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© 2015 All rights reserved. NMLS 810370

BE SET IN YOUR WAYS OR SET ON IMPROVING THEM.

There’s no escaping change. Especially when you’re trying to keep pace with a growing nation. So when the time comes to buy new equipment, purchase land or expand your operation, Ag New Mexico Farm Credit will be there. We give rural New Mexico access to the financial support it needs to never stop growing. AgNewMexico.com | 800.357.3545 Belen • Clovis • Las Cruces

䔀焀甀椀渀攀 ☀ 䰀椀瘀攀猀琀漀挀欀 䔀焀甀椀瀀洀攀渀琀Ⰰ  䘀攀渀挀攀 ☀ 圀椀爀攀 愀渀搀 䈀愀氀攀爀 匀甀瀀瀀氀椀攀猀

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DECEMBER 2016

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The Ideal Crossbreeding Solution Pérez Cattle Company Bull Sale 80+ Hereford & Angus Bulls February 23, 2017 | Tucumcari, New Mexico

PerezCattleCo.com 3

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l l u B s u g n a r B l l e w s o e l R a S . e l m . a a 0 17 at 1 Fem &

0 2 , 5 2 y r a u r b e F , y a d r Satu AT ROSWELL LIVESTOCK AUCTION ROSWELL, N.M. • 575/622-5580

80 to 100 Brangus & Angus Plus Bulls

Cattle may be viewed Friday, Feb. 24, 2017

• Most with EPDs • Registered and Commercial • Fertility Tested • These bulls have been bred and raised under Southwest range conditions. • Most bulls rock-footed • Trich-tested to go anywhere

at Roswell Livestock Auction This sale offers you some of the highest quality Brangus in the Southwest! The “good doing” kind. BUY DIRECT FROM BRANGUS BREEDERS! NO HIGH-PRICED COMMISSION MEN TO RUN THE PRICE UP!

Females— 700 to 1,000 • Registered Open Heifers • Registered Bred Heifers and Bred Cows • Bred Cows and Pairs – 3- to 7-yrs.-old • Bred Heifers – Coming 2-yr.-olds • Open Yearling Heifers FOR INFORMATION CONTACT: Years Raising Bulls

Total:

40 years 15 years 35 years 35 years 30 years 45 years 207 years

Years as IBBA Director 12 years w/Patti 5 years 3 years 6 years 3 years 6 years 35 years

Gayland Townsend Steven Townsend Troy Floyd Bill Morrison Joe Lack Larry Parker

580/443-5777, Mob. 580/380-1606 Mob. 580/380-1968 575/734-7005, Mob. 575/626-4062 575/482-3254, Mob. 575/760-7263 575/267-1016 520/845-2315, Mob. 520/845-2411

TO RECEIVE A CATALOG CONTACT: Bill Morrison: 575/482-3254 • C: 575/760-7263 To Consign Top Females Contact: Gayland Townsend: 580/443-5777 • C: 580/380-1606

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Hereford - Angus - Charolais

Moriarty, New Mexico

Bred Heifers Available

R B Tour Of Duty 177

Our bulls are Stout, Functional, and will add Pounds to your calves! We only use the highest quality genetics in our herd to produce high altitude cattle that will work for you. All bulls are trich and fertility tested. Registered Bulls Available Private Treaty Year Round.

L T Long Distance 9001

CRR 5280 N J W 98S R117 Ribeye 88X ET

Call For More Info Bill King (505)220-9909 Tom Spindle (505)321-8808 www.BillKingRanch.com or Visit us on Facebook DECEMBER 2016

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Saturday ■ February 11, 2017

12 Noon ■ At the ranch east of Estelline, Texas

SELLING 200+ ANGUS BULLS and a SELECT GROUP OF B3R CHAROLAIS BULLS! ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

50K on all bulls First breeding season guarantee Free delivery on purchases over $10,000 Delivery to central locations guaranteed not to exceed $150 per head Sight unseen guarantee

Ranch raised bulls for ranchers since 1955. Mary Lou Bradley-Henderson ■ 940) 585-6471 James Henderson ■ (940) 585-6171 Minnie Lou Bradley Ranch Office ■ (806) 888-1062 15591 CR K ■ Memphis, TX 79245

www.Bradley3Ranch.com

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Congratulations Jackie Ganter on another successful season. Good luck at the 2016 WNFR!

Photo by: Dainya Sapergia

Proper nutrition and care are essential ingredients to a healthy and high-performing horse. Backed by experienced equine nutritionists, we offer a diverse range of equine feed products that are suited to optimize the performance of your horse, based on their stage of life and level of activity.

Let Hi-Pro feed maximize your horse’s performance 1-800-447-7620│hiprofeeds.com │ HI-PRO FEEDS® and the HI-PRO EQUINE FEEDS logo are trademarks of Hi-Pro Feeds Inc. © 2016 Hi-Pro Feeds Inc.

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Doug Handley

Farm Credit of New Mexico has been farmer and rancher owned since 1916. We’ve spent the past 100 years helping our fellow farmers and ranchers grow their businesses and provide for their families. We’ve strengthened our communities and our ties to the land over that time. We look forward to building on our mutual success in the century to come. farmcreditnm.com 1-800-451-5997

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DECEMBER 2016


www.aaalivestock.com

Bull Buyers

2016

12

NEW MEXICO STOCKMAN P.O. Box 7127, Albuquerque, NM 87194 505-243-9515 Fax: 505-998-6236 E-mail: caren­@aaalivestock.com Official publication of ... n New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association Email: nmcga@nmagriculture.org 2231 Rio Grande NW, P.O. Box 7517, Albu­­quer­que, NM 87194 505-247-0584, Fax: 505-842-1766; Pres­i­dent, Pat Boone Executive Director, Caren Cowan Asst. Executive Director, Michelle Frost n New Mexico Wool Growers, Inc. P.O. Box 7520, Albuquerque, NM 87194 505-247-0584 President, Punk Cooper Executive Director, Caren Cowan Asst. Executive Director, Michelle Frost

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING Publisher: Caren Cowan Publisher Emeritus: Chuck Stocks Office Manager: Marguerite Vensel Advertising Representatives: Chris Martinez, Melinda Martinez Contributing Editors: Carol Wilson Callie Gnatkowski-Gibson, William S. ­Previtti, Lee Pitts Photographer: De­­e Bridgers

PRODUCTION Production Coordinator: Carol Pendleton Editorial & Advertising Design: Kristy Hinds

ADVERTISING SALES Chris Martinez at 505/243-9515, ext. 28 or chris@aaalivestock.com New Mexico Stockman

(USPS 381-580)

10 N.M. Cattle Growers’ Association President’s Letter by Pat Boone, President

12 To The Point by Caren Cowan

40 Aggie Notes by John Wenzel, DVM, NMSU Beef Extension Specialist

68 N.M. CowBelles’ Jingle Jangle 76 New Mexico’s Old Times & Old Timers by Don Bullis

78 N.M. Federal Lands Council News by Frank DuBois

80 On The Edge of Common Sense by Baxter Black

82 In Memoriam 86 Riding Herd by Lee Pitts

100 New Mexico Beef Council Bullhorn 110 My Cowboy Heroes by Jim Olson

112 Market Place 114 Real Estate Guide 118 View from the Backside by Barry Denton

124 Seedstock Guide 129 Ad Index

FEATURES 16 2016 Bull Buyers Guide 26 Growth Pattern of Cattle Affects Beef Eating Quality

28 What’s the Future for Beef Cattle Genomics by Burt Rutherford, beefmagazine.com

32 Where Will Your Cattle Be in Summer 2017? by South Dakota State University Extension

36 Finishing’s Effect on Climate by Donald Stotts, Oklahoma State University

47 Calf Scramble Sponsor Thanks 48 Thermo Fisher Scientific Presents Validation Data for New Bovine TB Detection Kit 52 Producing the Right Calf to Fit the Market Key to Capturing Premiums AgriLife Today 54 Feedlots Chew Through Cattle Supplies by Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State Unversity

56 A “Colossal Failure” by Prosecutors: Juror Defends Verdict in Oregon Standoff Trial by Derek Hawkins, Washington Post

63 Bull Buyers Guide by Travis Meteer, Illinois Extension Service

71 New Weapon Deployed in Battle to Stop Deer Screwworm Outbreak 72 Land Lover by Marc Ramierz, Texas Super Lawyers Magazine

74 Happy Sheep Contest Winners 87 Why We Use Electoral College by Jarrett Stepman, The Daily Signal

92 Meet Jack Chatfield: NMCGA Vice President at Large by Callie Gnatkowski Gibson

94 Pregnancy- Checking Options by Heather Smith Thomas

by Angela Calvert, FG Insight

A lonesome cowboy... photo by Julie Carter.

on the cover

is published monthly by Caren Cowan, 2231 Rio Grande, NW, Albuquerque, NM 87104-2529 Subscription price: 1 year - $19.95 / 2 years - $29.95 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Mexico Stockman, P.O. Box 7127, Albuquer­que, NM 87194. Periodicals Postage paid at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and additional mailing offices. Copyright© 2015 by New Mexico Stockman. Material may not be used without permission of the publisher.  Deadline for editorial and advertising copy, changes and cancellations is the 10th of the month preceding publication. Advertising rates on request.

DEPARTMENTS

GUIDE

DECEMBER 2016

VOL 82, No. 12 USPS 381-580 DECEMBER 2016

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE by Pat Boone NMCGA President

Dear NMCGA members & fellow cattle producers, Pat Boone President Elida Tom Sidwell President-Elect Quay

Jack Chatfield Vice President at Large Mosquero Dustin Johnson NW Vice President Farmington Blair Clavel NE Vice President Roy Jeff Bilberry SE Vice President Elida Randell Major SW Vice President Magdalena Shacey Sullivan Secretary/Treasurer Albuquerque Jose J. Varela Lopéz Past President La Cieneguilla

T

he wind has been blowing here for the last four days, stout and cold. I suppose it is ushering in the real beginning of winter. I dread it more every year – I really dislike being cold ! But it is also when we begin to calve, which is my favorite time here on the ranch. There is something about seeing those baby calves buck and pitch and run around that rejuvenates me, makes me want to stay around one more year. I pray the coming new year will be a good one for each of you, that the rains come and the market improves, and we all can stay around just a bit longer, doing what we love to do – raise cattle! The 2017 60-day Legislative session in Santa Fe promises to be an interesting one. Some old faces will not be there, and some new ones will be. The Republicans lost their majority in the House, and the Democrats retained their majority in the Senate. There are new majority and minority leaders so things are looking to be quite different. Money will be short, issues will be many. Taxes and water will be at the top of the list. Trapping is still causing heartburn for the animal rights folks, and there is sure to be some interest in banning coyote contests again. We will be sending out calls to action I’m sure so be ready to come to the Capitol when we need you! The 2016 edition of our Joint Stockmen’s convention is about to happen. By the time you read this it will be over. It’s going to be a good one. Hope I see all of you there. New Forest plans are coming, with proposals for new wilderness areas. We will keep our ears to the ground and keep you informed. We continue to work on the feasibility plan for a self-insured workers comp group plan. We need input from some of you. If you are interested in helping call or email the office. Cindy joins with me in wishing you all a very Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year. Give us a call or email us at the office or give me or one of our regional vice-presidents a call if there is anything we can help you with. We are here to help.

Rex Wilson Past President Ancho Caren Cowan Executive Director Albuquerque

Adios til next time,

Pat Boone – Luke 2:10-14

www.nmagriculture.org

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“Texas’ Only Hereford Operation West of the Rio Grande”

Hereford Ranch

Since 1893

TEXAS/NEW MEXICO RANCH 5 Paseo De Paz Lane, El Paso, TX 79932 (H) 915/877-2535 (O) 915/532-2442 (F) 915/877-2057 Jim (C) 915/479-5299 Sue (C) 915/549-2534 Email: barjbarherefords@aol.com OKLAHOMA RANCH Woods County, Oklahoma

Jim, Sue, Jeep, Meghan & Jake Darnell

Se Habla Español 11

DECEMBER 2016

THE DARNELLS CONTINUE A 123-YEAR-OLD FAMILY TRADITION OF RAISING GOOD-DOING HEREFORD CATTLE

DECEMBER 2016

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S

outhern tar Ranch

O n America ulls B s u g n a r Red B Sale for

O O Michael H. & Claudia Sander

2702 S. Westgate H Weslaco, Texas 78596

956/968-9650 • Office 956/968-4528

Angus, Effici ent, Profita High Quality ble, Many Low B irth Weight C alving Ease Bulls A vailable

Peddling Bulls in NM

Villanueva •

Registered Replacement Heifer Calves Available Call Bob, Kay, or Mike Anderson A Lazy 6 Angus at Blanco Canyon, HCR 72, Box 10, Ribera, NM 87560

Headquarters: 575/421-1809 Cells: 505/690-1191 • 505/660-2909 Email: alazy6ranch@yahoo.com

“They are worth more if they have Black Angus influence.”

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DECEMBER 2016

TO THE POINT by Caren Cowan, Executive Director, New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association

The New ED

T

here was a new national disease diagnosed in early November 2016. Fox News labeled it election depression (ED). This acronym is used for other things, so always be sure which malady or job you are referring to. Fox seemed to think this was a new discovery. Sadly they are wrong. I, and I am sure many others, have suffered off and on with election depression since 1992. In 1997 I was driven to wear a black arm band on Inauguration Day during the American Sheep Industry Convention. I was granted relief in 2000 and 2004, but election depression came back with a vengeance in 2008 and lasted a hard eight years. However I have discovered that the disease is made worse by additional actions of our state and federal government. We fall back from Daylight Savings Time on the Saturday before the election. That time change always throws my body clock into a tail-spin. I think it tends to exacerbate the depression that can come. I am not suffering as much from election depression this year. On the federal level I am quite healthy. At the state level, it is sad to lose friends on both sides of the isle in both the House and the Senate. We thank these men and women for their service. However, now there is a great opportunity to make new friends and we all shall carry on. As for at least a small portion of the rest of the nation… they just need to get over themselves. Life has consequences and there are no participation pretty ribbons or trophies in elections. I was thoroughly aggravated when the television news felt the need to teach people how to handle relatives at Thanksgiving. The report allowed as to how you were allowed to leave dinner if you just couldn’t take it, but you had to state clearly why you were leaving. As if everybody didn’t already know. I heard of one family that withheld the invitation to the annual dinner, sending the non-conformists off to Cracker Barrel for their turkey, or crow, as the case may be. It would be especially nice to have our


educational institutions focus on learning… including history and how actions have consequences instead of meddling in politics and family values. Schools across the country, including Albuquerque Public Schools, felt the need to send information home on how to deal with children in the wake of the election. Others sent special messages to their faculty, employees and students about caring. Students, including high school students, marched against the President-Elect. Totally disgraceful. Get back in the classroom and get back to learning about the history of our nation. If we don’t know our past, we won’t find our future. The Huffington Post felt compelled to publish this article right after the election: What You’ll Tell Your Kids About The Election Results. You will remind them that if they are hurting you will be there for them. You will tell them she didn’t win. That there will not be a woman in the White House. Not yet. You will tell them you are sad. You will say, yes, I voted for her. I was proud and confident in her abilities. I cheered, and sometimes wept, at her speeches and videos on the Internet because it was everything to see a woman

For B&H

rise up. I made calls and knocked on doors because I knew she was the best person for this job… You will tell them that you won’t stop fighting for equality. You will call on them to join you in that fight however they can. By treating kids at school who are different with respect. By speaking up when they see someone being mistreated. By standing up for themselves if they are the victims. You will remind them that if they are hurting you will be there for them. And, you will laugh with your children. You will play and give them hugs. You will be normal and everyday because really, you are their world. They do not know how much this means. Remember, you are the one who is hurting right now. Because no, there will not be a woman in the White House in 2017. So, you will tell them that we will survive the next four years, as we have survived previous difficult four-year stretches of time. You will tell them that it is possible, more than possible, to move on from disappointment…

From Another Front Animal Advocacy in the Age of Trump: John Connor Cleveland, policy adviser at

the Humane Society of the United States, wrote in the National Review: “If he’s serious about reforming Washington, one of his first targets should be Big Agriculture. President-elect Donald Trump’s vow to “drain the swamp” could find unlikely support among animal-welfare activists. If he’s really serious about reforming Washington, one of his f irst bottom-feeding targets should be Big Ag, which has a powerful presence on Capitol Hill and a well-documented dark side.”

But The Worm Turns Some animal rightists are now not so down on eating beef and pork. Not because our animals are well cared for, not because the protein and other nutrients they provide are essential to human health and wellbeing, they have a totally different reason. If you eat beef or pork, you probably won’t eat a whole animal a year. If you eat chicken or fish, you are killing many animals per year. Go figure.

Can’t Omit the Chickens… The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in California has thrown out the lawsuit filed by Missouri and other states against Califor-

Mark Your Calendars Herefords’ 2nd Annual MARCH 16, 2017

Bull Sale!

Roswell Livestock Auction – Roswell, NM

B&H Herefords Phil Harvey, Jr. P.O. Box 40 • Mesilla, NM 88046 575/524-9316 • Cell 575/644-6925 philharveyjr@comcast.net www.bhherefords.com

Jim Bob Burnett 205 Cottonwood Road Lake Arthur, NM 88253 Cell 575/365-8291 • jbb@ptvnetworks.net

Bulls, Females & Semen For Sale Cow Herd located at Pinon, New Mexico

DECEMBER 2016

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nia’s law requiring all eggs sold there to The appeals court ruling upheld the come from hens kept in enlarged cages, lower court ruling saying Koster and the according to brownfieldagnews.com. others had no standing in the case. The office of Missouri Attorney General Koster was the first Democrat endorsed Chris Koster says they are reviewing the by the Missouri Farm Bureau for governor ruling and declined to be interviewed by – in large part because of his stance on this Brownfield. Koster was supported in the issue – but lost the race in the recent lawsuit by attorneys general in Nebraska, election. Oklahoma, Alabama and Kentucky, and, by Meanwhile, animal rightist are now Iowa’s governor. The case was thrown out attacking cage-free chicken operations by a lower court but the plaintiffs appealed. because of their filth. Be careful what you They argued that no state has the con- ask for… or was this they plan all along to stitutional right to dictate production get rid of chicken and egg production all practices in other states. together?

WEAVER RANCH 32nd ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE

Monday, February 20, 2017 12:30 p.m. at the ranch north of Fort Collins, CO

150 COMING 2-YEAR-OLD BULLS Registered Black Angus

Not So Fast on the Overtime Rule, Says Judge From the National Center for Policy Analysis Senior Fellow Pam Villarreal In late November, a U.S. District judge issued a preliminary injunction against the Department of Labor’s new overtime pay rule, scheduled to take effect on December 1. Agricultural field workers were exempted from the rule. The rule doubles the threshold under which salaried employees are required to receive overtime pay. The NCPA published two reports on the negative effects of this rule and potential job losses as a result. According to Judge Amos Mazzant, the Department of Labor overstepped its authority by “raising the minimum salary level such that is supplants the duties test.” Part of Congress’ original intent of overtime rules was to exempt workers in executive, administrative and professional positions. In the DOL’s Final Rule, according to Judge Mazzant, the duties test was virtually ignored as “ambiguous.” But he noted that one only needs to check the dictionary in order to determine the meanings of words, thus, there was no ambiguity in defining the duties test. The “preliminary injunction” also applies to all employers nationwide who would be affected, not just those located in the 5th Circuit.

PAP testing since 1991 at an elevation of 7500' BVD, Fertility, PAP, Trich Tested and Carcass Ultrasounded

100 Bred Commercial Heifers

Featuring Sons & Daughters of These & Other Weaver Ranch Bulls CED

BW

WW

YW

M

$EN

MRB

REA

FT

SAV Final Answer 0035

Sire

+12

-1.2

+60

+102

+22

+6.68

+.59

+.67

+.097

Sinclair Net Present Value

+13

-2.0

+45

+81

+25

+13.93

+.77

+.37

+.051

TC Thunder 805

+16

-1.7

+42

+83

+22

+7.09

+.83

+.59

+.001

Over 57 years of selecting for:

Easy Calving, Carcass Quality & Disposition Susan & Mourine Weaver Sheldon Emerson 3000 West Co. Rd. 70 • Ft. Collins, CO 80524 (970) 568-3898 Visitors Always Welcome Cattle may be seen at any time!!!

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DECEMBER 2016

Are you ready to take the #40daycowboychallenge? If so, please order on AMAZON.COM by searching for “I’ll Drop You Off”


It will be interesting to see what happens with yet another controversial and overreaching Obama administration order. The overtime rule, or at least this version of it, will likely be tossed aside under the Trump administration.

Mr. Albuquerque Journal, Do Thousands of New Mexican’s Not Count? A recent editorial in the Journal made the assertion that it is only U.S. House Committee on Natural Resources Rob Bishop was the ONLY person that is seeking to overturn monument designations by the current administration, while admitting “that one person acting unilaterally should not be able to set aside hundreds of thousands of acres under the guise of conservation without adequate debate or discussion about what makes that acreage so very valuable in its pristine form.“ We are here to report that Congressman Bishop is not alone in his call for monument reversal action. With the Organ Mountain-Desert Peaks National Monument there were thousands if not tens of thousands of New Mexicans objecting to its creation. There are numerous ranching families whose livelihoods are now in jeopardy because of that

sweep of a pen. The Journal goes on to say, “It’s questionable if Trump would be able to do that – an official with the National Parks Conservation Association points out “there is no precedent” for a president taking back a national monument, and a former chief attorney for the Department of Interior says a U.S. Attorney General opinion from the 1930s examined the issue “and concluded that a president cannot undo a monument. “That leaves the question relatively open. There is no question that Congress can “undo” a monument, and it has – 11 times. “There’s also no question government gridlock helped create the current situation. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said back in 2013 she would recommend Obama act alone if necessary to create new national monuments because the paralysis on Capitol Hill had created a yearslong conservation backlog. She emphasized “that there are places that are ripe for setting aside, with a tremendous groundswell of public support.” “That’s likely always true, yet the tax-paying public deserves national monuments that do more than win popularity contests with their vocal supporters – which at times don’t include a majority of the “locals.” At the same time, the public deserves more than a

no-monument mindset that ignores personal private land gifts as well as the vital role land conservation plays in local economies. The public deserves science, fiscal analysis, standards for designation, and thorough and open vetting of proposals. “None of which come from one person designating or declassifying a monument. “Pearce points out “the Antiquities Act requires that a president designate the smallest possible footprint in order to achieve the desired environmental preservation” and emphasizes “these decisions must be made in Congress.” “Those are important starting points for any legislation that affects land that will belong to all Americans. Yet they hinge on a Congress that does in fact act, that actually airs all pertinent facts, debates proposals and then votes on them. “And that should include designating as well as declassifying national monuments.” The editorial first appeared in the Albuquerque Journal. It was written by members of the editorial board and is unsigned as it represents the opinion of the newspaper rather than the writers.     

2017

Best in the West SOUTHWEST

BRANGUS BREEDERS

SALE

Selling Brangus Bulls & Brangus Influenced Bred Cattle

Saturday, February 11, 2017, 12 NOON, at Marana Stockyards, Marana AZ (20 min W. of Tucson off I-10) — Viewing Available on Friday, February 10 at the Stockyards

Cattle are range raised in Arizona, New Mexico, & California, & are drought & heat tolerant.

LIVE Bidding Available through: CattleUSA.COM ON SALE DAY For Information Contact: Dr. Bart Carter 928-348-4030; Diane Parker 520-403-1967; Bill Morrison 575-760-7263 or Clay Parsons 520-444-7650

DECEMBER 2016

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Bull Buyers

2016

Here’s where to look for your bull battery! Call early for the best selection! NAME OF PRODUCER

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ANGUS A Lazy 6 Angus . . . . . . . . . 12, 124 American Angus Association . . 56 Angus Invitational Bull Sale . . 46 Black Angus “Ready for Work” Bull Sale . . . . . . . 47 Bradley 3 Ranch . . . . . . . . . 6, 125 Brennand Ranch . . . . . . . 57, 127 C Bar Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Conniff Cattle Co. LLC . . . 20, 126 Cornerstone Ranch . . . . . . . . . 19 George Curtis, Inc. . . . . . . 39, 124 Diamond Peak Cattle Co . . . . . 35 Diamond Seven Angus . . . 18, 125 continued on page 16 >>

Genetics and programs for the commercial cattle business.

Feeder Finder Genetic tools for ranchers

The source to find Gelbvieh and Balancer® influenced feeder cattle.

American Gelbvieh Association | 303-465-2333 | www.gelbvieh.org

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DECEMBER 2016


WHITE BULLS MATTER because

Hybrid Vigor Matters!

GCR Challenger 849

GCR Supreme 171

GCR Big Time L56

GCR Supreme Arrow 148

And HYBRID VIGOR MATTERS TO YOUR BOTTOM LINE Take advantage of Quality Performance Tested Charolais Bulls and wean more pounds to sell. Call today for the Bulls that matter!

Grau Charolais Ranch LANE 575/760-6336

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COLT 575/760-4510

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Bull Buyers

2016

GUIDE

PREGNANCY DIAGNOSTIC TECHNICIAN Call Steve Jensen 575/773-4721 License PD-2266

“Testing Cattle in New Mexico Only”

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DECEMBER 2016

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Dunn Ranches . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 4G Mountain Angus . . . . . . . . 50 Greer Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Hales Angus Farms . . . . 33, 124 Hartzog Angus Ranch . . . 31, 125 Hooper Cattle Company . . . . . 37 Hubbell Ranch . . . . . . . . . 59, 124 J-C Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Jimbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Bill King Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Laflin Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Lazy S Ranch Willcox LLC . . . . . 24 Manford Cattle . . . . . . . . . 57, 124 Manzano Angus . . . . . . . 49, 125 McCoy Cattle LLC . . . . . . . . . . 49 McKenzie Land & Livestock . . 23 Miller Angus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Miller-Sanchez . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 New Mexico Angus & Hereford Bull & Heifer Sale . . . . . . . . . 40 NMSU Animal & Range Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76, 78

NAME OF PRODUCER

SEE AD ON PAGE

Olson Land & Cattle . . . 29, 124 P Bar A Angus Ranch . . . 25, 124 Profit Maker Bulls . . . . . . . . . 43 Salazar Ranches . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Thompson Ranch . . . 55, 56, 126 Three Mile Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Candy Ray Trujillo’s Black Angus . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Tucumcari Bull Test . . . . . . . . . 32 2 Bar Angus . . . . . . . . . . 65, 126 U Bar Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Weaver Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Zia Agriculture Consulting, LLC . . . . . . . . . 113

BARZONA Raymond Boykin . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 F & F Cattle Company . . . . . . . 54 Barzona Breeders Assn. . . . . . 24 continued on page 18 >>


Selling at Private Treaty

Our Grand Champion New Mexico Angus Bull at the 2016 New Mexico State Fair.

Contact Us! Glenda & Leslie Armstrong acornerstone@plateautel.net Kevin & Renee Grant – 575-355-6621 cornerstone@plateautel.net Justin & Kyra Monzingo – 575-914-5579 616 Pecan Dr. • Fort Sumner, NM 88119

Cornerstone Ranch

“With Christ Jesus as the Chief Cornerstone.” — Ephesians 2:20

19

DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

19


Bull Buyers

2016

GUIDE

NAME OF PRODUCER

SEE AD ON PAGE

BEEFMASTER Beefmaster Breeders United . . 22 CJ Beefmasters . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Casey Beefmasters . . . . . . . 126

NAME OF PRODUCER

SEE AD ON PAGE

Elbrock Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Evans Beefmasters . . . . . . . . 65 Isa Cattle Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

BRAHMAN Manford Cattle . . . . . . . . . 57, 124 NMSU Animal & Range Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76, 78 Pratt Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 126 Williams Cattle Company . . . 63

CONNIFF CATTLE CO. LLC LLC Angus, Shorthorn, LimFlex

Heifers: Open, Bred, and Three Show Prospects and Pairs Bulls: Yearling Bulls Blacks & Reds by Calving Ease, Easy Fleshing Low Input Sires & Dams

John & Laura Conniff • 1500 Snow Road, Las Cruces, NM 88005 575/644-2900 • john@conniffcattle.com Call or email for EPDs and prices Casey & Chancie Roberts • Upham Road, Rincon, NM 575/644-9583 • www.conniffcattle.com • www.leveldale.com

NAME OF PRODUCER

SEE AD ON PAGE

BRANGUS Best In The West Brangus Sale 15 Brinks Brangus / Westall Ranches LLC . . 49, 128 Carter Brangus . . . . . . . . . 20, 125 Floyd Brangus . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Hubbell Ranch . . . . . . . . . 59, 124 Lack-Morrison Brangus . 127, 131 Lazy S Ranch Willcox LLC . . . . . 24 NMSU Animal & Range Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76, 78 Parker Brangus . . . . . . . . . . 30, 131 Ramro LLC / RJ Cattle Co . . . . . 51 Rio Hondo Land & Livestock . . 54 Robbs Brangus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Roswell Brangus Bull & Female Sale . . . . 4, 44, 52, 127 Roswell Brangus Breeders Coop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Skaar Brangus . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Southwest Brangus Breeders Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Westall Ranches LLC / Brinks Brangus . . . . . . . 49, 128

CHAROLAIS Bradley 3 Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 C Bar Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . 62, 126 Grau Charolais . . . . . . . . . 17, 125 Grau Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . 21, 125 Bill King Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Ramro LLC / RJ Cattle Co . . . . . 51 Tucumcari Bull Test . . . . . . . . . 32

CORRIENTE tle Born & Raised on Registered Black Brangus Cat es in S.E. Arizona One of the Roughest Ranch

~ POPPY CANYON RANCH ~

ut & Range Ready

Arizona Ranch Raised • Sto RE BULLS A E L B A L I AVA ATE V I R P FOR T TREA Y SE PURCHA

Call or Come By Anytime! 928.348.8918 , owner, 928-651-0881 ter Car t Bar er Ranch & Feedlot Manag120 1.5 .65 928 • ter Bryce Car www.carterbrangus.com bjcmd@cableone.net

Cates Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127

F1s Manford Cattle . . . . . . . . . 57, 124 Pratt Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 126

GALLOWAY American Galloway Breeders Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 continued on page 20 >>

20

DECEMBER 2016


There’s Power

in The Blood.

WG PRIME SUPREME A20 BWT. 96, WNG WT. 834, BD. 2/24/2011 — POLLED CE ACC 1.8, BWT ACC 3.5, WWT ACC 19, YWT ACC 31, REA ACC 15

​GET​SOME​POWER​IN​YOUR​NEXT​CALF​CROP!​CALL​TODAY.

GRAU RANCH

BULLS & HEIFERS FOR SALE COME LOOK • Call 575 760-7304 • Wesley @GRAU RANCH • www.grauranch.com

21

DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

21


BEEFMASTER THE BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

beefmasters.org

22

DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

22


Bull Buyers

2016

GUIDE

NAME OF PRODUCER

SEE AD ON PAGE

GELBVIEH American Gelbvieh Association . . . . . . . . . . 16, 127 Bar W Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Bow K Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Pratt Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 126

NAME OF PRODUCER

SEE AD ON PAGE

NAME OF PRODUCER

SEE AD ON PAGE

Zia Agriculture Consulting, LLC . . . . . . . . . 113

Greer & Winston Cattle Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

IRISH BLACKS & IRISH REDS

LIMOUSIN

Jarmon Ranch . . . . . . . . . 65, 124

LIM FLEX Conniff Cattle Co. LLC . . . 20, 126

Big Bend Trailers / Rancho Espuela Limousin . . . . . . . . 61 Craig Limousin . . . . . . . . . 62, 125 continued on page 23 >>

HEREFORD B & H Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Bar J Bar Herefords . . . . . 11, 124 Clark Anvil Ranch . . . . . . . . . . 40 Clavel Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Coleman Herefords . . . . . . . . 65 Cornerstone Ranch . . . . . . . . . 19 Cox Ranch Herefords . . . 61, 124 Coyote Ridge Ranch . . . . 55, 124 Craig Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Decker Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Henard Ranches . . . . . . . 49, 126 Hooper Cattle Company . . . . . 37 Bill King Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Manford Cattle . . . . . . . . . 57, 124 Mountain View Ranch . . . . . . . 62 New Mexico Angus & Hereford Bull & Heifer Sale . . . . . . . . . 40 Perez Cattle Company . . . 3, 128 Pratt Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 126 Profit Makers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Rancho de Santa Barbara . . . . 61 Tom Robb & Sons . . . . . . . . . . 63 Salazar Ranches . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Texas Hereford Association . . . 57 NMSU Animal & Range Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76, 78 USA Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52, 127 West Star Herefords . . . . . . . . 64 White Mountain Herefords . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 124 DECEMBER 2016

23


Bull Buyers

2016

GUIDE

NAME OF PRODUCER

SEE AD ON PAGE

Greer & Winston Cattle Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hayhook Limousin . . . . . . . . . Running Creek Ranch . . . . . . . Texas Limousin Association . .

