Page 1

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

95


96

LIMITED AVAILABILITY • LIMITED AVAILABILITY • LIMITED AVAILABILITY • LIMITED AVAILABILITY • LIMITED AVAILABILITY • LIMITED AVAILABILITY • LIMITED AVAILABILITY

arl g C t ac sprin is t n Co nd a as h e tte ion nc to a sess xperie S e ALP st to camp gue what like is

SUMMER 2017

Summer Camp 2017 FROM JUNE 26TH - AUGUST 18TH DAILY AND WEEKLY PRICING AVAILABLE

T

he Early Hit Training Center is pleased to announce its 14th Annual Junior Summer Tennis Camp. Our comprehensive program will provide your child with all the resources necessary to reach his/her maximum tennis potential. The Early Hit Training Center incorporates all aspects of the game into our complete program. We begin each session with a nutritionally complete and balanced shake from Court 7, our on-premises restaurant and smoothie bar. After a thorough warm-up, the student will work through the core components of tennis, including stroke production, drilling and physical fitness tranining, before breaking for a healthy lunch. We then move onto playing dynamics and strategy, and reinforce these lessons with focused match play. A thorough cool-down and stretching session completes a world-class day of tennis for your child. With our team of renowned tennis teaching professionals, experienced physical conditioning trainers, movement experts and on-site chef, the Early Hit Training Center offers a unique and total tennis experience. Ask About Campo Mas

SPRING 2017

Junior Alps Program "ALPS" is a program for High Aptitude Learners.

T

he Early Hit Training Center is pleased to announce it's 15th season of group training. This comprehensive program will provide your child with all the resources necessary to reach his/her maximum tennis potential. The Early Hit Training Center incorporates all aspects of the game into our complete program. After a thorough warm-up, the student will work through the core components of tennis, including stroke production and drilling. We then move onto playing dynamics and strategy, and reinforce these lessons with focused match play. A session starts or finishes with an hour of conditioning. Come experience our team of renowned tennis teaching professionals, conditioning trainers and movement experts. TUESDAY 6:00pm - 8:30pm SATURDAY 8:00am - 10:30am SUNDAY 8:00 am - 10:30am • 3:30pm - 6:00 pm

in Jo w! No

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2017 • LITennisMag.com


Hand & Upper Extremities

Shoulder

Spine

Elbow Hip

Knee

Foot & Ankle

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

1


10

Table Of Contents Keeping Pace With Father Time By Brian Coleman

Thirty-five-year-old Roger Federer shows age is just a number, winning the first Grand S year on a resurgent upswing. See page 10

Highlights 20 Your 2017 Guide to Court Builders and Suppliers It’s time to prep those courts for the spring and summer as we present the top court maintenance companies available to service your surface’s needs.

30 2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide With summer around the corner, we present the top tennis camp destinations and what they have to offer your child for the summer of 2017.

20

46 2017 Boys High School Preview By Brian Coleman With the boys high school season soon underway, we take a look at who to watch in the 2017 season and who is gunning for the top spot this year on Long Island

Features

30

4

Across Long Island … News and Notes From Across the L.I. Tennis Community

6

Beyond the Baseline: Jonathan Klee By Brian Coleman

8

Tennis Injury Prevention: Treating Patellarfemoral Pain in Tennis Players By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS

14

Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz

17

Shine on the Court With a Luxury Tennis Racquet From Bijou

18

Sportime Hosts Melbourne-Themed World Tour Event

24

Tips From the Tennis Pro: Overcoming Adversity By Emilio Sanchez-Vicario

26

USTA Eastern Looks to the Future at 2017 Annual Conference

28

Look Out for POP Tennis By Whitney Kraft

2 2

46

Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Pub


litennis

MAR/APR 2017 Vol 9, No 2

Long Island Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com

Grand Slam of 2017 and rolling into the new

Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Cover photo credit: Tennis Australia

50

USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update

53

Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller

54

MSG Rolls Out the Red Carpet to the Stars

56

Building the Fire Within Young American Athletes By Dr. Tom Ferraro

58

Five Rules You Must Know Before Sectionals By Barbara Wyatt

59

One-On-One Doubles Tournaments Return To The Big Apple

60

Mythbusters: Let’s Let the Pros Call Their Own Lines! At Least for Some Tournaments! By Ricky Becker

62

Why You Are Probably Working Too Hard on the Tennis Court to Create Power and Speed By Steve Kaplan

64

JMTA to Host Second Annual College Recruiting Combine in June

66

Serve and Volley for Women: Why Not? By Lisa Dodson

68

The Jensen Zone: The Tennis Season Heats Up as Spring Approaches By Luke Jensen

69

Carefree Hosts Third Annual Susan Alvy Memorial Tournament

70

Fitness & Nutrition: Everything You Need to Know About Oils By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN

71

Stop Distracting Yourself By Tonny van de Pieterman

72

Balancing Emotional Energy: The Key to Playing Inside the Zone By Rob Polishook

74

Bring Back Doubles By Jimmy Delevante

76

That’s the Point! Trying to Get Better in Every Way … Every Day By Lonnie Mitchel

78

Ten Takeaways From the 2017 Aussie Open By Brian Coleman

81

Long Island Tennis Club Directory

82

Long Island Rankings

85

USTA/Long Island Region 2017 Tournament Schedule

Sports Publications Ltd.—Copyright © 2017 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 • brianc@usptennis.com Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Scott Koondel VP of Operations (516) 409-4444, ext. 324

Sidney Beal III Staff Photographer

Kristen Scheidel Junior Intern

Lee Seidner Staff Photographer

Kendall Delaney Junior Intern

Maddie Germano Junior Intern

Darienne Rogers Junior Intern

Emily DeAngelis Junior Intern

Kate Berger Junior Intern

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

3


Across Long Isla Bethpage Park’s Semon Wins Multiple February Tournaments Skylar Semon of Bethpage Park Tennis Center had an excellent February in tournament competition. She came out victorious in two separate events, winning both the L2 Roslyn Sportime Open and the L2 Bethpage State Park February Open titles.

NYIT Tops ECC Preseason Poll, Selecky Named Preseason Player of the Year

Sportime Kings Park Hosts Tennis Week Photo credit: ECCSports.org

The New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) men’s tennis team has had a dominant run in the East Coast Athletic Conference (ECC), and that is expected to continue this spring. In the 2017 ECC Men’s Tennis Preseason Poll, conducted by the conference’s coaches, the Bears are projected to finish atop the conference once again. Senior Matej Selecky (pictured above), who won the Player of the Year Award last year, was also tabbed as the Preseason Player of the Year for this coming season.

PWTA’s Zausner to be Inducted Into USTA Eastern Hall of Fame Sportime Kings Park continued its initiative of bringing tennis into local schools, as staff members recently visited the Saw Mill Intermediate School and Wood Park Primary School in Commack, N.Y., seeing the kids during their regularly scheduled gym classes. “The goal anytime we go into the school is for us to get the kids playing tennis as quickly as possible,” said Sportime Kings Park’s Director of Tennis Jason Wass. “We run the kids through a number of basic skills and then get them rallying and playing tennis. With such large groups, we use items like jump ropes or pool noodles as nets to keep everyone playing and not just standing around.” Longtime Owner and Operator at Port Washington Tennis Academy, Dick Zausner, will be inducted into the USTA Eastern Hall of Fame during a ceremony on April 21. Read more about Zausner and the USTA Eastern Hall of Fame in the USTA Long Island Region Section of the magazine on page 51. 4

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


land

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

McHale Hits With Kids at NTC Former USTA Eastern standout, currently ranked 43rd in the world, Christina McHale took some time out of her schedule to stop by the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center and hit with some current USTA Eastern junior players.

Sportime Syosset Holds U10 Awards Ceremony The U10 program at Sportime Syosset celebrated another successful season and program, bringing its players together for an award ceremony to reward the kids for their hard work.

Rubin Captures Launceston Title

Photo credit: Phillip Briggs/The Examiner

Long Island’s Noah Rubin has had an excellent start to the 2017 season on the other side of the world. First, he reached the second round of the Australian Open and hung tough against eventual champion Roger Federer in Rod Laver Arena. He followed that up by winning the Launceston 75K title by defeating fellow American Mitchell Krueger 6-0, 6-1 in the finals.

Ahmad Family Recognized With Point Set’s Family of the Month Honors The Ahmad Family won the Point Set Family of the Month Award. The whole family plays tennis at Point Set, as Jamal plays in the Men’s League, Julie plays in the Women’s League and the two play together in the Mixed-Doubles League. Both children, Layla and Sahara, participate in the Junior Development Program, and they all take the court together for friendly family mixers.

Eighth Grade Tennis Player Patel Attends Trump’s Presidential Inauguration Vinit Patel, a 13-year old eighth-grader who plays tennis at Woodland Middle School in East Meadow, N.Y., got the opportunity of a lifetime when he was invited to attend the Presidential Inauguration in January as a part of a program called STEM Scholars. “This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to witness history,” said Patel. “As a Summit Delegate, I was able to attend the historic 58th Presidential Inauguration on the National Mall. I also had the opportunity to see/meet and listen to world-renowned speakers such as Malala Yousafzai and her father, Ziauddin Yousafzai, who talked about current situation of women’s education in their homeland Pakistan and how Malala took a stand. I also heard great speeches from Spike Lee, General Colin Powell, Abby Wambach, Gov. Martin O’Malley, Carly Fiorina, and Ann Compton at the Eagle Bank Arena.”

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

5


BEYOND THE BASELINE

BEYOND THE BASELINE

BEYOND THE BASELINE

beyond the

baseline JONATHAN KLEE BY BRIAN COLEMAN At the Annual USTA Eastern Conference in White Plains, N.Y., many new faces on the Board of Directors were ushered in for the various regions that comprise the Eastern Section. In the Long Island Region, there is a new Board of Directors and it will be led by its new president, Jonathan Klee.

“The Conference was very educational and we were able to participate in a number of different meetings to receive the strategic plan that USTA Eastern has for all the regions,” said Klee. “I had met a number of the Board Members at prior Sectional and National functions before, but

Sag Harbor Park Tennis Best value in The Hamptons

Get the highest level of adult and junior tennis programs, including Annacone Tennis Academy, from our world-class tennis pros.

2017 Memberships available now Contact us sagharbortennis@aol.com 395 Main Street • Sag Harbor, NY 11963 • 865-300-7323

www.sagharborparktennis.com 6

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

there are a lot of new presidents. Out of the six Regions, there are five new Presidents. It’s an enthusiastic group with a lot of new ideas.” Klee grew up in Oceanside, N.Y. and has been part of the Long Island tennis community for most of his life. He admits he wasn’t a major junior player growing up, but he did play on Oceanside High School’s Varsity Tennis team earning AllConference honors before heading to George Washington University, where he walked on to the school’s tennis team and played as a freshman. His time at George Washington was just about the only time he spent away from the local tennis community, returning to Long Island to go to law school at Hofstra, and then living and working on Long Island where he now resides in Sands Point. He has been active in a number of different aspects of tennis on Long Island, whether it would be volunteering, running events or participating in them. “I’ve kind of done this backwards,” Klee said of his path to becoming head of the

B


NE

BEYOND THE BASELINE

Long Island Region. “Most start by volunteering locally at the grassroots level, and then work their way up to the Sectional Level and then on to Nationals. In my case, I really started out at the Sectional Level and then jumped to some National positions, and now coming full circle to return to the Long Island Region. I think it gives me an interesting perspective, having seen what goes on at the National Level and trying to bring that knowledge to Long Island.” One of the major challenges that Klee wants to take on, and do so right away, is opening the lines of communication, not only between the Section and the Region, but also the Region and its constituents. “I want the Long Island Board to better communicate with the community at large, ranging from adults to juniors, from tournaments to leagues, from community events to school programs, etc. Many people know about the Long Island Board because of our Annual Awards Dinner, but most people do not know about all of the wonderful programs our volunteers help set up,

BEYOND THE BASELINE

organize and participate in,” said Klee. “Being able to connect all that into one uniform board will allow us to relay our needs and goals back to the Eastern section and then out to the community at large. If we can accomplish that, then we’ll be successful. I think Long Island Tennis Magazine is a great conduit for us to communicate to the public what programming and grants are available, and how to get involved in being a part of the Long Island tennis community.” USTA Eastern has many grants available for a variety of different programs and community-oriented events, which Klee wants to make sure that Long Island is aware of and takes advantage of to grow the sport at the grassroots level. A major aspect of the USTA Eastern strategic plan is its emphasis on the youth, continuing to build upon its 10U programming, in-school and after-school programs. Klee said it is a goal to begin implementing these programs and expand upon them in the next years, growing the outreach into

BEYOND THE BASELINE

schools and into the community. “We want to really grow the grassroots tennis on Long Island, while expanding on the programs we already have in place,” said Klee. “We want to make everybody fully aware of what USTA Long Island has to offer, whether it is grassroots, tennis in schools, after-school programs, junior tournaments or adult leagues. There is a different aspect of tennis in everybody’s life. Being able to communicate to the community all the programming that we have available to offer them is probably the major goal that we are trying to accomplish.” As the spring and summer approach, there will be a lot going on in the Long Island tennis community as Jonathan Klee and the rest of the USTA Board continue to expand and grow the game in the LI Region. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email BrianC@USPTennis.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

7


TENNIS INJURY PREVENTION

Treating Patellarfemoral Pain in Tennis Players By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS Just as important as proper upper body strength is for the tennis player, so is lower body strength, as a match often includes quick bursts of acceleration, changes in direction and bending. Many tennis players will complain of pain in front of the knee during a match and for days after. The most common reason is what is known as patellofemoral pain, betterknown “Runner’s Knee.” This is not a specific condition, but rather a collective term for overuse injuries that result from excessive exercise and activity of the lower extremities with a main presentation of knee pain on the underside of the patella (knee cap). In tennis players, 8

this condition is most often during the knee bending phase of the serve or when bending the knee during a volley. The main cause of this condition is weak quadriceps muscles and poor hamstring flexibility. These weaknesses cause the patella to absorb more of the impact during running and causing irritation to the cartilage under the kneecap and micro-trauma to the origin of the patellar tendon at the bottom of the kneecap. Weak quadriceps can also exacerbate patellar maltracking or instability, a condition where the kneecap may slide in and out of its intended position causing pain, locking, and buckling of the knee. Other common causes include worn cartilage in the knee joint, which reduces the ability of the knee to absorb shock. Those with high-arches are also at risk as their

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

feet provide less cushioning. Also, those with flat feet are at risk as the excessive turning out of their feet can pull the patella out of its intended position during activities exacerbating maltracking. The most common symptoms of runner’s knee include the following: l Pain on bending the knee, associated with activities such as bending, jogging/running, or kneeling. l Pain when arising from a sitting position. l Worsening of pain when walking downhill or downstairs. l Pain localized around the kneecap. l Swelling in the front of the knee. l A grinding or popping sensations in the region of the kneecap. Runner’s Knee has also been shown to be more common in women than men.


Treatment Treatment will vary depending on the cause of the problem, present symptoms and functional status of the patient. Very often, the first line of treatment is physical therapy, which may incorporate pain management with the use of therapeutic ultrasound. The goal of physical therapy is to strengthen the gluteals, hamstrings and quadriceps, as well as stretching of the calf muscles, iliotibial band, as well as quadriceps and hamstrings. Another focus of physical therapy is balance training to create optimal knee alignment so that further injury can be avoided. Specifically for patellar tendonitis an eccentric strengthening program can significantly improve symptoms in up to 90 percent of patients. For patients who have failed conservative treatment for patellar tendonitis an injection of PRP or platelet rich plasma, which is an in office procedure where the tendon injury is injected with one’s own blood, can help in tendon healing and improve or resolve symptoms. For patients who fail these treatments an arthroscopic debridement of the tendon can cure symptoms in up to 90 percent of patients. For patients with patella chondromalacia who have failed conservative treatment injections with PRP or viscosupplementation can help with symptoms. Viscosupplementation is an injection done several weeks in a row where the normal lubricating protein in ones knee is injected into the knee to increase viscosity and lubrication, which improves symptoms and pain. In rare cases surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of the patella so that stress for weight-bearing activities can be distributed more evenly. However, surgical procedures are considered only when all conservative modalities have failed to provide relief and there is an underlying defect of the knee that is present and must be addressed. Assessment by an orthopedic surgeon can diagnose the problem causing the pain and tailor a treatment plan that is specific for the problem. Dr. Charles Ruotolo is a Board-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and the founder of Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with locations in Massapequa, East Meadow and the Bronx, N.Y. For more information, call (855) 321ORTHO or visit TotalOrthoSportsMed.com. LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

9


Credit all photos to Tennis Australia

10

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


Keeping Pace With Father Time Thirty-five-year-old Roger Federer shows age is just a number at first Grand Slam of 2017 By Bri an C ol eman

he 2017 Australian Open was one for the ages in a number of ways, and turned back the clock to a decade prior with four 30-plus year-olds competing for the men’s and women’s singles titles. No Melbourne storyline was bigger than the men’s singles final between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, two long-time rivals whose Grand Slam titles, many believed, were in the rearview mirror. Federer defeated Nadal 6-4, 3-6, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3 in a three-and-a-halfhour epic battle that intrigued diehard tennis fans and attracted even the most casual sports fan. “Honestly, I never thought I’d be able to win this tournament. That’s what stands out to me three days later,” Federer told SI’s Sean Gregory just days after winning the fifth Australian Open title of his career. “I still cannot believe I was able to make it all happen. This one has a very special, different taste than all the other Grand Slams I ever won. Coming back, getting older, and people have written me off maybe, makes this one so unique.” The win bolstered Federer’s slam count to 18, and to many, secured his place as the greatest player of all-time. He entered the tournament with modest expectations and the Swiss legend said it himself, coming in as the draw’s 17th seed and playing his first competitive tournament in six months. “I said the best I can do here is probably a fourth round or a quarterfinal, depending on the draw,” added Federer. “And I sit here as the champion. It’s really strange to me.”

T

continued on page 12 LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

11


keeping pace with father time continued from page 11

Federer turned 35 last August and missed the bulk of the second half of 2016, skipping the French Open, the U.S. Open, the Olympics and the ATP Finals, to rehab his knee. He suffered the injury while prepping a bath for his kids and his career seemed to be trending downward. Federer returned to the court in the beginning of this year at the Hopman Cup in Perth, Australia, a round-robin, team event. The fun, crowd-engaging atmosphere gave Federer a warm welcome back to the professional tennis court. “One of the big reasons why I’m still playing tennis is to be able to enjoy these kinds of crowds because when I’m retired I won’t be able to see this anymore,” Federer said after

beating Dan Evans 6-3, 6-4 in his first match back. “I’ll just be sitting here in a suit or something and it won’t be the same. So this was beautiful, it was nice, it was all worth it so far and I hope there’s more to come for me.” The event was certainly happy to have him playing, as it sold out three sessions, plus the 6,000 spectators he drew in when he held a practice session open to the public. “I think it’s been everything I hoped it would be,” Hopman Cup Tournament Director Paul Kilderry said. “Roger’s in a league of his own, from what I’ve seen.” Feeling refreshed and playing with a nothing-to-lose attitude, Federer dazzled in Melbourne. After knocking off Jurgen Melzer in the opening round, he took on Long Island’s

www.30Fifteen.co.uk 12

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

Noah Rubin in the second round. Rubin, playing in the biggest match of his young career, played Federer tough, but was ultimately overmatched, and the 17th seed pushed through with a 7-5, 6-3, 7-6(3) victory. He then dismantled 10th seed Tomas Berdych 6-2, 6-4, 6-4 in what was his best performance of his first three matches, and it set up a showdown with fifth-seeded Kei Nishikori. At 35-years-old and with only a few matches under his belt after a long absence, Federer showed off his fitness level, outlasting the relentless Nishikori 6-7(4), 6-4, 6-1, 16, 6-3 to reach the final eight, the 49th Grand Slam quarterfinal of his career. In the quarterfinals, it was supposed to be newly-minted world number one Andy Murray awaiting Federer, but those plans were foiled by German Mischa Zverev, who provided the biggest upset of the tournament, upending Murray 7-5, 5-7, 6-2, 6-4. “I definitely did watch the match. It was played right before us and once I come into the building I watch tennis,” Federer said. “I thought it was another incredible match. Same when Denis [Istomin] beat Novak [Djokovic]. I would never have picked it. I like Mischa, he has a nice game coming forward. I’m happy for him. He was going for it and he deserved to win.” It set up a matchup between two players with similar styles of play (serve and volley) but contrasting careers, and the last time they met, Federer handed the German a 6-0, 6-0 defeat back in 2013. The score line was not as dramatic this time around, but it was still a routine 6-1, 7-5, 6-2 victory to book his spot in the final four. He then had to play another five-set match, and beat a third top 10 opponent, this time, his compatriot Stan Wawrinka, advancing in just over three hours. After blowing a two-sets-to-love lead, Federer took a rare medical timeout before the fifth set began to collect his thoughts and regroup. “I just said: ‘You know what, I never take injury timeouts’ Stan already took his, so people won’t be mad,” said Federer in a playful and charming manner. “Stan won’t be mad, hopefully. It was on the set change and you just hope something works. That physio, he’s got some magic hands.” The next day, Nadal hung on to beat Grigor Dimitrov in a thrilling, five-hour bout that was the best played match of the tournament, and


it set up an epic final, one that tennis fans could only dream of. It was also a final matchup that ESPN and other television networks around the world that were broadcasting the match had dreamed of. “This is a unique match to call because of the emotional investment fans make in this,” said ESPN announcer Chris Fowler, who called the match. “Not just when it’s Rafa versus Roger but this particular match. There are implications about each guy’s legacy. You are talking about 18 to 14 or 17 to 15 in terms of Slam counts. You are talking about Nadal making it five Slam finals in a row over Roger. Roger told me this would be his sweetest win ever. Not just because he is 35 and it’s been awhile but because it’s Rafa.” With so much build up and hype, the final did not disappoint in the slightest. It went the full five-sets and was a back and forth showdown that will be remembered forever. According to Sports Media Watch, the final was the highest-rated Australian Open final since the 2009 championship (also between Federer and Nadal). It pulled in a 0.7 final rating and 1.1 million viewers on ESPN, which was a 75 percent increase in ratings and 106 percent increase in viewership compared to the 2016 final between Djokovic and Murray. Not bad for a match that began at 3:30 a.m. on the East Coast. It was Federer’s first victory over Nadal in a Grand Slam final since Wimbledon in 2007, and was the 35th total meeting between the all-time greats. Both players were gracious to one another after the battle, and it bodes well for the rest of the 2017 season if these two have climbed back to the top level. “Tennis is a tough sport. There are no draws. If there were I would have been happy to accept one and share it with Rafa,” Federer said. “Everybody says they work very hard—I do the same—but I try not to shout about it. I’d like to thank my team. It’s been a different last six months. I didn’t think I’d make it but here I am.” Tennis fans are salivating at the thought of seeing Federer and Nadal going deep at Grand Slams as this year plays out. If the Australian Open is any indication, 2017 is shaping up to an exciting one in the world of tennis. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or e-mail BrianC@USPTennis.com.

TOPSPIN

TENNIS & FITNESS

“Long Island’s Tennis Store”

We Now Carry Viking Platform Tennis Racquets and Paddles Kids Apparel & Sneakers t Great Prices On Racquets Tennis & Running Shoes t 1 Hour Stringing

Open 7 Days t Demos Available Shipping Available ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

USTA Long Island Retailer of the Year

218 JERICHO TURNPIKE SYOSSET t 516-364-9470 ACROSS FROM SYOSSET HOSPITAL

TopSpinTennisLI.com

SECOND LOCATION NOW OPEN AT CHRISTOPHER

MORLEY TENNIS IN ROSLYN/MANHASSET!

516-484-4200

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

13


BY

Djokovic Buys Condos in Soho

E M I L I E

KAT Z

Bouchard Honors Super Bowl Wager

completed the historic comeback, and Bouchard was a woman of her word, and the two parties attended a Brooklyn Nets game.

Shapovalov Defaulted After Hitting Chair Umpire With Ball

Novak Djokovic is known for his tennis, but he is also a fan of architecture apparently, telling The Wall Street Journal that he is a big fan of Renzo Piano. So much so that he is now under contract for two condos in his SoHo complex, which is under construction and is expected to be completed by 2018.

With the Atlanta Falcons leading the New England Patriots 28-3 in Super Bowl LI, most of the world thought the Falcons had it won. That includes Canadian star Eugenie Bouchard, who accepted a Twitter fan’s challenge that if the Patriots were to come back and win, she would have to go on a date with him. As they say, the rest is history. The Patriots

Credit photo: Getty Images

During the deciding match in the CanadaGreat Britain Davis Cup showdown, Cana-

Looking to play college tennis?

