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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


New Year’s Resolutions By Irina Belfer-Lehat RD, CDN

small reward on the weekend. l Lower your expectations: Set a smaller goal at first and try to maintain it for at least two months. Instead of saying: “I want to lose l Focus on increasing your fluids and fibers instead of counting every calorie. 10 pounds in one month,” realize that losing it and maintaining it are two different things. Instead, say: “I want to lose five pounds and l Increase your intake of legumes and cut down on red meat. keep it off for two months.”

Many of us are already starting to plan our new year’s resolutions, and for many, getting healthier and in shape is at the top of the list! New year’s resolutions should be all about Many people focus on a particular number l Focus on getting healthier instead of punishing yourself with starvation: Fad diets do setting up small attainable goals and establishof pounds to lose. Unfortunately, getting monot work in the long-term. Do not cut out an ing a healthy routine for life. tivated on Jan. 1 and staying motivated entire food group as it will lead to vitamin dethroughout the year are two very different Irina Belfer-Lehat of Nutrition Solutions PC in ficiency and compromise your health. things and very often, most will quit their diet Great Neck, N.Y. is a New York State-licensed diby the end of the month. So why is this happening and why is it so l Do not cut all sweets out of your diet: In- etitian and certified dietitian-nutritionist. For more stead, set up a goal of not eating sweets information, call (917) 769-8031, e-mail irinalehard to stay focused throughout the year? Monday through Friday, and enjoy a hat@gmail.com or visit www.irinalehat.com. As a registered dietitian with 15-plus years of experience, I noticed that when people are focusing on “numbers,” they are less likely to achieve their goal. Those who focus on adapting a healthier lifestyle are more likely to stay balanced and fit throughout the year. PROVIDING THE VERY BEST Correctly setting up goals and achieving IN SERVICE, SELECTION & them is no easy task. Here are some ideas STYLE FOR OVER 35 YEARS! that can direct you to a healthier year. l Think long-term goals: Focus on where you would like to be at the end of 2016 instead of at the end of January. l Do not focus on “numbers:” Focusing on numbers will set you up for failure. Rather, focus on small changes that will lead to successful weight loss.

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LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Table Of Contents The Curtain Falls Down Under By Brian Coleman

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Lleyton Hewitt looks to close out his career Down Under at the 2016 Australian Open. See page 16

Featured Stories 18 2016 Australian Open Preview By Andrew Eichenholz The first Grand Slam of the year gets underway, as the sport’s top stars take to the court. We take a closer look at the year’s contenders, pretenders and sleepers as they vie for glory Down Under, and a special look at Long Island’s Noah Rubin as he gears up for the Aussie Open.

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28 Your 2016 Guide to Long Island’s Top Clubs & Programs We present the area’s top clubs and programs all in one handy guide. Whether it a local adult league program or a junior program to get your child started in the sport, our guide to the top clubs will offer the area’s top picks.

42 2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap A look back at the girl’s high school season, as Long Islanders headed to the States and came back singles and doubles champs, and we recognize 2015’s Players of the Year.

50 A Look Back at the Year That Was 2015 By Emily Katz A closer look at the Grand Slam winners of 2015, along with the pro tour’s award winners and those who called it a career over the past year.

42 Features

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Sportime World Tour Stops in Beijing

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Serena-Wozniacki, Wawrinka-Monfils to Headline BNP Paribas Showdown at MSG

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Xenecore Answers the Arm Injury Epidemic

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One Key Tennis Skill Separates the Novices From the Pros By Lenny Schloss

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Tennis Community Rings in the Season at Holiday Brunch

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USTA Eastern Hosts 29th Annual College Showcase Day By Brian Coleman

Long Island Tennis Magazine is published bi-monthly by United Sports


litennis

JAN/FEB 2016 Vol 8, No 1

Long Island Tennis Magazine

MAGAZINE

Long Island Tennis Magazine 1220 Wantagh Avenue • Wantagh, NY 11793-2202 Phone: (516) 409-4444 • Fax: (516) 409-4600 Web site: www.litennismag.com

Staff David Sickmen Publisher (516) 409-4444, ext. 309 • david@usptennis.com Joel M. Berman President (516) 409-4444, ext. 310 • joel@usptennis.com

Cover photo credit: Marianne Bevis

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To Fight or Not to Fight By Tonny van de Pieterman

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Tulane’s Koepfer and Ohio State’s DiLorenzo Crowned National Indoor Collegiate Champs

Featured Columns 1

Fitness & Nutrition: New Year’s Resolutions By Irina Belfer-Lehat, RD, CDN

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Across Long Island … News and Notes From Across the L.I. Tennis Community

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Court Six: Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Gossip Column By Emilie Katz

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How to Get Better Players to Want to Play With You in 10 Easy Steps By Steven Kaplan

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Beyond the Baseline: Julien Klien of Solow Sports By Brian Coleman

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College Tennis Spotlight: Mythbusters By Ricky Becker

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Goal Setting for Tennis: Winter 2016 By Dr. Tom Ferraro

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USTA Eastern Long Island Region Update

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You Are Good Enough: From Federer to Curry to Brady to You! By Rob Polishook, MA, CPC

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Tips From the Tennis Pro: The Mantra of Three for Your Best Tennis in 2016 By Lisa Dodson

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Tennis Injury Prevention: What is Tendonitis and How Can It be Treated? By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS

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The Jensen Zone: Kicking Off the Year Down Under By Luke Jensen

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Adult League Wrap-Up By Kathy Miller

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Long Island Tennis Magazine’s Charitable Initiatives

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You Are Not Entitled to Anything By Lonnie Mitchel

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Long Island Tennis Club Directory

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Long Island Rankings

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USTA/Long Island Region 2016 Tournament Schedule

s Publications Ltd.—Copyright © 2015 United Sports Publications Ltd.

Eric C. Peck Editor-in-Chief (516) 409-4444, ext. 312 • eric@usptennis.com Joey Arendt Managing Art Director Brian Coleman Senior Editor (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 • brianc@usptennis.com Francine Miller Advertising Coordinator (516) 409-4444, ext. 301 • francinem@usptennis.com Matthew Cohen Director of Business Development (516) 409-4444, ext. 306 • matt@usptennis.com Emilie Katz Assistant Marketing Coordinator Scott Koondel VP of Operations (516) 409-4444, ext. 324

Sidney Beal III Staff Photographer Lee Seidner Staff Photographer

Advertising To receive any information regarding advertising rates, deadlines, and requirements, call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. Article Submissions/Press Releases To submit any material, including articles and press releases, please call (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com. The deadline for submissions is the first of the month preceding the target issue. Subscriptions To receive subscription information, contact (516) 409-4444 or e-mail info@usptennis.com or check out our Web site: www.litennismag.com. Fax subscription changes to (516) 409-1600. Statements of fact and opinion in Long Island Tennis Magazine are the responsibility of the authors alone and do not imply an opinion on the part of United Sports Publications Ltd. Long Island Tennis Magazine reserves the right to edit, reject and/or postpone the publication of any articles, information or data.

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Across Long Isla Local pro coaches Barclays ATP World Tour Finalist

Local teaching pro Alex Pop-Moldovan recently accompanied top doubles player Florin Mergea to the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals in London. Pop-Moldovan, who is Mergea’s coach, helped Mergea and his partner, Rohan Bopanna, to the championship, where the duo lost to the team of Jean-Julien Rojer & Horia Tecau.

“It was a great experience and a great feeling to be there with the best of the best,” said Pop-Moldovan. “We enjoyed every moment and hope to be there next year too. Florin and Rohan had a great week, and Florin and I are preparing here in New York already for the next season.”

Sportime Massapequa duo claims mixed-doubles crown

Goetz wins Eddie Herr Boys U16 title

Sportime Massapequa added two more champions to its list of In-House Mixed-Doubles winners as the team of Mike Ahern & Terry Leheny captured the 7.5 Mixed-Doubles Title at a recent tournament.

Ryan Goetz of Harborfields won the Boys U16 Championship at the Eddie Herr Internationals in Plantation, Fla. Goetz, who trains at Bethpage Park Tennis Center, was the tournament’s 13th seed and defeated Germany’s Patrick Zahraj 7-5, 1-6, 6-3 in the finals. 4

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


and

… News and notes from across the L.I. tennis community

LI’s Mitchel named SUNYAC Coach of the Year Long Island’s Lonnie Mitchel was named the State University of New York Athletic Conference (SUNYAC) Coach of the Year for the fall season. Mitchel, a native of East Meadow, N.Y., coached the Oneonta Red Dragons to a 6-7 record and the number two seed in the SUNYAC East Division. “It’s easy to be ‘Coach of The Year’ when you have the right captain to lead us and the right players who buy into what we preach,” said Mitchel. “I’m humbled by this award because I know in my heart that the players on the roster, from top to bottom, are putting in the time, the hitting sessions and the workouts and writing a story about how we compete and how we represent ourselves. I thank the players and I thank SUNY Oneonta for allowing me the privilege to coach Red Dragon women’s tennis.”

Ross School players visit Sunshine State for 54th Annual Junior Orange Bowl Several players from The Ross School Tennis Academy in East Hampton, N.Y. took a trip down to Florida for the 54th Annual Junior Orange Bowl. The players were accompanied by coaches Hleb Maslau and Simona Weymar. Prior to the Orange Bowl, The Ross School had players competing in the Eddie Herr International Junior Championships and the Casely International Championships. “It was a great experience for everyone to compete against the best juniors in the world,” said Vinicius Carmo, director of tennis for The Ross School. Pictured here are Bianca Lorich, Ally Friedman, Ben Ebanks, Simona Weymar (pro) and Vitalina Golod.

Lionel Goldberg honored with Regional Volunteer of the Year Award Three-time Long Island Tennis Challenge Champion Lionel Goldberg of Hewlett, N.Y. was named the USTA Eastern’s 2015 Regional Volunteer of the Year for the Long Island Region. Goldberg will be honored at the Eastern Tennis Conference at the Westchester Renaissance Hotel in White Plains, N.Y. on Saturday, Jan. 30.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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BY

Ivanovic and Dimitrov team up for Rolex campaign Tennis stars Ana Ivanovic and Grigor Dimitrov paired up for a photo shoot for Rolex Magazine. The issue was highlighting the watch’s Oyster Perpetual YachtMaster watch, and the two both sported the timepiece.

E M I L I E

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Isner makes his list and checks it twice Santa Claus met his biggest fan recently, as topranked American John Isner paid Old St. Nick a visit at a local Bass Pro Shops store.

Serena mourns the loss of best friend It was a sad time recently for world number one Serena Williams as she had to say goodbye to her beloved dog

Jackie. Serena got Jackie in 1999, two weeks before she won her first Grand Slam title, and the pair enjoyed a 16-year life together. She posted a moving montage of pictures of her and Jackie over the years on her Instagram page. “Today really is hard for me,” she wrote on Instagram. “My special friend in which I got at 17 (two weeks before I won my very first Grand Slam) left me today.”

Ferrer ties the knot There is much to do in the offseason of professional tennis players, one of which is to get married. Spaniard David Ferrer married long-time girlfriend Marta Tomel recently in Valencia, Spain (pictured here). He wasn’t the only one to tie the knot in recent weeks, as Elena Vesnina and Marc Lopez also married their significant others.

ITF announces partnership with Betway The International Tennis Federation has announced a partnership with online gambling company Betway. The agreement gives Betway on-court branding at all Davis Cup and Fed Cup World Group ties. Despite a lot of public concern regard6

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


ing a conflict of interest, the ITF ensured that the partnership is “fully compliant with the rules and interpretations of the Tennis Anti-Corruption Programme.”

Mardy Fish (@MardyFish): I love playing this guy for money. @JustinVerlander

Tweets from the pros

Bouchard and Woznicki ‘balling’ in Miami

Eugenie Bouchard (@GenieBouchard): Thank you Nicky B @NickBollettieri for coming out on court this week :)

Victoria Azarenka (@Vika7): Aloha Friday #lifesizeemoji #squad John Isner (@JohnIsner): Thank you @benfergusonshow for unearthing this gem. What do you think @justingimelstob ??? #thatsmycoach

Nicholas Kyrgios (@NickKyrgios): #leavingalegacy Both Caroline Wozniacki and Eugenie Bouchard recently stopped by the set of HBO’s hit show “Ballers.” Will we see them make a cameo on the upcoming season?

Serena Williams (@SerenaWilliams): How much fun am I having at the @IPTL? It’s crazy. #ILoveMyTeam

continued on page 8

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Christina McHale (@ChristinaMcHale): Sister time in LA

court six continued from page 7 Novak Djokovic (@DjokerNole): Enjoying our wonderful vacation together ... still can’t get a racquet out of my hand. Hi to my #Nolefam

Venus Williams (@VenusesWilliams): Enjoyed lunch and art at the Wynwood kitchen today. Food, art and expression make life so much more … Rafa Nadal (@RafaelNadal): One of the things about tennis is getting to meet interesting people from all over the world … ;)

Noah Rubin (@Noahrubin33): I don’t usually wear sneakers but I make exceptions for these @Ferragamo

Caroline Wozniacki (@CaroWozniacki): The face you make when you told your friends you are staying in and then bump in to them while shopping … #busted Roger Federer (@RogerFederer): Racing my way from Dubai to India for @iptl

Justin Gimelstob (@justingimelstob): Fun getting a one-handed backhand lesson from @TommyHaas13—one of the best in the sport! Ana Ivanovic (@AnaIvanovic): Another day to get better and fitter! #PreSeason

Aga Radwanska (@ARadwanska): 1st match and a win @IPTL #BreakTheCode @RafaelNadal @DodigTennis @MirzaSania @rohanbopanna @fabsantoro72

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


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LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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How to Get Better Players to Want to Play With You in 10 Easy Steps By Steve Kaplan ost tennis players wish they could practice exclusively with better players despite the zero sum impracticality. This means that we cannot all hit up all the time because if one player is hitting “up,” the other is hitting “down.” Still, some players are able to overcome this challenge and are sought out by top competi-

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tors to be their hitting partners. The secret to their popularity is that they are ready, able and determined to always provide great practice. Here are the top 10 rules to become highly demanded as a practice partner. 1. Be available, reliable and on time Be ready to play anytime, anywhere, or better yet, ask a top player to play. Maybe they need a partner to warm them up before a

match, for example. Always show up ready to play and on time. 2. Be accommodating Practice the way your partner prefers. Play a set first, and then drill if asked. Maybe it’s not the way you would choose to organize your own practice, but this is not a time to be inflexible. 3. Come prepared Bring extra water, tennis balls, rackets and

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snacks. Your partner will be grateful if you offer them a drink or snack and even a spare racket if all of their strings break. 4. Work hard and be humble Roger Federer can practice with anyone he wants to and he chooses to play with young pros ranked in the top 200 in the world several times a year. He flies a few players to Dubai and schedules three sessions a day. He knows that these up and coming players will work incredibly hard with no complaints. If this practice protocol is good enough for Roger, it’s good enough for anyone. 5. Be attentive and hustle Everyone likes to have the undivided attention of others. Stay off your cellphone and Snapchat your friends later. Show your partner that you respect their time by hustling in between points to make practice productive and intense. 6. Don’t worry about getting practice, worry about giving practice I am fortunate enough to have warmed up

students at Grand Slams many times, and my goal was not to get practice, but to give it. These occasions were some of the most intense physical and mental tennis workouts of my life. 7. Keep your mouth shut during practice No one likes to play with a whiny practice partner. Let your racket do the talking to impress your partner. No muttering under your breath, no racket banging and no complaining! 8. Keep your mouth shut after play If you play a set, tie-breaker or drill game and you win, enjoy it and keep the result to yourself. If you brag about your great practice win, I promise it will be the last time they play with you. 9. Ask your partner what they would like to work on My best shot is my lob, because growing up, I played with some great players that loved to hit overheads, and I was happy to

accommodate them just for the chance to be on the court. As my lob improved, so did my popularity as a practice partner. 10. Develop a good name The simplest way to get a better player to practice with you is to have a stellar reputation as being a great partner. Then all you might have to do is say “yes” when asked to play. We are all selfish on the court in that our improvement is the primary goal. Altruistic practice, however, is an opportunity for enlightened self-interest. Steve Kaplan is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of Lacoste Academy for New York City Parks Foundation. Steve has been the longtime coach of more than 600 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school champions, two NCAA Division 1 Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. He may be reached by e-mail at stevenjkaplan@aol.com.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Sportime World To

Credit all photos to Brian Coleman


ur Stops in Beijing he Sportime World Tour continued with a Beijing-themed day to mirror the Beijing Open from the ATP/WTA World Tours. The tour swept through Sportime Lynbrook and consisted of a full day of tennis, food and tons of fun. The last stop of the 2015 tour had a little something for everybody. There were oncourt clinics where kids went through different drills to improve their tennis game, but there was also a bounce house, Asianstyle cuisine, music and many games and activities. “It definitely exceeded my expectations,” said Danny Casesa, director of tennis at Sportime Lynbrook. “The staff makes it all come together, and we get great cooperation from all the parents and kids which makes it work well.” The key to this type of event is making the kids feel as if they are playing in a professional atmosphere. There was a red carpet by the entry where kids had their “passports” stamped and then their photo taken. They also were interviewed at the Long Island Tennis Magazine Broadcast Table.

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“I am having a great time,” said John Henry Mills. “The food is really good and the tennis is so much fun.” DJ Curtis McCalla kept everybody entertained while they ate and waited for their group to be called onto the playing courts. On the courts, different instructors went through various drills and games to help each player have fun while also im-

proving their game. “This year, I think we did a better job on improving the on-court coaching,” said Casesa. “We put together a better plan in moving the kids around, organizing the schedule and really maximizing the kids’ court time.” Jason Wass, who has overseen all of the World Tour events, said they are constantly adding things to make each event better than the last. “We’ve learned a lot over the last year. The demand has been huge and we have added our Web site, SportimeNY.com/WorldTour, which has all of our pictures and articles from previous events, and gives players the opportunity to register for upcoming World Tour events,” said Wass. “To me, the fun is making each stop on the tour a bit different from the previous events and keep the players and their fans coming back.” The Sportime World Tour will make its first stop of 2016 on Jan. 23, when it stops at Sportime Kings Park for a Melbournethemed event as the 2016 Australian Open begins that same week.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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BE Y O ND TH E B A S E L I N E Getting to know the areas TOP SHOPS

JULIEN KLEIN OF SOLOW SPORTS BY BRIAN COLEMAN ost businesses only think of their customers as dollar signs. But that isn’t the case at Solow Sports in Huntington, N.Y. “I want to provide high-end tour level

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services to everyday people,” said Solow Sports Owner Julien Klein, who bought the store back in August of 2013. “I want the recreational player to get the same service and feedback the high-level players get.”

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

That is the mission statement and overall goal of Solow Sports, and it comes right from the store’s owner Klein, who practices what he preaches. There is a ping-pong table you can use while you wait for your racket to get strung and the employees are approachable and personable. Solow has a very personal feel to it and you get that vibe as soon as you walk in. “All of my employees like coming to work and the customers love coming in,” said Klein. “We have that barber shop feel. You can come in and talk about your matches. You can come in and just hang out in addition to your shopping.” Klein calls himself a late bloomer to the sport of tennis. He didn’t begin playing until he was 14-years-old, after he and his family moved to a house across from a public tennis court. “I played there every day and got hooked,” Klein said. “I actually started teaching before I played competitively. I would hand feed balls and do different


drills with kids, and in return, I got free court time, lessons and camps. I became addicted to the sport.” He would go on to play collegiately at Stony Brook and then Hartwick, and after that, he began working at pro shops where he began to hone his skills. “I taught and strung rackets just because I was interested in it. I worked really hard for a lot of different shop owners,” said Klein. “I was really excited when I got the opportunity to run my own place.” Klein knew he had the drive and desire to run his own shop, but had to learn the challenges of operating his own business. “I did not realize how much time goes into it,” said Klein. “It’s more than a fulltime job. I’m here about 100 hours every week. Here I am, almost three years later, and I’m maybe taking one or two days off a year. It’s such a hands-on operation. You really learn a lot about yourself.” Klein is always adding new things and services to continue to grow his business. “The ability to take any idea you have and try it is great,” Klein said. “We had the

idea of putting the ping-pong table in so we did. If it was no fun, we would throw it out, but the customers really like it. Any sort of fun experience we can add, we try it.” Klein’s next goal is to expand the shop’s online presence and continue growing. “We do a lot of things that others don’t,” said Klein. “We are open seven days a week and have a 24-hour racket drop off. We have custom painted rackets and carry every single racket manufacturer. We have on-site stringing, and products for all of the different racket sports, including platform tennis, pickle-

ball, etc. Any sport with a racket … we carry those products.” Solow Sports is located at 347 Main Street in Huntington, N.Y. Stop by to get your racket strung or to look through Solow’s array of racket sport offerings, and who knows, you might find yourself entrenched in a competitive ping-pong match in no time. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email brianc@usptennis.com.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2016 A

The Curta

Lleyton Hewi Photo credits Lee Seidner

t the end of the 2016 Australian Open, one of the game’s most popular players will hang up his shoes and say goodbye to his professional playing career. Australian native Lleyton Hewitt will play in his final tournament when he plays at 2016’s first Grand Slam in Melbourne, Australia, about 450 miles southeast of where he was born in Adelaide. The 2016 installment of the Aussie Open marks the 20th consecutive year he plays in his home country’s tournament. It will bring to a close a truly remarkable career for Hewitt, who broke onto the scene as a doubles player at the Wimbledon Championships in 2000. He reached the mixed-doubles final with then-girlfriend Kim Clijsters, but the couple fell to Americans Kimberly Po & Donald Johnson in the championship. It wouldn’t be long until the Aussie finally broke through at a Grand Slam, becoming the youngest male to win a major title when he paired with Max Mirnyi to win the U.S. Open Men’s Doubles crown at just 19 years of age. Hewitt continued his U.S. Open success the following year when he notched the first Grand Slam singles title of his career, routing American Pete Sampras 7-6, 6-1, 6-1 in the 2001 finals. “Lleyton is quicker. Maybe he doesn’t have quite the power of Andre [Agassi], but he doesn’t miss,” Sampras said of Hewitt at the time. “The speed of his hands and feet are phenomenal.” The win made Hewitt the youngest male to win the U.S. Open singles title

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Australian Open Preview

ain Falls Down Under

itt calls it a career on home soil since Sampras himself won Photo credit: Kate Tann/Flickr: Carine06 the first of his four titles in Flushing Meadows in 1990. And it kick-started what would be a fantastic career for Hewitt. He would add one more Grand Slam singles title, the following year in 2002 at Wimbledon, and would go on to compile a career singles record of 613259. His lasting legacy might be more than just his success on the court. Hewitt became the face of Australian tennis and remains that face today, even as a new wave of talented youngsters from the land Down Under tries to make their mark on the tour. But that wasn’t always the case early on in his career. He often faced criticism from the Australian media for his lack of transparency and his chastising of Australian fans, and much of it might have come from his style of play. Early on, he played with overwhelming emotion on the court. Fist-pumps, chest-bumps and loud yells were synonymous with Hewitt and oftentimes, earned him a lot of flak. But that was the emotion he played with because it was the way he had to play, being a smaller guy. “I had to deal with those pressures and be mentally tough,” said Hewitt. “I don’t have the biggest game. I’m not the tallest or the strongest guy out there, so I’ve had to learn how to counter-punch those bigger guys. I’ve had to work on my return of serve since I was nine or 10.” And it is those qualities, beyond how he performed on the court, that will leave him with an enduring legacy. It made him a recognizable athlete throughout sports, not just to the die-hard tennis fan. Donquan Van Nguyen, a writer at The Roar, a well-known Australian publication, has covered Hewitt for the bulk of his

By Brian Coleman

career, talked what Hewitt has meant to Australians. “Hewitt has no doubt carved out a solid if not spectacular career, winning two majors and becoming world number one at the tender age of 20 after winning the Tennis Masters Cup [now called the ATP World Tour Finals] in 2001,” said Van Nguyen. “It is of my belief that he would later pay for the success he enjoyed very early in his career, as injuries and inconsistency would start creeping in. But nonetheless, he has become one of Australia’s most trusted and respected sporting icons of the 21st Century. And when he finally hangs up the racket for the final time, it will no doubt be a very sad time for all concerned.” As the face of Australian tennis, Hewitt’s next role might be as important to his country as his days on the court were. He will be the leader and mentor of a young group of Aussies like Nick Kyrgios and Bernard Tomic who have already seen their share of troubles and criticism. After his retirement, he will become captain of the Australian Davis Cup team, and will lead the next generation of Australian tennis. “It will be up to the likes of Tomic and Kyrgios, among many others, to carry his legacy going forward,” said Van Nguyen. But before that, Hewitt has one more run left in him. We can expect him to bring that same fire and passion that fans have become accustomed to seeing, as he hits the Melbourne courts in January as a player one last time. Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email brianc@usptennis.com.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2016 Austr By Andrew Eichenholz layers, fans and everyone in between have waited four long months for answers to many of their questions. Could anybody possibly knock off the two players who completed arguably a couple of the best individual seasons in the history of tennis? Will there be a new tier of athletes who rise up to challenge those champions’ throne? What will the world see out of legends looking to make some noise at the end of their careers? In the world of tennis, the Australian Open is always the first stop where many of those questions, at least to an extent, are answers. Melbourne gives players a chance to make their opening statements as they buckle themselves in for the roller coaster that is a tennis campaign.