64 61 56 61

MAINE ANJOU TV Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

RED ANGUS Cattle With longevity & heavy BroWsing haBits

~

loW MaintenanCe & high CarCass Quality

Bar W Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Ferguson Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 JaCin Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . 54, 126 Lazy D Ranch Red Angus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 124 Lazy Way Bar Ranch . . . 62, 125 Santa Rita Ranch . . . . . . 62, 125 Southwest Red Angus Breeders Association . . . . . . . . . . 65, 124

NAME OF PRODUCER

SEE AD ON PAGE

RED BRANGUS ROD Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Southern Star Ranch . . . . 12, 128

SALERS American Salers Association . 44 Clark Anvil Ranch . . . . . . . . . . 40

SHORTHORN Conniff Cattle Co. LLC . . . 20, 126

SIM-ANGUS Diamond Peak Cattle Co . . . . . 35

SIMMENTAL Campbell Simmentals . . . . . . . 65 St. Vrain Simmentals . . . . . . . . 49

641-745-9170 info@barzona.com

LAZY S RANCH WILLCOX LLC 13250 Ash Creek Rd, Willcox, AZ 85643

M

S

S

M

J

Registered Angus and Brangus since 2002 For 2017, Bulls available PT at the Ranch and also featured in the Marana Angus and Brangus Sales, the Prescott Angus Sale, and the Open Sale in Belen. AAR Ten X 7008

EXAR Upshot 0562B

Baldridge Waylon W34

ANGUS: Herd sires for 2017 Sale Bulls are sons of AAR Ten X 7008, EXAR Upshot 0562B, and Baldridge Waylon W34 EXAR Ten X 3121 17773629 CED+9 BW+.8 Marb+.78 REA+1.12 Fat-.014 $W+55.2 $B+159.79

EF Upshot 3222 17626986 CED+3 BW+1.4 Marb+.57 REA+1.32 Fat-.006 $W+42.91 $B+130.74

EXAR Waylon 4685B 17740144 CED+12 BW-.5 Marb+.67 REA+.7 Fat-.034 $W+56.03 $B+132.06

Susan Wilson-Sanders, DVM (520) 403-8510 • Ed McClure (520) 306-1574 • drsue@dakotacom.net 24

DECEMBER 2016


c

o

n

t

a

c

t

Mark or Percy Larranaga (505) 850-6684 or (505) 270-0753 SAV Angus Valley 1867

P Bar A UpToPrimetime 1264

SAV Iron Mountain 8066 x SAV May 2397

Sitz Upward 307R x Twin Valley Precision E161 Calving Ease Outcross Sire with Lots of Power & Performance. UptoPrimetime is a Thick, Deep-Bodied, Heavy Muscled, & Perfect Disposition Bull.

Angus Valley represents everything we look for in an ideal breeding bull, both phenotypically and on paper. Widely admired and respected for his consistent calving ease and early gestation.

CED +13 BW .2 WW +52 YW +102

CED +11 BW -.4 WW +70 YW +127 $W +81.92 $B +149.15

Reg. # 17016630

Reg. # 17188424

P BAR A Angus Cattle, LLC

WWW.PBARAANGUS.COM Highly desirable Sons available at NMAA Annual Sale, other Consignment Sales, and Private Treaty. Call for details or view our NEW website for more information. 25

DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

25


Growth Pattern of Cattle Affects Beef Eating Quality by Angela Calvert, FG Insight

R

esearch has shown that producing cattle to slaughter under 24 months old has benefits in terms of meat eating quality compared to those finished at an older age. AHDB Beef and Lamb commissioned the study carried out by Scotland’s Rural College and the University of Bristol. Dr Mary Vickers, AHDB Beef and Lamb senior scientist, said: “The project tested the theory that cattle which undergo a store period produce meat with more gristle that is less tender.” The cattle were managed to finish at different slaughter ages between 12 and 36 months. Cattle on a short-duration growth path were finished indoors and slaughtered at 12-16 months old. Animals on the medium-duration growth path were grazed on a high-quality grass reseed then finished indoors during the subsequent winter feeding period. They were slaughtered at 18-24 months, having reached commercially

acceptable carcase specification (target Gristle R4L). Older animals which had a growth check Cattle on the long-duration growth path and a longer growing period had increased were grazed for two summers on poor-qual- gristle between the muscles as a proportion ity, unimproved grassland with the of the loin weight. They also had higher intervening winter acting as a store period shear force scores, reflecting tougher meat. when the animals were fed a forage-based Meat quality was assessed by the Univerdiet. The final finishing diet was a forage sity of Bristol’s professional taste panel, and concentrate ration during their second which found beef from animals reared on winter prior to slaughthe short finishing treatter at 25-36 months. ment was significantly more Cattle growth rates tender than cattle finished Strong on the long and mediat older ages. um-duration systems For flavour and overall evidence of were 34 per cent and 61 liking, the panel scored the per cent of those on numerous benefits ... medium duration cattle the shor t- duration highest, with no advantage system. Slower growth gained from slaughtering of producing cattle rates mean cattle on cattle at an older age. the long growth path Dr Vickers said: “It is to slaughter at under were on farm seven impossible to distinguish times longer than between the effect of age 24 months of age.” those on the short and the intermittent growth growth path. Cattle on the medium growth patterns on the results obtained in the path were on farm more than three-times study. However, the results from this work longer. Net margin decreased with duration provide strong evidence of numerous benof the finishing system, the biggest differ- efits, both commercially and from a meat ence seen between the medium and quality perspective, of producing cattle to long-duration systems. slaughter at under 24 months of age.”     

t s 1

Sale Date March 10, 2017 Clayton, NM

Sale Date March 10, 2017 Clayton, NM

Dink & Mitzi Miller (575) 760-9047 Patrick & Teresa Sanchez (505) 385-2994 26

DECEMBER 2016


Our Herd Performance 700+lb Calves @ 7 Mo’s on 1050-1200# Cows 21st Annual Private Treaty / 2017

BULLS FOR SALE RED ANGUS • RED ANGUS X GELBVIEH

$3000

each

“Genetics From The Nation’s Leading Growth and Marbling Bulls” If you are looking for feed efficient cattle with large rib eyes & marbling in order to meet the production and

Produced From Our Exceptionally High Fertility Female Herd

“Ra

n c h i n g S i nc e 9”

through the use of genetically

18 6

consumer needs of tomorrow

balanced, efficient “ ‘Real World’ and functional genetics. ”

superior, environmentally adaptable, efficient and proven bulls used in Arizona, Kansas, Texas, New Mexico and

BSE & T RIC H T ES T ED

Oklahoma, give Kendal a call today — or better yet come by and select superior bulls for your herd. “WE MEASURE OUR SUCCESS THROUGH YOUR SUCCESS”

BAR W RANCH, INC.

Continuous NMCGA Member Since Inception, 100 Years Ago. 27

Carrizozo, NM 88301 • wilsonk@alumni.nmsu.edu • 575/799-8142 DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

27


What’s the Future For Beef Cattle Genomics? Burt Rutherford, beefmagazine.com

R

emember 10 years ago? How you made your bull selection and breeding decisions in 2007 and before? You may have heard of DNA testing and the promise it held for the beef business, but most likely you paged through the sale catalogs looking at the pictures and taking in the EPD and individual performance data for the bulls that caught your eye. “The last 10 years, really, have been a very exciting time to work in genetics,” says Ben Hayes, a world-renown geneticist with the University of Queensland in Australia. Speaking at the recent convention of the American Angus Association, Hayes says that genetic and genomic technology has progressed to the point that it’s now widely used in breeding decisions. And not just for seedstock producers, but for cow-calf ranchers as well. “The question is, where do we go next with this technology?” One angle is to add value to breeding decisions, Hayes told

Angus breeders. “The second is starting to use genomics as a management tool.” To illustrate how genomics can be used to add value to breeding decisions, Hayes detailed an experiment in Australia to determine if it’s possible to select cattle for heat tolerance. This is of particular concern in Northern Australia, where heat events are common. It’s also a concern in many parts of the South and Southwestern U.S. Using Holstein heifers, Hayes and his team combined production data from the Holstein database with weather data generated by the Australian government. Combining these two large data sets, they came up with genomic breeding values for heat tolerance. Using those data, they screened 400 heifers from random farms and then selected 24 heifers that had the best prediction for heat tolerance and 24 that showed to be the least heat tolerant. These heifers were exposed to a mild heat event for a day. “It turns out the genomic breeding values really did pull apart the two groups quite well,” he says. In addition, Hayes says breeders can use genomic data to make genomic mating plans that avoid inbreeding. He says that’s important because of the declines in fertil-

ity and production that closely-related animals can suffer from. As well, it can help avoid recessive genetic defects, some of which are lethal. Looking even further down the road, Hayes told Angus breeders that the cost of genomic screening will continue to come down, meaning that genomic data can be used to make management decisions. He used feedlot prescreening as an example. The idea of genomically screening feeder cattle for various economically important feedyard traits has been around about as long as genomic tests have been available. But cost has been the hurdle. It’s now coming down to a point where it’s almost practical to do, he says. But genomically testing feeder cattle only gives you a handle on profitability from the animal’s own genome. “And every animal actually carries tens of millions, hundreds of millions if not a billion other genomes. And those are the microbes in the rumen. And they also contribute to feed efficiency and possibly to disease resistance as well.” Just a few years ago, there was no possibility of getting a handle on the rumen continued on page 30 >>

35th ANNUAL FOUR STATES AGRICULTURAL EXPOSITION March 16 –18, 2017 Montezuma County Fairgrounds Cortez, CO

Thurs. 9am-5pm Fri. 9am-6pm Sat. – 9am-5pm $5 at the gate. Children under 16 – free. FREE PARKING.

SEEDSTOCK ROW & BULL & HEIFER SALE Featuring

Saturday March 18, 1pm

THE BEST AGRICULTURAL UR in the FO VENDORS STATES!

n Brandi Lyons “No limits!” n Live Demos – Stock Dog Training n Daily giveaways and live entertainment n C.A.L.F. Partnered with Montezuma School to Farm n Hosting San Juan Basin

28

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n n n n n

Weed Symposium, Duel Credit Co. & N.M. Ag Summit Education Seminars Youth Education and Events FFA & 4-H Livestock Judging & Beef Show Applicators workshop: Continued Education Credits U.S. Forest Service Packer Glenn Ryan & Other Horse Clinicians

Nominate your top quality bulls and heifers for the sale! PLEASE ATTEND THE ALL BREEDS BULL AND HEIFER SALE, SATURDAY, MARCH 18, 1pm FOR ALL YOUR REPLACEMENT NEEDS — Consignments for Bulls & Heifers still being taken — info@fourstatesagexpo.com • 970.529.3486

www.FourStatesAgExpo.com


Friday: March 10,2017

Registered Angus Bull & Female Sale

Featuring 60 Bulls and 20 Bred Females Raising Angus Cattle since 1980

Hereford, TX Check our websites for bull information, video and a sale catalog Scott Pohlman Steve Olson (806) 346-3323 (806) 676-3556 www.pohlmancattle.com www.olsoncattle.com 29

To request a catalog email sg_olson@live.com DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

29


“QUALITY CATTLE FROM BREEDERS WHO CARE!”

Southwest Brangus Breeders Association

TOUGH CATTLE FOR ROUGH COUNTRY Raised with your needs in mind.

n PARKER BRANGUS Larry & Elaine Parker P.O. Box 146, San Simon, AZ 85632 520-508-3505 Larry’s cell 520-403-1967 Diane’s cell 520-845-2411 Office 520-845-2315 Home jddiane@vtc.net n CARTER BRANGUS Dr. Bart Carter 1017 S. 1st Avenue., Thatcher, AZ 85552 928-651-0881 Bart 928-651-5120 Bryce (Mgr.) bjcmd@cableone.net n LACK-MORRISON BRANGUS Bill Morrison 411 CR 10., Clovis, NM 88101 575-482-3254 Home / 575-760-7263 Cell bvmorrison@yucca.net n LAZY S RANCH WILLCOX, LLC Susan Wilson-Sanders 12325 East Horsehead Road, Tucson, AZ 85749 520-403-8510 / drsue@dakotacoin.net n EL RANCHO ESPANOL DE CUYAMA Pam Doiron, PO Box 367, New Cuyama, CA 93254 hm./off. ph: 805-245-0434, Doiron@spanishranch.net

GENOMICS

<< continued from page 28

efficiency with an accuracy of 0.49,” he says. “It means we’re getting a fairly good predicmicrobiome, he says. But recent develop- tion. Certainly not perfect but good, just ments in sequencing technology from the composition of those bugs.” d eve l o p e d in The feed ef f ihuman medicine ciency genomic can be transbreeding value Just a few years ago, ferred to livestock. established for dairy “It’s now at a point is 0.33. “But there was no possibility cattle where you can when you combine take a handful of them together, at of getting a handle on the rumen contents, least in this small extract the DNA study, we got an rumen microbiome. But recent increase in how accuout of those rumen contents rately we could developments in sequencing and profile the predict feed effirumen of the ciency,” he says. technology developed in animals,” he says. “We’re just starting This is an idea to shift into a space, I human medicine can be that needs a lot of think, where the res earch, b ut genomic information transferred to livestock.” initial trials on a is going to be useful small scale look for management of promising. Hayes and his team ran a small these animals,” he told Angus breeders. study on 28 dairy heifers where they mea- “That’s just starting to happen. The price sured feed efficiency and also profiled the point needs to come down a little bit to rumen microbiome. “From the rumen make it a reasonable goer, but certainly the microbiome, we were able to predict feed technology is nearly there.”     

PARKER BRANGUS Our bulls are Easy-calving, Low-birth weight, Great disposition, Rock-footed, Drought & Heat tolerant bulls that will perform in any type of country. Skyhawk’s Kennedy by Skyhawk’s Presidente out of a CCR Pathfinder 152W Dam. BW: +.6 WW: +26 YW: +51 Milk: 12 SC: +.64 REA: +.06 %IMF: -.08

n BOBBY VICTOR 2153 SRP, Portales, NM 88130 H: 575-477-2324 / O: 575-760-4154 n DESPAIN CATTLE CO. Brad and Donna DeSpain P.O. Box 475, Marana, Arizona 85653 H: 520-682-3914 / O: 520-429-2806 bridlebitranch@comcast.net n ROBBS BRANGUS R.L. & Sally Robbs 4995 Arzberger Road., Willcox, AZ 85643 520-384-3654 Home 520-507-2514 R.L. (cell) osonegro@powerc.net

30

DECEMBER 2016

4117 - Res. Champion Bull 2016 Roswell Brangus Sale.

WE HAVE CONSIGNED BULLS TO THE FOLLOWING SALES:

Southwest Brangus Breeders Association Sale Sat. Feb. 11, 2017 26th Annual Roswell Brangus Bull Sale Sat. Feb. 25, 2017

PARKER BRANGUS LARRY & ELAINE PARKER

P.O. Box 146, 1700 N. Parker Rd., San Simon, AZ 85632 Res: 520-845-2315 • Bus: 520-845-2411 Larry’s Cell: 520-508-3505 Diane’s Cell: 520-403-1967 Diane’s email: jddiane@vtc.net


Serving Texas and New Mexico

With herds located in several locations, we are able to test our genetics based on real world conditions.

Happy Holidays from Roy & Trudy Hartzog! AVAILABLE NOW 150 Bulls 100 Bred Heifers

We are working hard to earn & keep your business! 31

Roy Hartzog – 806-225-7230 cell • Trudy Hartzog – 806-470-2508 cell Ranch – 806-825-2711 • email arlo22@wtrt.net

DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

31


Where Will Your Cattle Be in Summer 2017? Manage your cattle this winter depending on your goal for the cattle in summer 2017.

Not every calf should be managed the same after weaning. Source: SDSU Extension

“P

utting the right cattle into the right program greatly increases the chances of success,” said Warren Rusche, SDSU Extension Beef Feedlot Man-

agement Associate. “Replacement heifers and calves that will spend next summer grazing as yearlings will be managed quite differently than calves going on either a fast-track backgrounding or calf-fed finishing program.” For replacement heifers and calves destined to spend summer 2017 grazing, Rusche said maximum performance is not the goal, but instead a balance between reducing overall wintering costs without compromising future productivity. “Getting calves too fleshy during the winter results in reduced summer gains in yearlings and negative effects on lifetime productivity in replacement heifers,” he explained. Rusche added that cattle producers

need to be careful not to reduce inputs too much, because this can result in lower pregnancy rates in replacement heifers and reduced marbling potential in growing cattle. For best results, Rusche urges cattle producers to aim for performance targets between 1.5 and 2 pounds per day. “This should avoid negative outcomes in most cases,” he said.

The right feeding program Frame size can help cattle producers decide what type of feeding program they should pursue. A long-yearling program, Rusche

SALE DATE: SATURDAY MARCH 11, 2017

32

DECEMBER 2016

continued on page 34 >>


GENERATIONS OF ANGUS • RELIABLE BULLS

22nd Annual

HALES ANGUS FARMS SALE

Saturday, March 18, 2017 • 1:00 pm • Canyon, Texas

Sale Offering Includes: 90 COMING TWO-YEAR-OLD & YEARLING ANGUS BULLS Sale will be broadcast live on Rural TV for your convenience.

40 BRED AND OPEN ANGUS HEIFERS HALES ANGUS FARMS

27951 S. US Hwy. 87, Canyon, TX 79015 www.halesangus.com • halesangus@gmail.com • 806-488-2274 fax

RICHMOND HALES 806-488-2471 • 806-679-1919 cell

RICK HALES 806-655-3815 • 806-679-9303 cell

54 years of breeding Angus cattle...

DECEMBER 2016

33


SUMMER 2017 << cont. from page 32

tive of achieving cheaper gains during the grazing period,” he said. “Owning the calves all the way to the end of the grazing period maximizes the opportunities to recapture any performance lost during the winter.”

explained allows the smaller-framed, lighter calves time to add frame before going on a finishing diet, resulting in increased hot carcass weights without negatively affectWinter grazing ing marbling. On the other hand, feeding larger Utilizing winter grazing resources when framed, higher performing cattle diets that feasible is one strategy to reduce the total restrict their growth potential will depress costs of a wintering program. marbling. “Research from “A downside of SDSU has demonfeeding calves to gain strated that Owning the calves at a relatively slow grazing replaceaverage daily gain ment heifers offers all the way to the (ADG) is that the total clear benefits in cost of gain-per-pound lifetime cow proend of the grazing period will almost always be ductivity,” Rusche more expensive commaximizes the opportunities said. pared to programs If grazing targeting greater perto recapture any performance resources are availformance,” Rusche ab l e an d th e said. weather permits, lost during the winter.” Feed costs to meet grazing lowthe calf’s maintenance requirements as well er-quality roughage combined with as all fixed yardage expenses have to be supplemental protein can reduce total cost borne by fewer pounds of gain. “These pro- of production. grams should focus on reducing A downside of these growing programs, costs-per-day for the winter with the objec- which Rusche pointed out, is that producers

can be exposed to more risk because of a longer ownership period. “Owning cattle longer means more time to see falling cattle price, and more opportunities for cattle to get sick or die,” he said. “Sound preventative health programs and risk management plans are vitally important to avoid dramatic impacts on a ranch’s financial position.” Changing weather conditions can also wreak havoc on marketing or production plans. Limited grass availability and drought conditions can drastically affect demand for grass cattle and replacement heifers. “Having a “Plan B” in place can be very important to avoid being forced to dump cattle in an unfavorable market environment,” Rusche said.     

Feds released more wolves in New Mexico – this time gray wolf puppies to add genetic diversity – is that even legal? PLEASE CONTRIBU TE TO

d e l l i K f l o AW ! r e h t o r B My

New Mexico Cattle Grower’s Association, P.O. Box 7157, Albuquerque, NM 87194 • Call 505.247.0584 to use a credit card. Thanks!

34

DECEMBER 2016

Photos courtesy of X Diamond Ranch, Arizona

THE WOLF LITIGAT ION FUND!


35

DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

35


Finishing’s Effect on Climate The ‘green’ facts of grass vs. grain when finishing beef cattle. by Donald Stotts, Oklahoma State University

I

t is a “green” discussion that continues to raise its head periodically. What is better for the environment: Grass-finished or grain-finished beef cattle? Emotions on the subject sometimes run high, and facts can be the first fatality as the level of discourse becomes more heated, whether the debate be among those within the cattle industry or with outside groups, said Clint Rusk, head of Oklahoma State University’s (OSU’s) department of animal

science. “It can be a hot topic in Oklahoma for any number of reasons, not the least of which is that the state ranks third nationally in the number of beef cows,” he said. “The truth is there are trade-offs in different aspects of sustainability when comparing the two finishing production systems.” Grain-finished beef has a lower carbon footprint than grass-finished beef because of cattle’s more efficient utilization of feed in the finishing phase, fewer days on feed and greater amount of beef produced per animal. However, grass-finished beef contributes to sustainable beef production by utilizing forage resources to produce food from plants that are largely inedible by humans.

The carbon footprint for beef is all the greenhouse gas emissions produced during the production of beef divided by the total amount of beef produced throughout the system’s three phases: cow-calf, stocker/ backgrounding and finishing. “Cattle entering the final ‘finishing’ stage are typically 12 to 16 months of age, and remain in this phase until they achieve a level of body condition that will provide a positive eating experience for consumers,” Rusk said. The main difference in carbon footprints between grass- and grain-finished beef occurs as a result of the time spent in the finishing phase, the type of feed consumed and the body weight of the animal at the continued on page 38 >>

The Clovis Livestock Auction READY E TO SERV YOU!

CHARLIE ROGERS 575/762-4422

Marketing Team

RYAN FIGG 575/760-9301

DARYL HAWKINS 575/760-9300

STEVE FRISKUP 806/786-7539

RUSTIN ROWLEY 575/760-6164

WAYNE KINMAN 575/760-3173

For weekend hauling permits, call 575/762-4422 or 575/760-9300 or any market representative.

Call ! Today

CLA Spring

Horse Sale March 24-26, 2017

FEATURING CLOVIS-CACTUS TEAM ROPING & SALE Cattle Sale every Wednesday at 9 a.m. • Holstein Steer Special 1st Wednesday of the month during Cattle Sale VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT

www.clovislivestockhorsesale.com

575-762-4422 • www.clovislivestock.com • clovislivestockhs@outlook.com

36

DECEMBER 2016


LLED

RN E D

RE

S

GUS

HO

F OR

Cattle Bred for OPTIMUM GENETIC Performance

D

AN

F OR

HE

AC K

S

HE

RE

BL

Hooper attle Company

www.hoopercattlecompany.com

D

PO

Trucking For Hire Flatbed • Cattle Pot

— Registered Herefords & Black Angus —

Offering: 14 Yearling Hereford Bulls and 16 Yearling Angus Bulls. BULLS

TAG #

ANGUS POLLED

9/18/16

205 D. ADJ.WT

W.W RATIO

EPDs

SIRE

DAM

B.DATE

B.W.

W.W.

W.D.A.

B.W

W.W.

6102

TG

4203

12/12/15

78

680

n/a

n/a

2.42

2.2

54

6108

3106

4132

12/24/15

76

620

579

95

2.30

3.5

46

ANGUS

6110

TG

4109

12/30/15

77

580

571

87

2.21

1.3

45

ANGUS

6112

1138

4219

12/30/15

92

720

646

98

2.74

3.0

POLLED

6114

203

9143

12/31/15

75

710

593

97

2.71

POLLED

6123

203

0214

01/10/16

91

740

638

104

POLLED

6126

Z24

4145

01/10/16

79

620

571

POLLED

6131

3106

4105

01/12/16

91

640

ANGUS

6144

TG

4147

01/20/16

75

ANGUS

6146

TG

2107

01/22/16

78

POLLED

6152

3205

6110

01/23/16

ANGUS

6154

1128

0102

ANGUS

6156

1128

POLLED

6158 t

POLLED ANGUS

Y.W

MILK

M&G

98

25

n/a

67

19

41

94

23

n/a

46

77

20

n/a

3.1

51

80

17

42

2.94

5.2

60

94

16

46

93

2.46

3.6

38

59

18

37

622

102

2.56

6.7

61

92

17

48

685

685

104

2.83

0.5

49

85

25

n/a

755

697

106

3.15

0.3

52

88

25

na

84

540

492

80

2.26

4.5

42

65

17

38

01/24/16

98

715

652

99

3.00

4.9

39

65

22

n/a

2224

01/25/16

90

695

649

98

2.93

3.5

39

63

26

n/a

3205

2125

01/27/16

70

735

676

S

3.08

6.0

51

78

17

43

6162

849

2209

01/30/16

82

620

583

95

2.67

3.3

43

66

26

47

6204

1128

8113

02/04/16

87

750

701

106

3.30

3.3

43

67

26

n/a

POLLED

6209

Z24

2122

02/09/16

97

675

651

107

3.04

4.4

48

76

26

51

ANGUS

6213

1211

9139

02/11/16

98

755

721

109

3.43

3.8

53

79

21

n/a

ANGUS

6215

1211

9142

02/13/16

90

605

581

88

2.78

2.9

45

80

22

n/a

ANGUS

6301

1138

5116

03/01/16

86

535

565

86

2.66

3.0

42

80

18

n/a

POLLED

6304

849

9127

03/07/16

94

560

568

97

2.87

3.3

47

71

19

42

ANGUS

6305

1138

2162

03/09/16

101

715

763

116

3.70

4.4

61

91

19

n/a

ANGUS

6311

1211

9301

03/14/16

87

490

521

79

2.61

3.4

38

81

20

n/a

ANGUS

6314

1211

9114

03/16/16

84

600

645

98

3.23

1.9

50

79

20

n/a

ANGUS

6315

TG

4117

03/17/16

83

585

699

106

3.16

1.6

52

89

25

n/a

POLLED

6317

Z24

2219

03/21/16

98

535

588

101

2.96

4.3

46

70

24

47

ANGUS

6318

1138

1222

03/22/16

77

590

652

99

3.28

1.3

53

90

18

n/a

POLLED

6401

203

6436

04/11/16

89

465

544

93

2.91

4.8

51

81

19

45

POLLED

6408

3106

2156

04/30/16

73

400

506

S

2.84

1.8

45

65

18

41

EPDs & TPR Records available on all cattle. Range-raised, rugged, rock-footed at over 7,600 ft. elevation. Bulls & Open & Bred Females For Sale at Private Treaty at the Ranch GUARANTEED SOUND & FERTILE STEVE & DEBBIE HOOPER · 575/773-4535 · FAX 575/773-4583 · HC 32 BOX 405 RED HILL RT., QUEMADO, NM 87829

37

DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

37


CLIMATE

<< continued from page 36

end of the finishing phase. Typically, cattle entering the feedlot for finishing eat a diet containing corn along with byproducts such as distillers’ grain left over after ethanol production or corn gluten feed left over after corn fructose production, as well as vitamins and minerals and small quantities of roughage such as hay. “Grain-finished cattle remain in the feedlot for approximately four to six months, and reach market weight faster than their grass-finished counterparts because their diets are higher in energy, which results in rapid and efficient weight gain,” said Sara Place, assistant professor of sustainable beef cattle systems for OSU’s Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources. In contrast, grass-finished cattle gain weight at a slower rate and typically go to harvest at 20 to 26 months of age, and at a lower final weight than their grain-finished counterparts. “Grass-finished cattle may finish either faster or slower than the typical age range, depending upon the forage and grass resources available,” Place said. “For example, the growing season is shorter in northern states, which may shorten the finishing period and lead to lighter animal weights at harvest.”

Change in outputs The difference in harvest weights translates into different numbers of U.S. citizens who can be fed per animal. Place said average grass-finished cattle provide a live animal weight at harvest of 1,100 pounds (lb.), a dressing percentage of 58 percent and a carcass weight of 638 lb. per animal, resulting in eight U.S. citizens being fed per animal, according to USDA per capita beef consumption data. “The dressing percent of an animal represents the meat and skeletal portion of an animal compared to its live weight,” Place said. “Utilizing grass forage as the primary source of feed also contributes to an increased carbon footprint because high-forage diets produce more methane emissions from the animal’s digestive tract than high-energy grain diets.” Methane is a greenhouse gas 28 times more potent at trapping heat in the earth’s atmosphere as compared to carbon dioxide. For grain-finished cattle with a live animal weight at harvest of 1,300 lb., a dressing percentage of 64 percent and a carcass weight of 832 lb. per animal would result in 10.4 U.S. citizens being fed per animal, according to USDA per capita beef consumption data. “The combination of consuming a higher-energy, lower-forage diet, less time spent on feed during the finishing phase and heavier carcass weights translates into an 18.5 percent to 67.5 percent lower carbon footprint for grain-finished beef compared to grass-finished beef,” Place said. So, some might ask, why is there a debate? “Even though grass-finished beef has a higher carbon footprint, it also has some sustainability advantages,” Place said. Grass-finished cattle utilize foodstuffs that are inedible to humans as their primary source of energy and nutrients throughout their lifetimes, but it doesn’t end there. “Beef cattle can utilize forage grown on land that is not suitable for crop production, thus providing us humans with a nutritious food source on land resources that otherwise would not be providing something we can eat,” Place said. Additionally, grasslands and pastures can sequester carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, which can help mitigate climate continued on page 64 >>

38

DECEMBER 2016


George Curtis, INC.

REGISTERED ANGUS CATTLE Good cow herds + performance bulls = pounds = dollars!

1947 photo of George F. Curtis

PERFORMANCE, EASY-CALVING BULLS that can help to assure your success in the “pound” business.

C all : B lake C urtis , C lovis , N ew M exiCo 575/762-4759 or 575/763-3302 aNd w ayNe k iNMaN 575/760-1564

39

DECEMBER 2016

G

eorge and Vera Curtis came to New Mexico as small children in the early 1900s. Their parents, arriving in a covered wagon, homesteaded in rural Quay County, New Mexico, on the Llano Estacado. Forrest, New Mexico, was the nearest place of commerce, a community built around a rural schoolhouse where their children of the 1920s and 1930s era received their education. George heard of the Aberdeen Angus breed, and much improved genetics that the breed was known for, and made the decision to acquire a registered Angus herd of his own. Traveling across the U.S. in search of the best genetics that money could buy turned out to be quite an adventure for Mr. Curtis but also a memorable quest for the Curtis children of the era. George Curtis and his youngest son James V. Curtis accepted the challenge of competing with the other top Angus breeders of the 40s and 50s at numerous State and regional competitions including the Denver and Ft. Worth livestock shows. When James V. Curtis (Rip) returned from his world travels, sponsored by the U. S. Air Force, with his wife, a North Carolina native and Air Force registered nurse, Thelma, the Curtis team resumed their Angus breeding venture. As cutting edge technology became available in the form of artificial insemination and embryo transplant, the Curtis family began to utilize these new tools to improve the herd focusing on the genetic traits that most needed improvement both in the industry and on the Curtis ranch. George Curtis’ passing in 1977 and his son’s passing in 1994 left the responsibility of sire selection and herd genetics to the present generation of Curtises. Tamara, Blake and Tye Curtis still operate George Curtis, Inc. today. The Curtis family takes pride in completing three generations in the Registered Angus cattle business. Our pledge is to continue to meet our customers’ expectations of excellence. The easy calving, top gaining, moderate framed stock that the Curtis family has been known for in the past is still available today at George Curtis Inc.

DECEMBER 2016

39


AGGIE NOTES

The Veterinary Feed Directive – What is it?

