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nytennis New York Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

New York Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.nytennismag.com

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com

Table Of Contents

JUL/AUG 2016 • Vol 6, No 4

Empire Strikes Back

World TeamTennis returns to New York as the New York Empire will play their inaugural season at Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club. See page 6

Cover photo credit: New York Empire/WTT

Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 • brianc@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Bryan Bongiovanni Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 315 • bryanb@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Beverly Bolnick National Sales Manager (516) 409-4444, ext. 316 Scott Koondel VP of Operations (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Sidney Beal III Staff Photographer

Lee Seidner Staff Photographer

Gabi Sklar Intern

Jenn Keneiby Intern

Emma Fein Intern

Trevor Mitchel Intern

Troy Haas Intern

Emily Shutman Intern

Alexandra Wald Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.nytennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in New York Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. New York Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

Highlights 12 From the Tennis Court to the Corporate Boardroom 30 Your 2016 Guide to Sports Medicine 34 2016 Boy’s High School Recap By Brian Coleman

Features 4 5 14 15 16 18 22 24 28 29 36 38 40 42 44 46 49 50 51 52 56 57 58 60 62 63 64 66 67 70

Cary Leeds Hosts 26th Annual Mayor’s Cup Tournament Trinity Beats Horace Mann for Mayor’s Cup Title Sportime RI Hosts Inaugural JMTA College Recruiting Combine Tennis Bubbles: A Grand Slam Victory Over the Elements Eliminate Your “Mental Blind Spots” By Brandyn Fisher, Ph.D. Beyond the Baseline: Ross School Tennis Across Metro New York USTA Eastern Metro Region Update Adult League: USTA Leagues Update MatchPoint Hosts Successful QuickStart Tournament The Top Nine Common Mistakes Junior Players Make By Gilad Bloom Season Planning: On-Court Curriculum By Sinisa Markovic From Recreation to Competitive Play By Salifu Mohammed McEnroe Continues Star Development With Johnny Mac Tennis Project Seven Days in Barcelona: On the Road With Elite Tennis & Travel Court Six: New York Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz The Keys to Keeping Juniors Passionate About Tennis By Eliza Davis Training in the Summertime By Eric Faro If Only Wives Followed the Rules of Tennis in Marriage (Part I) By Barbara Wyatt New York’s Elbaba Headlines U.S. Open National Playoff Eastern Section Winners Tennis … The Sport of a Lifetime By Christopher Dong The Jensen Zone By Luke Jensen Secrets of a Sports Psychologist By Dr. Tom Ferraro The Mini-Tennis Warm Up and Why We Love to Copy the Pros By Steven Kaplan More Than an Athlete By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC Metro Corporate League Recap, Presented by Advantage Tennis Clubs I Know Nothing and You Know Everything By Lonnie Mitchel Backhand Cures By Bill Longua New York Rankings USTA/Metropolitan Region 2016 Tournament Schedule

New York Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. • Copyright © 2016 United Sports Publications Ltd.


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Cary Leeds Hosts 26th Annua

he thrill of the spring high school athletic season is the end of the year Mayor’s Cup, where athletes across all sports compete for the citywide championship, and the tournament always brings an exciting and celebratory atmosphere. The Cary Leeds Center for Tennis and Learning in the Bronx hosted the 26th Annual Mayor’s Cup AllScholastic Tennis Championships in June, bringing to a close another exciting tennis season in New York City. The Mayor’s Cup was played over the course of a week and saw players, parents and coaches from all areas of New York City come together, culminating in the finals, parade and award ceremony. In the Boys Varsity Singles Final, Bronx

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Science’s Alexander Chiu defeated Niles Ghaffar of Xavier High School 6-1, 6-4 to be crowned champion. “I was extremely excited,” Chiu said of the victory. “It’s probably the biggest tournament I’ve ever won. I had to make a lot of adjustments because it was extremely windy. I was trying to settle in and change up my pace to deal with the wind. I think we both have similar styles, and I was able to be aggressive and win the points in the big moments.” The tournament is a great event even for those who don’t win, as 14-year-old Liam Dunne of Beacon High School pointed out. “I didn’t play my best tennis but my opponent was very good,” said Dunne. “I still had fun though; I really like this tournament.”

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

Below are the results of the finals: l Team Finals: Trinity defeated Horace Mann 5-0 l Boys Elementary Singles: Nicholas Murphy (The Buckley School) defeated Giuseppe Cerasuolo (Sacred Heart School), 4-0, 4-0 l Girls Elementary Singles: Julia Werdiger (Horace Mann) defeated Sophia Cisse (The British International School of NY), 4-0, 4-0 l Boys Middle School Singles: Sujay Sharma (MS 67 Q) defeated Robbie Werdiger (Horace Mann), 6-2, 6-3 l Girls Middle School Singles: Shawnte Beale (Young Women’s Leadership School of the Bronx) defeated Nia Dabreo (Vista Academy), 6-1, 6-4 l Boys Middle School Doubles: Timothy


ual Mayor’s Cup Tournament Trinity Beats Horace Mann for Mayor’s Cup Title

he banner season for the Trinity Boys Tigers continued, as they defeated Horace Mann 5-0 in the Mayor’s Cup team final at the Stadium Tennis Center. The event was hosted by Cary Leeds Center for Tennis and Learning, but due to rain, the final was moved indoors to Stadium Tennis Center. The win caps off another fantastic season for the Tigers, who earlier this spring, captured the San Marco Invitational Championship. The Tigers were led by its Captains Ananth Raghavan and Alex Chao who both won their respective singles matches. Chao saved three match points, and came back to win his match in a third set tie-breaker. “From the outset, winning the Mayor’s Cup was our chief goal this season. In fact, it’s been our goal for several years now,” said Trinity Head Coach Damon Lopez-O’Dwyer. “We came very close in each of the past three years, so to finally get over the top is a terrific feeling. This team has worked hard not just this spring, but for several years. We’ve enjoyed a huge amount of success over the past five seasons and have appreciated every bit of it, but this felt like the final piece we needed.” The win was a fitting end to the careers of Captains Raghavan and Chao, as well as fellow senior Antony Jippov. “Together, they had done everything they could do in their high school tennis careers, except this, so I’m especially happy for them,” said Lopez-O’Dwyer. “It’s a fitting end to their terrific run together.” The win marks the first Mayor’s Cup title for Trinity since 2000. Over the past five years, Trinity has won two San Marco Tournament Titles, four Ivy League Titles and posted a 62-4 record in Ivy League play. “The defining quality of the teams we’ve had over this era is that more than anything else, they’ve loved being a team,” said Lopez-O’Dwyer. “They play hard for each other every day. The fact that we had so many alumni players and parents cheering us on is a testament to the community around this team. It’s a very special thing and something I hope the guys will carry with them for a long time.”

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Barefield & Anthony Fratarelli (Edward Bleeker School) defeated Jean Paul Santamaria & Jean Pierre Santamaria, 6-3, 0-6, 6-1 Boys Varsity Doubles: Adam Borak & Michael Tyutyunik (New Explorations Into Science Technology and Math) defeated Yarden Hahn & Connor Morris (Horace Mann School), 6-4, 6-3 Girls Varsity Doubles: Christina Huynh & Sofie Levine (Bronx Science) defeated Yuka Lin & Victoria Zezula (Mary Louis Academy), 6-1, 6-4 Boys Varsity Singles: Alexander Chiu (Bronx Science) defeated Niles Ghaffar (Xavier), 6-4, 6-4 Girls Varsity Singles: Rosie GarciaGross (Home School) defeated Kyra Bergmann (Archbishop Molloy)

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2016 • New York Tennis Magazine

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The Empire Strikes Back World TeamTennis makes its return to New York with new franchise he summer is upon us and that means Mylan World TeamTennis (WTT) action is right around the corner, highlighted by the inaugural season of the New York Empire as WTT action returns to the New York area after a brief hiatus. The New York Empire will play its home matches at Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club. The New York Empire is one of six teams in this year’s field and will be coached by New York native Patrick McEnroe. In addition to the Empire, this year’s WTT field features the Orange County Breakers

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(coached by Rick Leach), Philadelphia Freedoms (coached by Josh Cohen), San Diego Aviators (coached by John Lloyd), Springfield Lasers (coached by JohnLaffnie de Jager), and the Washington Kastles (coached by Murphy Jensen). This year’s Empire roster features an array of international talent, including Americans Andy Roddick and Christina McHale, Argentina’s Maria Irigoyen and Guido Pella, and Oliver Marach from Austria. “To play on the legendary courts at Forest Hills and be involved with a team in a city that I love, New York, will make this even more special,” said Roddick.

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

CBS Sports Radio host and Gracie Award winner Amy Lawrence will serve as the “Voice of the New York Empire.” The host of the overnight radio program “After Hours With Amy Lawrence,” heard on hundreds of stations nationwide, online and via mobile app, Amy will help the crowd follow along with all the action, as well as host interviews with coaches and players during the six home matches of the NY Empire. “We are excited to have someone as creative and energetic as Amy Lawrence bring her voice to Empire matches this summer,” said Empire General Manager Colleen Hopkins. “Her skill sets will be vital in


highlighting the competitive, exciting atmosphere that is New York Empire Tennis, as well as bringing the fans as close as possible to the players and on-court strategy.”

The historic Forest Hills Stadium at the West Side Tennis Club On April 22, 1892, 13 initial members organized the West Side Tennis Club with the modest goal of renting ground on Central Park West, between 88th and 89th Streets, for three clay courts. The courts opened on June 11, 1892, and Club membership required a $10 initiation cost, a $10 annual fee, and the ability to play a good game of tennis. By the end of the first season, the Club expanded to 43 members and five courts. After 10 years, the Central Park West property became too commercially valuable for tennis, so the Club moved to 117th

Street near Columbia University, which had room for eight courts. Through the largesse of the land’s owner, Mrs. John Drexel of the prominent banking Drexel family, the Club paid a mere $20 per court annually With the success, however, came the realization that the West Side’s location was inadequate to accommodate the crowds. A committee was formed in 1912 to find a permanent location for purchase. The committee scouted 30-plus locations and narrowed the field to properties in the Bronx, Kew Gardens and Forest Hills. On Dec. 3, 1912, the Club voted on the Forest Hills location. The Club purchased the land, a few blocks from the Long Island Railroad, for a $2,000 down payment and a $75,000 mortgage. The Tudor-style clubhouse, built the following year, cost approximately $25,000. New York City featured a world-class tennis center by the spring of 1914. The 1915 transfer of the United States Lawn Tennis Association National Championship (later the U.S. Open) to the West Side Tennis Club from the Newport Casino was a watershed event in the history of ten-

nis. For the next six decades, the Championship would be held at West Side. Along with tennis events, West Side hosted music concerts in its stadium for decades. Frank Sinatra, The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, The Who, Diana Ross and the Boston Pops were just some of the musicians that performed at West Side. By the late 1970s, the popularity of the Open had boomed, and the 15,000-seat Forest Hills Stadium had become too small to handle the crowds. The USTA moved the Open to the broader expanses of Flushing Meadows in 1978. But professional tennis is now back at the West Side Tennis Club with the New York Empire who will be lighting up Forest Hills all-summer long.

About Mylan World TeamTennis World TeamTennis is a uniquely formatted tennis league which features teams comprised of both men and

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2016 • New York Tennis Magazine

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women. Originally founded in 1973, the league ended in 1978, but was resumed in 1981. In 1984, Billie Jean King was named commissioner and major owner of the league and its popularity has grown ever since. The matches consist of five sets, with each set being a different flight of men’s singles, men’s doubles, women’s singles, women’s doubles and mixed doubles. The scoring is played with no-ad, and the first team to reach five games wins that respective set. The crowds are encouraged to cheer and music is played throughout the match to provide a lively atmosphere.

New York Empire 2016 Roster Coach Patrick McEnroe (USA) Patrick McEnroe is a Long Island native who had a decorated doubles career, winning 16 titles, including the 1989 French Open with Jim Grabb. That same year, he also won the year-end Tour Finals with Grabb. Since his playing days, McEnroe has been busy. He currently serves as a tennis broadcaster for ESPN, and has previously been a Davis Cup captain, as well as the general manager of USTA Player Development.

Andy Roddick (USA) Andy Roddick is a former world number one who is a fan favorite amongst American tennis fans, most notably for his triumph at the 2003 U.S. Open, which is still the most recent Grand Slam title for American men’s singles players. He has been a staple of World TeamTennis and the PowerShares Series since his retirement, and his power and energy will bring fans to their feet this summer. Over the course of his career, Roddick captured 32 Tourlevel singles titles, including five ATP World Tour Masters 1000 crowns. He reached world number one in the ATP Men’s Singles Rankings on Nov. 3, 2003, and finished in the top 10 of the ATP Rankings for nine consecutive years (2002-2010). He helped lead the U.S. team to 2007 Davis Cup title, the first for the U.S. since 1995. His Andy Roddick Foundation has raised more than $14 million for charity since 2001.

Christina McHale (USA) A New Jersey native, Christina McHale was the first player chosen by the Empire for its inaugural season. She is currently ranked 68th in the world and reached a career-high ranking of 24th in 2012. Most recently, McHale helped lead the U.S. past Australia in the Fed Cup Playoffs with a victory over Samantha Stosur. She advanced to the third round at all four Grand Slam events. Christina has represented Team USA at the London 2012 Olympics and has represented her nation in seven Fed Cup ties as well, with her latest appearance coming in April 2016. Over the course of her career, she owns top 10 wins over Victoria Azarenka, Petra Kvitova and Marion Bartoli. Guido Pella (ARG) Making his WTT debut this year, Guido Pella hails from Argentina and reached a career high ranking of 39th in the world back in March. He reached the second round of the 2016 French Open before losing a hard-fought five-set match to the 18th-ranked Gilles Simon. Pella has won eight ATP Challenger Tour singles titles over his career, including the 2012 ATP Challenger Tour Finals trophy in

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Sao Paulo. In 2013, he secured his first top 10 victory by defeating then world number 10 Janko Tipsarevic in Dusseldorf. Maria Irigoyen (ARG) Like Pella, Maria Irigoyen is an Argentina native who is known as a doubles specialist and is making her WTT debut in 2016. She has won two career doubles titles on the WTA Tour, most recently the Rio Open in February with partner Veronica Cepede Royg. Irigoyen has won a combined 75 ITF titles (17 singles, 58 doubles), and reached a career-high WTA ranking of 147th in singles in July of 2015 and 49th in doubles in May 2016. She made her Fed Cup debut in 2008 representing her home nation of Argentina. Oliver Marach (AUT) Austrian Oliver Marach turned pro back in 1998 and will make his WTT debut this season. He has had a lot of success in doubles over the years, claiming 15 titles and reaching 25 finals in that time, and reached a career high of eighth in doubles in October 2010. This year, he picked up ATP

doubles titles in Chennai and Delray Beach with Fabrice Martin, and partnered with fellow countryman Philipp Oswald to win the ATP Challenger crown in Aix en Provence. He has advanced to the doubles quarterfinals at all four Grand Slam events, highlighted by a semifinal run at the 2009 Australian Open. With partner Lukasz Kubot, Oliver qualified for the year-end ATP World Tour Finals in backto-back seasons (2009 and 2010). He made his first Davis Cup appearance for Austria in 2003.

Season highlights for the New York Empire l Opening night for the Empire will be July 31 when Mardy Fish and the fivetime defending WTT Champion Washington Kastles will visit Forest Hills for the first ever New York Empire match. This will also be USTA Eastern Night. l Caroline Wozniacki will be the featured player for the Philadelphia Freedoms when the Freedoms visit Forest Hills and the Empire on Aug. 1. l Andy Roddick will join the New York Empire as its featured player during the Aug. 9 match against Mardy Fish and the Kastles.

l Long Island’s Scott Lipsky will visit West Side Tennis Club when the Orange County Breakers take on the Empire Aug. 11 l The 2016 Mylan World TeamTennis Finals will take place at West Side Tennis Club on Aug. 26.

2016 New York Empire Home Schedule l Sunday, July 31 vs. Washington Kastles (featuring Mardy Fish), 6:00 p.m. at Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club l Monday, Aug. 1 vs. Philadelphia Freedoms (featuring Caroline Wozniacki), 7:00 p.m. at Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club l Wednesday, Aug. 3 vs. Springfield Lasers, 7:00 p.m. at Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club l Tuesday, Aug. 9 vs. Washington Kastles (featuring Mardy Fish for the Kastles & Andy Roddick for the Empire), 7:00 p.m. at Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club l Thursday, Aug. 11 vs. Orange County Breakers (featuring Scott Lipsky), 7:00 p.m. at Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club l Friday, Aug. 12 vs. San Diego Aviators, 7:00 p.m. at Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club

FREE Summer Community Tennis Program Your child can learn to play tennis for free! NYJTL’s Community Tennis Program is for children and youth who are: • Between the ages of 5 and 18 • At any level of tennis skill, from “never held a racquet before” to “tomorrow’s champion” • Anywhere within NYC’s five boroughs District 75 (special needs) students have their own adaptive tennis program once a week at many Community Tennis locations. Racquets and balls are available for children to use during program hours. The only thing participants need to bring is their own water bottle and tennis sneakers. Visit our website for Locations, Dates & Times – www.NYJTL.org NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2016 • New York Tennis Magazine

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Ticket Information Home matches for the New York Empire at Forest Hills Stadium at The West Side Tennis Club are available for purchase. Season tickets, group discount packages and individual tickets are on sale now, so visit NYEmpireTennis.com to see all the great offers.

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New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com


NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2016 • New York Tennis Magazine

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From the Tennis Court to the Corporate Boardroom

Former junior standouts Jonathan and Adam Schwartz transition to the workforce here are life lessons to be learned throughout all sports, but there may be no sport that has a more direct correlation to the real world than tennis. Whether you are playing at an individual tournament or playing on your high school or college team, skills and lessons used and learned on the tennis court can translate into the workforce, as many current businessmen will tell you firsthand. Take Jonathan and Adam Schwartz, two former junior standouts and college tennis players, who now work at Jones Lang LaSalle, a publically-traded commercial real estate firm that specializes in commercial real estate services and investment management. “I think being an athlete, in general, always helps,” said Jonathan. “Working on a team and thriving in a team environment is crucial. On the tennis court, you’re analyzing every point and trying to figure out the best way to handle a given situation, and that’s something that translates into the business world. As we bring in clients, the lessons you learn in tennis like the ability to maneuver and adapt is extremely helpful in the business world. You’re meeting with a whole bunch of different people and personalities, and you have to learn to deal with each one differently like you would an opponent in tennis.” Jonathan and Adam grew up in Nassau County on Long Island, and developed a love for the sport at an early age, thanks to their father Jayson, who was a top college player at the University of Pennsylvania and is a member of the school’s Athletic Hall of Fame. The two would play a number of different

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Adam Schwartz (left) and Jonathan Schwartz (right) are two former top junior players who have found success off the court and in the corporate world

sports growing up, but tennis was always king, and each carved out successful junior careers, including winning a Nassau County Championship together in doubles for Wheatley High School. Adam, who is two years younger than Jonathan, would win the New York State Championship in singles in 2006 before taking his talents to his father’s alma mater, while Jonathan played college tennis for the Blue Hens of Delaware. Throughout their successful times as junior tennis players and then as college tennis players, the sport opened up doors for them to find similar success on a different court: The business world. After playing together and against each

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

other on the tennis court growing up, both have used those experiences to achieve success at Jones Lang LaSalle. “I have about four or five clients right now. One of them was my teammate at Penn and another went to school with me, so between tennis and school, it has helped me develop connections,” said Adam. “Having that trust factor with someone already established goes a long way. Someone with whom you’ve already built a relationship with and they have that trust in you, you are able to cut out the months and months of work you would’ve spent trying to establish that. It makes doing business easier and smoother.” Beyond just making connections and knowing people, sports and business share similarities in both skill sets and work ethics. “Dealing with losing and dealing with failure. You have to be resilient and have a positive attitude,” said Jonathan when asked about why former athletes oftentimes succeed in the business world. “That’s absolutely something you need in business, whether it’s finance or any other industry. Bouncing back from a loss and putting a positive spin on things, taking the positive out of a negative outcome.” Dedicating yourself to something transcends sports and applies to all walks of life. Those qualities often exist in athletes, and it is why they are usually the type of candidates that companies are eager to hire. “If you work 10 times harder than somebody who is more talented, the guy who works harder is the one who will be more successful,” said Adam. “That applies to tennis, but also many other things. Become a student of your craft, whatever it is, and the results will show.”


