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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


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Nothing Like a Late Summer Grand Slam Catching the excitement of the U.S. Open By Luke Jensen Hey tennis stars … the summer of 2015 is flying by, and I am still trying to figure out who is leading the points race in the U.S. Open Series! Ahhh, the U.S. Open: The big, bad boy on the Grand Slam block. The Aussie is the “Happy Slam.” The French Open is the “Fashion Slam” and Wimbledon is the “Traditional Slam.” Now, as the summer begins to fade away and back to school ads seem to be everywhere, the massive 22,000seat Arthur Ashe Stadium will greet players and fans with a brand new look for 2015. Towering like a massive military top secret project, the retractable roof structure will be ready to give poor Aaron Krickstein a break from the 1991 Jimmy Connors defeat in the 2016 U.S. Open. This will be the last U.S. Open rain delay to replay the Krickstein-Connors thriller! The U.S. Open is the bad boy on the block because the conditions will test even the mentally tough pros. Traffic from the city can be hectic and the noise from nearby planes and trains tell you this is NOT a quiet country club. Then, while you are in a heated match, the smell of burgers and hot dogs from the food court will make you woozy!!! But give me New York City! Give me the crowds and the passion of a rrrrrrroar on a winner to break serve. Let me high five the fans in the front rows and throw wristbands and hit balls into the top rows to get the American crowd fired up! I wish you all could experience exactly what the U.S. Open is! The Open was my kind of animal. It is a beast of intimidation and feasts on the weakest of players. From the outside courts, the presence of that massive star of Arthur Ashe Stadium is always present.

From the first ball to the last ball hit of the tournament, the U.S. Open is intensity personified! Now I have played on all of the courts since 1983, but my all-time favorite is the Grandstand. This will be the very last year for the court before it is torn down for a brand new show court. At some point this year, I will sneak down and kiss the net and say goodbye. My brother Murphy and I had some amazing moments on the Grandstand court that I will always treasure. The crowd is literally above you, looking over from Armstrong Stadium. One time while tossing the ball up to serve, there was a guy with some shirt that said “Boston STINKS” on the front. I guess he was a New York Yankees fan, but even after all of these years, I still remember looking up to hit the ball and seeing this guy and saying to myself, “This is NOT Wimbledon!” It is the players’ final shot to capture a real Grand Slam run in 2015 and they know it. It is a

long ride until the Aussie Open in 2016, so picking up a momentous run is on every player’s agenda. Watch for Roger Federer … his game is priceless and if the draw can break open for him, maybe he can win Grand Slam number 18. Don’t forget history and Serena Williams going for Steffi Graf’s record 22 Grand Slam titles and the calendar Grand Slam. Tons of storylines and excitement will unfold at the 2015 U.S. Open … let’s take it all in!!! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. Luke is currently director of tennis at Sea Island Tennis Center in Georgia. He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail lukejensen84@yahoo.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Table Of Contents Pursuit of History By Brian Coleman

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Serena Williams continues her quest for her 22nd Open Era Grand Slam title when the New York area for the final Grand Slam event of 2015. See page 22

Featured Stories 25 2015 U.S. Open Preview The stars of the sport get set to take over the New York area for the final Grand Slam of 2015, as we take a closer look at the men’s and women’s field vying for glory in Flushing Meadows.

42 Grow Tennis New York The 2015 installment of the Long Island Tennis Challenge wrapped up with great tennis action hitting Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y.

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56 2015 Long Island Girls High School Preview A look at Nassau and Suffolk County’s girl’s high school season, culminating with the State Championship.

Features

GROW TENNIS

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MBR Builders Brings Experience and Skill to Indoor Tennis Renovations

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Former ATP Pro and University of Miami Tennis Great Launches Innovative Tennis Instruction Product

38

What Was Is … Mauna Kea Beach Hotel Celebrates Its 50th Anniversary

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Best Lights: Perfecting On-Court LED Lighting

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inPhorm: Setting the Trend in Tennis Apparel

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Body, Mind, Soul & Set!

Featured Columns 1

The Jensen Zone: Nothing Like a Late Summer Grand Slam By Luke Jensen

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How to Become the Alpha Player on the Court By Dr. Tom Ferraro

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Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports


SEP/OCT 2015 Vol 7, No 5

litennis Long Island Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff the U.S. Open takes over

David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com

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Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz

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College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters … The Loophole Known as the “Bathroom Break” By Ricky Becker

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Across Long Island … News and Notes From Across the L.I. Tennis Community

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Long Island’s Country Club Tennis Roundup

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Tennis Injury Prevention: Does Arthritis Mean the End of Your Tennis Playing Days? By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS

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More Than an Athlete: Ten Myths That Need to be Busted By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC

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USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update

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Let Them Eat Cake By Steven Kaplan

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Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller

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Tennis Medicine: ACL Reconstruction By Dr. Eric Price

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Tips From the Tennis Pro: Pair the Grip and Toss for Serve Variety By Lisa Dodson

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Fitness & Nutrition: What Do Athletes Eat for Breakfast? By Irina Belfer-Lehat, RD, CDN

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Tennis Solitude and Perspective By Lonnie Mitchel

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Charitable Initiatives

73

Long Island Tennis Club Directory

74

Long Island Rankings

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015 Tournament Schedule

s Publications Ltd.—Copyright © 2015 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 • brianc@usptennis.com Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Matthew Cohen Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 306 • matt@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Scott Koondel VP of Operations (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Jacob Mishkin Intern

Jessica Haverlin Intern

Alyssa Gorman Intern Trevor Mitchel Intern

Samantha Sklar Intern Sarah Sklar Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

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How to Become the Alpha Player on the Court

By Dr. Tom Ferraro

Learning how to be the alpha wolf on the court will help you win more matches … all you have do is to understand the power of human behavior he term “Alpha” comes from animal research. As an example, in wolf packs, the strongest and largest wolf is the alpha and he is the leader of the pack. All of the rest will act submissively in his presence. The alpha first establishes this position by fighting the other wolves and winning, but when the hierarchy is established, all he needs to do is stare or growl and the other wolves will whimper, back off and walk away. The establishment of power and rank is typical of almost all species and has an evolutionary purpose. It would cause far too much blood, injury and loss of life if the challenger fought for dominance every day. So over the millennium, nearly every animal group has become programmed to understand both dominant behaviors and submissive behaviors. That goes

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


for humans as well. Let’s take sports as an example. I recall the first time I met Arnold Palmer, the world’s most loved golfer. He was an old man at that point, but I still recall the power of his gaze. This was a pure alpha athlete. And it was not only me that felt this way. A former patient of mine was a tour player and I asked him if he had ever been intimidated on a golf course. He quickly remarked, “Only one time, the day I played against Palmer. We shook hands on the first tee and I was done for the day.”

Alpha players show confidence, focus and attitude. Meeting Tiger Woods is exactly the same. When he walks into the press room, it’s like a wave of energy comes in with him and everyone gets very quiet and just watches him. This is the power of being an alpha athlete, and this power affects any-

against not only the alpha player, but their reputation and aggressive attitude. The opponent goes into a state of heightened anxiety and heightened passivity. Laymen call this “The Choke.” I call it “The Submission Response.”

one who is playing against them. Tennis players experience the same thing. When facing one of the game’s superstars, the opponent has many challenges, maybe the least of which relates to actual talent differentials. The superstar will walk onto the court with a swagger and a focused attitude. The opponent will become a spectator to this alpha superstar, and almost immediately lose focus, become passive, anxious and weaker. Some of this submissive behavior is a biologically-programmed response that the opponent feels, but cannot put into words, and therefore, they cannot do much about it. When an animal becomes submissive in the face of an alpha, they will back off, lower their head and become weak and act defenseless. This is biology. I think in athletes, it works the same way. When a big name players steps on to the court to play against an unknown player, the unknown player has already lost. The more established player in the group expects to win and expresses his power with a louder voice, firmer handshake and steadier gaze. He will be less chatty and less friendly. All of this takes place on an unconscious level. These types of psychological states occur in every sport, including Muhammad Ali in boxing (“I am the greatest!”), every Yankee to put on the pinstripes (the Yankee mystique) and John McEnroe in tennis (“You cannot be serious?!”) When the opponent faces them, they are playing

What to do The way to get around this submissive behavior is to reciprocally inhibit it by acting the opposite way: 1. Keep your shoulders back after every shot you take 2. Keep your head held up and look directly at your opponent 3. When speaking, do so with a loud and deep voice 4. Give a strong firm handshake at the beginning of the match When you act as though you are the dominant player on the court, it does three things. It convinces you that you’re the dominant one, it inhibits your own fear and it strikes some fear into your opponent as well … all done non-verbally. So remember, shoulders back, steady gaze, firm voice, head up, strong handshake and you will find yourself entering the land of the alpha athlete. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

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MBR Builders

Brings Experience and Skill to Indoor Tennis Renovations

MBR Builders is a nationwide expert in all facets of construction and renovations of metal buildings for the indoor tennis market. With more than 50 years of combined experience of their highly qualified staff, MBR offers a full range of services for your tennis club. Besides being a Certified Butler Builder for new construction and re-roofing systems, MBR Builders also works closely with their clientele to provide easy and cost-efficient ways to lower operating

costs of their existing buildings. With a multitude of high-quality insulation and lighting systems, MBR Builders can match your individual club needs to the perfect energy-efficient system for your facility. MBR’s offers LED lighting systems, such as The Watt Slayer Series, which have been extremely successful in reducing energy consumption, while giving their clientele the light levels they desire. MBR Builders also offers a quality line of

indoor tennis accessories, including custom backdrop curtains and divider nets. Check out MBR’s Web site at MBRBuilders.com to learn more about their services or request a free estimate. MBR’s services include: New construction, re-roofing, interior ceiling systems, lighting systems, curtains and wire work, and tennis accessories. Take that first step to the exceptional tennis facility of your dreams!

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


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The Mardy Fish retirement tour Former top 10 American Mardy Fish announced that the U.S. Open will be his last tournament before he retires. The fan favorite Fish reached a career high ranking of seventh in the world before anxiety issues forced him to take time off. In a July tweet, Fish said, “My schedule this summer will be Atlanta, Cincinnati and I will finish my career at the U.S. Open … #lastride.”

E M I L I E

KAT Z

Kirilenko gives birth Former top 10 player Maria K i r ilenko announced on Twitter that she has a new baby with her husband, Alexei Stepanov. The two married in January of this year. Kirilenko, who has not played since last September, has not yet decided whether to return to the WTA Tour.

HBO airs “7 Days in Hell” tennis mockumentary

Federer opens schools in povertystricken Malawi

(played by Kit Harrington, who portrays Jon Snow on HBO’s “Game of Thrones”). The show featured appearances by real life tennis stars Serena Williams, John McEnroe and Chris Evert.

del Potro not close to returning Juan Martin del Potro has stopped working with his longtime coach, Franco Davin. He appears to be a long way away from returning to the ATP Tour after another left wrist surgery. The 2009 U.S. Open champion has played just two tournaments this year. Davin began coaching del Potro in 2008. “I wanted to tell you that Franco is no longer part of my team,” del Potro wrote on Facebook. “I’m really grateful for the years we’ve worked together, and I wish them the very best. I’m also thankful to their families for their warm support that goes beyond tennis.”

Troubles for Tomic Seventeen-time Grand Slam champion Roger Federer spent some of his summer in Malawi, spending $13.5 million to open 81 schools in the poverty-stricken nation. “I believe every young child should have the opportunity to spend some years in such a center, because early education is the foundation of learning,” Federer said during his visit. 8

HBO recently aired a hilarious “mockumentary” called “7 Days in Hell.” The special reminisced on a fictional 2001 first round Wimbledon matchup between Aaron Williams (played by Andy Samberg of Saturday Night Live fame) and Charles Poole

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Australia’s Ber nard Tomic was in the news a great deal following his loss to eventual champion Novak Djokovic at Wimbledon. He stirred the pot with Tennis Australia, claiming that the federation does not support him and other players properly. He was then arrested at a Miami hotel after throwing


a party in his room. After guards came to the room following a noise complaint, Tomic refused to come out and was subsequently arrested for trespassing and resisting arrest. Tomic later apologized for the incident, saying: “It was definitely my fault. I was asleep on several occasions when they complained at first, but you know, it was just a noise complaint. I’m sorry for the police and the disturbance I caused. I’m just happy I got out and no one got hurt.”

tionship. “We experienced wonderful moments together. I wish her much happiness and success in life and in tennis,” said Dimitrov. “Now I’m concentrated entirely on the game, and I’m sure the results will soon be seen. This is the summer of the new beginning for me.”

Wedding bells for Berdych

Sharapova/Dimitrov end relationship One of the sport’s biggest power couples recently ended their relationship. Top 20 Bulgarian Grigor Dimitrov and five-time Grand Slam champion Maria Sharapova announced that they had amicably ended their rela-

Tweets from the pros

Andy Roddick (@AndyRoddick): @travismathew hat in my coffee! Bam!

Photos recently surfaced from the wedding day of Tomas Berdych and his wife, model Aga Radwanska (@ARadwanska): Getting Ester Satarova. It was reported to be a ready for the U.S. hard court season small gathering, with around 20 family and continued on page 10 friends in attendance.

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court six continued from page 9

Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): Love the latest style from @adidas and @finishlinewomen. These look great in any situation #thedebut Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): I was the chef today. First course, salad with olives! #Wimbledon #RafaNadalAlimentosEspaña

Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): I feel grateful to be able to share time with these amazing kids

Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Thank you to my team, to my #NoleFam and to all the people cheering and supporting me here @Wimbledon. Ideeemoooo!

Venus Williams (@VenusesWilliams): Taking it all in at The Grand Bazaar in Istanbul—the oldest mall in the world. Victoria Azarenka (@Vika7): Last day of being 25

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college tennis spotlight

MYTHBUSTERS The Loophole Known as the “Bathroom Break” By Ricky Becker hat makes tennis a unique sport? You can play it for a lifetime, it tests you technically, physically and mentally. There is also no clock telling you it is physically impossible to make a comeback. There is no coaching during non-team play either. All of these aspects are unique to tennis, but there are a couple of other sports that this applies to as well. What makes tennis the most unique? You are allowed to leave the court in the middle of the match to use the bathroom!

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And it seems like tennis players need to do this more than athletes in any other sport. Go us! Of course, I’m being tongue-in-cheek here, but really ... how did we get to this point? Do racecar drivers go for a “pit stop” when the car is in a pit stop? Have you ever seen an athlete in another sport actually leave the field of play to use a restroom? Why does tennis have a loophole in the rules that allows a player to take a bathroom break when they are really just being used as a cheap, lame and unskilled tactic in an attempt to change the momentum in a match? Over the last 30 years as a sport, ten-

A new school completely customized to each student. Middle & High School | Classes for Credit | TTutoring utoring | Mentoring | Enrichment Discover Fusion Academy – a revolutionar revolutionaryy scho school that meets kids where they are and helps ps them flourish flour through one-to-one cclassrooms, lassrooms, innova tive aapproaches pproaches to learning, innovative and rela tionships tha nce and streng strength. relationships thatt build confidence Join us for an event! Call TTiffany iffany Belferder aatt 516.364.5414 or visit FusionW FusionWoodbury.com/events. oodbury.com/events.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

nis has transformed from people giggling in their living rooms when Jimmy Connors took a bathroom break during the 1983 U.S. Open finals (rumors were he met with a doctor for an injury), to it really just being a commonly used momentum changer in 2015. It’s so commonly used, coaches and parents openly tell their kids in front of other people, “You should have taken a bathroom break to change the momentum of the match.” In the 2015 version of the “Friend at Court” rulebook, it says: “Toilet breaks are allowed when an official determines the need is genuine. They should be taken at set breaks unless there is a true emergency, in which case the break preferably is taken during an odd game changeover, but may be taken immediately.” I take three things from this rule: 1. The person who came up with it was exasperated and had their hands in the air and just didn’t know what to write. 2. The on-court official is supposed to be a body language expert in the art of telling when somebody has to go to the bathroom. 3. You should hold it in, but wait until the end of a set. If you cannot hold it in, just wait until a changeover, but if that makes you too uncomfortable, to heck with it … just leave the court whenever you want.


Really? According to the rule, I can take a bathroom break at match point to ice my opponent? Something is not right about this whole thing. I hate when people complain, but don’t have a solution. So, here is my fail-safe solution to keep bathroom breaks to an absolute minimum. If somebody takes a bathroom break during the match, the other player is only allowed instruction from a coach, player or friend during the duration of the bathroom break. This rule doesn’t say it cannot be done, but it can be enough of a deterrent that somebody might think twice about going. It’s just harsh enough of a penalty that the outcome of the match is still settled on the court, but going to the bathroom to change momentum doesn’t seem like cheating anymore. It also takes the pressure off an official to determine if “the need is genuine.” Some may say that it would be too hard to implement, too radical or nontraditional, but it really wouldn’t. Both players would leave the court and report to the desk if there is no on-court official and the desk would oversee that the non-bathroom attending player is the only one to get coaching. It would also be fun in the pros to micup a coach to hear what is said. If it seems too radical, it’s not. A famous sports radio talk-show host once laughed and hung up on a caller who had the idea of giving home-field advantage the league that wins the Major League Baseball All-Star Game, and sure enough, baseball implemented the rule a year later. For those who think coaching breaks the tennis tradition of no-coaching ... well, so do bathroom breaks! Anything so I don’t have to utter the coaching wisdom to my students “I don’t believe in bathroom breaks!” Ricky Becker is director of tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors year-round at Bethpage State Park and Jericho/Westbury. He can be reached at (516) 605-0420, rbecker06@yahoo.com or visit JuniorTennisConsulting.com. LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Across Long Isla Hewlett’s Arbitman captures 12-and-Under USTA Clay Doubles Title

Jericho’s Shi named to Team USA National Junior Team

Rachel Arbitman of Hewlett, N.Y. partnered with Charlotte Owensby of Boca Raton, Fla. to win the 12-and-Under Doubles Title at the USTA Clay Court Championships in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. The pair came back from a set down to defeat Savannah Broadus (Texas) & Kenadee Semenik (Las Vegas) 4-6, 7-5, 6-1.

The USTA has announced that 15-year-old Brian Shi of Jericho, N.Y will be part of the 2015 USA National Junior Team. He will be joined by top-ranked 16-year-olds Sam Riffice and Oliver Crawford, along with Junior Davis Cup champion Gianni Ross, to headline the eight junior boys selected for the 2015 Team USA National Junior Team.

Bethpage Park trains in the Big Apple Credit photos to Frank Dolan

Players and coaches from Bethpage Park Tennis Center have been going to Pier 40 at Hudson River Park in Manhattan every Tuesday this summer to do Nike Performance Training Sessions. The group works on things such as conditioning and speed.

ITA honors Hofstra Tennis program The Hofstra tennis program received numerous accolades from the International Tennis Association (ITA) following its spring campaign. The women’s team was named an ITA All-Academic Team and six student-athletes earned ITA Scholar-Athlete accolades. The Hofstra men were 14

also named an ITA All-Academic Team, while four student-athletes earned ITA Scholar-Athlete honors. Sarah Bowen, Bianca Derrick, Giulia Leone, Carmen Pestano, Bianca Posa and Ria Shah were named ITA Scholar-Athletes from the Pride Women’s Tennis team. It was Bowen’s third time earning scholar-athlete accolades from the ITA, while Derrick and Pestano earned the distinction for the second consecutive year.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


and

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

Summer camp season winds down Islandwide Tennis summer camps were a huge hit across Long Island this past summer, as tons of kids flocked to various courts and clubs across the Island to enhance their tennis game and spend time with their peers outside of school. Pictured here, campers at Hofstra’s camp show off their copies of Long Island Tennis Magazine (left), while campers at Early Hit Training Center in Glen Head (right) take a break from the action for a photo.

Sportime World Tour punches ticket to London The Sportime World Tour recently made a stop in London for a Wimbledon-themed event. Kids of all ages came out for a day of tennis and games, and had a bloody good time, enjoying the Wimbledon theme from the staffers of Sportime Kings Park.

