Issuu on Google+

5 STAR CAFE CSM MA COMMUNICATION DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY

FINAL SHOW CATALOGUE 2007


5 STAR CAFE PHOTOGRAPHY

Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design MA Communication Design, PHOTOGRAPHY PATHWAY CATALOGUE LONDON 2007


CONTENTS Introduction Vinita Agarwal Stephanie Cheng Lamia Gargash Eoghan Hanrahan Nina Mecagni Peter Rauch Ignacio Santa María Christopher Ullens

Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design MA Communication Design PHOTOGRAPHY PATHWAY Tutors> Daniel Alexander, Dave Hendley LONDON 2007 All images are Copyrighted © Vinita Agarwal, Stephanie Cheng, Lamia Gargash, Eoghan Hanrahan, Nina Mecagni, Peter Rauch, Ignacio Santa María, Christopher Ullens. You may use these images for reference to our work. All other rights reserved.

4

6 8 26 44 62 80 98 114 132


Daniel Alexander INTRODUCTION This catalogue has been produced by the first year to graduate from the new photography route on the MA Communication Design course at Central Saint Martins. It also marks for me the end of my first year of teaching. The work collected here is by eight students from eight different countries, with a broad range of academic backgrounds in subjects including fine art, graphic design, architecture and languages. They have spent the last year working out what it is they would like to say< about themselves, about the world around them and about photography. Together they have explored the subject through their ability to consider it, talk about it and make it. The range of work in this book addresses their diverse range of interests and has been born out of a continual discourse based around their ideas. Study at postgraduate level is about finding out for yourself what it is you would like to explore, what truly interests you and what can sustain a year long process of research, experimentation, analysis and discussion. Photography’s recent inclusion on the already well established MA Communication Design course is further proof of the subjects importance and influence as a tool of visual communication. The students have benefited from studying alongside Illustrators, Designers and Digital Media students. This has also helped contextualise photography as a brilliantly open discipline with no need for fixed parameters, as a tool to be experimented with and manipulated to ones will.

6

To this end I have tried to bring a wide ranging passion for photography, in all its forms and for all its possible applications to the discussion. I had no predetermined idea of the type of photography the students should engage in, only that it should be well researched, well considered and communicate something that they believe in to the people who will see it. As a result the work presented here spans everything from reportage and portraiture to constructed documentary and animation. The projects have been shot all over the world from Hong Kong to New York, Slovenia, Dubai and Elephant and Castle< they should tell you something about the subject matter as well as being the very personal statements of the individuals making the work. In the end though I believe that photography is basically about great images, beyond the talking and the writing. Enjoy the work. I’d like to thank the following people for their input into to the course, for inspiring both the students and me to think and care about photography< John Ingledew, Mike Smith, Dave Hendley, Jet, Anthony Dickenson, James Barnet, Chris Cairns, Jamie Dobson, Neil Reddy and Steve Harries. I’d also like to thank all of the MA Communication Design staff team for providing us with the wider context in which we have worked. Personally I’d like to thank the students for the huge amount of support they’ve given me in my first year of teaching< it’s been a pleasure. Cheers Daniel

7


LIGHT AND RHYTHM IN INDIAN DANCE Vinita Agarwal

8

Vinita Agarwal


My project aims to convey the traditional Indian dance form in a new light through photography. I have chosen to focus on four styles of Indian dance< Odissi, Kathak, Bharat Natyam, and Rajasthani Folk dancing. In no other major art form does time play such an important part as in Indian dance and music. Basic rhythm is described as taal, which is counted time, usually by the clapping of hands and this follows a structured pattern. This counted time is then further divided into subdivisions known as laya, which has strict rhythm and an ever-changing tempo according to the music piece. By breaking down dance pieces into 20 second long exposures, in each of these forms, I have aimed to convey the intricate relationship of the taal and laya. By attaching light sources to the hands and feet, the trails of movement were also captured within each time frame to communicate its precision. The dancers were also simultaneously flashed by my own personal instinctive responses to the music and beat. When placing the sequence of images together, the viewer is now able to see a piece of Indian dance far more intimately within the time frame and space used in each dance form than ever before.

