Long Island Tennis Magazine September / October 2019

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Net Generation Day Comes to Hofstra Camps By Allison Butler

early 300 children recently came together at Hofstra University to take part in a Net Generation event that was coordinated by Sunny Fishkind and the USTA Eastern Long Island Region. The kids were part of the various programs that Hofstra runs during the summer, and it was a great opportunity for many of them to learn and play tennis for the first time. “I really think that it’s a fantastic chance for me to bring tennis to kids who have never played before,” said Fishkind. “There are a lot of kids here who have never even held a racket before, and I’m hoping that this might spark an interest for them.” Hofstra’s Camp Director Terry Ryan echoed that sentiment, and was excited that the kids in his program were able to experience a new sport and hopefully take a liking to it. “Children who have never played are now being integrated into the game, and it is a lifelong sport which is great,” said Ryan. “I think it’s unbelievable, there’s been so much planning for over a year, the culmination of the event is phenome-

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nal. I hope every kid goes home and tells their parents they’d like to play, and hopefully they can get involved with the sport.” Jonathan Klee, USTA Eastern Long Island’s regional director, added, “Being able to come and participate in programming

which allows children who’ve never picked up a racket before to get involved and playing in a positive environment is truly giving back to the community.” Allison Butler is a contributing writer and intern with Long Island Tennis Magazine.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2019 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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litennis Long Island Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com

SEP/OCT 2019 • Vol 11, No 5

Table Of Contents

Djoker’s Wild By Brian Coleman

Novak Djokovic has regained his form as he rolls into Flushing Meadows to defend his US Open title. See page 16

Photo credit: USTA/Garrett Ellwood

Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 • brianc@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Art Director (516) 409-4444, ext. 307 Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Scott Koondel VP of Operations (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Sidney Beal III Staff Photographer

Lee Seidner Staff Photographer

Allison Butler Senior Intern

Stefen Rosner Senior Intern

Caroline Lee Intern

Sophia Remnek Intern

Sarah Schwartz Intern

Phoebe Warshauer Intern

Angelina Remnek Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600.

Highlights 8 20 34

Hundreds Turn Out for Nassau and Suffolk County Kids Days 2019 US Open Preview By Stefen Rosner 2019 Long Island Girls High School Preview By Brian Coleman

Features 1 4 6 10 12 28 30 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 51 52 54 56 58 60 62 63

Net Generation Day Comes to Hofstra Camps By Allison Butler Across Long Island … News and Notes From Across the L.I. Tennis Community inPhorm: Setting the Trend in Tennis Apparel The Jensen Zone: Under the Bright Lights of the Grandest Stage of Them All By Luke Jensen Creating a High-Performance Program By Joao Pinho Beach Tennis Making Waves in New York USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update Play the Game! It’s Supposed to be Fun … By Rob Polishook One Is the Loneliest Number By Steven Kaplan Rajesh Ready for Next Chapter at Stanford By Brian Coleman Three Secrets to a Better Serve Today By Lisa Dodson Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller The Loophole Known as the “Bathroom Break” and a Solution! By Ricky Becker NTC Hosts Nutritional Seminar to Combat Childhood Obesity By Brian Coleman How to Succeed in a Match When Your Biggest Opponent is YOU! By Tonny van de Pieterman The Student’s Responsibility for a Tennis Lesson By Mike Puc Personality: Why It Matters and What to Do About It By Dr. Tom Ferraro North Shore Interclub Women’s League, Still Going Strong After 45 Years By Brian Coleman Regards to the US Open, Collegiate Tennis Begins By Lonnie Mitchel That Water Bottle Didn’t Help My Game By Barbara Wyatt USTA/Long Island Region 2019 Tournament Schedule

Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

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September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2019 • LITennisMag.com Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. • Copyright © 2019 United Sports Publications Ltd.


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Across Long Isla Brayden Schnur Visits Carefree

Earlier this year, Brayden Schnur was the runner-up at the 2019 New York Open and reached the first ATP final of his career. He returned to Long Island recently and paid a visit to Carefree Racket Club (pictured above) and many other clubs on the Island. “It was my breakout moment here on the ATP Tour, it gave me a lot of belief that I deserve to be here and I can compete with the guys in the Top 50 and Top 100 in the world,” said Schnur. “That was a really special week that I’ll remember for the rest of my career, and hopefully, I’ll have more weeks like that moving forward. It’s been great coming back here to Long Island … everybody has been really friendly at all the clubs I’ve visited, and it’s been great to get out here and hit with the kids and club members.”

Ross School Hosts First Hamptons JTT Match

USTA Eastern has launched a Junior Team Tennis Summer League in the Hamptons with the first of four tournaments being hosted by Ross School Tennis Academy in East Hampton. In addition to the Ross School, the League was comprised of teams from Hampton Racquet, Future Stars Southampton and SPORTIME Amagansett.

Point Set Hires New Director of Tennis Oceanside, N.Y.’s Point Set Tennis has a new Director of Tennis, bringing in Csaba Laszlo to run its programming. A native of Hungary, Laszlo played his collegiate tennis at Gosehn College, where he set the program record for most victories in a season, and has worked as a coach and tennis director on Long Island for the last 10 years.

Adelphi Names Frank Russo New Men’s and Women’s Tennis Coach Adelphi University has named Frank Russo the new head coach of its Men’s and Women’s Tennis teams. Last year, Russo served as an assistant coach for the Men’s team at St. John’s. Prior to that, he was an assistant coach for the Men’s and Women’s Tennis team at Nicholls State, and also spent one year at Fordham. “I’m excited to come on and be the head coach of both the Men’s and Women’s Tennis teams here at Adelphi, and lead both programs in the competitive Northeast-10 Conference,” Russo told AUPanthers.com. 4

NTC Hosts First Ever Fortnite World Cup Prior to the stars of the tennis world arriving on the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, the stars of the video game world filled Arthur Ashe Stadium for the first-ever Fortnite World Cup. The seats were filled to capacity as more than two million people watched as 16-year-old Kyle Giersdorf won the Fortnite World Cup and claimed the $3 million prize money. For comparison’s sake, the winners of the 2019 US Open singles titles will earn $3.85 million.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com


land

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

SPORTIME Kings Park Brings in American Idol’s Robbie Rosen for Talent Show Summertime on Long Island means its camp season at many of the tennis clubs and programs, and the campers at SPORTIME Kings Park were recently visited by American Idol contestant Robbie Rosen for a talent show. Rosen performed a number of songs and was a spectator for some of the kids performances.

Pond Tennis Center Summer Challenger, coming back from a set down to win 4-6, 6-4, 10-7 in the championship match.

Cooper Schorr Wins July Challenger Cooper Schorr took home the title at the L1 July Championships at Robbie Wagner Tournament Training Center. Schorr, who trains at the Bethpage Park Tennis Center, won all his matches in straight sets, including beating the top-seed 7-6, 6-1 in the finals.

Ines Roti Wins Back-to-Back Tournaments Ines Roti, who trains out of Glen Head Racquet and Fitness, has had a very good summer competing in USTA tournaments on Long Island. Roti claimed the title at the L1B Hofstra University Challenger, and followed that up by winning the L1B Alley

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Setting the Trend in Tennis Apparel Founded in 2008, inPhorm’s mission was to create an active and lifestyle brand dedicated to sustainable production and empowering responsible consumers to choose products that are eco-forward and kinder to the Earth. The name “inPhorm” is a nod to customers’ fitness, athletic prowess—and their “informed” passion for preserving the environment and enhancing its recovery. Dressing women in feminine, comfortable and stylish tennis, golf and active wear has always been inPhorm’s focus, and that will be expanded when menswear and children’s lines debut in the Fall of 2020. The original inPhorm creative team, Founder/Designer/Creative Director Saad Hajidin and Manufacturer Supinya Vongsurapichet, has evolved and grown into an international business, with a main office in Dallas, Texas, and a design studio in New York City. inPhorm products are sold in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Switzerland, Singapore and Southeast Asia. Read more about the professionals wearing inPhorm, and its brand ambassadors by visiting its Web site, inPhormNYC.com, or following the brand on

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest. inPhorm has recently instituted a Pay it Forward campaign, which allows the brand to give back to the community. A growing list of charitable organizations will be involved, such as The Pete Brown Junior Tennis Program and the “Believe” Tennis Camp. The Pete Brown program provides free tennis to under-served minority children in Compton, Calif., many of whom come from

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

families who live under or near the poverty line. The fun day of tennis instruction and games, gifts and food is supported by the USTA, the City of Los Angeles and the LAPD. The “Believe” Tennis Camp for young girls is spearheaded by an inPhorm ambassador, former pro Melanie Oudin. “Believe” stresses the fun of becoming better tennis players, as well as learning to believe more in yourself on the court.


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Hundreds Turn Out for Nassau and Suffolk County Kids Days

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or the fourth consecutive year, Long Island Tennis Magazine and the USTA Eastern Long Island Region co-hosted multiple free events for kids throughout Long Island, as hundreds came out for the Nassau County Kids Day and Suffolk County Kids Day events. The Nassau County Kids Day event took place at Old Westbury Golf & Country Club, and featured groups from Circulo de la Hispanidad of Long Beach, the Boys & Girls Club of Glen Cove and the RCA Children’s Academy of Roosevelt, while nearly 200 kids came out to the Suffolk County event held at The Hamlet Golf & Country Club in Commack. “Both events were conducted very well. The Nassau Kids Day found a new home at Old Westbury, which was not only a beautiful facility, but their staff was very easy to work with,” said Neil Thakur, USTA Eastern’s tennis service representative for Long Island. “The Suffolk Kids Day was again held at The Hamlet and we had another large turnout. At both events, we had many new groups in attendance which is always our goal. USTA Eastern depends upon volunteers to help us grow tennis on Long Island, so a special thanks goes to David Sickmen, Michelle Stoerback and Hillary Bressler for their behind the scenes hard work to make these events a success.” At both events, the kids were spread out across the many courts where they took part

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in a number of different tennis drills using the Net Generation equipment. The New York Open was on hand to provide its Skills Challenge competition, and the events included more than just tennis, as there was a bouncy house, a dunk tank, music provided by DJ CM, relay races, and food, drink and prizes were provided throughout the day. “Using the Kids Days to introduce tennis is great because they are playing with their

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

friends in a beautiful setting. Our trained coaches use the Net Generation activities which are designed for kids who never even held a racket before while emphasizing the fun aspect of tennis,” added Thakur. “Since tennis is a lifelong sport, our hope is that after attending a Kids Day, many of them will be inspired to continue playing tennis because of the positive experience they had.”


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Under the Bright Lights of the Grandest Stage of Them All By Luke Jensen Tennis Rock Stars … how was your Summer of 2019? Can you believe it has gone way too fast and the US Open is right around the corner to shift us into another school year and fall tennis? The US Open marks the finish line for the majors on the calendar for the pros. My siblings and I would play World TeamTennis and build confidence through the US summer series of events, hoping to peak at the end of August just in time for the pressure on the big stage in New York City. I always felt Wimbledon was the halfway point of the calendar year with the US Open as a proving grounds for my overall mental and physical talent. It was my last chance to add a major to my trophy case for that calendar year, while getting a great lift from the

partisan American fans in Flushing Meadows. New York fans ask only two things from you for their hard-earned dollar to watch you perform: To play your guts out and to W-I-N! New Yorkers hate losing and want their tennis heroes to face the pressure and come out victorious. I felt my brother and I played extremely well in New York because the expectations of the fans drove us to deliver a better performance. Winning matches in New York in late August/early September feels like conquering the world. The weather is hot and humid, but can quickly turn into cold and windy during the second Tuesday of the Open. The tennis Gods test every tennis players’ toughness with conditions that are tough to endure, and only a laser-like hyper focus approach to every point will produce the best tennis you can. How does the US Open build on an extraordinary Wimbledon? Look for the Big Three on the men’s side to navigate any tricky spots in the draw with

2013 ETA Recipient “Innovative Tennis Program of the Year” LI’s first Tennis Academy devoted to the USTA’s 10 & under Initiative. Butch Seewagen is a former varsity coach at Columbia University. He holds over 15 national and international titles and is the owner/program director of the Children’s Athletic Training Schools.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

heady play and patience. Will this be the major event where a youngster from the “Next Generation” takes that next step? They may have all stumbled at Wimbledon, but the kids are eager and confident to make an impression in Flushing Meadows. On the women’s side, it is really hard to overlook 15-year-old Cori “Coco” Gauff. The young American captivated the tennis world with amazing play at Wimbledon. Coco won more games off the eventual Wimbledon Champion Simona Halep than Serena did. America had a winner for a very long time, especially someone as mentally tough as Serena. For my money, it will always be about Serena relaxing and allowing herself to not press and just play. The last 12 months have been solid for Serena, with appearances in two finals, Wimbledon, the US Open and the semis of the Aussie Open. If she is healthy and can prepare for the US Open, I say look out! Enjoy everything at the US Open and if you are there, take a peek at the Avenue of Champions in the Doubles Champions area for a very special dedication to the most influential role model who is responsible for making the Jensens winners. Go for WINNERS! Raised in Ludington, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles. He was also a member of the U.S. Davis Cup teams that reached the finals in 1991 and won in 1992. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” Luke is currently director of racket sports at West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y. He may be reached by phone at (315) 4030752 or e-mail LukeJensen84@yahoo.com.


