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This edition will feature: • Guide to the Top Tennis Clubs for Long Island Tennis Players • Australian Open Preview • 2015 Year in Review • Girls High School State Championships

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Table Of Contents Going Out on Her Terms By Brian Coleman

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litennis Long Island Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

Coaches Roundtable Discussion

Italy’s Flavia Pennetta calls it quits style, capturing the 2015 U.S. Open title to wrap up her storied career. See page 4

Featured Stories 26 2015 Tennis Travel Destinations Guide We take a look some of the hottest tennis travel destinations, including Boca West, Elite Tennis Travel, The Club at Mediterra, Israel Sports Exchange, Mauna Kea, Palm Island Resort, Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy, Tennis Fantasies With John Newcombe and The Legends, and Topnotch Resort.

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32 2015 Coaches Roundtable Discussion We get the chance to sit down with the area’s top coaches and brainstorm on a variety of topics, from the evolution of the sport of tennis, to the state of American tennis.

42 2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap A look back at the 2015 girl’s high school season, as Nassau and Suffolk County champs were crowned and the Island’s top players headed off to the States.

52 2015 Holiday Gift Guide Get some great gift ideas for the 2015 holiday season from some of the sport’s top providers.

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Features 6

Sharing the Collegiate Journey With the Next Generation By Brian Coleman

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Cultivating and Growing USTA’s Eastern Section: A Chat With Executive Director and COO Jenny Schnitzer By Brian Coleman

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Why “Keeping Your Eye on the Ball” is More Than a Slogan in Tennis By Lenny Schloss

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Little Mo Internationals Bring Top World Juniors to Forest Hills

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From Romania to New York: The Tennis Journey of Alexandru Pop-Moldovan By Brian Coleman

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ACL Injuries in Female Athletes By Dr. Brian DeVeaux, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS

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Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports


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NOV/DEC 2015 Vol 7, No 6

Long Island Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

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Cover photo credit: adidas

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NYC’s Top Chefs Take to the Tennis Court for the Celebrity Chef Challenge

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Syosset HS Tennis Players Take Part in the Stony Brook Collegiate Experience

Featured Columns 12

Across Long Island … News and Notes From Across the L.I. Tennis Community

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Three Things We Can Learn From Serena’s U.S. Open Loss By Steven Kaplan

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Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller

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Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz

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Tennis Injury Prevention: Three Types of Strengthening Exercises for the Offseason By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS

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USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update

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Tips From the Tennis Pro: Win Matches by Making Your Opponent Uncomfortable By Lisa Dodson

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College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters … What Does It Take to “Get There” By Ricky Becker

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More Than an Athlete: Creating the Conditions for Peak Performance By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC

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The Value of Sportsmanship in Tennis By Dr. Tom Ferraro

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Fitness & Nutrition: Large Meals vs. Small Meals for Athletes By Irina Belfer-Lehat, RD, CDN

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Charitable Initiatives

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I Am Going to Remember You By Lonnie Mitchel

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Long Island Rankings

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015 Tournament Schedule

s Publications Ltd.—Copyright © 2015 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 • brianc@usptennis.com Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Matthew Cohen Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 306 • matt@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Scott Koondel VP of Operations (516) 409-4444, ext. 324

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

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Going Out on Her Terms Flavia Pennetta winds down career with big Grand Slam win BY BRIAN COLEMAN

he 2015 U.S. Open was supposed to be a celebration of American Serena Williams, who was going after the Calendar Grand Slam and trying to tie Steffi Graf’s record of 22 career Grand Slams in the Open Era, but the show was stolen by Italian Flavia Pennetta, who dazzled the Queens crowd for two weeks on her way to her first career Grand Slam title. Pennetta dropped just three sets on her way to the title, which included a comeback win over two-time

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova and an easy 6-1, 6-3 victory over secondseeded Simona Halep in the semifinals. In the finals, she took advantage of what was most likely an emotionallydrained Roberta Vinci, who had beaten Serena in the semifinals, and beat her Italian compatriot in straight sets, 7–6, 6–2. Pennetta became the oldest player in the Open Era to win her first career Grand Slam and was clearly playing the best tennis of her life throughout the two weeks in Flushing. But immediately after the win, the 33year-old from Brindisi, Italy leaned over to her good friend and U.S. Open final opponent Vinci and told her that she is going to be retiring at the end of this year. “This was the perfect moment, I think,” Pennetta said. “It was a really hard decision to make, but I’m really happy that I did it. I’m really happy and I’m proud of myself.” Her decision took many by surprise, including Vinci. But Pennetta made the decision that so few professional athletes across all sports get to make: She is walking away from the sport on her own terms, a decision that no one can argue with. “Sometimes we are scared to make the decision because we don’t know what we like or what we are going to do after, how life is going to be,” said Pennetta on what she will do after tennis. “But I think it’s going to be a pretty good life.” Most careers of professional athletes either end in injury, the loss of ability, or in the case of team sports, there isn’t a franchise that sees a need for your services anymore. While her career wasn’t immediately over after the U.S. Open, she has played in tournaments in Beijing and Tianjin in hopes of qualifying for the end of the year finals in Singapore, announcing your retirement at the height of your athletic prowess is a noble endeavor. Pennetta is engaged to fellow Italian and professional tennis player Fabio Fognini, currently ranked 22nd in the ATP

Men’s Singles Rankings, says she couldn’t be happier with where her life is at. In addition to her Grand Slam win in Flushing Meadows, Pennetta has won 17 doubles titles over the course of her career. “It’s a good moment in my life,” Pennetta said. “I have everything that I always would like to have. Professionally, I’m in the perfect moment. I won one of my favorite tournaments, one of the best tournaments in the world. I have a high ranking. I have the person that I love with me. I can just say that I’m really happy.” Her final tournament as a professional was at the WTA Finals in Singapore, the

seventh WTA Tour player to qualify for the 2015 year-end finals. “Qualifying for the WTA Finals is a dream come true and the perfect way to end to an amazing season for me,” said Pennetta. “It will also be a wonderful way for me to say to say goodbye to tennis. It’s a spectacular stage to bow out on. Having won the WTA Finals before in doubles, I can’t wait to make my debut in singles.” Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or e-mail brianc@usptennis.com.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Sharing the Collegiate Journey With the Next Generation Sportime’s Mike Kossoff and Jay Harris look to grow college advisory services at Sportime BY BRIAN COLEMAN

Mike Kossoff ore than a decade ago, a kid from Syosset made a decision that would change the course of two men’s lives forever. Mike Kossoff was a standout tennis player at Syosset High School and a highly-touted recruit in his senior season on Long Island. As a 24-year-old firstyear head coach at Bowling Green State

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University in Ohio, Jay Harris found a recruiting video of Kossoff and was immediately impressed with what he saw. “The first day I walked into my Bowling Green office there was a VHS tape in the VCR, and it was this little kid from Syosset,” said Harris. “I quickly said to myself, ‘Wow, this guy has interesting energy compared to people in the Mid-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Jay Harris

west,’ and I began to recruit him immediately. But he ended up saying no to me!” Kossoff would decide to go to San Diego State, but after just a year, he started to look elsewhere. “He spent a year at San Diego State and then called me one April morning and said ‘Coach, I want to come to Bowling Green,’” recalls Harris. The two would bring the Bowling Green tennis program to heights it had never seen. The Falcons were ranked as high as 55th in the country and won two Mid-American Conference (MAC) titles, including one in Kossoff’s senior year, when he was the team captain and MVP. And while the program itself wouldn’t last (it would be cut after Mike’s senior season due to Title IX issues), the relationship between Harris and Kossoff would. Harris would go on to coach at Brown University, where he became the most successful coach in the 100-year history of the program leading them to the NCAA Tournament in seven of his eight years, a national ranking of 33rd, and


two Ivy League titles. Kossoff returned home to Long Island and began working at Sportime, where he is now director of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy on Long Island. Maintaining the bond they had formed together at the college, Kossoff became the recruiter, helping Harris to find and recruit talent to Brown. “He helped me recruit kids from all across the country ... Not just from New York but nationwide because of kids he knew from tournaments,” said Harris. “So that is when the relationship kind of went to another level.” Harris spent eight years as the Brown head coach before moving on in an attempt to launch his own business. “The last couple of years I was there, things changed in the University’s Athletics Department. I wasn’t enjoying the coaching there nearly as much as I had before,” recalls Harris. “Mike and I were really close, and we started having some conversations about me moving here to New York. So he sort of became the recruiter. Essentially after my last year, I left Brown looking to start my own business

in sports psychology consulting and college search consulting. I ended up coming down to Sportime to build those services into the company. That’s how I ended up at Sportime.” This time around, it was Harris who was coming to an unfamiliar area. The mid-Western guy was heading east to the big city, and Kossoff was here to help him get acclimated. “Mike was very experienced in this world and everything was new for me,” said Harris. “So he started mentoring me. And we were really able to work and coach together. We oversaw players and programs and the relationship really grew into one of peers.” Harris brought his knowledge of the college recruiting and college coaching processes to the Sportime clubs, and has been a key fixture of them since. He now serves as the general manager of Sportime Roslyn and is one of the directors of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy. Now, paired up with Kossoff, the two are heading the College Advisory Service

at Sportime. The program will assist and advise kids through the college search and recruiting processes, endeavors that can often become extremely stressful and nerve-racking for kids and parents. The two bring their own respective experiences to the table, which makes them an ideal duo to be heading up a committee on college recruiting. “College coaches are always contacting us to get our opinions on various players. We are obviously deeply involved in Eastern tennis so keeping a rapport with those coaches and players is important for us to understand the details of the college search process,” said Kossoff. “Parents, as well as juniors, don’t really know how the process works, and a lot of the time they use outside consultation. We know the kids personally and how they really play, so it just makes sense that we provide that service here.” Harris and Kossoff know how valuable the college search is. It isn’t just about continued on page 8

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sharing the collegiate journey continued from page 7 choosing the right school to launch a professional tennis career, but it is the bridge to whatever career path one chooses to go down. “Being a part of a college athletic team, whether it be tennis or any sport, is one of the greatest experiences you can have,” said Harris. “It gives you an opportunity to be a part of a setting that is going to help you no matter what field you go in to. It helps with developing proper time management, becoming an independently motivated performer, and learning to work within a team structure, which all become very important later in life for these kids. The college search is the first real job search of their lives. It is such an important process, and that is why this service is so important, because it is next to impossible to manage the process well if you don’t have help.” In addition to the committee that helps and consults with parents and junior

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players on a regular basis, this service is also going to be introducing the College Recruiting Combine, with the first one set to be held this coming summer on June 11-12. Harris spent this past summer visiting various other college showcases and talking with college coaches, and says those coaches are extremely excited about another showcase being added. The combine is beneficial to all involved, as it allows coaches to recruit more efficiently and see more players than they would be able to normally, and also allows players from the Eastern Section to showcase their skills in front of about 100 college coaches. The Combine will be held at Sportime Randall’s Island and is open to all players from the Eastern Section and throughout the United States. It will be unique in that it will not only offer tennis playing exposure, but the College Re-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

cruiting Combine will also include tennis analytics, fitness testing and even sports psychology and strategy testing. Head college coaches from all across the country have already confirmed their attendance to this prestigious showcase. The overall goal of this College Advisory Service and the soon-to-be College Recruiting Combine is to help parents and players navigate the intense process of the college search. The experience and relationship between Harris and Kossoff allow them to give guidance to a recruiting world that most struggle to grasp. “The reason I am able to do what I do now for a living is because of the experience I had as a college tennis player,” said Kossoff. “If we can get kids to have half as much fun as I did, then it is a winwin all around.” Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email brianc@usptennis.com.


LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Cultivating and Growing USTA’s Eastern Section A Chat With Executive Director and COO Jenny Schnitzer B Y B RIA N C O LEMA N

STA Eastern is ushering in a new era, as the association welcomes Jenny Schnitzer as its newest executive director and chief operations officer. Schnitzer will bring her two-decade plus experience to the table in the hopes of uniting the tennis community in the Eastern Section, and giving back to the sport that has given her so much in her lifetime. Schnitzer is a New Yorker through and through, having grown up playing on the public courts in New York City, and moving on to play her collegiate tennis at St. John’s University. “My parents would play at Inwood Park in Upper Manhattan, and that is where I first started playing and learning the game,” said Schnitzer. “I started to get involved in community programs in the parks, and eventually took a scholarship to play at St. John’s.” While at St. John’s, beyond her accolades on the court, she majored in athletic administration, and knew she wanted to

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work in tennis in some capacity once her time in school was complete. “I knew I wanted to give back to the game,” said Schnitzer. When she was done with school, she got a call from Arvelia Mayers, a legend in the Harlem tennis community and friend of Schnitzer’s, who told her there was a posi-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

tion available with the USTA. She was first hired as the school’s director for USTA Eastern, and she then moved to the position of community tennis manager, but was always involved with trying to unite the schools and community in the Eastern Section. Two decades later, she finds herself as


executive director of the organization, and still has many of the same goals in mind as she did when first hired. “I’ve seen it all come full circle,” Schnitzer said of the organization in her time there. “We were very community-focused and were about building a solid base. Then, we became more membership-driven. We noticed after a few years, that was okay, but we had to do a better job of doing both. We had to build a base to increase membership. If you focus on one and not the other, it doesn’t work out. You have to build both up to make things work completely.” Her primary goal is to unite the various entities that make up the tennis community in the Eastern Section, and she has several ideas on how to do this. One initiative that USTA Eastern offers is a school’s program, which offers free training and tennis equipment for physical education teachers to use in their schools in order to get more kids into the sport of tennis. “We think this is a great way to get more new kids playing,” Schnitzer said of the program. “We teach physical education teachers how to teach the sport of tennis in their gym classes. We physically go in and provide them with training and they get racquets and a tennis-based curriculum. After that, we help get them to start and maintain afterschool tennis programs.” Building on the idea of uniting the com-

munity, Schnitzer and her colleagues at USTA Eastern want to involve everyone, from high school players to club pros, to help drive these programs to success. “From there, we also want the whole community to get involved,” Schnitzer added. “We are looking at the colleges, clubs, high school teams, etc. We want them to give back and mentor these kids, and get them loving tennis, and following through on programs. We don’t want to just give these kids a taste, but want to carve a pathway for them to get to the level they want to achieve.” Another major goal of Schnitzer’s is to reach out to the Millennial Generation and incorporate programs for them to stay involved in the sport. She cited New York City’s Battle of the Boroughs Tournament as one such event that can help sustain the interest of the Millennial demographic. “Those kids who play Division I tennis and come back after graduation, there really is nothing for them when they come back from school,” Schnitzer said. “We want to make it fun again and more accessible to everyone and add to the social aspect of tennis.” With all of these ideas and initiatives, the overall goal of the organization will be to bring the community together so we can all reap the benefits of the sport. It can be difficult to do with so many different business and facilities, but it is an objective they are determined to accomplish.

“We have to build the dots in order to connect the dots,” she said. “That starts with getting out into the community. Finding areas that are ripe and ready … getting people together, putting a plan together and seeing what we can do as a team. If we build that base, it is going to benefit everybody.” Schnitzer’s goal is simple, build a strong grassroots base of a solid tennis community and cultivate that base to continue to grow and sustain the sport in the Eastern Section. “There are some good things happening, but we can do a lot more,” said Schnitzer. “I think what we really want to do is take things a step further. We want to try and reach down and build those communities, and make sure everyone has the same goal in mind and everyone works together. It’s not going to grow if we don’t grow. We need to set our differences aside so it can benefit everyone.” USTA Eastern is there to benefit everyone in the Section, and it’s doors are open to help. The onus is now on the businesses and clubs to come to the table, because when everyone in the community works together, the growth of the sport in the Eastern Section can be boundless. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email brianc@usptennis.com.

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Across Long Isla NSWTL Wraps Up Season

The North Shore Women’s Tennis League (NSWTL) recently held its annual awards dinner at Manhasset Bay Yacht Club. The longest-running women’s tennis league in the country celebrated another successful year with a cocktail hour, carving

stations and a buffet, as well as raffle prizes given out at the end of the night. The attendees were also able to browse around at the various items and gifts being sold throughout the night including bags from companies like Glam Slam Gear.

NYIT Succeeds Garden City’s Graham Makes at ITA Eastern Championships Waves at U.S. Open Garden City’s Alexa Graham participated in the U.S. Open Junior Tournament, and played some excellent tennis. Playing in front of her friends, family and neighbors, the 16-year-old advanced to the second-round of the tournament. “Before the match, I was obviously a little nervous,” Graham said of playing in front of a ton of people who were rooting for her. “Once you get locked into the game and match though, it goes away.”

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The New York Institute of Technology, coached by LI’s Jason Pasion, was well-represented at the ITA/USTA Regional Championships. NYIT’s Alessia Rossetti defeated Costanza Mecchi of Concordia College 6-0, 7-5 in the singles final, and then paired up with Justyna Krol to win the doubles final of the Division II East Region championships.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


and

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

Roslyn and Port Washington Hold Free Tennis Clinics

Both the Roslyn (pictured left) and Port Washington (pictured right) Girls Varsity Tennis Teams held their own free tennis clinics this fall, bringing in members of their respective communities to teach and work with them on their tennis game. “While we always want to succeed on the court, we also

know the importance of giving back to the community. Everyone in our town benefited from this wonderful event,” said Port Washington Girls Tennis Head Coach Shane Helfner of his clinic. “The participants all left with trophies and a big smile on their face.”

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LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Across Long Isla Hitting With the Pros

Paige Wygodzki of Huntington, who trains at Bethpage Park Tennis Center, got to experience a wonderful thrill during the U.S. Open. The nine-year old went on the courts at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and hit with two-time U.S Open finalist Victoria Azarenka.

Sportime Syosset Launches New U10 Program

Sportime Syosset recently unveiled a new U10 program for its young juniors. The kids have been enjoying the program thus far in the fall, and have even got themselves some new t-shirts. 14

Oyster Bay’s Elbaba Advances to ITA National Indoors Championship

Julia Elbaba of Oyster Bay, N.Y. won the singles draw of the ITA Atlantic Regional with a 6-1, 6-1 victory over Virginia Tech’s Caroline Daxhelet of Virginia Tech. With the win, Elbaba qualifies and advances to the ITA National Indoors Championship in mid-November to compete in singles.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


and

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

Nassau Indoor Tennis Under New Ownership Three-time Long Island Tennis Challenge champion Jonathan Klee has partnered with David Brent to purchase Nassau Indoor Tennis. The property was close to being bought by another buyer who wanted to turn it into a multi-sport facility, but Klee and Brent wanted to keep it strictly a tennis facility, and decided to keep it that way. “When I found out that the potential buyer was looking to eliminate tennis courts and convert the facility into a multi-sport, I spoke to David Brent and asked him if there was still a great demand for tennis in the Five Towns area,” said Klee. “Both of us love tennis, and with the loss of so many indoor facilities on the South Shore, it was upsetting that another would close without giving it a try. After evaluating the purchase price and crunching the numbers, both of us thought the facility was more valuable for other uses but with some improvements could still be operated profitably as a tennis center and decided to purchase the property together.”

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LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Three Things

We Can Learn From Serena’s U.S. Open Loss By Steve Kaplan Serena Williams’ semifinal loss to Roberta Vinci at the 2015 U.S. Open has been called “the greatest upset in tennis history.” Indeed, who could have predicted that Serena’s dominance of Grand Slams would be derailed by a player ranked 43rd in the world. With the omniscience of time, perhaps this grand upset makes a little more sense. Let’s briefly look at three things that went wrong for Serena, and right for Roberta Vinci and learn from them. 1. Serena cracked under pressure The build up to Serena’s chance to win a Grand Slam was enormous. The women’s finals in Flushing Meadows sold out before the men’s finals this year. Serena was on the brink of history, about to become only the fourth woman to win a Calendar Grand Slam and the first since Stefanie Graf in 1988 (the two others are Maureen Connolly and Margaret Court).

Body Mind Soul & Set!

Most experts were about to hand the title to Serena, but her semifinal matchup with the crafty Vinci proved the old saying “That’s why they play the match” to be true. Serena was asked about the pressure of the match, and she replied, “I don’t feel pressure. I never felt pressure.” Sure Serena … you were erratic all tournament and you refused to confront your own—as well as your opponent’s—vulnerabilities, even after they were displayed to the world. The road to choking is paved with denial. The best way to manage and overcome fear is to face it. 2. Serena was overconfident How many times have we heard the saying: “Only Serena can beat Serena?” Vinci had a brilliant plan to manage Serena’s power and executed that plan flawlessly, as the Italian played down the middle to take away Serena’s angled attack. John McEnroe, in his autobiography, You Can’t be Serious, revealed that the great Don Budge gave him this same advice to play Ivan Lendl. McEnroe then used this tactic to turn a seven-match losing streak

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

into an eight-match winning streak. I like to tell students that if a boxer and wrestler get into the ring, the winner will not be the stronger of better fighter. Rather, it will be the combatant who is better able to impose their style. You don’t have to play great or outhit your opponent if you can exploit their weaknesses and play your game. 3. Serena changed her routine Let’s not forget that Serena’s boyfriend, Drake, showed up for her semifinals match (after a much publicized make out session in a Cincinnati restaurant) which is fine, except for two things. First, he had not attended any of her previous matches at the U.S. Open and this was an especially critical time. Serena’s coach was now her new ex-boyfriend and this had to have been at least slightly and unnecessarily stressful. The fact that Coach Patrick Mouratoglou openly criticized his employer (Serena) to the press after this loss leaves me to suspect that things might have been a bit tense. Find a good routine during a tournament and stick to it. Winning is a habit and winning habits must be respected. History will likely consider Serena, the greatest player in women’s tennis history, but even champions have flaws that we can learn from. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.


LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

The 55+ 6.0 team from Eastern Athletic Club in Blue Point, captained by Kathy Sarli from Blue PointEastern Athletic

Congratulations to all of the teams who competed in Sectionals this year. There was some exceptional tennis, and best of luck to those who will be competing in Nationals! The 2015 winning Long Island teams that advanced to Sectionals include: 18 & Over League l 2.5 Women from Point Set (Captains Alyssa Levy & Lori Petrillo) l 3.0 Women from Carefree Racquet (Captain Gail Feder) l 3.5 Women from Carefree Racquet (Captain Bonnie Kolenberg) l 4.0 Women from Point Set (Captain Maureen Powers) l 4.5 Women from Sportime Lynbrook (Captain Ginger Wade) l 5.0 Women from Sportime Lynbrook (Captain Tina Buschi) l 3.0 Men from Eastern Athletic Blue Point (Captain Bill McManus) 18

l 3.5 Men from Sportime Lynbrook (Captains Miguel Gordon & Gabe Moreira) l 4.0 Men from Long Beach Tennis (Captains Andrew Camacho & Brian Connor) l 4.5 Men from Long Beach Tennis (Captain Sid Siddiqui) l 5.0 Men from Robbie Wagner Tennis (Captain Gregory Lumpkin) 40 & Over League l 3.0 Women from Eastern Athletic Blue Point (Captains Dianne Romano & Sonja Scalia) l 3.5 Women from Carefree Racquet (Captain Mara Mazza) l 4.0 Women from Jericho/Westbury (Captain Helane Goodman) l 4.5 Women from Carefree Racquet (Captains Donna Ryan & Sally Disabato) l 3.0 Men from World Gym Setauket (Captain Phil Monticciolo) l 3.5 Men from Eastern Athletic Blue Point (Captains John Selvaggio &

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Michael Seigmund) l 4.0 Men from Carefree Racquet (Captains Alex Havriliak & Gerard Paret) l 4.5 Men from Christopher Morley (Captain Jonathan Klee) 55 & Over League l 6.0 Women from Eastern Athletic at Blue Point (Captain Kathy Sarli) l 7.0 Women from Point Set (Captain Ann McGrath) l 8.0 Women from Carefree Racquet (Captain Debbie Cichon) l 7.0 Men from Robbie Wagner (Captain Chet Singer) l 8.0 Men from Sportime Syosset (Captains Steve Wolvovsky & Raj Nagdev) l 9.0 Men from Jericho/Westbury (Captain Ken Luba) Going to Nationals! 18 & Over League l 3.5 Men from Sportime Lynbrook


The 3.5 40+ Sectional winners from Carefree, captained by Mara Mazza

The 3.5 Men’s 18 & Over Nationals team out of Lynbrook, captained are by Miguel Gordon & Gabe Moreira l 4.5 Men from Long Beach Tennis l 5.0 Men from Robbie Wagner 40 & Over League l 3.5 Women from Carefree Racquet l 4.5 Women from Carefree Racquet l 3.0 Men from World Gym Setauket 55 & Over l 6.0 Women from Eastern Athletic Blue Point l 7.0 Women from Point Set Good luck to all of our teams! The mixed-doubles registrations are

presently taking place. I must know of all teams no later than Nov. 15. The MixedDoubles League is going to be based on final ratings only, not early start ratings. Final ratings usually come out the last week of November. You can have players register before the ratings come out, but please be aware that their rating may change once the final ratings are published. The Mixed-Doubles League is going to play from December to the end of April. The Mixed League will have teams at the 6.0 Level (two 3.0 players, a 2.5 & 3.5, or 2.5 & 3.0), 7.0 Level (two 3.5 players, a 3.0

& 4.0, or a 3.0 & 3.5), 8.0 Level (two 4.0 players, a 3.5 & 4.5, or a 3.5 & 4.0), and at the 9.0 Level (two 4.5 players, a 4.0 and 5.0, or a 4.0 & 4.5). You may also have a combination of players a full level below (5.0 playing 6.0, etc.), although it is not encouraged. If anyone is looking to be placed on a team, please e-mail me at kathym65@aol.com and I will do my best to get you placed. Kathy Miller is the manager at Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached at kathym65@aol.com.

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LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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BY

Bryan Brothers hit the big screen

E M I L I E

KAT Z

everything from Serena Williams to his wife Brooklyn Decker to Donald Trump’s hair. Roddick and Decker also welcomed their first child, a baby boy named Hank, into the world on Sept. 30.

Allaster Steps Down as WTA CEO The Bryan Brothers made their big-screen debut in the Broad Green Pictures comedy, Break Point. The movie follows the story of Jimmy Price, a professional doubles tennis player who is hanging onto his career and reaches out to his estranged brother, Darren, to pair up with him. Bob and Mike Bryan made a cameo in the film, and enjoyed their role. “Break Point has a great cast and we love that the storyline is all about a doubles tennis player,” said Mike Bryan. “It was fun to be a part of it, and we appreciate the shout-out to doubles tennis.”

Dan Rather interviews Andy Roddick

Stacey Allaster stepped down as the WTA’s chief executive officer, a post she has held since 2009. The 52-year-old cited that she wanted to spend more time with her family. “It’s been a privilege to lead the organization that Billie Jean King founded and to have worked with the world’s best female athletes, dedicated tournament promoters and passionate and professional WTA team members,” Allaster said. “For 25 years, I have dedicated my professional life to the sport and I’m proud of the work I leave behind.” Allaster will be replaced by Steve Simon, who has served as the Indian Wells Tournament Director.

Serena to appear in Pirelli Calendar

Andy Roddick recently sat down with legendary newsman Dan Rather on his Masahable series “Drinking With Dan” to discuss 20

Serena Williams was quite busy following her loss at the U.S. Open. The world number one was selected to be a part of the

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Pirelli Calendar, joining the likes of Yoko Ono, Patti Smith and Rockville Centre’s Amy Schumer for the 43rd year of the calendar.

Sharapova pulled over in Germany

Maria Sharapova was pulled over by German Police while she was driving through Dusseldorf. The 28-year old Russian didn’t commit any crimes or traffic violations—the officers just wanted to snap a picture with the five-time Grand Slam champion.

Pennetta and Fognini take in Salvatore Ferragamo Fashion Show Fresh off of her win at the U.S. Open, Italian Flavia Pennetta and her fiancee, fellow tennis player Fabio Fognini, sat front row at a f a s h ion show for Salvatore Ferragamo, a brand she has historically adored and been dressed in at times.


Sweeting splits with Cuoco Kayley Cuoco, star of the CBS hit show Big Bang Theory, announced her divorce from husband and tennis professional Ryan Sweeting. The two were married for 21 months before announcing the split.

Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): Crazy cool to be with #23 in China #ShanghAirJordan

Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Relaxing with team after a good day in the office

Tweets from the pros Aga Radwanska (@ARadwanska): Poland v Japan @ volleyball. Poland won Noah Rubin (@Noahrubin33): 10 points off Venus Williams (@VenusesWilliams): but still got the job done!! #TBT 1991, Compton, with Dad #tennis continued on page 22 #coaching

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LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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court six continued from page 21 Victoria Azarenka (@Vika7): For me as an athlete, training on a Sunday morning is like going to church!

John Isner (@JohnIsner): Great time last night! @langhamplaceny @measurelounge

Andy Roddick (@AndyRoddick): Fun being on court in NY, celebrating what makes an extraordinary #WinningShot, past and present, with @GreyGoose

22

Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): Missing my bff!! #voguemagazine #shoot #annieleibovitz #throwback @serenawilliams

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): On the other side of the world, having dinner like I’m home: bread and #IberianHam #RafaNadalAlimentosEspaña

Eugenie Bouchard (@GenieBouchard): In the hallway under Ashe... Jimmy is with me in spirit! @usopen


Why “Keeping Your Eye on the Ball” Is More Than a Slogan in Tennis By Lenny Schloss n developing a player’s tennis swing, the eyes are often overlooked. Perhaps that’s because we use our eyes all day long as we accomplish daily tasks. We use them with precision to scan (to find), track (to follow) or focus (to take action). We take them for granted. But a tennis stroke requires something more. To consistently hit quality shots, these three functions must operate in a precise and coordinated sequence. Most current methods of training treat each function independently. There are problems with this approach. Primarily it seldom works and leads to a syndrome we call “head-shifting.” This is when your eye shifts prematurely from the Point of Contact (POC), thus creating inconsistency and the majority of missed shots.

I

Point of Contact Training Point of Contact (POC) Training unifies these three eye functions so they perform as a team—for each ball and each stroke. When this happens, the full potential in the “kinetic chain” is unleashed, and we move closer to becoming the athletes we were born to be. My work over many years with players and coaches across the country prove that the eye reflex can be changed. We can replace it with a more-helpful reaction. As we do this, the results quickly become evident and you begin to self-reinforce your new behavior. A coaches normal focus When playing, coaches normally concentrate on the larger actions that consume the conscious mind—like stroke technique, unit turn or footwork. Most coaches are very good at this, and it certainly matters. What is often forgotten is the smaller motion of the eyes that is too fast for the human eye to spot (especially when the coach is positioned far from their student). POC Training removes all conscious thinking and allows

for a natural flow between the eye (mind) and the body to instinctively occur. Unleash your natural reflexes POC Training allows your eyes to work better for you. Look at it this way. Your eyes are crucial to survival using protective reflexes that are hardwired into the neural circuit. The eyelid closes when an object is about to hit it. The head pulls away from the force of a blow. Instantly, instinctively and without forethought, this reflex will only change if it is replaced. That’s what POC Training does. It allows the optimal eye position to become instinctive and selfcorrecting when mishitting occurs due to head shifting. Unfortunately most practice repeats the same mistakes over and over. This is a dead end street. You replace an established behavior by repeating a new specific action. You must do this repeatedly for the replacement to take effect. Consistency is the secret. That means that if the newly-acquired behavior is not maintained, the old reflexive reaction will return. And in tennis, your mishits will return.

My best advice Add POC Training to your system as a separate emphasis. Starting with the eyes impacts everything. It builds a more solid foundation for all training that will follow. This is how the kinetic change works. It’s how your game or your student’s play can become more fun and rewarding … almost immediately. Lenny Schloss is CEO and founder of Billie Jean King’s Eye Coach. Lenny has trained thousands of players and coaches on Point of Contact concepts and why it’s the fastest way to better tennis. Lenny is a former all-American tennis player, top 10 U.S. pro, and an award-winning club owner and manager. For more information, visit TheEyeCoach.com.

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LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Little Mo Internationals Bring To Credit photos to aguyandgirlphotography.com & Brian Coleman

he youngest and brightest stars in tennis played in the Fourth Annual “Little Mo” Internationals at The West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y. This year, approximately 120 players from the United States and 15 other countries participated in the popular “Little Mo” event. “The Maureen Connolly Brinker Tennis Foundation is so honored to call Forest Hills home for our Little Mo Internationals tournament,” said Cindy Brinker Simmons, daughter of Maureen Connolly Brinker and president of the MCB Tennis Foundation. “The last four years, The West Side Tennis Club has been so gracious and hospitable to host our outstanding tournament. It is

T

especially meaningful to me since my mom won the final leg of her 1953 Grand Slam victory on the hallowed center court here at Forest Hills when it was played at this particular site.” Bob Ingersole, Tennis Director at West Side Tennis Club, says that this event coincides with the values stressed at West Side. “We’re always happy to have the Little Mo here,” said Ingersole. “This tournament is the epitome of good sportsmanship. Tennis is based on honor. What we try to teach the kids here is honor and integrity, and this is just the perfect event for that.” One of the main objectives of the tournament is demonstrating sportsmanship and a good attitude. Tokens were given out

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

to players who performed acts of sportsmanship during their match, and those tokens could be used towards winning prizes. Summer Evan-Esh of Manasquan, N.J. and Giuseppe Cerasuolo of Bayside, N.Y. received the “Little Mo” Sportsmanship Awards. The Kindness Awards were presented to Joe Phillips of Pelham, N.Y. and Amina Abdullaeva of Aurora, Colo. Honorable mention Sportsmanship Awards went to Nobel Levitin of Rishon le Zion, Israel and Max Frias of North Haven, Conn. Sarah Youngberg, who hails from New York City and trains at the Gotham Tennis Academy, partnered with Arista Siebrits of South Africa in the doubles tournament. “I’m playing against my doubles partner in the first round,” said Youngberg of her singles opponent. “We chat on the phone and she asked me to play doubles, so we decided to partner up in the doubles tournament.” Siebrits would defeat Youngberg and go on to win the Girls 12 Singles Division Title, but the two also went on to win the Girls 12 Doubles Championship later in the week. Coming from South Africa, Siebrits said she enjoyed the experience of meeting new people, and making new friends all around the world. “I was really excited to play in this tournament,” Siebrits said. “To come here and meet new people from around the


op World Juniors to Forest Hills

world is just amazing.” The tournament also serves as a great way for young players to work on their own game and improve by watching their peers. Paige Wygodzki, who was the youngest player in the tournament at just six-years-old, talked about things she worked on heading into the tournament. “I have been working on my forehands and backhands,” said Wygodzki, who trains at Bethpage Park Tennis Center. “My backhands have a really big loop, but now I don’t. My forehands I used to not set up, but now I do.” Carter Swope took home the Boys 10’s Division Title at the “Little Mo” Internationals-New York to complete the second leg of the “Little Mo” Slam and will be going to the “Little Mo” Internationals in Florida at the PGA National Resort & Spa from Dec. 4-9 for the third and final leg. If he wins in Florida, he will take home the tallest trophy in junior tennis at six-feet tall. Carter is from Rogers, Ark. and trains at the Evert Tennis Academy in Boca Raton, Fla. There have been four “Little Mo” players who have accomplished this great achievement in the past two years. “We’re just so thrilled to have 120 kids from 10 countries participating,” said Carol Weyman, executive vice president of the MCB Tennis Foundation. “It’s our fourth year back and we couldn’t have asked for a better location. Coming from Texas, to be back in

New York City is just very exciting for me, and to have kids from all over the world here is great.” Congratulations to the locals who were winners at the Fourth Annual “Little Mo” Internationals: Singles l Boys 12: Hudson Beaudoin (New York, N.Y.) l Boys 11: Solomon Brown (New York, N.Y.) l Boys 8 (Yellow Ball): Dominick Mosejczuk (East Elmhurst, N.Y.) l Girls 9: Ariana Pursoo (Westbury, N.Y.) Doubles l Boys 12: Alexander Davis (Oyster Bay,

N.Y.) & Ryan Shayani (Old Westbury, N.Y.) l Boys 11: Solomon Brown (New York, N.Y.) & Mark Taranov (North Woodmere, N.Y.) l Boys 8: Nicholas Ciordas (Jersey City, N.J.) & Dominick Mosejczuk (East Elmhurst, N.Y.) l Girls 12: Arista Siebrits (Pretoria, South Africa) & Sarah Youngberg (New York, N.Y.) l Girls 11: Rose Hayes (East Moriches, N.Y.) & Sofia Iantosca (New York, N.Y.) l Girls 10: Sophia Cisse (New York, N.Y.) & Emma Roeck (Novi, Mich.) l Girls 9: Christasha McNeil (Massapequa, N.Y.) & Ariana Pursoo (Westbury, N.Y.)

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Boca West Country Club

Elite Tennis Travel Program

(561) 488-6990 BocaWestCC.org

(914) 713-5074 info@elitetennistravel.com EliteTennisTravel.com Elite Tennis Travel Inc. builds exclusive tennis and cultural experiences in Spain. Tennis training is provided by masters at renowned clubs in Barcelona, Valencia and Madrid. Cultural activities include dinners at the chef’s tables, behind-thescenes museum access, and winery tours. Spanish language lessons are also provided upon request.

Located in Boca Raton, Fla. in Palm Beach County, Boca West Country Club is renowned for its first-rate recreational activities. The Country Club’s reputation in golf is equaled by its $1.8 million Tennis Center. Fully dedicated to the racquet sport, there is a lighted stadium court and seating for more than 300, plus access for members to USPTA staff for tennis clinics and private lessons for instructions, drills, techniques and strategies. The number one residential country club in the U.S. is also the proud recipient of the 2013 USTA Outstanding Tennis Facility Award. Tennis enthusiasts looking for superb amenities in a beautiful private country club setting have the opportunity to see many WTA and ATP touring pros and other world-class players who frequent the courts. Adding cachet to the Club’s brand is the recent 2015 partnership with WTA rising star Christina McHale. Tennis Center courts carry a feature-worthy status of their own. There are 31 Hydro-courts, three of which are lit for night play. The Tennis Center is a sought-after destination, hosting championship tournaments and exhibitions, including the USTA French Open Wild Card Tournament. An award-winning community that was originally developed by Arvida Corporation in 1971, it is home to 6,000 residents (3,380 families) in magnificent residences, including townhomes, patio homes, villas, garden apartments and single-family homes. Boca West is the number one Private Residential Country Club in the country and number one private club in Florida. Boca West is a Platinum Club of America, Five-Star Private Club, since 1997. 26

n Our seven-day program is a world-class tennis experience. ETT can arrange a Master-Class, a conference and lunch with Toni Nadal, Carlos Moyá or Juan Carlos Ferrero. These tennis masters will help you work on your technique, precision, strategy and match play. ETT is able to plan any or every aspect of your vacation. The one- or two-week program in Barcelona for high school students includes tennis and physical training, language lessons, cultural experiences, 24-hour supervision, accommodations, three meals daily and transportation. n Our coaches are former ATP players and will work on technical and tactical parts of the game. This high performance program includes four hours of tennis instruction, and two hours of off-court training. n During the weekends, there are planned excursions to explore various facets of Barcelona. n ETT can accommodate groups of various sizes. ETT will design an experience to the required specifications. n Elite Tennis Travel’s schools are accredited by the National Independent Private Schools Association (NIPSA). Elite’s teachers are licensed, native speakers who will target the areas that will improve the skill of each student.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


The Club at Mediterra

Israel Sports Exchange (ISE)

(239) 254-3000 MediterraLiving.com

(973) 952-0405 Israel-Sports-Exchange.com An all-expense paid trip for varsity level high school tennis players to train, compete and travel to Israel this summer. The Program: This once in a lifetime program, under the direction of Larry Seidman and Yuval Higger, is a high-level sports training program for varsity level American tennis players. Yuval has coached Gilad Bloom, Harel Levy and Shahar Peer, all world-ranked players. Adult chaperones accompany the participants during all phases of the program. Every precaution will be taken to ensure that the participants are free to have fun in a safe and wholesome environment. The participants will train, tour and live with host families. “I can say with confidence that ISE is superior to any Israeli touring organization. It combines interacting with Israeli teens through touring and serious training,” a past participant states.

Mediterra is Naples, Fla.’s eighttime Community of the Year and was recently named the Number One Retirement Community in Florida by Best Retirement Destinations. It received a 2013 Aurora Award for Best Residential Development in the Southeastern U.S. and ranks as one of the top private clubs in the world by BoardRoom Magazine. It is also ranked as one of America’s Healthiest Clubs. The 1,700-acre community offers an array of lifestyle amenities, including two world-class Tom Fazio-designed courses and the private 10,000-square-foot Beach Club on the Gulf of Mexico, featuring an elevated swimming pool, casual dining with a full bar, and valet service for beach chairs, umbrellas, and beverage and food menus. The Club, Tavern on 18, Fire Pit Patio and Summer Kitchen offer formal and casual dining prepared by a staff of award-winning culinary experts. Available home designs in Mediterra include single-family estate homes and single-family maintenance-free villas priced from $1 million to more than $7 million. Mediterra’s on-site amenities include themed neighborhood parks; eight miles of walking and jogging trails; a fitness complex with bocce courts, a pool, spa; and a world-class tennis program. “Mediterra was the first to ever host a USTA-sanctioned Tiebreak Tournament last summer. Since then, the best of three, 10-point tie-break format has rapidly gained popularity around the state,” said Mike Baldwin, Mediterra’s USPTA director of tennis. “This type of tournament is really fun and guarantees that each player will have at least two matches. Players also appreciate the convenience of a one-day tournament rather than a weekend tournament with incurred travel and hotel expenses.”

Experience life like an Israeli: The program combines intensive training, competition, touring and home hospitality. Home hospitality is an important element of the program, as it enriches the cultural and social experience. Join ISE: There is no cost for ISE. The Israeli Sports Exchange sponsoring includes: Round-trip airfare between Israel and JFK/Newark, lodging, meals, sports instruction, touring fees, and admission to special events and museums. ISE is an unbelievable experience that fills your days learning about Israel, while playing tennis. You will leave this experience with an improved tennis game and everlasting friendships. For more information, contact Larry Seidman at (973) 952-0405 or e-mail lbseidman@msn.com or visit Israel-Sports-Exchange.com.

