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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


Published by News Media Corporation | SPRING 2013

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T Published by News Media Corporation. www.EquineEnthusiast.com EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T is a FREE quarterly publication. 12,000 copies are distributed throughout the state of Wyoming and the Nebraska Panhandle region. It is available at feed and retail stores, event centers, hotels and other equine-related businesses.

SPRING 2013

PUBLISHER Jim Wood jimwood@EquineEnthusiast.com

FEATURES USE YOUR HORSE SENSE FOR SAFETY..................................................... 6-7 GETTING BACK INTO THE BACKCOUNTRY ........................................ 12-13 A 30-YEAR SHOE ADDICTION ............................................................... 14-15 RICHENS USES CONNECTION TO HORSES TO HELP TREAT ANIMALS, PEOPLE ..................................................................... 16, 18 A HORSE OF A DIFFERENT COLOR ..................................................... 20, 22 LANCE CREEK WOMAN’S LEGACY LIVES ON THROUGH HER LOVE OF HORSES ................................................................................. 22, 24 EVANSTON RODEO SERIES CELEBRATES 21 YEARS ............................ 26-27 HORSES EARN THEIR KEEP ON WYO. RANCHES ............................... 28, 30 THE KEY TO THE KINGDOM? A WELL-SHOD HORSE ................... 31-32, 34 HORSES DUMPED NATIONWIDE DUE TO COST OF HAY, DROUGHT AND AMOUNT OF CARE.................................................... 34, 36 THE MAGIC OF MUSIC: TURNING EIGHT SECONDS INTO THREE MINUTES ......................................................................................... 38 LOCAL BUSINESS “BUCKLES” IT UP! ..................................................... 40-41 OKLAHOMA LIFTS HORSE SLAUGHTER BAN ...................................... 42-43 BRINDLE BUILDS COWBOY SEATS ........................................................ 44-45 BUDGET AXE NICKS BLM WILD-HORSE ADOPTION CENTER............ 46-47

EDITORS Travis Pearson tpearson@EquineEnthusiast.com Matt Roberts editor@EquineEnthusiast.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Mike Jensen mjensen@EquineEnthusiast.com ADVERTISING OFFICES Cheyenne, WY 307-632-5666 Evanston, WY 307-789-6560 Kemmerer, WY 307-877-3347 Lusk, WY 307-334-2867 Lyman, WY 307-787-3229 Pinedale, WY 307-367-2123 Scottsbluff, NE 308-635-3110 Torrington, WY 307-532-2184 Wheatland, WY 307-322-2627

USE YOUR HORSE SENSE FOR SAFETY PAGES 6-7

GENERAL INFORMATION Get the Word Out! EVENT CALENDAR Submit a short description of your club, business or organization’s event for our calendar. Be sure to include relevant dates, times, locations and contact information. E-mail your event to: mneher@EquineEnthusiast.com Advertise in the CLASSIFED MARKETPLACE! Line Class ads are at $15 Display Classied ads are $25 Call 307-532-2184 for information. rmort@EquineEnthusiast.com

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Horses graze just below the Hole-in-the-Wall on a trail ride last summer. Photo/ Vicki Hood

READ MORE ABOUT THE JACKSON HOLE HORSE RESCUE ON PAGE 6 4

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A 30-YEAR SHOE ADDICTION PAGES 14-15

A HORSE OF A DIFFERENT COLOR PAGES 20, 22

LANCE CREEK WOMAN’S LEGACY LIVES ON THROUGH HER LOVE OF HORSES PAGES 22, 24

EVANSTON RODEO SERIES CELEBRATES 21 YEARS PAGES 26-27

COLUMNS TRAIL TALK: TABLE MOUNTAIN, SPRINGER AND RAWHIDE WILDLIFE HABITAT MANAGEMENT AREAS.......................................................... 10, 19 WHAT’S IN YOUR HORSE’S MOUTH?.................................................... 50-51 CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE .................................................................. 55-59 EVENT CALENDAR ................................................................................. 60-61

HORSES EARN THEIR KEEP ON WYO. RANCHES PAGES 28, 30 COLUMN

THE MAGIC OF MUSIC: TURNING EIGHT SECONDS INTO THREE MINUTES PAGE 38 Published by News Media Corporation | SPRING 2013

BRINDLE BUILDS COWBOY SEATS PAGES 44-45

WHAT’S IN YOUR HORSE’S MOUTH? PAGES 50-51 EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