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Sportime Randall’s Island Hosts

Inaugural JMTA College Recruiting Combine

he John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA) at Sportime Randall’s Island hosted its inaugural College Recruiting Combine, as hundreds of high school players and college coaches gathered on Randall’s Island for the two-day event. The first day of the Combine began with two rounds of girls singles matches in the morning, while the boys went through a fitness assessment. This gave coaches an opportunity to walk around to the various courts to see the girls in match play action. While the girls played, the boys ran sprints and other conditioning drills before joining a coach’s panel which featured Combine Director Jay Harris, Jason Pasion of NYIT, Bryant’s Ron Gendron, Harvard’s Dave Fish, Billy Pate of Princeton and Drew’s Matt Brisotti. The panel went over what colleges and coaches look for in a recruit and other important and sometimes overlooked aspects of college athletics. On the second day of the combine, the girls were addressed by a panel consisting of Pasion, Brisotti, Sachin Kirtan of Mississippi State, St. John’s Lauren Leo, Stony Brook’s Gary Glassman, Wesleyan’s Mike Fried and Kate Bayard of Tufts.

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Both groups went through mental toughness assessment questionnaires, adding to an event that touched on everything that goes into college athletics and recruiting. “It’s something we’ve been planning for a few years and I think it’s going quite well,” said Fritz Buehning, director of tennis at Sportime Lake Isle. “We’ve also reconfigured the standard college showcase, adding things like mental toughness evaluations and fitness tests. Each one of the singles matches is being filmed, so you can see yourself play afterwards and be able to see things you did well and things you can improve on.” Each player was given their own Player Portal, which featured information on their rankings, competitive highlights, contact information, and afterwards, shareable reports and assessments on their performance at the combine. This gives coaches and players the opportunity to go back and look at each player even after the combine was over. “It’s been going good,” said Courtney Kowalsky, who will be a senior at Oyster Bay High School next fall. “I played one

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

match outside and one match inside, so I had to deal with different elements which was good for coaches to see.” High school players came from Florida, Georgia, Arizona and even Greece and Puerto Rico, in addition to the Tri-State area, to showcase their talent and skills to coaches. “I thought I played pretty well today, especially considering the tough competition,” said Hailey Feuer of Phoenix, Ariz. “I was able to speak with a few coaches today, so it definitely went well. I’m really just looking for a school with good academics, a good coach and a team that works well together.” “It’s a fantastic way for players to show their skills from a mental and physical aspect, but also expose them to a collegetype environment,” said Mike Kossoff, JMTA director. “The coaches are ecstatic in terms of the level of the players they are seeing and just how professional the event has been run. The fact that we have a coach’s panel, matches chartered with analytics and each player has their own Player Portal, I really couldn’t be happier with how it’s been and the amazing turn out.”


Tennis Bubbles

A Grand Slam Victory Over the Elements

rying to figure out a way to maintain your tennis training momentum throughout the offseason? Indoor tennis is a lot more viable than you might think. New York’s harsh winters make outdoor tennis strictly a seasonal sport—unless you can move it indoors. And while indoor tennis may seem like an expensive luxury, The Farley Group keeps the game going year-round by manufacturing, installing, and maintaining tennis bubbles. Bubbles are the ideal solution for indoor tennis—both economically and practically. Tennis has always been a big deal in New York, which has driven the demand for indoor playing spaces for several decades now. With more than 20 bubbles in New York City and the Long Island area, Farley tennis bubbles have helped solidify New York as one of the top places to train and develop tennis talent. By providing a

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way to train throughout the winter, tennis becomes much more accessible to those that don’t have the means or desire to travel south for the winter. Compared to other construction methods, bubbles have a relatively short history. Bubbles first made appearances in North America in the early 1970s, and have since evolved into a top solution for sports like tennis. Ralph Farley, founder of The Farley Group, saw how well the concept worked in Europe, and brought it back with him more than 40 years ago. Since then, The Farley Group has built dozens of tennis bubbles around the world. Stepping into a tennis bubble for the first time is awe-inspiring. No other structure can provide as much space without any support beams or walls. It’s almost counter-intuitive at first sight: “What’s holding up the roof?” Intriguingly, bubbles

require nothing but air to do that. Fresh, filtered, and conditioned air flows in, giving the bubble its rounded shape and protecting the playing surface and players underneath. A wonderful added benefit is that tennis bubbles can be either seasonal or permanent. Permanent bubbles have the advantage of full protection from the weather throughout the year—cold and snow during the winter, and rain or high winds in the summer—while seasonal domes can go up in the fall and come down in the spring. They represent the perfect solution for outdoor courts. And best of all? Tennis bubbles can be installed for a fraction of what other indoor tennis courts costs. To learn more about how Farley tennis bubbles can help your club members practice their swing 365 days a year, visit TheFarleyGroup.com or call at (888) 445-3223.

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Eliminate Your “Mental Blind Spots” By Brandyn Fisher, Ph.D. “I forgot she was a lefty.” This was Sarah’s response during the 10minute break after splitting sets at a USTA National match. I had asked her what she was seeing out there and about her game plan and the adjustments she made. Sarah said she was trying to keep the ball high to her opponent’s one-handed backhand and use her own forehand to attack. The problem: She kept hitting everything to the ad side, which was the opponent’s forehand (and a very good forehand at that). She did a great job of executing the 16

correct strategy in the first set, but something changed at the beginning of the second. Sarah made a few errors early on in the second set, began rushing and getting negative, and then started playing into her opponent’s strengths. Why did she suddenly change? How could she not realize her opponent was a lefty? This example represents a common performance issue tennis players face during competition. Sarah became overly focused on herself, and as a result, she developed a “mental blind spot.” In this case, her negative mindset during the second set made her blind to the obvious. Here are a few strategies on how players can eliminate

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

their blind spots and create problemsolving skills. Dig for information during the warm-up Use the warm-up to escape the early blind spots. Hit a variety of balls to your opponent’s “windows” and see how they react to the various height, spin and depth. I have found that this helps players work through the nerves and begin focusing on something within their control. They learn to distract themselves from the distractions. Look to steal some information from your opponent. Do they struggle when you hit a low slice? How do they handle topspin and


pace? Do they skip taking volleys and overheads? Tactical, not technical Successful players focus more on tactical adjustments and shot-selection during matches, rather than on how well they hit the ball that particular day. Save the technical critique for practice. Mats Wilander once told me that during his training, he focused mostly on himself (i.e., making technical adjustments), but when it was time to compete, it was more about what was happening on the other side of the net (i.e., making tactical adjustments). To eliminate your mental blind spots, start asking and answering the questions that matter: What does the opponent do well/not do well? Which hitting zone do they like/not like? What adjustments can be made to make the opponent play worse? Do the mental work in-between points Players create mental blind spots when their internal dialogue is negative. The

criticizing voice takes over and this leads to the player becoming internally focused (which can cause you to forget that your opponent is a lefty). Do the mental work in-between points, which includes performing rituals that force you to take more time, such as placing a towel at the fence and picking it up after each point. In doing so, you allow yourself the opportunity to change the internal dialogue to a motivational or instructional tone, and you begin to take control of how you respond to adversity. A quick tip for parents You play an essential role in helping your child develop critical thinking skills in competition. While there is a time and place to discuss technical adjustments, keep post-match analysis focused primarily on the player’s tactical adjustments and shot-selection at different times in the match. By keeping the conversation focused more on tactics and decision-making you create opportunities for players to figure out how to assess their matches in a more

constructive manner. Lastly, understand that it is always easier to see things when standing on the sideline. The pressure players feel during competition often clouds the obvious. A quick tip for coaches During competitive practice situations, ask your players open-ended questions about their tactics and shot-selection. Get players to engage more in the process by engaging them in the outcomes. What were you trying to accomplish with that shot? What was your plan going into the point? What adjustments did you make in the set? The answers you receive can help clarify which information is getting through and create more ownership in the process. Brandyn Fisher, Ph.D. is founder and CEO of American Sport Psychology, a leader in elite mental training for tennis players. Discover your potential by visiting AmericanSportPsychology.com or reaching out to Dr. Fisher at Brandyn@AmericanSportPsychology.com.

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BE Y O ND T H E B A S E L I N E

“You can go to Florida or California for good tennis academies, but the academics aren’t as strong. And you can go to boarding schools with good academics, but the tennis isn’t as strong. We have the best of both worlds here, and that’s what’s new and different about us.” —Vinicius Carmo, Director of Tennis, The Ross School

ROSS SCHOOL TENNIS or many young tennis players, finding the right tennis program or academy that offers a consistent balance of academics and tennis can be an elusive process. But if you look far out onto the South Fork of Long Island, The Ross School is providing just that. Five years ago, the institution launched The Ross School Tennis Academy (RSTA), a high performance academy that, in a very short time, is already rivaling some of the best tennis academies in the nation. “The main attraction is that there is no other school that offers top academics and a top tennis program in one place,” said Ross School’s Director of Tennis Vinicius Carmo. “You can go to Florida or Califor-

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nia for good tennis academies, but the academics aren’t as strong. And you can go to boarding schools with good academics, but the tennis isn’t as strong. We have the best of both worlds here, and that’s what’s new and different about us.” The tennis center has been around for about seven years, while the academy began about five years ago. The program began with just six players and has grown to 22 players in that short time, including players from Germany, Brazil, Saudi Arabia, Ukraine and across the United States. The school was incredibly supportive of the idea of launching the tennis academy, and has even helped tailor the course schedule for the academy’s players to en-

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sure they have time throughout the day to train. Students take their classes from 8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m., have lunch, and then hit the tennis courts at 1:30 p.m. for two hours. After playing, the kids do fitness for an hour, then have study hall and dinner from 4:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. before going back onto the courts until 8:30 p.m. While it seems like a busy schedule, it allows the students to have a balance of both academics and tennis, and helps develop a responsibility to manage one’s time, which is imperative when heading to college. “We thought, at first, that it would be a long day,” said Carmo. “But it turned out that it works really well. They are able to


study for two hours, and having this structure keeps them focused on both academics and tennis.” Unlike other boarding schools, The Ross School doesn’t have dorms on campus and the kids are able to stay with house parents off-campus who are usually teachers or individuals who work at the school. “It’s a great pre-college experience,”

said Holly Li, manager of The Ross School’s Tennis Center. “They stay in wellappointed beautiful homes, scattered around the surrounding area with house parents and in groups of up to 14 kids from around the world. Instead of typical boarding school dorms, this unique style of boarding really gives them the benefit of having a ‘home’ lifestyle with chores and

off-campus responsibilities, combined with their on-campus academic schedule. Learning how to live independently and in this type of environment with ethnically diverse roommates is great preparation for college.” The tennis philosophy at Ross is pretty simple: “They don’t have a specific one.” Being a smaller program, it allows for

The West Side Tennis Tennis Club West Side Forest Forest Hills, New New York York August August 21-27, 2016 Boys ages Boys & Girls: ag es 8-12 Singles/Doubles/Mixed Singles/Doubles/Mixed Doubles Doubles All Yellow Yellow Ball on full court court

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beyond the baseline continued from page 19 Carmo and Developmental Coach Phillip Williamson to provide individualized instruction and teaching to the players. “I see the kids on an individual level, putting together a developmental plan for each of them,” said Williamson. “We essentially come up with a plan, similar to a financial statement, that goes over the four major areas of tennis: Technique, Tactical Abilities, Physical Capabilities and Mental Capabilities. We give every player a report that lays out their pros and cons, and then work from there.” This sort of coaching enables players to work specifically on aspects of their game that need refinement, and ensure that it is done in an efficient and productive manner. Former Grand Slam champion Jim Grabb recently joined the Ross School staff to help players with the mental side of the game. In the last few years, The Ross School has expanded on its already successful academy, building a junior academy and a youth academy, in hopes of developing its own players to enter the main academy. The youth academy is for grades one through four, while the junior academy is for grades five through seven.

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“The level of play is increasing at the highest level here, and hopefully, we’re increasing it two-fold by developing players in our younger programs,” said Carmo. “That’s where our focus is right now. We’re recruiting and attracting higher-level players, but want to continue developing at an early level in order to create sort of a feeder program into the top academy.” The teaching and coaching extends beyond the tennis court and the classroom, as there is an entire department dedicated to prepping for college. The department works alongside Carmo, parents and other coaches and teachers to help make the stressful college selection process as

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seamless as possible. “We sit down with them and give them all the support they need,” said Carmo. “The key is finding the right school for each individual.” In addition to its location in the Hamptons, the combination of tennis and academics and an emphasis on both are what make The Ross School such an intriguing destination for prospective student athletes. “The location is so nice … right near the ocean,” said Hleb Maslau, tennis pro at The Ross School. “It is very quiet out here, so it’s easy for the kids to focus on academics and tennis. The School is extremely helpful in adapting the schedule to the tennis players, and if they are able to be prepared for that, they will be ready when they go off to college.” The array of international players, both in the program as well as throughout the school’s two campuses, introduces the kids to others of differing backgrounds and cultures. “Getting to interact with the international community and learning other cultures and points of views is awesome,” said Ross School junior Audrix Arce. “The tennis is what captured my attention, but the location is great and it has really become my second home.” The Ross School Tennis Academy continues to grow and expand on its programs and its facilities to ensure its students the best academics and top tennis training. If you find yourself out in the Hamptons this summer, stop by the beautiful Ross School campus to see what it is all about.


COMING IN SEPTEMBER 2016

Distribution scheduled for 08/26/16

This 2016 U.S. OPEN edition will feature: • 2016 U.S. Open Preview • Guide to Top New York Tennis Clubs • Summer Camp/Summer Events Recap

Distribution across New York at 300+ locations: • Indoor tennis clubs • Country clubs • Restaurants and health food stores • Tennis camps • Retail stores • Gyms • Supermarkets and • Many more!

Bonus Distribution: • U.S. Open • Taste of Tennis Events • Pre U.S. Open Events • Camps/City Parks/Hamptons • JMTA Benefit Night with Rafael Nadal

Don’t miss the advertising opportunities in the next edition of New York Tennis Magazine!

2016 U.S. OPEN EDITION Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by2016 August 1,Tennis 2016Magazine 21 NYTennisMag.com • July/August • New York For more information, please call 516-409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@NYTennisMag.com


Across Metro Ne JMTA’S Kachkarov Wins Super Six Title

Patrick McEnroe takes the CitiField mound

John McEnroe Tennis Academy’s (JMTA) Maxwell Kachkarvov captured the Boys 14 Singles Title at the USTA Eastern Super Six Sectional Championships in Mendham, N.J. Kachkarov came back from a set down to defeat Tyler Korobov, 6-7(2), 6-2, 7-6(6) in a thrilling championship match.

To promote the upcoming New York Empire season for World TeamTennis (WTT), Empire Head Coach Patrick McEnroe stepped out to the mound at CitiField to throw out the first pitch before a recent Mets game against the defending World Series Champs, the Kansas City Royals.

Cary Leeds JTT Team Win Metro Sectionals The 18 & Under Junior Tennis Team out of the Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning captured the USTA Eastern JTT Sectional Championships. Team members include Lorraine and Kyra Bergmann, Christina Huynh, Christopher Tham, Donovan Brown, Kai Yuminaga and Ethan Leon, and was coached by Jelahni Danlahdi Robinson.

Nine-Year-Old Iantosca Wins Bronx Science’s Rahman and Boys 12 Singles Tournament Williams Named All-Americans Nicolas Iantosca, who trains out of Gilad Bloom Tennis, won his first Level 1 tournament recently, winning the USTA L1B Gameset Tennis June Classic Boys 12 Singles Title. Nicholas came back from a set down to beat topseeded Matthew Liew, 2-6, 61, 10-4.

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New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

The National High School Tennis AllAmerican list has been announced, and Bronx Science standouts Sarah Rahman and Brianna Williams were both named All-Americans. In addition, Williams (pictured here with her coach Jeff Menaker) received the PSAL Wingate Award for the second consecutive year. The Wingate Award recognizes the most outstanding student-athletes in their respective sports.


New York

… News and notes from across the New York Metro tennis community

MatchPoint Hosts Successful Junior Development Tournament

Advantage Junior Tennis Camps Get Underway

With the summer in full swing, Advantage Tennis Clubs’ AllCity Junior Tennis Camps has launched at the Roosevelt Island Racquet Club (RIRC). The Camp combines tennis with other recreational activities and is a part of the All-City Junior Tennis program, which began in 1970 and is the longest running junior tennis program in New York City.

MatchPoint NYC in Brooklyn hosted a Junior Development Tournament to showcase the group’s talent level. The tournament divided 60 players into two groups, and a great time was had by all the players, coaches and families.

Former Centercourt Star Monaghan Wins ITA Arthur Ashe Award Credit photo: Andy Mead

Notre Dame senior Quentin Monaghan, who hails from Chatham, N.J. and trained out of Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy, won the Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA)’s Arthur Ashe Award for this year. “I am extremely honored to receive this award,” said Monaghan. “A recognition for both leadership and sportsmanship is not only a testament to my coaches and teammates, but to lessons and values instilled upon me by Notre Dame. I cannot thank my teammates enough. I care so much about each and every one of them and it was an honor to be their captain the last two years.”

CourtSense High West Side Tennis Club Continues Performance Kids Succeed School Outreach Program West Side Tennis Club at Super Six Sectionals The continues its School Outreach CourtSense’s High Performance players Maxim Mazak and Julian (Juju) Wu found success at the USTA Eastern Super Six Section Championships at the Bogota Racquet Club. The two players finished third and fourth, respectively, after Mazak defeated Wu 63, 6-2 in the third-place match.

Program for local schools in the area this year. The Club visits schools with tennis equipment and teaches a physical education class, or the schools visit West Side, where they can tour the facility, learn about the Club’s history and take part in tennis clinics. The program is completely free for schools and exposes kids who might not otherwise have the opportunity to the sport of tennis. NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2016 • New York Tennis Magazine

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USTA Metro Region The USTA Eastern Metro Region/Friends of South Oxford Park Community Tennis Festival USTA Eastern Metro Board member Mel Swanson and Friends of South Oxford Park President Dwayne Broadnax organized a free kids tennis clinic for the community which was sponsored by the USTA Metro Board. The kids had a great time on the court and enjoyed a delicious pizza party after. Board President Jackie Clark, Member-atLarge Jonathan Williams and Brooklyn Representative Mel Swanson, along with volunteers from the Junior Tennis Clinic Inc. and the Junior Metro Region Board Committee and the community, helped out.