From the Animal Resources Dept. Cooperative Ext. Service, NMSU

“T

by John C. Wenzel, Extension Veterinarian

Clark anvil ranCh

he FDA acknowledges the important role medically important antimicrobials play in treating, controlling, and preventing disease in food-producing animals. However, the agency has been actively engaging veterinary organizations, animal producer organizations and other stakeholders to express our position that medically important antibiotics labeled for

Registered Herefords & Salers BULL SALE April 12, 2017 La Junta Livestock – La Junta, CO

CLINTON CLARK 32190 Co. Rd. S., Karval, CO 80823 719-446-5223 • 719-892-0160 Cell cclark@esrta.com www.ClarkAnvilRanch.com

BEFORE YOU BUY AN ANGUS BULL, ASK FOR THE PAPERS

When it comes to selecting your herd genetics, there are a lot of choices out there. Choosing the right bull can be complicated. Angus genetics offer a clear solution. But before you purchase that next Angus bull, make sure he’s registered. That registration paper opens the door to the true power of known Angus genetics – and the industry’s largest, most accurate genetic database and selection tools. With the registration paper, you’re buying generations of pedigrees, carefully measured performance data and selection tools. With the registration paper, you’re buying generations of pedigrees, carefuly measured performance data and genomic information. With the paper, you’re receiving a registered bull that comes with the industry’s most reliable, rapidly available EPDs to advance your cow herd. Without the paper, you’re just buying a bull. So next time you’re at a sale, make the most of your investment and ask for the registration paper. It’s how you know what you’re purchasing – and how you can achieve your full profit potential. That’s the power of a registration paper. That’s the power of a registered Angus bull

40

DECEMBER 2016

New Mexico Angus Association

www.newmexicoangusassociation.org

NMAA & HA Bull & Heifer Sale March 4, 2017

continuous or undefined durations of use is not consistent with judicious use principles, as outlined in previously-released guidance documents.” The labeled indications for using antimicrobials included disease treatment, control and prevention, along with growth promotion and feed efficiency. As of Jan 2016, the label indications of growth promotion and feed efficiency were prohibited and had to be removed from the label. Before 1996, there were only two options for dispensing new animal drugs: (1) over-the-counter (OTC), and (2) prescription. In 1996 Congress enacted the Animal Drug Availability Act (ADAA) to facilitate the approval and marketing of new animal drugs and medicated feeds. As part of the ADAA, Congress recognized that certain new animal drugs intended for use in animal feed should only be administered under a veterinarian’s order and professional super vision. For example, veterinarians are needed to control the use of certain antimicrobials. Control is critical to reducing unnecessary use of such drugs in animals and to slowing or preventing any potential for the development of bacterial resistance to antimicrobial drugs. Therefore, the ADAA created a new category of products called veterinary feed directive drugs (or VFD drugs). So when a new animal drug application is submitted to FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) for approval, CVM evaluates the drug for safety and effectiveness, and as part of the review process, determines whether the drug will be an over-the-counter (OTC) drug, a prescription (Rx) drug, or a VFD drug (limited to drugs used in or on animal feed). According to federal regulations enacted through the Animal Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act (AMDUCA), extralabel drug use (ELDU) means “actual use or intended use of a drug in an animal in a manner that is not in accordance with the approved labeling. This includes, but is not limited to, use in species not listed in the labeling, use for indications (disease or other conditions) not listed in the labeling, use at dosage levels, frequencies, or routes of administration other than those stated in the labeling, and deviation from the labeled withdrawal time based on these different uses.” According to AMDUCA, veterinarians who treat food animals with drugs in an extralabel manner must use evidence “...derived from food safety data or other scientific information...” in order to determine an appropriate withdrawal interval (WDI) that allows for a conservative estimate of drug


residue level in edible animal tissues. Under the VFD provisions, EXTRALABEL DRUG USE IN FEED IS ILLEGAL. Extralabel drug use in feed, even by a veterinarian where a valid VCPR exists, is NOT permitted and is considered illegal. In New Mexico, a valid VCPR is defined by Statute and Rule as follows: A. NMSA 61.14.2.J. “valid veterinarian-client-patient relationship” means: (1) The veterinarian has assumed responsibility for making medical judgments regarding the health of an animal being treated and the need for and the course of the animal’s medical treatment; (2) The client has agreed to follow the instructions of the veterinarian; (3) The veterinarian is sufficiently acquainted with an animal being treated, whether through examination of the animal or timely visits to the animal’s habitat for purposes of assessing the condition in which the animal is kept, to be capable of making a preliminary or general diagnosis of the medical condition of the animal being treated; and (4) The veterinarian is reasonably available for follow-up treatment; B. NMSA 16.25.9.8.3.C. 1- For the purposes of a VFD order, the veterinarian must

be licensed in NM and must have been present on the premise for which the VFD order is made, within 6 months prior to each VFD order being issued. NMSA 16.25.9.8.3.C.2- The veterinarian writing a veterinary food directive (VFD)

order for premises in New Mexico must be a New Mexico-licensed veterinarian and present on the premises within the six (6) months preceding the issuance of the order. All elements of the federal rules to issue a continued on page 44 >>

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DECEMBER 2016

41


New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association Protecting Our Ranching Way of Life

C

attle Ranching represents America’s most enduring and ionic way of life. Yet, everyday, ranches throughout New Mexico and the United States are threatened by forces as far ranging as economic uncertainly, government regulations, crippling drought and more. That’s why New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association (NMCGA) works tirelessly to protect and promote all ranching families.

NMCGA continues to advocate for livestock producers and landowners on local, state, and federal legislative and regulatory issues.

■ NMCGA has worked hard to earn high respect at the State Capital and has a highly regarded reputation with top policy makers. Through our leaders and staff you have influence in the Governor appointed Boards and Commissions. ■

NMCGA strongly supports and defends a free enterprise system, the protection of private property rights, and the

protection and enhancement of our natural resources.

■ NMCGA members develop and vote on policies that direct the NMCGA leadership and staff in their advocacy efforts.

■ NMCGA leaders also take on key policy and decision-making roles with other national and state industry organizations, providing relevant input and testimony, influencing state and national policy development.

■ NMCGA makes sure the voices of ranchers are heard and that ranchers continue to influence policy and politics.

■ NMCGA hosts two major meetings a year with regulatory, policy and educational components for producers, as well as regional meetings twice a year. Most importantly, your membership in NMCGA will help ensure that ranching will not only endure, but prosper, for generations to come.

Join the NMCGA Today

Mark the category under which you will be remitting. Return this notice with your payment to assure proper credit. The information contained herein is for the Association’s use only, and is considered confidential. Your dues may be taxdeductible as an ordinary and necessary business expense.

OWN CATTLE

COW/CALF OPERATOR: $110 Minimum Cattle owned $0.60 per head, per month in state or $110 minimum

CATTLEMEN’S CORRAL CLUB Membership includes a plaque with yearly attachments. Trail Boss / $1,000 Top Hand / $500 Cowboy / $250 Wrangler / $110 $ ______

FUNDS/CONTRIBUTIONS

DAIRY PRODUCER: $110 Minimum Cattle owned $0.40 per head, per month in state or $110 minimum

Theft Reward Fund / Legal Defense Fund / Cattlegrowers Foundation

SEASONAL OPERATOR Cattle owned $0.025 per head, per month in state or $110 minimum

WORKING COWHAND $65 Recommended by: _______________________________

Name __________________________________ Ranch/Business Name _________________________ Address _________________________________ City __________ County _______ State __ Zip ____ Email _______________________ PLEASE CHARGE MY _______MasterCard _______Visa Account No. _______________________________ Exp. Date ______ Security Code ______

(Working cowhand must be recommended by a NMCGA member) $ ______

Signature _________________________________

FEEDLOT OPERATOR: $110 Minimum One time capacity $0.02 per head or $110 Minimum ❒ 1-170 Head - $110 ❒ 171-400 Head - $250 ❒ 401- 800- $500 ❒ 800 & up - $750 $ ______

42

OWN NO CATTLE ASSOCIATE MEMBER (Insurance Privileges Available) $ ______ Individual / $110 Corporation / $250 Youth Org. / $50 Small Business / $150 Association/Organization / $250

DECEMBER 2016

TOTAL AMOUNT REMITTED $ _________

DECEMBER 2016

42


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DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

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Elbrock Ranch Quality Commercial Beefmasters and Blackface Show Lambs

O

44

U R A D V E RT I S E R S make this magazine possible. Please patronize them, and mention that you saw their ad in ...

DECEMBER 2016

Edward & Tricia Elbrock Animas, New Mexico 88020 H: 575/548-2270 O: 575/548-2429 elbrock@vtc.net

505/243-9515

AGGIE NOTES

<< cont. from page 41

VFD order must be met and the issuing veterinarian must provide supporting documentation of the visit to the premises including medical records within fourteen (14) days of a request from the board to provide such documentation

Definitions of language used in the VFD Directive: A “veterinary feed directive” is a written (nonverbal) statement issued by a licensed veterinarian in the course of the veterinarian’s professional practice that orders the use of a VFD drug or combination VFD drug in or on an animal feed. This written statement authorizes the client (the owner of the animal or animals or other caretaker) to obtain and use animal feed bearing or containing a VFD drug or combination VFD drug to treat the client’s animals only in accordance with the conditions for use approved, conditionally approved, or indexed by the FDA (21 CFR 558.3(b)(7)). A VFD may also be referred to as a VFD order. A “veterinary feed directive (VFD) drug” is a drug intended for use in or on animal feed which is limited by an approved new animal drug application filed pursuant to section 512(b) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), a conditionally approved application filed pursuant to section 571 of the FD&C Act, or an index listing pursuant to section 572 of the FD&C Act to use under the professional supervision of a licensed veterinarian (21 CFR 558.3(b)(6)). Use of animal feed bearing or containing a VFD drug (VFD feed) must be authorized by a lawful VFD (21 CFR 558.6(a) (1)). A “combination veterinary feed directive (VFD) drug” is a combination new animal drug (as defined in § 514.4(c)(1)(i) intended for use in or on animal feed which is limited by an approved application filed pursuant to section 512(b) of the FD&C Act, a conditionally approved application filed pursuant to section 571 of the FD&C Act, or an index listing pursuant to section 572 of the FD&C Act to use under the professional supervision of a licensed veterinarian, and at least one of the new animal drugs in the combination is a VFD drug. Use of animal feed bearing or containing a combination VFD drug must be authorized by a lawful veterinary feed directive (21 CFR 558.3(b) (12)). If any component drug in an approved, conditionally approved, or indexed combination drug is a VFD drug, the combination


UPCOMING EVENTS

drug is a combination VFD drug and its use must comply with the VFD requirements. The expiration date on the VFD specifies the last day the VFD feed can be fed. In other words, a VFD feed or combination VFD feed must not be fed to animals after the expiration date on the VFD (21 CFR 558.6(a) (2)). The “duration of use” and how does it relate to the “expiration date”? The VFD expiration date defines the period of time for which the authorization to feed an animal feed containing a VFD drug is lawful. This period of time may be specified in the approved labeling of a given VFD drug or, if not specified in the labeling, the veterinarian must specify an expiration date for the VFD that does not exceed 6 months (21 CFR 558.6(b)(3)(v)). The duration of use is a separate concept from the expiration date, and determines the length of time, established as part of the approval, conditional approval, or index listing process, that the animal feed containing the VFD drug is allowed to be fed to the animals. This period of time is specified in the labeling of the VFD drug. For example, the currently approved VFD drug tilmicosin has an expiration date of 45 days and a duration of use of 21 days. This means that

New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Convention, Albuquerque, NM December 1 – 4, 2016 9:00am - 4:30pm, 2016 Zoetis Cattlemen’s College, Thursday, December 1, Crowne Plaza Albuquerque 9:00am, Welcome & Introductions, Keith Hedeman, Zoetis / New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association 9:15am, Trace Minerals 10:15am, Break 10:30 a.m., Impact of Calving Distribution on Reproduction/ potential speaker Craig Gifford 11:15am, Creating Positive Change 12:00 noon, Lunch 1:15pm, Antibiotic Stewardship / Zoetis 2:00pm, Economic Outlook, Risk Mgt. / potential speaker Brett Crosby 2:45pm, Break 3:00pm, Ranching Under a Microscope 3:40pm, Reproductive Vaccine Differences / Zoetis’ John Wenzel 4:15pm, Q & A Panel / Wrap Up Registration Fee $30 per person, includes lunch Call 505/247-0584 to reserve your seat! Or register online: nmagriculture.org/store

January 11-12, 2017

Southwest Beef Symposium January 11-12, 2017 Roswell Convention Center 912 N. Main Street, Roswell, NM. Register at: aces.nmsu.edu/ces/swbeef

Roswell Convention Center Roswell, NM

An educational forum tailored for beef producers in the Southwest. The Southwest Beef Symposium is a joint effort ROY, N.M.

Clavel Herefords between the New Mexico Cooperative Extension Service and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, established to annually provide producers with timely information about current industry issues and practical management. Call for info: 575-644-3379 Register Online: swbs.nmsu.edu

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when the VFD is issued, the client has 45 days to obtain the VFD feed and complete the 21 day course of therapy. It is unlawful to feed the VFD feed to animals after the VFD expiration date or duration of use period (21 CFR 558.6(a)(2)).

Client responsibilities: Only feed animal feed bearing or containing a VFD drug or a combination VFD drug (a VFD feed or combination VFD feed) to animals based on a VFD issued by a licensed veterinarian (21 CFR 558.6(a)(1)); feed a VFD feed or combination VFD feed to animals by no later than the expiration date on the VFD (21 CFR 558.6(a)(2))and for only the specified duration of use listed on the VFD; provide a copy of the VFD order to the distributor if the issuing veterinarian

sends the distributor’s copy of the VFD through you, the client (21CFR 558.6(b)(8); maintain a copy of the VFD order for a minimum of 2 years (21 CFR 558.6(a)(4)); and provide VFD orders for inspection and copying by FDA upon request (21 CFR 558.6(a)(5)).

Frequently Asked Questions: ЇЇ

ЇЇ

Can a client feed a VFD feed past the VFD expiration date? No. A VFD feed or combination VFD feed must not be fed to animals after the expiration date on the VFD (21 CFR 558.6(a)(2)). I have a VFD order that I would like to use to feed a VFD feed, but the order will expire before I can complete the duration of use on

the order, what should I do? The client should contact his/her veterinarian to request a new VFD order. A VFD feed or combination VFD feed must not be fed to animals after the expiration date on the VFD (21 CFR 558.6(a)(2)). Cattle drugs currently requiring a VFD: Tilmicosin, florfenicol Cattle drugs which change from overthe-counter sales to use only by veterinary feed directive in 2017: Neom y c i n , Ty l o s i n , V i r g i n i a m y c i n , Chlortetracycline, Oxytetracycline, Penicillin, Sulfadimethoxine:Ormetoprim, Sulfamerazine, Sulfamethazine This would include virtually all feed drugs except dewormers, carbadox, bambermycins, ionophores, bacitracin and a few others.

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Special Thanks to these Generous Folks Who Invested a Total of $21,000 In New Mexico Youth In Agriculture 2016 Southern New Mexico State Fair Calf Scramble Sponsors Bureau of Land Management Farm Credit of New Mexico Dona Ana County FLB Grant County Farm & Livestock Bureau Susan Sumrall, Farm Bureau Financial Services, Silver City Edward Ogaz, Seco Spice T&M Cattle & T&C Farms Danny Joe Farms, LLC Bud Deerman Farms New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association New Mexico Stockman Magazine New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau YF&R Program CKP Insurance John & Laura Conniff, Conniff F Cross Farm Farm Bureau Financial Services, Las Cruces Socorro County Farm & Livestock Bureau

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Thermo Fisher Scientific Presents Validation Data for New Bovine Tuberculosis Detection Kit

V

alidation data presented by researchers at the 4th Congress of the European Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians (EAVLD) shows that Thermo Fisher Scientific’s VetMAX M. tuberculosis Complex PCR kit is a reliable tool to confirm the presence of mycobacteria belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex. Development of the new realtime PCR kit extends the company’s portfolio of tests for the detection of bovine tuberculosis (bTB). When used in combination with the company’s existing bTB portfolio, consisting of reagents for skin tests and IFNγ release assays (Bovigam), the newest solution provides veterinarians with an effective combination of tests for their

bTB screening programs. Dr. Jean Louis Moyen, Director of the Regional Analysis and Research Laboratory of Dordogne, France, who was among the scientists to present data at the conference, said: “We have tested positive and negative field lymph node samples from cattle, wild boar and badger with the VetMAX M. tuberculosis Complex Real-Time PCR kit in our laboratory as part of the validation study. The test showed excellent diagnostic sensitivity and specificity with 87 out of 88 infected lymph nodes correctly identified and no false positive results in the 284 samples tested. Implementation of the test in the lab was really easy.”

Enhanced Detection The new PCR test detects all seven strains belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e. M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. microti, M. canetti, M. caprae, and M. pinnipedii) and does not detect 42 other tested related pathogens. It includes a ready-to-use master mix and uses the Xeno internal positive control in a single well, duplex PCR approach. “In the context of increasing TB preva-

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lence, the field needs diagnostic tools that are easy to handle and provide sensitive, reliable and fast results to help ensure the efficacy of surveillance and control programs,” said Martin Guillet, global head and general manager of AgriBusiness at Thermo Fisher. “The results we present at the EAVLD show that this kit meets these expectations and is in line with our mission of enabling our customers to make the world healthier, cleaner and safer.” The PCR-based kit is designed to reduce costs for the farmer and government-funded programs by delivering results typically in three hours instead of several weeks with bacterial culture, thus limiting the spread of infection while also reducing labor in the lab. “The eradication of bTB is complex and the flexible application of testing schemes will help avoid unnecessary culling and lengthy farm closures, as well as help eliminate the occurrence of bovine TB worldwide,” Guillet said. “We feel this can shorten the overall length of a TB program in a country.” The VetMAX M. tuberculosis Complex PCR kit is currently in development with registrations pending.     

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BULLS FOR SALE Gentle, Registered BRANGUS BULLS and Registered Full French Bred CHAROLAIS BULLS. Both out of Texas Certified TB Free Herds. RJ CATTLE CO/RAMRO LLC always strives to sire quality guaranteed bulls of service age. All bulls are Fertility and Trich Tested.

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Bulls & Heifers FOR SALE AT THE FARM

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Producing the Right Calf to Fit the Market Key to Capturing Premiums Source: AgriLife Today

T

hough cattle prices have come down from historic highs, there are still ways for beef cattle producers to capture more dollars for their calves by adding value at the ranch, according to experts at the 45th South Central Texas Cow-Calf Clinic in Brenham. Several hundred beef producers from Washington, Brazos, Austin, Burleson, Fayette, Harris, Lee and Waller counties took part in the day-long program hosted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and surrounding beef and forage county committees. Dr. Dan Hale, AgriLife Extension meat specialist, discussed carcass value and what cattle order buyers are looking for. He said there could be as many as nine order buyers at an auction ring looking to fill specific orders. “What are those buyers looking at inside the auction ring? They are looking at how fast those calves are going to gain once they leave the livestock market auction.” He said it’s important to get as many buyers in attendance to bid on your cattle to fill their orders. “You do that by making sure your calves you are marketing fit their orders.” Hale said the buyers are given orders every week before they go to the auction and may have as many as 20 orders to fill. “If your calves fit at least one or two orders on each of the bidders present need to fill, then your cattle will potentially receive higher prices and maybe the top price of the day,” he said. “They are looking at frame size, the size of the animal and how large they are going to get before they start

A

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in the New Mexico Stockman. Call: 505/243-9515. 52

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to get fat.” and is a finished market animal.” Hale said the longer you can feed those Hale said order buyers are also looking animals before they start getting into the at gender. He said heifers start the fattening rapid fattening phase of their life, and the phase of their lives much sooner than steers more muscular they are, the faster they and that is the reason prices paid for them grow. are often less than comparable steers. “The order Hale said producbuyer is looking at ers should consider What are those buyers seeing how long adding value to their they will they calves. This can be looking at inside grow in the feedachieved by impleyard or on grass menting programs the auction ring? They are before they start such as the VAC 45 getting really fat,” program, also known looking at how fast those he said. “This is as the Value Added also why lightCalf program, where calves are going to gain er-weight calves calves are weaned 45 often bring higher days before they are once they leave the livestock sold. They also receive prices per hundredweight, as two sets of booster market auction.” lighter cattle will vaccines to enhance be able to spend their immunity to more time as a stocker calf and as a feeder disease and sickness. calf before they become finished in the The buyers of VAC 45 calves find them feedyard. to more easily attain their genetic potential, They also look at genetic makeup of the have an enhanced immune system, are animal, and estimate the final USDA quality more predictable in their feedyard perforgrade — USDA prime, choice or select — mance, and reduce the use of antibiotics. once the calf has gone through the feedyard Castrating bull calves also adds value,

said Dr. Joe Paschal, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service livestock specialist, Corpus Christi. Paschal and Dr. Helen Philips of Philips Veterinary Hospital in Brenham provided a live chute-side demonstration. “Talk to your veterinarian and develop what is referred to as a vet-client relationship,” Phillips told attendees. “Don’t wait until your calves are too sick to call a veterinarian.” Phillips urged producers to develop a herd health plan with their veterinarian, and both she and Paschal discussed proper vaccinations to prevent diseases such as blackleg and redwater from causing death to valuable calves. They also discussed practices such as ear notching to help ranchers identify the pasture in which calves have received a round of vaccinations. “There are practices that can add value to your calves, whether it’s sticking an ear tag in their ear, putting a notch in the ear, blackleg vaccination or castrating bull calves at a young age. All of this adds value to those calves and you will be compensated when you market those calves,” Paschal said.     

DECEMBER 2016

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Raymond Boykin, Jr.

BREEDER SINCE 1986

BARZONA: EASY-KEEPING CATTLE THAT GRADE Montgomery, AL Ph: 334/395-5949 • Cell: 334/430-0563 etheldozierboykin@yahoo.com

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F&F CATTLE CO. Producers of quality foundation BARZONA cattle for over 40 years PUREBRED BULLS & HEIFERS AVAILABLE MIKE FITZGERALD 575/673-2346 130 Fitzgerald Lane, Mosquero, NM 87733 ffcattleco@plateautel.net

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Feedlots Chew Through Cattle Supplies by Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension livestock marketing specialist

F

eedlots continued a strong marketing pace in October with marketings up 4.6 percent year over year, despite one less business day in the month. October placements followed the September monthly decrease with another 5 percent reduction in placements year over year. The combination of large marketings and fewer placements left the November 1, 2016 cattle on feed inventory down 1.3 percent from one year ago. Despite the year over year decreases in placements in September and October, total feedlot placements are up 673,000 head from 2015, a 3.9 percent increase for the year to date. However, year to date feedlot marketings through October are up an impressive 5.2 percent year over year, some 855,000 head more than the same period last year. In fact, in the last six months, the year over year increase in feedlot marketings has been more than

double the increase in the number of cattle placed in feedlots compared to last year. The faster pace of cattle movement through feedlots has translated in more cattle slaughter and more beef production in 2016 than previously expected. Year to date beef production is up 5.3 percent from last year. Steer slaughter, in particular, has exceeded expectations this fall and is up nearly 7 percent year over year so far this year, though is expected to moderate to smaller year over year increases for the remainder of the year. Additional steer slaughter, combined with year over year increases in heifer and cow slaughter have pushed total cattle slaughter up 5.6 percent so far this year. Increased slaughter is partially offset with lower carcass weights since May. Weekly steer carcass weights have averaged 9 pounds less since May with heifer and cow carcass weights down about 2 pounds on a weekly average basis. Carcass weights have been down from last year’s record levels despite excellent feeding conditions this fall. Both steer and heifer carcass weights appear to have peaked seasonally the last week of October and should decline for the

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remainder of the year. The first winter Mexican and Canadian feeder cattle storm which covered the central and imports so far this year, totaling 336,000 northern plains recently may help pull head fewer imports through September.) carcass weights down faster in These delayed fall feeder cattle are not November. expected to burden The decrease in feeder markets f e e dl ot p la ce excessively unless The faster pace of ments in they get bunched up September and next spring. However, cattle movement Oc tober likely these retained means that some feeders are being through feedlots has feeder cattle are held in a wide variety being retained o f s to cke r a n d translated in more cattle and will be pushed back-grounding prointo next year. Cergrams across the slaughter and more beef tainly there has country and will been plenty of likely be spread out production in 2016 than market incentive in weight and timing for cattle to be spring. Wheat previously expected. Year to next retained out in the pasture stocking has country this fall. been slow this fall date beef production is up This may result is and additional some additional placements 5.3 percent from last year.” stocker increase in feeder on wheat may consupplies in 2017 tinue after January 1, on top of growing feeder supplies due to 2016 as producers look to graze out more a bigger 2016 calf crop. (Remember, wheat acres unless wheat market proshowever, that growing domestic feeder pects improve significantly.      supplies are being partially offset by a 29 percent year over year decrease in

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January 11-12, 2017

R A N C H

Roswell Convention Center Roswell, NM

An educational forum tailored for beef producers in the Southwest.

REGISTERED ANGUS BULLS AND FEMALES

The Southwest Beef Symposium is a joint effort between the New Mexico Cooperative Extension Service and Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, established to annually provide producers with timely information about current industry issues and practical management.

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Call for info: 575-644-3379 Register Online: swbs.nmsu.edu

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Two-year-old Bulls Proven Genetics, Range Ready

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recently, saying prosecutors fell far short of proving the conspiracy charges. Referred to only as “Juror 4,” he asked to remain anonymous out of fear that his remarks might draw threats. “It should be known that all 12 jurors felt that this verdict was a statement regarding the various failures of the prosecution to prove ‘conspiracy’ in the count itself — and not any form of affirmation of the defense’s by Derek Hawkins, Washington Post various beliefs, actions, or aspirations,” he hen jury deliberations began in said. October in the trial for Ammon According to the juror, everyone on the Bundy and six others charged in jury agreed that the protesters used intimthe armed takeover of Oregon’s Malheur idation, threats and force during the National Wildlife Refuge, a guilty verdict occupation to prevent workers from the U.S. seemed all but certain. Even defense attor- Fish and Wildlife Service and Bureau of neys admitted they were pessimistic. Land Management from performing their “You don’t walk into a federal court and duties. But prosecutors failed to show that win a case like this,” Matthew Schindler, an Bundy and the others had conspired to do attorney for one defendant, told the Seattle so, he said. Times. “It just doesn’t happen.” “We were not asked to judge on bullets But jurors came back with a stunning and hurt feelings, rather to decide if an decision: After deliberating for five days, agreement was made with an illegal object they had found all the defendants not in mind,” Juror 4 said. “It seemed this basic, guilty of conspiracy to impede federal offi- high standard of proof was lost upon the cers, the core charge in the case. prosecution throughout.” After the verdict was announced, critics At times, the juror continued, prosecuof the armed standoff were left scratching tors came off as arrogant, asking them to their heads. infer the existence of a conspiracy. That “It’s absolutely devastating. It’s awful,” apparently irritated some on the jury. Melissa Alfstad, who lives near the refuge, “Inference, while possibly compelling, told the Oregonian. “We’re just disgusted proved to be insulting or inadequate to 12 with the verdict.” diversely situated people as a means to The band of gun-wielding antigovern- convict,” he said. “The air of triumphalism ment protesters — 27 of them in total that the prosecution brought was not lost — had stormed the federal bird sanctuary on any of us, nor was it warranted given in Southeast Oregon, holding it for 41 days their burden of proof.” in January and February before the last of Deficiencies in the prosecution cropped them surren up throughout the dered to proceedings, the authorities. The juror told the OregoThese two major holes group’s spokesnian. Prosecutors did m a n , L aVo y not present witin the evidence record Finicum, was nesses who showed shot and killed proved to cause insurmountable that th e gro up by police during intended to impede the occupation federal workers, the doubt for me.” as he tried to juror said, planting “a drive past a roadblock and allegedly seed of doubt that grew.” Nor did prosecureached for a firearm. After being arrested, tors present evidence that showed a many of the occupiers struck plea deals, but conspiracy between Bundy and another Bundy and others chose to take their occupation leader who pleaded guilty, he chances in court. said. Now, amid shock and backlash over the “These two major holes in the evidence verdict, a key juror has come forward to record proved to cause insurmountable explain why 12 people voted to acquit them. doubt for me,” he said. The juror, a 44-year-old business student Prosecutors said they were disappointed at Marylhurst University, defended the in the verdict, but have stood by the theoacross-the-board acquittals in an email ries they offered at trial. U.S. Attorney Billy exchange with the Oregonian published J. Williams said employees at the refuge

W

R A N C H

Angus Bulls Yearlings & 2-year-olds Bred Angus replacement heifers Ranch Raised • Rock Footed Calving Ease with Rapid Growth Private Treaty Ernest & Ronda Thompson – Mountainair, NM 575-423-3313 • Cell 505-818-7284

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A reliable business partner is difficult to come by. Contact Radale Tiner to locate Angus genetics, select marketing options tailored to your needs, and to access Association programs and services. Put the business breed to work for you. To subscribe to the Angus Journal, call 816.383.5200. Watch The Angus Report on RFD-TV Monday mornings at 7:30 CST.

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A ‘Colossal Failure’ by Prosecutors: Juror Defends Verdict in Oregon Standoff Trial

DECEMBER 2016

RM_Tiner_New Mexico Stockman.indd 1

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were put in harm’s way when the occupiers overseeing the case that he would be able took it over and rejected suggestions that to examine the evidence impartially. the response from law enforcement was During deliberations, the juror brought excessive. up evidence that was never admitted in the “We still think it’s illegal to take over a case, refused to consider the defendants’ public structure on public land at the end state of mind, and used “imaginative theoof a gun,” Williams told the Oregonian in ries,” according to Juror 4. As a “last resort,” October. “There’s a distinction between Juror 4 sent a note to the judge asking that lawful protest and committing criminal acts he be dismissed, saying the jury was to prove your point.” wasting time dealing with his “bizarre” The occupation started with a peaceful interpretation of the case. The judge protest against the imprisonment of two replaced him. Oregon ranchers who were convicted of The verdict, when it came down, drew a arson after setting fires that burned federal torrent of criticism. Some people argued lands. Bundy and the others said their take- that the all-white jury’s acquittal of a nearly over of the wildlife refuge was a broader all-white group of armed protesters was a demonstration against the federal govern- damning example of “white privilege” in ment’s ownership of lands in the American action. The fact that it came down the same West, which the day as Native Amerigroup calls a violacan protesters in It was not lost on us tion of the North Dakota were Constitution. pepper sprayed and that our verdict(s) When Bundy arrested by officers in took the witness riot gear only added might inspire future actions stand, giving 10 to the outrage. hours of fiery tesOthers worried that are regrettable, but that that the verdict would timony, the jury w as ske ptic al, embolden other milisort of thinking was not Juror 4 said. tants to target federal “It was clear that agencies, as The Washpermitted when considering ington Post reported. there was no juror w h o r e ce i ve d “It is entirely possithe charges before us.” Ammon’s testible there will be mony as fully threats or intimidahonest, and several who felt manipulated,” tions from militants that believe such he said. “Even those who felt he was sincere actions are justified by this verdict,” John in his beliefs found examples of inconsis- Horning, executive director of WildEarth tency in his testimony.” Guardians, said in a statement. He added: “And I don’t think it was Juror 4 said he was “baffled” by the “flipendearing to us jurors for him to character- pant sentiments” in some responses. ize the entire federal court system, of which “It was not lost on us that our verdict(s) we were a key part of, as rigged against might inspire future actions that are regrethimself.” table,” he said, “but that sort of thinking Still, parts of Bundy’s testimony seemed was not permitted when considering the to undermine the notion of a conspiracy, charges before us.” the juror said. He said he took note when “Do these folks even know what it took Bundy talked about asking to meet in to arrive at a verdict on any one of these person with the FBI and being denied. On counts?” the juror continued. “How could top of that, visits from politicians to the 12 diverse people find such agreement occupation site, coupled with a lack of unless there was a colossal failure on the engagement from law enforcement, part of the prosecution? Don’t they know “caused me to see how occupiers could view that ‘not guilt y’ does not mean their presence as something other than ‘innocent’?”      illegal,” the juror said. The emails with the Oregonian also discussed Juror 4’s role in dismissing a juror who reportedly said on the first day of deliberations, “I’m very biased.” That juror had previously worked for the Bureau of Land Management as a ranch tech and firefighter, but he had told the judge

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e l t t a C s u l P s u g An

Our Annual Bull Sale Friday, March 3, 20 17 1:00 p.m. Cattlemens Livestock Au ction Belen, NM

ANGUS

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Rick & Maggie Hubbell 575/773-4770 505/469-1215 DECEMBER 2016

Mark Hubbell 575/773-4567

hubbell@wildblue.net P.O. Box 99, Quemado, NM 87829 DECEMBER 2016

59


Stout, Practical, • Easy Calving & Easy Fleshing • Registered Angus

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ANNUAL YEARLING ANGUS BULL SALE & Private Treaty

Available at All Times Loren & Joanne Pratt 44996 W. Papago Road Maricopa, AZ 85139 520/568-2811 60

DECEMBER 2016

CME to Amend Livestock Futures Options Minimum Listed Range of Exercise Prices

Cash and Kanzas Massey P.O. Box 335, Animas, NM 88020 575/544-7998 • 575/494-2678 masseybunch@hotmail.com

ME Group plans to amend rules governing minimum listed range of option exercise prices for its livestock options contracts to reflect a percentage range relative to the options exercise values closest to the settlement price of the previous day’s underlying futures contract, the exchange said recently. The new rule will be effective Dec. 18 for trade date on Monday Dec. 19, the CME said. Exercise prices for all contract months shall be at intervals of 2 cents for options on Lean Hog Futures, Feeder Cattle Futures and Live Cattle Futures, the agency said. All the option exercise prices will be listed prior to the opening of trading on the following business day. As new prices are added, existing values outside of the newly determined ranges without open interest may be delisted, the exchange said.     