JC OML L TE GAE RECRUITING COMBINE

2nd Annual SPORTIME/ John McEnroe Tennis Academy College Recruiting Combine REGISTRATION DEADLINE: MARCH 31, 2017 Find out more www.SportimeNY.com/JMTACombine

SPORTIME Randall’s Island, NYC June 24 and 25, 2017 3935USP

14

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

347-226-3447

www.SportimeNY.com | www.JMTA.com

@ JMTANY


dian teenager Denis Shapovalov was defaulted when he fired a ball off his racquet and hit the chair umpire in his eye. The default gave Great Britain the victory and they will play France in the quarterfinals.

Sharapova’s Comeback Schedule Rounding Out

major announcement early in the year: Her engagement to Reddit Co-Founder Alexis Ohanian. She announced the news on Reddit in the form of a poem, and it came as a surprise to many people as their relationship was not really known to the public.

Emirates Drops U.S. Open Series Naming Rights Emirates will no longer have the naming rights to the U.S. Open Series, the circuit of North American tournaments that leads into the U.S. Open. Emirates still has two years left on its contract with the USTA, and will push its resources more towards the U.S. Open, while the USTA will promote a youth initiative throughout the U.S. Open Series tournaments.

Zverev Wants to Hire Becker, Can’t Afford Him

Tweets from the pros Maria Sharapova’s suspension is coming to a close soon, and the Russian star is already putting together the schedule for her comeback tour. The first tournament on her slate is the Porsche Grand Prix in Stuttgart, which begins in April, and she has also accepted a wild card into the Mutua Madrid Open in mid-May.

Serena Gets Engaged

Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): Tennis in bathing suits ... Who’s in?! @si_swimsuit #SISwim

Before winning the Australian Open for her 23rd Grand Slam title, Serena made a

continued on page 16

Photo credit: ATPWorldTour.com

Alexander Zverev is one of the best young talents the men’s game has, and he knows what it will take to elevate his game to the next level. Unfortunately, he cannot afford it. “Boris [Becker] could definitely help me to improve my game,” Zverev told the German newspaper Bild of the fellow German and the six-time Grand Slam champion. “But if I want to work with him, first I have to win some tournaments, because at the moment I cannot afford it.” Zverev is currently coached by his father, and gets some help from brother Mischa.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

15


court six continued from page 15

Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): First practice on the Rod Laver Arena this year ... feels good to be home! Stanislas Wawrinka (@StanWawrinka): When you come back from 0-2 in sets but still lose in the 5th

Venus Williams (@VenusesWilliams): Sneak peak folks! @EleVenbyVenus #2017

Christina McHale (@ChristinaMcHale): View from my office #Doha

Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): Wearing my #SneakersforGood to support @LaureusSport as a symbol of the power of sport. Show me yours @rogerfederer @andy_murray #Laureus17

Petra Kvitova (@Petra_Kvitova): Nice to be back in the sunshine at @clublasanta #teampetra

Join us in Vermont and share the Windridge experience... Specialized programs in tennis, soccer and horseback riding with a 1:4 counselor to camper ratio. #"! "!!!!""! "!" ! !"! Share our commitment to hard work, good      !! " "!! !! 

 "!!"!"  "  16

www.windridgecamps.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): No photographers were harmed in the making of this photo #letshope


Shine on the Court With a Luxury Tennis Racquet From Bijou The Goddess Collection is adorned with more than 160 Swarovski crystals and comes in three eye catching colors: Rose, Silver and Gold n French, “Bijou” stands for jewel. In tennis, it stands for luxury, which is now part of the game. Players are already buying high-end sportswear, but now they can invest in upscale gear. A tennis racquet is the ultimate accessory in tennis as it showcases the player’s unique style. The idea for a dazzling racquet was born in New York City. Inspired by the city’s spectacular skyline, Bijou founders saw a niche for luxury in the world of tennis. Adding sparkle to the racquet proved to be a craftsmanship challenge. The effort, however, proved to be well worth it. Not only is the Goddess collection an aesthetic masterpiece: It is a technical triumph, too. The frame is composed of the same fine carbon fibers as used in luxury cars. Without exception, each racquet undergoes 18 quality control steps, an industry high. The meticulous attention to detail is evident in the crystal arrangement and overall design.

I

Notably, each racquet is individually hand painted by a master artisan. In addition, each racquet comes strung with the world’s best natural gut strings. Of the brand’s recent launch, Bijou CEO Agnese Rozite said, “I am thrilled to unveil these exceptional racquets. It took over a year to perfect every detail and I am very proud of the final product in terms of shine, design and performance. Fundamentally, we are not just selling the racquets, we are selling the experience. From the moment, the box is received to taking the first swing, we want to make sure every woman feels special. Every time I pick up the Bijou racquet, I feel like a Grand Slam champion.” In order to maintain exclusivity, Bijou produces each collection in limited quantities. At a price tag of $1,250, Bijou is the most expensive playable racquet on the market. The racquets are sold exclusively on the company’s online boutique, BijouTennis.com. Once you have

decided between the rose, silver, and gold color, the packaging comes with a complimentary dust bag and a certificate of authenticity. Currently, the racquets weigh just under 10 ounces, come with a 16 X 20 string pattern, and have two grip size options: 4 1/4 and 4 3/8. The 100-square inch head size aids in creating a larger sweet spot, which is a great benefit to players at every level of the game. Furthermore, each racquet has a solid foam filling, which lessens the vibration and reduces the risk of an injury. In case you miss out on a particular model, Bijou also offers customization for its VIP clients. Besides choosing a color, a true connoisseur can add precious gemstones instead of Swarovski crystals. The personalization only takes few weeks, as everything from the design to painting, to crystal application is done in New York. For more information, visit BijouTennis.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

17


Photo credit: Emily DeAngelis

Sportime Hosts

Melbourne-Themed World Tour Event ith the new year upon us, it means the Sportime World Tour is once again traveling the globe, bringing a taste of international tennis tournaments to local Sportime facilities. The first edition of the 2017 World Tour was held at Sportime Syosset with an Australian Open theme. “There is an accumulation of kids from all of the different clubs coming together, and they get to meet so many more people,” said Sebastian Wernecke, a Sportime teaching pro who was on-court working with the kids. “We’ve got a great turnout, and it’s just a really fun event where the kids can play tennis and learn the foundation of the game.” Each kid has their picture taken and receives a customized passport upon arriving, which helps give the event its international feel. “The event is designed for the youngest kids who maybe haven’t played a tournament or an official event yet, so they can come in and feel the excitement of playing,” said Jeffery Morys, the tennis director at Sportime Lynbrook who ran the event. “We look at this as our ‘tennis concert’ at the end of the year. We work on

W

things throughout the year in class, and the kids are able to showcase what they’ve learned in front of their parents in a big event like this. We hope everybody has a great time and feels confident going back home as well as learns the culture of tennis a little bit.” As with all of the Sportime World Tour events, the kids were able to get on-court and take part in a number of drills and hitting practices in a fun environment, regardless of the player’s level. In between

the different groups on-court, the players and parents were able to enjoy music from DJ Curtis McCalla, a bouncy castle and delicious food. “I have been playing tennis for two years and this has been my favorite event,” said nine-year-old Kelsey Roth. “My favorite part was playing on-court and practicing my serve.” The next stop on the Sportime World Tour will be held on March 12 at Sportime Lynbrook for an Indian Wells-themed event.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

19


Century Tennis

Har-Tru LLC

56 Brook Avenue Deer Park, N.Y. (631) 242-0220 CenturyTennis.com Since 1965, Century Tennis has been dedicated to the growing sport of tennis by building quality tennis courts and providing a specialized service to the tennis club industry, as well as the private community. By maintaining a high-quality of service and customer satisfaction over the years comes a trust that is ever so hard to attain. “We simply want to be the best at what we do.” In order to build great tennis courts, you have to start at the bottom with an understanding of soil conditions and converting it to a good base. Laser-controlled road graders enable Century Tennis to build with accuracy. Building Post-Tensioned Concrete instead of the old asphalt type courts are proving to be a great alternative for “crack-free” tennis courts. Whether it is a hard court with the softness of Deco-Turf or Classic Turf Rubber or whether it is a soft court like Har-tru or Hydro Court, or a surface that offers a little of both like Nova Synthetic Turfs, Century Tennis can deliver. The company is a member of the American Sports Builders Association (ASBA), Better Business Bureau (BBB) and the Long Island Builders Institute (LIBI). Century Tennis’ building techniques meet and or exceed those of the ASBA and the USTA and with its “Certified Tennis Court Builder” staff assures this quality. The company’s intention is to deliver the very best tennis courts for the most demanding players and tennis club owners. “Expanding the game of tennis, one court at a time.”

2200 Old Ivy Road, Suite 100 Charlottesville, Va. (877) 4HARTRU HarTru.com

20

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

Har-Tru LLC is a global tennis company based in Charlottesville, Va. It is the world’s leading provider of clay court surfaces, court consultation, court equipment and accessories. The company strives to help others build and maintain the best courts in the world, leveraging its products, knowledge, and experience to most effectively meet the needs of each customer. Har-Tru stays active in the in the industry as an advocate for the sport and sponsor of tennis-related activities.


FX Design Team

The Farley Group– Air-Supported Structures

Mt. Sinai, N.Y. (631) 882-1932 FXDesignTeam.com

6 Kerr Crescent Puslinch, Ontario, Canada (888) 445-3223 l TheFarleyGroup.com The Farley Group has installed more than 20 tennis bubbles in the New York City and Long Island areas, helping tennis facilities extend their season into the winter months. For seasonal or permanently installed tennis bubbles, The Farley Group is your number one source for quality, service and dependability. As a manufacturer, supplier, installer and service provider of air-supported structures, The Farley Group works with you from conception to implementation and beyond. The company’s philosophy is built around the belief that a customer never leaves The Farley Group—from project planning and installation to ongoing service and maintenance, we become a trusted member of your team. The company’s expert staff of sales consultants, designers and highly-skilled production and service professionals are well-experienced in all facets of air structure technology, ready to help you through every phase of your tennis bubble project.

What’s in your backyard? For more than 20 years, FX Design Team’s talented staff has transformed the landscape of many Long Island homes. Whether you enjoy spending hours with friends on your multi-purpose game court, practicing your short game on your own putting green or entertaining around your outdoor living space, let FX Design Team’s creative design team build it for you! FX Design Team specializes in: l l l l

Extreme waterfalls, grottos and slides Multi-purpose courts Outdoor kitchens, fireplaces and pizza ovens Adventure-themed landscapes Call (631) 882-1932 today to schedule your transformation.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

21


Lux-Craft Inc.

Velvetop Products

101 Bloomingdale Road Hicksville N.Y. (718) 934-3600 l LuxCrafters.com LuxCrafters@gmail.com Since 2010, Lux-Craft Inc. has been involved in research and development of the newest LED technologies for sport facilities. In 2013 as a leader in the field, first ever 100 percent LED system was installed at Robbie Wagner Tennis Academy. Today, through hard work and dedication Lux-Craft Inc. is the only company who is able to deliver indirect LED lighting manufactured in the USA with direct replacement capability of old HID systems. LED systems outperforms old 1,000-watt HID systems by delivering crisp and clear lighting, while reducing electricity cost by as much as 70 percent. By utilizing the latest technologies with years of research and development, Lux-Craft Inc. manufactures high-intensity light products, designed for industrial and commercial applications. Currently, the company has a line of lighting products for indoor and outdoor applications. Lux-Craft Inc. is also the first to introduce an outdoor indirect light fixture. The new outdoor fixture minimizes the glare and provides bright daylike lighting.

1455 New York Avenue Huntington Station, N.Y. (631) 427-5904 l Velvetop.com

22

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

VelveTop Products is a family-owned and operated business since 1968. We are a stocking distributor of a full line of tennis court materials and equipment. Our brands include: l l l l l l

Deco Turf: Cushioned Tennis Surface of Champions Har-Tru: Developing Champions Since 1932 Douglas Sports: Nets, Windscreens, Divider Nets RiteWay Crack Repair Systems Deep Root: Tree Root Barriers Hadeka Red Clay

For more information, call (631) 427-5904, e-mail BWalsh@VelveTop.com or visit VelveTop.com.


LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

23


tips from the tennis pro Overcoming Adversity By Emilio Sanchez-Vicario n an ideal world, competition should not exist. But in the world where we live, it is a key component. Since we were born, our parents have compared us to our siblings, our cousins, our classmates, our friends, or to the children of their friends. We all grow up competing, and this can be so stressful that some kids cannot handle it. In school, it is with grades, in life, it is in relationships, and with work, it is with our colleagues, and all this competition is very tiring. There are people who deal with it better than others. However, it is clear that those who have played sports since they were kids have a unique advantage. They are used to finding solutions when things get

I

tough thanks to their athletic experiences. When I teach coaching courses through our International Coaches Institute, we always talk about the four Pillars of Tennis: Technical, Tactical, Physical and Mental. It’s important to note that adversity can attack any of the pillars and with a multitude of possible consequences. When adversity attacks the Technical Pillar (which is comprised of our tools: Serve, volley, footwork, etc.) this can cause a crack in the foundation of the building. For example, if our serve is a work in progress and has not yet been consolidated, we will most likely revert to old techniques when we are under tournament pressure. This leads to a loss of the competitive state, knocking us out of the match on that day. When adversity attacks the Tactical Pil-

Boy’s Tennis Team Specials

Tune your game up with: New Racquet, New Tennis Outfit and Tennis Sneakers, Restring and Regrip! On the spot racquet stringing available (1 hour or less)  $0.."$, 30"% t $0.."$, (1/2 MILE SOUTH OF JERICHO TPKE)

24

631-499-6444

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

lar (knowing which tools to use and when), we struggle to organize our tools, and we don’t know which tool to use in which moment. As a result, we lose competitiveness and the outcome is unfavorable. The Physical Pillar is key in today’s world, as good health allows us to live better, and permits us to compete longer. If we rest, work, eat and hydrate well, we can do the things we do well for longer and we become survivors. On the other hand, if we don’t rest, don’t eat, or don’t drink enough, we run out of fuel and can no longer compete effectively. But the pillar that is most bombarded by adversity is the Mental one. Negative emotion, loss of control and those things that we cannot see can take down all three remaining pillars immediately. If we cannot stay calm, focused, driven and passionate, then we cannot use our tools (Technical), we cannot organize them (Tactical), and it doesn’t matter how much pressure our bodies can resist (Physical), because the mind is the boss and ultimately determines whether we compete successfully. In order to compete, our mind must face its strongest rival: Adversity. When I was 15, I was having a rough time, and couldn’t beat any of the other players in my age group. I was bumped out of the top training group in Spain and forced to play with girls. I had to listen to the Federation’s general director say: “This kid is a waste … he’s a small, fat loser.” Such kind and motiva-


tional words from the Spanish Davis Cup captain! I was about to quit tennis. My family had always supported me but didn’t have many resources, and luckily my club let me continue training and I kept working on my tools. By the time they fired the general director in the Federation, I had grown and was competing with players of the same height, and my hard work and talent began to show. Suddenly, my losing streak became a winning streak, and all the matches I previously lost became victories. When I turned 18, I was the National Champion, playing the Davis Cup, and ranked number 60 in the world. I am so proud that I didn’t quit and worked hard on the fundamentals of the game. By not giving up, I was ready to jump when the opportunity arose. When several players who were better than me had injuries, they couldn’t go to the European Championships, and suddenly it was my turn. I was on a plane to Switzerland representing Spain for the first time. I made it to the final, and was recognized

“… it is clear that those who have played sports since they were kids have a unique advantage. They are used to finding solutions when things get tough thanks to their athletic experiences.” as a promising talent. My advice today is to train consistently and develop your tools for competing, even during difficult moments of your development. When I finally matured, I was ready to compete on par with my opponents because I had focused on developing my tools at the right time. Don’t give up. Hard work and perseverance will pay off in the end. Now, I try to inspire and encourage our student-athletes with stories of my past, and I believe it helps them in moments of difficulty. I never criticize their physical abilities when they’re still growing. The

general director used to make regular appearances in my nightmares, but finally, the nightmares transformed to dreams through hard work and perseverance. Emilio Sanchez-Vicario is an ex-ATP player who was ranked as high as number seven in singles and number one in doubles. He won 50 ATP singles titles and 50 doubles titles, including three Grand Slams, in his career. He is USPTA Master Professional Elite Certified and RPT Master Professional Certified. He is the CEO of Sanchez-Casal Academy and is the coach of current ATP pro Fernando Verdasco.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

25


USTA Eastern Looks to the Futur

George Seewagen Award was presented to the late Howie Arons of Great Neck Estates and accepted posthumously by his sons he USTA Eastern Section held its Annual Conference at the Renaissance Westchester Hotel in West Harrison, N.Y., bringing together members of all the section’s regions for a weekend of celebrating the year’s achievements and discuss ways to continue to improve on its initiatives. “This year our focus was on celebrating collective success from true tennis innovators across the section,” said USTA Eastern Executive Director and COO Jenny Schnitzer. “It’s so important to us that every attendee leave with new ideas, new contacts and renewed enthusiasm for growing tennis. We have been able to measure success by the number of meaningful conversations, insightful sessions and a shared vision for the sport we love.” For the fourth consecutive year, the Conference partnered with the United States Professional Tennis Association (USPTA) and the Professional Tennis Registry (PTR) to ensure that all the attendees came away with new ideas and focuses to help grow tennis in their respective areas. The weekend was filled with various workshops, drills and seminars put on by renowned coaches and instructors, including

Tennis Hall of Famer Gigi Fernandez delivers her speech on the future of the sport

T

26

Members of the new USTA Eastern Board tennis Hall of Famer Gigi Fernandez, who presented new and innovative ways to grow tennis in a variety of areas. The Conference was highlighted by the Annual Meeting, as the Eastern Board reviewed its accomplishments over the last year and set goals moving forward for 2017. One of the main topics discussed was continuing to bring tennis into local schools by not only providing equipment, but instruction as well, the way other sports are taught in schools, and expanding tennis programming for adults. “Eastern truly believes that it is our respon-

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

USTA Eastern Executive Director and COO Jenny Schnitzer addresses the crowd

sibility to deliver quality tennis programming at every tough point and for every age and level,” Schnitzer said. “This delivery begins at schools and continues through local opportunities for kids, new innovative programs for young adults and continued options for seniors—some of the most enthusiastic and committed players in our section. We feel energized to continue to collaborate and connect the dots at the local level to keep families and individuals engaged in tennis.” The Annual Awards Dinner capped off night one as the Section honored the men, women and juniors who have had a positive impact in their respective regions. Among the award winners was Whitney Kraft of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, who won the USPTA Eastern Professional of the Year Award. “It’s always an honor to be recognized by your peers in the industry,” said Kraft. “I’m really fortunate to be surrounded by so many talented and all around dedicated


ture at 2017 Annual Conference

Sue Wold was named USTA Eastern Tennis Woman of the Year

John Klenner, takes over as USTA Eastern president from outgoing president Mark McIntyre

tennis professionals both within the National Tennis Center campus as well as outside of Queens in the greater tennis world. The Eastern Section is a pleasure to collaborate with … Julie Bliss-Beal, Jenny Schnitzer, Rob Testa, Monica Lamura, Gustavo Loza and the rest of the team are innovative and all embody teamwork.” The top volunteers from each region were also honored at the Dinner, and Randi Wilkins took home the award for the Regional Volunteer of the Year for the Long Island Region. “It’s always special to receive an award from your peers for your efforts, although it’s

not the motivation for me. I feel my real award is having a great turnout and enthusiastic participants for the events I am involved with that help grow tennis on Long Island,” said Wilkins, who put together Suffolk County Kids’ Day last summer which brought in more than 150 kids. “I hope people who attend these events will become as enthusiastic with the game as I am!” Many new board members were also ushered into their new positions, including John Klenner, who is taking over as the new USTA Eastern President, a position previously held by Mark McIntyre.

USTA Director-at-Large Laura Canfield recaps a successful year for USTA Eastern “It was somewhat bittersweet to lower the gavel one last time as the past two years have been both challenging and a great deal of fun,” said McIntyre. “However, I am extremely confident that Eastern is in good hands with John Klenner at the helm. He has been our treasurer for the last eight years and has done an incredible job putting us on a solid financial footing. Moreover, he is dedicated to ensuring that we will continue to support community tennis. It’s John’s turn to lead us down the next path, which he has played an influential role in mapping out.”

TENNIS RUSH Come play where the surf applauds every shot. The Seaside Tennis Club at the legendary Mauna Kea Beach Hotel on Hawaii Island. D I R E C TO R O F T E N N I S , C R A I G T. PAU T L E R 8 6 6 .9 7 7. 4 5 8 9 M AU N A K E A B E AC H H OT E L .CO M

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

27


Look Out for

POP Tennis By Whitney Kraft hat is fun, fresh, fast-paced and fantastic for your tennis game? POP Tennis! This is a standalone activity/program used as an engaging teaching tool that not only helps students with their tennis, but makes it enjoyable, too. The sport of POP Tennis isn’t new. In fact, it was founded more than 100 years ago, in 1898 and was originally called “Paddle Tennis.” The first Paddle Tennis

W

28

tournament was held in New York City in 1922. The popularity of the sport quickly spread during the late 1920s and early 1930s to other cities such as Los Angeles. During the 1950s, the Brighton Beach Baths in Brooklyn, N.Y. converted their handball courts into 20 smaller-sized Paddle Tennis courts. The “BBB” soon became the hub for Paddle Tennis. The game continued to grow in popularity over many years, so much so that with state-of the-art rackets, colorful clothes that catch the eye and fast

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

exchanges and poaches, Paddle Tennis was re-branded in 2015 as POP tennis— because “everything about the sport POPS!” POP remains as viable as ever in a marketplace in which tennis professionals around the world are finding more and more ways to enhance the experiences they can provide to students. I knew that this sport was something interesting when I tried it out myself with some of our on-staff teaching professionals and campers at Flushing Meadows over the summer and got rave


reviews. They all look forward to future POP play. We noticed that players and fans who competed or watched our USTA National Open Indoor Championships in December spent some time with POP paddles on the court and then, a totally different demographic, members of senior leagues, tested the sport and everyone enjoyed it. Underhanded serves, transitional balls, shorter racquets and reduced court sizes have been effective mitigators with aging up from traditional tennis. Tennis is the sport of a lifetime, after all, and I believe that it will not only bolster interest in programs, but aid in developing all players. As much as people can enjoy a fun game of POP Tennis without thinking about the ways in which it is helping their tennis technique and thought processes, the sport can do a lot to make everyone better tennis players. A common mistake many players make is failing to keep their wrist firm on the volley. If you play POP, which uses a paddle that has a smaller face/lever than a tennis racket, you’ll be aided in keeping

your wrist firm. Otherwise, it’ll be extremely difficult to make square contact with the ball, which is the only way to get it over the net. Even using POP as a replacement for the typical tennis racquet volley warm-up, can prepare students for a more intense and successful volley practice. The benefits are great for doubles players as well. Ever get pulled really wide and wonder what to do with the ball? The shorter court with most play happening closer to the net helps with a player’s spatial awareness and movement during “cat and mouse� points. It even helps with one of tennis’ toughest shots—the half volley. Players of the highest level sometimes struggle keeping their racquet behind the ball on the short hop but POP forces you to do just that, so when you switch to your tennis racquet, you’ll see the results. There is a reason that the Today Show, Good Day LA and other shows have covered POP Tennis. We’ve grown to love it here at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, and I think you will too.

Feel free to join us over the weekend, between April 28-30 at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows, N.Y., when we will be holding a USTA National Category III Innovations Challenges Tournament in both singles and One-on-One Doubles (ID#: 100018817)—another fun, innovative form of cross-training. We’ll be holding a demonstration/Open House of POP on Saturday evening, April 29 from 5:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m., whereby you can enjoy a sport that so many people already are. An additional Open House is being offered Sunday, March 12 from 6:30 p.m.-9:00 p.m. Both events are complimentary with equipment provided. Please RSVP by e-mailing NTCTournaments@USTA.com. Since 2007, Whitney Kraft has been the director of tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing, N.Y. and director of player operations for the U.S. Open. Previously, he was director of tennis for the City of Fort Lauderdale Park & Recreation Department (1998-2007).