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Creating a High-Performance Program

By Joao Pinho any pros or clubs aspire to develop a robust high-performance program, with the goal of developing, attracting and retaining competitive juniors. While many attempt to do so, the reality is that few are able to deliver a product that can be truly qualified as a high-performance program. The objective of this article is to highlight not only the necessary standards needed for such a program, but also to provide a list of actions needed to either develop a program from scratch or improve upon an existing one. “If you build it, he will come.” The classic quote from the movie “Field of Dreams” is a good way to start this discussion. It’s important to understand that, like with most ventures, having a vision of

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what the program will be is a crucial first step. As someone who is now developing junior programs at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, I can attest that having such vision can make a significant impact. In other words, knowing how your competitive program will look and feel will give you the direction needed to guide you through the ups and downs. More specifically, developing your program’s values and identity will improve your ability to create a unique image. This uniqueness can be the intensity that is implemented during your sessions, or the emphasis on technical/tactical development, or your staff’s ability to “connect” with the players and create a sense of community. Once you have this settled, other coaches and players who identify themselves with the reputation of your program will join you for the ride. Another important factor is understanding that competitive players can some-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

times have a “high maintenance” reputation. Some of the challenges include: Players often switching programs, difficulties with parents and the expectation of significant discounts or scholarships. However, be aware that there are ways to mitigate such issues, which we will explore later, and many underestimate the benefits associated with adding a high-performance track to a club’s portfolio. Here are five clear advantages to do so: 1. Impact the bottom line: Committed players are more likely to spend larger sums than purely recreational players, as they tend to attend multiple clinics, private lessons, etc. Some of the top players I work with spend as much as 17 times the amount of recreational players! 2. Create an aspiration for lower levels: Having a solid high-performance pro-


gram is an indirect way to boost recreational classes, as those players have something to look forward to and build toward. 3. Boost staff morale: Coaches tend to feel more rewarded when working with more committed players. Even if the level is not necessarily high, most would agree that working with students who are willing to work hard is more enjoyable. Therefore, having more of these players at your facility can create a boost of productivity from within your staff. 4. Fill your non-prime time slots: Competitive players are more willing to come at non-ideal times as tennis is a priority to them, thus improving your ability to sell non-prime time slots. 5. Improve your club’s overall image: The reality is that most clubs tend to become associated with the quality of its junior programs. The better the juniors, the better your image will be. With that said, below are some steps to be strongly considered when looking to either create or improve a competitive program. The order of these steps would be adjusted based on where one is in this process: 1. Develop your method, values, and culture that you hope to create: This

will ultimately be your key differentiator and create a unique bonding between you and the player. A successful program is often known for a specific characteristic. 2. Offer a tryout event: Create a buzz about your program by promoting your staff, facility, program structure, etc. This could be a one-day event or a series of days throughout the year. 3. Use scholarships or other similar methods to attract top players in the area: While the programs I have been involved with do not engage in such practice, this is commonly used. The reality is that many players and parents often care more about “who else is training there” than the quality of the program or coaches. While this tactic can be helpful at times, being able to develop players from the ground up is a better strategy in the long-run. If the program is good, you should be able to charge for it. 4. Provide parents with lots of education: Despite their reputation, I feel that most tennis parents are not problematic. However, most of them are uneducated about the journey of building a competitive player. Providing constant communication, in individual and group meetings, while explaining the journey of a junior

player and the parent’s role in that process, can be extremely helpful. 5. Be a role model for the players and develop a positive relationship with them: Most people will learn best if it comes from someone they like. We are tennis coaches, so we should live what we preach. In other words, if you are out of shape, get in shape. If you have a more limited playing background, work on it. One doesn’t need to be a world-class player to be a great coach, but it’s important to be able to know what the player is going through and see things at a deeper level. Being a more established player can help with that. Also, it’s important to know what your players like outside of tennis, show an interest in their overall life and personal growth, not just their forehands and backhands. 6. Continue to learn: Take every course you can, both in-person and online. Even if you learn just one new thing, you now have one more piece of information or concept to share with your players. 7. Train your staff: Put them through the drills you’ll do with the players, make them feed with the same tempo continued on page 14

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creating a high-performance program

actual results. While it’s important not to stress results and rankings at an early age, keep track of how your players progress by promoting their results to demonstrate your program’s availability to develop, retain and attract competitive juniors.

continued from page 13

In all, developing a quality high-performance program is not easy. It often takes some years to get enough players through your system, and its key to have the right type of personnel. However, the clubs who do it right often have lower employee turnover, higher player retention rates, and healthier programs in general. Joao Pinho is the head professional of 10U and high-performance at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. He is a USPTA elite professional, a former NCAA DI coach and player, and has specialized in developing competitive junior players over the past decade. Currently, he is the private coach of three national champions and a WTA touring pro.

10.Keep track of your players’ success: Nothing speaks louder than

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8. Create a curriculum for your classes: What are the skills that players should have before moving to a higher level? Such a list does not have to be complex, in fact, simpler is better in most cases. If you don’t have one, I suggest using the Net Generation templates and adjust them to your program’s needs.

9. Attend tournaments regularly: Watch your players compete. Not only will you be able to better understand how your player performs under pressure, but you will also develop a closer relationship. This goes a long way in showing your players and their families that you care and have a joint interest and commitment in their progress and success. In turn, players and families will likely feel a greater sense of connection and loyalty. Additionally, other players and parents will see you there which is a nice form of marketing your program. However, do not make this an opportunity to poach players from other programs.

and trajectory, while providing feedback in a similar manner. Otherwise, if every court is different, you don’t really have a program; only pros running their own independent classes. One important aspect I try to emphasize with my staff, is that “the skill matters more than the drill!� So, drills should be simple and emphasize fundamentals performed relative to the player’s level.

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comeback complete continued from page 20

Djoker’s Wild Dominant Djokovic looks to defend US Open title By Brian Coleman

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ans all around the world were able to witness one of the truly great performances in all of sports earlier this summer, when two of tennis’ all-time greats—Novak Djokovic and Roger Federer—squared off in the finals of the 2019 Wimbledon Championships. For five hours, Djokovic and Federer competed against one another on a beautiful Sunday afternoon in London, in a match that seemed to be even bigger than just the one trophy. With Federer sitting at 20 career Grand Slam titles, and Djokovic at 15, there were consequences that would tip the balance of the all-time great list. Djokovic, who has been the best player in the world for the last 18 months, outlasted Federer in an epic fifth-set tie-breaker that had seemingly everything. “This was mentally the most demanding because of the circumstances and Roger across the net was playing well,” said Djokovic when asked where that victory stacked up with ones throughout his career. “He was match points up and serving, and in those moments, you just try and stay there, try to stay present and find that strength and self-belief, and in the end I managed to pull it out. I’m very happy and proud of the achievement ... and exhausted as well, of course.” Djokovic’s dominant run has been similar to the one he had back in 2016 and 2017 when he won all four Grand Slams in a row. With his triumph at Wimbledon, the Serb has now won four of the last five majors, a run that began at last year’s Wimbledon Championships, and has a significant stronghold on the top ranking spot on the ATP World Tour. And with that, the 32-year-old arrives in the United States for the American hard-court swing with his eyes on yet another US Open title to close out his already dominant summer. A year ago in Flushing Meadows, he compiled a two-week tournament that culminated in him knocking off Kei Nishikori in the semifinals before defeating former champion Juan Martin del Potro 6-3, 7-6, 6-3 in the finals. His US Open title and his win at Wimbledon that preceded that had 16

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djoker’s wild continued from page 16

come on the heels of one of the worst stretches of his career that ranged from 2017 to the beginning of 2018, including upset losses to Marco Cecchinato in the French Open and Hyeon Chung at the Australian Open in the first two Grand Slams of the year With all the physical injuries he was deal-

ing with (he had elbow surgery in early 2018), plus some on-court struggles, Djokovic was at a crossroads in his career at that moment. It was then when he and his wife, Jelena, hiked up the famous Mont Sainte-Victoire in southern France, a trip that completely changed his outlook. And he was very open about it.

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“I psychologically felt huge pressure, and now I’m no longer thinking about the number of titles,” Djokovic recalls. “We sat down and we just looked at the world from that perspective. I breathed in the new inspiration, new motivation. I thought of tennis, thought of the emotion that tennis provokes in me. It was all positives. I just felt like I had a new breath for this sport. The rest is history in terms of results. I played finals of Queen’s, won Wimbledon, won Cincinnati and won US Open.” “I guess we’ll be hiking some more very soon,” he added. He must have continued hiking as 2018 turned into 2019, as Djokovic has not missed a beat. At the Australian Open, he went on an unstoppable streak in winning his record seventh Melbourne title after trouncing Rafael Nadal in straight sets for the tournament’s championship. And even after he lost to Dominic Thiem in the French Open semifinals, that was just a minor hiccup in his run of form. What would transpire at the All England Lawn Club at Wimbledon is the stuff of legends, and the final match may con-


ceivably go down as the greatest tennis match ever. Federer said that loss stayed with him for a while, and similarly to Djokovic, he went off-the-grid for a little bit afterwards to get himself refocused. “You look back for a few days while you decompress what happened. There are flashbacks of the final, both the good moments and bad moments, when you go back to the practice court. Those usually go away after the first couple of sessions,” said Federer. ‘We went caravanning the day after my Wimbledon and enjoyed Switzerland. I relaxed for a bit and then started practicing.” But as for Djokovic, he prepares for the rest of the US Open Series events before returning to Flushing Meadows in defense of his US Open title from a year ago and in search of his fourth triumph in New York overall. He is the clear-cut favorite to win the title, even Nadal’s uncle and former coach Toni admitted to that in a recent interview: “Today, I see Djokovic as a favorite for the US Open because he’s won Wimbledon and the Australian Open,” the elder Nadal stated. He will enter the tournament as the topseeded player and the one who most people believe will hoist the trophy when the fortnight concludes in early September. Djokovic’s new perspective and outlook has helped him in making calculated decisions and scheduling arrangements, and that’s the case as he gets ready for the US Open. He did not play at the Citi Open in Washington, D.C. or the Rogers Cup in Montreal. “I’m sorry to announce that I decided to pull out of Rogers Cup,” said Djokovic. “With the support of my team. I have decided to give my body longer rest and recovery time before coming back again to play.” That pragmatic approach only means that the 16-time Grand Slam champion will arrive in New York with both a fresh body and mind, which does not bode well for the competition as he aims to further cement his legacy and quest to be the greatest player of all-time. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by e-mail at BrianC@USPTennis.com. LITennisMag.com • September/October 2019 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2019 US Open Preview August 19-September 8, 2019 USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center l Flushing Meadows, N.Y.

What to Watch for ... By Stefen Rosner

Domination Novak Djokovic has been on a tear over a long stretch that dates back to the summer of 2018. He has added some nice hardware to his collection this season, having taken down Rafael Nadal at the Australian Open in straight sets, as well as outlasting Roger Federer in a tiebreaker to win Wimbledon for the second consecutive year. The US Open has not been too kind to the Serbian, as he owns a 2-5 record in the US Open Finals throughout his 12-year pro career. But he is the tournament’s defending champion and since 2016, winning is all we really have seen from him. The 32-year-old will look to continue his dominant year, and being currently ranked number one in the world, he will definitely be a heavy favorite. He has shown that he can beat a variety of opponents on any surface and will look to dominate like he did last year in Flushing Meadows. Youngest gun looks to improve At the age of 15, Cori Gauff, who goes by 20

the nickname “Coco,” shocked the tennis world at Wimbledon. She became the youngest player in the modern era to qualify for the main draw at the event. And in the first round, she made a bigger name for herself, as she knocked out her idol, Venus Williams. She was able to win her next two matches, reaching the Round of 16, before losing to eventual champion Simona Halep. It was an electric start to the youngster’s career, and now back on home soil, she will look to make waves in the Women’s Singles Draw. However, she may face some added pressure after her accomplishments over the pond. But in an interview with CNN, Coco stated that she is living the dream. As she grows more mature, her physical and mental toughness will propel her to superstar status in the tennis world for many years to come. She already captured her first WTA title during the US Open Series with a doubles win at the Citi Open, and will be looking to perform under the bright lights of the final Grand Slam of 2019 for the New York crowd.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

Serena is far from done

At the age of 37, Serena Williams is still the name everyone thinks of when they talk about the best in the world. But the greatest players cannot win them all, and as they get older, it becomes increasingly difficult to continue to dominate a sport


2019 US OPEN PREVIEW that grows younger by the day. At Wimbledon, Serena was able to make it back to the finals, but lost to Simona Halep 2-6, 2-6. She was even fined $10,000 for damages to a practice court earlier in the tournament. Surprisingly, Serena has struggled to win over the last handful of tournaments she has played. This year has been a rough one by her own standards where she has not won any titles in six events. Last year, she reached the finals of the US Open, but lost to Naomi Osaka in controversial fashion, as Serena was hit with three penalties in the second half by match chair umpire Carlos Ramos. She felt as if Ramos took the match away from her, and expressed that by directly calling him a “thief,” which he penalized her for. Now she will need to redeem herself and prove that she can win another Grand Slam before her career comes to an end.

fellow German Phillip Kohlschreiber in four sets. He has beaten the top dogs like Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal in ATP events, but hasn’t been able to get it done on the biggest stages. With still so much time to improve, it will be interesting to see if Zverev can go deep at the US Open. These are the events that separate the good players from the great players, and if he wants to join the ranks of tennis greatness, then a run at the US Open is pivotal for the 22-year-old Zverev.

abdominal injury. Osaka was then defeated at the Madrid Open in the quarterfinals. The Italian and French Opens were no different: She lost the top-ranking heading into Wimbledon and a first round elimination just made matters worse. Heading back to the US Open should give Osaka some comfort as that is where she made her big splash. And maybe those good memories can kick start a great finish to the year for the young star.

Osaka looks to bounce back

Not a worry in the world for Kyrgios

Naomi Osaka has struggled mightily since winning the US Open a year ago and the Australian Open earlier this year. The 21year-old was able to beat Serena Williams in straight sets to take home her first ever major win last September in Flushing Meadows. If that does not add a vote of confidence at her young age, not much will. Beating your idol is something that many dream of doing, but very few ever get the opportunity. A couple of months later, Osaka took home another major, winning the Australian Open in three sets against Petra Kvitova. She became Asia’s first number one ranked player, male or female, but the pressure of that distinction seems to have overtaken her ability to play the style of tennis that got her there. She lost in the Round of 32 at the Dubai Tennis Championship, the Round of 16 at the Indian Wells Masters, Round of 32 at the Miami Open and retired during the semifinals at the Stuttgart Open due to an

Whether it’s not practicing, or going out the night before a big match, Nick Kyrgios is just living his life and playing tennis. He recently took down Daniil Medvedev to take home the Citi Open in Washington, D.C. in what he described as one of the best weeks of his life. At Wimbledon, he battled hard against Rafael Nadal in the second round as they went to two tie-breakers with Nadal taking both, and he won the Mexican Open back in March, beating the young Zverev in straight sets. His clash of talent and apathy can often irk fans and reporters, and he even recently said he doesn’t particularly care about winning a major. He has the skills to be great, but just has not displayed the work ethic needed to take his game to the next level. We will see if his recent triumph at the Citi Open will help him remain focused during the US Open, where he can put on an exciting show for the New York fans.