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The men’s side of the draw Contenders When one thinks of some of the best tennis campaigns of all-time, Roger Federer’s 92-5 2006 season comes to mind along with Rod Laver’s Calendar Grand Slam-winning 1969. You can throw Novak Djokovic’s 2015 season right into that mix as one of the finest in history. The Serbian won three Grand Slam titles, only losing in the French Open final to Stan Wawrinka. Other than that, Djokovic set the record for most ATP Masters 1000 titles in a year with six, won the ATP World Tour Finals and showed the most consistently elite tennis in a calendar year, compiling a record of 82-6. 18

Roger Federer is arguably the best player to ever pick up a tennis racket. But at 34-yearsold, how much does he have left to give? If last season showed the world anything, it is that Federer still has jaw-dropping tennis to bring to the court. From his socalled SABR (Sneak Attack By Roger) in which he would surprise opponents by returning their serves from near the service line to overall consistent performance, Federer was not far off from adding an 18th major to his mantle. Djokovic stood in his way at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, both four-set championship losses, but there is no reason to believe that he cannot threaten again. Stan Wawrinka, 2014 Australian Open Champion, kept Djokovic from the history books in 2015. One may call his 48 winners in the final three sets of the French Open final masterpieces of aggression. A few years back, before Wawrinka entrenched himself inside the top 10, he would not be able to maintain that level for a full match. Wawrinka may not produce the year-round results that Djokovic does, but he has advanced to the quarterfinals or better at eight of the last nine majors. When he gets there.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

Pretenders Andy Murray led Great Britain to its first Davis Cup title since 1936. By all accounts, it was a major accomplishment, but it does leave many questions unanswered. Did he put everything in his tank out on the court to win the team title? Will the offseason be enough time mentally to recover and refocus on Murray’s individual goals? Armed with an all-around game that has allowed him to challenge and even beat Djokovic in the past, Murray has the potential to win every tournament he plays. But it is very possible that he will start the year off slowly and not reach his fifth Australian Open final. J a p a n ’s K e i Nishikori burst onto the scene at the 2014 U.S. Open, reaching the finals in Flushing Meadows, and then reached the quarterfinals of both the Australian and French Opens in 2015. But an array of injuries have halted the progress of the talented Nishikori, and despite his top 10 seed, don’t expect Nishikori to make a deep run in Melbourne. Young Australian Nick Kyrgios has proven that he has the game and the confidence to take on the best in the sport. He beat Federer, Wawrinka


ralian Open Preview and Milos Raonic in 2015. But on the flip side, Kyrgios is also 20-years-old and is still developing. Young players are bound to have mental lapses, especially in front of a partisan home crowd—how could that not be distracting? While nobody will be surprised to see Kyrgios threaten to make another second week in Melbourne, losing to a wily veteran early is a more likely option. Sleepers Every few years, all eyes turn to the so-called “next generation� of players who people claim will be tennis’ superstars sooner or later. Most recently, on the men’s side, this generation was said to be led by Milos Raonic, Kei Nishikori and Grigor Dimitrov. Nishikori found his way to one Grand Slam final at the 2014 U.S. Open but other than that, none have proven to be a consistent threat at the Slams. Today’s “next generation� is led by a talented group, perhaps more so than the last, consisting of Borna Coric, Andrey Rublev and arguably the best of the three, Alexander Zverev. At only 18, he is firmly inside the world’s top-100, and is only going to move up. Sporting a six-foot six-inch tall frame and clean, crisp strokes across the board, the youngster will have a chance to fill out his body and become a threat off the ground against whoever stands across the net. Now, the German will not win the Australian Open and making a very deep run is probably out of the question, but with no pressure against a top player who has all the pressure to beat a newcomer, do not rule out Zverev. He can play, and will be on the contender list consistently in a few years.

A player who has been on many contenders list in years past is Rafael Nadal. For the first time since 2004, the Spaniard failed to reach a major semifinal. Still rounding himself into form after all of the injuries he has dealt with, Nadal flew under the radar, as Djokovic and Federer put on a show in 2015. Even though he finished the year fifth in the rankings, Nadal is not considered a favorite for the Australian Open. The man owns 14 Grand Slam titles including one in Melbourne in 2009. With that resume, do not be surprised if Nadal makes a deep run.

A player who does not have those same credentials but is always a threat is Tomas Berdych. The topranked man from the Czech Republic, Berdych has too much game for virtually every player on the ATP Tour. Few can compete with the overwhelming pace of his forehand and backhand. Berdych has reached the quarterfinals or better in each of the last five Australian Opens, and is without a doubt a player who can threaten the top guys in the second week. Playing him is like treading water in the ocean—the water will keep coming relentlessly just like his game, unless someone finds enough variety to catch onto the current and ride it safely to shore. The best of the best like Djokovic and Murray are able to take Berdych out of his baseline bashing patterns to control play themselves, but if not, Berdych is a real threat.

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2016 Austr The women’s side of the draw Contenders Serena Williams held the world’s attention on her racket at the 2015 U.S. Open. Two wins. Three sets. That was all that stood between the world number one and her storied pursuit of the elusive Calendar Grand Slam. A winner of four consecutive majors, the younger Williams sister was that close to capturing a fifth consecutive Grand Slam, sweeping the calendar’s four biggest titles. Then she lost. Nobody, including her opponent, Roberta Vinci, thought that Williams would walk out of Arthur Ashe Stadium a loser after the semifinals. But she did. Is Serena done? Absolutely not. While she has laid low for a large majority of the fall, Williams will head into Melbourne as the heavy favorite to capture the year’s first major. Armed with the biggest serve in the history of women’s tennis and an under recognized variety off the ground, the only one who will likely be able to defeat the best in the world is herself. Someone who will try to get in Serena’s way is Maria Sharapova. The Russian missed the U.S. Open, but is on track to make another Slam run when the Australian Open gets underway. She has made the semifinals or further in Melbourne seven times, including her 2008 20

title run. There is nobody in the sport who brings a more intense focus and desire to win point-in and point-out, and few could keep up with her deep, hard-hit groundstrokes. Look for her to stick around and possibly be an obstacle for Serena towards the tournament’s end. Someone who was an obstacle for Serena in 2015 was Garbine Muguruza. The number threeranked player in the world still has not broken through for the casual fan just yet, but this tournament may be where that happens. There is virtually nobody who can trade groundstrokes with Serena, but the Spaniard is pretty close. Despite a shocking loss to Johanna Konta in the second round of the U.S. Open, Muguruza still managed to close her year out on a strong note by making the semis at the WTA Finals. It is hard to argue that anybody will beat Serena down under, but if the top seed is sent packing, look out for the 22-year-old at the bookend of the tournament. Pretenders Czech Karolina Pliskova is one of the most purely talented players on the WTA Tour. She reached a career-high of seventh in the world just before the U.S. Open and looked like she could possibly be the next “unknown talent” to make a deep run at a major. But at the same time, Pliskova has struggled at the majors. The

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

23-year-old has worked her way up the rankings, but the furthest she has made it at a Slam is the third round, she has done that twice, at last year’s Australian Open and the 2014 U.S. Open. While her ranking and more-than-solid baseline game is conducive to hard courts, experience is valuable. Without having made a second week, the future star will not have enough quite yet to threaten for the title. In contrast, Agnieszka Radwanska has a lot of experience at all levels of the sport. Poland’s top player has reached the quarterfinals or later in a Grand Slam 11 times, including one run to the finals at Wimbledon in 2012. There may be no other athlete in the sport—male or female—who brings as many tricks with them to the tennis court. Radwanska can play defense, use a plethora of slices, create angles around the court and simply confuse her opponents. But there are many players in today’s game who can hit through Radwanska’s defenses. She may be able to get past one or possibly two of those types of opponents, but eventually her run will come to an end. The player most likely to defy Radwanska’s spot on this list is Romanian world number two, Simona Halep. In recent years, she has shown those who may not be weekto-week tennis fans that she is capable of becoming a household name. But


ralian Open Preview at some point, all hot streaks come to an end. From the 2014 Australian Open through the 2015 Australian Open, Halep reached the quarterfinals or better at every Slam except for the U.S. Open. Since, she has lost in the second round of the French Open and in the opening round of Wimbledon. While she did make the semifinals of the U.S. Open, Halep struggled after her run in Flushing. The offseason is meant to refresh players and give them a shot at recovering for a new season. But will that be able to replenish Halep’s confidence? Sleepers Serena’s sister, Venus Williams is as much a contender as she is a sleeper, but somehow, the elder Williams sister has found herself flying under the radar. After closing out 2014 ranked 18th in the world, she defied her age of 35 to put together a strong season. If it were not for her own sister beating her in the Round of 16 at

Wimbledon and in the U.S. Open’s quarterfinal, who knows how far Venus could have gone? Venus looks stronger than she has in years, and if her draw opens up in Melbourne, the oldest player in the top100 stands a chance to win her first Grand Slam since 2008. It is as if the tennis world has forgotten that Victoria Azarenka has won two Grand Slam titles. And news flash … they both came at the Australian Open. Azarenka is still working herself back from injuries the last couple of years, but she has shown that she is not far off in terms of results. At both Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, the Belarusian lost in the quarterfinals, to Serena and Halep, respectively. Each defeat came in three sets, and if she gets to the second week again, there is no doubt that one of the best players in the game has the ability to give the top players trouble.

While she is only 18 - y e a r s - o l d , Belinda Bencic has beaten stars, and a lot of them. At the Canadian Open in August, she won the title by beating an impressive list of players—each had at some point in their career been in the world’s top 12. To beat Serena and Halep in back-to-back three-setters to seal the deal made it all the more impressive. The scary part for her future opponents is that Bencic will only get better. If she catches fire in Melbourne, look out. Andrew Eichenholz is a journalism student at Stony Brook University, where he currently is a staff writer for The Statesman, covering tennis amongst many sports. He grew up playing tennis at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, where he learned to love the game, eventually becoming a part-time tennis instructor, working for the most part with the QuickStart 10 & Under Program. He may be reached by email at Andrew.Eichenholz@StonyBrook.edu.

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LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2016 Australian


Open Preview

Long Island’s Rubin Gears Up for Aussie Open ast year at this time, Noah Rubin was a freshman at Wake Forest University, on his way to becoming the best freshman in college tennis and an NCAA singles finalist. While the pro tour beckoned, Rubin was focused on the task at hand: Successfully making his mark on the collegiate tennis world, as he prepared for the upcoming spring season. A year later, Rubin has taken on the ATP World Tour and is preparing to compete in the main singles draw at the 2016 Australian Open. Days spent attending classes, studying and juggling schoolwork with tennis have been replaced with hours of on and off-court training at the John McEnroe Tennis Academy, as Noah learns to manage his life as a young adult, and his career as pro tour player under the guidance of JMTA directors and coaches, and, of course, of John McEnroe. In November, Rubin secured a wild card into the main draw of this year’s Aussie Open by winning his first ATP Challenger tournament in Charlottesville, where he played eight matches in nine days, including a dramatic comeback in the finals—saving two match points after losing the first set and trailing 1-5 in the second. The victory set into motion a critical action plan for Noah’s off-season training and tournament selection, which Rubin admits was both exciting and overwhelming. “There were no expectations for me going into the final tournaments of 2015,” said Rubin. “I knew what I was capable of and this was another opportunity to prove it. It all took place so quickly, from winning my first ATP Challenger title to being awarded the wild card. I am not yet where I want to be, but this opportunity to train for and play at the Australian Open definitely takes me one step closer.” Professional tennis has the longest in-season tournament schedule of any pro sport, with tournaments scheduled most weeks from January through November , meaning that the off-season is basically a single month, and needs to be utilized optimally by players and coaching teams. This is the only time of the year when fitness coaches have the opportunity to put their players through more rigorous and demanding strength and conditioning routines, with the goal of addressing deficiencies and imbalances in anticipation of the start of the New Year. Rubin discovered just how intense off-season training could be after spending some of November and most of December working through a methodical, yet unorthodox program, designed by

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John McEnroe Tennis Academy Director of Athletic Performance Richard-John Mensing Jr. Noah’s off-season workout focused on both physical and mental components, as well as on the vital role nutrition plays in supporting and aiding his body’s recovery. “I have never felt better in my life,” said Rubin. “It is an incredible transformation as I feel now more than ever that I can walk onto the court and outlast the person on the other side. I also now understand the importance of realizing what my body needs in order to thrive and reach its maximum strength.” Not all of Rubin’s time was spent in the gym and on-court. In order to acclimate him for the blazing temperatures Down Under, he and Coach Mensing spent a portion of the off-season in the sun, heat and humidity of Miami. Ocean swims, sand dune sprints and other unique and unconventional components were all designed to improve Noah’s overall fitness and to increase his capacity to adapt to the grueling elements players historically endure at the Australian Open. Lawrence Kleger, director of tennis at the John McEnroe Tennis Academy and Noah’s long-time personal coach, is very grateful to have Coach Mensing as a fellow JMTA director and in Noah’s corner. “Richard Mensing Jr. working with Noah has made an incredible difference, not only in Noah’s physical condition, but also his mental approach to the stresses and demands of the ATP Tour. Noah has not yet cracked the ATP Top 100, but his work ethic is top 10. Hard work pays off and we are expecting some terrific results in 2016,” said Kleger. Looking back, Rubin knows how quickly things can change. “There is no predicting what the future holds,” said Rubin. “As I learned when I made my run at Junior Wimbledon and at the U.S. Nationals in 2014, and as I found out recently in Charlottesville, everything can change in an instant. My job is to make sure that my mind and body are ready for anything. It is a rollercoaster, but I am thoroughly enjoying every second of it.” Rubin hopes that his hiatus from college will be a long one which sees his dream of a successful career on the ATP World Tour realized. Noah continues to work hard with his JMTA coaches and trainers to educate himself, as he learns what it will take to realize his dreams. Let the 2016 season begin.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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college tennis spotlight

MYTHBUSTERS

Do You Think You Know All the Rules of Tennis? You Probably Don’t! By Ricky Becker Students of mine love to ask me what the rules are on the most random hypothetical tennis questions. “Am I allowed to run to the baseline to serve?” (No.) “Can I stand in the box to return?” (Well yes, but you can’t volley it so you probably don’t want to.) I have been asked questions this month by high school players. Granted these questions definitely were meant to be silly, there are a lot of rules that people who play in tournaments, and even for myself as a

director, don’t realize. They seem trivial until they happen. Some of them make sense, and some you may be surprised by. If you know half of them … kudos to you! You are ahead of the game. This list only covers the first third of the rulebook! 1. It’s a let if the ball pops during a point, but not if it loses all its’ compression during a point. 2. Players cannot use the ball to wipe off sweat. 3. Servers are actually required to say the score before each point. If an umpire thinks someone has been blatantly cheating on the score, the player can

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

be coded for not saying the score before serving. If the umpire warns them, there may be consequences. 4. If players cannot agree on a score, they go back point by point that game. If they disagree on a point, have them replay that particular point and have them go back to the score as if the person who won the replayed point won the point that was disagreed on. 5. If a ball hits the net post and goes in, it is in play. 6. In doubles, either player can serve first in a super tie-break. 7. If a returner takes a swing at the ball, they are deemed ready. 8. A returner is considered ready when they make eye contact with the server for two seconds. 9. If a ball comes from a neighboring court between a first and second serve, the server does not get a first serve unless the returner thinks it was too long of a delay. 10. If a player’s hat falls off on the court and neither player calls a let, the hat is in play and any shot that hits the hat should be played back. 11. You lose the point if you throw your racquet at the ball. 12. If a player’s shock absorber comes out during the point and hits the net or goes onto the other player’s side during the point, they lose the point, but it has to be called while the point is still being played.


13. A player must honor the request of an opponent to clear a ball on or close to the court. 14. If a player in doubles yells “back” or “switch” while the ball is traveling towards the opponent and it is deemed by the opponent to be a hindrance, the team communicating loses the point. 15. A player cannot call a let if their hat falls off or a ball falls out of their pocket, but the opponent can. 16. In doubles, if the receiver returns from the wrong side and it is discovered after at least one point is played, the returning team stays at those sides for the remainder of the game and can then switch back to their original sides for all remaining return games in that set. 17. If two players play a third set when a super tie-breaker should have been played, the set is the first to three games with a tie-breaker at two-all if the mistake is realized before the second point of the fifth game. 18. If two players play a third set when a super tie-breaker should have been played, it’s a regular set for the third if

the second point of the fifth game has been started. 19. If two players start a super tie-break instead of a full-third set accidently and the mistake is recognized after the start of the second point, the match should finish as a super tie-breaker (I regrettably have botched this before and have seen other directors mess this rule up too). 20. Worst, most vague rule ever: Toilet breaks are allowed when an official deems the need is genuine. They should be taken at set breaks unless there is a true emergency, in which case, the break preferably is taken during an odd game changeover, but may be taken immediately. 21. The 10-minute break between a second and third set does not occur if there is a rain delay of any kind in the first two sets. 22. A player must get permission before a match to wear an Apple Watch from an official since messages can be transmitted. 23. If a player erases a ball mark in question while the linesman is walking over

to check the mark, the player automatically loses the point. 24. A player has the right to decline the five-minute warm-up with the opponent before the match … and if they do, the opponent can warm-up with another person! 25. If a player overrules him/herself, they lose the point even if they return the shot. 26. An out call should be made either before the return shot has gone out, or before an opponent has the opportunity to play the return shot. (My note, the “you have to call it before you hit it” mantra is totally untrue and sometimes nearly impossible.) 27. A player is not required to show his opponent a mark. Ricky Becker is director of tennis at Pine Hollow Country Club and independently coaches high-performance juniors yearround at Bethpage State Park and Jericho/Westbury. He can be reached (516) 605-0420, rbecker06@yahoo.com or visit JuniorTennisConsulting.com.

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LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Goal S he new year brings a chance to set goals for the following playing season. Most professional tennis players do this religiously. There is ample evidence that establishing goals and writing down a plan is effective for game improvement. After years of working with the highest level tennis players on Long Island, this is what I have learned about winter time game improvement plans.

T

Find motivation There will only be success through the gates of failure. This is a painful but crucial element to any improvement plan. As an example, I had been avoiding joining a gym for years, but suddenly last summer, I found the motivation I needed. I was walking toward a friend who had not seen me for months and when he recognized me he exclaimed, “Wow, looks as if you swallowed a Volkswagen Bug. Have you gained weight?� Painful comment indeed, but by the next day, I had joined a gym and have been there five days a week ever since. Shame and embarrassment are necessary components of motivation. So take the time to assess your failures over the past year and find out just what caused them. Was it fitness? A weak serve? Sluggish footwork? When you carefully assess what your weakness is and how it led to failure, you have found the motive for change. Set a goal This is the fun part. A good yearly goal may be to choose a few tournaments that you want to qualify for but have not done so in the past. This may mean researching the events in question and getting the necessary forms to apply. This process will give you some excitement and that will be more fuel to carry out your game plan. Seek professional support It is the rare tennis player who can improve their game on their own. Harvey Pennick was a famous golf teacher from


Setting for Tennis:

Winter 2016 By Dr. Tom Ferraro

Texas and would say you can make quicker progress with one hour on the range with a pro than with six months of practice on your own. This same dictum holds true for tennis. Only a teaching pro can spot flaws and offer corrections. The plan After you have found your motivation and a good teaching pro, you now need to have a plan of action which should include both fitness and tennis lessons. The new plan should be both easy and

fun so that you incorporate it into your lifestyle. Find a practice and a workout facility that is convenient to get to and has a friendly atmosphere. And when you find a good coach, explain to them your goals and your weaknesses so that together you can build a plan.

must also remain patient as well. Anything worthwhile takes a long time to achieve and that holds true in tennis, as well as in life. If you find motivation, set a goal, find a pro, initiate a plan and observe small changes, there is no way you will not improve over the winter months.

Observe gains and be patient The last key to a good winter plan is to make sure you observe and appreciate the gains that are made. Notice things like improved strength, stamina or swing techniques. You

For consultations, treatment or on-site visits, contact Dr. Tom Ferraro Ph.D., sport psychologist, by phone at (516) 248-7189, e-mail drtferraro@aol.com or visit www.drtomferraro.com.

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YOUR 2016 GUIDE TO LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

Top Clubs & Programs

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


YOUR 2016 GUIDE TO LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

Top Clubs & Programs

Long Island tennis players have great choices when it comes to where to play tennis. Below is a list of Long Island Tennis Magazine’s top clubs and programs with descriptions of what each has to offer.

Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road, Building #4 Farmingdale, N.Y. (516) 777-1385 Bethpage Park Tennis Center is located just a few hundred feet from the Black Course at beautiful Bethpage State Park. Four indoor hard courts and four indoor red clay courts are air-conditioned for yearround play, along with two outdoor Har-Tru courts. Bethpage Park Tennis Center offers an array of adult seasonal, leagues, lessons and walk-on court opportunities. It’s free and low-cost program for seniors and special populations is perhaps the largest of its kind in New York State. The Center is best known for its renowned junior development program, led by top coaches Steve Kaplan and Keith Kambourian. Collectively, they have developed more players than anyone else in the east. Steve is the owner of Bethpage Park Tennis Center, as well as the director of City Parks Foundation Lacoste Academy. Steve has been the long-time coach of more than 800 nationally-ranked junior players, 16 state high school singles champions, two NCAA Division I Singles Champions, and numerous touring professionals and prominent coaches. Steve’s students have been

awarded in excess of $8 million in college scholarship money. Keith, co-owner of the club, has exceled as both a player and a coach. He was ranked in the top 30 nationally in the Boy’s 18 Division and received a full scholarship to Duke and was ranked nationally among the best collegiate players. He directed the Reebok Urban Youth Tennis Academy at Flushing Meadows, N.Y. and has since coached players from beginners to international touring professionals. In 1998, he was awarded the ETA Long Island Region Tennis Professional of the Year Award. Keith has a master’s degree in sports management. His level-headed approach to junior tennis ensures that students develop and maintain a positive and productive mental outlook. In the summer, the finest players in the east join us for summer camp on four indoor hard courts four indoor red clay courts that are air-conditioned, along with two outdoor Har-Tru courts and six nearby outdoor hard courts. Lunch is included and transportation is available. Bethpage Park

Tennis Center charges no membership fee and encourages and values beginners equally with our nationally-ranked players.

Boca West Country Club 20583 Boca West Drive Boca Raton, Fla. (888) 504-BOCA BocaWestCC.org Boca West Country Club is renowned for its first-rate recreational activities. The Country Club’s reputation in golf is equaled

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by its $1.8 million Tennis Center. Fully dedicated to the racquet sport, there is a lighted stadium court and seating for more than 300, plus access for members to USPTA staff for tennis clinics and private lessons for instructions, drills and strategy sessions. The number one residential country club in the United States is also the proud recipient of the 2013 USTA Outstanding Tennis Facility Award. Tennis enthusiasts looking for superb amenities in a beautiful private country club setting have the opportunity to see many WTA and ATP touring pros and other world-class players who frequent the courts. Adding cachet to the Club’s brand is the recent 2015 partnership with WTA rising star Christina McHale, who, according to USA Today, has “Long been considered a could-be next star for the U.S. on the women’s tour.” Known for competing hard and pushing players such as Maria Sharapova and Jelena Jankovic, McHale is currently ranked 63rd in the world. Tennis Center courts carry feature-worthy status of their own. There are 30 Hydrocourts, with three lit for night play. Keeping up with the times, they’re adding one U.S. Open cushion court, which converts to four Pickleball courts to be completed by September of this year. An award-winning community in Boca Raton, Fla. originally developed by Arvida Corporation in 1971, Boca West Country Club is home to 6,000 residents (3,380 families) in magnificent residences including townhomes, patio homes, villas, garden apartments and single-family homes. Boca West is the number one Private Residential Country Club in the country and number one Private Club, of all types, in Florida statewide. Boca West is a Platinum Club of America, Five-Star Private Club since 1997, and is proudly recognized as a Distinguished Emerald Club by BoardRoom Magazine since 2013. For more information, visit BocaWestCC.org. 30

Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy 188 Maple Avenue Rockville Centre, N.Y. (516) 763-1299, ext. 10 CATSNY.com CATSRVC@gmail.com The Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy is proud to be the first of its kind on Long Island devoted entirely to the USTA’s 10 & Under Tennis Program. The Academy features three state-of-the-art, QuickStart, U.S. Open blue green courts. The Academy offers professional tennis programs for group, semi-private and private lessons, plus birthday parties and special events. Directed by former U.S. National Amateur Champion and former top 70 player, the Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy uses USTA and the International Tennis Federation (ITF) QuickStart tennis guidelines. This progressive curriculum focuses on developing children’s tennis skills on a size-appropriate scale, utilizing smaller courts, low compression balls and smaller rackets. Drills and games are played with an emphasis on developing skill sets in a fun environment.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

Carefree Racquet Club 1414 Jerusalem Avenue, #1 North Merrick, N.Y. (516) 489-9005 CarefreeTennis.com Carefree Racquet Club is Long Island’s premier indoor tennis club. With its beautiful redone lobby along with constant upgrading, Carefree cannot be matched. Carefree has seven indoor tennis courts, two racquetball courts and a half-court basketball court. League Coordinator Debbie Cichon offers adult singles, doubles and team doubles leagues that are always on level to insure you a good game every time you play. Carefree has many USTA teams in the adult, senior, mixed-doubles and Tri-Level leagues. For those new to the game or just want to improve, Carefree offers 14-week learn and play groups coordinated by Louis Vallejo. Players get an hour lesson each week, along with 90 minutes of practice time each week. For players looking for a more relaxed social atmosphere, Karen Guigliano hosts parties on Friday nights where food is served and Karen arranges all games for the night. Jean Tanklowitz, senior program coordinator, has many retirees who simply have a flexible schedule, playing Monday through Thursday in the afternoon. All games are arranged by Jean. For junior players, Ben Marks, Carefree’s director of tennis, coordinates the Junior Development Program, a 14-week program starting at the age of five and running through the age


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of 18. Children can take group, semi-private or private lessons and get practice time and ladder match play as well. Ben also runs a high-school prep program and an Elite program. Carefree also offers a QuickStart tot program for children ages three to five years old. This adorable program uses all the props to keep the children’s attention and is unmatched by any other club. Carefree Racquet Club is managed by Kathy Miller, who is also the Long Island USTA Adult League Coordinator. Kathy, along with her assistant manager, Pat McIlwee, pride themselves on the organization and smooth running of the best indoor club on Long Island that has never and continues to not charge membership fees. So if you are looking to join a program or just rent a court now and then, we would love to see you at Carefree!

Centercourt Performance Tennis Academy 65 Columbia Road Morristown, N.J. CentercourtAcademy.com (973) 539-2054 SportsAcademy@CentercourtClub.com Centercourt can be summarized by one phrase: “Culture of excellence.” From its training to academics to tournament travel; the coaches, academic advisors, tutors and support staff are what make Centercourt a great training base, as well as a place to call home. Centercourt’s facilities are comprised of six New Jersey locations with more on the way.

Centercourt’s Performance Tennis home base is located in Morristown, N.J., conveniently located 45 minutes from New York City with transportation and boarding options available. While Centercourt encourages a tennis culture of excellence, Centercourt also places a strong emphasis and focus on academics and work ethic. Since its full-time academic inception two years ago, Centercourt’s scholar-athletes have committed to play collegiate tennis at strong academic institutions such as Columbia University, Wake Forest University, New York University and more. Centercourt offers schooling through both Laurel Springs and The Dwight School, a prestigious preparatory school located in the heart of Manhattan. There is a strong sense of team and family at Centercourt that is pivotal in complimenting strong tennis training. Centercourt’s full-time athletes reside in a beautiful home setting on a 60-acre estate providing the luxury of a family environment. On the weekends when players are not competing, Centercourt makes sure they take advantage of its prime location by providing excursions to New York City shows or a night of bowling. Centercourt is truly a performance athletes’ home away from home.

Visit CentercourtAcademy.com for more information on afterschool, weekend and fulltime training.

Early Hit Training Center 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. (516) 455-1225 The Early Hit Training Center is located at 95 Glen Head Road in Glen Head, N.Y. Home of the ALPS Program, Early Hit Training Center specializes in accelerated learning through a combination of private lessons, group sessions and physical training in tennis-specific exercises. The program was

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designed by Carl Barnett, with the help of Pat Etcheberry. The program focuses on the players and their need for accessible court time, coupled with a flexible schedule and parent-friendly budget. Early Hit Training Center features a fabulous summer camp, pro shop, restaurant and private training all year long.

Great Neck Estates Tennis Club 12 Shore Drive Great Neck, N.Y. (516) 233-2790 Great Neck Estates Tennis Club is located in the scenic Great Neck Estates Water-

front Park. The lobby and front desk area of the Club provides players with an incredible view of New York City. This new tennis center features a brand-new, fullyinsulated air structure and five Har-Tru courts. The air structure, manufactured by the world famous Farley Group of Canada, is the most advanced air structure of its kind and provides a tennis experience second to none. When players walk onto the court, they are instantly amazed by the quality of the lighting system. What truly makes a facility excellent are the people who create, direct and instruct the programs. Both Howie Arons and Willie Notar have an incredible passion for tennis and for what players expect their tennis experience to be like. For the past 38 years, Arons has been one of the most successful coaches in the Eastern Section. Willie Notar has been a standout in Eastern tennis since 1980. In addition to running adult and junior programs at Great Neck Estates, Willie is also the head pro at Fresh Meadows Country Club. From QuickStart to tournament training, New York tennis at Great Neck Estates is striving to offer junior tennis players the best tennis experience. Arons stated, “Our goal is to motivate our juniors to want to be the best

they can be. Whether the player wants to play every day with passion to improve for tournament play, or just once a week to have fun, we get it. Our pro staff is amazing and each day, we strive to bring out the best in all of our players.” The Club’s weekend junior tournament training programs is its trademark. On both Saturdays and Sundays, a three-hour tournament training program is offered, consisting two-hour lesson/drill followed by a full set of tennis. The session includes rigorous competitive drills, point play and fitness, and then each player participates in a ladder match. The results of the ladder match determines the player’s court next week. This type of experience weekly prepares juniors for both high school and tournament tennis. During the mornings and early afternoons, Willie Notar organizes and directs programs for adult players. To burn calories, there is Boot Camp and for players in the evenings, there are men’s drill and play leagues.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

Max Tennis Academy Jericho, N.Y. (516) 244-2979 MaxTennis.net Max Tennis Academy provides the highest level of personalized instruction for juniors and adults under the supervision of the internationally-respected coaches, Andrei Rosianu and Cornel Marola. Max Tennis caters to individuals of all ages and abilities,


YOUR 2016 GUIDE TO LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

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specializing in developing students to their maximum performance levels. Whether group lessons or private instruction, Andrei and Cornel deliver premier quality coaching in a fun, motivating environment. Junior Development/Tournament Training Programs Max Tennis Academy specializes in training programs that develop students to compete in local, regional and national level USTA Tournaments. With more than 20 years of experience, Andrei’s coaching technique has positioned students in world-class ITF competitions, as well as placement in top tier universities. Cornel shares his time between coaching on the ATP world tour and instructing competitive juniors at Max Tennis Academy. In addition to competitive training, Max Tennis is dedicated to offering 10 and Under programs. These classes focus on technique basics, introduction to game play and confidence building drills. This program is a great way to introduce children to tennis in an enjoyable, age appropriate format. Adult Programs Max Tennis Academy offers a variety of daytime and evening opportunities for adults. Group classes and private instruction range in ability levels from novice to professional players. A signature adult program of Max Tennis is the “Maximum Performance Zone,� offered every Tuesday and Thursday night. This program is fast-paced competitive doubles games with upbeat music playing in the background. The first 20 minutes are dedicated to drills, followed by a variety of highintensity cardio games. Players can come with a partner or one will be assigned. Summer Program Max Tennis Academy offers a full- or half-day summer program where children, ages five through 18, can learn to play tennis or further advance their skills. This outdoor program will test the endurance and skill of players of every level. Registration is offered daily,

weekly or monthly. A typical day of camp is comprised of warm-up exercises, drills, fun games and competitive play. Lunch and transportation can be provided. Call Andrei at (516) 244-2979 for more information or to schedule a free evaluation.

Nassau Indoor Tennis Club 73 Fern Place Inwood, N.Y. (516) 239-8303 NassauIndoorTennis.com Info@NassauIndoorTennis.com For more than 30 years, Nassau Indoor Tennis Club has been the tennis club to go to in the Five Towns area of Nassau County.

Conveniently located on the South Shore, 30 minutes from Manhattan and 10 minutes from JFK Airport in Inwood, N.Y., Nassau Indoor Tennis Club is easily accessible from anywhere on Long Island or New York City. Under new ownership, the recently reconditioned HarTru Tennis Courts are the perfect venue for the tennis enthusiast. Proud members of the USTA, Nassau Indoor Tennis Club offers something for everybody. Looking for an outstanding youth program, private lessons, adult leagues, seasonal or hourly court time? Looking to throw a tennis party and cannot find a facility to rent? Nassau Indoor is available for all-sized parties, big or small. Nassau Indoor Tennis is happy and able to accommodate your tennis needs. The Club is proud host to USTA-sanctioned junior tournaments and USTA Adult League Teams. Nassau Indoor Tennis Club provides unparalleled professional instruction to children and adults of all skill levels and abilities. The Club’s pros include David Brent, head pro at Inwood Country Club; Mark Harrison, head pro at Seawane









  

   

  

 

  

      



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YOUR 2016 GUIDE TO LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

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Country Club; Eric Morales, head pro at Woodmere Country Club; and Chris Morales, head pro at the Village of Lawrence Country Club. Rest assured, when you join Nassau Indoor Tennis Club, you’ll get hands-on instruction from some of the region’s best and nationally-ranked professionals. Whether you are taking up tennis for the first time or have been playing for a long time, Nassau Indoor Tennis is available for all of your tennis needs. Just let them know if you want an individual or group lesson and Nassau Indoor Tennis Club’s pros will do the rest. Nassau Indoor Tennis Club is open seven days a week, and hours are Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m., and on Saturdays and Sundays from 7:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m. Hourly and seasonal court time is also available. Whether you would like to sign up for individual or group lessons, rent hourly or seasonal court time, join a league, or need some questions answered, Nassau Indoor Tennis’s friendly staff is available to assist you. For more information, visit NassauIndoorTennis.com.

redesigned social space of post-storm Point Set Indoor Racquet Club! A state-ofthe-art, spare no expense renovation out of respect to our customers! With 350-plus juniors in developmental programs, 60-plus QuickStart Pee-Wees, 500-plus adult players in leagues/contracts/drills, Point Set Racquet Club is working towards fulfilling its mission statement: “Point Set aspires to be the most vibrant tennis club on the South Shore by integrating heart with sport in the community.” The dedicated Dream Team staff of tennis professionals administers a top tier Tournament Training Program (TTP) for three levels of junior competitors. It addresses all aspects of competition: drills, match play, fitness and mental toughness. See what a difference the Point Set staff delivers as the facility has added air-conditioning for a controlled climate for play yearround! Point Set Indoor Racquet Club recognizes that customers are our most important asset. The collegial relationship of the staff, on and off the court, translates into a friendly environment for our customers. Point Set is a full-service club and your gateway to challenging yourself to explore, enjoy and improve yourself through the great sport of tennis. Experience the difference a supportive environment makes! Come play at Point Set where fun meets fitness.

Point Set Indoor Racquet Club 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. (516) 536-2323 PointSetRacquetClub.com Extreme makeover … tennis club edition! Upgrade yourself by enjoying the all-new U.S. Open blue tennis courts, gleaming locker rooms, renovated lobby/office and 34

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. (516) 883-6425 PWTA.com Port Washington Tennis Academy (PWTA) is dedicated to young people, primarily from the ages of four through 18. PWTA was created in 1966 as a non-profit facility to use tennis as a means of fostering educational success for children, by developing a stimulating lifelong activity that is fun, healthy, and scholastically and socially beneficial. This is accomplished by utilizing specialized techniques with a wide range of instructional programs, special in-house competitions and several USTA-sanctioned tournaments. Additionally, graduating high school seniors get the benefit of PWTA’s many years of experiences and up-to-date knowledge of schools, teams and coaches when it comes to identifying, selecting and the eventual placement at a university meeting their individual capabilities and goals. While PWTA is well-known for many world-class professional players graduating from its programs, encouraging educational excellence will always be the club’s main focus. PWTA also offers an extensive variety of adult programs at all levels. Men’s and women’s daytime and evening leagues, private lessons, group clinics (three players plus a professional), seasonal courts, including instructional and season-ending


YOUR 2016 GUIDE TO LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

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doubles play sessions, are just part of the club’s broad spectrum of activities. PWTA is the largest indoor tennis facility on the East Coast, with 17 indoor courts (four hard and 13 Har-Tru) and a unique elevated quarter mile-long indoor running track. PWTA also provides many extras not found as part of a teaching program, such as an international teaching staff, closedcircuit TV for each court, upper TV lounge for relaxed viewing, spectator viewing galleries to ensure full visibility of every court, comfortable lounge areas, extensive men’s and women’s locker rooms, meeting rooms, etc. Complimentary coffee, tea, milk, cookies, juice and potassium rich bananas are always available to PWTA members. In addition, the Academy has a fully-stocked pro shop to meet the needs of members. For more information, call (516) 8836425 or visit PWTA.com.

from mid-fall through mid-spring, allowing for year-round play. The courts are directly adjacent to the beautiful, state-of-the-art Field House, featuring amenities such as locker rooms, lounge, snack bar, and ping-pong tables. The Field House is also used for a variety of special events and is available for private parties. Junior Tennis Programs (Nursery–Grade 6) Using the QuickStart method and low-pressure balls, this program for students up to age 10 develops strong foundations in our youngest players through fun, level-appropriate games and drills. This program develops spatial awareness and locomotor skills and is designed to motivate young players into continuing the sport and taking it to the next level. Junior Tennis Academy (RSJTA) (Grades 7-8) This program offers the same intense training program as Tennis Academy (below), but caters specifically to players in grades seven and eight.

Ross School Tennis Center 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. (631) 907-5162 Ross.org/Tennis TennisAcademy@Ross.org

Tennis Academy (RSTA) Grades 9-12 and Post-Graduate Featuring intense and demanding training for national and international high school students already playing in USTA or ITF tournaments, this unusual and dynamic program combines an engaging, global curriculum with the highest level of competitive tennis training available. Designed for USTA/ITF players in grades seventh through 12th and post-graduates, the RSTA is the first in the New York City area to augment a full academic program with a complete physical and mental conditioning program. Boarding options are available, as is a tennis-only (no academics) program.

The Ross School Tennis Center, located on the Ross Upper School campus in East Hampton, N.Y., is a wonderful resource in the Hamptons open to seasonal and year-round residents. The Center features six Har-Tru tennis courts that are enclosed by a bubble

Lessons and Court Rentals Private instruction is available for all ages and levels of play. The Tennis Center staff provides a fun and supportive atmosphere that allows for the greatest amount of success. Guests can also rent courts during the weekday,

weekend, or seasonally. Call (631) 907-5162 or e-mail TennisAcademy@Ross.org for more information or to make reservations.

SPORTIME Tennis Clubs 12 locations across Long Island, Manhattan, Westchester and the Capital Region (888) NY-TENNIS SportimeNY.com/Tennis Info@SportimeNY.com SPORTIME’s courts, programs, coaches, facilities and club environments have set the standard of excellence since 1989, and we are getting better every year. With 159 hard and soft surface courts, indoors and outdoors, we offer great tennis programs and facilities for players of all ages and abilities. When you are at a SPORTIME club you won’t want to leave! To find out more, go to SportimeNY.com. Programs for everyone l Juniors: From the Tennis Whizz program for preschoolers, to the SPORTIME U10 tennis pathways for red and orange level players, to the Junior Tennis Kinetics and EXCEL Tennis programs for green and yellow level juniors, to the ultimate opportunity to train with New York tennis icon Johnny Mac and the John McEnroe Tennis Academy team at SPORTIME Randall’s Island and at the JMTA Annex locations in Syosset on Long Island and at Lake

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YOUR 2016 GUIDE TO LONG ISLAND TENNIS MAGAZINE’S

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Isle, Eastchester in Lower Westchester, SPORTIME offers a complete menu of tennis programming for every level of play. SPORTIME’s games approach gets kids playing fast and blends technical and tactical learning and coaching from the very first lesson. SPORTIME students turn their weaknesses into strengths, and their strengths into winning games! l Adults: SPORTIME‘s Adult Tennis Kinetics program is the largest adult group lesson program in the country. For those looking for the ultimate challenge, SPORTIME offers Adult EXCEL, modeled after the highly successful Junior EXCEL and JMTA programs. Major League Tennis, Cardio Tennis, and SPORTIME’s signature “Zone” high-intensity competitive games program all provide great workouts and skills development and are a lot of fun! Mixed-doubles parties, round-robin mixers, club tournaments and other special events round out the adult schedule throughout the year. l SPORTIME Camps: SPORTIME offers the best tennis camps anywhere and has a camp location near you! SPORTIME summer camps and Excel player development camps utilize fun and fast-paced training methods, competitive games, technical instruction and tactical training for match play, along with tennis-specific conditioning tailored to all camper levels. SPORTIME campers develop positive self-esteem and a laser-like focus, while having FUN! Multi-Sport camps and school break camps are also offered.

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SPORTIME Tennis Clubs, Home of John McEnroe Tennis Academy 12 locations across Long Island, Manhattan, Westchester and the Capital Region (888) NY-TENNIS SportimeNY.com/Tennis JMTA.com Info@SportimeNY.com With SPORTIME Randall’s Island in Manhattan, the company’s 20-court flagship and the New York City home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy, SPORTIME Lake Isle in Westchester, a state-of-theart, eight-court club, and the Westchester home of JMTA, and Sportime Harbor Island in Mamaroneck, featuring eight beautiful red clay courts, SPORTIME offers the best tennis training programs and facilities for players of all ages and abilities. Check out SportimeNY.com. Programs for everyone l Juniors: From the Tennis Whizz program for preschoolers, to the SPORTIME 10 and under “U10” tennis pathways for red and orange level players, to the JMTA for green and yellow level juniors, SPORTIME offers a complete menu of tennis programming for every age and level of play. SPORTIME’s games approach gets students playing fast and blends technical and tactical learning and coaching from

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

the very first lesson. Our curriculums include world-class, age and level appropriate athletic training, mental toughness training, and other training, reflecting our commitment to developing complete players. Private tennis lessons, athletic training and mental toughness training are also available for adults and juniors! Recent JMTA graduates include top American prospect and 2014 Boys Wimbledon Singles Champion and USTA Boys National Champion in singles and doubles Noah Rubin. Noah launched his pro career in 2015 after a phenomenal freshman year at Wake Forest during which he was an NCAA singles finalist. And, Jamie Loeb, who also launched her pro career in 2015 after two stellar years at the University of North Carolina, including the NCAA singles championship in 2015. l Adults: SPORTIME’s Adult Tennis Kinetics program is the largest adult group lesson program in the country. Major League Tennis, Cardio Tennis and SPORTIME’s signature “Zone” high-intensity competitive games program all provide great workouts and skills development and are lots of fun! Mixed-doubles parties, round-robin mixers, club tournaments and other special events round out our adult schedule throughout the year. l SPORTIME/JMTA Camps: Training is not a part-time endeavor! SPORTIME and JMTA summer and school break training camps utilize SPORTIME’s training methods, competitive games, technical instruction and tactical training for match play, along with cross training and tennis-specific conditioning and mental toughness training tailored to all camper ages and levels.