Photo credit to: Earl Wilson

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New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com


USTA Metro Region Metro JTT Teams Advance to Eastern Sectionals Congratulations to the teams that won the USTA Eastern Metro Region Junior Team tennis playoffs. They represented Metro at USTA Eastern Junior Team Tennis Sectionals. Congratulations to all of the players and coaches.

The 10 & Under Cunningham Cubs with Coach Chris Atienza

The 18 & Under Island Grinders with Coach Andre Vaginer

The 10 & Under Cunningham Cobras with Coach Bill Rancho

The 14 & Under Highland Park Eagles with Coaches Hector Henry and Dion Lachmanen

The USTA Eastern Metro Board JTT Committee of Obong Akpan, Coordinator Joan Akpan, Jackie Clark and Bill Noonan (Jonathan Williams not in photo)

The 10 & Under Orange Crushers with Coach Willie Hammond

Congrats to the Staten Island Stars 10 & Under team for winning the Orange Ball Metro Championships NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2016 • New York Tennis Magazine

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adult league U S T A L E A G U E S U P D AT E

The 10.0 Mixed Doubles team, captained by Eric Tomasini, came in first place at the USTA Eastern Adult League Sectionals

The 9.0 Mixed Doubles team, led by Maria Salnikowa, came in first place at the recent Adult League Sectionals

The USTA Eastern Adult League Sectionals took place recently and the teams from the Metro Section did exceptionally well. l The 6.0 Mixed Doubles team, captained by Jeffrey Dietz and Lily Lee, finished as finalists l The 7.0 Mixed Doubles team, cap28

tained by Angelo Ragione and Jung Hoon Park, finished in fourth place l The 8.0 Mixed Doubles team, captained by Grace Hiroko, finished in fifth place l The 9.0 Mixed Doubles team, captained by Maria Salnikowa, came in first place

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

l The 10.0 Mixed Doubles team, captained by Eric Tomasini, came in first place The 9.0 Mixed Doubles Team and 10.0 Mixed Doubles team will represent USTA Eastern at the National Championships in November in Tucson, Ariz.


MatchPoint Hosts Successful QuickStart Tournament Credit all photos to Sidney Beal III

atchPoint NYC’s QuickStart program continues to find success this spring, hosting another tournament to showcase some of its top young junior players. This installment of their QuickStart tournament featured 22 boys, who were split up into one group of eight for QuickStart and one group of 14 for Advanced QuickStart. To add something extra to this tournament, the Advanced QuickStart group began each point by serving the ball in

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themselves, as coaches Pavel Bednarzh, Khyrstsina Tryboi and Danny Ostrometsky supervised, while coaches Narek Bazyan and Andrey Vyaltsev Jr. supervised the other group and helped them by feeding the balls in for each point. After exciting round-robin play that demonstrated talent and sportsmanship to the coaches and parents, Josh Dolinsky defeated Nikita Rykov to win the QuickStart Division, while Timothy Silantiev beat Kirill Libman 7-5 in an exciting Advanced QuickStart final. “I was really pleased with the results of

the QuickStart tournament. We had a really special group of kids to work with this year. They’re passionate about playing and have worked hard to develop their skills over the past months,” said Danny Ostrometsky, assistant director of MatchPoint’s QuickStart Program. “This tournament was a culmination of all of that hard work and dedication and an opportunity for the kids to showcase their abilities. We are really proud to coach these young athletes; watching them grow as players has been incredibly fulfilling for the entire coaching staff, and more importantly, fun for everyone involved.”

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American Sport Psychology (443)-243-5598 Brandyn@AmericanSportPsychology.com AmericanSportPsychology.com Brandyn Fisher, Ph.D., is founder and CEO of American Sport Psychology (ASP), the leader in elite mental training for tennis players. With a Ph.D. in sport psychology and an extensive coaching background, Dr. Fisher bridges the gap between mental training and on-court performance. He built and directed the mental conditioning programs at multiple tennis academies working with players at all levels, including USTA national champions, NCAA All-Americans, and ATP/WTA professionals. A sought-after speaker, Dr. Fisher has presented at the top coaching conferences in the world, including the USPTA World Conference and various USTA events. Additionally, he has served as the lead coach at USTA Regional Training Camps (RTC), which host the top junior players across the country. American Sport Psychology mentors players on their individual journeys towards achievement by helping them to unlock the mental and emotional aspects of performance. Using a strengths-based approach, the ASP team customizes the delivery of training services to each individual athlete. ASP athletes gain access to the entire ASP team, along with an extensive network of players and coaches who provide insight and mentorship along the way. In addition to providing elite mental training for individual players, ASP works alongside coaches and academies to create successful developmental training programs. From assessment to implementation, the ASP team brings an eclectic and versatile approach that is based on real-world experience in program development. Train with ASP and discover your potential by visiting AmericanSportPsychology.com. Dr. Fisher can be reached via email at Brandyn@AmericanSportPsychology.com. 30

Dr. Reuben S. Ingber (212) 213-0001/(718) 627-7750 DrIngber.com Dr. Reuben S. Ingber is a nationally-recognized specialist in myofascial pain, with 30 years of clinical experience treating pain and sports injuries. He is a double board certified physical medicine and rehabilitation and pain medicine specialist. He combines his medical knowledge with experience in martial arts and yoga, which leads to a unique approach to analyzing and treating sports injuries. He has published articles in peer review medical journals on myofascial pain (trigger points), including one on the treatment of racquet sports shoulder injuries with myofascial treatment of a major rotator cuff muscle. With the use of state-of-the art, scientifically sound, non-invasive methods (and not cortisone), he can effectively relieve rotator cuff tendinitis, shoulder impingement, tennis elbow, Achilles tendinitis, plantar fasciitis, herniated discs and sciatica. For more information, feel free to browse the web site at www.dringber.com With two convenient offices in midtown Manhattan and Midwood Brooklyn, Dr. Ingber can be reached by phone at (212) 213-001 or (718) 627-7750, or visit DrIngber.com.

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com


Dr. Tom Ferraro (516) 248-7189 DrTFerraro@aol.com DrTomFerraro.com Dr. Tom Ferraro is an internationally-known sport psychologist designated as one of “The nation’s top mental game gurus” by Golf Digest. He has a full-time sport psychology practice in Nassau County, working with elite and professional athletes, including top-ranked tennis players. He is also affiliated with the Winthrop University Hospital Psychiatry Department, where he teaches resident doctors about the history of psychotherapy. He has also worked with professional teams in the New York area as their team psychologist. Dr. Ferraro remains one of the few sport psychologists in the nation who is also a senior level, fully-credentialed psychoanalyst. This allows him to not only use standard behavioral techniques to help tennis players control emotions, but also enables him to diagnose accurately and fully treat underlying issues, such as depression, anxiety or attention deficit disorders that can plague an athlete’s career. He publishes columns and feature articles in the U.S., Asia and Europe, and has appeared on major television networks. His work has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The London Times, Newsday, The Daily News and The New York Post. He can be reached by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail DrTFerraro@aol.com or visit DrTomFerraro.com. Dr. Ferraro’s office is located in Williston Park, N.Y.

Nutrition Solutions PC 705 Middle Neck Road Great Neck, N.Y. (516) 439-5090 Irina@IrinaLehat.com IrinaLehat.com Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN founded her Nutritional Solutions firm on the premise that through education, young and old alike are empowered to make healthy choices for themselves and their families. Through her range of professional and personal experiences—which include a 13-year run as a clinical dietitian with the Visiting Nurse Services, an amateur tennis player, and years of providing one-on-one counseling—Irina has gained a broad understanding of how nutrition profoundly affects everything from how we feel every day and our athletic performances to preventing and managing diabetes, hypertension and arthritis. Utilizing her vast knowledge, Irina has developed educational programming, geared towards both individuals and groups, that instills fundamental health and nutrition principles, while making healthy living practical and doable.


Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group (516) 536-2800 OrlinCohen.com Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group is Long Island’s leading private orthopedic practice with a team of 37 board-certified and board-eligible physicians. The group features orthopedic subspecialists who have completed advanced fellowship training, focusing solely on a single area of concern. This focused approach results in optimum patient outcomes, as the doctors are on top of the latest advances for each specific area of expertise. The group’s highly trained and experienced orthopedists cover the entire spectrum of subspecialty needs, including sports medicine, hip, knee, shoulder, elbow, joint replacements, foot and ankle, spine, neck and back, hand and upper extremities, and general orthopedics. Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group has multiple offices in both Nassau and Suffolk Counties, with a recently-opened new office on the North Shore in Woodbury, N.Y. This new state-of-the-art, full-service facility addresses all of your orthopedic related needs, including in-house diagnostic testing, digital x-ray, MRI, physical rehabilitation and a fully-accredited pain management/fluoroscopy suite. This site is part of the Orlin & Cohen network, which consists of seven orthopedic offices, five physical rehabilitation centers, four MRI centers and two fully accredited fluoroscopy suites for pain management. Yet another full-service office is currently under construction in Garden City with an anticipated late-2016 opening. This new Garden City office is conveniently located off the Meadowbrook Parkway at 1101 Stewart Avenue and is a natural extension for the Orlin & Cohen team of board-certified, fellowship-trained subspecialists with offices in Rockville Centre, Cedarhurst, Lynbrook, Merrick, Massapequa, Woodbury and Bohemia. For more information, call (516) 536-2800 or visit OrlinCohen.com.

Peak Performance Locations in Wantagh, Lynbrook, New Hyde Park and Island Park (516) 599-8734 Info@PeakPTFit.com PeakPTFit.com Keeping athletes in the game for more than 25 years, Peak Performance has four locations and 21 physical therapists making Peak Performance one of Nassau County’s largest physical therapy groups. Peak Performance’s progressive facilities offer personal care through the use of advanced tools and techniques, all the while maintaining a direct relationship with your referring doctor. Specializing in orthopedic and sports therapy, Peak Performance is the Official Physical Therapist for The New York Cosmos and a member of the Hospital for Special Surgery’s Rehabilitation Network. Whether you suffer from tennis elbow, a torn rotator cuff or total knee replacement, Peak Performance meets your healing needs. Renowned for its state-of-the-art HydroWorx Therapy Pool, Peak Performance uses Aquatic Therapy to reduce pain and increase flexibility. The water’s buoyancy lessens pressure on knees, ankles and hips, as well as decreases postoperative swelling, leading to a quicker recovery. But Peak Performance doesn’t stop at recovery! Upon completion of therapy, patients graduate to the Peak Performance in-house Fitness Center—run by exercise physiologists—offering personal training, sports conditioning, V02/RMR Analysis and much more. Heal, Strengthen, Achieve! For more information, visit PeakPTFit.com.


Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (855) 321-ORTHO TotalOrthoSportsMed.com Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine is comprised of the most respected and experienced surgeons on Long Island. At Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, treatments range from conservative to surgical, and Total Orthopedics believes in an individualized approach to treatment determine each patient’s treatment protocol based on their health, lifestyle and goals. The team of specialists collaborates to determine the most effective treatment plan for each patient. For those who do require surgery, the surgeons of Total Orthopedics provide the most innovative and minimally-invasive procedures at some of Long Island’s most esteemed medical centers. Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine has locations throughout Long Island, and treats athletes from amateur to professional. Specialties include: l l l l l l l l

Shoulder injuries Spinal conditions Elbow injuries Hip injuries Knee injuries Foot and ankle injuries Hand/wrist injuries Sports medicine

The goal of Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine is to get all of its patients back to an active and healthy lifestyle as quickly and effectively as possible. For more information, call (855) 321-ORTHO or visit TotalOrthoSportsMed.com.

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2016

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP B Y B R IA N C OLE MA N

Trinity Defends San Marco Title With 4-2 Win Over Beacon

The Trinity School won its second consecutive San Marco Invitational title, downing Beacon 4-2 at the Cary Leeds Center for Tennis and Learning. Trinity overcame tricky windy conditions to take four of the six matches, led by its doubles play, and getting wins from its first and third singles players. “Gusty winds made it a challenging match for both teams, but we have a talented team with a lot of depth, which I think was the key to our success,” said Trinity Head Coach Damon Lopez-O’Dwyer. “The quality of play was a little erratic across all the courts at the outset, but as guys began to figure out the conditions, the level and intensity went way up. It was an exciting finish that came down to the last match of the day.” 34

Ananth Raghavan defeated Ameer Hosain 6-2, 6-1 in the top singles spot, while Peter Frelinghuysen defeated Felix Levine 6-0, 6-4 in the third singles spot. Andre Fernandez & Davoud Elghanayan beat Liam & Connor Dunne of Beacon 6-1, 6-0 at third doubles, and the clinching match came at second doubles, as Jack Wasserstein & Milan Jain clinched the match by winning a third-set super-breaker for the 6-7, 7-5, 10-8 victory. “Winning the San Marco in back-toback years is a great accomplishment. The tournament started with the 16 best teams in the region and we’re proud to come out on top,” said LopezO’Dwyer. “We have a lot of respect for

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Beacon. We’ve had some terrific battles with them in the Mayor’s Cup finals for the past several years, but they’ve bested us. To win the San Marco against them this year gives us a nice boost headed into the Mayor’s Cup, which will be an exciting tournament this year. “We expect to see Beacon again, as well as our league rival, Collegiate,” continued Lopez-O’Dwyer. “Like us, Collegiate has some key seniors who will be playing for the last time. Our matches with them over the past few years have been, I think, the defining ones for both groups. We’re looking forward to the opportunity to go at it one last time and culminate the end of a terrific era.”


2016

BOY’S HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Beacon Beats Brooklyn Tech for Ninth Straight PSAL Title

There is a culture of winning that reverberates inside the Beacon Blue Demons Boys Tennis program. So even after losing a number of seniors from last year’s city championship team, this year’s team didn’t miss a beat. The Blue Demons captured its ninth consecutive PSAL New York City “A” Division title, defeating top-seed and unbeaten Brooklyn Tech 4-1 on a hot day at Cunningham Park. “This one is really special,” said Beacon Head Coach Bayard Faithfull. “This is the youngest team I’ve ever coached. Our starting lineup consists of three freshman,

three sophomores and a junior. We graduated our top nine players from last year, so to get young kids to be consistent is something really special.” The first match off the court was the first doubles flight, as Beacon’s Julian Szuper & Marcos Lee rolled to a 6-0, 6-0 win over Daniel Maseyev & Denis Korol of Brooklyn Tech. Felix Levine then chipped in a 6-3, 6-2 win over Bojidar Todorov at third singles to give Beacon the 2-0 lead. The second doubles pairing of Lucas Larese De Santo & Tyler Kats came back from a set down to beat Brooklyn Tech’s Alex Huynh & Lawrence Shoykhet 6-7, 6-

1, 6-0, and Ethan Leon knocked off Philip Raytburg 7-6, 6-1 at second singles to round out the Beacon victory. In the final contest, with the overall match decided, Brooklyn Tech’s Samuel Vagner edged Ameer Hosain 6-7, 6-4, 105 in a competitive match. “They are aware of the legacy, and they very much want to uphold that,” Coach Faithfull said of his players understanding the Beacon history. “I talk to them all about the fact that we stand on the shoulders of lots of kids who have played before them, and these kids came in and did some outstanding stuff. We are really proud of that.”

Newcomers Beats Bard for NYC B Division Title

The Newcomers Lions captured the PSAL New York City “B” Division Championship, defeating Bard 4-1 at Cunningham Park. The win completes an undefeated 14-0 season for the Lions.

Singles play led the way for Newcomers, winning all three flights in straight sets. Evangelos Vasos defeated Caleb Miller 6-4, 6-1 at first singles, Dipen Rana beat Nathan Silverstein 6-4, 6-2, and Ioannis Vasos knocked off Alexander Komanoff 6-1, 6-3 at third singles. Bard’s lone win would come in the first doubles flight, as Finn Clarke & Zachary Miodownik beat Hongtao Liu &

Sonam Sherpa 6-4, 6-0, while the Newcomers pair of Nasir Khan & Syed Jamal defeated Alejandro Schmieder & Gabriel Neuman 6-1, 5-7, 11-6 at second doubles to round out the Newcomers victory. Brian Coleman is senior editor for New York Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email BrianC@USPTennis.com.

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The Top Nine Common Junior Players Make By Gilad Bloom s a coach, you learn fast that in tennis, every student is different in style of play, character and body type. However, there are still many things that are similar among most young players (such as the love to play points in practice over doing repetition drills). Over the years, I have noticed that most kids share the same common mistakes, some of them basic fundamentals that can easily be fixed in the young ages, but not as easy as the kids get older and bad habits become more difficult to fix. Here is a list of the top nine most common flaws I see in many kids. Many of them are due to the lack of organized coaching during a child’s formative years. Many kids grow up with homemade games without the luxury of getting one-onone lessons and when they start to get high level coaching, they have developed bad habits that are hard to change, but not impossible.

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1. Lack of ready position Having a good ready position is essential. It is surprising how fixing that simple thing can actually improve the quality of your shots right away. Placing the racquet in a neutral position, usually with a forehand grip, and leaning forward with knees bent allows for maximum balance, better timing and a cleaner, more consistent shot. 2. The split-step So many kids neglect this subject and don’t realize the importance of a good split-step before every shot (just a split second before the opponent connects with the ball). It’s not an easy realization, but the fact is that a good tennis player needs to split-step non-stop during a tennis match, the sooner they internalize this fact, the sooner they will reach the next level. 3. Taking an eye off the ball too soon If I had one sentence to leave to this world, it would be to “Keep your eye on the ball.” This is golden advice. Actually, you have to keep your eye on the point of contact for an extra split second after the ball is gone. That’s what all the great players are doing. Roger Federer is a great example of this. It is simple … if you try to watch the point of contact, you will make sure that you hit the sweet spot and thus increase the accuracy of the shot, maintain confidence and remain disciplined enough to trust the shot and keep the head down on big points. This is what separates the good from the great. Federer has done this the best and has been rewarded with pretty good results. Oftentimes, he will hit a winner without even looking at the result because he is so fanatical about keeping his eyes down where he connected. 4. Not hitting enough cross-courts during points The old quote from Bjorn Borg is one of my favorites. When asked about the secret of his success, he replied, “Basically, I hit lots of cross-courts and from time to time, I go down the line.” To me, this is tennis in a nutshell. That way of thinking won Borg 11 majors in six years. Many kids early in their development fail to understand the power of the cross-court and pull the trigger too soon, going down the line when down in the point, allowing the opponent to take control. The cross36

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before the serve (during the motion) or on groundstrokes, they will switch grips after the split-step. This habit takes away valuable time and increases missed hits. Many kids don’t even realize that they are doing it and when they fix the flaw. The result is immediate improvement and cleaner contact.

on Mistakes e court, inside-out forehand and short-angle cross are all shots that, when hit well, can open up the court and create an advantage, plus, the cross goes through the low part of the net. The defensive cross-court allows for time to recover. Need I say more?

7. Going to the net on a cross-court Obviously you need to mix it up from time to time, but eight out of 10 times, I would recommend approaching the net on a down the line shot. It simply allows you the best coverage of the net. Coming in on a cross-court exposes you to the easy down the line passing shot—it is a case of percentages. Many kids will go in on a cross-court shot and wonder why they lost a point they should have won. The ones who stick to the percentage game will win more points in the long run.

