glorieta Pass in 1862. His military star was on the rise after that. He traveled to Washington, D. C. where he was promoted to Brigadier General and ultimately became military governor of Alexandria, Virginia. He was a pallbearer at the funeral of President Abraham Lincoln. President Andrew Johnson appointed him Chief Justice of the New Mexico Supreme Court after the Civil War. One observer described Slough as an “abrasive, quicktempered, highly opinionated jurist with numerous bitter political enemies.” Another says he “had an exceptional command of abusive language, which he used masterfully and willingly against any opponent.” Great enmity between Rynerson and

continued on page 57


Old Times continued from page 56

Slough soon developed in Santa Fe; perhaps because they were so much alike. Rynerson introduced a resolution in the legislature calling for the censure of Judge Slough for his lack of judicial impartiality, and he signed off on a letter to Washington demanding the Chief Justice’s recall. In response, the Judge declaimed that Rynerson was “A thief in the army, a thief out of the army, a coward and a SOB.” Such effrontery could not be ignored. The two men came face to face in the Exchange Hotel (or La Fonda Americana) in Santa Fe on December 17, 1867, and here is where the confusion begins. Simmons gave this account of the affair. Slough entered the hotel and found Rynerson waiting, and the latter spoke first: “I want you to take it back!” To which Slough responded, “Take what back?” “You called me a thief and a liar,” Rynerson rejoined. “I won’t take it back,” the Judge said. Whereupon Rynerson pulled his gun and said, “If you don’t take it back, I’ll shoot you.” Slough put his hand into his pocket and said, “Shoot and be damned!” (Not a judicious demand.) Rynerson fired and Slough, hit in the stomach, dropped the Derringer pistol he had concealed in his pocket, and fell to the floor. He died a few minutes later. But there are other versions. For one thing, Simmons reported that the fight took place in the hotel lobby, near the bar. Historian Ralph Emerson Twitchell said it happened in the hotel office. Yet a third historian, Don Alberts, wrote that it happened in the hotel’s billiard room. Alberts also asserted that Slough was unarmed, and other writers, including Bob Alexander, skirted the issue. Alexander said, too, “Slough collapsed to the floor, sledgehammer dead. Rynerson pocketed his smoking six-shooter and calmly waited for the law to take its due course.” Simmons reported thus: “. . . Rynerson appeared about to fire again, but a bystander shoved him through the doors of the bar and disarmed him.” There are two certain things about the matter: John P. Slough was dead and William L. Rynerson, clearly the killer, was subsequently acquitted of murder upon a plea of self-defense. It would be nice to conclude the story with something positive about Rynerson, who came to be called “The Tall Sycamore of the Rio Grande,” but that is not possible. The remainder of his public life was frequently surrounded by accusations of self-

serving misdeeds and corruption. He even committed his corrupt ways to paper when, as District Attorney in Doña Ana County, he wrote a letter to members of the Riley-Dolan faction in the days leading up to the Lincoln County War: “It must be made too hot for Tunstall and his friends, the hotter the better, shake that outfit up till it shells out and squares up and then shake it out of Lincoln. You have good men about to aid Brady, and be assured I will aid you all I can.” Four days later John Henry Tunstall was dead, murdered by members of Sheriff William Brady’s posse. Selected Sources: Alberts, The Battle of Glorieta Alberts, Rebels on The Rio Grande Alexander, Six-Guns and Single-Jacks, A History of Silver City and Southwestern New Mexico Bryan, Santa Fe Tales & More Bullis, New Mexico Historical Biographies, Hening, ed., George Curry 1861-1947: An Autobiography Melzer, Buried Treasures, Santa Fe New Mexican, January 14, 1868 Thrapp, Encyclopedia of Frontier Biography Twitchell, Leading Facts of New Mexico History, Vol. II Utley, High Noon in Lincoln Wallis, Billy the Kid Wilson, Merchants, Guns and Money

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New Mexico Stockman P.O. Box 7127 Albuquerque, NM 87194 or FAX: 505/998-6236 or email mattie@aaalivestock.com Name

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MAY 2014

57


A Man among Men by CURTIS FORT

ve told about a lot of punchers in these “Scatterin’ the Drive” stories . . . fellas you could count on to cut the rope in a branding pen if you got in a jam dragging calves on a knot-head (and I like to tie on); men who rode that extra mile to make sure you came out of rough country when they knew you were riding a snake when you left camp; men who in a hot branding corral, and were just as dry as you, filled the dipper and handed it to someone else to quench their thirst before they had a drink; men that I admired, as they were top hands at everything a cowboy does! Those same men were very sad when they had to shoot a broke-legged horse, or when they could not get the new-born calf to breathe, when they, with another puncher had worked so hard to pull it during a steady spring snow storm. These men would offer to top-off a bad one for an older puncher, but in a way that the older puncher still had his pride; they would let everyone else go to the wagon for dinner, and were the last to eat because they were holding the round-up. They were buckaroos who would loan you their last dollar, or their only Sunday shirt. They might be rough on the outside, but had a heart big as a saddle blanket. These men were bosses that didn’t say, “You go do that chore,” but said,” let’s both get it done.” I’ve worked with many cowboys who were always respectful to a lady, tipped their hat, opened the door, and never used bad language in their presence . . . and still craved horse flesh and burning hair. A big snuffy cow blowing snot, even at them, or the bawling of a pitching horse, was all music to their ears. I loved all those canyons, plains, mountains and rim rocks I got to ride in, but working that range with good men like I just described is as good as it gets. Many folks sit at a desk where the high point of their week is eighteen holes at the club. I’m not saying that life is bad, it just makes

I’

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me realize how fortunate I’ve been, and I thank God for those times. I realize that many of those I speak of so highly, had a solid partner in their wives. These women understood the life of a cowboy, the long hours and love of the land. Most have lived in some dusty, cold, camps, but did the laundry, cooked the meals, and drove the kids sixteen-plus miles to catch the bus, then went back at five o’clock to pick them up. They knew the danger of a cowboy’s work and worried everyday about their cowboy husbands. Women like that can help pull a calf or feed a crew of cowboys in no time . . . and are still ladies. I have a lot of respect for them . . . my Mother, Lana Turner, Abby Hoffman, Georgia Culbertson, Laura McDonald, Robin Gierhart, Alice Cleaver, Carol Humphries, Punch Barnes, Carolyn Henard, Mariann Patterson, Carol Fort and many more. These are men who “shot the powder,” like Billy George Drennan, at the Pitchforks, Leo Turner at the The Bells, Bill John Wooley at the Vermejo, Jim Gierhart at the Mean’s Ranch near Mule Creek, or Bobby Muncy at the Armenderis, to name a few. One of many I would like to have worked with was Yaqui Tatom, who left The Bells just before I got there. I did get to make a works with his son Tommy, who is all cowboy. I never heard a bad word about his Dad. I knew several punchers that worked under Yaqui while he ran the Bell Ranch wagon works, and all I heard was their respect for him as a boss and cowpuncher, and a notch above at handling broncs. When The Bell Ranch was still 1,000 sections, Yaqui took the rough off many three year-old broncs every July. There are many great Harvey Caplin photos of him doing just that! Can you imagine trotting along with Charles Goodnight, Albert K. Mitchell, or men like them and listening to their experiences? They were all leaders with a way of being boss that didn’t belittle you for being

just another puncher. Larry Dean at the Question Mark, Jim Patterson at the Orndorf or Gene Nix at the Corralitos were the same. They all liked to laugh, but didn’t flinch in a tough spot when a puncher needed them. They could drop a comment about getting the job done that made you feel good, but not too much praise that might give you the big-head. On the other hand, they knew how to tell you that you didn’t get the job done right in a way that you learned from it and would try the way they suggested. On the Vermejo, Corralitos and some other outfits, the boss would drop me off with two or three of my mounts to help a camp-man for a few days. That camp-man might be in his sixties, single, and was leading what seemed to me, a lonely life. But he had breakfast cooking way before daylight, while I grained our mounts we’d kept up the night before. He enjoyed the company as we prowled or gathered stock, and I learned a lot from him. I admired him when the boss was not around because he rode for the iron and took pride in his work. He was stepping on “rough” horses before I was born, so we’d sit after supper and roll smokes by a kerosene lamp or the light of a fireplace. I would quiz him about the ranges he’d ridden, and how they worked. This brings to mind Leandro Martinez at Vermejo, who spent his summers at Number 1 Camp in the high country, and his winters at Caliente Camp; and Slim Burmeister, who summered at the Ring Camp, and wintered at Brimmer Canyon. Leo Turner would say, “You need to look that boss in the eye on payday, when he hands you a check, knowing that you always gave 100 percent for the outfit.” These men I have mentioned could sure do that! My main goal in doing these stories of riding for some outfits has always been to continued on page 59