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Mauna Kea Beach Hotel

Palm Island Resort

(808) 882-5420 MaunaKeaBeachHotel.com The legendary Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, an architectural icon designed to coexist beautifully with the unforgettable landscape of the Kohala Coast, is located on a silky white-sand crescent beach, Kauna’oa Bay. Escape to paradise where you will find 252 luxurious guest rooms, Laurance S. Rockefeller’s private collection of Asian and Pacific artwork, impeccable service, one of the world’s finest golf courses and tennis club plus tantalizing cuisine with unforgettable settings. The 11-court Seaside Tennis Club is one of the largest and most sought-after tennis experiences in Hawaii. Each one of the 11 courts offer an incredible view of the Pacific Blue Ocean, and on a clear day, you can see Maui in the background. Craig Pautler and his team serve up lessons and daily clinics, roundrobin tourneys, and a comfortable lanai to relax in the shade. Facilities and services include 11 ocean side tennis courts, a pro shop offering equipment and apparel, equipment rentals, men and women locker rooms, video instruction service, ball machine, tournament planning, racquet stringing, individual game-matching, customized special events, tennis clinics, round robin tournaments, private and group lessons. Enjoy the many other amenities offered at the resort like the weekly Lu’au and Clambake, 2,500-square-foot fitness room and spa just to mention a few. Enjoy time at this world-class resort, improve your tennis game while taking in some of the most incredible views in the world and create memories that will be treasured for a lifetime. The Club is open 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. daily, and can be reached at (808) 882-5420 or by visiting MaunaKeaBeachHotel.com.

(800) 824-5412 PalmIsland.com

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Palm Island Resort in Cape Haze, Fla. sets the standard for Southwest Florida’s family of Coastal Island Communities. Villas, cottages and private homes are available for vacation or staycation island visitors. Guests arrive by car ferry and drive a short distance to the resort’s main parking area. Come by boat if you like, since Palm Island Resort offers rental slips too. Palm Island Resort offers both “Go” and “Slow” activities, based on your preferred level of outdoor activity or relaxation. One of the options with Palm Island Go is, of course, tennis. The resort tennis program includes unlimited complimentary play, a complimentary round robin every Saturday, and affordable clinics for both adults and kids. During holiday weekends, the round-robin is geared more toward family play for those of all ages. In addition to the 11 hard tennis courts available at no charge, a tennis pro shop and equipment rentals are also available. Palm Island Resort even has an on-site tennis pro—Bill Longua—who is available to teach clinics and private lessons. Bill attended Iona College in New Rochelle, N.Y. on a tennis scholarship, and you can view his tips and tricks at OnlineTennisTraining.com. If tennis draws you to Palm Island Resort, it won’t be the only thing keeping you there. Activities like kayaking through the mangroves on a guided tour, bicycle trails, and off-shore and back water fishing are available to ensure that your stay at Palm Island Resort is tailored to your needs. Come visit and see for yourself why Palm Island offers one of Florida’s premier island experiences. For more information about Palm Island Resort, call (800) 824-5412 or visit PalmIsland.com.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy (631) 288-4021 • (914) 234-9462 peterkaplan2002@yahoo.com WestHamptonBeachTennis.com Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy, and the affiliated Grassmere Inn, is a wonderful destination for beginners to nationally-ranked players of all ages. Private instruction, clinics, one to seven full- and half-day camps are offered. The flexibility of the programming enables participants to enjoy the nearby beautiful ocean beaches, charming village, Performing Arts Center, movie theatre, wine country, shopping, cafes, restaurants and nearby water park. Resident students/families/teams stay at the historic, newlyrenovated and highly-honored Grassmere Inn, located on quiet, tree-lined Beach Lane Fifty yards from the beginning of the charming village, yet less than one mile from a beautiful ocean beach. The Grassmere’s 22 guest rooms all have air conditioning, WiFi, cable TV and private bathrooms. Ideal for families, are two suites or interconnected rooms. A delicious breakfast is included daily. The Tennis Academy features 12 soft courts. The Academy features an enthusiastic staff, renowned for its high-quality instruction with an average student/staff ratio of 2:1. Most participants seek a less intensive program of three to five hours of instruction daily. Visiting tennis pros bring students with Kaplan’s staff available to supplement the pro. Tennis during the day, the beach, perhaps a glass of wine at sunset, and then dining at a great restaurant, a movie or a show at the Performing Arts Center.

Tennis Fantasies With John Newcombe and The Legends Contact Steve Contardi: (800) 874-7788 stevec@towneproperties.com TennisFantasties.net Tennis Fantasies with John Newcombe and the Legends, the Original Tennis Fantasy Camp, is your chance to play tennis and rub shoulders with the all-time greats of the game. Join host three-time Wimbledon Champion John Newcombe and his “mates” at the John Newcombe Tennis Ranch in New Braunfels, Texas for this most memorable tennis event. The legendary staff will include International Tennis Hall of Fame Members John Newcombe, Roy Emerson, Fred Stolle, Owen Davidson, Mark Woodforde and Charlie Pasarell, as well as Grand Slam winners Ross Case, Marty Riessen, Dick Stockton, Brian Gottfried, Rick Leach and The Jensen Brothers, Murphy and Luke. Tennis Fantasies 2016 offers two great programs: March 3-6, 2016: Tennis Fantasies for Men and Women and October 16-21, 2016: Tennis Fantasies, Men Only. On-court activities include clinics, team competition, and “fantasy” pro-am matches. After tennis, guests will enjoy the “Aussie-style” hospitality of the John Newcombe Tennis Ranch. The John Newcombe Tennis Ranch is located just outside of New Braunfels in the rolling Hill Country of central Texas, 30 minutes from the San Antonio airport. The crystal clear water of Canyon Lake, the Guadalupe River, and the Comal River are just minutes from the Ranch. The John Newcombe Tennis Ranch has 28 deco-turf and four Har-Tru courts, eight lighted and four all-weather covered courts guaranteed tennis every day. Join John Newcombe and his “mates” for the best tennis vacation of your life!

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Topnotch Resort (800) 451-8686 TopnotchResort.com Set within 120 acres of woodland at the foot of Mount Mansfield in the village of Stowe, Vt., Topnotch Resort blends the gracious charm of a ski lodge with the luxurious amenities of a world-class resort. The boutique resort offers 68 guest rooms, two restaurants, indoor and outdoor pools, tennis center, a state-of-the-art fitness center, and a 35,000-square-foot spa. Additional accommodations can be found in a variety of resort homes. Surrounded by Vermont’s legendary Green Mountains, Topnotch Resort provides travelers with a four-season, luxury New England retreat with skiing, snowmobiling, hiking, fishing, canoeing, swimming, biking, paddle-boarding, golfing and more all nearby. The Tennis Center at Topnotch is open year-round, featuring six outdoor courts—all with stunning mountain views—and four indoor hard courts, offering winter guests the optimal ski and tennis experience. The Tennis Center at Topnotch, an official partner of Adidas, is consistently ranked number one in the Northeast, and one of the “Top 25 Tennis Resorts” by Tennis Resorts Online. The Resort’s top-rated Tennis Academy offers more than 30 programs for all ages and levels of play, including a full lineup of lessons, clinics, private instruction, and the newest tennis technologies, such as Dartfish and iPlaymate, led by seasoned pros including Tennis Director Milan Kubala. Designed to leave guests feeling a sense of ultimate achievement and advancement in their game, Topnotch Tennis’ “Play to Win” teaching philosophy provides students an edge in all three critical areas of tennis—strategy, technique and footwork. A Junior Academy for kids, ages five through 14 is also available. 30

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


TENNIS INJURY PREVENTION

Three Types of Strengthening Exercises for the Offseason By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS Now that the weather has begun to cool down, many tennis players will play less frequently than they have been. The offseason is the perfect time to exercise and strengthen the muscle groups imperative to speed and power. Below are three types of exercises to ensure that you are ready to play next season. ACL Injury Prevention Exercise Russian Leg Curl: This exercise is used to strengthen the hamstrings and avoid ACL injuries. To perform this exercise, it’s best to have a spotter to hold your legs. To start, kneel and line up your hips, torso and shoulders so your body forms a straight line from your knees up. Make sure your elbows are bent and your hands are shoulder high and facing outward and have the spotter firmly hold your ankles. Next, tighten the hamstrings, glutes and abdominals and slowly extend your torso toward the floor without bending forward at the hips and making

sure the back is straight. Release the tension as you get a few inches from the floor and then use your palms to push yourself back up to the starting position. Shoulder Injury Prevention Internal and External Shoulder Rotation Exercises: These exercises are used to strengthen the four muscles of the rotator cuff and avoid rotator cuff injuries. To perform these exercises, it is best to use a cable tower with enough weight to provide resistance, but not enough to cause strain. To start, stand with your lifting arm close to the machine with the handle of the cable tower set so that it is parallel to your ribs. Next, with your elbow flexed to 90 degrees, rotate your hand inward toward your belly and hold it for two to three seconds. Then, slowly rotate your elbow outward back to the starting position. For the external rotation version of this exercise, place your lifting arm further from the cable machine and rotate the hand across the entire body. Core Strengthening Exercises Planks and Side Planks: These exercises

are used to strengthen the core muscles and to help avoid spinal injuries. To start this exercise, lay facedown with your feet together and your forearms on the ground shoulder-width apart. Tighten the core muscles and glutes and lift your body off the floor into a straight line from head to toe, balancing your weight on your forearms and toes. Hold this position as long as you can and then return your body to the floor. For the side plank exercise, lie on your side with one arm bent under your body and the other arm on your hip. Align your head, shoulders, hips and ankles into a straight line and push your body toward the ceiling, while balancing the weight on your arm and foot. Hold this position as long as you can and then return your body to the floor. Dr. Charles Ruotolo is a Board-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and the founder of Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with locations in Massapequa, East Meadow and the Bronx, N.Y. For more information, call (855) 321-ORTHO or visit www.totalorthosportsmed.com.

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Coaches Roundtable Discussion he Long Island tennis community has some of the sport’s best facilities, both indoor and outdoor, and best coaches in the world. With this wealth of talent available right in our own backyard, Long Island Tennis Magazine recently took the opportunity to pick the brains of some of these top coaches. What you will find below are some of the sport’s top instructors sharing their ideas and strategies from coaching those new to the game to skilled juniors, the state of tennis on Long Island, the role of the parent in a player’s development, and much more. Even the best coach can always learn an extra tip or two, and the following article will provide all players and coaches with a chance to learn from the cream of the area’s crop.

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Meet the participants … Howie Arons Great Neck Estates Tennis Center Howie Arons is the owner/director of Great Neck Estates Tennis Center, as well as the Boys Tennis Coach of BN Cardozo High School in Bayside, N.Y. Howie has coached Cardozo for 36-plus years, and has the most tennis wins in New York State history with 584 wins. He was USTA Coach of the Year in 1988 and USPTA Coach of the Year in 2007. Carl Barnett Glen Head Racquet Club, Home of the Early Hit Training Center This is the 13th season of Carl Barnett’s Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club. Early Hit is dedicated to providing lessons, groups and training in its comprehensive ALPS program. Pat Etcheberry has worked with Carl as an advisor with the ALPS training program. Carl has concluded that students learn faster when they have core fitness, flexibility and explosive strength. Early Hit not only serves juniors as the program features nationally-ranked players in the USTA Open, 40s, 60s and 70s Divisions. 32

Ricky Becker JuniorTennisConsulting LLC Ricky Becker is the founder of JuniorTennisConsulting LLC, director of tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors yearround. Ricky was named the Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and was a top-five nationally-ranked junior. Vinicius Carmo The Ross School Vinicius Carmo is tennis director of The Ross School Tennis Academy and coach of the boy’s and girl’s varsity tennis teams. As a player, Vinicius was ranked among the top five junior players in Brazil and played several international junior tennis tournaments. He attended the University of Tennessee for four years on a full scholarship. Lisa Dodson Servemaster at The Total Serve Lisa Dodson is owner of Servemaster at The Total Serve, a USPTA Elite Pro, a formerly world ranked player and radio show host.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Steve Kaplan Bethpage Park Tennis Center Steven Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Over the last 35-plus years, Steve has been the long-time coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division I Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $8 million in college scholarship money. Mike Kossoff Sportime Mike Kossoff, a native of Long Island, was one of the top ranked juniors in the country prior to attending Bowling Green State University where he earned a bachelor of arts degree in communications. At Bowling Green, Mike led the men’s tennis team to two MidAmerican Conference Championships and became the most successful player in the history of the program. After graduating, Mike quickly became one of the top junior coaches in the East, developing numerous nationally-ranked players, while earning a master’s degree in physical education. He has competed and coached extensively in


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

Coaches Roundtable Discussion ITF tournaments around the world. Mike joined Sportime in 2000 and became Director of the JMTA Long Island Annex in 2012 and is the Tennis Director at Sportime Syosset/Bethpage. Whitney Kraft USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Since 2007, Whitney Kraft has been the director of tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. and director of player operations for the U.S. Open. Previously, he was director of tennis for the City of Fort Lauderdale Park & Recreation Department (1998-2007). He was a 1983 Singles AllAmerican for Florida Atlantic University, and inducted into their inaugural Athletic Hall of Fame class in 2006. He is a National 10 & Under Trainer, a USPPTA Platform Tennis instructor, as well as a member of the National Cardio Tennis Speakers Team. A USPTA member since 1983, Whitney served as district director for Broward County, Florida and as president of the local CTA, Broward Tennis Association. Whitney has been the tournament director for many prestigious events, including the National Public Parks Tennis Championships (2007), ITF World Championships (2002), the inaugural U.S. Open National Sectional Playoffs (2010), USTA Boys 14 National Clay Court Championships (2000-2007) and the USTA National Open Clay Court and Indoor Championships (1998-present). Ed Krass College Tennis Exposure Camps Ed Krass coached the Harvard Women’s Tennis Team to four consecutive Ivy League titles from 1986-1990. Ed is the founder and director of

the Annual College Tennis Exposure Camps, which are taught exclusively by all Head College Coaches for high school-aged players (15-18). Ed is also the founder of One-On-One Doubles tournaments, which have been played at USTA, ATP, ITA and USPTA national events. Ben Marks Carefree Racquet Club Ben Marks is the director of junior tennis at Carefree Racquet Club and director of tennis at Cold Spring Harbor Beach Club. He has previously worked at the John McEnroe Tennis Academy, and was the Cold Spring Harbor Varsity Head Coach for three years, earning Nassau County Coach of the Year Honors in 2014. He played number one and number two singles for Norfolk State University, and number one doubles, reaching a careerhigh regional ranking of ninth in the Atlantic Region. He is a 2015 National Open Doubles Champion. Butch Seewagen CATS—Children’s Athletic Training School/Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy Butch Seewagen is owner of CATS—Children’s Athletic Training School and Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy in Rockville Centre, N.Y. He is a former U.S. Amateur Champion, coach of Ivy League Champion Columbia University, and a former top 70 in the world. Seewagen played the U.S. Open 13 times, he reached the semifinals in doubles and was among the last 32 in singles.

Jay Wass Sportime Kings Park Jason Wass is a USPTA Professional Certified Instructor, with experience coaching all ages and levels. A graduate of the USTA High-Performance Player Development Program, Jay’s strengths lie in working with players in developmental stages of the game, building player’s technique and strategy from the ground up. Jason’s versatility as a tennis coach is demonstrated by his list of students that range from total beginner to nationallyranked. Named the 2010 USTA Long Island Tennis Professional of the Year, Jay is the director of tennis at Sportime Kings Park.

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Coaches Roundtable Discussion The roundtable ...

What are the main reasons for the loss of U.S. dominance at the professional level? Howie Arons: There are quite a few reasons for the lack of American dominance in tennis. Each of these reasons are important, but they don’t stand alone. One good reason, in my opinion, is we have no exciting players in the top 10. We have no players with talent and charisma … no magnets of the game. Where is the next 19-year-old Jimmy Connors, 17-year-old John McEnroe, 17year-old Andre Agassi, 17-year-old Pete Sampras, etc. We have no role models to

excite the younger generation, and we badly need a superstar. Another major reason is the amount of effort it takes as a junior—playing almost every day and playing in tournaments all weekend. What I see today that is different is the total commitment of most top juniors. They believe they work hard, but their effort is fragmented because of life’s many choices. Mike Kossoff: I feel it’s a combination of a number of factors. First, we are still way behind other countries in how we develop our 10 &

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Under tennis players. Secondly, the USTA tournament and ranking system. Third, until very recently, the USTA national coaches were not working hand-in-hand with our top developmental junior coaches. Fourth, college tennis switching to no-ad scoring and match super tiebreakers for the third set is not ideal for preparation on the pro tour. Fifth, the growing expense of the sport. Sixth, the sport of tennis in the United States does not attract our best athletes. And finally, prize money as a professional tennis player. Being a pro tennis player is far from glamorous. If you are in the top 200 in the world, you are a big time tennis player. The problem is you are not making any money! I will say that we do have some really bright young American players coming up in the rankings. We should see some of the women breaking out in the next two years, with some top men shortly to follow. I am even predicting one Long Island male to crack into the top 100 within the next three years. In fact … I can guarantee it. Whitney Kraft: That’s a great question with lots to consider. Tennis is becoming such a global sport, whereby in some countries it currently ranks as the second most popular sport behind soccer. The U.S. has added more and more choices


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

Coaches Roundtable Discussion for youth with video gaming not helping! Navigating the competitive/developmental pathway remains a tough puzzle for parents to sort out in our country. Tournaments historically hosted in the U.S. (1980s1990s) went overseas. This—combined with geographic advantages, innovative ranking systems along with feed-in draws—yielded more frequent and competitive match environments with France as an example. Some nations did a superior job over the past 20 years with the “tennis-sized right” youth pathway to excellence and long term development, such as the nations of France and Belgium. Many foreign players play and train more on clay, thereby developing excellent defensive skills, superior point construction, variety of shots and higher fitness levels. Collegiate tennis in the United States shifted to more foreign players being recruited, thus providing support/training grounds for the likes of Kevin Anderson of South Africa/University of Illinois. Many foreign pros have lived and trained in the U.S. since infancy, for example Maria Sharapova. Are they foreign or American? For many years, a mistake was made in thinking that U.S. players were ready to turn pro in their teenage years. As a result, many players never reached their full potential and/or caved from expectations and the pressure more easily mitigated from a more mature athlete. Could it just be cyclical? It would be interesting to ask Sweden, Argentina, Germany and Australia the same question. Where are the top 10 men and women?

to one-hour in the training room. Our tournament players do this three to five times per week, coupled with one or two private lessons. For high school and beginner tournament players, we encourage group lessons at least twice per week. Coincidently, my friend Pat Etcheberry was at Early Hit with touring professional Daniela Hantuchova, and they worked in the Training Center for an hour and then spent 90 minutes on the court. This, in my mind, is the best ratio. Steve Kaplan: Almost every session on the court should include functional fitness and tennis skill development, starting with a good movement preparation warm up. It’s important to recognize that most racket skill deficiencies are compensations for a lack of mobility and motor skill. These areas can be integrated into every practice. Off the court, athletes should roll and stretch daily for recovery, prioritizing mobility first and then include functional strength and power at least several times a week. Ed Krass: Light weights and speed, agility and flexibility training should be

only 20 percent of a tournament player’s training regimen. As we know, court time is very valuable for instruction, drilling and competitive practice matches, which should comprise 80 percent of a player’s training regimen. Ice should be applied to the knees, shoulders, elbows and other joints after each practice, as most top college tennis teams do ice therapy to eliminate inflammation of the muscles. We must prevent injuries! Butch Seewagen: A ratio should be based on a student’s time availability. In the winter, more time can be spent off the court due to less available court time. The busier summer months should be more of a maintenance program and time spent working on specific physical weaknesses.

