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LITennisMag.com • November/December 2019 • Long Island Tennis Magazine 109


S? LO L OVE TENNIS A CAREER BEGINS B HERE Enhance your caree er with a Professional Ten e nis Management (PTM ) Certificate from Queens College-CUNY

The Queens College-CUNY Professsional T Te ennis Management (PTM) Certificatte Program offffers students the oppo ortunity to hone their tennis teaching, sales, marketing, eer in the program administration and facility management knowledge to pursue a care tennis industry. This three semester program combines on-court workshops with online and cclassroom learning and experiential learning through internships and job placement.

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110 Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2019 • LITennisMag.com © 2019 USTA. All rights reserved.


New York Tennis Expo Returns Bigger and Better in 2020 The country’s largest tennis expo returns to Long Island this winter, as the 2020 New York Tennis Expo arrives at NYCB LIVE, home of the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum. Last year’s Expo drew a record crowd of more than 5,200 people, and the sixth New York Tennis Expo promises to be the biggest yet. This year’s free Expo will be held on Sunday, Feb. 9, which will give attendees the opportunity to watch free professional tennis as the New York Open’s qualifying tournament begins on the same day. With ATP Tour players on-site throughout the day, attendees will also have the opportunity to get autographs from a number of different players doing signings, as well as take part in the tournament’s Draw Ceremony. The Expo Hall will be filled with more than 70 exhibitors, where guests can try new products, learn about clubs/programs and enjoy games and activities for the whole family. “We are proud to be kicking off year three of the New York Open. More than 5,000 people came out to enjoy the 2019 New York Tennis Expo back in February, and Long Island and New York Tennis Magazines are excited to announce the return of this one-of-a-kind event,” said Publisher David Sickmen. “This free event provides unparalleled exposure and branding opportunities for companies who want to promote their programs, products, services, etc. to a diverse audience in a fun environment. For local families, it is a perfect way to spend the day as there is fun for everyone both on and off the court. Now in our third year at NYCB LIVE, we are excited to continue building off of the success and bring the public an even better New York Tennis

Expo in 2020.” Once again, there will be games and activities as we will have something for the whole family. The Kids Zone will feature a bounce house, face-painting, photo booth and other games, while the Activity Zone will have a Beach Tennis Court, two tennis courts and a speed serve booth, as well as non-tennis activities such as mechanical bull riding, a hockey slapshot booth, basketball pop-a-shot, football toss and more. Guests will get to learn from some of the top coaches in the industry who, joined by ATP Tour players, will speak on two different seminars about a wide array of topics ranging from the junior level to the professional ranks. The panels are interactive, and audience members will have the chance to ask questions and pick the brains of these tennis experts. There will be entertainment all-day long with a DJ, live band and mascots from local professional teams. The food court will be open so guests can purchase food and drinks throughout the day. The 2020 New York Tennis Expo is a can’tmiss event for anyone looking for a great way to spend their Sunday. It’s completely free to attend, and with something to do for everyone in the family, make sure to join us on Sunday, Feb. 9 from 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. To pre-register and receive free tickets and parking, visit 2020NYTennisExpo.EventBrite.com. For more information on the event, visit LITennisMag.com/2020NYTennisExpo, e-mail Info@USPTennis.com or call (516) 409-4444.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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litennis Long Island Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com

JAN/FEB 2020 • Vol 12, No 1

Table Of Contents

Kei Nishikori All in for 2020 New York Open By Brian Coleman Japanese star returns to Long Island in search of title at the 2020 New York Open. See page 16

Photo credit: GF Sports

Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 • brianc@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Art Director (516) 409-4444, ext. 307 Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Scott Koondel VP of Operations (516) 409-4444, ext. 324 Sidney Beal III Staff Photographer

Lee Seidner Staff Photographer

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

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Highlights 1 New York Tennis Expo Returns Bigger and Better in 2020 20 2020 New York Open Preview 28 Five Things to Watch at the 2020 Australian Open By Brian Coleman & Robbie Werdiger 42 Your 2020 Guide to Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Top Clubs & Programs 58 2019 Long Island Girl’s High School Recap By Brian Coleman

Features 3 6 8 10 14 26 32 34 36 39 62 64 66 68 69 70 72 74 75 76 78

Carefree Team Brings Home National Championship By Brian Coleman Hundreds of Players Come Out for SPORTIME’s World Tour Beijing Event Across Long Island … News and Notes From Across the L.I. Tennis Community A Look Back at the Year That Was 2019 By Emilie Katz The Tennis Guru … Chapter One: In The Beginning By Dr. Tom Ferraro The Hyperbole of High-Performance By Steve Kaplan USTA Eastern Hosts 33rd Annual College Showcase By Brian Coleman USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update How to Get the Most Out of Your Tournament Experience By Geoffrey Jagdfeld Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller Mastering the Mind: Mindfulness at 125 MPH By Rob Polishook Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz Elasticity and the Modern Spanish Forehand By Chris Lewit Long Island Tennis Charitable Initiatives The Jensen Zone: Looking Ahead to the 2020 Season By Luke Jensen Mythbusters: Which States Do the Strongest Junior Players Live in? By Ricky Becker Grip, Throw, Serve: It’s Simple If You Start Early By Lisa Dodson Anticipating Your Opponent’s Shot By Mike Puc The Talk By Barbara Wyatt Being Recruited Is an Acquired Skill, Understand It Quick By Lonnie Mitchel USTA/Long Island Region 2020 Tournament Schedule

2020 • LITennisMag.com Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2019 Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports Publications Ltd. • Copyright © 2020 United Sports Publications Ltd.


Carefree Team Brings Home National Championship By Brian Coleman or every player and team that competes in a USTA Adult League across the country, the ultimate goal is to end the season competing for a National Championship. The team out of Carefree Racquet in North Merrick accomplished that goal late last year, capturing the National Championship at the USTA National Campus in Lake Nona, Fla. “Representing Carefree, Long Island and the Eastern Section was a very cool experience,” said Team Captain Ben Marks. “Pride definitely played a part and we didn’t want to let our area down. Sectionals was very tough to come through, so we went to Nationals wanting to make sure we did well to prove that we deserved to be there. Beating a lot of the Sections who are considered the “powerhouses” was nice as we wanted to prove that Eastern can be a powerhouse too.” The team played in the 10.0 Mixed Doubles Division and went undefeated in the knockout rounds, going 4-0 overall as a team and 11-1 as individuals. From there, the squad advanced to the semifinals where it took on a team from Texas. Marks’ team defeated Texas 2-1 before sweeping the team from NorCal 3-0 in the championship. “Aside from the high level of the players we have on our team, I think the togetherness of the team is one of the biggest factors,” Marks said of the team’s success. “We are all very close as a group and spend a lot of time together off the court as well as on it. Our friends and family coming to watch made it an enjoyable weekend, and gave us that extra incentive and push we needed to get those wins.” While the players all live in the area now, the team was made up of just two native Long Islanders, with the roster constructed of players coming from

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Oklahoma, England, France, Russia and Venezuela. The roster was comprised of Janine Sadaka, Joseph Perri, Hali Katz, Antonella Karlin, Luis Vivas Martinez, Alina Volman, Marc Weingard, Nancy Turnblacer, Sarah Bowen, Kerri Weingard, Loic Minery, Peter Lebedevs, Rifat Biktyakov, Jacqueline Clark and Samantha Perri. “It was a great experience overall,” said Marks. “The USTA National Campus is an incredible tennis facility and all of the staff there were very welcoming and excited for all of the

teams that qualified. We had our family and friends come down to support us, so it was always going to be an amazing trip before the tennis even started.”

Tennis Court Equipment & Material Tennis Posts & Nets  Court Accessories Windscreen  Netting & Hardware (631) 427-5904 velvetop.com

1455 New York Ave Huntington Station, NY LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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l Exhibitor Hall: Featuring top programs, camps, products, apparel, sports medicine, travel destinations and much more l Tennis Courts: Use of two courts inside the expo hall l Kids' Zone: Featuring a bouncy house, face painting, live music, carnival games, mascots l Speaker Sessions: Learn from panels of ATP stars and top coaches l Chance to Meet the Stars of the ATP Tour: Autograph signing and photo opportunities with the sport's top stars l Activity Zone: Featuring 10U tennis courts, beach tennis courts, a speed serve booth

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com


Watch FREE professional tennis as the 2020 New York Open begins!

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Hundreds of Players Come Out for SPORTIME’s World Tour Beijing Event credit all photos to: Sarah Schwartz & Jared Karlebach

he SPORTIME World Tour continued to make its way across the globe, this time stopping in China, as SPORTIME Syosset hosted a Beijingthemed event. “The programs and the World Tour events are definitely continuing to grow,” said Jared El Gayeh, the club’s U10 and camp director. “Last year, we had about 150 kids here, and we have more than 225 players here today, so the numbers speak for themselves.” Throughout the evening, the courts were filled with players of varying ages

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and levels taking part in different games and drills with coaches. Away from the courts, the party hall featured decorations and food celebrating Chinese culture, as well as a DJ, bounce house and other games. “The World Tour brings together all of our U10 players from all of our facilities, and they get to come out here and compete with each other,” said Mike Kossoff, SPORTIME Syosset’s tennis director. “It’s an introduction for them to the competitive environment, and on top of that, it’s also a party-like atmosphere.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

We are really providing something that no other tennis facility can.” The Beijing event was the final World Tour event of 2019, but the traveling resumes as we enter the New Year. In honor of the Australian Open, a SPORTIME Melbourne-themed event will arrive on Jan. 18, 2020. “These events are for the kids, parents, staff and community to come out and have a good time,” said Kossoff. “The parents get to see how well their kids are progressing, and how the sport continues to change their lives.”


LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Across Long Isl Brachman Commits to Arizona State

Top junior and Commack native Spencer Brachman announced that he will playing his collegiate tennis out west at Arizona State University, after signing his letter of intent. Brachman has trained with a number of different coaches on Long Island throughout his junior career, and his hard work earned him a scholarship to the Pac-12 program at Arizona State.

Bart Selected to Represent Team USA

Aidan Bart, who is a member of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center’s Elite Program, was chosen to represent Team USA against Team Canada in a tournament taking place at the NTC later this fall. Bart is currently ranked inside the Top 30 in the USTA Boys 12s National Rankings.

Opelka Visits Carefree

Ahead of his title defense at the 2020 New York Open, young American Reilly Opelka returned to Long Island and made stops at several locations throughout the community. Opelka visited Carefree Racquet Club, the official practice courts of the New York Open, where he took the time to speak with club members and even hit the courts to play some points with juniors and adults.

Rila Posts Dominant Fall Season

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

Daniel Rila, who trains with Alex PopMoldovan at Glen Head Racquet & Fitness, has had a lot of success competing in USTA tournaments recently, bringing home three different titles this fall, and he hopes to carry that momentum into 2020.


sland

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

Goetz Successful in Freshman Season at Emory

was a 1989 graduate of SUNY Oneonta where he was a two-time captain of the tennis team and was named team MVP in his junior and senior seasons. He has been at the helm of the Stony Brook program since 1999.

Kleynerman Wins Eastern Sweet 16

Adult Team Places at Nationals

Bethpage Park Tennis & Education Center student Alexa Goetz is making her impact felt at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga. In her freshman season, Goetz has been a huge part of her team’s lineup, which included winning her two matches at the ITA Cup in Rome, Ga. Goetz posted a straight-set win in singles, and paired with sophomore Christina Watson to come back from a set down in their doubles match.

Glassman Inducted Into Stony Brook Hall of Fame

The Men’s 40 & Over 4.5+ team out of SPORTIME Syosset wrapped up their season with a trip to the National Championships in Orlando, Fla. The squad, captained by Andy Ross and Lance Kaufman, went 3-1 at Nationals, beating the teams from Texas and MidAtlantic, and finished in sixth place overall. The team’s lone loss came to the eventual champions from Southern.

Michelle Kleynerman, who trains out of SPORTIME Syosset, powered her way to the title at the Eastern Sweet 16 tournament at Glen Head Racquet & Fitness. After rolling to the championship match with straight-set wins, she hung on to win 6-1, 6-7(5), 7-6(3) in the finals to claim the title.

Longtime Stony Brook Tennis Coach Gary Glassman was inducted into the SUNY Oneonta Hall of Fame. Glassman LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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A Look Back at the Y

By Emilie Katz

2019 Retired Players

Australian Open

Wimbledon

January 14-27, 2019 Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia 2019 Champions Men’s Singles: Novak Djokovic (Serbia) Men’s Doubles: Pierre-Hughes Herbert (France) & Nicholas Mahut (France) Women’s Singles: Naomi Osaka (Japan) Women’s Doubles: Samantha Stosur (Australia) & Zhang Shuai (China) Mixed Doubles: Barbora Krejcikova (Czech Republic) & Rajeev Ram (United States)

July 1-14, 2019 The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club Wimbledon, London, England 2019 Champions Men’s Singles: Novak Djokovic (Serbia) Men’s Doubles: Juan Sebastian Cabal (Colombia) & Robert Farah (Colombia) Women’s Singles: Simona Halep (Romania) Women’s Doubles: Hsieh Su-Wei (Taiwan) & Barbora Strycova (Czech Republic) Mixed Doubles: Ivan Dodig (Croatia) & Latisha Chan (Taiwan)

French Open May 26-June 9, 2019 Roland Garros Paris, France 2019 Champions Men’s Singles: Rafael Nadal (Spain) Men’s Doubles: Kevin Krawietz (Germany) & Andreas Mies (Germany) Women’s Singles: Ash Barty (Australia) Women’s Doubles: Timea Babos (Hungary) & Kristina Mladenovic (France) Mixed Doubles: Latisha Chan (Taiwan) & Ivan Dodig (Croatian)

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US Open August 26-September 8, 2019 USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Flushing Meadows, N.Y. 2019 Champions Men’s Singles: Rafael Nadal (Spain) Men’s Doubles: Juan Sebastian Cabal (Colombia) & Robert Farah (Colombia) Women’s Singles: Bianca Andreescu (Canada) Women’s Doubles: Elise Mertens (Belgium) & Aryna Sabalenka (Belarus) Mixed Doubles: Bethanie MattekSands (United States) & Jamie Murray (Great Britain)

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

Nicolas Almagro Nicolas Almagro retired on the courts of his hometown in Murcia, Spain. The 2013 Australian Open quarterfinalist, Almagro has been battling physical problems that have prevented him from competing on the ATP circuit. He was a three-time quarterfinalist at the French Open, each time losing to the eventual champion and his compatriot, Rafael Nadal. During the 2014 Barcelona Open, Almagro snapped Nadal’s 41-match winning streak. It was his first victory over Nadal after meeting him 11 times in his career. Almagro has won 13 singles titles and he achieved a career-high singles ranking of ninth in the world back in 2011. Marcos Baghdatis Cyprus’ Marcos Baghdatis concluded his 15-year tenure on the ATP circuit at Wimbledon last year. The 2006 Australian Open runner-up lost the final match of his career to 17thseeded Matteo Berrettini in straight sets in the tournament’s second round. After it ended, the 34-year-old patted his heart with both hands and then knelt to the grass, and was in tears as the crowd gave him a lengthy standing ovation. Baghdatis’ career comes to an end after posting a 349-273 tour-level match record that includes winning four ATP titles and a career-high ranking of eighth in the world. Since retiring, Baghdatis has joined the coaching staff for Elina Svitolina.


Year That Was 2019 Tomas Berdych Former Wimbledon runner-up Tomas Berdych announced his retirement from tennis in 2019 after a 17-year professional career. The 34-year-old Berdych, after struggling with a back injury for much of the last two years, said his body no longer allows him to compete. Ranked as high as fourth in the world, Berdych made his decision after losing in the first round of the US Open last August. “I said, ‘Okay … that’s it. That’s enough.’ In terms of just my body doesn’t allow me to do so, and it’s very unpredictable,” said Berdych. “There is no real point to continue.” The Czech said the highlight of his career was reaching the 2010 Wimbledon final, beating Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic along the way before losing to Rafael Nadal. “Even the final that I lost, it was a very, very special moment,” he said. He also reached the semifinals at least once at each of the other three

Grand Slams and won 13 career titles.

Dominika Cibulkova Dominika Cibulkova closed the curtain on her stellar career in an announcement in her hometown of Bratislava, Slovakia. The 30-year-old reached 21 singles finals during her career, capturing eight titles and achieving a career high ranking of fourth in the world back in 2017. In 2014, Cibulkova became the first Slovak woman to reach a Grand Slam singles final, finishing runner-up to China’s Li Na at the Australian Open. A semifinalist at Roland Garros in 2009, she was a three-time quarterfinalist at Wimbledon and reached the last eight at the US Open in 2010. Having played her last match against Aryna Sabalenka at Roland Garros earlier this year, she retires with a 450-299 win-loss record and career prize money of $13,725,520.

RE CRUITIN G COMBIN E SPORTIME RANDALL’S ISLAND, NYC June 20 - 211, 2020

David Ferrer turned professional in 2000 and in the first years of his career, was known as a clay-court specialist, having won half of his titles on the surface. However, he has had significant success on all surfaces, reaching the final of the French Open in 2013, the semifinals of the Australian and US Open twice each, and the quarterfinals of Wimbledon twice. He represented Spain on the Davis Cup team that won the finals in 2008, 2009, and 2011. Ferrer won the Paris Masters in 2012, and was runner-up at six Masters tournaments throughout his career. He is often discussed as being one of the best players not to have won a Grand Slam title. He retired at his home tournament of Madrid after losing to Alexander Zverev in the round of 32. Ferrer will now serve as Tournament Director for the Barcelona Open. continued on page 12

at @jmtany Follow us a

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A Look Back at the Year That Was 2019

continued from page 11

Lucie Safarova The former top-ranked doubles player and fifthranked singles player ended her career after playing her last match in Paris. Safarova accumulated seven singles titles and 15 doubles titles throughout her time on tour, including five Grand Slam doubles titles (two Australian Opens, two French Opens and a US Open), and a Fed Cup Championship. Janko Tipsarevic Janko Tipsarevic played his final ATP tour match at the Stockholm Open this year. In 2012, the Serb reached a careerhigh singles ranking of eighth in the world. In

his career, he won four ATP titles and doubles title. He notched two victories over the top-ranked player in the world, defeating compatriot Novak

Djokovic twice. His best results at a Grand Slam tournament came at the US Open in 2011 and 2012, where he reached the quarterfinals both times.