USE YOUR HORSE SENSE FOR SAFETY IT’S THE TIME OF YEAR TO RIDE, BUT SAFETY MUST COME FIRST By Vicki Hood STAFF WRITER

A

s the hours of daylight lengthen and the temperatures reach a more consistent and comfortable level, recreational horse enthusiasts who must deal with winter weather are getting that itch to get back in their saddles again ... and again and again! But whether you ride for pleasure or a more stated purpose, safety for you and your horse should always be at the top of your checklist as you prepare to head out. As you might with any vehicle you drive, pay attention to your horse’s physical condition, particularly if they are boarded at a site away from your home. An annual vet check is a good investment, especially for a horse that has extended age. Preventative care can save your horse discomfort later, and is likely easier on your wallet than an emergent trip to the clinic will be. Your vet may be able to spot problems before they become bigger issues, particularly in regard to teeth and feet – two vitally important areas of concern. But even if you don’t take your horse in for a professional evaluation, there are still plenty of things you can look for to be sure your horse is sound and ready to ride. Watch your horse eat – is he or she spilling a lot of grain, or seem to be having trouble chewing? These are indicators for a problem in his mouth. Be especially suspicious of an oral problem if your horse

Photos/ Vicki Hood

Horses graze just below the Hole-in-the-Wall on a trail ride last summer.

has lost weight for unexplained reasons. Inspect your horse’s feet regularly and clean out the hooves to avoid stone bruises and injuries. Horses that spend much of their time on softer surfaces will require more frequent attention from a farrier. If your riding areas require your horse to have shoes, keep a record of when they were put on, and make sure they are removed or replaced A pair of trail horses watch intently during some down time at the at approximately Hole-in-the-Wall near Kaycee, Wyo. eight-week inter-

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

vals. If your horse doesn’t require shoes, his or her feet may still need occasional trimming to keep a correct angle and prevent cracking or breakage. If you want to do your own trimming, be sure you are trained in the proper technique. You can do a lot of damage that may take months to fix or heal if you don’t trim correctly. In addition, a farrier may be able to spot problems early on that the average horse owner can’t. Your horse’s feet are the foundation of his health, and proper maintenance is of utmost importance – this is not the area you want to skimp on to save a few dollars. Now that your horse is ready to go, spend a little time going through your tack. Check for worn spots or tears in bridles, reins or saddles. If any leather is dry or cracked, revitalize it with a good leather conditioner. Be sure any metal

parts of your tack that come in direct contact with your horse’s body are smooth around the edges. Inspect bits for corrosion or damage. While it may not portray the “western” image, wearing a helmet is a good idea, particularly for children or inexperienced riders. Head injuries happen in the blink of an eye and can change lives forever. Make sure the helmet is fitted to the rider properly for ultimate protection. If you’ll be riding with an organized group, it’s possible helmets may even be required due to liability issues. The use of helmets remains at the discretion of the rider, but they certainly serve a purpose. Remember that even skilled and experienced

SAFETY continued on page 7

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


SAFETY continued from page 6 riders are not immune from accidents. If you’re trailering your horse to another location, look your trailer over several days in advance of travel. Check tires for wear and damage, and be sure they are properly inflated. Check hinges, latches and any fasteners, inside and out. If you use trailer ties, check them for wear and replace anything questionable. Check the flooring and lower sidewalls for anything sharp that could injure your horse while transporting. Cover the floor with wood chips or saw-

dust to give your horses a solid footing in the trailer. Solid waste and urine can make a trailer floor very dangerous for both you and your horse. Check to see that all lights and flashers are operating properly. Keep extra fuses in your trailer or vehicle, along with some basic tools. Always check your hitch before departing – be sure it’s completely latched and locked, with safety chains engaged. This is an easy oversight, and one that can have disastrous results should your trailer come loose in transit. As a matter of safe routine, make this your last check-off item before leaving. Peace of mind as you travel is worth the efforts you make in advance. Your horse and equipment require a huge monetary investment, and the pleasure derived is often priceless. Protect that investment and assure yourself a great ride every time you ride by following a few simple but important Taking care of tack routinely will keep you safer and more guidelines for safety. comfortable out on the trail.

Published by News Media Corporation | SPRING 2013

Photos/ Vicki Hood

Wyoming has hundreds of great places for trail rides, such as at the Hole-in-the-Wall near Kaycee.

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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LOOKING FORWARD TO GETTING INTO THE BACKCOUNTRY While spring is very, very young in much of western Wyoming, equine enthusiasts can begin preparing their horses now – especially their hooves and teeth – for what is sure to be a busy season in the mountains.

Photo/ Matthew Manguso

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SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | TRAIL TALK

TRAIL DETAILS Type: Varied County: Goshen Trailhead: N/A Directions: All three of these management areas are located off U.S. Highway 85/26, which is accessible heading north from Cheyenne, Wyo. or east from Casper, Wyo. Nebraskans can get to the areas using U.S. Highway 26 via Scottsbluff, Neb. to Torrington, Wyo. Base elevation: Approximately 4,200 feet

Photo/ Travis Pearson

Rawhide Wildlife Habitat Management Area offers both trails and fishing opportunities.