Irv vine,    Jun ne 30Ju uly 4

   New York August 21-26

Palm Beach Gardens,   December 1-6

WIN THE T TA ALLEST TROPHY IN JUNIOR R TENNIS - 6' tall! In honor of Maureen "Little Mo" Connolly's G Grand Slam win in 1953 Open to playe ers worldwide / Ages 8-12

“Little Mo� Slam WINNER

"Big Mo" divisions (ages 13 and 14) will       

  To T o register: w www.mcbtennis.org Contact: cartennis@aol.com

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

29


2017 Tennis Magazine 2016 GuideLong to the TopIsland Clubs/Programs for New York Tennis Players

Camp Guide

Annacone Tennis Camps 2017 at Sag Harbor Park Tennis P.O. Box 2988 l 395 Main Street l Sag Harbor, N.Y. AnnaconeTennis.com l (865) 300-7323 l SAnnacone@aol.com Annacone Tennis Camps 2017 at Sag Harbor Park Tennis are for ages six through 15, all levels. All camps are held Monday-Friday from 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Players should bring racquets, sunscreen, hats, water and lunch. Camps will be held at Mashashimuet Park, located at 395 Main Street in Sag Harbor, N.Y. Annacone Tennis Camps are designed to cover all aspects of hitting and playing the game of tennis. Feeding drills, live ball drills, point situations, serving and returning serve, singles and doubles, footwork and movement, strategy, and sport psychology will be included. There will also be off court cross training activities and games. We will take breaks and discuss tennis related items such as scoring, rules, matches, tournaments, etc. Steve Annacone has been involved in the tennis industry for more than 40 years. He founded and was the director of Smoky Mountain Tennis Academy in Knoxville, Tenn. for 19 years. Steve has coached more than 75 players who have gone on to compete at the collegiate level, as well as directing and operating camps for all levels of players. He will personally staff and lead the program, as well as the tennis professionals, to ensure the highest level of instruction and enjoyment for the players. Our goal is to provide a great learning environment to help enable campers to improve their skills, learn to play the game, and have fun! We will do this with a highly organized program and a safe environment using our experience and knowledge coaching and teaching players. Our proven methods and passion for the game will help players get the most out of their time at our camp. Camps run for 10 weeks, starting Monday, June 26, 2017. Sag Harbor Park Tennis Members or Sag Harbor Residents receive a discount on registration. Please visit SagHarborParkTennis.com for special offers, more information and to register. 30

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide Bethpage Park Tennis Center Summer Tennis Camp 99 Quaker Meeting House Road, Building #4 l Farmingdale, N.Y. (516) 777-1358 l BethpageParkTennis.com To be your best, you need the best program, facilities and players Bethpage Park Tennis Center’s Summer Tennis Camp is designed for maximum time efficiency and productiveness. Bethpage Park’s wealth of tennis courts enables the facility to provide indoor and outdoor courts, hard courts and clay courts. No camp provides a more favorable camper to court ratio than Bethpage Park. This means campers can play singles and doubles matches daily. These opportunities for match play are most beneficial because they are with the finest players the East Coast has to offer. To be the best, you need the best staff! Bethpage Park Tennis trains players to excel with greater success than any other eastern camp because of its unique staff. Since yearround program are conducted, Bethpage Park employs proven, full-time professionals to oversee the camp. The rest of the staff is comprised of top-ranked students, many of whom are college standouts, to ensure quality, enthusiasm and continuity of instruction. Bethpage Park Tennis is very flexible, with nine one-week, as well as partial-week, sessions so that tournament players can design a schedule that accommodates their individual needs. The facility believes that the summer is a great time to drill skills, get match tough and develop fitness habits that will help year-round. Is this program right for you? At Bethpage Park Tennis Center’s Summer Tennis Camp, the standards are high, the prerequisites are not! They encourage and value beginners equally with nationally-ranked players. All that is required is the desire to attend a serious tennis camp to learn in an intensive, personal and fun environment, and the drive to achieve your personal best! Transportation is available, and a daily deli or pizza lunch is included.

WE'VE GOT YOU COVERED Play tennis year round under a Farley bubble. The Farley Group is the world leader in air-supported structures and has provided over 20 tennis bubbles in New York and Long Island. Contact us today to learn about how you can turn your outdoor courts into a year round facility.

www.thefarleygroup.com l info@thefarleygroup.com

1-888-445-3223

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

31


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide Carefree Racquet Club 1414 Jerusalem Avenue l North Merrick, N.Y. (516) 489-9005 l CarefreeTennis.com Where can you find a junior summer tennis camp highlighting the excitement of competition, high-structured instruction and plenty of allaround play time? At Carefree Racquet Club, complete with seven air-conditioned indoor tennis courts, two racquetball courts that convert to walleyball, a half-court basketball court, a cozy lounge and snack area … that’s where! At Carefree’s Summer Camp, the staff encourages the social and healthy aspect of loving sports just for the fun of it. Carefree stresses the positive approach of competition, which gives juniors perspective both on and off the tennis court. In the long run, this brings out the confidence to succeed in whatever our students venture into later in life. The key is to develop behavioral characteristics of success for all of our students: Vision, action, responsibility and independence. Carefree’s staff is comprised of knowledgeable and caring counselors, some of who were, or currently are, college players who also trained at Carefree. The program is directed by Louis Vallejo, and with 27 years of tennis experience, Louis has coached juniors of all levels of play. Along with his head pros, the tutelage of Carefree’s students is unsurpassed. Carefree Racquet Club is proud to celebrate its 25th year of its Junior Summer Camp. The success of the summer program comes from the outstanding facility, fun to win attitude and superior pro staff. Camp hours are from noon to 5:00 p.m. Students come in fresh and relaxed with energy, and ready for action. Carefree’s Junior Summer Tennis Camp is the most flexible on Long Island. You can attend full-time (eight weeks, five days a week) or a fewer number of weeks. You can also attend just two or three days a week if you’d like. You can even come just once a week, but Carefree bets that if you come once, you’ll want to come twice! So come on down and see for yourself … the staff at Carefree Racquet Club will be waiting! Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy 65 Columbia Road l Morristown, N.J. (973) 539-2054 l CentercourtAcademy.com l Info@CentercourtClub.com A commitment to excellence! Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy has quickly earned the reputation as one of the sport’s premier destination for player development in the Northeast. With access to 50 tennis courts (hard, Har-Tru, red clay and indoor hard), Centercourt’s tennis camps are a perfect opportunity for players to refine and develop their skills in a short period of time.

l l l l l l 32

Why choose Centercourt? l Train in a world-class environment with high-performance level coaches from around the world. l Achieve significant individual improvement in all facets of the game, including technical, physical and mental aspects. Centercourt is dedicated to meeting the individual needs of each and every one of its players. Academy players are among some of the top Sectional-, National- and ITF-ranked players from around the country. Centercourt puts the needs of the player first, in a development-focused model of training. Each camp is tailored to the skill levels and goals of the players; featuring small group training, match play, individualized fitness plans, mental coaching and video analysis. Tournament coaching and travel. Players who commit to Centercourt’s training will see themselves develop life skills that will enable them to Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide become champions, both on and off the court. Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy provides a superior junior player pathway that satisfies the needs of Sectional- and Nationally-ranked juniors. Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy offers programs with rolling admissions year-round and a 12week Summer Camp from June 12-Aug. 28.

CourtSense Tennis Training Center at Bogota Racquet Club 156 W Main Stree l Bogota, N.J. (201) 489-1122 l CourtSense.com l Info@CourtSense.com CourtSense at Ramapo College 505 Ramapo Valley Road l Mahwah, N.J. (201) 489-1122 l (201) 569-1114 With CourtSense, you’ll achieve your personal best, because our training is of the highest professional caliber–and easily tailored to suit your age and skill level. We use tennis as a vehicle to teach life lessons by tapping into the spirit of every player, with lots of passion, expertise and character. Our students have access to 32 outdoor and 15 indoor tennis courts and to the revolutionary PlaySight smart court system. High Performance Summer Tennis Camp at Bogota Racquet Club and/including Overnight camp at Ramapo College. These camps are geared towards High Performance Tournament and high level High School players. We have trained and currently are training players who have become ATP and WTA ranked players, U.S. Olympians, as well as many college scholarship athletes. Our International High Performance Coaches, in collaboration with our fitness staff and a sports psychologist, have developed a program that maximizes all our athletes’ strengths both on and off court. l Full Day High Performance Tennis Camp at Bogota Racquet Club runs from June 26-Aug. 25 (nine weeks), featuring 10 hours of tennis training; five hours of fitness and eight hours of match/point play) for players ages 11-18. Campers will have access to outdoor and indoor hard and clay courts, with a 3:1 student-to-coach ratio. Weekly dual matches with other academies, and mental toughness training are also included. Transportation service provided from Bogota Racquet Club. l Sleepaway High Performance Camp at Ramapo College runs from June 26-July 14 (three weeks), featuring 10 hours of tennis training; five hours of fitness and eight hours of match/point play) for players ages 11-18. Campers will have access to outdoor and indoor hard and clay courts, with a 3:1 student-to-coach ratio on a beautiful college campus. Campers will have access to an indoor swimming pool and lunch is provided at a brand new, air-conditioned cafeteria. Two players per fully air-conditioned room with their own shower and bathroom. Roundtrip transportation service from Tenafly and Bogota Racquet Clubs. l Depending on the needs of the players and based upon their tournament schedule, the first three weeks, the high performance players will train either on outdoor clay courts or on outdoor hard courts, and in case of inclement weather on indoor hard courts at Bogota Racquet Club.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

33


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide The Early Hit Training Center Junior Summer Tennis Camp at Glen Head Racquet Club Contact: Carl Barnett 95 Glen Head Road l Glen Head, N.Y. (516) 455-1225 l EarlyHit@optonline.net The comprehensive program at Early Hit Training Center will provide your child with all of the resources necessary to reach their maximum tennis potential. The Early Hit Training Center incorporates all aspects of the game into a complete program. Each session begins with a nutritionallycomplete and balanced shake from Court 7, an on-premise restaurant and smoothie bar. After a thorough warm-up, the student will work through the core components of tennis, including stroke production, drilling and physical fitness training before breaking for a healthy lunch. Then, the player moves on to playing dynamics and strategy, and these lessons are reinforced with focused match play. A thorough cooldown and stretching session completes a world-class day of tennis for your child. With a team of renowned tennis teaching professionals, experienced physical conditioning trainers, movement experts and on-site chef, The Early Hit Training Center offers a unique and total tennis experience. Contact Carl to attend a spring ALPS session as his guest to experience what camp is like.

Ed Krass’ 29th Annual College Tennis Exposure Camp University of Virginia: June 16-17 Lehigh University: July 16-20 & July 22-26; July 16-26 (10-day program) Brandeis University: July 29-30 (813) 684-9031 l CollegeTennis.com Coach Ed Krass’ 29th Annual College Tennis Exposure Camp is the nation’s only training camp taught exclusively by head college coaches. The camp is open to all players, ages 15-18, who are interested in playing college tennis. Players receive instruction and training from head coaches representing every level of the college game. Ed Krass has coached varsity tennis teams at Harvard University, Clemson University and the University of Central Florida prior to founding the College Tennis Exposure Camp. Under the skillful eyes of top college coaches, players showcase their singles, doubles and One-on-One Doubles skills, and receive specific feedback on their game. Instructional drills and match play competitions are conducted with the same style and intensity as collegiate practice sessions. Players have the opportunity to sample various coaching styles and receive on-court coaching during team competitions. Classroom seminars with college coaches motivate and educate players about college tennis preparation. The camp is offered the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va. from June 16-17; Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pa. for two sessions, July 16-20 and July 22-26; and Brandeis University in Waltham, Mass. from July 29-30. Dormitory accommodations, cafeteria meals and 24-hour adult supervision are provided. For more information, call (813) 684-9031 or visit CollegeTennis.com.

34

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide Gotham Tennis Academy in The Hamptons Napeague Tennis Club 47 Montauk Highway l Amangansett, N.Y. (646) 524-7069 l GothamTennis.com l Info@GothamTennis.com Gotham Tennis Academy offers summer tennis and sports day camps in the Hamptons at the Napeague Tennis Club, located at 47 Montauk Highway in Amangansett, N.Y. The Academy is directed by enthusiastic, USPTA-certified tennis coaches in a beautiful setting emphasizing skill development, fun and a supportive environment. The tennis and sports camp based at the Napeague Tennis Club is situated in a beautiful location on the Napeague Stretch, five miles east of Main Street in Amagansett, N.Y., next to Cyril’s, and only steps from the beach and the bay! The Napeague summer program features: An outstanding tennis and multi-sport day camp featuring instructors with international backgrounds; half-day and full-day options available; basketball, soccer and other field sports on multi-purpose courts; kayak, beach trips and mountain bike excursions may be arranged; and transportation can be arranged upon request. New this year, an early drop-off option between 9:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m. Light snacks and beverages are provided. Round-trip or one-way transportation may be arranged.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

35


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp (516) 463-CAMP l Hofstra.edu/Camp A great tennis experience for two, four or six weeks The Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp is suitable for both the beginning player through the advanced player interested in tournament play or wishing to participate on high school tennis teams. Basic techniques are taught to beginners and the Camp also offers the experienced player advanced skills and game strategy. Each child is instructed according to their ability and previous training is not required. Most lessons are taught in the form of a game. Additionally, all of Hofstra’s instructors have been trained in the 10 & Under Tennis/Quick Start program, the newest approach to teaching tennis to youngsters 10 years of age and younger. QuickStart is sanctioned by the USTA and its format takes a new approach to introducing kids to the game. Campers spend half the day in tennis and the other half participating in swimming, recreation and special events. Transportation and lunch are included in tuition. No instructors are below college age. Tennis Camp Directors Sunny and Eddie Fishkind have been running the camp for more than 30 years and have won many awards. Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp’s philosophy is that you cannot make a child a great tennis player in two weeks, but you can make them love the game for life! For additional information about Hofstra Summer Tennis Camp, call (516) 463-CAMP or visit Hofstra.edu/Camp.

Joel Ross Tennis Camp (914) 723-2165 l JoelRossTennis.com l Info@JoelRossTennis.com Joel Ross, owner and director of Joel Ross Tennis Camp in Kent, Conn., is a native Long Islander, having grown up in Westbury, N.Y. He won the New York State High School Singles Championships two consecutive years and earned a full tennis scholarship to the University of Michigan, where he captained the team and played number one singles. In 1971, Joel was Big 10 Singles Champion and was featured on the cover of Tennis Magazine. His best circuit wins include John McEnroe and Tom Gullikson. He currently resides in New Rochelle, N.Y. with his wife, Ellen. Their four grown children each attended and worked at the camp. Joel Ross Tennis Camp, located only 90 minutes from the Whitestone Bridge, is located in beautiful Kent, Conn., at the base of Mt. Algo, alongside the Housatonic River. The camp facilities include 12 oncampus tennis courts, including four indoor in our own steel building. Joel is a hands-on director, in attendance 24/7. His program of instruction and fitness in the morning and ladder play in the afternoon and evening has endured for 27 years since the inception of the camp in 1991. Facilities include squash courts, swimming pool, 300-yard driving ranges and canoeing/kayaking on the Housatonic River. All of our campers and staff are residents. Our tuition covers everything: Private lessons, laundry, snacks, trips, etc. Our campers can also participate in many electives, including archery, squash, canoeing, kayaking, basketball, soccer, football and more! We have a multi-tiered “Bully Prevention Program” in place as well. Give us a call at (914) 723-2165 and find out why Joel Ross Tennis Camp is a keeper!

36

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide Nike Tennis Camps (800) NIKE-CAMP (645-3226) l USSportsCamps.com Come join the fun and get better this summer at a Nike Tennis Camp! With more than 80 locations nationwide, both overnight and day options, there is a camp for everyone. Nike Tennis Camps provide young players the opportunity to improve their tennis skills, work hard, make new friends and have a lot of fun. Dedicated camp directors have a passion for teaching and a gift for helping you take your game to the next level. Locations include: Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Camp (Glen Cove, N.Y.); Lawrenceville School (Lawrenceville, N.J.); Randy Mani Tennis Academy at Hardscrabble Club (Brewster, N.Y.); Colgate University (Hamilton, N.Y.); and Chirico-Cohen Tournament Training at Chestnut Hill College (Chestnut Hill, Pa.). Who says that only kids can go to camp? The Nike Adult Tennis Camp at Amherst College has hosted more than 30,000 adult tennis players since 1972. Camp Directors Reiny Maier and Maureen Rankine are outstanding teachers and passionate coaches who inspire all players to get better and love the game. Multiple camp options and dates offered throughout June and July. Visit USSportsCamps.com/Tennis for details.

Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy (631) 288-4021 l (914) 234-9462 WestHamptonBeachTennis.com l PeterKaplan2002@yahoo.com Peter Kaplan’s Westhampton Beach Junior/Adult Tennis Academy, and the affiliated Grassmere Inn, is a wonderful destination for beginners to nationally-ranked players of all ages. Private instruction, clinics, one to seven full- and half-day camps are offered. The flexibility of the programming enables participants to enjoy the nearby beautiful ocean beaches, charming village, Performing Arts Center, movie theatre, wine country, shopping, cafes, restaurants and nearby water park. Resident students/families/teams stay at the historic, newlyrenovated and highly-honored Grassmere Inn, located on quiet, tree-lined Beach Lane, 50 yards from the beginning of the charming village, yet less than one mile from a beautiful ocean beach. The Grassmere’s 22 guest rooms all have air conditioning, WiFi, cable TV and private bathrooms. Ideal for families, are two suites or interconnected rooms. A delicious breakfast is included daily. The Tennis Academy features 12 soft courts and features an enthusiastic staff, renowned for its high-quality instruction with an average student/staff ratio of 2:1. Most participants seek a less intensive program of three to five hours of instruction daily. Visiting tennis pros bring students with Kaplan’s staff available to supplement the pros. Here, you can play tennis during the day, go to the beach and have a glass of wine at sunset, and then dine at a great restaurant, or take in a movie or a show at the Performing Arts Center. We are the only academy in the world the USTA selected for the members benefits program for both juniors and adults. And we are annually selected among the top 25 in the world and #1 in the East by TennisResortsonline.com Also, we will once again be offering partial and full scholarships to both adults and juniors, for our tennis academy. These are for beginning tennis players who have made contributions to their community, and are in the names of two of Peter Kaplan’s Cornell roommates. Contact us for more information! LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

37


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide Port Washington Tennis Academy Camp Programs 100 Harbor Road l Port Washington, N.Y. (516) 883-6425 l PWTA.com Port Washington Tennis Academy’s Summer Camp and Year-End Camp There is a difference in tennis day camps. The “unique” concept at the Port Washington Tennis Academy starts with a limited enrollment of only 50 juniors (a maximum of four per court). Tournament players to beginners receive special concentrated training from an elite international staff of Academy-trained professionals. Specific additional training on an exclusive 1/4-mile indoor running track provides the unusual benefit of maximizing each student’s speed and endurance performance capability. At Port Washington Tennis Academy (PWTA), 17 indoor courts guarantee 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. all-weather instruction. PWTA’s proven method includes intensive instruction, supervised practice and match play. Daily tennis-specific fitness drills provide for a super summer experience. Each camper will return home a much improved player. Luncheon (prepared in PWTA’s own kitchen) and additional weekend and weekday playing time is available for our students at no extra cost. The Junior Summer Camp consists of two five-week sessions, held Monday to Friday from 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Mini-Camp and Junior Clinics are also held from 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m., Monday to Friday. The End-of-Year Junior Camp takes place during the December school vacation period. Call (516) 883-6425 for additional information.

Ross School Tennis Academy Summer 2017 (631) 907-5162 l Ross.org/Tennis l TennisAcademy@Ross.org The Ross School Tennis Center, located on the Upper School campus in East Hampton, N.Y., is a wonderful resource in the Hamptons open to seasonal and year-round residents. It features six Har-Tru tennis courts that are enclosed by a bubble from mid-fall through mid-spring, allowing for year-round play. The courts are directly adjacent to the beautiful, state-ofthe-art Fieldhouse where players can take advantage of its many amenities, including locker rooms, lounge, snack bar, and ping pong tables. It is also used for a variety of special events and is available for private parties. This intensive program is specially designed for a small group of players dedicated to training to their highest potential every day. Boarding is available for ages 12 and up. Ross School Tennis Academy (Grades 9-12)–RSTA and Ross School Junior Tennis Academy (Grades 5-8)–RSJTA l Train on six impeccably maintained Har-Tru courts and two hard courts in preparation for USTA tournaments. l Four hour tennis practice daily (plus one hour of fitness) in small group and private sessions with the highest level players and coaches from around the world. l Daily Match Play component and weekly Interclub tournaments for maximal game practice. l Daily lunch at the renowned Ross café featuring the healthiest and most abundant variety of locally grown, farm-to-table style, delicious food. For Boarders Reside in luxurious boarding houses with students from around the world and take part in weekend and evening excursions to local Hamptons activities or New York City. Program runs rain or shine–there is always a new part of the game to discover and explore. Additional private training, sports psychologist sessions and coaching are available for a fee. 38

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide Ross School Youth Tennis Academy (Grades 1-4)–RSYTA RSYTA is a specialized U10 training program designed for our youngest serious tennis players entering grades first through fourth who already play more than two times per week. All training is with orange and green dot balls and includes a daily fitness and match play component. Players must be able to serve and keep score. Space is limited and tryout required. Dates and Times (June 26-Sept. 1) l RSYTA Grades 1-4, Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. (lunch not included) l RSJTA Grades 5-8, Monday-Friday from 10:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. l RSTA Grades 9-12, Monday-Friday from 10:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Sanchez-Casal Tennis Academy (239) 263-1818 l ASC-Florida.com l Admissions_FL@Sanchez-Casal.com The ASC Summer Camp is designed for players from around the world. The Sanchez-Casal System allows all levels of players to enjoy high performance training. Basic, intermediate and advanced level players will all thrive within the ASC training environment. The ideal combination of tennis and performance training, languages classes and leisure activities which campers experience make for an unforgettable summer camp experience. Five reasons to choose Academy Sanchez-Casal (ASC) 1. The ASC Training System: Spanish tennis greats Emilio Sanchez and Sergio Casal developed their training philosophy and program at their inaugural tennis academy in Barcelona. It delivers a proven combination of tennis development training, strategic technical, tactical, physical and mental as well as top-notch competition. 2. The ASC Campus: Unlike many academies, the ASC tennis facilities, residences and ES School are all located within one property, thereby creating a safe, fun, healthy, family atmosphere for all student-athletes. 3. Summer Camp Activities: Enjoy the best parts of Florida (Orlando amusement parks, The Everglades, pristine Gulf Coast beaches and more). Plus we speak English, Italian, Spanish and French. And we teach you language courses during the summer program for free as an option. 4. World Class Results: ASC alumni have excelled at every level of competitive tennis—from junior, national and international rankings and titles, to Collegiate All-American status and NCAA titles, to Olympic medals, to ATP/WTA titles, top 10 ATP/WTA rankings and Major Championship titles. Svetlana Kuznetsova, Andy Murray, Daniela Hantuchova, Grigor Dimitrov and Juan Monaco are just a few of ASC’s best-known professional alumni. 5. International Exchange Program: Besides the ASC-FL annual training in Naples, Fla., ASC and ES International School is the only residential tennis academy in the world to have wholly-owned campus headquarters located in both Europe and the United States. Its Exchange Program offers high-school and high performance tennis. College planning and placement is also offered.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

39


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide Southern California Tennis Academy (562) 704-2241 l SCTennisAcademy.com l Info@SCTennisAcademy.com Running June 25-Aug. 25, 2017 the Southern California Tennis Academy will have six weeks of options for boarding summer camps. Director Mitch Bridge and USC Head Coach Peter Smith offer a tremendous amount of tennis knowledge that helps develop players more rapidly. The workout is highly energetic and fun, and we believe in competing most of the time whether it’s with drills, serving or points play. The constant change and variety of formatting makes the seven-hour training day fly by. Boarding is at California State University, Long Beach with a boy’s dorm and girl’s dorm and two players to each room. All meals are served at the school’s cafeteria, and there are a variety of healthy options. Boarders have access to the rec room with dodge ball, rock climbing, foosball, and a variety of other activities with a pool and beach volleyball courts. On Tuesday and Thursday evenings and weekends, our boarders will go on fun social activities like Disneyland, movies, beach bonfires, Hollywood, Huntington Beach, Angel’s games, concerts and bowling. On the weekends players will have the option of playing a tournament or going on the social activities. For more information, visit SCTennisAcademy.com or contact Info@SCTennisAcademy.com

SPORTIME EXCEL and JMTA Tennis Training Camps Locations on Long Island, in Manhattan and Westchester (888) NY-TENNIS l (888) 698-3664 l SportimeCamps.com l Camps@SportimeNY.com SPORTIME EXCEL and JMTA Training Camps train 52 weeks a year. With multiple Tennis Camp locations across Long Island, in New York City and in Westchester, aspiring tennis players can experience SPORTIME and the John McEnroe Tennis Academy’s premier tennis training programs for recreational and aspiring junior players of all ages and abilities. SPORTIME’s training methods are fun and fast-paced, featuring stroke production, competitive games and tactical training for match play. Innovative tennis training techniques and tennis-specific conditioning regimens help newer players learn and enjoy and prepares serious juniors for the physical, mental and emotional demands of the sport of tennis. SPORTIME campers develop positive self-esteem and laser-like focus. The program is dedicated to turning weaknesses into strengths and strengths into winning games. Tennis programs vary at each camp location. Visit SportimeCamps.com to find out more information on SPORTIME EXCEL and JMTA Tennis Training Camps.