ROD

RANCH Red Brangus

FOR SALE: Registered and Commercial Bulls Heifers Rod Hille 575/894-7983 Ranch HC 32, Box 79 Truth or Consequences, NM 87901


Board Opposes Adding Wilderness Areas by Antonio Sanchez, Rio Rancho Observer staff writer

I

n early November, 2016, Sandoval County, New Mexico, County Commissioners unanimously adopted a resolution opposing a National Forest Service plan to create new wilderness areas in the Santa Fe National Forest. Debra Marquis of Jemez Pueblo spoke to commissioners about the U.S. Forest Service’s efforts to add 80 wilderness areas to the Santa Fe National Forest, which extends across Los Alamos, Mora, Santa Fe, San Miguel and Sandoval counties. If the forest service follows through with

the plan, Marquis said, the areas would be accessible only on foot or by horse. Marquis said the move would limit the county’s efforts for wildfire and flood protection, and limit the land’s use by residents of Jemez Pueblo. “The creation of new wilderness areas in the Santa Fe National Forest and their elimination of multi-use access will destroy this finely interwoven fabric that creates the identity of the people of Sandoval County,” Marquis said. Commissioner Glenn Walters amended the resolution opposing the plan, asking that the commissioners’ opinion be heard not only by the National Forest Service. “Just sending this to the Forest Service is not enough,” he said. “We should be sending it to our fine members of Congress.”     

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& Lim Flex

Over 30+ Years of Breeding & Selection Bulls and Replacement Females Large Selection Affordable Prices Central Oklahoma BLACK POLLED BULLS & HEIFERS EDNA MANNING • JUDY BUGHER 9700 Slaughterville Rd., Lexington, OK 73051 405/527-7648 • 405/306-1315 405/306-1316 hayhooklimousin@valornet.com

Ranch Raised at 5000’ Elevation Black Gentle Virgin SINCE 1968

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Rancho Espuela Cattle Co.

Jim & Kelie Dyer 432/426-3435 17257 State Hwy 166 Ft. Davis, TX 79734

James & Jan Dyer 432/426-3336 Box 1009 Ft. Davis, TX 79734

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61


Bull Buyers

2016

REG. BLACK ANGUS

Yearling Bulls & Heifers for sale Spring 2017

GUIDE

Mountain View Ranch Heifers and Bulls For Sale Year Round Grace & Michael Wystrach 520/456-9052 HC1 Box 788 Elgin, Arizona 85611

100% AI PROGRAM CAPITAN, NM 88316 • PO BOX 25

575/354-2682 • 480/208-1410

CRAIG

LIMOUSIN RANCH Breeders since 1971 of Top Quality, High-Altitude Registered Limousin Cattle.

For Sale Year-Round BLACK BULLS • BLACK HEIFERS Polled • Horned • Red • Black A.I. Sired from Select Bulls JOEL CRAIG 970/259-0650

14908 Hwy. 550 S. Durango, CO 81303

R.L. Robbs 520/384-3654

C Bar R A N C H SLATON, TEXAS

4995 Arzberger Rd. Willcox, AZ 85643 osonegro@powerc.net

Willcox, AZ

Charolais & Angus Bulls

TREY WOOD 806/789-7312 CLARK WOOD 806/828-6249 • 806/786-2078

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BEEFMASTERS R.D. and PEGGY CAMPBELL P.O. Box 269 • 1535 West 250 South Wellington, UT 84542

435/637-3746 Cell 435/636-5797 62

DECEMBER 2016

Ferguson Ranch

Reg. & Comm. Red Angus For Sale

Wally & Anne Ferguson • 575/849-1446 P. O. BOx 578 · CarrizOzO, NM 88301


Bull Buyers Guide

time for potential pathogens to break without exposing your herd. Lots of times cattle coming from a sale have experienced elevated stress. It is important to keep them on good feed, in a clean pen, and allow the quarantine period to run its course. ЇЇ

by Travis Meteer, Illinois Extension Service

A

re you sifting through stacks of bull sale catalogs looking for your next bull? While bull selection can be a daunting task, your choice will impact your herd for years to come. Thus, taking some time to think about what you need from your next herd sire is important. Here are some points to emphasize when it comes to bull selection. ЇЇ

Know your market. Understand what traits are value added-traits for your market. One of the best parts about the cattle industry is the different ways producers achieve their goals. While selling calves at weaning into the commodity market is the majority, some cattlemen are marketing in very creative ways. Local freezer beef, retained ownership, alliances, branded beef programs, video sales, or fitting the production environment to a consumer demanded practice are all ways farmers are adding value to their calves. Your bull selection should be based on traits that are profitable in your market.

ЇЇ

Don’t sacrifice functional traits or adaptability to your production environment. It is really easy to get caught up in the data, but remember these critters need to be sound and function in the pasture. Good feet and legs, a strong libido, and docility are all imperative. Masculinity, big testicles, and a tight sheath are good phenotypic indicators of the right kind. Buying bulls that are raised in similar conditions to your farm is preferred. You can buy someone else’s genetics, but you can’t buy their management.

ЇЇ

Require a passed BSE (Breeding Soundness Exam) and farm herd health protocols. I also suggest a quarantine period for new purchases. A minimum of two weeks will allow

ЇЇ

Identify and understand Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) and phenotypes that signify value added traits you are seeking. Calving ease (CE) is an important and valuable trait. Sometimes when talking to producers I hear them stressing CE and birth weight (BW). BW is an indicator trait for CE, but you don’t get paid for light birth weight calves. You get paid by not having to invest time and labor in pulling calves. So, avoid putting too much downward pressure on BW, especially if the bull will breed cows. Another mistake I see is purchasing low BW bulls for cows. This is not necessary. Many times you can purchase a bull with average or better calving ease for cows at a discount to “heifer bulls” with comparable growth. Smooth, flat shouldered bulls with decent CE EPDs are good value bulls for breeding mature cows. If you sell your calves at weaning through the sale barn and keep your own replacements, traits of priority should be CE, heifer pregnancy, stayability, and weaning weight. Selecting for more yearling weight, too much milk or too little milk, or carcarss traits are much less important in this scenario. If you retain-ownership in you cattle through the feedlot and market to the packer, then yearling weight and carcass traits become more relevant to your bottom line. Your ultimate goal should be to produce the most profitable product, thus seek traits that add value without increasing cost of production over the value of the trait. Utilize appropriate multiple trait selection indexes. Find the sweet spot/ profitable wind ow in milk, YW, and carcass EPDs. Avoid putting too much emphasis on one trait. Nearly all breeds now have dollar index values that help put economics to trait selection. These can be continued on page 64 >>

Williams

CATTLE COMPANY

Nice selection of registered Brahman Bull & Heifer calves. Various ages, exceptional bloodlines, stocky, lots of bone and natural muscling, beefy, gentle grays available by private treaty this coming Spring. marywcc@msn.com 16543 West Victory St. • Goodyear, AZ 85338

CEL. 602/809-5167

623/932-0809

NMBVM Certified in Pregnancy / Diagnosis & Artificial Insemination Reg. & Comm. Bulls, Replacement Heifers, & Bred Heifers

FOR SALE

Available by Private Treaty We now have Bulls & Heifers PAP tested @ 7,600 ft.

CONSIGNING TO THE NMAA/NMHA SALE & TUCUMCARI FEED EFFICIENCY TEST Miguel Salazar, Española, NM Salazar_ranches@yahoo.com 505/929-0334 • 505/747-8858 DECEMBER 2016

63


BBG

extremely effective tools if the index scenario matches your operation. Weaned Calf Value ($W) is a dollar value used by the Angus breed. It is an index that is designed for cattlemen that primarily sell calves at weaning. This index also assumes that replacement heifers are retained. EPDs for birth weight, weaning weight, milk, and mature cow size are focused on. Lower birth weights, heavier weaning weights, and lower mature cow size are desirable. Milk production is weighted both positively and negatively as it directly impacts calf weaning weights, but also increases cow maintenance requirements. A more detailed description of economic selection indexes is available on my blog

BULLS FOR SALE At Private Treaty Sheldon Wilson • 575/451-7469

cell: 580-651-6000 – leave message

D

J

JIMBAR NMAA Sale

Angus Cattle Available

March 4, 2017 Roswell, N.M.

JIM & BARBARA SMITH • 575-760-4779 P.O. BOX 397, MELROSE, NEW MEXICO 88124

GREER anch R

Since 1904

— 4th Generation Cattleman —

BLACK ANGUS

“High-Altitude, Low Pap” JIM GREER • 970-749-6393 8097 C.R. 100 • Hesperus, CO 81326

Greer & Winston 

Cattle Co 

Reg. Limousin & Lim Flex Comm. Angus/ Limo Cross

FOR SALE Jim Greer or Dave Winston 575/536-3730 • 575/534-7678 575/536-3636 • 575/644-3066 P.O. Box 700, Mimbres, NM 88049

64

DECEMBER 2016

<< continued from page 63

ЇЇ

Don’t be fooled by index names. Beef Value ($B) is a terminal index. It is a great tool for cattlemen that are not keeping replacements. This index will increase profitability of cattle in the feedlot and on the grid. Unfortunately, I have heard $B referred to as a comprehensive EPD several times which it is not. It is vital to understand that $B is a terminal index. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. The breeder or an Extension specialist will be able to help explain the numbers.

CLIMATE

<< continued from page 38

change, as reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Research conducted by Pelletier and Rasmussen in 2010 also shows there is an advantage for grass-finished beef production compared to grain-finished beef production when expressing feed conversion as human-edible energy returned per unit of human-edible energy consumed by the cattle. “Accounting for carbon sequestration could lower the carbon footprint of grass-finished beef by 42 percent,” Place said. “In contrast, approximately 18 percent of feed intake per unit of carcass weight will occur in the feedlot for grain-finished cattle.”

ЇЇ

Demand higher accuracy for traits. Technologies are available for seedstock producers to increase the accuracy of EPDs on yearling bulls. Genomic-enhanced EPDs result in less risk, less change, and more predictability in how a yearling bull will sire. A bull buyer can feel more confident now than ever in EPDs when they are backed by genomic testing.

ЇЇ

Heterosis. Crossbreeding systems are hard to deploy and maintain in small herds. However, leaving hybrid vigor on the table in a commercial herd is a big loss. Otherwise lowly heritable traits like reproduction, health, and cow longevity are best improved by crossbreeding. Crossbred cows and maternal heterosis is a key to profitability on commercial cow/calf operations. Studies have shown net profit per cow is increased by $75/cow/year as a result of maternal heterosis.

ЇЇ

Buy the right size, type, and demand quality. I would compare this to buying a car or truck. If you have little money for gas (feed), then don’t buy a gas (feed) guzzler. Buy a bull that fits your cow herd. Your cows will tell you the right size and milk production for your management. If they come up open … they are not the right size. Now,

The bottom line is this: Beef cattle producers using either system can sustainably meet consumer demand for beef. “It is human nature to discuss and even debate topics about which we are passionate, and to have some sort of ‘winner,’ ” Rusk said. “OSU’s land-grant university mission is to determine and disseminate researchbased factual information so people are better informed and can make knowledgeable decisions about issues and concerns of importance to them, their families and their communities, even in instances where there is no clear winner.” Cattle and calves account for approximately half of agricultural cash receipts in Oklahoma, according to USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service data.     


you also want a bull that is the right type. You don’t buy a fancy sports car for a work vehicle do you? So why buy a fancy, sexy bull to produce working kind cattle? To me there is a difference in fancy and quality. I suggest you demand quality. Select a product that will last and hold value. Look for signs that the breeder stands behind their product. That is a good sign of quality. ЇЇ

Seek value when buying a bull. The lowest priced bull is seldom the best valued. If you find a bull that has the traits you are looking for … buy him. Set a budget, but understand it is often hard to find everything you are looking for. Bulls with the traits you are seeking can add value to your cattle in a hurry. They can add far more value than a cow. The bull you buy this year will impact your herd for the next five years with his calves, but his daughters will impact your herd for the next 20 years. Make a good investment. Buy a bull that adds value to your calves and your cowherd.     

KEN & SUZANNE COLEMAN 1271 County Rd. 115 Visitors Always Welcome Westcliffe, CO 81252-9611 Home 719/783-9324 www.colemanherefords.com

SouthweSt Red AnguS ASSociAtion Ranch Tested - Rancher Trusted For contact information on a Breeder near you call:

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O

RED ANGUS

Bulls & Replacement Heifers 575-318-4086 2022 N. Turner, Hobbs, NM 88240

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DECEMBER 2016

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JINGLE JANGLE

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ew Mexico CowBelles was established in 1957 when Pat Nowlin moved to New Mexico from Arizona, where CowBelles was originally founded. In Arizona, it started as a social club for wives and daughters of ranchers, or women who had their own brand and cattle. Now, our members are actively involved in spreading awareness about BEEF production, influencing legislation and supporting the BEEF industry. There are 21 chapters of New Mexico CowBelles split into four different districts based on location. Many of the chapters help in their local counties and often set up displays at county fairs”. That is how our website, in a short version, explains CowBelles. We are so much more. We are ranchers’ wives, school bus drivers, nurses, teachers, business owners,

68

DECEMBER 2016

public servants, insurance agents, adminis- and your support and as we move towards trative assistants, the list goes on. 2017 my challenge to all is to seek innovaRegardless of what capacity we serve we all tive ways to promote Beef and increase our share a common interest and that is a membership. May 2017 be the best ever! passion for Beef and the agricultural way of life. “There are no great limits to growth We love to promote Beef. Be it with Beef because there are no limits of human license plates, sharing our ranching story or intelligence, imagination, and wonder”. speaking to urban families about Beef and – Ronald Reagan      educating on how Beef is safe and nutritional and affordable. The regular meeting of the ChuckI have enjoyed being your President and Wagon CowBelles’ was held on November I have learned so much. New Mexico Cow- 8th, 2016 at the Mountainair Christian Belles is a great group of ladies, each with Center. The meeting was called to order at strengths that make CowBelles stronger 10:30 am by President Lyn Greene. Welcome and a passion to make our organization Guests: Trinnie Chilton and LuJean Stone even better. Both became new members – Welcome! Thank you to all our members, thank you Roll Call was held with 14 members attendfor your ideas, your passion, your guidance ing. Minutes and Treasurer Reports


approved. Membership report: $60.00 for Meeting December 2nd & 3rd 2016 – Albudonation bucket and total $477. Tommie querque Crowne Plaza. $25 to state ordered checks. It was decided to pay treasurer for breakfast meeting on Saturday, ANCW Associate membership and to order Dec 3rd. Kids, Kows and More will happen $250 of the RADA for sales. Unfinished Busi- in May. From the October meeting: Report ness: Mountainair Rodeo Banner will be up on 5-States Round Up by Carolyn said they next spring. New Busiwere the best proness: Rep or t on grams ever. NCBA I have enjoyed being Valencia 4-H Pumpkin President, Tracy Patch and Galloping Brunner, Cat tle your President and Grace Youth Ranch mens Beef Board Pumpkin Patch. Lyn & executive, Barbara I have learned so much. Carolyn worked at Jacques, and Sue b oth an d Cin d y Krentz enlightened New Mexico CowBelles worked the Pumpkin group with good Patch which gave out informative prois a great group of ladies, recipes and free grams about the things to kids. Lyn global economy, each with strengths that gave a plea for ANCW the Beef Check-off, membership dues. and border probmake CowBelles stronger Program: Danielle lems . Pro gram: Berrien – Torrance John Garlish, Bernaand a passion to make our County Extension: lillo County “Gluten Free Cooking”. Extension Horticulorganization even better. December Program: turalist gave us all 5:00 pm Monday, information about December 12 at Pete’s Restaurant in Belen our house plants. Turns out we were all followed by viewing the Christmas lights at treating our plants badly. Welda McKinley the Harvey House Museum. Please NOTE Grider the date has been changed. Annual State The Copper CowBelles had their annual

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meeting on October 25 which opened with the Pledge of Allegiance led by President Kim Clark, the CowBelle Creed read by Rosella Escobedo DeBusk and the Prayer read by Joan Woodward. The minutes were tabled for corrections and the Treasurer Report was accepted for review. Reports were made by committee chairs for the yearbook, cookbook sales, annual Shindig, county fair and scholarship fund. Under new business, it was decided to approve the proposed by-laws and policy changes as published in the September newsletter where the 2nd vice president position was thereby removed from the slate of officers. The slate of officers for 2017 was then approved. The President will be Pat Hunt, Vice President, Judy O’Loughlin, Secretary, Rosella Escobedo DeBusk and Treasurer, Beverly Medford with Kim Clark remaining on the Board as Past President. Linda Pecotte will attend Executive Board meetings as the member-at-large and will prepare the newsletter. It was approved to update the signatures on the First NM Bank checking accounts with Pat Hunt and Bev Medford authorized to conduct financial business for the group. The Christmas luncheon and installation of officers will be on December 13. The meetings in 2017 will be

Office & Mill: P.O. Box 370 Las Vegas, NM 87001 505/425-6775

DECEMBER 2016

69


held on the 3rd Tuesdays with no meetings scheduled in January, July and November. Copper will participate with the Grant County Extension Service in a booth at the December 3rd annual Tamal Fiesta y Mas in downtown Silver City where beef posole samples will be handed out. Cookbooks, napkins and license plates will be sold as well as raffle tickets for the scholarship bucket. Submitted by Patricia Hunt The Chamiza CowBelles’ November 3, 2016 meeting was brought to order at 12 noon by President Nancy Phelps in Johnny

B’s Restaurant in TorC with 13 members present. Cathy recited the Cowbelle Prayer and Creed followed by the Pledge. Minutes from the previous meeting were approved. Treasurer’s report was approved as presented. OLD BUSINESS: Kristie Wear made certain the Boys & Girls Club had the correct graphics for the mural. Nancy thanked Sherry for her assistance in tallying the volunteer hours and Cathy for helping with the annual activity report. NEW BUSINESS: Nancy plans to attend the upcoming Joint Stockmen’s and NMCB Board of Directors’

and General Membership Meetings to be held December 1 through 4 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Albuquerque. An inventory was taken of marketable items. Nancy will order more license plates and brand napkins. Because several people have asked for different colors of brand throws other than what we have on hand, and because we are getting low on the brown color, we decided to order 50 more brown throws as well as 25 in blue and 25 in red. Cathy will take care of ordering the additional throws. Nancy acknowledged the need for the local to donate to the Pat Nowlin Scholarship Fund. Nancy also requested volunteers for Promotion, Legislative, and Education in our local. No decisions were made at this time. Next meeting will be held December 1st at the home of Jodell Downs. This will be a potluck, and Sherry volunteered to make beef stew. Bring a side dish or dessert. In lieu of a gift exchange, bring non perishable food items and/or donate money to the local food pantry. Meeting adjourned at 12:55 p.m. with a motion made by Sherry and seconded by Robbie. The newest member, Ashley Boggs, won the door prize! Cathy Pierce Powderhorn Cattlewomen met at the DeBaca County Extension office with Kari Henry and Aspen Achen co-hostesses. Eight members with three guests were present. We are continuing our discussion on establishing a billboard on I-40 near Clines Corner and we have contacted NM Beef Council about a ‘wrap” and also a producer with the availability of land. Several suggestions have been made on the design of wrap we want promoting Beef and we will decide at future meeting. We will be participating in the Winterfest held on Dec 3 at the multiple purpose room at Ft. Sumner High School in conjunction with the 4-H Club. We will be handing out Beef Brochures. Officers that are serving for 2016 will continue to serve in 2017 with the exception of Treasurer. Officers will include Kelsey McCollum, president, Kari Henry, Vice President and Joan Key Secretary. Christmas party will be held at the home of Nick and Karen Cortese on Dec 8 with an ornament exchange. MERRY CHRISTMAS to everyone. May God continue His blessings on you and your family. Joan Key New Mexico CowBelles: Thank you to all who have submitted their news to Jingle Jangle. Please send minutes and/or newsletters to: Jingle Jangle, Janet Witte, 1860 Foxboro Ct., Las Cruces, NM 88007 or email: janetwitte@msn.com the 14th of each month.     

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New Weapon Deployed in Battle to Stop Deer Screwworm Outbreak by Jenny Staletovich, Miami Herald

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ildlife officials racing to protect endangered Key deer from a grisly outbreak of screwworm flies have added a new weapon to their arsenal: a medication pit stop. The stations are being deployed in the Florida’s National Key Deer Refuge’s backcountry to treat more reclusive deer and, like the deer, are a miniature version of a method used to successfully treat domestic livestock. The stations — feeding troughs baited with sweet corn, oats and other grains and rimmed with rollers coated with an anti-parasitic — should add another layer of protection to the endangered herd which now numbers about a thousand. Since August, 130 deer have died after being infected with the screwworm larva,

which burrow into wounds to feed on flesh. have been confirmed, with entomologists While deer continue to die, officials continuously monitoring traps to calibrate believe the numbers might be leveling off. releases. Female screwworm flies only mate Recently the number held steady at 127 for once, so entomologists predict populations several says before creeping up after two should begin to drop nine to 12 weeks after infec ted male releases, Davis said. deer were discovThe medication staered in a more tions were added to Feeding troughs baited remote part of the reach wilder deer that refuge. won’t eat medicated with sweet corn, oats “What we bread being fed to expect epidemioand other grains and rimmed tame deer that hang logically is to have out in neighborhoods a c u r ve t h at near the refuge. So far, with rollers coated with an almost looks like a nearly 1,700 doses bell curve,” said have been distributed. anti-parasitic should add Joanna Davis, a Combined with fly spokeswoman for releases, Gentry said another layer of protection the U.S. Departofficials hope treatment of ment methods have to the endangered herd ...” Agriculture. “So helped ease the worst it’s kind of following the path that’s of the outbreak. In the past few days, she expected.” said, a resident also reported seeing The USDA in mid-October also began wounds on a treated deer start to improve. releasing hoards of sterile male screw“So that’s very promising, at least for that worms — about 6 million larvae weekly one individual,” she said. “And when you’re — to wipe out the wild flies. The flies are looking at endangered species, every indibeing released at 25 different sites on 10 vidual counts.”      islands where screwworms or infected deer

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Land Lover

Natural resources attorney Tom Paterson wrangles cattle—and government agencies—to manage his ranch and environs by Marc Ramirez, Article first published in Texas Super Lawyers Magazine www.superlawyers.com/texas/article/land-lover/f29b2f03-09aa-4fd1-8263-05a33984ed83.html

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om Paterson had just put 400 head of cattle on his land south of Luna, New Mexico, when Arizona’s largest-ever wildfire crossed the border and took a turn toward his ranch. He awoke to the smell of smoke, the sight of tanker trucks hosing water on the rooftops of his property, and the challenge of moving cattle to safety. The job required driving the cattle to safe pasture land. Once there, Paterson gathered the herd together. “I put some hay on the back of my four-wheeler and they followed me,” he says. “Sort of like the Pied Piper.” For Paterson, it was just part of the job. That is, the second job. The first one involves practicing energy and natural resources litigation at Houston’s Susman Godfrey. The 30-year partner intersperses calf-weaning and bull-cutting with courtroom argu-

ments and client meetings. Paterson also helped First Presbyterian More than most, Paterson is keenly Church of Houston rebuff the national Presaware of his surroundings, especially the byterian Church’s efforts to claim interest environmental forces faced at Spur Ranch, in the Texas church’s museum district his cattle operation in western New Mexico. property. He’s been recognized for his conservation Paterson has a lifelong connection to efforts, and his measures to the land. As a boy, he spent protect his operation during summers and weekends at his the massive 2011 wildfire parents’ small ranch. “Nothing may have aided other ranchglamorous,” he says. “No elecers as well. tricity or running water, and we Born in Morenci, Arizona, had an outhouse. It was just all Paterson moved as a boy to work.” But the life got into his another mining-focused blood, so in 1997, when proptown, Silver City, New erty became available in Catron Mexico. He studied agriculCounty, on New Mexico’s tural economics at Texas central western border, he A&M, then earned a law went for it. degree and a master’s and Spur Ranch is prone to Thomas W. Paterson Ph.D. in agricultural eco- Energy & Natural Resources erosion, and Paterson’s biggest nomics from the University challenge was a tributary of the of Wisconsin-Madison, before starting at his San Francisco River that, over time, had current firm in 1985. carved a gully through the property 25 feet He represents both plaintiffs and defen- deep and 125 feet wide. He worked with dants, mostly in oil and gas law. His cases local, state and federal government ageninclude contract disputes, fraud and anti- cies to work out a solution: two major dam trust claims. His first big case: helping projects to combat the erosion, with a Unocal thwart billionaire T. Boone Pickens’ series of retention structures that pull sedtakeover attempt; it ended with a settle- iment from within the channel and deposit ment and Pickens dropping his bid. it further upstream, raising creek levels over time. “We’ll never completely reverse the erosion,” he said, “but we’re going to restore it to a level where even in big floods, it will williamswindmill stay inside the channel.” @live.com The $500,000 projects, funded by Paterson and a mix of federal, state, local and private entities, took five years to pull off— lightning speed, by some accounts. The work was groundbreaking in more than the literal sense: In the process, Paterson Aermotor Windmills & Parts received a Safe Harbor Agreement for Spur Ranch, a unique partnership with federal Sun Pump & Grundfos Solar Pumps agencies in 2002 that secured both his land Photovoltaic Panels and Trackers ownership and the protected animal life Webtrol Pumps & Water Systems whose existence his conservation efforts Water Tanks & Septic Systems would promote. Federal authorities usually forbid use of lands supporting protected Complete Line of Plumbing Supplies species, but since Paterson’s efforts to Fencing Supplies improve his land would draw some of those 12VDC Stock Tank Bubbler De-Icers species to the area, the agreement made Structural Pipe & Steel sure both parties benefited. Poly, PVC & Galvanized Pipe “Normally, if you would go in and do a conservation project on a property that had Welding Supplies and Gas the effect of making it a habitat for endanPortable Corral Panels & Gates gered species, they would tell you that you Stock Tank Floats & Valves can’t use it anymore,” he said. “What kind NRCS NSF Approved Poly Storage of incentive is that?” Tanks In addition to fighting the effects of erosion, the dams transformed a barren Rubber Tire Troughs gully with virtually no habitat to a grassy meadow supporting insects, birds, elk and

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other wildlife. As a result, in 2003 he was “When you’ve been living with a fire for that of my playbook to make happen,” Paterson named Conservation Rancher of the Year long—when you’ve seen the plumes and reflects. “The good thing about being a for Southwestern New Mexico by the San the cattle and see everything you’ve lawyer is that it teaches you to frame a Francisco Soil and Water Conservation Dis- worked hard for about to go up in flames— problem, form an objective, recognize the trict. Howard Hutchinson, chairman of the it can be pretty emotional,” he says. constraints and push it through. It’s all district, says the award wasn’t sufficient to The fire would end up torching about about resolving problems. And this will mark Paterson’s achievement. “He really 30,000 acres of Spur Ranch and 50 miles of have a tremendous impact on our use of resources.” deserved a much higher honor than a fence. Looking back, it’s the agreement he Says Hutchinson, “Not only did it benefit plaque and ‘congratulations,’” Hutchinson says. “We now have marshlands, and ripar- forged with official entities that makes him his operation and the surrounding environian species occupying the area.” proudest. The Spur Ranch Safe Harbor pact ment, but it has become an example, to say He praises Paterson for wrangling a coa- also set the stage for further environmental this is what can be done. Hopefully we can lition of organizations and government projects on Paterson’s land addressing envi- expand this model all over the U.S., wheragencies, including the conservation dis- ronmental effects that stretched back ever erosion is occurring.”      trict, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and generations—projects federal agencies Wildlife Service, and U.S. Army Corps of couldn’t afford to Engineers. “It’s just a tribute to his negoti- take up on their ating skills and his tenacity,” he says. own, such as thinPaterson and his family started raising ning out ponderosa cattle on the ranch in 2008, adding a second p i n e l a n d s l e f t property for grazing—partly in southern unchecked by the New Mexico and partly in Arizona—four logging industry’s years later. They raise calves born in the fall decline. through the state’s cold winters, readying “ T hat proje c t them for spring sale, and move the animals took every play out between the properties seasonally. The operation now includes 500 head of cattle on 125,000 acres. The 2011 wildfire, called Wallow Fire, was sparked during Memorial Day weekend. It Tom Paterson leading cattle away from smoke during Wallow Fire would eventually scorch over 800 square miles of land and force the evacuation of nearly 6,000 people. In Houston, Paterson, wife Callie and daughters Lindsay and Caroline were set to vacation in Europe, and initial reports indiwww.fivestateslivestockauction.com cated the fire would miss the ranch, so they Box 266, packed their bags. “I hadn’t been to bed Clayton, NM 88415 Active buyers on all classes of cattle. Stocker two minutes when I got word that the fire SALE BARN: demand within excellent wheat pasture and had turned and headed toward our 400 575/374-2505 head,” Paterson says. Kenny Dellinger, Mgr., grass demand. Supporters of vaccination Paterson dashed to the ranch. Forest program of your choice. Four active packer 575/207-7761 Service officials offered Paterson a site for buyers, supported by area feedlots on these Watts Line: his cattle two hours away, but that locafeeder cattle. Receiving station available. 1-800/438-5764 tion—in addition to the distance—posed a major wolf problem. Paterson argued to We are an active Sheep sale 2nd to last Wednesday every month! use a pasture a half-mile from the ranch, but supporter of local We believe that customers, large and small, should he and other ranchers in the region were 4H clubs and receive the highest quality service available. Our buyers stymied by federal regulations protecting several other and sellers are our biggest asset and we are dedicated to threatened and endangered wildlife on that student activities. land. With intervention from Caren Cowan, serving your needs. Our top priority is to get you the Not only do we executive director of the state’s Cattle best possible price for your cattle. In operation since the contribute to the Growers’ Association, the Forest Service youth but also to 1950s and sold to the current owners who held their first relented. Paterson also briefed New Mexico the local economy sale in January 1990, Kenny Dellinger has managed the as 90% of the supGov. Susana Martinez on the situation, and sale barn and served the community since that first sale plies and services “she made it be known that she expected more than 25 years ago. are contracted. the Forest Service to work with all the ranchers,” he says. Paterson and his crews quickly forced the cattle toward the temporary pasture. It WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS! wasn’t pretty; some cows died from the stress. Those days were nerve-wracking.

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2nd Place JUDGES HAD A HARD TIME SELECTING from all the great photos that were submitted by the youngsters ages 18 and under who entered the contest sponsored by the New Mexico Livestock Board and the New Mexico Wool Growers, Inc. from August to early October. FIRST PRIZE INCLUDED a $100 Tractor Supply gift card, and the winning photograph featured in the New Mexico Stockman magazine. Pictures had to be of sheep and goats, any breed or number, and contestants could enter all the pictures they wanted.

Congratulations Happy Sheep Photo Contest Winners! The contest was designed to develop a photo file that displays New Mexico raised sheep in our environment and creates youth awareness about scrapie eradication. Photos will be used in future scrapie outreach programs as well as other sheep promotions.

3rd Place

st Place 174 DECEMBER 2016

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NEW MEXICO’S OLD TIMES & OLD TIMERS by Don Bullis, New Mexico Author DonBullis.biz

The Treasure of Victorio Peak

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ictoria Peak is located in Doña Ana Mountains.” One source wrote that he reportedly County, in the San Andreas MounThe problem with this tale is that histo- “amassed a fortune of gold, silver treasure tains. It is not a particularly striking rians generally agree that the Coronado and jewels” before being ordered to land feature, but it is noted for the treasure expedition found no mineral wealth at all Mexico City in 1607. Again, no documenit is alleged to contain. in New Mexico; that his entrada was con- tation. It should also be noted that Oñate There are a plethora of legends about sidered a failure for just that reason. resigned as New Mexico’s first colonial the treasure. Moreover, the several routes traversed by governor and therefore returned to According to one source, mining activ- Coronado and his subordinates in 1540- Mexico City voluntarily. ity in the area around the peak dates back 1542 do not go anywhere near the San Another bit of lore holds that a French to Francisco Vásquez de Coronado and his Andres Mountains of south-central New Catholic priest named Felipe La Rue (or La exploration of New Mexico in 1540-1542. Mexico. The author offers no documentary Rux or even La Crux), exiled to Mexico for He wrote, “Historical documentation, support for his assertions. One modern insubordination to his superiors, fled along with abundant artifactual evidence, historian of Coronado’s exploration flatly north to New Mexico sometime in the late has revealed that this region was visited stated that “…no one in the expedition 18th century and ultimately not only disby the followers of the Spanish explorer. It prospected for precious metals….” covered the gold in the San Andreas is also known that Coronado’s miners Another tale is that the treasure was Mountains, but opened a mine and set up explored for and found gold and silver in placed there by Juan de Oñate, New Mex- a smelter and produced numerous gold abundance in and near the San Andres ico’s colonizer, between 1598 and 1607. ingots which he stacked inside the mine.