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USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, N.Y. (718) 760-6200 NTC.USTA.com The USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center (NTC), home of the U.S. Open Tennis Championships, is the largest public tennis facility in the world. The Tennis Center is open to the public yearround and offers exciting programming, as well as numerous events throughout the year. Programs, clinics, private lessons, leagues, tours, field trips, summer camps, corporate events, birthday parties and tournaments are offered throughout the year for all ages and levels. The NTC also supports all USTA Community Tennis and Player Development initiatives. The professional staff also conducts community tennis programs for adults and children including the 10 & Under population for children to learn tennis in a fun and dynamic way; USTA Junior Team Tennis for youth match play; USTA League Tennis for competitive, level-ofplay competition, and an official Cardio Tennis site for on-court heart pumping fitness. Initiatives for USTA Player Development include an Invitational USTA Competition Training Center for ranked

players, Player Development programs for top-ranking juniors residing in the Northeast, and a year-round USTA Tournament Training Program for ranked juniors. The NTC also provides for diverse community outreach programs including; NYJTL, the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, the Queens District Attorney’s Star Track/Say Yes to Tennis, No to Violence program for Queens at-risk youth. The NTC hosts various tennis opportunities for special populations, including wheelchair tennis instruction for the physically-challenged , HERO (Help Expand Recreational Opportunities) for developmentally challenged adults and tennis for autistic children through ACEing Autism. There is an extensive summer camp program which provides basic tennis instruction starting as young as 10 and under, up through and including Acad-

emy level players. Camps include instruction and fitness programs; the encouragement of good sportsmanship leading to general character building for the children of all ages and levels. These services are provided at nominal cost, making it affordable for youngsters who would not otherwise get the chance to attend camp or receive tennis instruction. Lastly, the Project ACES (Alternative Classroom Environment for Students), implemented at the NTC in 2009, is geared towards children from schools from the New York City Metropolitan Area. This program provides students the opportunity to visit the NTC and learn about the history and the game of tennis. The kids are given a tour of the entire site, including Center Court in Ashe, a video presentation on the history of tennis and the great players of the sport, followed by an hour of on-court tennis instruction.

litennis Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Serena-Wozniacki, to Headline BNP Parib erena Williams, a 21-time Grand Slam champion, will take on close friend and former world number one Caroline Wozniacki, and two-time Grand Slam winner Stan Wawrinka will square off with France’s Gael Monfils in the 9th Annual BNP Paribas Showdown at Madison Square Garden, set for World Tennis Day, Tuesday, March 8. The ninth edition of the BNP Paribas Showdown, which consistently attracts the biggest names in tennis, will follow the likes of Pete Sampras, Rafael Nadal, Andre Agassi, Andy Roddick, Ivan Lendl, Juan Martin del Potro, Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray, Mike and Bob Bryan, John and Patrick McEnroe, Grigor Dimitrov, Venus Williams, Maria Sharapova, Kim Clijsters, Victoria Azarenka, Svetlana Kuznetsova, Ana Ivanovic, Monica Seles, Gabriela Sabatini and Jelena Jankovic, all of whom took part in previous Showdowns and provided unforgettable memories for New York tennis fans.

S

TRAINS 17 DIFFERENT SHOTS!

As in years past, the BNP Paribas Showdown at Madison Square Garden will once again headline a full day of worldwide activities as part of World Tennis Day, a global tennis participation effort. All events promote tailoring the game to players 10 & Under with smaller rackets, lighter balls and modified scoring. Serena captured the inaugural BNP Paribas Showdown held in 2009 at Madison Square Garden with a 6-4, 6-3 victory over her sister Venus. The field also included 2008 French Open Champion Ana Ivanovic, as well as year ending number one Jelena Jankovic. Serena holds the most major singles, doubles, and mixed-doubles titles combined amongst active players and her record of 36 major titles puts her fifth on the all-time list. Additionally, Serena has won four Olympic Gold Medals, one in women’s singles and three in women’s doubles. Serena’s opponent, Wozniacki, is a former world number one who will be making her second appearance at MSG in the BNP Paribas Showdown, having faced Sharapova in 2012. She made her

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

professional debut at 15-years-old in 2005 and has since won 23 WTA singles titles. In 2008, she was named WTA Newcomer of the Year. “I have been fortunate to play in World Tennis Day events in New York and Hong Kong,” said Wozniacki. “It’s a great day to celebrate our sport. This year will be even more special as I return to Madison Square Garden with Serena. It doesn’t get much better than that.” Wawrinka has won two Grand Slam titles over the course of his career, including the 2014 Australian Open and 2015 French Open title. Additionally, Wawrinka was a member of the Swiss team that won the Davis Cup in 2014 and also won a Gold Medal in the 2008 Olympics. Stan and his doubles partner, Marco Chiudinelli, played in the longest known doubles match when they faced Tomas Berdych & Lukas Rosal in a match that lasted seven-plus hours. “There are certain things in your tennis career that you want to do: Win Grand Slams, win the Davis Cup for your country,” said Wawrinka. “Playing in Madison Square Garden is one of the things on that list so I am excited about the invitation to play in the BNP Paribas Showdown and look forward to walking onto The Garden court.” Monfils, is currently ranked 24th in the world. In 2014, he finished in the Top 20 for first time since 2011 and fifth time overall, and advanced to the quarterfinals of both the U.S. Open and French Open. He made it to the semifinals of the French Open in 2008 and the quarterfinals of the U.S. Open in 2010. In recent Davis Cup play, Monfils went 3-0 in singles to help France reach its first final since 2010. “I have always loved playing for the New York crowd which inspires me very much,” said Monfils. “So coming back to New York with Stan on World Tennis Day will be a great opportunity to play for the fans. We will put on a great show for them.”


Wawrinka-Monfils bas Showdown at MSG

9th Annual BNP Paribas Showdown TA L E OF THE TAPE

SERENA WILLIAMS

vs.

Country: United States of America

CAROLINE WOZNIACKI Country: Denmark

Birth Place: Saginaw, Mich.

Birth Place: Odense, Denmark

Birth Date: Sept. 26, 1981

Birth Date: July 11, 1990

Residence: Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

Residence: Monte Carlo, Monaco

Turned Pro: 1995

Turned Pro: 2005

2015 Year-End Ranking: 1

2015 Year-End Ranking: 17

Career Singles Record: 737-123

Career Singles Record: 475-192

Grand Slam Titles: 21

Grand Slam Titles: 0

STAN WAWRINKA

vs.

Country: Switzerland

GAEL MONFILS Country: France

Birth Place: Lausanne, Switzerland

Birth Place: Paris, France

Birth Date: March 28, 1985

Birth Date: Sept. 1, 1986

Residence: Saint-Barthélemy, Switzerland Turned Pro: 2005

Turned Pro: 2004

2015 Year-End Ranking: 4

2015 Year-End Ranking: 24

Career Singles Record: 390-231 Grand Slam Titles: 2

Residence: Trelex, Switzerland

Career Singles Record: 332-191 Grand Slam Titles: 0

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

39


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LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

41


2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap Oyster Bay’s Kowalsky/Matute, Hewlett’s Zonova Win New York State Championships For the second year in a row, Long Island reigned supreme at the New York State Championships in upstate Latham, N.Y., as both singles and doubles champions hailed from Long Island. In doubles play, the Oyster Bay duo of Courtney Kowalsky & Celeste Matute repeated as state champions, running through the tournament without dropping a set, and defeating the team of Louina Campos & Vanessa Caino of Urusuline 6-3, 6-1 in the final. The two become the first doubles team from Long Island to repeat as state champions since Amy Chen & Alexandra Kobishyn of Lynbrook accomplished the feat in 1998 and 1999. “We practiced a lot, and we knew what was coming playing in the state tournament,” Kowalsky said on using their experience. “We used that experience to prepare ourselves this time around.” “The key for us is that we play together all the time,” said Matute. “We’ve been doing this for such a long time, and we have a great bond on and off the court that really helps us.” 42

A three-peat won’t be in the cards for the Oyster Bay pair, as Matute will be graduating next spring, but Kowalsky, a junior, will look to get back there herself next year. In singles play, Nassau County Champion Kseniya Zonova of Hewlett, N.Y. continued the excellent play she exhibited throughout the fall, losing just one set in Latham, culminating in a 6-3, 6-2 win over Suffern’s Sydney Kaplan in the finals. “Each match I played better and better,” said Zonova. “I was always trying to improve point to point, and just got stronger each match.” Zonova only moved to Hewlett from Ukraine about six months ago, but now already has a Nassau County and New York State Championship to her name. “I’m so excited, it means a lot to me,” Zonova added. “It’s what I wanted to be when I started playing this year.” The junior is the first singles champion from Nassau County since Syosset’s Vivian Chang in 2012. Nassau County was well represented in both the third place matches as well. Cold Spring Harbor eighth-grader Merri Kelly Hannity finished in third place, defeating Mercy’s Julia Andreach in the consolation match. “I’m happy, it feels good,” said Hannity. “I felt that I played pretty well throughout the tournament. I thought my forehand was good and really helped me. I’m going to improve and work harder so that I can

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap Credit photos to Keith Kowalsky

New York State doubles champions Courtney Kowalsky & Celeste Matute, and singles champion Kseniya Zonova hold up their championship banners

Merri Kelly Hannity sizes up a backhand during her run in Latham

Oyster Bay’s Courtney Kowalsky & Celeste Matute celebrate after winning second straight State Title

Lia Frankis fires a serve during the doubles tournament as she and Amanda Foo of Manhasset finished in third place

go further next year. Hopefully, this experience will help me.” Manhasset’s Amanda Foo & Lia Frankis finished third after defeating Pittsford Mendon’s Joyce Luo & Liza Pinchman in the third place match. “I’m very happy with the way we played,” said Frankis. “To get third place is amazing.” It was a fantastic run for the two girls who had just started playing doubles together a couple of weeks ago. “I had been playing first doubles and Amanda had been playing first singles,” added Frankis. “The Thursday before Counties, we decided to play together. We’ve known each other for four years now and we each know how the other one plays, so we balance each other out.” Foo added, “We both help each other out mentally. Lia has more doubles experience, and during Counties, we figured out different strategies to help each other out, and it just worked out. It feels amazing. I didn’t expect to get this far!” The performance at States capped off a wonderful year for the Manhasset program, who went undefeated this season and won its

Kseniya Zonova rips a forehand during the New York State Championships

Manhasset’s Amanda Foo was honored with the Section VIII Sportsmanship Award

second consecutive Nassau County Championship. “We have a phenomenal team over at Manhasset,” said Frankis. “We really value each and every player we have. We are strong throughout each. And putting us together and going this far in this tournament really shows that.” In addition, Foo was honored with the Section VIII Sportsmanship Award. “Amanda represents Section VIII well, we couldn’t ask for anything more,” said Nassau County Girls Tennis Coordinator Shai Fisher. “She is a model citizen on the court and the level of care she exhibits off the court to the rest of the section is outstanding. She really exemplifies what a student-athlete should be.” Suffolk County was also well-represented in Latham. In singles, Commack’s Kimberly Liao and Half Hollow Hills East’s Stephanie Chikvashvili reached the quarterfinals, and Danah Han & Mina Sarcevic of Half Hollow Hills West and Olivia Faulhaber & Mikayla Goria reached the second-round in doubles action. Huntington’s Emily Shutman and William Floyd’s Lisa Lin and Kaitlin Hibbert also competed in the tournament.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap

Long Island Honors Its Players of the Year It was another successful and exciting season of girls high school tennis on Long Island this past fall. Eighteen girls from Nassau and Suffolk Counties went up to Latham, N.Y. to represent Long Island at the New York State Championships, and just like 2014, the singles and doubles State Champions came from Long Island. Below are the winners of the Long Island Tennis Magazine Coaches and Players of the Year honors:

program and embraced everyone around her. She worked hard in practice and in school every day. She never made any excuses. I wish I could always have a player like her who can truly give to the sport as she did: Not only by playing on the team, but also in the way she encouraged her teammates.”

Players of the Year

The Commack eighth-grader took the Suffolk County tennis scene by storm this past fall. She went undefeated in singles play during the regular season and led her Commack team to an undefeated season and a runner-up in the Suffolk County Championship. She won the Suffolk Individual Singles Title and reached the quarterfinals of the State Championships. “I’m so proud of Kimberly. She raised her level so much from last year,” said Commack Head Coach Jackie Clark. “Last year was her first year on varsity as a seventh-grader, and she really took her game to another level this season. She has a tremendous work ethic, has an excellent attitude and is such a competitive player. For an eighth-grader, she really raises the level of her teammates also. Her teammates just adore her. She is so supportive of them and vice-versa, and it was an amazing combination this year. She’s such a gifted athlete, and I think if she continues to work hard and stays dedicated, there are great things ahead for her.”

Kseniya Zonova Hewlett Kseniya Zonova moved to Long Island less than a year ago, but has already made her mark in the tennis world. The junior helped lead Hewlett to an undefeated regular season and would rack up Nassau County and New York State Individual Singles Championships. Zonova became the first State Champion from Hewlett since Bea Bielik in 1997, and despite being a junior, will graduate from Hewlett this spring. “It’s hard to say that one player makes that big of a difference, but in her case, she did,” said Hewlett Head Coach Abby Samlin. “Here is a girl who came over from the Ukraine, spoke very little English, and left her parents behind to live with her aunt. Not only did she pick up the language and customs, she excelled in school and adapted to the culture. She has been a true inspiration to our

44

Kimberly Liao Commack

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


2015 Long Island Girls High School Recap 11 starters, I expect our program to continue its improvement and become a dominating force in girls tennis.”

Coaches of the Year Mike Kazin Great Neck North The Blazers of Great Neck North had one of the best regular seasons of anyone in Nassau County in 2015, putting together a record of 12-2 in the regular season and earning a spot in the first Section VII team tournament that included all of Nassau County’s conferences. “Our season was a great success,” said Mike Kazin (pictured here on the left with Nassau County Girls Tennis Coordinator Shai Fisher). “Coming off two straight 7-7, non-playoff seasons, I knew that our team was going to be stronger this year due to a number of reasons. We welcomed back our first singles player, a senior, who did not play her junior season. We also returned five 10th graders who became solid starters, and a seventh-grader who was an amazing addition to our already deep squad. However, I did not necessarily know we would improve to 12-2. Our team came together, supported each other at matches and excelled in tennis drills and team bonding activities. With the return of eight of

Jackie Clark Commack Jackie Clark took over a Commack team that went 9-6 last season and quickly helped turn them into a county contender. The Cougars went undefeated in the regular season before falling to Half Hollow Hills East in the Suffolk County Championship. Beyond her on-court accomplishments, Clark’s team became a fixture in its community, hosting many clinics and fundraisers to give back to the people who support them. “It meant so much to me,” Clark said of winning the award. “I worked so hard, and care so much about my players and the sport of tennis. I’m so passionate about it and growing the sport here, so it really meant a lot to me. It was an honor to be recognized for all the hard work my team and I put in this year.”

Winning Matters Maurice Trail has been one of the most successful Junior Coaches in the United States for the last 17 years. His students have won many National and International Championships. With his ability to teach the technical and strategic development of the game Maurice has set himself apart as one of the most successful Junior Coaches in the Nation.

Come and train with the best! Maurice Trail l 516-445-7159 MauriceTrailTennis@yahoo.com LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA Eastern Lo Eastern Section honors Tito Perez, tennis director of World Gym Setauket, Member Organization of the Year

Lionel Goldberg, Regional Volunteer of Chuck Russell (center), Clinician of the Year, shown receiving a USTA Long Island Award in May 2015 the Year from LI Region President Daniel Burgess (right) and Nassau County Legislator Laura Curran (left) The USTA Eastern Section will honor several Long Islanders at its Annual Awards program later this month. These dedicated tennis players and volunteers will be recognized for their “greatness, not only in attitude, but also in performance and dedication,” according to the Section. Congratulations to the following deserving awardees: l Edith Martin Girls’ 14 Sportsmanship Award: Calista Sha (Roslyn Heights, N.Y.) l Member Organization of the Year: World Gym Setauket (East Setauket, N.Y.)

Farmingdale State College Head Coach Adam Waterhouse, Collegiate Award

l Regional Volunteer of the Year (Long Island): Lionel Goldberg (Hewlett, N.Y.) l Clinician of the Year: Chuck Russell (Huntington, N.Y.) l Collegiate Award: Farmingdale State College The Annual Awards ceremony will be held Saturday, Jan. 30 at the Renaissance Hotel in White Plains, N.Y. This event is the highlight of the two-day Eastern Annual Conference (Jan. 29-30). For information on attending the Awards ceremony or the Eastern Annual Conference, visit Eastern.USTA.com.

Early Development Camp for young tennis players

The USTA’s new Early Development Camp (EDC) is underway at Sportime Kings Park. Having begun in October, the program was developed by USTA Player Development to focus on dedicated seven- to nine-year-old players. The Kings Park EDC is headed by Camp Director Jason Wass and Head Coach Jeff Rothstein. The goal is to bring together the top players in a local area for intensive half-day Orange Ball training sessions. Orange Ball Tennis fosters learning in young players that proportionately mimics larger/older players on a full-size court. One of the most critical 46

stages of training. The Eastern Section encourages young players to train in Orange Ball Tennis for as long as possible. The four camp programs in the initial EDC are: l Camp 1: The Expert Rallyer (Groundstrokes) l Camp 2: The Solid Server & Ridiculous Returner (Serve and Return) l Camp 3: The Net Dominator (Transition Game) l Camp 4: The All-Court Player (All Court Game)

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


ng Island Region Long Island Fairs and Festivals Abound

The team from Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center in Glen Cove, N.Y. has been going back to school. Working with USTA Long Island, Wagner’s pros are bringing the USTA’s 10-andUnder Tennis (TAUT) program to students in several North Shore schools for the second year in a row.

This year, the Wagner’s team is teaching tennis at Temple Sinai/Roslyn, Glenwood Landing School, Sea Cliff Elementary, The Greenvale School and The Portledge School as part of the schools’ afternoon activities. Oyster Bay schools will be added this spring.

Introducing Youth Tennis Leagues Are you a tennis club looking for new members and families? Trying to fill courts on weekend afternoons? Seeking to develop young players? Youth Tennis Leagues (YTL), a new program for kids that combines learning with match play, can help. “YTL is designed for children ages seven to 12 who play at a low- to high-intermediate level and are looking for an affordable indoor tennis program,” said YTL Director Joani Akpan. “Most have limited match experience. Our goal is to teach the skills to prepare them for match play. YTL enables young players to gain confidence and compete in a low-pressure setting so they feel comfortable transitioning to Junior Team

Tennis and tournaments.” The pilot program started in October 2014 at the USTA National Tennis Center in Flushing. Additional facilities in the USTA Metro Region have launched programs since, and now Akpan is seeking to expand YTL to Nassau and Suffolk. “We’re hoping to grow within the Eastern Section,” Akpan said. “There’s a huge demand for youth tennis that includes match play. Our program helps kids develop the skills to become confident in match play. We provide a specific focus each week to help with their technical and tactical skills.” Akpan explains that YTL consists of two

hours a week for 10 weeks: The first hour, with an instructor, provides skills development and drills, while the second hour is match play. Setting up a program is easy, Akpan says. “We provide advance purchase of pro and court time, online registration, a toolkit for pros and parents and marketing support for your club including print ads, flyers, postcards and a Web site,” said Akpan. Those interested in learning more about Youth Tennis Leagues can visit YouthTennisLeagues.com, e-mail YouthTennisLeagues@gmail.com or call (718) 258-4730.

Nominations now open! The USTA Long Island Region has begun planning for its 26th Annual USTA Long Island Region Awards Dinner. Scheduled for early May 2016, the event will honor many special people within the Nassau and Suffolk tennis communities, including the Region’s tireless volunteers, most-winning

league players and teams, high achieving juniors, high school players and more. Do you have someone in mind to be honored in May? Nominations are now open for these prestigious awards! Visit LongIsland.USTA.com and click “Annual Awards Dinner” on the left side where you’ll

find a complete list of awards and instructions for making your nominations. The nominating process will close mid-January, so please submit your information as soon as possible. More information on the dinner will be available at LongIsland.USTA.com.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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You Are Good Enough! From Federer to Curry to Brady to You! By Rob Polishook, Mental Training Coach MA, CPC

I

magine this … you just turned pro. You play a few tournaments, and in your first year, your record is 2-3. Okay, fair enough as you’re just getting into things. In your second year, your record is 12-14. You play two Davis Cup matches and lose both and then lose in the first round of all seven outdoor tournaments you entered. You also fail to reach the main draw of the U.S. Open and Australian Open Grand Slams due to losses in the qualification rounds. Okay … so this is going to be hard. Then, in your third year, you lose in 21 out of 38 first round matches! Your season ending record is 27-30. In your first three years as a pro, you compile an overall record of 41-47. Hardly what you expected. If this happened to you, how would you feel about your game? What would you think of your prospects in terms of making a living as a pro tennis player? What would you think about reaching your goals? As a mental training coach, when I ask kids these questions, most say, “It would be rough!” others have even said, “I’d look for another job!” Well, thankfully, the fellow I am talking about above didn’t look for another job. This is the story of how Roger Federer began his professional career. Roger and his camp must have known or believed what others didn’t: That he was “good enough” to do this. Clearly, early in his career, he was not good enough as a tennis player, otherwise he would have been winning more matches. But while it would take time and experience to get traction, he must have had an intrinsic feeling that, regardless of the mounting losses, he was good enough to keep going. This spirit would act 48

“When you bring your spirit, your whole self, and your heart to the competition, the results begin to speak for themselves..” like fuel in a car. It would allow him to persevere, learn from adversity, not overreact to losses and not judge every match as an indicator of his future or if he was good enough. Certainly the rest is history. Federer continues to amaze. It seems at every level he plays, whether he wins or loses, he seemingly doesn’t define himself by the outcome. Rather, his focus is on what he can control: Doing the best he can, bouncing back and improving. Similarly, if we look from the outside in at Stephen Curry and Tom Brady, both of them were not good enough early in their college careers. If people only looked at the stats, no one would ever have predicted the greatness they have achieved. It took time for them to be the superstars they are recognized as now. Somewhere deep inside, they must have believed, “Hey, I can do this.” Seemingly, they were comfortable where they were, being good enough at the present time as a person and athlete, not trying to rush the process to be something they weren’t. Their real game was about learning, improving, working hard and cultivating a spirit of courage, confidence, humility, resiliency and purpose under pressure, especially when others didn’t believe. Coming from this place, even if they found they were not good enough on the athletics field, they could walk away knowing they gave 100 percent. Their score did not determine their worth, and, as people, they were good enough. I know, you’re not Roger, Stephen or Tom

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

… so what does this mean for you? Just like them, you are good enough! No matter what level you are currently playing at, or whether you win or lose in your next tournament, you are good enough. Don’t let others or the results be an indicator of the future. You are more than an athlete. Knowing this will provide the freedom you need to let go of the results, so that you can stop feeling like you have to prove anything to anyone, and instead, focus on what you need to do to continue progressing and bring all the attributes of who you are to the court. That’s what the players and commentators mean when they say, “So and so is playing within themselves, they are letting the game come to them and are not forcing things.” This is the point where the magic happens. When you bring your spirit, your whole self, and your heart to the competition, the results begin to speak for themselves. Then, even if you lose on the court, you still know you are good enough! Trust your process. Trust in that little voice that says: “I can do this.” Federer, Curry and Brady were good enough and so are you! Rob Polishook, MA, CPC is founder and director of Inside the Zone Sports Performance Group. As a mental training coach, he works with athletes and teams, focusing on helping athletes gain the mental edge. Rob is author of Tennis Inside the Zone: Mental Training Workouts for Champions. He may be reached by phone at (973) 723-0314, e-mail rob@insidethezone.com or visit www.insidethezone.com.