Scatterin’ continued from page 58

tell about cowboys I worked with, and who I highly respect. Carol, my closest friend and companion, has encouraged me, proof read, and spent many hours on these stories. So, if you’ll allow me, I’d like to salute one last cowboy I learned from a long time ago, that had all the qualities I just mentioned. I’ve always thought that if I could ever be half the cowboy and man that Byron Fort was, I’d be happy. I think I would have wanted to punch cows anyway, but after working with him, I knew what I wanted to do. He was born on a homestead in a dugout, many years ago. At five years old his job was to gather cow-chips in a sack for his mom in order for her to cook in the wood-stove, and to use for heat in his folks’ homestead. He rode for the neighbor McClure’s outfit, took any job available and left home at seventeen to work for Turner Hutchinson at Crossroads for thirty dollars a month. He never said much, but when he did it had a lot of meaning. I never heard him talk badly about someone or use bad language. He helped drive herds to the railheads at Sea-

graves and Bledsoe Texas, and Kenna, New Mexico. He worked for Dickinson Cattle Company for forty years. He built many miles of fence for them, then handled their cattle, horses, and windmills . . . many times by himself. He raised a family and fed them beef, biscuits and gravy that was furnished by the light of his life, Ruby Faye. They raised a big garden, and Ruby Faye canned late into the night to help her family through the winter. Byron milked a cow or two every morning and Curtis Fort & his Dad, Byron Fort. Dickinson Ranch, near night until he was ninety Tatum, New Mexico, circa 1955. years old. He taught me how I thank Caren and Margarite, along to “cheek” a bronc and step on quick as you kept his head pulled around. He was with all those at the New Mexico Stockthe reason I wanted to be a cowboy man magazine, for putting in print these because I saw how much he loved the life. tracks I’ve laid. I thank all of you for readI can still see that twinkle in his eye, when ing them . . . hopefully you enjoyed the he knew that all I really craved was to be ride. Adios, Amigos! like him. Byron Fort was a man to ride the River with! He went to be with Mom and Suggested reading: Harvey Caplin’s Ranch Cowboys Christ the on March 29, 2014 at ninety- and the Old West; available through Abbie Caplin nine years old. 928/205-9119.

MAY 2014

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A AC Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Ag New Mexico FCS ACA . . . . . . . . .2 Agrow Credit Corporation . . . . . . . .21 American Galloway Breeders Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 American Water Surveyors . . . . . . .24 American West Real Estate . . .69, 71 Artesia Trailer Sales . . . . . . . . . . . .77 B Ken Babcock Sales . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Bale Buddy Manufacturing, Inc. . . .36 Bar G Feedyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Bar J Bar Herefords . . . . . . . . .64, 79 Bar M Real Estate . . . . . . . . . .69. 74 Beaverhead Outfitters . . . . . . . . . .68 R Shane Beer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .67 BJM Sales & Service, Inc. . . . . . . . .54 Bobcat of Albuquerque . . . . . . . . .11 Bovine Elite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Bradley 3 Ranch, Ltd. . . . . . . . . . .65 Brand / J Perschbacher . . . . . . . . .37 Brennand Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 C C Bar Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Casey Beefmasters . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Cattleman’s Livestock Commission .33 CattleMax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Caviness Packing Co., Inc. . . . . . . .13 Century 21 Champions . . . . . . . . .70

ADVERTISERS’ INDEX

Don Chalmers Ford . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Clovis Livestock Auction . . . . . . . . .17 Coba Select Sires . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Chip Cole . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Conniff Cattle Co., LLC . . . . . . . . .22 Cox Ranch Herefords . . . . . . . . . . .65 George Curtis Inc . . . . . . . . . . .35, 66

% "#

" !%

$! % !# " # # !" ( % "# &# "# # % !# " % "#

!" ! !

H Harrison Quarter Horses . . . . . . . . .54 Hartzog Angus Ranch . . . . . . .22, 65 Headquarters West . . . . . .68, 69. 71 Henard Ranches . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Hi-Pro Feeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 High Plains Ranchers & Breeders . .49 Hubbell Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Hudson Livestock Supplements . . .18 Hutchison Western . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

E James R. Evrage . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72

I Inn of the Mountain Gods . . . . . . . .5 Insurance Services of New Mexico .25

F Farm Credit of New Mexico . . . . . . .8 Farmway Feed Mill . . . . . . . . . . . .16 FBFS / Monte Anderson . . . . . . . . .46 FBFS / Larry Marshall . . . . . . .31, 63 Five States Livestock Auction . . . .41 4 Rivers Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . .78 Freeman Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

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G Genex/Candy Trujillo . . . . . . . . . . .66 Giant Rubber Water Tanks . . . . . . .61 Grau Charolais . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Grau Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66

D D Squared Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Dairy Producers of New Mexico . . .49 David Dean/Campo Bonito . . . . . .68 Dan Delaney Real Estate . . . . . . . .74 Denton Photography . . . . . . . . . . .61 Desert Scales & Weighing Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 DJ Reveal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Domenici Law Firm PC . . . . . . . . .21

JUNE — Sheepman of the Year JULY — Directory of Agriculture AUGUST — The Horse Industry; Charolais SEPTEMBER — Fairs Across the Southwest OCTOBER — Hereford; New Mexico State Fair Results NOVEMBER — Cattleman of the Year; Angus; Brangus; Red Angus DECEMBER — Bull Buyers Guide; Joint Stockmen’s Convention Preview JANUARY — Wildlife; Gelbvieh; Joint Stockmen’s Convention Results FEBRUARY — Beefmasters; Texas Longhorns MARCH — Limousin; Santa Gertrudis APRIL — Dairy MAY — News of the Day !

Fury Farms, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

Plan your advertising for the coming year!

J J & S Pipe & Service Company . . . .55 JaCin Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Jarmon Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Joe’s Boot Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 K Kaddatz Auctioneering & Farm Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Bill King Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Koben Pucket Invitational . . . . . . .30 L L & H Mfg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 La Luz Properties, LLC . . . . . . . . . .71 Lakins Law Firm PC . . . . . . . . . . .15 Lazy D Ranch Red Angus . . . . . . . .66 Lazy Way Bar Ranch . . . . . . . . . . .65 M Major Ranch Realty . . . . . . . . .71, 74 Manford Cattle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Mathers Realty, Inc./Keith Brown . .70 Paul McGillard / Murney Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Merrick’s Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Mesa Feed Co . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Mesa Tractor, Inc. . . . . . . . . . .27, 55 Mesilla Valley Commercial Tire . . . .77 Michelet Homestead Realty . . . . . .72 Chas S. Middleton & Son . . . .72, 73 Monfette Construction Co. . . . . . . .55 N National Animal Interest Alliance . .56 New Mexico Beef Industry Initiative 34 New Mexico Cattle Growers Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 New Mexico 4-H Foundation . . . . .32 New Mexico Property Group . . . . . .72 New Mexico Purina Dealers . . . . . .80 New Mexico Wool Growers . . . . . . .44 Nine Cross Hereford Ranch . . . . . . .29