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When ecclesiastical authorities in Mexico the Franklin Mountains which are virtually learned what La Rue was doing, they surrounded by the city of El Paso, Texas, declared that the gold belonged to the and not in the San Andreas Mountains of church, except for the one fifth that went New Mexico. to the king, and they set about recovering Yet another tale is that famed Apache it. When La Rue learned that armed troops Chief Victorio raided far and wide and hid were coming, he the treasure he stole hid the mine from prospectors, op ening and wayfarers, settlers, One story alleges that vowed never to and the like. One admit the exisstory alleges that the nuggets and ore he tence of the gold, the nuggets and ore and he swore all he hid in the peak hid in the peak which bears members of his which bears his group to the his name would require sixty name would require same silence. La sixty or so mules to Rue, it is said, carry it out. No or so mules to carry it out.” died while being records support the tortured, as did theft of this vast several of his followers but “not a single amount of mineral wealth. one revealed the location of the mine and Among the treasure hunters who pried the accumulated gold.” into Victorio Peak, Milton “Doc” Noss is This is the tale of the Lost Padre Mine probably the best known. He alleged that and it does not appear to be have histori- there were at least 350 gold bars—perhaps cal support, either. There are those, too, as many as 16,000 of them—in a cave in who claim that the Lost Padre Mine is in the mountain. No one has been able to

find his treasure, however, and even he was not able to return to it. Most observers of the day consider Noss to be a charlatan who used his so-called discovery to bilk the unwary into investing in his efforts to recover the treasure. One of them, Charles Ryan, shot and killed Noss on the street in Hatch, New Mexico in 1949. Ryan was acquitted of murder on the basis of self-defense. Doc had $2.16 in his pocket at the time of his death. Victorio Peak is now within the limits of the White Sand Missile Range and therefore not open to the public. Sources: Kit Carson, “Fabulous Treasure at Victoria Peak,” Real West, January 1964 W. C. Jameson, New Mexico Treasure Tails Las Cruces Sun News, March 7, 8, 10, 11, May 26, 1949 Melzer, Buried Treasures Schweidel & Boswell, What Men Call Treasure Thompson, Lost Treasures on the Old Spanish Trail     

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or perpetuate the toxic myths that sus- Earth Guardians, in a statement. “It is tained it.” entirely possible there will be threats or “This is an extremely disturbing verdict intimidations from militants that believe for anyone who cares about America’s such actions are justified by this verdict.” by Frank Dubois public lands, the rights of native people and That’s just a few of the milder reactions. their heritage, and a political system that I can’t read them without grinning. refuses to be bullied by violence and The Bundys were there because of racism,” said Kierán Suckling, the Center for federal overreach in the Hammond case Biological Diversity’s executive director. and the Bundys were found not guilty as a We’re talking Bundy jumping, Trump “The Bundy clan and their followers peddle result of overreach by the federal thumping and Monument molesting a dangerous brand of radicalism aimed at prosecutor. taking over lands owned by all of us. I worry this verdict only emboldens the kind of intimidation and right-wing violence that hile most of the media and D.C. underpins their movement.” “The FBI’s alk about your double-whammy. Not Deep Thinkers have been reacting treatment of the Bundy militia as Boy Scouts long after the Bundys were found not to Donald Trump’s surprising elec- for 41 days hobbled the prosecution…”, guilty one Donald Trump was elected toral victory, I’ve been having fun Suckling said. President. The same Trump who said he monitoring the left-enviro reaction to the “We are deeply disappointed in today’s would pull the U.S. out of the Paris agreesurprising not guilty verdict in the Bundy verdict, which puts our park rangers and ment on global warming, revoke the Oregon case. That particular decision has scientists at further risk just for doing their “waters of the U.S.” rule and bring back the generated such headlines as “The Bundy jobs,” Jennifer Rokala, executive director of coal industry. The enviros aren’t happy. Typical of their Acquittal Is Dangerous” and “A Shocking the Center for Western Priorities, said in a Outcome”. statement. “The outcome of today’s trial will reaction are these statements by Heather Let me give you a flavor of what has undoubtedly embolden extremist groups.” Leibowitz, Director of Environment New been said. “I fear this ruling will embolden other York. Dan Ashe, Director of the U.S. Fish and militants to use the threat of violence and I “At a time when children are being poiWildlife Service, said his agency “must send worry for the safety of employees at our soned by lead in their drinking water and a strong message of deterrence to those public land- management agencies,” said sewage and manure pollute our rivers, we who would seek to replicate the occupation John Horning, executive director of Wild- need to strengthen our clean water protections and invest in clean water infrastructure.” “At a time when sea levels are rising, temperature records are being smashed, and extreme weather events threaten Americans across the country, we need to rapidly shift to 100 percent renewable energy and away from dirty fossil fuels.” The “The American people did not vote for TheDepartment DepartmentofofAnimal Animal&&Range RangeSciences Sciencesisispart partofofthe the College dirty air, dirty water or the destruction of CollegeofofAgricultural, Agricultural,Consumer Consumer&&Environmental EnvironmentalSciences Sciences our precious lands and wildlife…” Four on-campus animal facilities house: Yes, Trump’s election will mean children beeF CaTTle/horses/swine/sheep are poisoned and our lands and wildlife will Students can major in Animal or Rangeland Resources and are provided with the very be destroyed. NEW MEXICO FEDERAL LANDS NEWS

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The Department also offers pre-veterinary studies – our graduates have a high acceptance rate into veterinary medicine programs. We offer graduate degrees at the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy levels. The M.S. or Ph.D. in Animal Science can emphasize nutrition or physiology, and offers a Ph.D. in Range Science to study range management, range ecology and watershed management.

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in the New Mexico Stockman. Call: 505/243-9515.


Time out for a good guffaw. Can the President actually revoke or On a more serious note, the enviros are revise a National Monument? It’s my underpreparing for battle. They are planning an standing this has never been litigated. We aggressive effort in the federal courts to do have a 1938 opinion by the U.S. Attorney defeat any of Trumps deregulation General. That opinion says the Antiquities proposals. Act grants the President the authority to “We will be full-blast in the courts to resist proclaim a National Monument, but the Act undermining any of our fundamental envi- “does not…authorize the President to ronmental laws where progress has been abolish national monuments...” However, made through executive branch actions on the opinion also says the President has the environment,” vowed Trip Van Noppen, diminished the size of monuments under president of the law firm Earthjustice. that part of the act which provides that the They do face one problem: So many of limits of the monuments “in all cases shall Obama’s environmental initiatives were be confined to the smallest area compatible implemented by Executive Orders or similar type actions and they will be vulnerable to executive action by Trump. The Imperial Presidency, those “stroke of the pen” actions may come back to haunt them. And yes, I can’t keep from smiling as I write this.

with the care and management of the objects to be protected…” He can’t revoke but he can diminish. Sounds very much like what Rep. Pearce is proposing. And I’m still grinning. Till next time, be a nuisance to the devil and don’t forget to check that cinch. Frank DuBois was the NM Secretary of Agriculture from 1988 to 2003, is the author of a blog: The Westerner (www.thewesterner.blogspot.com) and is the founder of The DuBois Rodeo Scholarship and The DuBois Western Heritage Foundation     

Monument molesting

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ep. Rob Bishop, Chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, has suggested that Trump should revoke many of the monuments proclaimed by Obama. The reaction has been quick. U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich says of any attempted roll backs, “they’re going to have to do it over my dead body.” Senator Udall and Rep. Lujan joined Heinrich in condemning the idea. Rep. Steve Pearce, however, says, “The Antiquities Act requires that a President

Can the President actually revoke

or revise a National

Monument? It’s my understanding this has never been litigated.

designate the smallest possible footprint in order to achieve the desired environmental preservation. American’s have witnessed the Obama Administration disregard that part of the law.” Pearce is calling on Trump to review the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks and other designations to reduce their footprint “to an acreage supported by existing federal law.” DECEMBER 2016

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THE EDGE OF COMMON SENSE by Baxter Black, BaxterBlack.com

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isit any café or machine shop in any small town in rural America. The first topic of conversation is the weather. It has to be discussed, cussed, praised and pounded thoroughly before any other subject is taken up. It is followed by the market; the price of soybeans, grain, cattle, hogs or the price of tea in China. Then, usually politics, sports and local gossip. I’ve been in a million of these conversations. Everyone has an opinion and we’re quite willing to share it. It takes a little time to hear everybody out but it’s worth it as long as we can get in our two cents worth. But I’ve noticed that

Coffee Shop Experts in Small Towns farmers and ranchers are a little like vets and lawyers when we get down to talkin’ about our own business. Or talkin’ about parting with some of our own money. It’s harder to get a straight answer. Suddenly our opinions are built on shifting sand. “Doc, will this medicine work as well as you said at the meeting?” “Uh, it should help.” Or: “Henry, you always said you believed in worming your stock.” “Yeah, but I didn’t know it cost that much.” Strangely enough, when we’re dis-

cussing the neighbor’s problems in the comfort of the coffee shop, there’s no lack of helpful opinions forthcoming. Or when outlining some new wonder drug at the county cattlemen’s meeting, we speak with evangelistic conviction. But when we get down to makin’ the decisions involving our own operation, our confidence gets weak in the knees. It’s easy to be an expert if you don’t have to stay and clean up the mess. Anyone can make recommendations if you don’t have to be responsible for the results. College professors, columnists and show ring judges start a lot of things other people have to finish. But nobody is better at givin’ advice than a bunch of fellers sittin’ around a table drinkin’ coffee. We have opinions on how the neighbor should work his cows, how the president should run the country, how the widow should raise her kids and how the coach should handle the team. Yep, we have all the answers. Too bad no one ever asks us.     

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Myers Family Donates Santa Gertrudis Bull Statue to Texas A&M University

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ark and Karen Myers of Myers Cattle and Land Corporation have donated a large bronze statue to Texas A&M University in honor of Carroll D. Myers. The statue of the Santa Gertrudis bull is displayed at the west entrance of the newly opened Veterinary and Biomedical Education Complex, which is part of the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences. The statue, which measures 9 feet tall by 9 feet long, was installed Nov. 4, and was ready for the grand opening of the $120 million state-ofthe-art facility Nov. 11. Mark Myers says the statue represents the spirit of the Running M Ranch and Myers Cattle and Land. “It is strong, tough and muscular, with a fierce and determined look. It is competitive and relentless in its pursuits, yet kind and tender hearted,”

Myers explains. “It is positioned as if that it wanted, as they serve the entire approaching the top of a mountain crest, animal kingdom, so in that vein it is incredlooking down and over its offspring that ibly important that they selected a bovine, will follow over the years.” and specifically a Santa Gertrudis bull,” Texas artist Payne Lara designed and Myers says. created the 1,800 pound golden bronze John Ford, executive director of Santa statue with input from Mark Myers, in honor Gertrudis Breeders International (SGBI), is of his father, Carroll D. Myers, and his 80th very pleased that the Santa Gertrudis breed birthday. is represented at the new facility. “Words “It has the Myers Cattle and Land do not describe the pride felt by members “Running M” branded on its left hip along of SGBI that the first breed developed in the with the numbers 830 over 33 signifying my United States and recognized by the U.S. father’s birthday, August 30, 1933, and rep- Department of Agriculture welcomes sturesenting all of the traits that he has left for dents and visitors to the College of all of us – such the name of the bull being Veterinary Medicine Complex,” Ford says. Legacy,” Myers says. “We recognize the science of animal agriculMyers says the statue is also dedicated ture is constantly evolving and are pleased to the students, faculty and staff of Texas that our breed is represented as a model for A&M University. “It is our hope that all who progress at a leading institution.” pass through the west entrance of the Ford is thankful for the Myers’ support impressive new college will look at this of the Santa Gertrudis breed. “I and all magnificent Santa Gertrudis bull and be members of SGBI are extremely appreciainspired to excel and lead in everything that tive of the support given by the Myers they do in the spirit of a great teacher, family to the association. Their devotion taking time to make sure all have an oppor- and dedication to promoting the breed tunity to learn,” Myers says. can’t be measured, and we as an association Having a statue of a Santa Gertrudis bull are grateful for all the family does to present at the new facility brings added strengthen the breed ’s industr y recognition for the breed. “This college presence.”      could have selected any species of animal

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Vera Evaline Mordasini Boyd, 87, Blanco, entered into eternal rest on November 10, 2016. Vera was born on January 5, 1929 to Antonio G. Mordasini (Crana, Switzerland) and Maud Nichols Mordasini (Kansas). Vera grew up on a dairy farm near Brawley, California. After graduating high school and starting nurses’ training, she met Richard Boyd of Peña Blanca, New Mexico. They were wed on October 26, 1946 and settled in his home state of New Mexico. They began their ranching career in the Valle Grande (Valles Caldera) working for Frank Bond & Sons, where Richard was the cattle foreman for 16 years. There was a short stint spent in Mexico with AFTOSA. Upon leaving the Valle, they moved on to various New Mexico ranches, Colorado, while rearing their four children – Toni, Linda, Richard, and Molly. After many years of hard work, leasing summer grass around Chama, and winter country near Los Lunas and Socorro, the couple was able to acquire their own ranches in the Largo Canyon and Chama, New Mexico, where they remained until retiring to Blanco, New Mexico. During the years at Chama, Vera worked at 1st National Bank of Rio Arriba, and for the Insurance Co. She was known for her excellent cooking, time and energy spent as 4-H leader, fund raisers for athletics, hauling kids everywhere, making sure there were music lessons, and her unfailing generosity and love for her family, friends, neighbors, and strangers in need. She is survived by her children, Richard A. Boyd (Barbara), Toni Boyd Broaddus, Linda Bierner, and Molly B. Manzanares (Antonio), 13 grandchildren, 27 great-grandchildren, and numerous nieces and nephews. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to NM Boys and Girls Ranch or Doctors Without Borders. John Osborne Magoffin, 86, Cochise Stronghold, passed away on November 5, 2016. He was born in Buffalo, New York on March 13, 1920, his life spanned a century of incredible change. His grandfather had a blacksmith shop, his father designed trucks for REO Speed Wagon, John flew in the B-24’s that helped win World War II, and later his son John Jr. would fly jet airliners. As a small boy John came to Arizona during the winters for his mother’s health. They continued on page 84 >>

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IN MEMORIAM << cont. from page 82

the Southwest to attend the University of Arizona. His plans changed though, when stayed on a guest ranch near Phoenix he had a chance to work on a ranch at where John became enchanted with the life Sasabe, AZ. Finding work in the great outof the cowboys. His mother’s death when doors more motivating than sitting in a John was 12 changed his life, but not his school room, he determined to learn everyintention to return to the West. His father thing he could about ranching by working and aunts hoped he would run the family for various outfits. This quest took him to business, a bookstore in Buffalo, but it was the CS ranch in northern New Mexico, and not to be. His education consisted of a other ranches near Trinidad, Colorado. John number of years in boarding schools, fol- hated the cold winters, so he returned to lowed by a short sojourn at Cornell where southern Arizona to work on the Rigg’s he intended to study Agriculture. World War ranch at Dos Cabezas, and later, the Merle II interrupted his plans and he enlisted in Roll ranch in the Pat Hills near Ash Creek. In the Army Air Corps in 1941. He was trained 1950 John married Mary Burnett – she had as a navigator and assigned to the 13th Air been working as a cowboy on a neighborForce, attaining the rank of 2nd Lt. during ing ranch. This fulfilled John’s hope of his tour of duty in the South Pacific. This finding a partner that shared his dream of experience left indelible memories of which owning a ranch. In 1952 John and Mary he was always eager to share. After his dis- purchased a ranch that included part of the charge from the service, John returned to Cochise Stronghold. Four children, Meg,

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John Jr., Molly, and Matt were born and reared there. Fifteen years later, John, Mary, and family moved to Guadalupe Canyon Ranch where they lived until 1989. Retirement took them back to the Stronghold to live near their daughter Molly. John was a dedicated community minded individual. He was a founding member of the Valley Telephone Cooperative, taking the Sulphur Springs Valley out of the crank phone/party line era into the new age of communications in the 1950s. He served on the Soil Conservation Board, Arizona Cattle Growers’ and Cochise Graham County Cattle Growers’ Associations. Cochise County Historical Society, Sulphur Springs Historical Society and the Arizona Historical Society. He was a member of the Southwest Pioneer Cowboy Association and had been inducted into the Willcox Cowboy Hall of Fame in 2005. A problem solver to the very end, John always had an idea or two to offer. A practical man that appreciated things that made life a little easier, but not too easy! He loved history and told many a good story about his journey and the changes he had seen. He was disappointed not to be on hand to know how the 2016 Presidential race ended. He did however, get to see the Cubs win the World Series! John is survived by his daughter, Meg, and her husband David Gilmore; son, John Magoffin Jr., and his wife Lori; daughter, Molly Hunt, and her husband Walter; and son, Matt Magoffin, and his wife Anna; four grandchildren and two great-granddaughters. Bobby (Robert H.) Romer , 71, Las Cruces, July passed away on October 21, 2016. Bobby was born July 4, 1945 in Memphis, Tennessee to James and Martha Romer. He moved to Holly, Colorado before his first birthday. He attended Holly Public Schools participating in FFA, football and wrestling. He was crowned Colorado State Wrestling Champion his junior year and finished fourth at state his senior year which earned him a wrestling scholarship at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK. After two years on the wrestling squad his interests turned to the Flying Aggies and rodeo. Bob loved to dance, Dr. Pepper, kids and rodeo. He was known as “The Bull Dancer”, a CB moniker that stuck. After getting started clowning during his college years Bob joined the RCA in 1968. He worked rodeos big and small from the East coast to the West Coast during his career including Prescott, AZ; El Paso, TX; Cheyenne, WY; Pendleton, OR; San Angelo, TX; Santa Fe, NM; Bonifay, FL: Kissimmee, FL; Jasper, TX; Odessa, TX; Burwell, NE; Cle-


Editorial Calendar

burne, TX; Colby, KS; Hawley, MN; Amarillo, Animas FFA Chapter. TX; and Garden City, KS. He was honored to Evelyn Agnes Fite, 98, Socorro, passed have been selected as a bullfighter to work away at her home on August 28, 2016 surthe PRCA NFR in Oklahoma City (1976); the rounded by her family and friends. Born Plan your r NIRA Finals (1977-1980); Canadian Rodeo Evelyn Agnes Galenzovsky on February 20, advertisinginfo JANUARY — Wildlife; Gelbvieh; the com g Finals (1978); Indian National Finals Rodeo 1918, Outlook, Saskatchewan to Herman year! Joint Stockmen’s Convention Results (1978-1982); National Oldtimers Rodeo and Emma (Brown). She married Dean Fite FEBRUARY — Beefmasters; Texas Longhorns Association Finals (1985-1986); and the on May 16, 1937. The owned and operated MARCH — Limousin; Santa Gertrudis Wrangler Bullfight Tour (1981-1982). Bob Fite Ranch. Evelyn knew the value of hard APRIL — Dairy also performed as a Barrelman. Bobby is work, honesty, integrity and commitment. MAY — News of the Day survived by his wife Terrie; daughters Chris- She never met a stranger and always had a JUNE — Sheepman of the Year tina (Israel) Jimenez, Las Cruces, NM and story to tell. Evelyn is survived by numerous JULY — Directory of Agriculture Velinda (Joshua) Gonzales, Topeka, KS; nieces and nephews. All those who had the AUGUST — The Horse Industry sisters and brother Barb (Larry) Duggan, privilege will be forever blessed because SEPTEMBER — Fairs Across Canyon, TX, Linda (Buz) Todd-Washington, of her.      the Southwest; Charolais Grand Junction, CO, Susie (Buck) McGee, OCTOBER — Hereford; New Mexico Montrose, CO and Don (Holly) Romer, Col- Editor’s Note: Email caren@aaalivestock.com. State Fair Results leyville, TX; five grandchildren; as well as Memorial donations may be sent to the Cattlegrowers’ NOVEMBER — Cattleman of the Year; Angus; Foundation, a 501(c)3, tax deductable charitable several nephews and nieces. Memorials Brangus; Red Angus foundation serving the rights of ranch families may be made to the St. Jude Children’s Hos- and educating citizens on governmental actions, DECEMBER — Bull Buyers Guide; pital, Memphis, TN and/or to the Justin policies and practices. Cattlegrowers Foundation, Inc., Joint Stockmen’s Convention Preview P.O. Box 7517, Albuquerque, NM 87194. The New Cowboy Crisis Fund, 101 Pro Rodeo Drive, Mexico Stockman runs memorials as a courtesy to If you would like to see your breed featured Colorado Springs, CO 80919. its readers. If families & friends would like to see more email caren@aaalivestock.com Edward Elbrock, 76, Animas, entered detail, verbatim pieces must be emailed to us, & may To Reserve Advertising Space eternal rest on October 27, 2016 in Tucson, be printed at 10¢ per word.      email chris@aaalivestock.com or Arizona following an ATV accident on his call Chris at 505.243.9515, ext. 28 ranch. Edward was born on February 13, 1940 in Lordsburg to Lewis and Retha Elbrock. His #1 profession was being a rancher. He was also a local businessman owning Elbrock Water Systems, Elbrock Drilling, Valley Mercantile and Valley Fuel Center. Edward offered much needed well, septic, and equipment services to Hidalgo County, all Southwest New Mexico, and Southeast Arizona for more than 40 years. He also made a trip to Tanzania to teach the Maasai people how to repair their earthen dams; to teach them conservation techniques. Edward was presently serving as president of the Columbus Electric Coop Board where he has served for 38 years. He also served on the Malpai Borderlands Group, Animas School Board for 14 years, Farm Services Agency Committee for 26 years, served on Hidalgo County Fair Board, member of the Hidalgo County Cattle Growers and member of the National and New Mexico Groundwater Associations. He also served under President George W. Bush on the Environmental Good Neighbor Board that addressed environmental problems along the Southern border. Edward is survived by his wife, Tricia Elbrock; daughter, Visit us at: www.3cfeeders.com Starla Freeman; sons, Bunch Swift, Travis Swift, and Trevor Espinosa; seven grandchildren; brother, Billy Ray Elbrock (Josephine) P.O. Box 144, Mill Creek, OK 74856 and sister Patsy Ann Malm and many nieces O: 580/384-3943 • After Hrs.: 580/618-1354 and nephews. In lieu of flowers family PATENT NO. 6263833 requests that memorial contributions be facebook.com/3C-Cattle-Feeders made to the Cotton City 4H Club or the

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RIDING HERD by Lee Pitts

A

Down to Earth

s a rodeo fan I’ll admit that when the PRCA crowned its “World Champions” I felt like something was missing. For starters, how about Trevor Brazille, the Tryans, Luke Branquinho and others of their cowboy ilk? Much has been made about the war between the PRCA and the ERA (Elite Rodeo Association) and I am less of a fan because of it. But I’ve found a new sport to take its place and if the PRCA and ERA don’t stop their quibbling, the new kid on the block could snatch their thunder and part of their fan base as well. Rodeo is supposedly the only national sport to have evolved from an industry, although one might argue that the chewing tobacco industry was invented by a bored right fielder during another long and dull Major League Baseball game. If you really want to see a sport that was mid-wifed by an industry try Ranch Rodeo. I’ve never ridden a bull or jumped off Gentleman to wrestle a steer to the ground but, like most ranchers, I’ve participated in Ranch Rodeo events like wild cow milking, team doctoring and bronc riding on a daily basis. Ranch Rodeo isn’t really new, the Working Ranch Cowboy’s Association held its 21st annual finals in Amarillo in November and it was a four day celebration of everything cowy, including traditional cowboy crafts like bit and spur making, horsehair hitching, cowboy poetry, cowboy concerts and traditional Dutch oven

cooking. Talk about a tailgate party, the chuck wagon was the original! I’m told motel rooms filled up as far away as Tucumcari. The roots of Ranch Rodeo are as old as the West itself and their tour schedule sounds like an atlas to the history of the West: Roswell, Encampment, Coffeyville, Medicine Lodge, Wichita Falls, Dalhart, and Roaring Springs. One of the qualifying Ranch Rodeos was held in Earth, Texas! You can’t get more down to earth than that. If the rodeo sites sound familiar, so do the names of the ranch teams like the Palo Duro, Tongue River, Sandhill Cattle Company, Spur, Haythorne, High Card Ranch, and the Bell. Ranch Rodeo is family entertainment and a team sport with photos of the winners almost always including one cowboy holding a baby. Ranch Rodeo has created a bigger demand for top hands who work on the ranch during the week and in the arena on the weekend. I predict that in the future there will be free agents in Ranch Rodeo signing contracts for $10 million, wild cow milking specialists will be buying real estate in Aspen and Sedona and instead of sleeping on the ground and in the mud when they go out with the wagon, top hands will have eight bedroom tents with maids, showers with hot water, 60 inch televisions, 300 thread count silk sheets and a masseuse to massage their sore throwing arms. Cowboys won’t have to tiptoe around

Cookie anymore either, instead a French Chef will cook a son-of-a-gun-stew using filet mignon and shallots with a drizzle of truffle oil. Hungry cowboys will have to manage five forks and three knives as they sit on their haunches around the campfire. Before you know it they’ll be using steroids, collecting Bentleys, and have to pee in a cup after every event. They’ll hire high class New York divorce attorneys, go to rehab and party with the Kardashians. Saddle and vaccine companies will entertain in luxury suites. One of the things I like best about Ranch Rodeo is the horses are honored as well as the cowboys. Before you know it geldings with names like Root Canal, Leather Lip and Damifino will have their own fans clubs and little girls will collect trading cards with horse faces on them. A few years ago Steve Ballmer of Microsoft paid two billion dollars for the LA Clippers basketball team and he doesn’t even get to play! For a lot less money he could have bought the Waggoner Ranch, hired all the cowboys who went to the NFR, suited up himself and had a billion dollars in change left jingling in his pocket. And, Mr. Colin Karpernick, he’d also have had a team of superb athletes, everyone of them holding a sweat-stained cowboy hat over their big collective American heart when Old Glory thundered into the arena.     

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Why We Use Electoral College, Not Popular Vote Jarrett Stepman, The Daily Signal

T

he Electoral College remains in place over two centuries after the framers of the Constitution empowered it to select presidents. Though occasionally maligned, this system of electing a chief executive has been incredibly successful for the American people. Many modern voters might be surprised to learn that when they step into a ballot box to select their candidate for president, they actually are casting a vote for fellow Americans called electors. These electors, appointed by the states, are pledged to support the presidential candidate the voters have supported. The Electoral College holds its vote the Monday after the second Wednesday in December following the election. The Founding Fathers created the Electoral College after much debate and compromise, but it has provided stability to the process of picking presidents. Though the winner of the national popular vote typically takes the presidency, that vote failed to determine the winner in four elections: 1824, 1876, 1888, and 2000. Some see the Electoral College as a peculiar and mystifying institution that ensures only a few, select individuals will ever cast a direct vote for president in the United States. Others complain that the system rewards smaller states with more proportional power than the large ones. Every four years, around election time, there are murmurs about revamping the system and moving toward a direct, national popular vote.

The Founders’ College As one of The Heritage Foundations legal experts, Hans von Spakovsky, notedin a paper on the Electoral College: “In creating the basic architecture of the American government, the Founders struggled to satisfy each state’s demand for greater representation while attempting to balance popular sovereignty against the risk posed to the minority from majoritarian rule.” Some elements of the Electoral College, such as the indirect vote through intermediaries, were hotly debated at the 1787 Constitutional Convention. It was eventually justified in part as a stopgap to potentially reverse the vote if the people

elected a criminal, traitor, or similar kind of As students of ancient history, the heinous person. The Founders wanted to Founders feared the destructive passions empower democratic elements in the of direct democracy, and as recent subjects American system, but they feared a kind of of an overreaching monarch, they equally pure, unrestrained democracy that had feared the rule of an elite unresponsive to brought down great republics of the past. the will of the people. The Electoral College The product of the Founders’ compro- was a compromise, neither fully democratic mise has been well balanced and enduring, nor aristocratic. and we would be wise to leave it intact. The Constitution states: Alexander Hamilton defended the Electoral College in Federalist 68. He argued Each state shall appoint, in such that it was important for the people as a manner as the legislature thereof may whole to have a great deal of power in direct, a number of electors, equal to choosing their president, but it was also the whole number of senators and rep“desirable” that “the immediate election resentatives to which the state may be should be made by men most capable of entitled in the Congress. analyzing the qualities adapted to the station, and acting under circumstances In addition to balancing the protection favorable to deliberation, and to a judicious of individual rights and majority rule, the combination of all the reasons and induce- Founding Fathers attempted to create a ments which were proper to govern their “federalist” system that would keep most of choice.” policymaking power reserved to states and Hamilton also wrote that this system of localities. America’s presidential election intermediaries would produce a greater system also was designed to empower the amount of stability, and that an “ … inter- states, not just the American people as an mediate body of electors will be much less undifferentiated mass. apt to convulse the community with any The total number of electors and thus extraordinary or violent movements, than electoral votes across all states and the Disthe choice of one who was himself to be the trict of Columbia—included after the final object of the public wishes.” passage of the 23rd Amendment—adds up

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to 538. The winner must receive a majority, howled that the system—even without the or 270, of these votes to become Supreme Court stepping in—was unfair. president. One organization, National Popular Vote, The system empowers states, especially has worked toward eliminating the Elecsmaller ones, because it incentivizes presi- toral College through an amendment to the dential candidates to appeal to places that Constitution or a state compact. National may be far away from population centers. Popular Vote argues that the current system Farmers in Iowa may have very different encourages presidential candidates to concerns than bankers in New York. A more spend most of their time in “swing states” federalist system of electing presidents rather than campaigning for votes across takes that into account. the entire country. The states are free to select the method This plan for a national popular vote has in which they choose their electors. In the received a moderate level of support, but early days of the republic, most states chose Heritage’s von Spakovsky has called it bad to have their legislatures pick electors, policy, based on mistaken assumptions. rather than the people. But, over time, the Swing states, he wrote, “can change from states shif ted to election to election, choosing electors via and many states that the state’s popular are today considered Many states have vote instead. Every to be reliably ‘blue’ or state has opted for ‘red’ in the presidensigned on to a bill popular election at tial race were recently least since the Civil unpredictable.” that essentially would tie War. Many states have signed on to a bill a state’s electoral votes to Calls to Abolish that essentially Modern oppo would tie a state’s the national popular vote. nents of the Electoral electoral votes to the College argue against Those states will pledge to national popular what they call antivote. Those states democratic aspects will pledge to swing swing all of their electoral of the institution, critall of their electoral icizing both the votes to the winner votes to the winner of the intermediary electors of the national vote. and the state-byBut this is because national vote.” state s ystem of the incentives would voting. be to appeal only to Calls to fundamentally change the Elec- the biggest population centers. Swing toral College reached a peak after states change over time, and the 2016 elecRepublican George W. Bush defeated Dem- tion could be a prime example of ocrat Al Gore in the tightly contested 2000 swing-state unpredictability and erosion of election. Gore narrowly won the national the traditional partisan political map. popular vote, and many of his supporters Additionally, if the president were

elected by unfiltered national vote, small and rural states would become irrelevant, and campaigns would spend their time in large, populous districts.

Over 200 Years of Success Unneeded tinkering with a process that is over two centuries old could destabilize one on the steadiest political systems in the world. As author and Texas lawyer Tara Ross wrote in a Heritage Foundation memorandum: America’s election systems have operated smoothly for more than 200 years because the Electoral College accomplishes its intended purposes. America’s presidential election process preserves federalism, prevents chaos, grants definitive electoral outcomes, and prevents tyrannical or unreasonable rule. The Founding Fathers created a stable, well-planned, and carefully designed system—and it works. On Election Day, Americans should appreciate the great and long-lasting constitutional tradition bequeathed to them—including the quirky Electoral College system created by the nation’s Founders.     