ATP Year End Rankings

WTA Year End Rankings

1. Rafael Nadal (Spain) 2. Novak Djokovic (Serbia) 3. Roger Federer (Switzerland) 4. Dominic Thiem (Austria) 5. Daniil Medvedev (Russia) 6. Stefanos Tsitsipas (Greece) 7. Alex Zverev (Germany) 8. Matteo Berrettini (Italy) 9. Roberto Bautista Agut (Spain) 10. Gael Monfils (France)

1. Ashleigh Barty (Australia) 2. Karolina Pliskova (Czech Republic) 3. Naomi Osaka (Japan) 4. Simona Halep (Romania) 5. Bianca Andreescu (Canada) 6. Elena Svitolina (Ukraine) 7. Petra Kivitova (Czech Republic) 8. Belinda Bencic (Switzerland) 9. Kiki Bertens (Netherlands) 10. Serena Williams (United States)

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LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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The Tennis Guru Chapter One: In The Beginning

By Dr. Tom Ferraro nce upon a time there was a boy named Yin. He was an ordinary boy with ordinary talent.

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He was not particularly strong or tall or fast. He was not that smart, nor special in any way, except for one thing: He loved tennis. He had been shown the game by his father who played often and ever since Yin heard the sound of the ball against the

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

racket he was mesmerized and rarely thought of anything else. During class he paid no attention to the teacher’s lessons but instead spent his time either drawing pictures of tennis courts or fantasizing about playing a match against Roger Federer or Rafael Nadal. He dreamt about tennis at night and played tennis at least five days a week. He was lucky because he had an older brother, Yang, who played tennis too, so Yin always had someone to play with. And when Yang went off to spend time with his friends, Yin went into the basement and hit balls against the concrete wall. He made up imaginary matches during wall practice and even went so far as to keep track of each point scored as he played. He would do this hour after hour and, on occasion, his mother would come down to the basement to do laundry and watched her son pound away with his racket. She would worry that her son was


too obsessed with the game and would sometimes try to coax him out of the basement to go to the library. And when he was taken to the library he found the section on tennis, only worsening his obsession with tennis. It was no surprise that Yin got better at tennis and when he tried out for his high school team, he made it on the first try. But of course this is where Yin’s problems emerged. For reasons he could not understand, he always seemed to lose to players he was far better than. His coach could see this problem as well and kept lowering his rank until he was forced to play against kids who could barely get the ball over the net. All this led to shame, embarrassment, despair and lots of anger. He grew into a hot head and would often scream, curse, throw rackets and generally act like a big baby. In the past he loved tennis, but

now he grew upset and unhappy. It got so bad that one day, after a particularly shameful loss, he went into the backyard where Yang was hanging out and asked, “Yang I do nothing but choke in nearly every match I play. I can’t seem to handle pressure. What can I do?” Yang smiled at him and said, “Not to worry little brother, I have just the solution. You ought to go see The Tennis Guru.” “Oh wow! That sounds good to me! How much does it cost? Where does he work? Is it far from here? Is he taking new students?” “Slow down little fella,” Yang replied. “Way too many questions. The Tennis Guru is high-priced but more important than that, the training he puts his students through is like real torture. Are you very sure you’re up for it?” “Yes. I’m definitely up for it,” said Yin. “Just show me the way big

brother. Show me the way.” Yang turned Yin around, pointed to a big mountain which was far in the distance and said: “You see that mountain over there? The Tennis Guru teaches his students in an academy on the top of that mountain. It is a perilous, exhausting and expensive journey to get to his academy. All those who want greatness in tennis have climbed up there and have had to face many demons on the way up. Think it over before you say yes. If you decide to make this journey, I will accompany you to the top. If you say yes, tomorrow we will begin our journey.” For consultations, treatment or onsite visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., Sport Psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail DrTFerraro@aol.com or visit DrTomFerraro.com.

Attention Merchants and Companies Question? How would you like to deliver your brand and message in-person to thousands of sports oriented New York families all in one day?

Answer! You can by being part of the New York Tennis Expo on Sunday, February 9, 2020 at the New York Open at NYCB LIVE, home of Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum. The New York Tennis Expo opens a week of New York Open professional tennis. l Exhibitors receive custom designed invitations to blast to their database. l Includes our extensive e-mail, media and social media marketing campaigns for the Expo.

For sponsorship and exhibiting opportunities please call 516.409.4444 or e-mail Info@USPTennis.com LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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comeback complete

Kei Nishikori All in for 2020 New York Open

continued from page 20

Japanese star returns to Long Island in search of title By Brian Coleman

tar power returns to Long Island in February as some of the world’s best tennis players arrive right here in our backyard for the third annual New York Open at NYCB LIVE, home of the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum. At the core of that star power is Japan’s Kei Nishikori, a perennial member of the top 20 in the ATP World Tour’s Rankings, who will be back on the black courts in search of a New York Open title. This coming season is a significant one for Nishikori, for whom injuries have hampered much of his success over the last several years. He missed the conclusion of 2019 after having elbow surgery, and as he approaches his 30s is eager to stay healthy and have sustained success as the new decade begins. “I don’t want to overdo it,” Nishikori said recently. “The prospect is a return from surgery on my right elbow in January, maybe February. In the second half of next year, I want to be able to play well.” That timetable puts him on track to make his season debut at the New York Open, a tournament which has served as a springboard for its previous two champions: Kevin Anderson and Reilly Opelka. Following his win at the New York Open in 2018, which included a win over Nishikori in the semifinals, Anderson would go on to reach the Round of 16 at both the French Open and US Open, while powering to the finals of Wimbledon. For Opelka, after he hoisted his first career ATP title in New York, the 22-year-old American would go on to continue the best year of his young career, achieving his best results at each of the Grand Slams. Nishikori hopes the New York Open can have a similar effect on his season when he begins campaign at the tournament. It will be one of his first events under his new coaching regime, which he shook up a bit ahead of 2020. The 13th ranked Nishikori, whose primary coach is still Michael

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kei nishikori continued from page 16

Chang, announced that he and Dante Bottini will no longer be working together and replaced him with former New York Open doubles champion Max Mirnyi. “After nine years of working together literally day in and day out, I have decided it is time for a new voice,”

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Nishikori said in an Instagram post. “I am forever grateful for Dante’s contributions to my career and we will obviously remain very close friends. Between all the travel, the winning tournaments, the ups, the downs, and reaching the final rounds of Grand Slams … thank you my friend. I

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

appreciate so much the last nine years and our friendship.” In a follow-up post, Nishikori welcomed Mirnyi to his staff. “Excited to announce that Max Mirnyi will join the coaching team (with Michael Chang) full time in 2020!” he wrote. “Excited what the future holds.” One of the first tests of this new partnership will take place in February, where the Matsue, Japan native will likely be the New York Open’s top-seed. New York has been a friendly place for Nishikori, and an area that holds a special place in his heart. Six years ago, Nishikori compiled the best run of his career at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, less than 20 miles west of where the New York Open takes place. It was the 2014 US Open, and Nishikori used his relentless effort from the ground to upend Stan Wawrinka in a five-set thriller in the quarterfinals before taking out Novak Djokovic in the semifinals. However, in the championship match, Nishikori was unable to overcome the power of Marin Cilic who was nearly


perfect on the day, as the Croat lifted his first major trophy. In the years since, Nishikori has been a mainstay at the top of the world rankings and if it were not for a plethora of injuries, who knows how many more titles would be in his possession. But a return to the New York-area could be the best thing for Nishikori as he embarks on what he hopes is a painfree and consistent 2020 season. In his only appearance at the New York Open, which was in the tournament’s inaugural event two years ago, Nishikori reached the semifinals and battled Anderson in what turned out to be a thrilling three-setter in primetime on Saturday night. Anderson would come out on top in a third-set tiebreaker, and don’t be surprised if the two of them find themselves squaring off in the latter stages of the 2020 tournament. The Long Island fans should be eager to watch Nishikori play as he leads a long list of highly-ranked players into the third installment of the New York Open. Nishikori himself is eager to come back and once again play on the venue’s black courts. “It was quite impressive to play on the black courts at NYCB LIVE in its debut year, and I’m looking forward to being back,” said Nishikori. “I have good memories from playing there and look forward to coming back in 2020.”

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2020 NEW YORK Top Players Commit to New York Open he New York Open returns for its third year at NYCB LIVE, home of the Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, bringing highlevel professional tennis to the black courts right here on Long Island. The tournament will once again be one of the highlights of the winter here in New York, and the event has already received commitments from some of the top players in the world. In addition to Kei Nishikori, the tournament’s inaugural champion and former Wimbledon and US Open finalist, Kevin Anderson, will be back in the fold, looking to bounce back from a tough 2019 season that saw him deal with injuries. Reilly Opelka will return to try to defend his title from last season. The young American hoisted the first ATP trophy of his career at the New York Open last February, and will be ready to compete for the title once again. Nick Kyrgios, the enigmatic Australian, will be sure to delight the

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2019 New York Open champion Reilly Opelka will be back on Long Island to defend his title, which was the first ATP title of his career crowd with his highlight-reel style of tennis. Kyrgios, a two-time Grand Slam quarterfinalist, has won six ATP titles in his career and remains one of

the sport’s most talented players, as he currently sits at 30th in the world rankings. American John Isner is back in the

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K OPEN PREVIEW fold as he returns to Long Island for the third straight year. Isner is the highest-ranked American in the world and is the owner of 15 career ATP titles. “We are really proud and excited to have top players like Nishikori, Isner and Kyrgios choose to play the New York Open. The players have options and they contacted us early wanting to play,” said Peter Lebedevs, tournament director for the New York Open. “The players love our fans, NYCB LIVE and, of course, the black courts. When these top players, along with Kevin Anderson, our 2018 champion and Reilly Opelka, our 2019 champion, play in the tournament each year, it shows the fans and business community that we are consistently elevating experiences to be one of the top ATP events on the calendar.” There will be more news leading up to the tournament on other players who will round out the player field. It’s expected that a few other of the top Americans will join the draw, so stay tuned to LITennisMag.com for more announcements.

Fans will not want to miss talented Australian Nick Kyrgios take to the courts at NYCB LIVE for the 2020 New York Open

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2 0 2 0 N E W YO R K O P E N P R E V I E W

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Special Events to Highlight New York Open Week he New York Open continues to engrain itself within the local community, and in further doing so, will be hosting a number of different special events and promotional nights throughout the week-long event. The tournament kicks off the with New York Tennis Expo on Sunday, Feb. 9, which is completely free to attend for the public, and includes the ability to watch the beginning of the qualifying draw at no cost. The following day will be the Veterans and Diversity Hiring Expo which is part of GF Sports’ initiative to provide job opportunities to veterans, women, minorities and those with disabilities in the local community. Ladies’ Day, which has become one of the staples of the New York Open, is back and will be held Tuesday, Feb. 11. It includes brunch, a fashion show, meet and greet with the players, and the ability to attend that day’s matches and enter through the same VIP entrance as the players. Later that night, college students are eligible for discounted tickets as the New York Open celebrates College Night. The USTA Eastern Long Island

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Region’s Annual Awards Dinner will take place during the New York Open this year, as the best and brightest in Long Island tennis from the past year will be honored on Wednesday, Feb. 12. Throughout the week, the New York Open will also be hosting educational workshops and seminars for both Attendees enjoying Ladies Day during the 2019 New York Open students and adults. On Tuesday, Feb. 11 from 10:00 a.m.-Noon, there will be business world and much more. a GF Sports STEM Education School An exciting new addition to the week Day, which will feature instructional is the New York Open Pickleball sessions provided by Geeks Rule, Championships, with skill levels including talks from ATP Tour players ranging from 3.0-5.0, and three and admission to the Day Session different age divisions. matches. You can learn about all of these Later that week, the inaugural GF events and everything offered, Sports Women’s Leadership Brunch including various ticket options, at the will be held on Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020 New York Open by visiting featuring a panel of top women in the NewYorkOpen.com.

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K OPEN PREVIEW

2 0 2 0 N E W YO R K O P E N P R E V I E W

Q&A With New York Open Tournament Director Peter Lebedevs Long Island Tennis Magazine had a chance to sit down with Peter Lebedevs, tournament director of the 2020 New York Open. We discussed a variety of topics, from what’s new in 2020, to the local grassroots tennis community. What is new this year at the New York Open? What sort of special nights/promotions will be going on during the week? Peter Lebedevs: This year, we are kicking off the tournament on Sunday, Feb. 9 by combining the New York Tennis Expo and the New York Open qualifying tournament. Both events will be free to the public, so everyone can come to the Expo and see the tennis on the same day. We are adding community platforms during the week of our event this year as well. On Monday, we will host a Veterans and Diversity Hiring Expo; Tuesday we will have a STEM Education Day for all the schools in the area, so it will be packed with youngsters watching and experiencing tennis, a lot of them for the first time. That date also features our Ladies’ Day event, with brunch, a fashion show, player meet-and-greet and then tennis viewing all day. On Wednesday, we will be hosting the USTA Long Island Awards Ceremony and recognizing the award winners on Stadium Court. On Thursday, there will be a Women’s Elevating Experiences Leadership Brunch, with some outstanding speakers on the agenda. On Friday is Valentine’s Day, and we have a terrific ticket package for couples that evening. Friday also starts our inaugural New York Open Pickleball Championships downstairs in the Expo Hall. It will run from Friday through Sunday and is creating a lot of buzz with players coming in from all over the country.

Saturday, we will be hosting the USTA Eastern Section’s Junior Awards Ceremony and recognizing these young tennis players on Stadium court. There are some big names already committed to the field this year. How excited should the local community be about the type of tennis that will be on display this year? Peter Lebedevs: Tennis fans will be in for a treat this year with a host of returning players and some new players. Kei Nishikori, ranked 13th in the world, is returning along with our past two champions Kevin Anderson (2018) and Reilly Opelka (2019). Nick Kyrgios, the super-talented Australian, will be making his New York Open debut and is guaranteed to entertain the crowd. We have baseliners, huge servers and all-court players so the field is filled with different styles of play. The New York Open provides that opportunity to get up close and personal with all the players to create lasting memories. How has the New York Open tried to build off of, learn from and improve the tournament heading into Year Three? Peter Lebedevs: Our goal is to “Elevate the Experience” for fans, sponsors, players and everyone that is a part of our event each year. In 2020, The Overlook will have an expanded glassed area to provide more room for everyone with the Box or VIP allinclusive ticket to see tennis in the most unique setting.

Another exciting change is having our Qualifying Tournament free to the public to showcase the New York Open to more fans. Our tickets for Monday through Thursday this year will be one session each day. Those days will include tennis from noon until the last ball is hit around 10:30 p.m. So people can come early or right after work and see more tennis than ever before with the same ticket. Everyone will have to come out to see some of the new oncourt changes we are thrilled about; it will be exciting. What types of community outreach/local engagement will you be doing in the weeks leading up to the tournament? Peter Lebedevs: The New York Open is out in the community all year promoting the tournament and tennis in general. We have over 40 Ambassador Clubs that we engage with throughout the year. In January, we have some unique events for the local players, including the New York Open College Wild Card Challenge at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center from Jan. 9-11. The winner of that event will receive a Main Draw Wild Card to play at night on Tuesday, Feb. 11. We will also have some 7.0 and 8.0 Men’s and Women’s Doubles Qualifying events with the winners getting to play on the Black Courts just like the professionals. We try to connect as many people to the tournament and provide those unique experiences for everyone.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2020 New York Open Tournament Schedule

Date

Event

Time

Details and Players

Sunday, February 9

New York Tennis Expo

10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Free to attend with activities for the whole family. Chances to meet New York Open stars and more!

Sunday, February 9

Qualifying

Noon

Qualifying Draw begins

Monday, February 10

Final Round of Qualifying and First Round Main Draw

Noon

Qualifying, Round 1 Session

Tuesday, February 11

First Round of Main Draw

Noon—Two matches starting no later than 7:30 p.m.

First Round Session

Wednesday, February 12

Second Round Main Draw

Noon—Two matches starting no later than 7:30 p.m.

Second Round Session See Kei Nishikori’s debut match during 7:30 p.m. Session

Thursday, February 13

Second Round Main Draw

Noon—Two matches starting no later than 7:30 p.m.

Second Round Session

Friday, February 14

Quarterfinals

Noon

Quarterfinals Day Session

Friday, February 14

Quarterfinals

7:30 p.m.

Quarterfinals Night Session

Saturday, February 15

Semifinals

2:00 p.m.

Semifinals Day Session

Saturday, February 15

Semifinals

7:00 p.m.

Semifinals Night Session

Sunday, February 16

Finals

2:00 p.m.