10

Vinita Agarwal

Previous Page> Two Terateli Dancers in Motion, 20 seconds

Initial Trial of Light Trails

Light and Rhythm in Indian Dance

11


12

Vinita Agarwal

Performance shots for initial research

Performance shots for initial research

Light and Rhythm in Indian Dance

13


14

Vinita Agarwal

Traditional Costume of A Bharatnatyam Dancer

Expressed Emotion in Odissi Dance

Light and Rhythm in Indian Dance

15


16

Vinita Agarwal

Rajasthani Dhol Player

TeraTeli Rajasthani Folk Dancer

Light and Rhythm in Indian Dance

17


18

Vinita Agarwal

Terateli, Rajasthani Folk Dancer

Sangeeta, the Snake-Charmer Rajasthani Folk Dancer

Light and Rhythm in Indian Dance

19


beats from 1 to 8 1

2

Ta

Tai

3

4

5

6

7

tai

tat /

Dhit

Tai T

Tai

8

Tat /

Ta

Dhig

Gi

Na /

Tom

Tom o

Ta

Ta /

Jham

Tari

Ja

Ka /

Tari

tari a

Ta

Kum /

Jhaana

Jhanana

Jhonu

Ta /

kum

Tari T

Ta

num /

Ta

tari

Nam

kita /

dhiim

T Ta Tari

Ta

Jham /

Ta

Dhing

Gi

Na /

tom

o tom

Ta

Ta /

Dhimi

Dhimi

Ta

Num/

Jham

Jham a

Ta

Ta /

Ta

Dhimi

Ta

Num/

Jham

Jham h

Ta

Dhimi

Dhimi

Ta

Num /

Ta

Ta T

Ta

Ta / Ta /

Jham

Jham

Ta

Ta /

Ta

Ta

Ta /

Dhimi D

Tala: Adi ( Consisting of eight beats) Representation: 1/0/0 4+2+2

Tirmanam Tha....................Dhing.............Na............Na./ Ta.....................Tom...........Tom.....Tom/

20

Vinita Agarwal

Rekha the Candle-Dance Rajasthani Folk Dancer

Notation for a pure dance sequence in Bharatanatyam

Light and Rhythm in Indian Dance

21


22

Vinita Agarwal

20 seconds, Kathak dance performance

Light and Rhythm in Indian Dance

23


24

Vinita Agarwal

20 seconds, Kathak dance performance

Light and Rhythm in Indian Dance

25


THREE CITIES Stephanie Cheng

26

Stephanie Cheng


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where are you from|â&#x20AC;? That is one of the most common questions asked by people when they first meet. This is the crux of my project. I am often left speechless when I am confronted with this question so I set out in an attempt to achieve an answer. With this, I have created a world somewhere caught between reality and fantasy memories I have managed to keep from each city I have lived in. The memories are slowly being stripped away and are being replaced with an everevolving environment. It is my hope to salvage what is lost and record these memories using photography as a point of capture and as a means of revealing the importance of this world. The cities, or rather, the means of a new city, are Hong Kong, New York and London. Through illustrative and photographic studies of each cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s built environment, street culture and more personally, my homes in each city, I made the decision to reveal all that is behind closed doors. Through a series of photographs taken from each home in each of the three cities, I have created an imaginative place; an imaginary home; a place of comfort. It is a conglomeration of memories, ideals, personal elements both small and large, a lifestyle, the home I have come to know and the home I hope to remain. Upon completion of this project, I have come to see a world somewhere that could be an imaginary state of mind but when coupled with a state of physical presence, can come true.

28

Stephanie Cheng

Three Cities

29


30

Stephanie Cheng

Three Cities

31


32

Stephanie Cheng

Three Cities

33


34

Stephanie Cheng

Three Cities

35


36

Stephanie Cheng

Three Cities

37


38

Stephanie Cheng

Three Cities

39


40

Stephanie Cheng

Three Cities

41


42

Stephanie Cheng

Three Cities

43


PRESENCE DUBAI \ LONDON Lamia Gargash

44

Lamia Gargash


PRESENCE “Presence” deals with the idea of subsistence in a renounced space and prevalence of identity within unwanted houses or structures in the United Arab Emirates. The quarters documented varied from being semiabandoned (people about to move to newer houses) to those soon to be demolished. These interiors represented a young culture that came to life post the oil boom nearly thirty years ago. Now with the need to be “new” taking over, cultural extinction is sadly inevitable and a new identity is forming. The fast rate at which these structures are being renovated or formed leaves very little time to grieve over these spaces.