5. Not having the right grip on volleys With 99 percent of kids hitting a two-handed backhand nowadays, it is getting increasingly difficult to teach kids to hit with a proper Continental Grip. Many of them use the “Fake Continental,” which is between an Eastern Forehand Grip and a Classic Continental. Fixing that early on in one’s development can 8. Not using the left hand enough determine between having a mediocre volley (on a two-handed backhand) or a quality volley. The two-handed backhand (for a righty) is essentially a left-handed forehand with a little 6. Re-gripping help from the right arm. Many kids never Especially on the serve, but also on ground- work on their weak hand and use too much strokes, many kids will change their grip right of the dominant arm. I make my students hit

left-handed forehands every day for a few minutes. Once they develop that muscle and become more crafty with their off-hand, it will take over the shot and create more power, and provide better placement and more versatility in the shot. 9. Having a consistent toss on the serve Many kids have a solid motion and can generate a lot of pace on the serve, yet fail to make first serves with good percentages. Most of the time, it is due to an inconsistent toss. Once they fix the toss, it usually makes a visible impact on the first serve percentages and makes holding serve a bit more simple, not a small thing in this game, to say the least. Gilad Bloom is a former Israeli Davis Cup player and two-time Olympian. He played on the ATP Tour from 1983-1995, reaching the fourth round of the U.S. Open in 1990. Gilad reached a highest ranking of 61st in singles, and was Israel’s singles champion three times. He has been running his own tennis program since 2000 and was the director of tennis at John McEnroe Tennis Academy for two years. He may be reached by phone at (914) 9070041 or e-mail Bloom.Gilad@gmail.com.

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Season Planning: On-Court Curriculum By Sinisa Markovic o get the best out of your students, tennis pros need to build a detailed curriculum just like school teachers. This ensures that players will more likely get the most out of their lessons. This doesn’t mean that lessons cannot change on the fly if the pro notices some glaring problem, but “winging it,” as the basis of that curriculum will no longer fly. It is a disservice to the students, who can benefit most from the logic of an in-depth plan that builds from the ground up. At CourtSense, we divide the school year up into three sessions of about three months each which we call trimesters. We have developed a three-month plan for each trimester that I essentially repeat each new trimester, give or take a week. To use our high performance 10-and-under groups as an example, we divide each trimester into four stages: General, Specific, Pre-Competitive and Competitive Preparation. The general stage is four weeks long and it is the initial stage of the trimester. The main goal at this stage is to concentrate on players’ techniques. To break this stage down a little more—during the first week, we do a lot of live ball drills which helps the pros study technique and movement, and assess what we see as the main issues with their game. One of the most important things we do is track what appears to be getting better with our students, and what still needs more work. Once we have a sense of what the players need, we spend the next three weeks designing drills to attack these issues. Players might work on changing grips or improving their swing path on various strokes. Additionally, they will begin to work on basic movements, like split-stepping and taking the proper first steps. We always include some sort of match play in the last part of our lessons, and during the general stage of the trimester, those competitions tend to focus on consistency and control. Young players often forget their “corrections” once they’re competing,

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no matter how low level the competition is, so on the last week of this stage, we take points away from the players if they are not executing the proper technique or the corrections that they have been working on. In this way, the competition is more about winning in terms of technique, not winning a point in a forgettable King-of-the-Court game. Our next four weeks are taken up by the specific preparation stage. The focus in this stage is primarily on footwork. We work on movement in various directions for all types of shots (easy, neutral and emergency). During this stage, we also work on basic shot selection based on court position. We set up any number of situational drills, such as inside-out and inside-in forehands, swinging volleys off of a defensive shot from the opponent, and hitting the ball on the rise so as not to lose court position. We don’t want to completely forget technique of course, and if we begin to notice a pattern where students are reverting to old habits, we will go back and polish the technique. During match play we will continue to

take points away from players if they use poor technique even if they win the point. But we will also reward them extra points if they take the right shots and use the patterns that we were working on. In the pre-competitive prep stage (three weeks), we return to a live ball environment, and begin to focus on decisionmaking. We work on how to begin and finish points, patterns of play, and place players into different tactical situations to see how they compete their way through the point. We still reward players for proper shots and pattern execution, and we also start to play straight up points with no special rules. The last two weeks of the trimester is our competitive stage in which everything is about live ball, point play and shot selection. Not surprisingly, students enjoy this stage the most. There are still points of focus at this stage. While students might like this stage, it’s at this point that tempers often flare when competition reminds them that they still need more work on their games. At this stage, we work on students managing their emotions, and on rituals

that help them calm their nerves to compete more effectively. Each stage in the trimester builds logically to the next. We begin with technique, move to movement, slide into shot selection and decision-making, and finish off with competition and dealing with competitive stress. All the while, we are flexible in terms of the dynamics and patterns of the students’ needs, which always should come first. Sinisa Markovic is a co-director of player development at CourtSense-Tenafly Racquet Club and a certified USPTA Elite Professional. Born in Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Markovic was a number oneranked tennis player in every age division and played the top spot in singles and doubles at Texas Tech University. Prior to joining CourtSense, Sinisa competed on a professional level and achieved ATP ranking in singles and doubles, and played for the Bosnian Davis Cup team in 2006 with Ivan Dodig. At CourtSense he works with juniors and adults from all different levels, including many nationally ranked players.

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From Recreation t

By Salifu Mohammed What it takes to be an elite junior player It all starts with the love and passion for the game. It is accomplished by hard work, parent/family support and great coaching. Elite junior players begin as recreational players, usually in small classes of between three and six students. At this stage, players work on coordination and agility, learn the fundamentals of tennis, the foundations of sportsmanship and sound technical skills. This leads them to a pivotal discovery: The more they practice, the better they will become as tennis players. They also begin routines and mental disciplines that will last as long as they are involved with the game and serve them well in life. In my years working with talented juniors, I have learned that becoming an elite player is not a sprint, it’s more like a marathon. The journey has specific bench40

marks, but each player experiences these benchmarks in their own way. There are also some common, basic characteristics among all successful junior players and those are: Hard work, goal-setting and the passion to achieve that goal. Benchmark #1: Keeping the ball in play All sports have learning curves, and the learning curve for basic tennis is more difficult than most other sports. In track, you are running right off the bat. There is no real failure until someone passes you. If you swim, all you have to do is point yourself in a direction and you are successful. Even in basketball, if you are tall enough, you can make a basket. Not so in tennis. Without the proper training, ESPN has noted that tennis is one of the more difficult sports to play. However, once a junior learns how to keep the ball in the court, tennis is one of the most rewarding sports of all. Once a junior understands how to keep the ball in

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

the court, great possibilities open up, including improving upon skills like balance, power, speed and endurance. At this point, juniors begin to understand and develop a love for the game. Benchmark #2: High performance A love of the game turns into a serious commitment. The next step is graduating to high performance junior players. As the better players progress, they are separated into a much smaller and focused group to truly unlock their potential. This is the time to work with a master coach who can take players to the next level and can help turn basic skills into something greater. We train juniors to play with focus and intensity, and set ambitious yet realistic goals for their own process and performance. Along with offensive and defensive skills, girls and boys start to develop a personal playing style. I also introduce stress management techniques and self-discipline at this stage.


n to Competitive Play Benchmark #3: Fitness, mental toughness and strategy At this level, players put in many hours of practice and compete at the highest possible level. Tennis is now a significant part of the junior’s life and their game takes on mental, as well as physical, characteristics. As a coach, it is important to build a strong working relationship with the player. It is the role of a coach to provide feedback on how a player can improve. This is coming from a figure who the player respects and looks up to in terms of the sport. The parents’ job is to provide emotional support and encouragement, win or lose. Coaching at this level is totally individualized and covers the ability to adjust to different opponents, refining a personal game style and working on endurance and strength. The best coaches also prepare players for spending time in the limelight

without being distracted by it, and for assuming responsibility for challenging and motivating themselves. Benchmark #4: Match play Match play is where all phases of training come into play, to simulate as closely as possible the stress factors and realities of playing in a real match. Coaches study match play to help students become more self-aware on the court, knowing exactly where they are mentally and physically at all times, so that they may activate strategies to compete and hopefully win. Match play is not about if you will face adversity on the court. It is about whether you can follow the training plan and win the match when you face adversity on the court. No matter how many wins or losses a player experiences, one thing should remain

constant–the love of the game. But in order to love the game you must understand the game. That is why tennis is a sport in which effective coaching really matters. Tennis is a sport players can enjoy for a lifetime … and they do! Salifu Mohammed is tennis director at New York Tennis Club, training high performance junior players, and providing QuickStart, beginner, and junior development programs, as well as private lessons and adult clinics. A world-ranked player since his own junior days, Salifu achieved a world junior ranking of 69th in the world. Trained by Nick Bollettieri, Salifu has competed in the Davis Cup for Ghana, as well as the main draw junior tournaments at the U.S. Open, French Open, Wimbledon and Australian Open. He may be reached by phone at (914) 312-5931 or by e-mail at SMohammed@AdvantageTennisClubs.com.

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McEnroe Cont With Johnny M

he next great American tennis champions could hail from anywhere—maybe even from right here in New York. No one is more acutely aware of this than John McEnroe, whose relentless efforts to regrow interest and participation in the game on many levels is exemplified by the Johnny Mac Tennis Project (JMTP), a non-profit organization committed to changing young lives by removing barriers to success through tennis. JMTP is based at Sportime Randall’s Island, the New York City home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA). “The dream is to bring the buzz back to American tennis, starting in New York,” said McEnroe, Tennis Hall of Famer and winner of seven Grand Slam Singles Titles. “Tennis is a great community sport, but we need to make it more accessible to those of every in-

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come level and in communities where tennis has not been accessible in the past. I’m looking forward to the JMTA fundraising events taking place in East Hampton this August, which will support our effort to make tennis a bigger part of community life in NYC, and also giving kids who find that they have a passion for the sport a chance to become players—to learn, practice, compete and succeed.” Tennis stars like Rafael Nadal, Bjorn Borg, Andre Agassi, Jim Courier and Novak Djokovic have participated in events to raise funds for JMTP, which has introduced tennis to thousands of New York City area kids, many from the East Harlem and the South Bronx communities adjacent to Sportime Randall’s Island. JMTP introduces kids to tennis as a life-long health, fitness and social activity. For its most dedicated young ath-

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letes, JMTP provides an entree to competitive tennis that can lead to college scholarships, careers in the industry and, for some, professional tennis careers, and as McEnroe hopes, Grand Slam titles. That its namesake reached the loftiest heights of tennis greatness is not lost on JMTP coaches or on the youngsters in JMTP sponsored programming. In the context of its “Pathway to Success,” JMTP enables New York children to explore their athletic and related potentials through tennis. Sportime and McEnroe share a mission to help kids achieve excellence by embracing healthy and active lifestyles, by learning analytic and problem-solving skills and by developing winning strategies for both practice and play that can pay life-long dividends far beyond the game. Creating and operating programs to


ntinues Star Development Mac Tennis Project make McEnroe’s dreams a reality for hundreds and ultimately thousands of under-resourced New York City children from local communities, requires substantial financial support from individual and corporate donors. Millions of dollars are needed, on an annual basis, to offer tennis programs, held at Sportime Randall’s Island daily, to partner public schools as part of their physical education curriculums and to community based organizations, as well as offering programs off-site at additional partner schools and community based organizations. Additional funding supports individual scholarships for students who show promise

and who seek to compete at the highest levels of the junior game. Since 2010, JMTP scholarship recipients have parlayed these opportunities into college scholarships and favored recruitment into NCAA programs at top colleges and universities. “Tennis is a sport that can be enjoyed at any age and at every level of play. It’s not only fun for individuals and families, but the physical, emotional and intellectual challenges and benefits of the game bear lifelong rewards,” said McEnroe. “It’s also true that we who love the sport in this country need to do a better job of cultivating and nurturing our talent. Through JMTP, we’re saying to young

people who have the aptitude, attitude and skills to compete at college and pro levels—we are here to support you, coach you and help you get there.” Upcoming JMTP fundraising events include a dinner “Under the Stars With the Stars” at a private oceanfront home in East Hampton on Saturday, Aug. 27, followed by a Pro Am Tournament at Sportime Amagansett, in which McEnroe, other legends and top pros and coaches, and Chelsea Handler and other tennis-obsessed celebrities, will play a round-robin doubles event with donors on Sunday, Aug. 28. To learn more about the Johnny Mac Tennis Project, visit JMTPNY.org.

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Seven Days in Barcelona

On the Road With Elite Tennis & Travel or Adriana Isaza, the marriage between tennis and Latin culture was a natural fit. A native of Bogota, Colombia, Adriana hit the tennis circuit at the age of 16 when she was the Colombian National Tennis Champion, a reign which lasted for four years. She was an NCAA All-American, and a Silver Medalist at the Pan American Games in 1987. Adriana brought her love of tennis and Latin culture to the New York metro area, where she has been coaching tennis and teaching Spanish for more than 15 years. In 2014, she founded Elite Tennis and Travel to share her dual passions with other tennis and culture enthusiasts. This spring, Isaza teamed up with Wendy Gardiner, director of tennis at Chelsea Piers in Connecticut, to customize the trip of a lifetime for the most adventurous players within Chelsea Piers’ membership. Nine intrepid tennis fans traveled to Spain, to enjoy the Barcelona Open and experience the many wonders of Barcelona off the court–including personal tours of Gaudi’s iconic architectural masterpieces, exclusive shopping, wine-tasting and touring the gorgeous Catalonian countryside. The linchpin of the trip was the three days of tennis at the historic Real Club de Tennis Barcelona 1899.

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The group from Chelsea Piers makes an appearance at Real Club de Tenis in Barcelona, Spain

“What I like about the Torneo Godo [Barcelona Open] is that it’s a small and intimate venue,” said Isaza. “We were able to see world-class tennis from literally an arm’s distance. It’s impossible to get near the players at the bigger Grand Slam venues, but in Barcelona, we were just a few feet away from Rafael Nadal, Kei Nishikori, and the Bryan Brothers. We even managed to snap a few selfies because we were so close!” The avid doubles players in Wendy’s group studied the Bryan Brothers intently, and with some cues from Adriana, picked up a few tips about doubles play.

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In larger venues, Adriana has introduced “virtual coaching,” in which she creates a Twitter feed to privately commentate the match, play-by-play, for her guests. “I love it when I can personalize the match for my group,” said Isaza. “For example, if I know that someone has a problem or question about their lob, I’ll make sure to point out good examples during the match. I think it helps them build confidence and play better when they see a professional employing strategies that they are working on as well.”


The group was also keen to watch three consecutive days of Rafael Nadal, and kept their eyes peeled for sightings of him off the court and around town in Barcelona. Though Nadal never made a personal appearance, the ladies had a fine time looking for him at The W Hotel Barcelona. The group’s enthusiasm peaked when Nadal edged out Kei Nishikori 6-4, 7-5 for the 2016 title. According to Wendy, whose wild popularity is largely due to the many thoughtful and creative events she prepares for her club members, “It was hands down the most fabulous trip! We were able to adjust the agenda on the fly, according to the desires of the group and the weather. Everyone on the trip has committed to going again next year, which speaks volumes, especially since the destination isn’t even finalized yet.” But Isaza is, in fact, already preparing for the 2017 ATP Tour season. She already has trips locked in for both the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters (April 2017) and the Italian Open (May 2017).

Up close and personal at center court in Barcelona

Tortilla Espanola, prepared with a dash of NYC spice, in a private cooking class

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courtsix New York Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Fritz to marry fellow tennis player

Sometimes when you know, you just know.”

Serena passes Sharapova on Forbes’ earnings list

American Taylor Fritz announced his engagement to girlfriend and fellow tennis player, Raquel Pedraza. Just 18-years-old, Fritz made the announcement via Instagram with the caption: “She said yes …

World number one Serena Williams can now call herself number one on a different list, as Forbes’ annual listing of the world’s highest earning athletes named her the top earning female athlete in the world. She made a total of $28.9 million, with $20 million of that coming from endorsements.

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McEnroe joins Raonic coaching team, Lendl rejoins Murray

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

Seven-time Grand Slam champion Jon McEnroe has joined the coaching team for Milos Raonic as a coaching consultant for the grass-court season. McEnroe will also continue his broadcasting duties, but sees a lot of potential in the 24-year old Canadian. “The timing made sense to me,” said McEnroe. “There was an opening in my schedule so I thought to myself: ‘Name six or seven guys that can win Wimbledon.’ I would put Milos as one of those guys.” Ivan Lendl has rejoined Andy Murray’s coaching team. Lendl previously worked with Murray from 2012-2013, the most successful period in Murray’s career, winning both the U.S. Open and Wimbledon. “I had two very successful years working with Ivan. He’s single-minded and knows


what it takes to win the big events,” said Murray. “I’m looking forward to Ivan joining the team again and helping me try and reach my goals.”

Dane was recently featured in an extensive feature in Esquire where she took the opportunity to open up about her personal life and life on the WTA Tour.

Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): When you go to the @adidas store & pick out all the things u didn’t know u needed! (yes that’s leopard print in there)

Cab driver takes jab at Bouchard Eugenie Bouchard was driving across the Netherlands border when a guard stopped her to ask the nature of her visit. When she said it was for a tennis tournament, the guard decided to take a jab at her:

Tweets from the pros

John Isner (@JohnIsner): Proud of my father for going after this at home in NC.

Serena Williams (@SerenaWilliams): The true GOAT. What a sad day for everyone to lose someone so great and kind …

Ana Ivanovic (@AnaIvanovic): More Love. Less Hate. #PrayForOrlando

Murray gives Beckham’s son a tennis lesson

Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Find your favorite “instrument” and play it with lots of love #dayatwork #RG16

Nick Bollettieri (@NickBollettieri): Circle of life. Privileged 2 work w/@TommyHaas13 4 many years. Now got to work w/his daughter! Doesn’t get better! Prior to playing in the Aegon Championships at the Queen’s Club, Andy Murray took the time to give soccer legend David Beckham’s son, Romeo, a tennis lesson. “It’s obviously a huge treat and one that he wasn’t expecting … I wasn’t expecting it as well,” said David Beckham. “We were just coming down here to see some of the guys warm up and practice, so this is a big plus for him.”

Wozniacki opens up in Esquire feature Caroline Wozniacki’s 2016 has been a struggle to date, most notably, her recent injury which forced her to miss about two months of action. But the

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court six continued from page 47 Stanislas Wawrinka (@StanWawrinka): Thanks @LeRoyalMonceau always a pleasure to stay in the best hotel in #Paris !! Aga Radwanska (@ARadwanska): Proud to be a supporter and ambassador of Poland’s @uefa 2016 campaign in France #euro2016

Christina McHale (@ChristinaMcHale): Thanks @LacosteTennis for my new gear

Eugenie Bouchard (@GenieBouchard): What post match cool down looks like in Mallorca

Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): GRACIAS! Victoria Azarenka (@Vika7): Hola #madrid

Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): Not looking good for tennis today, but so nice to be back on court.

Justin Gimelstob (@JustinGimelstob): Beautiful night in Paris @Tour Eiffel

Venus Williams (@VenusesWilliams): Enjoying the Italian Oceanside, after practice and gym of course!