Singles and Doubles Finals

24

Long Island Tennis Magazine • November/December January/February 20202019 • LITennisMag.com • LITennisMag.com


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The Hyperbole of High-Performance

By Steve Kaplan Coaches can have a positive impact on the lives of junior tennis players and this responsibility is the catalyst to work harder, learn best practices and improve. While true professionals create opportunities for their students, self-important one’s are boasting that they are “High-Performance” coaches by displaying only their student’s rankings. They hope you will infer that they must be a great coach because they have great students by conflating their ability to expertly lead with their willingness to shamelessly promote themselves. Such pretension devalues and undermines the integrity of the profession. Events and numbers can be spun to say anything you want because you 26

can always find a correlation or connection between things, but correlation is not causation. A student may achieve because or despite the coaching they receive, and while everything may happen for a reason, it’s not always for the reason that we would like others to believe. As the great American author Mark Twain once said, “Figures don’t lie, but liars figure,” and the line that is often credited to former British prime minister Benjamin Disraeli, “There are three kinds of lies; lies, damned lies and statistics.” Simply stated, you can make figures say anything you want them to say because you can always find a statistical correlation between events, but as anyone who was paying even casual attention in high school knows, correlation is not causation. Great coaches are an invaluable asset to the development of top

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

players, but what all experienced coaches know is that the drive and enthusiasm of talented students can make even an average coach look like a genius. Therefore, what masquerades as an accomplishment may really be underachievement when viewed in a different context. Here’s an illustrative example: Let’s say you were introduced to the coach of the 11th, 12th and 13th ranked players in the nation in the Girls’ 16s. Sounds impressive, right? Maybe there is a little more information that you might not have been told. These players were ranked third, fourth or fifth in the nation eight months ago before this coach started to work them and the number one and two ranked players this person coached? They’re both injured and not playing. Don’t think this happens? Think again. The takeaway here is that high performance coaching is not about


producing high performers, but rather, producing the highest, most sustainable performers possible. Furthermore, there is no guarantee that the quality of the student fully indicates the quality of their teacher, since coaching ability inferred from students, while valuable to know, is not a defining or definitive quality. Some of the least skilled coaches I know coach top players, although many take great license with the term “coach,” which can mean anything from a long-term mentorship to chaperoning a player to one tournament. From my personal experience, I recognize that while I am known for working with students who achieved professional rankings, some of the best coaching I’ve done has resulted in more modestly capable students ascending on their high school and college teams. While it’s useful to recognize that current and former students’ success can be seen as one of many factors used to assess a coach’s suitability to maximize a new student’s success,

there are other markers that make for a great student-teacher fit. I have talked extensively about those specific qualities in other articles I have written for this publication, including: “Ten Things to Consider When Choosing a Coach: A Two-Part Guide” (page 58 of the November/December 2016 issue) and “Why You Should Look Beyond the Hype When Selecting a Tennis Coach: A Two-Part Guide” (page 38 of the January/February 2019 issue). Remember to be cautious when you hear tennis coaches using hyperbole to suggest that student’s rankings are the singular compelling factor to prove their success because these numbers are a quantitative “snapshot” of the student, not a qualitative measure of their teacher. Further, don’t assume that the highest ranking a student achieves tells the whole story because it might not be. A true exceptional coach will not only help a student perform, but also protect them from injuries. A list of student rankings often camouflages a coach’s career filled with leading a few

to success, and most to the orthopedist. A coach’s actions speak louder than student’s results, because while results don’t lie, liars promote figures to exaggerate, mislead and sell. Steve Kaplan is the owner and managing director of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as director emeritus of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation and executive director and founder of Serve & Return Inc. Steve has coached more than 1,100 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous highly-ranked touring professionals. Many of the students Steve has closely mentored have gone to achieve great success as prominent members of the New York financial community, and in other prestigious professions. In 2017, Steve was awarded the Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award by the USTA. He may be reached by email at StevenJKaplan@aol.com.

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27


Five Things t

2020

Written and compiled by Brian Coleman and R

The “Big Three”

which reached an emotional high after the Brit defeated Stan Wawrinka in the finals of the European Open to claim his first title since returning from injury. The five-time Australian Open finalist has no expectations heading into the first Grand Slam of the year, but wants to be able to compete pain-free. If he can achieve this goal, Murray is a dark horse candidate whose competitive spirit is as high as anyone in the men’s field, and can make him a dangerous opponent for whoever winds up across the net from him.

Young stars Bencic and Vekic … how will they follow up their US Open run? As the calendar flips to a new decade, three familiar names still remain atop the ATP World Tour rankings. The three greatest players of all-time playing in the same era is remarkable, and something that has captivated the sports world and has elevated the popularity of tennis. Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal have combined for 55 Grand Slam titles and counting, and the tennis world is wondering if 2020 will be the year a new star emerges. Nadal storms into the Australian Open fresh off a Davis Cup victory for Spain, and currently holds the top ranking in the world. After a solid run to the finals last year, he is hoping to capture his second Australian Open title. However, throughout his career, the Spaniard has had his worst major results in Australia, and the rest of the field is not going to make winning a title easy. Djokovic travels to the “Land Down Under” as a slight favorite. The defending champion had some spectacular moments in 2019, winning two major titles, but seemed to return down to Earth towards the end of the season and lost the number one ranking. Djokovic is known for his ups and downs, but when things get tight on the biggest stages, the Serbian always seems to come through. Federer, at the age of 38, is looking to capture his seventh Aussie Open title. Very few people expected the “Swiss Maestro” to raise the trophy two years ago, and this year is no different. After suffering a heartbreaking loss in the Wimbledon final, Federer is eager to capture another Grand Slam and extend his tally. If his body holds up, Federer’s brilliance can help him get past anyone.

Andy Murray’s expectations Andy Murray has slowly but steadily mounted his comeback, 28

The US Open was a breakout tournament for many players on the women’s side beyond its champion Bianca Andreescu. This included Belinda Bencic and Donna Vekic, both of whom were pegged to be stars when they were teenagers, and are now tapping into that potential. Still both extremely young at 22- and 23-years-old respectively, Bencic and Vekic compiled their best Grand Slam runs of their careers in Queens. Vekic reached the quarterfinals, while Bencic reached the semifinals, and both should be ready to make a deep run in the first Grand Slam of 2020.

The Aussies As is usually the case, and even more so being in his home country, all eyes will be on Nick Kyrgios. The crowd favorite will likely put on the usual show, with a mixture of trick shots and theatrics. Despite winning multiple ATP 500 titles, last season was a bit of disappointment for Kyrgios. At the Australian Open, Kyrgios will not even be the

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com


to Watch at the

0 Australian Open

and Robbie Werdiger

highest-seeded Australian in the draw. Fellow countryman Alex de Minaur is currently ranked 18th in the world, and the 25-year-old is coached by Australian legend Lleyton Hewitt. With a strong mind and an explosive game, de Minaur has higher expectations than Kyrgios heading into this year’s tournament.

Young stars in the top 10 A group of breakout stars in their early 20’s have climbed the rankings and are threatening to topple the reign of the Big Three. Dominic Thiem beat Federer, Nadal and Djokovic in 2019 en route to a career-best year and hopes to do the same as the fourth-seed at the Aussie Open. Daniil Medvedev went on a magical run last season, winning the most matches of anyone on tour, including reaching the US Open finals. After a few tough losses at the

end of the season, Medvedev is rested and ready to capture his first major title. Stefanos Tsitsipas won the biggest title of his career at the Nitto ATP Finals and is looking to build off his semifinal run in Australia last year to become the first Greek male ever to win a Grand Slam. Alexander Zverev was the first Next Gen player thought to be able to continued on page 30

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2020 australian open continued from page 29

contend with the Big Three. He’s played well in tournaments with a two-out-of-three set format, but at the Grand Slams, Zverev has yet to get past the quarterfinals and, therefore, remains on upset alert. Matteo Berrettini emerged out of nowhere and has stunned the odds-makers as he fought his way to the semifinals of the US Open. Having lost in the first round last year at the Australian Open, Berrettini is likely to build off his newfound confidence and make a mark in the draw this year.

Can Osaka defend her title?

mid-September. A new year could mean a fresh start for Osaka, and the 22-year-old will be ready to defend her title in Melbourne.

The young star you may not know: Jannik Sinner You may not have heard of Jannik Sinner before he won the Next Gen ATP Finals late last year, and you may still not know his name. But you will soon. The 18-year-old Italian prodigy is ranked 78th in the world and has earned his ranking mostly through tournaments on the Futures and Challengers Tour. He has beaten Gael Monfils, as well as Alex de Minaur, and won a set off Stan Wawrinka at the US Open. The year 2020 is the time for Sinner to break into the top 50, and there is no better place to start the season than on a high note at the Australian Open.

Wozniacki’s last ride

Last year at the Australian Open, Naomi Osaka capped off a remarkable six-month run that began towards the end of 2018. After winning the US Open, she parlayed that into an Australian Open title, becoming the first woman to win backto-back majors since Serena Williams in 2015. Osaka’s season peaked then, as the young star failed to reach the semifinals of any event until the Toray Pan Pacific Open in

Towards the end of 2019, Caroline Wozniacki, one of the greatest players of this generation, announced that she will be retiring from professional tennis. But before she officially calls it quits, Wozniacki will play the 2020 Australian Open, a tournament she won two years ago for her maiden Grand Slam title. Still just 29-years-old, Wozniacki said she has more to accomplish in life away from tennis, and lingering injuries, including rheumatoid arthritis, have made it difficult for her to practice and compete over the last couple of years. Wozniacki has long been a fan-favorite, and she will try to go out on top in her final career tournament.

How will Andreescu respond? Canada’s Bianca Andreescu became the sport’s new star in 2019, as the teenager powered her way to the US Open title.

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She made the usual rounds that a Grand Slam champion does, being honored back in her hometown and doing a number of television appearances and interviews. The 19year-old plays the game with an edge and has the game to back it up, and we should expect to see her competing at the top of the game for the next decade. But on the heels of her first major title, how will she respond at the Australian Open being the most recent Grand Slam winner? Last year, she had to go through qualifying to just reach the main draw in Melbourne, where she proceeded to win two more rounds, but will be one of the top seeds in the 2020 edition of the event.

The American women Last year, we saw a number of American women achieve their best results at a Grand Slam, setting them up to improve on those showings as we enter 2020. That begins at the Australian Open. In Melbourne a year ago, Danielle Collins, the 26-yearold former University of Virginia standout, powered her way into the semifinals before falling to eventual runner-up Petra Kvitova. That was followed up by three Americans reaching the quarterfinals of the French Open, Madison Keys, Sloane Stephens and Amanda Anisimova, which included the latter, just 18-years-old, reaching the semifinals. And at

Wimbledon, Alison Riske took on Serena Williams in a threeset match for a spot in the semifinals. In the year’s final major, Serena was the lone American into the semifinals, although the Round of 16 featured four players from the United States. This is a good sign heading into the New Year, with a number of American women, besides Serena, having experienced deep runs into the Grand Slams. Expect them to be a factor at the calendar’s first Grand Slam in 2020.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA Eastern Hosts 33rd Annual College Showcase By Brian Coleman

Coaches, parents and players gathered at the Saw Mill Club in Mount Kisco, N.Y. for USTA Eastern’s Annual College Showcase, the 33rd year USTA has hosted this one-of-a-kind event. “College Showcase Day was huge this year! We had increased attendance from both players and coaches over 2018,” said Julie Bliss-Beal, USTA Eastern’s senior director of competition. “We are beyond thrilled that our 33-year-old event continues to forge connections between young players and college coaches—it goes without saying that one of our biggest objectives with College Showcase Day is to support the development of tennis on college campuses. But beyond facilitating these introductions, we also want to help players and their parents better understand the recruitment process.” For three decades now, the event has helped bridge the gap between high school tennis players and college coaches, and has provided an invaluable resource and advice on how to navigate the recruiting process. “With that goal in mind, this year we added two phenomenal guest 32

speakers: Brian Ormiston, who works in collegiate tennis at the USTA, manages the recruitment materials on USTA.com and serves as the USTA liaison to the NCAA; and Elizabeth Guy, who trains top athletes within the USTA development program,” said Bliss-Beal. “Their presentations added value to the event—I know that for a fact because multiple attendees approached me to say just that!” Off the court, Ormiston, USTA’s collegiate tennis manager, gave a presentation to players and parents on all the steps that high school players should take, both academically and athletically, to prepare for college tennis. Ormiston was joined by multiple college coaches, including Ilene Weintraub, head coach of women’s tennis at Columbia. Guy, a strength and conditioning coach for USTA Player Development, conducted a number of different oncourt clinics, demonstrating how to teach drills that help players perform a proper warm-up to practice and matches, as well as drills that help with multi-directional speed. “The showcase is a great event to

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

give both coaches and players exposure to the world of college tennis,” said Weintraub. “On the panel, I tried to help clarify some of the NCAA recruiting rules and regulations, give families a suggested time frame for when to contact coaches and what tournaments to play in, and provide players with tips on how to manage the challenges of balancing competing at a high level and continuing to do well in high school.” In addition to the on-court clinics and seminars, there were networking opportunities throughout the day, as players had the opportunity to meet with and talk to coaches about their respective programs and what they are looking for in student-athletes. After more than 30 years, the College Showcase Day continues to grow each year, helping ease the daunting process that is college recruiting for high school athletes, and allowing coaches from all levels of college tennis to meet and connect with hundreds of local players. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by e-mail at BrianC@USPTennis.com.


COMING IN MARCH

Distribution scheduled for 03/01/20

This edition will feature: • Guide to the Top Tennis Camps • New York Tennis Expo Recap • Guide to the Top Court Builders and Manufacturers • 2020 New York Open Recap • Boys High School Tennis Season Preview

Distribution across Long Island at 300+ locations: • Indoor tennis clubs • Country clubs • Tennis camps • Retail stores • Gyms • Restaurants and health food stores • Supermarkets and • Many more!

Don’t miss the advertising opportunities in the next edition of Long Island Tennis Magazine March/April 2020! Facebook-www.Facebook.com/LongIslandTennis Instagram-@NYTennisMag • Twitter-@LITennisMag

Submissions for both advertising and editorial are due by 2020 LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020February • Long Island1, Tennis Magazine 33 For more information, please call 516-409-4444 or e-mail Advertise@LITennisMag.com


U S TA E A S T E R N L O N G I S L A N D R E G I O N

USTA LI Awards Dinner to be Held at Third New York Open Top honors for Harrison, Zebroski, Phillip and the Goetz Family The best and brightest in the local tennis community will be honored oncourt with top-ranked pro tennis champions at the third edition of the New York Open in February. In recognition of its 30th year, the annual USTA Long Island Awards Dinner will be held Mark Harrison (left), Hy Zausner Lifetime at NYCB LIVE, Achievement honoree, pictured with his home of the Nassau doubles partner, David Brent Veterans Memorial Coliseum, to take advantage of the unique benefits the event brings to the area. The awards program will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020, just prior to the Evening Session of play (in case of inclement weather, the event will take place on Thursday, Feb. 13). The evening will include a cocktail hour, followed by the awards presentation, the Night Session of tennis and oncourt recognition of awardees. Top honors will go to: l Mark Harrison: Hy Zausner Lifetime Achievement Award l Al Zebroski: Vitas Gerulaitis “For the Love of Tennis” Award l Hamlet Phillip: Arthur Ashe Multicultural Award l The Goetz Family: Rose Buck Scalamandre Tennis Family of the Year

Additional awards will be given in categories including volunteers, juniors, USTA tournament and league players, and high school champions, among others. “Long Island is very fortunate to have an ATP 250 event right here in our own backyard, and it’s a wonderful opportunity for the USTA Long Island Region to support the NY Open’s third year at NYCB LIVE,” said Jonathan Klee, USTA Long Island Regional Council executive director. “Combining the two events will give our award winners an opportunity to hear from and take pictures with touring players. In addition, award winners will receive a free ticket and parking pass to the matches that evening and will be recognized once again for their achievement between matches. Guests of award winners will be able to purchase tickets for the event at a discounted price. The dinner usually attracts more than 350 tennis enthusiasts and we are hoping that by combining the awards with a night of top-level professional tennis, we can rock NYCB LIVE that evening.” More information about the Awards Dinner is available at www.usta.com and our Facebook page, USTA Long Island. For information on the third New York Open, visit www.NewYorkOpen.com. 30th Annual USTA Long Island Awards Dinner Schedule Wednesday, February 12, 2020 4:30 p.m.-6:00 p.m.—Cocktails, Registration, Photos and Light Hors D’Oeuvres 6:00 p.m.-7:15 p.m.—Awards Ceremony 7:30 p.m.—Night Session Tennis

USTA Eastern Long Island Regional Council Executive Committee l Jonathan Klee, Regional Director l Michael Pavlides, Past Regional Director l Sunny Fishkind, Vice Regional Director l Randi Wilkins, Secretary For more information on the USTA Long Island Region, please visit LongIsland.USTA.com, e-mail USTAOnLongIsland@gmail.com, visit us on Facebook at USTA Long Island and follow us on Twitter @USTA_LI. 34

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U S TA E A S T E R N L O N G I S L A N D R E G I O N

Long Island’s Sunny Fishkind to be Inducted into Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame Longtime Long Island tennis volunteer, instructor and coach Sunny Fishkind will be inducted into the USTA Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame in January. The induction will take place during the 33rd Annual USTA Eastern Tennis Hall of Fame Celebration to benefit the Junior Tennis Foundation (JTF) Grant and Scholarship Programs. According to its Web site: “USTA Eastern and the JTF are thrilled to welcome our 2020 inductees who have played pivotal roles in Eastern’s tennis community.” Joining Sunny as the Hall of Fame’s newest members are John James and Ricky Meyer. Fishkind has worked as a tennis instructor and coach in the Eastern Section for more than 40 years. From 19792005, Fishkind served as the Girls Varsity Tennis coach at Bethpage High School. She also coached the Boys Varsity Tennis team concurrently from 1979-1990 and also worked

with programs at Hofstra University and Long Island University. In 1986, she was named director of the Hofstra University Summer Tennis Camp, a position she still holds today. Through this role, she has introduced tens of thousands of children to tennis over the last 35 years. Sunny currently serves as vice regional director and Facebook manager for the USTA Long Island Region Council. She has been an active USTA Long Island volunteer for many years. The Hall of Fame celebration will take place on Friday, Jan. 24, 2020 at the Renaissance Westchester, located at 80 West Red Oak Lane in West Harrison, N.Y. For information on attending, visit Eastern.USTA.com. Since its inception, the JTF has awarded more than $2 million in grants and scholarships for aspiring junior and adaptive players, as well as NJTLs throughout the Eastern Section. The funds raised from this celebratory event will afford many worthy and motivated children with incredible opportunities to attend tennis camps, Sectional and National competitions and educational workshops that ultimately cultivate the love and prosperity of our beloved sport.