40

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide SPORTIME Summer Tennis & Sports Camps Locations across Long Island, in Manhattan, Westchester and Schenectady (888) 698-3664 l SportimeCamps.com l Camps@SportimeNY.com “Last year, I had the best summer ever!” Who said that? Every kid who attended a SPORTIME Summer Camp last summer! That’s because at all SPORTIME summer camps, the staff makes sure that every kid is safe, that every kid has fun and that every kid has positive experiences that they will always remember. How does SPORTIME do it? It’s really quite simple: l The staff is experienced and skilled l The programming is challenging, innovative and educational l The facilities are state-of-the-art and safe l And … SPORTIME knows how to make camp fun! From preschoolers to older kids who love tennis and sports, each SPORTIME camp challenges a child’s abilities, while enhancing their self-esteem and providing positive social interaction. Programs and facilities vary at each camp location. High-level tennis, volleyball and hockey-specific camps are also available. Go to SportimeCamps.com to find the perfect camp for your child. USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Flushing Meadows Corona Park l Flushing, N.Y. (718) 760-6200 l NTC.USTA.com The USTA Billie Jean National Tennis Center will once again offer seven weeks of fun in the sun tennis day camps starting in June. Enrollment will soon be available online and you may choose registration for one, two or as many as seven weeks. The weekly program runs Mondays through Fridays, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., with a one-hour lunch break or a twilight session from 4:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m. Campers work on the development of tennis techniques, tactics, sports conditioning, multi-sports and strategy geared toward maximizing the learning experience in a fun presentation. As the juniors develop, they are advanced to more challenging groups. Tennis activities include Stroke of the Day, team games and competitive match play. The camp also offers cross-training activities, such as soccer, softball and basketball in the park or at the Corona Park multi-purpose recreational facility, off-site field trips include ice skating, Mets games, and more, and full access to the many fun activities on the grounds of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center. The program accepts junior players, ages four- through 10-years-old for the 10 & Under programs. Recreational players 11-yearsold and up are enrolled in the Junior Camps (8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. or 4:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m.). Advanced High Performance Tournament training campers will also be invited to participate in an intensive Tennis Academy training program. The National Tennis Center has 22 outdoor courts, 12 indoor courts, and four stadium courts. Also on-site are ping-pong tables, ball machines, a fitness center, and other age-appropriate fun activities like arts, multisports, arts and crafts, and other engaging sporting events. The primary focus will be on developing tennis skills, while offering other activities to enhance the learning and summer camp experience. Also offered are junior evening and weekend programs, as well as adult daytime, weekday evening and weekend camps. Detailed information will be available soon at NTC.USTA.com. You may contact the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center at (718) 760-6200 for more information about year-round and summer day camp programs. LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

41


2017 Long Island Tennis Magazine Camp Guide Windridge Tennis and Sports Camps 1215 Roxbury Road l Roxbury, Vt. (802) 860-2005 l WindridgeCamps.com Windridge ... a tradition of tennis, soccer and horseback riding and so much more for 50 years. Located in the Green Mountains of Vermont, the Windridge Tennis and Sports Camps stand unique in that they feature specialized sports programs within the framework of a traditional New England camp setting. Since 1968, children have come to Windridge from most of the 50 states and many foreign countries to share in the Windridge experience. Campers make a commitment to hard work, good sportsmanship, and wholesome fun and laughter. Within a warm and friendly environment, campers make lifelong friends while learning skills for life. Windridge offers two- and three-week coed sessions from June through August, serving ages seven through 15. Windridge’s 4:1 camper-to-counselor ratio is an important factor in its warm and nurturing environment. Windridge offers “majors” in tennis, soccer and horseback riding, and also offers many elective programs, such as golf, mountain biking, archery, a ropes course, basketball, volleyball, arts and crafts, and more. Windridge adds to this, a wide variety of exceptional evening activities and special events to create a wellrounded experience for each camper. For more information, visit WindridgeCamps.com or contact Camp Director Norbert Auger at NAuger@WindridgeCamps.com.

ClayTech® courts are easily installed over a concrete or asphalt base.

• • •

• • • •

www.hartru.com 42

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


COMING IN MAY

Distribution scheduled for 05/01/17

This edition will feature: • A Guide to Long Island’s Top Tennis Apparel Stores • 2017 USTA Long Island Awards Dinner • Tennis in the Hamptons • 2017 French Open Preview • Country Club Tennis

Distribution across Long Island at 300+ locations: • Indoor tennis clubs • Country clubs • Tennis camps • Retail stores • Gyms • Restaurants and health food stores • Supermarkets and • Many more!

Don’t miss the advertising opportunities in the May/June 2017 edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine!

Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by April 1, 2017 For more information, please call 516-409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com


SPORTIME SUM Long Island’s Leader for Summer Te

Preschool | Under 10 Tennis | Tennis & Sports | JMT

With camp locations throughout Long Island, the Hamptons and in New York City

Camp programs vary by S

Visit us online to find the

www.SportimeCamps.c 44

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


MMER CAMPS r Tennis Training, Sports and Fun!

Call and about ou ask r Sc Break Ca hool mps!

JMTA Tennis Training | Volleyball | Hockey | More!

ork City, Westchester and the Capital Region, we’ve got your summer fun covered!

ary by SPORTIME location.

the perfect camp for you!

ps.com | 888-698-3664

is Reg

te

da o T r

y!

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis3950LITM Magazine

45


2017

LONG ISLAND BOYS HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW NAS S A U C O U N T Y BOYS H I GH SC H OOL PREVI EW

Player to Watch: Yuval Solomon, Plainview JFK Cold Spring Harbor’s Josh Levine won back to back New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) singles titles in 2011 and 2012 which capped off a run of six state champions from Long Island in nine years. But it would take four more years until a player brought the state title back to Long Island, and Plainview JFK’s Yuval Solomon was the one to snap the streak, knocking off two-time defending champion Matt Gamble of Webster-Schroeder in last spring’s state final. “I just told myself that I knew I could do this,” Solomon told Long Island Tennis Magazine after winning last year. “I have been working at this and playing tennis for years. I had to fight. I was able to get some more first serves in and stayed aggressive.” Solomon had lost to Gamble in the 2015 final, and demonstrated the improvements

46

in his game, both physical and mental, in the 2016 final. He was more aggressive and his fitness level was second to none, which was evident as the match went to a thirdset tiebreaker. Those are the same things he wanted to improve on heading into this coming season. Now a senior, Solomon has already reached the pinnacle of high school tennis, but is eager to return to the final. “My goal is to do well at Counties again and get into the state tournament,” said Solomon. “And hopefully have a chance to

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

defend my title and win states again.” Solomon also has high hopes for his Plainview JFK team who is expected to compete at the top of a tough Conference I. Along with Solomon, the Hawks return Anthony Casale and Jared Philips. Both were freshman a year ago and will bolster the singles lineup this year, and longtime varsity players Alex Fried and David Weissman give the Hawks great depth in their lineup. Following this year, Solomon will head down to Winston-Salem to continue his tennis career at Wake Forest. “The team is really good, number two in the country right now, and the ACC is one of the toughest conferences so we’ll always have tough matches,” Solomon said of his decision to go to Wake Forest. “The campus has a small-school feel to it and I just liked everything about the school.”


2017

LONG ISLAND BOYS HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW Teams to watch … Syosset Syosset has been the class of Nassau County for the last couple of seasons and will look to continue that dominance once again. The Braves are two-time defending Nassau County champions and have won 34 consecutive matches over the course of those two years. Syosset has a deep lineup which includes Neel Rajesh, Kabir Rajpal, Preet Rajpal and Eli Grossman, and are clearly the team to beat in Nassau heading into the spring season. The target will be on its back all year long, something the Braves have come to embrace in the last couple of seasons. Port Washington Port Washington returns the bulk of its team from last year, including all-county singles players George Kaslow and Tim Serignese. In all, it has five seniors returning and will be anchored by Austin and Max Egna in the first doubles spot. The two reached the quarterfinals of the Nassau County doubles tournament a year ago and will look to build on that success. With a deep and experienced roster, Port Washington hopes to make noise this year atop a tough Conference I.

Roslyn The Bulldogs of Roslyn had a great season a year ago making a run all the way to the county finals. Although it lost in that final, Roslyn will return with a talented and experienced lineup as it hopes to return to the Nassau final. Last year’s county doubles finalists Sangjin Song and Zach Khazzam will be back with the team. Roslyn will once again be a threat in Conference I. Plainview JFK Plainview JFK surprised many people when it reached the semifinals of the county tournament last spring, but their success should be expected this season. Led by last year’s state singles champion Yuval Solomon, the Hawks will put forth a deep lineup that will make them competitive in every match. Anthony Casale and Jared Philips bolster its singles card and experienced players such as Alex Fried and David Weissman give Plainview depth down the lineup as it hopes to compete atop the county’s best conference.

Massapequa The Chiefs are the lone team outside of Conference I to check in on this list, but Massapequa should be much improved from last year. It won Conference IIA two years ago but went through a bit of a rebuilding season a year ago, and has regrouped ahead of the 2017 season. Niles Ghaffar, Matthew Musalo and Matthew Waterhouse are the team’s top three singles players who will look to lead the Chiefs back to a conference title, and will make them a tough out in the county tournament against any opponent. Key Nassau County Boys Tennis dates … l Thursday, March 30: Regular Season Begins l Wednesday, May 10: Regular Season Ends l Saturday-Sunday, May 13-14: Nassau County Individual Tournament (rain dates May 20-May 24) l Monday, May 15: Nassau County Team Playoffs Begin l Friday-Sunday, June 2-June 4: 2017 New York State Championships

Do you want to be a High-Performance Player but Can't Get a High Performance Coach? Contact Ricky Becker for 2017 Winter Season Groups and Private Lessons.

516-359-4843 rbecker06@yahoo.com LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

47


2017

LONG ISLAND BOYS HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW S UF F O L K C O U N T Y BOYS H I GH SC H OOL PREVI EW

Player to Watch: Abhinav Srivastava, Half Hollow Hills East The Half Hollow Hills East tennis program is always one of the strongest in not just Suffolk County but across Long Island. That was no different last season, in large part because of the performance of first singles player Abhinav Srivastava. Srivastava, a sophomore last year, was thrust into the top spot after playing the majority of his eighth and ninth grade seasons at third and fourth singles. He would have the best year of his varsity career, reaching the semifinals of the Suffolk County tournament and earning a trip to the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) tournament. “Playing at States gave me a lot of experience. It was new to me and something I wanted to do ever since I was a seventh grader on junior varsity,” said Srivastava. “When I finally made it, it wasn’t just about

me winning, but I wanted to play not to lose. That was the most pressure I felt during a match. Some of my teammates were there, my coach and athletic director were there as well as my family.” Srivastava took on the eighth-seed Mitchell Ostrovsky of Leon M. Goldstein High School, and played the senior extremely tough, losing 4-6, 4-6. Ostrovsky would go on to the quarterfinals while Srivastava used his experience to improve on his game. “Since last season I feel I have a lot more confidence on the court,” he said. “I trained

a lot this offseason with my dad, who is my coach, and we worked on shots and the strategy of the game. At John McEnroe Tennis Academy, the coaches have taught me a lot, not just shot making and technical stuff, but how to keep my mind calm and stay calm on the court.” He hopes that confidence will translate to another excellent season for him individually but also for his Hills East team, who lost in the county final a year ago to cross-town rival Half Hollow Hills West. “Both teams train a lot in the offseason and always working to get better,” said Srivastava. “The East-West rivalry ignites a flame between us and makes us both work harder to try and beat each other.” The goal for him and the team is to go through the season undefeated and return to the county title match, something the Thunderbirds have become accustomed to doing.

CENTURY TENNIS INC. Specializing In All Phases Of Tennis Court Construction

Maintenance and Repairs Servicing Long Island for 45 years with over 2,000 installations Contact Kevin or James at 1-800-660-PLAY

56 Brook Avenue l Deer Park, NY 11729 l 631-242-0220 l www.centurytennis.com 48

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


2017

LONG ISLAND BOYS HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW Teams to watch … Half Hollow Hills West The two-time defending Suffolk County champions Colts of Half Hollow Hills West enter this season seeking a three-peat. It will be led by seniors Jackson Weisbrot and Tyler Nierman in singles and a deep, experienced crop of doubles players who give Hills West a talented team up and down all seven flights.

Half Hollow Hills East Half Hollow Hills East is always a threat to win the Suffolk County championship, and that will be no different this coming season. The Thunderbirds have lost in the county final to rival West in the last two seasons so there is no doubt it will be seeking revenge this time around. Abhinav Srivastava will anchor the singles lineup in his junior season after posting a successful sophomore campaign. With a mix of experienced and up-and-coming players, Hills East has the depth to make a deep run in the county tournament once again as it looks to regain the title of Suffolk’s best team. Commack The Cougars enjoyed an excellent season a year ago in reaching the Suffolk semifinals. It would lose to eventual champion Hills West in the final four but should be back again this spring to make another deep county run. It lost top singles player Andy Zhou to graduation, but returns a bulk of players including Sol Yoon and Andrew Lin, who will try to use their experience to lead Commack through a tough League I in Suffolk County. Ward Melville Ward Melville took many people by surprise when it came out of League V to go all the way to the county semifinals a year ago, but

season. The Blue Devils reached the quarterfinals last year and lost a tough 4-3 match to Commack, but return much of its roster which has them confident. In addition to Flores, Nick Newell, Cody Bograd, two allLeague players from last year, Jacob Strieb and Jason Kessler will lead an experienced Blue Devils team as it hopes to battle for a top spot in the always-competitive League I.

the Patriots are primed to compete for a county championship once again this year. They will be led by top singles player Nick Decker and have a solid singles lineup rounded out by seniors Matt Roberts and Dan Meinster, who will guide it through its league and another top seed in the county tournament.

Key Suffolk County Boys Tennis dates … l Monday, March 13: Regular Season Begins l Tuesday, May 2: Regular Season Ends l Wednesday-Saturday, May 3-13: Suffolk County Team Playoffs l Thursday-Saturday, May 4-6: Division Individual Tournaments l Friday-Saturday, May 19-20: Suffolk County Individual Tournament l Friday-Sunday, June 2-June 4: 2017 New York State Championships

Huntington Despite being a freshman, Jack Flores is one of the top players in the county and will look to lead Huntington this coming

Brian Coleman is senior editor of Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email BrianC@USPTennis.com.

NIKE TENNIS E CA A MP S SERIO OUS. FUN. JUNIOR OVERNIGHT AN ND DA DAY CA CAMPS

AD T CA ADUL CAMPS

Randy Mani TTeennis Academy– Academy NY Robbie Wagner TToournament Training Camp– NY Wintergreen Resort – VA VA Lawrenceville School – NJ

Am mherst College College–MA MA wrenceville School–NJ Law

Colgate University University– NY Chirico Cohen TToournament Training Camp – PA PA Amherst College – MA Williams College– MA

USSportsCamps.com 1-800-NIKE CAMP (1-800-645-3226) All Rights reserved. Nike and the Swoosh design are registered trademarks of Nike, Inc. and its affiliates, and are used under license.Nike is the title sponsor of the camps and has no control over the opera o attion of the camps or the acts or omissions of US Sports Camps.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

49


USTA Eastern Lon Long Island Awards Dinner Scheduled The USTA Long Island Region will host its 27th Annual Awards Dinner on Wednesday, May 3 at Chateau Briand in Carle Place, N.Y. Join your tennis community to celebrate the hard work and success of our fabulous honorees, who will be recognized for achievements both on and off the court. The evening will again be a wonderful celebration of local

tennis and will include the awards presentation, delicious dinner and some special surprises. For information on the evening, please visit LongIsland.USTA.com and click “Awards Dinner” on the left hand side of the Home Page. There, you’ll also be able to register to attend the dinner. We look forward to seeing you!

LI Welcomes Officers, Seeks New Volunteers Sunny Fishkind, a 30-year LI Region volunteer who previously served as second vice president, Public Parks Advocate and Facebook Manager, is now vice president, while also continuing in her Parks and Facebook roles. A lifelong tennis player, Sunny teaches at Long Island University’s CW Post campus and has run the Hofstra University Summer Tennis Camp for 30 years. Craig Fligstein, who held the positions of secretary and treasurer for the past six years, will continue to serve the Executive Board as treasurer. Craig is vice president of Grant Development & Strategic Program Initiatives for the United Way of Long Island. Photo credit: James Alfalla

USTA Long Island Region board members attend the USTA Eastern Section Annual Meeting: Hilary Bresler, Jon Klee, Denise Schmidt, Mike Pavlides, Fabiana Rezac and Randi Wilkins The USTA Long Island Region welcomed its new slate of Executive Board Officers at the USTA Eastern Section Annual Meeting in January.

Terri Arnold-McKenzie, a former USTA executive in Diversity & Inclusion, joins the board as secretary. An avid tennis player, Terri currently serves as executive director of Alliance Tennis Development Inc.

Taking the helm of the Regional Board as president is Jonathan Klee, an attorney and avid tennis player who has volunteered with the USTA and USTA Long Island for many years. He previously was League Liaison-League Appeals & Inquiries.

Calendar of Events l Monday, March 13: Boys High School Tennis Season Begins l Saturday, March 25: Stop World Hunger Spring Tennis Party at Carefree Racquet Club l Friday, April 21: USTA Eastern Hall of Fame Induction/Dinner l Wednesday, May 3: 2017 USTA Eastern LI Region Awards Dinner at Chateau Briand l Saturday, May 13: Nassau County Boys High School Tournament l Saturday, May 13: Suffolk County “Boys Play for Autism” Fundraiser l Friday, May 19: Suffolk County Boys High School Tournament l Thursday, May 25: Long Island USTA Executive Cup l Thursday-Saturday, June 1-3: New York State Boys High School Championships at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center 50

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


ong Island Region LI Juniors Honored at USTA Eastern Annual Meeting Photo credit: James Alfalla

USTA Eastern awarded the Henry Benisch Scholarship to Claire Handa of Rockville Centre, N.Y.

The Edith Martin Girls 18 Sportsmanship Award went to Elysia Bolton of Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

Jared Phillips of Plainview, N.Y. (right) was awarded the Jr. Boys 14 Sportsmanship Award, while Nibedita Ghosh (left) of Kendall Park, N.J. won the Edith Martin Girls 14 Sportsmanship Award

Calling All Volunteers If you love Long Island AND love tennis, we’d LOVE to hear from you! The USTA Long Island Region has so many great programs and activities that would benefit from your help. Volunteers are needed to help with many programs. Our volunteers assist in areas including: Teaching youth tennis through a Community Tennis Association (CTA), National Junior Tennis & Learning (NJTL) program

or at your neighborhood school or park; supporting adults with disabilities and U.S. veterans; participating in community service projects, such as the collection of gently used tennis clothing and equipment; teaching tennis at neighborhood street fairs and festivals; and much more. If you would like to volunteer, please e-mail ustaonlongisland@gmail.com.

LI Legend Dick Zausner to be Inducted Into Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame Long Island tennis legend Dick Zausner, owner/operator of Port Washington Tennis Academy for more than three decades, will be inducted into the USTA Eastern Hall of Fame at its 2017 Annual Dinner, scheduled for April 21 at 7:00 p.m. The USTA Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame is a virtual place of recognition for the tennis community to visit online and support through its Annual Dinner. It was created in 1988, first as a dinner to honor individuals who have excelled at growing the game of tennis. Founders Harry Marmion and Alex Aitchison developed the USTA Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame with two objectives: To honor

friends of the game and as fundraising initiative for young players. Each year, there is a black-tie dinner saluting its honorees. Inductees such as Arthur Ashe, John & Patrick McEnroe, Billy Talbert, Alastair B. Martin, Althea Gibson, Mary Carillo, Vitas Gerulaitis, The Honorable David Dinkins, Barbara Williams and Eugene L. Scott have all been honored at this annual event, to name just a few. For a detailed history of the Port Washington Tennis Academy and Dick Zausner’s contributions to tennis on Long Island, visit LongIsland.USTA.com. For information on attending the Eastern Hall of Fame Dinner, visit Eastern.USTA.com.

Getting Kids on the Courts Many play opportunities are available across Long Island for young many communities also have Junior Team Tennis programs. Visit players. Junior USTA tournaments are designed for players of all USTA.com/Tennis-Near-Me/ for an updated list of tournaments abilities and ages at locations across Nassau and Suffolk, while and programs near you. LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

51


52

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

unday, March 12 is the final day to register for a USTA Men’s and Women’s team for the upcoming 18 & Over, 40 & Over, 55 & Over and 65 & Over Leagues. To register a team, please contact Kathy Miller by email at Kathym65@aol.com. The 18 & Over League has teams for men and women at the 2.5 Level (plays one court of singles and two courts of doubles), the 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5 Level (plays two courts of singles and three courts of doubles). There is also a 5.0+ Level which allows two 5.5 players on the team (plays one court of singles and two courts of doubles). Play will begin in May for all levels and will run approximately 10 weeks. The 40 & Over League has teams for men and women at the 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 and 4.5+ Levels (all play two courts of singles and three courts of doubles). The 4.5+ Division allows three 5.0 players on the team. Play will begin in May for all levels and will run for approximately 10 weeks. The 55 & Over League has teams at combined levels of 6.0 (two 3.0 players or a 2.5 & 3.5), 7.0 (two 3.5 players or a 3.0 & 4.0), 8.0 (two 4.0 players of a 3.5 & 4.5), and 9.0 (two 4.5 players or 4.0 & 5.0). All levels play three courts of doubles. Play will begin mid-June and run for approximately 10 weeks. The 65 & Over League is relatively new. Last season, we had teams at the 7.0 Level for both the men and the women. We have interest in the 8.0 Division and would love to get teams. Please reach out to people you think might like to play and we will get some teams together! Matches consist of three courts

S

of doubles with play beginning the end of June. The Captain’s Cocktail Party, where the seasons schedule is distributed, is scheduled for Tuesday, April 18 at 6:30 p.m. at Crest Hollow Country Club on Jericho Turnpike in Woodbury, N.Y. This Party is for one captain per team only. New rules will be discussed, schedules distributed and questions answered, while enjoying the Cocktail Party with the other captains in your divisions. It’s a nice way to kick off the upcoming season! The Tri-Level League is played from October to December, with the Sectional Championship in January. The women’s team from Sportime Roslyn, captained by Gigi Banks and Alyssa Bonadonna, and the men’s team from Christopher Morley, captained by Mitchell Low, were

the winning Long Island teams! Both teams fought hard and came in second at the Sectionals. Great job! The 40 & Over Mixed-Doubles League was also played in the fall and will play their Sectional Championship in September 2017. The winning Long Island teams are: The 6.0 team out of Christopher Morley, captained by Sharon TaiYap. The 7.0 team is out of Blue Point, captained by Hank Winnicki; the 8.0 team out of Sportime Lynbrook, captained by Donna Healy; and the 9.0 team out of Hempstead Lake/Sportime Roslyn is captained by Cecil Hollins and Roz Chua. Kathy Miller is manager of Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached by e-mail at KathyM65@aol.com.