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Feds Want More Access to Private Property on Red River

by John Ingle, Times Record News

T

he federal government is asking a federal district court judge to rule on the areas to which they have access while surveying properties along the Red River between Texas and Oklahoma that are enmeshed in a land dispute between property owners and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). In an emergency motion filed recently in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas, the government argued that the “Plaintiffs continue to refuse reasonable access to portions of the disputed area” as determined by an October 30 ruling by Judge Reed O’Connor. The judge’s order allows BLM surveyors and armed federal agents access to the northern boundary of eight parcels of land in question for the purpose of collecting information via a survey for their July 2017 trial. Surveyors began work in Wichita County on land owned by Kevin Hunter. There was disagreement then between Rob Henneke, attorney for the plaintiffs, and Department of Justice attorney Romney Philpott as to the how far inland the surveyors could advance, with the two eventually agreeing to a compromise so the inspection could get underway. The government argued that in addition to not allowing broader access to the property in question, the BLM surveyors were not allowed to “trace and re-examine the boundary lines identified by a prior BLM survey” and that they were prevented “from inspecting topographic elevations” on the land away from the river’s edge. “This Court made in its October 30 Order that Plaintiffs cannot limit the

O

scope of the discovery to only those areas consistent with Plaintiffs’ theory of the case,” the government said in the motion. “It also observed that no undue burden will result from permitting access to Plaintiffs’ land for Defendants to inspect ‘the disputed area.’ The Court should not countenance Plaintiffs’ new impediment to the discovery authorized in that Order. Henneke said by telephone that they’ve been given deadline by O’Connor to have their response filed with the court. He said the court was clear in its direction as to where the BLM could survey and have access regarding the northern boundary of the properties along the southern gradient line of the Red River. “Yet, BLM still insists that the 1923 survey line is controlling (the inspection) and they want to have full access through the pastures and all the area on my clients’ properties all the way to that 1923 survey line,” he said, “which ... is nearly 2 miles inland from the waters of the Red River.” Henneke said the plaintiffs have already compromised by allowing the BLM to measure and take pictures not just at the river, but also the designated path by which the BLM can access the area. He said they have been “reasonable” in letting surveyors go beyond what the court order allows. “Upland and grass areas the BLM wants to have full access to are areas that are specifically excluded by the (U.S.) Supreme Court in terms of what the river bed (and) river bank area is,” he said. The Supreme Court in the early 1920s commissioned Arthur Kidder and Arthur Stiles “to run, locate and mark upon the ground” the southern gradient boundary so as to define the border between Texas and Oklahoma. The gradient boundary was determined to be the mid point between the edge was water flowing normally in the Red River and the south cut bank along the river.     

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by Joe Carroll, Bloomberg News, www.star-telegram.com

I

n a troubled oil world, the Permian Basin is the gift that keeps on giving. One portion of the giant field, known as the Wolfcamp formation, was found to hold 20 billion barrels of oil trapped in four layers of shale beneath West Texas. That’s almost three times larger than North Dakota’s Bakken play and the single largest U.S. unconventional crude accumulation ever assessed, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. At current prices, that oil is worth almost $900 billion. The estimate lends credence to the assertion from Pioneer Natural Resources CEO Scott Sheffield that the Permian’s shale could hold as much as 75 billion barrels, making it second only to Saudi Arabia’s Ghawar field. Irving-based Pioneer has been increasing its production targets all

-H

year as drilling in the Wolfcamp produced bigger gushers than the company’s engineers and geologists forecast. “The fact that this is the largest assessment of continuous oil we have ever done just goes to show that, even in areas that have produced billions of barrels of oil, there is still the potential to find billions more,” Walter Guidroz, coordinator for the geological survey’s energy resources program, said in the statement. Oil explorers have been flocking to the Permian Basin in West Texas and New Mexico to tap deposits so rich that they can generate profits even at lower oil prices. A race to grab land in the Permian has been the main driver of a surge of deals in the energy patch and the industry’s main source of good news. Although the Permian has been gushing crude since the 1920s, its multiple layers of oil-soaked shale remained largely untapped until the last several years, when intensive drilling and fracturing techniques perfected in other U.S. regions were adopted. The Wolfcamp, which is as much as a mile thick in some places, has been one of the primary targets. ConocoPhillips, the world’s largest inde-

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pendent oil producer by market value, increased its estimate for the size of its Wolfcamp holdings on Nov. 10 to 1.8 billion barrels from 1 billion last year. A day earlier, Concho Resources CEO Timothy Leach told investors and analysts that two recent wells it drilled in the Wolfcamp were pumping an average of 2,000 barrels a day each.

Big Lake goes from oil boom to bust Diamondback Energy Inc. disclosed recently that it has been drilling 10,000-foot sideways wells in the Wolfcamp. Production from the wells has been as high as 85 percent crude, according to the Midland, Texas-based explorer. For Apache Corp., a slice of the Wolfcamp and another Permian layer known as the Bone Spring are major components of the 3 billion-barrel Alpine High discovery that the company announced in September. CEO John Christmann called Alpine High “a world class resource” during a Sept. 7 presentation at a Barclays Plc conference in New York. The Wolfcamp shale also holds 16 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 1.6 billion barrels of gas liquids, the geological survey said in a statement.     

REWARD For Your Best Photo!

Have a favorite photo that is just too good not to share? Have one that might be cover-quality? The New Mexico Stockman is instituting a monthly photo contest and will pay $100 for the best photo received each month. The winning photo will also be published in a future issue of the Stockman.

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Permian’s Wolfcamp Formation Called Biggest Shale Oil Field in U.S.

Send your photo to caren@aaalivestock.com along with the name and address of the photographer. Once a photo is provided to the Stockman, the publication has the right to publish it at any time and in any place in the magazine.


Meet Jack Chatfield: NMCGA Vice President at Large by Callie Gnatkowski Gibson

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to the Bell Ranch. “I had no idea I would stay for 27 years,” he laughed. “The Bell Ranch still pulled a wagon both spring and fall. To a 20-year-old kid raised on a small outfit to leave headquarters with 100-125 head of horses and a crew of good cowboys was like heaven. I lived on several of the Bell Ranch camps and especially liked catching remnants in the rough country,” he said. “Throughout those years I always rode a few colts for the public to help pay the bills.

ortheastern New Mexico rancher Jack Chatfield, Rosebud, has deep roots in New Mexico and as Vice-President At Large for the New Mexico Cattle Growers’ Association, he wants to do all he can to protect and preserve the land and industry he loves for the future. Chatfield’s family has been in New Mexico for five generations. They first settled near Mayhill, then moved to Hillsboro, and finally homesteaded south of T or C on the Animas Creek where they remain today. Jack’s father, Harvey Chatfield, bought that homestead from his parents and grandmother, and put it together with his three great uncles’ homestead, and later added an adjoining Bureau of Land Management (BLM) permit. Today, Jack’s younger brother Joe owns and operates the ranch. Jack was born in T or C and raised on the family ranch, and is grateful for the Christian values and the work ethic instilled in him by his parents, as well as the opportunity to be close to his grandparents, who also lived on the ranch. Growing up, Jack said, he always enjoyed the horse and cattle work. At age 15, he went to work for Jack Sanderson, who trained performance horses, and John David (mounted), Jill and Jack Chatfield. worked there riding colts and training horses through high school. After graduation, he moved back home for a couple of I learned a lot there about livestock and years, but said he always wanted to work people. Through good times and bad it on a big outfit. On August 28, 1977, he shaped my life and left me with a lifetime loaded his belongings in a two-horse trailer of memories.” and a little International Scout and moved In 2004, Jack and his wife, Jill Hopson

Chatfield, had the opportunity to buy the ranch where she was raised. That November, they moved to the Triangle Ranch near Rosebud, NM in the sand hills amidst the canyon breaks of northeastern New Mexico where they run a commercial cow-calf operation. In addition to ranching, Jill worked at the Mosquero Post Office and Jack went to work managing the Watershed Restoration Project on the Canadian River, working to address invasive species on the entire watershed of the Canadian River.

The project started out treating salt cedar and other non-native invasive species on the river banks and have since moved upland. Last year, the project treated 30,000 acres of mesquite and this year, in cooper-

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ation with the New Mexico Department of a variety of ways but one of the most Game and Fish, they are working to treat important was joining the NMCGA. Cattle 4000 acres of piñon juniper which will also Growers is a group that is constantly watchbenefit large game habitat. To date, the ing for issues that threaten our way of life project has treated 33,000 acres of salt and our industry and the executive director cedar and 2000 miles of stream. and staff put in many long hard hours.” “New Mexico is in one of the driest “I believe it is important to preserve this periods anyone can remember – it’s been way of life for our children and their childrier than the 30s, and drier than the 50s - dren, and without the NMCGA it truly would although the last couple of years have been no longer exist” he continued. “It is a privia little better,” Chatfield explained. “We lege to work with this group today.” can’t control what falls on the ground, but For Chatfield, the most important issue we can do a better job of what we do with facing the industry and nation is private that rain we do property rights, and get. The water we one of those is water save goes to rights. In New Mexico, We can’t control what recharge the the doctrine of prior aquifer, some appropriations does a falls on the ground, may be used by a good job of protecting f ar m er dow n but we can do a better job of a g r i c u l t u r e a n d stream, and some people who live on goes to other the land by ensuring what we do with that rain uses, but none of that water goes to it goes to waste.” we do get. The water we save those who first put it E a c h y e a r, to beneficial use, he Chat f ield rep goes to recharge the aquifer, noted. However, there resents the are many people in project during some may be used by a farmer the state that would the state legislalike to see that go ture in Santa Fe. downstream, and some goes away – be able to While there, he change how and works with what where water is to other uses, but none of it is known as the allotted. Ag Group, a loose “It is really importgoes to waste.” coalition of agriant to protect and cultural and natural resource groups that abide by the laws we have in place, which work together on issues. “There are people will protect agriculture,” he pointed out. that are in Santa Fe, meeting and working “Without property rights, the idea of free with legislators, and people at home who enterprise is gone, and in New Mexico, read the bills and let us know when they without water, it is hard to do anything. see something of concern,” he said. “IndiJack and Jill have been married for 23 vidually we don’t have much power in the years and have five kids between them, state, but together we are a force to be along with six grandchildren and one more reckoned with. We work together, we on the way. Jill’s mother passed away in understand each other, and have gotten to 2015 and her father, Harry Hopson, still lives know each other over the years.” on the ranch. “We are grateful for our many “Without that group of people working friends and extended family and for being on our behalf, we wouldn’t have the blessed with the ability to live the life we freedom we have today in New Mexico, and love,” he noted. many of us wouldn’t have the operations Chatfield is very active in Mosquero we have,” he continued. “I think that Cattle Community Church, has served as president Growers is a leader in that group. It is so of the Mosquero School Board 15 years and important to have the Association there in is a member of New Mexico Farm and LiveSanta Fe, standing up for those of us that stock Bureau. Before he started working on depend on production agriculture for a the Canadian River Project, he was active in living.” the Mesa Soil and Water Conservation Dis“At least twenty years ago, I realized that trict (SWCD), and now he works for and with the way of life and values that I cherished eight SWCDs. He is also known for his skills would cease to exist if more of us did not as a chuck wagon cook, and his dutch oven begin to stand up for those values and our cooking demos are in high demand.      industry,” he said. “I began to participate in

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PregnancyChecking Options by Heather Smith Thomas

C

it helps monitor health and reproductive status of a herd. Finding more open cows than usual can alert you to a disease problem such as IBR, BVD, leptospirosis or sexually transmitted diseases like trichomoniasis or vibrio that cause cows to abort. Nutritional deficiencies in a herd can also

hecking cows for pregnancy is a good management tool. Knowing which cows are open gives you several options; you could wean their calves early, to sell open cows at peak market prices, or sort off thin ones to fatten before selling, or sell open heifers when they still bring top dollar. If a person is selling bred heifers, bred cows, or 3-in-one packages (bred cow with calf at side), you can be sure those females are pregnant before sale—and even predict the sex of the calf if you wish. Most stockmen will be money ahead to cull open cows rather than winter them. The cost of a pregnancy check (about $5 per cow, on average) A reproductive scan. is cheap compared with the expense ($100 to $200 per head, for hay) of show up as open cows, especially in 2-yearolds that should have bred back for their feeding an open cow through the winter. Another benefit of preg-checking is that second calves.

Some producers use pregnancy testing to determine stage of gestation, to know when cows will calve, facilitating sorting them into early and late-calving groups. Most producers are content to know whether the cow is pregnant or not, but some want to know if she will calve early or late, for management purposes, such as sorting the herd for pre-calving scours vaccinations. Some producers also want to know whether to put a certain cow with an early group (to watch more closely during colder weather) or a later calving group. Yet only about 20 percent of cow-calf producers take the opportunity to pregcheck cows. According to data from USDA’s National Animal Health Monitoring System, palpation and ultrasound are used in 11.3 percent of herds with 1 to 49 cows, 30.2 percent of operations with 50 to 99 cows, 47.7 percent of herds with 100-199 cows and 71.7 percent of operations with 200 cows or more. A total of 20.2 percent of all operations utilize some form of pregnancy testing. Cattle producers have several options for testing, including palpation, ultrasound and a blood test. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. PALPATION – Rectal palpation is the traditional method. Clues that the cow is pregnant can be detected as early as 30 days and definitely by 45 days of gestation, feeling the uterus, ovaries, and uterine

Dr. Steve Hendrick says

that with experience, manual palpation

can be very accurate.

arteries through the rectal wall. Position of the ovaries changes as pregnancy advances; increasing weight of the uterus pulls them deeper into the abdominal cavity. After the 5th month, the weight and size of fetus and uterus cause it to sink down and rest on the abdominal floor.

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ULTRASOUND – Hendrick prefers to use ultrasound (rather than palpation) because this is what he has used throughout most of his career. Ultrasound can detect pregnancy earlier than palpation, sometimes as

One downside to checking early (with any method) is that some cows may abort or resorb a pregnancy at a later time. A cow that checked pregnant early in gestation may end up open or very late instead (she may lose the pregnancy and rebreed). Producers need to realize that there’s always a certain amount of early pregnancy loss in every herd.

Pregnancy Loss After A Test

Experienced veterinarians can estimate surements — such as trunk measurements stage of pregnancy (and approximately and crown to rump length — to estimate when the cow will calve) with fair accuracy stage of pregnancy,” he says. Using ultrasound is generally more between 30 and 100 days and after 7 months. The mid-stage of pregnancy is a expensive than palpation, requiring the little harder to date, after the uterus drops necessary equipment and a source of elecout of reach. Taking the bull out of the herd tricity (some technicians utilize a generator or a battery pack). It after a defined breedcan provide more ing season helps when it comes time to preginformation than nancy test because it palpation, such as eliminates those quesviability of the fetus tionable ones that and incidence of may have just been twins. “One of the bred but can’t be added benefits of def initively deterultrasound is that mined by palpation. you can tell the sex Dr. Steve Hendrick, of the fetus. This Coaldale Veterinary may be desired by Clinic, Coaldale, some producers, Alberta, says that with especially in a pureexperience, manual bred herd,” palpation can be very Hendrick says. accurate. “Being really Since it enables good at pregnancy the operator to testing and determinvisualize the fetus, ing stage of pregnancy sex can be deteris an art; it’s not all mined — most science. There’s a lot of easily between 55 variability in size of the and 90 days’ gestabuttons (cotyledons), Blood draw from the tail into a vein-vacutainer. tion. This is helpful size of the fetus, etc. if you want to sell a You have to weigh many factors when esti- group of cows or heifers that will all have mating when that cow will calve,” he says. bull calves, or all have replacement heifers. Disadvantages to palpation include the Most ultrasound technologies still go fact that rough handling of the uterus in into the cow’s rectum with a probe, but less early pregnancy may lead to abortion. manipulation is needed to confirm early There’s also risk of injury to the cow, or spreading diseases (such as Bovine leukosis) from one cow to another unless a new, clean palpation sleeve is used for each cow.

“If you preg-check early, a few cows that were determined pregnant are no longer pregnant by calving time,” says Hendrick. “This is true whether you use palpation, ultrasound or a blood test. On occasion you might get a false positive on a blood test just because the pregnancy protein lingers in the bloodstream a couple months after calving, or after an abortion.” If you took the blood sample just after a pregnancy loss it may show as positive or suspect, even though the cow was no longer pregnant.

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Ultrasound can detect pregnancy earlier

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early as 13 days after breeding (but more commonly after 21 days). You can diagnose pregnancy earlier, and send open females to market sooner. “You can also take mea-

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Stages Of Pregnancy As Detected By Palpation

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70 days – The enlarging uterus is readily felt. The amnion sac feels like a solid oval ball (about 2 ¼ inches in diameter) floating within it. 90 days – The uterus is usually still resting up near the pelvic brim, with the pregnant horn about 3 ½ inches wide and the nonpregnant horn about 2 inches wide. The fetus can sometimes be felt in the pregnant horn. 110 days (3.5 months) – The enlarging uterus has dropped below the pelvic brim (the cervix lies at the brim) and there is fluid distention in the lower part of the uterus. 4 to 5.5 months – It is possible to feel the fetus in about half the cases. 5.5 to 7.5 months – It’s more difficult to reach the uterus, but if so, you may be able to touch the fetus’ head or flexed limbs that lie just beyond the pelvic brim. 7.5 months to birth – It’s often easier to feel the fetus because it has grown so much that the front legs are closer to the pelvis. If you can’t reach the uterus you may be able to feel large cotyledons or a strong vibrating pulse in the enlarged uterine arteries.

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pregnancy. There is less stress to the cow/ improved version of this technology called a protein produced by the placenta of rumifetus, and less wear and tear on the practi- Repro-Scan that uses a convex rectal probe nant animals, detectable in their blood, and tioner’s arm and wrist — especially with the that produces a larger image, with more founded a company called BioTracking. His newer extension-arm probes that don’t durable equipment, and put it into a porta- blood test called BioPRYN (Pregnant Ruminecessitate putting the arm into the cow. nant Yes/No) for cattle, sheep, Ultrasound is often more accurate than goats, and other ruminants palpation for detecting pregnancy (espebecame commercially available cially when checking early) or determining in 2002 and today there are 50 stage of pregnancy. Jeff Hoffman (a USDA labs in North America that veterinarian) says one thing he’s noticed process blood samples. when ultrasounding cows is that he’s not as According to Jeremy Howard, accurate in palpation (for determining marketing manager, advantages stage of pregnancy) as he thought. of the blood test over palpation “There’s enough variation in cows, when include being able to detect palpating rectally, that you can be fooled. pregnancy sooner. The blood test Some are farther along than what they feel is cheaper like (when assessing size of the uterus, than ultraamount of fluid, etc.) and some a little s o un d an d shorter time,” he says. more accurate “The cost of ultrasound is often about ble case. than rec tal twice that of rectal palpation, but improved The big advanpalpation. It accuracy is worth it, to many producers. t a g e t o t h e can be done Ultrasound is the standard method in most e x t e n s i o n - a r m more quickly dairies, not only because of better accuracy, unit is that it is a n d e a s i l y, but also because you can diagnose ovarian much easier on taking the problems and other reproductive issues. In the person doing sample from a beef cattle, ultrasound isn’t used as much the pregnancy vein under the yet, but I know of a veterinarian in Montana testing. Palpation tail. This is who ultrasounds most of the larger beef and arm-in ultramuch less herds in his region. The ranchers use porta- sound put a lot of invasive, less ble corrals out on the range and he runs an wear and tear on traumatic, and inverter off his truck to power the ultra- veterinarians who safer for the sound machine,” explains Hoffman. In one do a lot of this. animal, says instance he ultrasounded a bunch of older “My partner and I Howard. cows that had only been bred a short time. p r e g - c h e c k e d You can do The rancher wanted to see if they were m o r e than more animals pregnant before he culled them (keeping 150,000 heifers by in shorter time, pregnant ones another year), and at that ultrasound in 2 ½ taking blood stage of their pregnancy ultrasound was years. We would samples. (top) Manual palpation. (bottom) Ultrasounding a cow. more accurate than palpation. not have been Ranchers can able to do this do this themEXTENSION-ARM many without ex ten - selves. It’s sometimes hard to get a vet to ULTRASOUND – There are sion -arm ultrasound,” come to the ranch during a busy Bronson says. two ways a veterinarian preg-checking season. Blood testing has The big or technician can do the He doesn’t charge any advantages, particularly for herds that are ultrasonography—with advantage to more for this service than remote and far from a veterinary service. If the traditional arm-in for palpation. “It does the the veterinarian has to drive a ways to get rectal probe, or the newer the extension-arm same job I was able to do there, it will cost more for the farm call. For with my hand. But if the some herds, it may be more cost-effective extension-arm probe that eliminates the need for client wants accurate fetal to just draw the blood samples yourself and unit is that it is inserting his/her arm into aging, which takes more send them to the lab. If a person wants to every cow. much easier on the time with ultrasound, then check just a few cows, it’s much cheaper to I charge more.” The extension-arm just draw blood. probe has been in use Samples are labeled with the cows’ person doing the about 15 years. The first BLOOD TEST – There numbers and shipped to a lab, with results commercial extension pregnancy testing. have been several tests sent back by phone, fax or e-mail. “For the arm units had an oscillatdeveloped using hormone blood test, all you need is a syringe and ing probe so you didn’t have to rotate the measurements in blood and milk, to needle. Cost per sample is $2.50. We can rod to view the uterus and its contents. Dr. confirm pregnancy. The most useful at this also do our BVD test from those samples at Andrew Bronson (Alberta, Canada) and his point is a blood test developed by Dr. Garth an additional cost of $3.65, if a rancher partner Bruce Hill then developed an Sasser at University of Idaho. He discovered wants both tests at the same time. The

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Age-Old Methods

Seeing a cow in heat is usually a clue she’s open, but not a dependable way to determine pregnancy. Some open cows do not cycle if they are lactating or have a cystic ovary, and some pregnant cows will continue to show heat. Old-timers used a few other ways to tell if a cow was pregnant. Many stockmen say you can feel the fetus by about the 5th or 6th month by putting your hand against the cow’s lower flank and making a quick upward and inward push, keeping your hand against her flank. If she’s pregnant the fetus (that was pushed away) should bounce back against your hand. Another method sometimes used was to milk a little from the cow just after you wean her calf, putting a drop of milk into a glass of water. Proponents of this method claimed that if the drop goes all the way to the bottom without spreading out, the cow is pregnant, whereas if the milk droplet spreads out, she’s open. One thing noticed by many stockmen is that after you wean calves, many of the open cows that weren’t cycling during lactation will come into heat shortly after you pull their calves off. Another tipoff regarding pregnancy status: at weaning time, the cows that are most reluctant to leave their calves (staying by the fence bawling for several days, rather than going off to graze, or coming home through 5 fences to try to get back to their calves) are generally the ones that are open. The pregnant cows tend to wean easier and are less worried about where their calves are.     

rancher can bleed the cows, using red-top tubes, then label and send them to a lab. Samples don’t need to be kept cool — just wrapped in bubble wrap to prevent breakage,” says Howard. The blood test is a great tool if you wait two weeks after AI breeding before putting a cleanup bull with cows. With this test you can then tell which ones conceived to the AI breeding and which ones were bred later to the cleanup bull. Breeders using embryo transfer can check recipient cows quickly to determine which ones are pregnant, and have another chance to use the ones that didn’t take. Disadvantages of the blood test include having to wait for results (which may take two to three days) compared to knowing immediately, and inability to determine the stage of pregnancy. Ranchers who just work cows one time and sort off open ones to sell won’t find it useful, but operators who have access to the cows more than once as when — giving calves pre-weaning vaccinations — can process the cows after they know which ones are open.     

MEET

Those of us who care about animals face a multitude of challenges, not the least of which is the constant misrepresentation of issues pertaining to animals. The National Animal Interest Alliance (NAIA) counters this propaganda in numerous ways; with articles and blogs, through social media, by conducting original research and disseminating the findings, by publishing ads in magazines and on billboards, by hosting conferences and more. NAIA is adding a new vehicle for disseminating factual information: DiscoverAnimals.org, a resource that strives to provide useful, entertaining, and reliable information about animals to the public. The site is a collaborative effort and we encourage all of our supporters to take an active role in helping us achieve that goal. I invite you to take a look at it, read the content, and share with us any additional information or resources you would like us to include. Our understanding of animals and animal care is always growing, and we welcome your updates and corrections where needed! It is our hope that DiscoverAnimals.org will benefit animals and everyone who cares for them. Please enjoy and share the site and provide us with any feedback you may have.

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Range Changer is a mix of three different types of Forage Kochia, along with Russian Wild Rye and Vavilov Siberian Wheatgrass and soon to be added, a very drought tolerant Smooth Brome Arid. This is not your typical brome. It’s very drought tolerant down to a 8 inch yearly precipitation. Range Changer is my personally designed range mix. It is fashioned for arid climates and will improve your worst rocky, clay, sandy, poor, dry range ground. It thrives in extreme heat, cold, and drought. In other words, sow it on your poorest, rocky ground and watch it produce some amazing cow feed; and that’s at 6-8 inches of precipitation. Plant it in better conditions and it will totally out-perform your expectations. — Shane Getz, Westfork LLC, Tremonton, Utah Range Changer is an extremely drought resistant rangeland mix, with several types of Forage Kochia originating from the sandy soils of the Middle East. As an arid range ground shrub, it loves extreme heat and extreme cold. In addition, it also has two very drought tolerant coolseason grasses. This mix will compete with prickly pear, yucca and will even grow under junipers, where normally nothing will grow. And…it will never freeze out …it truly is a miracle plant. I call it the alfalfa of the desert. If you live in dry cowboy country where you deal with droughts and fires, you owe it to yourself to become educated about this shrub. — Connor Kent, Kent Cattle, Lehi, UT Forage Kochia does very well in arid, dry regions. It is good, high protein feed for fall and winter. It will grow well in all kinds of soil: alkali, sandy, rocky and clay. I always like to have other grasses in with the Forage Kochia, making it a well-rounded range feed. — Bob Adams, Salt Wells Cattle Company, Promotory, UT Range Changer is a very good fall and winter feed. It is a mix of several Forage Kochias and two cool season, drought resistant types of grasses. The mix will crowd out cheat grass and other noxious weeds and will increase your dry arid rangeland by at least three-fold. Another plus… because of the high moisture content in the Forage Kochia, it provides excellent fire prevention. Just last summer, in 2016, we had a wild fire on our winter sheep range. The fire came, raged over the mountain and then stopped as it hit our Forage Kochia. Best feed available down to a six inch yearly rain fall. — Cole Selman, Selman Ranch, Tremonton, Utah

Ask us for more information about Range Changer. Also able to discuss warm season grasses if you would like along with the Forage Kochia.

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NFL Player Spends Signing Bonus to Buy Cattle by Amanda Radke, Beef Daily

T

exas farm boy and professional football player Cobi Hamilton may have achieved fame and fortune when he secured his spot on the Pittsburgh Steelers team as a wide receiver. However, the country boy hasn’t forgotten his roots in agriculture. Hamilton revealed in a recent interview that he used his entire $94,000 signing bonus from the Cincinnati Bengals following the 2013 NFL draft to purchase cattle for his parents. When Hamilton was in college and short on cash, his parents would sell a cow to fund his tuition. According to an article written by Ryan Wilson for CBS Sports, Hamilton grew up on the family farm and spent 2015 back on the home place, before he was signed to play for the Steelers.     

South Dakota Joins Other States in New Mexico Wildlife Management Case Source: wnax.com

S Cholla Livestock, LLC Gary Wilson Arizona & New Mexico 602-319-2538 gwilsoncattle@gmail.com

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outh Dakota has joined 16 other states in a friend of the court brief on a wildlife management case that could have long-term implications for the state’s livestock industry. It argues the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was prevented by a Federal Trial Court from further release of Mexican Wolves pending permits from the State of New Mexico. South Dakota Attorney General Marty Jackley says the issue centers around state’s rights and now is before the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals. He says it should be up to states to manage wolves and one of the major reasons the friend of the court brief was filed is that wolf reintroduction by the Fish and Wildlife Service could spread to South Dakota. Jackley says the case in New Mexico involved the federal government reintroducing the wolves without establishing any kind of management plan. Jackley says federal regulations required that the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service obey state permit requirements prior to releasing wildlife under certain federal programs.     