NMSU Animal & Range Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43, 47 O Jim Olson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 P Phase-A-Matic Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Phillips Diesel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 PolyDome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Pratt Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 R The Ranches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 D.J. Reveal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54, 67 Riley & Knight Appraisal, LLC . . . .74 Robertson Livestock . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Roswell Livestock Auction Co . . . . .12 S James Sammons & Associates . . . .72 Sandia Trailer Sales & Service . . . .55 Santa Rita Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Scott Land . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Singleton Ranches . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 Southwest Red Angus Association 64 Stockmen’s Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Straight Shooter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Joe Stubblefield & Associates . . . . .72 Subliminal Skulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Swihart Sales Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 T TechniTrack LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Terrell Land & Livestock Co . . . . . .71 Titan Machinery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 2 Bar Angus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 U United Country Vista Nueva, Inc . . .69 USA Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 V Virden Perma Bilt Co. . . . . . . . . . .63 W Wells Champlin Ranch LLC . . . . . .66 West Wood Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . .72 Westall Ranches LLC . . . . . . .14, 64 Westway Feed Products LLC . . . . .62 Williams Cattle Co . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Williams Windmill, Inc . . . .19, 45, 55 WW - Paul Scales . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Y Yavapai Bottle Gas . . . . . . . . .55, 57


inMemoriam Rosalie Dunlap passed January 21 in Las Cruces. She was active in so many community projects and clubs for over 60 years. She and her husband Ralph were extremely active in the agricultural community and the New Mexico Wool Growers. Photography was her passion. She took many, many pictures over the years. She is survived by daughter Lois Coleman, five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Malcolm Stuart (Buddy) Major Jr., 92, Los Lunas, passed away Tuesday, April 22, 2014 in Albuquerque. He was born in Socorro on November 9, 1921, to Malcolm and Lily Major. In the late 1940s, Buddy met and married Helen Hobbs from Ancho. He was a lifetime rancher; he ranched in Montana, Colorado and New Mexico. He lived most of his life in New Mexico, where he had several ranches in his life time. He was a cattle trader for many years. He bought cattle from ranchers all over New Mexico and western Arizona. In the late 1950s, the 60s and 70s, Magdalena would come alive in the fall because of his cattle trading. The town would be buzzing with the stock yards full of bawling cattle, trains coming and going, trucks and truck drivers, ranchers, cowboys, and cattle buyers. It was a exciting time. Buddy loved the land, cattle and horses. Even at the age of 92 he was still gathering cattle on his four wheeler. He loved to go to Cattleman's Livestock auction just to watch the cattle. Buddy, in his earlier years was a calf roper. Later he was a tie on hard and fast left handed heeler. During his life, he learned how to fly airplanes and helicopters. He served on Magdalena School Board, as Socorro County Commissioner, on the State Fair Commission, and State Racing Commission. Buddy also served his Country in the United States Army. In 1946 and was stationed at Fort Bliss where he was deployed to the Philippines. He is survived by his three daughters Linda Major, Gail Major and Beverly Major and his three sons Stuart (wife, Pat) Major, Mike (wife, Holly) Major, Randell (wife, Lynn) Major, 18 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. He is also survived by sisters Helen Graham, Marie Major, JoAnn Major and his brother Kenneth Major as well as many extended relatives. Donald L. Chalmers, 65, passed away

peacefully on Easter morning, April 20, 2014, surrounded by his family. Known to most as “Don”, or to his family as he was growing up as "Dude," Don was born on May 4, 1948 in Tulsa, Oklahoma to James S. (Bud) and Marjorie (Cohenour) Chalmers. Don was active in his high school, Tulsa Memorial High School, where he was Vice President of Student

Council his senior year. He went to Tulane University where he was a member of Sigma Chi fraternity. He returned to Oklahoma to marry his high school sweetheart, Dianne, in 1969 and attended Oklahoma State University where he received a BS degree in Marketing in 1970. Don started continued on page 63

Available in 6', 8' 9', 10', 11', 12' 13' Lane Thompson • 806/662-5937 email: redmud@wildblue.net

MAY 2014

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In Memoriam continued from page 61

his career with Ford Motor Company as a Dealer Representative in Houston, TX. Two years later, he became partner in Sound Ford in Seattle, Washington. He went on to own eight automotive dealerships in the Seattle area which included twelve franchises. In 1987, Don sold his interests in the Seattle dealerships and moved back to Tulsa where he owned and managed two successful dealerships. Education has always been extremely important to Don. He wanted to lend his leadership abilities and was elected and served on the Jenks Board of Education, one of the largest school district in Oklahoma. In 1995, Don sold his dealerships in Tulsa and he and Dianne moved to New Mexico where he was asked by Ford Motor Company to build a new dealership in Rio Rancho. He built a non-traditional dealership where the customers have a more positive buying experience. His personal family values were extended into the culture of his dealerships. Don was loyal to all his employees and treated them like his extended family. Don Chalmers Ford opened its doors on February 29, 1996. He acquired Chalmers Capitol Ford in March 2007. Don shared his leadership abilities with various national, state and local organizations. Don served as Vice-President of the University of New Mexico Board of Regents; Vice-President of the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Board of Directors; Served on the board of the National Auto Dealer Association and was Chairman of the Government Relations and Industry Relations committees; Board member of the Ford National Dealer Council; Past Chairman of the Fellowship of Christian Athletes National Board; Past Chairman of the Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce and the Rio Rancho Chamber of Commerce; Past Chairman of United Way of Central New Mexico and Alexis de Tocqueville Society; Past President and current member of the Rotary Club of Albuquerque del Sol; and numerous other boards and organizations. He was especially gratified to recently cochair the Capital Campaign for the National Dance Institute Highland Theater Renovation raising over $14 million dollars. He will long be remembered as one of the staunchest supporters ever of the New Mexico State Fair Junior Livestock Sale. Don is survived by his wife of 45 years, Dianne; daughter Courtney (husband, Rob); son Cameron (wife, Brandi); and two grandchildren. He is also survived by his two brothers Greg Chalmers (wife, Karen), and Kirk Chalmers (wife, LaDon)

along with other extended family. Dixie Joan Howerton, 78, Sonita, AZ on August 13, 1932 and quietly passed away on April 4, 2014. Dixie was born on August 13, 1932. Her family moved from Sonita to Tucson when she was five years old and she graduated from Tucson’s Amphitheater High School. She raised a family in Tulsa, Oklahoma, but always considered Tucson to be “home” and returned in 2004. She is survived by her two sons, Laurence Robert Howerton (wife, Kathy), Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Bradley Scott Howerton (wife, Pamm), Plano, Texas. John “Byron” Fort, 99, Tatum, passed away on March 29, 2014 in Denver City, Texas. Byron was born in Lea County on the homestead east of Lovington on March 1, 1915 to William Herman and Bera (Freeman). He married Ruby Faye Sweatt in Lovington on December 20, 1935. Mr. Fort was a rancher who enjoyed his job and he worked as much as he could until he broke his leg at age 97. He has been a member of Tatum Baptist Church for 70 years serving as deacon, trustee, treasurer and Sunday school teacher. He was on the Lea County ASCS committee; a member of the Tatum School Board; was inducted into the Lea County Cowboy Hall of Fame and received the Foy Proctor Memorial Cowman’s Award. He enjoyed playing dominoes especially “42”. He was a wellrespected man and will be greatly missed. He is survived by three sons: Royce L. (wife, Sally) Fort, Midland, Texas; Curtis A. (wife, Carol) Fort, Tatum, and Jerry D. Fort, Aurora, Colorado and one daughter: Laquita A. Dial, Clovis; one brother: R. F. “Buddy” Fort, Lubbock, and one sister: Bessie D. Spears of Las Cruces. Also surviving him are eight grandchildren and thirteen great-grandchildren and a host of friends. Will E. (Bill) Craddock, 79, Deming, passed away on February 5, 2014 after a brief illness. Bill was born on July 22, 1934 in Midland, Texas, the fifth of seven children born to Perry and Mildred Craddock. Bill’s first saddle was made for him at age three. Being raised on ranches in Texas and New Mexico Bill was a true cowboy and authentic western horseman. In high school Bill competed in the events of calf roping, bareback riding and bull riding, earning trips to the National High School Finals as a junior and senior. Bill also showed steers in high school and excelled in track and football. A member of the PRCA for over 60 years, Bill was an accomplished calf and steer roper and a member and past officer of the Senior Steer Roping continued on page 66

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T. Lane Grau – 575.760.6336 – tlgrau@hotmail.com Colten Grau – 575.760.4510 – colten_g@hotmail.com 1680 CR 37 Grady, New Mexico 88120