DUBAI\LONDON The “Dubai\London” project is one, which represents veiled women in a lighter, honest and less contrived manner. The idea revolves around how these women dress in Dubai and how they dress in London. The project entails a variety of women all whom express themselves differently< their individuality is illustrated through their clothing. Some choose to wear the veil abroad while others don’t, some are flamboyant others more conservative…etc. The main goal is tackling the idea that these women are restrained and oppressed and present them in a more positive manner.

46

Lamia Gargash

Presence

47


48

Lamia Gargash

Presence

49


50

Lamia Gargash

Presence

51


52

Lamia Gargash

Presence

53


54

Lamia Gargash

Presence

55


56

Lamia Gargash

Work in progress The veil (Polaroid)

Work in progress The veil (Folds 1)

Presence

57


60

Lamia Gargash

Previous pages Work in progress Stills from veil documentary

Dubai \ London

Presence

61


ALL DAY EVERY DAY Eoghan Hanrahan

62

Eoghan Hanrahan


A news report in November 2006 stated that Londoners were more afraid of their young people than anyone else in Europe. Youth street culture gains media attention for all the wrong reasons. The title of this project “All Day Every Day” comes from a common phrase used by youths when talking about where they are from. If I asked someone from Homerton who they represented the response could be “E9 All Day Everyday”, E9 being the post code for Homerton. Loyalty to ones postal code becomes fascinating. The more I documented, the more I discovered the extent to which people identify themselves by their particular area through the use of tags, hand signals and slogans. My intention during this project was to show London’s young people in a close up and non-exploitative way, a contrast to the ‘out of control hoodie wearing thugs’ portrayal being pushed by todays media. Many thanks to Peggy and Tony.

64

Eoghan Hanrahan

All Day Every Day

65


66

Eoghan Hanrahan

Halfz and Pinkos Stoke Newington, N16

Bow, E3

All Day Every Day

67


68

Eoghan Hanrahan

Olos, Homerton E9

Olos, Homerton E9

All Day Every Day

69


70

Eoghan Hanrahan

Chuckles and Swingers, Bow E3

Fuda, Bow E3

All Day Every Day

71


72

Eoghan Hanrahan

Rowans N4

Rowans N4

All Day Every Day

73


74

Eoghan Hanrahan

Smile Now, Cry Later

Holloway Road N7

All Day Every Day

75


76

Eoghan Hanrahan

London Fields E8

Finsbury Park N4

All Day Every Day

77


78

Eoghan Hanrahan

Peckham Vigil, February 2007

Stoke Newington, N16

All Day Every Day

79


MAN’S RUIN> MEANINGFUL MUTATIONS Nina Mecagni

80

Nina Mecagni


Rockabilly music made its debut via Elvis Presley’s 1954-1956 recordings on the Sun records label. In the 1950’s rockabilly music, was described by media as, “Hedonistic, Cacophonous, Loud, Threatening, Corrupting, Racially Tainted, Unpleasant and Abusive”. By the end of the 1950’s this “new” style of music experienced temporary unpopularity in the United States as a result of little to no radio airplay. In England however, rockabilly music remained popular due to its growing fan base. Over five decades later it’s still a vibrant and active scene in both England and America as well as many other countries in the world.Rockabilly is as much an attitude as it is a music style, attitude that embraces rebellion, disdain for authority, overt expression of one’s sexuality and a life free from the value system of its parent generation. The attitude found most predominantly in the character of rockabilly music serves as the subject of my photographic exploration into this vibrant subculture as it currently exists. I have photo-documented events in America, rockabilly’s country of origin, as well as in the country that has kept its proverbial fire alive…England. This collection of photographs provides its viewer with an intimate view of the styles, textures, and mood of the unapologetic rockabilly style.