Point Set takes part in Green Dot League Kids from Point Set Indoor Racquet Club and Carefree Racquet Club recently competed in the 10 & Under Green Dot League. The League featured teams from across Long Island, and helped expose players to friendly competition against players from different areas. Pictured here is the Point Set squad after their match at Carefree Racquet Club in Merrick, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LO N G IS L A N D ’ S C OU N TRY C LUB TENNIS ROUND UP

Sixty-Plus Attend Wine and Play Tennis Night at Engineers

Long Island Tennis Magazine hosted a Wine and Play Tennis Night at Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y., as more than 60 players took to the courts, and others came to watch and enjoy the ambiance. The night began

with activities on four courts with a fifth court reserved for Wilson to demo their new rackets. The second hour brought various games to all the courts. After the on-court action wrapped up, Engineers CC supplied food

and fine wine for all in attendance. Throughout the night, music was performed by the live band, Tooty and the Mother Pluckers, and those both on and off the court sang along and danced.

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LO N G IS L A N D ’ S C OU N TRY C LUB TENNIS ROUND UP

Cold Spring Harbor CC Wraps Up Annual Member-Guest Tennis Social

Cold Spring Harbor Country Club hosted its annual Member-Guest Tennis Social. Those in attendance gathered to enjoy some sun and take part in a tennis tournament with their closest friends. Laura Olsen, in her fifth year as a member of Cold Spring Country Club, had nothing but good things to say about the event. Ever since she joined the Club, she participated in the Member-Guest Tennis Social. What makes her continue to return is the dedication from the Cold Spring CC staff. “A lot of it is Renie [Tournament Director Renie Sokolowski] … she really has great enthusiasm,” said Olsen. “There are a lot of good friends here, I think it’s always topnotch … the courts, the events … and we just always know it will be an amazing banquet/luncheon. Cold Spring CC always goes over the top. We’ve made a lot of great friends since we’ve joined here.” As noted by Olsen, Sokolowski’s enthusiasm was brought to light when she talked about the turnout of the day’s event. Running the member-guest social for 13 years in a row, Renie seems to enjoy it more each year.

“The turnout was amazing,” said Sokolowski. “It’s a full house, which I’m really happy about, and the tournament is being played at a nice level as well [the 3.0-4.0 Level]. Everyone is having a wonderful time. It’s about having your members feeling like they’re at home, and feeling like they are a part of a big com-

munity and a family as far as a country club is concerned.” To end the day, a lunch was planned for the members and guests. With beautiful decorations and an endless selection of both food and drinks, the lunch was an ideal way to cap off a terrific day of friendship and tennis.

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LO N G IS L A N D ’ S C OU N TRY C LUB TENNIS ROUND UP

The Hamlet CC Heats Up the Summer With Tennis and BBQ Night

The Hamlet Country Club opened its gates to members and guests for the Club’s Annual Tennis and BBQ Mixed-Doubles Tournament. Those in attendance enjoyed a nice summer evening and an assortment of food and beverages. While there was a tournament to be played, having a great time, meeting new people, and enjoying the sport of tennis were what the night was all about. The Hamlet Golf & Country Club Tennis Director Bruce Moodnik was pleased with the night’s turnout, as he, along with other Hamlet staffers, have steadily progressed the overall tennis program at the Club over the past three years. “We have a lot of new members this year 18

which is great,” said Moodnik. “We have 40 new families, so there are a lot more tennis players. We have also done a lot of advertising and we did a whole renovation to the tennis area, which has made the area even more beautiful than it was in the past. For the tennis members, we run cardio tennis, tennis zones and have the club championships.” The Hamlet member Rob Smith, who competed in the tournament, reiterated the growing popularity of tennis at the Club. “There are a bunch of new members this year that are only tennis members,” said Smith. “This year, we started a single and doubles league. Each year, tennis seems to grow more and more, and we have more tennis members in the development pro-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

gram than we have had before. With a larger pool of players, we are having more people come out now.” Smith also noted how great the events are for the community. “The social aspect is really good,” said Smith. “It’s nice bringing out all of the new members … you meet everybody so you can set up games as the season goes on.” As the event wrapped up, newfound friends mingled and continued to laugh it up, as burgers, hot dogs and chicken wings were being served. From the happy members to the strides being made to boost the tennis program, it’s safe to say tennis is on the rise at The Hamlet Golf & Country Club. .


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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


BY BRIAN COLEMAN

ot since 1988 has a woman’s player won all four Grand Slams in a calendar year. That year, Steffi Graf dominated the rest of the women’s field, as the 18-year-old won her second career Grand Slam at the Australian Open, and proceeded to rattle off titles at the French Open, Wimbledon and U.S. Open. Twenty-seven years later, 34-year-old Serena Williams has a shot at the Golden Slam. She has already completed her second career “Serena Slam,” winning last year’s U.S. Open and the first three majors of 2015, and a win at this year’s U.S. Open will tie her with the aforementioned Graf for the most Grand Slam titles with 22 in the Open Era. At her age, what Serena has been able to do over the past 10 months is nothing short of remarkable. At any age, the feat would be great, but to be playing at the top of her game in her mid-30s only further demonstrates her dominance over the rest of the sport. The question heading into the final Grand Slam of the season is: Can anyone in the women’s game beat Serena? Many have speculated as to what the difference is in Serena’s game that sets her apart from the rest of the pack. It is not just her power, but the consistency with which she uses power that makes her stand out. No one on the WTA Tour serves with as much speed and accuracy as Serena, making it nearly impossible to break. With the U.S. Open being played on hard-courts, her power becomes even more of a factor. In addition to her sheer power, there might not be anyone on the Tour who plays with as much passion and intensity on every single point than Serena. Her emotions were on full display in the French Open final against Lucie Safarova as she was yelling at herself, and in her Round of 32 match at Wimbledon against Heather Watson, she turned to the crowd to say “Don’t try me” in reference to the British crowd favoring the hometown favorite Watson. For someone who is so dominant, it almost seems that Serena still plays with the same chip on her shoulder that helped propel her and her older sister Venus into stardom more than 15 years ago. It is what keeps her drive at full throttle and still motivates her to be the seemingly unbeatable force that she remains to this day. Sure, there are times where she drops sets and looks to be on the brink of defeat, but at this point in the season, winning two sets out of three against her feels like an impossible assignment. “I was really excited to achieve that ‘Serena Slam,’” said Serena. “It was really important for me to do that. Just holding all four trophies at the same time, two times in one career … I feel okay about

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in pursuit of history continued from page 23

my game. I’m always looking to improve. I’m never too comfortable. That’s when I think you are susceptible to losing.” That is the scary part for opponents. Serena is not yet satisfied and is still hungry for victory even to this day. There doesn’t seem to be a complacent bone in her body,

as her desire for victory and pulling out dominant performances has become her forte. Another trait that separates Serena from her compatriots on the WTA Tour is her ability to hit another gear in the match’s biggest moments, evident in some of her Grand Slam wins. When the lights are on

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the grandest of stages, as they often are for Serena on the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, she shines her brightest. Sixteen years ago, a then 17-year-old Serena captured her first Grand Slam title in Flushing Meadows at the U.S. Open. If she wins this time around, she will tie Graff’s record of 22 career Slams, and only add to her ever-growing and legendary legacy. She is the odds-on favorite to hoist the trophy for the sixth time in her career and win her fifth consecutive major title. “Hopefully, people will be cheering me on to push me over the edge, give me the extra strength needed for this historic moment,” said Serena of playing in front of the U.S. Open audience. “I think, in a way, it also makes things easier for me because I feel like I have nothing to lose. I feel like I can go in there, do the best I can and just hope for the best.” While she may be trying to tame expectations, Serena is undoubtedly the odds-on favorite to extend her reign in Queens once again.

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2015 U.S. Open Preview A Look at the 2015 U.S. Open Men’s and Women’s Draws BY JACOB MISHKIN

n the heels of the final Grand Slam of 2015, the U.S. Open descends upon New York to bring the pageantry and electricity that only the backdrop of NYC can bring. If last year is any indication with the 14th-seeded Marin Cilic defeating the 10th-seeded Kei Nishikori, upsets may be abound, as any player at any time can score a shocker in Flushing Meadows en route to the championship match.

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The Men’s Draw The contenders … Coming off a 2015 Wimbledon Championship, world number one Novak Djokovic had a very lopsided 48-3 record on the year in early August, winning more than 94 percent of the matches he has played this season. His winning percentage so far this year by far eclipses that of world number two Roger Federer (85 percent)

and world number three Andy Murray (87 percent). Djokovic is also 20-1 in Grand Slams this year, a true testament to his consistency at the most pressure-ridden tournaments. If Djokovic manages to win the last Grand Slam of the year at the U.S. Open, he would earn his third Grand Slam title of 2015 and his 10th Grand Slam crown overall. Look for Djokovic to finish off the year the way he started it—strong. The tennis world knows Andy Murray is back. After a disappointing 2014 where Murray made only one semifinal appearance in a Grand Slam at the French Open, Murray has made the finals of the Australian Open and the semifinals

of Wimbledon in 2015. In the semifinals of Wimbledon, Murray played superb tennis, however, ran into a resurgent Roger Federer. There was simply nothing he could have done to beat the Swiss Maestro on that day. The Andy Murray of the past wouldn’t be able to push that loss aside. However, the new Murray, under the guidance of two-time Grand Slam Champion Amélie Mauresmo, has done a great job of transitioning his game

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2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW both on and off the court. After Wimbledon, Andy led Great Britain to a Davis Cup quarterfinal victory over France, with wins over world number 12 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and world number 11 Gilles Simon. Murray followed those wins up by beating world number one Djokovic in the finals of the Rogers Cup. The 2012 U.S. Open Champion has won beneath the bright lights of Arthur Ashe before and Murray will be on a mission to end his remarkable run in 2015 with his first Grand Slam title in two years. Stan Wawrinka possesses unlimited firepower. His forehand is huge, his backhand is colossal, and his serve is untouchable at times. His quarterfinal loss to Richard Gasquet inn early July at Wimbledon was an anomaly, as Stan has played some of his best tennis this year. Wawrinka won the 2015 French Open Championship and has a 16-2 record in Grand Slam events this year. Stan has won a hard court Grand Slam before at the 2014 Australian Open, and will look to use his

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pure strength to put his opponents on edge. Consistency for Stan will be key in hopes of winning the U.S. Open. If Stan is off or going for too many lines, he could exit Flushing Meadows earlier than expected, but if he is playing close to his peak, Stan “The Man” will be a tough man to defeat. The pretenders … Spaniard David Ferrer, ranked seventh in the world, never gives up. He plays every point like it’s his last, he runs for every ball, keeps the rally going, and is always in peak shape. This year, however, has been a struggle for Ferrer. He has had knee and wrist issues, which forced him out of Wimbledon, and he owns losses against world number 59 Marco Baghdatis and world number 66 Pablo Andujar. Though Ferrer has won two hard court tournaments this year, he did not face the likes of Djokovic, Federer, Murray or Wawrinka in any of those ATP events. He did beat world number seven Tomas Berdych and world number five Kei Nishikori, but can he maintain that

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

consistency on a regular basis? It would be great if Ferrer proved his doubters wrong, but the U.S. Open is not the best place to get over injuries. It’s still hard to believe, but Rafael Nadal is currently ranked 10th in the world. In back-toback tournaments in June and July, Nadal suffered a first round loss to world number 75 Alexandr Dolgopolov at the ATP AEGON Championships at The Queen’s Club, and was defeated by world number 81 Dustin Brown in the Round of 64 at Wimbledon. Even though those losses were on grass courts, they were still poor losses for Nadal. Most importantly, Rafa lost to world number 41 Fernando Verdasco and world number 122 Michael Berrer in 2015. Both of those losses were on outdoor hard courts and do not forecast a successful 2015 U.S. Open for the 14-time Grand Slam champion. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, in early August, slipped from the 12thranked player in the world to the 24th-ranked player in the ATP Men’s Singles Rankings. Though he had a nice showing at the 2015 French Open and 2015 Wimbledon, Tsonga has not won any ATP titles this year, and owns a pedestrian match record of 13-8 to date. Tsonga always seems to have bumps and bruises, and just weeks ago, was working through an abdominal injury. Only he knows if he is truly healthy and if he is, Tsonga might turn some heads at the U.S. Open. Tsonga may not be in top-form as we approach the Open, having not played many


2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW tournaments since Wimbledon. While his forehand is one of his strengths, you can attack his backhand for some easy points. He struggles with big serving so he will need to step up his return game to be exploited in Flushing. The sleepers … Vasek Pospisil, the 25-year old Canadian and the 29th-ranked player in the world, is coming off his best results in a Grand Slam. By far, 2015 has been Vasek’s best when it comes to Grand Slam finishes. Pospisil made it to the third round of the Australian Open and advanced to the quarterfinals of Wimbledon. While his 13-13 match record this year is middle of the road, Pospisil’s confidence should be at an all-time high after such strong showings at the Slams. If the Canadian rides his Wimbledon momentum into the U.S. Open, look for him to make a heavy push in Flushing Meadows. Kevin Anderson, the 6’ 8” South African, has played well as of late. The former University of Illinois standout has used his big serve to notch wins over Stan Wawrinka and Gilles Simon en route to the finals at the ATP AEGON Championships. He also made it the Round of 16 at Wimbledon before losing in five sets to eventual champion Novak Djokovic. He had control of his Wimbledon match with Djokovic, and the loss might have been difficult to shake off, but Anderson knows if he plays like that,

he will have a chance to sneak into the latter stages of the U.S. Open. For the 2015 season, Anderson owns a career high 79 percent first serve percentage points won. It is the highest it has been throughout his career, and if Anderson continues to serve near that percentage and keeps hanging with his opponents at the baseline, Anderson might go deep into the second week at the year’s final Slam.

The Women’s Draw The contenders … Who else would be the favorite to win the U.S. Open besides Serena Williams? Serena has been a woman on a mission. She has gone 40-1 on the year and has won 82 percent of her service games. Serena is three for three in Grand Slam events this year and will look to achieve the “Golden Slam” in Flushing Meadows. The 21-time Grand Slam winner will look to get her 22nd title and tie Steffi Graf for

first place on the list of major championships won in the Open Era. Twenty-one-yearold SpanishVenezuelan Garbiñe Muguruza is at the top of her game. She made it to the finals of Wimbledon this year and defeated Angelique Kerber, Caroline Wozniacki and Agnieszka Radwanska before losing to Serena Williams in a tightly contested 4-6, 4-6 defeat. Her run at Wimbledon was her highest finish ever in a Grand Slam and she should take her confidence and young legs with her to Flushing Meadows. Keep your eyes peeled for Muguruza, as she could very well be the future of the WTA tour. After injuries caused Victoria Azarenka to take some time off from tennis, the Belarusian is back. The 19thranked player in the world is not actually the 19th

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2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW best player in the world as her ranking does not do her justice. When healthy, Azarenka is a top three player in the world and one of the few players who can compete with and beat Serena Williams. This year alone, Azarenka lost to Serena three times, yet she split sets in all three of the matches that they have faced off in. Behind Serena, Victoria is the best baseliner on the WTA Tour because of her ability to attack with her forehand and backhand. If Azarenka can get a favorable draw at the Open and avoid a top-seeded player early on, don’t be shocked if you see Azarenka make it to the last day and possibly earn the third Grand Slam title of her career. The pretenders … Though she remains ranked third in the world, Simona Halep’s best tennis seems to be a thing of the past. In two tournaments prior to Wimbledon, Halep has lost to world number 70 Mirjana Lucic-Baroni and world number 43 Kristina Mladenovic. At Wimbledon, she lost to the 106th-ranked Jana Cepelova in the first round. Halep did have hard court

success early in the year, but a coaching change, along with recent poor play, will be difficult to overcome on such a huge stage. It’s no secret that Spaniard Carla Suarez Navarro’s best results have come on clay. The hard courts of the U.S. Open don’t suit her topspinheavy shots and craftiness. Although she is in the top 10 of the world, Navarro has never made a semifinals appearance in any Grand Slam tournament and will have trouble doing so in New York. While Agnieszka Radwanska has been a consistent player on the WTA Tour for years, a Grand Slam title has yet to be in her cards. She has made deep runs into past Grand Slam tournaments, but she has only made one Grand Slam final (2012 Wimbledon). As Radwanska progresses into the deep

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stages of these Grand Slams, her style doesn’t bode well. Radwanska is an extremely consistent player who has touch, footwork, craft and patience, but she has little offensive weapons to defeat the very best. If Radwanska hopes to contend for a Grand Slam, she will need to take more risks and practice being more offensive. Caroline Wozniacki is very similar to Radwanska in that she simply does not have the offensive game to keep her opponents on edge. Similar to that of Radwanska, she has the finesse, speed, smarts and racquet skills, but that alone will not be enough to beat those who have Grand Slam Championships on their resumes. Wozniacki made the finals of the U.S. Open last year, but in 2015, she has shown some inconsistent play at the Grand Slams, as she has failed to advance past the fourth round in all three events. The sleepers … 20-year-old Madison Keys has the chance to make some noise onthe court at this year’s U.S. Open. She has the serve and powerful shotmaking skills to creep into the last few days at Flushing and will undoubtedly cause the boisterous American crowd to root her on every step of the way. Keys advanced to the semifinals of the 2015 Australian Open and should attempt to equal or better that results on a very similar and familiar surface. I can already hear the U.S. Open crowd chanting … “USA, USA, USA!”


2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW In the last seven years, Flavia Pennetta has reached the quarterfinals or better at the U.S. Open five times. With her best result coming in 2013, a semifinal appearance, Pennetta will search for that form once again. For her career, Flavia has gone 24-10 at the U.S. Open, which is her best record in all of the Grand Slam events. Though she is 33-years-old, she brings needed experience to Flushing Meadows. Though she did not have a great Wimbledon showing, she made it to the Round of 16 at this year’s French Open and she defeated Azarenka in March at the hard courts in Miami. She also came out victorious against Maria Sharapova at the hard courts of Indian Wells in March. If she can beat Azarenka and Sharapova on the hard courts, she is definitely someone who deserves attention when the U.S. Open begins.