In Memoriam continued from page 63

Association. For 25 plus years Bill roped at Cheyenne Frontier Days. For over 40 years Bill's Spur Lazy Spur horses have demonstrated their athleticism and sound dispositions in a variety of rodeo events throughout the United States. Bill made numerous friends and could remember every horse that anyone had ever ridden or competed on. Bill was a graduate of Fort Sumner High School, served honorably in the United States Army and attended New Mexico State University. He is survived by his wife Sue Ann; son David (wife, Michele), Crowley, Texas; son Jay (wife, Patricia), Bridgeport, Texas; and honorary son Manuel Sandoval, Deming. His daughters include Cathy Fikany, Fort Sumner; Jane Brown, Tucson, Arizona and Sherry Craddock, Weatherford, Texas. Bill is also survived by five grandchildren. Sisters Margaret Long, Carthage, Texas and Mary Jane Maddock,Rancho Dominguez, California are Bill’s only surviving siblings. Other survivors include brother and sisterin- law Bob and Vicki McDaniel, Princeton, Indiana. LeRoy P. Montoya, 59, Clarksdale, Kansas, died, April 2, 2014 at his home of an apparent heart attack. He was born November 2, 1954 to Manuel and Magdalena (Pino) Montoya in Mountainair, New Mexico, and grew up on the family ranch in Moriarty. LeRoy was a member of Oak Christian Church and the American Angus Association. He was also a professional cattle fitter and a cowboy. He married Jennifer Waller in 1998; she survives him. Additional survivors: sons, Manuel Montoya, Clarksdale; Jacob Conley, Clarksdale; and Jeffrey Conley, Maryville, Missouri.; brothers, Facundo Montoya wife, (Janet), Fred Montoya, Fidel Montoya, Michael Montoya (wife, Julie) and Casey Ingram (wife, Heather); sisters, Juana Saiz, Betty Knorr, Mary Ann Strohl husband, (Sid) and Lucy McCurry (husband, Geoff); and numerous nieces and nephews. Joseph James (Joe) Lane III, 78, Tucson, passed away on March 6, 2014 after a long battle with Parkinson’s Disease. Born September 16, 1935 in Roswell. Joe was born and raised on the Lane family ranches in Arizona and New Mexico. He went to elementary school in Willcox, Arizona, High School at the New Mexico Military Academy in Roswell and received his Bachelor Degree in Agriculture from the University of Arizona in Tucson. After his graduation in 1957, he served in the U. S Army as a First Lieutenant in the Armor Division in Killeen, Texas until 1960. Joe


In Memoriam continued from page 66

owned ranches in New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado. He always considered himself a cattleman and spent the majority of his ranching career on the O Bar O Ranch north of Willcox at Bonita. He sold this ranch in 1983 to devote his full time to government service in Arizona. Joe served in the Arizona Legislature from 1978 to 1988 and was Speaker of the House of Representatives in the 38th Legislature (1987 – 1988). He subsequently served as an Aide to Governors Fife Symington and Jane Hull. Joe was Director of the Arizona Department of Agriculture Brand Department until his retirement. He contributed his time to numerous organizations. He was a past President of the Arizona Cattle Growers’ Association (ACGA), served as Chairman of the Arizona State Transportation Board, held the Chairman position of the Arizona Chapter of the American Heart Association in 1993, received the University of Arizona College of Agriculture Lifetime Achievement Award in 1997, and was named Cattleman of the Year in 2007 by the ACGA. Joe is survived by brother Charles B. “Doc” (wife, Patti), son Walter (wife, Karen), daughter Nora (husband, Phil) daughter Denise and ten grandchildren. He is also survived by his former wives Mari and Susan. Roy Wayne Laney, 66, Carlsbad, passed away March 29, 2014 at University Medical Center in Lubbock. He was born October 17, 1947 in Carlsbad to Roy B. and Ruby (Miller) Laney-Boulware. Wayne worked for Pennsylvania Drilling Company for many years and later went to work for Phonix and Sessoms and was instrumental in working at the Nevada test site and WIPP. Survivors are daughter, Jana Laney; brother, Paul Laney (wife, Melissa); sister, Nita Laney-Saler (husband, Michael); a granddaughter; three nieces, three nephews, and several great-nieces and great-nephews and cousins. Wayne was a giant man with a heart bigger than he was, and will be greatly missed. Abran “Abie” Ellis Parra, 82, a longtime Deming resident passed away on April 23, 2014, at Memorial Medical Center in Las Cruces. “Abie”, as he was affectionately known, was born August 18, 1931, to Isabel Lara and Salvador Solis Parra in Dwyer, New Mexico. He attended Grant County Schools and was raised on the Y-(Nan) Ranch in the Mimbres Valley and served in the U.S. Army during the Korean Conflict. On April 10, 1955, he married Marilyn

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continued on page 77 MAY 2014

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE

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ST. JOHNS OFFICE: TRAEGEN KNIGHT P.O. Box 1980, St. Johns, Arizona 85936 Ph. 928-524-3740 • Fax 928-563-7004 • Cell 602-228-3494 email: info@headquarterswest.com

EASTERN ARIZONA FARM: Located in central Apache County, Arizona, between Alpine and Springerville along US Highway 180 in the Nutrioso Valley at the confluence of Colter Creek and Nutrioso Creek with over ½ mile of meandering Nutrioso Creek running through the property. Includes over 118 acres total with grand-fathered water rights for 33.8 acres of irrigated pasture. Farmable acreage has been utilized for livestock grazing on improved pasture and is irrigated via gravity flow dirt ditches. Beautiful views of Escudilla Mountain located in the heart of the White Mountains. There are numerous home sites on the property with excellent access including over ¼ mile of paved frontage along US Highway 180. Additional access is provided by county maintained roads on both the north and south boundaries. Price $1,200,000 REDUCED! $1,000,000 NORTHERN ARIZONA RANCH: Coconino County, Arizona between Flagstaff and Kingman just north of Interstate 40 in the Kaibab National Forest. The ranch contains nearly 8,000 deeded acres including two “in-holding” parcels within the forest boundary. The ranch carrying capacity is for 267 animal unit’s year-long and varies in elevation from 5,200 feet to 6,200 feet with the headquarters situated at 5,460 feet. Access is provided by Forest Road #142 approximately 6 miles north of Interstate 40 at Ashfork, Arizona. The ranch headquarters includes a ranch house with barn and corrals. The ranch is watered by over 30 earthen reservoirs scattered throughout each pasture. The ranch is fenced and cross-fenced into six main pastures with nine working/holding traps. The northern portion of the ranch is behind locked gate and could generate additional income from hunting, wood-cutting or sandstone quarries. Price: $3,800,000 EASTERN ARIZONA RANCH: North of St. Johns in Apache County, Arizona, includes 1,760 deeded acres with State & BLM leases for 121 animal units yearlong. Newly improved with several miles of new pipeline, numerous storage tanks/drinkers supplied by four wells. Total ranch is over 11,000 acres with a five pasture rotational grazing system and one small holding trap. All ranch fences have been reworked including over two miles of new fencing. The main block of the ranch is behind locked gate providing the owner with great privacy and seclusion. Price: $700,000

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D V E RT I S E

in the New Mexico Stockman. Call: 505/243-9515. 68

MAY 2014


AGUA NEGRA

MARANA BRANCH

RANCH

SCOTT THACKER, Assoc. Broker • P.O. Box 90806 • Tucson, AZ 85752 Ph: 520-444-7069 • Email: ScottThacker@Mail.com www.AZRanchReaIEstate.com • www.SWRanch.com

Buckhorn Ranch – 350 head ranch spread over 19,000 acres with 2,163 deeded acres, plus State, BLM & Forest. The ranch is found in one of Southeast Arizona's prime ranching valleys with picturesque setting & steeped in very old history. Asking $2,500,000 New Listing! La Cienega Ranch – NW Arizona, 500 head ranch, AZ State land, BLM & adverse plus ephemeral increases, remodeled headquarters, home & bunkhouse, airstrip. Great Price Per AUM! Asking $1,295,000 Reduced Price! Beloat Ranch – 300 head year-long, plus increases with rain, Asking $599,000

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Rock NV Natural Farm – Willcox, AZ, Organic or Natural Farm w/145 acres, home, barn, possible retail shop, w/ many irrigated pastures. Asking $580,000 Reduced Price with New Package! Dripping Springs Ranch – Globe AZ, 194 Head year-long, 10 deeded acres plus State & BLM. $399,000. Reduced Price: CK Ranch – Tonopah AZ, 50 acres deeded, 237 head year-long on State & BLM. The waters were recently reworked, & ephemeral increases can bump the numbers with rain. This ranch makes sense. Asking $399,000 We have more ranches available, please check our websites. All properties are listed by Arizona Ranch Real Estate, Cathy McClure, Designated Broker