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Trump Ag Committee Outlines Pro-Farmer Agenda in Talking Points

ignoring the countryside and the people who live there. In the 2016 election, the folly of that strategy came home to roost. These are places where issues like property rights, over-regulation and the second amendment are a lot more than talking points. It’s where an out of control federal agency like EPA can ruin your life and livelihood.” by Lynn Brezosky, San Antonio Express-News To hear Hall and elected representatives f the 64 members of Donald Trump’s agri- from farming and ranching states like Texas cultural advisory committee hold any say it, the EPA’s recast rule on Waters of the sway, the New York City billionaire heads United States, or WOTUS, was the poster into his presidency with a pro-farmer child of an “out of control federal agency.” agenda near and dear to many in the flyover Under the rule, the subject of a lawsuit states that elected him, according to cam- by Texas and other states, stock ponds and paign talking points obtained by the San what farmers view as ditches could be desAntonio Express-News. ignated as tributaries that feed into rivers “You will have the government off your and lakes and subject to EPA monitoring. back and out of your pocket,” the docu- The rule previously covered navigable ment reads. “You will have a voice in how waterways. While environmental advocates agricultural issues are addressed and you applauded the move as needed oversight will have allies in the White House and the to prevent fertilizers and pesticide runoff agencies that have influence on your from polluting the nation’s water supply, business.” farmers and ranchers envisioned costly High on the group’s wish list are paperwork and compliance fines on top of Supreme Court justices who will defend state regulations and their own private property, water and mineral rights. stewardship. The advisory panel also wants an EnvironA Labor Department move to treat rural mental Protection Agency administrator vendors of anhydrous ammonia fertilizer as who understands “the complexity of agri- wholesalers subject to tens of thousands of culture and rural issues” as well as a farm dollars in compliance costs was another bill “written by those who are thankful for sore point. The action, which ended up shot our remarkable food system in this country,” down by a federal appeals court, was in according to the reaction to the deadly 2013 document. West Texas explosion Exit polls show caused by ammonium Rural leaders rural voters came nitrate, a different fertilizer. out strong for But it could have compelled have long been Tr u m p , w h o s e nearly 4,000 fertilizer appearances in concerned that national dealers to no longer carry heavy agricultural anhydrous, forcing area areas drew long farmers to pay more for less leadership is ignoring lines of supporters. effective substitutes. Sixty-two percent The talking points also the countryside and the of rural voters call for an agriculture secreturned out at the people who live there.” tary “who will defend polls for the RepubAmeric an agriculture lican last week, compared with 53 percent against its critics, particularly those who in 2008. The Trump appeal was most dra- have never grown or produced anything matic among rural voters in tiny beyond a backyard tomato plant.” While communities far from urban centers, where current Secretary Tom Vilsack was previ71 percent went for Trump, compared with ously governor of the Corn Belt state of 40 percent of voters in cities with a million Iowa, Texans in particular felt sold out when or more people. he declined to designate cotton as an Gene Hall of the Texas Farm Bureau said oilseed that would have made the crop the margins showed how Hillary Clinton’s eligible for federal subsidies. Those were concentration on “huge urban voting cut in the 2014 farm bill as a concession in blocks” during the campaign backfired. a trade dispute with Brazil, but cotton prices “That rural folks can make a difference at had plunged since 2014 due largely to the polls is now quite obvious,” Hall wrote Chinese stockpiling and paying growers far in a TFB blog post. “Rural leaders have long over the global commodity price. been concerned that national leadership is Food labeling favored by consumer

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groups was another point of contention. Members of the Texas and Southwestern — and we already sell $1.6 billion, how much Country of origin labeling for meat, which Cattle Raisers Association had high hopes more can we sell?” Thorpe said. Though Trump denounced the pact on The World Trade Organization rejected as for the Trans-Pacific Partnership, an Obama unfairly favoring U.S. meat over Mexican administration trade pact with 12 other the campaign trail, cattle raisers hope and Canadian, was unpopular among South Pacific rim countries that would have been Trump’s business acumen prevails in a Texas ranchers who said labels showing a big boost for Texas beef. Tariffs for Japan, softer stance. They’re also holding out hope where cattle was the top export for immigration policies, crossing their market for U.S. fingers that Trump’s intended crackdown “born, raised and beef with $1.6 on illegal immigration comes with a more harvested” was an We have a serious labor onerous requirebillion in yearly workable agricultural guest worker ment for those with problem in Texas on ranches sales, would program. mixed herds. drop from 38.5 “I think he sees the unique labor chalGenetically modpercent to 9 lenges of agriculture, just like I know he and farms. It would be difficult ified crops, vilified percent, for sees them in his hotel business, finding as a potential corexample. workers for his hotels,” Thorpe said. “We for us to give up the labor.” ruption of the food “We’re think- have a serious labor problem in Texas on supply, are considered advances by row ing, good grief, if we can get from 38 and a ranches and farms. It would be difficult for crop producers that allow them to produce half percent with a strong dollar — which us to give up the labor.”       far more per acre than they could even a makes our product very expensive in Japan generation ago. “Agriculture will NOT be regulated based on the latest trends on social media,” the talking points say. Bank CD1 (5 YEAR CYCLE) Trump also called for eliminating the Bank CD1 (5 YEAR CYCLE) so-called “death tax,” which taxes values of estates over $5.45 million at up to 40 percent. Call me today to lock-in this great rate. “I think it’s a bigger deal for the agriculCall me today to lock-in this great rate. ture community because their biggest Monte Anderson Farming is your livelihood and no one understands that better than 15 Oak asset is their land and because their profit Monte Anderson Farm Bureau. 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concede that, out of no more than a dozen Steele. Together the couple traveled the turn-of-the-century lady bronc riders, country performing in Wild West Shows Fannie Sperry was the best and the most and rodeos. During their careers, the couple dedicated to her rough-and-tumble trade.” worked the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show, the Fannie was notable for her different Miller Bros. 101 Ranch Wild West Show, The riding style from most lady bronc riders of C.B Irwin Wild West Show and dozens of the day—she did not ride with hobbled “contested” rodeos along the way. They stirrups. Riding with the stirrups tied even formed their own Wild West Show for together under a horse’s belly allows for a time, often using wild horses captured in greater stability and was considered an the hills on their ranch. Besides being a have never tired of rodeo in my life. I advantage for the rider. Judges of the day bronc rider and relay race rider, Fannie was have never seen one show too many, be allowed women to ride this way without said to be a crack shot. She and Bill had an it good, bad or middlin’. I hope there’s penalty. Fannie became famous for riding act whereby she would shoot the ash off an arena in Heaven, that’s where you’ll find her entire career without hobbled stirrups. the end of a cigar in his mouth. me.” Wrote Fannie Sperry Steele, one of She wrote, “Mine is the reputation of being One time at Calgary, she drew a bad Montana’s most famous Bronc Riders from the only woman rodeo rider who rode her bronc called, Red Wing, who had trampled the early days of rodeo. entire career un-hobbled. I confess it is a a rider to death only a few days prior. When Fannie was born to Datus E. and Rachel record I am proud of!” asked later if she was afraid of the horse, she Schrader Sperry on March 27, 1887 in the Although there were no official World’s replied “You just forget about being scared Prickly Pear Valley near Helena, Montana. Champions recognized in those days, and when you ride horses.” Her father did not ride horses (reportedly several rodeos claimed their champs were Fannie was known for dressing in cowgirl because of an old injury) but her mother indeed the “World Champion,” Fannie won fashion, with long black braids, a vaquetaught her to ride well. By the time she was the Calgary Stampede ladies bronc riding ro-styled hat and fancy boots. She knew sixteen, she discovered she could earn in both 1912 and 1913, giving her the unof- that many folks came to watch the women money riding bucking horses. The follow- ficial title of Lady Bucking Horse Champion riders and, while she wanted to ride as well ing year, in 1904, she earned the title of of the World. She competed at rodeos and as the cowboys, she did not want to look Montana’s Women’s Bucking Horse performed with Wild West Shows across like them. Champion. the country for years. After riding the rodeo circuit for twenty Rodeo historian, Willard Porter once On April 30, 1913, she married fellow long years, Fannie competed for the last wrote, “Rodeo biographers generally bronc rider and rodeo clown, W.S. “Bill” time in 1925 at Bozeman, Montana. Although retired form competing, she did continue to ride exhibition off and on for years afterwards. By the time the Steeles Monthly retired from rodeo, they had sold the family Auction ranch and started a guiding outfit near Schedule Lincoln, Montana. Fannie continued to run Native American Indian Jewelry the pack string after Bill died (in 1939) right Turquoise, Navajo Textiles, on up till she was in her seventies (she did Baskets Bits, Spurs, Antique Guns, Old West and Arizona Antiques, not completely retire from riding horses Old Coins, Gold & Silver until about 1974). Fannie Sperry Steele, was one of the first Nov. 19th @ 10:00 am women inducted into the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum’s, Rodeo MERRY CHRISTMAS! Hall of Fame (1975), and the first Montana Jan. 14th @ 10:00 am native in the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame (1978). She once wrote, “If there is a horse Feb. 11th @ 10:00 am in the zodiac then I am sure I must have been born under its sign, for the horse has shaped and determined my whole way of life.” Her last few years were spent reflecting on her storied career from a Helena, Montana rest home. At the ripe old age of ninety-five, Montana’s most famous Bronc Rider from the early days of rodeo passed over the great divide (February 11, 1983). Much has been recorded about her fabulous career and there was even a book written about the great Fannie Sperry Steele titled, The Lady Rode Bucking Patronize Our Horses.      MY COWBOY HEROES by Jim Olson

Fannie Sperry Steel – Montana’s First Famous Bronc Rider

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he Southwest Beef Symposium, a twostate educational program jointly hosted by New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service is set for Wednesday and Thursday, January 11 and 12, at the Roswell Convention Center, 912 N. Main St. in Roswell. This year’s theme will be “What’s to Follow Historic Times?” said Dr. Bruce Carpenter, AgriLife Extension livestock specialist in Ft. Stockton, Texas. “After several years of very favorable cattle prices for cow-calf and stocker producers, the drastic drop we’re seeing in the cattle market now has various segments of the industry wondering what to do for income, production and profit. The goal of this symposium is to provide answers to those questions.” Individual early registration is $75 and includes a steak dinner on January 11, lunch on January 12, refreshments and symposium proceedings. Early registration is required by January 6. To register, and for more information, visit the symposium website, http://swbs.nmsu.edu, or contact Carpenter at 432/336-8585, BCarpent@ ag.tamu.edu. The opening session from 1 to 5 p.m. on Jan. 11 will address emerging big-picture issues in the global beef industry, he said. Issues and speakers will be: ЇЇ Global Factors Affecting U.S. Beef Demand and What Are Others Expecting from the U.S., Leann Saunders, IMI Global president. ЇЇ Sustainability, What Is It? What Does It Really Mean?,” Dr. Ted McCollum, AgriLife Extension beef specialist, Amarillo. ЇЇ What Happened to the Calf Market?” Dr. Derrell Peel, Oklahoma State University professor of agricultural economics and agricultural business, Stillwater, Oklahoma.

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SOLD

*REDUCED* 90 Head, Agua Fria

Ranch, Quemado, NM – This is a scenic mid-size ranch with great prospects. Operating as a private hunting retreat, & a purebred Angus & Paint horse ranch. +/-1200 deeded acres, +/-80 acres of NM lease, & +/-5220 acres BLM. 4BR, 2BA, mfg. home. Trophy elk, antelope, deer. Elk & mule deer permits. Candidate for a conservation easement or land exchange with the BLM. $1,490,000

*NEW* 1388 AUM’s - Deadman Ranch, East of Reserve, NM – Gor-

geous Mtn ranch in the Ponderosa Pines with open grassy meadows and abundant wildlife. Turnkey operation with a fully improved and equipped headquarters. Pristine, beautiful, private. 115+/- Acre deeded forest inholding with USFS permit. Modern log cabin, separate guest and cowboy bunkhouses, managers house, corrals, stable, shop, seasonal creek, strong well with water piped to all pastures. $1,200,000 w/ cattle & equipment. Call Nancy Belt 520-221-0807

*SOLD* 207+/- Acre Farm, Benson,

SOLD

AZ – Fenced and cross fenced for cattle. Includes home, equipment shed, work shop, barn, shipping corrals. Close to I-10. $1,200,000

272+/- Acres, San Simon, AZ – Parcel 1, 222+/- acres of cleared land. Parcel 2, 50+/- acres with 5 acres of producing Pistachio trees. 8 New shallow wells. Call Harry Owens 602-526-4965. $600,000

*SOLD* 65+/- Acre Farm, Benson,

SOLD

AZ – 23+/- acres of Bermuda pasture. Custom 3BR, 2 BA Home large workshop, equipment shed and fish pond stocked with large mouth bass. $610,000 $550,000

*SOLD* +/-78 Acre Farm, Virden,

NM – with 49+ acres of irrigation Rights. 3 BR, 2 Bath site built home, shop, hay barn, 8 stall horse barn, unique round pen with adjoining shaded pens, roping arena. $550,000

SOLD

*SOLD*94 Head Cattle Ranch,

SOLD

Safford, AZ – 200 Deeded Acres, BLM and State of AZ Grazing Leases. Desert ranch w/five sets of corrals, four w/ wells & one w/a spring. The ranch is well watered w/5 total wells, 6 dirt tanks & a spring. $450,000

*REDUCED* +/-38 Acre Farm, Shel-

don AZ – This preppers paradise includes a large 4 BR 3 BA home; canning

Tobe Haught 505-264-3368 Tamra Kelly 928-830-9127 Harry Owens 602-526-4965

studio; root cellar; large workshop with covered outdoor work area; irrigated pasture with 600 gpm well, fenced and cross fenced for cattle/horses; corrals; barn; chicken houses and pens; rabbit pen; garden area, fruit trees, pond and other various outbuildings. The property includes tractor implements; backhoe; and RV. $410,000 $395,000

*NEW* 98+/- Acre Farm, Pomerene, AZ – 70 plus irrigated acres with an 800 gpm well that has a 16” casing, records indicate it is 70’ deep with static water at 35’. Flood irrigated and fenced. Suitable for crops, pasture, or nut trees. Located close to I-10, town, schools and services with easy access. A great value at $400,000 *NEW* 17 Head BLM Permit, Near Ft. Thomas, AZ – 200+/- deeded acres with well, and spring. Very remote and extremely scenic with a beautiful canyon lined with sycamore and cottonwood trees and stunning rock formations. $285,000 *MAJOR REDUCTION* 240 Acres with Irrigation Rights, Elfrida, AZ – Suitable for hay, crops, pecans, irrigated pasture, homesite or future development. Includes 130 acres of irrigation rights, partially fenced, with corrals, & a well. Reduced to $279,800 $215,000. Terms.

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

n SOUTHERN NM (Chaves/Otero Co.) – 25,665 +/- ac., 1,320 +/- deeded, 4,024 +/- State, 15,000 +/- BLM, 5,321 +/- Forest, permitted for 580 au’s year-round, well watered, good headquarters, very nice updated home, excellent pens & out buildings. n CANYON VIEW RANCH – 1,542 deeded ac. +/- just out of Clayton, NM, beautiful, good country, well watered, volcanic rock mining operation offers addtl. income, on pvmt. n RED WING RANCH - Harding Co., NM – 1,280 ac. +/-, scenic, native grass land, no cattle in 13 yrs. Call for details. n SANCHEZ CANYON RANCH – Union CO., NM – 677 ac. +/- of very rugged, scenic country w/excellent hunting/recreation & good home for livestock, White Tail & Mule Deer, Elk, Turkey & many other varmints. n IMA HWY. – Quay Co. 1,600 ac. +/- of grassland in the House, NM area – information being processed!. n NM STATE LEASE – Union Co. – buy the improvements & irr. equip. on the property & lease a NM State Leased section, 640 ac. +/-, w/nice home, landscaped yard w/matured trees, nice shop, cattle pens & pivot sprinklers. n MELROSE, NM – easy access just off of Hwy. 60 - 1,840 ac. +/- well located, watered w/windmills & dirt tanks, easy drive out of Clovis, NM. n STEAD, NM – Union Co, NM – located at the confluence of the Pinabetes/Tramperos Creeks, year round live water, beautiful country w/super improvements & livestock watering facilities, 4,650 deeded, 3,357 State Lease, one irr. well with ¼ mi. pivot sprinkler for supplemental feed, excellent access via pvmt. & all weather roads. PRICE REDUCED CONSIDERABLY! n LAKE VIEW RANCH – San Miguel Co., NM - 9,135 total ac.+/-, w/6,670 ac. +- deeded, 320 ac. +/- BLM, 40 ac. +/- State Lease, 2,106 ac. +/- “FREE USE”, well improved, just off pvmt. on co. road., a neighboring ranch may be added for additional acreage! n LINCOLN/SOCORRO, NM – 37.65 sections +/- Central NM ranch w/good, useable improvements & water, some irrigation w/2 pivot sprinklers, on pvmt. w/all-weather road, 13,322 ac.+/Deeded, 8,457 ac. +/- BLM Lease, 2,320 ac. +/- State Lease. n FOR SALE OR LEASE - 30,000 HD. FEED YARD – Southeast Texas Panhandle, close to Texas & Kansas packers. Call or email for details!!!!. n WALKING G ARENA – Castro Co. - 6.65 ac. +/-, located just on the edge of town, a 120’ X 350’ rodeo arena, ten 12’ X 40’ horse stalls. Electric hook-up for RV & trailers. Large concrete slab for dances, auctions, etc., on pvmt. n ARGENTINA….PLEASE CALL FOR DETAILS on 176,000 ac. +/- (WE CAN DIVIDE into tracts of 1,500 acres or more) of choice land which can be cleared for soybeans & corn, some cleared & seeded to improved grasses for grazing of thousands of mother cows, some still in the brush waiting to be cleared. n AIRPORT DRIVE – Tucumcari, NM – Choice 160 ac. +/-, on pvmt. w/beautiful home, roping arena, steel pens & 139.5 ac. +/- of water rights. n BIRD HUNTERS HAVEN – Quay Co., NM - 276.22 ac. +/-, in easy driving distance of Ute & Conchas Lakes, all in native grass w/ home, barns, good fences, well watered , on pvmt. . n CLAYTON, NM – 2600 sq. ft. home, 4 bdrm., 2 bath, 2 living areas, located on 20 ac. +/- in Mountain View Estates, on city water. n SELLER VERY MOTIVATED to buy or trade for ranch or farmland properties between Dallas & Houston, TX. For sale Pontotoc/Coal Co., OK – three good, solid ranches just out of Ada in close proximity, one to the other (one owner -779 ac. +/-, 1,370 ac. +/-, 974 ac. +/-), good, useable improvements, on pvmt. or good all-weather roads.

HORSE PROPERTIES/LAND *NEW* 49+/- Acres, with 10 Head State Grazing Lease, Benson, AZ – Beautiful hilltop home with 5 bedrooms 3 Baths, 2 Fireplaces, two family rooms, large food storage area, root cellar, steel workshop/hay barn with concrete floor and corrals. Great potential as a family home, group home, bed and breakfast. $360,000 San Rafael Valley, AZ – Own a slice of heaven in the pristine San Rafael Valley, 152 Acres for $380,150 & 77 Acres with well for $217,000

Stockmen’s Realty licensed in Arizona & New Mexico www.stockmensrealty.com Ranches • hoRse PRoPeRties • FaRms DECEMBER 2016

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Commitment. Responsibility. self esteem. ACComplishment.

BAR M REAL ESTATE New Mexico Properties For Sale...

These are the values taught by the New Mexico Boys & Girls Ranches for 72 years.

Bar M

Real Estate

Scott McNally, Qualifying Broker Roswell, NM 88202 Office: 575-622-5867 • Cell: 575-420-1237

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MAKE IT CHRISTMAS FOR FRIENDS, FAMILY & BUSINESS ASSOCIATES WITH A NEW MEXICO STOCKMAN

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Keep the tradition of caring alive by giving today!

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the largest cattle ranches within the state of New Mexico. The historic Turkey Track Ranch, once owned by Cap Mossman, the famous lawman, has been under one family ownership for over 70 years. The ranch is situated in three southeastern New Mexico counties and encompasses over 253,000 acres. The ranch extends from the Pecos River Valley on the ranch’s western boundary for over 40 miles to above the “Caprock Escarpment” in Lea County. The acreage includes, 37,000 +/- deeded acres, 167,625 federal BLM lease acres and 48,800 NM State lease acres. The grazing capacity is set by the BLM at over 3,000 AUYL. The ranch is operated from a headquarters located above the Caprock in Lea County and two additional cow camps all complete with living facilities and working pens. The pasture design includes 13 larger pastures and numerous smaller pastures and traps. Livestock water is provided by approximately 30 serviceable wells and miles of buried pipeline. In addition there are numerous large earthen tanks scattered throughout the ranch. The terrain and vegetation is diversified ranging from shinnery oak lowlands to tight grama grass turf. This is a must see. It could be one of the last opportunities to own a large piece of history. Call for an appointment to come take a look. Price: $18,500,000 cash CONTACT

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

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BAR M REAL ESTATE New Mexico Properties For Sale...

GATO MOUNTAIN RANCH: 2,991 total acres in the Bent,

CONTACT

Bar M Real Estate

Scott McNally, Qualifying Broker Roswell, NM 88202 Office: 575-622-5867 • Cell: 575-420-1237

SOLD SOLD

C6 Ranch: Sonoita/Patagonia AZ. 165 head, 45 acres deeded, 8700 acres forest lease great water, good improvements. $725,000. Sam Hubbell-Tom Hardesty Hunt Valley Ranch: 1,173 deeded acres & 320 acres private lease with cowboy house and irrigation well for small pasture and orchard. Located 12 miles NW of St. Johns, AZ. $595,000. Traegen Knight Tres Alamos Ranch/Farm, Benson AZ: 668 acres deeded W/200 irrigated, shallow water, 3 Pivots, present owners running 200 head yearlong. Priced at $2,250,000. Walter Lane

Rogers Lake: 80 acres SW Flagstaff, adjacent summer leases may be available to sublease. $1,600,000. Paul Groseta

Price Canyon Ranch: 191 head Guest Ranch in SE AZ. Great improvements. $2,950,000. Walter Lane

Phoenix Con Englehorn Kyle Conway 602-258-1647 Cottonwood Andy Groseta Paul Groseta 928-634-8110 Sonoita Sam Hubbell Tom Hardesty Sandy Ruppel 520-609-2546 Tucson Walter Lane Trey Champie Vince Hutson 520-792-2652 St. Johns Traegen Knight 928-524-3740

Providing Appraisal, Brokerage & Other Rural Real Estate Services

www.ranchesnm.com

O’NEILL LAND, llc P.O. Box 145, Cimarron, NM 87714 • 575/376-2341 • Fax: 575/376-2347 land@swranches.com • www.swranches.com

WAGONMOUND RANCH, Mora/ Harding Counties, NM. 4,927 +/- deeded acres, 1,336.80 +/- state lease acres, 2,617 +/- Kiowa National Grassland Lease Acres. 8,880.80 +/- Total Acres. Substantial holding with good mix of grazing land and broken country off rim onto Canadian River. Fenced into four main pastures with shipping and headquarter pasture and additional four pastures in the Kiowa lease. Modern well, storage tank and piped water system supplementing existing dirt tanks located on deeded. Located approximately 17 miles east of Wagon Mound on pavement then county road. Nice headquarters and good access to above rim. Wildlife include antelope, mule deer and some elk. $2,710,000

Class A irrigation shares, 2 center pivots, nice sale barn, 100 hd feedlot. Depredation Elk Tags available. Owner financing available to qualified buyer. Significantly reduced to $550,000 MIAMI 80 ACRES, Colfax County, NM. 80 +/- deeded acres, 80 water shares, expansive views, house, shop, roping arena, barns and outbuildings. Reduced to $490,000 COLD BEER VIEW, Colfax County, NM 83.22 +/- deeded acre, 3,174 sq ft, 5 bedroom, 3 ½ bathrm, 2 car garage home situated on top of the hill with amazing 360 degree views. $560,000

MIAMI 20 ACRES, Colfax County, NM. 20 +/- deeded acres, 20 water shares, quality MIAMI HORSE TRAINING FACILITY, 2,715 sq ft adobe home, barn, grounds Colfax County, NM. Ideal horse training facil- and trees. Private setting. This is a must see. ity, 4 bedroom 3 bathroom approx. 3,593 $425,000 sq-ft home, 332.32 +/- deeded acres, 208 RATON MILLION DOLLAR VIEW, Colfax shares of irrigation, all the facilities you need County, NM. 97.68 +/- deeded acres, 2 parto summer your cutting horse operation cels, excellent home, big shop, wildlife, a out of the heat and far enough south to true million dollar view at end of private have somewhat mild winters. Approximately road. $489,000 6,200 ft elevation. $1,790,000 FRENCH TRACT 80, Colfax County, NM MAXWELL FARM IMPROVED, Colfax irrigated farm with home and good outbuildCounty, NM. 280 +/- deeded acres, 160 ings, $350,000

Apache Mesa Ranch – 5,300 +/- acre rim rock ranch located off Hwy 84 south & west of Las Vegas, NM. 3,500+- deeded w/BLM & State grazing leases, cedar, pinon & ponderosa tree cover, rim rocks, mesas & grassy meadows. Nice HQ w/bunk house, includes caretakers home/w 5 acres plus barns & corrals & plenty of scenery. New Price is $2,498,900 Trigg Ranches – 720 deeded acres lies near La Cueva Canyon Ranch on Apache Mesa off Hwy 84. Off the grid in tall pines but power is close by! 720 acres priced at $288,900 & smaller 200 acre parcel available for $124,000! Pending!

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

NM area. Extensive improvements along with abundant wildlife. Paved access from U.S. 70. Suitable for corporate retreat or guest ranch. ($2,800,000) Take a look at this one. FLORES CANYON RANCH: 3,290 total acres at Glencoe, NM. Ruidoso River runs through the southern tip of the ranch. Foothills of the Sacramento Mountains with fantastic views. Price; $3,000,000 DOUBLE L RANCH: Central NM, 10 miles west of Carrizozo, NM. 12,000 total acres; 175 AUYL, BLM Section 3 grazing permit; Water provided by 3 wells and buried pipeline. Improvements include house and pens. Price: $1,500,000 RHODES FARM: Southeastern NM on the Pecos River east of Hagerman. Comprised of 480 total acres with 144 irrigated acres. Unique private drain water rights. Call for a Brochure. Price: $1,400,000

Lazy EH: Western AZ, 122.5 ac deeded, 260,000 ac BLM/State Lease. 11,500 AUM ephemeral/500 AU yearlong. 17 wells, 2 pumps on CAP canal. $875,000. Con Englehorn

Romero Ranch – 960 deeded acres has a 40 acre BLM grazing parcel attached. It’s a mountain mesa top with grammas, side oats, sacatone, cedars, pinons & tall pines. Has 6 dirt tanks, close to power too. North & east sides drop into La Cueva Canyon. Asking $400,000 Dilia Loop Road – Fenced 20+ acre parcel is planted in alfalfa & grass, has 4 irrigated sections plus 20 ac ft of ditch rights and Pecos River frontage. Excellent farming opportunity for organic vegetable gardens, alfalfa or sweet grass. Priced at $225,000 Upper Anton Chico – This parcel has outstanding alfalfa production for a small parcel, 7.5 acres are irrigated with under ground pipes, perimeter fenced, easy farm to work and irrigate. Now $82,500 I HAVE BUYERS, I NEED LISTINGS

KEN AHLER REAL ESTATE CO., INC. 300 Paseo Peralta, Suite 211, Santa Fe, NM 87501

Office: 505/989–7573 • Toll Free: 888/989–7573 • Mobile: 505/490–0220 Email: kahler@newmexico.com • Website: www.SantaFeLand.com DECEMBER 2016

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VIEW FROM THE BACKSIDE by Barry Denton

The Good Guys Might Win

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

T

he signs were all in place, the rallies drew unprecedented crowds, working people were banding together against the freeloaders, the liberal media were going ballistic about things that do not matter, and the Chicago Cubs win the World Series for the first time in 108 years. To me these were all signs that Mr. Trump would win the presidential election. I went to the Trump Rally in Prescott Valley, Arizona. I went as a VIP so I did not have to stand in line very long compared to most. When I was waiting to get in I never saw a crowd so large. It was a line that snaked for a couple of miles. People were friendly and helpful to each

other. I got a seat right up front and got to shake hands with Mr. Trump. Needless to say, it was an exciting event and people were going nuts in a good way. There was one heckler in front of the podium. Simultaneously, two cowboy guys turned around and decked him until security guards could get there. They reported that the venue held 7,000 and there were over 20,000 people outside. In the small town, it was an amazing turnout. The electricity that filled the arena was very impressive as well. When you left there you had a good sense that indeed Mr. Trump had started a movement and was not your typical politician. Okay, so here we are sitting on the back of a horse, tractor, combine, or doing the books at our desk wondering how some guy from NEW YORK CITY is going to do us any good. Here is the first clue. Just three days after Mr. Trump is elected President of the United States he is starting to choose members of his Cabinet and other appointees. One of the first things he does is creates the

Agricultural and Rural Advisory Committee headed by Charles Herbster. Sixty persons from the agriculture industry will be included. The sixty chosen are dairy farmers, wheat farmers, soybean farmers, cattle ranchers, a few former politicians that made great strides in agriculture, a few governors of agricultural states, oil men, miners, etc. I do not think that they missed any one area of our western business. I guess they should have had at least one horseshoer on there and maybe they will at that. A few of the people included on that list that us westerners may know are: Helen Graves of the King Ranch in Texas, Mark Killian Commissioner of Agriculture for Arizona, Mary Fallin the former Oklahoma Governor, Forest Lucas CEO of Lucas Oil, Johnny Trotter CEO of Bar G Feedlot, and Red Steagall Cowboy Poet of Texas and advocate of the American Cowboy. If you know any of those folks, that is a very impressive list. How many of your friends were asked to be on the current President’s advisory list? Mr. Trump may hail from New York

WALKER & MARTIN RANCH SALES Santa Fe

Denver

ust Renew GENT! You M

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Your Free Lis

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.com aaalivestock

www.RiverRanches.com Greg Walker (720) 441-3131 Greg@RiverRanches.com Robert Martin (505) 603-9140 Robert@RiverRanches.com

Broker Associate cell: 214.701.1970 www.jamessammons.com jsammons@briggsfreeman.com

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Editorial Calendar

James B Sammons III

Plan yourfor g advertisinin the com g year! JANUARY — Wildlife; Gelbvieh; Joint Stockmen’s Convention Results FEBRUARY — Beefmasters; Texas Longhorns MARCH — Limousin; Santa Gertrudis APRIL — Dairy

MAY — News of the Day If you would like to see your breed featured email caren@aaalivestock.com To Reserve Advertising Space email chris@aaalivestock.com or call Chris at 505.243.9515, ext. 28

JUNE — Sheepman of the Year JULY — Directory of Agriculture AUGUST — The Horse Industry SEPTEMBER — Charolais; Fairs Across the SW OCTOBER — Hereford; NM State Fair Results NOVEMBER — Cattleman of the Year; Angus; Brangus; Red Angus DECEMBER — Bull Buyers Guide; Joint Stockmen’s Convention Preview


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John D iamo nd, Qu ali fying Bro ker john@beaverheadoutdoors.com Cell: (575) 740-1528 Office: (575) 772-5538 Fax: (575) 772-5517 HC 30 Box 445, Winston, NM 87943

Specializing in NM Ranches & Hunting Properties www.BeaverheadOutdoors.com

from no chance on this reform to a good chance to get it done. Please explain to me why National Cattleman’s Beef Association did not stop the recent agreement with Brazil bringing in over 3 million pounds of beef each year. Are we ever going to see foreign beef labeled in the stores? If you could export American beef at a premium and import foreign beef cheap I might be able to see the logic. However, it is not the average rancher that makes money on this deal. Our beef prices will just continue to decline. I hope Mr. Trump can help with this issue as we are losing our beef jobs to other countries as well. Many corrections can be and should be made to help the last of the small ranchers. Hopefully, happy days will be here once again.     

Bar M Real Estate

SCOTT MCNALLY www.ranchesnm.com 575/622-5867 575/420-1237 Ranch Sales & Appraisals

The Fourr Ranch Dragoon AZ – 1280 deeded acres, 11610 AZ state, and 3689 NF Acres. Runs 300 head, Well-watered, lots of grass. Priced at $4,250,000 RAINBOWS END RANCH, SUNIZONA, AZ – 315 head yearlong, 5588 deeded acres 15000 state and BLM lease. Good easy grass country. This is a nice ranch in a very productive area of Arizona. Priced @$3,500,000

SOLD

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

City, but I think he is hell bent on helping small business to succeed in this country. He recognizes that the small businessman is the backbone of America. That is why he will go after the North American Free Trade Agreement. Look at how NAFTA has flooded our cattle market with more and more foreign beef. It has only made the small rancher disappear from the western landscape. How many ranchers in your local Cattle Association actually make their entire living from the ranch? It is sad how low that number has become. I do not think Mr. Trump will wave a magic wand and all small ranchers will suddenly make a half million dollars a year, but I do think he will remove some hurdles that prevent you from making a decent living. It looks to me like this is a chance at a new beginning in America. Perhaps even the Bureau of Land Management and the United States Forest Service will actually become the rancher’s friend once again. It will take awhile to adjust or repeal some of these overreaching environmental laws. Keep in mind that we have gone

BAR B RANCH, TUBAC, AZ – 75 head yearlong, 526 acres with 75 acres irrigated, owned by the same family since 1914, large grandfathered water right. Last large tract of land in the area. Improvements need attention. Priced @$1,950,000 – reduced from $2,350,000

D L O S

If you are looking to Buy or Sell a Ranch or Farm in Southwestern NM or Southern AZ give us a call: Sam Hubbell, Qualifying Broker 520-609-2546 DECEMBER 2016

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Protect Water Quality

PAUL McGILLIARD Murney Associate Realtors Cell: 417/839-5096 • 800/743-0336 Springfield, MO 65804

www.Paulmcgilliard.murney.com

by Raylene Nickel, www.agriculture.com

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

P •Rocky Ridge Ranch – Just Listed almost 6 sections with 41% Deeded, 44% BLM and 14% State Lease. Very few ranches are improved in a manner comparable to this ranch, regardless of size and the location and is within close proximity to Roswell, NM as an added bonus. Call Cherri Michelet Snyder for more details and check out the website. Reduced by $200,000

REDUCED 0 0 0 , 0 0 $2

Cherri Michelet Snyder Qualifying Broker 920 East 2nd Roswell, NM 88201 Office: 575/623-8440 Cell: 575/626-1913

Check Our Website For Our Listings — www.michelethomesteadrealty.com

FARMS, RANCHES, DAIRIES, HORSE & COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES — Satisfied Customers Are My Best Advertisement —

Southwest New Mexico Farms & Ranches FORT FILLMORE ROAD- 5 acre pecan farm with 5 enclosed horse pens and pipe fencing. Property does not include an irrigation well but does have ground and surface water rights. Directions: Hwy 478 - east on Fort Fillmore 1/2 mile and property will be on the north/left. $159,900 20.79 ACRE COUNTRY ESTATE - The acreage contains approximately 18 +/- acres of income producing pecan trees with surface & ground water rights and an irrigation well. Past production records are available. Ample storage with approximately 7,600 sq. ft. of metal buildings with 6 roll-up bay doors and over 5,700 sq. ft. of covered equipment sheds. Residence is a gorgeous 3711 sq ft +/- 2br / 2.5ba adobe main home that has been completely remodeled throughout and a large addition that looks into a meticulously landscaped back yard. Expansive master suite that has it’s own private courtyard and large walk-in cedar lined closet. The list goes on and on! One of the detached structures contains a large 1 br / 1ba apartment, indoor/outdoor dog kennels and more. This truly is a one of a kind property! Call Dan or Jamie to schedule your private viewing today! $1,218,000 27.5 ACRE FARM IN SAN MIGUEL, NM - consists of 3 tracts (two 8 acre tracts & 11.5 ac tract) will sell each tract separately for $19,000/acre. Full EBID & irrigation well, community water, electric, telephone & gas on Camunez Road to adjoining property. Beautiful farm land, great mountain & valley views. Priced at $399,000 DAWSON ROAD FARM - 98.292 acres - 2 Separate parcels and 2 irrigation wells with ground and surface water rights, cement ditches and paved road frontage. Currently planted in corn. South of La Mesa to intersection of Hwy 28 and 189. Go 1/2 mile DAN DELANEY south to Dawson Road. Go east or left .4 miles. REAL ESTATE, LLC Farm on both sides of Dawson Road. $1,671,000

“If you are interested in farm land or ranches in New Mexico, give me a call.”

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318 W. Amador Avenue Las Cruces, NM 88005 (O) 575/647-5041 (C) 575/644-0776 nmlandman@zianet.com www.zianet.com/nmlandman

oor-quality drinking water can wreak havoc on the health and performance of livestock. Because water plays such a vital role in every bodily function, decreased quality or limited intake of water can lead to loss of weight or a poor rate of gain, reproductive inefficiency, reduced milk production, illness, and even death. Sulfate, manure, and blue-green algae are three elements that can potentially cause problems with water quality.