Americans Headline U.S. Open Junior Championship Field orld number one junior Taylor Fritz, Wimbledon Boys Champion Reilly Opelka, French Open Boys Champion Tommy Paul and reigning ITF World Junior Champion CiCi Bellis (pictured above) headline the Americans entered into the boys and girls singles fields at the 2015 U.S. Open Junior Championships, which will be played Sept. 6-13 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. Top-10 world-ranked juniors Michael Mmoh, a 2015 French Open boys

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semifinalist, and William Blumberg, who reached the boys singles quarterfinals at Wimbledon and the boys doubles final at Roland Garros this year, are also entered into a U.S. Open boys field that included 24 of the Top 25 juniors in the world when the International Tennis Federation released the entry lists last week. Bellis, the breakout star of the 2014 U.S. Open with her upset of Dominika Cibulkova in the first round of the women’s draw, headlines a girls field that includes other top American prospects, such as Katerina Stewart, Sofia Kenin, Usue Arconada and Claire Liu, among others, along with Wimbledon girls champion Sofya Zhuk of Russia, and Australian Open Girls Champion Tereza Mihalikova of Slovakia. Tornado Alicia Black, a 2013 U.S. Open Girls Singles Finalist, is entered into qualifying. The full list of Americans entered into the U.S. Open Junior Championships: Boys–Main Draw Taylor Fritz Michael Mmoh Reilly Opelka William Blumberg Tommy Paul Nathan Ponwith Ulises Blanch Sam Riffice Boys–Qualifying Emil Reinberg

Girls–Main Draw CiCi Bellis Usue Arconada Sofia Kenin Michaela Gordon Raveena Kingsley Francesca Di Lorenzo Ingrid Neel Claire Liu Katerina Stewart Girls–Qualifying Kayla Day Alexandra Sanford Tornado Alicia Black

Locals Loeb and Elbaba Selected for 2015 American Collegiate Invitational he USTA has announced that 2015 NCAA champions Jamie Loeb (pictured left) of the University of North Carolina of Ossining, N.Y., and Ryan Shane of the

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2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW University of Virginia, will lead the group of top American collegiate players selected to play in the second annual American Collegiate Invitational at the 2015 U.S. Open, Sept. 10-12 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. Joining Loeb and also representing the New York area will be Winston Lin, a senior at Columbia from Williamsville, N.Y., and Oyster Bay, N.Y.’s Julia Elbaba, a junior at the University of Virginia. The American Collegiate Invitational, open only to American college players, began last year as a way to spotlight college tennis during the U.S. Open. Eight men and eight women will again play single-elimination singles tournaments Thursday to Saturday during the second week of the U.S. Open, with the winners receiving a wild card into the 2016 U.S. Open, main draw or qualifying, depending on their ranking next summer. “It is important that college tennis continues to be a part of the U.S. Open,” said U.S. Open Tournament Director David Brewer. “We are excited to once again feature a high level of competition between some very talented players with the American Collegiate Invitational.” The men’s field will consist of (italics

indicates that the player is a graduating senior and/or has turned pro/exhausted collegiate eligibility): l Gonzales Austin, a senior from Vanderbilt from Miami, Fla. l Mitchell Frank, a senior at Virginia from Annandale, Va. l Thai-Son Kwiatkowski, a sophomore at Virginia from Charlotte, N.C. l Winston Lin, a senior at Columbia from Williamsville, N.Y. l Mackenzie McDonald, a sophomore at UCLA from Piedmont, Calif. l Quentin Monaghan, a junior at Notre Dame from Chatham, N.J. l Ryan Shane, a junior at Virginia from Falls Church, Va. The women’s field will consist of (italics indicates that the player is a graduating senior and/or has turned pro/exhausted collegiate eligibility): l Robin Anderson, a senior at UCLA from Matawan, N.J. l Brooke Austin, a freshman at Florida from Indianapolis l Julia Elbaba, a junior at Virginia from Oyster Bay, N.Y. l Lauren Herring, a senior at Georgia from Greenville, N.C. l Josie Kuhlman, a freshman at Florida from Ponte Vedra, Fla. l Jamie Loeb, a sophomore at North Car-

olina from Ossining, N.Y. l Maegan Manasse, a sophomore at Cal from Redondo Beach, Calif. In addition to the participants listed, the USTA will issue one men’s and women’s wild card to fill out each field of eight. The fields are comprised of the top two players in the ATP/WTA rankings (as of June 1) and the top five players in the year-end Intercollegiate Tennis Association singles rankings (excluding those selected by pro ranking), including at least two graduating seniors or players who have turned pro/exhausted their collegiate eligibility. The men’s/women’s American Collegiate Invitational champions will receive main draw wild card entries into the 2016 U.S. Open if either is ranked 120th or better by the U.S. Open entry deadline next summer. Otherwise, the winners will receive qualifying wild cards. The champions will also get wild cards into two USTA Pro Circuit events, while each runner-up will get one.

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he USTA has announced that the total purse for the 2015 U.S. Open will increase by $4 million dollars, bringing the total purse for the

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2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW tournament to a record $42.3 million and a 10.5 percent increase over the 2014 U.S. Open. Both the men’s and women’s singles champions will earn $3.3 million, the largest payout in U.S. Open history. Each round of the singles competition will see double-digit percentage increases over last year’s record payouts, with the minimum increase of 10 percent for the champions and up to a 14.4 percent increase in the Round of 32. Both the men’s and women’s doubles champions will earn $570,000, the highest in U.S. Open history, and overall doubles prize money has been increased by 8.4 percent. The U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament will now offer more than $1.7 million in prize money, a 12 percent increase over 2014. In the last three years, US Open main draw prize money has increased by 67 percent. “We continue our commitment to ensure that the U.S. Open offers one of

the most lucrative purses in all of sports,” said USTA Chairman of the Board and President Katrina Adams. “As we have stated, total player

compensation at the U.S. Open will reach $50 million by 2017.” Round-by-round individual prize money for the U.S. Open is as follows:

Singles

Doubles (each team)

Winner: $3,300,000

Winners: $570,000

Runner-Up: $1,600,000

Runners-Up: $275,000

Semifinalist: $805,000

Semifinalist: $133,150

Quarterfinalist: $410,975

Quarterfinalist: $67,675

Round of 16: $213,575

Round of 16: $35,025

Round of 32: $120,200

Round of 32: $21,700

Round of 64: $68,600

Round of 64: $14,200

Round of 128: $39,500

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

Five Reasons to Love the U.S. Open 5. Night tennis

tennis was. I don’t know if I’ve ever felt this good here before.” The magical run by Jimmy Connors at 39-years-old in 1991 included a five-set win over Patrick McEnroe that ended at 1:35 a.m. You never know what to expect at the Open, but it is often worth staying up late to find out.

3. Practice court viewing area

4. Celebrities

Night tennis at the U.S. Open is where fans will create memories for years to come. Late-night tennis has been a tradition at the Open since 1975, when New Zealand’s Onny Parun defeated American great Stan Smith at the West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y. Last year, two top 10 players did battle under the lights, as Kei Nishikori won a four-hour, 19-minute match over Milos Raonic that ended at 2:26 a.m., tying the record for latest finish at the U.S. Open. And who can forget Andre Agassi, at the age of 35, coming back from two sets down to defeat James Blake in five sets in 2005? After the match, Agassi said, “At 1:15 a.m. for 20,000 people to still be here … I wasn’t the winner,

Celebrities, like the rest of us, love tennis. Spotting athletes, actors and musicians in attendance throughout the tournament becomes easy. The U.S. Open has attracted the likes of former U.S. President Bill Clinton (pictured above), Ricky Martin, Eva Longoria, Michael Jordan, Beyonce, Jay-Z, Sean Connery, Ben Stiller and many more to Flushing Meadows. When you are on grounds this year keep your eyes open for your favorite celebrities!

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

A two-story practice gallery debuted at the 2014 U.S. Open. This allowed fans a better view of their favorites stars as they warmed up for matches on the practice courts. What made this area even better is that you could view Courts 4, 5 and 6 from the same spot by simply turning around. The practice courts are always packed with fans looking to catch a glimpse of players or get autographs, but this new viewing area allowed people to be a bit more spread out. Make sure to stop by this new spot at the 2015 U.S. Open. 2. Entertainment

From live music to interactive games and kids tennis sessions, there’s something for everyone at the 2015 U.S. Open. It starts with Arthur Ashe Kids Day on Saturday, Aug. 29, which features games and activities all over the grounds of the National Tennis Center, as well as a stadium show in the afternoon featuring top stars from the worlds of tennis and music. The American Express Fan Experience offers great family fun for all ages throughout the tournament. Kids can take part in youth tennis sessions, while adults can have their swing analyzed by a teaching pro. Fans can


2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW also sit in on interviews with top players on the Fan Court or get an autograph from their favorite stars at the WTA booth. The U.S. Open includes plenty of live music, with performers ranging from solo singers to jazz bands, which can be heard throughout the tournament at the South Plaza and President’s Gate.

Aces and Champions Bar & Grill

1. The stars

Well this one is simple … the best players in the world are in our backyard, here in New York for three weeks (including qualifiers and practice days). Whether you are a fan, casual player or a serious tennis player, you will not want to miss out on your chance to get up close with the best players when they come to town for the biggest and best tennis tournament in the world!

Both are located on the Club level in Arthur Ashe Stadium, between Gates 3 and 4, and are available to Courtside Box seat holders and Luxury Suite guests. You can access both restaurants by using the elevators on the east side of Arthur Ashe Stadium adjacent to the U.S. Open Club. Loge and Promenade Subscription Series ticket holders may purchase passes for the duration of the tournament by calling the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Ticket Office at (718) 760-6363. Reservations are recommended for both Aces and Champions Bar & Grill. Aces features vaulted ceilings, vibrant colors and a casual but elegant wine and sushi bar, combined with superlative seafood offerings, making Aces the ultimate dining experience. You can also enjoy Aces’ flavorful and sumptuous cuisine in your suite with the Aces Platinum Package Series. Open for lunch,

dinner or after the matches. Champions Bar & Grill features a contemporary setting with classic leather and wood accents. Champions Bar & Grill is a modern take on the traditional clubhouse atmosphere. The Grill offers premium steaks, hearty chops, fresh seafood, salads and a wide variety of wines. Join us for fun, delicious menu items and the finest cuts of meat and more. Bring your friends for lunch, dinner or after the matches, and you won’t miss a minute of the action with live matches and other sporting events on Champions’ many TVs. U.S. Open Club

The U.S. Open Club is located on the ground floor of Arthur Ashe Stadium. The U.S. Open Club is available to all Subscription Series ticket holders for the duration of the tournament for a nominal entrance fee, and is included

2015 U.S. Open Restaurant Guide long with the best tennis and entertainment in the world, the U.S. Open offers premium-dining experiences—from Mojito, a Cubaninspired restaurant and bar, to Champions Bar & Grill, a classic American steakhouse. Whether you are in the mood for a light snack, lunch, dinner, meeting friends for cocktails or satisfying a sweet tooth, restaurants on the grounds of the National Tennis Center can cure any craving. Come experience all that the U.S. Open has to offer.

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW for Silver Loge Box seat holders. The U.S. Open Club, with its striking contemporary décor, is famous for its Chef’s Table and seasonal selections of eclectic American cuisine. Open for lunch, dinner or after the matches. Restaurant passes are required. To purchase passes, call the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Ticket Office at (718) 760-6363.

is available for all ticket holders. Open for lunch, dinner or after the matches, Mojito is located on the ground floor of Arthur Ashe Stadium near the Patio Café.

Perfect Pour” each afternoon with local New York City bartenders judging the best, and awarding winners with VIP tickets to that evening’s match.

Heineken Red Star Café

Rejuvenate by the Fountains

The new Heineken Red Star Café is located next to the South Plaza Fountains. Sitting on the top level of the two-story building, it provides guests a spacious, ideal setting to unwind and keep track of the matches while enjoying the café’s laid-back atmosphere and enhanced menus. The new U.S. Open Collection Store, located on the ground level, will feature a complete assortment of U.S. Open merchandise and mementos alongside a limited selection of Heineken-branded offerings.

Visit the refreshing food destinations by the fountains, including the South Plaza Café, Cuppa Spotta, Carnegie Deli and Ben & Jerry’s. l Oyster Bar is located on the Club Level in Arthur Ashe Stadium and offers fresh oysters, lobster rolls and crab cakes in a unique setting. l Come quench your thirst with a full-service bar that includes premium wine upgrades at Baseline Cocktails. l Sample Mediterranean flavors with wines to match at Wine Bar Food. l Located in the Food Village, the Grey Goose Bar features the Grey Goose Honey Deuce, the U.S. Open signature cocktail, along with Grey Goose specialty cocktails and a full service bar. l Enjoy regional cuisine and specialty items at the U.S. Open Food Village.

Patio Café

Soak up the beautiful surroundings of the U.S. Open grounds at the expanded charming outdoor Patio Café and bar located outside the U.S. Open Club. Enjoy fresh selections of seasonal sandwiches and salads paired with summer specialty cocktails. The Patio Café is available for all ticket holders. Open for lunch, dinner or after the matches.

Heineken House

Mojito Restaurant & Bar

Mojito, a Cuban-inspired restaurant, transports you to a dramatic setting in a tropical oasis reminiscent of 1950s Havana. Experience Mojito’s luscious flavors with Latin specialties and cool cocktails either inside or outdoors in our whimsical outdoor garden. Mojito 34

A trip to the U.S. Open isn’t complete without a stop at the Heineken House, located above the Food Village. You’ll be able to grab a few Heinekens from one of the three bars on-site, relax in cabanas, play games with friends, and even purchase limited edition Heinekenbranded clothing from the Pro Shop. TVs will be set up throughout, so you won’t miss a moment of the action on the courts, while relaxing with a cold beer. You can also compete in the “Heineken

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

Hopefuls Aim for Grand Stage at U.S. Open Ballperson Tryouts BY JACOB MISHKIN

t the four Grand Slam events, fans often forget the preparations that make for a successful tournament. One of these significant provisions is to find ballpersons who are fit to be on the court and make each tennis match run efficiently. In late June, the 2015 U.S. Open Ballperson Tryouts were held at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, and were open to prospective ballpersons 14 years of age and older. To begin the afternoon, optimistic ballpersons patiently stood on line to register and try out for one of the 80 open positions. As registration concluded, candidates rushed through the U.S. Open gates and continued onward to the outer courts to receive further instruction. After everyone arrived, U.S. open staff told them which courts they will be trying out on. On multiple outside courts, candidates were judged on their throwing strength and accuracy, catching skills and overall hand-eye coordination, running abilities, and listening skills. Before the tryouts were underway, hopefuls were smiling and chatting away. Talking with high school student Matthew Hirschfeld from The Ramaz School in the Upper East Side of Manhattan, his excitement for the opportunity to make the “ballperson team” was clear. “I think it will be a remarkable experience, I’d talk about it for the rest of

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my life, and to be so close to some of the sport’s biggest stars. But to also be able to help out at the U.S. Open would be special,” said Hirschfeld. Similar to that of his younger brother, Ben Hirschfeld, a recent graduate of The Ramaz School, also looked forward to the chance to be a 2015 U.S. Open ballperson. “I consider myself to be an athletic guy, so anything involving running, throwing and catching would be fun for me,” said Ben Hirschfeld. “I am also a huge tennis fan and I always watch the U.S. Open, so now to actually be part of it would be really exciting to me.”

The Hirschfeld brothers have experience as ballboys at the semiprofessional level and used their experience at the tryouts to their advantage. Great Neck middle school students Jonathan Robani and Matthew Yezan made their aspirations known. Robani and Yezan mentioned this would be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be up close and personal with the best players in the world. With hundreds competing, there will be some disappointment, but one thing is for sure … those who try out will gain a memorable experience.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW

Kids Comment on the U.S. Open Experience very summer, Long Island Tennis Magazine visits dozens of local tennis camps. This summer during our travels, we asked kids the following question: “If you had a chance to play in the U.S. Open, how would you feel and who would they want to play against?” Here are some of the answers from our local tennis players: l Arianna Arcos (seven-years-old), Sportime Lynbrook: “I would feel really excited and happy to play at the U.S. Open. I would want to play against Serena Williams because she is my favorite player and is the best player in the world.” l Ryan Berg (11-years-old), Sportime Syosset: “I want to play Roger Federer because he has won the most trophies and tournaments, and he’s the best.” l Harrison Bruderman (11-years-old), Nike Tennis Camps: “I would like to play Roger Federer. To play at the U.S. Open would be so cool and I couldn’t imagine it!” l Jackie Bukzin (15-years-old), Bethpage Park Tennis Center: “I would like to play against Novak Djokovic. The U.S. Open is the biggest stadium in the world, and

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COME PLAY TENNIS AT THE HOME OF THE US OPEN

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being from New York, it would be amazing to play there.” Anthony Cacciato (11-years-old), Sportime Kings Park: “I would play Djokovic because I want to prove to him that there are better players than him.” Ryan Dituro (11-years-old), Sportime Kings Park: “I would play Djokovic, and would like to formally challenge Novak to both a tennis match and a thumb war!” Jordan Freeman (15-years-old), Sportime Roslyn: “I would like to play Roger Federer at the U.S. Open, and would feel excited in wanting to learn from him.” Aaron Geula (14-years-old), New York Tennis Academy: “I would want to play Roger Federer because he is the best to ever play the game of tennis. It would be amazing and so fun to play against him at the Open.” Diya Guglani (12-years-old), Hofstra Summer Camps: “I would like to play Caroline Wozniacki, because I love how she goes for every ball, no matter what. I feel like we have the same playing style. It would be a dream come true.” Brandon Jager (12-years-old), Point

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We are open to the public 11 months of the year and feature: • • • • •

Year round Programs for Adults and Juniors 10 and Under Tennis Summer/Seasonal Camps Open/Contract Court Time Corporate Events, Birthday parties, Field Trips, Tours and more • Private Lessons • Cardio Tennis

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For more information call

718.760.6200 or visit ntc.usta.com

l Photo Courtesy of the DIRECTV Airship and Chief Pilot Allan Judd. © 2014 USTA. All rights reserved.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Set: “I would feel really excited because when I grow up, I plan to win a Grand Slam and represent my country. I would want to play against Novak Djokovic because he’s the greatest player of all time “ Michael Jager (13-years-old), Point Set: “I would definitely feel excited to play for my country and represent USA. I would want to play against Roger Federer because he’s the best in the world and I would love the chance to play against him before he retires.” Benjamin Kaplan (10-years-old), Carefree Racquet Club: “I would like to play Roger Federer. I would try to do my best and would be so excited and even ask for a signature.” Cole Kirincich (13-years-old), Sportime Syosset: “I would like to play Novak Djokovic because I know I’m probably not going to beat him, but I would love to have that experience of saying that I played him. I would learn what I did wrong and how he plays, so eventually I can get to the level he is at.” Brian Kornreich (13-years-old), New York Tennis Academy: “I want to play Novak Djokovic, as it would be the biggest challenge because he is number one in the world. It would really be a dream come true to play him at the U.S. Open.” Patrick Maloney (15-years-old), Bethpage Park Tennis Center: “I would play Roger Federer because it would be a good experience to play against the best player ever.” Natalie Obedian (10-years-old), Early Hit Training Center Junior Summer Tennis Camp at Glen Head: “I would like to play Serena Williams at the U.S. Open and I would be so excited … just really happy to play there!” Justin Oresky (13-years-old), Sportime Bethpage): “I would challenge Andre Agassi, and it would


2015 U.S. OPEN PREVIEW feel amazing because he is my favorite player.” l Calista Sha (14-years-old), Sportime Bethpage: “I would play Serena Williams because she is a good player and it would be awesome to play against her. It would feel amazing to play at the U.S. Open.” l Madhul Shah (13-years-old), Carefree Racquet Club: “I would like to play Roger Federer. To play at the Open, I would be nervous, anxious

and super excited all at once.” l Olivia Sinha (six-years-old), Sportime Lynbrook: “I would feel really excited, but would be nervous to play in front of a lot of people. I would want to play against Roger Federer, because he’s really, really good.” l Solomon Sion (12-years-old), Sportime Roslyn: “The player I would like to face at the U.S. Open is Rafael Nadal. I would be super happy to be there, but a bit worried

and confident as well.” l Aaron Vinsky (14-years-old), Sportime Elite: “I would like to play Roger Federer, because he is my idol, and it would feel great to play at the U.S. Open.” l Alex Vinsky (12-years-old), Sportime Elite: “I would like to play Roger Federer because he’s my role model and I look up to him. I would love the opportunity to play at the Open because you must be good.”

2015 US Open Schedule Date

Session

Time

Featured Matches

Monday, August 31

1 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Monday, August 31

2 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Tuesday, September 1

3 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Tuesday, September 1

4 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 1st Round

Wednesday, September 2

5 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round

Wednesday, September 2

6 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round

Thursday, September 3

7 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round

Thursday, September 3

8 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 2nd Round

Friday, September 4

9 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round

Friday, September 4

10 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round

Saturday, September 5

11 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round

Saturday, September 5

12 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s 3rd Round

Sunday, September 6

13 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s Round of 16

Sunday, September 6

14 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s Round of 16

Monday, September 7

15 Day

11:00 a.m.

Men’s/Women’s Round of 16

Monday, September 7

16 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s/Women’s Round of 16

Tuesday, September 8

17 Day

11:00 a.m.

Women’s Quarterfinal/Men’s Quarterfinal

Tuesday, September 8

18 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Women’s Quarterfinal/Men’s Quarterfinal

Wednesday, September 9

19 Day

11:00 a.m.

Women’s Quarterfinals/Men’s Quarterfinal

Wednesday, September 9

20 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Men’s Quarterfinal/TBD

Thursday, September 10

21 Evening

7:00 p.m.