What advice do you have for tennis parents in how to deal with their kids during training, and before and after matches? Ricky Becker: It is a good idea for the parent to sit on the court during lessons, because the pro and child will feel more accountable. The parent can also report

What should the ratio be between the time spent on the court and time spent on fitness for juniors? Carl Barnett: The ratio we like to work within group is 90 minutes of court time LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Coaches Roundtable Discussion back to the coach what is being absorbed in tournaments. Parental feedback during the lesson, as well as to a child immediately after a match, are not productive or constructive. Vinicius Carmo: My advice is for the parents to always be supportive and give their children strong confidence and selfesteem. The well-being of the child outside of tennis is very important for any player’s performance. If the kids are happy outside the court, there is a good chance that they will have a good training session. If the child has a bad training session, parents should listen to their children and provide mental support off the court, so the children can come back next time and improve upon their training. Lisa Dodson: At competitive levels, the role of the parent is to be supportive of the player and of their coaches. The coach is the coach and the parent is the parent, and it usually works best if these roles are adhered to. Parents should do what they would instinctively do for all of their children, regardless of tennis: Provide a loving, structured and

supportive environment in which their child can thrive, grow and succeed. Being positive and supportive is critical. Many kids leave tennis when the parent gets a little too pushy. If kids don’t live up to their parents’ expectations, it creates an uninspired student. There is too much pressure to succeed everywhere. Kids want to achieve for their coaches. We are one step removed and can be more demanding so gains are more measurable and appreciated. Jay Wass: In a word, RELAX. This is a marathon, not a sprint. Parents seem to be way too concerned with short-term winning and losing. The development process takes a long time, and failing is good! As far as before and after matches, let the kids drive conversations. If they need space, give it to them, and if they want to talk, be supportive. How has coaching tennis changed in the time you have been involved in it? Howie Arons: I have been a tennis coach in New York City and Long Island for 40 years and have come to know hundreds of coaches. The main difference in

coaching today from 20 years ago is knowledge of the importance of a coordinated fitness program to go handin-hand with a junior program. Coaches and program directors try to make complete tennis programs, with a strong emphasis on fitness training. Lisa Dodson: The change in the style of play has been massive. Keeping up with the times and deciding on what I believe is the best way to get through to the student is ever-evolving. With the Internet and online coaching sites, coaching has become much more of a business. There is an endless supply of online teaching and programs to learn from which can be positive and negative. A lot of players are receiving conflicting information from a variety of sources, and this can be confusing. For some, it replaces the special relationship between the student and coach. Those players don’t know what they are missing. Steve Kaplan: When I first started coaching tennis over 35 years ago, coaching was viewed primarily as teaching the art of racket management. Over the years, progressive coaches have evolved to focus less on developing rackets skills and more on overall athletic development. Of course, advances in technology have led the way to promoting this shift which has unquestionably raised the overall quality of play. Butch Seewagen: Before the Internet, all knowledge came from observation alone and good coaches. Now, with the information age, a student can get an infinite amount of knowledge online. It is now up to the coach to sort all this out for the student. Which coaches do you admire in other professional sports? Howie Arons: Tom Coughlin of the New

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Coaches Roundtable Discussion York Giants is my favorite coach. He is tough, exciting, loves to coach and loves the process, not just winning. His players love to play for him. He makes players better and they love it. Another coach that comes to mind is Mike Kryzyzewski. He has so much intensity, but never goes over the line. He coaches with all that he has every game. There really are a lot of great coaches in every sport. Carl Barnett: I admire Pete Carroll, head coach of the Seattle Seahawks. He, just like us at Early Hit, strive to have a learning based organization that is hungry to figure out the challenges of expressing human potential. We cannot measure success by a point, set or match. We are more interested in the process of a successful arc of growing. I also want to add Dr. Angela Lee Duckworth from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Duckworth is a psychologist who coaches grit in students from a motivational perspective. Grit is passion and commitment for long-term goals. Ms. Duckworth is a leading proponent of Growth Mindset. Here, brains and talent are considered the starting point. This view creates a love of learning and a resilience that is essential for great accomplishment.

Football Club in the English Premier League. He is a master tactician and gets the most out of all of his players. His body language and demeanor oozes confidence, and his personnel management skills are top notch. What is the one thing you hope any student of yours learns from you? Steve Kaplan: The positive value of effort, dedication, education, health, confidence and humility. Ed Krass: The one thing I hope a student learns from me is that it is important to be a good person first, a good player second. Honesty, integrity and character far outweigh the match results as we prepare for the game of life! Ben Marks: I always try to make sure that all of my students enjoy playing the game. It is very easy to forget the real reason we all play tennis … for fun! This does not mean that my students do not work hard and strive to improve every time they step onto a tennis court, because they definitely do! But, in order for them to keep wanting to work as

hard as they do, they have to enjoy the sweat and occasional tears as well! Jay Wass: Sportsmanship, and respect for the game, their opponents, competition, etc. I tell my students that they get to be tennis players some of the time, but they can be great human beings all of the time. Do you think it is important for kids to play other sports in addition to tennis? Mike Kossoff: Absolutely. We strongly encourage all of our John McEnroe Tennis Academy players to participate in other sports, especially team sports. It’s beneficial for kids to experience competition in different settings, as well as just enjoy themselves with their peers! Whitney Kraft: Absolutely, research across numerous sports has shown that over-specialization at too young of an age doesn’t yield long-term results. Becoming a great athlete is more important. Diversity in sports prevents burnout and overuse injuries. Remember the sport of soccer that

Ricky Becker: The late Al Arbour of the National Hockey League is someone I have always admired. He was a strict disciplinarian with a well-organized system, but was well-liked by all of his players. What a combination! He was humble and classy, and his opponents even respected the heck out of him. He certainly got results, as he led the Islanders to four straight Stanley Cups under his watch! Mike Kossoff: I am a big fan of Jose Mourinho, current coach of the Chelsea LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Coaches Roundtable Discussion John McEnroe, Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer played as juniors. What are some of the teaching/coaching adjustments you have to make when going from outdoors in the summer to indoors in the winter? Lisa Dodson: The biggest adjustment is the playing surface. I teach on Har-Tru in the spring, summer and fall, and on hard courts in the winter. I also go from a country club environment to a more highperformance program indoors. Pretty much everything is different, so it really keeps things interesting. What stays the same is teaching solid technical basics, good grips and most of all, an all-court game. Whitney Kraft: You can leave the sunscreen and hat at home, along with the excuses about wind, shadows and temperatures. A static playing environment is optimal, thus take full advantage! Ben Marks: There are a lot of adjustments to be made switching from indoor tennis to outdoor tennis. One of

the main things I am aware of when we make the transition is the speed of the points. Preparation has to happen earlier due to the increased speed of the ball, points tend to be shorter indoors (though often not as short as they should be!), so a more aggressive approach to point construction is required as players cannot just sit back and grind. Another thing to remember is that because balls are traveling faster, players have to keep in mind that their opponents can come up with more winning shots from areas in the court they maybe couldn’t when playing outside. Seeing a couple of winners flying by you can be disheartening at times, but players cannot let themselves get worked up by a few “lucky” shots from their opponents. For younger players, do you emphasize mental toughness and attitude more than technique? How do you find a healthy balance between the two? Carl Barnett: We start focus training in the training room. A group may be doing 18 core hops and a new student may only be able to do five. We have that student do five and hop up until they can do

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

seven. Eventually, the student will join the group at 18, but until then, they do the exact amount they’ve committed to. Focus is based on self-belief and this achievement and growth enhances belief. Technique is best developed initially in private lessons. For example, when a student is doing inside-out forehands and their footwork could improve by watching a higher level effort from a more experienced student. The balance between technique and focus is then best developed in supervised match play where nuances can be addressed as they develop. Ed Krass: The younger players, ages 10-14, need to establish solid technique that will allow their game to grow. They also need to learn some of the key mental aspects of the game if they are to learn how to handle winning and losing. The older juniors must learn the balance of respect and pressure to perform optimally each time. That being said, juniors must learn to give credit where credit is due, the other player counts too! This will allow for huge mental growth. The mental side needs to be stressed all the time—as it is our minds that tell our body what to do. Butch Seewagen: Obviously, proper tennis technique and skills are emphasized, first and foremost. Mental toughness lessons are best learned in the school of hard knocks—competition. A lesson should be learned from every competitive match. Do you think it is important for top junior players to play high school tennis, or are they better off focusing on individual tournaments? Ricky Becker: I played four years of high school tennis at Roslyn while


2015 LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

Coaches Roundtable Discussion having a top national ranking and loved it! But my coach let me train on my own and just play matches. High school coaches should be sensitive to a top-player’s time and practice quality. Top players don’t “need” high school tennis to play college tennis, but I would recommend it. Vinicius Carmo: I think that top junior players should compete in high school tennis as long as the high school tennis coaches have flexibility with the player’s practice schedule. It is important to be part of a team in case you play college tennis one day. It also improves selfconfidence for the player to represent their school. Ben Marks: This is a question without a straightforward answer. It comes down to the individual and their high school coach finding a balance between the two. I coached the Cold Spring Harbor Boys Varsity Team for three years. I was fortunate that I was able to coach players who have reached the top 100 in the country in their age groups and have gone on to play D-1 college tennis, yet still wanted to represent our team. I believe that playing in these high-pressure matches was fantastic for their development as players, and future college athletes. I believe that high-performance players cannot give up their individual tennis completely during the high school season, like many coaches require, without causing harm to their games and without bad habits creeping in. All of the players on my team were given the option to attend one to two private lessons during the week instead of coming to every high school practice. This was a great compromise for all of our players and the only way high school tennis can still attract the best juniors in the country. High school tennis provides huge benefits, such as playing under pressure,

playing as part of team, dealing with many unusual conditions, but it cannot provide our juniors with the technical help and structure that they need to continue their development like our academies and clubs can. What are the biggest positives and negatives of the current state of tennis on Long Island? How can we continue to grow participation? Carl Barnett: We need to honor all achievements: Level 3, Level 2, high school tennis, etc. Winning at any level encourages tennis players to keep playing. Be welcoming and encouraging to beginners. We may not remember it, but we were one once beginners too at one point in time. Vinicius Carmo: Of course the biggest challenges are the cost of indoor tennis and the lacking of a national hero. Children today do not have a top American player to inspire them to play the sport of tennis. I believe in the 10 & Under method of teaching, using the appropriate sized nets, racquets and balls for children to

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play tennis. I hope that all clubs and academies continue to use this method to grow the sport of tennis. Children will have more fun and they will engage in the sport at a much earlier age. Steve Kaplan: Tennis has the potential to thrive on Long Island despite the current participation downturn in most local areas. This starts by giving great regard to economic circumstances and providing opportunities to players based on need as well as ability. I also talked in this magazine about the opportunity for clubs to go beyond the scope of QuickStart and reach out to local communities to become leaders in early childhood athletic development. Jay Wass: Long Island has an amazing group of people involved in the game. Coaches, parents and former players are all ready, willing and able to help out our current players. I believe we need to embrace more opportunities to get players started in the game at a younger age. Ideally, we as coaches can find ways to work with schools to offer more play within their current curriculum.

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2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap Oyster Bay’s Kowalsky & Matute Repeat as Nassau County Champs For the second consecutive year, the Nassau County Doubles Championship belongs to the Oyster Bay team of Celeste Matute (senior) & Courtney Kowalsky (junior). The two girls, who won last year’s Nassau County and New York State Doubles Titles, defeated the second-seeded team of Manhasset’s Lia Frankis & Amanda Foo in straight sets 6-2, 6-0 in the finals at Eisenhower Park in East Meadow, N.Y. “We’re a good team. We work hard and practice hard together,” said Matute. “We also communicate with each other well and motivate each other on the court. That is the key to our success.” Matute & Kowalsky defended their County Title in dominant fashion, rolling through their matches without dropping a set and losing only four total games in the semis and finals combined. In the semifinals, they defeated the third-place team, Jericho’s Samantha Galu & Jiya Singh, 6-2, 6-0. Kowalsky, who is a junior, said that both her and Matute have 42

worked hard to improve their volleying skills and that it paid off in the championships. “I think we have improved our net play and we set each other up really well,” said Kowalsky. “Celeste is a senior, and next year, I’m really going to miss the chemistry we have on the court together.” For now, the Oyster Bay duo’s main focus is heading back to the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) Championships to defend their title. The singles final featured Hewlett’s Kseniya Zonova, a native of the Ukraine who was playing in her first tennis tournament on U.S. soil and Cold Spring Harbor’s Merri Kelly Hannity. Zonova defeated Hannity 6-2, 6-1. Hannity is an eighth grader who was also competing in her first Nassau County tournament. Zonova upset the number one-seeded Alex Koniaev of Locust Valley in the semis, 6-2, 7-6, while Hannity survived a fantastic match with second-seeded Ashley Lessen from Wheatley as she was able to pull out an impressive 6-3, 4-6, 7-5 win, in a match that lasted over two hours. In the finals, Zonova used her power and consistency to grab the lead, taking the first set 6-2, but Hannity kept fighting in the second set. Hannity used impressive groundstrokes from both sides to take an early 1-0 lead. After Zonova battled back to tie the score 1-1, Hannity worked hard in the third game trying to break

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap Zonova’s serve. The game lasted almost ten minutes with both players taking ad point multiple times. Zonova was able to grind it out and won the game with a strong swinging volley at the net. From there, she cruised to win the next four games, winning the match and the 2015 Nassau County Championship, 6-2, 6-1. “After winning that 1-1 game, it gave me confidence,” said Zonova. “That game was very stressful mentally, but I tried to mix it up with slices and hard shots, and it ended up working.” She added that Hannity played great and generated power from the baseline that caused her to really adjust her game. “I was on the run a lot and I just tried to return her shots,” said Zonova. “She hit some really great shots out there.” Hannity said she tried to hit as hard as she could and move her

opponent around, but felt she lacked consistency. “She got a lot of my balls back and made me hit extra shots,” added Zonova. Both Hannity and Zonova said that they are looking forward to playing at States for the first time. They will be joined at States by Ashley Lessen, who won her Consolation Match over Koniaev 62, 7-6 (4). In doubles, Jericho’s Galu & Singh claimed the final spot in the States, along with Matute & Kowalsky and Frankis & Foo, after a 6-2, 6-0 win over Port Washington’s Emma Rosenberg & Sydney Levy. The NYSPHSAA Championships will be played Oct. 31-Nov. 1 in Latham, N.Y.

Scenes from the 2015 Nassau County Championship Eisenhower Park in East Meadow, N.Y.

Eighth grader Merri Kelly Hannity from Lia Frankis & Amanda Foo, Courtney Kowalsky & Celeste Cold Spring Harbor is headed to Latham, Matute, and Samantha Galu & Jiya Singh will represent N.Y. for the 2015 State Championships Nassau County at the State Championships

Kseniya Zonova, Ashley Lesse and Merri Kelly Hannity are headed to the 2015 State Championships

Nassau County Doubles Champs Celeste Matute & Courtney Kowalsky

Credit all photos to Keith Kowalsky

Oyster Bay’s Celeste Matute & Courtney Kowalsky, 2015 Nassau County Doubles Champions

2015 Nassau County Individual Champion Kseniya Zonova

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2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap

Commack’s Liao Captures Suffolk County Girl’s Title Commack’s Kimberly Liao showed once again why she has been such a good player all season long. Just an eighth grader, Liao captured the 2015 Suffolk County Girl’s Individual Singles Title on a cold and windy afternoon at William Floyd High School in Mastic Beach, downing big-hitting Stephanie Chikvashvili of Half Hollow Hills East 7-5, 6-3. Liao fell behind 3-0 early as Chikvashvili notched the early break in the second game, but Liao demonstrated her maturity and hung tough to get the break back in the fifth game. “I just calmed down and told myself to rally with her,” said Liao, who anchored Commack to a 12-0 team record this season. “I got my serve back and everything started flowing from there.” At 4-4, Liao would break again to jump ahead 5-4. But the experienced Chikvashvili answered right back with a break to even things at 5-5. Liao continued to hang at the baseline to rally and wait for her chances, and once again broke Chikvashvili for the 6-5 lead. This time, she closed things out on her serve to take the opening set 7-5. In the second, it was Liao who came out firing. She jumped on a second serve from Chikvashvili and ripped a forehand winner down the line to go up an early break. After consolidating that with a hold, the eighth-grader broke again to take a commanding 3-0 lead in the second set. At 5-3, Liao closed out the victory on her third match point on Chikvashvili’s serve, beating the junior for the fourth time this season. “I lost to her twice last year,” Liao recalled. “This year I re-

ally knew how to play her, but I didn’t focus on the person and just played the ball.” Both players will be heading to Latham, N.Y. for the New York State Championships. Joining them upstate will be Huntington’s Emily Shutman, who defeated Jackie Bukzin of Eastport-South Manor 6-2, 62 in the third-place match. The top-seeded duo of Danah Han & Mina Sarcevic of Half Hollow Hills West launched a great comeback in the doubles final, defeating Floyd’s Lisa Lin & Kaitlin Hibbert 0-6, 6-1, 6-2 to win the Suffolk County Girl’s Doubles Title. After dropping the first six games of the match, the Hills West pair made a key adjustment that helped them find their rhythm. “After talking to our coach, she said ‘go back to the basics, hit it crosscourt and stay consistent’ and that really helped,” said Han. Hills West Head Coach Kim Langendorfer said the two had never played a team that poached and came to the net as much as Lin & Hibbert, and told her girls to stand back from the baseline to counter that. The strategy paid off as they rattled off 12 of the match’s final 15 games to win the title. “I was just really proud of how we played because it was a great match,” added Han. “I’m really excited to go to states.” Both doubles teams will be heading up to Latham for the state tournament, along with the team of Olivia Faulhaber & Mikayla Goria of Smithtown East, who defeated Gina LaRusso & Alexis Huber 6-1, 6-2 in the third-place match.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap

Scenes from the 2015 Suffolk County Championship William Floyd High School in Mastic Beach, N.Y.

Half Hollow Hills East’s Stephanie Chikvashvili rips a forehand during the semifinals of the 2015 Suffolk County Tournament

Credit all photos to Brian Coleman

Emily Shutman of Huntington is headed Danah Han of Half Hollow Hills West hits a backhand during to the States after her win over Jackie the Suffolk County finals Bukzin of Eastport-South Manor

Danah Han & Mina Sarcevic of Half Hollow Hills Jackie Bukzin of Eastport-South Manor sets a West with the completed draw after winning backhand during her semifinal match against the 2015 Suffolk County Doubles Finals Stephanie Chikvashvili

2015 Suffolk County Champion Kimberly Liao of Commack gears up for a serve during her win in the finals

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www.pinehollowcc.org l 516-922-0300 LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap

Manhasset Girls Repeat as Nassau County Champions B Y B RIA N C O LEMA N

The Manhasset Indians were a 5-2 winner over Cold Spring Harbor to repeat as Nassau County Champions

Credit all photos to Brian Coleman

Manhasset’s Amanda Foo during her win over CSH's Merri Kelly Hannity

Cold Spring Harbor's Merri Kelly Hannity battles Amanda Foo during the Nassau County Championship As the defending Nassau County Girls High School Tennis champions, the Manhasset Indians played each and every match of the 2015 season with a target on its back. And each and every time, Manhasset’s girls came through, culminating in a 5-2 victory over Cold Spring Harbor to complete the undefeated season and win its second straight Nassau County Championship. “The girls came into the beginning of the season wanting to go back to back. It has never been done before at Manhasset,” said Manhasset Head Coach Eileen Cuneo. “But they also knew it’s always harder to repeat than it is to win the first one. We never looked ahead to any match or opponent, just always focused on the match at hand. And the girls really embraced that and took that on.” Manhasset’s focus this season, and it resulted in a perfect 16-0 record heading into the County Championship. But standing in its way was a deep and talented Cold Spring Harbor team from Conference II, led 46

by eighth grader and top singles player Merri Kelly Hannity, who squared off with Manhasset’s Amanda Foo. In a matchup between two of the top players in Nassau County, this match did not disappoint. Hannity was able to pull out the first set 7-5, but Foo, a senior, did not fold, using her experience to stage a comeback over the next two sets. She raced out to a 5-2 lead in the second set, and even after Hannity was able to get a break back and close the deficit to 4-5, Foo broke Hannity to win the second set and force a deciding third. In the third set, Foo had a chance to serve for the match with a 5-3 lead. She built a 40love advantage and had four match points, but Hannity showed toughness, saving all four of the match points to extend the match for at least one more game. But much like the second set, Foo broke right back, closing out the match and securing a big 5-7, 6-4, 6-4 comeback win.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

“Amanda has had an incredible season,” said Coach Cuneo. “She has been on the varsity team since eighth grade. I have seen this young woman develop into such a confident and persevering player. She is so determined. Regardless of what the score is, she keeps fighting until the end. She comes out with an open mind and just plays her heart out.” Manhasset would take the second and third singles matches as well, as Stephanie Petras and Brooke DiGia both won in straight sets, and had the 2015 County Championship clinched after the team of Alina Zhitnik & Yaya Wang hung on to beat Dylan Beder & Katherine Faria, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4 at second doubles. The win moved Manhasset’s record to 170 on the year and earned them a second straight Nassau County Championship. “This is amazing,” said Foo. “It was incredible to win last year and to repeat is fantastic.”


2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap

Hills East Upsets Commack for Suffolk Title B Y B RIA N C O LEMA N

The Half Hollow Hills East Thunderbirds defeated Commack for the Suffolk County Championship

Credit all photos to Brian Coleman

Stephanie Chikvashvili of Hills East was victorious at first singles over Commack’s Kimberly Liao

Suffolk County Individual Champion Kimberly Liao of Commack at first singles against Hills East The Half Hollow Hills East Thunderbirds entered the 2015 Girls High School Playoffs as the fourth seed in Suffolk County, but played its best tennis when it mattered most, and ran the table in the playoffs, defeating second seed and undefeated Commack 5-2 in the County Final. It was singles play that led the way for the Thunderbirds, as it took three of the four singles courts on its way to the victory, highlighted by Stephanie Chikvashvili’s victory at first singles over Commack’s Kimberly Liao. The two met for the fifth time this season, and once again, played an incredibly competitive match that had each spectator fixated. Liao, who defeated Chikvashvili in the Suffolk County Individual Championship, was on her game early, racing out to a 5-2 lead before eventually closing out the opening set 6-4. But Liao, who was battling an illness all week, took a medical break after Chikvashvili jumped out to a 4-1 lead in the second set. The Hills East junior seized momentum, and rattled off the final two sets for the win.