Carefree Team Wins the Crown at USTA League National Championships Carefree Racquet Club’s 10.0 Mixed Doubles team, captained by Ben Marks, won the 2019 18 & Over Mixed 10.0 USTA League National Championships at the USTA National Campus in Orlando in November. With only two native Long Islanders among them in Orlando, as most of the group lives in the area but hail from places that include Oklahoma, England, France, Russia and Venezuela, the Eastern team came together to go undefeated in the lead-up to the knockout rounds. Going 4-0 and 11-1 as individuals, posting a staggering 70 percent of games won in their first four matches, the group first beat the team from Texas in the semifinals, 2-1, before sweeping Patrick Huck’s team from NorCal to win the title, 3-0. The winning roster included Janine Sadaka, Joseph Perri, Hali Katz, Antonella Karlin, Luis Vivas Martinez, Alina Volman, Marc Weingard, Nancy Turnblacer, Sarah Bowen, Kerri Weingard, Loic Minery, Peter Lebedevs, Rifat Biktyakov, Jacqueline Clark and Samantha Perri. LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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How to Get the Most Out of Your Tournament Experience

By Geoffrey Jagdfeld s a director of tennis at clubs and programs for more than 20 years, I’ve seen all the sides of tournament play … as a player, coach, tournament director and USTA official. Unfortunately, the number of players participating in tournaments these days is lower than in year’s past. Part of the issue is players having a badtournament experience, so this article is designed to provide players with some ideas on maximizing their experience and find the road to tournament happiness. One of the best quotes about why you should play tennis tournaments is from Hall of Famer Bill Tilden: “Play tennis for the game’s sake. Play it for the people you meet, the friends you make, and the pleasure you may give to the public by the hard-working, yet

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sporting game, that is owed them by their presence at the match.” Competing one-on-one can be difficult. The players that are successful understand that and embrace this as part of the whole tournament experience. Here are a few things to remember that are beyond your control. Know what they are and be prepared to focus on the things you are able to control. Here’s a list of the good and the bad: l No one goes undefeated, only one player per tournament is the champion. l It’s not always fair—from a bad draw to rain delay or a player’s bad calls, it’s all part of tournaments. l Be prepared to hurry up and wait, it’s all part of tournament play. Matches have no time limit, so delays are very common. l You have no control over your

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

opponent, their effort, their sportsmanship or their attitude. l Spectators act of their own accord, which in some cases, can be annoying. Remember you can seek the tournament director’s help if they are involving themselves directly in your match. l Unless you are playing on a stadium court, the court next door may distract you with stray balls, banter and even outbursts. l Everyone has a bad match. From the top-ranked to the novice player, there is always one you want to forget. Pure excitement is the difference between a practice match and the adrenaline rush of competition. You cannot reach your highest level of achievement without tournament play. Playing tournaments is good for you, win or lose. It’s always fun to win, but losing is sometimes more


powerful. Playing tournaments help hone your skills under fire against different opponents, and under varying conditions and pressure. Learning self-control, sportsmanship and etiquette is all done through tournament participation. Experience, friendships and contact with players who share your enthusiasm for tennis. Play tournaments as often as you can. It’s only through this type of competition that you will truly learn to compete. Be prepared with a game plan, no matter the outcome. Before you decide what tournament to play, determine the best competitive situation for you to have the best chance to enjoy the game. This will result in more success in the long run. Do some research about court surface, tournament reviews from other players and practice court availability. A little effort in this area goes a long way. Prepare with focus as the tournament draws closer. Increase practice sessions and don’t

forget to make them more matchoriented. By including practice matches into your preparation, you’ll be ready. On the day of the tournament, do some early warm-up at least three hours before for 30 minutes being such you hit all your strokes in a rally format. Read the entry form as you’d be surprised how many players miss important info regarding format, scoring, venue, date and time. I suggest having a hard copy, or a digital copy with you to reference. Don’t pack lightly. Parents would always ask me if I was taking the whole house with me when I played as a junior. Here is a list of items I suggest you bring with you to a tournament: l Water bottle l Sports drink l At least one extra racket l Two to three extra shirts l Extra pairs of socks l Practice balls l Folding/portable chair for changeovers

l Food/fuel–bagels, bananas or power bars l Ibuprofen or similar for aches and pains l Overgrips l Hat or visor l Sunglasses l Sunblock l Extra shoelaces l Plastic bag for wet clothes l Friend at Court—the USTA’s rule book/player code l Notepad/appointment book; or these days a smartphone works best l Phone charger l Umbrella for outdoor rain delays l Book or other entertainment for waiting between matches or rain delays Now its tournament day and you need to follow a pre-match routine. Be sure to get a good night’s sleep the night before. Be thinking about meals continued on page 38

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how to get the most out of your tournament experience continued from page 37 and hydration prior to your match. I suggest having a light meal/snack and drinking at least 20 ounces of water about two to three hours beforehand. Come early and check in immediately; if you arrive 20-25 minutes before match time that should suffice. Loosen up and start to get focused. Use a dynamic warm-up and start to put on your game face based on your personal style; you can start to become the tennis animal, or the silent warrior. Always meet your opponent as an equal to establish mutual respect. Too many times players underestimate their opponent or are overconfident which usually leads to an emotional letdown when the match does not go your way. When match time arrives, you need to lower the hype and nerves you might be feeling at the outset. Breathe

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deeply and loosen up, and you start the 10-minute warm-up. Use it wisely—trying to warm-up your shots and observe your opponent’s skills & tendencies. Establish courtesy with your neighbors on the adjacent courts as soon as possible. Take the spin seriously as most players do not take advantage. Do what is best for you and don’t be afraid to choose to receive, pick a side or have the opponent pick first. Live by the rules/code and avoid any possible disputes. Don’t rush, take your time. Be ready to play because, with no time limit, you’ll need to be prepared for the long haul. Remember you can always comeback but so can your opponent, so no lead is safe until the final point is played. Finally, know the tie-break and don’t forget the second set. Following your match remember to

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

report your scores promptly and get the time for your next match. Now it’s time to stretch, cool down and, if needed, refuel. What’s truly important is to win with grace and lose with dignity. I hope you can use this article to help you know what to expect and be prepared for you next tournament. Good luck and have fun playing this great game! Geoffrey Jagdfeld is USPTA Eastern president and currently tennis director of Solaris Sports Clubs. He is a USPTA elite professional and USTA highperformance coach who serves as USTA Junior Team Tennis League Coordinator for Westchester. He is the head coach of the Men’s and Women’s Tennis Teams at St. John Fisher College, and played collegiate tennis at Michigan State University.


By Kathy Miller

STA League tennis on Long Island is in full swing with the 2020 TriLevel League finishing up, while the 2020 18 & Over Mixed Doubles League is beginning and the 40 & Over Mixed Doubles League is scheduled to begin the first weekend in February! For the first time, we have a Men’s Combo League at the combined level of 8.0, which is a non-advancing league and plays from September to March. I will be in touch with last season’s captains for the 2020 Men’s and Women’s USTA League, which plays from May to August. There are a few rule changes for the coming year which are:

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l All participating League players have to have turned 18-years-old BEFORE playing a match. l In the 18 & Over 5.0+ League and the 40 & Over 4.5+ League, below level players are not permitted to play in number one positions with higher level players playing in the remaining positions. l If two Eastern Section teams are scheduled for the same Regional or Sectional Championship and share more than seven eligible players, only one team may advance. The teams must choose which team will advance, and the other team must concede their championship

spot to the second place team. The league coordinator must be notified no later than 48 hours following the conclusion of the deciding match. l In the Adult and Mixed Divisions, all Self-Rated and Valid Computer Rated Appealed players are eligible to progress to Local and Regional Championships if that player has played on the same team in at least two matches (no defaults count) at the same NTRP Level in the same age group during its local league season and is otherwise eligible. In the Adult and Mixed Divisions, all Self-Rated and Valid Computer Rated Appealed players are eligible to progress to the Sectional Championships if that player has played on the same team in at least three matches (no defaults count) at the same NTRP Level in the same age group during its local league season, local championships and regional championships and is otherwise eligible. To advance to the National Championships, all Self-Rated and Valid Computer Rated Appealed players have to have played four matches at the same NTRP level in the same age group during its local league season and is otherwise eligible. No defaults received by the player during local league or championship competition shall count for advancing.

l USTA National has changed the format of the 40 & Over League. Matches will be one court of singles and three courts of doubles. It is still being decided what we will be doing locally, but will be set shortly and for playoffs, regionals, sectionals and nationally. If you will be captaining a team for the first time this season, please let me know so I can include you on the e-mail that goes out to captains at the end of January. Looking forward to a great mixed doubles season and the upcoming Adult League season which not only brings great competitive tennis, but also warm weather! Good luck to our Tri-Level teams: The Men’s team from Sportime Lynbrook, captained by Mitchell Low, and the Women’s team, who at the time of this article, has not yet been decided! Lastly, Congratulations to the 2019 Long Island 18 & Over 10.0 Mixed Doubles team from Carefree Racquet, captained by Ben Marks, for winning Nationals! Their journey is covered on page 3 of this issue of Long Island Tennis Magazine. Kathy Miller is manager of Carefree Racquet Club and is also the adult league coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached by e-mail at KathyM65@aol.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com


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Your 2020 Guide to Long Island Tennis Magazine’s

Top Clubs & Programs

Long Island tennis players have great choices when it comes to where to play tennis. We have compiled a list of some of the top clubs and programs 42 Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com with descriptions of what each has to offer.


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Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road, Building #4 Farmingdale, N.Y. BethpageParkTennis.com (516) 777-1358 Bethpage Park Tennis Center is located just a few hundred feet from the Black Course at beautiful Bethpage State Park. Four indoor hard courts and four indoor red clay courts are air-conditioned for year-round play, along with two outdoor HarTru courts. Bethpage Park Tennis Center offers an array of adult seasonal court opportunities, Men’s and Women’s leagues, Lesson and Junior Development Programs, Quickstart, Zone tennis and walk-on court opportunities. New this year is the addition of Pickleball and Saturday night tennis/pickleball parties. It’s free and low-cost program for seniors, special populations and veterans is perhaps the largest of its kind in New York State. New this year is the addition of Sky’s The Limit girl’s empowerment program. We are excited to have finalized part of our major renovations with newly resurfaced courts, LED lights and heating/cooling system. The Center is best known for its renowned junior development program, led by top coach Steve Kaplan who has developed more top players than anyone else in the East. Steve is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, director emeritus of City Parks Foundation Lacoste Academy and Executive Director of Serve and Return Inc. Steve has been the long-time coach of more than 1,100 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school singles champions, two NCAA Division I Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals, prominent coaches and many prominent members of the New York financial. Steve’s students have been awarded in excess of $10 million in college scholarship money. In the summer, the finest players in the East join Bethpage Park Tennis Center for summer camp on four indoor hard courts four indoor red clay courts that are air-conditioned, along with two outdoor HarTru courts and six nearby outdoor hard courts. Lunch is included and transportation is available. Bethpage Park Tennis Center charges no membership fee and values all of its beginners equally with its nationally-ranked players.

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Carefree Racquet Club 1414 Jerusalem Avenue, #1 North Merrick, N.Y. CarefreeTennis.com CarefreeTennis@gmail.com (516) 489-9005 Carefree Racquet Club is Long Island’s premier indoor tennis club, offering seven indoor tennis courts, two halfcourt basketball courts and four pickleball courts. League Coordinator Debbie Cichon offers adult singles, doubles and team doubles leagues that are always on the correct level to insure you a good game every time you play. Carefree has many USTA teams in the 18 & Over, 40 & Over, 55 & Over Men’s, Women’s and Mixed Doubles Leagues, along with Tri-Level Leagues. For those new to the game or just want to improve, Carefree offers two 14-week sessions of learn and play groups, coordinated by Louis Vallejo. Players get an hour lesson each week, along with 90 minutes of practice time each week. Jean Tanklowitz, senior program coordinator, has many retirees who simply have a flexible schedule, playing Monday through Thursday in the afternoon. All games are arranged by Jean. For junior players, Ben Marks, Carefree’s director of tennis, coordinates the Junior Development Program with two 14-week sessions starting at the age of five, running through the age of 18. Children can take group, semiprivate or private lessons, along with practice time and ladder match play as well. Ben also runs a high school prep program and an Elite program. Carefree is very proud of its QuickStart Tot Program for children ages three- to five-years-old, which uses props to keep the children’s attention. Carefree Racquet Club is managed by Kathy Miller, who is also the Long Island USTA Adult League Coordinator. Kathy, along with Assistant Manager Pat McIlwee, pride themselves on the organization and smooth running of Long Island’s premier indoor tennis club that has never and continues to not charge membership fees. So if you are looking to join a program or just rent a court now and then, come down and visit Carefree Racquet Club!

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Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy 65 Columbia Road Morristown, N.J. CentercourtAcademy.com SportsAcademy@CentercourtClub.com (973) 539-2054 Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy can be summarized by one phrase: “Culture of excellence.” From its training to academics to tournament travel; the coaches, academic advisors, tutors and support staff are what make Centercourt a great training base, as well as a place to call home. Centercourt’s facilities are comprised of six New Jersey locations, with more on the way. Centercourt’s Performance Tennis home base is located in Morristown, N.J., conveniently located 45 minutes from New York City with transportation and boarding options available. While Centercourt encourages a tennis culture of excellence, Centercourt also places a strong emphasis and focus on academics and work ethic. Since its full-time academic inception two years ago, Centercourt’s scholar-athletes have committed to play collegiate tennis at strong academic institutions such as Columbia University, Wake Forest University, New York University and more. Centercourt offers schooling through both Laurel Springs and The Dwight School, a prestigious preparatory school located in the heart of Manhattan. There is a strong sense of team and family at Centercourt that is essential in creating the ideal training environment. Our world-class staff of coaches is proven globally in the industry and boast decades of experience at the highest levels. We firmly believe in communication between the players, parents and coaches, and that players need to be developed holistically to become the best they can be. We use competition as the backbone to development with players competing locally, nationally and at ITF level regularly. Centercourt’s full-time athletes become proficient in technical through the use of our SMAP Video Analysis Programs and also undertake intensive Mental Training Programs weekly. We challenge players to become top student athletes through our academics guided by our own on-site teacher. It is truly our objective to ensure our environment is a home away from home. Visit CentercourtAcademy.com for more information on after school, weekend and full-time training programs. We also have numerous UTR Competitions and Events.