Overcoming the big stage

At just 22-years-old, Alexander Zverev has already cemented himself in the sport’s history after becoming the youngest player to crack the top 10 back in 2018. But even more impressive is that he is now ranked inside the top five in the world and has won 11 ATP titles in singles and two in doubles. But for the German youngster, he has yet to win a major, or even make it out of the quarterfinals. He is coming off a shocking loss which saw him dismissed in the first round at Wimbledon. And at the US Open a year ago, Zverev lost in the third round to

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2019 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2019 US OPEN PREVIEW

US Open to have richest purse in tennis history The United States Tennis Association (USTA) has announced that the 2019 US Open will feature the largest purse in the sport’s history, as it will surpass $57 million in prize money. In addition to the increased prize money, the USTA will also be making a $1 million payment to support the ATP and WTA Tour player programs. “The US Open prides itself on offering the best tennis players in the world, the richest total prize money in our sport,” said Patrick Galbraith, USTA chairman of the board and president. “We strive to be innovative, and feel that our new contribution of $500,000 to the ATP’s player programs, including its pension and the WTA Tour’s transition programs for players, will go a long way toward the long-term financial well-being of all of our sport’s athletes.”

l Round of 32: $163,000 l Round of 64: $100,000 l Round of 128: $58,000

The uptick in prize money represents an eight percent increase over the compensation handed out in 2018, with main draw prize money for the first round increasing by 47 percent over the last four years. The men’s and women’s singles champion will each earn $3.85 million, while the men’s and women’s doubles championship teams will earn $740,000, both of which are the highest in U.S. Open history. Here is a breakdown of the round-byround payouts:

Doubles (each team) l Winner: $740,000 l Runner-Up: $370,000 l Semifinalist: $175,000 l Quarterfinalist: $91,000 l Round of 16: $50,000 l Round of 32: $30,000 l Round of 64: $17,000

Singles l Winner: $3,850,000 l Runner-Up: $1,900,000 l Semifinalist: $960,000 l Quarterfinalist: $500,000 l Round of 16: $280,000

The US Open gets underway with the Qualifying Tournament which begins on Monday, Aug. 19, with the main draw beginning on Monday, Aug. 26 and running through Sunday, Sept. 8 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center.

Where to eat/drink at the US Open (courtesy of USOpen.org)

l Aces: Located on the Club Level in Arthur Ashe Stadium between Gates 3 and 4, Aces is available to Courtside Box seat holders and Luxury Suite guests. Loge and Promenade Subscription Series ticket holders may purchase restaurant passes. l Champions Bar & Grill: Also located on the Club Level in Arthur Ashe 22

Stadium between Gates 3 and 4, Champions Bar & Grill is a first-class chop shop featuring premium steaks, hearty salads and fresh seafood prepared by Benjamin Steakhouse, which is consistently rated one of New York City’s best. Bring your friends for lunch, dinner or after the matches. You won’t miss a moment of the action with live matches on our many TVs. l US Open Club: The US Open Club is located on the ground floor of Arthur Ashe Stadium. Available to all Subscription Series ticket holders, the Club is available for a nominal entrance fee and is included in select Lodge seat subscriptions. With its striking contemporary décor, the US Open Club is famous for its Chef’s Table and seasonal selections of American

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

cuisine, and is open for lunch, dinner and after matches. l Heineken Red Star Patio Café: Soak up the beautiful surroundings of the US Open grounds at the charming outdoor Heineken Red Star Patio Café, located outside the US Open Club. Enjoy fresh selections of seasonal foods, paired with a Heineken or a summer specialty cocktail. The Heineken Red Star Patio Café is available for all ticket holders. l Mojito Restaurant & Bar: Located on the ground floor of Arthur Ashe Stadium near the Heineken Red Star Patio Cafe, Mojito features a menu inspired by Chef Marcus Samuelsson. Experience Mojito’s luscious flavors with Latin specialties, enhanced by multiple TVs showing the live matches. Mojitos is available for all ticket holders.


2019 US OPEN PREVIEW l Emirates Sports Café: The Emirates Sports Café is located on the west side of the South Plaza, adjacent to Court 7 and positioned above the US Open Collection Store. With a spacious, ideal setting to unwind and keep track of the matches, guests can enjoy the Café’s laid-back atmosphere and assortment of food and drink offerings. Emirates Sports Café is available for all ticket holders. l Cafe Spiaggia: Cafe Spiaggia is bringing its inviting and lively take on casual Italian fare to US Open guests. James Beard Award-Winning Chef Tony Mantuano and winner of Top Chef Season 15, Joe Flamm, have curated a bright, fresh menu packed with shared plates, handmade pastas, and impeccable wines that provide the perfect setting for guests to savor and socialize. Arthur Ashe Stadium Food

l Pat LaFrieda Meat Company: New York’s “King of Meat” Pat LaFrieda serves his signature filet mignon steak sandwich and other favorites. l Hill Country Kitchen: Located at Gate 9 and straight from Texas, Hill Country brings authentic barbeque to Flushing Meadows. Comfort food items are served up at this casual, down-home eatery. l Angry Taco: Chef David Burke serves up a flavorful Mexican street food menu. Menu items include carne asada beef tacos, pescado tacos, nachos; chips and guacamole. l Bar Tartine: Located at Gate 6, Bar Tartine uses the finest ingredients,

traditional techniques and original recipes to deliver the most authentic artisanal flatbreads. Enjoy a Heineken or Honey Deuce as well. l Dean & DeLuca: Located at Gate 10, Dean & Deluca brings you the world’s finest gourmet and artisan food. The acclaimed upscale American market and purveyor of fine food joins the concessions offerings serving nutrientrich performance bars and tasty, lighter options. l Oyster Bar: Located at Gate 4, the Oyster Bar offers a selection of oysters, lobster rolls, and crab cakes with beverages to match! l Wine Bar Food: Located at Gate 8, Wine Bar Food serves up its signature favorite flat bread, flaming ouzo shrimp, and other dishes by acclaimed Chef Tony Mantuano. l Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream: Located at Gate 35, Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream serves hand-dipped ice cream with an array of toppings, milkshakes and smoothies. l Franks & Sausages: Located at Gates 22, 23 & 27, Franks & Sausages serve New York Italian sausage, Coney Island foot-long frankfurters, all-beef frankfurters, kettle chips, baked pretzel braids, crackerjacks and ice cream.

l Fuku: Located at Gate 32, Fuku is a casual chicken concept by Momofuku. Originally started as a fried chicken sandwich joint, Fuku has since grown to serve a variety of chicken and seasonal offerings. l Grand Slam Grill: Located at Gates 26 & 34, Grand Slam Grill serves up the classics … all-beef frankfurters, New York Style Italian sausage, grilled hamburgers and cheeseburgers, chicken tenders, seasoned french fries, baked pretzel braids and crackerjacks. l Grey Goose Bars: Located at Gate 26, the Grey Goose Bars will again feature the Honey Deuce, the US Open’s signature cocktail. l Italian Experience: Craving Italian? Visit the Italian Experience, located at Gates 25 & 36, for traditional cheese pizza, pepperoni and grilled panini sandwiches. l JoJu: Serving classic Vietnamese sandwiches. l Lemonade & Popcorn: As simple as it sounds … fresh-squeezed lemonade and fresh-popped popcorn, located at Gates 28 & 32. l The Open Bar: Located at Gates 27, 33, & 38, the Open Bar serves US Open Signature Cocktails, Wine by the

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2019 US OPEN PREVIEW Glass, Heineken, wraps, sandwiches, kettle chips, crackerjacks and baked pretzel braids. l Stellar Cellars Wine Bar: Serving delicious wines by the glass. l Prime Burger: Located at Gate 29, Prime Burger serves grilled hamburger and cheeseburger, grilled chicken breast sandwich, World’s Greatest hot dogs and seasoned french fries.

hand-dipped ice cream with an array of toppings, milkshakes and smoothies. US Open Food Village

Backyard x17

l Franks & Fries: Satisfy your craving for comfort food, Franks & Fries features hot dogs, Italian sausage, chicken tenders and fries. l FIELDTRIP: Offering a selection of rice bowls, grain buns and salads. l Creperie: Enjoy traditional French crepes by Chef Paul. Choices include Le Boeuf (steak), Le Poule Dijon (chicken) and Le Classic (ham). l Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream: Serving

l Curry Kitchen: Offering traditional cuisine, including chicken tikka wraps, kati rolls, and lamb handi. l Angry Taco: Chef David Burke serves up a flavorful Mexican street food menu. Menu items include carne asada beef tacos, pescado tacos, nachos; chips and guacamole. l Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream: Serving hand-dipped ice cream with an array of toppings, milkshakes and smoothies. l Farm2Fork: If you’re looking for a healthy option, Farm 2 Fork has you covered. Give the grain bowl a try— barley topped with chicken, roasted sweet potato, roasted beets and arugula. l Fish Shack: Featuring lobster rolls, shrimp cocktail, poached salmon

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

salad, and shrimp and lobster salad created by Chef David Burke. l Franks & Fries: Satisfy your craving for comfort food, Franks & Fries features hot dogs, Italian sausage, chicken tenders and fries. l Fuku: Fuku is a casual chicken concept by Momofuku. Originally started as a fried chicken sandwich joint, Fuku has since grown to serve a variety of chicken and seasonal offerings. l Grey Goose Bar: More than 275,000 melon balls will be used to garnish the US Open signature cocktail—the Honey Deuce. Get one and take the glass home as a souvenir. l Glatt Kosher: Enjoy sausage and peppers, pastrami, tuna wraps and knish. l Hill Country Kitchen: Straight from Texas, Hill Country brings authentic barbeque to Flushing Meadows. Comfort food items are served up at this casual, down-home eatery. l Korilla BBQ: Korilla features rice bowls served with caramelized kimchi, beansprouts, fire roasted corn, garlic spinach and choice of bulgogi (marinated ribeye), braised ginger sesame chicken, slow roasted pork shoulder in gochugaru (Korean red pepper flakes), and organic tofu, with choice of Korilla’s signature sauces. l Lavazza Café: Lavazza brings the flavor of authentic Italian coffee to the US Open. Located in the Food Village and behind Court 6, the Lavazza Cafe serves hot and iced coffee, single or double espresso, café latte and more. l Melt Shop: NYC’s comfort-food haven introduces several of its classic melted sandwiches and sides in Food Village. l Neapolitan Express: Neapolitan’s pizzas feature locally sourced vegetables, as well as all-organic ingredients. Choices include margherita, meat lovers, and for dessert, the nutella pizza. l Poke Yachty: Guests’ choice of classic tuna, spicy tuna, salmon, crab and shrimp and tofu poke bowls.


2019 US OPEN PREVIEW l Prime Burger: Serving grilled hamburgers and cheeseburgers, grilled chicken breast sandwiches, World’s Greatest hot dogs and seasoned French fries. l Stellar Cellars: Serving delicious wines by the glass and other fine beverages at the full service bar. Grandstand Food Village

this casual, down-home eatery. l Neapolitan Express: Neapolitan’s pizzas feature locally sourced vegetables, as well as all-organic ingredients. Choices include margherita, meat lovers, and for dessert, the nutella pizza. l Prime Burger: Serving grilled hamburgers and cheeseburgers, grilled chicken breast sandwiches, World’s Greatest hot dogs and seasoned French fries. Louis Armstrong Stadium Main Concourse

l Oyster Bar 7: The Oyster Bar 7 is located adjacent to Grandstand and features a menu curated by Lure Fish Bar serving fresh oysters, lobster rolls and crab cakes in a unique setting. l Angry Taco: Chef David Burke serves up a flavorful Mexican street food menu. Menu items include carne asada beef tacos, pescado tacos, nachos; chips and guacamole. l Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream: Serving hand-dipped ice cream with an array of toppings, milkshakes and smoothies. l Fish Shack: Featuring lobster rolls, shrimp cocktail, poached salmon salad, and shrimp and lobster salad created by Chef David Burke. l Grey Goose Bar: More than 275,000 melon balls will be used to garnish the US Open signature cocktail—the Honey Deuce. Get one and take the glass home as a souvenir. l Franks & Fries: Satisfy your craving for comfort food, Franks & Fries features hot dogs, Italian sausage, chicken tenders and fries. l Hill Country Kitchen: Straight from Texas, Hill Country brings authentic barbeque to Flushing Meadows. Comfort food items are served up at

l Angry Taco: Chef David Burke serves up a flavorful Mexican street food menu. Menu items include carne asada beef tacos, pescado tacos, nachos; chips and guacamole. Angry Taco can also be found in Louis Armstrong Stadium in the Upper Concourse.

l Ben & Jerry’s Ice Cream: Serving hand-dipped ice cream with an array of toppings, milkshakes and smoothies. l Curry Kitchen: Offering traditional cuisine, including chicken tikka wraps, kati rolls, and lamb handi. l Fuku: Fuku is a casual chicken concept by Momofuku. Originally started as a fried chicken sandwich joint, Fuku has since grown to serve a variety of chicken and seasonal offerings. l Grand Slam Grill: Grand Slam Grill serves up the classics … all-beef frankfurters, New York Style Italian sausage, grilled hamburgers and cheeseburgers, chicken tenders, seasoned french fries, baked pretzel braids and crackerjacks. The Grand Slam Grill can also be found in Louis Armstrong Stadium in the Upper Concourse. l Grey Goose Bar: More than 275,000 melon balls will be used to garnish the US Open signature cocktail—the Honey Deuce. Get one and take the glass home as a souvenir. l Heineken Bar: Enjoy delicious Heineken draught beers, including Heineken, Heinken Light, and H41.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2019 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2019 US OPEN PREVIEW l Hill Country Kitchen: Straight from Texas, Hill Country brings authentic barbeque to Flushing Meadows. Comfort food items are served up at this casual, down-home eatery. l Pat LaFrieda Meat Company: New York’s “King of Meat” Pat LaFrieda serves his signature filet mignon steak sandwich and other favorites. Upper Concourse l Franks & Fries: Satisfy your craving for comfort food, Franks & Fries features hot dogs, Italian sausage, chicken tenders and fries. l Korilla BBQ: Korilla features rice bowls served with caramelized kimchi, beansprouts, fire roasted corn, garlic spinach and choice of bulgogi (marinated ribeye), braised ginger sesame chicken, slow roasted

pork shoulder in gochugaru (Korean red pepper flakes), and organic tofu, with choice of Korilla’s signature sauces. l Melt Shop: NYC’s comfort-food haven introduces several of its classic melted sandwiches and sides in Food Village. l Neapolitan Express: Neapolitan’s pizzas feature locally sourced vegetables, as well as all-organic ingredients. Choices include margherita, meat lovers, and for dessert, the nutella pizza. Outside of Louis Armstrong l Melt Bakery: Craving some dessert? Melt has a pop-up dessert station situated outside Louis Armstrong Stadium. Featuring delicious desserts.