Xenecore Answers the Arm Injury Epidemic

ccording to the International Tennis Federation (ITF), half of all tennis players will suffer from tennis elbow (Itftennis.com). Thirty-four of the top 40 ATP and WTA men and women have been sidelined recently from shoulder, wrist and elbow injury or surgery (TennisInsights.com/Injuries). In the past 30 years, more than 150 million players have suffered an arm injury, according to Mark Kovacs, former USTA sports science director. A Tennis Industry of America (TIA) survey reports that 22 percent of all permanent debilitations for tennis players in the United States comes from an arm injury (TIA survey, 2011). This epidemic did not exist in these vast numbers prior to the advent of hollow empty rackets. Research conducted found that 70 percent of children in intensive tennis training programs suffer an arm injury or arm surgery before the age of 16. Thousands of these young victims were especially vulnerable because of their underdeveloped tendons and muscles. Children as young as eight-years-old are hitting balls four to five hours a day, and modern composite racquets have “Added too much power and put enormous wear and tear on young bodies,” wrote Martina

A

Navratilova (“Sidelined in their Prime,” Newsweek, 2009). “More injuries are likely unless tennis’s governing bodies fight back against the racquet manufacturers that have hijacked the game.” The paramount authority, Dr. Stuart Miller, head of the ITF’s Technical Commission, after years of studying all possible causes of the injuries, that racket shock is the cause of injuries (British Journal of Sports Medicine). The medical examinations from doctors at the Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia who perform hundreds of surgeries on tennis children concluded that the cause of the injury was the racket. In the paper “Influence of Racket Properties on Injuries and Performance in Tennis,” Dr. Ewald M. Hennig concludes that the characteristics of the racket cause racket shock. “Poor stroking technique is frequently accused, conveniently diverting scrutiny from racquet design. What is good for minimizing elbow damage is low shock (RacquetResearch.com).” Numerous studies have shown that the characteristics of the racket affect the shock load up to five times, depending on the construction of the rackets. In

wood rackets, vibration disappeared quickly. But the new stiffer, lighter and hollow conventional frames do a poor job of snuffing out the vibrations, so they transfer this shock to the arm that can stealthily sabotage the elbow, wrist, forearm and shoulder.” The most recent published scientific study conducted by Ferrara and Cohen showed that empty hollow rackets have shock durations up to three times that of a Xenecore multi solid-core racket, which shocked for less than 0.2 of a second, compared to an average of 0.7 of a second for the other brands’ empty hollow models. That means, in a typical match with 180 balls, more than 43,000 pounds of force is transmitted from the racket to the arm versus 13,000 pounds of force transmitted from multi-solidcore rackets. In the abstract “Prediction of Impact Shock Vibrations at Tennis Player’s Wrist,” the authors concluded that shock vibration is higher in super lightweight rackets. This is why Xenecore developed its revolutionary 114-square inch seven ounce super control racket which could become the next dominant form in the industry. Based on Federal Consumer Safety Product Commission Recall regulations, all conventional hollow empty rackets are technically illegal because of the high likelihood of injury as they transmit well over 100 pounds of force and shock significantly longer than 0.2 seconds at impact (see 16 CFR § 1115). Xenecore technology was developed to cure this arm injury epidemic. Visit Xenecore.com for more information.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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A Look Back at the Y BY EMILIE KATZ

2015 Grand Slam Winners

Australian Open 2015 Champions l Men’s Singles: Novak Djokovic (SRB) l Men’s Doubles: Simone Bolelli & Fabio Fognini (ITA) l Women’s Singles: Serena Williams (USA) l Women’s Doubles: Bethanie MattekSands (USA) & Lucie Safarova (CZE) l Mixed-Doubles: Martina Hingis (SUI) & Leander Paes (IND)

French Open 2015 Champions l Men’s Singles: Stan Wawrinka (SUI) l Men’s Doubles: Ivan Dodig (CRO) & Marcelo Melo (BRA) l Women’s Singles: Serena Williams (USA) l Women’s Doubles: Bethanie MattekSands (USA) & Lucie Safarova (CZE) l Mixed-Doubles: Bethanie MattekSands (USA) & Mike Bryan (USA)

Wimbledon 2015 Champions l Men’s Singles: Novak Djokovic (SRB) l Men’s Doubles: Jean-Julien Rojer (NED) & Horia Tecau (ROU) 50

l Women’s Singles: Serena Williams (USA) l Women’s Doubles: Martina Hingis (SUI) & Sania Mirza (IND) l Mixed Doubles: Martina Hingis (SUI) & Leander Paes (IND)

U.S. Open 2015 Champions l Men’s Singles: Novak Djokovic (SRB) l Men’s Doubles: Pierre-Hughes Herbert (FRA) & Nicholas Mahut (FRA) l Women’s Singles: Flavia Pennetta (ITA) l Women’s Doubles: Martina Hingis (SUI) & Sania Mirza (IND) l Mixed-Doubles: Martina Hingis (SUI) & Leander Paes (IND)

ATP Year-End Award Winners, presented by Moët & Chandon

l ATP World Tour No. 1 (determined by Emirates ATP Rankings): Novak Djokovic The 28-year-old Serbian has become the sixth player to clinch the year-end number one Emirates ATP Rankings on four or more occasions, following in the footsteps of Pete Sampras (six years), Jimmy Connors and Roger Federer (five years), Ivan Lendl and John McEnroe (four years). In 2015, Djokovic reached all four Grand Slam finals (3-1 record), eight ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournament finals, winning titles in Indian Wells, Miami,

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

Monte-Carlo, Rome, Shanghai and Paris. He also lifted the Beijing trophy among 14 finals. He closed out his successful season with a victory at the Barclays ATP World Tour Finals. l ATP World Tour No. 1 Doubles Team (determined by Emirates ATP Doubles Team Rankings): Jean-Julien Rojer & Horia Tecau The duo won the Barclays ATP World Tour final earning them the year-end number one ranking in the Emirates ATP Rankings for 2015. l ATP Star of Tomorrow Award presented by Emirates: Alexander Zverev This category, in its third year, replacing the player voted newcomer of the year, is awarded to the youngest player in the top 100 of emirates ATP rankings as of Nov. 9. Zverev, who began the season ranked number 136th, broke into the top 100 on May 18 and reached career-high number 74 on June 29. The 18-year-old German reached the Bastad semifinals and the quarterfinals in Washington, D.C. He also won one ATP Challenger Tour Title in Helibronn. l Most Improved Player of the Year (voted by ATP players): Hyeon Chung The 19-year-old Korean climbed more than 120 places from number 173 in the Emirates ATP rankings at the start of the year winning four titles on the ATP Challenger Tour in 2015. He also reach the Shenzhen quarterfinals and is currently ranked at a career-high of number 51. l Comeback Player of the Year (voted by ATP players): Benoit Paire A knee injury and long months of inactivity in 2014, saw the Frenchman drop out of the top 150 in the Emirates ATP rankings, but in 2015, he produced a dramatic resurgence. He captured his first ATP world tour title at Bastad in July


Year That Was 2015 to become the first player since Steve Darcis in 2007 to win an ATP World Tour, ATP Challenger Tour and ITF Future title in the same season. He recorded his first top five win over the number four ranked Kei Nishikori in the U.S. Open first round and went on to finish a runner-up in Tokyo where he beat Nishikori again in the semis. He is currently at a careerhigh number 20 in the Emirates ATP rankings.

dren,” which it does by “Identifying and supporting charities and causes that help at-risk youth survive and thrive. Tennis is at the core of what the brothers’ foundation does, as it “promotes the ideals of sport, and tennis in particular, to emphasize the values of hard work, dedication and perseverance”.

l Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship (voted by ATP players): Roger Federer Fellow players voted Roger Federer as the winner of the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship award for the 11th time and fifth consecutive year. He also won the award six straight years, from 2004-2009.

l ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favorite Singles Player, presented by Moët & Chandon (voted by the fans): Roger Federer The Swiss has been voted ATPWorldTour.com fans’ favorite for a record 13th straight year, receiving 65 percent of all votes cast. Rafael Nadal finished second, followed by Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray and Kei Nishikori.

l Arthur Ashe Humanitarian of the Year Award (awarded by ATP): Bob & Mike Bryan The Californian twins have shown tremendous commitment to their off-court philanthropy, with their charitable foundation, Brian Bros, raising money for dozens of beneficiaries. The foundation’s mission is to “Support and grow the dreams of chil-

l ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favorite Doubles Team, presented by Moët & Chandon (voted by the fans): Bob Bryan & Mike Bryan The Bryan Brothers received 35 percent of votes to be named The ATPWorldTour.com Fans’ Favorite for a record 11th time. Australian Open champions Simone Bolelli & Fabio Fognini came in as the sec-

ond most popular duo, followed by Jamie Murray & John Peers in third place. l Media Excellence Award (awarded by ATP): Linda Pearce The Melbourne-based sportswriter covered her first Grand Slam in 1988. As the long-time chief tennis writer for The Age, she has since covered almost 50 majors, as well as four Davis Cup finals, multiple Olympic Games. She has won multiple media awards as a news and feature writer.

WTA Year-End Award Winners

l WTA Player of the Year: Serena Williams Serena Williams has won the WTA’s Player of the Year Award for seventh time in her career (2002, 2008-2009, & 2012-2015). The year-end number one for the fifth time in her career and third continued on page 52

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A Look Back at the Y consecutive year (2013-2015), Serena held the number one ranking for every week throughout the 2015 season. She finished the season with a 53-3 record winning a WTA-leading five titles in 2015, including three Grand Slam titles (Australian Open, Roland Garros and Wimbledon) to take her career total to 21 Grand Slam singles titles. In addition, she won her eighth title in Miami and third consecutive title at Cincinnati. She finished the season with more than $10,582,642 in prize money. l WTA Doubles Team of the Year: Martina Hingis & Sania Mirza The team of Martina Hingis & Sania Mirza ended the year as the number one doubles team after first teaming up at 2015 Indian Wells. Mirza became the first Indian player to reach the number one ranking in April, and remained at the top through the end of the year. The pair won nine doubles titles throughout the season, including Grand Slam titles at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open, losing only one set in both title runs, in addition to titles at Indian Wells, Miami, Charleston, Guangzhou, Wuhan and Beijing.

l WTA Most Improved Player of the Year: Timea Bacsinszky Timea Bacsinszky was named the WTA’s Most Improved Player of the Year, as the player who finished inside the Top 100 and showed significant improvement throughout the 2015 season. She improved 36 spots from the end of 2014 (number 48 to number 12). Her breakthrough year saw her advance to her Grand Slam semifinal at Roland Garros, defeating number 16 Madison Keys and number four Petra Kvitova en route to the semis, falling to eventual champion Serena Williams. She won her second and third career singles titles in back-to-back weeks at Acapulco and Monterrey (defeating Caroline Garcia in both finals). l WTA Newcomer of the Year: Daria Gavrilova The WTA Newcomer of the Year is awarded to the player who made their top 100 debut or notable accomplishments during the 2015 season, and prior to the current year, had not played in more than six main draw events at tour-level in a single season. Daria Gavrilova finished 2015 ranked 36th in

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the world and achieved her career-high ranking of 35th in the world on Oct. 5. Daria jumped 197 spots from the end of 2014 (number 233 to number 36). The highlight of her 2015 season was her semifinal run at Rome, where she qualified and defeated Belinda Bencic, Timea Bacsinszky and Ana Ivanovic before falling to Maria Sharapova. l WTA Comeback Player of the Year: Venus Williams The WTA Comeback Player of the Year Award is given to the player whose ranking previously dropped due to injury or personal reasons and current season’s results helped restore their ranking. Venus Williams is a seven-time Grand Slam champion who has made several comebacks in her illustrious career, but 2015 saw her return to the top 10 in the WTA Women’s Singles Rankings for the first time since April 2011. At 35-years-old, Venus became the oldest woman in the top 10 since 1995 (Martina Navratilova who was 38-yearsold). Venus posted seven top 10 wins this season, and finished the season at number seven, her highest year-end finish since 2010 when she finished at number five. l Peachy Kellmeyer Player Service Award: Lucie Safarova The Peachy Kellmeyer Player Service Award is given out each year to the player who has done the most for their fellow players. The player can be acknowledged for their efforts made through the Player Council or any other initiative on behalf of the general player population. This award has been voted on by players since 1977. Previous winners include Kim Clijsters, Liezel Huber, Nicole Pratt, Francesca Schiavone, Pam Shriver and Venus Williams. Safarova is a repeat winner of the Peachy Kellmeyer Player Service Award, having received the honor in 2014 as well.


Year That Was 2015 l Karen Krantzcke Sportsmanship Award: Petra Kvitova The Karen Krantzcke Sportsmanship Award is awarded to the player who conducts themselves in a manner fitting of a professional sports figure and observes the rules of fair play, shows respect for others and is gracious on and off the court. This award has been voted on by players since 1978. Past winners include Kim Clijsters, Elena Dementieva, Ana Ivanovic, Lindsay Davenport, Chris Evert and Evonne Goolagong-Cawley. Kvitova won the award in 2014, as well.

Players who retired in 2015 Mardy Fish American Mardy Fish started his career in the year 2000 and won six ATP tournaments overall. He reached the finals of four Master Series events: Cincinnati in 2003 and 2010, Indian Wells in 2008, and Montreal in 2011. He couldn’t make a mark in the Grand Slams, as his best performances were reaching the quarterfinals once each at Wimbledon, the Australian Open and U.S. Open. One of the greatest achievements of his career was earning a Silver Medal at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, losing to Nicolás Massú. Flavia Pennetta Flavia Pennetta announced her shocking retirement immediately after winning her first Grand Slam title in Flushing Meadows at the U.S. Open. She made her announcement in the post-match ceremony, leaving the crowd and her fans shocked. In her 15year long career, she won 10 WTA singles

titles. She became the first Italian player to be ranked number one in doubles in 2009. Her major achievements in doubles were winning the WTA Finals in 2010 (teaming with Gisela Dulko) and winning the 2011 Australian Open title (again with Dulko). Michael Russell At the age of 37, Michael Russell decided to call it quits and retire in 2015. Some of his career highlights include the number one ranking in the U.S. Boys 18 & Under in 1996. He was named NCAA Rookie of the Year at Miami before turning pro in 1998. Russell won 15 Challenger Series Singles Titles. In his 2001 debut at French Open, he reached the fourth round of main draw. He led by two sets and held match point at 5-3 in the third set before losing, 3-6, 4-6, 7-6 (7), 6-3, 6-1 to then-top-ranked Gustavo Kuerten in 2001.

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Eduardo Schwank Eduardo Schwank, who hails from Argentina, turned professional in 2005 after finishing as the second ranked junior in the world. His best result in a Grand Slam was reaching the French Open Men’s Doubles Finals in 2011 where he teamed with Juan Sebastián Cabal. Robin Soderling Sweden’s Robin Soderling announced his retirement at the age of 31. Soderling hadn’t played a match in more than four years due to glandular fever, a condition he was diagnosed with in 2011. He won 10 titles over the course of his career and reached back-toback French Open finals in 2009 and 2010. He will be remembered most for his victory in the fourth-round over Rafael Nadal at Roland Garros in 2009, snapping the Spaniard’s 31-match winning streak at the French Open.

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tips from the tennis pro The Mantra of Three for Your Best Tennis in 2016 By Lisa Dodson Patience. Patience. Patience. Patience is one simple word that has big meaning and impact on your game. Said once is not enough. One time turns into three: Patience, Patience, Patience. At some point in your tennis quest, it’s likely that you’ll reach a level of frustration that sends you in search of answers. Ninety-nine times out of 100, the answer is going to be more patience. Just keep repeating it until it is deeply embedded in your mind and then you might just begin to understand what it’s all about. In order to play good tennis, it has to be fun, not head-banging and frustrating. Fun

means something different to all of us. In tennis, we all do have one fun thought in mind: Winning matches. The trick is to learn to choose a positive and productive path, and leave the negative thoughts and self-destruction behind. Learn to enjoy and trust the process. This takes lots and lots of patience. Improving the next three keys that will give your mantra meaning and start your forward progress now: 1. Technique Typically, learning technique is the number one task for those relatively new to the sport. It’s also essential for more experienced players to constantly upgrade and improve their technique. Technique refers to proper formation of all the basic shots: Fore-

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hand, backhand, serve, volley and overhead. This addresses ball watching, point of contact, correct grips, swing patterns and footwork. Each basic shot has a number of variations or sub-sets. These can all be learned after some proficiency once basic shot technique is completed. All of these specific techniques need to be learned, accepted, understood and practiced in order to achieve some level of proficiency or mastery. In other words, it’s a complex process that builds over time … and that’s where patience comes into play. It’s essential to be patient with yourself and trust the process. When you are developing and learning new grips, shots and footwork, you need to use the new, developing aspects in stressful situations. For example, when you are playing a set with a person you regularly beat, use your modified serve grip or new topspin forehand even though you might lose the set. Winning this particular set is not important. What is important is using the new stuff in a real situation. Initially, you won’t trust it, but that’s how you will learn to. Then, go and practice outside of the playing situation to solidify the technique. Remember: Losing is an important part of the process and is a great learning tool. 2. Mental The mind drives our emotions, and emotions can create fear on the court. Fear is a four-letter word in tennis and the most destructive emotion. Fear leads to impulsive behavior, playing outside of our means or not up to our potential, poor concentration


and negative thinking. Once you go down that road, it’s difficult to recover. After all, if you are not nice to yourself on the court, who will be? Do you expect too much of yourself or worse, not enough? Are you often afraid on the court? Are you afraid to fail or to look bad or worse ‌ to lose? The honest answer is likely yes. Who needs an opponent when you have yourself? Once you have become somewhat proficient with the basic shots, you’ll discover the need for positive thinking and mental management skills, especially if you like to win games and matches. Fear, impulsive thoughts and negative behavior lead to unsatisfying play and prevent you from improving and loving the game. The fix to battling fear is proficiency in technique. If you know for sure that you can produce, then what is there to be afraid of? It’s almost that simple. Tennis is a very patterned and logical game when you understand it. Playing in the moment, leaving the past (good or bad) behind you and not letting your emotions get the best of you is key. Developing mental stability and discipline requires a whole new level of patience and takes time to cultivate. We’ve all been next to or playing someone spewing negativity and generally acting poorly. Maybe you’ve seen terror in the eyes of someone who is winning, but about to go down the tubes or someone who looks like a much better player than the opponent, but just cannot keep the ball in the court. Maybe it was even you! Now look on the other side

and see the guy who looks relaxed, focused and attentive. If he shows any emotion, it is only positive. He may not win today, but he is on a far better path than the others and will certainly win many future matches. Chances are you don’t know how negative thoughts are hurting you when, in fact, they are your fiercest foe. Negativity is far more powerful than the person on the other side of the net. The next time you feel fear on the court, simply smile. Smiling reduces stress. The experience has to be fun, whatever your definition of fun is. 3. Strategy Shot selection can make strategy seem like the most challenging area. Basically, we act like we have mastered Key Number One (Technique) and we really haven’t. If you play within your means (pick shots you can actually hit with a high degree of success) and up to your potential, then your strategy becomes much simpler. Just because you can hit a variety of shots doesn’t mean you need to use them. Use them when they are appropriate for the situation, not just because you want to. Simplicity leads to success. Remember: Tennis is not a random game (repeat after me: Tennis is not a random game). A successful game is built on successful patterns of play and the ability to choose and string these patterns together. That brings us full circle and back to technique and mental discipline. Being able to make your opponent uncomfortable is at the top of the strategy list. Accomplish this by knowing your strengths

and putting them to use, planning ahead and having an answer for everything your opponent throws at you. Like a chess match, success in tennis often depends on identifying your opponent’s weaknesses and capitalizing on them before they realize it’s too late. The Mantra of Three is every player’s route to success. Patience often translates in physical, mental and strategic terms as simply being steady, keeping our cool and outlasting our opponent. How dull, right? Those solid concepts are the cornerstone of every game. With a good plan, every area of the game can be expanded into one that is truly successful. Players who are not particularly athletic might not achieve enough because they don’t know the process and don’t think they can do it. Those of us who are athletic and highly competitive often skip some of the key steps to building a successful game. We are in a hurry to win. It can take these players much longer and cause more grief even though they bust through the gate faster. Slow down and enjoy the process. It takes some time and Patience, Patience, Patience. Thanks to my new tennis friend, Harun Asad, for his content contribution for this article. Lisa Dodson is owner of Servemaster at The Total Serve, a USPTA Elite Pro, a formerly world ranked player and radio show host. She may be reached by e-mail at Lisa@TheTotalServe.com or visit TheTotalServe.com.

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One Key Tennis Skill Separates the Novices From the Pros It’s probably not what you think

By Lenny Schloss onsistent strokes, footwork, fitness, visual skills and mental clarity … all of these tennis skills are essential to consistently winning on the court. But only one of these crucial skills makes almost every shot a good one. It’s that impossible-to-overemphasize visual ability to steady the eyes and head at the point of contact when the ball hits the racquet. The good news is that, from the very beginning, a novice can be taught to master this key skill. We call it Point of Contact Training.

C

Even a kid can hit a tennis ball like a pro player It’s going take them years of playing to acquire all of the necessary skills to win consistently on the court. Even the pros know about the importance of eye position at point of contact, yet few have mastered this art that grants them the substantial edge they are looking for. Maintaining the proper eye position at the point of contact (EPOC) is a very difficult skill to learn, because keeping the head in one place is not natural when the target is over there! The eyes and head reflexively move away from the point of contact with the ball too soon—unless they’ve been retrained not to move until just after contact. Beginners have fewer bad habits to get rid of The advantage of starting young, and being trained at the Point of Contact correctly from the beginning is that all of the player’s learning can be directed toward improving their game much quicker. They are acquiring a skill that comes into play with every shot they make. Having that ability as part of their basic repertoire makes all of their subsequent practice and play even more effective and rewarding. Customarily, much of any learning curve involves going back and eliminating counter-productive habits that were acquired along the way. A beginner has yet to develop a repertoire of


bad habits that have become entrenched over time. They do, however, come to the game with the same inborn reflexes that everyone has. So those reflexes that interfere with their quality of play need to be addressed. The most important thing is to stop doing things wrong and start doing things right ASAP. Fortunately, the reflexive one that makes the eyes shift prematurely eight out of 10 times can be removed and replaced with a new one that works for both reflexes and habits. Either way, the player will see an immediate improvement in their balance and performance. Since the average player who plays once a week hits approximately 12,000 shots a year, they are either losing their balance or mishitting about 10,000 times a year! Becoming competent with their eye focus when the ball hits the racquet assures that number will drop dramatically. Also, increasing the number of hits done correctly through repetitive practice will help the new behavior stick.