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BAR M REAL ESTATE New Mexico Properties For Sale... C6 Ranch: Sonoita/Patagonia AZ. 165 head, 45 acres deeded, 8700 acres forest lease great water, good improvements. $725,000. Sam Hubbell-Tom Hardesty Stockton Pass: Beautiful SE AZ Ranch North of Willcox, Mountain Ranch 145 head AU, Deeded Surrounded by forest. Reduced to $975,000. Walter Lane Red Top Ranch: 3,800 deeded acres in SE AZ. Priced at $197 per deeded acre. Walter Lane Wildhorse Basin Ranch: Yavapai county, 864 deeded, 6701 State Lease, $3,900,000. Con Englehorn Crooked H: Central AZ, 126 Sections, 450 head Winter Range/664 summer Range. $2,375,000. Traegen Knight Lazy EH: Western AZ, 122.5 deeded, 300,000 BLM/State Lease, 17,486 AUM ephemeral/500 AU yearlong. 18 wells, 4 pumps on CAP Canal. $600,000. Con Englehorn NI Ranch Tombstone AZ: The ranch consists of 6555 deeded acre & 6650 state lease, 250 head annually; all improvements are in top condition, the ranch is well watered w/8 wells, & pipelines. Good strong grass country. The Ni Ranch is one of the last working cattle ranches in the state with the majority of the land being deeded. Priced at $3,150,000 Liberty Ranch: 1917 Deeded aces in SE Arizona. $950,000. Walter Lane Turkey Creek Ranch: Yavapai Co, 130 AU winter permit Oct. through March on the Prescott Nat. Forest, base land is 59.32 acres in the Bradshaw Mtns at 5,800’ that would make a pleasant getaway from the Metro areas. $605,000 – Paul Groseta

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SIX SHOOTER RANCH – Located approximately 15 miles west of Carrizozo, New Mexico in western Lincoln County. The ranch is comprised of 640 ± Deeded Acres, 961.4 New Mexico State Lease Acres and 11, 246 Federal BLM Lease Acres. Grazing capacity is controlled by a Section 3 BLM grazing permit for 175 Animal Units on a yearlong basis. Improvements include one residence, which has recently been remodeled, hay barn, storage sheds and corrals, all functional. Water is provided by three wells and an extensive buried pipeline system. Much of the water system has been replaced or installed new within the last five years. The Carrizozo Malpai lava outcrop forms the entire eastern boundary of the ranch. Access to the ranch is gated and locked from Highway 380. Public access is by permission only. Price: $1,300,000.

R E D UN RACT T N O C

BORDER RANCH – Located approximately 10 miles east of Columbus, New Mexico along the international boundary with Mexico along and on both sides of State Highway 9. The ranch is comprised of 1,910 ± Deeded Acres, 11,118 NM State Lease Acres and 52,487 Federal BLM Lease Acres. Grazing capacity is set by a Section 3 BLM grazing permit for 613 Animal Units. Livestock water is provided by three wells and a buried pipeline system. Five sets of working corrals are situated throughout the ranch. Adjoins the Mt. Riley Ranch to the west. Price: $1,100,000, but negotiable, come look & make an offer. Seller wants the ranch sold. MT. RILEY – Located approximately 30 miles northwest of Santa Teresa, New Mexico along and on both sides of State Highway 9. The southern boundary of the ranch is the international boundary with Mexico. The ranch is comprised of 160 ± Deeded Acres, 6921 NM State Lease Acres and 74,977 Federal BLM Lease Acres. Grazing Capacity is set by a Section 3 BLM grazing permit for 488 Animal Units on a yearlong basis. The biggest portion of the ranch is located north of the highway. The headquarters is located approximately one mile north of the highway. Headquarters improvements consist of a camp house, maintenance shop, storage sheds and a large set of working pens with scales. Water is provided by four wells and a buried pipeline system. Adjoins the Border Ranch to the east. Price: $725,000, but negotiable, come look & make an offer. Seller wants the ranch sold. Scott McNally, Qualifying Broker Roswell, NM 88202 Office: 575-622-5867 • Cell: 575-420-1237

Bar M Real Estate

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE

Nancy A. Belt, Broker Cell 520-221-0807 Office 520-455-0633 Sonoita, AZ

Committed To Always Working Hard For You!

RANCHES/FARMS *NEW* 400 Head Ranch, adjoining Leslie Canyon, Cochise Co., AZ Highly improved & maintained w/4 homes; horse barn; hay barn; equipment sheds; workshop; roping arena; excellent shipping corrals w/scales; extensive water distribution w/wells, storage & pipelines. Scenic w/rolling grasslands and mountains. Easy country. +/7,346 deeded acres, State lease & USFS permit. This is a top quality ranch & a rare opportunity. $3,900,000. *NEW* 150 Head R anch , Near Willcox, AZ – +/- 3,000 deeded acres, and State Grazing Leases. One bedroom home, corrals, well, and electric at headquarters. Well watered with about 15 miles of new pipeline and 9 storage tanks & drinkers, 8 dirt tanks. Great country. Good mix of browse and grass. $1,950,000. *REDUCED* 90 Head, Agua Fria Ranch, Quemado, NM – This is a scenic mid-size ranch with great prospects. Operating as a private hunting retreat, and a purebred Angus and Paint horse ranch. +/-1200 deeded acres, +/-80 acres of NM lease, and +/-5220 acres BLM. 4BR, 2BA, mfg. home. Trophy elk, antelope, deer. Elk and mule deer permits. Candidate for a conservation easement or land exchange with the BLM. $1.65M $1.55M *REDUCED* 52 Head Ranch, San Simon, AZ – Indian Springs Ranch, pristine & private, only 12 miles from I-10. Bighorn sheep, ruins, pictographs. 1480 acres of deeded, 52

head, BLM lease, historic rock house, new cabin, springs, wells. $1,300,000 $975,000, Terms. *REDUCED* 335 Head Ranch, Greenlee County, AZ – +/- 20 Deeded acres, w/two homes, barn & outbuildings. 58 Sections USFS grazing permit. Good vehicular access to the ranch – otherwise this is a horseback ranch. Scenic, great outfitters prospect. $850,000 $760,000. * REDUCED* 314 Acre Farm, Pearce, AZ – Two pivots, three irrigation wells, charming +/- 2100 s.f. home, four car garage, large metal workshop, both with concrete floors, two railroad cars with cover between for horse stalls, hay and feed storage. $750,000 Now $698,000. *REDUCED* San Simon, AZ – Indian Springs Farm 162 acres w/pivot, nice home, hay barn other utility buildings. $750,000 Now $650,000. *NEW* Graham Co, AZ 78 Plus Head Cattle Ranch – Approx. 640 deeded acres, 3633 acres USFS and 5204 acres BLM; 1 BR, 1 Bath home/camp. Foothills of the Santa Teresa Mountains. $650,000 *REDUCED* Virden, NM +/-78 Acre Farm, with 49+ acres of irrigation rights. Pastures recently planted in Bermuda. 3 BR, 2 Bath site built home, shop, hay barn, 8 stall horse barn, unique round pen with adjoining shaded pens, roping arena. Scenic setting along the Gila River. Great set up for raising horses also suitable for cattle, hay, pecans, or pistachios, $550,000 Terms.

Jesse Aldridge 520-251-2735 Rye Hart 520-455-0633 Tobe Haught 505-264-3368 Sandy Ruppel 520-444-1745 Erin Aldridge Thamm 520-519-9800

*REDUCED* Young, AZ, 65+ Acres – Under the Mogollon Rim, small town charm & mountain views. 2100 s.f., 3 BR, 2 Bath home, 2 BR cabin, historic rock home currently a museum, shop, & barn. Excellent opportunity for horse farm, bed & breakfast, or land development. +/- 65 acres for $1,070,000; home & other improvements. $424,500. 240 Acres with Irrigation Rights, Elfrida, AZ – Suitable for hay, crops, pecans, irrigated pasture, homesite or future development. Includes 130 acres of irrigation rights, partially fenced, with corrals, & 1200 gpm well. $336,000 Terms.

KEITH BROWNFIELD ASSOC. BROKER, GRI Brownfieldkeith@gmail.com

mathersrealty.net

Mathers Realty, Inc.