South Plaza

l Dean & DeLuca: Dean & Deluca brings you the world’s finest gourmet and artisan food. The acclaimed upscale American market and purveyor of fine food joins the concessions offerings serving nutrient-rich performance bars and tasty, lighter options. l Pat LaFrieda Meat Company: New York’s “King of Meat” Pat LaFrieda serves his signature filet mignon steak sandwich and other favorites.

Top reasons to love the US Open

l Entertainment from start to finish: From live music to interactive games and kids tennis sessions, there’s something for everyone at the 2019 US Open. It starts with Arthur Ashe Kids Day, which will take over the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King 26

National Tennis Center on Saturday, Aug. 24. Again this year, access to the grounds and all grounds activities are free. For the first time, courtesy of the USTA Foundation, general admission promenade seats in Ashe Stadium for the concert are free. That entertainment continues throughout the tournament with the Opening Night Ceremony, and with Net Generation clinics taking place on court before each Day Session of the Main Draw. l Tennis under the stars: There is something special about summer nights in New York City, and that only gets amplified during the US Open’s

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

fortnight. Late-night tennis featuring star-studded matchups have become synonymous with the US Open. From Onny Parun and Stan Smith at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills to Andre Agassi and James Blake nearly 15 years ago, the tennis stars always deliver big performances under the stars late into the early morning hours in the city that never sleeps. l Practice court access: A two-story practice gallery debuted at the 2014 US Open, which allowed fans unprecedented access to see their favorite players as they prepared for their matches. In addition to the viewing area of the practice courts, the gallery is also adjacent to Courts 4, 5 and 6 where matches are taking place, giving fans 360 degrees of tennis. l Qualifying week: One of the coolest aspects of the US Open’s first week is the access to the qualifying tournament. Few things are free in


2019 US OPEN PREVIEW this world, let alone professional sporting events, but the US Open allows fans to come in and see the players competing in the qualifying draw at no cost. 128 men and 128 women compete to qualify for the final 16 positions in the main draws of the US Open. The qualifying

tournament, which offers the fifthlargest purse for a tennis event in the U.S., takes place from MondayFriday, Aug. 19-23. l New York, New York: Tennis is an international sport with fans and players from all over the globe. But for a three-week period in the late

summer, tennis’ home is located right here in our backyard. New York City becomes the sport’s host site and welcomes the best players and millions of fans to come celebrate the sport, and the city’s energy always brings out the best in the players.

2019 US Open Schedule (schedule subject to change) Session 1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 23 23 24 24

Day

Date

Session Time

Matches Scheduled

Monday Monday Tuesday Tuesday Wednesday Wednesday Thursday Thursday Friday Friday Saturday Saturday Sunday Sunday Monday Monday Tuesday Tuesday Wednesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Friday Saturday Saturday Sunday Sunday

08/26 08/26 08/27 08/27 08/28 08/28 08/29 08/29 08/30 08/30 08/31 08/31 09/01 09/01 09/02 09/02 09/03 09/03 09/04 09/04 09/05 09/06 09/06 09/07 09/07 09/08 09/08

11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 1 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 1 11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 1 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 1 11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 2 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 2 11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 2 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 2 11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 3 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 3 11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 3 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Round 3 11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Round of 16 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Round of 16 11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Round of 16 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Round of 16 11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Quarterfinals 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Quarterfinals 11:00 a.m. Men’s and Women’s Quarterfinals 7:00 p.m. Men’s and Women’s Quarterfinals 7:00 p.m. Women’s Singles Semifinals 12:00 p.m. Men’s Doubles Final 4:00 p.m. Men’s Singles Semifinals 12:00 p.m. Mixed Doubles Final 4:00 p.m. Women’s Singles Final LITennisMag.com • July/August 2019 • LongFinal Island Tennis Magazine 27 1:00 p.m. Women’s Doubles 4:00 p.m. Men’s Singles Final LITennisMag.com • September/October 2019 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Beach Tennis Making Waves in New York ew York Beach Tennis (NYBT) recently hosted an International Tennis Federation (ITF)-sanctioned tournament at Crest Hollow Country Club in Woodbury, N.Y., as clear skies and a sold-out draw set the stage for a great day on the sand. The Men’s Doubles Draw featured strong competition, with both international and local teams going against one another. The top-seeded duo of David Sickmen (United States) & Pedro Penalver (Venezuela) took out the fourth-seeds Fran Larios (Nicaragua) & Ignacio D’Elia (Argentina) 6-3, 6-2 to book their spot in the finals, while the Aruban duo of Ricardo Pagliuca and Jim Wijngaarde defeated the American pairing of Marty Salokas & Matt Garavaglia to advance to the championship.

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With both teams having advanced without dropping a set on the day, there was much anticipation heading into the finals. But in the end, it was Sickmen & Penalver, who had never played together as a team prior to the event, who were able to come out on top to win 6-3, 6-2 and claim the title. On the Women’s Doubles side, a fullypacked draw of ladies hit the sand for a competitive afternoon of beach tennis. After an afternoon of beach tennis, four teams remained and would do battle in the semifinals. In the first semifinal, the American duo of Julia Koulbaskaya & Liz Kobak came back from a set down to beat Venezuela’s Luisiana Ramirez & Lourdes Santiago in three sets, while American Emilie Katz &

Italy’s Sara Burinato defeated Mexico’s Carolina Buccio & Jeanna Frey from the U.S. in the draw’s second semifinal. It was a hard-fought final, but after playing a long three-set match in the semifinals, Koulbaskaya & Kobak were unable to overcome Burinato & Katz, who captured their first ITF title together with a 6-4, 6-2 victory in the championship. As the host site, NYBT would like to thank Crest Hollow CC and its staff who made sure players had access to food, drinks, locker room amenities and the beautiful club, which created a great atmosphere for everyone involved with the tournament. NYBT would also like to thank its sponsors SPORTIME, John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA), inPhorm, GF Sports and the New York Open for making the event possible.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2019 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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U S TA E A S T E R N L O N G I S L A N D R E G I O N

A Message From USTA Eastern Long Island Regional Director Jonathan Klee

Aranxta Sánchez Vicario (third from left) joins USTA Eastern LI Regional Director Jonathan Klee (second from left), USTA Eastern Executive Director Jenny Schnitzer (right, front) and awardees at the Annual Awards Dinner

Children enjoying Nassau Kids’ Day

The 65 & Over Mixed League has added a third team

Long Island Champions from Port Washington’s Schreiber High School team

The Year to Date on Long Island he past few months have been busy ones for tennis on Long Island, and I would like to look both back and ahead to keep you apprised of what’s happening within the USTA Eastern Long Island Region. An annual highlight is our Long Island Awards Dinner. This year, we were grateful to have 14-time Major champion and International Tennis Hall of Famer Aranxta Sánchez Vicario as our special guest.

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A new JTT program was launched this summer in the Hamptons

Long Island volunteers help out during the successful second NY Open

Aranxta shared her experiences as a young tennis player with us and posed for photos with our wonderful awardees. I was pleased to meet and speak to many of our honorees, and on behalf of the entire USTA Eastern Long Island Regional Board, I thanked everyone who attended the dinner for their support. In case you missed them, you can see all the pictures from that night on our Web site (LongIsland.USTA.com). Feel free to download, print and share your favorites. Summer is our favorite time of year, as we get to meet and play tennis with the many children who come out to enjoy our annual Summer Kids’ Days, coordinated with Long Island Tennis Magazine. We hosted several hundred children–many new

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com


U S TA E A S T E R N L O N G I S L A N D R E G I O N to the sport of tennis–at our Nassau and Suffolk events, held at the Old Westbury Golf & Country Club and the Hamlet Golf & Country Club in Commack, respectively. Long Island pros and USTA Eastern Long Island Regional Council members volunteered their time to teach tennis basics and run clinics, while the kids also enjoyed dancing to tunes spun by a local DJ and playing games. A new and welcome activity was the Tennis Skills Challenge, coordinated by the New York Open. Thank you to all of the volunteers whose hard work made these events a success. Another focus on kids is our Junior Team Tennis (JTT) program, coordinated by our LI Tennis Service Representative (TSR) Neil Thakur. This USTA program has brought tennis games and competition to a growing number of participants in 2019. New this summer was a JTT program in the Hamptons. It is in addition to the LI Winter JTT Tournament at the New York Open, in which 60 players representing six clubs participated, and the Spring JTT season, which saw more than 150 players. Our USTA Adult League teams have been doing a wonderful job representing Long Island and the Eastern Section so far this year. Most recently, the 18 & Over 7.0, 9.0 and 10.0 Mixed Doubles teams won their Eastern Sectional championships. Last summer, we welcomed a brand new 65 & Over Mixed League, the first (and only) one in the Eastern Section. Teams play mostly at Hempstead Lake State Park. This year, the League added a third team and is having a great summer. As I reported earlier this year, our boys high school tennis players had a great season, with Syosset’s Kabir Rajpal as runner up at the NY State Tournament in June. The USTA LI Regional Council was pleased to present all the Nassau and Suffolk boys competing at the State Tournament with sweatshirts; we also gave plaques to all players from Paul D. Schreiber (Port Washington) Senior High School (Nassau) and Half Hollow Hills East (Suffolk) for participating in the Boy’s Long Island High School Championship won by Port Washington in a close 4-3 match. In addition, in support of our “No

Cut High School Initiative” to create well-rounded student athletes, all No Cut team members received blue “No Cut Tennis” wristbands during the spring season to coincide with Autism Awareness Month. We distributed more than 800 blue wristbands to players on more than 26 teams. We are so proud of all the boys teams that organized community service programs this spring, including charity events or hit-and-plays with younger children in their communities. Many of the teams supported either Autism awareness or breast cancer research in their efforts. We are looking forward to the girls high school season, which gets underway on Monday, Aug. 26. Key dates to mark on your calendars include Oct. 28-30 (Long Island Championship, to be played at a Suffolk site) and Nov. 1-4 (New York State Tournament in Albany). We were excited to welcome back professional tennis to Long Island, in the form of the 2nd Annual New York Open ATP Tournament, bigger and better than its first iteration in 2018, as well as the highly successful Long Island Tennis Expo. These events took over NYCB Live, the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, and brought tennis greats and legends, amateurs and fans, to the Island for a week of competition and fun. The USTA Long Island Region, along with event sponsor USTA Eastern, was proud to support the NY Open with volunteers throughout the week. We were happy to congratulate event champions Reilly Opelka (singles) and Kevin Krawietz & Andreas Mies (doubles) and have been eagerly following their professional accomplishments since. We look forward to the 3rd New York Open, scheduled for Feb. 8-16, 2020. Top players Kevin Anderson, Kei Nishikori, Nick Kyrgios and Reilly Opelka have already committed to play. Please check out our Web site (LongIsland.USTA.com) for future events and get out on our beautiful Long Island tennis courts where everybody is a winner! Jonathan Klee is USTA Eastern Long Island Regional Director (volunteer).

USTA Long Island Regional Council Executive Committee l Jonathan Klee, Regional Director l Michael Pavlides, Past Regional Director l Sunny Fishkind, Vice Regional Director l Randi Wilkins, Secretary For more information on the USTA Long Island Region, please visit LongIsland.USTA.com, e-mail USTAOnLongIsland@gmail.com, visit us on Facebook at USTA Long Island and follow us on Twitter @USTA_LI. LITennisMag.com • September/October 2019 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2019

LONG ISLAND GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW Written and compiled by Brian Coleman

Teams to watch in Nassau County Port Washington Port Washington enters the season with a bit of a chip on its shoulder following a disappointing end to last season. Following up on its Nassau County and Long Island Championship titles the year prior, the Vikings were upset by Hewlett in the county semifinals a year ago. The team returns Thea Rabman at the top of its singles lineup, and with an experienced core of playoff performers behind her, Port Washington will look to rebound in 2019. Hewlett The Bulldogs of Hewlett surprised some folks when it made its way into the Nassau County final a year ago, but that won’t be the case this season as the squad enters 2019 with high expectations. Led by New York State Public High School Athletic Association Singles Champion Rachel Arbitman, Hewlett will be eager to make a return trip to the county championship. Despite losing second singles player Gabriela Sciarrota, talented youngster Nyla Gershfeld will be thrust into a bigger role for Hewlett, which should make them a formidable opponent once again.