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CourtSense Tennis Training Centers at Tenafly and Bogota Racquet Club 195 County Road Tenafly, N.J. (201) 569-1114/(201) 489-1122 CourtSense.com CourtSense offers the best tennis facilities in Northern New Jersey and provides a comprehensive program of tennis instruction delivered by professional coaches, using the finest techniques and technologies. With CourtSense, you’ll achieve your personal best, because its training is of the highest professional caliber— and easily tailored to suit your age and skill level. Children under 10 years of age benefit immensely from a proper training foundation—eliminating poor techniques that could mar their game later in life. If you’d like yours to take up the challenge, CourtSense is the best place—making them as great as they can and want to be. CourtSense Tennis Training Centers have a whole range of activities to support junior and adult tennis lovers. From teddy tennis and afterschool clinics to high-performance full-day program, cardio tennis, internal and USTA Leagues, and private and group sessions, CourtSense has something to suit everyone. CourtSense students have access to 15 indoor tennis courts (10 PlaySight smart-courts), world-class strength and conditioning centers and luxury players’ lounges. CourtSense’s club in Bogota, N.J. primarily specializes in the high-performance and tournament players. They have worked with players who have become ATP- and WTA-ranked players, U.S. Olympians, as well as many college scholarship athletes. CourtSense’s high-performance coaches, in collaboration with its fitness staff and a sports psychologist, have developed a program that maximizes athletes’ strengths, both on and off the court. CourtSense uses tennis as a vehicle to teach life lessons by tapping into the spirit of every player, with passion, expertise and character. CourtSense wants its juniors to be the best tennis players they can possibly be, but at the same time, be prepared to be successful in anything they want to be once their tennis careers are over. Another unique aspect to CourtSense’s facilities is the fitness programming provided in partnership with Magnus: Expand Human Potential. Magnus’ team has the ability to assess, correct, enhance and reassess an athlete–giving you everything you need to compete like a winner. CourtSense members have access to cuttingedge strength and conditioning technology, private sessions, nutritional counseling and psychological skills training. For more information on CourtSense programs, call (201) 569-1114 and (201) 489-1122 or e-mail Info@CourtSense.com. Registration is now open for the fall clinics at CourtSense.com. 46

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Eastern Athletic EasternAthleticClubs.com EACTennis@yahoo.com (631) 773-6293 Multiple locations on Long Island and in Brooklyn Eastern Athletic is family-owned and is one of the New York’s original and finest tennis and fitness facilities, offering a wide variety of programs for the tennis enthusiast and fitness buffs. Offering five locations throughout Suffolk County and Brooklyn to accommodate the ever changing needs of our clientele, Eastern Athletic has 17 Nova Ultra cushion indoor tennis courts, seven racquetball courts, eight squash courts, Indoor Pools and much more. To find out about all we have to offer, visit us at EasternAthleticClubs.com. Eastern Athletic Tennis offers season and open court rentals, private and group instruction for the pee-wee through the seasoned octogenarian. All programs, lessons, drills, clinics, zones, leagues, performance training, ladders, parties and camps are offered year-round in climate-controlled facilities. We host one of the largest Men’s Singles Flex Ladder/Leagues on Long Island, and are home to more than 15 USTA teams. Many of our teams have competed in regional, sectional and national competition. In addition, Eastern Athletic has one of the best performance training programs, integrating tennis with athletic performance programs. Eastern Athletic has produced some of the top tennis players on Long Island under the direction and supervision of Laurie Tenney Fehrs and its renowned tennis staff. Eastern Athletic has programs for Juniors and Adults of all ages and level of play, and is confident there is something for you. For more information and to join our growing family, e-mail EACTennis@yahoo.com or visit: •

EAC in Blue Point: 9A Montauk Highway, Blue Point, N.Y. • (631) 363-2882

EAC in Dix Hills: 854 East Jericho Turnpike, Dix Hills, N.Y. • (631) 271-6616

EAC in Melville: 100 Ruland Road, Melville, N.Y. • (631) 773-6293

EAC in Brooklyn Heights: 43 Clark Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. • (718) 625-0500

EAC in Prospect Park: 17 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, N.Y. • (718) 789-4600

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Evert Tennis Academy 10334 Diego Drive South Boca Raton, Fla. EvertAcademy.com The Evert Tennis Academy (ETA) is located in the Mission Bay area of Boca Raton, Fla. With 23 courts, pristine grounds, state-of-the-artequipment, a caring staff and family atmosphere combine make Evert Tennis Academy a beautiful and unique training environment. As the proud home to more than 15 Grand Slam participants and 100 Division I college athletes, Evert Tennis Academy has a proven record of success in developing champions at the highest levels. Chris Evert, tennis legend and winner of 18 Grand Slam titles, and John Evert, world-renowned developmental coach and academy director, believe in designing personalized programs that consist of a strategic balance between technical, tactical, mental and physical training. They pride themselves on handpicking some of the finest developmental coaches working in the sport who are dedicated to the instruction, development and success of each athlete Academy and Developmental Programs The Academy Program at Evert systematically addresses every aspect of a player’s game through a daily regimen of technical, tactical, mental and physical training. The Morning Training Session is composed of drilling, and strength and conditioning. The program is continued in the afternoon with a focus towards competition and tactics. The Developmental Program at Evert Tennis Academy is designed to take players to the next level by providing a very exclusive, individualized program and the difference between it and the Academy Program lies within the daily 1:1 lesson. Boarding students age 18 and younger enrolled in the FullTime, Weekly or Camp programs, stay in our three-story dormitory. Each dorm room houses up to two students during the school year and up to four students during Camp and Summer Sessions with boys and girls being housed on separate buildings. Evert Tennis Academy conveniently provides one-on-one airport transportation for its boarding students, for a fee (subject to change), to all three area international airports: (PBI) West Palm Beach (35 minutes), (FLL) Fort Lauderdale (35 minutes), (MIA) Miami International (55 minutes). All transportation coordination is handled directly through the Academy, making it stress-free and easy for you. Please contact Evert Tennis Academy at (561) 488-2001 for more information or e-mail Andrew.Parker@EvertAcademy.com.

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Future Stars Southampton 1370A Majors Path Southampton, N.Y. FutureStarsSouthampton.com (631) 287-6707 Located on the East End of Long Island, Future Stars Southampton is a year-round tennis facility with an awardwinning summer camp. The summer season brings Hamptons crowds looking for tennis options and Future Stars provides them all. From private lessons and junior programs to summer camps and seasonal courts, Future Stars is a one-stop shop for all tennis club necessities. The Future Stars facility consists of four outdoor HarTru courts, four outdoor hard courts and a full-service pro shop. Future Stars is proud to offer the most affordable tennis options in the Hamptons, with a team of more than 20 international tennis professionals, and programs for all ages and skill levels. In addition to the tennis club, the campus of Future Stars hosts 15 summer camp programs with tennis being among the most popular. Tennis Director Pablo Montesi has built the program over an eight-year period and has established a strong, loyal following through innovation, camaraderie and a consistent culture. Campers are grouped by age/skill level and are exposed to a healthy mix of on-court drills, stroke development and match play plus off-court agility/footwork training and more. In 2019 the Academy Program was introduced for elite players, which provides a 3:1 on-court ratio that allows for intensive skill development, video analysis, tournament play and a strong focus on fulfilling the potential of Future Stars athletes. Future Stars’ award-winning summer camps are a staple on the East End, with options available for campers starting at just 1.5-years-old and going all the way up to 16-years-old. Programs range from multi-sport, baseball, basketball to golf, explorer, chess and plenty more. For Summer 2020, Future Stars will be launching new art and volleyball programs. Future Stars employs experienced coaches, educators and college athletes to facilitate a positive, inclusive environment that aims to help young campers learn and grow through sports and group activities. For the off-season from September to May, Future Stars converts to an indoor facility with two climatecontrolled inflatable bubbles. One hosts four HarTru indoor tennis courts, while the other has a turf field for soccer, lacrosse, baseball, etc. Through the indoor season Future Stars operates mini-camps, junior tennis programs, adult clinics, soccer leagues, birthday parties and plenty more! Hope to see you on court soon! Visit Future Stars at FScamps.com or FutureStarsSouthampton.com, or call (631) 287-6707 for more info!

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Avenue Glen Head, N.Y. (516) 676-9849 GlenHeadRAF.com Glen Head Racquet & Fitness Club is a boutique tennis club that provides the highest tennis standards in the North Shore Area, the reason why it was named “2018 Tennis Club of the Year!” Though the Club has been one of the pioneers in the area, gathering and forming many champions over the years, under the new ownership, Glen Head Racquet and Fitness Club has been modernized in many ways. From the elegant fully-equipped locker rooms to the cozy lounge and LED lighting, everything comes together to satisfy every client. With easy access from both Glen Cove Road and LIRR (Glen Head Station), Glen Head Racquet & Fitness has a fantastic playing facility: Six high-quality hard courts of which four can be used for pickleball and table tennis classes. The satisfaction and results of the facility’s clients are priorities for us and now you can learn from the knowledgeable, certified pros. Their programs include:

• • • • •

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• A wide variety of junior and adult tennis clinics are available for all ability levels. These tennis programs feature video analysis, stroke development and refinement for both basic and advanced skills, including the use of spin, repetitive/tactical drills and some competitive situations. These clinics are a great opportunity to build solid technique and to learn new skills Accommodation for groups and teams year-round. If the existing programs do not meet your needs, we can tailor a group training session just for your team. We are happy to accommodate groups and teams yearround at our site. Summer camps: Glen Head’s camps offer technical and tactical training from highly-skilled and passionate certified coaches. Players will receive world-class instruction on every stage of their game, thus aiding in the advancement of their skill level. Glen Head’s coaches push each player to perform at their highest level and although it’s intense training, the coaches see to it that the week is fun and enjoyable. 10 & Under Tennis School break camps Pickleball classes Special events Private birthday parties

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New York Tennis at Great Neck 12 Shore Drive Great Neck, N.Y. NYTAGN.com (516) 233-2790 A hidden gem conveniently located and open to players of all ages and levels, New York Tennis at Great Neck is a short ride from anywhere in Nassau County and Queens. This scenic club overlooking the Little Neck Bay features five year-round clay courts, two outdoor season hard courts, and a highly-skilled and experienced coaching staff comprised of former ATP, ITF and NCAA players. New York Tennis at Great Neck has been serving up tennis in this location since 2010. Initially formed over 30 years ago by the late and legendary Tennis Director Howie Arons, the junior program has produced more than 90 NCAA players, 250 ranked junior players, and 1,000 high school players. The club’s adult program prides itself in having a wide array of programming, from dynamic clinics and express tennis for beginners, to high energy cardio tennis and in-club competitive leagues, ensuring adults have exactly what they’re looking for. The waterfront location, accommodating staff, and friendly atmosphere has also made the club an increasingly popular destination for those looking to host events, such as birthday parties, holiday parties and corporate outings. What players enjoy most about playing at the club is the comfortable, relaxed and welcoming environment that they feel when they walk through the doors of New York Tennis at Great Neck. Passion, consistency and authenticity ring true every day at the club, where everyone feels at home and part of one big, but at the same time, tight-knit tennis family.

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Point Set Indoor Racquet Club 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. PointSetTennis.com Lori@PointSetTennis.com (516) 536-2323 Extreme makeover … tennis club edition! Upgrade yourself by enjoying the all new U.S. Open blue tennis courts, gleaming locker rooms, renovated lobby/office and redesigned social space of post-storm Point Set Indoor Racquet Club! A state-of-the-art, spare no expense renovation out of respect to our customers! With 350-plus juniors in developmental programs, 60-plus QuickStart Pee-Wees, 500-plus adult players in leagues/contracts/drills, Point Set Racquet Club is working towards fulfilling its mission statement: Point Set aspires to be the most vibrant tennis club on the South Shore by integrating heart with sport in the community. The dedicated dream team staff of tennis professionals administers a top tier Tournament Training Program (TTP) for three levels of junior competitors. It addresses all aspects of competition: drills, match play, fitness and mental toughness. See what a difference the Point Set staff delivers as the facility has added airconditioning for a controlled climate for play year-round! Point Set Indoor Racquet Club recognizes that customers are its most important asset. The collegial relationship of the staff, on- and off-the-court, translates into a friendly environment for its customers. Point Set is a full-service club and your gateway to challenging yourself to explore, enjoy and improve yourself through the great sport of tennis. Experience the difference a supportive environment makes! Come play at Point Set, where fun meets fitness.

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Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. PWTA.com Tennis@PWTA.com (516) 883-6425 Port Washington Tennis Academy (PWTA) is dedicated to young people, primarily from the ages of four through 18. PWTA was created in 1966 as a non-profit facility to use tennis as a means of fostering educational success for children, by developing a stimulating lifelong activity that is fun, healthy, and scholastically and socially beneficial. This is accomplished by utilizing specialized techniques with a wide range of instructional programs, special in-house competitions and several USTA-sanctioned tournaments. Additionally, graduating high school seniors get the benefit of PWTA’s many years of experiences and up-todate knowledge of schools, teams and coaches when it comes to identifying, selecting and the eventual placement at a university meeting their individual capabilities and goals. While PWTA is well-known for many world-class professional players graduating from its programs, encouraging educational excellence will always be the club’s main focus. PWTA also offers an extensive variety of adult programs at all levels. Men’s and women’s daytime and evening leagues, private lessons, group clinics (three players plus a professional), seasonal courts, including instructional and season-ending doubles play sessions, are just part of the club’s broad spectrum of activities. PWTA is the largest indoor tennis facility on the East Coast, with 17 indoor courts (four hard and 13 HarTru) and a unique elevated quarter mile-long indoor running track. PWTA also provides many extras not found as part of a teaching program, such as an international teaching staff, closed-circuit TV for each court, upper TV lounge for relaxed viewing, spectator viewing galleries to ensure full visibility of every court, comfortable lounge areas, extensive men’s and women’s locker rooms, meeting rooms, etc. Complimentary coffee, tea, milk, cookies, juice and potassium-rich bananas are always available to PWTA members. In addition, the Academy has a fully-stocked pro shop to meet the needs of members. For more information, call (516) 883-6425 or visit PWTA.com.

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Ross School Tennis Academy 20 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Ross.org/Tennis TennisAcademy@Ross.org (631) 907-5162 Ross School Tennis Academy (RSTA) is the premiere training center in the Hamptons, boasting a beautiful tennis facility that is open to the public and located on the Ross Upper School Campus in East Hampton, N.Y. The Tennis Center features six HarTru courts that are enclosed by a bubble from mid-fall through mid-spring, allowing for year-round play. The Tennis Center features state-of-the-art amenities such as spacious locker rooms, lower level lounge, convenient snack bar, and ping-pong tables, and the staff provides a fun and supportive atmosphere that allows for the greatest amount of success. After-school programming, a dynamic program for junior players, and specialized summer programs are offered to make Ross Tennis Academy the place to play tennis in the Hamptons.

After-school Programs (Pre-K–Grade 12) • Nursery-Grade 4: Specialized one-hour training program where players build a strong foundation through a variety of game-based and cooperative activities using 10U age appropriate (Red, Orange or Green) balls and nets that will prepare them for eventual full court play. • Grade 5-Grade 12: Players build off their 10U foundation to further develop fundamental skills and techniques as they transition into yellow balls and prepare for full-court tournament competition. Ball control, strategy, and work ethic are all emphasized in this 90-minute session of drills and point play. Players in kindergarten and higher are required to play twice per week in this program. Integrated Training + Academic Program • Designed for USTA/ITF players in grades seventh through 12 and postgraduates, RSTA is the first in the New York City area to have a full academic program with a complete physical and mental conditioning program. In addition, unlike other tennis academies, RSTA is a small, intimate program that allows student-athletes to develop lasting relationships with coaches, while receiving personalized instruction. Students who attend the Academy experience high-performance tennis training, while studying alongside their peers in a stimulating college preparatory learning community following a regular academic year (Ross.org/Tennis). • Lessons and Court Rentals: Ross Tennis Academy also offers adult clinics, court rentals and private and group instruction for all ages and levels. The Tennis Center is also used for a variety of special events and is available for private parties.

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SPORTIME Tennis Clubs–Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy New York Region 11 locations across Long Island, Manhattan, Westchester and the Capital Region

SportimeNY.com/Tennis Info@SportimeNY.com (631) 269-1055

SPORTIME’s facilities, programs and coaches have set the tennis standard of excellence in New York since 1994. With more than 150 hard and soft surface courts, indoors and outdoors, we offer great tennis clubs, programs, academies and camps for players of all ages and abilities. To find out more, go to SportimeNY.com. Programs for everyone include: • Juniors: From Tennis Whizz for preschoolers, to the SPORTIME U10 tennis pathway for red and orange level players, to SPORTIME EXCEL for green and yellow level juniors, to the ultimate opportunity to train with New York tennis icon Johnny Mac and the John McEnroe Tennis Academy (JMTA) team, SPORTIME offers a complete menu of tennis programming for every level of junior development and play. SPORTIME Randall’s Island is the flagship home of JMTA, with additional JMTA locations in Syosset on Long Island, Amagansett on Long Island (summer only) and at Lake Isle, Eastchester in Lower Westchester. Our curriculums include world-class, age and level appropriate athletic training, mental toughness training, vision training, and more, reflecting our commitment to developing complete players. SPORTIME/JMTA’s approach, including gamification, gets kids playing fast and blends technical and tactical learning and coaching from the very first lesson. SPORTIME students turn their weaknesses into strengths and their strengths into winning games! Adults: SPORTIME’s Adult Tennis Kinetics is the largest adult group lesson program in the country. Major League Tennis, Cardio Tennis, and SPORTIME’s signature “Zone” high-intensity competitive games program all provide great workouts, combined with skills development and lots of fun! For those looking for the ultimate challenge, SPORTIME offers Adult EXCEL, modeled after the Junior EXCEL and JMTA programs. Mixed-doubles parties, round-robin mixers, club tournaments, special events, and concierge-style game arranging, enhance adult play throughout the year. SPORTIME and JMTA Tennis Training Camps: SPORTIME offers the best tennis camps anywhere and has a camp location near you! SPORTIME summer and school-break camps, including U10, EXCEL and JMTA player development camps, utilize fun and fast-paced training methods, competitive games, technical instruction and tactical training for match play, as well as off-court athletic and mental toughness training. Multi-Sport, Preschool, Volleyball and Hockey camps are also offered. LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, N.Y. NTC.USTA.com (718) 760-6200 The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, home of the US Open Tennis Championships, is the largest public tennis facility in the world. It is, most certainly, a “Tennis Welcome Center.” The Tennis Center is open to the public year-round for court rentals and offers exciting programming, as well as numerous events throughout the year. Programs are offered for all ages and levels, as well as clinics, private lessons, leagues, tours, field trips, summer camps, corporate events, birthday parties, and tournaments. The NTC also supports all USTA Community Tennis and Player Development initiatives. The professional staff of the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center also conducts community tennis programs, including 11 & Under Tennis for children 11 years of age and under to learn tennis in a fun and dynamic way; USTA Junior Team Tennis for youth match play; USTA League Tennis for competitive, level-of-play competition, and an official Cardio Tennis site for on-court heart-pumping fitness. Initiatives for USTA Player Development include an Invitational USTA Competition Training Center for ranked players, Player Development programs for top-ranking juniors residing in the Northeast, and a year-round USTA Tournament Training Program for ranked juniors. The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis also provides for diverse community outreach programs including; the New York Junior Tennis League (NYJTL), the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, various Community outreach events, the Queens District Attorney’s Star Track/Say Yes to Tennis, No to Violence program for Queens atrisk youth. The NTC hosts various tennis opportunities for special populations, including wheelchair tennis instruction for the physically-challenged from the months of October through July, HERO (Help Expand Recreational Opportunities) for developmentally challenged adults and tennis for autistic children through NYFAC (New York Families for Autistic Children). There is an extensive summer camp program which provides basic tennis instruction starting as young as 11 and under up through and including Academy level players. Camps include instruction and fitness programs; the encouragement of good sportsmanship leading to general character building for the children of all ages and levels. These services are provided at a nominal cost, making it affordable for youngsters who would not otherwise get the chance to attend camp or receive tennis instruction. Lastly, the Project ACES (Alternative Classroom Environment for Students), implemented at the NTC in 2009, is geared towards children from schools from the New York City Metropolitan Area. This program provides students the opportunity to visit the NTC and learn about the history and the game of tennis. 56