“Stephanie’s win over Kim was well-deserved,” said Hills East Head Coach Tom Depelteau. “Her prior losses to her were very close, and I believe this result confirms that the two of them will be factors in the upcoming state tournament.” The doubles team of Alexis Huber & Gina LaRusso from Hills East, who finished fourth in the Individual County Tournament, knocked off the duo of Shelly Gupta & Alexa Corben at first doubles. After Hills East got a win from Ariana Malik over Commack’s Emma Matz at third singles, the Thunderbirds were one victory away from the 2015 Suffolk County Title. That win would come from the fourth singles court, as Brynn April defeated Dara Danzinger 6-1, 6-1 to clinch the victory. “I am very proud of my team,” said Depelteau. “One strength of the team is that each competed for their teammates and not just for themselves. It was important to each that they make a contribution to the whole.” It was a remarkable playoff run for Hills East,

who beat previously undefeated and topseeded Floyd on Floyd’s home courts in the semifinals, and then knocked off the previously unbeaten and second-seeded Commack in the finals. “While Commack beat us twice during the season, we felt all along that we only needed one more chance to turn the tables,” added Depelteau. “William Floyd was more of an unknown quantity. We had no common opponent and knew very little of their strengths.” Hills East finishes the season at 14-2, with the only two losses coming to Commack in the regular season, and concluded the year on a six-match winning streak. “At the outset of the season, we held modest expectations,” said Depelteau. “As we progressed, the doubles team’s chemistry grew and the quality of their play and that of our singles girls improved. Although we suffered those two losses to Commack, our expectations grew. The outcome is all the more sweet as a result of those modest expectations.”

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA Eastern Lo New Eastern Section Chief The USTA Long Island Region is pleased to welcome Jenny Schnitzer, the new USTA Eastern executive director and chief operating officer. Jenny has been a valued member of the USTA team for the past 23 years. In her current role, she oversees all departments, including Competitive, Community, Finance and Marketing & Communications. She provides training, supervision and support to all section staff, including the regional Tennis Service Representatives. Previously, she was USTA Eastern’s assistant executive director, where she was responsible for developing a plan with an emphasis on growing tennis at the community level. The Long Island Region congratulates Jenny and wishes her well in her new position. We look forward to continuing to work with her to further the USTA’s and the Eastern Section’s goals.

Althea Premieres on Long Island

Photo credit: Neil Tandy Image Photographers

The USTA Long Island Region joined the local film and tennis communities for the Long Island premiere of Althea, a documentary exploring the rise and celebrating the life of tennis pioneer Althea Gibson. The LI Region and Gold Coast International Film Festival hosted the gala screening, which was highlighted by a special question and answer panel featuring director 48

Rex Miller, Robert Ryland, George Henry, Leslie Allen and Lori McNeil (via Skype). Althea Gibson’s life and achievements transcend sports. From her roots in poverty, she emerged as a most unlikely queen of the highly segregated tennis world in the 1950s, with her fame thrusting her into the early Civil Rights movement. Althea reveals rare archival material and compelling interviews

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

with those who knew Gibson personally, such as former New York City Mayor David Dinkins; Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe, widow of Arthur Ashe; and Billie Jean King, an executive producer of the film. In addition to its showings on the big screen, Althea aired as part of the American Masters series on PBS. For more information and a schedule of future showings, visit PBS.org.


ng Island Region Long Island Fairs and Festivals Abound

The USTA Long Island Region loves participating at fairs and festivals! Tennis pros and other volunteers had a great time teaching tennis to and meeting children at several recent events around town,

including the Merrick Festival, Bellmore Family Street Fair and Lido Beach Family Festival by the Sea. Additional photos can be viewed by visiting LongIsland.USTA.com and clicking on “Photos.”

Coming Soon … Please join the Eastern LI Region at some or all of these great upcoming tennis events. For more information on these events or any others, please visit LongIsland.USTA.com. You can also keep current on happenings in the Region by subscribing to the quarterly digital newsletter, On the Ball: News From LI. Send an e-mail to USTAonLongIsland@gmail.com with the

subject line “Newsletter.” On Sunday, Nov. 8, the Eastern College Showcase will be held at the Saw Mill Club in Mt. Kisco, N.Y. The College Showcase provides high school seniors and juniors with the opportunity to meet college tennis coaches, collect information, listen to experts and learn about the NCAA process. The event is also for col-

lege coaches to recruit and get exposure for their tennis programs. On Saturday-Sunday, Nov. 28-29, the Long Island Tennis Circuit will be held at Sportime Quogue. This monthly tournament is sponsored by Hampton Estates Realty. Participants can register by visiting LongIsland.USTA.com and clicking on the “TennisLink” tab.

Heading to Nationals Congratulations and best of luck to the USTA League teams representing the LI Region and Eastern Section at the USTA League National Championships this fall:

l 3.5 Women’s Carefree Racquet Club (captain Mara Mazza) l 4.5 Women’s Carefree Racquet Club (captains Donna Ryan & Sally Disabato)

18 & Over l 3.5 Men’s Sportime Lynbrook (captains Miguel Gordon & Gabe Moreira) l 4.5 Men’s Long Beach Tennis Center (captains Naeem Siddiqui & Andrew Camacho) l 5.0 Men’s Robbie Wagner (captain Gregory Lumpkin)

55 & Over l 6.0 Women’s Eastern Athletic Blue Point (captain Kathy Sarli) l 7.0 Women’s Point Set (captain Ann McGrath)

40 & Over l 3.0 Men’s World Gym (captain Phil Monticciolo)

Mixed-Doubles l 8.0 Long Beach Tennis Center (captains Andrew Camacho & Brian Connor) l 6.0 Christopher Morley Tennis Center (captain Darlene Sotomayor)

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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From Romania to New York The tennis journey of Alexandru Pop-Moldovan BY BRIA N C O LEMAN

any of the top coaches and teaching pros at clubs throughout Long Island come from places all over the world. The tennis community on Long Island is one big melting pot, and because of that, various techniques and training methods are available. One of those teaching pros is Alexandru Pop-Moldovan, who works at Christopher Morley Tennis. Born in Romania, Pop-Moldovan was one of the fixtures of junior tennis in Romania for years. He developed his own 10 & Under training methods, even writing his own book. “I tried to play on the tour for a few years, but the costs became too much, so I quit when I was about 21,” PopMoldovan said. “I went to a coaching school and graduated from there. I got involved in the federation with tournament players. I wrote a book about 10 & Under tennis.” After spending years spreading his technique across the country, PopMoldovan headed west for the United States. He brought his unique teaching methods to the States to begin the next chapter in his life. “I wanted to make a change in my life and come to America,” said PopMoldovan. “In the States, what I like is the positivity of the people. Also, you can do things like high-performance

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


training, because you have the courts, facilities and resources, and everybody wants to go to a good college and after that, turn pro. Everyone wants to invest and wants to improve, so there is a high level of motivation.” With his girlfriend, Raluca, PopMoldovan moved across the pond to begin the next step in their lives. The two have since married. “I am a family guy and I like to keep everything balanced,” said PopMoldovan. “We adapted to American life. We had a lot of Romanian friends here, so it was easy for us to adapt. I tried to learn to speak better English and apply it on the court. I tried to implement what I learned in Europe here.” That is the one thing many foreign pros and coaches have to deal with when coming over the States. Not only is the language barrier a task to overcome, but also the day-to-day routine of living in the hectic and populous Greater New York area, something that Pop-Moldovan has succeeded in doing. “The toughest part was getting into a daily routine. Socializing, and being able to relax while communicating,” said PopMoldovan. “But coaching is different. There is the international language of tennis. So adjusting to teaching on the court here wasn’t that difficult.” His teachings at the junior level are a result of his experience working with professionals. Not only did he attempt to make it on the Pro Tour himself, but he is

Alexandru Pop-Moldovan (standing left) and Doru Murariu (standing right), fitness director from the Tennis Players Fitness Institute during a 10 & Under Tennis demonstration

also the coach of Florin Mergea, who, along with partner Rohan Bopanna are ranked inside the top 10 of the ATP World Tour. “It’s so nice to see and talk with other amazing coaches all around the world,” he reflected. “I learned a great deal, saw a lot of things happening and wanted to share that with my kids. If the kids I coach see that what I am teaching is working for a professional player, it becomes more realistic to them.” The 34-year-old’s methods of coaching have worked, and as a result, has led some of his juniors to find success,

coaching his players to over 20 tournament wins. But coaching isn’t the only thing he does to keep busy. Coming to America has opened his eyes to other sports, such as paddle tennis and Beach Tennis. He has reached the semifinals of the Long Island Tennis Challenge, won a New York Beach Tennis tournament and competes in Division I Paddle Tennis. Not only are these new sports and experiences extremely fun for him, but it also gives him an opportunity to meet new people. “I like to socialize a lot and meet new people. I am starting to play beach tennis and paddle, and a lot of nice people are playing,” Pop-Moldovan said. “It opened up another door for me to share what I know about tennis, and to learn more from other people. These are great and experienced people, so it is good for me to learn from them as well as share what I know.” So as he continues to teach people the things he knows and to learn from others, Pop-Moldovan is a perfect example of what the tennis community on Long Island is all about. There are always new doors to be opened, and he has set some goals for himself and his players. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email brianc@usptennis.com.

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482 Route 110 • Melville N.Y. (631) 385-0606 437 Old Country Road • Westbury, N.Y. (516) 333-2811 FrankAndCamilles.com A KAWAI Grand Player Piano is the ultimate entertainment center. This grand piano will play live piano music that will entertain you, your family and friends. A KAWAI Grand Player Piano adds gracious beauty to your home … even if you don’t play. The Kawai Grand Player Piano will be the focal point of a room, adding grace and beauty to any space. And if you do play, a KAWAI grand piano is a quality musical instrument. The touch and tone of a KAWAI Player Grand Piano is incomparable. A KAWAI Grand Player Piano is educational … it is a wonderful music instrument for you and your children to learn to play. It will become an heirloom … a piano that will be passed on for generations to come. With the touch of your iPad, a Kawai Grand Player Piano will magically perform all genres of music, from classical to jazz … and from your favorite artists such as Billy Joel, Diana Krall, Norah Jones, Frank Sinatra, Van Cliburn, Liberace, etc. … hundreds of artists featuring thousands of songs. Your very own KAWAI Grand Player Piano will be playing live piano music right in your own home. It is amazing! So, this holiday season, give the gift that keeps on giving— a Kawai Grand Player Piano! The Kawai Grand Player Piano is found exclusively at Frank & Camille’s showroom in Melville, located at 482 Route 110 or in their new Westbury showroom, located at 437 Old Country Road. Call (800) 4-PIANOS, or visit FrankAndCamilles.com for more information. Or, better yet … just stop in and browse. Let Frank & Camille’s show you how easy it is to own and enjoy a KAWAI Grand Player Piano.

Unpaid endorsements “I will never again play without my Advantage Tennis Glove. The grip makes the difference in my game.”—T.S., Naples, Fla. “I have been using Advantage Tennis Gloves for several years now and love them … they have saved my game! I tried everything else prior to finding your glove to improve my grip playing tennis and nothing worked.”—S.S., Wilmington, Del. “Players come into my store and specifically ask for Advantage Tennis Gloves. I highly recommend the Advantage Glove to players looking for a better grip. This glove works and it is the only tennis specific glove I carry in my store.”— G.K., USPTA professional and owner of JusTennis in Naples, Fla. 52

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


Glam Slam Gear

Hytail Hat by AD Active Wear

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Put some GLAM in your SLAM with tennis accessories by Glam Slam Gear. Luxurious Italian leather, vibrant nylon and couture camouflage are our fabrics of choice, Glam Slam Gear has all of your tennis fashion needs! Glam Slam tennis racquet covers are fashion forward and practical. These bags can carry it all! Each bag holds three racquets and clothing. A generous exterior zipper closure bears everything in your handbag. Say goodbye to lugging multiple bags onto the court. Look GREAT, play GREAT! For those who like to haul everything but the kitchen sink, Glam Slam Gear offers its GLAM tote. This super-sized, carry-all is for the player who enjoys a multi-functional bag. The Glam tote comfortably fits two racquets plus other bulky items like shoes, jacket, purse, toiletries, etc. It easily turns into your everyday tote bag by fitting your laptop and daily necessities. Do you know someone who plays platform tennis? The GLAM Sac can be your number one gift idea for this season. Same great fabric choices and universal design for men or women. Protect your belongings from the rough surface of your paddle. Get a GLAM Sac today! Add a monoGLAM to any item you choose—customize your purchase with FREE embroidery. Call the designers anytime: Lisa Olivieri at (631) 697-8339 or Meaghan Janedis at (917) 608-6510.

Created by women for women, the Hytail Hat is a must-have for any tennis enthusiast this holiday season. Eliminating the horrible feeling of sticky sweaty hair on your neck, this one-of-a-kind hat allows women to wear their hair comfortably in a high ponytail (with or without a hair tie), all while looking sleek and stylish. Tess Rogers, a successful executive and engineering recruiter, birthed the idea while on vacation. Being an outdoor lover, she was frustrated that there were no hats that would allow her to comfortably wear her hair in a ponytail with sunglasses. That is when the idea for Hytail was created. After years of perfecting the design, she realized that all women and girls would benefit from the stylish hat. The flexible two-inch wide band in the back perfectly lifts and holds hair to ensure it will not be a distraction during any match. The release of the Athletic Hytail makes for an even more enjoyable experience. The Athletic version combines the classic, comfortable Hytail design, with sporty new features like its breathable moisture wicking material, which will help to regulate sweat and keep you cool and comfortable throughout your game. It has been spotted on tennis pro and former Wimbledon and U.S. Open Doubles Champion Vania King. Whether you are on the court, on the run, or even just relaxing in the sun, Hytail will be your favorite addition to your wardrobe this holiday season. Available in a variety of colors and sizes there is a perfect fit for every athletic woman. The Athletic Hytail retails at $24.99 and can be purchased online at ADActiveWear.com.

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inPhorm (214) 688-4026 info@susannetaylor.com inPhormnyc.com inPhorm is a distinctive international collection of tennis and active wear that has gained an enthusiastic following among our readers, avid players and a growing lineup of touring pros since the debut of its tennis collection in 2011. Luxurious fabrics combine with unmatched detail in construction to create comfortable, athletic and elegant garments. All garments are eco-friendly, easy-care and easy-wear. Shown here, in white, is the inPhorm Core Style S15034— rouched cami top (a favorite among inPhorm consumers for its body flattering style), paired with inPhorm Classic Core SkortStyle S15009. The Classic Skort with built-in short, is 14 inches in length (available also in all black, sizes XS through XLRG). Also shown, from the inPhorm 2015 Winter Collection, are Style F15026—racerback tank in rose with a subtle black mesh inset, paired with Style F15025—rose, 13 inch, mesh skort with built-in shorts (available also in black or white, sizes XS through XLRG). inPhorm recently announced its first sponsorships of young professionals on the circuit. Currently inPhorm has five young pros under their sponsorship, and is in negotiations with two additional players. To locate the retailer nearest you or for more information, contact inPhorm at (214) 688-4026 or e-mail info@susannetaylor.com.

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Nutrition Solutions PC 705 Middle Neck Road Great Neck, N.Y. (516) 439-5090 irina@irinalehat.com IrinaLehat.com A gift from Nutrition Solutions PC for you! Get 20 percent off on your personalized diet plan! A five-day meal plan, designed just for you by Irina Belfer-Lehat, a registered dietitian, that will include a pre-match meal, recovery meal and fluid, calories and protein calculations! Call (917) 769-8031 today and see where good nutrition can take you! Irina Belfer-Lehat of Nutrition Solutions PC is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. Irina Lehat RD Nutrition Solutions offers group classes for kids in kindergarten through high school. Small groups, affordable prices! For more information, call (917) 769-8031, e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com or visit IrinaLehat.com.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


ServeMaster

Tennis Elbow Grease

(925) 570-1326 lisa@thetotalserve.com TheTotalServe.com Give the gift of an ACE! Did you know that in just 15 swings of ServeMaster, a beginner tennis player can learn to serve with the same fluid motion as a pro? Free online videos show you how to improve your serve and overhead strokes by using ServeMaster. It can be used to for forehand and backhand drills too. It’s like having a tennis coach in your bag! How it works: Follow the easy steps included in the package, watch ServeMaster videos online or get free tips emailed to you. With the Continental Grip (markings on the handle will get you in position), move slowly through your entire service motion. Because it is completely flexible, flaws such as hitches, erratic rhythm, inconsistent timing and poor technique will cause ServeMaster to “flop,” stop and bump you. With practice, you’ll have a rhythmic and flowing service motion. The ServeMaster is available in three sizes for players of all ages and abilities. Wholesale academy packages for teaching pros and group lessons are available. To find the size ServeMaster that’s right for you, visit TheTotalServe.com. New Junior and LTE versions of ServeMaster are now available in orange!

(800) 636-4130 info@eliminatetenniselbow.com EliminateTennisElbow.com Do you have tennis elbow (scientifically referred to as epicondylitis)? Do you know anyone with tennis elbow? Now there is finally some relief for this debilitating problem. Introduced at the New York Tennis Expo at the USTA National Tennis Center, our products are now available in retail stores across the country and online. Tennis Elbow Grease (TEG) Pain Relief Cream is formulated as a topical analgesic to address the symptoms of tennis elbow, as well as to aid in healing the long-term underlying problems of arm and elbow pain. Utilizing a unique delivery system, the active ingredients in the TEG formula are distributed through the sub-dermal layers of the skin, where they can penetrate the affected muscles, tendons and skeletal areas. Essentially, the active ingredients in TEG target those areas in need of relief, ultimately reducing inflammation and pain. Unlike many other topical analgesics currently on the market, TEG incorporates a variety of ingredients that have been successfully proven to minimize or eliminate muscle, tendon and nerve pain. These include Glucosamine, MSM, Capsaicin, Curcumin, Hyaluronic Acid, Vitamin E, R-Alpha Lipoic Acid, Camphor, Menthol, Arnica and DMSO. TEG eliminates the need to buy and use multiple, less effective products. It offers efficacy, convenience and cost savings. In addition to a pain relief cream, TEG now offers a natural gut string that is high performing and extremely arm friendly, as well as an elbow brace with an insertable ice and heat gel pack for post-match maintenance. Give TEG products a try, or buy it for someone who is hoping to return to the tennis court sooner rather than later. Go to EliminateTennisElbow.com for more information and to shop now. Use promo code “LITM” to receive 15 percent off your purchase!

LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Thrive (866) 523-6639 support@le-vel.com Le-vel.com Thrive is an all-natural weight management, weight support and fitness system. It also helps cognitive performance, digestive and immune support, joint support, lean muscle support, pain management and anti-aging/antioxidant support. What Thrive can do for men and women is give natural, allday energy. You can feel fabulous, look and feel amazing, and just enjoy life at a whole new level. Thrive is an easy way to keep in shape and keep your energy levels stable all day. Thrive is perfect for tennis players, as well as all other sports and professions, as it helps mental and cognitive support. Thrive is great on-the-go, as the vitamins come pre-packaged and ready for your day, in the form of a combination of a patch, vitamins and a delicious and nutritious gluten-free shake. The Thrive Experience is an eight-week premium lifestyle plan to help individuals experience and reach peak physical and mental levels. You’re going to live, look and feel UltraPremium like never before! Results from the Thrive Experience are high impact, and results can slightly differ for everyone–depending on which areas of your lifestyle need the most help–and depending on your eight-week goal. Whether your goal is to lose weight, get in the best shape of your life, or simply be the best you can be, the Thrive EightWeek Experience will get you THRIVIN’ in all areas of your life! Individuals on the Experience will enjoy premium support and benefits in the areas of: l Weight Management l Cognitive Performance l Digestive and Immune System Support l Joint Support l Lean Muscle Support l Aches and Discomfort Relief l Anti-Aging and Antioxidant Support

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ACL Injuries in Female Athletes Dr. Brian DeVeaux, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS The velocity, power and intensity of women’s sports have considerably amplified over the past decade. Along with the increase in play has also come an increase in injury occurrence. One of the more common injuries is a sprain or rupture of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) of the knee. Female ACL injuries occur (six to 10 times more so than males) with many being non-contact injuries (a landing or cutting injury). There is a great deal of research available on the prevention of ACL injuries, but the way to help eliminate three main problems that can lead to non-contact injuries include ligament dominance, leg dominance and quad dominance. Ligament dominance Ligament dominance is when an athlete relies more on their ligaments than their muscles (specifically their hip muscles) to perform athletic tasks such as cutting or landing from a jump. You can see this when an athlete has “Knocked Knees” when they squat or land from a jump, or if they land stiff. This is a very bad situation because it loads up all of the ligaments, especially the ACL.