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Great Neck North Great Neck North will present one of the strongest singles lineups in Nassau County this year which should make it a threat from start to finish this season. Anchored by the return of Amy Delman, who finished in third place in the county tournament for two straight seasons before not playing a year ago, the Blazers will certainly be one of the favorites to get to the County Championship. Alina Lyakhov & Alyssa Ghassabian, who last year played first and second singles, respectively, and teamed up to become an all-state doubles pairing, will move to second and third singles, creating a deep lineup for a Great Neck North team looking to make a lot of noise this season. Cold Spring Harbor Cold Spring Harbor always presents a difficult lineup for teams in Nassau County’s Conference I, and that should be the case once again this year. While it loses its top singles player in Maddy Richmond, returning is Nicolette Loeffler, an All-State doubles player and County runner-up from last year, who will return

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

to help give the Seahawks a stout lineup to challenge anybody in Nassau County. Roslyn The Roslyn Bulldogs lost a number of key contributors from last year’s team to graduation, but still have a deep lineup of players that will help it make a run in Nassau County’s top conference this year. Sarah Faber returns to anchor the top of the singles lineup and will be followed by Angelina Remnek in the second singles spot, and if its four doubles teams can exhibit the depth it needs to, Roslyn could be a contender later this season. Nassau County Key Dates (subject to change) l Monday, Sept. 9: Regular Season Begins l Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 19-20: Nassau County Individual Championships l Monday-Friday, Oct. 21-25: Nassau County Team Playoffs l Saturday-Monday, Nov. 2-4: 2019 NYSPHSAA Championships


2019

LONG ISLAND GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW Teams to watch in Suffolk County

Westhampton Beach Westhampton Beach enters the 2019 season with a 17-match winning streak, and has a couple of different titles to defend. The Hurricanes won the Suffolk County Championship and parlayed that into the Long Island Championship, with wins over Commack and Syosset, respectively. Led by Suffolk singles champion and one of the top players in the Section in Rose Hayes, in addition to experienced veterans such as Jen Curran and Rose Peruso, Westhampton Beach will have a target on its back as it looks to repeat this season. Commack Having lost the Suffolk County Championship a year ago, the Commack Cougars can’t wait to get back to the courts and attempt to get back the finals this season. With the potential return of Emily Tannebaum, a County Singles Finalist last year, and Gabriela Glickstein at the top of the singles lineup, plus a deep doubles lineup with loads of experience, Commack has what it takes to once again be one of the top teams in Suffolk County. Half Hollow Hills East Having failed to reach the County Championship a year ago, Suffolk County power-

Harborfields The Tornadoes of Harborfields often fly under the radar in Suffolk’s League I, but the team has put together a very nice run over the last few years and will enter the 2019 campaign with high expectations for itself. The team returns its top three singles players—Lauren Hutton, Remi Berlent and Giuliana Farino—which will make it a tough squad to play from start to finish this season. Their talent and varsity experience should help Harborfields make a deep run into the playoffs later this year, and hopefully compete for a Ward Melville In recent years, Ward Melville has estab- County Championship. lished itself as one of the top teams in Suffolk County, despite not competing in Suffolk County Key Dates League I. Ward Melville won the Suffolk (subject to change) County Championship and reached the l Tuesday, Sept. 3: Regular Season Begins Long Island finals two years ago, but came l Friday-Saturday, October 18-19: up short in a hard-fought quarterfinal showSuffolk County Individual Division down with Half Hollow Hills East last seaChampionships son. Despite losing top singles player l Friday-Saturday, October 25-26: Denise Lai, as well as some other experiSuffolk County Individual Section enced players, senior Jade Eggleston leads Championships the top of the Patriots’ lineup, as Ward Melville looks to be a high seed come play- l Saturday-Monday, Nov. 2-4: 2019 NYSPHSAA Championships off time and looks to upend some of Suffolk County’s top teams this fall. house Half Hollow Hills East hopes to return to the place it had become accustomed to reaching. It lost a few seniors to graduation, but returns much of its lineup including County Doubles Champion Alexis Huber, who competes in the singles lineup during the regular season, as well as its first singles player from a year ago, Janelle Chen. The Thunderbirds always have a plethora of talent that feeds into the varsity team, and don’t be surprised if it returns to be one of the best teams in the county in 2019.

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2019

LONG ISLAND GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW

New York State Public High School Athletic Thea Rabman looks to return to the top of its singles Association Singles Champion Rachel Arbitman lineup for Port Washington this fall will look to lead Hewlett to the Nassau County Championship

Alyssa Ghassabian and Alina Lyakhov return to power Great Neck North’s lineup for the upcoming fall season

Suffolk County Doubles Champion Alexis Huber, who competes in the singles lineup during the regular season, returns to the lineup for the Half Hollow Hills East Thunderbirds for the 2019 season

Gabriela Glickstein returns to the Commack lineup for the upcoming girl’s high school season

Ward Melville Senior Jade Eggleston leads the top of the Patriots’ lineup

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Nicolette Loeffler, an All-State doubles player and County runner-up from last year, will return to the singles court to help give the Cold Spring Harbor Seahawks a strong lineup

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com


COMING IN NOVEMBER

Distribution scheduled for 11/01/19

This edition will feature: • Top Coaches Roundtable Discussion • Tennis Travel Destination Guide • Holiday Gift Guide • 2019 Girls High School Season Recap

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Play the Game! It’s Supposed to be Fun ... By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC Every year for the past 10 years, I teach a workshop at the Omega Institute in upstate New York called “Tennis Inside the Zone: Becoming More Than an Athlete.” The workshop is targeted toward adult tennis players. We spend the week reconnecting to those unique attributes, characteristics and skills that make us uniquely ourselves. And we learn how to bring these to the court and to competition. The logic behind this is pretty simple: When we stop focusing on what we can’t control, we let go of stress, tension and playing tight. When we stop over-trying, playing to others’ expectations and focusing on outcome, we are able to bring more of who we are to what we do and become better, balanced players. At the workshop, we do something called the “Intention Exercise.” First, we identify our intentions, then we list three attributes we can use to accomplish this

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intention. Finally, we presuppose a greater outcome. For example, an intention might be to stay focused on what you can control. The attributes to accomplish this might be patience, awareness and curiosity. The greater outcome might be that you are better able to manage adversity when it comes up in a match. While going around the circle, one of the students innocently said, “I have been playing for years and no one told me this game is supposed to be fun!” The air was sucked out of the room. The pink elephant appeared. Everyone looked at each other in disbelief. It reminded me of when Andre Agassi penned, “I hate this game” in his book Open. It’s the kind of thing we think but never say. Whether you are a recreational player, weekend warrior, competitive junior or professional, it’s of utmost importance to keep the fun in the game. Without fun, the journey will be a fast track to disappointment, frustration and burnout. We all can envision that player who just doesn’t want to be on the court. Maybe they are talking to themselves, screaming at others, and

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

seeming as though they want to be anywhere else than on the tennis court. So, what’s a player to do? 1. Your big “Why:” I suggest connecting to the reason that has nothing to do with winning or losing, but will always be there no matter the outcome. Maybe it’s your love of competition, a camaraderie with friends, trying to be the best you can, or challenging yourself to improve. Maybe you have identified those you hope to inspire when you play. Often, a client of mine will want to inspire their siblings or the group of players they are part of. This helps to recognize there is a greater reason for playing. It isn’t just about you. Lastly, give some thought to what you get back from playing. What lessons does the game teach you? This might be staying calm under pressure, fitness or remembering that the game is supposed to be fun! 2. “Play the game:” Let’s break up the phrase and think about what “Play” means. The online dictionary states: “An activity engaged in for enjoyment and recreation, especially by children.” This brings up memories of playing as a kid, where the only focus was unconditionally trying to be and do my best. Also adapting and adjusting to whatever was happening without fear of the outcome. Imagine if we let go of the outcome? How loose, free and relaxed would you be when you played? In defining “game,” the online dictionary states: “A complete episode or period of play, ending in a definite result.” Think back to your childhood … playing a game wasn’t do or die. We weren’t pressed or forced. We didn’t over-try. Not a chance! It was a game. As soon as we start to put too much importance on the game, we compromise our ability to “play the game!” The author of this article experienced this lesson in his last tournament.


I had lost the first set 5-7, and I was in a second set tie-breaker, with the score 5-6. I served and volleyed, trying to hit a crosscourt volley winner which I inexplicably missed and lost the match. I couldn’t figure out how I could miss what I considered such an easy shot? After careful reflection, I realized that I stopped playing the game. I was over-trying and forced things. Simply, at that point, I stopped playing the game, rather, pressured the game. So, the next time you walk on the court, don’t fall into the trap that so many others including two-time Grand Slam winner Naomi Osaka did. She recently shared on her Instagram, “I can honestly reflect and say I probably haven’t had fun playing tennis since Australia and I’m finally coming to terms with that while relearning that fun feeling …” So what’s a player to do? Remember your “Big Why” and “Play the Game.” After all … it’s supposed to be fun! Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is founder and

Author and Mental Training Coach Rob Polishook recently instructed his “Tennis Inside the Zone: Becoming More Than an Athlete” workshop where the group examined the re-discovery of “fun” in the sport of tennis director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach, he works with athletes and teams, focusing on helping athletes gain the mental edge. Rob is author of Tennis In-

side the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, e-mail Rob@InsideTheZone.com or visit InsideTheZone.com.

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2019 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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One Is the Loneliest Number By Steven Kaplan think we all know how young tournament players would answer this question: “Would you like to win the US Open one day?” While aspiring players all want tennis greatness, it’s not desire, but the willingness to do whatever it takes that’s extraordinary. Almost every young player would love to be the very best, but very few are willing or even knowing of what it takes to be number one. In my career, I have coached 11 players ranked number one in the country, and I’ve learned from each of them. Upon reflection, it’s clear that they all shared and excelled in certain qualities. Below is my list of the common attributes that these players used to rise above the competition. It’s useful to view these questions as a test and consider: Do you, your child or your student display the following?

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1. The best players follow directions with attention to detail, with precision and with perfection. Cognitive intelligence is commonly displayed by the efficiency by which we learn and the best players are highly skilled at learning and improving. The very best players are extraordinarily “coachable.” They love to learn and improve. They often question directions, but they inquire out of thoughtfulness, not inattention or defiance. 2. The best players do the easy things well. A great ready position is relatively easy to display as compared to great backhand volley. Walking with poise and managing your racket well in between points is a lot easier than sprinting to a difficult shot. Great players excel at perfectly executing the easy, small intangibles. Sure, they are the small things, but the small stuff is the difference between “good” and “the best.”

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

3. The best players value fairness. Out-preparing the competition is empowering. The best believe they will win because they are ready and deserving of victory. Such thinking places strong faith in the value of merit with no shortcuts to the top. The best players believe that it’s fair that they win because they will always outwork the competition and they give less value to the shortcuts designed to cheat the system. Of course we all know great juniors who are tennis rules cheaters, but I strongly believe that such behavior is a corruption of a top players’ integrity by needless external pressures. It’s also a shame. 4. The best players love to compete, but are motivated by performance discipline. We all play our best when faced with an outside challenge, but the biggest challenge in tennis is to remain motivated by an inner desire to be the best. Show me a player who refuses to lose focus and discipline even when they can easily dominate, and I suggest you


are witnessing a vital skill that will help ascend that player to the top. A great coach needs to motivate lesser players, but great players can motivate even a lesser coach. 5. The best players expect to win. Most players believe they can win. The best players believe they will win despite the fact that they are often wrong. Such belief is the result of unyielding performance optimism. It takes courage to believe in your ability to win because the more emotion you invest, the greater the disappointment of failure. The best players are especially brave because they hate to lose a lot. 6. The best players leave nothing to chance. The best players are both macro- and microoriented. They focus on both the big and small picture, and they see details that most players miss. They bring extra food, extra drinks, extra clothing and extra equipment on the court just in case. They will bring an extra pair of shoelaces because, while they rarely break, such an event could be a real problem. They train hard, get rest, eat well and strive for excellence always because to do anything less is an unnecessary risk.

and often get frustrated, but some players are not fooled. They simply ask for the ball because they think outside the box and they love to creatively solve problems. Each match is a unique problem-solving opportunity and the best players love to seize the moment to find a way to succeed. 8. The best players never give up. Every achievement study indicates that success is like buying lottery tickets—the more tickets you buy, the better your odds of winning. The best players buy more tickets and fail more, but are unrelenting. They keep going until they succeed. The expression is: “The expert has failed more times than the beginner has tried.” 9. The best players hate to lose, but hate not playing even more. Losing can be awful, but for the best, not playing is a guaranteed loss. The best tennis players play tennis, period. They are opportunists and they view every match not played as a missed opportunity to succeed.

10. The best players are students of the game. There is so much to learn and know about tennis to be the best. Knowledge is power 7. The best players and the best players want to learn and know love to solve problems. everything. They are never complacent, as I often challenge players to “get the ball from they recognize that it is never too late to learn me and they can’t punch, bite, scratch, pinch what is always helpful to know. They watch or tickle me.” The players who fight me fail matches, break down mechanics and study

tennis history because to understand where they can go, they want to know where others have been. On a scale of one to 10 for the above qualities, a score of nine for each, is the minimum threshold for the useful embodiment of these attributes because at a rarified level, you need to own these qualities to use them. Further, to be the best, you need all 10 of these qualities because they are a chain of performance synergies working together to produce greatness. Imagine locking your bike with a 10-link chain having nine links of galvanized steel and one link of a paperclip. Any chain, like any performance personality, is only as strong as its weakest link. Steve Kaplan is the owner and managing director of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as director emeritus of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation and executive director and founder of Serve & Return Inc. Steve has coached more than 1,100 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous highlyranked touring professionals. Many of the students Steve has closely mentored have gone to achieve great success as prominent members of the New York financial community, and in other prestigious professions. In 2017, Steve was awarded the Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award by the USTA. He may be reached by e-mail at StevenJKaplan@aol.com.

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Rajesh Ready for Next Chapter at Stanford By Brian Coleman

ust a couple of years ago, Neel Rajesh was one of the top high school players on Long Island. Competing for one of the best high school teams on the Island in the Syosset Braves, he played atop the lineup at first singles and helped lead his team to a both a Nassau County Championship and Long Island Championship. “It was a lot of fun to play for a team; it was a completely different experience altogether,” recalls Rajesh. “Tennis is usually such an individual sport, but when you are on a team, you’re playing for something bigger. It was more fun, there’s more energy.” But following that season, Rajesh made the difficult decision that many top junior tennis players face: He chose to stop playing high school tennis, and instead, focused on his individual training while finishing up his classes online. “I felt like I was playing some good tennis and I wanted to play some ITF tournaments, and to do that you needed to travel more and there’s also a lot of tournaments during the week. So it’s tough,” he said. “I tried to play a few while I was playing at Syosset, but it was just too difficult to keep up with the curriculum and do all the travelling. So my family and I decided to do online schooling after that and just focus on some ITF tournaments, and focus on my practice to continue to try and get better.” It has turned out to be a great decision for Rajesh, as he has found success on the ITF circuit, as well as in some of the top USTA tournaments, to become one of the most improved players in the country. “It’s been a great experience. I really enjoy playing on the ITF circuit and competing in Nationals,” said Rajesh. “I feel like travelling around the world, you see so many different people and so many different cultures. I appreciate everything I have a little more now, after seeing people who

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Neel Rajesh (center) with his parents prior to signing his letter of intent to join the Stanford Cardinals Men’s Tennis team this fall didn’t have the same advantages I had, but are still working hard. That just motivated me even more. I was also able to see the level of play of the top kids from around the world, and I was able to compete with them. It just motivates me to keep getting after it and keep working hard.” He credits a lot of his success to his training at Christopher Morley Tennis in Roslyn, N.Y., where he has been for the last two years. “It’s a great culture to be a part of Christopher Morley Tennis. I was able to play with and against some high-level players like Cannon Kingsley and Spencer Brachman, and it was a great experience,” Rajesh said. “Everyone there, from all the coaches down to the fitness trainer, they really want to see you succeed and they do what they can to help you in any way. They’re always looking out and doing