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2019

LONG ISLAND GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Written and compiled by Brian Coleman

Forman, Perfiliev Clinch Port Washington’s County Title

Port Washington reclaimed the Nassau County title with a win over Great Neck North in the finals

For the last few years, no tennis team on Long Island has been more dominant than the girls from Port Washington. The Vikings proved that once again by winning the Nassau County championship with a 7-0 win over Great Neck North at Eisenhower Park. “Even though the score was 7-0, it was a really close match,” said Port Washington Head Coach Shane Helfner. “We knew coming in that it was going to be a tight match, and the score isn’t indicative of how close the match really was. But the fact that we got seven points just shows the kind of depth we have, and how hard it is for teams to try and get points from top to bottom.” The first point that the Vikings got on the afternoon came from the third doubles duo of Casey Fanous & Samantha Radinsky, who won 6-1, 6-1 over Lauren Yu & Barrett Kanter. Soon after, Ellie Ross defeated Alyssa Ghassabian 6-0, 6-1 at third singles, and Andrea Martinez de los Rios notched a 58

6-3, 6-1 win at second singles, putting their team into a commanding lead. Needing just one court to clinch the County Title, Charlotte Forman & Dasha Perfiliev were seeking to close out their first doubles match against Margaret Haykin & Katharine Tang. Up 6-5 in the second set, Forman was serving, but quickly fell behind 0-30 on her service game. Forman dug in, though, delivering some clutch serves to fight back in the game, and the duo closed out their win and the team’s county championship with a put-away volley by Perfiliev on match point. “I didn’t even realize we were the deciding match, I was just so in the zone and when that happens you have the mentality that you’re not going to lose this point, not going to lose this game or match,” said Forman. “When you think about it that way it really helps you win.” Port Washington’s Kayla Hill & Misha Petrov won 6-4, 7-6(3) at fourth doubles,

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

Dasha Perfiliev (left) and Charlotte Forman (right) embrace after winning their match at first doubles which clinched the Nassau County Title for Port Washington and Katie Kors & Phoebe Levitsky came back to win 3-6, 6-3, 11-9 at second doubles, and Thea Rabman fought back from a set down to beat Amy Delman 4-6, 6-4, 6-2 at first singles, in a rematch of the county semifinals the previous week, to round out the scoring. “It was a lot of hard work,” Rabman said of the team’s success this year, bouncing back from a loss in the semifinals to Hewlett last year. “The captains were really helpful in getting us ready for each match, giving speeches before we played and keeping us motivated throughout the season.” Helfner added: “What I love most is that we started a new streak this year. I think that we learned most from last year was that anything can happen on a given day. They were determined, they were hungry and they wanted it more than ever this year. Our practices showed that. We prepared harder than ever and did everything we could to get here.”


2019

LONG ISLAND GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Westhampton Defeats Islip to Defend Suffolk Crown The Hurricanes of Westhampton Beach were crowned back-to-back Suffolk County Championships

With one match remaining in the Suffolk County Championship, a crowd gathered outside the fence of the fourth singles court at ShorehamWading River High School. As top-seed Westhampton Beach and third-seed Islip split the first six matches on the day, the Suffolk County Champion would come down to this one match. “I knew that I just had to stay calm and cool in order to win because it was all on me to take our team to the next step,” said Westhampton’s Julia Stabile. “I just tried to play the same way and stay calm.” Stabile did just that, as the eighthgrader clawed her way back from a set down to beat Islip’s Maya Levy 3-6, 6-2, 6-2 and clinch the Hurricanes’ second consecutive Suffolk County Title. Prior to her match in the County final, Stabile had not played a threesetter all season. “She was definitely a little frazzled

Julia Stabile won at fourth singles to clinch Westhampton Beach’s second straight Suffolk County title

after that first set, she wasn’t used to this,” said Westhampton Head Coach John Czartosieski. “But we had a talk and she settled down. We encouraged her to keep the ball in play longer, you can push, just keep it in play longer than your opponent, and she was able to do that.” Rose Hayes, Suffolk County’s Individual Singles Champion, put Westhampton on top early as she won at first singles. Islip then jumped into the lead with wins by Maddie Germano & Kate Berger at first doubles, Kristen Scheidel & Ciara Hand at second doubles and Darienne Rogers & Kendall Delaney at third doubles. But after Katelyn Stabile and Rose

Peruso won at second and third singles, respectively, all eyes turned to the fourth singles court, where the younger Stabile sister sealed the County Championship. “I’m just so proud of my girls. We lost half of our starters from last year to graduation, and then for this group to come back and do it again is amazing,” said Czartosieski. “We saw early on in the season that our team was pretty good. Many of the girls who were on the team last year but didn’t play a lot are in the lineup now and they’ve seen what it takes to win a County Title and a Long Island Championship. They stepped up their game and we had a lot of good players step up from junior varsity.”

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2019

LONG ISLAND GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP Port Washington Caps Off Undefeated Season With LI Championship The dominance of Port Washington Girl’s Tennis this season reached its culmination at The Hamlet Golf & Country Club in Commack, as the girls won for the 50th time in its last 51 matches, defeating Westhampton Beach 7-0 to capture the 2019 Long Island Championship. “What makes this even more special is that we just won [the Long Island Championship] with the boys team in the spring,” said Head Coach Shane Helfner. “So to sweep the calendar year, I’m very proud of both of our programs for being on top right now. I’m just really, really happy for everyone involved in our tennis program.” On center court at The Hamlet, Port Washington’s Thea Rabman and Westhampton Beach’s Rose Hayes squared off in the first singles match, in a battle of two of the top singles players on Long Island and who competed at the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) Championships just days prior. Rabman would get the best of Hayes, winning a tight two-setter, 7-5, 6-4. “I tried to step in on her balls and use variety, and try to take her consistency away from her,” said Rabman. “We’ve put so much effort in as a team this whole season. We’re really tired, especially the girls who went to States, but we’re always ready to play for our team.” As has been the strength of the Vikings team throughout the year, its doubles teams came up clutch once again. The match was played with Suffolk County rules, meaning four singles matches and three doubles matches, and Port Washington got its 60

Port Washington is currently atop the high school tennis mountain, as both the Boys and Girls teams won Long Island titles in 2019

Andrea Martinez won the fourth and clinching point for Port Washington with a victory at second singles

Thea Rabman, who reached the state singles final earlier in the week, won at first singles in the Long Island Championship

first three points of the day on the doubles courts, getting wins from Charlotte Forman & Dasha Perfiliev at first doubles, Casey Fanous &

Samantha Radinsky at second doubles, and Kayla Hill & Misha Petrov at third doubles, to build a commanding early lead.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com


2019

LONG ISLAND GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL RECAP The clinching match would come from second singles, as Andrea Martinez defeated Katelyn Stabile, 6-3, 6-1. “I didn’t even know that my match was the one that clinched it,” Martinez said. “I just really wanted to get the point for my team. This has just been such a fun experience.” Ellie Ross would defeat Rose Peruso 6-3, 6-1 at third singles, and Katie Kors notched a 7-5, 0-6, 10-4 win at fourth

singles to round out Port Washington’s sweep. “We have such a unique roster in that we have five girls who are freshmen or younger, and six girls who are seniors who have been taught what we expect each year,” said Helfner. “There is a great balance of veteran leadership and these young tournament players who can come right in and fill our lineup.” Multiple days of rain delayed the

match for over a week before it could be played, creating a tough scheduling adjustment for both teams. “It was tough and mentally exhausting for everyone involved,” Helfner added. “This was definitely unique. In all my years of coaching I don’t think I’ve ever had to wait almost two weeks to play a match. But I’m just happy we were able to get it in today and the girls came through.”

Hewlett’s Arbitman, Gershfeld Win State Doubles Title A year ago, Rachel Arbitman powered her way to the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) singles title. This year, the Hewlett sophomore moved to the doubles court with teammate Nyla Gershfeld, and the two parlayed their Nassau County Championship into a state title at Tri-City Tennis in Latham, N.Y. “We knew coming in what we wanted to accomplish, so to actually come here and do it feels really great,” said Arbitman. The NYSPHSAA final was a rematch of the Nassau County final, as the Hewlett duo of Arbitman & Gershfeld played sisters Kavina & Kaya Amin of Wheatley. The match was tightlycontested, but Gershfeld & Arbitman came out on top 7-5, 6-4 to claim the title. “It means a lot,” said Gershfeld. “I had never played States before, this is my first time, and it’s such a big accomplishment. I think we both have experience playing doubles, and we were close friends before, so we just clicked together.” In the singles final, Port Washington’s Thea Rabman’s excellent run came to an end as 2017 champion Julia

The Hewlett duo of Rachel Arbitman & Nyla Gershfeld captured the NYSPHSAA Doubles Championship in Latham, N.Y.

Andreach of Our Lady of Mercy High School in Rochester, N.Y. won her second title with a 7-6(4), 6-1 victory. It was an excellent weekend for the Long Island girls up in Latham. Cold Spring Harbor’s Merri Kelly Hannity reached the semifinals before falling to Rabman, while Westhampton Beach’s

Rose Hayes and Great Neck North’s Amy Delman reached the quarterfinals. Port Washington’s Ellie Ross & Andrea Martinez advanced to the quarterfinals in the doubles draw, while Ward Melville’s Jade Eggleston & Kira Kronenberg won their first-round match.

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Mastering the Mind Mindfulness at 125 MPH By Rob Polishook Remember when you saw Kawhi Leonard draining that last-second three pointer? Or Tom Brady driving down the field with less than two minutes to go? Or more recently, Rafael Nadal’s epic match versus Daniil Medvedev in the season-ending 2019 ATP Finals. He was down 1-5 in the third set, only to pull out the match 6-7, 6-3, 7-6 in what might be the greatest comeback of 2019. I don’t think anyone would disagree that in all these instances, the mental edge is huge. In fact, I’d say that the mental game is what separates the good athletes from the great ones. Novak Djokovic might agree, he is widely quoted as saying, “Tennis is a mental game. Everyone is fit, everyone can hit great forehands and backhands.” So what is it that many of these elite athletes are doing to help them compete at a higher level and manage adversity under pressure? One big part of an athlete’s preparation is something you

may not hear much about in the sport’s world: Meditation. Do you know that many great athletes meditate? In fact, Djokovic has long spoken about his practice and, just recently, US Open winner Bianca Andreescu spoke about how she visualizes ahead of big matches. Others include Michael Jordan, LeBron James, and Steph Curry in basketball; Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Jason Day in

golf; Tom Brady and the 2014 Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks in football; Carli Lloyd in soccer; Misty May-Treanor and Kerri Walsh Jennings in volleyball; Derek Jeter, Barry Zito and Marcus Stroman in baseball. The list goes on. Think about it. How much time and effort do you spend working on the technical aspects of tennis, hitting ball after ball? Then in fitness, trying to get stronger, and improving endurance? And

New York’s Premier Tennis Program For Over 30 Years & Counting Having proudly produced 90+ NCAA Division I, II, III Players / 250+ USTA Ranked Players / 1,000+ High School Players Offering programs for all ages and levels under the direction of a highly accomplished coaching staff of homegrown ATP, ITF, and NCAA players JUNIOR PROGRAMS • 10 & Under Pathway in association with Net Generation • Junior Development for recreational and high school players • High Performance Training for players competing in tournaments

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ADULT PROGRAMS • High Energy Cardio Tennis • Drill & Play, Group Clinics, Express Tennis for Beginners • In-club and USTA Leagues

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com


then drills, strategy and pattern play? Now, how much time do you spend on the mental side? If you’re honest with yourself, the answer is probably not very much. Athletes often disproportionately favor “everything else” to the point the mental side is almost non-existent. Yet we all know how important the mental emotional game is. In a 2008 post match press conference, Federer said, “Previously, I always thought it was just tactical and technique, but every match has become almost mental and physical— I try to push myself to move well. I try to push myself not to get upset and stay positive, and that’s what my biggest improvement is over all these years. Under pressure, I can see things clear.” What if you could practice mindfulness, and it could help you the same way it helps Novak Djokovic, Bianca Andreescu, Kobe Bryant or the Seattle Seahawks? Could it be helpful? Now, you may be wondering … what is mindfulness meditation? Where does it come from? And what’s in it for you? In this article, we will explore these questions. Then in future “Mastering the Mind: Mindfulness at 125 MPH” articles, I will discuss how can you practice mindfulness and integrate it into your mental training in an intentional and meaningful way. Mindfulness meditation has been around for 2,500 years. Like a great athlete, the practice has withstood the

test of time. Its roots extend back to the early teachings of the Buddha and Eastern wisdom. It’s important to note, mindfulness meditation is not a religion. Rather, mindfulness is about being present, it is a practice that helps you heighten awareness, acceptance and concentration among many other things. A quick Google search defines “Mindfulness” as, “The quality or state of being conscious or aware of something.” During my mindfulness meditation teacher training, our teacher David Nichtern defined mindfulness as: “Learning to bring our attention to the present moment and simply seeing what arises (thoughts, emotions, feelings) without judgment.” Imagine how freeing it would be to allow thoughts to come and go, and be able to refocus on your game, your strategy and what you can control during competition. It would be, literally, a gamechanger, and oftentimes, the difference between a big win or loss. The opposite of mindfulness is mindlessness! Mindlessness refers to not paying attention to what’s going on around you, or how your thoughts and emotions are impacting your behavior. In competition, it’s safe to say we have all experienced this to one degree or another. Perhaps you have had this recurring thought, “Oh my god, I’m nervous about playing him/her! Everyone thinks I should win.” Unfortunately, a

thought like that can send an athlete spiraling down the proverbial rabbit hole where you obsess about losing. Worse yet, you lose your focus on what you need to do to play your game. Mindfulness is a tool which will help you refocus, re-center and build resilience. In the next article, we will delve deeper into the benefits of mindfulness, and specifically, how to practice. For now, to get a brief sense of what it’s like to meditate, find a comfortable and quiet place, sit straight up with your eyes softly gazing down. Bring your attention to your breath, breathing in and out, settling into its rhythm. As your mind wanders, gently bring it back to your breath. Just these few moments may help you get ready. I’m just saying, if it’s good enough for Kobe, Curry, Novak, Jeter, Brady, Andreescu and other top athletes, it might be worthwhile for you. Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is the founder of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach, he works with athletes helping them to unleash their mental edge through mindfulness, somatic psychology and mental training skills. Rob is author of two best-selling books: Tennis Inside the Zone and Baseball Inside the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, e-mail at Rob@InsideTheZone.com, visit InsideTheZone.com, and follow Rob on Instagram @InsideTheZone.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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By Emilie Katz

Bryan Brothers Announce 2020 Will Be Last Year on Tour

titles. The Bryans’ last tournament will be the 2020 US Open.

Wozniacki to Hang it Up After Aussie Open

America and in a subsequent Instagram post, where she indicated there was more she wanted to accomplish in life off the court. Wozniacki is a two-time US Open finalist and held the year-end number one ranking in 2010 and 2011.

ESPN to Air Doc on Instant Replay in Tennis

The greatest duo to ever lace up tennis shoes, Bob & Mike Bryan, announced that their illustrious career will come to a close after the 2020 season. The 41-year-old duo have captured 118 doubles titles together, including 16 Grand Slam

Former world number one and Australian Open champion Caroline Wozniacki will end her professional tennis career after the Australian Open. The 29-year-old made the announcement on Good Morning

ARE YOU TRAINING AT THE BEST INDOOR CLUB IN THE COUNTRY? OPEN ENROLLMENT—CALL FOR EVALUATION & PLACEMENT 17 Courts, 4 Pickleball Courts & ¼ Mile Running Track...

One of the latest ESPN projects will be focused on instant replay in tennis. ESPN Films will be airing a 30 for 30 Short “Subject to Review” which takes a close look at the technology that’s been developed to make more accurate calls in sports, with a focus on tennis, but also the meaning and significance of the pursuit of that technology.

Jack Sock Gets Engaged American Jack Sock put a ring on it! The former eighthranked player in the world in singles and top-ranked doubles player got engaged

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to girlfriend, Laura Little.


Cibulkova Expecting First Child

Bollettieri Once Gave Lombardi Tennis Lesson

providing a cameo on The Morning Show, which is on Apple TV+ and stars Jennifer Aniston and Reese Witherspoon. In the episode, Sharapova has the line: “Wow, I’ve just got to say I love you guys together. It’s like watching a great tennis match.”

ATP Names New CEO

Soon after announcing her retirement from the WTA Tour, Slovakia’s Dominika Cibulkova shared some even bigger news with her fans. The 30-year-old Cibulkova and husband Michael Navar, who married in 2016, announced they were expecting their first child. Cibulkova, who was ranked as high as fourth in the world, closed the curtain on her 15-year career and now embarks on the next stage of her life.

Nick Bollettieri is one of the greatest coaches in tennis history, and it was recently revealed that he gave a lesson to one of the greatest coaches in the history of sports. Sports reporter Darren Rovell tweeted out a picture of a check Vince Lombardi wrote to The ATP recently named Massimo Bollettieri for a tennis lesson in 1964. Calvelli its chief executive officer, and The cost? $17.64. he will assume that role beginning on January 1, 2020. Calvelli was a Sharapova Shows unanimous choice by the ATP’s Board of Directors, and enters his new position after 20-plus years as a sports executive in global sales, marketing, operations and product development.