Noah Rubin (@Noahrubin33): Nothing like playing on this incredible dirt after a long trip! Missed this stuff. #wakeupamerica @_JMTA Petra Kvitova (@Petra_Kvitova): Time for my coffee fix

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Jack Sock (@JackSock): that’s a wrap for the clay season


The Keys to Keeping Juniors Passionate About Tennis By Eliza Davis s a former junior player, I fully understand the ups and downs of playing tennis consistently. You love it when you are winning, but lose interest when losing. Passionate when the weather is perfect, but frustrated when conditions are unfavorable (wind, sun, heat). The key to keeping juniors passionate about the sport of tennis is to keep the game fun. Playing tennis seriously or recreationally needs to remain fun, always maintaining a smile and a laugh to retain your love of the sport. Let’s say during your drills, you finally complete a goal of 10 consecutive forehands beyond the service line. Celebrate your goal with a smile or a fist pump. It may have been a long, arduous road to 10 forehands; however, when you keep the drill tough but rewarding, you can reflect: “I worked hard, I gave everything, I accomplished 10 consecutive forehands, and now I can smile and be happy with the process.” In another scenario, maybe you are in a long, grinding point in a match. Your opponent hits the top of the net, and it rolls onto your side of the court and you lose the point. Smile and congratulate your opponent even though you want to be frustrated. Remember, you worked hard and gave everything, you can be happy with the process and bring that desire to win to the next point. I have broken rackets, screamed, and pouted losing points like that. I eventually learned that the joy of tennis is harnessing your passion. It is easy to express frustration and get upset, but my love of tennis and desire to win kept me in the sport. When I stopped letting the negativity into my tennis world, I began to truly have fun, drilling, competing and training. Sometimes, finding motivation to play may be an issue. Perhaps you are drained or are “just not feeling it” on a particular day. It is times like these where you must dig down and find that motivation. What is it that gets you onto the tennis court? Why do you compete? Whatever the motivation may be, you must channel it into a positive and use it to drive you forward. Make the tennis court your favorite place to be and use that to drive you to meet your goals. In terms of goals, tennis is a sport where we can set a series of small goals to build upon in achieving bigger and better things. Set your goals, as lofty as they may be, and continue to work toward your ultimate prize. Start small and work on things like a particular shot or refine your footwork, and then advance these skills to the next level as you progress forward. No matter your motivation or goals, the bottom line is to keep it fun when on the courts. Are you a recreational player? If so, make the best of your time on the court, know your limitations and use the sport of tennis to have a great time while getting in a good workout. Do you have more of a competitive spirit? Even the most competitive of players find fun in the sport. It may seem like it’s strictly business on the exterior, but what drives this competitive spirit? Sports are designed to be fun, so look past the wins in the “W” column and losses in the “L” column and rediscover why you picked up a racket in the first place—a love for the game that should endure despite one’s record. So get out there, enjoy the game and remember … tennis is designed to be fun!

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Eliza Davis is assistant manager at Midtown Tennis Club. She is a former tennis player who attended the Chris Evert Tennis Academy. NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2016 • New York Tennis Magazine

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Training in the Summertime

By Eric Faro or junior players, summer is a great time to improve upon all aspects of their game. These student-athletes do not have the pressures and responsibilities that go along with their education and schoolwork, and can work on their game with a free and focused mind. Summer training is crucial to their development as solid tennis players. One obvious factor in the improvement of their game is the opportunity to spend more time on the court. During the school year, junior players are usually very limited to court time, especially in the Northeast. The summer months allow for more available court time and players can train like professionals spending endless hours on the court. During this training time, it is vital for jun-

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ior players to work on the technical aspects of their game. Whatever the player is working on—whether it be a grip change, kick serve or inside-out forehand—there is plenty of summer court time for them to really focus on making major improvements. During the school year, a majority of junior players focus their training on getting ready for tournaments. This constant tournament preparation does not allow enough time for instruction on breaking down strokes, working on strategy and speeding up footwork. Summer allows for more time to make major improvements and the training focuses on getting better rather than endless competition. My suggestion for junior players is to play a limited amount of tournaments in the summer, and instead, work on all aspects of your tennis game. Summer is also an important time for junior players to spend concentrated

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time off the court improving their strength and conditioning. Additionally, working out in the summer heat will not only make players much more fit, it will also make them mentally stronger. Setting workout goals is crucial, too. Always train with intention and objectives. Train to improve the first step (quickness), train for endurance, and train for overall strength building. This off-court training, combined with increased on-court practice time and focus, will make you see major improvements in your game. Eric Faro is program director at Gotham Tennis Academy and Stadium Tennis Center, just south of Yankee Stadium. Eric attended Ohio State University and won more than 100 matches during his collegiate career. He may be reached by e-mail at Eric@GothamTennis.com, or online at StadiumTennisNYC.com or GothamTennis.com.


If Only Wives Followed the Rules of Tennis in Marriage (Part I) By Barbara Wyatt he game of modern tennis was patented in 1874, and was offered to players in a box with bats, balls, a portable court and a nine-page pamphlet titled Wingfield’s Rules of the Game. Nine pages! By the time the 2015 edition of Friend at Court, the USTA Handbook of Tennis Rules and Regulations, was published, it took 296 pages of fine print to cover the rules for tennis. I admire tennis players who understand all the rules and apply them fairly. What makes me chuckle is when players demand obedience to “the rules” when they stand within the white lines of a tennis court, while their day-to-day life is lived in opposition to those rules. If an opponent arrives six minutes late for a match, players demand their pound of flesh—the loss of toss, plus two games. Later in the week, this same player who demanded a pound of flesh will arrive 45 minutes late for a dinner date and wonder why their significant other is angry. Players will engage in near battle over the time wasted to pick up a stray ball that may, or may not, have been a hindrance. Then they return to a job and spend hours avoiding a supervisor while searching the Web, deliberately seeking ways to waste time. So, I propose dragging the “Rules of Tennis” into our day-to-day lives. We’d all get along better. Let’s start with marriage. If only wives would follow the Rules of Tennis in marriage.

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For example, Code Rule 11. Requesting opponent’s help. It’s the end of the point, and you aren’t sure where the ball landed. Go ahead, ask your opponent for help; you’re allowed. You must accept the decision that the opponent is obliged to answer honestly. You accept the decision and the game continues on fairly. The same rule should apply in marriage. If a wife asks for her husband’s help, she must listen, take the advice, and make the necessary adjustments to her behavior. The marriage continues. Code Rule 16. Spectators never make calls. A tennis player cannot ask a spectator to help make a call. Spectators have no part in the match … nor in a marriage. The best friend or mother’s opinion cannot be called upon to weigh in on an issue between husband and wife. Both the games

of tennis and marriage are between two people, and that does not include family, friends or spectators. Though sometimes a trained official should be called upon for assistance. ITF Rule 27(a) Correcting Errors. All points previously played stand. When an error is discovered, correct it, forget it, and play on. ITF Rule 27 (a) is used when a player serves from the wrong half of the court. First serve is a fault? Oops, you should have served from the ad side? The serve was played in good faith and is still a fault. Serve the second serve from the ad side. In marriage, when a husband makes a mistake and it is discovered by the wife, make the correction and play on. The wife must not continue to speak about the mistake. It was corrected. Did the husband forget to pick up the kids? Oops! Make the correction (someone pick up the kids), forget it and play on. And please remember to pick up the kids next time. If you believe this editorial has been unduly harsh on the behavior of wives, wait until you read the next edition, when we present the tennis rules that husbands should follow in marriage. Barbara Wyatt is a writer, photographer, USTA official and app developer for iKnowTennis!, the mobile app for advanced players, beginners, coaches and professionals to learn and understand tennis rules. She discovered the game of tennis about 10 years ago and is striving to hit the little yellow ball inside the white lines—in both games. She can be reached by e-mail at BarbaraW@iKnowTennis.com.

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New York’s

Elbaba Oyster Bay’s Julia Elbaba prepares to rip a forehand during her three-set win over Rachel Lim

Headlines U.S. Open National Playoff Eastern Section Winners or the second straight year, New Yorker Julia Elbaba captured the Women’s Singles Title at the U.S. Open National Playoffs Eastern Sectionals, defeating Briarcliff Manor’s Rachel Lim 2-6, 6-1, 6-0 in the finals. Elbaba got off to a slow start and struggled to find her rhythm early on. Lim took advantage of this, breaking in the third game to open up a 2-1 advantage. After three straight holds, Lim found herself with a 4-2 advantage, and she would break again for the 5-2 lead, going on to serve out the set 6-2.

Credit all photos to Brian Coleman

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But the former University of Virginia standout responded in the second set. Elbaba had a calm hold in the opening service game of the set, a huge mental lift after she dropped five of the last six games to close out the first set. “That first game was so big mentally. It’s not actually a crucial game, but from a mental standpoint it was huge,” said Elbaba. “Rachel came out very strong today. She was definitely playing better than me early on. She was more confident and more consistent than I was, so I sort of had to regroup after losing that set.” She did just that, playing much sharper and aggressive tennis. After Lim held to even things at 1-1 in the second, Elbaba rattled off the next 11 games, rolling to the three-set victory. “I was a little too fired up in the beginning so I needed to sort of calm down,” said Elbaba. “I was able to hit with more margin. I didn’t aim for lines as much and decided to work the points a little more. I made sure that I stayed composed.” With the win, Elbaba advances to the U.S. Open National Playoffs Championships in New Haven, Conn. in August. She fell in the final of that draw a year ago in a tight three-set match against fellow New Yorker, Jennifer Elie. “Last year, I lost in the New Haven final, and I had a match point. So I definitely feel like I can go all the way this year … I have the confidence,” said Elbaba. “It’s a new batch of girls, so there is going to be a lot

Women’s Singles Finalists Julia Elbaba (left) and Rachel Lim (right) are congratulated by U.S. Open National Playoff Eastern Sectional Director Whitney Kraft (center)

of tough matches. It’s always been my dream to play in the U.S. Open, so I am just going to continue to work hard.” In the Men’s Singles final, Columbia’s Shawn Hadavi outlasted Myles Schalet, 64, 3-6, 6-2. After Schalet forced a third set, Hadavi dominated the final set. He broke for the 2-0 lead, and after consolidating it with a hold, broke one more time to take a 4-0 lead.

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From 0-5 down, Schalet trimmed the deficit down to 2-5, but Hadavi responded with a break in the eighth game to close things out and win the title. “It was a really tough match, and I was just happy to come out on top,” said Hadavi. “I was able to hit all the right shots in the third set.” continued on page 54

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new york’s elbaba headlines continued from page 53

Women’s Doubles winners Michelle Sorrokko & Dasha Kourkina found success using their twoback strategy in their straight set win over Courtney Kowalsky & Samantha Galu

Hadavi advances to New Haven, where he will compete in the Men’s Singles Draw. The St. John’s duo of Gustavo Loza & Vaidik Munshaw captured the Men’s Doubles Championship, defeating the Princeton duo of Damian Hume & Alen Salibasic, 6-2, 6-2. Both sets looked like mirror images of each other, as Loza & Munshaw broke open 2-2 ties in each set, winning the final four games

in each to notch the straight set victory. “They were serving really well, and so we decided to just pick spots and go down the line on a lot of the key points,” said Loza. The Women’s Doubles final consisted of four local high school players, as Oyster Bay’s Courtney Kowalsky & Jericho’s Samantha Galu took on Little Neck’s Michelle Sorokko & Brooklyn’s Dasha Kourkina.

Kourkina & Sorokko got things started early, breaking Kowalsky’s serve in the opening game to take the early lead. The two would take it over from there, winning 12 of the match’s 16 total games on their way to a 6-3, 6-1 victory. “We play two-back and for us it’s a good strategy,” said Sorokko, referring to her and Kourkina both playing back at the baseline. “This is our fifth year playing together so we know each other’s movements really well.” The pair hopes their chemistry and success together will transfer into New Haven. “I know there are some pretty tough teams there so it will be a challenge,” said Sorokko. “But we’re excited to have the opportunity.” Former Grand Slam champion Alona Bonadrenko-Dyachok paired with husband Nickolay Dyachok to win the Mixed-Doubles title, defeating the team of Madison Appel & Myles Schalet, 6-2, 6-3. With Appel serving in the seventh game of the second set, the Dyachok duo broke for the 4-3 lead, and one more break in the ninth game to close things out. “They were a good team, but I’m glad we were able to win. It was a lot of fun,” said Nickolay Dyachok afterwards. The Mixed-Doubles Championships in New Haven will take place from Aug. 24-27.

1-The St. John’s duo of Gustavo Loza & Vaidik Munshaw celebrate win a point during their straight sets win in the Men’s Doubles Final 2-Former Grand Slam champion Alona Bonadrenko-Dyachok paired with husband Nickolay Dyachok to win the Mixed-Doubles Title 3-Rachel Lim fires a serve during the Women’s Singles Finals 4-Columbia’s Shawn Hadavi tees up a serve during his win over Myles Schalet in the Men’s Singles Final

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Tennis … The Sport of a Lifetime By Christopher Dong ennis can truly be the “Sport of a Lifetime” if your skills can age as gracefully as your passion for the game. As we get older, everyone from the recreational player to Roger Federer has needed to make adjustments to keep themselves competitive and enjoy their longevity in the sport. I have worked with numerous players transitioning to the next stage of their life, whether it is a top junior who now holds a full-time job and laments they are a shell of their former competitive self, to my parents who have played since their 30s and are still playing 40 years later. There are commonalities to the adaptations they have needed to make. The following are some of the “shortcuts” one can try incorporating in their game to keep themselves sharp for years to come.

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Take the ball early Taking the ball early can have a number of benefits. The pros are able to do it with full swings, but we may need to shorten our backswings a bit and redirect the opponent’s pace. This saves you court coverage and takes time away from your opponent. Be sure to keep you head down and focused at the point of contact as timing will become more important. Just remember to recover and never get caught in “No Man’s Land.” 56

Let the racket do the work Although amazing to watch, ripping the ball like Rafael Nadal is not conducive to long-term play. Injuries are part of the game, but we cannot let them keep us out of the sport we love. Loosen that grip and try to get the racket going smoothly through the point of contact. This can be done by adjusting to more of an Eastern Grip and making three-ball contact instead of pulling up too early. Anticipating the ball rather than reacting to the ball can help you get your swing smoother. You may sacrifice some topspin, but in turn, may gain longevity in your wrists and forearms. Improve your feel Unfortunately, as our court coverage diminishes, we are not always in strike zone position. This means more contact points when we are out of position. Though not optimal, we still need to handle these shots as best as possible. To improve your feel, be sure to keep a loose grip, which will allow you to make subtle grip changes. Also, don’t be afraid to experiment. Trying different shots outside the box improves improvisational skills. Shorten points As Roger Federer has done later in his career, coming to net and shortening points can save valuable miles on time-

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

worn legs, especially when you have been playing for years. If you have good hands and have practiced this list, you could even try the “SABR” (Sneak Attack By Roger) to get in early and surprise your opponent. As most players probably know, approach your opponent’s weakness and keep the ball deep. Also, pay attention to court speed as you may need to be more selective when coming in on a slower surface. As players seem to be playing longer on the pro tour, factors such as improved equipment, training and technique all correlate to a higher quality of play later in life. Improvements in technology and video analysis may be considered as well. Though many factors come into play, these tips are timeless and can work at any age and/or level. So get out there, be like Roger and Serena, and keep these whipper-snappers at bay! Christopher Dong is senior manager of programs at the Cary Leeds Center. A former top 10 USTA New England player and varsity NYU Men’s Tennis team member, Christopher took that experience into coaching and earned a PTR certification. In 2008, he was awarded the prestigious AYP Triangle Award for his excellence in leadership, programming and community outreach by the Association of YMCA Professionals.


Footwork as the Foundation to an Explosive Game By Luke Jensen am often asked “What is the very best way to improve in the sport of tennis?” There are many aspects of a growing and developing game. The ability to be consistent is always essential. The work done on your shot placement can give your game a boost, as well as adding some pop to your game with added swing speed. One area where you can become a better tennis player that I have found throughout my tennis career was how to become a quicker tennis player. Even in the doubles game, quick movements in all directions can be a massive difference maker. In the singles game, the points are longer and there is more court coverage required. The footwork in both singles and doubles can make all the difference in reaching the next level of your tennis potential. Whenever I felt my game was in a slump, I would map out a footwork routine that would give me more of an explosive first step. Tennis is a series of sprints over a long period of time. I would first go to work on the jump rope. This simple old school approach builds the calf muscles and revs up footwork. I used the jump rope in 30 second intervals. These can be longer or shorter to fit your starting point, but 30 seconds jumping rope, followed by 30 seconds of rest for 15 minutes, is a solid place to start speed training. Increase the time to one minute of jumping with 30 seconds of rest as you progress. When I was playing, I would go for 30 minutes with this ap-

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proach and track my progress. I would also run the stairs for another explosive first-step footwork drill. Be careful not to overdue this, because the constant pounding running stairs entails can be tough on the joints. My stair routine was based on fast bursts of speed up the stairs, and then walk down. I focused my speed work on intensity and not the longevity of the workout. Finally, there is nothing better than running the lines on the tennis court. The court is perfect to construct a number of speed routines that fit the distance you will need to chase down a running backhand or a quick volley. From side to side, all the way to up and back for overheads, running the lines of a tennis court can give you that next step towards success. Even if your footwork drills last only 15 minutes, I promise you will see immediate

results. To get some really good hints on how to improve your speed, go online and find an approach that works best for you. These days, there is great advice online and even speed camps to attend to improve your athletic ability. I hope your next step on the tennis court is a fast one! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. Luke is currently director of tennis at Sea Island Tennis Center in Georgia. He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail LukeJensen84@yahoo.com.

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Secrets of a Spo

How to insure victory By Dr. Tom Ferraro have worked for many years with top level athletes and have come to realize that the 24 hours leading up to any big event will determine how you do during your match. Here are the basic psychological approaches that will help you to win:

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1. It ought to be obvious that any high level athlete will be both fit and skilled This usually means that they have a fitness trainer to get them flexible and strong, and they also have a swing coach who works with them on technique. After the above foundation is laid down, the remaining task is to be able to control your mental set. This is by no means easy to do, given the high level of competitive stress you will be facing. This is where the expertise of a sport psychologist comes into play. With 24 hours to go before the tournament, one needs to establish a strong mind set. 2. Early to bed The first thing one must do is relax and conserve energy the night before a big match. In thoroughbred racing for a day prior to the race, the horse is kept in his stall and allowed to rest. The danger the athlete faces is social distractions that can drain energy the night before a big match. If the tournament site is far from home, you may be in a hotel and can be tempted to go out and be distracted. If you are home, you may be tempted to stay out late as well. This can only hurt your chances of winning. 3. The mental approach on the morning of the match A feeling that tennis is fun and that


orts Psychologist

ory by using the right pre game routine tournaments are a great way to spend the day is helpful. It is necessary for the athlete to instill a positive mood state rather than feeling dread or anxiety. 4. An aggressive attitude Deep down inside, the mindset of any champion is aggression. Whether it’s John McEnroe, Pete Sampras, Roger Federer or Novak Djokovic, the champion has one thing in mind … to win. And winning means being very aggressive. They all smile on the outside, but on the inside, they are killers at heart. In that way, sport is like war. You either win or you lose. It helps to remind yourself of that so you can get

more in touch with your aggressive nature. 5. Murphy’s Law Always be ready for things to go wrong on the day of the event. Maybe you get there late, there is a rain delay, someone makes a wisecrack or starts to cheat. Rest assured, things like this happen in every tournament, so be ready for it and don’t let it affect you. 6. Have a strategy for each point, game, set or match A good one is to remind yourself that the only thing that matters is the point at hand. It is natural to get ahead of yourself from time to time, but train

yourself to refocus on this point only. 7. Forgiveness Tennis is a tough sport. You are only human and will make mistakes from time to time. Train yourself to let the mistake go and get back into focusing on the point at hand. To be a winner in tennis, you need a strong body and great racket skills, but you also need a great mindset. To win more often, try to follow the plan I just laid out for you and you will fare much better in tournament play. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail DrTFerraro@aol.com or visit DrTomFerraro.com.