Leg dominance Leg dominance is when an athlete relies on one leg more than the other when performing athletic tasks. This can be seen if they lean to one side with a squat or a landing. This is detrimental in that it stresses the leg to the point that an injury can occur.

l

l Quad dominance Quad dominance is another common injury where an athlete will call on their quadriceps (front of the thigh) muscles before their gluteus maximus (butt/hip) muscles. This is very bad and quite common in females because it increases the shearing force on the ACL and the possibility of an ACL injury. Other factors that may lead to an ACL injury include: l Hamstring weakness (very common because the hamstrings protect the ACL), overall ligament instability, Qangle (shape of the female pelvis), athletic playing style, internal knee anatomy (the size of the notch that the ACL travels through and ACL strength/size) all play a role in potential ACL injuries. l What can really be improved upon is an athlete’s neuromuscular control. This can be done by training strength, flexi-

l l

bility, balance/proprioception, and simple technique training. Jump training and improving an athlete’s ability to land from a jump (landing softer, landing deeper and with the proper contact time—toes before heels and hips before knees) is very important. Strength training for the core/hips and hamstrings is very important. Emphasizing single leg training with jumps/strengthening to avoid leg dominance. Dynamic flexibility prior to training/game and static flexibility postmatch/post-game.

Brian DeVeaux, PT, DPT, OCS, CSCS, USAW, FMS received his doctorate degree in physical therapy from Touro College. Brian holds a bachelor of health science degree, is board-certified as an orthopedic clinical specialist in physical therapy, and a certified strength and conditioning specialist. He is also certified as an Olympic weightlifting coach through the Olympic Training Center and in the Functional Movement Screen and Y Balance Tests. Brian runs the Sports Outreach Program at Peak Performance’s Lynbrook, N.Y. office, and conducts sport-specific conditioning, injury prevention clinics and presentations for athletes.

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tips from the tennis pro Win Matches by Making Your Opponent Uncomfortable By Lisa Dodson hank you, Roberta Vinci. Finally, someone has opened our eyes and made a clear statement: Tennis is not all about hitting the cover off the ball. Somehow, we all bought into the idea that the only way to play is to stay on the baseline and slug it out. Vinci showed us that simply changing up the spin and speed of the ball and getting off the baseline keeps the opponent off balance and out of rhythm. If it works for the top players in the world, just imagine what it could do for you.

T

Give your opponents balls that make them uncomfortable In order to be successful at this you need a variety of shots. If two players are equally matched, stroke-to-stroke on the baseline, then common sense says that one additional disruptive shot would be the key to winning the match more easily. It’s really that simple. Here are a few examples of disruptive shots and shot combinations: l Slice or topspin serve (any serve with spin, curve and margin) l Under-spin (slice) backhand off the ground or return l Chip and charge return l Serve and volley l Drop shot and lob l High rolling topspin balls

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Here is the interesting thing … the Continental Grip is used for all of the shots and shot combinations above, except the high rolling, topspin balls. In the entire game of tennis, the only shot hit with a forehand grip is a flat or topspin forehand. Consequently, we have an interesting problem A majority of coaches and pros teach players to hit a bouncing ball from the backcourt first. We go heavy on the forehand for two main reasons: It is the most successful and satisfying stroke for the student, and is statistically the biggest weapon on the court. I mean, who doesn’t love the feel of hitting a big forehand? Because players spend so much time in the backcourt, the forehand grip gets locked in very quickly. Players get accustomed to the feel of the grip and where the ball will go from the strings with this grip. So, they try all of the other strokes with that same forehand grip and that cannot work. They don’t know that this grip is used only for this one stroke. Consequently, players have a difficult time changing to the grip that is used for all other shots in the game. You simply cannot hit every ball hard Don’t get me wrong. Penetrating balls hit with topspin and pace are at the core of our games. This style of play is enough if these types of shots are superior to your opponent and they, too, don’t have variety. Hard,


flat strokes and topspin strokes come with their benefits and limitations. We need to spend more time developing shots that are hit with the Continental Grip. Somehow hitting a slice backhand, an offspeed ball, a slice serve or a chip return became very uncool. These misunderstood shots got a bad rap as weak and defensive. Hit properly and at the right time, these balls can be your best friends. Shots hit with the Continental Grip l Serve: Flat and slice (topspin and kick is a more extreme grip away from the forehand) l Volley: Mid-court, closing, low, high, angle l Half-Volley: Touch, defense on low ball, attack on higher ball l Backhands: One handed (flat/slice) and two-handed (topspin) l Under-Spin (Slice) Drive: Change of pace, defensive/on the run, approach shot l Under-Spin (Slice) Return: Off a hard or spin serve, take time away from the opposition l Chip and Charge: Off the return or short ball, and follow to the net with the same grip l Drop Shot: A lofty shot with tremendous spin l Defensive Lob: Take the pace off a very hard hit ball l Lob Volley: Soft angles off the ground or as a volley

Wow ‌ that’s a lot of shots. Shots hit with the Continental Grip have several things in common l Most have under-spin (slice) l Ease of varying shot spin, speed and height l The edge is used to open the face of the racket (strings facing up) l Under-spin acts as a control, as the ball slides on the strings and grips the ball l They travel slower and bounce lower l They can be hit in a broader range of contact points l They are typically shots hit on the move l They can be disguised easily and placed more accurately Using under-spin (slice) as a tool at the right times makes the opponent extremely uncomfortable. The bounce is lower and slower, so it demands a timing change. It can be hit different distances and speeds from the same look. It can be used for offense (volley, approach and chip) and defense (retrieval and lobbing). Added in strategically with topspin groundstrokes and a varied serve, you will find your change of pace shot invaluable. The under-spin ball is predictable from the hitting side and less predictable on the receiver’s side. What more can you ask from a safe and reliable ball? Pros and coaches choose what players learn, and are therefore partially responsi-

ble for creating one-dimensional bang, bang play. Many pros fail to expose players to the entire range of shots. We must insist that you hold the correct grips that will allow your game to expand. That being said, the biggest issue can be you, the player, the one who wants to improve, but does not want to change. Missing in a learning environment is good and essential to learning and changing. Using your “new� methods in non-competitive play is essential otherwise you will always revert back to your previous methods. Losing a few sets to the guy or gal you beat every week is a good thing. That means you are branching out and being proactive in your development. Chickening out and going back to your safe shots is unsatisfying and non-productive. Eventually adding in these shots will just be a part of how you play and you’ll wonder how you ever played without them. Roberta Vinci gave a very compelling demonstration of the benefits of a varied game. Whether you are a man or woman, hopefully Vinci’s spectacular win serves as an inspiration to you. Adding this family of tennis shots to your game will send you to another level. You too may find yourselves winning matches that you thought were unwinnable. Lisa Dodson is owner of Servemaster at The Total Serve, a USPTA Elite Pro, a formerly world ranked player and radio show host. She may be reached by e-mail at lisa@thetotalserve.com or visitwww.thetotalserve.com.

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college tennis spotlight

MYTHBUSTERS What Does It Take to “Get There”

By Ricky Becker nly 80 percent of you need to read this article if your child is thinking about tak-

O

ing up tennis. Ten percent of your children have won the genetic lottery. Congratulations! You can do less than the rest of us to achieve the goals I outline below. Your child stepped onto the soccer field at fiveyears-old and scored goals at will. Ten percent of your children were just not made for tennis. It doesn’t mean they cannot play and enjoy it. It just means

that they will have to do more than I am outlining below to reach their goals. And the last two goals will probably be out of reach. The middle 80 percent I am talking to are the middle 80 percent athletically. This is the 80 percent whom I truly believe will use dedication, hard-work, discipline, interest, parental involvement/leadership, mental toughness and good coaching to reach their potential as a tennis player. I truly believe that a child’s success in tennis among the middle 80 percent is solely determined by how badly they want it, the parents want it for the child, how much

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the child enjoys competing in tennis and good team leadership. The most dedicated of that 80 percent group will often surpass the top 10 percent who put in less effort. What does it take to make your high school varsity team? This depends of course on the level of your high school team. If your team is in Division I, generally, if you have been playing once or twice a week consistently since you were young, you can make the team. If your team is Division II or III, you can make it if you have taken lessons on-and-off since you were young. Divisions IV and V don’t require lessons to make the team. What does it take to help you get into a small Division III college you otherwise wouldn’t get into? Some small Division III schools are looking for any of their students to play for them. To have tennis help you get into one of these schools, it is necessary to play some tournaments while you are a junior in high school and to have played two or three days a week for a few years. Saying on a college application that the extent of your junior tennis career was playing high school tennis won’t help much here.


What does it take to play for a Division I school or a strong Division III school? What can be done to help with admissions? This is a huge jump both in terms of commitment and in financial status, from the previous level. Generally, tennis will have to be the biggest commitment outside of schoolwork in a child’s life, and often in the family’s life as well. More days consist of playing tennis than days not playing tennis. At least half of your weekends will be spent playing tournaments, and parents need to be willing to spend many Friday and Saturday nights in the lobby of a tennis club. There will be some national travel as well. This can be costly, but a lot of fun. This is probably the category where families spend the most money. If this seems strange, I’ll explain why in the next category. What does it take to get a tennis scholarship or get into an Ivy League school because of tennis? Players at this level have pretty much been

playing five or six days a week consistently for a long-time. Tennis is the main priority of the family … certainly during the high school years. Travelling five to 10 times a year for national tournaments is to be expected, and the child needs to enjoy the life of competing in tournaments. Players at this level genuinely crave the next tournament and the tournament start date cannot come soon enough. In recent years, players at this level will often get free groups from clubs and privates are often offered for a heavily discounted rate so that the child can get enough training and that the club and pro can “sell” a junior player at this level to other kids. Players in the middle 80 percent athletically can definitely hit this level.

cialization, I believe that both the child and family need to know by the age of 10 that they want to make a go of it and literally put tennis ahead of everything else. Home schooling is pretty much a prerequisite now, as is spending 10,000 purposeful hours on the court to achieve true mastery. This isn’t going to happen without a big parental push as well. Both the child and the parent need to share the common goal of the child to be number one in the world one day. I imagine everyone that is top-100 in the world today had the dream and ambition to be number one in the world someday. The best way to reach the level that you are striving for is to have a coach who has coached people at the level or reached that level as a player!

What does it take to be a top-100 pro? Talent is definitely necessary. So is accepting and embracing the belief that “Hard work won’t guarantee you anything, but without it, you will never stand a chance.” In this day and age of spe-

Ricky Becker is director of tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors yearround at Bethpage State Park and Jericho/Westbury. He can be reached (516) 605-0420, rbecker06@yahoo.com or visit JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

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More Than an Athlete: Creating the Conditions for Sustained Peak Performance By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC The 2015 Grand Slam season has concluded and on the men’s side, Novak Djokovic walked away with the U.S. Open trophy, defeating Roger Federer in four sets. Both Novak and Roger have had consistently solid years. They are both poster boys for the thread which I have woven into my articles during the previous year: More Than An Athlete (MTAA). Person first, every time. MTAA means bringing your whole self to the performance. When a competitor jointly brings “who they are” (the person) to “what they do” (the athlete) in a competition, the sum of these parts is always greater than just bringing one dimension. Let’s look at Djokovic. He allows the fans to see his fun, quirky and vulnerable side. He can often be seen laughing and performing player imitations. Other times, he is talking about his gluten-free diet. And yet other times, he talks about how he sets the

“When you bring ‘who you are’ to ‘what you do,’ that’s where the magic happens.” conditions for calm by meditating and stretching through yoga. Clearly Novak brings more than talent, technique and skill to the court. He brings his personal side, story, spirit and vulnerabilities to the table. Federer does the same. Remember back when he lost to Rafael Nadal at the 2009 Australian Open men’s finals and wept uncontrollably upon receiving his runners up trophy? Many thought this was a display of weakness. He quickly cleared up that misperception by winning the next three Grand Slams. Roger shared his heart from a very authentic place. By sharing his personal side, in combination with his talent, he helped remove a weight from his shoulders so he could just play. How do you bring your whole self to the court? In order to sustain your own intrinsic

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drive and continue to assess, push and ride the ups-and-downs during competition? Answering these five key questions will start you on the way! 1. What is your Big Why for competing? Without a personal “Big Why,” it can be very easy to give up, rather than push through difficult situations. With a crystal clear understanding of your Big Why, it becomes easier to face adversity, challenges and obstacles head on. In any competition, you will face difficult situations, your Big Why will provide you with the purpose, perseverance and passion to intrinsically propel you forward. 2. What is it about yourself that, rather than make you better or worse than someone, makes you who you are? Everything you have experienced and learned during your journey fuels you during competition. Your experiences are what make you who you are, both on and off the playing field. This is your “More.” Traditional thought says when you step on the court or field, you are only an athlete. This is not true. You are a person, playing a sport. 3. What do you do to create the conditions which help you settle and play from a place of present moment awareness, the place where you are calm on the inside and aware on the outside? Many players have pre-match or game


rituals. The idea is to warm up so that you can enter from a state of calm. Novak often talks about using family time, yoga, meditation and diet to help him settle down. I have developed an exercise called “gradual acceleration.� The idea is to help competitors not only warm up the physical side of the game, but to warm up the “other side,� the all-important mental part.

where fight or flight occurs. Usually what follows next is that “deer in the headlights� look or freeze state. This is where the player loses control and spirals down the rabbit hole into the negative numbers. There will always be fluctuations in competition especially when adversity strikes. The idea is to stay within a range of tolerance that allows you to manage adversity.

4. Where are you? This seems like a rhetorical question, maybe even a sarcastic question! However, it is imperative to know where you are before, during and after competition. Think of a wave, where the low end is zero and the top end is 10. In a perfect world, the idea would be to maintain a fairly stable level during competition, without huge fluctuations ‌ maybe between a three and a seven. The ability to do this allows you to stay inside your zone within your range of tolerance. From this place, you can better focus on the present and what you can control and let go of what you cannot. Oftentimes, players spiral out of control and reach a level of 10 and then beyond, this is

5. What do you need from yourself and from others? This is a big question! I remember watching a documentary on Roger Federer. They asked, what is it that makes Roger so good? The answer was simple, even obvious: He knows what he needs! In other words, he knows where he is in any given situation, based on this, he knows when to slow things down, collect his thoughts and when to speed up to continue his momentum. Equally important, he knows when to continue as is and stay the course to allow the impending storm to pass. There are many techniques to help a player ride the waves (speed up, slow down

or stay the course). This is for another article and workshop. However, per this entire MTAA series, what’s important is to understand that everything starts with the unique person within the athlete. When you bring who you are (your story and your spirit) to what you do (your skill), that’s where the magic happens. This organic and authentic union allows a player to reach well beyond what anyone thought was possible. Just like a combination lock, you must have all of the numbers in place to unlock the lock and reveal the paradoxical secret to peak performance. More than an athlete ‌ person first— every time. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach, he works with athletes and teams, focusing on helping athletes gain the mental edge. Rob is author of Tennis Inside the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, email rob@insidethezone.com or visit www.insidethezone.com.

   

   



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Lynbrook: 516-599-8734 l Island Park: 516-897-9700 New Hyde Park: 516-326-4580 l Wantagh: 516-785-4800 LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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The Value of Sport

friend of mine just returned from a three-week trip to Japan and told me a story I found impossible to believe. This same story also brought tears to my eyes. It occurred at the end of a long day of shopping in Kyoto. She was in a very highend department store and it was closing time. As she walked toward the exit door, she witnessed a scene that one will never ever see in the United States. The entire staff of the store, including the top executives, were lined up forming a two-column path to the exit. And as each shopper walked out, the staff bowed silently to them in a show of respect and gratitude. That story alone could motivate me to go to Kyoto for a vacation.

A


tsmanship in Tennis This is what one calls “etiquette” and most obviously it is lacking both on American streets and on the playing field. Do you recall those charming throat-slashing gestures that NFL players loved to act out in the end zone after a touchdown. The crowds and opponents were so appalled by these acts of rudeness that the commissioner was forced to fine each player $25,000 if they dared to do it again. One can argue that sports etiquette and winning in sports do not mix, given the high level of competition that athletes now face. Over the last 50 years, all things have changed. I was recently asked to give a talk to the student body at Iona College, my alma mater. In 1969, I played number one on their golf team and even won some tournaments. As I was introduced to Iona’s current D-I team, it was very clear to me that I would not even make the team now. Such is the rising caliber of competition now faced by young athletes. With extremes of competition come extremes of pressure and aggression. Add that all up and you can kiss etiquette and sportsmanship goodbye.

Of course there is something very sad about that. Etiquette is a form of behavior that was once taught by parents, but is now something that kids have to learn on their own. I once interviewed Patricia Napier-Fitzgerald, founder of the Etiquette School of New York. She told me that good manners makes our interactions pleasant, reflect upon our character, family, town and company. There is research out from both Harvard and Stamford which shows that new hiring and promotions are based upon soft skills like manners rather than technical skills. These are findings that do not surprise us. The conundrum is that sports are not all business and maybe good manners do not help the cause of winning. But if you are a parent raising a young tennis player with the hopes that they will garner a scholarship, you would do well to teach your child sportsmanship and social rituals like friendliness, clean language, good eye contact with the opponent, and a warm handshake of either condolence or congratulations after the match. Future coaches are watching that as closely as they watch a player’s forehand and serve.

By Dr. Tom Ferraro

How to teach sportsmanship One teaches sportsmanship with verbal repetition and role modeling. The young tennis player will listen if the parent or coach tells them to be polite and gracious during a match. They will listen if you show them how to shake hands and say congratulations to the opponent. The coach can have this as a core philosophy of their practice sessions. Tennis is a game, and as such, it ought to be fun and edifying to all players. This occurs in only two ways. One must express one’s talent on the court and this gives you a sense of pride and pleasure. One must also show a sense of humanity and kindness to the opponent as well. This instills the match with goodness and even joy. If you teach your young player to do these two things, they will go very far both on the courts and in life. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

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Credit all photos to Sidney Beal III, Clique Photography


NYC’s Top Chefs Take to the Tennis Court for the

Celebrity Chef Tennis Challenge

Some of New York City’s premier celebrity chefs stepped out of the kitchen and onto the tennis courts of City View Racquet Club in Long Island City for a day of tennis, food and an overall good time. Put on by AYS Sports Marketing as a part of the Taste of Tennis Week, the Celebrity Chef Tennis Challenge featured a round-robin doubles tournament with the players rotating partners. Beyond the tennis, a multitude of sponsors were out serving food and drinks to all in attendance. “This is our first year at City View, we’ve been friends with them a long time, so it’s great to bring our event here to such a dynamic club with a beautiful view of Manhattan,” said Penny Lerner, CEO of AYS World. “The caliber of chefs this year is unbelievable;

we’ve got Francois Payard, Marc Murphy, Jonathan Waxman, Kerry Heffernan. Plus Michelle Yu of SNY and Mayor Dinkins came out. Life couldn’t be better for tennis in New York City. This is a great moment.” After the round-robin action, the finals were set. Defending champion Christian Pappanicholas paired up with Long Island Tennis Magazine Challenge winner Lisa Goldstein and took on the chef tandem of Jeff Lefcourt & Juan Santa Maria. The championship match was played in a four-game format, with a fifth game being played if the score was 2-2 after the four games. Pappanicholas opened up serving, and began the match with an excellent serve for a 15-0 lead. The two teams would

exchange points until the first game went to 40-40. After a long rally, an excellent drop shot from Goldstein gave her and Pappanicholas a 1-0 advantage. Santa Maria would serve in the second game and won four straight points, finishing it off with a forehand winner to even the match at 1-1. Despite the first two games going the way of the serving team, the style of the match changed heading into the third game. The returning teams picked up their aggressiveness, and it showed as Goldstein fell behind 0-40 on serve. After saving one game point, another forehand winner from Santa Maria gave his team the break for a 2-1 lead. continued on page 68

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celebrity chef tennis challenge continued from page 67 Lefcourt had a chance to serve for the match, but Pappanicholas & Goldstein dug deep. At 15-40, Pappanicholas hit a winner in between Lefcourt & Santa Maria to nail down a break of their own and force the match into a deciding fifth-game. The teams flipped a racquet to decide who would be serving the game, and Santa Maria & Lefcourt won the advantage. Santa Maria was chosen to serve, and quickly built a 150 lead after a Poppanicholas backhand sailed long. The two teams would exchange points until it got to 40-30 when, after a long rally, Goldstein hit another one of her patented drop shots to even the game at 4040, meaning the championship would be decided by a single point. On the championship point, Santa Maria hit a backhand into the net, giving Pappanicholas & Goldstein the title. “I took a spill on a mountain bike, so I’m coming back from a bad shoulder injury, so I knew I wouldn’t be serving as

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hard,” Pappanicholas said on adjustments he made from last year. “I just had to volley better and play within myself. This is one of the best events ever and I’m so grateful just to be a part of it.” Goldstein, who captured the title in the Women’s Amateur Division at the Long Island Tennis Magazine Challenge earlier this summer, said this type of tournament was a little different than the ones she normally plays. “I really didn’t know anyone’s game here, so I had to adjust coming in,” said Goldstein. “There are such different levels of players here, you can team up with a really good player or you can team up with somebody who has never been on the court before. And I got a really good partner!” The pair walked away with a ton of prizes, including a three-day trip to Saddlebrook Resort in Tampa, Fla. Goldstein was joined at the event by fellow Long Island Tennis Challenge winners Jodi Schwartz, Jill Friedman and Simone Crames.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

“It’s such a great way to combine food and tennis,” said Schwartz. Larry Hong, co-owner and managing partner of City View Racquet Club, said he was extremely pleased with how the event turned out. “It’s pretty exciting, it’s a unique experience, it’s not very often we get some of the top chefs in New York, let alone the world,” said Hong. “They’re all having a good time, competing in a family-oriented fun experience. This definitely has all the elements and potential for a charity element moving forward.” The money raised at the event went towards City Harvest, as well as towards the recovery of Eli Kulp, a promising New York City chef who was paralyzed in May’s deadly Amtrak train crash. Chef Kerry Heffernan spoke of the good that an event like this can bring. “We’re just so lucky to be able to do what we love and have fun doing it. This year we are able to really help this unfortunate chef,” Heffernan said. “So for us to be able to play tennis, raise some money and help someone in dire need is a great thing.”