82

Nina Mecagni

Viva Las Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada USA

Man’s Ruin

83


84

Nina Mecagni

Rockabilly Rave East Sussex, England

Viva Las Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada USA

Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ruin

85


86

Nina Mecagni

The Boston Arms London, England

The Boston Arms London, England

Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ruin

87


88

Nina Mecagni

Viva Las Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada USA

Rockabilly Rave East Sussex, England

Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ruin

89


90

Nina Mecagni

The Rhythm Riot! East Sussex, England

The Rhythm Riot! East Sussex, England

Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ruin

91


92

Nina Mecagni

The Boston Arms London, England

The Boston Arms London, England

Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ruin

93


94

Nina Mecagni

Viva Las Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada USA

Viva Las Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada USA

Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ruin

95


96

Nina Mecagni

Viva Las Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada USA

Dingwalls London, England

Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ruin

97


DARK BROWN GREY Peter Rauch

98

Peter Rauch


Dark Brown Grey project is a photographic essay on basic elements of a photographic image> space, light and figure. All three elements are thoroughly constructed within themselves and in regard to each other so they can create and control an image that resembles itself - an image. Self-similarity of a photographic image means that it functions as a plausible image taken from a broader context, it means there is always something else, further and apart from what one can see in the image. This life-out-of-a-frame is more characteristic for cinema than for photography which is usually self-enclosed. This very notion of what lies within the image and beyond the situation is the reason for creating a series of photographs - plausible movie stills. The only thing that is missing in a series of stills is their origin, the movie. The project is sequenced in three chapters. Each is an individual situation of a specific person in a specific space and light. They do not necessarily relate to each other, although they do offer a reference, a comment for understanding the other two and the whole. In chapter Dark there is a scientist and an office. In second chapter, Brown, an architect occupies a space of an abandoned movie theatre. The third chapter, Grey is about a musician in an old library.

100

Peter Rauch

Dark Brown Grey

101


102

Peter Rauch

Chapter 1> Dark

Dark Brown Grey

103


104

Peter Rauch

Chapter 2> Brown

Dark Brown Grey

105


106

Peter Rauch

Dark Brown Grey

107


108

Peter Rauch

Dark Brown Grey

109


110

Peter Rauch

Chapter 3> Grey

Dark Brown Grey

111


112

Peter Rauch

Dark Brown Grey

113


DIORAMA The Representation of Reality

Ignacio Santa María

114

Ignacio Santa María


The Diorama series is a result from an ongoing photography project concerning artificial or man-made environments, which aims to show how a representation of reality can be re-represented. By modifying itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original meaning and function, giving to the redundant and banal a new lecture. Different kinds of foreign environments are represented in the reptileâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cages. From a tropical jungle to the polluted desert - these mini habitats with their hand made drawings on the walls and the different layers of branches and rocks imitate the actual places were these animals are found. However, neither the animals nor the visitors seems convinced of this poor attempt at depicting reality. I have chosen to photograph these spaces, and focused on the actual mistakes on the drawings, and the out of context elements such as lamps and ventilation shafts. vIn my printed image, it is these elements which remind us that we are looking a representation of an environment that is already a new original reality itself - a diorama in a zoo - and not anymore simply a representation of something else. On a different scale, The Conservatory Garden and Group of Trees are two extensions of the project where the diorama effect is also present. The Garden contains living tropical nature encapsulated and artificially cultivated away from their original habitat, where we humans take the role of the encaged animals. In another approach, Group of Trees shows us how nature is treated and lit at night in parks, making it appear as artificial as the first diorama series but this time, on a larger scale, questioning the level of artificiality of the environments, compared to how we are used to seeing them normally in their natural element.