The Most Underused Weapon In Tennis

Gino Fava To see how your game can be improved dramatically by this one simple skill, visit me on YouTube. LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

53


01

02

04

54

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February March/April 2017 •2017 LITennisMag.com • LITennisMag.com

06

03

05

07


MSG Rolls Out the Red Carpet to the Stars BNP Paribas Showdown celebrates a decade of the sport’s top stars in the Big Apple

T

he BNP Paribas Showdown will once again grace New York City with its presence in early March, marking the 10th anniversary of the event that has attracted the sport’s biggest stars for a decade. “The event actually got started after Pete Sampras played an exhibition against Andy Roddick in Houston,” said the event’s creator Jerry Solomon. “After the match, he said to a friend of his: ‘I can still play. It would be so much fun to play against Roger [Federer].’ Pete had been retired for about five years at that point and Roger was on top. Pete’s friend was a golfing buddy of Ivan Lendl, and I had worked with Lendl for years, so a phone call eventually came to me from him. I said I didn’t think it would ever happen, but it’s a great idea, and I said I would play around with it a little bit.” One thing led to another and Solomon began on working to put the event together, knowing that Madison Square Garden would have to be the venue for it. “It’s the most well-known venue in the United States and probably the world and there hadn’t been tennis there for seven or eight years,” said Solomon. “My first job in sports was working on the Colgate Grand Prix Masters at MSG, so I had seen tennis first hand in the Garden from a behind the scenes point of view. I just felt there was really nothing like that crowd and atmosphere; that heavyweight-bout history. It just made a lot of sense. Over the years there had been seven or eight

pro tennis events in New York but over time that decreased. I knew that there was an appetite for a winter tennis event.” Solomon put together the plan in advance and presented it to Federer, who came back with just one available date, March 10, the Monday of Indian Wells. And that date has stuck throughout all the years of the event. After searching for a sponsor for the event, NetJets came on board to sponsor the first edition of the BNP Paribas Showdown, just four months before the event was set to take place. Tickets went on sale in early January and within weeks, the building had been sold out. “I didn’t know that we would sell it out as quickly as we did, or that it would become what it’s become,” said Solomon. “It was just my sense that was the place to do it, it was the first job I had working in tennis so I had some sentimentality about it. But there are a lot of reasons to do it at Madison Square Garden. The event comes at a time where there is not much going on in the world of sports. The NFL season is over, the MLB and NCAA Tournament hasn’t yet started, and the NBA and NHL are winding down their regular seasons, so I think we get a lot of extra focus because of that, especially being on a Monday night.” The event is part of World Tennis Day which has become a hallmark of tennis around the world with multiple initiatives and events promoting the game. This year’s edition of the Showdown will bring fans more excitement as there will be

a team format and there will be eight players competing, the most the event has ever had. It will be a quicker, faster paced form of tennis which will keep the fans engaged, and as always, there will be opportunities for fans to get on the court and hit. “We’ve had people like Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Ben Stiller in the stands,” said Solomon. “Two years ago, we had a kid who hit a lob over Federer to win a point and that got the crowd into it. I think this year stands to have the greatest entertainment value, with a lot of different looks and lots of players. I’m really looking forward to it because it will be something different for the event and the fans.” The 10th installment of one of tennis’ most popular events returns to Madison Square Garden in early March with four matches: Jack Sock vs. Nick Kyrgios, Juan Martin del Potro vs. Kei Nishikori, Venus Williams vs. Garbine Muguruza, and Andy Roddick vs. Lleyton Hewitt in a team format of Americas vs. The World. These four star-studded showdowns will give the New York City crowd something to cheer about as the winter begins to come to a close. “We have great success with the BNP Paribas Showdown over the years, with the event attracting the top names in tennis and providing great memories for fans,” said MSG’s Executive Vice President of Marquee Events Joel Fisher. “We are excited about the 10th anniversary edition of the BNP Paribas Showdown here at Madison Square Garden.”

01: Jerry Solomon, creator of the BNP Paribas Showdown, addresses the media prior to last year’s event 02: Roger Federer entertains the crowd at the World’s Most Famous Arena 03: Grigor Dimitrov during the 2015 BNP Paribas Showdown in new York City 04: Caroline Wozniacki at MSG during her match in 2016 against Serena Williams 05: Gael Monfils and Stan Wawrinka show their New York sports pride at MSG 06: Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic field questions from the media prior to the 2014 BNP Paribas Showdown 07: Serena Williams during her 2013 BNP Paribas Showdown match against Victoria Azarenka LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

55


Building the Fire Within Young American Athletes Romania’s Alex Pop-Moldovan fosters new approach to coaching local juniors By Dr. Tom Ferraro omania is the homeland of Olympic Gold Medalist Nadia Comaneci, gymnastics coach Bela Karolyi and Marta Karolyi and tennis superstar Ilie Nastase. Romania is located in the southeastern region of Europe and had to develop a fighting spirit based upon its dealings with the Soviet Union. When you have to fight a super power to maintain sovereignty you either get tough or you disappear. So the Romanian people got tough. I recently met the Romanian Tennis Coach Alex Pop-Moldovan at a holiday brunch last week and found him so interesting that I knew I wanted to interview him. He is a high performance coach and

R

56

I met him to learn more about his style of coaching. In Romania, he was in charge of all U10’s for the Romanian Tennis Federation and was head pro at the As Club Sportiv Tennis Masters. He was a supervisor at all ATP, WTA and ITF events in Romania, including the Davis Cup Matches. He also came in third place in the Squash National Championships. He is tennis coach to Silver Medalist Florin Mergea and Spencer Brachman, ranked number two in the USTA Eastern Ranking Boys 16’s. I asked him to describe the Romanian mentality. He told me, “Romanians are a people known for toughness. They tend to be hungry, hard-working, very respectful of authority and very disciplined.” Our conversation focused on American athletes who have the same kind of

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

hunger. He told me, “Serena and Venus Williams were raised in poverty and also have that hungry look in their eyes.” I immediately associated this to Tiger Woods who also came from early childhood circumstances where he had to withstand humiliation and discrimination. This made him very hungry for fame, fortune and victory. So the question becomes … exactly how does one build this hunger in the young American athlete who has not come from deprived circumstances? How does one build a fire within? This is what Alex PopMoldovan has been thinking about since he started teaching in America. The answer is not in any way simple or self-evident. If you provide too much discipline and too much of a work atmosphere, the young player or their parent will go down the block and find an easier coach. But if you do not provide


a tough regiment, there is really no way to get the young tennis player to the top ranks. This also will prove to be problematic for the player, the parent and for the coach (Alex) … kind of stuck between a rock and a hard place. I have always felt that good coaching is made up of: Solid discipline, astute teaching and refined psychology. All of the great coaches have all these things in spades. Vince Lombardi at Green Bay, John Wooden at UCLA and Phil Jackson with the Chicago Bulls had these three character traits. They all knew how to discipline and set down standards, how to teach in interesting and unique ways and also how to show kindness, respect and caring for every player on the team. I have always felt that coaching may be the toughest job on earth. Elite sports are demanding for the player, parent and coach. The delicate blend of toughness and of love combined with creative teaching is all necessary. It is the rare coach who can manage all three areas and the ones that do become famous in the long run.

In answer to Alex’s question about how best to build a fire in the American athlete that has not experienced deprivation … set high standards, create interesting teaching drills and show compassion each day. When all these things are prescribed, you also need to explain this approach both to the player and to the parent. The only way players will submit to a process is if they have some understanding of why it is structured this way. To become elite is very difficult. I recall my experience in graduate school at SUNY Stony Brook. To get a Ph.D., one must take four years of difficult classwork, followed by original research that is turned into a dissertation. This dissertation must then be accepted by a group of five professors. After working on my dissertation for more than two years, I submitted it for acceptance. It was rejected. I asked my advisor for support. He told me a story which goes like this: “Think of this like being a high jumper in the Olympics. The bar is set at seven feet. You run up to the bar on your first try and leap up to about three feet and

land in the pit. You rush over to the judges and ask if that maybe, perhaps, pretty please they could lower the bar so that you could make it over next time. The judges look at you, shake their heads no and say try again.” I got the message loud and clear. It took me 12 rewrites to get my dissertation passed … but I made it. By the way, many students in Ph.D. programs never finish the dissertation and are labeled “A.B.D.s” which means “All But Dissertation.” And that is worthless. Success is difficult to achieve. It takes discipline, effort, patience, time, money, support from experts and parents, learning and even a bit of luck. Tennis on the highest level is very demanding. Count yourself lucky if you find a teacher like Alex who is smart, caring and tough, and then settle in for the long haul and enjoy the ride. For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail DrTFerraro@aol.com or visit DrTomFerraro.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

57


Five Rules You Must Know Before Sectionals By Barbara Wyatt The vast majority of tennis games are played with great sportsmanship by players who demonstrate that tennis is a game of scrupulous honesty and courteous competitive spirit. A handful of players—and I do mean a handful—whip out a new rule interpretation that rattles the brain. I saw a player stop a match in a third set tiebreak with the opponents ready to start their serve at 10-9. The player walked over to the bench, sat down, removed a shoe and massaged the foot, while quoting the 90-second time rule. Jaws dropped onto the court in astonishment. An opponent managed to stumble out, “This is not a change-over. Shoe back on.” There are 46 rules in The Code, 31 International Tennis Federation (ITF) rules, and more than 100 pages of USTA regulations. It is difficult to know every nuance. Here are my recommendations of the

five rules that you must know. If you haven’t read USTA Friend at Court cover to cover, at least know these five rules. l Code 2: Points played in good faith are counted. Sometimes, when a point is over, there is a delayed surprise as players remember the score was incorrectly stated, or teams were supposed to switch sides. The point counts. Fix the error and continue playing. l Code 17: Prompt calls eliminate the “two chance option.” The “two chance option” is selectively opting to call a let after you hit the ball and dump it into the net. Suppose you’re receiving. The ball may have been out. You didn’t return the ball. You didn’t make a prompt call. You have a short conversation with your partner. The server has moved over to the next position. You call the ball out in an attempt to enforce the “two chance option.” Your call is too late. The ball is good. It takes a fraction of second for both you and your partner to raise shoulders in the universal shoulder language of “I don’t

know” and promptly call the ball in. Make your calls promptly, clearly, loudly, and immediately. l Code 31: Server announces the score. If you disagree with your opponent’s clear and audible score announcement, don’t play the point. Raise your hand before the serve and clarify. If there is a dispute, walk to the net and discuss it. l Code 33: Claim a hindrance as soon as possible. Opponent’s shoe falls off, keep playing. Racquet slips from your opponent’s hand, keep playing. If a hat, a shoe or ball rolling onto the court truly distracts you, call hindrance immediately and re-play the point. If the shoe or racquet continues to fly off, you may be awarded a point because the hindrance has moved from unintentional to deliberate. The vast majority of tennis players follow the rules of the game and look forward to an honest competitive match. My fifth recommendation is the basic principle of tennis: Code 1: Courtesy is expected. You can expect that from the vast majority of players. When your opponent is in that small rule-inventing minority, relax. Read USTA Friend at Court prior to your match. Have it in your bag. Ask for help from the USTA desk or roving umpire. USTA staff and referee professionals will do their best to ensure your tennis match is conducted under the fairest possible conditions. Barbara Wyatt is a writer, photographer, USTA official, and mobile app developer of iKnowTennis!, the tennis rules app. Her poem, Ode to Tennis, an amusing poem on the joys and frustrations when learning tennis, is available at Amazon. She can be reached by e-mail at BarbaraW@iKnowTennis.com.

58

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


One-On-One Doubles Tournaments Return To The Big Apple ne-On-One Doubles Tennis, the half-court serve-and-volley singles game played cross-court including the alley, returns to the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, Friday-Sunday, April 28-30, 2017 as a USTA National Category III Tournament. The Innovations Tennis Challenges will include both a Singles Tournament and One-On-One Doubles Tournament for the three playing divisions offered: The Men’s 35 & Over Division; Men’s 45 & Over Division and Men’s 55 & Over Division. Since the game’s inception in 2004, One-On-One Doubles has been played as part of ATP, USTA, USPTA and ITA national events. Whitney Kraft, tennis director at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, will serve as tournament director. “We are excited to bring back One-OnOne Doubles Tennis to the NTC,” said Kraft. “The game displays plenty of actionpacked, all-court play. Our first Men’s OneOn-One Doubles Tournament was won by Jared Palmer in 2008.”

O

One-On-One Doubles, dubbed the “Third Game of Tennis,” has been played in its tournament format, throughout the East Coast since 2004. Stony Brook University has hosted several Division I Women’s One-On-One Doubles Tournaments during their Fall season. In addition to Stony Brook, One-On-One Doubles Tennis is played on college campuses nationwide. Ed Krass, former Harvard Women’s Tennis coach and director of the 29th Annual College Tennis Exposure Camps, is the founder of One-On-One Doubles Tournaments. The format of tournament play is a round-robin pool play, with short, no-ad sets, the first to win four games with a nine-

point tie-breaker played at 3-3. Winners of each round-robin proceed to the single elimination rounds based on draw size. Matches are played to music which adds to the lively atmosphere of the One-On-One Doubles Tournaments. “Playing in the One-On-One Doubles Tournaments has been a great experience for me,” said Mikael Pernfors, Singles Finalist at the 1986 French Open and past One-On-One Doubles Tournament winner. “The tournament format provides a great atmosphere and fun tennis.” Ashley Fisher, 2006 U.S. Open Doubles Semifinalist, has played in six events in Florida and captured a few titles along the way. “Playing One-On-One Doubles is always a highlight of my year. The tournaments combine energy, music and a high level of tennis,” said Fisher. For more information about the tournaments, e-mail Whitney Kraft at NTCTournaments@USTA.com. For more information about One-On-One Doubles Tournaments, visit OneOnOneDoubles.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

59


Mythbusters: Let’s Let the Pros Call Their Own Lines! At Least for Some Tournaments!

By Ricky Becker ’m a tennis lifer. Played, coached, ran programs, ran tournaments, written for a couple tennis magazines and have spoken at tennis events. I have to admit … watch-

I

ing professional tennis outside of the Grand Slams does nothing for me. I really want it to. I have enormous respect for the people who can make it on the pro tour. I love tennis and I should enjoy watching the best of the best, but I don’t. Give me the Islanders, Mets or any pro football game over a professional tennis match.

TENNIS SPECIALTY CAMP For boys and girls entering grades 2-9 Sunny and Edward Fishkind, Directors Want to improve your tennis skills this summer? For young novices, we offer the “10 and Under Tennis” (Quick Start) program, while more advanced players will learn techniques like overheads, serves, approach shots, topspin, and slices. You’ll also learn scoring, strategy, and mental toughness as you participate in fun and positive competitions.

For more information, visit hofstra.edu/camp or call 516-463-CAMP. 60

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

I think the biggest reason is that I need someone to root for. I think that’s fairly common in that professional sports leagues like the NFL, NBA, NHL and MLB, the fans have a rooting interest. It might be for a hometown team, a favorite player, a gambling interest or fantasy sports interest. So, how can we make it so people like me can find a rooting interest? Let’s bring the game back to its’ roots and hold some ATP and WTA events where the players call their own lines. This would really bring out the character in players that people can relate too. Imagine if Ekaterina Makarova and Andrea Petkovic are playing … do I really care who wins? But what if Makarova hooks Petkovic at 4-3 deuce. Now I have a rooting interest! Let’s go Petkovic! Or, Kyle Edmund is playing Thomaz Bellucci and Edmund goes on an un-British rant about Bellucci’s calls meanwhile all the calls are fair. It would be a lot easier to bring out the personality of the players. As great as the HawkEye is, it really has taken the personality out of the players. Who doesn’t have a guilty pleasure in


hearing a player arguing with an umpire or another player. Having the players make their own calls would allow the fans to get inside the players a bit more. How would Roger Federer react to getting hooked compared to Andy Murray? What would Murray say to a cheating opponent? Letting players call their own lines would also bring the game to the 99 percent of people who regularly play matches without umpires. Doubles enthusiasts say they sometimes like to watch. Watching matches like this would be very relatable. Everyone who plays tennis can relate to a cheating opponent. Yes, there are some things to work out. Would there be a person announcing the score? Can a person request an umpire similarly to how you can in junior tournaments, etc.? This stuff could get worked out though. Hopefully, the stigma of cheating in front of thousands of people and many more on television would police the players into calling lines fairly for the most part. The fans would also get behind a player who is getting the wrong end of a

bad call, which would give an emotional lift to that player. The argument against this is that the players would never agree to this. If you up the prize money, that would probably take care of that though. I remember about 20 years ago, a radio listener calling top-rated sports radio host Mike Francesa on-air with the suggestion that Major League Baseball award home field advantage in the World Series to the league that wins the AllStar Game. Francesa laughed him off, said that was the craziest idea he ever heard, Major League Baseball would never do something like that and hung up on the caller. The following year, Major League Baseball adopted that very rule (until eliminating this year.). The idea of no umpires or linesmen is definitely out of the box but so crazy that it might work. One other idea: Allow coaching on injury timeouts/bathroom breaks Injury timeouts and bathroom breaks

suck the life out of a match, are abused and are a relatively new phenomenon that are miserable. I cannot imagine the tours like the abuse, although they say there is nothing that can be done to stop them because it is too difficult to determine if the request is legit. So let’s allow the player who isn’t taking the break to get coaching during the break. It’s not a total match changer, but at the same time, it is enough of a deterrent that someone who doesn’t really need the timeout will think twice about taking that time out. Once again … it’s kind of crazy, but just might work! Ricky Becker is director of tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors yearround at Bethpage State Park and Jericho/Westbury Tennis where he is the junior tournament director. He can be reached by phone at (516) 605-0420, email rbecker06@yahoo.com or visit JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

61


Why You Are Probably Working Too Hard on th By Steve Kaplan erformance improvement is all about hard work, and you need to work as hard as you can, right? Wrong! Hard work is important, but the ultimate goal is to be as productive as you can and this comes from finding just the optimal balance of effort and temperance. Remember … smart work is your best work. To illustrate this idea, imagine a car stuck in a snow ditch. If you press the accelerator too softly and the power that the wheels produce is less than gravity, you stay stuck. Even worse however is too much power. If the power of the wheels are greater than friction, you will dig the car deeper into the ditch. Similarly, the sweet spot of tennis performance is a delicate balance here in areas of stability, mobility, effort, rest, focus, flow and temperament. I often challenge my young students to “Get the ball from my hand” and after they unsuccessfully wrestle me, I explain that “It would have been easier and more effective to just ask for it.” Powerful efficient strokes and explosive controlled movements are the result of high quality efforts and have several keys components that are worth exploring in detail.

P

1. Powerful strokes start from the ground and work their way upward in a sequential series of movements called the “Kinetic Chain.” For simplicity sake, it’s useful to think of this chain as starting with your legs driving your hips, which in turn drives your torso, which swings your arm and racket to strike the ball. Many players try to create that little bit of extra power with extra arm effort resulting in less power and accuracy and increased injury potential because the kinetic chain is disrupted. 2. A strong connection between your hips


n the Tennis Court to Create Power and Speed and torso is essential to ensure power transfer and to prevent unwanted sway or rotation. A great saying in the sports performance world is “to learn to rotate with power, first learn to resist rotation.” 3. A loose wrist promotes racket speed much the same way a pliable tip of a whip results a forceful “snap.” An active wrist does little to add power but a passive flexible wrist will transmit the forces created by your legs, hips torso and arms and display this force as speed. 4. Pushing the racket away from your body with the racket face turned slightly down on ground strokes will promote the production of a linear swing. It should be noted that the ultimate goal of the kinetic chain is efficient racket speed and the single biggest enemy of your racket moving

fast is nonlinear racket movement. A racket which takes a straight path moves much faster and truer. 5. The primary goal of sound footwork is a quick start with as much positive acceleration as needed to meet the ball and perform a controlled slowing and stop which transitions to another quick start. This goal is in contrast to the common and harmful bit of advice to “run as fast as you can to set up to hit the ball.” Such unnecessarily fast movements are an enormous waste of energy which requires greater effort to start and stop much like racing from stoplight to stoplight in a car is wasteful of gas and hard on the engine and brakes. Balance which is defined by achieving zero acceleration in movement is enhanced by efficient movement. It’s understood that getting to the ball late is bad but that does

not make a compelling case for the requirement to sacrifice body control to get to the ball early. Get to the ball on time and save your big efforts for challenging full effort runs and fast recoveries. Training is an art, but the prerequisite to this discipline is following the principles of science that guide high performance. Steve Kaplan is owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. He may be reached by e-mail at StevenJKaplan@aol.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

63


JMTA to Host Second Annual College Recruiting Combine in June

T

he John McEnroe Tennis Academy announced the 2017 John McEnroe Tennis Academy College Recruiting Combine will be held the weekend of June 24-25 at SPORTIME Randall’s Island. The Combine will give selected rising high school sophomores, juniors and seniors from around the country and beyond the opportunity to showcase their technical and tactical tennis skills, as well as their athletic abilities and mental toughness, in front of coaches from top colleges and universities. “One of the driving forces at JMTA is our commitment to preparing our players for college tennis, and helping each player find their best college fit,” said John McEnroe. “After a terrific inaugural year in 2016, we are excited to be expanding the JMTA Combine in 2017 to include more coaches and more students, and we are confident that it will again be a great resource for both.” As in 2016, coaches representing all three NCAA Divisions are expected to attend, with commitments from Harvard, Columbia, Tulane, North Carolina, Wesleyan and many other top programs, and with many more coming. Representatives from prestigious leagues including the Ivy League, ACC, Big East, SEC, Big 10, Pa-

triot League and NESCAC attended last year, and are expected again this year. Interested players can get more information and can apply to participate in the Combine at SportimeNY.com/JMTACombine, with registration closing on March 31. A limited number of Combine spots are available to boys and girls. JMTA directors will evaluate each application based upon objective criteria. Those chosen to participate will be informed no later than Saturday, April 15. Player check-in will begin at 8:00 a.m. for all players on both days. Participants will compete in singles and doubles match play with tracked results. Players will also receive athletic performance assessments, mental toughness assessments, and will have one match recorded and analyzed by Tennis Analytics, with additional matches available for purchase. An integrated recruiting package for each Combine participant will be compiled and made available, digitally, to both the participants and the coaches, at the touch of a button. JMTA students who have gone on to compete on the collegiate level include: Current ATP number 163 and 2014 Junior Wimbledon Champion Noah Rubin, the ACC Player of the Year at Wake Forest University

and NCAA singles finalist in 2015; Jamie Loeb, the 2015 NCAA singles champion from the University of North Carolina who also turned pro in fall 2015 and is currently ranked 155th on the WTA Tour; Jessica Golovin, a sophomore already making her mark at LSU; and Sabrina Xiong, a sophomore at Harvard, who was the recipient of the first full scholarship to JMTA in 2010. Last year, JMTA players who received athletic and merit based scholarships included: Madison Battaglia to Yale, Athell Bennett to Purdue University, Jake Bhangdia to Furman University, Xavier Pacthod to New York University, Sean Mullins to Boston College, Christina Sisti to Tulane University and Brianna Williams to Columbia University. This year, JMTA’s graduating class has committed to nine different Division I schools so far, including Stephanie Chikvashvili to Stony Brook University, Loren Haukova to Boston College, Amber Policar to Kansas University, Nathalie Rodilosso to Princeton University, Maranda Sears to Duquesne, Victoria Sec to Ball State University, and Sam Turchetta to Stanford University. For more information, visit SportimeNY.com/JMTACombine or e-mail JMTACombine@SportimeNY.com.

Servemaster

Practice SMART-Teach SMART Servemaster lets you FEEL every part of the service motion by letting your body move naturally. You’ll be amazed how effective this simple tool is for players and students of all ages, levels and abilities

Great for ground strokes, too! How and why does it work? Check it out at ...

www.ThetotalServe.com

Lisa Dodson l Lisa@thetotalserve.com LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

65


Serve and Vol By Lisa Dodson here are a number of classic “reasons” for the lack of serve and volley among women in the modern game of tennis. Opinions and quotes from fans, players, coaches and commentators are many. True or not here, they are: 1. “The return is too big.” 2. “Women’s serves are not big enough and they are too small.” 3. “Racket and string technology makes serve and volley ‘suicidal.’” 4. “Women aren’t agile and quick in forward/back movement.”

T

I have long been a believer that women’s tennis took an ill-advised, one dimensional turn many years ago. With the onset of topspin, the baseline became the main room in the house for female players. A successful style was created and copied, commentators and coaches professing that this was the way women should play tennis. We, the coaches, professionals and spokespeople for the game bought into this in a big way. Consequently, we have undermined players’ abilities and undervalued a substantial part of the game in women’s tennis. The serve We all know that, generally speaking, women are not physically capable of serving the speed of men. Nature dictates this by giving men the size, speed and strength advantage. That being said, it does not mean that women cannot develop big serves. The man’s muscle mass is above the waist and women’s is below the waist. Women need to be taught to engage the center and lower body more to harness their natural power and to couple this with a proper throwing technique. The fastest, officially-recorded, woman’s serve is 131 miles per hour by Sabine Lisicki, followed by 12 pro players who have recorded speeds over the minimum 124 miles per hour benchmark. Given the right tools and coaching, these exceptional results are attainable by women players. 66

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


Volley for Women: Why It’s all a matter of the player and coach believing that this is possible and going through a solid progression. It’s also a matter of time spent, balls hit and willingness to persevere. Like anything else there are some players who will take to the challenge more naturally and with open and accepting attitudes. These players and coaches will then set the bar for others. In the last few years, there has been a push to improve women’s serves and strides are being made to earn some cheap points. Commanding play from the serve can be the future of women’s tennis if we make it a priority. We’re not even talking about blasting untouched aces, but setting a tone and confidence for a match by using varying spin, pinpoint placement and speed. The key is to make the receiver hit returns that are outside of their striking zone. Then, returns become less accurate, less deadly and more vulnerable. The volley The serve always gets the blame for the lack of serve and volley for women. What about the poor old, neglected classic volley, which just so happens to be the second and equally important half of the serve and volley? The art of the volley has been stripped and robbed by forehand grips. Female players spend so much time on the baseline hitting topspin forehands and two-handed backhands that the Continental grip is a stranger. Dangerously true is that this happens daily at grassroots levels. It’s no wonder that our most creative and versatile female players in history utilize the one-handed backhand. Using a Continental grip for the backhand leads to familiarity of what this grip provides for both the serve and the volley. The Continental grip is essential for a controlled volley. Generally, classic volleys are not meant to overpower, but to put pressure on the opponent to hit a difficult passing shot and is a necessity for the first or midcourt volley. Forward movement takes players from one physical place to another by means of hitting the shot and is an integral part of hitting this non-swinging shot.