Habits and reflexes are very different Just to be clear, a reflex is not a habit because reflexes are primarily instinctive. However, habits are a more learned behavior that a person has acquired—intentionally or unintentionally—until a particular behavior becomes automatic. In developing habits, we actually decide to do something deliberately, but then if repeated often enough it happens without thinking, but it never becomes a reflex. However, once a habit is established, it goes away from the conscious control of the mind, so it is just about as difficult to stop or change as a reflex is. Doing things right consistently is a restart to how you improve faster It is easier for a player to improve their overall performance if they start correctly at the Point of Contact from day one. The good news is the same re-training of the eyes works for players at any level of play quickly within a few hours. Once they’ve mastered the ability to hold their

TAKE YOUR COACHING TO

THE NEXT LEVEL

eyes and the head still at the point of impact for that fraction of a second, their whole game shows improvement. And with less work, too. My best advice It’s taken me many years to find a way that gives a player this Point of Contact Training advantage. Removing the cause and replacing it with the correct habit is the key with thousands of correct reps, so they are not thinking about it. This habit works for every player, at every level, and for almost every shot and can be ingrained within just a few hours. The renewed excitement for the game when players of all ages see themselves improving faster than their expectations almost overnight is priceless! Lenny Schloss is CEO and founder of Billie Jean King’s Eye Coach. Lenny is a former all-American tennis player, top 10 U.S. pro, and an award-winning club owner and manager. For more information, e-mail Info@TheEyeCoach.com, call (800) 7169004 or visit TheEyeCoach.com.

The Coach Youth Tennis online courses and interactive workshops will enhance your teaching skills. Highlights include: • Teaching tennis skills and fundamentals • Organizing age appropriate games and activities • Communicating more effectively with children

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© 2015 United States Tennis Association. All rights reserved.

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TENNIS INJURY PREVENTION

What is Tendonitis and How Can It be Treated? By Dr. Charles Ruotolo, MD, FAAOS he term “tendonitis” refers to an inflammation or damage to the fibrous bands of tissue that connect muscles to the surrounding bones. Depending upon where the muscle is located, the tendons can be thick and re-

T

semble a rope (like those in the calf and thigh) or small and resemble a rope (like those in the hands). Typically, while it is called tendonitis, the true term is tendinosis, which is degenerative fraying or tearing of the tendons as the tendons are rarely inflamed as tendonitis implies. Most cases of tendon injuries arise in one of two ways: The first is due to repeti-

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

tive strain injuries. With a repetitive strain injury, small microtraumas can cause small tears in the tendon, which develops into tendinosis and causes it to become painful and weakened over time. The second way this injury can occur is due to a sudden overload of the tendon. For instance, pushing or pulling a heavy object with improper form can cause the tendon to be severely damaged as it partially or completely tears. If the tendon does not properly heal, continuous use will increase the damage over time. Below are the most common areas affected by tendonitis/tendinosis as well as the causes of the injury. Shoulder tendonitis This form of tendonitis often affects athletes whose sports require repetitive overhand motions, such as tennis, baseball and football. This is also commonly seen in weight lifters. The reason that this overhand throwing motion can damage the tendon is most often due to overuse, but can be compounded by improper form and lack of strengthening of the tendons. Many tennis players have recently adopted


a form attributed to Rafael Nadal, which emphasizes a large amount of topspin on the ball. Although this style may be effective against your opponent, it can place significant force on the shoulder ligaments. As a result, players may find the overhand position to be painful and are no longer able to exhibit a full range of shoulder motion. This loss of shoulder internal rotation has been shown in many studies to increase risk for more significant shoulder injuries, including superior labral tears. For those with loss of shoulder internal rotation, a specific stretching program has been shown to decrease pain and the incidence of more severe shoulder injuries.

cases, muscular imbalance can cause the patellar tendon to be pulled much harder in one direction than another, causing increased stress and damage to the tendon. Identifying the cause of the injury with activity modification is the most important first step in the treatment of patellar tendonitis. Eccentric strengthening programs have been shown to decrease pain and return function in patients with patellar tendonitis. For those with chronic patellar tendonitis who have failed conservative treatment, a minimally invasive arthroscopic technique has been shown to have a high success rate in returning athletes to their pre-injury performance.

Knee tendonitis This form of tendonitis (more often referred to as “patellar tendonitis”) affects the area surrounding the kneecap. The patellar tendon connects the kneecap to the shin bone and allows for the extension of the knee needed for running and changing direction. Athletes whose sports require consistent running or jumping are often at risk for this injury due to improper form or even shoes that are not appropriately fitted. In other

Elbow tendonitis This is the form of tendonitis that most are familiar with and is more commonly known as “tennis elbow” or “golfers elbow.” However, despite being named after sports, athletes make up only a small portion of those who suffer elbow tendonitis as any repetitive motion can cause this condition. The tendons of the elbow also help control the ability to grip objects, especially for the thumb and first two fingers. Over time,

repetitive motions that use the elbow tendons, like gripping or swinging an object, can cause strain on these tendons. Treatment of elbow tendonitis includes physical therapy, and injections including platelet rich plasma which can aid in healing the tendon injury. For those who have failed conservative treatment, a minimally invasive surgery can repair the torn tendon and has a high success rate for returning to sports and performance. The most common symptoms of tendonitis will include: l l l l l

Hearing a “pop” sound Immediate pain in the area Swelling of the affected area Reduced range of motion Bruising

Dr. Charles Ruotolo is a Board-Certified Orthopedic Surgeon and the founder of Total Orthopedics and Sports Medicine with locations in Massapequa, East Meadow and the Bronx, N.Y. For more information, call (855) 321-ORTHO or visit www.totalorthosportsmed.com.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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Kicking Off the Year Down Under By Luke Jensen It’s that time of year when you wish the snow would melt and the skies would clear for some real tennis fun! For the players on the pro tour, that fun is played at the “Happy Slam!” The Aussie Open, played at the end of January for two weeks, serves as a springboard into the new year. Because Australia is in the Southern Hemisphere, they are in their summer season, while the winter months are upon us in the Northern Hemisphere. Now you can be a pro player or a firstclass world traveler to experience the Happy Aussie Grand Slam, but I may have a better idea for you! I will even let you in on my latest little tennis secret I call “Tennis Heaven!” Now if you are a tennis adventurer and are looking to get out of the deep freeze, a

warm world-class destination is just a punch volley away. There are so many great tennis getaways for any type of budget featuring all types of programs and courts. From group lessons to grass courts, there is a tennis resort destination calling your tennis spirit. Make sure you do your homework and find the perfect fit for your specific needs. Are you looking for a tennis camp? A tennis hammock feel to get a little sand in your shoes or even a little competition to test your winter game in the sunshine? Make sure you take your time and dig into the details. The little things mean you can have big time fun on your tennis getaway. Now how do I know this? In my life, tennis has blessed me with the ability to see the world as a junior, college and pro player. I have covered the Grand Slams as an analyst for ESPN, have coached at the collegiate level, and now, tennis has granted an old tennis dog like myself one

last wish. Years ago, I was neck deep into an ice bath in Belgium after a match, wondering as my body numbed away the pain, where this tennis road was taking me. I remember thinking I could see myself teaching away my days at a resort, just a stone’s throw away from the beach. Now, after many matches from that freezing necessity of an ice bath, I landed in my tennis heaven. It’s called Sea Island, where I am the director of two eight-court clay court facilities. During my 6:00 a.m. lessons, I can hear the waves gently crashing at the beach club. My days are filled with tennis clinics, lessons and mixers. My programs are based on providing fun and enthusiasm for every guest. From tennis to sea turtle adventures, Sea Island has me living my dreams once again through the sport of tennis. When you are looking for your perfect family tennis getaway this season, make sure everyone in the family has their activities covered and you will add an unforgettable family portrait of memories to be shared for generations. Until next time … keep going for winners! Born in Grayling, Mich., Luke Jensen’s resume includes 10 ATP Tour doubles titles and singles victories against Andre Agassi, Pete Sampras, Ivan Lendl, John McEnroe, Bjorn Borg, Jimmy Connors, Boris Becker, Stefan Edberg and Jim Courier. Jensen and his brother, Murphy, won the 1993 French Open doubles title. Luke is currently director of tennis at Sea Island Tennis Center in Georgia. He may be reached by phone at (315) 443-3552 or e-mail lukejensen84@yahoo.com.

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B Y K AT H Y M I L L E R

The Tri-Level League, which is played on three doubles courts—one at the 3.5 Level, one at the 4.0 Level and one at the 4.5 Level—wrapped up in October and November. The winning men’s team was captained by Gabe Moreira & Mitch Low. The winning women’s team was captained by Karen Levine. Both teams will be competing at the Sectional Playoff set for the weekend of Jan. 15 in Westchester, N.Y. The Mixed-Doubles League is now underway at the 6.0, 7.0, 8.0 & 9.0 Levels. This League is run based on combined ratings. The Mixed-Doubles League began mid-December and runs through the end of April with the regional playoffs set for the beginning of May. Players can be added to rosters until Jan. 15.

Jamie Stickney is now the coordinator of the Tri-Level and Mixed-Doubles Leagues, and can be reached at limixedusta@gmail.com. Organizing for the upcoming Men’s and Women’s Seasons for the 18 & Over League, the 40 & Over League, and the 55 & Over League will begin in February. If there are any new captains, please let me know before Tuesday, March 1 when I begin scheduling. These leagues will run from May to August. Any players looking for teams should contact me after March 1 when I will know which teams are looking for players. The 18 & Over League has teams at the 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5 & 5.0+ Levels. The 5.0+ League is permitted to have two 5.5 players

on the team. The 40 & Over League has teams at the 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 & 4.5+ Levels. The 4.5+ League is permitted to have three 5.0 players on their team, with just two playing in each match. The 55 & Over League consists of three courts of doubles at the combined levels of 6.0, 7.0, 8.0 & 9.0. Wishing everyone a very happy and healthy New Year and looking forward to USTA League Tennis in 2016! Kathy Miller is manager of Carefree Racquet Club and is also the Adult League Coordinator for USTA/Long Island. She may be reached by e-mail at kathym65@aol.com.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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L O N G

I S L A N D

charitabl Carefree raises money for Susan G. Komen Foundation

Carefree Racquet Club recently hosted a charity event to raise money for the Susan G. Komen Foundation in its fight against breast cancer. Teaching pros from Carefree taught drills with 36 participants for two hours, and afterwards, the players enjoyed wine, provided by Ace Wine & Liquor, appetizers and desserts. The event raised $2,000 for the Susan G. Komen Foundation.

Commack Girls host Tennis With Teachers Fundraiser The Commack Girls Varsity Tennis team hosted its annual Tennis With Teachers Fundraiser at Commack High School. Each player paired up with a teacher from Commack for a doubles tournament and the event raised more than $1,700, which was donated to the Susan G. Komen Foundation.

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T E N N I S

M A G A Z I N E ’ S

le initiatives Commack Girls Tennis provides clinic to students with disabilities Members of the Commack Girls Varsity Tennis Team recently presented a tennis clinic to members of the Athletics for All (adapted sports for students with disabilities) program at Commack High School. The USTA also chipped in by donating water bottles and bags for all the athletes. “It was a great afternoon of tennis and everyone had a lot of fun,” said Commack Girls Tennis Head Coach Jackie Clark. “We all enjoyed playing tennis with the athletes, and more importantly, volunteering our time to make a difference.”

Roslyn Play for Pink Raises Money for Go With Courage

The Roslyn Boys and Girls Varsity Tennis teams hosted a Play for Pink fundraiser re-

cently. There was a fun and competitive doubles tournament, and they raised more than $800 which was donated to Go With Courage. Go With Courage is a notfor-profit corporation founded by Robyn Jaslow and her family primarily to raise funds to support

critical cancer research for the purpose of finding a cure. In addition, an anonymous donor from the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center triple-matched the funds raised, and donated it to ongoing breast cancer research led by Dr. Clifford Hudis and his team. “We are extremely grateful to everyone who participated in our event, both on and off the courts,” said Roslyn Head Coach Kerriann Jannotte-Hinkley.

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You Are Not Entitled to Anything By Lonnie Mitchel n the fall of 2015, we are confronted with young people owning every gadget you can possibly think of, such as the iPhone. You have a computer that fits in the palm of your hand that you can do miraculous things with. A computer 40 years ago could not do half the things our iPhones can do and took up enough space to fill a large storage room. We have sure come a long way! There is danger to having instant gratification at your fingertips and not have to do the work to obtain fulfillment. I spend a great deal of time with the first generation of Millennials who have become used to getting the things they want in a short amount of time. What does this have to do with tennis? In terms of coaching young men and women, I see a complete difference in the young people I coached some 20 years earlier. The overwhelming majority of the college kids I coach come to campus for

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the first time, and as it relates to tennis, they want instant gratification. They feel they are entitled to the reward and are not always willing to put the work in to reach their goals. I spend a great deal of time recruiting young men and women to play tennis at the collegiate level for SUNY Oneonta. The last group of skilled and talented freshman men showed up at practice and many thought they were going to be the number one singles player because they are who they are. I told them that each person will have an opportunity to earn starting positions as we went through the challenge matches. Invariably, when a student lost that challenge match, I could see the “deer in the headlight” look in their faces … the realization of having to work hard at just being a starter would be challenging. What do you say to a young man who has instant gratification in the palm of his hand and won many USTA junior matches and tournaments? Most of these young people were the best player on their high

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

school squad and is now no longer king of the hill. Now comes the time where you find who has the character to persevere. Who will incinerate the thoughts of entitlement and start doing the work necessary to balance their lives on the tennis court and in the classroom? Who will say that it is “too hard” and simply quit? A common theme I hear if a player quits is “I do not have the passion anymore” and “The classroom is creating excess stress that I cannot balance.” Make no mistake about it … I know what they are saying and I am very good at reading between the lines: “I want it to be fun and easy and have success. If not, I am not going to do it.” Where is it written that tennis is supposed to be fun and easy all the time? When you play collegiate tennis and sports, you have to sacrifice time, and I look them in the face and say welcome to the real world, you will have to earn your spot. This concept is a real world scenario. The adults reading this know that nothing is handed to you, and in most cases, you will have to earn just about everything. For


many young people, coming to college, they find out the hard way that they are entitled to nothing! On a recent coaching trip, I met a respected member of the clergy from the United Kingdom who spoke about keeping your word. The ethical person makes a promise and keeps to it. I recruit players to compete in college and they say, “Well I am looking forward to committing and will do what it takes to be successful.” Then, reality sets in upon arrival and they find that work and long-term success is dependent on your day-to-day efforts both on the court and in the classroom. They have an unrealistic expectation even though I was crystal clear as to what it takes to be successful. Instant gratification is what some want, and for some, their lack of perseverance surfaces. The game of tennis has evolved in the last 40 years from wood rackets to spaceage equipment. We know now that power is a tool that can separate you from the rest of the competition. I have evolved in the coaching profession and have embraced the power game. In the years

“Instant gratification is what some want, and for some, their lack of perseverance surfaces.” when I developed my game and passion tennis was a slower game, using the whole court to develop a winning game was predicated on consistency. Although being successful in tennis you have to be consistent, the game seems now to lend itself to win at power and not patience. Earlier gratification for the young players seems to be a common variable. This style runs hand-in-hand with the instant gratification I write about. If you play tennis for me, I will hold you accountable. I cannot hold a gun to your head and make you play and work hard, but I can teach you an important lesson that you cannot handle life in the same fashion. Your boss will hold you accountable, no matter your position in life and the responsibilities you may have. Everything that comes with great success comes with hard work, and if it was easy, everyone would do it. We celebrate those players who endure

their four years of collegiate tennis, whether they are a starter or last on the depth chart. I know they accomplished something that the overwhelming majority of people cannot do. Those who get through this blink-of-an-eye, four-year collegiate sports/tennis experience go out in the real world better equipped to handle the adversity and lack of instant gratification the world will heap on them. Sports does not just build character, it also reveals character. Do you want it now or are you willing to work for it? Lonnie Mitchel is head men’s and women’s tennis coach at SUNY Oneonta. Lonnie was named an assistant coach to Team USA for the 2013 Maccabiah Games in Israel for the Grand Master Tennis Division. Lonnie may be reached by phone at (516) 414-7202 or e-mail lonniemitchel@yahoo.com.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


GROW TENNIS

Tennis Community Rings in the Season at

Holiday Brunch Long Island Tennis Magazine and New York Tennis Magazine recently hosted its Third Annual Holiday Gourmet Brunch at Engineer’s Country Club in Roslyn, N.Y. The event brought together members from all sides of the tennis community in New York and Long Island, and kicked off the 2016 season in style with great food and drinks, and the opportunity for guests to discuss the state of the sport. Long Island Tennis Magazine would like to extend its thanks to everybody on hand for the event, as well as to the staff at Engineers Country Club. Over the past eight years, one of Long Island Tennis Magazine’s proudest accomplishments has been the many fantastic relationships that have been built within the tennis community and the annual Holiday Gourmet Brunch reflects just that. LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA Eastern Hosts 29th A BY BRIAN COLEMAN

SUNY Purchase Director of Admissions Stephanie McCaine talks to kids Eric Butorac discusses his journey from D-III player to the Pro Tour and parents about the college admissions process and to his current role as president of the ATP Player Council

STA Eastern recently hosted its 29th Annual College Showcase Day at the Saw Mill Club in Mount Kisco, N.Y. bringing together college coaches and high school tennis players for a day of match play, seminars and much more. “I think the people who attend this event are here because they realize they need more information about the college recruiting process,” said Julie Bliss Beal, USTA Eastern’s senior director of competition. “And the coaches who are here know what spots they need to fill on their teams.” More than 60 college coaches and programs set up shop at the club to talk to and meet high school juniors and seniors who

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are thinking of playing tennis at the collegiate level. The group of players was divided into juniors and seniors, and were able to hear seminars from people of all collegiate backgrounds, as well as participate in match play on the courts throughout the club. “It’s a great opportunity for potential student athletes, parents and coaches to network and help the families through the process of getting into college and being part of a collegiate team,” said Lonnie Mitchel, head coach at SUNY Oneonta. “Each year I attend, SUNY Oneonta is able to secure one or two players who have collegiate talent who I might not have seen

Jaime Kenney, director o about her time as a coll college athletes

otherwise. It’s also great for college coaches to network with each other and stay updated with the latest in collegiate tennis.” The seminars were an important tool for both the kids and their parents, as they heard from Eric Butorac, a professional tennis player who reached the men’s doubles final at the 2014 Australian Open and currently serves as president of the ATP Player Council; Jaime Kenney, a former collegiate head coach who currently serves as the Intercollegiate Tennis Association’s (ITA) director of member programs; and Stephanie McCaine, who is director of admissions at SUNY Purchase.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


Annual College Showcase Day Credit all photos to Brian Coleman

of member programs for the ITA, talks ege coach and what the ITA offers to

Players were able to get on court for match play to showcase their skills to prospective college coaches

Each brought their own unique experiences and perspectives to the seminar, which allowed the attendees to hear from all sides of the college recruiting process. “It’s very important because kids will hear information they wouldn’t find on the internet or through other college resources,” said Bliss Beal. “To have experts stand up and talk to the kids and parents about what their journey was like, they get that touch point, and that is invaluable.” McCaine discussed the admissions process into college, while Kenney talked about her time as a college coach and what the ITA offers, and Butorac talked about his route from a Division I player to

A number of college coaches and programs were on hand to talk about what their school can offer to the high school players in attendance

Division III, and ultimately a career in professional tennis. “It provides a great opportunity for kids to learn in several different ways,” said Kelsey Clark, coordinator of public relations and communications at USTA Eastern. “Having a professional player speak is important because it gives the kids someone to look up to, especially someone who played Division III tennis. It shows they can attain anything, regardless of the Division I, Division II or Division III title.” The event is a valuable resource for players, parents and coaches, and helps fill in the gaps that exist sometimes in the recruiting process while also answering a lot

of important questions for those looking to play college tennis. “An event like this can help kids decide if they want to play college tennis,” said Bliss Beal. “It’s for players of all levels and abilities. They could play third doubles on their high school team and be able to find a school where they fit in the lineup. The fact that they can meet more than 60 college coaches in one place is remarkable.” Brian Coleman is senior editor for Long Island Tennis Magazine. He may be reached by phone at (516) 409-4444, ext. 326 or email brianc@usptennis.com.

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To Fight or Not to Fight By Tonny van de Pieterman Per-se-vere Synonyms: persist, carry on, keep going, struggle on, keep at it, press on, stand firm, hold on, stay the course. hen I was a junior player, I was told that in order to be a champion, I had to be a great “fighter.” In hindsight, I wish I had been told that, to be a champion I had to persevere. Let me explain. In tournament play, a closely contested first set is often followed by a complete walk-over in the second set. Just take a look at any random draw sheet of a completed tournament and you will find many scores like 7-6, 6-1, or 7-5, 60. In my playing days, I also fell victim to this phenomenon many times. I would play my heart out in the first set, get close, and have my chances, only to have the second set completely run away from me. This was very frustrating for me. I was told to forget about the first set and to start fresh. I was told to change my strategy, but most often, I was told to fight harder in the second set. And yet every time I tried to “fight” harder after losing a very close first set, I just couldn’t find the energy to do so. Trying to fight seemed to make matters worse. It wasn’t until I learned the psychology behind my energy lapse that I was able to be a much better and tougher competitor … a better fighter you could say. When we lose something very important to us, something we have a great deal invested in, we go through a process of feelings connected with this loss (mourning). This feeling is one of lackluster, a depressed level of energy. For noncompetitive tennis players, this might be a little far-fetched. However, anyone who has been involved in competitive tennis knows how consumed and involved our minds get during a match. Aside from that, it is very easy for us to lose perspective. Just think of watching a scary movie late at night. I am sure that I’m not the only one who has checked the closets or under the bed for monsters. It’s not like I didn’t know the movie was not reality. Losing a first set is not like losing a family member or something along those lines, so the period of sorrow usually does not last too long. If you can manage to “hang in” for a little while, your level of energy will surely return. You will be able to put the first set in perspective and continue at a high level. However, in my early matches, in a 10-minute period in the second set, I would usually be down 4-0 or 5-0 already. By then, it was often too late. I was completely frustrated at my inability to “fight.” So my advice to my students after losing a close first set: l Give yourself some time l Don’t make any radical game changes (yet) l Don’t misbehave when feelings of anger set in

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Tonny van de Pieterman is director of tennis at Point Set Indoor Racquet Club. He was recently named USTA Tennis Professional of the Year for the USTA/EasternLong Island Region and helped the Eastern Section win this year’s Talbert Cup. He may be reached by phone at (516) 536-2323 or e-mail tonny@pointsettennis.com. 70

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


Tulane’s Koepfer and Ohio State’s Di Lorenzo Crowned National Indoor Intercollegiate Champs Tulane’s Dominik Koepfer capped off a brilliantly-played 2015 fall college tennis season in style on Sunday at the 2015 USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate Championships Credit photo: Parker Waters/Tulane.edu

Tulane’s Dominik Koepfer capped off his 2015 fall college tennis season in style at the 2015 USTA/ITA National Indoor Intercollegiate Championships. Competing at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in front of a worldwide audience tuning in on ESPN3, Koepfer, the number three seed in the tourney, tamed Andre Goransson of Cal in straight sets 6-1, 7-5 to earn the ITA’s third and final Division I national title of the 2015 fall season. “It’s just awesome after making the semis in Malibu [Oracle/ITA Masters], making the finals and losing a tough one in Tulsa [St. Francis Health System ITA Men’s All-American Championship], it’s just an awesome feeling that everything worked out and I’m very happy,” said Koepfer. The final in New York showed that Koepfer did indeed learn from his prior championship experience in Tulsa, where the usually fiery left-hander was uncharacteristically low-key and never recovered from a sluggish start. Against Goransson, Koepfer was the aggressor early and breezed through the first set 6-1. Goransson resiliently battled back in the second set, but Koepfer’s game was too strong and he let out a thunderous yell and pumped his fists when he secured match point. “I did what I had to do to give myself the best chance to win,” said Koepfer. “I went for my shots every point and started really well, which gave me a lot of confidence.” Before the men took the court, the women’s singles final kicked off ESPN3’s

coverage. Ohio State freshman Francesca Di Lorenzo showed why she was the topranked freshman/newcomer in the 2015 Oracle/ITA Division I Preseason National Rankings, as she bested Clemson’s Joana Eidukonyte in straights 6-3, 6-1. “I think [the match] went pretty well,” said Di Lorenzo. “I wasn’t hitting my backhand as well as I would’ve liked or how I had in previous matches, but I think I kept the ball moving well with my forehand, moved her well and came in when I had my opportunities.” Di Lorenzo opened the match with a break of serve and quickly consolidated for a 2-0 lead. Di Lorenzo stretched the advantage out to 4-1 before closing out the

set 6-3. The second set saw more of the same as Di Lorenzo never allowed Eidukonyte to find a rhythm. “It’s definitely an exciting way to finish out the fall; it couldn’t have ended any better,” said Di Lorenzo. “I’m just happy to represent my school and this was a really cool moment.” Champions were also crowned in women’s and men’s doubles, as the number four North Carolina duo of Hayley Carter & Whitney Kay defeated the number three seeds, Kentucky’s Mami Adachi & Aldila Sutjiadi, in three sets 4-6, 6-4, 1-0 (6) for the women’s title. The men’s doubles final also went to the third-set tie-break, with Texas Tech’s Felipe Soares & Hugo Dojas slipping past second-seeded North Carolina’s Brett Clark & Robert Kelly 6-4, 57, 1-0 (7). Florida State’s Benjamin Lock won the men’s consolation singles title with a 7-6 (4), 7-5 victory over Dartmouth’s Dovydas Sakinis. Cal’s Klara Fabikova won the women’s consolation title after defeating Michigan’s Brienne Minor 6-2, 3-6, 6-1. Stanford’s Taylor Davidson & Caroline Doyle beat Ohio State’s Miho Kowase & Anna Sanford for the women’s doubles consolation title.