TABLE MOUNTAIN, SPRINGER AND RAWHIDE WILDLIFE HABITAT MANAGEMENT AREAS THREE OF SOUTHEASTERN WYOMING’S RECREATIONAL RIDING SPOTS

Elevation change: Varies Facilities: Parking and restroom facilities are available at most of the entry points. Potable water and corrals are not available. Fees: No parking fee Season: Year round

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

By Travis Pearson STAFF WRITER

M

uch of southeastern Wyoming lacks the public land more abundant elsewhere in Wyoming and the West. However, three wildlife habitat areas managed by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in Goshen County offer horse enthusiasts an opportunity for riding. Table Mountain, Springer and Raw-

hide are three areas well renowned for hunting and recreational opportunities year-round, but in spring, early summer and fall, many will take the opportunity to horseback ride in areas plentiful with waterfowl and other flora and fauna. “Springer and Table Mountain and Rawhide, during the fall months they are very popular sites for general hunting, specifically deer, water fowl, pheasant and turkey as being the main

ones,” WGFD Torrington Game Warden Jon Stephens said. Table Mountain is located about five miles south of Huntley. According to Stephens, the area is a complex of 1,716 acres. Springer is a similar setup about three miles south of Yoder and comprising about 1,900 acres.

TRAIL continued on page 19

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

GETTING BACK INTO THE BACKCOUNTRY PREPARATION IS KEY BEFORE TAKING HORSES INTO THE WILDERNESS FOR EXTENDED TRIPS By Matthew Manguso STAFF WRITER

T

here are few things that can offer the peace, solitude and sheer enjoyment that comes from saddling up a horse and heading out into the backcountry. It’s an activity that works well alone or with a group. And with the seasons beginning their cyclical shift from winter to spring, people heading out into the backcountry should adequately prepare themselves and their horses for a trip into the hills.

LEGGING UP Just about everyone puts on a little extra weight during the cold weather months, and both horse and rider need to get into shape before trekking into

the backcountry. When the weather is cold and snowy, riders should take advantage of local arenas or indoor facilities that give horses the opportunity to stretch their legs and rebuild stamina and muscle. “You need to leg him up,â€? Al Parker, vice president of the Wyoming Back Country Horsemen of America (BCHA), Teton Chapter, said. “Ride him short distances at first in arenas or on local trails; short in-and-out type trips for a little bit and get them in shape for the mountains.â€? Getting the horse acclimated to being ridden and walking is key to having a successful backcountry trip, Parker added, and the more ďŹ t the horse becomes, the less it will “huff and puff and sweat.â€? A good horse will “tell youâ€? when he’s ready for that extended trip, and the mark of a good horseman is un-

derstanding the horse’s endurance. Riders need to get in shape, too, and Parker recommended strengthening the legs by taking walks or doing squats. Riding as much as possible during the winter and before the pack season will get all the necessary muscles ready to go, as well.

TYING AND TRAILERING Most backcountry trailheads are located at the end of dirt roads, making horse trailers a must, and the animals need to be re-accustomed to loading and unloading from a trailer. “If you have a horse that you’re just getting started with, get him going in and out of a trailer,� Parker said.

Horses tend to be less timid going into larger trailers, Parker said, so if an owner only has a small trailer, it’s better to start early when getting the animal used to it. Younger horses will usually be more comfortable going into a trailer if they follow an older, more experienced horse into the vehicle, and having a more seasoned horse around always make training easier. Another important routine to get a horse used to is being tied up for extended periods of time. When in the backcountry, horses can be restrained from the afternoon until the next morning, and they need to adjust to not being able to roam freely. “Tie them up at home ďŹ rst,â€? Parker

BACKCOUNTRY continued on page 13

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BACKCOUNTRY continued from page 12

said. “Start with 15 minutes, and then move up to 20. You just want to work up [to more time] and get them used to being tied up.� Horses are herd animals, and if the plan is take several into the backcountry, tie them up at the same time, so the entire group understands there are going to be times when they will be tethered.

A GOOD TEMPERAMENT GOES A LONG WAY One of the most important things a rider can do when preparing for the backcountry season is to make sure the horse has the right temperament for an overnight or extended trip. Unlike when corralled in a familiar environ-

ment, horses that go up into the hills often have to deal with deadfalls, river crossings and wildlife encounters. A horse that is easily spooked can toss a rider, bolt into the woods and disappear, causing the horseman to have to shift his itinerary from a pack trip to a walking tour. Being miles away from a trailhead, not to mention having all your gear go scampering off into the woods, can spell disaster. “You want a horse with a good, calm disposition,� Mark Bogar, past chairman of the Idaho BCHA, said. “He’s going to have to not be spooky, and you don’t want him to jog; he needs to be able to walk.� Setting up a makeshift obstacle course with little hurdles, logs to step over and other obstructions that mimic what might be found in the backcountry is a good way to get a horse ready for a stint in the hills.