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The Mini-Tennis Warm Up and By Steve Kaplan he top tennis stars have distinctive styles that we love to mimic because the sport is so highly individualistic. Back in the 1970s, young players carefully applied surgical tape to their racket grips to be like local hero Vitas. They wore Fila headbands to embody the coolness of Borg. They had huge windups to try to serve like McEnroe. By copying the habits and style of the best players, we felt further connected to these tennis gods. Today, I see young players copying the top stars, but looking a bit more to substance over style and that’s a good thing if applied properly. A good place to begin to explore this topic is the start of play by learning and emulating the “do’s” and “don’ts” of how the pros warm up. About 10 years ago, I traveled to the hallowed grounds of the All-England Club to bring a longtime student to play on the grass courts of Wimbledon. Usually, it’s next to impossible to find an empty practice court during the early rounds, but to my surprise, I saw courts open all over the place. It seemed as though half the players were on the sidelines doing functional movement exercises to get ready to play. It made me think that if the top players in the world were choosing to perform “glute bridges” and “lateral lunges” over hitting on these very unique courts, this was the start of something revolutionary. Today off the court training is as significant as on the court training as the sport is defined by athletic ability, as much as by racket skill. A good non-hitting, functional tennis warm up will:

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l Emphasize mobility of ankles, hips and torso and stability of knees, core and shoulders. l Focus on the correct sequencing of the core firing before the hips hinge to ensure good posture.


and Why We Love to Copy the Pros l Raise your respiratory rate, core temperature and hormonal levels. l Emulate actual tennis movements. Good tennis movement warm up protocols will help you play better, longer and with fewer injuries. One of the exercises that I am not fond of is the practice of holding the net and swinging one leg from side to side in an exaggerated hip abduction/adduction movement. Of the criteria above, it just address hip mobility and in a limited, highly unrealistic and impractical movement. You have to self-stabilize when you play, you don’t get to hold the net. Still somehow because Maria Sharapova, Roger Federer and others did it before a match, its copied by juniors time and time again. Maybe it’s popular because it’s simple, easy and it kind of looks like you are doing something

that is “high performance.” While it’s not a total waste of time, it’s a far cry from a best practice. In the same vain, while a warm up of jogging around the court a few times is better than sitting on the couch and eating potato chips, but not a great preparation for most tennis movements which are short, quick and multi-directional. My advice here is to find a top trainer and learn a sound, compact, practical and functional routine that is right for your needs and the demands of your play. Follow this routine before you start to hit each and every time. The pros prepare with many exercises, choose yours wisely and appropriately. A pro practice that I love is the popular habit of warming up “short court,” but again its value is found in understanding what can be gained and exercising discipline in performance. Short court warm ups are more

than gaining “feel” for the ball. The close distance between the hitters creates time urgency, which compensates for a slowed swing speed, and therefore, the ball will arrive soon even when hit slowly and your preparation must still be quick. The advantage of a slow tempo is that it promotes selfawareness and mechanical correctness so that you can move at the speed you “can,” not at the speed you “can’t” and begin play with great positioning and stroke production. If you use the short court to be lazy, this warm up will not help your game, but if you work your feet and your mind, the short court is a valuable tool to start play. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. He may be reached by e-mail at StevenJKaplan@aol.com.

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More Than an Athlete: Person First. Every Time. By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC n addition to talent, skills and technique, an athlete brings many attributes, values and characteristics to the court. These attributes can be thought of as the fuel that drives and motivates the performance. It’s essentially the player’s “X Factor.” When you bring “Who you are” to “What you do,” more happens because you will be performing from an authentic place with passion, perseverance and purpose.

I

Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach, he works with athletes and teams, focusing on helping athletes gain the mental edge. Rob is author of Tennis Inside the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, e-mail Rob@InsideTheZone.com or visit InsideTheZone.com.

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Team Bloomberg LP was crowned winners of the Metro Corporate Tennis League Winter Advanced Division

Advanced Intermediate Division winners Deutsche Bank celebrate their victory Metro Corporate Tennis League Intermediate Division winners HBO pause for a team photo

he Metro Corporate Tennis League, presented by Advantage Tennis Clubs, is an initiative of the Metrotennis Community Tennis Association (MCTA). MCTA is divided into three levels of play, Intermediate (3.0-3.5), Advanced Intermediate (4.0) and Advanced (4.5+). We also offer an Advanced Beginner Clinic program for teams that are not ready to compete. The MCTA just finished its Winter 2016 season. Congratulations to Bloomberg for winning the Winter 2016 Advanced Division Championship, Deutsche Bank for winning the Advanced Intermediate Division Title and to HBO for capturing the Intermediate Division Championship. MCTA hosted more than 47 teams during the Winter 2016 season. However, during the Summer season, only 25 teams can

T

be accommodated. The season will run from June to August, culminating with an end-of-season party at Roosevelt Island Racquet Club (RIRC). MCTA has finished rounding up its roster of teams for the Summer 2016 season, including:

4. Akin Gump 5. Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP 6. The Corcoran Group 7. Barclays (Alvaro) 8. Bloomberg (Stella) 9. BNP Paribas (Kage)

Advanced Division 1. BNP Paribas (Pierre) 2. Bloomberg (Vighnesh) 3. Deutsche Bank 4. Ernst & Young 5. Proskauer 6. Cleary 7. Corcoran

Intermediate Division II 1. Bloomberg (Ankur) 2. BNP Paribas (Nicolas) 3. Sullivan 4. Deutsche Bank (Armen) 5. Patterson 6. Barclays (Fares) 7. NYCEDC 8. Xaxis

Intermediate Division I 1. Bloomberg (Kara) 2. D.E. Shaw & Company 3. White & Case

For more information, visit Metrotennis.com/Corporate/Main.html, or call Luis Espinoza at (347) 886-3117 or e-mail Luis@Metrotennis.com.

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I Know

Nothing and

You Know

Everything BY LO NNIE M ITCHE L

“For the young student who grows into a mature post-collegiate individual and ventures out in the workforce, let’s see how well it works out for you if you won’t do what your boss asks.”

have been watching the campaign for delegates for the presidential nomination in both major parties with great interest. One day Donald Trump throws accusations at his opponents, and the next moment, Hilary Clinton does the same. I am not going to take political sides for the purpose of this article as this is not the forum to advocate for one candidate over the other. What I am going to say is that “Neither of the presumptive presidential candidates are afraid to speak their minds or seem to be worried about any sort of backlash.” The candidates are committed to their point of view and each sees their names in the news daily, as the media either applauds or criticizes their points of view and the comments can be downright ugly at times. However, the candidates move forward with

I

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a steadfast manner hoping to sway the American public to get votes. At the end of the day, neither candidate seems fearful of pushback commentary that comes their way … they are committed and focused. My articles are usually directed at tennis players, where I hope to give some good advice to help live a richer life both on and off the tennis court. Now, my comments go to both the coaches and players. I have taught hundreds of players and student/athletes who compete for me on my college squad. Each has an opinion on how things should be taught, coached, scheduled and administered. Each one of their opinions, in most cases, differs from mine and from each other. You hit a forehand a certain way and no other, a backhand one way and not another. The problem with that train

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

of thought is this … you take hundreds of professionals on the international circuit and no two strokes are alike. There are slight variations in everyone’s game, and that’s a fact. I learn from my students often in how the mechanics of a stroke are processed through a shot that can vary from person to person. I acknowledge that strokes vary from person to person, even when done completely correct. I now bring you back to real life to both the coaches and players. To the coach, I say this, “You know best, you are committed to your routines, style, rules and regulations.” You came to those conclusions because you are experienced, have had good mentors, have seen success competing and know how to attain it. You are confident and deliver that message with a steadfast focus. The student still believes that they know bet-


ter. The parent who calls and says, “My child cannot tolerate your style.” The collegiate athlete on a team who does not agree with my timing, style of running and preparation, along with the philosophy of the coach. Here is when I say, “Too bad!” Yes, too bad. There is a fine line between being a coach who is cooperative, which is the recommended style, and a coach who utilizes a dictatorship style. There is the time though the coach, with years of experience, simply knows better. The coach knows better than a parent, better than a student and better than a collegiate athlete. For those students who just cannot adopt, I say “You can’t or you won’t”—two entirely different four-letter words with different meanings. For the young student who grows into a mature post-collegiate individual and ventures

out in the workforce, let’s see how well it works out for you if you won’t do what your boss asks. That attitude will get you great success and is received very well on the unemployment line. In coaching, an “I won’t” attitude gets you on the “I cannot” side of the tennis court. I would rather hear students say, “I will” because I believe in you and I know you can. The responsibility for improvement does not lie with the coach, it lies with the student who says, “I can and will.” But for those who push back, I say with tongue in cheek, “I am wrong and you are right and you win and get your way.” Let’s see how that works out for you. Going back to our friends in the presidential campaign, they stand in front of the American public and state their position and policy. The press loves it or hates it, the public votes for or against, and yet the campaigner has the confidence to believe he or she is doing what is right and does not yield to the court of public opinion. If the political campaigners and corporate CEOs can do it, then I can stand in front of my students in a much smaller audience and believe that what I am doing is right and I can remain confident in my own decision-making process. Any coach that is reading this should learn as much as you can and then be confident in the message you pass along to your players. Believe it, because you know better, and despite what a student says, you have their best interest at heart and want to see improve-

ment. You can help them get better, and you want to get that student better and get them to believe they can improve. “Can” becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy and they will get better. It’s simply magical what takes place. So to the students who I have encountered who say I am wrong and you are right … I now say you win, do it your way. I learned from the presidential candidates that every citizen will not agree, and from a coaches point of view, every student will not buy in. Coaches, please continue to deliver the message, build a great foundation for the student who wants it. And for those who want to build that foundation under your tutelage, if you build it, they will come. They will come and it will come. “It” is an improved game. Students, please trust your coach because they want you to get better, and coaches, you are right ... believe it and keep delivering that message. You are not wrong! For the student … it takes hard work to do it the way your coaches want, you might get it right. Imagine that. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail LonnieMitchel@yahoo.com.

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Backhand Cures By Bill Longua Having problems with the backhand? Here some easy cures that will it improve. We’ll begin with the one-handed backhand. If you have read my column often enough, you already know that all groundstrokes should have some degree of spin on the ball for control of your shots, the spin could be either topspin or backspin. When discussing topspin the three biggest areas of concern should be the grip, preparation and follow through. The topspin grip is a past the Continental to the left (for right-handed players) so the top knuckle of the index finger is on top of the bevel on top of the handle. The left hand is one key in the preparation; it will take the racket back, placed on the throat of the shaft, to allow for an easy grip change. The left hand stays on the racket to maintain the correct angle and will release as you step to hit the shot, the butt of the handle must lead the swing and never face in towards your body, so when the racket is back, your arm and racket should almost form a 4566

degree angle having the butt facing toward the sidelines of your half of the court, not the net. To create topspin, brush up the backside of the ball with a firm wrist (you can add wrist snap as you improve) and follow through completely. If your shots are sailing long, make sure the grip is on top enough, then, complete the follow through to make sure the ball is on the racket face long enough for the spin to take effect. If your shots are going into the net, you have not angled the racquet enough behind you so the butt is incorrectly facing toward the net. This will cause the face to turn over too quickly and send the shot downward. The two-handed backhand shot that sails long is not for the same reason. The grips for both hands can be in the Eastern position, there are different combinations that are perfectly fine. The top hand is the power and controlling hand, it will snap up the ball, creating topspin. If you are using the bottom hand for power, the ball will sail because you are basically pushing the ball and the follow-through will be short. You need the top hand to get over the shoulder on your followthrough.

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Hitting into the net on the two-handed backhand is caused primarily by just not hitting up the ball enough. Many players think they are finishing over their shoulder, but are really finishing over their elbow … that’s not high enough. Another might be that your backswing is too high. The head of the racquet must be below the ball as you start your forward motion to allow for the low to high swing. If you are really having problems aim three feet above the net to give yourself a greater margin of error. For all groundstrokes, trying to have your shots land past the service line is a good thing, even if they land short, they have cleared the net. Bill Longua is tennis director and head pro at Palm Island Resort in Cape Haze, Fla. He is a member of the USPTA, has 35 years of tennis teaching experience and teaches at OnlineTennisTraining.com. He is the author of Winning Tennis Strokes and his new 117-lesson app, “Complete Tennis Mastery,” is available for Apple and Android devices, and features 117 lessons. He may be reached by e-mail at Bill@OnlineTennisTraining.com.


NEW Boys & Girls Metro Rankings (as of 06/21/16)

BOYS Metro Boys 12 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Safin Shaikh ....................Bayside, N.Y. 2 ......Christian Bobko ..............Bronx, N.Y. 3 ......Dylan Lachmanen............Brooklyn, N.Y. 4 ......Ty Justin Staco-Towns ....Brooklyn, N.Y. 5 ......Cal R. Wider ....................New York, N.Y. 6 ......Joshua Staroselskiy ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 7 ......Nicholas Jozef Zagora ....Staten Island, N.Y. 8 ......Michael Zlatnik ................Forest Hills, N.Y. 9 ......Arnav Agostinho..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 10 ....Sacha Maes ....................New York, N.Y. 11 ....Ronald Aaron Fridlyand ..Forest Hills, N.Y. 12 ....Ryan Friedman ................New York, N.Y. 13 ....Bobby Duskin ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 14 ....Sebastian Brustein ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 15 ....Noah Katzer ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 16 ....Charles Robertson ..........Whitestone, N.Y. 17 ....Mathias Isaac Davila ......Whitestone, N.Y. 18 ....Dominick Mosejczuk ......East Elmhurst, N.Y. 19 ....Daniel Atkin......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 20 ....Andrew R. Ena ................Rego Park, N.Y. 21 ....London Mosquera ..........Howard Beach, N.Y. 22 ....Theodore R. Murphy ......New York, N.Y. 23 ....Jack Griffin ......................New York, N.Y. 24 ....Santiago Espejel..............New York, N.Y. 25 ....Yash Bhandari More........New York, N.Y. 26 ....Milo Kessler ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 27 ....Benjamin Elliot Emag ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 28 ....Jake Srebnick..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 29 ....Teddy J. Ryan..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 30 ....John Wu ..........................New York, N.Y. 31 ....Ryan Mark........................New York, N.Y. 32 ....Santiago Soto..................New York, N.Y. 33 ....Romero Jones ................New York, N.Y. 34 ....Zecheng Fang..................New York, N.Y. 35 ....Ethan Cintron ..................Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 36 ....David Alan Khaimov........Jamaica, N.Y. 37 ....Damian Stellings..............New York, N.Y. 38 ....Luke Hollman ..................New York, N.Y. 39 ....Anthony Eric Fratarelli ....Whitestone, N.Y. 40 ....Christopher Chi................Bayside, N.Y.

Metro Boys 14 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Ryuichi Nitta ....................Bronx, N.Y. 2 ......Dylan James Lachmanen Brooklyn, N.Y. 3 ......Matthew Mosejczuk........East Elmhurst, N.Y. 4 ......Connor P. Dunne ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 5 ......Eugene Fishman..............Rego Park, N.Y. 6 ......Daniel Galisteo Gordon ..New York, N.Y. 7 ......Brandon Torres ................Bronx, N.Y. 8 ......Ryan David Brandes ......Rego Park, N.Y. 9 ......Simon Camacho..............New York, N.Y. 10 ....Waley Chen......................Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 11 ....Kevin Daniel Golub..........New York, N.Y. 12 ....Gabriel Markowitz ..........New York, N.Y. 13 ....Neel M. Epstein ..............New York, N.Y. 14 ....Jasper Hunt Thomas ......New York, N.Y. 15 ....George Manuel Arteaga..East Elmhurst, N.Y. 16 ....Liam J. Dunne..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 17 ....Alfonso Laffont ................New York, N.Y. 18 ....Jack Charles Benavides New York, N.Y. 19 ....Nicholas Wernink ............New York, N.Y.

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

YORK

....Anton Semenov ..............New York, N.Y. ....Winter Fagerberg ............New York, N.Y. ....Cooper Williams ..............New York, N.Y. ....Nicholas Oblonsky ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. ....Rohan Gold......................Forest Hills, N.Y. ....Ethan King ......................New York, N.Y. ....Sabian Kosinov................Forest Hills, N.Y. ....Michael Zlatnik ................Forest Hills, N.Y. ....Guy Ferrera......................New York, N.Y. ....Solomon Brown ..............New York, N.Y. ....Sunjay Dev Singh ............New York, N.Y. ....Michael Cooper ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. ....Joshua Ashvil ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. ....Andres Fente ..................New York, N.Y. ....Zachary Portnoy..............New York, N.Y. ....Rino Cattabiani................Flushing, N.Y. ....Yesh Nikam......................New York, N.Y. ....Bhawick Singh ................East Elmhurst, N.Y. ....Ethan Cintron ..................Oakland Gardens, N.Y. ....Arnav Agostinho..............Brooklyn, N.Y. ....Alex Stolarz......................New York, N.Y.

Metro Boys 16 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Daniel Leon Maseyev......Brooklyn, N.Y. 2 ......Richard Wickman ............Bayside, N.Y. 3 ......Simon Camacho..............New York, N.Y. 4 ......Alex Portnoy ....................New York, N.Y. 5 ......Alfonso Laffont ................New York, N.Y. 6 ......Michael Kaydin ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 7 ......Matthew Mosejczuk........East Elmhurst, N.Y. 8 ......George Manuel Arteaga..East Elmhurst, N.Y. 9 ......Dominik Pajor ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 10 ....Jonathan Glinsky ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 11 ....Harry Portnoy ..................New York, N.Y. 12 ....True Waaktaar-Savoy ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 13 ....Tadd Long........................Woodside, N.Y. 14 ....Connor P. Dunne ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 15 ....John C. Bricker................New York, N.Y. 16 ....David Krasner ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 17 ....Eugene Fishman..............Rego Park, N.Y. 18 ....Illya Semenov ..................New York, N.Y. 19 ....Marcos Souza Lee ..........New York, N.Y. 20 ....Donald James Smith ......Roosevelt Island, N.Y. 21 ....Alex Robert Goldstein ....New York, N.Y. 22 ....Liam J. Dunne..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 23 ....Teddy Brodsky ................New York, N.Y. 24 ....Robert Ivko ......................Staten Island, N.Y. 25 ....Christopher Tham............Flushing, N.Y. 26 ....Jeffrey Yu ........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 27 ....Albert Y. Wan ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 28 ....Sadi Gulcelik....................New York, N.Y. 29 ....Max Schindel ..................New York, N.Y. 30 ....Yarden Hahn ....................New York, N.Y. 31 ....Igor Maslov ......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 32 ....John-Tomas Bilski ..........New York, N.Y. 33 ....Rino Cattabiani................Flushing, N.Y. 34 ....Henry William Firestone ..New York, N.Y. 35 ....Derek Lung ......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 36 ....Jeffrey McCready ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 37 ....Jaime Gomez ..................New York, N.Y. 38 ....William Kofman................Queens Village, N.Y. 39 ....Daniel Vascones ..............Middle Village, N.Y. 40 ....Leonidas Vrailas ..............New York, N.Y.

Metro Boys 18 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Richard Wickman ............Bayside, N.Y. 2 ......Michael Dozortsev ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 3 ......Lucas Larese DeSanto....New York, N.Y.