Large Meals vs. Small Meals for Athletes Should we eat three large meals or six small snacks? By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN Many experts in the nutrition field argue about what is better for athletes: Eating the traditional three large meals a day, or spreading calories evenly throughout the day into six small and frequent meals? In order to achieve optimum endurance on the court, every advantage counts. Let’s look at the facts and figure out what works best for a tennis player. Large meals burden the digestive system and often cause bloating and low energy while the body struggles to break down the big meal. It’s simple: The bigger the meal, the bigger the crash one will experience. Crashes

are a tennis player’s worst nightmare—we want continuous energy throughout an entire match or practice. Have you experienced playing an amazing, high-energy set and then “hitting the wall” in the second set only to lose the match? This occurs because when we eat a big meal, the sugar level in our blood rises. But once that meal is digested, the blood sugar levels fall, thus taking your energy and mood with it. Many sports nutritionists, including myself, agree that eating smaller and frequent meals will prevent the sugar drop, allowing your body to function more efficiently throughout the day and hence improving your endurance on the court. Try to eat breakfast within one hour of rising, eat every three hours, and stop eating three

hours before bedtime. This will help to increase BMR (Baseline Metabolic Rate), increase energy level and decrease appetite among other things. This will also aide in weight loss because irregular eating patterns and skipped meals can lead to overeating at nighttime. For complete nutrition analyses and an individualized meal plan, see a registered dietitian specializing in sport nutrition. Remember, there are no two athletes alike and following someone else’s meal plan, might not work for you. Irina Belfer-Lehat of Nutrition Solutions PC in Great Neck, N.Y. is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. For more information, call (917) 769-8031, e-mail irinalehat@gmail.com or visit www.irinalehat.com.

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L O N G

I S L A N D

charitabl Suffolk County Players Come Out in Support of Breast Cancer Awareness

Nearly 40 of Suffolk County’s Girls High School Varsity players gathered for the fourth year in a row at The Hamlet Golf and Country Club in Commack to participate in the “Play for Pink” Breast Cancer Charity Tennis Tournament. Nineteen doubles teams from all over

Suffolk County took to the courts and played in a round-robin style tournament, with the two highest total point teams meeting in the finals. Before a full house made up of players, parents, families, and friends, the duo of Emily & Brooke Fernandez from William

Floyd High School defeated the team of Rachel Collins & Hannah Niggemeier from Sayville High School, in a very well fought, close match, 7-5. The event raised $600 which will go for research to try and find a cure for breast cancer.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


T E N N I S

M A G A Z I N E ’ S

le initiatives Long Island Girls Play for Pink

The Massapequa High School Girls Tennis team

The Hewlett Girls Tennis team

The MacArthur High School Girls Tennis team

The Lynbrook Girls Tennis team

Throughout the month of October, many of Long Island’s girls high school teams took to the court to “Think Pink” to raise awareness of breast cancer. Here are a few of our locals who took part in the “Think Pink” campaign to stamp out breast cancer. LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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I Am Going to Remember You By Lonnie Mitchel I often sit in meetings with other head coaches from a variety of sports at the college where I lead the men’s and women’s tennis programs. I attend forums and seminars, spending time trying to learn new ways to improve within the coaching profession. I share coaching stories with other instructors, and invariably, there is always something we share in common, no matter the teaching style we use. That is how we remember our players—whether it be positively or negatively. So now I ask you: How do you want to be remembered? To begin with, I think that in order to be a secure person, you may not need someone else’s approval. That is true in the sense of what clothing you might wear, the kind of car you drive, your political views or how you choose to bring up your children. If you believe that you are doing the right things, then continue doing so. However, in your wake, you leave impressions much 72

like you are on a job interview. If you want the job you are interviewing for, dress appropriately, act according to the protocol of the situation because you want to be remembered. What an interviewer remembers would have an adverse effect on your livelihood. That leads me back to the world of coaching. I have taught many players over the years, and now I am in the world of coaching collegiate athletes to not just to be better players, but to become better people. In the past several years, many players have graduated from my program at SUNY Oneonta, and I have an opinion on each one of those players. I also remember those who did not make it through the program for four years. Yes, I have an opinion, I may not share it with you, but I have one. Say a person’s name from the tennis team past or present and it will provoke a thought. Why is this important and how does it relate to tennis? If you are a junior player and taking lots of lessons and are enrolled in a program, take note. Perhaps you are an adult en-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

rolled in a series of group lessons or a collegiate player on a team. The instructor, coach or teacher is going to remember you if you stand out. This is also true if you are the student, as you might remember the exceptionally good or bad teacher. If you had a treasure map that could lead you to the Holy Grail of your life, I hope you would follow it. After years of coaching, I can say, without hesitation, that I tried to provide that Holy Grail map to my students for being a better tennis player and person. Coaches and teachers have provided the treasure map to success, and some players and students follow it. Other students create other paths to success, while others avoid any attempt to follow the route. In all likelihood, I will remember the ones who embraced my teachings or carved out their own path to success in tennis and that of also being a good person and student. I also invariably remember the ones who seem to go to great lengths to resist. So … now why would you care if I remember you or not? The reason is that you


should just want to be a good ethical person, or be a better student and tennis player and that probably should be enough. But, one day you might need a reference letter, a recommendation for a job or graduate school. I am always looking for the path to betterment and will do so until the day I die. If I can share the mistakes I made and help others on and off the tennis court I will. That is what coaches do. I will also remember you if you make no attempt to empty your glass and take on the wisdom that coaches share with you. Let me provide you with an illustration: I had a young man on my team several years ago whom I helped expedite his college admission. I was certainly not looking for a thank you, but this young man was verbally abusive, rude to the athletic staff, lacked any gentlemanly behavior to the female tennis players, was late to practice, lacked any accountability, his tennis court behavior was inappropriate, he vandalized property, was disruptive in class and was an overall bad example of a student/athlete. I eventually had to remove this young man from the squad because his conduct was

detrimental to the entire team. It was easy to remember him negatively, both from my point of view and the perspective of his teammates as well. However, in education, a teacher can learn as much from their students as they try to convey. I tried to teach this individual the right things, discipline him, and have him make a little progress. This particular individual’s parents enabled his behavior, and epitomizes the saying: “The apple does not fall far from the tree.” Yes, I did remember him, but he taught me something as well. I needed to do a better job of recruiting players. I needed to do my due diligence in getting recommendations from coaches, in getting references, in interviewing families, and finding out how a potential student-athlete behaves in school and their demeanor both on and off the tennis court. So I just want to thank this individual, wherever they may be. You helped me to improve my collegiate program in the area of team camaraderie and community service. Apparently I learned more from him than I taught him. I indeed remember you! I remember those students positively who have suggestions to help me become a bet-

ter coach. I listen and learn to work within the confines of a cooperative coaching style. I will remember you if you competed hard on court to the last ball struck. This could be an indication of your work ethic in the job force. I will share that information with a graduate school examiner or human resource department. In the real world, you might ask yourself: “How will I be remembered?” After all, we all have a reputation and the way you behave both on and off the tennis court will go right in your character folder for all of us to have individual access to? Because our sport is unique when you are on the tennis court by yourself, the light shines directly on you. If you care, act accordingly on and off the field of competition; I/we will remember you. Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

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Syosset HS Tennis Players Take Part in the

Stony Brook Collegiate Experience One of the best parts of tennis on Long Island is its community-based mindset. That was evident earlier this fall, when Head Coach Shai Fisher took his Girls and Boys Varsity Tennis teams from Syosset High School to watch the Stony Brook college team compete in the Stony Brook Invitational Classic Women’s Tennis Tournament. “I wanted to take them down there and see what college tennis was all about,” said Fisher. “I wanted them to see how the players support each other and really buy in to the team concept.” The Stony Brook Invitational played host to nine different colleges and exposed the Syosset kids to all levels of play in both singles and doubles. Stony Brook Head Coach Gary Glassman said the visit was not only

beneficial for the Syosset players, but also gave his players some added motivation in their own matches. “It was a great opportunity for his players to see a college tennis tournament, as we had nine teams in our event. They were also able to witness all different levels of play in singles and doubles,” said Glassman. “It was also good for our players to have such a nice crowd on a Saturday morning, and

I’m quite certain it pumped our kids up.” One of the main takeaways a lot of the Syosset players had was how well and often the doubles teams communicated with each other, and is something that Fisher says he has seen improve in his team throughout this season. “I also wanted them to realize that no matter what flight they play in high school, it doesn’t mean they cannot play college tennis,” said Fisher. “There’s no shame in playing third or fourth singles or doubles. Now that I’m coaching both boys and girls, a trip like this only strengthens the program.” Glassman added, “Hopefully, more schools, teams and junior players will take advantage of being able to catch Division I tennis action in their backyard on a more frequent basis.”

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com


LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 10/15/15)

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles RankName........................................City 1 ......Dylan D’Agate ......................Melville, N.Y. 2 ......Jeremy Levine ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 3 ......Alex Eli Vinsky ......................Westbury, N.Y. 4 ......Candrin Chris ......................Port Washington, N.Y. 5 ......Evan Joseph Rupolo............East Patchogue, N.Y. 6 ......Joseph Perry Boyle..............Setauket, N.Y. 7 ......Matthew Evan Kronenberg..East Setauket, N.Y. 8 ......Ryan Shayani ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 9 ......Aiden Patel ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 10 ....Bilal Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 11 ....Azim Gangat ........................Syosset, N.Y. 12 ....Pius Lo..................................Massapequa, N.Y. 13 ....Michael Ryan Safir ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 14 ....Joshua Elenowitz ................Syosset, N.Y. 15 ....Kyle Zhou ............................Commack, N.Y. 16 ....Alejandro Pablo Perez ........Selden, N.Y. 17 ....Cameron Levchuck ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 18 ....Johnny Donohue..................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 19 ....Joseph Monticciolo ............Coram, N.Y. 20 ....Max Daniel Safir ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 21 ....Ethan Rabinowitz ................Great Neck, N.Y. 22 ....Matthew Strogach ..............Commack, N.Y. 23 ....Ajer Sher ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 24 ....Ian Kaish ..............................Northport, N.Y. 25 ....Matthew Leonard Zeifman ..Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 26 ....Brandon Gicquel..................Huntington, N.Y. 27 ....Matthew Leonard Zeifman ..Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 28 ....Ryan Carlos..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 29 ....Samuel Perlman ..................Great Neck, N.Y. 30 ....Sujay Alluri............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 31 ....Andrew Cyril Mancheril........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 32 ....Trevor R. Hayes....................East Moriches, N.Y. 33 ....Dion Park..............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 34 ....Aaron Rittberger ..................Huntington, N.Y. 35 ....Brian D. Gao ........................Syosset, N.Y. 36 ....Taylor Brooks Thomas ........Water Mill, N.Y. 37 ....Aron Bursztyn ......................South Setauket, N.Y. 38 ....Gavin Park............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 39 ....Justin Shen ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 40 ....Benjamin Grushkovskiy ......Woodmere, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles RankName........................................City 1 ......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Zachary David Gruber ........Port Washington, N.Y. 3 ......Aaron Marcos Vinsky ..........Westbury, N.Y. 4 ......Timothy Lewis Chiu ............Holtsville, N.Y. 5 ......Samir Singh..........................Syosset, N.Y. 6 ......Zachary Emmanuel Stern....Dix Hills, N.Y. 7 ......Anthony Casale....................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 8 ......Griffin Schlesinger................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 9 ......Zachary Chan ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 10 ....Brandon Lee ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 11 ....Alex Eli Vinsky ......................Westbury, N.Y. 12 ....Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 13 ....Pius Lo..................................Massapequa, N.Y. 14 ....Liam Thomas Schmidt ........Wantagh, N.Y. 15 ....Azim Gangat ........................Syosset, N.Y. 16 ....Nicholas Harbans Sathi ......Port Jefferson, N.Y. 17 ....Putimet Inroon......................Greenvale, N.Y. 18 ....Jai Madisetty........................Dix Hills, N.Y.

ISLAND

19 ....Valentine LeGoupil-Maier ....Oceanside, N.Y. 20 ....Matthew Southard ..............Islip, N.Y. 21 ....Justin Benjamin Oresky ......Syosset, N.Y. 22 ....Danny Tocco ........................East Quogue, N.Y. 23 ....Martin Charles Racanelli......West Islip, N.Y. 24 ....Evan Brady ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 25 ....Ishan G. Varma ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 26 ....Joshua Rothbaum ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 27 ....Zakir Siddiqui ......................Huntington, N.Y. 28 ....Josh Gelfond........................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 29 ....Richard Martin Racanelli......West Islip, N.Y. 30 ....Ethan Ertel ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 31 ....Neil Edward Sathi ................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 32 ....Michael Wexler ....................Old Westbury, N.Y. 33 ....Dion Park..............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 34 ....Joshua Elenowitz ................Syosset, N.Y. 35 ....Alexander Benanti................East Setauket, N.Y. 36 ....Andre Kun Kirkorian ............Woodbury, N.Y. 37 ....David Ammendola ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 38 ....Michael Wang ......................Syosset, N.Y. 39 ....Gabriele Brancatelli..............Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 40 ....Kian Ziari ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles RankName........................................City 1 ......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Timothy Serignese ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 3 ......Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y. 4 ......Samir Singh..........................Syosset, N.Y. 5 ......Marco Ammirati....................Halesite, N.Y. 6 ......Justin Ullman........................Huntington Station, N.Y. 7 ......Alexander Hazarian..............Garden City, N.Y. 8 ......Alex B. Fried ........................Plainview, N.Y. 9 ......Matthew T. Roberts..............Setauket, N.Y. 10 ....Evan Kirsh ............................Roslyn, N.Y. 11 ....Jake William Buckley ..........Sound Beach, N.Y. 12 ....Matthew Musalo ..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 13 ....Matthew Moreida ................East Rockaway, N.Y. 14 ....Vincent Avallone ..................Smithtown, N.Y. 15 ....Matthew Ramsay ................Bay Shore, N.Y. 16 ....Connor Leaf..........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ....Neil Edward Sathi ................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 18 ....Edward Brambil ..................Halesite, N.Y. 19 ....Jai Madisetty........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 20 ....Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 21 ....Rohan Mathur ......................Dix Hills, N.Y.

RANKINGS

22 ....Nicholas Gajda ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 23 ....Ian Mitchell Capell................Woodbury, N.Y. 24 ....Evan Brady ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 25 ....Ethan Ertel ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 26 ....Andrew Lin ..........................Commack, N.Y. 27 ....Preet Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 28 ....Andrew Marc Nakhjavan ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 29 ....Valentine Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 30 ....Mark Julian Baker ................North Baldwin, N.Y. 31 ....Nicholas Mark Newell..........Huntington Station, N.Y. 32 ....Matthew G. Levine ..............Dix Hills, N.Y. 33 ....Nicholas Goldman ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 34 ....Justin Alec Blicht..................Woodbury, N.Y. 35 ....Garrett Joseph Sebold ........Centerport, N.Y. 36 ....Hunter M. Pomerantz ..........Old Westbury, N.Y. 37 ....Kian Ziari ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 38 ....Rohan Dayal ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 39 ....Evan Hirsch ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 40 ....Timothy Lewis Chiu ............Holtsville, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles RankName........................................City 1 ......Christopher McGorty ..........Bellmore, N.Y. 2 ......Michael Petersen ................Bridgehampton, N.Y. 3 ......Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y. 4 ......Matthew Moreida ................East Rockaway, N.Y. 5 ......Samuel R. Yuen....................Selden, N.Y. 6 ......Mitchell Reid Berger ............Lake Grove, N.Y. 7 ......Kyle Hudson Gower ............Oceanside, N.Y. 8 ......Harris Durkovic ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 9 ......Simon Adler..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 10 ....Jordan Diamond ..................Mt. Sinai, N.Y. 11 ....George Kaslow ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 12 ....Faran Nazir ..........................Deer Park, N.Y. 13 ....Justin Matthew Scuderi ......Smithtown, N.Y. 14 ....Jonathan Gruberg................Setauket, N.Y. 15 ....Elias D. Tsalatsanis ..............Smithtown, N.Y. 16 ....Tyler Ancona ........................East Setauket, N.Y.

4 ......Sadhana Sridhar ..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 5 ......Sophia Elizabeth Schutte ....Great Neck, N.Y. 6 ......Ariana Pursoo ......................Westbury, N.Y. 7 ......Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 8 ......Emily Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y. 9 ......Jacqueline Zambrotto..........Kings Park, N.Y. 10 ....Elle Brignati ..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 11 ....Ava Thunder Scordo............Glen Head, N.Y. 12 ....Anna Vanessa Malin ............Oceanside, N.Y. 13 ....Theadora Yael Rabman ......Port Washington, N.Y. 14 ....Kiera Agic ............................Miller Place, N.Y. 15 ....Janae Fouche ......................Freeport, N.Y. 16 ....Ida Nicole Poulos ................Manhasset, N.Y. 17 ....Bianca Rose Lorich..............Southampton, N.Y. 18 ....Anna J. Martorella................Wantagh, N.Y. 19 ....Olivia N. Fermo ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 20 ....Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 21 ....Remi Berlent ........................Huntington, N.Y. 22 ....Skylor Wong ........................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 23 ....Alysson Dawn Pierro............East Patchogue, N.Y. 24 ....Nicolette Loeffler..................Syosset, N.Y. 25 ....Vivian Wu..............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 26 ....Isabella Sha..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 27 ....Alexandra Kaylee Ho ..........Syosset, N.Y. 28 ....Bianca Banilivi......................Great Neck, N.Y. 29 ....Skylar Blake Semon ............Melville, N.Y. 30 ....Elizabeth Becker ..................Jericho, N.Y. 31 ....Tola Pola Glowacka ............Jericho, N.Y. 32 ....Madelyn Kay Germano........Islip, N.Y. 33 ....Lisa Baldinucci ....................Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 34 ....Natalie Becker......................Jericho, N.Y. 35 ....Martina Eulau ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 36 ....Sydney Simmons ................East Northport, N.Y. 37 ....Ella Griffiths ..........................East Hampton, N.Y. 38 ....Taylor Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 39 ....Sofia Maurina Discipio ........Woodmere, N.Y. 40 ....Sarah Elizabeth Lane ..........Garden City, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles

GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles RankName........................................City 1 ......Daniella Victoria Paikin ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ......Jennifer Rabinowitz ............Great Neck, N.Y. 3 ......Ines Roti................................Locust Valley, N.Y.

RankName........................................City 1 ......Daniella Victoria Paikin ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ......Alexis Madison Huber..........Melville, N.Y. 3 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 4 ......Jade Eggleston ....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 5 ......Jade Fixon-Owoo ................Lynbrook, N.Y. 6 ......Ashley Yu..............................Great Neck, N.Y.

2013 ETA Recipient “Innovative Tennis Program of the Year” LI’s first Tennis Academy devoted to the USTA’s 10 & under Initiative. Butch Seewagen is a former varsity coach at Columbia University. He holds over 15 national and international titles and is the owner/program director of the Children’s Athletic Training Schools.

For Boys and Girls 3 – 10 years old.