MAKE FRIENDS AND LEARN FROM THE EXPERTS

Photo/ Vicki Hood

Going into the backcountry is worth the effort.

Published by News Media Corporation | SPRING 2013

Just about every state in the nation has a local BCHA chapter, and like horses, it’s always best to learn from those who have done it before. If a novice backcountry horseman has the desire to get out but doesn’t know where to go, has never been taught to correctly pack a horse or is just a little squeamish about heading out onto the trails, it is best to contact a local BCHA group. Learning how to properly high-line or hobble a horse can be difficult to understand if you don’t have someone who has done it numerous times explain and demonstrate it, so it is best to learn from the experts and make some friends.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

A 30-YEAR SHOE ADDICTION SHERIDAN COLLEGE PREPARES STUDENTS FOR CAREER AS A FARRIER

Courtesy

Come rain or come shine, when it comes time to shod a horse, future farriers don’t hesitate to get hands-on. By Emily Siegel STAFF WRITER

A

fter some 30 years of shoeing horses in Montana, Stephen Stephenson has taught students at Sheridan College the same technique, as well as other equine courses, in a program he helped start about a year-and-a-half ago. Within the program, he teaches to a variety of individuals ranging in ages from 18 to 50, and from areas as far north as Canada to the Carolinas. “A lot of them are freshman kids, but there’s people from all over the country … so a pretty big cross section of people,” he said. Stephenson grew up in Round Up, Mont., which is about 50 miles north of Billings. There, he lived and worked

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as a farrier at barns in and around the area before heading to Sheridan. It has been about a year-anda-half since he started teaching horse shoeing, equine anatomy and equine biomechanics to students at Sheridan College. “I teach them the anatomy of the legs, muscles, tendons, bones, blood supply and how we shoe it – how it affects the way that legs work, which is bio-mechanics,” he said. Additionally, he said that, through the program, students have incredible resources at their disposal. With support from a couple big ranches in the area, students in the program are able to work on anywhere between 100 and 150 head. “In Sheridan, we’re pretty lucky. It’s one area that has a lot of horses

to work on, because in a lot of areas, it’s hard to find an adequate number of horses,” he said. By starting with the physiology of the horse, Stephenson teaches students that, by understanding the different functions of the leg, and how they relate to one another, a proper fit can then be made. “[Shoeing is] determined by how the leg is constructed, so all the joints load properly, which is known as joint congruency, so the joints all the way up the leg load right,” he said. In some cases, if not properly shoed, he said horses can become susceptible to health issues later on down the road, like bone growths or damaged joints, and how many owners and farriers are unaware of this. “Its not very well understood by

both horseshoers and horse owners,” he said. “It’s not understood how important that is.” Unlike in the past, when horses were used in everyday life, and the importance of the right shoe could greatly affect a person’s daily life, many today don’t have the same perspective. Once horses became less of a tool and more of a toy for many, the knowledge of proper shoeing techniques being of the utmost importance, fizzled with it. “Say 100 years ago, it was more important because, if a horse went lame you couldn’t harvest your crop, or drive to town for supplies or go to war. It was a lot more important then, people were more knowledgeable,” he said. Today, there is still an international standard for shoeing that is recognized worldwide, and is dictated by the anatomy of the leg and bone structure, and he said that is what the students work on. “It takes years to become confident, you know, running the tools and visualizing the hoof,” he said. He continued by saying that a lot of horses don’t really even need shoes, because they have a good quality of feet. This could be because they aren’t worked very hard, or if they are just wondering in a pasture, and said that an occasional trimming is fine. Determining the time to get new shoes for a horse varies on things such as age, how often and to what kind of work the horse is doing, as well as the environment. For instance, a horse being worked in the mountains that has walked on hillsides, on ice and in mud might require a shoe change more often than a horse kept in a pasture. “When we impose our environment on the horse, he can’t take care of it himself, so I think we have a moral and ethical responsibility to take care of him,” he said.

SHOE continued on page 15

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


SHOE continued from page 14 Furthermore, he said a basic shoeing could cost anywhere from $100 to much higher, depending on the type of shoes. He said a change every five to seven weeks can become costly when you have multiple horses needing shod. Laughing, Stephenson said, “Well, when you have five horses though, every month, it can get expensive in a hurry.” When people come to learn from Stepehenson, he said he constantly urges his students to take away the knowledge availed from opportunities given through the college. “Well-known people from around the country come and do clinics for us on specialized shoeing, and I stress to the students that they should attend as many of those as possible,” he said. He concluded by saying that the actual book side of learning to shoe a horse isn’t difficult, but the hands-on experience is where time, patience ad knowledge comes into play. “It’s easy to learn the academic part of this – you know, the science part – but the art part takes a lot of practice from the practical skills,” he concluded.