RANKINGS 4 5 6 7 8 9

......Nicholas James Ostrovsky Staten Island, N.Y. ......Alexander Chiu ................New York, N.Y. ......Daniel Usvyat ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. ......Yarden Hahn ....................New York, N.Y. ......Fayed Fayaz Uddin ........Elmhurst, N.Y. ......Connor Ryan Crowley ....Bronx, N.Y.

GIRLS Metro Girls 12 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Jordan Ben-Shmuel ........New York, N.Y. 2 ......Kelly Chen........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 3 ......Rachel Zhang ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 4 ......Samantha Bentsianov ....Staten Island, N.Y. 5 ......Natalie Bergmann............Forest Hills, N.Y. 6 ......Alina Ongeyberg..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 7 ......Sofie Shen........................New York, N.Y. 8 ......Rosie Isabella Seccia ......New York, N.Y. 9 ......Tess Ariel Whitman..........New York, N.Y. 10 ....Jala Atkinson ..................New York, N.Y. 11 ....Juliana Hornak ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 12 ....Ava Dahl ..........................New York, N.Y. 13 ....Diya Emine Chawla ........New York, N.Y. 14 ....Talia Helen Kahan............New York, N.Y. 15 ....Blakely Dushkin ..............New York, N.Y. 16 ....Nicolette Fundator ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 17 ....Abigail Hammer ..............Astoria, N.Y. 18 ....Kira Diaz ..........................Richmond Hill, N.Y. 19 ....Isabella Sofia Mandis ......New York, N.Y. 20 ....Sophia Cisse....................New York, N.Y. 21 ....Patricia Grigoras..............Middle Village, N.Y. 22 ....Nicole Korsunskiy............Staten Island, N.Y. 23 ....Karah C. Augustin ..........Saint Albans, N.Y. 24 ....Ronit Khromchenko ........Staten Island, N.Y. 25 ....Sasha Noel Ryder............Staten Island, N.Y. 26 ....Fuschia Steward..............New York, N.Y. 27 ....Anna Becker ....................New York, N.Y. 28 ....Charlie Eve Liss ..............New York, N.Y. 29 ....Victoria Penny McEnroe..New York, N.Y. 30 ....Allegra Noelle Wong........New York, N.Y. 31 ....Elizabeth Bentsianov ......Staten Island, N.Y. 32 ....Jasmine Leon Soon ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 33 ....Julia Dementyev ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 34 ....Gabrielle Sophie Usvyat..Forest Hills, N.Y. 35 ....Mia Saveljic......................New York, N.Y. 36 ....Brooke Hoffman ..............New York, N.Y. 37 ....Claire de Saint Phalle ......New York, N.Y. 38 ....Angelina Rose Bittan ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 39 ....Sabine Abeia....................New York, N.Y. 40 ....Langley Beaudoin............New York, N.Y.

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

....Nathalie Williams ............New York, N.Y. ....Leila M. Epstein ..............New York, N.Y. ....Natalie Bergmann............Forest Hills, N.Y. ....Tess Ariel Whitman..........New York, N.Y. ....Abigail Hammer ..............Astoria, N.Y. ....Ellie Sullivan ....................New York, N.Y. ....Casey Brandes ................Rego Park, N.Y. ....Katrine Zlatnik..................Forest Hills, N.Y. ....Sofia Allinson ..................New York, N.Y. ....Nicolette Fundator ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. ....Alina Abramoff ................Brooklyn, N.Y. ....Maxie Molly Karen ..........New York, N.Y. ....Laura Coleman ................New York, N.Y. ....Nia Simone Benjamin......Brooklyn, N.Y. ....Hillary Sherpa ..................Astoria, N.Y. ....Josephine Kimball ..........New York, N.Y. ....Isabella Sifuentes ............Flushing, N.Y. ....Catalina Haberman ........New York, N.Y. ....Jasmine Leon Soon ........Brooklyn, N.Y. ....Nia Lashawn Dabreo ......Brooklyn, N.Y. ....Alexandra Peeler ............New York, N.Y. ....Nadezhda M. Blot ..........Arverne, N.Y. ....Tess Anna Price ..............Brooklyn, N.Y.

Metro Girls 16 Singles Rank Name ................................City 1 ......Alanna Levitt ....................New York, N.Y. 2 ......Natalie Marguiles ............New York, N.Y. 3 ......Maryna Bohdanovska ....Brooklyn, N.Y. 4 ......Jamila Akhmedjanova ....New York, N.Y. 5 ......Anna Borovinskaya ........Bronx, N.Y. 6 ......Mariam Shengelia............Brooklyn, N.Y. 7 ......Celina Liu ........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 8 ......Gianna Gaudio ................Staten Island, N.Y. 9 ......Gabrielle Hernandez........Ridgewood, N.Y. 10 ....Nicole Koi Massa ............Astoria, N.Y. 11 ....Theodora Vrailas..............New York, N.Y. 12 ....Audrey Pacthod ..............New York, N.Y. 13 ....Bella Kaplan ....................New York, N.Y. 14 ....Jordan Ben-Shmuel ........New York, N.Y. 15 ....Danielle P. Kezeli..............Staten Island, N.Y. 16 ....Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 17 ....Kristina Pali ......................Briarwood, N.Y. 18 ....Masha Serjantov..............New York, N.Y. 19 ....Tomi Alalade ....................Rosedale, N.Y. 20 ....Niki Truszkowski..............Middle Village, N.Y. 21 ....Prthvi Srinivasan..............New York, N.Y. 22 ....Mia Simone Parrish ........Queens Village, N.Y. 23 ....Carolyn Silverstein ..........New York, N.Y.

Metro Girls 18 Singles

Metro Girls 14 Singles

Rank Name ................................City

Rank Name ................................City

1 2 3 4

1 ......Anna Borovinskaya ........Bronx, N.Y. 2 ......Jamila Akhmedjanova ....New York, N.Y. 3 ......Niki Truszkowski..............Middle Village, N.Y. 4 ......Jordan Ben-Shmuel ........New York, N.Y. 5 ......Nicole Koi Massa ............Astoria, N.Y. 6 ......Rachel Zhang ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 7 ......Beyonce Blake ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 8 ......Cassie Tian ......................Flushing, N.Y. 9 ......Emma Eisenberg ............New York, N.Y. 10 ....Sheyna Esther Karen ......New York, N.Y. 11 ....Samantha Bentsianov ....Staten Island, N.Y. 12 ....Nadzeya Fliaha ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 13 ....Leah Margulies ................New York, N.Y. 14 ....Sofie Shen........................New York, N.Y. 15 ....Kelly Chen........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 16 ....Celina Liu ........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 17 ....Anya Barteck ..................New York, N.Y.

......Tamila Latif-Zade ............Brooklyn, N.Y. ......Anna Borovinskaya ........Bronx, N.Y. ......Miriam Irfan Aziz ..............Staten Island, N.Y. ......Marian Shengelia ............Brooklyn, N.Y.

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NEW Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 06/15/16)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 3 ......Cooper Williams ..............New York, N.Y. 4 ......Sebastian Sec..................New York, N.Y. 8 ......Wesley Zhang ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 9 ......Ty Switzer ........................New York, N.Y. 12 ....John-Thomas Bilski ........New York, N.Y. 14 ....Joseph Phillips ................New York, N.Y. 20 ....Donovan Spigner ............New York, N.Y. 24 ....Jace Alexander................New York, N.Y. 27 ....Nicholas Steiglehner ......New York, N.Y. 28 ....Sachin Palta ....................Forest Hills, N.Y. 31 ....Adrien Svilen Jippov........New York, N.Y. 35 ....Ari Hercules Cotoulas......Brooklyn, N.Y. 37 ....Astro Brundo Pilipovic ....New York, N.Y. 40 ....Nicholas Laffont ..............New York, N.Y. 42 ....Nicholas Murphy ............New York, N.Y. 46 ....Sacha Maes ....................New York, N.Y. 49 ....Benjamin Kantor..............New York, N.Y. 54 ....Rafe Photopoulos............New York, N.Y. 57 ....David Krasner ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 61 ....Solomon Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 62 ....Joshua Ashvil ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 69 ....Samuel Zeitlin ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 70 ....Coby Matthew Brown ....New York, N.Y. 76 ....Andrew R. Ena ................Rego Park, N.Y. 80 ....Stephan M. Gershfeld ....New York, N.Y. 86 ....Luca Photopoulos ..........New York, N.Y. 88 ....Ty Justin Staco-Towns ....Brooklyn, N.Y. 95 ....Safin Shaikh ....................Long Island City, N.Y. 98 ....Dominick Mosejczuk ......East Elmhurst, N.Y. 102 ..Dylan Lachmanen............Brooklyn, N.Y. 103 ..Theodore R. Murphy ......New York, N.Y. 106 ..Noah Katzer ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 110 ..David Dove Hendon........New York, N.Y. 114 ..Nicholas Jozef Zagora ....Staten Island, N.Y. 116 ..Joshua Staroselskiy ........Brooklyn, N.Y. 117 ..Santiago Espejel..............New York, N.Y. 121 ..Nicholas Iantosca............New York, N.Y. 127 ..Bobby Duskin ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 128 ..Romero Jones ................New York, N.Y. 130 ..Cal R. Wider ....................New York, N.Y. 132 ..Sebastian Brustein ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 140 ..Ryan Friedman ................New York, N.Y. 144 ..Giuseppe Cerasuolo ......Bayside, N.Y. 147 ..Noah Zrihen ....................New York, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 2 ......Jeffrey Fradkin ................New York, N.Y. 11 ....Tyler Korobov ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 13 ....Joseph Wilkanowski ......Long Island City, N.Y. 14 ....Maxwell Igor Kachkarov..Flushing, N.Y. 15 ....Noah Edelman ................New York, N.Y. 18 ....John-Tomas Bilski ..........New York, N.Y. 19 ....Brandon T. Cohen ..........New York, N.Y. 20 ....Wesley Zhang ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 22 ....Robbie F. Werdiger ..........New York, N.Y. 31 ....Kai Yuminaga ..................Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 32 ....Ryan McCook..................Saint Albans, N.Y. 35 ....Hudson Beaudoin ..........New York, N.Y. 41 ....Blake Frank......................New York, N.Y.

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YORK

46 ....Oliver Obeid ....................New York, N.Y. 55 ....Anton Semenov ..............New York, N.Y. 58 ....Eitan Khromchenko ........Staten Island, N.Y. 59 ....Oliver Worth ....................New York, N.Y. 60 ....Sebastian Sec..................New York, N.Y. 64 ....Sachin Palta ....................Forest Hills, N.Y. 66 ....Noah Abels Eisenberg ....New York, N.Y. 71 ....David Krasner ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 72 ....Sidharth Chawla ..............New York, N.Y. 73 ....Nash Crofoot Johnson....New York, N.Y. 75 ....Anthony Cataldo..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 76 ....Mitchel Pertsovsky..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 78 ....Cooper Williams ..............New York, N.Y. 86 ....Marcos Souza Lee ..........New York, N.Y. 88 ....Charles William Phillips ..New York, N.Y. 89 ....Winter Fagerberg ............New York, N.Y. 91 ....Harry Portnoy ..................New York, N.Y. 99 ....Alex Portnoy ....................New York, N.Y. 102 ..Jonathan Laforest............Queens Village, N.Y. 106 ..Bradley Bennett ..............New York, N.Y. 108 ..Benjamin Ebanks ............New York, N.Y. 111 ..Milan Kavi Jain ................New York, N.Y. 112 ..Jonathan Glinsky ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 113 ..Albert Y. Wan ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 117 ..Donovan Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 118 ..Ty Switzer ........................New York, N.Y. 120 ..Zachary Portnoy..............New York, N.Y. 121 ..Solomon Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 122 ..Scott Fischer....................New York, N.Y. 125 ..Gunner S. Overstrom ......New York, N.Y. 130 ..Spencer Tuck ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 134 ..Ryuichi Nitta ....................Bronx, N.Y. 136 ..Neel M. Epstein ..............New York City, N.Y. 137 ..Dylan Lachmanen............Brooklyn, N.Y. 142 ..Sunjay Dev Singh ............New York, N.Y. 146 ..Waley Chen......................Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 147 ..Nicholas Wernink ............New York, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 11 ....Gary C. Fishkin ................Staten Island, N.Y. 17 ....David Mizahi ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 20 ....Igor Maslov ......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 21 ....Shawn Jackson ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 23 ....Lantis Wang ....................New York, N.Y. 24 ....Zachary Jordan Lieb ......New York, N.Y. 29 ....Steven Daniel Nazaroff....Brooklyn, N.Y. 30 ....Peter Frelinghuysen ........New York, N.Y. 43 ....Gabriel Sifuentes ............Flushing, N.Y. 44 ....Jeffrey Fradkin ................New York, N.Y. 46 ....Nicholas Pustilnik ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 48 ....Ethan Leon ......................Woodhaven, N.Y. 50 ....Christopher Kolesnik ......Staten Island, N.Y. 57 ....Jonah Jurick ....................New York, N.Y. 59 ....Sam Vagner ....................Staten Island, N.Y. 62 ....Dylan Friedman ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 70 ....Shand Stephens..............New York, N.Y. 73 ....Gabriel Isaac Rissman ....Brooklyn, N.Y. 81 ....Kai Yuminaga ..................Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 85 ....Derek Raskopf ................New York, N.Y. 88 ....Christopher Tham............Flushing, N.Y. 102 ..Felix Levine ......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 103 ..Oliver Obeid ....................New York, N.Y. 105 ..Eitan Khromchenko ........Staten Island, N.Y. 111 ..William Charles Phillips ..New York, N.Y. 117 ..Blake Frank......................New York, N.Y. 119 ..Dominik Pajor ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 120 ..Maxwell Igor Kachkarov..Flushing, N.Y. 123 ..Derek Lung ......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 125 ..Jeffrey Gorilovsky............Brooklyn, N.Y.

RANKINGS 127 ..Ilya Semenov ..................New York, N.Y. 129 ..Kemal Irfan Aziz ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 130 ..Jeffrey McCready ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 131 ..Julian Szuper ..................New York, N.Y. 135 ..Richard Zusman ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 138 ..Ameer Hosain..................New York, N.Y. 144 ..Gregory Thomas Coe......New York, N.Y. 146 ..Zachary G. Targoff ..........New York, N.Y. 148 ..Harry Portnoy ................New York, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 17 ....Peter Lohrbach................Little Neck, N.Y. 19 ....Calvin Chung ..................Bronx, N.Y. 27 ....Sumit Sarkar ....................New York, N.Y. 43 ....Ananth Raghavan............New York, N.Y. 44 ....Mitchell Ostrovsky ..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 47 ....Robert Kennedy ..............New York, N.Y. 51 ....Cole Gittens ....................New York, N.Y. 60 ....Zachary Jordan Lieb ......New York, N.Y. 63 ....Nicholas Pustilnik ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 69 ....Avery Bicks ......................New York, N.Y. 75 ....Adam Bryan Borak..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 99 ....David Mizrahi ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 100 ..Andreja Radevic ..............New York, N.Y. 103 ..Gabriel Sifuentes ............Flushing, N.Y. 112 ..Michael Tyutyunik............Brooklyn, N.Y. 122 ..Kemel Irfan Aziz ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 123 ..Dominik Pajor ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 126 ..Christopher Kolesnik ......Staten Island, N.Y. 137 ..Xavier Pacthod ................New York, N.Y. 140 ..Shawn Jackson ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 142 ..Noah Kyle Agarwal..........New York, N.Y. 146 ..Michael Dozortsev ..........Brooklyn, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Metro Region

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 3 ......Rosie Garcia Gross ........New York, N.Y. 10 ....Perene Wang ..................New York, N.Y. 22 ....Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 23 ....Isabella Sinclair Cooper ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 29 ....Daniella Benabraham......New York, N.Y. 31 ....Rachel Rubenzahl ..........New York, N.Y. 33 ....Lorraine Bergmann..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 37 ....Dakota Fordham..............New York, N.Y. 38 ....Khyanna Singh ................Queens Village, N.Y. 39 ....Rebecca Eliana Fisch......New York, N.Y. 49 ....Carolyn Brodsky..............New York, N.Y. 51 ....Nathalie Williams ............New York, N.Y. 58 ....Sabrina Boada ................Woodhaven, N.Y. 59 ....Amanda Solecki ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 61 ....Gabriella Eitkis ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 66 ....Zoe Kava..........................New York, N.Y. 73 ....Jamila Akhmedjanova ....New York, N.Y. 85 ....Anastasya Menshikova ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 91 ....Deliala Friedman..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 94 ....Josephine Kimball ..........New York, N.Y. 96 ....Rachel Zhang ..................Forest Hills, N.Y. 100 ..Alyssa An ........................New York, N.Y. 101 ..Anna Borovinskaya ........Bronx, N.Y. 106 ..Catalina Haberman ........New York, N.Y. 107 ..Shakima Hotaki ..............Flushing, N.Y. 108 ..Nia Lashawn Dabreo ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 109 ..Medina Garunja ..............Bronx, N.Y. 114 ..Beyonce Blake ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 123 ..Sofia Allinson ..................New York, N.Y. 132 ..Rebecca Sitkovetsky ......Staten Island, N.Y. 139 ..Cassie Tian ......................Flushing, N.Y. 142 ..Emma Abels Eisenberg ..New York, N.Y. 143 ..Niki Truszkowski..............Middle Village, N.Y. 147 ..Nadzeya Fliaha ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 149 ..Jordan Ben-Shmuel ........New York, N.Y.

Rank Name............................City

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Metro Region

8 ......Daniella Benabraham......New York, N.Y. 11 ....Natalie Eordekian ............Woodside, N.Y. 13 ....Sarah Lucy Youngberg....New York, N.Y. 25 ....Catalina Haberman ........New York, N.Y. 31 ....Sage Loudon ..................New York, N.Y. 32 ....Nina Wiese ......................Flushing, N.Y. 41 ....Julia T. Werdiger ..............New York, N.Y. 42 ....Lara Rose Berliner ..........New York, N.Y. 48 ....Bukky Alalade..................Rosedale, N.Y. 49 ....Blakely Duskin ................New York, N.Y. 50 ....Leila M. Epstein ..............New York, N.Y. 64 ....Linda Ziets-Segura..........New York, N.Y. 66 ....Sofia Iantosca..................New York, N.Y. 67 ....Taylor Overstrom ............New York, N.Y. 73 ....Emma Voykhanskaya......Brooklyn, N.Y. 76 ....Alina Ongeyberg..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 79 ....Sophia Cisse....................New York, N.Y. 85 ....Natalie Bergmann............Forest Hills, N.Y. 87 ....Ronit Khromchenko ........Staten Island, N.Y. 91 ....Nicole Wooyin Lee ..........New York, N.Y. 96 ....Kelly Chen........................Forest Hills, N.Y. 99 ....Charlie Eve Liss ..............New York, N.Y. 106 ..Patricia Grigoras..............Middle Village, N.Y. 112 ..Rosie Isabella Seccia ......New York, N.Y. 117 ..Ava Dahl ..........................New York, N.Y. 118 ..Mia Saveljic......................New York, N.Y. 122 ..Bianca Dumitru................Forest Hills, N.Y. 148 ..Diya Emine Chawla ........New York, N.Y. 149 ..Samantha Bentsianov ....Staten Island, N.Y.