Women’s Semifinals

Friday, September 11

22 Day

12:00 p.m.

Mixed-Doubles Finals/Men’s Semifinals

Saturday, September 12

23 Day

12:00 p.m.

Men’s Doubles Finals/Women’s Finals

Sunday, September 13

24 Day

12:00 p.m.

Women’s Doubles Finals/Men’s Finals

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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What Was Is … Mauna Kea Beach Hotel Celebrates Its 50th Anniversary This year marks the 50th anniversary of Mauna Kea Beach Hotel and the celebration of one man’s vision a half-century ahead of its time—a resort both at one with nature and the epitome of luxury. Laurance S. Rockefeller, an environmentalist before environmentalism, envisioned the hotel to be “invisible,” and so it would be. A pair of stepped-back galleries blends seamlessly with the hillside. The blue-tiled lobby opens to the sky and the ocean view carries clear through to the threshold of the porte-cochere. Rooms have broad lanais and door-

Body Mind Soul & Set!

ways facing garden atriums rather than dark corridors. On opening day, Mauna Kea set the standard for luxury in the Islands. Now a $150 million restoration has raised it. True to his vision, today, even baths have been re-mastered for ocean views. Many baths have deep soaking tubs, windowfront showers and separate private lanais. The Beachfront Wing, just barefoot steps to the sand and surf, has its own surprise … a picture window view from the tub through the room to the ocean. Mr. Rockefeller expected to draw out-

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

door-minded people. “What we look for are people who have enough inner resources to enjoy an unorganized environment, to appreciate peace, serenity, beauty and reasonable comfort,” said Mr. Rockefeller. Then, of course, there is the great outdoors, itself—none greater than Mauna Kea’s golden crescent beach on Kauna‘oa Bay. Tennis-loving guests enjoy an equally beautiful ocean vista at the 11-court Seaside Tennis Club. The resort also sports the 18-championship holes of Mauna Kea Course, its third hole arguably the most beautiful in the world. And now, golfers can surf their way around the course on Mauna Kea’s new “Golf Boards”—great fun that saves 30 minutes per round. A timely opportunity: “Fall Into Winter” at Mauna Kea Guests staying Oct. 1-Dec. 18, 2015 will be rewarded with daily breakfast buffet for two at the hotel’s signature Manta Restaurant overlooking the bay. Also included is a onetime resort credit from $300-$1,000 based on room category selected. Credits can be used for dining and activities during the stay. Some restrictions and blackout dates apply. For “Fall into Winter” promotion information and reservations, along with Mauna Kea 50th Anniversary packages, call (866) 977-4589 or visit TimelessMaunaKea.com.


Best Lights: Perfecting On-Court LED Lighting Best Lights has spent the past three years researching and developing its Triangular LED™ 630-watt indirect series. Its design incorporates stable, economical and durable components. Through the use of a proprietary reflector Best Lights is able to produce more light using less wattage and has solved many of the frustrating problems associated with LED luminaries. By introducing its Triangular LED™ design, Best Lights gains superior stability and light performance, while protecting the LEDs from bugs and dust collecting on top of them. This design also allows the elimination of the need for lenses, which reduce light output by 20 percent. LEDs create a tremendous amount of heat, and if that heat is not drawn away from the back of the LED board through heatsinks, the LED will lose life and light output. Best Lights’ heatsink system and active air design allow superior performance protecting the LEDs from overheating, allowing them to operate well below the maximum temperature rating, which in turn, allows the LED to produce more light and last longer. Manufacturing indirect lights over 21 years, Best Lights has perfected its reflectors. They magnify and reflect the light out of the luminaire at the correct angles with the intensity to reflect off the ceiling, eliminating

hot spots or hot lines seen on the ceilings in other designs. The outer housing has a stiffing rib rolled into the side, which strengthens it for durability. The silent dimmable electronic drivers are inside the luminaire. Whether installing new lights or replacing existing lights, installation is simple and easy. Best Lights’ designs utilize the existing wiring and attachment points. Best Lights 630-watt Triangular LED™ Indirect series produces more light than a

brand new 1,000-watt HID lamp in your existing fixtures. When your goal is to reduce energy cost, Best Lights’ luminaire pays for themselves through electricity savings. Having the best-lit facility will generate new members, thus leaving your competitors in the dark. Just another benefit to having Best Lights. For a quote, energy analysis or light layout, contact Best Lights at (800) 545-2928, (248) 588-4980 or visit BestLights.com.

Play Tennis @ Towers Country Club 5 Har-Tru courts, 2 lighted courts for night play USPTA Certified Pro & Assistant Pro on duty PLUS - you get full Country Club membership which includes: use of gym with aerobics, spin & Zumba classes; indoor & outdoor swimming pools; lockers; VIP Restaurant; country club & tennis association social events and entertainment.

All of this for $1750 membership & $75 association dues For information contact the Country Club @ 718.428.5030 ext. 0 27286 Grand Central Parkway, Floral Park, NY 11005

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

39


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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


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JOHN McENROE TENNIS ACADEMY LOCATIONS: Long Island/Syosset - 516/364-2727 | Manhattan/Randall’s Island - 212/427-6150 | Westchester/Lake IsleIsland - 914/777-5151 LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Tennis Magazine

41


GROW TENNIS

Grow Tennis New York Long Island Tennis Challenge Wraps Up at Engineers Country Club Summer’s Second Long Island Tennis Challenge a Sold Out Success The second installment of the 2015 Long Island Tennis Challenge took place July 11th at Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y., where some of the area’s top players took to the Club’s clay courts on a beautiful Saturday afternoon for a day of highly-competitive tennis, great food and prizes, and a chance to be crowned the champions of the Long Island Tennis Challenge. All four divisions, the Men’s Pro, Men’s Amateur, Women’s A and

Women’s B Divisions, were sold out. The morning session of the tournament featured the Men’s Amateur and Women’s B draws, and got the day going with some exciting play. Jonathan Klee & Lionel Goldberg entered the tournament looking to defend their Men’s Amateur title from May. With targets on their back, the two took everybody’s best shot in the pool play, and used their big game experience to advance to the semifinals where they would face Owen Kassimir & Seth Levenberg.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Much like their title run at the first installment of the tournament in May, the team of Klee & Goldberg would win the semis in a tie-breaker, and found themselves back in the finals. They faced a tough task in the title match against the duo of Chris Colesanti & Casey Schnabel. Colesanti & Schnabel looked to be the team to beat, making their way through the pool play unharmed and beating the pair of Matthew Cohen & Trevor Mitchel 5-0 in the semifinals. Like the semifinals, the finals were played in a best-of-eight games format. Colesanti & Schnabel got off to a fast start in the finals against Klee & Goldberg. They broke Goldberg’s serve in the second game, and after consolidating it with a hold, held a commanding 3-0 advantage. But Klee & Goldberg wouldn’t go away, breaking Colesanti in the fifth game to get the match back on serve. Klee would hold his serve, down 3-4, to force the match into a tiebreaker. The tie-break was an exciting one, as both pairs won points on the other’s serve and traded points. At 7-6, Klee & Goldberg broke through. They were able to get Colesanti’s serve back into play, and after a long rally, Goldberg hit a beautiful backhand overhead volley to seal the 5-4(8-6) victory. “We play a lot of tie-breakers,” said Klee.


Chris Colesanti teamed with Casey Schnabel to defeat the pair of Matthew Cohen & Trevor Mitchel 5-0 in the semifinals

Dennis Reisman celebrates winning a point

Adriana Isaza from Elite Tennis Travel was on hand to discuss her company's travel destination offerings

Jay Harris of Sportime presents a clinic prior to the start of the event

Lionel Goldberg & Jonathan Klee captured the Men's Amateur Championship at the second installment of the Long Island Tennis Challenge

Men's Pro Division finalists Mclane Green & Mark Baker with the team of Cameron Daniels & Jay Harris

Roey Heymann sizes up a shot at Engineer's Country Club during the Long Island Tennis Challenge

Women's B Division Champs Jill Friedman & Jody Schwartz of Engineer's Country Club

Women's A Division Champions Jerilyn Jud & Melani Weitz celebrate their victory

“In this match, we were down 0-3, but we just fought and kept fighting back. The big game came when I was serving down 3-4 and held rather easily, Lionel [Goldberg] had a nice volley in one of the points, and it gave us confidence heading into the tie-break.”

While the Men’s Amateur final was an exciting one, the eyes of the spectators weren’t just focused on that match. On Court 4, the Women’s B final saw Engineers’ own Jill Friedman & Jody Schwartz and the duo of Debbie Schmertz and Robin Schreiber meet

in the championship. Friedman & Schwartz hit an array of deep shots and steady volleys to put their opponents on their heels as they took the continued on page 44

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lead 1-0. Friedman & Schwartz were offensively-minded from the initial stages to the closing moments. While the team of Schmertz and Schreiber put up a fight, Friedman & Schwartz were just too tough and came out victorious. “We played our best friends in the final, so we had a good idea of how the other player plays,” said Friedman. “We play at Engineers, so I think we had the home-court advantage going all day.” As the morning shifted to the afternoon, the Men’s Pro and Women’s A competitors took to the courts with the hopes of coming away with a title. The Women’s A Division featured a championship matchup between Susan Bacy & Tony Carlos against Melani Weitz & Jerilyn Jud. Bacy & Carlos advanced to the finals after their semifinal opponents had to withdraw with an injury, while Weitz & Jud had to defeat Jen Leggio & Dawn Hellman to book their spot in the final. Weitz & Jud carried the momentum from their semifinal win into the final and held serve to open up the match. At deuce in the ensuing game, Weitz & Jud secured a huge break point after a long rally to open up a 2-0 advantage. Down a break, Bacy & Carlos turned up their aggressiveness to try and work themselves back into the match. But Weitz & Jud were just too consistent, holding serve in the third game and then nailing down another break point in the fourth to all but seal the deal. A couple of games later, Weitz & Judd closed it out and won the championship. “We were nervous in the first match, very tight,” said Weitz. “We weren’t used to the

different types of balls coming at you in the beginning. Some had pace, some didn’t. But we worked through that and got better with each match.” Weitz & Jud played a lot of doubles together throughout the years, but not as much in recent years. The two quickly got their chemistry back, which helped them throughout the tournament. “We have good chemistry, and we are very comfortable with each other, so there is zero pressure,” said Weitz. “It was a great and beautifully run tournament. Everybody did a great job, everyone was really nice and it was a beautiful day. We really enjoyed ourselves.” With the sun starting to wind down, the Men’s Pro matches were just heating up. The pool play was much tighter than the first installment of the tournament, and the semifinals weren’t determined until the final round-robin contest. Two-time runner up Jay Harris partnered with Wesleyan College’s Cameron Daniels to defeat the team of Mikey Nelson & Elvis Henry in the first semifinal match, setting up a matchup with Mclane Green & Mark Baker, who upset defending champions Corey Seltman & Dimitar Pamukchiyan in the other semifinal. In the beginning, it looked as if Harris & Daniels would be on their way to a title. Harris held serve in the opening game, and after a break, the two found themselves with a 2-0 lead in the best of six-games match. But Green & Baker answered right back with a break point, and proceeded to rattle off the next two games to build a 3-2 advantage and have a chance at serving for the match. Baker proceeded to rip four baseline

winners in that game to seal the deal and capture the championship with a 4-2 victory. The pair was only playing doubles together for the second time, with the other time coming in the first Long Island Tennis Challenge back in May. “Last time we didn’t even make it out of the round-robin stage,” said Green. “I think sometimes you get lucky with the draw, and I think we just played a lot better this time around.” The key to their success all-afternoon long was their ability to not let bad points get to them and staying mentally strong. “We looked at it as if we had nothing to lose,” added Green. “I think once we got in [to the semifinals] we just played freely.” “We stayed solid, we didn’t miss too many shots,” said Baker. “We didn’t let lost points get to us.” Green & Baker played a nearly flawless final four games to clinch the final, and walk away with the $600 prize. While the tournament was the highlight of the day, there was much more than just match play. The tournaments were preceded with a free clinic put on by Sportime pros, who worked with club members and tournament participants on a variety of drills. Lawn games such as cornhole were a big hit on the side lawns, and the fantastic staff at Engineers kept players and spectators fed and hydrated with food and drinks all day long. Thanks to all the sponsors who made this event possible, including Sportime, Elite Tennis Travel, The Connecticut Open, Maui Jim, The Sum Company, Saddlebrook Tennis Resort, John McEnroe Tennis Academy, Taste of Tennis and Celebrity Chef Challenge, and Zensah. A special thanks goes out to the staff at Engineers Country Club for keeping the Long Island Tennis Challenge running smoothly.

Team of Klee & Goldberg Complete Three-Peat at Final Installment of LI Tennis Challenge The Women’s Amateur Division draw at the third installment of the 2015 Long Island Tennis Challenge, held in early August at Engineer’s Country Club, was one of the strongest fields the tournament has seen. It made for a highly competitive and well-bal-

anced tournament. After a morning of intense matches in the Women’s Amateur Division, the duo of Diane Starke & Marie Woitach met the team of Shanice Arthur & Allie Posker in the championship match. Posker & Arthur’s route to the finals was difficult as after the morning of round-robin matches, the two had to get past Carly Dolberg & Kelly Walther in the first-to-four-

games semifinals and got all they could handle. After jumping out to a 3-0 lead, Arthur & Posker saw that lead trimmed to 3-2, as Dolberg & Walther mounted a comeback. In the sixth game, Arthur & Posker won a huge deuce point (no ad scoring was in place) to avoid a tie-breaker and reach the finals with a 4-2 victory. Taking the momentum from that win into the finals, Arthur, who finished in third place

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Women’s Amateur Division winners Allie Potsker & Shanice Arthur pose with their prize buckets after the Long Island Tennis Challenge

Eldad Campbell gets ready to hit a forehand in the Men’s Pro Division semifinals

Men’s Pro Division finalists Jordie Dolberg & Cameron Daniels, and winners Valentine Mihai & Gustavo Loza with their prizes

Three-time Men’s Amateur Division Champions Lionel Goldberg & Jonathan Klee

Sportime’s Jordie Dolberg works with a player during the free clinic prior to the tournament

Lisa Olivieri of Glam Slam Gear was on hand to showcase the company’s product offerings

in the Nassau County Individual Singles Championships as a member of the Jericho High School tennis team last year, held serve easily in the opening game of the championship for a 1-0 lead. They quickly built their advantage to 2-0 by breaking Woitech's serve after Arthur hit a passing shot up the line from the ad court. However, the break did not hold up with Posker serving. With long rallies and great volley winners, Starke & Woitach won the game at love to cut the lead in half and get the match back on serve. In the following game, though, Starke was unable to consolidate the break with a hold, allowing Posker & Arthur to take a 3-1 advantage. The next two games would both see breaks of serve, bringing the score to 4-2 in Arthur and Posker’s favor. With a chance to serve out the match, Posker didn’t waste it, and held serve to bring home the title with a 5-2 win. “I had a great partner, I owe it all to her,” said Posker. “It felt great to win. I had a lot of fun playing today.”

Arthur said the strategy was to just relax and focus on one point at a time. The two hadn’t met prior to the tournament, and had to develop chemistry as they went through the day.

“I didn’t have any nerves going into the championship. I was just trying to have fun,” said Arthur. “We didn’t have any stratcontinued on page 46

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www.catsny.com LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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grow tennis new york continued from page 45 egy in any of the matches, we were just enjoying ourselves.” While a new team was crowned champions in the Women’s Amateur Division, the Men’s Amateur Division felt like déjà vu. The formidable duo of Jon Klee & Lionel Goldberg did it once again as they defeated the team of Todd Selter & Tony Golden by a score of 6-1 to win their third consecutive Long Island Tennis Challenge Men’s Amateur Division title.They played well throughout the day as Goldberg used his powerful ground strokes to set up Klee’s consistent net game. Down 15-40 in the opening game of the Finals, Golden had the chance to give himself and Selter an early lead by holding to begin the match. As usual, Klee & Goldberg failed to accept their relatively slow start. With a passing shot by Goldberg and an overhead by Klee at 4040, the duo broke to take a 1-0 lead. “In that first game, Tony Golden was up 40-15 on his serve and we won that game,” said Goldberg. “It was good momentum for us.” While that first game was a minor struggle, Klee & Goldberg played their best tennis of the day in the finals. Both players decided intensity and aggression would give them the edge needed to come out on top, and as it turned out, it was the right game plan. Simply put, “We hit the shots when we had to make them,” said Klee. “We played aggressive tennis, especially in the finals,” Goldberg added. “I think we were both tired and maybe a little bit more relaxed because of it and we really played our best match in the final,” Goldberg added. Revisiting the final of the Long Island Tennis Challenge in July, Klee mentioned what he and his partner did differently this time around. “In the last tournament final, we came out very slow, we were lobbing, and this time, we decided we were going to come out aggressive and let the chips fall where they may,” said Klee. It was clear that the team of Klee & Goldberg came out with a purpose in 46

pursuit of their third straight championship. Until someone knocks them off, the duo will be the favorites as they look to capture their fourth straight title at the next Long Island Tennis Challenge. For now, it’s a “Klee-peat!” In the afternoon all eyes were on the Men’s Pro Division. As expected, the round-robin play was extremely tightlycontested and competitive as all the teams were vying for spots in semifinals and a chance to compete for the prize money. Both semifinals featured former Long Island Tennis Challenge champions. In the first semifinal, Dimitar Pamukchiyan & Cory Seltman, who won the first installment of this tournament back in May, took on Jordie Dolberg & Cameron Daniels. This match was tough to figure out, as neither team seemed to be able to have success on their own serve early on. The first four games all went to the returning team to bring the score to 2-2. In the following game, Pamukchiyan got his serve back in rhythm, and held at love to go up 3-2. The next three games would also go to the way of the serving side, evening things at 4-4 and forcing the match into a deciding tie-breaker. Just like the rest of the match, the tiebreaker was very closely played and tied through the first 12 points. At 6-6 though, Dolberg & Daniels won the final two points to close it out and reach the finals with a 54(8-6) victory.(Scoring was first team to 5 games) While the other semifinal was close as well, the duo of Gustavo Loza & Valentin Mihai got a late break to beat Elvis Henry & Eldad Campbell 5-3. Henry and Campbell led early 3-1 but Loza and Mihai were able to stay the course and win the final four games of the match to advance. Loza & Mihai got things going in the championship early. The pair broke Daniels’ serve in the opening game, and Loza consolidated that break by holding serve for a 2-0 advantage. Daniels & Dolberg, who have both played in Long Island Tennis Challenge championships but never as partners, weren’t going to go away though. Dolberg held

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Michelle Haddad hits an overhead shot during her semifinal match in the Women’s Amateur Division serve in the next game, and a backhand winner from Daniels in the fourth game gave them the break they needed, evening the match at 2-2. Their momentum didn’t last long, however. After a long rally, Loza ripped a forehand winner in between Daniels & Dolberg to answer right back for the break and a 32 advantage. In the next game, Loza came up with a huge serve at 40-40 (no ad scoring) to hold and take a 4-2 lead. Needing to hold serve to stay in the match, Dolberg came up just short, and after a backhand volley flew into the net, Loza & Mihai were champions. The key moment in the match came in the fifth game, as Loza & Mihai picked up a break point immediately after squandering a 2-0 lead. “It was huge,” said Loza. “Especially when you play these types of short sets with no ad-scoring, it’s very important. Every game really counts. We played a good point. They’re great returners so we knew we had to break them.” Despite both being former players at St. John’s, the two said they haven’t played doubles together that often. “We don’t play that often together. I guess we can count the amount of times we’ve played together on one hand,” said Mihai. “We definitely played better towards the end. We picked up on each other’s vibes and kind of understood where the other is going to go and we got better with that as the matches went on.” “It’s a great tournament,” added Loza. “We appreciate being invited to the event. There was great competition all day long and a lot of good matches. We had a lot of fun.”