Female players need to spend time on their volley technique and how to make that technique work on the move. If it is true that women are less good at forward movement and struggle with transitioning reflexively, then it really is for lack of doing it. Reallocate a good chunk of practice time to coming forward, learning an athletic split-step and quickening up the transition. Add a precision first volley to complete building the confidence to use a serve and volley or an approach technique. Not only will this make serving and volleying more successful, but it will enhance approaching on forceful ground shots or returns. It’s time and it takes time. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not advocating that all women players should become serve and volley players, I’m advocating a winning style of play at all levels. Use it at specific, strategic times, against specific player types, as a pressure tool, as a bluff. Just use it! Remember that when you go to the net, you will sometimes get passed. But in the meantime, you will win more points by simply approaching (and not having to volley) than you will by volleying. The premise above is driven by facts. Craig O’Shannessy, the lead strategy analyst for ATP and WTA, cited the following facts:

Not?

An examination of the statistics shows that serving and volleying remains a winning strategy for men and women … At the 2012 U.S. Open both men and women had the highest winning percentage (of baseline, net and serve and volley) when serving and volleying: 68.7 percent for men, 69.2 percent for women. The percentages were similar for Wimbledon 2013. Surprisingly, baseline points won were 46.2 percent for men and 47.3 percent for women. Still, there were only 190 serve-and-volley points in the women’s tournament, and only 37 of the 128 women in the field served and volleyed at all. 19 women did not lose a point while serving and volleying. Perhaps things will change when coaches encourage women to spend quality time on their serve, volley and the athletic movements associated with putting them together. So, let me ask again, why not? Lisa Dodson is the developer and owner of Servemaster, a USPTA Elite Professional and a former WTA world-ranked player. She is currently the director of tennis at Shenorock Shore Club in Rye, N.Y. She may be reached by e-mail at Lisa@TheTotalServe.com or visit TheTotalServe.com.

PREVENTATIVE NUTRITION HEART DISEASE & DIABETES ADOLESCENT BODY IMAGE SPORTS NUTRITION For groups and individuals

irinalehat@gmail.com 917.769.8031

www.irinalehat.com LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

67


The Tennis Season Heats Up as Spring Approaches By Luke Jensen Get your pro spring swing on! I love this time of year. The weather is warming up and there is such positive energy around the tennis courts. On the Pro Tour, the American swing in Indian Wells, Calif. and in Miami are so much fun for the players. I was a player that loved the road and being on the tour. From week to week, there was always a new awesome adventure. Some players needed more time off the Tour, but I was a player that didn’t feel good when I was away from the courts. I always felt that the week I took off was the week I could have won another tournament. I was so locked in for the Grand Slams. The on- and off-the-court training. Even my mental and tactical approaches changed to approach every Grand Slam with a “winning it all” attitude. The mindset changed for Indian Wells and Miami. For some reason, I just had more fun at these events. I had mixed results on the

court during my career, but off the court, it was a time of the year where it charged me up for the long European tour that would go from March until July. A tournament every week in another country every week needed a full tank of emotional fuel. During Indian Wells and Miami, I would skydive, swim with dolphins and play with the tour rock band at the Hard Rock Player’s Party. Sometimes, this was done the day of or before matches and it was a blast!!! The fans were always on spring break from a long winter and they seemed to be a bit nuts as well. These tournaments are really geared for the fan. You can get right on the rail for practices and matches to see the stars of the sport. I found this atmosphere made a strong connection between player and fans. I remember fishing in Miami, in a spot right behind the courts waiting for my match and some fans came over and hung out with me. It was so cool to be at one of the biggest tour stops in the world and just a few feet away from world class tennis, while I was fishing for tarpon with

some tennis fans from around the world. If you get a chance to book a spring tennis trip, I highly recommend taking a shot at either the East or West Coast. They both have their own personality and are considered to be the fifth and sixth most important tournaments on the Pro Tour today. I promise you won’t regret the up-close-and-personal vibe you will receive at these events that you won’t receive at the Grand Slams. I will leave you this issue with a Roger Federer observation … I lost a ton of sleep watching the Aussie Open with all of the upsets on both the Men’s and Women’s sides of the draw. It was worth it watching Fed come back after six months away from the Tour. Now 35-years-old, Fed continues to amaze. Remember when Andre Agassi reached the finals of a Slam at the age of 35 and was still very competitive? Fed, like Agassi, watches the nutritional approach and fitness approach for an aging and beat up body. I see Fed taking the ball earlier and on the rise. Some tennis circles call this “off the bounce.” This allows Fed to take reaction and recovery time away from his opponent. The next time you watch Fed, look for this kind of ball control and see if you can implement it into your game. Enjoy the American spring swing through Cali and Miami before the mud rolling begins towards the French Open! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. Luke is currently director of tennis at Sea Island Tennis Center in Georgia. He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail LukeJensen84@yahoo.com.

68

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


Carefree Hosts Third Annual Susan Alvy Memorial Tournament arefree Racquet Club in Merrick recently hosted the third annual Susan Alvy Memorial Tournament, continuing its tradition of honoring the late Susan Alvy, who was the manager of Rockville Racquet Club for many years, as well as serving as a member of the Long Island USTA League Committee. “One of Susan’s favorite events at Rockville Racquet was the Men’s Doubles Holiday Tournament,” said Kathy Miller, manager of Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. “She would tell me how she loved watching the great tennis followed by schmoozing with the players afterwards. The players loved seeing her there as much as she loved being there!” Susan lost her battle to cancer in November of 2014, and players who had

C

“A” Division Winners Jeff Snow & Brad Shafran and Finalists Jon Bonnet & Keith Mattes are congratulated by Judy Weiss (center), sister of Susan Alvy played in the tournament asked Miller if she would continue running it. “It was an honor to do so and we all knew

it had to have Susan’s name attached,” said Miller. “I am so happy that this tournament continues in Susan’s name.” The tournament consisted of Men’s Doubles with an “A” Division for 4.5-5.0 players and a “B” Division for 3.5-4.0 players. All players played in a final round, followed by a breakfast and a trophy presentation by Susan’s sister, Judy Weiss. “We are so happy that each year, either Judy or Susan’s daughter Debbie have joined us to give out the trophies,” said Miller. This year’s winners and finalists are: l “A” Division Winners: Brad Shafran & Jeff Snow l “A” Division Finalists: Jon Bonnet & Keith Mattes l “B” Division Winners: Chris Wolfe & Shahzeb Mirza l “B” Division Finalists: Tomas Kukla & Sammy Tam

SUMMER JUNIOR TENNIS CAMP DIRECTED BY LOUIS VALLEJO Featuring:

• Tennis • Wallyball • Half Court Basketball • Pickleball

Tennis Pre Camp Program MAY 22ND - JUNE 19TH

Transportation $65 Per Week (Local) Includes:

Most flexible program on Long Island Schedule your own make-ups

JUNE 26TH - AUG 18TH

• Instruction Drills • Cross Training

8 Hours—$135 • 4 Hours—$70

CALL 489-9005 l 1414 Jerusalem Avenue l North Merrick LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

69


Everything You Need to Know About Oils By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN ils are not a food group, but they do provide essential nutrients, and are therefore, included in USDA recommendations for what to eat. Most athletes do not pay attention to types of oils and fatty acids that they are consuming, but it’s extremely important to consume the right ones for peak performance. Most of the fats you eat should be polyunsaturated (PUFA) or monounsaturated (MUFA) fats. Oils are the major source of MUFAs and PUFAs in the diet. PUFAs contain some fatty acids that are necessary for health called “essential fatty acids.” Because oils contain these essential fatty acids, there is an allowance for oils in the food guide. Approximately 22-55mg of MUFA and PUFA are recommended.

essential; heart health benefits and assistance in blood sugar control.

Fatty Acids 101 l Omega-3: Cannot be produced by the body (essential). The least naturally abundant in the diet; brain development, roles in cognition and mood, and heart disease risk reduction (lower LDL). l Omega-6: Essential; contribute primarily to heart health and cholesterol reduction. l Omega-9: Monounsaturated; non-

People eat food, not nutrients Where can you find Omega-3, Omega-6 and Omega-9? l Omega-3s: Can be found in canola and soy beans, walnuts, Flax seeds and oily fish like salmon and tuna. l Omega-6s: Can be found in corn, canola, olive, peanut, safflower, soy bean, sunflower, almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, pistachios, pumpkin seeds, walnuts, eggs, dairy,

O

70

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

meat and poultry. l Omega-9s: Can be found in canola, corn, soy bean, olive, peanut, sunflower, safflower, almonds, cashews, macadamias, peanuts, pecans, pistachios, hazelnuts, walnuts, avocado, eggs and dairy. Irina Belfer-Lehat of Nutrition Solutions PC in Great Neck, N.Y. is a New York State-licensed dietitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. For more information, call (917) 769-8031, e-mail IrinaLehat@gmail.com or visit IrinaLehat.com.


Stop Distracting Yourself By Tonny van de Pieterman e play our best tennis when we are not distracted … I think we can all agree on that. When our mind is quiet, our muscle memory is able to operate freely. Decisions are made effortlessly and creative solutions to shots and strategies seem to appear out of nowhere. What most people don’t realize is that they are actually distracting themselves with their constant self-correcting and critiquing. Especially those with a Type A personality who seem to have a hard time shaking this habit. I know it feels like the right thing to do to self-correct. It feels like you are helping yourself. I would like to suggest the opposite. I do not expect you to take my word for it, but after reading my next story, I hope I have made you curious enough to give it a try. After one of my drills recently, I had the following conversation with a habitual selfcritic …

W

“May I offer you my opinion on your self-talk during your play?” I asked. “Please do,” she replied. “Often, I sense that you are suffering through these sessions,” I answered. “I see your tremendous effort and work ethic, but then I feel that you beat yourself up with your critical self-talk. Besides, most of the time, I disagree with your critique. In my opinion, your self-corrections are usually wrong, superficial and definitely not helpful.” With this last statement, I got her full attention. “Could you give me an example please?” she replied. “Sure,” I continued, as I actually could have given her 10 examples. “Today, I heard you say at one point that you missed a shot because you were lazy,” I said. “That was wrong, and definitely not helpful. I would never ever call you lazy. I have seen you run into the side wall to return a shot! You were momentarily frozen because of a misjudgment you made on your opponent’s shot. It was an error in anticipation. By yelling at your feet

or calling yourself lazy, your eyes will not improve and help you better anticipate.” A week later, at our next drill lesson, this woman showed up a new person. She decided to forego the self-talk and see how she liked it. After the drill was over, the feedback was tremendously positive. She was much more relaxed during her play, and seemed especially creative with the variety of shots and the strategies she used. I think it makes sense to leave some space available for creativity, one of our great human powers. So, when you find yourself being judgmental of your poor play, there is a good chance your poor play is a result of your own critiquing, not the other way around. Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/EasternLong Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this year’s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail Tonny@PointSetTennis.com.

• Experts in elimination of termites, carpenter ants and other wood boring insects • Residential and commercial pest control maintenance programs • Experienced pest control professionals for over 30 years • Nassau, Suffolk, Queens County and Brooklyn • References available • Certified Pesticide Applicator NYS #C1-625256

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

71


Balancing Emotional Energy The Key to Playing Inside the Zone By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC During professional matches or junior tournaments, everyone in the stands can see the score. But what about what’s below the score? What can’t we see? More times than not, that’s going to be the predictor in what happens next? I’m referring to a player’s emotional energy. Are they calm, aware and in a balanced state? Are they over or under stimulated? Or are they in the dreaded fight, flight or freeze? Why is this so important to know? Because if the player, his/her coach or even the parent is attuned to the player’s emotional energy, they can help themselves stay in this balanced place, or make adjustments to stay within their range of resiliency and manage adversity, challenges and opportunities. We’ve all seen a match where an unseeded player is playing the number one seed. Maybe they are up 5-2 in the decisive set. According to the score, everything looks good. However, the keen observer may be able to sense that the unseeded

player is starting to get frustrated, over-trying, perhaps beginning to rush. At some point, everything starts to melt down. The most recent example of this is the Atlanta Falcons and the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl. During the second half, the momentum shifted, and the Falcons self-destructed. In tennis, top seeds have saved match points and turned the match around. Stan Wawrinka did it against Dan Evans at the 2016 U.S. Open and then won the tournament. Imagine you had a graph or scale that could illustrate the emotional state of any player during the course of a match. This graph would be able to highlight how a player is dealing with adversity, challenges, and opportunities in the match. It would illustrate how the player experiences a progression of nerves, tension, or calmness during a match. It would also show where the focus was and how it changed during specific times in a match. Lastly it would show what they could do to regain their focus, come back to a place of calm awareness and stay within their range of resiliency. This scale would be a sane voice of reason whenever you needed to get back on track.

ARE YOU TRAINING AT THE BEST INDOOR CLUB IN THE COUNTRY?

OPEN ENROLLMENT—CALL FOR EVALUATION & PLACEMENT 17 COURTS PLUS ¼ MILE RUNNING TRACK...

INTERNATIONAL PROFESSIONAL STAFF. 10 LEVEL JR. PROGRAM FOR INDIVIDUAL NEEDS..

SUPERVISED PRACTICE AND MATCH PLAY... OUR RESULTS ARE OUTSTANDINGLY SUCCESSFUL…..

SPRING CLASSES CONTINUE UNTIL JUNE 25TH

100 Harbor Road, Port Washington, New York 11050 > > (516) 883-6425 Our 52nd year serving our community as a non-profit teaching facility, for students of any race, color, nationality and ethnic origin.

72

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

To get a sense of how helpful this might be, remember a time when you were getting crushed, your coach was offering suggestions that you could barely hear. What you needed was a voice of calm, one thing to execute to get you back on track, rather than a loud voice barking instructions that made you more tense. This would be a game changer! You could then make the appropriate mental adjustments like the top players do, instead of spiraling further out of control. A coach or parent who understands this scale, could intervene with advice based on where the player was and what the player was experiencing, rather than trying to offer suggestions that the player may be in no state to hear because they are so overwhelmed or shutdown. In fact a scale like this does exist! It’s called The Emotional Energy Scale. Essentially this is a scale, which illustrates where a player is emotionally, and based on that, what they need to move forward. The good news is that it is easy to access and free. Bad news is that it takes awareness and courage to subjectively know where you are and make appropriate adjustments to reboot, recharge and rebound in an empowered way to try to turn things around in a match. Below are key components in the scale. Future articles will go in depth into the many layers and action points. Color-coded states Each of the five emotional states are colorcoded. This makes it easy to describe, based on a color or a word, what the player is experiencing. For example, when a player is calm, relaxed, playing inside the zone, they are in the green-balanced state. When they are frustrated, trying too hard or rushing, they are in the orange over-stimulated state. When they are feeling flat, disinterested and disconnected, they are in the yellow state of under-stimulation. When they are feeling out of control, helpless and


stand that, during different parts of a match, a player’s emotional energy will fluctuate. However, the player that can harness their energy and use it to their advantage will be able to adapt and adjust and make the best decisions under pressure. If you’re a player get comfortable with the scale. In your last match what progressions did you experience? What could you have done to stay better balanced? Or within the range of resiliency? If you are a coach, how do you see your students on this scale during key points in a match? Based on this, how could it help them? If you’re a parent, remember back to the time you tried to tell your child something after a big loss? Maybe they were in shutdown mode? That may have been a time to just allow them to settle and re-connect.

threatened, they are in the red overwhelmed state. Lastly, when they have that hopeless, shocked, and deer in a headlights look, this is the grey shutdown state. Emotional range of resiliency While it would be great to play balanced all the time, this is just not realistic. The key is to stay within your emotional range of resiliency. During matches a player’s emotional energy will fluctuate. What’s key is to stay with your capacity. As a player manages difficult situations, their future capacity to deal with adversity and

recover will increase and become more tolerant. Key questions The chart answers three questions: l What is a player experiencing? l What “zone” is the player in? l What can they do to shift out of that zone if need be? In other words: What are the symptoms? What’s the diagnosis? And what is the prescription to prescribe? Again, the key to the scale is to under-

The Emotional Energy Scale is a great way to conceptualize and understand how to play in the zone, adapt and adjust to situations, and recalibrate when you begin shutting down. It can help you toward (and finally achieving!) sustained peak performance. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach, he works with athletes and teams, focusing on helping athletes gain the mental edge. Rob is author of Tennis Inside the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, email Rob@InsideTheZone.com or visit InsideTheZone.com.

DJCM

DJ Curtis McCalla

DJ Services Available For Booking Phone

516.852.6063 E-mail

djcmnyc@gmail.com LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

73


Bring Back

By Jimmy Delevante n the past 30 years, we have seen a large increase in the popularity of tennis in the United States. Viewership, advertising, attendance and the overall tennis economy have grown significantly over the course of these years. However, as much as our overall industry has gained ground in the world of sports, we have experienced a comparative decline in the attention we pay to doubles. Thirty years ago, there were more professional tennis players that competed in both singles and doubles on a regular basis. When John McEnroe was the number one player in the world in singles, we often forget that he was also the number one player in the world in doubles at the same time. Due to level of fitness that is now required to compete at the highest levels, it has become more difficult for players

I

74

to commit to playing in both the singles and doubles flights in the same tournaments. Ultimately, in recent years, more professionals have been forced to choose between the two options. Given the fact that the prize money for winning singles tournaments is so much larger than it is for doubles, more professionals have chosen to turn their back on doubles and focus their efforts on singles. With singles tournaments offering much larger purses it is obvious why they attract the strongest players in the world. Like all sports, the promotion of tennis trickles down from the top. When television and other media focus almost all of their coverage on singles, it makes it nearly impossible for spectators to be exposed to doubles and become longterm fans of the event. Without a base of long-term fans and without an influx of new fans to doubles, we are creating a cycle that is hurting the promotion of our entire sport.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

In addition to the change in professional tennis, there has also been a change in college tennis. College tennis matches, or “duels,” used to use the same format for singles and doubles. Both types of matches were played in a two out of three set format with standard scoring. Years ago, the NCAA changed this format, shortening the doubles matches to eight game pro-sets which are still used today (shortened formats, including no-ad scoring and 10-point super tie-breakers, are now used in professional tennis as well). In Division I college tennis, a team only earns one doubles point for their school by securing two out of the three doubles matches, whereas, all singles matches are each worth one point. All of these factors slowly contribute to the diminished role that doubles plays in our sport. Interestingly, in recent years, we have seen a sharp decline in the classic net-


ck

Doubles rushing style of play. In the United States, we have seen a devastating drop-off in the forward-moving game, mid-court skills, volley skills and the allcourt style of play. It is my belief that we are finally seeing the repercussions of not teaching these skills enough in years past. There is no doubt that this deficiency is greatly because we are not playing enough doubles, and thereby, not gaining enough experience moving forward. We need to bring doubles back to the forefront of professional tennis in order to start a chain reaction throughout the sport. We can accomplish this by incentivizing professionals to play more doubles events. This can be done either by setting up a bonus structure or by bal-

ancing out prize money distributions. We could also alter the format that is used in both professional tennis and American college tennis in order to legitimize the doubles events. Showing more doubles matches on television and in other media would help promote the event and bring in new fans. Incentivizing or even requiring juniors to play a minimum number of doubles tournaments per year in order to maintain their rankings would be another step that the USTA could pursue to bring back doubles. As teaching professionals, we need to spend more time working on doubles in order to bring back the all-court game style and potentially build more of an interest both events. When working with middle school and

high school tennis players, we have to remember that only four team members compete in singles during a meet, while the majority of the team competes in doubles. Let’s also not forget that when we play doubles, we are having fun, socializing, developing better communication skills and finding a sense of teamwork and camaraderie that cannot be found in singles play. Jimmy Delevante is a USPTA-certified teaching professional and a National HighPerformance Coach. He is the director of tennis at the Suffolk County Junior Tennis League Training Center, a former ATP professional tennis player, and master pro at Sportime Kings Park. He may be reached by e-mail at QCtennis5@yahoo.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

75


That’s the Point! Trying to Get Better in Every Way … Every Day

By Lonnie Mitchel have had one of those days recently. I was under the weather with the flu and my players were coming into my office needing my help to solve the world’s problems. I had reports due to the athletic director and we started practice for the spring season the same week at SUNY Oneonta. That is one hell of a week when you are just trying to keep your head above water with a fever of 101. “What’s next?” I thought to myself. “Does someone need me to solve the latest Middle East Crisis?” I went home and got some rest, and while collecting my thoughts, I realized that young men and women, who have not yet experienced the real world, constantly need to be given the right messages. The truth is, the overwhelmingly majority of the time, they need guidance. In fact, they beg

I

76

for guidance. Every pushback they give to well-intended advice comes from a place of non-experience. Although it should be considered with an open mind, ultimately you are a competent coach and confident that you are giving the very best advice to the betterment of these players on and off the court. That’s the point! If you are a coach, you are also an educator. Whether you are teaching youngsters or adults, the responsibility to be totally ethical and moral is tantamount to the highest levels of integrity. When I say to a player that not doing your homework is a reason for me to not allow you to compete in your next match and the student/athlete looks at me and says: “Why? You are not my professor, the two issues are not related.” Who wins? What wins? I can tell you who loses though: we all do. A student and a future society contributor must know there is a level of accountability that’s related to another event … that’s the point.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

I was at a symposium in Indianapolis several months ago and the former athletic director from USC spoke about taking a moral stand on certain issues. The pressure to win at a Division I institution is often so great that it shadows making good moral judgments and allowing players to compete when the privilege may not be warranted. This speaker said something to me that really resonated: “Eat the losses” was the lesson she learned after years at the helm of a prestigious institution. Meanwhile, back in Upstate Oneonta, N.Y. at my Division III tennis program, that lesson has stayed with me. Eat the losses and you win in the very long run. We don’t get coverage on ESPN or any major network but that should never deter me or any coach to make decisions which you know is the right thing. That’s the point. We are not here just to teach tennis strokes and footwork, but to teach the right things. We are here to make them better competitors and better human beings. This


comes with the territory of being a coach, and if you are an instructor/teacher reading this and you have one of those days where it’s just not going right, you must stay the course and continue with good moral ethics. I certainly do not want to give an impression that I am the god of all coaches and get to pick and choose what is moral. As a member of the human race, I make mistakes and each and every coaching situation is an opportunity to be a better coach, even when a parent or a studentathlete advocate wants to challenge you. I think during those times that doing what’s right is a good start to guide me in the right direction. If a student-athlete lies or breaks a promise, these are things that could get you fired in the real world. The employer does not care that you have a mortgage to pay or children to feed, you will be going home that day with a pink slip. We have the responsibility to hold students accountable with very reasonable ethical ramifications,

such as dismissal from the team, suspension or even having a student-athlete research what ethical standards are and try to raise the bar. One of the guidelines I refer to is from the great collegiate basketball coach John Wooden, winner of an unprecedented 10 national championships with “The Pyramid of Success.” You can look at this Pyramid and read the many qualities exhibited, and once you do, you can be sure that you have the best chance of success by adapting to as many of these qualities. I have had parents in my office make excuses as to why their son or daughter is not succeeding. I would refer to “The Pyramid of Success,” and in the overwhelmingly majority of cases, that student/athlete in question was lacking in many of those qualities. Many 18- to 22-year-old adults (and they are adults) can fool parents into believing the coach is wrong and they are right. The thing about The Pyramid of Success is that each

student-athlete is totally empowered and can morph into greatness by adapting many of the excellent qualities … they just have to decide to do so. As the coach, I again say, “That’s the point: To help each student/athlete go beyond and exceed expectations.” For me, being a coach and making a mistake is an opportunity to become better. For a student-athlete, give yourself the opportunity to become better, allow yourself to be better, challenge yourself, accept criticism and become just a bit better than the day before…That’s the point! Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail LonnieMitchel@yahoo.com.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

77


Ten Takeaways From the

2017AussieOpen BY BRIAN COLEMAN

The 2017 Australian Open was one of the most memorable Grand Slams in recent history, with exciting matches throughout the tournament, culminating with two magnificent singles finals that turned back the clock. Here are our top 10 takeaways from the first major Grand Slam of 2017 … 1. Federer and Nadal rewind the clock The 35th meeting between Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal did not disappoint, as these two rekindled their rivalry to meet in the men’s singles final, their first meeting in a major final since the French Open in 2011. Federer outlasted Nadal in five sets in one of the most viewed men’s singles finals ever, attracting the attention of sports fans everywhere. The performance of both of these alltime greats came as a surprise to some after both battled through injuries in the last couple of years, but they showed they still have plenty left in the tank. 2. Serena and Venus meet again Not to be outdone by the men’s final, the women’s singles final was one for the ages in its own right as Serena Williams took on older sister Venus in their first Grand Slam final meeting since Wimbledon in 2009. Serena won a straight-forward 6-4, 6-4 match, but the match 78

was more important than just the final score. The first time the two ever played a tour-level match against each other came in Melbourne in 1998, 19 years before this final. The run to this final was Venus’ first since that 2009 Wimbledon final and was a remarkable tournament considering what she has gone through off the court over the last few years. And of course, the win was extra special for Serena, who finally won her 23rd major title to pass Steffi Graf’s Open Era record, and reclaimed the world number one ranking. 3. Vandeweghe’s breakout Down Under While the women’s final consisted of two Americans, there was a third American who had a huge tournament, 25year-old Coco Vandeweghe. Vandeweghe produced by far her best Grand Slam tournament, upending 15th-seeded Roberta Vinci, Eugenie Bouchard, defending champion and top-seed Angelique Kerber, and seventh-seed Garbine Muguruza on her way to the semifinals. She took the first set off of fellow American Venus in the semis before dropping the next two, but she showed that she can channel her passion and aggressive tennis into positive results on the court, and it could serve as a turning point in her career.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


4. Dimitrov shows he has the stuff Bulgaria’s Grigor Dimitrov has been a muchhyped player for years now, especially after reaching the Wimbledon semifinals in 2014, but he hadn’t made it out of the fourth round at a Grand Slam since that run in England three years ago. But he showed the development in his game and it was demonstrated on the court as he reached the semifinals in Melbourne, coming ever-so-close to reaching the final. He had his opportunities against Nadal in his semifinal matchup, but came up short. He is still just 25-years-old and is loaded with talent, which should make him a serious threat at Grand Slams moving forward.