$ )0-1+ ,)%( '%3%'-7< ))(<%5( /2'%7)( 21 %'5)6 -1 7,) 1257,)%67)51 81% 2817< ",) 1257, 3)16 ,%9) % 727%/ 2* 3)16 = ())3 ; :-() : 2* /&)56 -)/6)1 67%1',-216 : *7 2* *))( &81.6 : ')0)17 %35216 ",) 6287, 3)16 ,%9) &-+ 3)16 = ())3 7,)< 9%5< -1 :-(7, 3/86 60%//)5 3)16 *25 6257-1+ (2'725-1+ 25 ,2/(-1+ '%77/) : *7 *))( &81.6 <(52/-' ,87) /&6 '%77/) 6'%/) 1 6-7) :)// : )/)'75-' 68&0)56-&/) 3803 : +%//21 6725%+) 7%1. 81()5 +5281( :%7)5 5-+,76 +%//21 02/%66)6 6725%+) 7%1. 648%5) *227 '2002(-7< &%51 : 6725%+) &%<6 %// *25 %1 %332-17 0)17 5-')( %7 # ! )0-1+ '5)6 2* *%50/%1( : 81()5+5281( :%7)5 5-+,76 :)//6 : ')0)17 (-7',)6 3/86 %((-7-21%/ %'5)6 2* 3%6785) /%1( 5-')( %7 MATHERS REALTY, INC. 2223 E. Missouri, Las Cruces, NM 88001 575/522-4224 Office • 575/522-7105 Fax • 575/640-9395 Cell

“Propriety, Perhaps Profit.”

HORSE PROPERTIES/LAND *NEW* 480 Acres Oracle, AZ – One of the last remaining large parcels of land in the area. On the northern slope of Santa Catalina Mtns. Small ranching, development or granite mining potential. $2,640,000. San Rafael Valley, AZ – Own a slice of heaven in the pristine San Rafael Valley, 152 Acres for $380,150 & 77 Acres with well for $217,000 *NEW* 40 Acres Beautiful Turkey Creek Area – An amazing opportunity to own 40 unique acres in an incredibly bio-diverse location, in the foothills of the Chiricahua Mountains, with end of the road privacy. $340,000.

FARM AND RANCH IN VEGUITA, NEW MEXICO! Beautiful custom home on 14 acres with irrigation and amazing views! 2141 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, and 3 baths. Corrals, stalls, hay barn, RV garage and workshop with 720 sq. ft. apartment. Additional acreage available. Come home to the country! $439,900 MLS #759826

Willcox, AZ 40 Acres – Great views in every direction, power to the property. $85,000.

Stockmen’s Realty licensed in Arizona & New Mexico

www.stockmensrealty.com Century 21 Champions, Inc. Nancy at 505-480-2121 70

MAY 2014


RANDELL MAJOR Qualifying Broker

D L O S

Santo Nino – This Ranch is located 7 miles south of Patagonia on the western edge of the beautiful San Rafael Valley. This ranch consists of 62 deeded acres & 12,000 plus National Forest Lease. The ranch is rated at 185 head annually. The land contained in the ranch consists of steep sided ridges to rolling hills along the side of the valley floor. Improvements include 3,000 sq. ft. owners home, cowboy house, barn & corrals. Rarely does a ranch in this area come on the market. $899,000 including cattle.

D L O S

NI Ranch Tombstone, AZ – The Ranch consists of 6555 deeded acres and 6650 state lease, 250 head annually; all improvements are in top condition, the ranch is well watered with 8 wells, and pipelines. Good strong grass country. The Ni Ranch is one of the last working cattle ranches in the state with the majority of the land being deeded. Priced at $3,150,000. If you are looking to Buy or Sell a Ranch or Farm in Southwestern NM or Southern AZ give us a call:

Cell: 575-838-3016 Office: 575-854-2150 Fax: 575-854-2150

P.O. Box 244 585 La Hinca Road Magdalena, NM 87825

TERRELL LAND & LIVESTOCK CO. 575/447-6041 # "

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We Know New Mexico...Selling Ranches For 40 Years!

505/243-9515

Sam Hubbell, Qualifying Broker 520-609-2546 Tom Hardesty – 520-909-0233

rmajor@majorranches.com www.majorranches.com

565 acres with a beautiful 2 bedroom, 2 bath home, granite countertops, under cabinet lighting, Saltillo tile, kiva fireplace, horse barn, ponds, 3 car garage, and much, much more. $2,000,000

O

35 irrigated acres in Dilia, NM – NM Borders River, mostly fenced, Reduced Price! $449,900

U R A D V E RT I S E R S make this magazine possible. Please patronize them, and mention that you saw their ad in ...

Stacie Ewing, Qualifying Broker/Owner 575-377-3382 ofc. • 575-779-6314 cell

HOOSER RANCH, L.P. First Time Offering 18,087 ACRES +/Some deeded land has access to the Charette lake that is owned by Game and Fish in Colfax County. There is 4,998 acres of State Land at $4080 per year included in total acreage. There are 7 wells on the ranch – 2 on top of Charette Mesa and 4 on the bottom below the mesa. There are 7 storage tanks, fiberglass and I metal off the wells and owners have over 10 miles of water lines to most all pastures from the wells and Springs along the bottom of the mesa along with 29 stock tanks. Two springs feed a storage tank that provides water for households and tubs in the corrals and to 4 pastures. The working pens are designed to work cattle smoothly and to the scales. The Sweetwater Creek from up above provides flood rights in rainy season. There are years when hay has been a staple off the sub-irrigated meadows. There are 4 Springs along the mesa that have been developed. Ranch could carry 515 mama cows or 1200 head of yearlings. The ranch is not leased so should be in good condition. This property offers Antelope hunting every year and has been allowed total of 8 permits, 2 of which are doe and 3 state hunters. Seller does not know what percentage of mineral rights they own. Seller will transfer any they own to Buyer at closing. Improvements included with sale of property is a 5000 sq ft. metal shop which offers a small live/work space newly built, has a galley kitchen with appliances. The backhoe and welder are included. The shop sports a 6 bay parking for vehicles and big covered hay barn close by. Owners built a beautiful custom 3000 plus sq ft home about 6 yrs ago with tile and wood floors. 4 bedrooms, 3½ baths with 3 car attached garage. The 3 bedroom 2 bath Foreman’s house is in great condition and recently had windows replaced and painted is located close enough yet is private. This is a rancher’s kind of ranch and is known for its gains on cattle. Taxes for 2013 $6480 total. 7734.41 +/- Acres are in Colfax County. 5354.75 Acres are in Mora County. This ranch is one of a kind as far as location and the area is known for gains on cattle and has been improved and maintained in good condition to start your operation with little to do. Call listing office for information or appointment to see this exceptional ranch. Information provided is deemed reliable and is not guaranteed by La Luz Properties and should be independently verified. Sale offering is made subject to errors omissions, changes in price, prior sale or withdrawn without notice.

LA LUZ PROPERTIES, LLC Lucy Maez, Qualifying Broker OFFICE: 505-454-8784 • CELL: 575-799-8784 laluz@newmexico.com www.newmexicorealestatelaluzproperties.com MAY 2014

71

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

C6 Ranch – This ranch is located at Patagonia AZ. The ranch consists of 40 deeded acres & 8,000 plus acres National Forest Lease. This ranch is rated at 165 head annually. Great water system & good strong grass. Improvements include 1600 sq. ft. home built in 2006, barn & corrals. The Ranch has easy access to town & beautiful views. $725,000.

MAJOR RANCH REALTY


REAL ESTATE GUIDE

JAMES SAMMONS & ASSOCIATES INC. $ * + %)% $ %"$ %+$*. 0 ) +$ '+ &(%& (*. - * $ # $+* ) % %-$*%-$ + %)% % () * & ( * ( ( * %$ " -%(! $ ( $ * ) $ # " +$ * %& ( * %$ - * #+"* *+ % +$* $ %&&%(*+$ * ) ( $ % () ) $ , -) - * #&(%, **" "* ) +(

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PAUL McGILLIARD Murney Associate Realtors Cell: 417/839-5096 • 800/743-0336 Springfield, MO 65804

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www.Paulmcgilliard.murney.com

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D V E RT I S E

in the New Mexico Stockman. Call: 505/243-9515.