TENNIS INJURY PREVENTION

Does Arthritis Mean the End of Your Tennis Playing Days? By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS For older amateur players, tennis is a great excuse to get out of the house for a few hours and do something fun and active with friends or a spouse. However, as many athletes age, the effects of knee pain and stiffness are enough to make them hang up their rackets for good. The primary culprit for this pain and stiffness is arthritis in the joints of the knee. Bracing A well-fitted knee brace is designed to limit the hyperextension of the knee that often occurs in tennis. Hyperextension and overuse injuries can often cause the symptoms of arthritis to become more severe. Braces fall into different categories, depending upon the severity of injury or if the athlete has undergone surgery. Commonly, an “unloader” brace is used for patients with arthritis in the knee. This type of brace is custom fitted for the ath-

lete and unloads stress on a specific part of the knee joint where the arthritis is more severe by pushing the weight towards the less affected side. This can be very effective for an athlete who has pain just on the inside part of the knee and varus alignment (bowlegged). Physical therapy A good physical therapy regimen will strengthen and stretch the proper muscles to minimize the pain as a result of arthritis. The quadricep muscles and the hip flexor muscles play a very important role in the range of motion in the knee joint and are often a large focus of when treating knee arthritis. Second, the physical therapist will help retrain the athlete to utilize better biomechanical movements in the leg. These improved motions place less stress on the knee joints, which reduces and helps prevent further inflammation. Viscosupplementation This treatment is a non-surgical injection of

a lubricating fluid (hyaluronic acid) into the arthritic areas of the knee in an effort to increase range of motion and reduce pain. Hyaluronic acid is a naturally occurring component of the fluid surrounding the joints and is what creates the smooth gliding surface for the joints. As the joints become deteriorated or weakened, the concentration of this fluid becomes less. The result is increased friction between the joints, leading to pain and inflammation of the knee joints. Viscosupplementation can provide six to 12 months of pain relief when effective and is often used as an alternative to surgery. If these injections are effective in reducing pain, they can be repeated every six months. Dr. Charles Ruotolo is a Board-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and the founder of Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with locations in Massapequa, East Meadow and the Bronx, N.Y. For more information, call (855) 321-ORTHO or visit www.totalorthosportsmed.com.

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More Than an Athlete Ten Myths That Need to be Busted By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC Can you remember a time you played effortless tennis? The ball looked as big as a grapefruit, your mind was free of distracting thoughts, your body relaxed, and you seemingly floated from shot to shot. Roger Federer, in his book, Quest for Perfection, described it this way: “At the time … I was in the famous zone. Suddenly, everything was running on automatic. I had the feeling that I couldn’t do anything wrong.” In the previous installment, we unveiled the seven biggest fears that take an athlete out of the zone. They were: Fear of not being good enough, fear of failure, fear of the unknown, fear of being judged, fear of not meeting expectations, fear of success, and fear of injury or re-injury. In this fifth installment of the “More Than an Athlete” series, we will unveil 10 commonly held myths that we hear all the time, but that

“The key point is being able to let go of the previous point and the emotions that go with it and begin the next point in a relaxed, aware and balanced place.” nonetheless are simply not true. The following are the top myths and subsequent myth-busting: 1. Winning is ALL about talent, skills and technique It’s clear these things are important to a good performance. Metaphorically, they can be thought of as the armor a warrior wears. Without them, the warrior would be at an extreme deficit when competing. However, these things are only half of the equation, half the warrior, not the whole warrior. What is crucial is what is behind the armor, the athlete’s spirit, soul, story and inspiration. When an athlete can bring who they are to

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

what they do in competition, magic happens. That combination can unlock the unlimited. It’s the combination of the inside with the outside, not one or the other. 2. Great players do it ALL themselves In individual sports, it’s so common to think that an athlete’s success is 100 percent about them. Certainly, again the athlete is a key component. However, look at many recent Grand Slam winners—from Novak Djokovic, Stan Wawrinka and Serena Williams. They all have a box full of supporters and coaches. Each one is supporting the player in a different way. So if you want to stand taller, you don’t have to reinvent the wheel. Pay tribute to those who have come before you, even meet with them to understand their journey. Then, jump on their shoulders and reach higher! 3. Work harder, succeed more This certainly sounds like a logical equation. Growing up, it was a mantra. Now, I’m not disputing that hard work, resiliency and determination are keys to the success equation. However, there is also a point where you work so hard (grind) that you metaphorically “strip the gears.” Part of work is rest and rebooting the body and mind. This should not be an afterthought. The greatest players build “down-time” into the equation. This allows them to rejuvenate and deposit physical rest and men-


tal recovery into their next performance. Djokovic spoke about how he took time off after his French Open loss to rejuvenate and get his head on right for Wimbledon. We all know he beat Roger Federer at Wimbledon! 4. Great players have NO weakness When looking at the top professional players or even the top seeds in a tournament, it’s easy to put them up on a pedestal and overlook their weaknesses. All players have weaknesses, the great ones are just better at hiding them and playing to their strengths. They know how to amplify their strengths. For example, Pete Sampras wasn’t the best baseliner, but he covered that up with a huge serve. Even when he was pinned to the baseline, he often overplayed his backhand and baited his opponent to hit into the open court. The open court was his lethal running forehand. The key is to understand what game plan provides you the best chance to win, then strategizing, moving, and hitting those shots.

5. Great players show no emotion Yet another myth that couldn’t be further from the truth! The great players do show emotion, however, they are also exceptional at letting it go so it doesn’t impact the next point. The key point is being able to let go of the previous point and the emotions that go with it and begin the next point in a relaxed, aware and balanced place. This will allow you to make the appropriate adjustments and/or adapt to what is happening in the present. This past Wimbledon, Djokovic was livid as he gave up a 6-3 lead in the second set tie-breaker to Federer. After dressing himself down for everyone to see on TV, he recomposed himself and won the next two sets in a straightforward fashion. So remember, it’s not the emotion that’s bad, but what happens after it, does the player let it go? Remember when Andy Murray cried after losing at Wimbledon, he then followed it up with a U.S. Open and Olympic victory! That’s what I call a good cry! 6. Winning is supposed to be easy Nothing is further from the truth! How many

times do you see a junior player walking on the court and expecting an easy match or not respecting their opponent? This puts them at a huge deficit before the competition even begins. They are not in the present but already far into the outcome and future. When the match gets tight or challenges present themselves, they are so surprised that they are not able to manage the adversity and have no resiliency to battle. However, if a competitor walks on the court respecting their opponent, and expects a hard match, when they get to the high pressure points they will not be surprised and just play like any other point. The moral: This game is hard, expect pressure, expect to be challenged, expect to make adjustments and expect that nothing is easy! 7. Seeded players are always better than unseeded players If this was true, there would be no reason to play a tournament. A player’s seed simply shows their body of work in the past, it has nothing to do with what will happen in the continued on page 50

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more than an athlete continued from page 49 present. Matches are won and lost on the court, not on the paper that the seeds are printed on. 8. Great players only focus on their goals This reminds me of my brother Mark’s saying: “Focus on the path, not the peak.” Certainly it’s important to know where you want to go, this piece provides purpose, inspiration and passion. However, once a goal is set, the focus needs to shift from the peak to the path. What are the specific steps that must occur in order to reach the peak? I often think of it like dominoes, in order to knock over the last domino, the one before that must fall. Essentially, it starts with the first domino, and once that falls, momentum is built and it can be easier. Goals are never achieved simultaneously, rather they are a sequence of actions that happen one at a time until the last domino or outcome happens.

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9. If you lose, you weren’t prepared enough Have you ever played in a tight match where you lost a heartbreaker? Certainly, if you didn’t train, then you could have been better prepared. However, assuming you trained hard, slept right, did your mental training and hydrated yourself, the result cannot be blamed on a lack of effort. Remember, winning and losing is not something a player can control. They can only control their effort, adjustments and choices. There is an opponent that has at least 50 percent in the outcome. The key is to enter a match knowing you controlled what you could and then let go and play. 10. Being nervous is bad and shows weakness Another myth that must be busted. Being nervous shows that you are alive, that you care, and that you are entering a competition, not knowing what will happen in the future.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Being nervous is never a problem, it’s how you respond to it. Many junior players enter competitions nervous and then get scared that they are nervous, this then leads to a downward spiral. Nervousness is okay, so acknowledge it, accept it and shift your focus to what you need to do next in the match. Whether you are a player, coach or parent, the above myths need to be busted! They are erroneous thoughts that can weigh you down and hurt your performance. I highly encourage you to reframe and BUST these myths to set the stage so you can play your best, unlock your unlimited, and be more than an athlete! Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach, he works with athletes and teams, focusing on helping athletes gain the mental edge. Rob is author of Tennis Inside the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, email rob@insidethezone.com or visit www.insidethezone.com.


inPhorm Setting the Trend in Tennis Apparel inPhorm is a distinctive international collection of tennis and active wear that has gained an avid following among tennis players and a growing lineup of touring pros since the debut of its tennis collection in 2011. Luxurious fabrics combine with unmatched detail in construction to create comfortable, athletic and elegant garments. Tennis Runway hosts, the Ellison Sisters, have cited inPhorm for its superior standards of fabric, style, function and performance, saying: “Outfits that combine country club and lifestyle dressing into one.” A special partnership with its manufacturer and mill allows inPhorm to design and produce high quality, price-sensitive and sustainable designs. inPhorm fabrics and garments are created under eco-forward guidelines that preserve energy and resources, and lower demands on the environment.

inPhorm recently announced its first sponsorships of young professionals on the circuit: Alexandrovna (Alla) Kudryavtseva of Russia, who reached the third round in women’s doubles at Wimbledon this year and is currently playing on the World Team, has joined with inPhorm. She has won one singles and seven doubles title on the WTA Tour, as well

as two singles and 13 doubles titles on the ITF Tour. Joining Kudryavtseva is American Jacqueline Cako, who has won two singles and seven doubles titles on the ITF Tour. Three other Russian players sponsored by inPhorm are Marina Valeryevna Shamayko, who has been steadily moving up the WTA singles and doubles rankings; young Alina (Margarita) Mikheeva, who is new to the circuit; and Olga Alekseyevna Puchkova, who is also a model and played as a junior for Belarus. On the courts at Wimbledon, Indian Wells or the U.S. Open, inPhorm-sponsored athletes define athleticism and beauty with an eco-conscious pedigree! For more information, contact inPhorm at (214) 688-4026 or e-mail info@susannetaylor.com. To see inPhorm’s latest line of products or to learn more, visit inPhormNYC.com.

Pine Hollow Country Club 2015 Tennis Program

Ricky Becker… Pine Hollow’s Director of Tennis • • • • •

Stanford University grad, started all four years Team MVP, Senior season Won two NCAA Division 1 team titles Awarded an individual chair in Stanford's "Row of Champions" A unique Tennis Pro with a wealth of talent, skill and knowledge • A Long Island native, very familiar with north shore tennis conditions and culture • Directs and manages Pine Hollow’s active Tennis Membership and daily events May through August

www.pinehollowcc.org l 516-922-0300 LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA Eastern Lo Kids’ summer fun

Long Island youngsters had a great time learning to play tennis and meeting new friends at several free USTA LI Region events this summer. Nassau and Suffolk County Kids Days, Nassau County Tennis in the Parks and the Town of Hempstead Summer Recreation Showcase brought hundreds of children to local tennis courts for lessons, games and more. Volunteer LI Region pros gave lessons to newcomers while helping more experienced juniors play matches and more. Nassau County Kids Day, sponsored by the Long Island Region, along with the Inwood Country Club and Inwood Charities Fund Inc., took place at the Inwood Country Club in July, while the Long Island Region Suffolk County Kids Day took place at World Gym Setauket in August. Many children participated in both days of tennis learning, games, contests, food and fun. In addition to the many individuals/families who came out to enjoy tennis and lunch, the following groups participated in the two 52

special days: Lawrence Woodmere Academy, JCC of the Five Towns (Cedarhurst), Alliance Junior Tennis Camp (Roosevelt), AMC Child Care (Roosevelt), Daniel Burgess Tennis Academy Summer Camp (Freeport), Hicksville Community Tennis Association, Sportime Lynbrook, YES Group (Youth Enrichment Services, West Islip), Girls Inc. of Long Island (Deer Park) and the Town of Islip. Assemblyman Todd Kaminsky (Long Beach) joined the fun at Nassau Kids Day. The 8th Annual QuickStart Tennis in the Parks Day took place at seven Nassau County parks in July. This event was sponsored by the Nassau County Department of Parks, Recreation and Museums along with the USTA, USTA Eastern Section, USTA LI Region and the USPTA (United States Professional Tennis Association). Kids ages five-12 enjoyed playing tennis at Cow Meadow Park (Freeport), Eisenhower Park (East Meadow), Nickerson Beach Park (Lido

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Beach), Rev. Arthur Mackey Park (Roosevelt), Wantagh Park, North Woodmere Park and Cantiague Park (Hicksville). In the Town of Hempstead, USTA LI Region pros were on hand at Newbridge Road Park in Bellmore at the Town’s Summer Recreation Showcase. The children enjoyed hitting tennis balls and learning some of the basics of the game with volunteer pros using the USTA’s 10-andUnder Tennis format. The Parks Department offered children an actionpacked afternoon of fun in which they could preview all the exciting summer activities available at Town parks. Kids’ tennis clinics were provided throughout the afternoon to the delight of the participants and their parents. Looking ahead to the fall season, the USTA LI Region will be on hand at several fairs and festivals around town, including the Merrick Festival, Bellmore Family Street Fair and Lido Beach Family Festival by the Sea.


ng Island Region LI Region offers grants One of the many benefits of USTA organizational membership is access to grants and other funding for programs that promote and develop tennis participation. Long Island Regional grants are allocated in the range of $300-$1,000, with special consideration given to those seeking to expand programming to Special and Minority Populations, Parks & Recreation, Community Tennis Associations, Schools/After School, Wheelchair and Senior Tennis. Grant money is available to member organizations who will support and participate

in the Region’s mission to promote and develop the growth of tennis on Long Island. “The Long Island Region is focused on fostering participation in tennis and USTA programs with all of our member organizations,” said Herbert Harris, grants coordinator for the Long Island Region board, a volunteer organization. “Grant proposals should emphasize the following: demonstrate interest in working more closely with the Long Island Regional Board, the Regional Program Coordinator and the LI Tennis Service Representative with tennis

program development; show specific examples of programs that attract new players and/or retain existing players through clinics, leagues, special events and tournaments, and willingness to participate in USTA League Tennis and USTA Junior Team Tennis.” Please visit LongIsland.USTA.com and click on “Grant Application” on the lefthand side of the Home Page for more information and to apply for a Long Island Regional grant or e-mail USTAonLongIsland@gmail.com.

Six LI juniors selected for Camp Eastern

Six high-school-age local teens were chosen to participate in Camp Eastern, a fiveday, four-night sleep-away tennis, education and cultural camp hosted by New York Junior Tennis & Learning (NYJTL) and the USTA Eastern Section. Representing Long Island were Jade Ann Rowe, Puja Sengupta, Ashley Yu, Ana Maria Hernandez, Liam Schmidt and Nicole Rezak. A total of 36 student athletes from each of

the six USTA Eastern regions (Long Island, Western, Northern, Southern NY, Metro and New Jersey), were selected by their regional presidents to take part in this special program in July. The students were housed at Pace University and participated in tennis drills and match play, off-court training, educational workshops and cultural activities. Tennis programming took place at the Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Education at Crotona Park, Riverside Park and the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. In addition to tennis, the participants enjoyed various New York City cultural activities, including visiting a museum, attending a professional sports game, a Broadway show and visiting

the corporate headquarters of one of NYC’s largest organizations. Food, housing and activities were awarded as part of a scholarship granted by USTA Eastern. NYJTL is the largest tennis and education-themed community organization in the United States and offers comprehensive school and community based programs throughout New York City’s five boroughs reaching more than 75,000 youth ages five through 18. Its mission is to develop the character of young people through tennis, emphasizing the ideals and life of Arthur Ashe by: Reaching out to young people who otherwise would not have the opportunity to learn and play tennis; instilling the values of humanitarianism, leadership and academic excellence, and introducing the opportunity to fully develop their tennis skills and competitive potential for a lifetime of enjoyment.

Coming Soon Please join us at some or all of these great upcoming tennis events. For more information on these events or any others, please visit LongIsland.USTA.com. You can also keep current on happenings in the Region by subscribing to the quarterly digital newsletter, “On the Ball: News From LI.”

Just send an e-mail to USTAonLongIsland@gmail.com with the subject line “Newsletter.”

l Saturday, Sept. 26: Merrick Festival l Saturday, Sept. 26: Lido Beach Family Festival by the Sea

September l Saturday, Sept. 19: Bellmore Family Street Fair

October l Saturday, Oct. 17: 10 & Under Orange Ball Junior Tournament Series

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Let Them Eat Cake BY STEVE KAPLAN

hile the 150th best basketball, baseball, football or soccer player in the world is making a generous income, the 150th best tennis player in the world is about breaking even and just making enough money to pay for expenses, forget about being able to afford a home, car and health insurance. Since tennis professionals average just a seven-year career, it’s simply not a great job unless you are in the top five percent of success or you come from a country in which a ranking of 100 makes you a national star. You will likely retire from tennis with little money or formal education. Your job opportunities will be limited by your ability to be a successful “Tennis Entrepreneur.” We have great educational opportunities in this country. It’s so good that tennis players from around the globe are flocking to play tennis at U.S. universities and it’s difficult to imagine why most tennis players risk going “all in” to one day play in a stadium when they can use tennis to facilitate their education and buy the stadium.

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Roger Federer might be able to purchase a stadium or two with $56 million in total earnings last year, with more of that money coming from endorsements than from prize money. The stars earn very well on the men’s side and women tennis players hold seven of the top 10 spots as the highest paid female athletes in the world. The really big money goes to the one percent on the pro tour and the case can be made that the top stars are the reason why most fans watch. Perhaps the top players get paid what they deserve (as many of them are quick to say when the subject of greater prize money equality is discussed), and clearly, the USTA understands star value as the grand prize for singles this year at the U.S. Open is $3.3 million. The 64 first round losers at this year’s U.S. Open will split just $2.5 million and $39,500 will be split for the

Round of 128. I’m not going to address prize money fairness here however. Instead, let’s discuss expediency and the idea that U.S. professional tennis needs to be supported from the bottom up to give domestic players a chance to thrive. Prize money inequity is just not going to help grow the game. Economists might explain this by saying that prize money at the top has diminishing marginal utility. Simply stated, the stars will play the U.S. Open if the grand prize is $1 million or $3 million, but several million dollars more in the qualifiers will help support many players’ expenses to give the tour a shot for a long time. The great tennis boom of the 1970s resulted, in part, from macro social trends, notably the women’s movement. Half of the population were free to pursue athletics and sports with

less sexist stigma and many choose tennis, because of brave pioneers like Billie Jean King. Maybe it’s time for another revolution at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center with the bold move to grow the sport by reducing money at the top to keep the top players hungrier and giving it to lower ranked players so they are less hungry (literally). Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. He may be reached by email at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

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2015 Long Island Girls High School Preview ith the summer winding down and the start of school on the horizon, the high school girls tennis season will get underway. The girls of Nassau and Suffolk Country are ready to get back onto the courts in hopes of having a successful year. Last season saw girls from Long Island dominate the New York tennis landscape statewide, with a strong showing at the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) State Championship. Both the singles state champion, Ester Chikvashvili from Half Hollow Hills East, and doubles champs, Celeste Matute & Courtney Kowalsky from Oyster Bay, came from Long Island and represented both counties. In Nassau County team play, Manhasset captured the Nassau Conference I title, Friends Academy won the Conference II title and Glen Cove took home the Conference III championship. William Floyd upended Half Hollow Hills East for the Suffolk County championship.

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Nassau County The layout of the Nassau County girls season will be a little different this season compared to years past, as a new playoff format 56

will be introduced. Similar to how Suffolk County crowns its champion, Nassau will have a tournament at the end of the regular season, with teams from all three Conferences combined to determine the Nassau County Champion.