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

what’s best for the player. I felt like going there was the best move for me and I feel like it’s helped my game a lot.” His private coach at the club is Nick Brebenel, whom he says has helped make him more of an attacking player on the court. “I’ve worked with Neel and we’ve tried to develop a very aggressive and creative game,’ said Brebenel. “We’ve really worked to improve his footwork, and his confidence to come to the net more. I am so happy with how his game has come together over all.” Perhaps his biggest win came last year at the USTA National Clay Court Championships in Delray Beach, Fla., where he won 10 matches, including four in the full three sets to claim the Gold Ball and score a huge tournament victory. The run was capped off by a thrilling 4-6, 6-3, 7-6(7)


come-from-behind win over the defending champion and eighth-seeded Axel Nefve. His run over the course of his two weeks in Delray Beach did more than just improve his rankings, it also did a great deal for his confidence and belief in his own game. “That run was really magical for me,” Neel recalls. “My whole family and coach were there. Each match, I felt better about my game and how I was playing. I was confident heading in based on the tournaments I had played leading up to it, but I never thought I would do that well. I just kept at it every match. There were a lot of three-set matches in there, a lot of grinders, but my confidence never wavered. I was always staying with it mentally and physically, and just felt great that whole tournament.” He began to receive a lot of calls from college coaches following his Delray Beach victory, as he became a highly-sought-after recruit. Rajesh fielded a lot of offers, but knew that he wanted to attend a school that had the perfect balance of high-level athletics and top-notch academics. After narrowing his choices down and discussing his options with his family, he

Neel Rajesh competing at last year's US Open Junior Championships. committed to Stanford and will join the Cardinal this fall. “I felt at home there the second I stepped on campus and was hanging out with the team and the coaches. They were super nice and I really felt like they cared for me. They truly took an interest in me and my family,” said Rajesh. “And the

weather in California … you can’t beat that. That’s one thing that really appealed to me also, being able to play outdoor tennis rather than indoor. I just felt that with the culture there, it was the right fit for me.” Rajesh’s hard work and continued desire to improve his game has guided him to a decorated junior tennis career, and he will soon be competing for one of the top colleges in the country, and he is ready to take on the next stage of his life. “I’m really looking forward to the team aspect of tennis again, and having the teammates and coaches behind me,” Neel stated. “I really want to grow as a player and I think the coaches are really going to help me a lot with that, and with my transition hopefully to the pro tour. I’m also just looking forward to being there as a student. Being away from my family is going to be tough at first, but I’m very much looking forward to continue growing both on and off the court.” Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by e-mail at BrianC@USPTennis.com.

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Three Secrets to a Better Serve Today By Lisa Dodson n today’s game, there are many schools of thought as how to create the best serve. The information is often unclear, the terminology is difficult and the execution is

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near impossible. I’d like to give you three clear and simple concepts to think about that will change your serve for the better in a relatively short period of time. 1. Relax already! It is truly rare to find a player who understands what “relaxed” means in the

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

game of tennis. Often when searching for a relaxed state, a player becomes so loose that strokes and technique are slow and sloppy. They simply haven’t hit enough technically sound serves to be confident in letting the racket head do the work for them. Especially problematic for the serve is the uncomfortable Continental Grip. Players squeeze the grip tight as not to lose the grip. At the same time, they are killing the fluid and rhythmic technique they are trying to achieve. A relaxed mind, hand and body have a direct effect on the speed your serve will travel. Here are a few practical things you can do to physically understand what a relaxed grip means. Gently put your hand in the correct grip position on the racket. Slide your hand down so that only your first finger and your thumb are on the flared butt-end of the racket. Your other three fingers will be curled under the butt of the racket. Now go through your service motion without hitting a ball. The racket should feel heavy and uncontrollable. You can feel all of the “links” in your arm contributing to your service motion. Now try hitting a ball with this grip.


You’ll be surprised that this seemingly impossible task is really effective. As you put more fingers on the grip, strive to maintain the whippy feeling that allows all of the “links” in your arm to contribute to the serve. 2. Look up before you toss! Most tennis players think that they are looking up to their ball toss when they are actually looking out. To test what you do, stand up, relax your neck and let your head go back as far as it can against the top of your back. If you are inside, you should be looking at a spot on the ceiling almost directly above your head. Your tossing arm lifts and the fingers of your tossing hand go to the sky. A high tossing hand will set the tossing shoulder higher than the hitting shoulder, making this head position feel more natural. Clear vision is essential for great contact on a ball. A little-known fact is that the best servers look up before the ball is tossed. Looking up in anticipation of the arrival of the ball is a much more efficient method of serving. If your head goes up

in advance of the toss, your eyes will be still. Now you will be fully able to focus on the target. Try envisioning a small picture frame hanging in the air at optimum contact point. Look up to that picture frame and work on being able to place the toss in that area. Your focus and intent to strike the ball will be far greater. 3. Toss with a flat hand The position of the toss hand and arm are neglected areas when dealing with the serve. The toss arm has several critical functions. How the ball is propelled up is important not only for the result of the toss but also for the next phase of the serve. Ball tosses should travel straight up and down, without spin or arc (except when intended). Fingers bent or curled around the ball assure failure. For a successful toss, flatten your fingers and place the ball on the creases of the last joint segment. Place your thumb gently over the top of the ball, making sure to keep the hand flat by laying your wrist down. Straighten your elbow, bring

your toss arm down and up in the direction of the right net post (for a righthanded server). The toss comes from the shoulder and gentle body action, and the hand finishes up in the “picture frame” described above. Gently popping the hand open at the release point eliminates “flipping” the ball off the fingers. The toss hand continues to the sky to set the tossing shoulder higher than the hitting shoulder and allowing an upward hit. The three secrets to a great serve aren’t flashy, but are critically fundamental to the serve that you simply cannot be as successful without them. Make mastering these principles a priority and you will soon have the stress-free, dominant and powerful serve that you have been wanting. Lisa Dodson is the developer and owner of Servemaster, a USPTA Elite Professional and a former WTA world-ranked player. She is currently the director of tennis at Shenorock Shore Club in Rye, N.Y. She may be reached by e-mail at Lisa@TheTotalServe.com or visit TheTotalServe.com.

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By Emilie Katz

Osaka Throws Out First Pitch in L.A.

‘Top 10 Worst Fails,’� she said afterwards. Luckily for Osaka, she shook off her nerves and threw a strike.

Gauff Meets First Lady Michelle Obama

Two-time Grand Slam champion Naomi Osaka ditched her tennis racket for a baseball at a recent Los Angeles Dodgers baseball game. Osaka was honored as a part of the team’s “Japan Night at Dodger Stadium,� where she threw out the first pitch. “I was just really hoping that I wasn’t gonna end up on SportsCenter for, like,

Wimbledon Championships. The 15year-old became an immediate celebrity when people like Snoop Dogg, Dwayne Wade and former First Lady Michelle Obama praised her performance. A few weeks later, Gauff was in Washington, D.C. she won her first WTA title by winning the Citi Open doubles title alongside fellow American teenager Catherine McNally, and got to meet one of her idols: “Today, I got to meet my idol Michelle Obama,� Gauff wrote on Twitter. “Her words and wisdom on my journey will stay with me on the court over the course of my career. She is a true inspiration.�

It has been an exciting summer for American teenager Coco Gauff, who captured the hearts of the country when she advanced to the fourth round at the

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Visa Issue Keeps Kuznetsova Out of Citi Open Defending champion Svetlana Kuznetsova had to withdraw from the Citi Open in Washington, D.C. in early August due to an issue with her visa. Kuznetsova said she had been waiting since February to get her U.S. visa, and while she was eventually able to get it from the United States embassy in Moscow, the two-time Grand Slam champion was unable to get it in time to travel to the U.S. before the Citi Open.

ATP, IMG Reportedly Reach Agreement

According to SportBusiness, the ATP World Tour and the IMG agency have agreed to a 10-year deal reportedly worth $1 billion for betting streaming and data

rights, a deal that would cover the ATP World Tour Masters 1000 series, the World Tour 500 series and a few of the 250 series events.

Isner Partners With DEFY

John Isner became the first professional tennis player to enter into a partnership with a Cannabidiol (CBD) company, as he partnered with DEFY, a performancebased CBD drink. The highest-ranked American male in the world joins fellow University of Georgia alum and Pro Football Hall of Fame running back Terrell Davis, as ambassadors for the product. “I play a sport where taking a single point off can be the difference between winning and losing a match, and DEFY is a product specifically intended to put me in a position to perform on every single point,” said Isner. “It’s been great getting to know DEFY as a company, and I look forward to working with them to help people achieve improved performance through CBD.”

Van Uytvanck, Minnen Share On-Court Moment Belgium’s Alison Van Uytvanck (right) and Greet Minnen (left), who are both doubles partners and in a relationship off the court, competed against one another in singles for the first time at a WTA tournament in Karlsruhe, Germany. After the hard-fought 6-4, 1-6, 6-1 victory for Van Uytvanck, the two, who are two of the few openly gay players on the WTA Tour, shared a warm embrace at the net. “We have a lot of fun on the court. It’s fun to play with her,” said Van Uytvanck. “We try things, and that helps us to improve our game.”

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By Kathy Miller

The 18 & Over 4.0 Women’s team from Sportime Syosset, captained by Gigi Banks and Dawn Schosberg, will be advancing to the Sectional Championship in Albany With the summer flying by, the USTA leagues are finishing up. At the time of this article being due, the 18 & Over League has its winners that will be advancing to the Sectional Championship in Albany, N.Y.. The winners include: 18 & Over l Women 2.5: Huntington Indoor, captained by Lorena Trabucco l Women 3.0: Sportime Lynbrook, captained by Rosalynn Steele & Diana Hensley l Women 3.5: Sportime Lynbrook, captained by Nayana Brahmbhatt l Women 4.0: Sportime Syosset, captained by Gigi Banks & Dawn Schosberg

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Heading to Adult League Sectionals, the Women’s 3.0 team from Sportime Lynbrook, captained by Rosalynn Steele & Diana Hensley l Women 4.5: Sportime Lynbrook, captained by Suzanne Markowitz & Katie Figgie l Women 5.0: Sportime Syosset, captained by Hali Katz & Meredith Steigman l Men 3.0: Deer Park, captained by Ed Sinn l Men 3.5: Christopher Morley, captained by Adam Moramarco l Men 4.0: Christopher Morley, captained by Joseph Bullaro & Frank Fattizzi l Men 4.5: Long Beach, captained by Mitchell Low & Fayez Malik l Men 5.0: Carefree Racquet, captained by Ben Marks

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com


40 & Over l Women 3.0: Point Set, captained by Dena Stein & Melissa Kotcher l Women 3.5: Christopher Morley Tennis, captained by Marcia Rosenkranz & Loretta Marcoux l Women 4.0: Sportime Roslyn, captained by Seema Imberman & Constance Feiner l Women 4.5: Sportime Lynbrook, captained by Tina Buschi & Suzanne Markowitz l Men 3.0: Deer Park Tennis, captained by Ed Sinn l Men 3.5: Long Beach Tennis Center, captained by Andrew Camacho l Men 4.0: Eastern Athletic Blue Point, captained by Steve Subject l Men 4.5: Sportime Syosset, captained by Andy Ross & Lance Kaufman The 55 & Over Leagues are in full swing, with playoffs starting the end of August. We also have our 65 & Over League, which has grown quite a bit. We have the Men’s 7.0 and 8.0 Divisions again and for the ladies, we have 6.0, 7.0 and 8.0 Divisions this year. Hoping to continue the growth! We also have a 65 & Over Mixed Doubles League, which is a social league that continues to grow. Al Silverstein and Sue D’Alessandro organize this particular League and would love for more players to join. If interested, e-mail Al at ASilver1118@aol.com and Sue at SueDAless10is@optonline.net.

We will be getting the Tri-Level League off the ground at the end of September and will again run the 4.5, 4.0 & 3.5 League in addition to the 4.0, 3.5 & 3.0 League. Matches consist of three courts of doubles, one court at each level. If you have a team, please let me know so I can get you a registration number and get you on the schedule. In the beginning of November, we will start getting the 18 & Over and 40 & Over Mixed Doubles Leagues organized. Both Leagues will offer teams at the combined levels of 6.0 7.0, 8.0, 9.0 and 10.0. The matches for the Mixed League also consist of three courts of Mixed Doubles and will play on weekends. The 18 & Over League will begin mid-December, with the 40 & Over League beginning in February. If you would like to get involved with your own team or would like to join a team, please let me know. I will be putting together a non-advancing competitive Men’s 8.0 League which will start in October. Players at the 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5 Levels will be able to join a team and matches will be three courts of doubles. This is a pilot program for this year to see how it goes with the hope that we can add to it in the future. If you are interested in playing, please let me know. That’s it for now! As always, we wish all of our advancing teams luck at Sectionals and hope to see you all go to Nationals! Kathy Miller is Manager of Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached by e-mail at KathyM65@aol.com.

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The Loophole Known as the “Bathroom Break” and a Solution! By Ricky Becker hat makes tennis a unique sport? You can play it for a lifetime, it tests you technically, physically and mentally. There is also no clock telling you it is physically impossible to make a comeback. There is no official coaching during Grand Slams either. All of these aspects are unique, but there are a couple of other sports that this applies to as well. What makes tennis the most unique? You are allowed to leave the court in the middle of the match to use the bathroom! And it seems like tennis players need to do this more than athletes in any other sport. Go us! Of course, I’m being tongue-in-cheek here, but really … how did we get to this point? Do racecar drivers go for a pit stop when the car is in a pit stop? Have you ever seen an athlete in another sport actually leave the field of play to use a restroom? Why does tennis have a loophole in the rules that allows a player to take a bathroom break when they are really just being used as a cheap, lame and unskilled way to try and change the momentum in a match? Over the last 30 years, tennis has transformed from people giggling in their living rooms when Jimmy Connors took a bathroom break during the 1983 U.S. Open finals (rumors were he met with a doctor for an injury), to it really just being a commonly used momentum changer. It’s so commonly used, coaches and parents openly

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tell their kids in front of other people: “You should have taken a bathroom break to change the momentum of the match.” In the USTA Friend at Court 2019 Handbook, it says, “A toilet/change of attire break consists of a reasonable amount of time when an official determines that there is genuine need. No coaching is allowed during a toilet/change of attire break … When possible, these breaks should be taken during a set break. If this is not possible, then the break should be taken at an odd game changeover. Breaks taken at other times should be limited to true emergencies.” I take three things from this rule: 1. The person who came up with it was exasperated, had his/her hands in the air and just didn’t know what to write; 2. The on-court official is supposed to be a body-language expert in the art of telling when somebody has to go to the bathroom; and/or 3. You should hold it in and wait until the end of a set … but if that doesn’t work and you can’t hold it in, then just wait until a change-over … but if that makes you too uncomfortable, to heck with it, just leave the court whenever you want. Really? According to the rule, I can take a bathroom break at match point to ice my opponent? Yeah, something is not right about this whole thing. I hate when people complain but don’t have a solution. So here is my fail-safe solution to keep bathroom breaks to an absolute minimum. If somebody takes a

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

bathroom break during the match, only the other player is allowed instruction from a coach, player or friend during the duration of the bathroom break. This rule doesn’t say it can’t be done, but it can be enough of a deterrent that somebody might think twice about going. It’s just harsh enough of a penalty that the outcome of the match is still settled on the court, but going to the bathroom to change momentum doesn’t seem like cheating anymore. It also takes the pressure off an official to determine if “The need is genuine.” Some may say that it would be too hard to implement, too radical or even non-traditional, but it really isn’t. Both players would leave the court and report to the desk if there is no on-court official and the desk would oversee that the non-bathroom attending player is the only one to get coaching. For those who think coaching breaks the tennis tradition of no-coaching … well, so do bathroom breaks! Anything so I don’t have to again utter the coaching wisdom to my students: “I don’t believe in bathroom breaks!” Ricky Becker is the director of tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club. He independently coaches high-performance juniors and adults of all-levels year-round at Bethpage Park Tennis Center. He has coached hundreds of ranked junior players. As a player, Becker was awarded Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and 1989-1992 Roslyn High School Tennis Teams, and was ranked number four in the United States in the 18 & Under Division.