5. LI’s Rubin wins in main draw again, tests Federer There is something about the Melbourne courts that Long Island’s Noah Rubin seems to like. Last year, he upset the 17thseeded Benoit Paire in the opening round, and followed it up this year by upending one of his good friends and fellow American Bjorn Fratangelo in the first round in Melbourne. The win moved him into the second round and into a matchup with Federer on the main court at Rod Laver Arena. Federer would win in straight sets, but Rubin showed no fear and competed at a high level against him. This match will serve as a pivotal moment in his promising career. “I was very impressed by Noah,” Federer said. “I thought he played really well. I feel like he’s going to have a great, consistent career. The question now is how far can he go?” We will see … continued on page 80

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

79


6. Where are all the American men? Fifty-three … that is how many consecutive Grand Slams have now passed without an American man hoisting a championship singles trophy. Not since Andy Roddick at the 2003 U.S. Open has it happened and it didn’t look any closer to happening in Melbourne. John Isner lost to Mischa Zverev in the second round, and Sam Querrey and Jack Sock were ousted in the third round, by Andy Murray and JoWilfried Tsonga, respectively. There is a good young crop of players who will be successful on the ATP Tour, but how many more Grand Slams will pass by before an American stands alone at the end? 7. Early exits for Djokovic and Murray

their second Australian Open title together and fourth overall. Mattek-Sands is now the number one ranked women’s doubles player in the world, and the American/Czech duo will look to win their third straight major title together this spring at Roland Garros. 9. Lucic-Baroni’s remarkable run If there was an overarching theme to this year’s Australian Open, it was that age is but a number. No one personified that more than 34year-old Croatian Mirjana Lucic-Baroni, who put together an unprecedented run to reach the semifinals. She knocked off third-seeded Agnieszka Radwanska early and would go on to reach the final four before losing to eventual champion Serena Williams. Before this run, Lucic-Baroni hadn’t won a main draw match in Melbourne since 1998, and reached her first quarterfinal since 1999. She battled past a multitude of personal issues which derailed her once promising career, but inspired many with her showing this year. “When I want something, I work really hard and do whatever it takes to get it. Nothing is ever guaranteed, but the satisfaction I feel right now is incredible,” Lucic-Baroni said. “I would tell anyone struggling out there to just show up and do it with your heart.”

While the tennis world was buzzing with the possibility, and ultimately the reality, of a Federer-Nadal final, Andy Murray and Novak Djokovic, the last two world number ones, were both bounced early in Melbourne. Djokovic, the two-time defending 10. American Brady reaches quarterfinals champion who has six titles Down Under, was the first to go as he One of Lucicwas shocked by Denis Istomin in the second round. A couple of Baroni’s victims rounds later, Murray fell to Mischa Zverev, and the draw became in her run was completely wide open after that. The poor performances by both American players could be attributed to the heavy burden each carried qualifier Jennifer towards the end of last year as they were jockeying for the world’s Brady, whom she top ranking. This could lead to each of them taking lighter defeated to schedule loads as 2017 continues to make sure they are in top reach the form for the majors. quarterfinals. But Brady took everyone by surprise, coming through qualifying 8. Duo of Mattek-Sands & Safarova continue to win six straight matches, including an upset over the 14thto roll seeded Elena Vesnina. She had never competed in a main Don’t look now, but draw at a Grand Slam before this, and the former UCLA star we may have found will look to build off of this momentum as she continues her a new dominant pro career. women’s doubles team. American Bethanie MattekSands and the Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. Czech Republic’s He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or eLucie Safarova won mail BrianC@USPTennis.com. 80

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


directory

LONG ISLAND TENNIS CLUB

Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 (516) 777-1358 BPTCenter@aol.com Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue Rockville Centre, NY 11570 (516) 763-1299, ext. 10 CATSRVC@gmail.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue Merrick, NY 11566 (516) 489-9005 CarefreeTennis@aol.com Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 667-3476 DeerParkTennis.com Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Carl Barnett: (516) 455-1225 EarlyHit@optonline.net Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Stephanie Leo: (516) 676-9849 GlenHeadRC@verizon.net Huntington Indoor Tennis Club Richard Rottkamp—Manager/Owner 100 Broadway Huntington Station, NY 11746 (631) 421-0040 HITennis@myway.com New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Brian Stein and Chris Tasso—Co-Directors of Junior Tennis Programs 12 Shore Drive Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 233-2790 Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, NY 11572 (516) 536-2323 Tonny@PointSetTennis.com PointSetTennis.com

Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, NY 11050 (516) 883-6425 Tennis@PWTA.com PWTA.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, NY 11542 (516) 759-0505 RWTT.com Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 907-5162 HLi@Ross.org Ross.org/Tennis Southampton Racquet Camp & Club 665 Majors Path Southampton, N.Y. (631) 488-4700 SouthamptonRCC.com SPORTIME Amagansett (Open Seasonally) Sue de Lara—General Manager 320 Abrahams Path Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 Amagansett@SportimeNY.com SportimeNY.com/Amagansett SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Chris Leahy—Co-General Manager Chelsea Riccio-Co-General Manager Emmanuel Ponce—Director of Tennis 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 933-8500 CLeahy@SportimeNY.com SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Tennis SPORTIME Kings Park Bea Bielik—General Manager Jason Wass—Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road Kings Park, NY 11754 (631) 269-6300 JWass@SportimeNY.com Sportimeny.com/Kings-Park

SPORTIME Lynbrook Bea Bielik—General Manager Vicki Weiss—Assistant General Manager Jeff Morys—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, NY 11563 (516) 887-1330 JMorys@SportimeNY.com SportimeNY.com/Lynbrook SPORTIME Quogue Rene Bond—General Manager Greg Meyer—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead Road East Quogue, NY 11942 (631) 653-6767 RBond@SportimeNY.com SportimeNY.com/Quogue SPORTIME Randall’s Island Flagship Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Allison Hodgkins—Assistant General Manager Jared Karlebach—Assistant General Manager One Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 (212) 427-6150 AHodgkins@SportimeNY.com/JKarlebach@SportimeNY.com SportimeNY.com/Manhattan SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—General Manager Chris Pagoto-Assistant General Manager Jordan Dolberg—Director of Tennis 1 Landing Road Roslyn, NY 11576 (516) 484-9222 JHarris@SportimeNY.com SportimeNY.com/Roslyn SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport John McEnroe Tennis Academy, Long Island Joe Siegel—General Manager Chelsea Riccio—Assistant General Manager Mike Kossoff—Director of Tennis/JMTA 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, NY 11791 (516) 364-2727 MKossoff@SportimeNY.com SportimeNY.com/Syosset-Tennis USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, NY 11568 (718) 760-6200 USTA.com

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

81


LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 01/04/17)

ISLAND

Long Island Boys 16 Singles

3.... Kristen D. Cassidy.................. Wantagh, N.Y.

142 Dylan D’Agate..........................Melville, N.Y.

Rank..Name.................................... City

4.... Maya Aerin Masheb................Jericho, N.Y.

145 Mark R. Taranov...................... Valley Stream, N.Y.

1.... Andrew Lin.............................. Commack, N.Y.

5.... Jasmine Olivia Abidi................Glen Head, N.Y.

147 Joshua Elenowitz.................... Syosset, N.Y.

2.... Yoel Andre Yamus.................. Deer Park, N.Y.

6.... Brooke Delprete...................... Westhampton, N.Y.

150 Max Daniel Safir...................... Old Westbury, N.Y.

3.... Deven Andrew Wackett.......... Setauket, N.Y.

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles

RANKINGS

4.... Putimet Inroon........................ Greenvale, N.Y. 5.... Pranav Vallapragada.............. Nesconset, N.Y.

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings

152 Nicolas O. Hull........................ Locust Valley, N.Y. 156 Arin Siriamonthep....................Greenvale, N.Y. 157 Joshua Kaplan........................ East Quogue, N.Y.

(as of 02/13/17)

158 Aaron Rittberger...................... Huntington, N.Y.

BOYS

159 Justin Y. Shen.......................... Glen Head, N.Y. 174 Stephan M. Gershfeld............ Hewlett, N.Y.

9.... Austin Du Lai............................Manhasset, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players

4.... Benjamin Grushkovskiy.......... Woodmere, N.Y.

10.. Ashkan Moghaddassi............ Woodbury, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

5.... Colin Liotta.............................. East Williston, N.Y.

11.. Julian Mercante...................... Lido Beach, N.Y.

7.... Michael Ryan Safir.................. Old Westbury, N.Y.

6.... Conrad Kulikowski.................. North Bellmore, N.Y.

12.. Gavin Small..............................Huntington, N.Y.

8.... Max Daniel Safir...................... Old Westbury, N.Y.

7.... Julian Daniele Messina.......... Oyster Bay, N.Y.

13.. Sampath Srungaram.............. Smithtown, N.Y.

9.... Ty Nisenson............................ Port Washington, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

8.... Sebastian Bielen......................Glen Cove, N.Y.

14.. Jacob Benjamin Goldstein.... Huntington Station, N.Y.

24.. Stephan M. Gershfeld............ Hewlett, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

28.. Jordan Reznik..........................Great Neck, N.Y.

2.... Cannon Kingsley.................... Northport, N.Y.

Rank..Name.................................... City

6.... Zachary Emmanuel Stern...... Dix Hills, N.Y.

1.... Daniel Beckles........................ Roslyn, N.Y.

7.... Joshua Rothbaum.................. Great Neck, N.Y.

2.... Jeffrey Rosario........................ Dix Hills, N.Y.

8.... Jonathan Brandon Lum..........Albertson, N.Y.

3.... Ryan Newitz............................ Melville, N.Y.

9.... Aryan Badlani.......................... Roslyn, N.Y.

197 Luca Anton Johnson.............. Syosset, N.Y. 199 Gabriele Brancatelli................ Westhampton Beach, N.Y.

10.. Noah Michael Ramos............ Huntington Station, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles

42.. Malik Trail................................ Mill Neck, N.Y.

4.... Ronald P. Hohmann................ Oyster Bay, N.Y.

11.. John Harold Adamo................East Williston, N.Y.

Rank..Name.................................... City

55.. Candrin Chris.......................... Port Washington, N.Y.

5.... Daniel Eric Pellerito..................Syosset, N.Y.

12.. Michael Chan.......................... Commack, N.Y.

1.... Avi Anand................................ Dix Hills, N.Y.

57.. Aron Bursztyn..........................South Setauket, N.Y.

15.. Neel Raj....................................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

13.. Aidan Garvey.......................... New Hyde Park, N.Y.

2.... Brandon James...................... Wheatley Heights, N.Y.

59.. Matthew Leonard Zeifman.... Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

18.. Karin K. Amin.......................... Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

14.. Joseph Michael Wilson.......... East Hampton, N.Y.

3.... Patrick James Bodovitz..........Garden City, N.Y.

64.. Aiden Patel.............................. New Hyde Park, N.Y.

19.. Spencer Brachman................ Commack, N.Y.

15.. Aaron Raja.............................. Old Westbury, N.Y.

4.... Hunter Jacob Lazare.............. Jericho, N.Y.

68.. Julian Daniele Messina.......... Oyster Bay, N.Y.

21.. Logan Paik Chang.................. Old Westbury, N.Y.

16.. Jordan Heyman...................... Melville, N.Y.

5.... Malik Bass.............................. Rockville Centre, N.Y.

71.. Nicolas O. Hull........................ Locust Valley, N.Y.

27.. David Raphael Weiner............ Glen Head, N.Y.

17.. Murray Eric Litman..................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

6.... Steven Gaudio........................ Miller Place, N.Y.

75.. Ajer Sher.................................. Jericho, N.Y.

37.. Maxwell Moadel...................... Oyster Bay, N.Y.

18.. Benjamin Lawrence Pinkus.... Valley Stream, N.Y.

7.... Parker A. Tuthill........................Cutchogue, N.Y.

77.. Daniel Kong............................ Commack, N.Y.

43.. Abhinav Raj Srivastava.......... Melville, N.Y.

19.. Matthew Manesh.................... Great Neck, N.Y.

8.... Nicholas Mark Newell............ Huntington Station, N.Y.

85.. Dillon Lev Beckles.................. Roslyn, N.Y.

46.. Rohan Gaddam Reddy.......... Glen Head, N.Y.

20.. David Anosov.......................... Oceanside, N.Y.

9.... Garrett Joseph Sebold............Centerport, N.Y.

89.. Luke Louchheim......................Sagaponack, N.Y.

49.. Niles Ghaffar............................ Massapequa, N.Y.

21.. Branden A. Sattier.................. East Meadow, N.Y.

95.. Daniel Beckles........................ Roslyn, N.Y.

50.. Kabir Rajpal............................ Syosset, N.Y.

22.. Eli Victor Newman.................. Great Neck, N.Y.

110 Dylan D’Agate..........................Melville, N.Y.

58.. Michael Medvedev..................Albertson, N.Y.

116 Jeffrey Rosario........................ Dix Hills, N.Y.

66.. Adrian Kristofer Tsui................ Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

124 David Anosov.......................... Oceanside, N.Y.

67.. Luke Karniewich......................Glen Head, N.Y.

23.. Adam Preston Persky............ East Setauket, N.Y. 24.. Avery Frekhtman.................... Woodmere, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles

25.. Joshua Samuel Winiarsky...... Woodmere, N.Y.

Rank..Name.................................... City

146 Sebastian Bielen......................Glen Cove, N.Y.

70.. Jack Flores.............................. Huntington, N.Y.

26.. Joshua Cyril Mancheril............New Hyde Park, N.Y.

1.... Kira Sydney Kronenberg........ East Setauket, N.Y.

158 Joseph Michael Wilson.......... East Hampton, N.Y.

71.. Billy G. Suarez........................ Huntington, N.Y.

27.. Trevor R. Hayes...................... East Moriches, N.Y.

2.... Nicole Pinkus.......................... Valley Stream, N.Y.

159 Paolo Christie-Schrank.......... East Hampton, N.Y.

93.. Matthew Charles Cashin........ Syosset, N.Y.

28.. Bryan Volk................................Dix Hills, N.Y.

3.... Ellie Ross..................................Port Washington, N.Y.

176 Benjamin Lawrence Pinkus.... Valley Stream, N.Y.

97.. Evan Brady.............................. Glen Head, N.Y.

29.. Sean Manesh.......................... Great Neck, N.Y.

4.... Catherine Karman.................. Port Washington, N.Y.

178 Andre Insalaco........................ Quogue, N.Y.

109 Lazar Ivan Markovic................ Lattingtown, N.Y.

30.. Arjun Bindra............................ Glen Head, N.Y.

5.... Isabella Zhang........................ Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

183 Ansh Chadha.......................... Westbury, N.Y.

114 Griffin Schlesinger.................. Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

31.. Arkin Mukherjee...................... Roslyn, N.Y.

6.... Pressley Fortunato.................. Rockville Centre, N.Y.

185 Conrad Kulikowski.................. North Bellmore, N.Y.

118 Alexander Karman.................. Port Washington, N.Y.

32.. Christopher Andrew Lum........Great Neck, N.Y.

7.... Sophia Nina Kamazin..............Hewlett, N.Y.

186 Lucas Sowder-Yuson..............Amagansett, N.Y.

120 Avi Anand................................ Dix Hills, N.Y.

33.. Morgan Park............................Jericho, N.Y.

8.... Amanda Huang...................... Syosset, N.Y.

197 Ethan Rabinowitz.................... Great Neck, N.Y.

122 Sujay Sharma.......................... New Hyde Park, N.Y.

34.. Zachary Cohen........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

9.... Maggie Wang.......................... Dix Hills, N.Y.

139 Danny Tocco............................East Quogue, N.Y.

10.. Tara Torosian............................West Hempstead, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players

Long Island Girls 14 Singles

Rank Name...................................... City

156 Tavish McNulty........................ Bay Shore, N.Y.

1.... Ajer Sher.................................. Jericho, N.Y.

Rank..Name.................................... City

6.... Logan Paik Chang.................. Old Westbury, N.Y.

166 Andrew Lin.............................. Commack, N.Y.

2.... Max Daniel Safir...................... Old Westbury, N.Y.

1.... Jennifer Rabinowitz................ Great Neck, N.Y.

9.... Sujay Sharma.......................... New Hyde Park, N.Y.

171 Ravi MacGurn..........................Amagansett, N.Y.

3.... Alejandro Pablo Perez............ Selden, N.Y.

2.... Jennifer Perper........................ Valley Stream, N.Y.

12.. Kabir Rajpal............................ Syosset, N.Y.

173 Brandon Zhu............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

4.... Joseph Perry Boyle................ Setauket, N.Y.

3.... Mary Theresa Madigan.......... Sayville, N.Y.

24.. Alexander Karman.................. Port Washington, N.Y.

184 Jack Louchheim......................Sagaponack, N.Y.

5.... Jeremy Levine........................ Woodbury, N.Y.

4.... Alexandra Nicole Yiachos...... Manhasset, N.Y.

28.. Jared M. Phillips...................... Plainview, N.Y.

186 Deven Andrew Wackett.......... Setauket, N.Y.

6.... Aaron Rittberger...................... Huntington, N.Y.

5.... Daniella Victoria Paikin............Valley Stream, N.Y.

38.. George Scriber Bader............ Water Mill, N.Y.

187 Alexander Stephen Rzehak....Centerport, N.Y.

7.... Luca Anton Johnson.............. Syosset, N.Y.

6.... Lydia Mercante........................Lido Beach, N.Y.

42.. Anthony Casale...................... Old Bethpage, N.Y.

190 Kian Ziari.................................. Locust Valley, N.Y.

8.... Ryan Newitz............................ Melville, N.Y.

7.... Ida Nicole Poulos.................... Manhasset, N.Y.

48.. Justin Benjamin Oresky.......... Syosset, N.Y.

195 Justin Benjamin Oresky.......... Syosset, N.Y.

9.... Alexander G. Davis..................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

8.... Kelsey Sy................................ Port Washington, N.Y.

55.. Michael Weitz.......................... Roslyn, N.Y.

197 Bilal Rashidzada......................Dix Hills, N.Y.

10.. Brian Gao................................ Syosset, N.Y.

9.... Ada Maria Amarghioalei..........Port Washington, N.Y.

58.. Alex Eli Vinsky..........................Westbury, N.Y.

198 Robert Steven Bellino............ Huntington, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles Rank..Name.................................... City

147 Nicholas Wernink.................... Glen Cove, N.Y. 151 Yoel Andre Yamus.................. Deer Park, N.Y.

60.. Aman K. Sharma.................... Glen Head, N.Y.

11.. Gavin Park.............................. Roslyn, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles

77.. Joseph Monticciolo................ Coram, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players

1.... Daniella Victoria Paikin............Valley Stream, N.Y.

91.. Ryan E. Shayani...................... Old Westbury, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

2.... Emily Austin............................ Woodmere, N.Y.

94.. Bilal Rashidzada......................Dix Hills, N.Y.

7.... Patrick F. Maloney.................. Oyster Bay, N.Y.

16.. Mitchell Klee............................ East Rockaway, N.Y.

3.... Alexa Villez.............................. West Sayville, N.Y.

105 Joseph Perry Boyle................ Setauket, N.Y.

9.... Finbar Talcott.......................... Sea Cliff, N.Y.

17.. Sean M. Cohen........................Plainview, N.Y.

4.... Hailey Rose Loughlin.............. Shirley, N.Y.

111 Matthew Evan Kronenberg.... East Setauket, N.Y.

10.. Daniel Eric Pellerito..................Syosset, N.Y.

18.. Joshua Kaufman.................... Dix Hills, N.Y.

5.... Kristen D. Cassidy.................. Wantagh, N.Y.

124 Ian Schunk.............................. Westhampton Beach, N.Y.

13.. Cannon Kingsley.................... Northport, N.Y.

130 Taylor Brooks Thomas............ Water Mill, N.Y.

18.. Yuval Solomon........................ Plainview, N.Y.

133 Michael Ryan Safir.................. Old Westbury, N.Y.

20.. Sean Mullins............................ Lloyd Harbor, N.Y.

137 Alejandro Pablo Perez............ Selden, N.Y.

26.. Brenden Volk.......................... Dix Hills, N.Y.

140 Luka David Markovic.............. Locust Valley, N.Y.

28.. Athell Bennett.......................... Valley Stream, N.Y.

12.. Samuel Perlman......................Great Neck, N.Y. 13.. Colin Liotta.............................. East Williston, N.Y.

Rank..Name.................................... City

14.. Joshua Kaplan........................ East Quogue, N.Y. 15.. Kevin Chen.............................. Commack, N.Y.

19.. Nadav Cohen.......................... Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 18 Singles Rank..Name.................................... City 1.... Jillian Rebecca Shulder.......... Setauket, N.Y.

63.. Pius Lo.................................... Massapequa, N.Y.

2.... Morgan Wilkins........................Huntington, N.Y.

82

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

40.. Alexander Roti........................ Locust Valley, N.Y.


LONG

ISLAND

RANKINGS

41.. Daniel Weitz............................ Roslyn, N.Y.

140 Victoria Matos..........................Coram, N.Y.

153 Jennifer Rabinowitz................ Great Neck, N.Y.

43.. Andrew Marc Nakhjavan........ Dix Hills, N.Y.

148 Martine McGowan.................. Port Washington, N.Y.

156 Sophia Elizabeth Schutte........Great Neck, N.Y.

46.. Pete Siozios............................ New Hyde Park, N.Y.

157 Tara Andrea Kurepa................ Jericho, N.Y.

160 Jennifer Perper........................ Valley Stream, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

52.. Michael Medvedev..................Albertson, N.Y.

159 Taylor Goetz............................ Greenlawn, N.Y.

166 Kiera Agic................................ Miller Place, N.Y.

5.... Elysia Bolton............................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

55.. Rajan Jai Vohra........................Glen Head, N.Y.

169 Catherine Karman.................. Port Washington, N.Y.

171 Margaret Esther Haykin.......... Great Neck, N.Y.

17.. Merri Kelly................................ Oyster Bay, N.Y.