Nassau County players to watch l l l l l l l

Amanda Foo, Manhasset High School Alex Koniaev, Locust Valley High School Courtney Kowalsky, Oyster Bay High School Ashley Lessen, The Wheatley School Celeste Matute, Oyster Bay High School Emma Rosenberg, Port Washington High School Morgan Wilkins, Friends Academy

Nassau County teams to watch Manhasset The Manhasset Indians won its first conference title in 25 years last fall, defeating Roslyn to win the program’s first championship since 1988. The Indians posted a record of 15-1, and with top players such as Amanda Foo and Madeline Clinton returning this season, Manhasset is one of the favorites to compete for the Nassau County Championship.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


2015 Long Island Girls High School Preview Roslyn The Roslyn Bulldogs will be motivated this season, following its loss to Manhasset in the Conference I Championship last season. Despite the loss of Melissa Fuchs, Roslyn’s young core should be ready to answer the bell this season. Look for Roslyn to be a factor in the jam-packed Conference I this season.

l Saturday-Sunday, October 17-18—Nassau County Individual Tournament at Eisenhower Park l Monday-Sunday, October 19-25—Nassau County Individual Tournament Rain Dates (as needed) l Friday-Monday, October 30-November 2—NYSPHSAA State Tournament

Port Washington Port Washington is looking to take the next step from a season that saw it reach the county semifinals before losing to Roslyn. The Vikings will see key players such as Emma Rosenberg and Brittany Polevikov return, and will look to be among the top of the food chain in Conference I.

Suffolk County

Friends Academy The Quakers of Friends Academy captured the Conference II-A championship last year, defeating Great Neck South. The win was huge for the program, and it will look to build on that this fall. Friends returns singles players Morgan Wilkins, and Calista Cha, and Marina Hilbert, who played doubles. With a strong team returning, Friends Academy moves up to Conference I this season. Glen Cove Glen Cove enjoyed a fantastic run to the Conference III finals last season. After a 9-3 record, the Knights upended Plainedge and undefeated East Meadow, before beating undefeated Calhoun for the Conference Title. The Knights return top singles players Trinity Chow and Lauren Rizzo, and with the new playoff format, will have a chance at dethroning the best that Conference I has to offer.

Nassau County key dates

l Tuesday, September 8—First Match of Season l Wednesday, October 14—Seeding Meeting

Suffolk County players to watch l l l l l l

Jacqueline Bukzin, Eastport-South Manor High School Stephanie Chikvashvili, Half Hollow Hills East High School Alexa Goetz, Harborfields High School Denise Lai, Ward Melville High School Courtney Provan, Half Hollow Hills West High School Emily Shutman, Huntington High School

Suffolk County teams to watch William Floyd High School The defending Suffolk County Champions will look to repeat this season, but will do so without some key players from a year ago. The Colonials snapped Hills East’s 69-match winning streak in the county final, and despite some losses, Floyd returns key players such as Lisa Lin, and Brooke and Emily Fernandez. Half Hollow Hills West High School Half Hollow Hills West High School reached the Suffolk County Quarterfinals last season, anchored by Suffolk County Individual Champion Courtney Provan. As a sophomore, Provan competed at the State Championships and will look to build on her success in her junior campaign. Also returning for Hills West will be Dana Han, who reached the State Championships in doubles. All-

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2015 Long Island Girls High School Preview League players Anjali Maheshwari, Jessica Lustig, McKenzie Udell, Mina Sarcevic and Olivia Nakhjavan will all be back as well to add depth to a strong Hills West lineup. Eastport-South Manor High School Eastport-South Manor had a down season a year ago, finishing at the bottom of the League VIII standings, but could be a sleeper team to watch out for this fall. Led by All-State player Jacqueline Bukzin and All-Division player Cassie Rivera, this could be the year the Sharks of Eastport-South Manor break through. Ward Melville High School Ward Melville enjoyed a fantastic season a year ago, going a perfect 12-0 in the regular season before falling to eventual champions William Floyd in the semifinals, the squad’s only defeat on the season. The Patriots return a chunk of its roster from a year ago, including Keren Collins, Megan Falvey, Denise Lai and Emily Winston, and will look to go even further in the county tournament this time around. Islip High School Islip High School was one of the better teams in Suffolk County last season, but ran into a tough Commack team in the County

Tournament. The Buccaneers went 14-2 overall on the year, and will look to repeat as League III regular season champions. Ashley Mannetta, Caroline Darcy and Nicole Arey, three All-County players from 2014, will be back for Islip this fall and will look to use their experience and talent to build on last year’s success.

Suffolk County key dates l l l l l l l l l

Tuesday, October 13—Division I (Finals) at Smithtown East Tuesday, October 13—Division II (Finals) at East Islip Tuesday, October 13—Division III (Finals) at Patchogue-Medford Tuesday, October 13—Division IV (Finals) at William Floyd High School Friday, October 16—Suffolk County Team Playoff Tournament Begins Saturday, October 17—Section Individual Championships (Rounds 1 & 2 at William Floyd) Monday, October 19—Section Individual Championships (Semifinals & Finals at William Floyd) Saturday, October 24—Suffolk County Team Championship Friday-Monday, October 30-November 2—NYSPHSAA State Tournament

   

   



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Body, Mind, Soul & Set! At PRACTICE, the philosophy is simple and honest … everyone can live a vibrant, balanced and healthy life. PRACTICE speaks to the truth that all are a work in progress–body, mind and soul. In today’s world, fitness extends beyond the physical training needed for tennis or one’s sport. Headlines highlight top athletes’ inclusion of yoga, Pilates and other mind-body disciplines to rehab and avoid injuries, better condition the body and improve mental focus and awareness, thus creating a new reality called “Inner Fitness.” Located in Roslyn, N.Y., PRACTICE offers a constellation of practices and master practitioners who are dedicated to your athletic performance and personal evolution in body, mind and soul. Services include yoga, Pilates, meditation, mindfulness, Reiki & energy healing, massage, nutrition, integrated wellness consultations, acupuncture, and correc-

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B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

nother USTA season is coming to an end. Some playoff matches have concluded and others are still being scheduled at the time this article went to print. I am going to save the list of winners for the next issue so it will be complete. I am going to, instead, release some feelings from this past season and share an e-mail sent to me a little over a year ago. The person mentioned in the email below is a great guy named Joe who worked for me quite a few years ago, and it was sent to me by a very special tennis player who is a nurse and works with cancer patients. Does the article sound depressing? The e-mail is at the end of this article, and I find it inspiring and full of bravery and having life in perspective. What I am about to write before the e-mail, that’s the depressing part! This past season was one story after another, on a daily basis, of just how nasty and manipulative people were being. I was witness to some of it, and for the life of me,

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I just don’t get it. These are adults who get to spend their free time with friends and teammates playing tennis. Yes, it is competitive, but it is also supposed to be fun and enjoyable. There was the usual, stalling, bad line calls, the new complaint of cellphone abuse, etc. All of these annoying things are the norm, and we will probably never have a season played without them. However, matches lately have gone a little further. We had women arguing, telling the other she was going to shove her racquet up the other women’s behind (I toned it down for the magazine). More than one men’s match almost came to physical blows. I heard accusations of coaching via text messages, questioning calls from outside the court by spectators, total manipulation in trying to not let opponents know when playoff matches would be until the last possible second (I can only assume with the hopes that the opponent would then not be able to get their players). We also had play-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

ers manipulating who they play in playoffs and the teams that just miss making playoffs doing all they can to find a way in. There were the usual inconsiderate, thoughtless teams, where once they are out of the running to make playoffs, they just forfeit courts like it was no big deal. Does it ever occur to them that the other team was looking forward to playing? Did they ever think that the facility was holding that court time for weeks, even months, for them or that their opponent was trying to get players qualified to be able to compete in the championships and you now took that away from them? For some, it really has very little to do with competing fairly, and very little to do with sportsmanship and dignity. It became all about advancing to the championships at any cost. There was a new player who joined the league this year and was looking forward to meeting new people to play tennis with. She was shocked when she arrived for her first match and her captain stood in the


vestibule of the hosting club, telling her, “You can be friendly after the match if you want, until then, they are the enemy and you’re here to kill them.� Really? That’s laying the groundwork for a real nice match! There is a positive flipside to this, and I don’t want to ignore that. I watched a playoff match where a doubles court had a great close match, with all four women hugging at the end. Two singles players who met for the first time, had a great match and came off the court to sign up for a team doubles league together. I have read e-mails between two opposing captains setting up their playoff match and teasing each other about the refreshments. I see pictures on Facebook where teams are socializing after the match with their opponents. Lastly, a very touching story from this season. In a 55 & Over match, a player suffered an aneurysm during the warm-up. The opposing captain was on the phone with me the first thing the next morning asking for any and all updates. There much concern on his and his players part. I was included on the many e-mails to this player from his teammates which were filled with encouragement and love. These are the stories, and these stories alone that I wish represented this league, but there is another side that casts such a shadow over the good. I really wish those who cast that dark shadow would recognize just what they are doing and the impact it has. So, here is my confusion and my questions: Do people want this league to con-

tinue? Do you think people are going to continue playing in the league if their opponent is cheating or manipulating? Is it really necessary to be so nasty to your opponent? Does it feel good to win knowing you won on a bad call, manipulation or just plain and simple bullying? I hear more and more people say: “I don’t need this� and I cannot blame them. The end result, eventually, is going to be no one wanting to continue playing in the league. People’s time is more and more precious, and if they are not enjoying themselves, they will move on to something else. Please consider all of this when playing. You’re healthy enough to be on the court, you are spending your time playing a great sport with a good amount of nice people. How great is that? Don’t lose sight of those facts, and if you do, think of the e-mail below. I have saved it for over a year, and every now and then, re-read it to get things back in perspective. Kathy: I’m so sorry to hear about your dad. I will keep him in my prayers. I was so sad that we lost. We almost won and should have, but I guess it was not meant to be. Regina and I have battled crazy tennis elbow and are lucky to have had the season we had. Our team was awesome and we wanted so badly to advance. We were lucky to have met great people along the way too. I went to bed wiping away tears like a baby and got up and went to work. While I was there, I spent hours talking to Joseph

Sepe, who is not much older than myself. We talked about his cancer which has come back with a vengeance, him being adopted and his recent kidney failure, all while sitting and eating with him over our lunch break. I was joking about “The Life and Times of Joe Sepe.� I told him how sorry I was that his cancer was Stage 4, and how this just should not be. He said “Annmarie, don’t you get it? This is all part of my journey!� I said, “I guess you have to own it!� He said, “Yes, Annmarie, you have to own it and the sooner you do, the easier it is to accept your life and live your journey.� I fought back tears for his bravery and thought how silly I was to be crying over tennis. It’s all part of our journey, and we have to be thankful for whatever we experience along the way, even if we are disappointed. Joe and I hugged and took a picture to send you. We look horrible, but I will carry throughout my life the lessons learned from this man. and what a great day for me and him to chat. I wish everyone could work with dying patients. They would live so differently. Thanks for all of your help this season. The tennis journey will continue and there will never be another complaint about me getting my butt kicked! I will own it! —Annmarie Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

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TENNIS MEDICINE

ACL Reconstruction

By Dr. Eric Price The ACL (Anterior Cruciate Ligament) is a major stabilizing ligament in the knee. A ligament is a dense band of connective tissue, like a rope or cord. The ACL prevents abnormal movement of the thighbone (femur) on the shinbone (tibia). People with ACL tears often complain that their leg “gives out” and feel that they are unable to trust their leg, especially when they pivot, turn or twist. This sensation is called “instability.” Instability can occur during sports and everyday activities. ACL injuries often occur as a result of an abrupt twisting motion during sports or a fall. Often people say they twisted their knee, felt a pop, and then were unable to walk. Many report that the knee quickly became swollen and filled with fluid. 62

To diagnose an ACL tear, a doctor will take a history and perform a physical examination along with X-rays and often an MRI. Certain abnormal movements occur in the knee after an ACL tear and the doctor can feel these movements during the

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

examination. The X-rays show the bones of the knee and the MRI shows the ACL. Treatment options vary from physical therapy, to bracing, to surgery. Options are best discussed with the doctor. Often, people who wish to resume an active lifestyle choose to have surgery. Some patients need to have physical therapy before surgery to improve motion or strength. ACL surgery is called a “reconstructive surgery” which means the torn ACL is removed and a new one is placed. A torn ACL will not heal back together, either on its own or if a doctor stitches the torn ends together. Therefore, in order for ACL function to be restored, a new ACL must be made. It is made with a graft which will serve as a replacement ligament. A graft is a piece of tissue from another part of the body or a cadaver. The graft is surgically placed in the proper location in the knee to function as a new ACL.


Most of the surgery is done through small incisions with small instruments, but some larger incisions are needed to obtain the graft and place it in its new location. During surgery, the torn ends of the ACL are removed and tunnels are drilled in the shinbone and thighbone. These tunnels allow placement of the graft in the proper location to become the new ACL. The graft is held in place with metal or absorbable screws, stitches or both. Over time, the graft ligament heals to the surrounding tissue and functions as a new ACL. Patients usually go home the same day, often with a brace on the leg. Recovery after ACL reconstruction surgery is gradual. Several months of physical therapy will be required for a proper recovery. Activity restrictions will apply after surgery until appropriate rehabilitation goals have been achieved. Eventually, running and sports will be permitted. Dr. Eric Price is a board-certified, fellow-

ship-trained sports medicine specialist with Orlin & Cohen Orthopedic Group. Dr. Price’s expertise includes shoulder arthroscopy for repair of rotator cuff tears, dislocations, knee arthroscopy, in-

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tips from the tennis pro Pair the Grip and Toss for Serve Variety By Lisa Dodson There are four main types of serves in tennis: Flat, Slice, Topspin and Kick. A Slice, Topspin and Kick Serve each have a specific direction of spin. The central focus of every serve is pronating. Pronating simply means that, at contact, the hand naturally moves from an inside to outside position by means of the wrist, forearm and elbow. How and when you pronate, using the correct grip, gives you the ability to hit different serve types and different spins. The grip and the ball toss location need to be compatible for success in hitting all serves. First, you need to know what type of serve you are hitting and have an un-

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derstanding of what you are trying to make the ball do. Typically, players simply toss up a ball and try to hit it (usually hard) or they attempt to hit a specific serve type without the correct grip and corresponding toss. If you are a player who does not hold the grip in the Continental Grip direction or cannot place your ball toss, then your first task is to understand how important this is to your serve. Most players do not realize that the serve simply cannot be hit without the correct toss and corresponding ball location. The difficulty is this: The grip directly affects how your arm can move and which part of the ball the strings will strike on the ball. Also, the toss location will either let the strings get there or not. A poor grip can

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

make a good toss fail and a good grip becomes less effective with poor toss location. Why is the grip so important? How you hold the racket sets the angle of the racket face and it either allows your hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder to move naturally or not. Comfortable movement produces an effortless energy flow and keeps us healthy. The joints in your wrist and arm cannot move properly with a “flat” or forehand grip and will only allow you to strike the face of the ball. You cannot hit an effective spin serve of any kind with a forehand grip. The grip creates racket face angle and allows you to strike a specific location on the ball. This is essential to hitting a serve


with spin. A spin serve will always provide variety and a high percentage of serves in. Pictured below are the two primary grips for the serve: The Continental and Eastern Backhand.

grips. Grips with the V to the right of center are not used for the serve. For the Continental Grip, the V is on the first left bevel. For the Eastern Backhand, the knuckle is on the top of the racket. The grips in between these two places are also good for the serve as well. What is so important about ball toss location? Where the ball is located in relationship to your head and your hitting shoulder is critical for natural and comfortable movement of the arm and the driving force of the body. Good ball toss location will let your racket face access the part of the ball you want to strike and let your arm and racket drive for power and spin. Let’s match the grip with the ball toss location in the pictures to the right:

Continental Backhand

Eastern Backhand

Notice that the grip placement shows the “V” of the hand (between thumb and forefinger) is to the left of center for both

Flat Serve l Toss: Notice for the Flat Serve, the ball toss is forward (into the court) and to the right. The Flat Serve contact will be somewhere between the head and the hitting shoulder.

l Grip: The Continental Grip is recommended. Hitting up and letting the forearm, wrist and hand pronate will allow a flat hit to occur. Remember that every ball has some spin and will not be completely flat. An Eastern Forehand Grip can be used, but is not shown or recommended. continued on page 66

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tips from the tennis pro continued from page 65 Slice Toss

This creates a spin that rotates diagonally forward, causing the ball to curve from right to left (righty) and left to right (lefty). Flat and Slice Tosses travel straight up and down with no spin or arc. Kick Toss

l Toss: The Slice Toss is also into the court, but is slightly further to the right than the Flat Toss. It will land approximately the same distance inside the baseline as the Flat Serve. This will differ depending upon personal preference and the amount of spin being hit. l Grip: The Continental Grip is a must. For more spin, modify closer to the Eastern Backhand. Using the toss and grip correctly will allow the edge to travel to the ball before the hand pronates. Typically, you’ll be instructed to hit up to 1:00 or 2:00 on the ball, with the leading edge of the racket.

l Toss: The Kick Toss contact location is over the head. If you were to let your toss hit the ground, it would land in a place behind your left and right heels. The ball is placed here so that you can drive straight up with your body and front racket edge. l Grip: The Eastern Backhand is a must. The racket edge traveling straight up

the ball creates a left to right movement of the strings across the ball giving the ball a diagonal/forward spin. Thinking in terms of a clock face, your racket will start at 7:00 and sweep to 1:00. On this serve, you must swing very hard and skim up the ball to achieve maximum spin. The ball travels high over the net and bounces to the right for the righty and to the left for the lefty. It bounces the opposite direction of the slice. A big misconception Many players think that all serve types can be hit from the same toss. While some of the top players can do this, it is not recommended or even possible for the rest of us. The serve can be a complicated stroke, and there is much more involved than what is covered in this piece. If you remember that the most important action in the serve is the act of pronating, then the grip and toss combination will become your best friend. The correct grip is essential to pronating. All you have to do is decide the serve you want to hit, choose your grip and put the ball in the path of the moving racket head. You’ll be serving with variety, consistency and accuracy in no time. Lisa Dodson is owner of Servemaster at The Total Serve, a USPTA Elite Pro, a formerly world ranked player and radio show host. She may be reached by e-mail at lisa@thetotalserve.com or visitwww.thetotalserve.com.

A Long Island local, James Christian has a well versed education and has trained under some of the top plastic surgeons of the metropolitan area. James specializes in the latest Dermal fillers, Botulinum toxins, Dermapen and Smart lipo and firmly believes in using Injectables as an art form to regress as well as preventing the aging process. Call/text to set up your FREE consultation 917-860-9003 or visit www.jameschristiancosmetics.com. 66

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


What Do Athletes Eat for Breakfast? By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN Everyone knows that a proper diet can improve your performance and help you recover quickly for your next workout. However, not everyone has the time to always do the right thing. A number of athletes do at least one thing right when it comes to nutrition: Breakfast! Eating breakfast consistently will make you feel more energized and less tired. So who eats what and what should you eat? According to Shape Magazine, “Venus Williams starts her day with oatmeal, whole wheat toast and freshly-squeezed

orange juice.” Maria Sharapova tells Shape that nutrition and hydration are the keys to staying energized as her favorite breakfast consists of an egg white omelet, some oatmeal, berries and sometimes, a smoothie. A great breakfast should consist of all of the food groups: A serving of a complex carbohydrate, protein, low-fat dairy, a fruit and a vegetable. If it seems like an impossible task, here are some easy tips and ideas: l Half-cup of Irish Steel oatmeal (prepare your oatmeal the night before) l One boiled egg with cucumber l Half-cup of fresh berries l One glass of low-fat milk or kefir

Make a smoothie for the road. The key is to include more than four ingredients: l One cup of almond milk l Half-cup of berries l Half-cup of kale leaves l Half of a banana l One tablespoon of peanut butter l One tablespoon of flax seeds l One tablespoon of chia seeds This smoothie will provide you with the perfect nutrients and ideal energy to start your day.