1. SULFATE High-sulfate water can lead to a broad gamut of physical signs, says Cody Wright, South Dakota State University ruminant nutritionist. “It can lead to loss of performance and body condition and create a copper deficiency. We’ve had producers who couldn’t get cows and heifers bred. They struggled to find a cause and later discovered it was lost body condition due to high-sulfate water,” he says. The presence of excess sulfate in water is spotty and hard to predict. High levels can occur in wells, dugouts, and runoff. Weather events like heat and wind, which lead to evaporation of surface water, can increase the level. A heavy rain may either dilute the sulfate levels or bring more sulfate into the dam. “If you suspect you might have too much sulfate in the water, it’s important to take a water sample a couple of times during the grazing season,” says Wright. This is especially important when putting cattle on

Sam Middleton

SERVING THE RANCHING INDUSTRY SINCE 1920 Farm - Ranch Sales & Appraisals www.chassmiddleton.com 1507 13TH STREET LUBBOCK, TEXAS 79401 • (806) 763-5331


new pastures where you have no prior experience with the water source. “Rural water is typically safe,” he continues. “When digging a new well, for instance, check with area producers to find out their experience with sulfate at various depths.” 2. MANURE If manure becomes concentrated in drinking water, cattle tend to drink less. “When water consumption is limited, feed consumption is affected,” he says. “When cattle drink less, they eat less.” During cool weather, a lactating beef cow needs about 1 gallon of water per 100 pounds of body weight and 2 gallons per 100 pounds during the hottest days. If cattle are drinking from ponds or dugouts, manure-loading of the water may be reduced by finding ways to restrict loitering of the cattle at the water source.

Larry D. Preuit Qualifying Broker 575.760.2775 Larry preuitre@yahoo.com

230 West Hadley, Las Cruces, NM 88995 caprockrealestateservices.com

SPRING VALLEY – WEST (Ranch) All deeded 15,000 acres (more or less) just 45 air miles S.E. of Santa Fe, New Mexico, in rolling foothills. Good improvements, good water, good gramma grass. Cow calf or yearlings. Locked, gated entrance on pavement. Scenic. Has no public roads through this ranch! Price recently reduced to only $375.00 per acre. FREE BROCHURE upon request. Contact Larry (first time advertised). CALL FOR DETAILED INFORMATION ANYTIME!

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

3. BLUE-GREEN ALGAE On hot, dry, calm days in summer, stagnant water can have a blue-green algae bloom, or scum, says Wright. “When the algae cells die, they release toxins into the water that can kill cattle. Water sources that have a high nutrient load are at the greatest risk for blue-green algae,” he says. Where possible, fencing cattle away from the contaminated area of water can be helpful. “In a stock dam, you can try pumping uncontaminated water from deeper levels into a stock tank,” he says. Treating the contaminated area of water with copper sulfate, or bluestone, can also help. Bluestone is typically available at feed stores. Wright suggests treating the affected water at a rate of 2.7 pounds of copper sulfate per acre-foot of water. An acre-foot measures 66×660 feet and 1 foot in depth. “You can just fling it out in the water,” says Wright. “Some apply it in a more uniform fashion, but it’s not necessary.” After treating the algae bloom, keep cattle off the water source for approximately one week. When good sources of water coexist with contaminated sources in the same pasture, you might trust the cattle to seek out the water they need. “Cattle are smart enough to find good water if it’s available,” says Wright. “If cattle are grazing well and performing well, you likely don’t have a problem with water quality.”     

Caprock Real Estate Services, Inc.

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REAL ESTATE GUIDE

CRAWFORD L BAR RANCH: SANDOVAL COUNTY, NM 36,460 DEEDED ACRES: Price Reduced! This ranch truly epitomizes the description of New Mexico being the “Land of Enchantment.” The topography and views from all parts of this ranch are stunning which makes it one of the most scenic in the state. $20,053,000

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Land Report Best Brokerage Firm 2010 , 2011, 2012, 2013, 20 14 & 2015

LANGFORD MOUNTAINS RANCH: GRANT COUNTY, NM 21,595 TOTAL ACRES, 7,760 +/- DEEDED ACRES WITH REMAINDER NM STATE AND BLM: Nestled in the Southwest region of New Mexico, lies a high desert livestock ranch that is perfectly balanced with beautiful open rolling desert rangeland and scenic mountain terrain. Both regions of this ranch are suited to livestock grazing and home to some very large mule deer bucks. $3,650,000

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WHITE BLUFF RANCH: CHAVES COUNTY, NM 16,027.04 TOTAL ACRES, 4,176.04 DEEDED ACRES WITH REMAINDER NM STATE AND BLM: This quality grazing ranch, containing over 25 sections, is located in Chaves County and has a permit for 372 Animal Units. The ranch is perfectly balanced with beautiful open rolling productive rangeland, excellent headquarter improvements, highly functional range infrastructure, and a whole lot of location, location, location. $3,500,000

REAL ESTATE GUIDE

THOMPSON RANCH: CHAVES COUNTY, NM, 21,747 TOTAL ACRES, 9,438 DEEDED ACRES WITH REMAINDER NM STATE AND BLM This property has been under the same family ownership since 1926 and has never, until now, been offered for sale. This long term family ownership working cattle ranch is located in the northwest corner of Chaves County, and offers good native grass turf, is well watered and has plenty of topography for winter protection and scenic appeal. $3,303,300

CHARLIE MIDDLETON g e Farmin Serving th g Industry in & Ranch 1920 Since

Ranch Broker in Texas • Qualifying Broker in New Mexico www.chassmiddleton.com • (806) 763-5331 office • (806) 786-0313 cell Texas Law requires all Texas real estate licensees to provide all clients with the following Information about Brokerage Services in Texas: www.trec.state.tx.us/pdf/contracts/OP-K.pdf

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▫ seedstock guide

Angus Plus & Rick & Maggie Hubbell Mark Hubbell

George Curtis Inc.

Brangus

Bulls & Heife rs 575-773-4770

Quemado, NM • hubbell@wildblue.net

CANDY TRUJILLO Capitan, N.M. 575/354-2682 1-800/333-9007, ext. 6712

~ Registered Angus Cattle ~

Good cow herds + performance bulls = pounds = dollars!

/K

Registered Bulls & Females Available Horned & Polled

Call: BLAKE CURTIS, Clovis, NM 575/762-4759 or 575/763-3302

RANCH RAISED

Semen Sales AI Supplies AI Service

DARIC & PATTY KNIGHT SPRINGERVILLE, AZ 928/333-3600 • CELL 928-521-9897 WhiteMountainHerefords.com facebook.com/White-Mountain-Herefords

MOUNTAIN RAISED

Coyote Ridge Ranch

WINSTON, NEW MEXICO Russell and Trudy Freeman

575/743-6904

SINCE 1962

NGUS FARMS 22nd Annual Bull & Heifer Sale Saturday, March 18, 2017 – Canyon, Texas 27951 South U.S. Hwy. 87, Canyon, TX 79015-6515 Richmond Hales • 806/488-2471 • Cell. 806/679-1919 Rick Hales • 806/655-3815 • Cell. 806/679-9303

Villanueva •

Ranch

Angus Bulls & Replacement Females

Cattle that will produce in any environment.”

BOB & KAY ANDERSON • 575/421-1809 HCR 72, BOX 10 • RIBERA, N.M. 87560

Herefords

Total Performance Based on a Strong Foundation of Working Mothers

18300 Weld County Rd. 43, LaSalle, CO 80645 Jane Evans Cornelius • 970/284-6878 Hampton & Kay Cornelius • 970/396-2935 www.coyoteridgeherefords.com

Bar J Bar

HEREFORD RANCH Since 1893 • Se Hable Español

BULLS & HEIFERS – PRIVATE TREATY TEXAS / N.M. RANCH: 5 Paseo de Paz Ln., El Paso, TX 79932 H: 915/877-2535 • O: 915/532-2442 • C: 915/479-5299 OKLA. RANCH: Woods County, OK • barjbarherefords@aol.com

March 10, 2017

“Proven genetics that increase profit” 505-850-6684

SouthweSt Red AnguS ASSociAtion Ranch Tested - Rancher Trusted For contact information on a Breeder near you call:

432-283-1141

RED ANGUS

Bulls & Replacement Heifers 575-318-4086 2022 N. Turner, Hobbs, NM 88240

www.lazy-d-redangus.com

SEEDSTOCK GUIDE

TO LIST YOUR HERD HERE CONTACT CHRIS@AAALIVESTOCK.COM OR 505-243-9515, x.28

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M

ANFORD

PRIVATE TREATY

C A T T L E

ANGUS • BRAHMAN • HEREFORDS • F1s F1 & Montana influenced Angus Cattle GARY MANFORD 505/508-2399 – 505/414-7558


Performance Beefmasters from the Founding Family

Angus Cattle for the Long Haul Coming 2-Yr-Old Bulls For Sale Longevity - Maternal - Efficiency

GrauPerformance Charolais ranCh Tested Since 1965

DunnRanches@yahoo.com • 520/560-0721 Breeding Registered Angus Since 1964

T. Lane Grau – 575.760.6336 – tlgrau@hotmail.com Colten Grau – 575.760.4510 – colten_g@hotmail.com

BEEFMASTERS 56th Bull Sale—October 7, 2017 Private Treaty Females Semen & Embryos

Lorenzo Lasater • San Angelo, TX 325.656.9126 • isabeefmasters.com

www.DunnRanches.com

▫ seedstock guide

T O L I S T Y O U R H E R D H E R E C O N T A C T C H R I S @ A A A L I V E S T O C K . C O M O R 5 0 5 - 2 4 3 - 9 5 1 5 , x . 28

1680 CR 37 Grady, New Mexico 88120

Bradley 3 Ranch Ltd. www.bradley3ranch.com

Ranch-Raised ANGUS Bulls for Ranchers Since 1955

a

Thatcher, Arizon

DiamondSevenAngus.com

lity Represents Qua The Brand that angus Bulls & Females Br Registered Black

Annual Bull Sale February 11, 2017 at the Ranch NE of Estelline, TX M.L. Bradley, 806/888-1062 Fax: 806/888-1010 • Cell: 940/585-6471

928/651-5120 • 928/348-8918 • bjcmd@cableone.net

Maternal Efficiency, Moderate Frame, Calving Ease with Rapid Growth 21st Annual

BULL SALE

Tuesday, March 21, 2017 Gardner Family | www.manzanoangus.com Bill 505-705-2856 | Cole 575-910-5952 | Clayton 505-934-8742 Estancia & Yeso, New Mexico

GRAU

Bulls & Bred Heifers, Private Treaty Roy, & Trudy Hartzog – Owners 806/825-2711 • 806/225-7230 806/470-2508 • 806/225-7231 FARWELL, TEXAS

RANCH

CHAROLAIS HEIFERS & BULLS FOR SALE 575-760-7304 WESLEY GRAU www.grauranch.com

CRAIG

LIMOUSIN RANCH Breeders since 1971 of Top Quality, High-Altitude Registered Limousin Cattle.

For Sale Year-Round BLACK BULLS • BLACK HEIFERS Polled • Horned • Red • Black A.I. Sired from Select Bulls JOEL CRAIG 970/259-0650

14908 Hwy. 550 S. Durango, CO 81303

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▫ seedstock guide

Coming Soon To a pasture near you Bulls - Females - Embryos - Semen

1-877/2-BAR-ANG 1-806/344-7444

Hereford, Texas JOHNSTEVE THAMES KNOLL & LAURASTEVE KNOLL WWW.2BARANGUS.COM

C Bar R A N C H SLATON, TEXAS

Charolais & Angus Bulls

TREY WOOD 806/789-7312 CLARK WOOD 806/828-6249 • 806/786-2078

CONNIFF CATTLE CO.LLC Angus, Shorthorn, LimFlex Bulls - Cows - Heifers for Sale John & Laura Conniff 1500 Snow Road, Las Cruces, NM 88005 575/644-2900 • john@conniffcattle.com Casey & Chancie Roberts Upham Road, Rincon, NM 575/644-9583 www.conniffcattle.com www.leveldale.com

Casey

BEEFMASTERS SIXTY PLUS YEARS

www.CaseyBeefmasters.com Watt, Jr. 325/668-1373 Watt50@sbcglobal.net Watt: 325/762-2605

HEREFORD BULLS FOR SALE VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME!

HENARD RANCH

OSCAR · 575/398-6155 • 575/760-0814 BOX 975, TATUM, NEW MEXICO 88267 RUSTY · 575/760-0816

Producers of Quality & Performance Tested Brahman Bulls & Heifers “Beef-type American Gray Brahmans, Herefords, Gelbvieh & F-1s.” Available at All Times Loren & Joanne Pratt 44996 W. Papago Road Maricopa, AZ 85139 520/568-2811 126

DECEMBER 2016

Red Angus Cattle For Sale Purebred Red Angus

R A N C H

• Weaned & Open Heifers • Calving Ease Bulls

YOUNG BULLS FOR SALE

JaCin Ranch SANDERS, ARIZONA

928/688-2753 cell: 505/879-3201

Angus Bulls Yearlings & 2-year-olds Bred Angus replacement heifers Ranch Raised • Rock Footed Calving Ease with Rapid Growth Private Treaty Ernest & Ronda Thompson – Mountainair, NM 575-423-3313 • Cell 505-818-7284


AGBA

CORRIENTE BEEF IS SANCTIONED BY SLOWFOOD USA

American Galloway Breeders Association

www.AmericanGalloway.com

PUT YOUR HERD BACK TO WORK. Galloway genetics are ideal for today’s low input market demands.

▫ seedstock guide

T O L I S T Y O U R H E R D H E R E C O N T A C T C H R I S @ A A A L I V E S T O C K . C O M O R 5 0 5 - 2 4 3 - 9 5 1 5 , x . 28

Feed Efficient • High Yielding carcass w/Minimal Back Fat • Easy Fleshing • Moderate Mature Size • Low BW American Gelbvieh Association • www.gelbvieh.org 303-465-BEEF (2333)

970-405-5784 Email: AGBA@midrivers.com

Registered CORRIENTE BULLS Excellent for First Calf Heifers

Bulls & Heifers FOR SALE AT THE FARM

CATES RANCH

WAGON MOUND, NEW MEXICO 575/666-2360 www.catesranch.com

Registered Polled Herefords

Attend the 26th Annual Roswell Brangus Bull & Female Sale February 25, 2017

David & Norma Brennand Piñon, NM 88344 575/687-2185

Raising Cattle that Work in the Real World Quality Registered Black Angus Cattle Genex Influenced Mountain Raised, Rock-Footed

Cañones Route P.O. Abiquiu, N.M. 87510 MANUEL SALAZAR P.O. Box 867 Española, N.M. 87532 PHONE: 575-638-5434

Joe Paul & Rosie Lack P.O. Box 274 Hatch, NM 87937 575-267-1016 Rachael Carpenter 575-644-1311

Bill Morrison

411 CR 10 Clovis, NM 88101 575-482-3254 575-760-7263 Cell

www.lackmorrisonbrangus.com

bvmorrison@yucca.net

n Calving Ease n Easy Fleshing n Powerful

Performance Genetics n Docility

Zoetis HD 50K 50,000 DNA Markers (Combined w/Angus EPDs provides the most accurate & complete picture of the animals genetic potential) DNA Sire Parentage Verified AGI Free From All Known Genetic Defects BVD FREE HERD Available Private Treaty Born & Raised in the USA

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Scott & Shackleton Logbooks Prove Antarctic Sea Ice is Not Shrinking 100 Years After Expeditions

we view the ebb and flow of Antarctic sea 1950s, before a steep decline returned it to ice,” said Dr Jonathan Day, who led the around 3.7 million miles (6 million square study, which was published in the journal kilometres) in recent decades which is just The Cryosphere. 14 per cent smaller than at the highest point “We know that sea ice in the Antarctic has of the 1900s and 12 per cent bigger than increased slightly over the past 30 years, than the lowest point. since satellite observations began. ScienThe findings demonstrate that the tists have been grappling to understand climate of Antarctica fluctuated signifithis trend in the context of global warming, cantly throughout the 20th century and but these new findings suggest it may not indicates that sea ice in the Antarctic is be anything new. much less sensitive to the effects of climate “If ice levels were as low a century ago as change than that of the Arctic, which has by Sarah Knapton, Science Editor, estimated in this research, then a similar experienced a dramatic decline during the www.telegraph.co.uk increase may have occurred between then 20th century. ntarctic sea ice had barely changed and the middle of the century, when previIn future the team plans to use data from from where it was 100 years ago, sci- ous studies suggest ice levels were far naval and whaling ships as well as the logs entists have discovered, after poring higher.” from Amundsen’s expeditions to complete over the logbooks of great polar explorers The study was based on the ice observa- the picture. such as Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest tions recorded in the logbooks from 11 Separate research by the British AntarcShackleton. voyages between 1897 and 1917, including tic Survey also showed that the present day Experts were concerned that ice at the three expeditions led by Captain Scott, two loss of the Pine Island Glacier on the West South Pole had declined significantly since by Shackleton, as well as sea-ice records Antarctic Ice Sheet has been happening the 1950s, which they feared was driven by from Belgian, German and French since the mid 20th century and was probaman-made climate change. missions. bly caused by El Niño activity rather than But new analysis suggests that condiCaptain Scott died along with his team global warming. tions are now virtually identical to when the in 1912 after losing to Norwegian Roald Pine Island Glacier, which drains into the Terra Nova and Endurance sailed to the Amundsen in the race to the South Pole, Amundsen Sea in West Antarctica, is retreatcontinent in the early 1900s, indicating that while Shackleton’s ship sank after becom- ing and thinning rapidly, but the initial declines are part of a natural cycle and not ing trapped in ice in 1915 as he and his crew triggering mechanism was unclear. The the result of global warming. attempted the first land crossing of team looked a sediment cores in the area It also explains why sea ice levels in the Antarctica. which showed that an ocean cavity under South Pole have begun to rise again in The study is the first to calculate sea ice the ice shelf began to form around 1945, recent years, a trend which has left climate in the period prior to the 1930s, and sug- following a pulse of warmth associated scientists scratching their heads. gests the levels in the early 1900s were with El Niño events in the tropical Pacific “The missions of Scott and Shackleton are between 3.3 and 4.3 million square miles Ocean. remembered in history as heroic failures, (5.3 and 7.4 million square kilometres) “We are very excited about this new yet the data collected by these and other Estimates suggest Antarctic sea ice finding as it provides the first direct eviexplorers could profoundly change the way extent was significantly higher during the dence of the timing of glacier retreat even before we had satellites to measure them,” said lead author, marine geologist Dr James Smith from British Antarctic Survey. Michael H. “They show us how changes half-way & Claudia across the planet in the tropical Pacific, Sander reached through the ocean to influence the Antarctic ice sheet.” Co-author Professor Bob Bindschadler of NASA added: “A significant implication 2702 S. WestgateH Weslaco, Texas 78596 of our findings is that once an ice sheet 956/968-9650 • Office 956/968-4528 retreat is set in motion it can continue for decades, even if what started gets no worse. “It is possible that the changes we see today on Pine Island Glacier were essentially Call us set in motion in the 1940s.” for ALL your Registered Brangus Bulls & Heifers Brangus needs! The Pine Island research was published Ray & Karen Westall, Owners / Tate Pruett, Ranch Manager in Nature.     

A

S O

outhern tar Ranch

O

American Red Brangus Bulls for Sale

Westall Ranches, LLC

P.O. Box 955, Capitan NM 88316 • Cell: 575.365.6356 • Ranch: 575.653.4842 • email: taterfire@hotmail.com

SEEDSTOCK GUIDE

TO LIST YOUR HERD HERE CONTACT CHRIS@AAALIVESTOCK.COM OR 505-243-9515, x.28

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A Lazy 6 Angus Ranch . 12, 124 AC Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . 130 Ag New Mexico FCS, ACA . . . 2 Ken Ahler Real Estate Co. . . 117 American Angus Assn. . . . . 56 American Galloway Breeders Assn . . . . . . . . 127 American Gelbvieh Assn.16, 127 American Salers Assn . . . . . 44 Bert Ancell . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Angus Invitational Bull Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Arizona Life, LLC . . . . . . . 114 B & H Herefords . . . . . . . . . 13 Ken Babcock Sales . . . . . . 113 Bale Buddy Mfg., Inc. . . . . . 79 Bar G Feedyard . . . . . . . . . 41 Bar Guitar Liquid Feed Co. . 111 Bar J Bar Herefords . . . 11, 124 Bar M Real Estate . 116, 117, 119 Bar W Ranch Inc . . . . . . . . . 27 Barzona Breeders Assn. . . . . 24 Beaverhead Outdoors . . . . 119 Beefmaster Breeders United . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Best in the West Brangus Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 BJM Sales & Service Inc . . . 113 Black Angus “Ready for Work” Bull Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Black Range Enterprises . . . 82 Border Tank Resources . . . 113 Bovine Elite . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Bow K Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Raymond Boykin . . . . . . . . 54 Bradley 3 Ranch, Ltd. . . . 6, 125 Brand Your Cookin’ . . . . . . . 86 Brennand Ranch . . . . . 57, 127 Brinks Brangus / Westall Ranch, . . . . . 49, 128 C Bar Ranch . . . . . . . . 62, 126 Campbell Simmentals . . . . . 65 Caprock Real Estate Services . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Carter Brangus . . . . . . 20, 125 Casey Beefmasters . . . . . . 126 Cates Ranch . . . . . . . . . . 127 Caviness Packing Co., Inc . . . 68 Circle H Headquarters . . . . 113 CJ Beefmasters . . . . . . . . . 62 Clark Anvil Ranch . . . . . . . . 40 Clavel Herefords . . . . . . . . 45 Clovis Livestock Auction . . . 36 Coba Select Sires . . . . . . . 126 Coleman Herefords . . . . . . 65 Conniff Cattle Co . . . . . 20, 126 Cornerstone Ranch . . . . . . . 19 Cox Ranch Herefords . . 61, 124 Coyote Ridge Ranch . . 55, 124 CPE Feeds Inc . . . . . . . . . 113 Craig Herefords . . . . . . . . . 54 Craig Limousin . . . . . . 62, 125 Crystalyx . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 George Curtis, Inc. . . . . 39, 124 Davis & Sons Hatting Co. . . 112 Decker Herefords . . . . . . . . 52 Dan Delaney Real Estate . . 120 Denton Photography . . . . . 82 Desert Scales & Weighing Equipment . . . . . . . . . . 112 Diamond Nutrition . . . . . . . 16 Diamond Peak Cattle Co. . . . 35

Diamond Seven Angus . 18, 125 Domenici Law Firm, PC . . . . 89 Dunn Ranches . . . . . . . . . 125 Elbrock Ranch . . . . . . . . . . 44 Evans Beefmasters . . . . . . . 65

FGHIJK

F & F Cattle Company . . . . . 54 Fallon-Cortese Land . . . . . 116 Farm Credit of New Mexico . . 8 Farmway Feed Mill . . . . . . . 69 FBFS / Monte Anderson . . 109 FBFS / Larry Marshall . . . . 108 Ferguson Ranch . . . . . . . . . 62 Five States Livestock Auction . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 4G Mountain Angus . . . . . . 50 Four States Ag Expo . . . . . . 28 Genex / Candy Trujillo . . . . 124 Giant Rubber Water Tanks . . 95 Grau Charolais . . . . . . 17, 125 Grau Ranch . . . . . . . . 21, 125 Greer & Winston Cattle Co. . . 64 Greer Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Hales Angus Farms . . . 33, 124 Harrison Quarter Horses . . 113 Hartzog Angus Ranch . 31, 125 Hay Rake, Inc. (fmly. Fury Farms . . . . . . . 41 Hayhook Limousin . . . . . . . 61 Headquarters West, Ltd . . . 117 Headquarters West, Ltd. / Sam Hubbell . . . . . . . . . 119 Henard Ranch . . . . . . . 49, 126 Hi-Pro Feeds . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Hooper Cattle Company . . . 37 Hubbell Ranch . . . . . . 59, 124 Hudson Livestock Supplements . . . . . . . . . 77 Hutchison Western . . . . . . . 2 I’ll Drop You Off . . . . . . . . . 14 Innovative Solar Systems . . . 83 Isa Beefmasters . . . . . . 65, 125 JaCin Ranch . . . . . . . . 54, 126 Jarmon Ranch . . . . . . 65, 124 J-C Angus Ranch . . . . . . . . 52 Steve Jensen . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Jimbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Kaddatz Auctioneering & Farm Equipment . . . . . 113 Bill King Ranch . . . . . . . . . . 5

LMNOP

L & H Manufacturing . . . . . 89 Lack-Morrison Brangus . . . 127 Laflin Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Lazy D Ranch Red Angus65, 124 Lazy S Ranch Willcox . . . . . . 24 Lazy Way Bar Ranch . . . 62, 125 Manford Cattle . . . . . . 57, 124 Manzano Angus . . . . . 49, 125 M-Hat Angus . . . . . . . . . . . 60 McCoy Cattle, LLC . . . . . . . 49 McKenzie Land & Livestock . 23 Merrick’s Inc . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Mesa Tractor, Inc. . . . . . 71, 112 Michelet Homestead Realty . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Chas S. Middleton & Son . . . . . . . 120, 122-123

Miller Angus . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Miller-Sanchez . . . . . . . . . . 26 MIX 30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Monfette Construction Co. 112 Motley Mill & Cube Corp . . . 67 Mountain View Ranch . . . . . 62 Paul McGillard / Murney Assn . . . . . . . . . 120 National Animal Interest Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 National Western Stock Show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 New Mexico Angus & Hereford Assn . . . . . . . . . 40 NMCGA Clothes . . . . . . . . . 92 NMCGA Insurance . . . . . . 104 NMCGA Membership . . . . . 42 New Mexico Federal Lands Council . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 New Mexico FFA Fdtn . . . . . 94 New Mexico 4-H Fdtn . . . . . 90 New Mexico Mutual . . . . . . 66 NMSU Animal & Range Sciences . . . . . . . . . . 76, 78 New Mexico Premier Ranch Properties . . . . . . . . . . 119 New Mexico Property Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 New Mexico Purina Dealers . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 New Mexico Wool Growers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Olson Land and Cattle . 29, 124 Jim Olson . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 O’Neill Land . . . . . . . . . . 117 P Bar A Angus Cattle . . 25, 124 Parker Brangus . . . . . . . . . 30 Perez Cattle Company . . 3, 128 Phase-A-Matic, Inc. . . . . . . . 76 Power Ford . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Pratt Farms . . . . . . . . . 60, 126 Cattle Guards / Priddy Construction . . . . 109 Profit Maker Bulls . . . . . . . . 43

RSTUV

Ramro LLC / RJ Cattle Co . . . 51 Ranch For Sale By Owner . . 120 Ranch-Way Feeds . . . . . . . . 84 Rancho De Santa Barbara . . 61 Big Bend Trailers / Rancho Espuela . . . . . . . . 61 Range Changer . . . . . . . . . 99 D.J. Reveal . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Rio Grand Classic Livestock Auction . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Rio Grande Scales & Equipment . . . . . . . . . . 112 Rio Hondo Land & Livestock Co. . . . . . . . . . . 54 Tom Robb & Sons . . . . . . . . 63 Robbs Brangus . . . . . . . . . 62 Robertson Livestock . . . . . 112 ROD Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Roswell Brangus Breeders Co-op . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Roswell Brangus Bull & Female Sale . . . . . . . . 4, 44, 52, 127 Roswell Livestock Auction Co. . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Running Creek Ranch . . . . . 56

St. Vrain Simmentals . . . . . . 49 Salazar Ranches . . . . . . . . . 63 James Sammons III . . . . . . 118 Sandia Trailer Sales & Service . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Santa Rita Ranch . . . . . 62, 125 Sci-Agra Inc . . . . . . . . 61, 106 Scott Land . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Sidwell Farm & Ranch Realty, . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Singleton Ranches . . . . . . 112 Skaarer Brangus . . . . . . . . . 47 Southern Star Ranch . . 12, 128 Southwest Beef Symposium 55 Southwest Brangus Breeders Assn . . . . . . . . . 30 Southwest Red Angus Assoc. . . . . . . . . . . . 65, 124 Stockmen’s Realty . . . . . . 115 Joe Stubblefield & Assoc . . 114 Swihart Sales Co. . . . . . . . 112 T & S Manufacturing . . . . 107 TechniTrack, LLC . . . . . . . 111 Texas Hereford Association . 57 Texas Limousin Association . 61 The Ranches . . . . . . . . . . 116 Thompson Ranch . . 55, 56, 126 3C Cattle Feeders . . . . . . . . 85 Three Mile Hill Ranch . . . . . 60 Candy Ray Trujillo’s Black Angus . . . . . . . . . . 62 Tucumcari Bull Test . . . . . . . 32 TV Cattle Company . . . . . . 55 2 Bar Angus . . . . . . . . 65, 126 U Bar Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . 48 United Fiberglass, Inc. . . . . . 87 USA Ranch . . . . . . . . . 52, 127 Virden Perma Bilt Co. . . . . 112

ad index ▫

ABCDE

WYZ

W&W Fiberglass Tank Co. . . . 96 Walker Martin Ranch Sales 118 Weaver Ranch . . . . . . . . . . 14 West Star Herefords . . . . . . 64 West Wood Realty . . . . . . 114 Westway Feed Products . . . 75 White Mountain Herefords . . . . . . . . 48, 124 Williams Cattle Company . . . 63 Williams Windmill, Inc. . 72, 112 WW - Paul Scales . . . . . . . . 80 Yavapai Bottle Gas . . . . 96, 112 Tal Young, P.C. . . . . . . . . . . 61 Zia Agriculture Consulting . . . . . . . . . . 113

DECEMBER 2016

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130

DECEMBER 2016

DECEMBER 2016

130


26 thAnnual

ROSWELL BRANGUS SALE Feb 25, 2017

Roswell Livestock Auction ~ Roswell, NM Selling 100 Brangus & Angus Plus Bulls. Approx. 1000 Commercial Females.

MC STUNNER International Grand Champion Owned with Traci Middleton, Puryear, TN

Call Bill Morrison for Sale Catalog Motel Headquarters: Comfort Suites, 3610 N. Main For Special Brangus Sale Rates call 575-623-5501

lackmorrisonbrangus.com Joe Paul & Rosie Lack • P.O. Box 274 • Hatch, NM 87937 • Ph. 575-267-1016 • Fax: 575/267-1234 Racheal Carpenter • 575-644-1311 Bill Morrison • 411 CR 10, Clovis, NM 88101 • 575/760-7263 • bvmorrison@yucca.net CONTACT ROSWELL BRANGUS BREEDERS CO-OP FOR BRANGUS BULLS & FEMALES

Floyd Brangus TROY FLOYD P.O. Box 133 Roswell, NM 88201 Phone: 575/734 -7005

131

DECEMBER 2016

Lack-Morrison Brangus JOE PAUL & ROSIE LACK P.O. Box 274, Hatch, NM 87937 Phone: 575/267-1016 • Fax: 575/267-1234 Racheal Carpenter 575-644-1311 BILL MORRISON 411 CR 10, Clovis, NM 88101 Phone: 575/760-7263 Email: bvmorrison@yucca.net lackmorrisonbrangus.com

Parker Brangus LARRY & ELAINE PARKER P.O. Box 146, 1700 N. Parker Road San Simon, AZ 85632 Larry’s Cell: 520/508-3505 Diane’s Cell: 520/403-1967 Business – 520/845-2411 Residence – 520/845-2315 Email: jddiane@vtc.net or parker_brangus@yahoo.com

Townsend Brangus GAYLAND and PATTI TOWNSEND P.O. Box 278 Milburn, Oklahoma 73450 Home: 580/443-5777 Cell: 580/380-1606

DECEMBER 2016

131


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Carlsbad, NM • Walley Menuey 800-386-1235

Tucumcari, NM • Luke Haller 575-461-2740

CORTESE FEED & SUPPLY

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GARY CREIGHTON OUR CONTACT YOUR Cattle SpecialistLOCAL •ONTACT Portales, OCAL EALER TO O NM DEALER ONTRACT OUR FEED EED ONTRACT YOUR ONEthe STOP FEED INC below if you wouldCor 800-834-3198 575-760-5373 Contact your local Purina Animal Nutrition Dealer or call number listed Clovis, NM • Austin like your local Purina Animal Nutrition Sales Specialist to contact you Hale to learn more about incorporating Accuration Block into your feeding program.575-762-3997 GLCreighton@landolakes.com COWBOYS CORNER

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©2014 Purina Animal Nutrition LLC.

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NMS Dec 2016  

The Magazine for Southwestern Agriculture

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