56.. Mark Julian Baker....................North Baldwin, N.Y.

180 Isabella Dinulescu....................Huntington Station, N.Y.

189 Nicole Pinkus.......................... Valley Stream, N.Y.

19.. Jacqueline Rae Bukzin............Manorville, N.Y.

57.. Carl Grant................................ Sagaponack, N.Y.

183 Isabella Zhang........................ Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

196 Jade Eggleston........................Stony Brook, N.Y.

20.. Courtney B. Kowalsky............ Oyster Bay, N.Y.

60.. Pieter Alexander Wernink...... Glen Cove, N.Y.

184 Vishnu Nair.............................. Jericho, N.Y.

200 Bianca Rose Lorich................ Southampton, N.Y.

22.. Claire Handa............................Westbury, N.Y.

68.. Keegan James Morris............ Franklin Square, N.Y.

189 Olivia Tiegerman......................Jericho, N.Y.

72.. George Kaslow........................Port Washington, N.Y.

192 Carina D. Cristobal..................Smithtown, N.Y.

73.. Alan Delman............................ Great Neck, N.Y.

194 Sophia Nina Karmazin............ Hewlett, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players

78.. Brian Shi.................................. Jericho, N.Y.

196 Maggie Wang.......................... Dix Hills, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

80.. Sean Patrick Hannity.............. Oyster Bay, N.Y.

197 Alexa Reese Brecher.............. Syosset, N.Y.

9.... Merri Kelly................................ Oyster Bay, N.Y.

40.. Samantha Lena Galu.............. Jericho, N.Y.

83.. Leonard Lazar Koblence........ Jericho, N.Y.

198 Hailey Lessen.......................... Old Westbury, N.Y.

19.. Maryam Beshir Ahmad.......... Albertson, N.Y.

44.. Kimberly Liao.......................... Commack, N.Y.

91.. David Raphael Weiner............ Glen Head, N.Y.

200 Cassandra Dinulescu..............Huntington Station, N.Y.

24.. Alexa Susan Goetz..................Greenlawn, N.Y.

47.. Francesca Karman..................Port Washington, N.Y.

25.. Lea Ma.................................... Dix Hills, N.Y.

62.. Alexa Graham..........................Garden City, N.Y.

28.. Rachel Arbitman......................Hewlett, N.Y.

64.. Julia Klara Szymanska............Elmont, N.Y.

31.. Francesca Karman..................Port Washington, N.Y.

72.. Maryam Beshir Ahmad.......... Albertson, N.Y.

100 Matthew Kolkhorst..................Sea Cliff, N.Y.

City

24.. Ashley Lessen..........................Old Westbury, N.Y.

92.. Danuel Meinster...................... South Setauket, N.Y. 98.. Lazar Ivan Markovic................ Lattingtown, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players

28.. Rachel Arbitman......................Hewlett, N.Y. 32.. Lea Ma.................................... Dix Hills, N.Y. 35.. Emma Scott............................ Syosset, N.Y.

102 Sangjin Song.......................... Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

34.. Steffi Antao.............................. New Hyde Park, N.Y.

73.. Olivia Rose Scordo..................Glen Head, N.Y.

112 Nicholas Gajda........................ Smithtown, N.Y.

9.... Rachel Arbitman......................Hewlett, N.Y.

49.. Calista Sha.............................. Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

77.. Steffi Antao.............................. New Hyde Park, N.Y.

115 Timothy Serignese.................. Port Washington, N.Y.

25.. Rose B. Hayes........................ East Moriches, N.Y.

51.. Amy Delman............................ Great Neck, N.Y.

90.. Alexa Susan Goetz..................Greenlawn, N.Y.

116 Abhinav Raj Srivastava.......... Melville, N.Y.

26.. Amy Delman............................ Great Neck, N.Y.

54.. Kimberly Liao.......................... Commack, N.Y.

91.. Nicole Kielan............................Valley Stream, N.Y.

117 Max Egna................................ Port Washington, N.Y.

37.. Janelle Chen............................Dix Hills, N.Y.

64.. Denise Lai................................ Setauket, N.Y.

129 Denise Lai................................ Setauket, N.Y.

121 Neel Raj....................................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

40.. Kimberly Liao.......................... Commack, N.Y.

74.. Vitalina Golod.......................... Setauket, N.Y.

140 Courtney Provan.................... Dix Hills, N.Y.

124 Matthew Franklin Porges........Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

51.. Kaya Amin................................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

83.. Madison Jane Williams.......... Glen Cove, N.Y.

147 Vitalina Golod.......................... Setauket, N.Y.

125 Maxwell Moadel...................... Oyster Bay, N.Y.

56.. Gabriela Glickstein.................. Commack, N.Y.

97.. Sofia Rose Anzalone.............. Center Moriches, N.Y.

152 Amanda Allison Foo................Manhasset, N.Y.

133 Julian Thomas MacGurn........ Amagansett, N.Y.

61.. Kavina Amin............................ Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

120 Gabriela Sciarrotta.................. Woodmere, N.Y.

163 Calista Sha.............................. Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

134 David Ammendola.................. Massapequa, N.Y.

68.. Emily Tannenbaum..................Commack, N.Y.

132 Madeline Sarah Richmond.... Syosset, N.Y.

166 Madison Jane Williams.......... Glen Cove, N.Y.

137 Matthew Musalo......................Massapequa Park, N.Y.

74.. Sadhana Sridhar......................Stony Brook, N.Y.

133 Soraya Koblence.................... Jericho, N.Y.

167 Isabella DiScipio......................Woodmere, N.Y.

140 Xin Eric Yu................................Manhasset, N.Y.

76.. Sofia Rose Anzalone.............. Center Moriches, N.Y.

134 Andrea Irta Brazyte..................Ronkonkoma, N.Y.

168 Andrea Irta Brazyte..................Ronkonkoma, N.Y.

141 Bruno Paolino Alves................East Hampton, N.Y.

78.. Soraya Koblence.................... Jericho, N.Y.

139 Janelle Chen............................Dix Hills, N.Y.

170 Brooke Ann Fernandez.......... Shirley, N.Y.

143 Timothy Hayden Nacca..........Garden City, N.Y.

88.. Tatiana Robotham Barnett......Port Washington, N.Y.

142 Kaitlyn Schwarz...................... Oceanside, N.Y.

174 Anna Pasternak Nicoleia........ Sag Harbor, N.Y.

151 Luke Torel Karniewich............ Glen Head, N.Y.

90.. Alexis Madison Huber............ Melville, N.Y.

143 Anna Pasternak Nicolela........ Sag Harbor, N.Y.

176 Rachel Weiss.......................... Great Neck, N.Y.

154 Preet Rajpal............................ Woodbury, N.Y.

91.. Alina Lyakhov.......................... Great Neck, N.Y.

150 Julia Kielan.............................. Valley Stream, N.Y.

186 Amy Delman............................ Great Neck, N.Y.

160 Avi Anand................................ Dix Hills, N.Y.

106 Andrea Irta Brazyte..................Ronkonkoma, N.Y.

153 Alexis Madison Huber............ Melville, N.Y.

192 Alexis Madison Huber............ Melville, N.Y.

162 Nicolas Demaria...................... New Hyde Park, N.Y.

111 Sarah Gunasekera.................. Mount Sinai, N.Y.

161 Jill Olga Lawrence.................. Hauppauge, N.Y.

193 Elena Artemis Vlamakis.......... Garden City, N.Y.

163 Noah J. Reisch........................ Floral Park, N.Y.

114 Rebecca Suarez......................Huntington, N.Y.

166 Daniella Victoria Paikin............Valley Stream, N.Y.

195 Sofia Rose Anzalone.............. Center Moriches, N.Y.

165 Adrian Kristofer Tsui................ Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

120 Grace Isabel Riviezzo..............Syosset, N.Y.

177 Brooke Ann Fernandez.......... Shirley, N.Y.

198 Kristen D. Cassidy.................. Wantagh, N.Y.

168 Rohan Gaddam Reddy.......... Glen Head, N.Y.

121 Daniella Victoria Paikin............Valley Stream, N.Y.

195 Kaya Amin................................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

199 Nicole Rezak............................Merrick, N.Y.

170 Austin Egna..............................Port Washington, N.Y.

126 Anna J. Martorella.................. Wantagh, N.Y.

171 Billy G. Suarez........................ Huntington, N.Y.

134 Lauren Zola..............................Rockville Centre, N.Y.

176 Alexander Karman.................. Port Washington, N.Y.

139 Emma Sy................................ Port Washington, N.Y.

183 Spencer Brachman................ Commack, N.Y.

147 Olivia Fermo............................ Smithtown, N.Y.

198 Matthew Charles Cashin........ Syosset, N.Y.

151 Ariana O. Pursoo.................... Westbury, N.Y.

199 Ryan Goetz..............................Greenlawn, N.Y.

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name...................................... City

2013 ETA Recipient “Innovative Tennis Program of the Year”

16.. Olivia N. Fermo........................Smithtown, N.Y. 17.. Theadora Yael Rabman.......... Port Washington, N.Y.

LI’s first Tennis Academy devoted to the USTA’s 10 & under Initiative.

19.. Tola Pola Glowacka................ Jericho, N.Y. 22.. Ariana O. Pursoo.................... Westbury, N.Y. 25.. Isabella Sha............................ Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 36.. Ava Thunder Scordo.............. Glen Head, N.Y. 38.. Ines Roti.................................. Locust Valley, N.Y. 49.. Hailey Stoerback.................... Saint James, N.Y. 51.. Nicolette Loeffler.................... Laurel Hollow, N.Y. 56.. Kady Tannenbaum.................. Commack, N.Y. 76.. Tatiana Georgie Lorich............ Southampton, N.Y. 77.. Skylor Wong............................ Mount Sinai, N.Y. 79.. Alexandra Kaylee Ho.............. Syosset, N.Y. 104 Natalie Phillips........................ Plainview, N.Y. 116 Skylar Blake Semon................Melville, N.Y. 120 Andrea Martinez de los Rios.. Glen Head, N.Y. 123 Pressley Fortunato.................. Rockville Centre, N.Y. 137 Ellie Ross..................................Port Washington, N.Y.

Butch Seewagen is a former varsity coach at Columbia University. He holds over 15 national and international titles and is the owner/program director of the Children’s Athletic Training Schools.

For Boys and Girls 3 – 10 years old.

188 Maple Avenue • Rockville Centre Phone: 516-763-1299 catsrvc@gmail.com

www.catsny.com LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

83


LONG Boys & Girls National Rankings

(as of 02/24/17)

BOYS National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name...................................... City 141 Max Daniel Safir...................... Old Westbury, N.Y. 218 Michael Ryan Safir.................. Old Westbury, N.Y. 235 Ty Nisenson............................ Port Washington, N.Y. 425 Malik Trail................................ Mill Neck, N.Y. 611 Jordan Reznik..........................Great Neck, N.Y. 678 Stephan M. Gershfeld............ Hewlett, N.Y. 857 Aron Bursztyn..........................South Setauket, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name...................................... City 40.. Sujay Sharma.......................... New Hyde Park, N.Y. 51.. Logan Paik Chang.................. Old Westbury, N.Y. 159 Alexander Karman.................. Port Washington, N.Y. 171 Kabir Rajpal............................ Syosset, N.Y. 185 Aman K. Sharma.................... Locust Valley, N.Y. 650 Jared M. Phillips...................... Plainview, N.Y. 657 Mark R. Taranov...................... Valley Stream, N.Y. 678 Max Daniel Safir...................... Old Westbury, N.Y. 755 Justin Benjamin Oresky.......... Syosset, N.Y. 936 Michael Ryan Safir.................. Old Westbury, N.Y.

ISLAND

RANKINGS

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players

643 Rajan Jai Vohra........................Glen Head, N.Y.

973 Kaya Amin................................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

654 Spencer Brachman................ Commack, N.Y.

974 Kavina Amin............................ Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

675 Neel Raj....................................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

5.... Cannon Kingsley.................... Northport, N.Y.

765 Ryan Goetz..............................Greenlawn, N.Y.

52.. Ronald P. Hohmann................ Oyster Bay, N.Y.

776 Pete Siozios............................ New Hyde Park, N.Y.

81.. Daniel Eric Pellerito..................Syosset, N.Y.

784 Sean Patrick Hannity.............. Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

113 Spencer Brachman................ Commack, N.Y.

826 Logan Paik Chang.................. Old Westbury, N.Y.

35.. Lea Ma.................................... Dix Hills, N.Y.

161 Neel Raj....................................Oyster Bay, N.Y.

972 Alan Delman............................ Great Neck, N.Y.

91.. Maryam Beshir Ahmad.......... Albertson, N.Y.

212 Logan Paik Chang.................. Old Westbury, N.Y.

994 Andrew Marc Nakhjavan........ Dix Hills, N.Y.

132 Merri Kelly................................ Oyster Bay, N.Y.

301 Billy G. Suarez........................ Huntington, N.Y. 331 Sujay Sharma.......................... New Hyde Park, N.Y. 382 Abhinav Raj Srivastava.......... Melville, N.Y. 400 Karan K. Amin..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 566 Alexander Karman.................. Port Washington, N.Y. 636 Rohan Gaddam Reddy.......... Glen Head, N.Y. 662 Kabir Rajpal............................ Woodbury, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players

136 Rachel Arbitman......................Hewlett, N.Y.

GIRLS

216 Francesca Karman..................Port Washington, N.Y.

National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players

221 Alexa Susan Goetz..................Greenlawn, N.Y. 355 Steffi Antao.............................. New Hyde Park, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

696 Calista Sha.............................. Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

198 Olivia N. Fermo........................Smithtown, N.Y.

884 Amy Delman............................ Great Neck, N.Y.

367 Theadora Yael Rabman.......... Port Washington, N.Y. 465 Tola Pola Glowacka................ Jericho, N.Y.

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players

513 Ariana O. Pursoo.................... Westbury, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

603 Ines Roti.................................. Locust Valley, N.Y.

7.... Elysia Bolton............................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players

676 Ava Thunder Scordo.............. Glen Head, N.Y.

114 Lea Ma.................................... Dix Hills, N.Y.

978 Nicolette Loeffler.................... Laurel Hollow, N.Y.

250 Claire Handa............................Westbury, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

995 Kady Tannenbaum.................. Commack, N.Y.

282 Alexa Graham..........................Garden City, N.Y.

763 David Raphael Weiner............ Glen Head, N.Y. 811 Adrian Kristofer Tsui................ Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 993 Michael Medvedev..................Albertson, N.Y.

61.. Cannon Kingsley.................... Northport, N.Y. 63.. Finbar Talcott.......................... Sea Cliff, N.Y. 119 Patrick F. Maloney.................. Oyster Bay, N.Y. 160 Daniel Eric Pellerito..................Syosset, N.Y. 191 Yuval Solomon........................ Melville, N.Y. 196 Athell Patrick Bennett..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 237 Sean Mullins............................ Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 329 Brenden Andrew Volk............ Dix Hills, N.Y. 347 Ronald P. Hohmann................ Oyster Bay, N.Y.

443 Isabella Sha............................ Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

339 Rachel Arbitman......................Hewlett, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players

380 Merri Kelly................................ Oyster Bay, N.Y. 416 Courtney B. Kowalsky............ Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Rank Name...................................... City

424 Maryam Beshir Ahmad.......... Albertson, N.Y.

17.. Rachel Arbitman......................Hewlett, N.Y.

449 Ashley Lessen..........................Old Westbury, N.Y.

416 Rose B. Hayes........................ East Moriches, N.Y.

623 Francesca Karman..................Port Washington, N.Y.

505 Amy Delman............................ Great Neck, N.Y.

702 Alexa Susan Goetz..................Greenlawn, N.Y.

579 Rebecca E. Suarez..................Huntington, N.Y.

726 Jacqueline Rae Bukzin............Manorville, N.Y.

864 Olivia N. Fermo........................Smithtown, N.Y.

968 Steffi Antao.............................. New Hyde Park, N.Y. 982 Julia Klara Szymanska............Elmont, N.Y.

452 Brian Shi.................................. Jericho, N.Y.

The Store for Fashion & Fun!

Layette • Infant • Toddler • Girls 4-14 Boys 4-20 • Juniors • Young Men’s Pro Team • Your #1 School & Camp Store Great Gifts • 1-on-1 Service • & More! Providing the very best in Service, Selection & Style for over 38 years! Bellmore (516) 221-3187 • E. Northport (631) 499-2504 Hewlett (516) 295-0946 • Little Neck (718) 225-883 Plainview (516) 681-4490 • Scarsdale (914) 722-6077

COME SEE OUR

HUGE MP CSEA LE CT IO N!

*** VISIT SHOPDENNYS.COM *** 84

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

BE IN THE CLUB! TEXT SHOPDENNYS TO 313131


USTA/Long Island Region 2017

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. MARCH 2017 Friday-Sunday, March 17-19 L1B Sportime Kings Park March Challenger Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, March 17-19 Eastern Empire Cup National Doubles at PWTA Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Advanced Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (MFIC) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 883-6425.

Friday-Sunday, March 24-26 L1B Bethpage State Park March Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RBecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Friday-Sunday, March 17-19 Eastern Empire Cup National Doubles at RWTTC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Advanced Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (MFIC) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, March 17-19 Eastern Empire Cup National Doubles at Point Set Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Advanced Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (MFIC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, March 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, March 24-26 L1B End of March Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, March 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Andrew@LongBeachTennisCenter.com or call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Sunday, March 17-19 L2 Bethpage State Park March Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RBecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Friday-Sunday, March 17-19 L2 Huntington March Open Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Saturday, March 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Sunday, March 24-26 L1B Port Washington Tennis Challenger Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 883-6425.

Friday-Sunday, March 17-19 L2 Sportime Bethpage March Open Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail KSorokko@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Saturday, March 18 L3 Roslyn Sportime UPS Sportime Roslyn 1 Landing Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12-16 (RR) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail GAshley@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 484-9222.

Friday-Sunday, March 24-26 L1B Point Set Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

85


USTA/Long Island Region 2017

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Saturday, March 25 Youth Progression Orange L1: East Hampton Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 1 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $48.88 per player For more information, e-mail PWilliamson@Ross.org or call (631) 907-5162. Saturday, March 25 Youth Progression, Orange Ball L2 Bethpage Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 2 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 19 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail KSorokko@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Sunday, March 26 Youth Progression Orange L2 East Setauket World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 2 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 for BG(10 (60’Court/Orange Ball))s, NEF, Orange Level 2. Maximum fee charged per player is $45 plus the processing fees for the number of events you select (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 19 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Vtapr@hotmail.com or call (631) 751-6100.

Friday-Sunday, March 31-April 2 L2 March Open at Point Set Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, March 31-April 2 L1B Huntington April Challenger Huntington Indoor Tennis Friday-Sunday, March 31-April 2 100 Broadway L1B RWTT March Challenger Huntington Station, N.Y. Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Surface Type: Clay Indoor Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, March 23 at 1:00 p.m.) Surface Type: Clay Indoor For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Entry Fee: $53.05 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, March 27 at 1:00 p.m.) APRIL 2017 For more information, e-mail RWagner968@aol.com or call Friday-Sunday, April 7-9 (516) 759-0505. Saturday, March 25 L2 EAC April Open Youth Progression Orange L1 Roslyn Sportime Eastern Athletic Clubs-Blue Point Friday-Sunday, March 31-April 2 Sportime Roslyn 9 Montauk Highway, Unit A L2 Bethpage State Park March Open 1 Landing Road Blue Point, N.Y. Bethpage Park Tennis Center Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12Divisions: Orange Level 1 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ 99 Quaker Meeting House Road 18 (SE) Farmingdale, N.Y. Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Unknown Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April (FMLC) Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, 2 at 1:00 p.m.) Surface Type: Hard Indoor March 19 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail EACJRTennis@gmail.com or call For more information, e-mail GAshley@SportimeNY.com or call Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, (631) 363-2882. March 27 at 1:00 p.m.) (516) 484-9222. For more information, e-mail RBecker06@yahoo.com or call Friday-Sunday, April 7-9 (516) 359-4843. Saturday-Sunday, March 25-26 L1B Sportime Bethpage April Challenger Youth Progression Green L1: March Green Ball Open Sportime Bethpage Friday-Sunday, March 31-April 2 Long Beach Tennis Center 101 Norcross Avenue L1B PWTA March Challenger 899 Monroe Boulevard Bethpage, N.Y. Port Washington Tennis Academy Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Divisions: Green Level 1 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ 100 Harbor Road Surface Type: Hard Indoor Port Washington, N.Y. Green Ball 10 (NEF) Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April Surface Type: Hard Indoor 2 at 1:00 p.m.) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Entry Fee: $3 for first singles/$48.88 for first doubles/$48.88 for For more information, e-mail KSorokko@SportimeNY.com or call March 19 at 11:59 p.m.) additional doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, March 20 at (516) 933-8500. For more information, e-mail Andrew@LongBeachTennisCen1:00 p.m.) ter.com or call (516) 432-6060. For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 883-6425.

86

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com


USTA/Long Island Region 2017

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, April 7-9 L1B Sportime Syosset April Challenger Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail KSorokko@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, April 7-9 L1B Long Beach Earth Day Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, April 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Andrew@LongBeachTennisCenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, April 7-9 L1 Roslyn Sportime April Championships Sportime Roslyn 1 Landing Road • Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, April 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail GAshley@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, April 7-9 L1B GHRC April Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail TennisCoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, April 7-9 L1 PWTA April Championships Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, April 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 883-6425.

Friday-Sunday, April 7-9 L1 Point Set April Championships Point Set Tennis • 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, April 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, April 7-9 L3 Huntington’s Eastern April UPS Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway • Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (NEF) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040. Saturday-Sunday, April 8-9 Youth Progression Green L1 East Setauket World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road • East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Green Level 1 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, March 26 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail VTAPR@hotmail.com or call (631) 751-6100. Friday-Sunday, April 14-16 L1A Kings Park Earth Day Championships Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road • Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player(deadline for entries is Friday, April 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call Tvanepps@SportimeNY.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, April 14-16 L1B Sportime Bethpage Spring Challenger Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue • Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Advanced Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail KSorokko@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, April 14-16 L2 Long Beach Freedom Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$3 for additional singles/$28 for first doubles/$28 for additional doubles (deadline for entries is Wednesday, April 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Andrew@LongBeachTennisCenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, April 14-16 L2 Roslyn Sportime Open Sportime Roslyn 1 Landing Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, April 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail GAshley@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, April 14-16 L1B Sportime Syosset Spring Challenger Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail KSorokko@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, April 14-16 L1B PWTA April Challenge Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 883-6425.

LITennisMag.com • March/April 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

87


USTA/Long Island Region 2017

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, April 21-23 L1B World Gym Springtime Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail VTAPR@hotmail.com or call or call (631) 751-6100. Friday-Sunday, April 21-23 L1B Long Beach April Showers Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles/$33 for additional doubles (deadline for entries is Thursday, April 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Andrew@LongBeachTennisCenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, April 21-23 L2 Roslyn Sportime Open Sportime Roslyn 1 Landing Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC), and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, April 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail GAshley@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, April 21-23 L1B GHRC April Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, April 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail TennisCoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849.

88

Saturday-Monday, April 22-24 USTA National Level 3 Tournaments Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Level 3 Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FICR16); and Level 3 Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $145.63 for one event; $146.12 for two events; additional fees may apply if registered in three or more events (deadline for entries is Thursday, March 30 at 11:59 a.m.) For more information, e-mail SuperScoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Saturday, April 22 Youth Progression Orange Level 1 Kings Park Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 1 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $48.88 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 16 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, call TVanEpps@SportimeNY.com or call (631) 269-6300. Saturday, April 22 Youth Progression Orange L2 East Quogue Sportime of The Hamptons 2571 Quogue Riverhead Road East Quogue, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 2 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player For more information, e-mail GMeyer@SportimeNY.com or call (631) 653-6767. Saturday-Sunday, April 22-23 Youth Progression, Green L1 Sportime Bethpage Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Green Level 1 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles 78’ Green Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player For more information, e-mail KSorokko@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • March/April 2017 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, April 28-30 L2 End of April Open Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles; $3 for additional singles; $28 for first doubles; $28 for additional doubles (deadline for entries is Monday, April 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Andrew@LongBeachTennisCenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, April 28-30 L1B Roslyn Sportime Challenger Sportime Roslyn 1 Landing Road Roslyn, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, April 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail GAshley@SportimeNY.com or call (516) 484-9222. Friday-Sunday, April 28-30 L1B GHRC Spring Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, April 23 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail TennisCoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, April 28-30 L1B Point Set April Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $58.55 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, April 19 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.


LITennisMag.com • January/February 2017 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

97


98

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2017 • LITennisMag.com

Long Island Tennis Magazine March / April 2017  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you