116

Ignacio Santa MarĂ­a

Diorama

117


118

Ignacio Santa MarĂ­a

Diorama

119


120

Ignacio Santa MarĂ­a

Diorama

121


122

Ignacio Santa MarĂ­a

Diorama

123


124

Ignacio Santa MarĂ­a

Diorama

125


126

Ignacio Santa MarĂ­a

Diorama

127


128

Ignacio Santa MarĂ­a

Conservatory Garden A

Conservatory Garden B

Diorama

129


130

Ignacio Santa MarĂ­a

Group of Trees A

Group of Trees B

Diorama

131


INTIMATE GAME

Christopher Ullens

132

Christopher Ullens


The starting point of this project was my fascination for animation. I wanted to create a short film that played with the boundaries of that medium. It had to mix different techniques together, from classical stop-frame to recent digital animation effects. I came across the short story titled ‘Intimate Game’ in which I saw a rich visual potential and an intense psychological mind-play. I also felt that ‘Intimate Game’ has a contemporary plot situated in a very classical location. All these elements suited my idea of mixed styles. I first looked out for a potential location and models. After having discovered the house and characters through medium-format camera shooting sessions, I felt ready to begin my animation. I started with tests in live animation with my models in the house, but the results were not suiting the story. I then decided that the animation would be model size stop-frame animation, mixed with parts of live animation on location. On this basis, I recreated a house with my medium format photographs, mixing it with dollhouse furniture to add depth and credibility to the rooms. The characters then became porcelain dolls, everything being at a 1>12 scale. I had now all the tools for my “surgeon” hands to operate the magic of animation on that story. Words are now pointless, watch it on www.myspace.com\thebelg

134

Christopher Ullens

Intimate Game

135


136

Christopher Ullens

Medium format photographic studies of location.

Intimate Game

137


138

Christopher Ullens

Medium format photographic studies of characters in location.

Intimate Game

139


140

Christopher Ullens

Transition from real location in medium format photography to animation model in digital photography.

Intimate Game

141


142

Christopher Ullens

Still frames from animation.

Intimate Game

143


144

Christopher Ullens

Still frames from animation.

Intimate Game

145


146

Christopher Ullens

Still frames from animation.

Intimate Game

147


148

Christopher Ullens

Intimate Game

149


VINITA AGARWAL

(e) vinita.agarwal@gmail.com (w) www.vinitaagarwal.com (m) +447957124181

STEPHANIE CHENG

(e) steph.cheng@gmail.com (m) +44 79 7130 4524 (m) +852 2890 6815

NINA MECAGNI

(e) nmecagni@mac.com (w) www.ninamecagni.com (m) +44 77 5778 6445 (m) +1 805 555 NINA

PETER RAUCH

(e) blough@gmail.com (w) www.snabyrow.com (m) +44 79 0003 7054 (m) +386 41 350 545

LAMIA GARGASH

(e) lgargash@gmail.com (w) www.lamyagargash.com (m) +44 77 677 33769 (m) +97150 4 545428

EOGHAN HANRAHAN

(e) eoghanhanrahan@gmail.com (m) +44 77 8097 5147 (w) www.eoghanhanrahan.com

IGNACIO SANTA MARIA

(e) ignacio.santamaria@gmail.com (w) www.santamaria.photosite.com (m) +447989206798

CHRISTOPHER ULLENS

(e) christopher@ullens.net (m) +447962670968 (w) www.myspace.com\thebelg

150

151


A special thanks to> Daniel Alexander, Dave Hendley, Jet, Anthony Dickenson and James Barnett for educational support< Guy and Myriam Ullens, Hussain Abdul Rahim Gargash, Salem Al Qassimi and Dubai Media City for financial support< Dave Hendley and Radyoyo \ Roots in Session for the music< 5 Star Cafe (Sothampton Row) for their Full English Breakfast and Coffee.

152

OpeningNovember2007

153


154

155


Chimoo Acharya & Aiyaz Mitha presents

L’atitude

Events & more ….

L’atitude is an Event Management & PR company based out of Dubai. The company has been running successfully for the past 6 years and has an impressive portfolio comprising of over 30 corporate clients, and has hosted some of the largest International events in the Middle East.

156

Dubai Media City Tel: 009714-3902627 Fax: 00971-43631902 Email: latdxb@eim.net www.latitude-dubai.com

University of the Arts London Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design MACD 2007 Photography Route www.snabyrow.com


MACD2007 Catalog