6 ......Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 9 ......Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 12 ....Chelsea Williams ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 18 ....Rosie Garcia Gross ........New York, N.Y. 22 ....Shelly Yaloz......................Little Neck, N.Y. 25 ....Aleksandra Bekirova ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 29 ....Perene Wang ..................New York, N.Y. 33 ....Anastasia Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 34 ....Kyra Bergmann................Forest Hills, N.Y. 39 ....Christina M. Huynh..........Astoria, N.Y. 41 ....Katherine Kachkarov ......Flushing, N.Y. 43 ....Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 44 ....Nicole Semenov ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 47 ....Lauren Munari..................Middle Village, N.Y. 49 ....Dakota Fordham..............New York, N.Y. 53 ....Valicia Browne ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 56 ....Daniela Hernandez..........Corona, N.Y. 59 ....Sarah Rahman ................East Elmhurst, N.Y. 63 ....Diana Sosonkin................Brooklyn, N.Y. 73 ....Jennifer Yu ......................Forest Hills, N.Y. 74 ....Amy Kaplan ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 86 ....Shawnte Beale ................Bronx, N.Y. 87 ....Sabrina Boada ................Woodhaven, N.Y. 91 ....Nicole Mika ......................Staten Island, N.Y. 92 ....Miriam Irfan Aziz ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 93 ....Isabella Sinclair Cooper ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 94 ....Barbara Podvorchani ......Bronx, N.Y. 97 ....Anastasya Menshikova ..Brooklyn, N.Y.

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

Rank Name............................City


NEW 98 ....Khyanna Singh ................Queens Village, N.Y. 110 ..Sofie Kate Levine ............New York, N.Y. 113 ..Isabella T. Hartman..........New York, N.Y. 118 ..Stephanie Li ....................New York, N.Y. 121 ..Amalia M. Parrish ............Queens Village, N.Y. 127 ..Jamila Akhmedjanova ....New York, N.Y. 134 ..Audrey Pacthod ..............New York, N.Y. 138 ..Nicole Koi Massa ............Astoria, N.Y. 140 ..Shakima Hotaki ..............Flushing, N.Y. 148 ..Alanna Levitt ....................New York, N.Y. 150 ..Kate Yamin ......................New York, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Metro Region Rank Name............................City 9 ......Alexandra Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 26 ....Shelly Yaloz......................Little Neck, N.Y. 29 ....Victoria Sec......................New York, N.Y. 31 ....Sonia Tartakovsky ..........New York, N.Y. 33 ....Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 40 ....Yuka Lin............................Kew Gardens, N.Y. 42 ....Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 53 ....Lauren Munari..................Middle Village, N.Y. 54 ....Jennifer Yu ......................Forest Hills, N.Y. 57 ....Valicia Browne ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 59 ....Patricia Obeid ..................New York, N.Y. 61 ....Lisa Marchelska ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 62 ....Jessica Livianu ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 70 ....Dakota Fordham..............New York, N.Y. 71 ....Kiara A. Rose ..................New York, N.Y. 73 ....Miriam Irfan Aziz ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 74 ....Jillian Rose Auteri ............Staten Island, N.Y. 77 ....Anastasia Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 80 ....Emma Brandes Kassan ..New York, N.Y. 90 ....Anna Maite Kaplan..........New York, N.Y. 93 ....Amy Kaplan ....................Brooklyn, N.Y. 94 ....Kyra Bergmann................Forest Hills, N.Y. 98 ....Isabelle Rovinski..............New York, N.Y. 103 ..Sarah Rahman ................East Elmhurst, N.Y. 104 ..Sydney Lynn Katz............New York, N.Y. 106 ..Daniela Hernandez..........Corona, N.Y. 107 ..Nicole Semenov ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 109 ..Dea Koiava ......................New York, N.Y. 112 ..Nicole Khorosh ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 117 ..Isis Gill..............................Brooklyn, N.Y. 132 ..Christina M. Huynh..........Astoria, N.Y. 134 ..Sophia Kryloff ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 135 ..Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 137 ..Stephanie Li ....................New York, N.Y. 139 ..Katherine Kachkarov ......Flushing, N.Y. 142 ..Anastasya Menshikova ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 143 ..Tamila Latif-Zade ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 144 ..Khyanna Singh ................Queens Village, N.Y.

YORK

Boys & Girls National Rankings

RANKINGS 461 ..Igor Maslov ......................Brooklyn, N.Y. 533 ..Jeffrey Fradkin ................New York, N.Y. 585 ..Nicholas Pustilnik ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 674 ..Jonah Jurick ....................New York, N.Y. 712 ..Christopher Kolesnik ......Staten Island, N.Y. 734 ..Ethan Leon ......................Woodhaven, N.Y. 746 ..Sam V. Vagner..................Staten Island, N.Y. 753 ..Gabriel Sifuentes ............Flushing, N.Y. 783 ..Dylan Friedman ..............Brooklyn, N.Y.

(as of 06/22/16)

BOYS National Boys 12 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City

National Boys 18 Singles— Metro Region

19 ....Sebastian Sec..................New York, N.Y. 26 ....Cooper Williams ..............New York, N.Y. 36 ....Wesley Zhang ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 40 ....John-Tomas Bilski ..........New York, N.Y. 80 ....Ty Switzer ........................New York, N.Y. 146 ..Donovan Spigner ............New York, N.Y. 153 ..Jace K. Alexander ..........New York, N.Y. 195 ..Joseph Phillips ................New York, N.Y. 229 ..Sachin Palta ....................Forest Hills, N.Y. 280 ..Nicholas Steiglehner ......New York, N.Y. 301 ..Adrien Svilen Jippov........New York, N.Y. 436 ..Nicholas Murphy ............New York, N.Y. 448 ..Nicholas Laffont ..............New York, N.Y. 494 ..Astro Brundo Pilipovic ....New York, N.Y. 521 ..Sacha Maes ....................New York, N.Y. 622 ..Alexander Aney ..............New York, N.Y. 637 ..Ari Hercules Cotoulas......Brooklyn, N.Y. 730 ..Benjamin Kantor..............New York, N.Y. 784 ..Solomon Brown ..............New York, N.Y. 794 ..Luca Photopoulos ..........New York, N.Y. 795 ..Rafe Photopoulos............New York, N.Y.

Rank ..Name ..........................City 176 ..Oliver Sec ........................New York, N.Y. 182 ..Peter Lohrbach................Little Neck, N.Y. 289 ..Ananth Raghavan............New York, N.Y. 360 ..Sumit Sarkar ....................New York, N.Y. 388 ..Robert Kennedy ..............New York, N.Y. 489 ..Cole Gittens ....................New York, N.Y. 608 ..Calvin Chung ..................Bronx, N.Y. 612 ..Zachary Jordan Lieb ......New York, N.Y. 819 ..Adam Bryan Borak..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 875 ..Gary C. Fishkin ................Staten Island, N.Y. 679 ..Mitchell Ostrovsky ..........Brooklyn, N.Y.

GIRLS National Girls 12 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City

National Boys 14 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 34 ....Jeffrey Fradkin ................New York, N.Y. 172 ..Joseph Wilkanowski ......Long Island City, N.Y. 177 ..Tyler Korobov ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 181 ..Noah D. Edelman ............New York, N.Y. 183 ..Robbie Werdiger..............New York, N.Y. 191 ..Wesley Zhang ..................Staten Island, N.Y. 193 ..Maxwell Igor Kachkarov..Flushing, N.Y. 195 ..Brandon T. Cohen ..........New York, N.Y. 240 ..John-Tomas Bilski ..........New York, N.Y. 323 ..Hudson Beaudoin ..........New York, N.Y. 391 ..Sebastian Sec..................New York, N.Y. 411 ..Oliver Obeid ....................New York, N.Y. 430 ..Harry Portnoy ..................New York, N.Y. 476 ..Oliver Worth ....................Long Island City, N.Y. 560 ..Blake Frank......................New York, N.Y. 626 ..Kai Yuminaga ..................Oakland Gardens, N.Y. 764 ..Winter Fagerberg ............New York, N.Y. 784 ..Mitchel Pertsovsky..........Brooklyn, N.Y. 795 ..Zachary Portnoy..............New York, N.Y. 844 ..Alex Portnoy ....................New York, N.Y. 931 ..Anton Semenov ..............New York, N.Y. 944 ..Ryan McCook..................Saint Albans, N.Y. 953 ..Eitan Khromchenko ........Staten Island, N.Y. 987 ..Charles William Phillips ..New York, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 104 ..Gary C. Fishkin ................Staten Island, N.Y. 200 ..Lantis Wang ....................New York, N.Y. 248 ..Zachary Jordan Lieb ......New York, N.Y. 314 ..David Mizrahi ..................Brooklyn, N.Y. 386 ..Peter Frelinghuysen ........New York, N.Y. 387 ..Shawn Jackson ..............Staten Island, N.Y. 397 ..Steven Daniel Nazaroff....Brooklyn, N.Y.

14 ....Daniella Benabraham......New York, N.Y. 118 ..Natalie Eordekian ............Woodside, N.Y. 137 ..Sarah Lucy Youngberg....New York, N.Y. 311 ..Sage Loudon ..................New York, N.Y. 437 ..Catalina Haberman ........New York, N.Y. 554 ..Julia T. Werdiger ..............New York, N.Y. 555 ..Nina Wiese ......................Flushing, N.Y. 594 ..Linda Ziets-Segura..........New York, N.Y. 725 ..Sofia Iantosca..................New York, N.Y. 879 ..Bukky Alalade..................Rosedale, N.Y. 926 ..Sophia Cisse....................New York, N.Y. 927 ..Blakely Duskin ................Brooklyn, N.Y. 933 ..Mia Saveljic......................New York, N.Y. 936 ..Charlie Eve Liss ..............New York, N.Y. 960 ..Lara Rose Berliner ..........New York, N.Y. 971 ..Kelly Chen........................Forest Hills, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 22 ....Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 36 ....Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 79 ....Shelly Yaloz......................Little Neck, N.Y. 238 ..Chelsea Williams ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 239 ..Anastasia Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 251 ..Aleksandra Bekirova ......Brooklyn, N.Y. 253 ..Lauren Munari..................Middle Village, N.Y. 348 ..Rosie Garcia Gross ........New York, N.Y. 371 ..Katherine Kachkarov ......Flushing, N.Y. 375 ..Kyra Bergmann................Forest Hills, N.Y. 480 ..Nicole Semenov ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 529 ..Dakota Fordham..............New York, N.Y. 610 ..Christina M. Huynh..........Astoria, N.Y. 642 ..Perene Wang ..................New York, N.Y. 653 ..Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 665 ..Jennifer Yu ......................Forest Hills, N.Y. 833 ..Daniela Hernandez..........Corona, N.Y. 839 ..Isabella Sinclair Cooper ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 902 ..Anastasya Menshikova ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 917 ..Amy Kaplan ....................Brooklyn, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 168 ..Jessica Melanie Livianu ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 186 ..Alexandra Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 249 ..Dasha Kourkina ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 434 ..Michelle Sorokko ............Little Neck, N.Y. 447 ..Shelly Yaloz......................Little Neck, N.Y. 474 ..Victoria Sec......................New York, N.Y. 561 ..Isis Gill..............................Brooklyn, N.Y. 593 ..Alexus Gill ........................Brooklyn, N.Y. 597 ..Sonia Tartakovsky ..........New York, N.Y. 833 ..Jennifer Yu ......................Forest Hills, N.Y. 851 ..Anastasia Koniaev ..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 888 ..Lauren Munari..................Middle Village, N.Y. 904 ..Lisa Marchelska ..............Brooklyn, N.Y. 989 ..Patricia Obeid ..................New York, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Metro Region Rank ..Name ..........................City 31 ....Rosie Garcia Gross ........New York, N.Y. 51 ....Perene Wang ..................New York, N.Y. 181 ..Nadejda Maslova ............Brooklyn, N.Y. 311 ..Rachel Rubenzahl ..........New York, N.Y. 327 ..Daniella Benabraham......New York, N.Y. 340 ..Lorraine Bergmann..........Forest Hills, N.Y. 344 ..Isabella Sinclair Cooper ..Brooklyn, N.Y. 484 ..Khyanna Singh ................Queens Village, N.Y. 573 ..Shawnte Beale ................Bronx, N.Y. 584 ..Rebecca Elaina Fisch......New York, N.Y. 722 ..Carolyn Brodsky..............New York, N.Y. 818 ..Nathalie Williams ............New York, N.Y. 852 ..Michelle Kleynerman ......Staten Island, N.Y. 924 ..Zoe Kava..........................New York, N.Y. 933 ..Anna Borovinskaya ........Bronx, N.Y.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2016 • New York Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Metropolitan Region

2016 TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. JULY 2016 Friday-Monday, July 15-18 L2O APTC July Open Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FRLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600. Friday-Sunday, July 15-17 L1B Cunningham Tennis Summer Classic Cunningham Sports Center 19600 Union Turnpike Fresh Meadows, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12, 18 (SE); Ranked Men’s Singles Open 25, 35 (SE); Ranked Women’s Singles & Doubles Open (SE); Ranked Men’s Doubles Open (SE); and Ranked Mixed Doubles Open (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Klastique@yahoo.com or call (718) 740-6800. Friday-Sunday, July 15-17 L1B Sportime Randall’s Island July 2016 Challenger Sportime Randall’s Island 1 Randall’s Island • New York, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail MTrumino@SportimeNY.com or call (212) 427-6150. Monday-Friday, July 18-22 L2R City Parks Regional at Bensonhurst Park, Brooklyn City Parks Foundation 9000 Bay Parkway Brooklyn, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, July 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999. 70

Monday-Friday, July 18-22 L1B City Parks Green Ball Challenger at Bensonhurst Park, Brooklyn City Parks Foundation 9000 Bay Parkway Brooklyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999.

Friday-Sunday, July 22-24 L1B Sportime at Randall’s Island Summertime Challenger Sportime Randall’s Island 1 Randall’s Island New York, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE) and Challenger Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail MTrumino@SportimeNY.com or call (212) 427-6150.

Wednesday-Sunday, July 20-24 L2O MatchPoint NYC July Open MatchPoint NYC 2781 Shell Road Brooklyn, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Klastique@yahoo.com or call (718) 769-0001.

Saturday, July 23 PSP L3 Fresh Meadows Orange Ball Cunningham Sports Center 19600 Union Turnpike Fresh Meadows, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, July 17 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Brian@CunninghamTennis.com or call (718) 740-6800.

Friday-Monday, July 22-25 L1B North Shore Tower CC Summertime Challenger 27286 Grand Central Parkway Floral Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, July 128at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (718) 428-5030.

Tuesday-Thursday, July 26-28 L2O Staten Island Community Tennis Center Summer Open Staten Island Community Tennis Center 2800 Victory Boulevard Staten Island, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, July 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Klastique@yahoo.com or call (718) 982-3355.

Friday-Tuesday, July 22-26 L1B APTC July Challenger Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE) and Challenger Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600.

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

Friday-Saturday, July 29-30 L1B Sportime at Randall’s Island July Challenger Sportime Randall’s Island 1 Randall’s Island New York, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail MTrumino@SportimeNY.com or call (212) 427-6150.


USTA/Metropolitan Region

2016 TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Saturday-Sunday, July 30-31 L3 Alley Pond TC July UPS Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 26 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600. AUGUST 2016 Monday-Friday, August 1-5 L2R City Parks Regional at Central Park, Manhattan City Parks Foundation 1 Olmstead Center Flushing Meadow Corona Park Flushing, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (FMLC) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999. Monday-Friday, August 1-5 L1B City Parks Green Ball Challenger at Central Park, Manhattan City Parks Foundation 1 Olmstead Center Flushing Meadow Corona Park Flushing, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999. Tuesday-Thursday, August 2-4 L1B Staten Island Community Tennis Center August Challenger Staten Island Community Tennis Center 2800 Victory Boulevard 8 Staten Island, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Klastique@yahoo.com or call (718) 982-3355.

Friday-Sunday, August 5-7 L2O Lincoln Terrace Tennis Association Summer Open Lincoln Terrace Tennis Courts Buffalo Ave and Eastern Parkway Brooklyn, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Tcgosl@hotmail.com or call (917) 379-0094.

Monday-Friday, August 8-12 L2R City Parks Regional at Walker Park, Staten Island City Parks Foundation 1 Olmstead Center Flushing Meadow Corona Park Flushing, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, July 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999.

Friday-Sunday, August 5-7 L1B Cunningham Park Summer Challenger Cunningham Sports Center 19600 Union Turnpike Fresh Meadows, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Klastique@yahoo.com or call (718) 740-6800.

Monday-Friday, August 8-12 L1B City Parks Green Ball Challenger at Walker Park, Staten Island City Parks Foundation 1 Olmstead Center Flushing Meadow Corona Park Flushing, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, July 28 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999.

Friday-Sunday, August 5-7 L1B Cary Leeds Summer Challenger The Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning 1720 Crotona Avenue Bronx, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail WWiese@NYJTL.org or call (718) 247-7420. Friday-Monday, August 5-8 L1B APTC Summer Challenger Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600.

Friday-Saturday, August 12-13 L3 Sportime Randall’s Island August 2016 UPS Sportime Randall’s Island 1 Randall’s Island New York, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail MTrumino@SportimeNY.com or call (212) 427-6150. Friday-Sunday, August 12-14 L1B Cary Leeds Challenger The Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning 1720 Crotona Avenue Bronx, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail EBantovska@NYJTL.org or call (718) 247-7420.

NYTennisMag.com • July/August 2016 • New York Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Metropolitan Region

2016 TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Monday-Friday, August 15-19 L2R City Parks Regional at Pelham Bay Park, Bronx City Parks Foundation 1 Olmstead Center Flushing Meadow Corona Park Flushing, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Aug. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999. Monday-Friday, August 15-19 L1B City Parks Green Ball Challenger at Pelham Bay Park, Bronx City Parks Foundation 1 Olmstead Center Flushing Meadow Corona Park Flushing, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $33 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Aug. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Tomtvedt@yahoo.com or call (718) 760-6999. Thursday-Sunday, August 18-21 L1 Harlemweek Tri-State Championships Harlem Junior Tennis Program 40 West 143rd Street New York, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Aug. 11 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail DanteBrown@HJTEP.org or call (212) 491-3738. Friday-Tuesday, August 19-23 L1B APTC August Challenger Alley Pond Tennis Center 7920 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12, 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 15 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Hemco2@aol.com or call (718) 264-2600. 72

Friday-Sunday, August 19-21 L1 Cary Leeds Mid-Summer Championship The Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning 1720 Crotona Avenue Bronx, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, July 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail EBantovska@NYJTL.org or call (718) 247-7420. Friday-Sunday, August 19-21 L2O MatchPoint NYC August Open MatchPoint NYC 2781 Shell Road Brooklyn, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Tuesday, July 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Klastique@yahoo.com or call (718) 769-0001. Friday-Sunday, August 19-21 L1B Sportime at Randall’s Island August 2016 Challenger Sportime Randall’s Island 1 Randall’s Island New York, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 15 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail MTrumino@SportimeNY.com or call (212) 427-6150. Friday-Sunday, August 26-28 L1 Cary Leeds August Championships The Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning 1720 Crotona Avenue Bronx, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail WWiese@NYJTL.org or call (718) 247-7420.

New York Tennis Magazine • July/August 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, August 26-28 L2O Sportime Randall’s Island August 2016 Open Sportime Randall’s Island 1 Randall’s Island New York, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail MTrumino@SportimeNY.com or call (212) 427-6150.


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122 New York Tennis Magazine • May/June 2016 • NYTennisMag.com

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