NTC Hosts Nutritional Seminar to Combat Childhood Obesity By Brian Coleman

major health problem that has consumed much of the United States over the last decade is childhood obesity. Proper nutrition and formulating a healthy diet has become a major point of emphasis, but there is still work to be done to educate much of the public on how to eat properly and to find the right balance between exercise and recovery for children. With that in mind, the City Parks Foundation, Steve Kaplan, Dr. David D’Agate and 1Huddle recently hosted a free Nutritional Seminar at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center to share their perspectives on the topic and to shed light on a topic that impacts far too many of today’s youth. “As many people know, childhood obesity and body image issues are some of the most pressing health problems in the country today,” said Kaplan, owner and managing director of Bethpage Park Tennis Center. “This problem is growing, as many young people are increasingly sedentary and prefer playing video games to rigorous activity. Dr. David D’Agate, a renowned preventive cardiologist, and my philanthropic organization, Serve and Return, have partnered with an innovating learning and game platform developed by 1Huddule to develop a simple, but powerful, nutritional program to help children make better food choices.” After Kaplan and Mike Silverman, the sports director for the City Parks Foundation, addressed attendees to open the seminar, Dr. D’Agate began his presenta-

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tion, dispelling some nutrition myths, explaining how to properly read nutrition labels and providing the basics for constructing a healthy diet. “As an adult cardiologist, I see the devastating effects that poor nutrition can have on a person’s life,” said Dr. D’Agate. “Approximately 40 percent of the American adult population is obese. Sadly, 20 percent of children and adolescents are obese. The nutrition program through the City Parks Foundation gives us a unique opportunity to educate future generations about the importance of good eating habits that will hopefully last their entire lifetime.” Dr. D’Agate’s son, Dylan, who plays for the Half Hollow Hills East tennis team, then spoke about the effects unhealthy eating

habits have on society. Following the seminar, participants were encouraged to download the 1Huddle app and take part in a quiz based on what they learned from Dr. D’Agate’s presentation where they could win prizes. “I think it’s a little too late to get children to put down their phones, so the idea is to get them to use their phones to learn important life skills,” added Kaplan. “Many thanks to City Parks Foundation, the USTA National Tennis Center and my student and Dr. D’Agate’s son, Dylan, for helping make this talk a success.” Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by e-mail at BrianC@USPTennis.com.

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How to Succeed in a Match When Your Biggest Opponent is YOU! By Tonny van de Pieterman re you plagued by excessive negative thoughts during your matches? Are you unable to follow your own game plan? Do you suffer from tentative play that you later regret? Are you calling yourself horrible names in your head? Are you regularly not satisfied with your performance, even when winning? Do you feel you need a psychiatrist? After countless heartaches, nightmares and much soul-searching, I eventually learned how to play competitively without regret. It took some understanding, some gentle awareness and a carefully-crafted game plan. I learned to play ‘on purpose,’ as opposed to ‘by default.’ It was liberating!

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We know that in order to get the best results we must focus on the process, and not as much on the results. What does that mean in a tennis match? When your focus is on winning, it is also simultaneously on losing (winning equals not losing). This triggers your ego to start a ping-pong match in your head. Every shot or decision will be judged by the morality of your conscience as either good or bad, or right or wrong. Not only is this exhausting, this debate will bring on the torture of doubt. Thanks Mr. Ego! The reason we focus on the result is that we are desperately trying to control the outcome, so the first hurdle we need to clear is to admit that we cannot control the outcome. Psychology has taught us that our ego needs control and structure and that’s why this fun, and recreational tennis match at your local club can quickly

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make you feel like you are in a life or death struggle. This will never change! We need to go around this issue. I realize that this is a biggie. You can wrestle with it for a while, but you must get by it. You must get over it, get over yourself. The only concession I will make is by saying that you can influence the result, but not control it. There is another human being—a counter force to you—on the court that is creating the lack of control. Ultimately, your psyche is not mostly concerned with winning anyway. You might think that you want to win more than anything, but this simply is not true. If it were true, you would only schedule opponents that you knew you could beat. You don’t do that because there is no challenge. Also, I’m sure you have won matches that you were not satisfied with (or even disgusted with). On the flipside,


you probably have lost matches that you were okay with. Okay, so accept that you have no control over the outcome of the match. Stop trying to get rid of the uncertainty, as it is another reason you play tennis! Your ego will blame you for not being in control. Accept it. If you cannot get past this, your ego will make sure you will get control over the outcome, by paralyzing you with excruciating thoughts and feelings of doubts. You will play way below your level, and hence control the outcome, a negative one. Your ego will then also tell you that you stink, and that he knew it all along that you were going to lose. What makes tennis, especially singles play, such a fascinating sport to me is that the one-on-one combat between two individuals touches us deep in the core of our being. The lack of control and the uncertainty our ego senses will immediately put us in touch with deep psychological feelings of powerlessness and insignificance. I am convinced that the great appeal of match play comes from our innate human urge, desire or force to grow. I have

instant respect for every person lacing up the sneakers to dive in again! So, what to focus on instead of the result, instead of winning? You need to focus on something that is more important to you than a victory. I already explained that winning does not satisfy the ego anyway. It is never good enough! There are deeper values within us that will make us feel satisfied when met after a challenge. Find them for yourself. For me, and I am sure for most others, courage was a big one. If I felt that I had played with courage, I was usually on good terms with myself. There are other values as well that you must satisfy. Find them and devise a plan that would satisfy them first and foremost. Once you have your plan, try it out, but be forewarned … your ego will put up a great fight. From psychology, we know that “ego” is convinced of its own annihilation so it might send out thoughts and feelings of terror and despair! Personally, I have been shaking in my boots trying to follow my plan to serve and volley at a key moment in a close match. My arm weighed about a 1,000 pounds and my legs felt like

Jell-O. It was very frustrating at first to not even be able to follow my own self-directed plan, but I was fascinated by my own defiance and bodily resistance. I figured I was on the right path, and I was! Freedom was right around the corner. When I was finally able to ‘override’ the emotional messages and convince my ego I would be safe following a different path, my confidence grew massively. Like Buddha’s quote: “It is better to conquer yourself than to win a thousand battles. Then the victory is yours. It cannot be taken from you, not by angels or by demons, heaven or hell.” Good luck on the journey, you have my respect as a fellow competitor. Tonny van de Pieterman is a tennis professional at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/Eastern-Long Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this year’s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail Tonny@PointSetTennis.com.

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The Student’s Responsibility for a Tennis Lesson By Mike Puc f your goal is to learn tennis properly by developing a solid technique, tactics and strategies, it is a step in the right direction to seek the advice of a tennis professional for guidance. The most important part of your responsibility for improvement is choosing the right pro. Referrals by friends are the best bet. It may not always be the convenience of the pro at your club who is best for you, but with a little research, you will locate the right person. Evaluate the pro after your lesson to be certain you are comfortable with their style, delivery of information, examples, use of time and their personality. Progress will be even quicker if you

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come to the table with an idea of where you would like to go and what you would like to achieve. Is the goal to be good enough to rally and play with a spouse, or is the goal to compete at a high level in tournaments? Be honest and realistic about your goals and discuss them with your pro. The first lesson should be an overview of your background and goals. This needn’t be a lengthy dialogue at this point but enough to relay your expectations. You should listen as much as talk in this exchange and agree upon some short range goals of a week, a month or two months, and long range goals of six months to a year or more. If you are asking the pro to get you from a “C” level player to a “B” level player in a month, you are being unrealistic. This may be a season-long or

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

year-long project, depending on your dedication. If you are new to the game, the pro will lead you and your important evaluation is that you feel good about the pro. If you are interested in a physical workout and hit, let the pro know that this is your goal. The pro will bring new balls out, hit a few balls with you and then play some points or games. If you wish to play but do not convey this to the pro, do not be disappointed the pro has not read your mind. Besides the pro selection, what exactly are your responsibilities for a tennis lesson and improvement? l Do give the pro some information of what it is you would like to improve. If you are consistently missing your backhand, try to report if it is just missing long, hitting the fence,


clipping the top of the net or bouncing three times before it gets there. l Don’t tell the pro you are slow to take your racket back, make contact late and never follow through. The pro will determine the cause of errors and suggest a cure. l Do be ready to hit balls when you arrive to the court 10 minutes early. Warm up by jogging and stretching so you are ready to work when you hit the court. Visit the restroom. Have hats, hair ties, wristbands and over-grips in place and turn off your phone! l Don’t come late to the lesson and expect the pro to move the next student back or waste time discussing the recent news, movies or team gossip. l Do commit yourself to trusting the pro you have chosen and let them lead the lesson. l Don’t become frustrated and ask to

change the drill because you cannot accomplish a task or ask to touch on every aspect of the game in the time allotted. l Do take constructive criticism and feedback in a positive way. The genesis of teaching is information, correction and trial and error. l Don’t expect praise on every shot you believe to be a winner. A good pro will mix praise with the completion of the task and for effort. You are a trusting team on the practice court that will gel with honest assessment. Improper praise will create a phony atmosphere. l Do take notes after the lesson. Discuss a plan of action to work on the lesson items by ball machine time, backboard practice, drills for skills with another player, or hitting a bucket of serves as outlined by the pro. l Don’t ask the pro to prepare a lesson

dossier for you. You will remember and retain information quicker if you are a part of the process. This is your game and you are responsible to become a student of the game. Do you feel good about yourself and your game and did you have fun? If you worked as hard as possible, communicated with the pro and had at least one “gem” of a takeaway from the lesson, then it was a success. Budget your time and money as you would any decision that affects your life. If you don’t feel good and didn’t have fun, make an adjustment. Mike Puc has been the director of tennis at Gleneagles Country Club in Delray Beach, Fla. since 1998. A winner of 15 national titles and an ATP world ranking, Mike directs 25 teams with 350 players in nine leagues, while offering the most extensive calendar of events in South Florida that includes tournaments, lectures and social round-robins.

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Photo credit: Kenneth B. Goldberg

When the crowd turns against you, they can become another opponent you must deal with

Personality: Why It Matters and What to Do About It By Dr. Tom Ferraro he 2019 Championship at Wimbledon served up a startling contrast in personality. The Gentlemen’s Singles Finals pitted the number two seed Roger Federer against number one-seeded Novak Djokovic in front of a sold-out crowd which included Kate Middleton, Prince William, David Beckham, Kate Beckinsale, Stanley Tucci, Jude Law and Eric Bana. At the conclusion of this five-set, fivehour marathon, television commentator John McEnroe described it as the greatest tennis match he has ever witnessed and Novak Djokovic described the experience as the most mentally grueling match he has ever played. Anyone who watched this match knew that it was two against one with the tag-team of the crowd and Roger fighting Djokovic all by his lonesome. It is clear why the crowd favored Roger so much. His age (37), his finesse, his good looks, the way they dress him, his reputation as a class act, the way he moves like a cat, or maybe the fact that he is from Switzerland and speaks English, French and German fluently, gives him an enormous likability factor. This polish and charm translates into huge endorsement contracts for him,

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which includes the recently-signed contract with Japanese apparel giant Uniqlo for $300 million. Federers’ image brings him over $65 million in endorsement dollars yearly, fully five times more than he earns in prize money. And on the other side of the net in the Men’s Singles Finals was the “Un-Federer” and crowd-unfriendly Novak Djokovic. The Serbian was fully aware that he would have to face a hostile crowd and spent months leading up to the match visualizing the boos and figuring out ways to ignore them. He remarked that he used a technique called “transmutation,” where he would train himself to hear “Novak, Novak, Novak” when the crowd was shouting “Roger, Roger, Roger!” Novak earns about half the endorsement dollars compared to Federer and this, in all likelihood, is based upon his perceived personality and overly acerbic, sardonic and disconnected from the fans. He is obviously bright and does try to manage to display a sense of humor, but it often comes across as too biting. In the world of big-time tennis, a likable personality adds up to crowd support and large endorsement dollars, but most amateur players rarely play in front of big crowds and never earn significant endorsement dollars, so one could argue that personality in amateur tennis means noth-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

ing. But that would not be true at all and here’s why. 1. Friendly body language: If you manage to display friendliness when under pressure, remain upbeat when behind and calm after a missed point or bad call, this sends a strong non-verbal message to your opponent that you are confident and relaxed and therefore expect to win. I have observed countless head-to-head matches in tennis and golf, and there is a palpable force that is felt from the player who is calm and relaxed. It says: “I’m calm and you’re not.” 2. Coaches and recruitment time: One of the key issues that college coaches are looking for is a player and a family who will be calm, friendly and easy to work with. College coaches always have their hands full with endless petty team dynamics and jealousies and will avoid like the plague any player who presents with personality problems no matter how much talent they have. 3. Social acceptance: Amateur tennis, especially at country clubs, is largely a social affair and the players want to feel at ease and have fun so if you present with too much aggression, competitiveness and anger, over time, you will wind up alone with no one to play with. This is one of the great challenges of amateur tennis because


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Photo credit: USTA/Darren Carroll

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A good personality means more endorsement dollars and crowd support we all want to win and in order to win, one must tap into aggression. But since the game is largely social and not really related to money, one must figure out how to manage both. How to combine the powerful will to win with social grace. An answer One idea is to observe the professional

players who do show both charm, selfcontrol and manners, but still have the will to win. The two best examples of this would be Bjorn Borg and Roger Federer. When they were young players, they both had fiery tempers, would throw rackets and scream. In both cases, they were disciplined by parents who took away their tennis for a long period in order to teach

them a lesson. And in both cases, it worked. They learned how to internalize their anger and not to show it while playing. This was also what Tiger Woods’ mother did when he was young and showed temper tantrums when playing golf. Competitive sports are so enjoyable because they bring us emotions like anxiety, anger, shame, disappointment, pride and meaning. These are the reasons we play the games we do. And one of the many things one must master is controlling these emotional states. The way we deal with them defines our personality. For the pro, that translates into applause and endorsement deals. For the amateur, that translates into more social acceptance, more scholarship money and more wins as you master the art of body language. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., Sport Psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail DrTFerraro@aol.com or visit DrTomFerraro.com.