Djokovic, Serena Named Players of the Decade Maria Sharapova recently stepped off the court and into a television studio,

2020 USPTA Conferences and Workshops

As the decade came to a close, Tennis.com named Novak Djokovic and Serena Williams as the Men’s and Women’s Player of the Decade, respectively. Djokovic posted a record of 627-100, and Serena posted a record of 377-45 from 2010-2019, and both were clearly the most dominant players on the respective tours over the last 10 years.

• January 24-25 - USTA Eastern Section's Annual Conference in White Plains, NY • February 15 - New York Open Workshop at Nassau Coliseum in Uniondale, NY • May 1-3 - USPTA Eastern/New England Annual Conference in Newport, RI USPTA is accredited by the USTA

USPTA.com/getyoursix TM

Please contact Paul Fontana at 914-656-0614 or paul.fontana@uspta.org LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Elasticity and the Modern Spanish Forehand

By Chris Lewit he modern forehand at the professional level, especially on the men’s side of the game, is typified by parabolic swing shapes, leg explosion and hip rotation, mid-air ball striking, lower, reversed and inverted finishes—and most of all—elasticity. Looking back at the evolution of tennis technique over the past 3040 years, the dramatic change is striking. In the 1970’s and 1980’s for example, the typical forehand technique was mostly linear,

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grounded and relatively rigid, with an emphasis on weight shift, firm wrist and extension out to a high finish in front or around the neck. What’s remarkable is that even with the enormous change at the top level of the game, coaches still teach the outdated forehand mechanics of the 1970’s and 80’s to young children, and then try to sell it to players and parents as “Learning solid fundamentals.” This is a joke. If your kid is stuck with a coach or club that insists on teaching technique from a bygone era, don’t just walk away—run—and find a teaching environment that

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

emphasizes modern technique and builds players for the future of the game. While it’s possible to learn an old fashioned stiff technique and then later on morph it into a modern, elastic stroke, why risk it? And why put yourself or your child through such an inefficient learning process? It’s much faster and better to learn an elastic and whippy forehand based on the modern model from day one. Ingrain one motor program in the player, a motor engram that doesn’t have to be upgraded or changed later. In Spain, there are still coaches in


the old guard—even legends like Luis Bruguera and Toni Nadal— who stress the “old school” fundamentals first, but many in the younger generation of coaches are embracing a more modern style of technical development. In my school and at my summer camp, we try to focus on building the forehand foundation in this modern Spanish way, using special exercises from Spain—but wasting as little time as possible—and preparing the technique to allow a powerful and massive RPM shot in the future. This continues the classic Spanish philosophy of making the heavy topspin forehand the primary weapon of the player— but uses a more efficient method than has been traditionally used in Spain. Toni Nadal calls the forehand “the most important shot in the game.” I agree that it is important—maybe not the most important shot—but critical. However, I want to develop the essential motor program from day one, rather than build one motor program and then wait for a second one to replace the first. Back here in the United States, I see so many kids under 10-yearsold who have been taught stiff, linear forehands, closed stances

and follow-throughs to the ear or neck—often from mediocre RedOrange-Green U10 programs. This style of teaching ruins more forehands than it helps. Most players end up scarred for life with outdated form, overly flat shots and difficulty generating a heavy ball. Sometimes, hitting flat and hard can work on the indoor hard courts of New York and New England, but players are in for a rude surprise if they ever aspire to play well on outdoor slow hard or clay courts, or on the red dirt in Europe. Next time you are taking a class or watching a kids’ class, observe if the technique being taught reflects the modern game or if it’s from the old school textbook. You should look for the following keys: • Open and semi-open stances taught early alongside closed stances • Parabolic swing path with pronounced arm pronation and rotation (windshield wiper movement) in the forearm after contact • Controlled explosions with players allowed to leave the ground • Good hip rotation creating lag in the racquet and a whipping effect in the forward swing

• A loose, elastic arm • Inverted finish (racquet tip pointing down) with the racquet frequently wrapping around the side of shoulder, waist or even the hip • Significant topspin generated Make sure your coach understands modern biomechanics and can teach the modern forehand clearly and efficiently. You or your player will improve faster with this approach rather than learning outdated fundamentals first. Vamos! Chris Lewit is a former number one for Cornell and a pro circuit player. He is a high-performance coach, educator, and the author of two best-selling books: The Secrets of Spanish Tennis and The Tennis Technique Bible. He has coached numerous top 10 nationally-ranked players and is known for his expertise in building the foundations of young prodigies. Chris trains players during the school year in the NYC area, and players come from around the country to his summer camp in the paradise of Vermont. He may be reached by phone at (914) 4622912, e-mail ChrisLewit@gmail.com or visit ChrisLewit.com.

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charitable initiatives Commack, Port Washington Host Tennis with the Teachers Events

ach year, the Commack Girls Tennis team hosts a fundraiser to raise money for the Breast Cancer Research Fund. The team did so once again this year, as each player paired up with a teacher to compete in the “Tennis with the Teachers Doubles Tournament” at Commack High School. “Together, the team worked very hard to organize the event to raise a few hundred dollars for the Breast Cancer Research Fund,” said Commack Head Coach Jackie Clark. “Partnering up with their teachers is something that they look forward to every year and it’s wonderful to see the studentathletes and teachers having such a great time out on the courts. Although many of the teachers were beginners in level, they all had a blast competing and we saw a lot of great points.” The doubles teams competed on court in a singleelimination format, as raffle prizes and gifts were auctioned off just outside the courts. It was a fun yet competitive atmosphere that led to some exciting tennis, but more importantly, coming together as a community to raise money

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for a good cause. In the end, the team of Ava Sheerin & Social Studies teacher Jose Zaidinski would come out on top and win the tournament. “Playing tennis is a great way to connect with others, exercise, have fun and help others in the process,” Clark added. “The event was a great way to end our fantastic season.” The girls from the Port Washington tennis team held a similar event to raise money for Breast Cancer Awareness, as each player from their program paired with a teacher or administrator from the school district, with local stores also donating gifts and prizes to be raffled off. Andrea Martinez and French teacher Julie Suk-Novinski were victorious in the tournament, while Kayla Hill and Guidance Counselor Joe Lorge finished in second. “It was a great way to bring the community, school and tennis program together for such a worthy cause and try to make a difference in the community,” said Port Washington Head Coach Shane Helfner.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com


Looking Ahead to the 2020 Season By Luke Jensen

tennis shoes and feel the sunshine. My heart will always be drawn to a place my An intriguing year on brother Murphy and I called tennis home for many years, Sea Island Resort. It’s just tour for sure I’m looking forward to a heaven on Earth and the perfect getaway. “Rock-n-Roll Tennis” start to A lot of my club members have been flocking to travel out to the BNP Paribas 2020. The year kicks off with the Aussie Open, Open in Indian Wells, Calif., or to Boca Raton, Fla. to attend the Miami Open. To and with so many new events like the Laver Cup and the new Davis Cup format, me, the winning formula is play and P-L-AY while watching world-class tennis. I cannot wait for another great year of tennis. The sport has fresh faces emerging My winter tennis tip on the scene to add to the intrigue of I will leave you with the tennis tip of the watching Roger Federer, Serena and winter. The overhead is an extremely Venus Williams, Rafael Nadal and Novak important shot when looking to close out a Djokovic. point at the net. It is one of the most critical The 2020 farewell tour of the Bryan shots, but one that is not focused on Brothers will be bittersweet for me to enough during practice sessions. Most watch because, to me, they approached players hate playing lobbers because they the game the right way. Fun was always have bad overheads. If you have a great the number one priority when they overhead, you look forward to playing the competed, and boy did that work! moon baller! Having a great overhead is A massive salute to all the league about eliminating the full swing like you’d team winners and participants Adult leagues have really become the bedrock of the tennis energy here in New York. The club where I swing my racket is the historic West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, and we have all kinds of leagues competing year-long. In the winter time, my junior program ends at 8:00 p.m. with those rock stars sweeping and lining the courts for the league players about to compete after them. I marvel at how the players are so locked in and focused as if they were walking into the final of a Grand Slam. I wish them luck, but most of the time, they can’t hear me with the pregame music blaring in their headphones. It’s also that time of year to pack up the sticks and hit the road to an awesome tennis destination. Get some sand in those

have in your service motion. Cut out the big windup and simplify the motion by taking the racket directly to your shoulder in the trophy position. This helps with the quick timing and precision that goes into hitting a great overhead. If you see your opponent taking a full swing at their overheads in the warm-up, lob them! Trust me, you will win tons of points because of it. Until next time … GET YOUR RACKET STRUNG! Raised in Ludington, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles. He was also a member of the U.S. Davis Cup teams that reached the finals in 1991 and won in 1992. His ambidextrous play, including his ability to serve the ball with either hand at 130 mph, earned him the nickname “Dual Hand Luke.” Luke is currently director of racket sports at West Side Tennis Club in Forest Hills, N.Y. He may be reached by phone at (315) 4030752 or e-mail LukeJensen84@yahoo.com.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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junior tennis spotlight

M YTHBUST ERS

Which States Do the Strongest Junior Players Live in? BY R I C K Y BE C K E R

Some information probably won’t actually help you much but may still be interesting. The table below is just that. Have you ever wondered which states are the biggest producers of top junior tennis players? The table below is a fairly empirical way of ranking the states. We did the same study in 2016 and a few people asked if we can do a table in 2019 for comparison. The list was compiled by taking the top 150 kids in the TennisRecruiting.com National Junior Rankings for both 2019 Total Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 70

State

California Florida Texas New York New Jersey Illinois South Carolina Georgia Ohio North Carolina Michigan Pennsylvania Virginia Washington Massachusetts Indiana

genders in all four high school grades (senior, junior, sophomore and freshman) and assigning a point value for each child. The state where the number one player in the country lives gets 150 points, in the number two state player gets 149 points, etc. While Universal Tennis Rating may be used more widely, TennisRecruiting.net seemed like a better measure to use here due to the fact it actually measures who wins the matches. Would you have predicted it to fall something like this?

Total Points

Boys Rank

Boys Points

Girls Rank

Girls Points

2016 Rank

(3-Year Movement)

19,771 11,197 8,523 4,919 4,011 3,898 3,477 3,038 2,814 2,647 2,403 2,024 1,866 1,792 1,490 1,399

1 2 3 4 6 5 9 8 13 7 11 12 10 15 16 19

10,381 6,119 4,293 2,495 1,776 1,843 1,329 1,457 960 1,683 1,134 1,052 1,189 825 741 605

1 2 3 4 5 7 6 9 8 13 10 11 18 12 16 15

9,390 5,078 4,230 2,424 2,235 2,055 2,148 1,581 1,854 964 1,269 972 677 967 749 794

1 2 3 4 6 8 7 5 10 11 12 17 9 16 15 18

No Change No Change No Change No Change +1 +2 No Change -3 +1 +1 +1 +5 -4 +2 No Change +2

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com


2019 Total Rank 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38-39 38-39 40 41

State

Arizona Oklahoma Connecticut Maryland Nevada Tennessee Utah Louisiana Kansas Minnesota Oregon Colorado Wisconsin Alabama Puerto Rico Hawaii Washington, D.C. Arkansas Kentucky New Mexico Rhode Island Delaware New Hampshire Missouri Maine

42 43 44-45 44-45 46-52 46-52 46-52 46-52 46-52 46-52 46-52

Iowa Montana Idaho Mississippi Alaska Nebraska North Dakota South Dakota Vermont West Virginia Wyoming

Total Points

Boys Rank

Boys Points

Girls Rank

Girls Points

2016 Rank

(3-Year Movement)

1,250 1,199 1,187 1,181 933 793 788 753 691 691 645 585 463 416 334 311 277 267 208 197 139 138 138 122 119

25 22 17 14 26 24 20 23 29 18 21 28 39 27 41-52 30 31 38 34 41-52 37 41-52 32 35 33

412 476 664 887 365 432 591 463 218 630 509 251 7 321 0 138 127 36 99 0 42 0 126 63 119

14 17 20 26 19 23 30 27 21 39 34 24 22 37 25 31 32 28 35 29 36 33 44 40 45-52

838 723 523 294 568 361 197 290 473 61 136 334 456 95 334 173 150 231 109 197 97 138 12 59 0

13 23 19 14 25 28 37 20 21 29 31 26 33 22 27 39 24 30 38 32 43 45-52 45-52 34 42

-4 +5 No Change -6 +4 +6 +14 -4 -4 +3 +4 _2 +4 -8 -4 +7 -9 -4 +3 -4 +6 +7 +7 -6 +1

95 90 26 26 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

36 41-52 41-52 40 41-52 41-52 41-52 41-52 41-52 41-52 41-52

43 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

41 38 42 43 45-52 45-52 45-52 45-52 45-52 45-52 45-52

52 90 26 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

36 45-52 45-52 35 45-52 41 45-52 44 45-52 40 45-52

-6 +2 +1 -9 -1 -5 -1 -2 -1 -6 -1

Ricky Becker is the director of tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors yearround at Bethpage State Park. As a player, Becker was awarded Most Valuable Player for the 1996 NCAA Championship Stanford Tennis Team and 1989-1992 Roslyn High School teams. He was ranked number one in the East and number four in the United States in the 18-and-Unders. He can be reached by e-mail at RBecker06@yahoo.com, call (516) 605-0420 or visit JuniorTennisConsulting.com. LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Serve and Volley for Women:

Why Not? By Lisa Dodson There are a number of classic “reasons” for the lack of serve and volley among women in the modern game of tennis. Opinions and quotes from fans, players, coaches and commentators are many. True or not here, they are: 1. “The return is too big.” 2. “Women’s serves are not big enough and they are too small.” 3. “Racket and string technology makes serve and volley ‘suicidal.’” 4. “Women aren’t agile and quick in forward/back movement.” I have long been a believer that women’s tennis took an ill-advised, one-dimensional turn many years ago. With the onset of topspin, the baseline became the main room in the house for female players. A successful style was created and copied, commentators and coaches professing that this was the 72

way women should play tennis. We, the coaches, professionals and spokespeople for the game bought into this in a big way. Consequently, we have undermined players’ abilities and undervalued a substantial part of the game in women’s tennis. The serve We all know that, generally speaking, women are not physically capable of serving at the same speed as men. Nature dictates this by giving men the size, speed and strength advantage. That being said, it does not mean that women cannot develop big serves. A male’s muscle mass is above the waist and a female’s is below the waist. Women need to be taught to engage the center and lower body more to harness their natural power and to couple this with a proper throwing technique. The fastest, officially-recorded, serve by a woman is 131 miles per hour by Sabine Lisicki, followed by 12 pro players who have recorded

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

speeds over the minimum 124 miles per hour benchmark. Given the right tools and coaching, these exceptional results are attainable by female players. It’s all a matter of the player and coach believing that this is possible and going through a solid progression. It’s also a matter of time spent, balls hit and willingness to persevere. Like anything else, there are some players who will take to the challenge more naturally and with open and accepting attitudes. These players and coaches will then set the bar for others. In the last few years, there has been a push to improve women’s serves, and strides are being made to earn some cheap points. Commanding play from the serve can be the future of women’s tennis if we make it a priority. We’re not even talking about blasting untouched aces, but setting a tone and confidence for a match by using varying spin, pinpoint placement and speed. The key is to make the receiver hit returns that are outside of


their striking zone. Then, returns become less accurate, less deadly and more vulnerable. The volley The serve always gets the blame for the lack of serve and volley for women. What about the poor old neglected classic volley, which just so happens to be the second and equally important half of the serve and volley? The art of the volley has been stripped and robbed by forehand grips. Female players spend so much time on the baseline hitting topspin forehands and two-handed backhands that the Continental grip is a stranger. Dangerously true is that this happens daily at grassroots levels. It’s no wonder that our most creative and versatile female players in history utilize the one-handed backhand. Using a Continental grip for the backhand leads to familiarity of what this grip provides for both the serve and the volley. The Continental grip is essential for a controlled volley. Generally, classic volleys are not meant to overpower, but to put pressure on the opponent to hit a difficult passing shot and is a necessity for the first or mid-court volley. Forward movement takes players from one physical place to another by means of hitting the shot and is an integral part of hitting this

non-swinging shot. Female players need to spend time on their volley technique and how to make that technique work on the move. If it is true that women are less good at forward movement and struggle with transitioning reflexively, then it really is for lack of doing it. Reallocate a good chunk of practice time to coming forward, learning an athletic split-step and quickening up the transition. Add a precision first volley to complete building the confidence to use a serve and volley or an approach technique. Not only will this make serving and volleying more successful, but it will enhance approaching on forceful ground shots or returns. It’s time and it takes time. Don’t get me wrong. I’m not advocating that all women players should become serve and volley players, I’m advocating a winning style of play at all levels. Use it at specific, strategic times, against specific player types, as a pressure tool, as a bluff. Just use it! Remember that when you go to the net, you will sometimes get passed. But in the meantime, you will win more points by simply approaching (and not having to volley) than you will by volleying. The premise above is driven by facts. Craig O’Shannessy, the lead strategy analyst for ATP and WTA, cited the following facts:

An examination of the statistics shows that serving and volleying remains a winning strategy for men and women … At the 2012 US Open, both men and women had the highest winning percentage (of baseline, net and serve and volley) when serving and volleying: 68.7 percent for men, 69.2 percent for women. The percentages were similar for Wimbledon 2013. Surprisingly, baseline points won were 46.2 percent for men and 47.3 percent for women. Still, there were only 190 serve-andvolley points in the women’s tournament, and only 37 of the 128 women in the field served and volleyed at all. 19 women did not lose a point while serving and volleying. Perhaps things will change when coaches encourage women to spend quality time on their serve, volley and the athletic movements associated with putting them together. So, let me ask again, why not? Lisa Dodson is the developer and owner of Servemaster, a USPTA Elite Professional and a former WTA worldranked player. She is currently the director of tennis at Shenorock Shore Club in Rye, N.Y. She may be reached by e-mail at Lisa@TheTotalServe.com or visit TheTotalServe.com.