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LONG ISLAND TENNIS CLUB

directory

Alley Pond Tennis Center 79-20 Winchester Boulevard Queens VillageY 11427 (718) 264-2600 AlleyPondTennisCenter.com Bethpage Park Tennis Center Andrea Pappas—Manager 99 Quaker Meeting House Road #1 Farmingdale, NY 11735 (516) 777-1358 bptcenter@aol.com Butch Seewagen Tennis Academy @ Rockville Centre CATS Jami Madison—Director 188 Maple Avenue Rockville Centre, NY 11570 (516) 763-1299, ext. 10 catsrvc@gmail.com Carefree Racquet Club Kathy Miller—Manager 1414 Jerusalem Avenue Merrick, NY 11566 (516) 489-9005 carefreetennis@aol.com Deer Park Tennis Club Afzal Ali—Director of Tennis 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, NY 11729 (631) 667-3476 DeerParkTennis.com Early Hit Training Center at Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Carl Barnett: (516) 455-1225 earlyhit@optonline.net Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, NY 11545 Stephanie Leo: (516) 676-9849 glenheadrc@verizon.net Nassau Indoor Tennis Club David Brent–Director of Tennis 73 Desibio Place Inwood, NY 11566 (516) 239-8303 info@NassauIndoorTennis.com New York Tennis Academy at Great Neck Estates Howie Arons—Director of Junior Tennis Program 12 Shore Drive Great Neck, NY 11021 (516) 233-2790 bightennis@aol.com

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Point Set Indoor Tennis Tonny vandePieterman—Director of Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, NY 11572 (516) 536-2323 tonny@pointsettennis.com PointSetTennis.com Port Washington Tennis Academy Manny Iqbal—Director of Tennis 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, NY 11050 (516) 883-6425 tennis@pwta.com PWTA.com Robbie Wagner’s Tournament Training Center at Glen Cove Stephen Alcala—Managing Partner 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, NY 11542 (516) 759-0505 RWTT.com Ross School Holly Li—Manager 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 907-5162 hli@ross.org Ross.org/Tennis SPORTIME Amagansett (Open Seasonally) Sue de Lara—General Manager 320 Abrahams Path Amagansett, NY 11930 (631) 267-3460 amagansett@sportimeny.com SportimeNY.com/Amagansett SPORTIME Bethpage Tennis Joe Siegel—General Manager Chelsea Riccio-Assistant General Manager Mike Kossoff—Director of Tennis/JMTA 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, NY 11714 (516) 933-8500 mkossoff@sportimeny.com SportimeNY.com/Bethpage-Tennis SPORTIME Kings Park Bea Bielik—General Manager Jason Wass—Director of Tennis 275 Old Indian Head Road Kings Park, NY 11754 (631) 269-6300 jwass@sportimeny.com Sportimeny.com/Kings-Park

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

SPORTIME Lynbrook Bea Bielik—General Manager Vicki Weiss—Assistant General Manager Jeff Morys—Director of Tennis 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, NY 11563 (516) 887-1330 jmorys@sportimeny.com SportimeNY.com/Lynbrook SPORTIME Massapequa Chris Leahy—General Manager Emmanuel Ponce—Director of Tennis 5600 Old Sunrise Highway Massapequa, NY 11758 (516) 799-3550 cleahy@sportimeny.com SportimeNY.com/Massapequa SPORTIME Quogue Rene Bond—General Manager Greg Meyer—Director of Tennis 2571 Quogue-Riverhead Road East Quogue, NY 11942 (631) 653-6767 rbond@sportimeny.com SportimeNY.com/Quogue SPORTIME Randall’s Island Flagship Home of the John McEnroe Tennis Academy Allison Hodgkins—Assistant General Manager Jared Karlebach—Assistant General Manager One Randall’s Island New York, NY 10035 (212) 427-6150 ahodgkins@sportimeny.com/jkarlebach@sportimeny.com SportimeNY.com/Manhattan SPORTIME Roslyn Jay Harris—General Manager Chris Pagoto-Assistant General Manager Jordan Dolberg—Director of Tennis 1 Landing Road Roslyn, NY 11576 (516) 484-9222 jharris@sportimeny.com SportimeNY.com/Roslyn SPORTIME Syosset Tennis & Multi-Sport John McEnroe Tennis Academy, Long Island Joe Siegel—General Manager Chelsea Riccio—Assistant General Manager Mike Kossoff—Director of Tennis/JMTA 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, NY 11791 (516) 364-2727 mkossoff@sportimeny.com SportimeNY.com/Syosset-Tennis USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Whitney Kraft—Director of Tennis Flushing Meadows Corona Park Flushing, NY 11568 (718) 760-6200 USTA.com


COMING IN MARCH

Distribution scheduled for 03/01/16

This edition will feature: • Guide to the Top Tennis Camps • Guide to he Top Court Builders and Manufacturers • Boys High School Tennis Season Preview • Australian Open Recap

Distribution across Long Island at 300+ locations: • Indoor tennis clubs • Country clubs • Tennis camps • Retail stores • Gyms • Restaurants and health food stores • Supermarkets and • Many more!

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LONG Boys & Girls Long Island Rankings (as of 12/16/15)

BOYS Long Island Boys 12 Singles RankName ......................................City 1 ......Jeremy Levine......................Woodbury, N.Y. 2 ......Dylan D’Agate......................Melville, N.Y. 3 ......Evan Joseph Rupolo ..........East Patchogue, N.Y. 4 ......Candrin Chris ......................Port Washington, N.Y. 5 ......Joseph Perry Boyle ............Setauket, N.Y. 6 ......Andrew Cyril Mancheril ......New Hyde Park, N.Y. 7 ......Matthew Evan Kronenberg East Setauket, N.Y. 8 ......Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 9 ......Aiden Patel ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 10 ....Ajer Sher ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 11 ....Ryan Shayani ......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 12 ....Joshua Elenowitz ................Syosset, N.Y. 13 ....Aaron Rittberger ..................Huntington, N.Y. 14 ....Michael Ryan Safir ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 15 ....Ian Kaish ..............................Northport, N.Y. 16 ....Alejandro Pablo Perez ........Selden, N.Y. 17 ....Bilal Rashidzada ..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 18 ....Cameron Levchuck ............Greenlawn, N.Y. 19 ....Johnny Donohue ................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 20 ....Kyle Zhou ............................Commack, N.Y. 21 ....Brian D. Gao ........................Syosset, N.Y. 22 ....Ethan Rabinowitz ................Great Neck, N.Y. 23 ....Max Daniel Safir ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 24 ....Joseph Monticciolo ............Coram, N.Y. 25 ....Matthew Strogach ..............Commack, N.Y. 26 ....Joshua Kaplan ....................East Quogue, N.Y. 27 ....Matthew Leonard Zeifman..Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 28 ....Mario Earl Simmons ............North Baldwin, N.Y. 29 ....Brandon Gicquel..................Huntington, N.Y. 30 ....Aron Bursztyn ......................South Setauket, N.Y. 31 ....Ben Botwinick......................Melville, N.Y. 32 ....Ryan Carlos ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 33 ....Trevor R. Hayes ..................East Moriches, N.Y. 34 ....Joshua Cyril Mancheril........New Hyde Park, N.Y. 35 ....Nicholas M. Pham ..............Northport, N.Y. 36 ....Justin Shen ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 37 ....Gavin Park............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 38 ....Benjamin Grushkovskiy ......Woodmere, N.Y. 39 ....Brett Carnival ......................Smithtown, N.Y. 40 ....Albert Cheng........................Melville, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 14 Singles RankName ......................................City 1 ......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Timothy Lewis Chiu ............Holtsville, N.Y. 3 ......Zachary Emmanuel Stern ..Dix Hills, N.Y. 4 ......Samir Singh..........................Syosset, N.Y. 5 ......Matthew Southard ..............Islip, N.Y. 6 ......Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 7 ......Liam Thomas Schmidt........Wantagh, N.Y. 8 ......Nicholas Harbans Sathi ......Port Jefferson, N.Y. 9 ......Zachary David Gruber ........Port Washington, N.Y. 10 ....Brandon Lee ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 11 ....Pius Lo ................................Massapequa, N.Y. 12 ....Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 13 ....Azim Gangat ........................Syosset, N.Y. 14 ....Putimet Inroon ....................Greenvale, N.Y. 15 ....Griffin Schlesinger ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 16 ....Jai Madisetty........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 17 ....Joshua Rothbaum ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 18 ....Aaron Marcos Vinsky ..........Westbury, N.Y.

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ISLAND

19 ....Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 20 ....Danny Tocco........................East Quogue, N.Y. 21 ....Zachary Chan ......................Woodbury, N.Y. 22 ....Joshua Elenowitz ................Syosset, N.Y. 23 ....Ishan G. Varma ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 24 ....Zakir Siddiqui ......................Huntington, N.Y. 25 ....Austin Du Lai........................Manhasset, N.Y. 26 ....Justin Benjamin Oresky ......Syosset, N.Y. 27 ....Ashkan Moghaddassi ........Woodbury, N.Y. 28 ....Pranav Vallapragada............Nesconset, N.Y. 29 ....Ethan Ertel............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 30 ....Neil Edward Sathi ................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 31 ....Richard Martin Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 32 ....Dion Park ............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 33 ....Alexander Benanti ..............East Setauket, N.Y. 34 ....Andre Kun Kirkorian ............Woodbury, N.Y. 35 ....Gabriele Brancatelli ............Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 36 ....Martin Charles Racanelli ....West Islip, N.Y. 37 ....David Ammendola ..............Massapequa, N.Y. 38 ....Michael Wang ......................Syosset, N.Y. 39 ....Sujay Alluri............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 40 ....Kian Louis Ghazvini ............Glen Head, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 16 Singles RankName ......................................City 1 ......Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 2 ......Timothy Serignese ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 3 ......Alexander Hazarian ............Garden City, N.Y. 4 ......Samir Singh..........................Syosset, N.Y. 5 ......Justin Ullman ......................Huntington Station, N.Y. 6 ......Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y. 7 ......Alex B. Fried ........................Plainview, N.Y. 8 ......Rohan Dayal ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 9 ......Marco Ammirati ..................Halesite, N.Y. 10 ....Jake William Buckley ..........Sound Beach, N.Y. 11 ....Vincent Avallone ..................Smithtown, N.Y. 12 ....Matthew Moreida ................East Rockaway, N.Y. 13 ....Matthew Southard ..............Islip, N.Y. 14 ....Connor Leaf ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ....Edward Brambil ..................Halesite, N.Y. 16 ....Neil Edward Sathi ................Port Jefferson, N.Y. 17 ....Jai Madisetty........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 18 ....Amani Siddiqui ....................West Babylon, N.Y. 19 ....Steven Gaudio ....................Miller Place, N.Y. 20 ....Evan Kirsh............................Roslyn, N.Y. 21 ....Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y. 22 ....Nicholas Gajda ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 23 ....Ethan Ertel............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 24 ....Andrew Lin ..........................Commack, N.Y. 25 ....Rohan Mathur......................Dix Hills, N.Y. 26 ....Ciro Baldinucci ....................Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 27 ....Evan Brady ..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 28 ....Preet Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 29 ....Justin Suzzan ......................Manhasset, N.Y. 30 ....Ian Mitchell Capell ..............Woodbury, N.Y. 31 ....Matthew Musalo..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 32 ....Zachary Emmanuel Stern ..Dix Hills, N.Y. 33 ....Nicholas Mark Newell..........Huntington Station, N.Y. 34 ....Nicholas Goldman ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 35 ....Pranav Vallapragada............Nesconset, N.Y. 36 ....Garrett Joseph Sebold........Centerport, N.Y. 37 ....Kian Ziari ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 38 ....Ashkan Moghaddassi ........Woodbury, N.Y. 39 ....Nicholas A. Troia..................Floral Park, N.Y. 40 ....Andrew Neil Smith ..............Bellmore, N.Y.

Long Island Boys 18 Singles RankName ......................................City 1 ......Matthew Moreida ................East Rockaway, N.Y. 2 ......Samuel R. Yuen ..................Selden, N.Y. 3 ......Luke Sandoval ....................Garden City, N.Y.

RANKINGS

4 ......Michael Petersen ................Bridgehampton, N.Y. 5 ......Andrew Baichulall................Westbury, N.Y. 6 ......Parker A. Tuthill....................Cutchogue, N.Y. 7 ......Mitchell Reid Berger ............Lake Grove, N.Y. 8 ......Steven Gaudio ....................Miller Place, N.Y. 9 ......Harris Durkovic ....................Dix Hills, N.Y. 10 ....Simon Adler ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 11 ....George Kaslow ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 12 ....Justin Matthew Scuderi ......Smithtown, N.Y. 13 ....Jonathan Gruberg ..............Setauket, N.Y. 14 ....Elias D. Tsalatsanis ..............Smithtown, N.Y. 15 ....Tyler Ancona ........................East Setauket, N.Y.

GIRLS Long Island Girls 12 Singles RankName ......................................City 1 ......Daniella Victoria Paikin ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ......Ines Roti ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 3 ......Jennifer Rabinowitz ............Great Neck, N.Y. 4 ......Sophia Elizabeth Schutte....Great Neck, N.Y. 5 ......Emily Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y. 6 ......Jacqueline Zambrotto ........Kings Park, N.Y. 7 ......Ida Nicole Poulos ................Manhasset, N.Y. 8 ......Sadhana Sridhar..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 9 ......Ariana Pursoo ......................Westbury, N.Y. 10 ....Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 11 ....Theadora Yael Rabman ......Port Washington, N.Y. 12 ....Elle Brignati ..........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 13 ....Nicolette Loeffler..................Syosset, N.Y. 14 ....Ava Thunder Scordo ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 15 ....Anna J. Martorella................Wantagh, N.Y. 16 ....Kiera Agic ............................Miller Place, N.Y. 17 ....Isabella Sha..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 18 ....Martina Eulau ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 19 ....Anna Vanessa Malin ............Oceanside, N.Y. 20 ....Lisa Baldinucci ....................Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 21 ....Skylor Wong ........................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 22 ....Remi Berlent ........................Huntington, N.Y. 23 ....Janae Fouche ......................Freeport, N.Y. 24 ....Alysson Dawn Pierro ..........East Patchogue, N.Y. 25 ....Alexandra Kaylee Ho ..........Syosset, N.Y. 26 ....Bianca Banilivi......................Great Neck, N.Y. 27 ....Elizabeth Becker..................Jericho, N.Y. 28 ....Ada Maria Amarghioalei......Port Washington, N.Y. 29 ....Tola Pola Glowacka ............Jericho, N.Y. 30 ....Natalie Becker ....................Jericho, N.Y. 31 ....Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 32 ....Kady Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y. 33 ....Taylor Goetz ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 34 ....Ella Griffiths ..........................East Hampton, N.Y. 35 ....Sofia Maurina Discipio ........Woodmere, N.Y. 36 ....Sarah Elizabeth Lane ..........Garden City, N.Y. 37 ....Serena Li ..............................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 38 ....Jennifer Perper ....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 39 ....Vivian Wu ............................Old Westbury, N.Y. 40 ....Christasha McNeil ..............Massapequa, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 14 Singles RankName ......................................City 1 ......Daniella Victoria Paikin ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 3 ......Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 4 ......Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 5 ......Jade Fixon-Owoo................Lynbrook, N.Y. 6 ......Jennifer Rabinowitz ............Great Neck, N.Y. 7 ......Alexa Villez ..........................West Sayville, N.Y. 8 ......Sophia Elizabeth Schutte....Great Neck, N.Y. 9 ......Charlotte Goldbaum............Old Westbury, N.Y. 10 ....Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

11 ....Olivia Zhang ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 12 ....Ida Nicole Poulos ................Manhasset, N.Y. 13 ....Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 14 ....Lauren Hutton......................Huntington, N.Y. 15 ....Hannah Rose Niggemeier ..Sayville, N.Y. 16 ....Grace Isabel Riviezzo..........Syosset, N.Y. 17 ....Ashley Yu ............................Great Neck, N.Y. 18 ....Anna J. Martorella................Wantagh, N.Y. 19 ....Elena Gabriela Hull ..............Locust Valley, N.Y. 20 ....Ines Roti ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 21 ....Emily Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y. 22 ....Christine Kong ....................Commack, N.Y. 23 ....Jacqueline Zambrotto ........Kings Park, N.Y. 24 ....Anastasia Hoffman ..............North Massapequa, N.Y. 25 ....Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppague, N.Y. 26 ....Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 27 ....Erica Silver ..........................Plainview, N.Y. 28 ....Emma Rae Matz..................Commack, N.Y. 29 ....Julia Gentile ........................Rockville Centre, N.Y. 30 ....Gabriela Sciarotta................Woodmere, N.Y. 31 ....Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y. 32 ....Julianna Marie Romeo ........Massapequa, N.Y. 33 ....Sarah Gunasekera ..............Mount Sinai, N.Y. 34 ....Mary Theresa Madigan ......Sayville, N.Y. 35 ....Olivia N. Fermo ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 36 ....Madison Li ..........................Old Westbury, N.Y. 37 ....Andrea Irta Brazyte..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 38 ....Onalee Batcheller ................Westhampton, N.Y. 39 ....Jennifer Perper ....................Valley Stream, N.Y. 40 ....Bianca Banilivi......................Great Neck, N.Y.

Long Island Girls 16 Singles RankName ......................................City 1 ......Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 2 ......Nicole Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 3 ......Kristen D. Cassidy ..............Wantagh, N.Y. 4 ......Taryn Roche ........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 5 ......Jillian Rebecca Shulder ......Setauket, N.Y. 6 ......Natalia Caroline Krol............Greenvale, N.Y. 7 ......Elena Artemis Vlamakis ......Garden City, N.Y. 8 ......Elizabeth Leigh Dwyer ........Cutchogue, N.Y. 9 ......Isabella DiScipio ..................Woodmere, N.Y. 10 ....Ariana Lynn Fixon-Owoo ....Lynbrook, N.Y. 11 ....Marina Hilbert ......................Locust Valley, N.Y. 12 ....Morgan A. Wilkins................Huntington, N.Y. 13 ....Kaitlyn Byrnes......................Massapequa, N.Y. 14 ....Alexa Villez ..........................West Sayville, N.Y. 15 ....Rachel Flynn Collins............Port Jefferson, N.Y. 16 ....Gina LaRusso ......................Melville, N.Y. 17 ....Morgan Voulo ......................East Setauket, N.Y. 18 ....Jill Olga Lawrence ..............Hauppauge, N.Y. 19 ....Hannah Vimod Abraham ....Syosset, N.Y. 20 ....Sarah Bunk ..........................Sayville, N.Y. 21 ....Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 22 ....Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 23 ....Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 24 ....Gabrielle Vaillant ..................East Moriches, N.Y. 25 ....Elinor Simek ........................Glen Head, N.Y. 26 ....Andrianna Kaimis ................Commack, N.Y. 27 ....Adhele Sukhov ....................Westbury, N.Y. 28 ....Anna J. Martorella................Wantagh, N.Y. 29 ....Andrea Irta Brazyte..............Ronkonkoma, N.Y. 30 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 31 ....Riley Elizabeth Katzman......Halesite, N.Y. 32 ....Madeline Lane ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 33 ....Jade Fixon-Woo ..................Lynbrook, N.Y. 34 ....Madeline Clinton..................Manhasset, N.Y. 35 ....Lauren Hutton......................Huntington, N.Y. 36 ....Jade Eggleston....................Stony Brook, N.Y. 37 ....Sarah Khan ..........................Manhasset Hills, N.Y.


LONG Long Island Girls 18 Singles RankName ......................................City 1 ......Nicole Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 2 ......Rebecca Elizabeth Stern ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 3 ......Eleni Markopoulos ..............Seaford, N.Y. 4 ......Maya Aerin Masheb ............Jericho, N.Y.

ISLAND

Sectional Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City

16 ....Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 20 ....Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 26 ....Mark Ryan Taranov..............Valley Stream, N.Y. 32 ....Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 47 ....Ty Nisenson..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 51 ....Ian Schunk ..........................Westhampton Beach, N.Y. 60 ....Max Daniel Safir ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 68 ....Ryan E. Shayani ..................Old Westbury, N.Y. 73 ....Joseph Perry Boyle ............Setauket, N.Y. 74 ....Dylan D’Agate......................Melville, N.Y. 80 ....Luka David Markovic ..........Locust Valley, N.Y. 92 ....Matthew Kronenberg ..........East Setauket, N.Y. 98 ....Evan Joseph Rupolo ..........East Patchogue, N.Y. 105 ..Matthew Strogach ..............Commack, N.Y. 110 ..Candrin Chris ......................Port Washington, N.Y. 116 ..Jeremy Levine......................Woodbury, N.Y. 122 ..Aidan C. O’Connor ..............Manhasset, N.Y. 126 ..Matthew Leonard Zeifman..Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 133 ..Joseph Monticciolo ............Coram, N.Y. 144 ..Sohrob Yavari ......................Syosset, N.Y. 147 ..Kyle Zhou ............................Commack, N.Y. 150 ..Taylor Brooks Thomas ........Water Mill, N.Y.