Irina Belfer-Lehat of Nutrition Solutions PC in Great Neck, N.Y. is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. For more information, call (917) 769-8031, e-mail iriDon’t have time to sit and eat? No problem. nalehat@gmail.com or visit www.irinalehat.com.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Tennis

Solitude and Perspective By Lonnie Mitchel t the time of this writing, we are just weeks away from the start of the U.S. Open and I cannot wait! Like every Grand Slam, I look forward to the countless hours of tennis coverage. This is especially true for the U.S. Open which takes place in our backyard, with no time zone changes and oceans separating us from the action. You can watch tennis 12 hours a day without ever leaving your living room. If you’re a tennis fan, this is nirvana. I thought a lot about this so-called tennis nirvana the last several days. I am writing this on an airplane headed back to New York from Europe after coaching the USA Maccabi team. The international competition took place late July through early August in the city of Berlin, Germany on the 70th anniversary of the ending of World War II and the Holocaust. This was an unbelievable experience for the players and guests who traveled with us. It was also a chaotic encounter in that you are in Germany, a foreign country, shuttling from one venue to another. We practiced in one place, competed in another, with a tournament draw that was not completed until after we arrived. Starting times for all players varied throughout the day, with transportation to and from the hotel not consistent with match timing. If you ever played or went to international tournaments like the U.S. Open, patience is truly a virtue. I was stressed much of the time, making

A

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“I felt like I was at home in the friendly confines of the net, service boxes and baselines.” sure all the players were where they were supposed to be and supporting our combatants in match play. However, something happened to me that really resonated. Once the practices began and the competition began, I was now on a tennis court and all of the stress I was feeling lifted right away. No psychological therapy, but a joy and type of solitude overcame me. I admit, I do not compete much these days as I am too busy coaching, but the joy I was feeling being in a tennis environment settled me down to a blissful state that I always feel when on the court as a player and/or coach. I felt like I was at home in the friendly confines of the net, service boxes and baselines. Whether I was in Germany or upstate New York coaching my squads at the State University of New York/Oneonta, I was on my turf. It is soothing to hear the sounds of a racquet hitting a ball continuously. This rat race is unexplainable. However, I thought about this solitude I was feeling compared to the pandemonium happening

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

around me. For a few short hours, I escaped into my own little tennis world. I then went on to think of the club level players I have met over the years back home on Long Island, when I witnessed firsthand the utter disregard for employees. Pros that work at the club were, at times, treated by members like the hired help at a fast food joint. Having returned from Europe, I also saw members at a variety of tennis clubs and venues treat their tennis professionals as a respected skillful individual, much like a doctor/patient relationship. The professional was a person who would help you get to that solitude I am now writing about. They are the person who can help you to get to a place where you can escape life for a few hours, giving advice from years of experience. I have seen people rant and rave about the slightest things at local clubs in the New York area. Are you so distraught that you have to unleash the fury and frustration of everyday life at those who are trying to help you escape into your own tennis nirvana? If you are not in a place where you are enjoying yourself, you need to take a step back and examine your priorities. Tennis is a game that should give you some level of solitude, peaking right at the end when the only disappointment you feel is when your time on the court is up. The parent of a child/student should never clash with the tennis pro, but should be an important ally to help discover the joys of the game. My belief as to what I think tennis is and what I always hoped it should be for the many customer encounters over the years came to fruition in Europe. Quite


frankly, it was refreshing. This journey to solitude and tennis nirvana takes practice, much like hitting a volley over and over again, or repeating a service motion to reinforce muscle memory. Your brain, when changing behavior, has to go through a cognitive modification that, after much practice, becomes easier. Let’s get it right, you need to come to grips with your tennis or your children’s tennis. While in Germany, I visited some concentration camps where millions perished, and the very next day, I went to the Maccabi tennis matches in Berlin. Back in solitude! I said to myself, “I need to share this moment with my friends, colleagues and readers.” Less than an hour from where my players were competing, 70 years earlier, horrific atrocities took place. That was a wakeup call for sure. A little perspective ... we get to play tennis! Think about how lucky you are to play, have the ability to play and find joy in the game. Too many of us lose sight of what’s important. So back to the U.S. Open, many of you will attend or watch the event on TV, getting the enjoyment from being a viewer that will likely put you in the mood to go out and hit tennis balls. Not me though, I will be in Oneonta, N.Y., getting my collegiate players ready for another season of competition. I will share those experiences I just went through so they have a better understanding of the game and the joy we should all find. I want desperately to be at the U.S. Open as a spectator and watch it on TV, but I won’t have time due to my coaching responsibilities. It’s okay though, there are far greater tragedies in not being with you at the U.S. Open. I will be with joy and solitude on a tennis court elsewhere in Upstate New York with my team reminding myself of what historical atrocities I saw in Germany, and then move forward and practice the joy of a life in the game. Enjoy the U.S. Open and your own game. Find the right meaning and find some solitude. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or email lonniemitchel@yahoo.com. LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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L O N G

I S L A N D

charitabl Youngsters Compete for John McEnroe Tennis Academy Scholarship Opportunity

Young hopefuls from across Long Island converged on Sportime Syosset, the Long Island home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA to try out for a full scholarship to attend JMTA at SPORTIME Syosset for the 2015-2016 season. The day entailed a variety of tryout evaluation sessions, both on and off the court. The tryout was open to players ages six to 16, as the committee evaluated 70

players as they participated in tennis drills, athletic assessments and played in matches. “There are so many good players here, it will be hard to determine who to pick to receive the scholarship,” said Lawrence Kleger, JMTA Director. “I am looking for attitude, effort, character, athletic ability and tennis ability” Another committee member, Mike

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Kossoff, added, “It was a fantastic turnout. I am looking for a kid who is motivated, with the goal to be the best tennis player they can be. Noah Rubin and Jamie Loeb, being in the NCAA finals this year, both came through the Sportime system. To give back to a local Long Island kid and provide them with the opportunity to play tennis brings a smile to my face.”


T E N N I S

M A G A Z I N E ’ S

le initiatives Engineers CC Hosts Successful Holes for Hope Autism Event

Tennis players from the Long Island community gathered at Engineers Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. for the Holes for Hope Tennis Event, which raised money and awareness for autism. The day started with drills, games and skill-based competitions where the par-

ticipants competed for some great prizes. This was followed by a round-robin tournament where the competitors teamed up with different doubles partners from match to match. It was a great way for participants to introduce themselves to new people and

bond over some competitive tennis. Prizes and trophies were awarded to the tournament winners. There were plenty of drinks and snacks provided to participants and guests, and the event was followed by luncheon served by the Engineers staff.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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COMING IN NOVEMBER

Distribution scheduled for 11/01/15

This edition will feature: • Top Coaches Roundtable Discussion • Tennis Travel Destination Guide • Holiday Gift Guide • 2015 Girls High School Season Recap

Distributionacross Long Island at 300+ locations: • Indoor tennis clubs • Country clubs • Tennis camps • Retail stores • Gyms • Restaurants and health food stores • Supermarkets and • Many more!

Don’t miss the advertising opportunities in the next edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine November/December 2015! Facebook-www.Facebook.com/LongIslandTennis Instagram-@NYTennisMag • Twitter-@LITennisMag Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by October 1, 2015 For more information, please call 516-409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


LONG ISLAND TENNIS CLUB

directory

Alley Pond Tennis Center 79-20 Winchester Boulevard Queens Village, N.Y. (718) 264-2600 www.alleypondtenniscenter.com Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 (516) 777-1358 • bptcenter@aol.com Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue Rockville Centre, NY 11570 (516) 763-1299, ext. 10 • catsrvc@gmail.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue Merrick, NY 11566 (516) 489-9005 • carefreetennis@aol.com Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 667-3476 • www.deerparktennis.com Eastern Athletic Club Betsy Johnson—Manager 854 Jericho Turnpike Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 271-6616 • www.easternathleticclubs.com Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Carl Barnett: (516) 455-1225 earlyhit@optonline.net

Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, NY 11572 (516) 536-2323 • tonny@pointsettennis.com www.pointsettennis.com Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, NY 11050 (516) 883-6425 • tennis@pwta.com www.pwta.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, NY 11542 (516) 759-0505 • www.rwtt.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glenwood Landing Adrian Chirici—Director of Tennis 142 Glenwood Landing Road Glenwood Landing, NY 11547 (516) 676-9107 • www.rwtt.com Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 907-5162 • hli@ross.org www.ross.org/tennis Southampton Racquet Club & Camp 665 Majors Path Southampton, N.Y. (631) 488-4700 www.southamptonrcc.com

Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Stephanie Leo: (516) 676-9849 glenheadrc@verizon.net

SPORTIME Amagansett Sue de Lara—General Manager 320 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • amagansett@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett Eric Scoppetta—Camp Director (631) 267-2267 • ehsc@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/ehsc

Huntington Indoor Tennis Club Richard Rottkamp—Manager/Owner 100 Broadway Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 421-0040 • hitennis@myway.com

SPORTIME Amagansett Multi-Sport Mike Ritsi—General Manager 385 Abrahams Path • Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 • mritsi@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/amagansett-multi-sport

New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program 12 Shore Drive Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 233-2790 • bightennis@aol.com

SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Joe Siegel—General Manager 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 933-8500 • jsiegel@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-tennis

SPORTIME Bethpage Multi-Sport Randy Louie—General Manager 4105 Hempstead Turnpike • Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 731-4432 • rlouie@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/bethpage-multi-sport SPORTIME Kings Park Bea Bielik—General Manager Jeff Morys—Co-Director of Tennis Jason Wass–Co-Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road • Kings Park, NY 11754 (631) 269-6300 • bbielik@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/kings-park SPORTIME Lynbrook Bea Bielik–General Manager Danny Casesa—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, NY 11563 (516) 887-1330 • dcasesa@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/lynbrook SPORTIME Massapequa Chris Leahy—General Manager Emanuel Ponce—Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway • Massapequa, NY 11758 (516) 799-3550 • cleahy@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/massapequa SPORTIME Quogue Rene Bond—General Manager Greg Meyer—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead Road • East Quogue, NY 11942 (631) 653-6767 • rbond@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/quogue SPORTIME Randall’s Island Flagship Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Allison Hodgkins—Assistant General Manager Jared Karlebach—Assistant General Manager One Randall’s Island • New York, NY 10035 (212) 427-6150 • ahodgkins@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/manhattan SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—General Manager Jordan Dolberg—Director of Tennis 1 Landing Road • Roslyn, NY 11576 (516) 484-9222 • jharris@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/roslyn SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport Long Island Annex of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Joe Siegel—General Manager Mike Kossoff—Director of Tennis JMTA 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, NY 11791 (516) 364-2727 • mkossoff@sportimeny.com www.sportimeny.com/syosset-tennis

USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park • Flushing, NY 11568 LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine 73 (718) 760-6200 • www.usta.com


LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 07/14/15)

ISLAND

38 ....Peter Albert Bukary ............Jericho, N.Y. 39 ....Gavin Park ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 40 ....Ajer Sher ..............................Jericho, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank Name ......................................City

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Dylan D’Agate......................Melville, N.Y. 2 ......Jeremy Levine......................Woodbury, N.Y. 3 ......Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 4 ......Ryan Shayani ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 5 ......Matthew Kronenberg ..........East Setauket, N.Y. 6 ......Peter Anastasakis................East Norwich, N.Y. 7 ......Evan Joseph Rupolo ..........East Patchogue, N.Y. 8 ......Bilal Rashidzada..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 9 ......Joseph Perry Boyle ............Setauket, N.Y. 10 ....Azim Gangat........................Syosset, N.Y. 11 ....Candrin Chris ......................Port Washington, N.Y. 12 ....Joshua Elenowitz ................Syosset, N.Y. 13 ....Aiden Patel ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 14 ....Sujay Alluri ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 15 ....Kyle Zhou ............................Commack, N.Y. 16 ....Alejandro Pablo Perez ........Selden, N.Y. 17 ....Cameron Levchuck ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 18 ....Justin Shen ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 19 ....Joseph Monticciolo ............Coram, N.Y. 20 ....Max Daniel Safir ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 21 ....Ethan Rabinowitz ................Great Neck, N.Y. 22 ....Matthew Strogach ..............Commack, N.Y. 23 ....Andrew Thaler......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 24 ....Pius Lo ................................Massapequa, N.Y. 25 ....Matthew Zeifman ................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 26 ....Brandon Gicquel ................Huntington, N.Y. 27 ....Ryan Carlos ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 28 ....Samuel Perlman ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 29 ....Dion Park ............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 30 ....Ian Kaish ..............................Northport, N.Y. 31 ....Taylor Brooks Thomas ........Water Mill, N.Y. 32 ....Harrison Maxwell Tucker ....Huntington, N.Y. 33 ....Aron Bursztyn ......................South Setauket, N.Y. 34 ....Brian D. Gao ........................Syosset, N.Y. 35 ....Benjamin Grushkovskiy ......Woodmere, N.Y. 36 ....Gabriel Chan........................Commack, N.Y. 37 ....Brandon J. Lin ....................Great Neck, N.Y.

1 ......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Zachary David Gruber ........Port Washington, N.Y. 3 ......Aaron Marcos Vinsky ..........Westbury, N.Y. 4 ......Griffin Schlesinger ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 5 ......Timothy Lewis Chiu ............Holtsville, N.Y. 6 ......Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 7 ......Samir Singh ........................Syosset, N.Y. 8 ......Zachary Emmanuel Stern ..Dix Hills, N.Y. 9 ......Josh Gelfond ......................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 10 ....Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 11 ....Zachary Chan ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 12 ....Brandon Lee ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 13 ....Liam Thomas Schmidt........Wantagh, N.Y. 14 ....Ruskikesh Patel ..................Albertson, N.Y. 15 ....Valentine LeGoupil-Maier....Oceanside, N.Y. 16 ....Jai Madisetty........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ....Azim Gangat........................Syosset, N.Y. 18 ....Evan Brady ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 19 ....Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 20 ....Martin Charles Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 21 ....Danny Tocco........................East Quogue, N.Y. 22 ....Nicholas Harbans Sathi ......Port Jefferson, N.Y. 23 ....Zakir Siddiqui ......................Huntington, N.Y. 24 ....Putimet Inroon ....................Greenvale, N.Y. 25 ....Richard Martin Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 26 ....Alexander Rzehak ..............Centerport, N.Y. 27 ....Ishan G. Varma ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 28 ....Bradford J. Lin ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 29 ....Neil Edward Sathi................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 30 ....Michael Wexler ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 31 ....Dion Park ............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 32 ....Edward Brambil ..................Halesite, N.Y. 33 ....Joshua Elenowitz ................Syosset, N.Y. 34 ....Aryan Kumar Sethi ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 35 ....Richard James Kelly............Manhasset, N.Y. 36 ....Alexander Benanti ..............East Setauket, N.Y. 37 ....David Ammendola ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 38 ....Brandon Zhu........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 39 ....Andre Kun Kirkorian ............Woodbury, N.Y. 40 ....Sol Yoon ..............................Commack, N.Y.

RANKINGS

Long Island Boys 16 Singles

Long Island Boys 18 Singles

Rank Name ......................................City

Rank Name ......................................City

1 ......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 3 ......Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y. 4 ......Matthew G. Levine ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 5 ......Samir Singh ........................Syosset, N.Y. 6 ......Justin Ullman ......................Huntington Station, N.Y. 7 ......Timothy Serignese ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 8 ......Varun Gaddam Reddy ........Glen Head, N.Y. 9 ......Alexander Hazarian ............Garden City, N.Y. 10 ....Matthew T. Roberts ............Setauket, N.Y. 11 ....Matthew Musalo..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 12 ....Alex B. Fried ........................Plainview, N.Y. 13 ....Jonathan E. Brill ..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 14 ....Evan Kirsh............................Roslyn, N.Y. 15 ....Matthew Moreida ................East Rockaway, N.Y. 16 ....Jake William Buckley ..........Sound Beach, N.Y. 17 ....Matthew Ramsay ................Bay Shore, N.Y. 18 ....Connor Leaf ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 19 ....Neil Edward Sathi................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 20 ....Edward Brambil ..................Halesite, N.Y. 21 ....Ian Mitchell Capell ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 22 ....Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 23 ....Valentine Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 24 ....Andrew Marc Nakhjavan ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 25 ....Jai Madisetty........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 26 ....Preet Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 27 ....Evan Hirsch..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 28 ....Nicholas Goldman ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 29 ....Nicholas Mark Newell ........Huntington Station, N.Y. 30 ....Justin Alec Blicht ................Woodbury, N.Y. 31 ....James P. Ryan ....................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 32 ....Hunter M. Pomerantz..........Old Westbury, N.Y. 33 ....Yash Samantaray ................Syosset, N.Y. 34 ....Rohan Dayal ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 35 ....Kian Ziari ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 36 ....Chase Greenberg ................Roslyn, N.Y. 37 ....Curran Varma ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 38 ....Timothy Lewis Chiu ............Holtsville, N.Y. 39 ....Martin Charles Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 40 ....Luke Torel Karniewich ........Glen Head, N.Y.

1 ......Christopher McGorty ..........Bellmore, N.Y. 2 ......Benjamin Doron ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 3 ......Matthew Moreida ................East Rockaway, N.Y. 4 ......Harris Durkovic....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 5 ......Samuel R. Yuen ..................Selden, N.Y. 6 ......Mitchell Reid Berger............Lake Grove, N.Y. 7 ......Kyle Hudson Gower............Oceanside, N.Y. 8 ......Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y. 9 ......Simon Adler ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 10 ....Roberto Sangirardi ..............Lynbrook, N.Y. 11 ....Faran Nazir ..........................Deer Park, N.Y. 12 ....George Kaslow....................Port Washington, N.Y. 13 ....Jordan Diamond..................Mt. Sinai, N.Y. 14 ....Justin Matthew Scuderi ......Smithtown, N.Y. 15 ....Jonathan Gruberg ..............Setauket, N.Y. 16 ....Elias D. Tsalatsanis..............Smithtown, N.Y. 17 ....Tyler Ancona ........................East Setauket, N.Y.

You can make a decision to change your life. • Feel Fabulous • Look Amazing • Enjoy Life

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GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 2 ......Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 3 ......Ines Roti ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 4 ......Sadhana Sridhar..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 5 ......Ariana Pursoo ......................Westbury, N.Y. 6 ......Anna Vanessa Malin............Oceanside, N.Y. 7 ......Jennifer Rabinowitz ............Great Neck, N.Y. 8 ......Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 9 ......Daniella Victoria Paikin........Valley Stream, N.Y. 10 ....Emily Tannenbaum..............Commack, N.Y. 11 ....Olivia N. Fermo....................Smithtown, N.Y. 12 ....Sophia Elizabeth Schutte....Great Neck, N.Y. 13 ....Ava Thunder Scordo ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 14 ....Isabella Sha..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 15 ....Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 16 ....Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 17 ....Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 18 ....Ida Nicole Poulos ................Manhasset, N.Y. 19 ....Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 20 ....Skylor Wong ........................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 21 ....Jacqueline Zambrotto ........Kings Park, N.Y. 22 ....Remi Berlent ........................Huntington, N.Y. 23 ....Alysson Dawn Pierro ..........East Patchogue, N.Y. 24 ....Sydney Simmons ................East Northport, N.Y. 25 ....Ella Griffiths..........................East Hampton, N.Y. 26 ....Nicolette Loeffler..................Syosset, N.Y. 27 ....Anna J. Martorella ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 28 ....Vivian Wu ............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 29 ....Alexandra Kaylee Ho ..........Syosset, N.Y. 30 ....Skylar Blake Semon............Melville, N.Y. 31 ....Theadora Yael Rabman ......Port Washington, N.Y. 32 ....Madelyn Kay Germano ......Islip, N.Y. 33 ....Taylor Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 34 ....Elle Brignati..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 35 ....Bianca Banilivi ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 36 ....Serena Li ..............................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 37 ....Emily Moran ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 38 ....Kiera Agic ............................Miller Place, N.Y. 39 ....Sofia Maurina Discipio ........Woodmere, N.Y. 40 ....Kady Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 2 ......Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 3 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y.