188 Maple Avenue • Rockville Center Phone: 516-763-1299 catsrvc@gmail.com

www.catsny.com LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

75


LONG 7 ......Hannah Rose Niggemeier ..Sayville, N.Y. 8 ......Sophia Elizabeth Schutte ....Great Neck, N.Y. 9 ......Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 10 ....Jennifer Rabinowitz ............Great Neck, N.Y. 11 ....Lauren Hutton ......................Huntington, N.Y. 12 ....Alexa Villez............................West Sayville, N.Y. 13 ....Sofia Rose Anzalone............Center Moriches, N.Y. 14 ....Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 15 ....Grace Isabel Riviezzo ..........Syosset, N.Y. 16 ....Julia Gentile..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 17 ....Elena Gabriela Hull ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 18 ....Charlotte Goldbaum ............Old Westbury, N.Y. 19 ....Janae Fouche ......................Freeport, N.Y. 20 ....Jill Olga Lawrence................Hauppague, N.Y. 21 ....Emily Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y. 22 ....Ida Nicole Poulos ................Manhasset, N.Y. 23 ....Bryn Schlussler ....................Bay Shore, N.Y. 24 ....Andrianna Kaimis ................Commack, N.Y. 25 ....Anna J. Martorella................Wantagh, N.Y. 26 ....Jacqueline Zambrotto..........Kings Park, N.Y. 27 ....Soraya Koblence..................Jericho, N.Y. 28 ....Emma Rae Matz ..................Commack, N.Y. 29 ....Olivia Anne Nakhjavan ........Dix Hills, N.Y. 30 ....Erica Silver............................Plainview, N.Y. 31 ....Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y. 32 ....Julianna Marie Romeo ........Massapequa, N.Y. 33 ....Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 34 ....Gabriela Sciarotta ................Woodmere, N.Y. 35 ....Andrea Irta Brazyte ..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 36 ....Onalee Batcheller ................Westhampton, N.Y. 37 ....Emily Moran ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 38 ....Julia Amelie Raziel ..............Melville, N.Y. 39 ....Bianca Banilivi......................Great Neck, N.Y. 40 ....Emily A. Mowdy ..................Jamesport, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles RankName........................................City 1 ......Nicole Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 3 ......Elena Artemis Vlamakis ......Garden City, N.Y. 4 ......Isabella DiScipio ..................Woodmere, N.Y. 5 ......Kaitlyn Byrnes ......................Massapequa, N.Y. 6 ......Kristen D. Cassidy ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 7 ......Jillian Rebecca Shulder ......Setauket, N.Y. 8 ......Taryn Roche ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 9 ......Elinor Simek ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 10 ....Elizabeth Leigh Dwyer ........Cutchogue, N.Y. 11 ....Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo ....Lynbrook, N.Y. 12 ....Jill Olga Lawrence................Hauppauge, N.Y. 13 ....Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 14 ....Alexa Villez............................West Sayville, N.Y. 15 ....Rachel Flynn Collins ............Port Jefferson, N.Y. 16 ....Gina LaRusso ......................Melville, N.Y. 17 ....Andrianna Kaimis ................Commack, N.Y. 18 ....Hannah Vimod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 19 ....Sarah Bunk ..........................Sayville, N.Y. 20 ....Eleni Markopoulos ..............Seaford, N.Y. 21 ....Montaine LeGoupil-Maier....Oceanside, N.Y. 22 ....Morgan A. Wilkins................Huntington, N.Y. 23 ....Bryn N. Schlussler ..............Bay Shore, N.Y. 24 ....Alexandra Grace Waldman East Hampton, N.Y. 25 ....Gabrielle Vaillant ..................East Moriches, N.Y. 26 ....Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 27 ....Natalia Caroline Krol ............Greenvale, N.Y. 28 ....Carly Menker........................Great Neck, N.Y. 29 ....Andrea Irta Brazyte ..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 30 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 31 ....Janae Fouche ......................Freeport, N.Y. 32 ....Adhele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 33 ....Riley Elizabeth Katzman ......Halesite, N.Y. 34 ....Morgan Voulo ......................East Setauket, N.Y.

76

ISLAND

35 ....Madeline Lane......................Port Washington, N.Y. 36 ....Sarah Khan ..........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y. 37 ....Jade Fixon-Woo ..................Lynbrook, N.Y. 38 ....Madeline Clinton ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 39 ....Lauren Hutton ......................Huntington, N.Y. 40 ....Emily R. Victorson................Northport, N.Y.

RANKINGS

135 ..Alex Eli Vinsky ......................Westbury, N.Y. 136 ..Zachary David Gruber ........Port Washington, N.Y. 137 ..Brandon Lee ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 139 ..Aaron Marcos Vinsky ..........Westbury, N.Y. 142 ..Griffin Schlesinger................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 145 ..Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 147 ..Arjun K. Sharma ..................Glen Head, N.Y.

101 ..David Henry Reinharz..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 117 ..Kyle Hudson Gower ............Oceanside, N.Y. 123 ..Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 127 ..Carl Grant ............................Sagaponack, N.Y. 131 ..Garrett Malave......................Laurel, N.Y. 134 ..Keegan James Morris..........Franklin Square, N.Y. 137 ..Nicholas Braden Gunther....East Hampton, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

GIRLS

Long Island Girls 18 Singles RankName........................................City 1 ......Rebecca Elizabeth Stern ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Nicole Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 3 ......Eleni Markopoulos ..............Seaford, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 10/05/15)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 2 ......Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 16 ....Aman K. Sharma..................Glen Head, N.Y. 20 ....Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 32 ....Alex Eli Vinsky ......................Westbury, N.Y. 37 ....Mark Ryan Taranov..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 46 ....Ty Nisenson..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 53 ....Max Daniel Safir ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 55 ....Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 72 ....Dylan D’Agate ......................Melville, N.Y. 78 ....Joseph Perry Boyle..............Setauket, N.Y. 85 ....Michael Weitz ......................Roslyn, N.Y. 90 ....Ryan E. Shayani ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 99 ....Evan Joseph Rupolo............East Patchogue, N.Y. 102 ..Michael Hayden Singer ......Greenlawn, N.Y. 119 ..Matthew Evan Kronenberg..East Setauket, N.Y. 122 ..Joseph Monticciolo ............Coram, N.Y. 123 ..Arin Siriamonthep ................Greenvale, N.Y. 125 ..Luka David Markovic ..........Locust Valley, N.Y. 133 ..Matthew Leonard Zeifman ..Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 140 ..Jeremy Levine ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 142 ..Matthew Strogach ..............Commack, N.Y. 149 ..Sohrob Yavari ......................Syosset, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Spencer Brachman..............Commack, N.Y. 2 ......Cannon Kingsley..................Northport, N.Y. 6 ......Ronald Hohmann ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 11 ....Billy G. Suarez......................Huntington, N.Y. 15 ....Neel Raj ................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 17 ....Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 20 ....David Raphael Weiner ........Glen Head, N.Y. 21 ....Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 24 ....Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 28 ....Karan Amin ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 41 ....Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 45 ....Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 47 ....Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 63 ....Adrian Krisofer Tsui..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 70 ....Luke Karniewich ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 76 ....Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 85 ....Rohan Gaddam Reddy........Glen Head, N.Y. 92 ....Jack Louchheim ..................Sagaponack, N.Y. 93 ....Brandon Zhu ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 96 ....Justin Benjamin Oresky ......Syosset, N.Y. 100 ..Maxwell Moadel ..................Brookville, N.Y. 103 ..Valentine Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 104 ..Aman K. Sharma..................Glen Head, N.Y. 109 ..Anthony Casale....................Old Bethpage, N.Y.

Rank Name ......................................City 2 ......Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 12 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito ..............Syosset, N.Y. 17 ....Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 18 ....Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 20 ....Patrick Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23 ....Cannon Kingsley..................Northport, N.Y. 26 ....Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 29 ....Pete Siozios..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 39 ....Rajan Vohra ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 42 ....Spencer Brachman..............Commack, N.Y. 45 ....Daniel Weitz..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 49 ....Keegan James Morris..........Franklin Square, N.Y. 52 ....Athanasios Bilis....................East Hampton, N.Y. 59 ....Emmanuel V. Vacalares........Hicksville, N.Y. 65 ....Neel Raj ................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 70 ....Abhinav Raj Srivastava........Melville, N.Y. 71 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 81 ....Andrew Marc Nakhjavan ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 86 ....Julian Thomas MacGurn ....Amagansett, N.Y. 90 ....Matthew Franklin Porges ....Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 91 ....Timothy Hayden Nacca ......Garden City, N.Y. 98 ....Daniel Meinster ....................South Setauket, N.Y. 107 ..Karin K. Amin ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 108 ..Sangjin Song........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 109 ..Michael Medvedev ..............Albertson, N.Y. 111 ..Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 116 ..Nicholas Demaria ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 121 ..George Kaslow ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 123 ..Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 125 ..Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 128 ..Gardner Howe......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 131 ..Alexander Roti......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 133 ..Timothy Serignese ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 139 ..Samir Singh..........................Syosset, N.Y. 148 ..Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 7 ......Lubomir T. Cuba ..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 10 ....Athell Bennett ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 11 ....Brenden Volk........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 12 ....Jesse M. Levitin ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 17 ....Sean Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 18 ....Bryant J. Born ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 20 ....Eric Wagner..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 29 ....Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 40 ....Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y. 42 ....Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 45 ....Finbar Talcott........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 50 ....Travis Leaf ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 53 ....Alexander Lebedev..............Island Park, N.Y. 55 ....Rajan Jai Vohra ....................Glen Head, N.Y. 56 ....Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 59 ....Daniel Shleimovich ..............Syosset, N.Y. 67 ....Dylan Granat ........................Woodbury, N.Y. 76 ....Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 77 ....Mark Julian Baker ................North Baldwin, N.Y. 78 ....Pete Siozios..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 81 ....Stephen Gruppuso ..............Bayport, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 12 ....Rose Hayes..........................East Moriches, N.Y. 29 ....Madison Smith ....................Glen Cove, N.Y. 39 ....Rebecca Suarez ..................Huntington, N.Y. 40 ....Olivia N. Fermo ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 49 ....Tatiana Robotham Barnett ..Port Washington, N.Y. 52 ....Alina Rebeca Lyakhov ........Great Neck, N.Y. 54 ....Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 62 ....Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y. 68 ....Hailey Stoerback..................Saint James, N.Y. 71 ....Bianca Rose Lorich..............Southampton, N.Y. 80 ....Janae Fouche ......................Freeport, N.Y. 84 ....Emily Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y. 90 ....Sadhana Sridhar ..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 92 ....Ariana O. Pursoo..................Westbury, N.Y. 95 ....Ines Roti................................Locust Valley, N.Y. 98 ....Daniella Victoria Paikin ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 132 ..Anna Vanessa Malin ............Oceanside, N.Y. 136 ..Jacqueline Zambrotto..........Kings Park, N.Y. 138 ..Lauren Zola ..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 141 ..Ava Thunder Scordo............Glen Head, N.Y. 146 ..Alysson Dawn Pierro............East Patchogue, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 2 ......Lea Ma..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 8 ......Maryam Beshir Ahmad........Albertson, N.Y. 17 ....Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 18 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 19 ....Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 22 ....Alexa Susan Goetz ..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 25 ....Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 37 ....Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 39 ....Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 44 ....Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 48 ....Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 52 ....Madison Jane Williams........Glen Cove, N.Y. 63 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 70 ....Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 79 ....Alexis Madison Huber..........Melville, N.Y. 84 ....Kaya Amin ............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 87 ....Lucia Hu ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 93 ....Sofia Rose Anzalone............Center Moriches, N.Y. 94 ....Jade Fixon-Owoo ................Lynbrook, N.Y. 101 ..Madeline Sarah Richmond..Syosset, N.Y. 108 ..Ally Friedman........................East Hampton, N.Y. 113 ..Gabriela Sciarotta ................Woodmere, N.Y. 115 ..Vitalina Golod ......................Setauket, N.Y. 118 ..Kavina Amin ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 123 ..Emily Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y. 124 ..Soraya Koblence..................Jericho, N.Y. 128 ..Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 130 ..Daniella Victoria Paikin ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 134 ..Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 139 ..Lauren Hutton ......................Huntington, N.Y. 140 ..Jade Eggleston ....................Stony Brook, N.Y.


LONG Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players

Boys & Girls National Rankings

Rank Name ......................................City

(as of 10/21/15)

2 ......Elysia Bolton ........................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 8 ......Lea Ma..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ....Claire Handa ........................Point Lookout, N.Y. 24 ....Ashley Lessen ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 29 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 37 ....Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 43 ....Jasmine Olivia Abidi ............Glen Head, N.Y. 51 ....Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 53 ....Oliva Rose Scordo ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 58 ....Stephanie Chikvashvili ........Melville, N.Y. 62 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ........Manorville, N.Y. 65 ....Alexa Susan Goetz ..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 68 ....Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 73 ....Trinity Chow..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 76 ....Nicole Rezak ........................Merrick, N.Y. 80 ....Nicole Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 95 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad........Albertson, N.Y. 96 ....Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 98 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 100 ..Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 110 ..Madison Jane Williams........Glen Cove, N.Y. 118 ..Theodora Brebenel ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 136 ..Michelle Roitgarts ................Roslyn, N.Y. 137 ..Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 139 ..Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 141 ..Samantha Lena Galu ..........Jericho, N.Y. 142 ..Kaitlyn Byrnes ......................Massapequa, N.Y.

BOYS

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Madison Battaglia................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 7 ......Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 8 ......Alexa Graham ......................Garden City, N.Y. 18 ....Madison Courtney Appel ....Locust Valley, N.Y. 23 ....Courtney Provan ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 26 ....Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 53 ....Emma Scott ........................Syosset, N.Y. 55 ....Rebecca Elizabeth Stern ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 68 ....Ellen Nicole Huhulea............Rockville Centre, N.Y. 72 ....Shanice Nadia Arthur ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 86 ....Ashley Lessen ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 88 ....Amanda Allison Foo ............Manhasset, N.Y. 92 ....Elysia Bolton ........................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 94 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 98 ....Stephanie Nakash................Great Neck, N.Y. 99 ....Claire Handa ........................Westbury, N.Y. 103 ..Lea Ma..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 112 ..Michelle Carnovale ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 115 ..Nicole Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 120 ..Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 121 ..Mia M. Vecchio ....................Manhasset, N.Y. 125 ..Nicole Rezak ........................Merrick, N.Y. 127 ..Jacqueline Rae Bukzin ........Manorville, N.Y. 128 ..Rachel Weiss........................Great Neck, N.Y. 131 ..Danielle Mirabella ................Wantagh, N.Y. 134 ..Sarah Seeman......................Port Washington, N.Y. 137 ..Josephine Winters ..............Elmont, N.Y. 140 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 143 ..Theodora Brebenel ..............Glen Head, N.Y. 150 ..Alexandra Grace Waldman East Hampton, N.Y.

ISLAND

National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players

RANKINGS

464 ..Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 568 ..Daniel Weitz..........................Roslyn, N.Y. 697 ..Spencer Brachman..............Commack, N.Y. 730 ..Michael Medvedev ..............Albertson, N.Y.

553 ..Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 616 ..Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 702 ..Madison Jane Williams........Glen Cove, N.Y. 838 ..Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players

Rank Name ......................................City

Rank Name ......................................City

Rank Name ......................................City

15 ....Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 68 ....Aman K. Sharma..................Glen Head, N.Y. 138 ..Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 351 ..Mark R. Taranov ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 451 ..Alex Eli Vinsky ......................Westbury, N.Y. 821 ..Ty Nisenson..........................Port Washington, N.Y.

33 ....Brenden Volk........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 53 ....Lubomir Cuba ......................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 122 ..Jesse Levitin ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 150 ..Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 156 ..Eric Wagner..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 179 ..Athell Patrick Bennett ..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 188 ..Alexander Lebedev..............Island Park, N.Y. 229 ..Bryant Born ..........................Manhasset, N.Y. 257 ..Sean M. Mullins....................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 351 ..Finbar Talcott........................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 454 ..Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 617 ..Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 662 ..Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 912 ..Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y.

9 ......Elysia Bolton ........................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 68 ....Lea Ma..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 263 ..Claire Handa ........................Point Lookout, N.Y. 273 ..Ashley Lessen ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 314 ..Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 394 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 785 ..Olivia Rose Scordo ..............Glen Head, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 8 ......Cannon Kingsley..................Northport, N.Y. 20 ....Spencer Brachman..............Commack, N.Y. 32 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 59 ....Billy G. Suarez......................Huntington, N.Y. 142 ..Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 178 ..Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 201 ..Neel Raj ................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 240 ..Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 255 ..Karan K. Amin ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 275 ..David Raphael Weiner ........Glen Head, N.Y. 432 ..Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 651 ..Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 729 ..Luke Torel Karniewich..........Glen Head, N.Y. 810 ..Adrian Kristofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 885 ..Isaac Smith ..........................Glen Cove, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

GIRLS National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 3 ......Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 278 ..Madison Smith ....................Glen Cove, N.Y. 295 ..Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 532 ..Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 629 ..Rebecca E. Suarez ..............Huntington, N.Y. 918 ..Olivia N. Fermo ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 967 ..Janae Fouche ......................Freeport, N.Y.

Rank Name ......................................City

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players

23 ....Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 52 ....Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 200 ..Patrick F. Maloney................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 221 ..Cannon Kingsley..................Northport, N.Y. 235 ..Daniel Eric Pellerito ..............Syosset, N.Y. 278 ..Pete Siozios..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 293 ..Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 362 ..Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 390 ..Rajan Jai Vohra ....................Glen Head, N.Y.

5 ......Lea Ma..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 81 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad........Albertson, N.Y. 109 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 110 ..Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 179 ..Alexa Susan Goetz ..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 215 ..Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 222 ..Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 412 ..Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 46 ....Madison Battaglia................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 83 ....Alexa Graham ......................Garden City, N.Y. 135 ..Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 152 ..Madison Courtney Appel ....Locust Valley, N.Y. 157 ..Elysia Bolton ........................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 413 ..Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 628 ..Claire Handa ........................Westbury, N.Y. 654 ..Lea Ma..................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 703 ..Emma Scott ........................Syosset, N.Y. 721 ..Courtney Provan ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 943 ..Ester Chikvashvili ................Melville, N.Y.

Rank Name ......................................City

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USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. NOVEMBER 2015 Friday-Sunday, November 20-22 L1A GHRC 10U Championships Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Nov. 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, November 20-22 Eastern Super Six at Sportime Bethpage (National L4) Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Super 6 Event Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FICR16) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $113.38 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, November 20-22 L2O Lynbrook Sportime Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE); and Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 16 at 9:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, November 20-22 L2O Bethpage State Park Fall Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road • Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Nov. 15 at 10:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Friday-Sunday, November 20-22 Eastern Super Six at RWTTC (National L4) Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Super 6 Event Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (FIC-R16) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $113.38 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

PROVIDING THE VERY BEST IN SERVICE, SELECTION & STYLE FOR OVER 35 YEARS! LAYETTE • INFANT • TODDLER GIRLS 4-14 • BOYS 4-20 • JUNIORS YOUNG MEN’S • PRO TEAM #1 BACK TO SCHOOL STORE 1-ON-1 SERVICE • GREAT GIFTS ALL THE LATEST TRENDS Bellmore (516) 221-3187 • Cedarhurst (516) 295-0946 E. Northport (631) 499-2504 • Little Neck (718) 225-883 Plainview (516) 681-4490 • Scarsdale (914) 722-6077

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, November 20-22 L1A Point Set Harvest Championships Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE); and Championships Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 13 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Saturday, November 21 L3 Sportime Syosset UPS Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10, 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Monday, November 27-30 USTA National Selection Tournament-November Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (FIC-R16); and Girls’ Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $134.88 for one event; $135.38 for two events, additional fees may apply if registered in three or more events (deadline for entries is Thursday, Oct. 29 at 11:59 a.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, November 27-29 & December 4-6 L1B Huntington Winter Challenger Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway • Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rjal1@verizon.net or call (631) 421-0040.


USTA/Long Island Region 2015

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, November 27-29 L1B Bethpage State Park Thanksgiving Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road • Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Nov. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Friday-Sunday, November 27-29 L1B GHRC Glen Head Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club • 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, November 27-29 L1B Point Set Thanksgiving Challenger Point Set Tennis • 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Nov. 22 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, November 27-29 L1B Long Beach Pumpkin Pie Classic Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12, 16 (SE); and Challenger Mixed Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12, 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$54.25 for additional singles/$28 for first doubles/$28 for additional doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Nov. 15 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Saturday, November 28 L3 Sportime Bethpage Eastern UPS Sportime Bethpage • 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

DECEMBER 2015 Friday-Sunday, December 4-6 L1B GHRC December Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC); and Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Doubles 78’ Green Ball 10 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, December 4-6 L2R Sportime Bethpage December Regional Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE); and Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Nov. 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, December 4-6 L1B Bethpage State Park Winter Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Nov. 29 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Friday-Sunday, December 4-6 L1B Point Set Winter Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14,18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Nov. 22 at 7:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, December 4-6 L1B RWTTC Winter Challenger Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Nov. 30 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Saturday-Sunday, December 5-6 PSP L1 Sportime Lynbrook Orange Ball Series #4 Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road • Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Level 1 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (COMP) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $59.63 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Nov. 26 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail dvcasesa@gmail.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, December 11-13 & December 18-20 +L1 Eastern Grand Prix at GHRC Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix Boys’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (FICQ) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Dec. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, December 11-13 & December 18-20 +L1 Eastern Grand Prix at Point Set Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (FICQ) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Dec. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, December 11-13 & December 18-20 +L1 Eastern Grand Prix at Sportime Bethpage Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FICQ) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Dec. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

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TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, December 11-13 L2O Sportime Lynbrook December Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 1218 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Dec. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, December 11-13 L1B WG December Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC); and Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12,16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail vtapr@hotmail.com or call (631) 751-6100. Friday-Sunday, December 11-13 L1B Sportime Syosset Challenger Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14,18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Dec. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, December 11-13 L2O Bethpage State Park Winter Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Dec. 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

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Friday-Sunday, December 11-13 L2O Eastern Athletic December Open Eastern Athletic Clubs 9A Montauk Highway Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Dec. 6 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail eacjrtennis@gmail.com or call (631) 363-2882. Saturday-Sunday, December 12-13 L3 RWTTC December UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Green Ball 12 ,78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Dec. 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Monday, December 18-21 L2O Sportime Lynbrook December Open Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14,18 (SE); and Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12,16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 for first singles/$23 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, Dec. 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentslyb@sportimeny.com or call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Monday, December 18-21 L1B RSTA December Challenger Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1218 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail pwilliamson@ross.org or call (631) 907-5162.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, December 18-20 L2O LBTC Key Lime Pie Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE); and Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$33 for first doubles For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, December 18-20 L1B WG Winter Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC); and Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14,18 (SE)) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail vtapr@hotmail.com or call (631) 751-6100. Friday-Sunday, December 18-20 L2O Bethpage State Park Winter Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Dec. 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Saturday-Monday, December 26-28 L1B Sportime Syosset December Challenger Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Dec. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727.


LITennisMag.com • November/December 2015 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2015 • LITennisMag.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine November / December 2015  
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