Courtesy

One student watches while learning the tricks of the trade when it comes to shoeing a horse.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

RICHENS USES CONNECTION TO HORSES TO HELP TREAT ANIMALS, PEOPLE EQUINE THERAPY BENEFICIAL TO HORSE AND RIDER By Jennifer Haessig STAFF WRITER

T

he one thing I know is that there are horse people and there are not-horse people,” said Vernal, Utah, resident Makenzie Richens. And Richens is the real “horse people” deal. Richens, who was born and raised in the Vernal area, has been around horses her entire life. She’s loved them, benefitted from the comfort they can provide, competed with them and taught others to ride, to name just a few facets of her personal equine experience. And now, as an adult, she can offer them comfort and treat their ailments. Richens is a former student of Kathy

Duncan, a prominent equine therapist and founder of Aspen Equine Studies in Colorado – from which Richens earned equine therapy certification – and uses her skills to treat illness and injury in horses using three methods: massage, hydrotherapy and sports medicine. Hydrotherapy involves the use of water to facilitate the movement of blood to an injured or problem area. According to Richens, this is the least-used of her methods. For the majority of her cases, she uses a sports medicine approach not unlike the approach a doctor would take when treating a highly-trained human athlete, to determine and address the source of a breakdown in the horse’s

physical performance. When addressing a horse’s problem or problems using sports medicine, Richens explained that a span of three months is the minimum amount of time she requires to properly identify the problem, address it and monitor a horse’s progress. “Three months is the baseline, where you can actually see a difference and see if it’s helping the horse. That’s my favorite one to do, because I get to work with them long term and take before-and-after pictures. It’s amazing to look back and see what you started with and then, what you’ve come to,” she said. One has to wonder, though, if in an area like Vernal, with what must be a

large contingent of long-time ranchers, horse folks and “good ol’ boys,” the term “equine therapy” might be less a source of interest and more a source of skepticism and cynicism. Was it difficult when she was first certified to get people to take her seriously? “Definitely,” she replied. “Especially when I was starting out … nobody’s ever heard of Kathy Duncan. They’re like, ‘Great, you’ve graduated from Kathy Duncan’s equine school, but who is she?’ So it’s taken me a while, but because I’ve grown up here and I have the references and networking

RICHENS continued on page 18

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May

8 - Select Gelding Sale, contact Todd Stevie at 307-367-6507 for more information 17 - 22 - Erica David Champion Mindset Livestock Clinic

3 & 4 - Cabin Fever Spring Fair Kick-Off Concert. May 3 at 7 pm 32 Below and Copper Mountain Band .Spring Fair, May 4 at 10 am, Local Businesses and vendors selling the things they have to offer to get us in the mood for Spring.

3 - Chuckwagon Days Lil Buckaroo Rodeo, Lance Kopenhafer Arena @ 6pm go to www.chuckwagondays.com for full schedule

4 - 4-H Council Auction, Commercial Building @ 9:00 am Drop off will be May 3 Noon to 8:00 PM (No clothing) Proceeds benefit Sublette 4H clubs and programs. Contact Carolyn 276-3828 or Sandy 360-6339 with questions.

4 - Chuckwagon Days Barbecue, Events Center, following the 4th of July Parade, free to all, donations appreciated, Rodeo follows in the Buss Fear Outdoor Arena www.chuckwagondays.com for the full schedule and events.

4 & 5 - Bits & Spurs Horse Show, contact Stuart Thompson at 307-360-8273 for entry information.

12 - 13 - IDRHA & CSRHA Horse Show

11 - A Woman's Work Chili Cook-off, Events Center 15 - 19 - Pat Wyse Horsemanship Clinic, contact Dari at 307-231-5978 for more information. 24 - 26 - 11th Annual Outfitters Memorial Weekend Team Roping, contact Todd Stevie at 307-367-6507 for more information.

July

22 - 28 - Sublette County Fair with pre-fair events starting July 19 - 21. For more information, call 307276-5373 or email manager@sublettecountyfair.com 28 - SCBRC Barrel Jackpot, 9 am - 4 pm. Contact Jessie at 307-260-5266 for more information and to enter.

August

25 - 26 - 351 Productions Cowgirl Classic Barrel Racing

30 - Sept 1 - Ed Wright Barrel Clinic, for more information, contact Shelly McAdams at 307-360-7002.