LONG 4 ......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 5 ......Jade Fixon-Owoo................Lynbrook, N.Y. 6 ......Daniella Victoria Paikin........Valley Stream, N.Y. 7 ......Hannah Rose Niggemeier ..Sayville, N.Y. 8 ......Ashley Yu ............................Great Neck, N.Y. 9 ......Lauren Hutton......................Huntington, N.Y. 10 ....Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 11 ....Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 12 ....Elena Gabriela Hull..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 13 ....Kristen D. Cassidy ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 14 ....Jillian Rebecca Shulder ......Setauket, N.Y. 15 ....Gina LaRusso ......................Melville, N.Y. 16 ....Grace Isabel Riviezzo..........Syosset, N.Y. 17 ....Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 18 ....Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 19 ....Alexa Villez ..........................West Sayville, N.Y. 20 ....Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppague, N.Y. 21 ....Emily Tannenbaum..............Commack, N.Y. 22 ....Sophia Elizabeth Schutte....Great Neck, N.Y. 23 ....Bryn Schlussler....................Bay Shore, N.Y. 24 ....Andrianna Kaimis ................Commack, N.Y. 25 ....Charlotte Goldbaum............Old Westbury, N.Y. 26 ....Ida Nicole Poulos ................Manhasset, N.Y. 27 ....Natalia Caroline Krol............Greenvale, N.Y. 28 ....Olivia Anne Nakhjavan ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 29 ....Emma Rae Matz..................Commack, N.Y. 30 ....Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 31 ....Cecilia H. Scheuer ..............Southampton, N.Y. 32 ....Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 33 ....Jean Woon ..........................Commack, N.Y. 34 ....Erica Silver ..........................Plainview, N.Y. 35 ....Andrea Irta Brazyte..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 36 ....Emily Moran ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 37 ....Julia Amelie Raziel ..............Melville, N.Y. 38 ....Anna J. Martorella ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 39 ....Onalee Batcheller ................Westhampton, N.Y. 40 ....Madeline Richmond............Syosset, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ......Hannah Vimod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 3 ......Elena Artemis Vlamakis ......Garden City, N.Y. 4 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 5 ......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 6 ......Kaitlyn Byrnes......................Massapequa, N.Y. 7 ......Taryn Roche ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 8 ......Jillian Rebecca Shulder ......Setauket, N.Y. 9 ......Elinor Simek ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 10 ....Samantha Lena Galu ..........Jericho, N.Y. 11 ....Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo ....Lynbrook, N.Y. 12 ....Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppauge, N.Y. 13 ....Rachel Flynn Collins............Port Jefferson, N.Y. 14 ....Gina LaRusso ......................Melville, N.Y. 15 ....Andrianna Kaimis ................Commack, N.Y. 16 ....Kristen D. Cassidy ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 17 ....Sarah Bunk ..........................Sayville, N.Y. 18 ....Eleni Markopoulos ..............Seaford, N.Y. 19 ....Elizabeth Leigh Dwyer ........Cutchogue, N.Y. 20 ....Alexandra Grace Waldman East Hampton, N.Y. 21 ....Gabrielle Vaillant ..................East Moriches, N.Y. 22 ....Christina Lorraine Jud ........Glen Head, N.Y. 23 ....Morgan A. Wilkins ..............Huntington, N.Y. 24 ....Bryn N. Schlussler ..............Bay Shore, N.Y. 25 ....Montaine LeGoupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 26 ....Natalia Caroline Krol............Greenvale, N.Y. 27 ....Carly Menker ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 28 ....Adhele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 29 ....Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 30 ....Andrea Irta Brazyte..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 31 ....Morgan Voulo ......................East Setauket, N.Y.

ISLAND

RANKINGS

32 ....Riley Elizabeth Katzman ....Halesite, N.Y. 33 ....Madeline Lane ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 34 ....Sarah Khan ..........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 35 ....Rachel Bernstein ................Plainview, N.Y. 36 ....Jade Fixon-Woo ..................Lynbrook, N.Y. 37 ....Emily R. Victorson ..............Northport, N.Y. 38 ....Lauren Hutton......................Huntington, N.Y. 39 ....Fallon Berger........................Syosset, N.Y. 40 ....Amy Schlussler....................Bay Shore, N.Y.

93 ....Maxwell Moadel ..................Brookville, N.Y. 98 ....Jack Louchheim..................Sagaponack, N.Y. 100 ..Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 101 ..Benjamin Reichbach ..........Syosset, N.Y. 105 ..Valentine Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 119 ..Brandon Zhu........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 136 ..Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 137 ..Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 140 ..Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

GIRLS

Rank Name ......................................City

Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players

Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ......Rebecca Elizabeth Stern ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 3 ......Larissa Danovitch................Sagaponack, N.Y. 4 ......Ellen Huhulea ......................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 5 ......Eleni Markopoulos ..............Seaford, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 07/27/15)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 6 ......Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 16 ....Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 21 ....Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 35 ....Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 37 ....Peter Anastasakis................East Norwich, N.Y. 47 ....Mark Ryan Taranov ............Valley Stream, N.Y. 55 ....Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 61 ....Max Daniel Safir ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 62 ....Ty Nisenson ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 68 ....Michael Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 75 ....Joseph Perry Boyle ............Setauket, N.Y. 87 ....Ryan E. Shayani ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 105 ..Michael Hayden Singer ......Greenlawn, N.Y. 114 ..Matthew Kronenberg ..........East Setauket, N.Y. 117 ..Dylan D’Agate......................Melville, N.Y. 118 ..Joseph Monticciolo ............Coram, N.Y. 123 ..Arin Siriamonthep................Greenvale, N.Y. 124 ..Brandon J. Lin ....................Great Neck, N.Y. 127 ..Evan Joseph Rupolo ..........East Patchogue, N.Y. 129 ..Jared M Phillips ..................Plainview, N.Y. 140 ..Jeremy Levine......................Woodbury, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 2 ......Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 3 ......Ronald Hohmann ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 13 ....Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 14 ....Neel Raj................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 18 ....Abinhav Srivastava..............Melville, N.Y. 25 ....Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 28 ....Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 29 ....Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 30 ....Karan Amin ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 32 ....David Raphael Weiner ........Glen Head, N.Y. 47 ....Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 48 ....Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 66 ....Adrian Krisofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 68 ....Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 81 ....Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 89 ....Rohan Gaddam Reddy ......Glen Head, N.Y. 91 ....Evan Brady ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 92 ....Luke Karniewich..................Glen Head, N.Y.

2 ......Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 11 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y. 12 ....Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 18 ....Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 21 ....Patrick Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23 ....Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 26 ....Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 31 ....Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 39 ....Daniel Shleimovich..............Syosset, N.Y. 42 ....Rajan Vohra..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 43 ....Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 44 ....Kyle Hudson Gower............Oceanside, N.Y. 49 ....Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y. 52 ....Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y. 56 ....Athanasios Bilis ..................East Hampton, N.Y. 65 ....Emmanuel V. Vacalares ......Hicksville, N.Y. 66 ....Michael Medvedev..............Albertson, N.Y. 77 ....Andrew Marc Nakhjavan ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 79 ....Neel Raj................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 82 ....Matthew Franklin Porges....Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 88 ....Gardner Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 89 ....Daniel Meinster....................South Setauket, N.Y. 95 ....Julian Thomas MacGurn ....Amagansett, N.Y. 97 ....Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 100 ..Sangjin Song ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 101 ..Timothy Hayden Nacca ......Garden City, N.Y. 105 ..Abhinav Raj Srivastava ......Melville, N.Y. 121 ..Austin Egna..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 125 ..George Kaslow....................Port Washington, N.Y. 126 ..Max Egna ............................Port Washington, N.Y. 127 ..Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 134 ..Alexander Roti ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 135 ..Karin K. Amin ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 136 ..Nicolas Demaria ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 137 ..Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 139 ..Carl Grant ............................Sagaponack, N.Y. 140 ..Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 7 ......Lubomir T. Cuba..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 10 ....Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 11 ....Jesse M. Levitin ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 12 ....Athell Bennett ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 15 ....Bryant J. Born......................Manhasset, N.Y. 18 ....Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 20 ....Sean Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 29 ....Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 35 ....Daniel Grunberger ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 37 ....Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y. 42 ....Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 43 ....Travis Leaf............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 45 ....Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 52 ....Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 64 ....Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 67 ....Dylan Granat........................Woodbury, N.Y. 68 ....Stephen Gruppuso..............Bayport, N.Y.

71 ....Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 73 ....Rajan Jai Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 95 ....David Henry Reinharz ........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 99 ....Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 111 ..Michael James DeNigris ....Islip, N.Y. 114 ..Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y. 126 ..Duane Davis ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 132 ..Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 134 ..Kyle Hudson Gower............Oceanside, N.Y. 136 ..Jake Sandler........................Lynbrook, N.Y.

Rank Name ......................................City 4 ......Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 22 ....Rose Hayes..........................East Moriches, N.Y. 32 ....Madison Smith ....................Glen Cove, N.Y. 45 ....Olivia N. Fermo....................Smithtown, N.Y. 48 ....Tatiana Robotham Barnett..Port Washington, N.Y. 49 ....Kaya Amin............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 51 ....Alina Rebeca Lyakhov ........Great Neck, N.Y. 55 ....Rebecca Suarez ..................Huntington, N.Y. 57 ....Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 67 ....Kavina Amin ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 74 ....Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 75 ....Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y. 77 ....Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y. 82 ....Hailey Stoerback ................Saint James, N.Y. 92 ....Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 93 ....Sadhana Sridhar..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 95 ....Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 99 ....Emily Tannenbaum..............Commack, N.Y. 107 ..Ines Roti ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 109 ..Ariana O. Pursoo ................Westbury, N.Y. 116 ..Anna Vanessa Malin............Oceanside, N.Y. 119 ..Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 125 ..Daniella Victoria Paikin........Valley Stream, N.Y. 128 ..Jennifer Rabinowitz ............Great Neck, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 2 ......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 10 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 18 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 20 ....Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 23 ....Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 27 ....Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 29 ....Alexa Susan Goetz..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 39 ....Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 43 ....Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 52 ....Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 56 ....Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 59 ....Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 75 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 84 ....Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 92 ....Lucia Hu ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 99 ....Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 105 ..Jade Fixon-Owoo................Lynbrook, N.Y. 108 ..Madeline Richmond............Syosset, N.Y. 114 ..Ally Friedman ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 119 ..Kaya Amin............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 121 ..Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 133 ..Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 138 ..Kavina Amin ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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LONG Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 5 ......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ....Claire Handa ........................Point Lookout, N.Y. 19 ....Jasmine Olivia Abidi............Glen Head, N.Y. 27 ....Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 30 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 41 ....Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 46 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin........Manorville, N.Y. 55 ....Oliva Rose Scordo ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 62 ....Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 64 ....Stephanie Chikvashvili........Melville, N.Y. 67 ....Trinity Chow ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 82 ....Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 89 ....Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 92 ....Alexa Susan Goetz..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 94 ....Amanda Allison Foo............Manhasset, N.Y. 99 ....Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 107 ..Nicole Rezak........................Merrick, N.Y. 108 ..Theodora Brebenel..............Glen Head, N.Y. 111 ..Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 120 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 130 ..Michelle Roitgarts................Roslyn, N.Y. 131 ..Samantha Lena Galu ..........Jericho, N.Y. 133 ..Abigail Carrie Okin ..............Amagansett, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 7 ......Alexa Graham......................Garden City, N.Y. 9 ......Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 11 ....Madison Courtney Appel....Locust Valley, N.Y. 23 ....Courtney Provan..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 38 ....Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 56 ....Rebecca Elizabeth Stern ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 65 ....Ellen Nicole Huhulea ..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 68 ....Shanice Nadia Arthur..........Glen Head, N.Y. 70 ....Mia M. Vecchio....................Manhasset, N.Y. 76 ....Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 79 ....Stephanie Nakash ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 86 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 92 ....Amanda Allison Foo............Manhasset, N.Y. 93 ....Claire Handa ........................Westbury, N.Y. 97 ....Danielle Mirabella ................Wantagh, N.Y

ISLAND

116 ..Michelle Carnovale..............Massapequa, N.Y. 120 ..Nicole Kielan........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 123 ..Theodora Brebenel..............Glen Head, N.Y. 128 ..Rachel Weiss ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 130 ..Montaine Le Goupil-Maier..Oceanside, N.Y. 132 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 133 ..Mara Danielle Stewart ........Oceanside, N.Y. 136 ..Dominique Woinarowski ....Syosset, N.Y. 137 ..Sarah Seeman ....................Port Washington, N.Y.

Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 08/05/15)

BOYS National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 20 ....Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 25 ....Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 79 ....Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 134 ..Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 346 ..Peter Vasilios Anastasakis ..East Norwich, N.Y. 493 ..Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 498 ..Mark R. Taranov ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 879 ..Ty Nisenson ........................Port Washington, N.Y. 883 ..Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 6 ......Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 24 ....Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 39 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 74 ....Billy G. Suarez ....................Huntington, N.Y. 119 ..Neel Raj................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 172 ..Abhinav Raj Srivastava ......Melville, N.Y. 222 ..Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 240 ..Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 253 ..Karan K. Amin......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 261 ..Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 355 ..David Raphael Weiner ........Glen Head, N.Y. 513 ..Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 560 ..Sam Reichbach ..................Syosset, N.Y. 727 ..Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y.

RANKINGS

817 ..Luke Torel Karniewich ........Glen Head, N.Y. 897 ..Adrian Kristofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

350 ..Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 560 ..Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 809 ..Rebecca E. Suarez..............Huntington, N.Y. 962 ..Olivia N. Fermo....................Smithtown, N.Y. 997 ..Janae Fouche......................Freeport, N.Y.

Rank Name ......................................City 33 ....Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 108 ..Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 296 ..Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y. 319 ..Patrick F. Maloney ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 321 ..Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 348 ..Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 352 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 368 ..Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 427 ..Rajan Jai Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 471 ..Daniel Shleimovich..............Syosset, N.Y. 578 ..Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 753 ..Michael Medvedev..............Albertson, N.Y. 818 ..Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 862 ..Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 46 ....Lubomir Cuba......................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 71 ....Brenden Volk ......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 107 ..Jesse Levitin ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 133 ..Eric Wagner ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 199 ..Athell Patrick Bennett..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 207 ..Bryant Born..........................Manhasset, N.Y. 217 ..Sean M. Mullins ..................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 224 ..Alexander Lebedev ............Island Park, N.Y. 424 ..Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 559 ..Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 591 ..Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 709 ..Daniel Grundberger ............Great Neck, N.Y. 887 ..Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y. 965 ..Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

GIRLS National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 10 ....Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 104 ..Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 118 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 134 ..Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 224 ..Francesca Karman..............Port Washington, N.Y. 278 ..Alexa Susan Goetz..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 279 ..Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 437 ..Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 621 ..Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 627 ..Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 51 ....Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 239 ..Claire Handa ........................Point Lookout, N.Y. 286 ..Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 326 ..Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 512 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 569 ..Courtney Provan..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 648 ..Jasmine Abidi ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 805 ..Olivia Rose Scordo..............Glen Head, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 41 ....Madison Battaglia ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 46 ....Alexa Graham......................Garden City, N.Y. 104 ..Madison Courtney Appel....Locust Valley, N.Y. 134 ..Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 499 ..Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 542 ..Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 688 ..Courtney Provan..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 909 ..Ester Chikvashvili ................Melville, N.Y.

Rank Name ......................................City 10 ....Rachel Arbitman..................Hewlett, N.Y. 297 ..Madison Smith ....................Glen Cove, N.Y.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. SEPTEMBER 2015 Friday-Saturday, September 4-5 L1B Point Set Fall Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78' Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 30 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, September 4-6 L1B Sportime Lynbrook September Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 31 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, September 4-6 L2O LBTC Indian Summer Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE); and Intermediate Mixed-Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$33 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Aug. 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 L1B Sportime Lynbrook Fall Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 6 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.

Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 L1B Point Set September Challenger Point Set Tennis • 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 6 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 L1B Bethpage State Park Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road • Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 6 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 L2O LBTC Mid-September Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE); and Intermediate Mixed-Doubles: 78' Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$33 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, September 11-13 L3 Huntington Eastern UPS Huntington Indoor Tennis • 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Green Ball 12, 78' Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR); and Entry Level Boys' & Girls' 10 and Under Singles 60' Orange Ball 10 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 7 at 4:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hitennis@myway.com or call (631) 421-0040. Saturday-Sunday, September 12-13 PSP 2; Bethpage Eastern Orange Challenger Series #9 Sportime Bethpage • 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' 10 and Under Singles 60' Orange Ball 10 (FRLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 6 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail atunaru@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, September 18-20 L1A GHRC September Championships Glen Head Racquet Club • 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys' & Girls' 10 and Under Singles 78' Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 13 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849.

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, September 18-20 L1A Sportime Bethpage September Championships Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 13 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, September 25-27 L2R Pine Hollow CC Fall Open Pine Hollow Country Club 6601 Northern Boulevard East Norwich, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (FRLC) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 20 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Friday-Sunday, September 18-20 L1B Sportime Kings Park September Challenger Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 13 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, September 25-27 L1B Long Beach Apple Pie Classic Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles & Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 14,18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, September 18-20 L1B LBTC September Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12,16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 15 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, September 18-20 L2O RWTTC Fall Open Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 14 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

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Friday-Sunday, September 25-27 L1B Point Set September Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 30 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Saturday-Sunday, September 26-27 L3 RWTTC September UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Green Ball 12, 78' Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Sept. 22 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

OCTOBER 2015 Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 L2R Sportime Lynbrook October Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles & Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Sept. 28 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 L2O Sportime Kings Park October Open Sportime-Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 14 (SE);and Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Doubles: 78' Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Sept. 27 at 9:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 Empire Cup National Doubles at Point Set Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Boys' & Girls' Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 25 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 Empire Cup National Doubles at GHRC Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Boys' & Girls' Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 16 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 25 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849.


USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 Empire Cup National Doubles at RWTTC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Boys' & Girls' Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 14 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Sept. 25 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, October 2-4 & October 9-11 L1 Huntington Indoor Fall Championships Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway • Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 2 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail hitennis@myway.com or call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Monday, October 9-12 L2R Deer Park Tennis October Regional Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, July 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail deerparktennis@optimum.net or call (631) 667-3476. Friday-Monday, October 9-12 L1A Port Washington Columbus Day Championship Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 2 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail manny@pwta.com or call (516) 883-6425.

Friday-Sunday, October 9-11 L1B GHRC Columbus Day Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 16 (SE); and Challenger Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, October 9-11 L2O Bethpage State Park Fall Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 4 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

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LITennisMag.com • September/October 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, October 9-11 L1A Point Set Columbus Day Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 2 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, October 16-18 L2O Bethpage State Park Fall Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 11 at 10:30 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Saturday-Monday, October 10-12 USTA National Selection Tournament—October Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 18 (FIC-R16); and Boys' & Girls' Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $134.88 for one event; $135.38 for two events; additional fees may apply if registered in three or more events (deadline for entries is Thursday, Sept. 10 at 11:59 a.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, October 16-18 L1B Point Set October Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12, 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Saturday-Sunday, October 10-11 PSP 2; Sportime Lynbrook Eastern Orange Challenger Series #10 Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys' & Girls' 10 and Under Singles 60' Orange Ball 10 (FRLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Oct. 5 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, October 16-18 L1B Sportime Lynbrook October Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Oct. 12 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.

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Friday-Sunday, October 16-18 L3 RWTTC January UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Green Ball 12, 78' Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Oct. 13 at 11:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Saturday, October 17 PSP L3; Sportime Lynbrook LI Orange Series #5 Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys' & Girls' 10 and Under Singles 60' Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $28 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Oct. 12 at 8:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1 L1B GHRC Junior Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles & Doubles 78' Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1 L1B RWTTC Halloween Challenger Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Oct. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, October 30-November 1 L1B Point Set Halloween Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys' & Girls' Singles 78' Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Oct. 25 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78' Yellow Ball 12,16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Aug. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.


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Long Island Tennis Magazine • September/October 2015 • LITennisMag.com


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