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North Shore Interclub Women’s League, Still Going Strong After 45 Years By Brian Coleman or the last half-century, the North Shore has been home to a competitive tennis league for adult women called the Long Island Women’s Inter-Club Tennis League, which continues to grow with each passing year. Now in its 45th season, the League is home to more than 1,600 players representing almost 30 different clubs and programs. “We’re in 28 clubs on the North Shore of Long Island, so we touch almost every private club on the North Shore, including everyone from high-level players to the recreational player,” said Elona Weiner, who has been the League’s president for the last 19 years. The league is comprised of various levels, with A, B and C Divisions, with players ranging in ages 25-85, and runs from early May through the middle of August. “Every club has people who want to play competitively. They can enroll in our League, and we have different levels, from beginners all the way through advanced, with middle and intermediate levels in between,” said Weiner. “We recently created a senior division for those 60 years of age and over. We wanted to give them the ability to play, and it’s more of a friendly, laid-

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The LI Women's Interclub Tennis League Board: (Top, from left to right): Marie Franzoni, Cheryl Schefer, Suzanne Putnam, President Elona Weiner, Vice President Gigi Banks, Meg Selim and Jackie Pierangelo and (bottom, left to right): Susan Greenberg, Lynn Offsey and Debbie Resnick back division. The group has loved it. The rules in that division are a little different; we try to limit the amount of time they have to be outdoors and things like that. It’s been very successful.” Weiner took over as League president in 2000, and has been at the forefront of its growth in that time. An integral part of that was the introduction of the League’s Web

site, InterClubTennis.net, which contains team rosters, scores, standings, schedules and more, with records dating back years so you can browse the League’s history. “What’s great about that is if my team is scheduled play, I can go in and check our matchups against that opponent from previous years to see which player played on what court, who won, who lost, etc.,” said

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com


Weiner. “So you can evaluate what you need to do in a future matchup. It’s very friendly and easy to navigate. Every captain gets a login and password, and they can go in and input their rosters and report their scores.” The teams play out of their respective clubs or facilities, and have both home and away matches. The amount of matches a team plays throughout the season depends on how many teams are in the division as each team plays every other team once. At the end of the season, whichever team sits in first place is that division’s winner. “It’s very beneficial for the clubs because the members are actively coming in to take lessons so they can compete and help their teams win in the League, so it has really been beneficial for everyone involved,” added Weiner. The season culminates every year with the End-of-Season Dinner Banquet, where the ladies from the League gather to celebrate the year in style with a trophy presentation and ceremony. There are prizes raffled off, an awards ceremony and giveaways. “We do a giveaway that everyone gets. Last year, we gave away towels with the League name embroidered on it,” said Weiner. “This year, it will be something else, so every year everyone goes home with something.” This year’s party will be held on Sept. 25 at The North Ritz Club in Syosset, and once again, Weiner and her executive

Members of the 2018 A-1 Division Champions from Bay Terrace Club are awarded their championship trophy board will use the League’s success and notoriety to give back to the community with the proceeds from the League’s fees and the party going towards charity. In the beginning, the League donated to the Adelphi Breast Cancer Hotline, but in recent years, they have donated to the Maurer Foundation, whose mission is to save lives through breast health education that focuses on breast cancer prevention, healthy lifestyle choices, early detection and risk reduction. The Long Island Women’s Inter-Club Tennis League has not only produced a

competitive atmosphere for thousands of tennis players, but has also used that success to give back to the community. With the help of her board, which is made up of 10 other women, Weiner has helped grow the League in her 20 years there, and if that trend continues, the League hopes to be around for another 50. You can learn more about the league by visiting InterClubTennis.net. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by e-mail at BrianC@USPTennis.com.

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Regards to the US Open, Collegiate Tennis Begins

By Lonnie Mitchel t’s US Open time again, the largest economic influx for our city and region every year, bringing tens of thousands of tennis fans to the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. However, us collegiate tennis coaches who want to go to Flushing Meadows to see some of these world-class players … we simply cannot get there. We are beginning our seasons with training camps and tennis matches, traveling across our respective regions, coaching our players to victory or consoling them after a difficult loss. The tennis culture has branches that go beyond the US Open, and it’s all happening while you are at Arthur Ashe Stadium or watching endless coverage of matches, from morning to midnight streaming live or on television. Recently, while on a recruiting trip, I

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had the opportunity to see John McEnroe talk to some aspiring talent with just weeks to go prior to the US Open. What a treat to hear one of the greats of our game give his perspective on the state of the game. My generation watched John in his prime as a court master and saw how he did things that an overwhelming number of the tennisplaying population can only dream about. The one thing that jumped out at me during his seminar and open Q&A session, he said to an audience of high school youngsters: “If you are considering turning professional ...” and on he went with his monologue. So now I am going back to college in just a few weeks, and waiting for me are highly-talented tennis players who are using tennis to enhance their collegiate education and experience who have all trained very hard to get there. I am a fan of yours John McEnroe, but you and many of the top and former playing professionals are living and have lived a

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

charmed life reserved only for the best of the best. Encouraging young high school tennis players to turn professional may not be the prudent thing to do. I will soon be immersed in a training camp, prepping players who, for the most part, have trained most of their young lives to be tennis competitors and consider it a privilege to have the opportunity to participate collegiately. These players have trained and prepared for this moment. We will not be at the US Open, and we will have to settle and satisfy our US Open tennis craving by having to watch the events in Flushing Meadows unfold on television. However, you can be sure that when the smoke clears, endless tennis-playing aspiring high school competitors mist know their decision to play and compete at the collegiate level is a great one. The decision to play professionally is a whole another dimension that for the tennis professionals who toil in their craft just to try and qualify for a main draw,


while traveling across multiple time zones and draining their wallets in the process. Training costs money, as well as expenses related to airline tickets, hotels, food and transportation just add to your debt beyond comprehension. There is no guarantee that you can earn any significant prize money and for the 99 percent of these professionals, their careers are short and without a college education, you might be destined for fewer choices in life. What kind of coach am I not to encourage those who I meet to not consider a playing career on the professional tour? I hope a very smart one! I would encourage young high school players to spend their time on the courts and on their academics ensuring a college career. Do not worry about scoring the highest UTR possible. A 9, 10, 11, 12 or better UTR is just a number. In the grand scheme of things, a UTR one point differential will not matter. At the end of the day, the world will judge you on the skills acquired as part of your education, and I can tell you that

the UTR number will not be on your graduate school application or inquired about on your job interview. It is also improbable that the number you played in your collegiate lineup won’t be a factor or your USTA ranking. My advice is become the best tennis player you can, but keep reality in check, make sure you are well-rounded and the doors opening will be more vast in the opportunities presented to you. I will be heading to Budapest, Hungary shortly to coach four nationallyranked juniors in the European Maccabi Games, competing against top-flighted juniors from all over Europe. As their head coach, I will hope that they can win some medals to take back to the States. You can be sure though we will be discussing their career aspirations, and I hope to send them back to their respective part of the country, having been exposed to some European culture and become more marketable when they are applying for colleges and preparing for life. That is the main goal for me as their head coach.

No, I won’t be a spectator at Flushing Meadows this year at the US Open, although I wish I could be there. But our collegiate teams will be preparing for battle, while balancing their education and ambitions. We will though help the viewer ratings and our TV’s will be on for sure. Regards to you from the collegiate tennis courts all over the country. We have work to do! Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Also coached for Team USA in Berlin and Chile in 2015 and Team USA Maccabiah for the Open Division working with Division I players and professionally ranked in the Israel Games in 2017. Was also named “Coach of the Year” in 2015 for State University of NY Athletic Conference. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail LonnieMitchel@yahoo.com.

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That Water Bottle Didn’t Help My Game By Barbara Wyatt ’m grinding it out on the court. My footwork is better, I’m hitting the split-steps, my coach is helping me with my slice, and I’ve made some cool friends from the team. This is a hard letter to write, but this is how I really feel. After I lost the match yesterday, you yelled at me. You threw a water bottle at me. On court … in front of my friends. The bottle hit me in the chest and water splashed all over the court. It didn’t hurt, but I can still feel it smack against my ribs. I can still see my teammates’ jaws drop. Don’t throw a bottle at me because you don’t like a match score. Don’t rip this let-

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ter up and throw it in my face ‘cause you don’t like what you’re reading. I knew I lost the match. Yeah, I doublefaulted more than the earlier match. But did you notice the extra spin on my serve, especially in the second game? You know, the one I won 40-0? Did you notice my backhand down-the-line shots? I was killin’ it! You only counted my unforced errors. You didn’t see what I was doing right or tried to do right. #CoachToldMeTo. Tennis is not football or pro-wrestling or basketball … you’re not supposed to shout and yell from the sidelines. Sometimes, during a point, all I think about is what my elbow is doing. Or if my right or left foot should be in front. I might be locked in a long powerful rally, then struggle to make a nearly impossible shot.

Don’t groan or yell at me when the ball hits the net or the back curtain. I see it. C’mon. Stay silent during live play. After the point is over, go ahead and cheer and clap for good shots by me and my opponent. Don’t laugh at errors. Don’t call balls in or out. Don’t boo my opponents … it’s only a game! Let me handle any on-court challenges. I don’t need Mom or Dad to rush out to save me. I must learn how to ask for help from the official. If I forget the score or the opponent makes a really bad line call, that’s why the officials are there—to keep the game fair. Support me, win or lose. C’mon—read that again—support me, win or lose. Don’t argue with other parents in the bleachers. Oh yeah, stop bringing D’Angelo to my matches, or at least stop him from running around and yelling during a match. And when I do something right like a great put-away after a long rally, I want to hear a loud and spirited cheer. That’s when I need you the most. At the end of the game, I want to hear five words from you. If you want me to be the absolute best I can be, say: “I love watching you play.” That’s would mean the world to me. Your son, Caleb Barbara Wyatt is a writer, photographer, USTA official, and mobile app developer of iKnowTennis!, the tennis rules app. Her poem, Ode to Tennis, an amusing poem on the joys and frustrations when learning tennis, is available at Amazon. She can be reached by e-mail at BarbaraW@iKnowTennis.com.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2019

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. SEPTEMBER 2019 Friday-Sunday, September 20-22 L1B Point Set Challenge Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 15 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, September 20-22 L1B Ross September Challenger Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail CSidor@Ross.org or call (631) 907-5162. Friday-Sunday, September 20-22 L2 GHRF September Open Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Vasco.D.Antunes@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, September 20-22 L2 Sportime Syosset September Open Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 16 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Saturday-Sunday, September 21-22 Youth Progression L1 Green Ball-Robbie Wagner’s Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Green Level 1 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 16 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail StephenAAlcala@gmail.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, September 27-29 L1 GHRF September Challenger Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Advanced Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 1:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail Vasco.D.Antunes@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849.

Saturday, September 21 Youth Progression Orange Ball L2 Sportime Bethpage Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 2 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 15 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, September 27-29 L1B Challenger at Sportime Syosset Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, September 27-29 L1B World Gym September Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 1416 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail VTAPR@hotmail.com or call or call (631) 751-6100.

Friday-Sunday, September 27-29 L1 RWTT Fall Championships Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Alex.Alcantara@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, September 27-29 L1 Point Set Fall Championships Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

OCTOBER 2019 Friday-Sunday, October 4-6 Eastern Super Six at World Gym (National L4) World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Super 6 Event Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (FICR16) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $134.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail VTAPR@hotmail.com or call (631) 751-6100.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2019

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, October 4-6 L2 Park Ave Fall Open Park Avenue Tennis Club 100 Partridge Lane Huntington, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.10 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Caddy44@aol.com or call (631) 271-1810. Friday-Sunday, October 4-6 L2 Sportime Syosset October Open Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, October 4-6 L2 Bethpage Park Fall Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RBecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Friday-Sunday, October 4-6 Eastern Super Six at Point Set (National L4) Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Super 6 Event Boys’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FICR16) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $134.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 536-2323.

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Saturday-Sunday, October 5-6 Youth Progression L1 Green Ball-Robbie Wagner’s Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Green Level 1 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 30 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail StephenAAlcala@gmail.com or call (516) 759-0505. Saturday, October 5 Youth Progression, Orange Level 2: Long Beach October Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 2 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 29 at 11:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail KLastique@yahoo.com or call (516) 432-6060. Saturday, October 5 Youth Progression Orange L2: Ross School Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 2 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 29 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail CSidor@Ross.org or call (631) 907-5162. Saturday, October 5 Youth Progression L1 Orange Ball Eastern Athletic Clubs-Blue Point 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 1 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 29 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail EACJrTennis@gmail.com or call (631) 363-2882.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2019 • LITennisMag.com

Saturday-Monday, October 12-14 USTA National Level 2 Tournament Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: National Level 2 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FIC-R16) and National Level 2 Boys’ & Girls’ Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $145.63 for one event; $146.12 for two events; additional fees may apply if registered in three or more events (deadline for entries is Thursday, Sept. 19 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RWagner968@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, October 18-20 L3 RWTT October UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 1218 (RR) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player For more information, e-mail RWagner968@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Saturday-Sunday, October 19-20 Youth Progression Green Ball L1 Sportime Bethpage Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Green Level 1 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, October 25-27 L2 GHRF October Open Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail Strong28@msn.com or call (516) 676-9849.


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