31 - June 2 - National Cutting Horse Association Days Area 4 (Montana & Wyoming)

September

June May 31 - June 2 - National Cutting Horse Association Days Area 4 (Montana & Wyoming)

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10 - 16 - Wyoming Cutting Horse Association Cow Cutting

Questions on Events? Call The Fairgrounds office @ 307-276-4161 or 307-749-3546.

LLOYD BROWER MEMORIAL SLIDE July 11th-13th, 2013 Idaho Reining Horse Association Cowboy States Reining Horse Association Entires and Information check out our website

www.idrha.com or call Matt at

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RICHENS continued from page 16

that I do, it’s really helped me.” No doubt it’s helped a lot, but she still has to prove herself. “Those old farmers and old ranchers – I go out there and they say, ‘You’re going to massage my horse? I’m not paying for that,’” she said with a chuckle. “I’ve had to offer free assessments, because people will kind of think, ‘Well, that would be nice if it worked, but who’s this girl and how can I trust her?’ So usually when I get there and I do my free assessment, and then explain to them [that] ‘I’m working with these veterinarians, I have these kind of references, this is my background with it’ – once I introduce myself and kind of sell myself a little bit, it’s a lot easier.” To illustrate her point, she told a story about a previously skeptical – but now regular – client whose horse was suffering from what he thought was navicular syndrome, inflammation or degeneration of the navicular bone and surrounding tissues, which can easily make a horse lame. The navicular bone is a small bone found in the feet of most mammals. She looked the horse over and felt him down, which is a fundamental and essential part of her assessment, since she can feel for knots and tenderness, among other symptoms. Almost immediately, she noticed a significant muscle deficiency on the left side of the horse’s neck. And although she hadn’t yet taken a look at the horse’s hoof, she had already seen what she needed to and told the owner that she didn’t think it was navicular. At that point, the owner asked her how she could know that, especially since she hadn’t taken a look at the hoof. Undeterred by his disbelief, Richens explained that the lack of muscle development she had observed, in conjunc-

tion with its location, was the clue that eliminated navicular as the problem. As she explained it, if the horse had navicular, she’d expect to see more muscle development, not less, because he’d be compensating, or working that part of the body harder to compensate for favoring another. She continued her assessment and explained that she was pretty sure it was a problem with the horse’s hock. When a horse has a hock problem, the area around their loin can be extremely tender. To demonstrate her point, she took her pocketknife – because of its rigidity, not with the blade open – and ran it down the horse’s back. When she hit the loin area, the horse forcefully flinched. “The guy kind of looked at me for a minute and he said, ‘Are you a vet?’ And I said, ‘No, I’m an equine therapist,’” Richens said. He asked what that meant, she recalled, and they chatted for a bit before she asked him if he would ride the horse so she could observe and confirm her suspicions. She also got up to ride, explaining to him that she’d expect to see specific behaviors in response to certain movements if the problem was, in fact, navicular. But the horse didn’t exhibit those expected behaviors. Then she explained what she expected to see if it was a hock-related problem, and directed the horse to move in such a way as to test her theory. “So I did that, and the horse nearly laid down on me,” she said. Just as she expected. “After that, we went and packed the horses up, and I gave him my card, and he said, ‘Well, it’s really nice to meet you. Do you have a minute?’ and I said, ‘Sure,’ and he went and got three more horses for me.”

Richens is also a nurse, and can use those skills on the human owners of her equine clients, as well. She understands the physical and psychological connection between people and horses. Prior to becoming certified, and at the young age of about 18, Richens worked with client suffering with multiple sclerosis. “When I first worked with her, she couldn’t mount the horse by herself, and she couldn’t use the right side of her body,” she said. “I taught her massage, and how to work with her horse and do things on her own. [Otherwise] she couldn’t ride her horse unless I was there. And so she built up this great connection with her horse through the massage and through the therapy that I taught her on her horse – an older mare that actually needed it anyway – and it helped both of them to bond together. This woman – by the time they were done, she was riding her horse by herself.” The success she had, long before she became certified, with that client by utilizing massage, reminds her of how valuable an equine therapy massage can be. “The one thing that I’m absolutely sad about is [that] I have no clients in the basin whatsoever who hire me to do equine massage,” she lamented. “I just feel like that’s so beneficial…just for the babies, the imprint training, where you massage their bodies, get them used to the touch of humans, just getting them to trust you, the massage is so, so beneficial.” And if everything she’s said about the benefits of massage doesn’t make someone a believer, she points out another practical benefit of developing that trust through massage. “My horses run up to me in the field,” Richens added, “and people are always