FOR SALE By owner. 22+ sections, 150 mother cows year-round. Very well watered and fenced. Nice Home. $1.2 million. Please call: James R. Evrage, 575-963-2340 or 575-687-3455

LLC RICHARD RANDALS Qualifying Broker

We may not be the biggest, the fanciest or the oldest but we are reliable & have the tools. O: 575/461-4426 • C: 575/403-7138 • F: 575/461-8422

JAMES B. SAMMONS III FARM & RANCH / COMMERCIAL / RESIDENTIAL T. 915.833.9373 • M. 915.491.7382 • F. 915.975.8024

6006 North Mesa Street, Suite 901, El Paso, Texas 79912 james @ jamessammons.com www.jamessammons.com

RANCH SALES AND APPRAISALS

SERVING THE RANCHING INDUSTRY SINCE 1920 1507 13TH STREET LUBBOCK, TEXAS 79401 (806) 763-5331

STRAIGHT SHOOTER RANCH & FARM INSPECTIONS & INVESTIGATIONS

TOM SIDWELL Associate Broker

nmpgnewmexico@gmail.com • www.newmexicopg.com 615 West Rt. 66, Tucumcari, NM 88401

Buyers, Sellers, Agents & Lenders... Don’t Saddle The Wrong Horse! Allow Us A Close Look At The Property. We Go Way Beyond “Due Diligence”. View our Services at RanchInspector.com 575-533-6253 • Email: nbarranch@hughes.net

INTEREST RATES A S L OW A S 3% Pay m en t s Sch ed u l ed o n 25 Year s

www.michelethomesteadrealty.com

Cherri Michelet Snyder Qualifying Broker

FARMS, RANCHES, DAIRIES, HORSE & COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES — Satisfied Customers Are My Best Advertisement —

920 East 2nd, Roswell, NM 88201 • Office: 575/623-8440 • Cell: 575/626-1913 72

MAY 2014

J o e Stu b b l ef i el d & A s s o c i at es 13830 Wes ter n St ., A m ar i l l o , TX 806/622-3482 • c el l 806/674-2062 joes3@suddenlink.net Mi c h ael Per ez A s s o c i at es Nar a Vi s a, NM • 575/403-7970


REAL ESTATE GUIDE

RANCHES FOR SALE Lower L–Bar Ranch

LOWER L – BAR RANCH: 36,427 deeded acres 75 miles northwest of Albuquerque, New Mexico. The terrain varies dramatically from high mesas with steep fractured rock ledges and ridges to wide valley bottomlands offering unbelievable views of massive steep volcanic up thrust cones that tower over the surrounding country side. The property has a scenic “western movie set” look. The ranch is a wildlife haven, including elk, deer, aoudad, turkey, bear and lion. Improvements include an owner’s home and a large log hunting lodge. This ranch has the added bonus of one-half of the minerals with 100% of the leasing rights, along with a substantial water rights conveyance. $20,000,000 or approximately $549 per acre. Northern New Mexico Ranch

NORTHERN NEW MEXICO RANCH: 16,717 deeded acres positioned along the Continental Divide in the heart of New Mexico’s most scenic high mountain country. The terrain is diverse ranging from open grassy meadow valleys to rugged, timbered mountain slopes and ridges. The property is very well watered by creeks, mountain springs, trout fishing ponds and wells. A portion of the ranch is high game fenced and all of the elk (an estimated 519) within the game park are privately owned and will transfer with the ranch. The ranch is extremely well improved and the seller owns 100% of the mineral interest. The property is priced at $2,500 per acre with one-half of the minerals conveyed. The seller will convey all of the minerals at a slightly higher price. Offered Exclusively By:

www.chassmiddleton.com • 1507 13th Street, Lubbock, Texas 79401 • 806/763-5331

Descriptive Brochures Available


REAL ESTATE GUIDE

Bar M Real Estate SCOTT MCNALLY Laura Riley Justin Knight

www.ranchesnm.com 575/622-5867 575/420-1237

505/330-3984 505/490-3455

Ranch Sales & Appraisals

Specializing in Farm and Ranch Appraisals

1301 Front Street Dimmitt, TX 79027

Southwest New Mexico Farms & Ranches 19.18 acres of farm land in La Mesa, NM – Located in La Mesa, NM. Paved road frontage and EBID surface water rights. Call for aerial map & EBID water rights info. Has ground water rights but no well. Farm located west of intersection of Lister Road & San Jose Road off Hwy 28 on north side of La Mesa. Sellers will divide. $326,060 27.50 Acre Farm – Consists of 3 tracts – 8 Acres, 8 Acres, & 11.5 Acres – will sell separately. Full EBID & shared irrigation well. Community water, electric, telephone & gas on Camunez Road to adjoining property. Beautiful farm land, great mountain & valley views. Take Highway 28 south to San Miguel, east or left on Highway 192, first right or south on Las Colmenas, then left or east on Camunez to end of pavement. Priced at $467,000 Fancher Ranch – Located southwest of Las Cruces, NM off Afton Road. 198 head permit, 210 acres deeded, 19,224 acres BLM and 4666 acres state land. 2 pastures, 3 wells, 1900 square foot home with 3 bedrooms and 2 baths, bunk house, green house, horse barn, corrals, round pen, etc. Easy access 45 minutes from El Paso and Las Cruces. $550,000 10 acre farm – located south of La Mesa, NM. Beautiful farm with irrigation well and EBID water rights. Surrounded by other farms. Hwy 28, east on Afton Road, farm is on the north side. $179,900 $164,000 14.83 acre farm – located in the north valley of Las Cruces, NM, includes an irrigation well, EBID water rights (Elephant Butte Irrigation District), shop and barn. $279,900 14.39 acre farm – located in San Miguel, NM. Full EBID irrigation, electric, new irrigation well, new cement ditches, and new canal crossing. $245,000

DAN DELANEY REAL ESTATE, LLC

Beautiful Albuquerque South Valley Farm – 78.9 acres reasonably priced at $1,762,500, consist of 2 parcels, owner will sell separately. North farm includes 43.0667 acres for $957,500 and south farm includes 35.7908 acres for $805,000. Shown by appointment only.

“If you are interested in farm land or ranches in New Mexico, give me a call”

318 W. Amador Avenue Las Cruces, NM 88005 (O) 575/647-5041 (C) 575/644-0776 nmlandman@zianet.com www.zianet.com/nmlandman

THREE PINONS RANCH: 6,070 ACRES. GOOD COMBINATION HUNTING/CATTLE. $3,968,000 OSO FLATS RANCH: 16,436 ACRES. GOOD CATTLE RANCH. $3,250,000 TWO BIT LAND & CATTLE: 3,300 ACRES ALL DEEDED LAND. $980,100 ABBE SPRINGS RANCH: 16,772 ACRES. BEAUTIFUL HOME! MAJOR SCENIC MOUNTAIN RANCH $825,000 T RANCH REALTY AC W DIAMOND RANCH: 2180 ACRES. TRPONDEROSA ON C RANDELL MAJOR R E PINES, D DEER, ELK HUNTING. $750,000 Qualifying Broker UNMULE P.O. Box 244, 585 La Hinca Road, Magdalena, NM 87825

rmajor@majorranches.com

Cell: 575-838-3016 • Office: 575-854-2150 • Fax: 575-854-2150

www.majorranches.com

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For other listings go to

800-933-9698 day/eve. www.scottlandcompany.com • www.texascrp.com Ben G. Scott – Broker • Krystal M. Nelson • NM Qualifying Broker ■ SPRINGER, NM – TOP OF THE WORLD! Just east of town on pvmt. 9,200 ac. +/- ac. deeded, state-of-the-art improvements, 5000 ft. +/- home, two guests houses, employee housing, horse stalls w/breeding station, excellent improvements including fences, working pens, roping arena w/air operated release, new old-time cook house w/out-house. A must see property! ■ CAPITAN, NM – Laboratory/Office, covered pens, home, 15.6434 ac. +/_. Ideal for horse or cattle breeding or embryo transfer facility or vet clinic. ■ WE HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY to offer the Walker Canyon Ranch in multiple parcels. 10,432 ac. +/- of Motley Co., TX. ranchland w/a large, permitted dam providing a large, beautiful lake w/water backed up in a number of smaller canyons for boating, fishing & other recreation together w/good hunting on the ranch. The ranch can be purchased in individual or multiple pastures & is on pvmt. w/good access. ■ OCEANS OF GRASS – East Central NM – Almost 200 sections, mostly deeded, well improved w/homes, barns, several sets of pens w/scales, watered by solar & electric powered subs, windmills, an extensive pipeline system, springs, spring-fed draws & canyons, earthen dams & river frontage, on pvmt. ■ 12 MI. OF THE PENASCO RIVER – East Slope of the Sacramento Mountains, Brown & Rainbow trout fishing, mule deer, Barbary sheep & turkey, beautiful, new custom-built home w/exceptional landscaping, guest house/office newly remodeled, nice employee housing, barns, steel pens, woven + barbed wire fences, 35,309 ac. +/- (deeded, state & BLM leases) on pvmt. ■ OLD HWY. 66. – Santa Rosa, NM – 12,718 ac. +/- deeded, 640 ac. state lease, this ranch is well improved & watered by springs, subs, windmills & earthen dams in an excellent location w/frontage on three different hwys. (development potential). ■ STATE OF THE ART! – Improved to the hilt w/homes, barns, cutting horse training facilities, excellent fencing, extremely well watered by wells ranging from 10ft to 209ft, equipped w/mills & subs, extensive pipeline system, springs & earthen dams, w/abundance of old grass to start the season, on pvmt. w/paving to the headquarters (approx. 25 mi. from Old Hwy. 66 Ranch). ■ GUADALUPE CO., NM – 1,760 ac. +/- well improved w/homes, barns & pens, well watered, pvmt. & all weather roads from the interstate. Please view our websites for details on choice NM ranches, choice ranches in the high rain-fall areas of OK, irr./dryland/CRP &commercial properties.