1 ......Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 6 ......Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 13 ....Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y. 14 ....Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 17 ....Patrick Maloney ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 29 ....Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 34 ....Rajan Vohra..........................Glen Head, N.Y. 36 ....Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 48 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 51 ....Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y. 52 ....Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 53 ....Abhinav Raj Srivastava........Melville, N.Y. 73 ....Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 77 ....Neel Raj................................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 80 ....Andrew Marc Nakhjavan ....Dix Hills, N.Y. 81 ....Emmanuel V. Vacalares ......Hicksville, N.Y. 88 ....Karin K. Amin ......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 91 ....Timothy Hayden Nacca ......Garden City, N.Y. 93 ....Daniel Meinster....................South Setauket, N.Y. 104 ..Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 106 ..Nicholas Demaria ................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 108 ..Matthew Franklin Porges ....Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 109 ..Sangjin Song........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 112 ..Alexander Roti ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 116 ..Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 126 ..Michael Medvedev ..............Albertson, N.Y. 128 ..George Kaslow ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 130 ..Rohan Gaddam Reddy ......Glen Head, N.Y. 134 ..Avi Anand ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 139 ..Gardner Howe ....................Locust Valley, N.Y. 141 ..Timothy Serignese ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 144 ..Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 147 ..Samir Singh..........................Syosset, N.Y. 150 ..Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y.

Sectional Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players

Sectional Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players

Boys & Girls Sectional Rankings (as of 12/22/15)

BOYS Sectional Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City

Rank Name ......................................City

Rank Name ......................................City

1 ......Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 3 ......Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 9 ......Billy G. Suarez......................Huntington, N.Y. 12 ....Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 13 ....Ronald Hohmann ................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 17 ....Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 23 ....David Raphael Weiner ........Glen Head, N.Y. 26 ....Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 33 ....Karan Amin ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 41 ....Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 47 ....Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 57 ....Luke Karniewich ..................Glen Head, N.Y. 67 ....Adrian Krisofer Tsui..............Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 68 ....Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 75 ....Rohan Gaddam Reddy ......Glen Head, N.Y. 81 ....Valentine Le Goupil-Maier ..Oceanside, N.Y. 84 ....Justin Benjamin Oresky ......Syosset, N.Y. 91 ....Brandon Zhu........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 98 ....Griffin Schlesinger ..............Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 100 ..Maxwell Moadel ..................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 103 ..Anthony Casale ..................Old Bethpage, N.Y. 110 ..Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 115 ..Jack Louchheim ..................Sagaponack, N.Y. 134 ..Ravi MacGum......................Amagansett, N.Y. 145 ..George Scriber Bader ........Water Mill, N.Y. 150 ..Brandon Lee ........................Valley Stream, N.Y.

4 ......Athell Bennett ......................Valley Stream, N.Y. 7 ......Lubomir T. Cuba ..................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 9 ......Brenden Volk........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 15 ....Sean Mullins ........................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 19 ....Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 22 ....Jesse M. Levitin ..................Manhasset, N.Y. 27 ....Bryant J. Born......................Manhasset, N.Y. 28 ....Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 31 ....Eric Wagner..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 33 ....Daniel Shleimovich ..............Syosset, N.Y. 38 ....Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 47 ....Rajan Jai Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 50 ....Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 51 ....Mark Julian Baker................North Baldwin, N.Y. 53 ....Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y. 57 ....Alexander Lebedev..............Island Park, N.Y. 67 ....Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y. 76 ....Dylan Granat........................Woodbury, N.Y. 95 ....Carl Grant ............................Sagaponack, N.Y. 103 ..Travis Leaf ............................Dix Hills, N.Y. 104 ..Nicolas DeMaria ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 128 ..Brian Hoffarth ......................Fort Salonga, N.Y. 133 ..Stephen Gruppuso..............Bayport, N.Y. 136 ..Nicholas Braden Gunther....East Hampton, N.Y. 142 ..Garrett Malave ....................Laurel, N.Y. 147 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y.

RANKINGS

GIRLS Sectional Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 8 ......Rose Hayes..........................East Moriches, N.Y. 28 ....Rebecca Suarez ..................Huntington, N.Y. 30 ....Olivia N. Fermo ....................Smithtown, N.Y. 44 ....Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y. 48 ....Alina Rebeca Lyakhov ........Great Neck, N.Y. 56 ....Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 65 ....Hailey Stoerback ................Saint James, N.Y. 71 ....Ariana O. Pursoo ................Westbury, N.Y. 73 ....Isabella Sha..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 78 ....Bianca Rose Lorich ............Southampton, N.Y. 86 ....Sadhana Sridhar..................Stony Brook, N.Y. 90 ....Janae Fouche ......................Freeport, N.Y. 95 ....Theadora Yael Rabman ......Port Washington, N.Y. 99 ....Ines Roti ..............................Locust Valley, N.Y. 102 ..Daniella Victoria Paikin ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 115 ..Martina Eulau ......................Oceanside, N.Y. 117 ..Skylor Wong ........................Mount Sinai, N.Y. 119 ..Ava Thunder Scordo ..........Glen Head, N.Y. 125 ..Jacqueline Zambrotto ........Kings Park, N.Y. 126 ..Kiera Agic ............................Miller Place, N.Y. 142 ..Andriana Rose Zaphiris ......Smithtown, N.Y. 145 ..Nicolette Loeffler..................Laurel Hollow, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 5 ......Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 12 ....Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 14 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 17 ....Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 19 ....Alexa Susan Goetz..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 22 ....Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 30 ....Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 38 ....Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 44 ....Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 48 ....Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 53 ....Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 67 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 69 ....Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 70 ....Vitalina Golod ......................Setauket, N.Y. 83 ....Kaya Amin............................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 87 ....Alexis Madison Huber ........Melville, N.Y. 88 ....Sofia Rose Anzalone ..........Center Moriches, N.Y. 92 ....Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 96 ....Madeline Richmond ............Syosset, N.Y. 101 ..Jade Fixon-Owoo................Lynbrook, N.Y. 104 ..Kavina Amin ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 108 ..Ally Friedman ......................East Hampton, N.Y. 109 ..Lucia Hu ..............................Roslyn, N.Y. 123 ..Soraya Koblence ................Jericho, N.Y. 126 ..Emily Tannenbaum ..............Commack, N.Y. 130 ..Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 134 ..Daniella Victoria Paikin ........Valley Stream, N.Y. 135 ..Gabriela Sciarotta................Woodmere, N.Y. 139 ..Tatiana Robotham Barnett..Port Washington, N.Y.

57 ....Stephanie Chikvashvili ........Melville, N.Y. 58 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 62 ....Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 67 ....Nicole Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 72 ....Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 75 ....Nicole Rezak........................Merrick, N.Y. 83 ....Trinity Chow ........................Glen Cove, N.Y. 86 ....Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 92 ....Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 96 ....Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 105 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 108 ..Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 110 ..Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 113 ..Theodora Brebenel..............Glen Head, N.Y. 115 ..Elena Artemis Vlamakis ......Garden City, N.Y. 133 ..Kaitlyn Schwarz ..................Oceanside, N.Y. 141 ..Kaitlyn Byrnes......................Massapequa, N.Y. 147 ..Madeline A. Clinton ............Manhasset, N.Y. 148 ..Samantha Lena Galu ..........Jericho, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 4 ......Madison Battaglia................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 9 ......Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 14 ....Elysia Bolton ........................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 19 ....Claire Handa ........................Westbury, N.Y. 20 ....Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 23 ....Courtney Provan..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 24 ....Emma Scott ........................Syosset, N.Y. 27 ....Madison Courtney Appel ....Locust Valley, N.Y. 31 ....Alexa Graham ......................Garden City, N.Y. 45 ....Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 54 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin........Manorville, N.Y. 68 ....Ellen Nicole Huhulea ..........Rockville Centre, N.Y. 74 ....Amanda Allison Foo ............Manhasset, N.Y. 85 ....Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 90 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 92 ....Nicole Kielan ........................Valley Stream, N.Y. 108 ..Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 110 ..Stephanie Nakash ..............Great Neck, N.Y. 127 ..Michelle Carnovale..............Massapequa, N.Y. 134 ..Rachel Weiss ......................Great Neck, N.Y. 136 ..Ivanna Nikolic ......................Glen Head, N.Y. 137 ..Danielle Mirabella ................Wantagh, N.Y. 140 ..Sarah Seeman ....................Port Washington, N.Y. 141 ..Nicole Rezak........................Merrick, N.Y. 145 ..Josephine Winters ..............Elmont, N.Y. 150 ..Julia Kielan ..........................Valley Stream, N.Y.

Sectional Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 1 ......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 7 ......Elysia Bolton ........................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 17 ....Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 26 ....Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 36 ....Jacqueline Rae Bukzin........Manorville, N.Y. 39 ....Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 52 ....Oliva Rose Scordo ..............Glen Head, N.Y.

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LONG Boys & Girls National Rankings (as of 12/18/15)

BOYS National Boys 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 68 ....Aman K. Sharma ................Glen Head, N.Y. 128 ..Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 317 ..Mark R. Taranov ..................Valley Stream, N.Y. 501 ..Alex Eli Vinsky......................Westbury, N.Y. 846 ..Ty Nisenson..........................Port Washington, N.Y. 890 ..Luka David Markovic ..........Locust Valley, N.Y.

National Boys 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 5 ......Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 11 ....Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 29 ....Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 44 ....Billy G. Suarez......................Huntington, N.Y. 115 ..Logan Paik Chang ..............Old Westbury, N.Y. 143 ..Kabir Rajpal..........................Syosset, N.Y. 226 ..Karan K. Amin......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 230 ..Sujay Sharma ......................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 283 ..David Raphael Weiner ........Glen Head, N.Y. 421 ..Jack Flores ..........................Huntington, N.Y. 574 ..Alexander Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 620 ..Niles Ghaffar ........................Massapequa, N.Y. 771 ..Luke Torel Karniewich ........Glen Head, N.Y. 837 ..Adrian Kristofer Tsui ............Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

National Boys 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 3 ......Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 50 ....Yuval Solomon ....................Plainview, N.Y. 118 ..Cannon Kingsley ................Northport, N.Y. 179 ..Patrick F. Maloney ..............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 197 ..Daniel Eric Pellerito..............Syosset, N.Y. 231 ..Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 249 ..Pete Siozios ........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 345 ..Rajan Jai Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 389 ..Alan Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 476 ..Ronald P. Hohmann ............Oyster Bay, N.Y. 656 ..Daniel Weitz ........................Roslyn, N.Y. 663 ..Spencer Brachman ............Commack, N.Y. 700 ..Karan K. Amin......................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 793 ..Michael Medvedev ..............Albertson, N.Y. 902 ..Keegan James Morris ........Franklin Square, N.Y.

ISLAND

GIRLS National Girls 12 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 253 ..Rose B. Hayes ....................East Moriches, N.Y. 523 ..Janelle Chen ........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 594 ..Rebecca E. Suarez..............Huntington, N.Y. 833 ..Gabriela Glickstein ..............Commack, N.Y. 892 ..Alina Rebecca Lyakhov ......Great Neck, N.Y. 944 ..Olivia N. Fermo ....................Smithtown, N.Y.

National Girls 14 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City

RANKINGS

National Girls 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 52 ......Madison Battaglia..........................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 96 ....Alexa Graham ......................Garden City, N.Y. 116 ....Elysia Bolton ..................................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 144 ..Taylor S. Cosme ..................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 167 ..Madison Courtney Appel ....Locust Valley, N.Y. 416 ..Claire Handa ........................Westbury, N.Y. 445 ..Celeste Rose Matute ..........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 572 ..Courtney Provan..................Dix Hills, N.Y. 636 ..Courtney B. Kowalsky ........Oyster Bay, N.Y. 671 ..Emma Scott ........................Syosset, N.Y. 674 ..Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y.

4 ......Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 55 ....Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y. 107 ..Rachel Arbitman ..................Hewlett, N.Y. 109 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 180 ..Alexa Susan Goetz..............Greenlawn, N.Y. 189 ..Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 231 ..Amy Delman ........................Great Neck, N.Y. 333 ..Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 465 ..Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 544 ..Madison Jane Williams ......Glen Cove, N.Y. 589 ..Denise Lai ............................Setauket, N.Y. 788 ..Kimberly Liao ......................Commack, N.Y. 906 ..Kavina Amin ........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y.

National Girls 16 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 10 ....Elysia Bolton ........................Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. 33 ....Lea Ma ................................Dix Hills, N.Y. 285 ..Merri Kelly ............................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 294 ..Ashley Lessen......................Old Westbury, N.Y. 531 ..Francesca Karman ..............Port Washington, N.Y. 611 ..Olivia Rose Scordo..............Glen Head, N.Y. 711 ..Calista Sha ..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 756 ..Steffi Antao ..........................New Hyde Park, N.Y. 887 ..Maryam Beshir Ahmad ......Albertson, N.Y.

National Boys 18 Singles— Long Island Players Rank Name ......................................City 35 ....Brenden Volk........................Dix Hills, N.Y. 66 ....Lubomir Cuba......................Massapequa Park, N.Y. 102 ..Ryan Goetz ..........................Greenlawn, N.Y. 126 ..Jesse Levitin ........................Manhasset, N.Y. 134 ..Athell Patrick Bennett..........Valley Stream, N.Y. 186 ..Finbar Talcott ......................Sea Cliff, N.Y. 216 ..Eric Wagner..........................Roslyn Heights, N.Y. 220 ..Alexander Lebedev..............Island Park, N.Y. 250 ..Sean M. Mullins ..................Lloyd Harbor, N.Y. 287 ..Bryant Born..........................Manhasset, N.Y. 411 ..Brian Shi ..............................Jericho, N.Y. 440 ..Chris Kuhnle ........................Shoreham, N.Y. 639 ..Rajan Jai Vohra....................Glen Head, N.Y. 641 ..Sean Patrick ........................Oyster Bay, N.Y. 934 ..Colin Francis Sacco ............Brightwaters, N.Y.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2016

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. JANUARY 2016 Saturday-Sunday, January 16-17 L1B Sportime Quogue October Challenger Sportime of The Hamptons 2571 Quogue Riverhead Road East Quogue, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Jan. 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail gmeyer@sportimeny.com or call (631) 653-6767. Sunday, January 17 PSP Level 3, Glenwood Landing-Orange Ball Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF); and Co-ed 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, Jan. 13 at 3:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Friday-Sunday, January 22-24 L1B GHRC January Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Jan. 16 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, January 22-24 L2O Eastern Athletic January Open Eastern Athletic Clubs 9A Montauk Highway Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 17 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail eacjrtennis@gmail.com or call (631) 363-2882.

Friday-Sunday, January 22-24 L1B Sportime Lynbrook January Challenger Sportime Tennis Lynbrook 175 Merrick Road Lynbrook, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Jan. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (516) 887-1330. Friday-Sunday, January 22-24 L1B Point Set January Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Jan. 15 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Saturday-Sunday, January 23-24 PSP L2; Long Beach Holiday Orange Ball Championships Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Open Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF); and Open Co-ed 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $38.13 for first singles/$28 for first doubles For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060. Friday-Sunday, January 29-31 L1B RSTA Winter Challenger Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14,18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail pwilliamson@ross.org or call (631) 907-5162.

Friday-Sunday, January 29-31 L2O Eastern Athletic Winter Open Eastern Athletic Clubs 9A Montauk Highway Blue Point, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail eacjrtennis@gmail.com or call (631) 363-2882. Friday-Sunday, January 29-31 L2O Bethpage State Park Winter Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843. Friday-Sunday, January 29-31 L1B Nassau Indoor Tennis Winter Challenger Nassau Indoor Tennis 73 Desibio Place Inwood, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Sunday, January 29-31 L1B LBTC January Blue Starz Challenger Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE); and Challenger Mixed Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$33 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 24 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060.

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USTA/Long Island Region 2016

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Saturday, January 30 PSP L3 Syosset Orange Ball Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, Jan. 27 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Friday-Sunday, February 5-7 L2O Bethpage State Park February Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

FEBRUARY 2016 Friday-Sunday, February 5-7 L1B World Gym February Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12,16 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail vtapr@hotmail.com or call (631) 751-6100.

Friday-Sunday, February 5-7 L1B Sportime Bethpage February Challenger Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

Friday-Sunday, February 5-7 L1B Sportime at Kings Park February Regional Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300. Friday-Sunday, February 5-7 L1B RSTA February Challenger Ross School Tennis Academy 18 Goodfriend Drive East Hampton, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14,18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail pwilliamson@ross.org or call (631) 907-5162.

78

Friday-Sunday, February 5-7 L1B GHRC Winter Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 78’ Green Ball 10 (FMLC) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, February 5-7 L1B Point Set Tennis Winter Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com

Friday-Sunday, February 5-7 L1B PWTA Challenger Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road • Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Jan. 31 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Saturday, February 6 PSP L3 Bethpage Orange Ball Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road • Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $38.13 per player For more information, e-mail kkambo1175@aol.com or call (516) 777-1358. Saturday-Sunday, February 6-7 L3 RWTTC February UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue • Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505. Saturday-Sunday, February 6-7 PSP L2; Syosset Orange Ball Sportime-Syosset • 75 Haskett Drive • Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 1 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail atunaru@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727. Friday-Sunday, February 12-14 L1B World Winter Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road • East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 1618 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail tjakl@verizon.net or call (631) 751-6100.


USTA/Long Island Region 2016

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, February 12-14 L2O GHRC Winter Open Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 1418 (SE); and Challenger Boys & Girls Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Feb. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849. Friday-Sunday, February 12-14 L1A Sportime Bethpage Presidents’ Championships Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500. Friday-Sunday, February 12-14 L1B Nassau Indoor Tennis Challenge Nassau Indoor Tennis 73 Desibio Place Inwood, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Feb. 7 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088. Friday-Monday, February 12-15 L1B Point Set Tennis February Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Feb. 5 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Monday, February 12-15 L1A Deer Park Presidents’ Championships Deer Park Tennis Center 30 Burt Drive Deer Park, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail deerparktennis@optimum.net or call (631) 667-3476.

Saturday-Sunday, February 13-14 PSP L3; Long Beach Cupid’s Arrow Championships: Orange Ball Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Open Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Feb. 11 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060.

Friday-Monday, February 12-15 L1A Huntington Presidents’ Championships Huntington Indoor Tennis 100 Broadway Huntington Station, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Thursday, Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, call (631) 421-0040.

Friday-Sunday, February 19-21 L1B World Gym Feb Freeze Challenger World Gym Racquet & Sports Arena 384 Mark Tree Road East Setauket, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player For more information, e-mail vtapr@hotmail.com or call (631) 751-6100.

Friday-Monday, February 12-15 L1A Port Washington Presidents’ Championships Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Championships Boys Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Feb. 4 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tennis@pwta.com or call (516) 883-6425.

Friday-Sunday, February 19-21 L2O Sportime Syosset February Open Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE) and Intermediate Boys Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Feb. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Saturday-Monday, February 13-15 USTA National Selection Tournament - February at RWTTC Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Boys Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (FIC-R16) and Boys Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $134.88 for one event, $135.38 for two events, additional fees may apply if registered in three or more events (deadline for entries is Thursday, Jan. 14 at 11:59 a.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, February 19-21 L2R Sportime Bethpage February Regional Sportime Bethpage 101 Norcross Avenue Bethpage, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (SE); and Intermediate Girls Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12-18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Friday, Feb. 12 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 933-8500.

LITennisMag.com • January/February 2016 • Long Island Tennis Magazine

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USTA/Long Island Region 2016

TOURNAMENT SCHEDULE For detailed information on these and all USTA tournaments, visit tennislink.usta.com/tournaments. Friday-Sunday, February 19-21 L1B Point Set Tennis February Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 18 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Feb. 14 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Friday-Sunday, February 26-28 L1B Sportime Syosset Winter Challenger Sportime-Syosset 75 Haskett Drive Syosset, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Friday, Dec. 18 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tournamentssyt@sportimeny.com or call (516) 364-2727.

Saturday-Sunday, February 27-28 L3 RWTTC Winter UPS Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Entry Level Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Green Ball 12, 78’ Yellow Ball 14-18 (RR) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $43.50 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 22 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail superscoot@aol.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Saturday-Sunday, February 20-21 L1B GHRC Feb Freeze Challenger Glen Head Racquet Club 95 Glen Head Road Glen Head, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Saturday, Feb. 13 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tenniscoach.mc@gmail.com or call (516) 676-9849.

Friday-Sunday, February 26-28 L2O Bethpage State Park February Open Bethpage Park Tennis Center 99 Quaker Meeting House Road Farmingdale, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles & Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16-18 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles (deadline for entries is Sunday, Feb. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail rbecker06@yahoo.com or call (516) 359-4843.

Saturday-Sunday, February 27-28 PSP L2; Long Beach Winter Orange Cup: Orange Ball Long Beach Tennis Center 899 Monroe Boulevard Long Beach, N.Y. Divisions: Open Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Thursday, Feb. 25 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail sid@longbeachtenniscenter.com or call (516) 432-6060.

Saturday-Sunday, February 20-21 & Friday-Sunday, February 26-28 +L1 Port Washington Eastern Grand Prix Port Washington Tennis Academy 100 Harbor Road Port Washington, N.Y. Divisions: Grand Prix Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (FICQ) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Monday, Feb. 8 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail tennis@pwta.com or call (516) 883-6425.

Friday-Sunday, February 26-28 L1B Point Set Tennis February Challenger Point Set Tennis 3065 New Street Oceanside, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (SE) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Feb. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

Sunday, February 28 PSP Level 3-Glennwood Landing: Orange Ball Robbie Wagner Tournament Training at Glen Cove 60 Sea Cliff Avenue Glen Cove, N.Y. Divisions: Level 3 Boys & Girls 10 and Under Singles: 36’ Red Ball 8, 60’ Orange Ball 10 (NEF) Surface Type: Hard Indoor Entry Fee: $38.13 per player (deadline for entries is Wednesday, Feb. 24 at 3:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail stephenaalcala@gmail.com or call (516) 759-0505.

Friday-Sunday, February 26-28 L2O Sportime Kings Park February Open Sportime Kings Park 275 Old Indianhead Road Kings Park, N.Y. Divisions: Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 12 (FMLC); Intermediate Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE); and Intermediate Boys & Girls Doubles: 78’ Yellow Ball 14 (SE) Surface Type: Unknown Entry Fee: $54.25 for first singles/$28 for first doubles For more information, e-mail tvanepps@sportimeny.com or call (631) 269-6300.

Friday-Sunday, February 26-28 L1B Nassau Indoor Tennis Challenger Nassau Indoor Tennis 73 Desibio Place Inwood, N.Y. Divisions: Challenger Boys & Girls Singles: 78’ Yellow Ball 16 (SE) Surface Type: Clay Indoor Entry Fee: $54.25 per player (deadline for entries is Sunday, Feb. 21 at 1:00 p.m.) For more information, e-mail ruiz.clark@yahoo.com or call (917) 991-0088.

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Long Island Tennis Magazine • January/February 2016 • LITennisMag.com


A N E S E RN IAC KI R I N K A Z S W L O A I F W W MON VS.

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Photos courtesy of Getty Images.*Players subject to change.

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