asking, ‘How do your horses do that?’” She doesn’t have to go and fetch them; the concept of trust features largely in Richens’ relationship with horses, and is not an insignificant part of treating her equine clients. When she was young, Richens suffered maltreatment for which she sought – and received – comfort from her horse. “… My horse really got me through it,” she said. “I didn’t tell anybody but my horse, because I could trust him and I knew that he wouldn’t tell anybody. And I’d sit and I’d cry on him – I’d sit on his back in his stall and just cry and cry and cry and talk to him. He was my best friend and he saved me as a kid. When you feel like nobody else in the world understands you and nobody else cares, there’s such a huge feeling when you walk into the stall and your horse walks up to you and drops their head to your chest. This is a big animal that could kick you, could hurt you, could do anything to you, but when they want to come and be kind to you and take care of you and be your friend, it’s just so special.” “I’ve seen it in a lot of kids, in even a lot of adults, where you kind of are lost in your life and you really want a friend, you feel like nobody really understands you, and here’s this horse that you have, that’s your friend, and it’s nobody else’s friend, it’s just yours, that’s really special,” Richens concluded. “Horses connect with people. And not all people, but they connect with certain people, and they can really save them in a sense.” That connection, as difficult as it is to pinpoint and sum up in just a few words, is an intrinsic part of who Richens is, genuine “horse people,” and makes her as valuable to them – and their owners – as they are to her.

Local Horseman & Facility Features | Event Coverage | Equine News Business Prole | Calendar of Events | Regular Editorial Columns | Classieds Equine Enthusiast is produced locally and distributed quarterly to feed/tack stores,event facilities, hotels, fairgrounds and other equine related businesses. It is also packaged with The Business Farmer, a weekly specialty publication that covers agricultural issues in eastern Wyoming and the Nebraska panhandle, and available at the Wyoming State Fair in Douglas, Cheyenne Frontier Days and numerous county fairs. (12,000 copies total, each issue) ™

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Equine Enthusiast is also available online at www.EquineEnthusiast.com and on Facebook: Facebook.com/ equineenthusiastmagazine Looking to expand your coverage even more? Ask about our Equine Enthusiast publications in Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and California.

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


TRAIL

30th Annual

continued from page 10 Both of these areas have parking facilities at most of the entry points, as well as restrooms. However, not every point will feature these amenities. From there, horse riders may proceed wherever they would like on the state grounds. There are various two-tracks that are available for horseback riding and other recreation. However, Stephens does urge caution at these two management areas due to the proximity to nesting birds, which are a major hunting draw in the region. “For two out of those three areas, those are big migratory bird production areas for us. Table Mountain especially is a complex of eight to nine wetlands, and we have an awful lot of nesting waterfowl there during the summer, as well as some pheasants,� he said. Stephens went on to say those visiting the areas in the spring up until late May

should be particularly cognizant of the nesting birds and do everything possible not to “disturb or displaceâ€? the animals. Though, generally, he noted, horses don’t tend to disturb the wildlife as much as say, a motorcycle. The other management area, Rawhide, is located west of Torrington off Highway 85 heading toward Casper along the North Platte River corridor. Stephens said this area is popular for ďŹ shing, as well as seasonal hunting. This is the smallest of the Goshen County management areas at 740 acres. Although all three areas do not have potable water, each sits in close proximity to water features that animals could utilize. None of the sites has established campsites or camp facilities, Stephens said. There are some ďŹ re rings near the Springer reservoir, though, a spot that’s also used for boating, ďŹ shing and other recreation.

May Quarter Horse Arena, Ranch Broke Gelding & Production Sale The pictured gelding sells and his name is Chutin Roan, 2005 bay roan gelding, 15 hands, 1,200# Featuring an outstanding selection of 67 sound broke geldings plus an exceptional set of started two- and three-year-olds and yearlings from the Bartlett/Smith breeding program.

SATURDAY, MAY 18, 2013 Hot Springs County Fairgrounds

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Thermopolis, Wyoming Friday Night Parade of Geldings, 7pm, May 17 Sale Day Performance Review BNt)PSTFTTFMMBUQN

For catalogs and information, contact Bill and Carole Smith, PO Box 642, Thermopolis, WY 82443 ) t $  'BY email: wyoqhr@directairnet.com

S e e o u r o n l i n e c a t a l o g a t w w w. w y o h o r s e s . c o m

PRCA Rodeo July 26th & 27th 7:00 pm

Rubber Check Race August 7th

JB and the Moonshine Band Hwy 26 Summer Jam The Panhandles largest dance in the dirt.