D V E RT I S E

in the New Mexico Stockman. Call: 505/243-9515.


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Phase-A-Matic, Inc. Phase Converters are used when three-phase lines are not available or are cost prohibitive. The phase converter will run virtually any 3phase machine at any single-phase location. Advances in converter technology have resulted in low price, high performance and reliability closely resembling three-phase line power. This enables us to provide the required power for CNC and other voltage-sensitive equipment.

Phase-A-Matic, Inc. Rotary Phase Converters run all common three-phase machine shop equipment, providing the power necessary to run all load types – including CNC/PLC, transmitters, lasers, welders, battery chargers, heating elements, etc. Whatever the load type – motor, resistive, induction, or transformer load – our Rotary Converter will power it. Phase-A-Matic, Inc. has been providing phase conversion for the home shop machinist, the industrial machinist, the farmer in agricultural use, for food processing equipment, the woodworking industry, the metalworking industry, medical equipment, elevators, etc. The Rotary Converter is designed to operate as modules with the ability to be connected in parallel to produce any required output, no matter how large. With fuel prices skyrocketing, diesel generators are now being replaced with Phase-A-Matic, Inc. Rotary Phase Converters. Bring your request to us and we will supply the right conversion for your application.

ROTARY CONVERTER RELIABILITY – MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure) Failure rate (MTBF) is so low it’s almost impossible to determine. We find that within the first 12 months approximately 1 in 150 might have a problem, and usually within a few weeks or months. After the first 12 months, it might be one or less in 10,000 over a 35-year period. We continue to hear of our Rotary Converters that have been in service for 25 or 30 years or more, and which are still working flawlessly. It could go on to do another 25 or 30 years. The reason for the reliability is fairly obvious. Phase-A-Matic, Inc. Rotary Converters do not have start capacitors or contactors or mechanical connections of any kind as most other converters do, which contributes to and is usually the most common cause of failure. All connections are soldered, which is not feasible with other designs. Even though some other manufacturers claim to use Baldor motors, they still have start capacitors and switch gear, which we have eliminated by working with Baldor for approximately 2 years to develop the way these are engineered. It pays to buy Phase-A-Matic, Inc. for long life and high reliability. There is very little to go wrong with the Rotary Converter. 75

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long-term dependability. It is the quietest rotary converter on the market, and the best quality available anywhere. It meets your concerns in delivering the critical uptime and reliability your operation requires.

COMPANY REPUTATION & BENEFITS Professional, available technical support for proper sizing and installation, consistent product reliability and immediate delivery from stock for most items are core components of the strength of the company and its esteemed reputation. Phase-A-Matic, Inc. phase converters range from 1/3 to 500 HP or more. We have the right converter to meet your needs in delivering economical, reliable and true 3-phase power of the highest quality, thus providing the dependability and uptime you must have.

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In Memoriam continued from page 67

Gonzalez in Garfield. They made their home in Deming and for 29 years he was employed by the New Mexico Highway Department, where he was an equipment inspector. He later worked for the Deming Public Schools for eight years. Abie was a communicant at St. Ann’s Catholic Church. He was avid cowboy and horseman and enjoyed hunting with his sons. He is survived by wife, Marilyn G. Parra; four sons, Abie Parra (wife, Carol), Mimbres; Tom Parra (wife, Melba); Sonny Parra (wife, Judith), all of Deming; and Anthony Parra (wife, Jennifer), Las Cruces; brother, Salvador Parra Jr. (wife, Betty), Bayard; sister, Ruth Parra, Albuquerque; seven grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Editor’s Note: Email caren@aaalivestock.com. Memorial donations may be sent to the Cattlegrowers’ Foundation, a 501(c)3, tax deductable charitable foundation serving the rights of ranch families and educating citizens on governmental actions, policies and practices. Cattlegrowers Foundation, Inc., P.O. Box 7517, Albuquerque, NM 87194. The New Mexico Stockman runs memorials as a courtesy to its readers. If families & friends would like to see more detail, verbatim pieces must be emailed to us, & may be printed at 10¢ per word.

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Since 1893

Hereford Ranch JIM, SUE, JEEP, MEGHAN & JAKE DARNELL TEXAS/NEW MEXICO RANCH: 5 Paseo de Paz Lane, El Paso, TX 79932 (H) 915/877-2535 – (O) 915/532-2442 – (F) 915/877-2057 JIM (C) 915/479-5299 – SUE (C) 915/549-2534 OKLAHOMA RANCH: Woods County, Oklahoma E-mail: barjbarherefords@aol.com

“Texas’s Only Hereford Operation West of the Rio Grande.”

Se Habla Español THE DARNELLS CONTINUE A 121-YEAR-OLD FAMILY TRADITION OF RAISING GOOD-DOING HEREFORD CATTLE

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GET SERIOUS WITH ACCURATION® BLOCK PART OF PURINA’S SUSTAINED ® NUTRITION PROGRAM New Accuration Block from Purina Animal Nutrition takes the games and guess-work out of beef cow nutrition supplementation. Accuration Block includes Purina’s Intake Modifying Technology , allowing cows to consume the nutrients they require, when they need them, while providing a balanced supplement. A part of the Sustained Nutrition program, the Accuration Block helps keep cows at an optimal BCS all year-round, for their best performance. ®

Accuration Block is available in 200 lb block, 500 lb block and 200 lb tub form. ®

Also available: Accuration ® Liquid and Sup-R-Lix Liquid

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Contact these Purina Dealers to discuss your needs ... BERNALILLO FEED & CONOCO

CREIGHTON’S TOWN & COUNTRY

ONE STOP FEED INC

Bernalillo, NM • Johnny Garcia 505-867-2632

Portales, NM • Garland Creighton 575-356-3665

Clovis, NM • Austin Hale 575-762-3997

CIRCLE S FEED STORE

DICKINSON IMPLEMENT

ROSWELL LIVESTOCK & FARM SUPPLY

Carlsbad, NM • Walley Menuey 800-386-1235

Tucumcari, NM • Luke Haller 575-461-2740

Roswell, NM • Kyle Kaufman 575-622-9164

CORTESE FEED & SUPPLY

HORSE ‘N HOUND FEED ‘N SUPPLY

STEVE SWIFT

Fort Sumner, NM • Aaron Cortese 575-355-2271

Las Cruces, NM • Curtis Creighton 575-523-8790

Account Manager • Portales, NM 575-760-3112

COWBOYS CORNER

OLD MILL FARM & RANCH

GARY CREIGHTON

Lovington, NM • Wayne Banks 575-396-5663

Belen, NM • Corky Morrison 505-865-5432

Cattle Specialist • Portales, NM 800-834-3198 or 575-760-5373

Contact Your Local Dealer To Contract Your Feed

Contact your local Purina Animal Nutrition Dealer or call the number listed below if you would like your local Purina Animal Nutrition Sales Specialist to contact you to learn more about Ê Ê into your Ê incorporating Accuration® Block feeding program.

// 1/,/" ° "ÊUÊ­nää®ÊÓÓLJn™{£ Ê Ê Ê Accuration, Building Better Cattle, Sustained Nutrition, IM Technology and Intake Modifying Technology are registered trademarks of Purina Animal Nutrition LLC.

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NMS May 2014