Play SMART - Coach SMART With

SERVEMASTER

“I started using Servemaster when I was 11 years old. Now I’m a pro and I still use it every day.” —Alycia Parks How and why does it work? Check it out at:

www.totalserve.com Lisa Dodson lisa@thetotalserve.com

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2020 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Anticipating Your Opponent’s Shot O By Mike Puc

ne of the quickest ways to elevate your club doubles game is through proper positioning, strategy and tactics. Club members are often out of position and struggling to get to balls and marvel how advanced players seem to know where the ball is going before it is struck by the opponent. Anticipation is the word to describe this skill, and with a few astute observations of your opponent, you will quickly find yourself ahead of the play. Start with a proper ready position, with your feet shoulder-width apart, weight on your toes and turning your belly button or “squaring off” to your opponent who is striking the ball. This alignment will provide the best balance and opportunity for movement once the ball is stuck. Pros will often coach players to “follow the ball” on the other side of the court, sliding left, right and up and back on your side of the court, mirroring your opponent. This is good advice. Watch your opponent’s body language and

evaluate their potential shot responses based on their position on the court. If they are deep in the court and falling backward, you can safely assume you will not be receiving a drop-shot or power drive shot. You are more likely to receive a ball back on the trajectory it arrived, so eliminate the low responses and look for the obvious. It may be the ball that you yourself would hit from this position. When advancing to the net after a good lob from the baseline, move to the service line and get set. I prefer to call the service line the “look and see line,” since I want to stop at this neutral position to evaluate the opponent’s response. Many players run too close to the net and get a winner lob hit over their heads. When you play at the net, reset yourself between the net and the service line or “IVP” (Ideal Volley Position) after every shot. Players often get too close to the net and are lobbed when not returning to the IVP. Shuffling backwards footwork to reset is often ignored, resulting in the ability to only move forward and not adapt. You must move back and reset to volley after each hit once achieving the IVP. The back-step shuffles occur

on all areas of the court from returning back to a “home base” position on the baseline to the aforementioned volley area. It can also save you from bodily injury when your opponent has an easy overhead close to the net. While many players do not adjust their position, this is a moment when you should definitely anticipate a hard overhead and square off and shuffle back as far as you can until your opponent strikes the ball when you must then be set and make your stand giving yourself a better chance to return the ball. Your court position and readiness is predicated by your opponent’s position on the court. Evaluate your opponent’s court position and shot selection at their disposal for better anticipation. Mike Puc has been the director of tennis at Gleneagles Country Club in Delray Beach, Fla. since 1998. A winner of 15 National titles and an ATP world ranking, Mike directs 25 teams with 350 players in nine leagues, while offering the most extensive calendar of events in South Florida that includes tournaments, lectures and social roundrobins.

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djcmnyc@gmail.com 74

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com


The Talk By Barbara Wyatt Travis storms the net, finger pointed … “Stop calling my balls out. That ball was in.” Without a pause, his partner says, “We’re calling for line judges.” Thank heavens, I thought, There IS a player with intelligence on that side of the net. Travis’ partner demonstrated she knows tennis rules when she requested line judges. Travis needs a reminder about courtesy on court (The Code Rule 1) and not making line calls from his side of the net (The Code Rule 5). His combative behavior made me want to leap from the bleachers and launch into “The Talk,” a lecture about line calls. First, it’s difficult to identify a splitsecond ball-landing position. The ball, and maybe the player, are moving. Travis’ view from over 70-feet away and through a net, is not as accurate as two players less than 10-feet from where the ball landed. Vic Braden, tennis aficionado with books, videos and legendary coaching techniques, published a “Tennis Ball Vision Study,” a video summary that

can be viewed on YouTube. Second, if you believe there has been an incorrect line call, ask: “Are you sure?” If a second call in the match appears to be incorrectly identified, ask again: “Are you sure?” and mention you might call for line judges. If you believe a third ball is incorrectly called out, formally ask for line judges. Yet at any time, you may request line judges. If the first bad call happens in a tie-break or at a critical match point, call for line judges. Third, three bad line calls rarely result in a complete loss of the match. In a three-set tennis match, more than 100 points (ball landings) could determine the winner of the match. A set that ends at 6-0, with all six games at 40-0, means there were 24 points in that set. A match won 6-0, 6-0, all games at 400, means the set was won with 48 points. If the match was 6-4, 6-4, it may have required 80 points to determine a winner. Matches with tiebreaks require more than 100 points to determine a winner. Some points land on or near a white line. Bad line calls may earn a player three points out of 100. Line judges prevent further abuses. Players need to focus

on the 97 other points: Get the first serve in, make fewer unforced errors and discuss strategies with a partner. In Travis’ match, even with line judges on the court, he was obsessed with lines and questioned his opponents’ line calls throughout the remainder of the match. The judges corrected him more than 10 times saying, “Yes, Travis, your ball was out. Their out call is correct.” Travis threw his anger at the judges. His gestures of intimidation and his fight-invoking finger-waving left an unpleasant taste for spectators and players. The opponents ignored Travis’ tantrums and focused on the 97 other points: First serves in, tennis strategies and fewer unforced errors. They won and it wasn’t a surprise. Barbara Wyatt is a writer, photographer, USTA official, and mobile app developer of iKnowTennis!, the tennis rules app. Her poem, Ode to Tennis, an amusing poem on the joys and frustrations when learning tennis, is available at Amazon. She can be reached by e-mail at BarbaraW@iKnowTennis.com.

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Being Recruited Is an Acquired Skill, Understand It Quick

By Lonnie Mitchel For years, writing editorial contributions for Long Island and New York Tennis Magazine, I have shared so many different points of views on a variety of topics in the world of tennis. From the teaching courts here on Long Island, to Upstate New York at the State University of New York at Oneonta coaching the Men’s and Women’s Tennis teams. Furthermore, being exposed to traveling abroad, coaching top Division I tennis players in Chile, Germany, Hungary and Israel. Having my collegiate team compete against high levels of competition throughout the country has also exposed me to a plethora of tennis talent. Now, after close to 50 years around the sport, seeing it evolve from a wood racket finesse game to the power game it is today, I have also been lucky with a 20-plus year corporate career to augment the tennis experience I humbly posses. As I coach in the collegiate ranks and teaching business classes at SUNY Oneonta, I like to think that I also bring 76

something more to the table for students to gain knowledge from. I have learned from coaching and teaching that a coach must be willing to learn from students almost as much as they try to teach to their pupils. After all, everyone has a different learning style and a coach has to adapt on a daily basis to every player they interact with. I love that about coaching and teaching to embrace challenges every day. Students have taught me that I do not know everything and young people’s qualities have changed in the way they need to be communicated with and coached. I learn from those students who I am recruiting as well. Here is another challenge and coaching opportunity for young people. A great deal of my offseason activity is related to recruiting and learning. I love to recruit and talk about our school, tennis team/family, our activities, the wonderful aspects of playing collegiate tennis, and the rewards that can be garnered by participating and competing. What I confront on the recruiting trails is eager, potential student athletes who dream about playing collegiate tennis and parents

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

who support their efforts. As a recruiter, I am the first to understand that there are hundreds of colleges to choose from and teams to play for with good coaches all over the country. I never lose sight of that important fact. I also spend lots of the time in the classroom teaching students in a business school environment on how to sell, market and always put the best brand of yourself out into the marketplace. The same applies for the recruiter and the potential student athlete. The days of social media and iPhones have contributed to eroding young people’s social skills. One practices their tennis strokes for hours upon hours to perfect their game, taking years to improve incrementally. Mental toughness is a science that can be practiced and improved, and great self-talk is an acquired skill to supplement your oncourt tennis performance, beyond just tennis strategy and technical competence. Now, let’s learn how parents and potential student/athletes should be recruited—another acquired competence. If you are not interested in the college, be upfront with the coach. It does little service to not return a phone call, e-mail


or text, in the process ignoring a tennis professional who is simply interested in you. That coach talks to other college coaches and your reputation follows you. You might find yourself rejected from your top college choice and have to consider a second or third choice. A coach is not going to be as welcoming if you did not respond and promote yourself in the best light the first time around. You only have one chance to make a good first impression … don’t blow it! It happens often: You go to the college of your choice and find that it was not what you thought it was going to be. Perhaps the ill-perceived romance of playing tennis at the Division I program you selected leaves you lacking time for your studies. Now you are thinking about transferring to a Division III college and competing at another high level institution where academics is stressed, and a great athletic experience, it turns out, was the right thing to do after all. So you did not show that collegiate coach respect or the courtesy of a return text or phone call on the outset, and now you want to transfer to that college. I am not sure that will have a happy outcome as you left a poor brand aftertaste. Your behavior, your reputation which you create and have the power to author, follows you wherever you go. Something to consider is that the world of tennis is

very small with only one or two degrees of separation and if your reputation is not good it will be revealed faster than you think. The last thing you should know, while it pains me to say, is: “You are not as good as you think” … in other words, be humble. You may be the best in your high school, an all-county player, ranked highly in the USTA juniors in your district, section or nationally. Congratulations, but those credentials, while something to be proud of, is now in the past. You come to college as a boy or girl with a clean slate playing against experienced men and women who once had similar credentials as you. You have to prove yourself all over again and nothing is going to be handed to you. Go out of your way to understand, no matter what school or coach you talk to, represent yourself as a human being first and tennis player second. The human qualities of good tennis players resonate more. Qualities that are consistent in the world of collegiate tennis and in my program are traits such as a love of the game and keen competitive spirit, a person who loves being on a team and not playing for one’s self, someone who is coachable, an organized student and a willingness to learn, self-motivated, pleasant attitude, humility and emotional maturity. I will end this article in perhaps an abrupt fashion. I can see your video,

watch you play and try to get to know you, but display some, if not all, of the these qualities from the onset before during and after you are being recruited. Those qualities resonate far more than anything else. I will put a bow on this article and borrow some advice from the great football coach Nick Saban who said, “Get rid of the buts.” In other words, be as many of these qualities as possible AND as many of those traits mentioned to augment the promotion of yourself. Some of those traits adding a “but” could very well indicate a red flag. Communicate with every coach who is taking the time to show interest in you. Be a person who is forthright and honest. You will be shocked and pleasantly amazed to see the success that will result. Lonnie Mitchel is head Men’s and Women’s Tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Also coached for Team USA in Berlin and Chile in 2015 and Team USA Maccabiah for the Open Division working with Division I players and professionally ranked in the Israel Games in 2017. Was also named “Coach of the Year” in 2015 for State University of NY Athletic Conference. He may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail LonnieMitchel@yahoo.com.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2020

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. JANUARY 2020 Friday-Sunday, January 24-26 L6 Bethpage Park Winter Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Jan. 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RBecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Friday-Sunday, January 24-26 L7 (former L2) Sportime Syosset January Open Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Boys’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Level 7 Boys’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Jan. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, January 24-26 L6 RWTTC January Challenger Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Jan. 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RWagner968@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Sunday, January 26 Eastern UPS at ATS Point Set Tennis Center 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Green Ball 14 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Jan. 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 536-2323.

Friday-Sunday, January 24-26 L7 LBTC Winter Classic Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Jan. 20 at 1:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail Sid@LongBeachTennisCenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, January 24-26 L7 GHRF January Open Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Level 7 Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday Jan. 20 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Strong28@msn.com or call (516) 676-9849.

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Friday-Sunday, January 31-February 2 L4 Eastern Empire Cup at Bethpage Park Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Level 4 Boys’ Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (MFIC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $59.63 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Jan. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RBecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Friday-Sunday, January 31-February 2 L7 Eastern Open at RWTTC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, Jan. 22 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RWagner968@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, January 31-February 2 L6 January RSTA Challenger Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14, 18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Jan. 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail CSidor@Ross.org or call (631) 907-5162. Friday-Sunday, January 31-February 2 L4 Eastern Empire Cup at GHRF Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Level 4 Boys’ Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (MFIC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $59.63 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday Jan. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Strong28@msn.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, January 31-February 2 L4 Eastern ATS Empire Cup Point Set Tennis Center 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Advanced Girls’ Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (MFIC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $59.63 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Jan. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 536-2323. Friday-Sunday, January 31-February 2 L6 Sportime Syosset January Challenger Sportime-Syosset • 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 364-2727. FEBRUARY 2020 Saturday-Sunday, February 1-2 Youth Progression Green L1 Robbie Wagner’s at Glen Cove Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Green Level 1 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (FRLC) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Jan. 27 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail StephenAAlcala@gmail.com or call (516) 759-0505.


USTA/Long Island Region 2020

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L6 RWTTC February Challenger Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Feb. 4 at 11:59 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RWagner968@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L6 Bethpage Park February Challenger Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road • Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RBecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L7 February Open at World Gym World Gym Racquet Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road • East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) and Level 7 Boys’ & Girls’ Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles For more information, e-mail VTAPR@hotmail.com or call or call (631) 751-6100. Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L6 RSTA February Challenger Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail CSidor@Ross.org or call (631) 907-5162. Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L6 Deer Park February Challenger Deer Park Tennis Club 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 3 at 1:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail fortunadpt@gmail.com or call (631) 667-3476.

Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L7 LBTC February Cup Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Boys’ & Girls’ Singles & Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles For more information, e-mail Sid@LongBeachTennisCenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L7 (former L2) Sportime Syosset February Open Sportime-Syosset • 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Feb. 4 at 1:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, February 14-16 L7 LBTC February Freeze Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard • Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 10 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Sid@LongBeachTennisCenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, February 14-16 L5 ATS February Eastern Championships Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Level 5 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Feb. 9 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 536-2323.

Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L7 GHRF Feb Open Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Boys’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) and Level 7 Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $59.63 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Strong28@msn.com or call (516) 676-9849.

Friday-Sunday, February 14-16 L5 Park Avenue Eastern February Championships (LI) Park Avenue Tennis Club 100 Partridge Lane • Huntington, N.Y. Divisions: Level 5 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $65 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 10 at 5:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Caddy44@aol.com or call (631) 271-1810.

Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L6 ATS Eastern Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street • Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Feb. 2 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 536-2323.

Saturday-Monday, February 15-17 L4 Eastern Super Six at RWTTC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Level 4 Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (FIC-R16) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $134.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail RWagner968@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, February 7-9 L7 Park Avenue February Open Park Avenue Tennis Club 100 Partridge Lane • Huntington, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 3 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Caddy44@aol.com or call (631) 271-1810.

Saturday-Monday, February 15-17 L4 Eastern Super Six at World Gym World Gym Racquet Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road • East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Super 6 Event Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (FICR16) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $134.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail VTAPR@hotmail.com or call or call (631) 751-6100.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2020

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Saturday-Monday, February 15-17 L4 Eastern Super Six at Sportime Bethpage Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Level 4 Boys’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (FIC-R16) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $134.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday, Feb. 4 at 1:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 364-2727. Saturday-Monday, February 15-17 L4 Eastern Super Six at GHRF Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Road • Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Level 4 Boys’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (FIC-R16) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $134.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Strong28@msn.com or call (516) 676-9849. Saturday-Monday, February 15-17 L4 Eastern Super Six at Huntington Indoor Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway • Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Level 4 Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (FIC-R16) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $134.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail HITennis@HITennisNY.com or call (631) 421-0040. Saturday-Monday, February 15-17 L4 Eastern Super Six at Deer Park Deer Park Tennis Club 30 Burt Drive • Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Level 4 Boys’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FIC-R16) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $134.88 per player (deadline for entries is Tuesday Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail DeerParkTennis@optimum.net or call (631) 667-3476.

Friday-Sunday, February 21-23 L7 LBTC February Fun Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Open Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 17 at 1:00 a.m.) For more information, e-mail Sid@LongBeachTennisCenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, February 21-23 L5 GHRF February Championships Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Level 5 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Strong28@msn.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Monday, February 21-24 L7 ATS February Open Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 536-2323.

Friday-Monday, February 21-24 L5 Sportime Syosset February Championships Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Friday-Sunday, February 21-23 Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, L6 February RSTA Challenger Feb. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) Ross School Tennis Academy For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call 18 Goodfriend Drive • East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Level 6 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12, 16 (516) 364-2727. (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail CSidor@Ross.org or call (631) 907-5162. 80

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2020 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, February 28-March 1 L7 Sportime Syosset February Open Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, February 28-March 1 L7 GHRF February Open Glen Head Racquet and Fitness 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Level 7 Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail Strong28@msn.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, February 28-March 1 L6 ATS Eastern Feb Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys’ & Girls’ Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail Ruiz.Clark@yahoo.com or call (516) 536-2323. Saturday, February 29 Youth Progression Orange L1 Sportime Bethpage Sportime Tennis Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Orange Level 1 Boys’ & Girls’ 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $48.88 per player For more information, e-mail A.Kavalenka@yahoo.com or call (516) 364-2727.


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NASSAU COLISEUM FOR TICKETS VISIT NEWYORKOPEN.COM SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13

New York Tennis Expo Family Day free to the public

Womens Elevating Experiences Leadership Brunch Top Seeds in action

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14

Veterans and Diversity Hiring Captains Club Night

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11 Ladies Day STEM Education Day College Night

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 USTA Long Island Awards Kei Nishikori Second Round Match

PRESENTED BY USTA EASTERN Valentine’s Day Quarterfinals New York Open Pickleball Championships

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15 USTA Eastern Junior Awards Semifinals New York Open Pickleball Championships

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16

Championship Sunday PlayersLong subject to change Island Tennis Magazine • November/December 2019 • LITennisMag.com 112 New York Open Pickleball Championships

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Long Island Tennis Magazine January - February 2020  

Long Island Tennis Magazine January - February 2020  

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