August 8th

Mud Bog & ATV Races Friday August 9th

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band the grounds act Play with gravity Aug 10th

Moto Cross Aug 9th & 10th

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

A HORSE OF A DIFFERENT COLOR BREEDING, GENETICS CAN DETERMINE COLOR OF A HORSE By Ed Close STAFF WRITER

T

here is, at times, confusion among horse owners about equine colors and the genetics involved in horse breeding for particular coat colors and patterns. One example is the breeding of Overo horses. Overos cannot be bred to one another, as there is a likelihood of getting non-Overo foals from the breeding, or having foals that die shortly after being born. Breeding Tobiano paint horses, on the other hand, does not carry this type of risk. It is known now that all horse colors are, or result from modification of, black, bay and chestnut. With horses, there are but three primary genes known to determine the base color. Some understanding of these genes may prove helpful to horse

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

breeders, especially if they are new to the field. If, for instance, the breeder is looking to breed spotting, as in Appaloosas, paints or “colored� horses, it is best to know these patterns have their own genetics, but the base colors are still associated with the A, B and E genes. Piebald horse coloration is primarily black, while Skewbald coloration is primarily chestnut. Red roans are actually chestnuts with a roaning pattern, with the coat color and roaning determined by separate genes. Greys are unusual in this colorization, as their color is actually caused by color changes due to aging of the animal. Greys are not a darker, Courtesy

COLOR continued on page 22

Tobiano Paint horses can be bred based on genetics.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

LANCE CREEK WOMAN’S LEGACY LIVES ON THROUGH HER LOVE OF HORSES SCHOLARSHIP AND HORSE SHOW HONOR THE LATE SHERRI GILKERSON By Brandie Collins STAFF WRITER

S

herri Lea Hammond was born July 20, 1972, to Jack and Carolyn Hammond. She came home to two sisters and the community of Lance Creek that would be her home until she left for college. According to her family, Gilkerson had been living and breathing horses since she was a very young child. Gilkerson loved being on a horse and, according to her family, at six months of age she sat on a horse like she knew what she was doing. If she couldn’t be found, her parents would head straight to the corral. She would be feeding a piece of grass or hay to a horse, or if she could get one next to the fence, she would be on top. Most girls want dolls or toys for Christmas, but not Gilkerson. When she was 6 years old, all she wanted for Christmas was a horse. She was so proud when she did get her horse, named Twister. Jack and Carolyn enrolled her two older sisters, Julie and Lisa, in the local 4-H horse program. Carolyn was the 4-H horse leader for 30 years. Sherri was always in tow to the horse meetings, and if she didn’t have a horse

would go. Carolyn to ride, she was alalways had a special ways begging to ride shirt for her daughters someone else’s. to wear to the rodeo Sherri had just on Saturday, so she turned 8 in July, and in August of that year got to wear her shirt early. Carolyn stuck she and her family her youngest daughwent to the county ter on Lisa’s 4-H fair, where Julie and horse, Ozzie, and off Lisa were showing she went. horses, and Julie was She had to do an a contestant in the equitation pattern – Miss Rodeo Niobrara walk, trot, lope, recontest. Gilkerson verse and stop – and was now old enough Ozzie wasn’t pickto enter the Junior ing up the correct Queen Contest, which Courtesy photos lead. Sherri knew was for girls between the ages of 8 and 14. Sherri (Hammond) Gilkerson was crowned even at that young age that Ozzie was in She begged her mom Miss Rodeo Niobrara in 1992. the wrong lead. She to let her compete. looked up to see if the judges were looking, Carolyn was busy with all her 4-H kids, as and gave Ozzie a quick smack with the reins was Julie in the Miss Rodeo Contest, but she to remind him that she was the boss! At the was persistent. end of the competition, Sherri was crowned Finally, her mom gave in and stuffed the Junior Queen – what a great surprise! contents of an entire box of Kleenex into a hat The next year, she took over her sister Juthat was way too big for her tiny, little head, lie’s horse, Dusty, to show in 4-H. and shortened Lisa’s stirrups as short as they

The activities she enjoyed in high school included the rodeo team and the FFA, and Sherri was always active in her church youth group, as well. She continued to participate in the 4-H program, where she had become a junior leader, training other young horsemen. She had also started breaking and training horses for many of her neighbors. Gilkerson’s parents noticed her interest in horses and showing, and began fostering that interest by taking her to local shows all over the area. She won many awards and honors, but the most amazing thing was that she never concerned herself about her competition. She had put the training in on the horse and she knew she could win. She was quiet, and not cocky, and that never changed. She always let her showing do her talking for her. By the time Sherri graduated from Niobrara County High School, she knew riding and training horses would be her chosen vocation. Sherri attended Laramie County Community College on a horse judging scholarship, and was an active LCCC

or black in color, while phaeomelanin is either reddish or yellowish brown. These two basic coat colors are the basis of horse color genetics. Horses have a common thread with other mammals, as their skin color may very well be, and often is, different from their coat color. Among all horses, it is found that red horses are true breeding, and so are easily bred to produce red foals. On the other hand, breeding true black horses can be difficult, as black horses don’t always breed true, and can produce chestnut foals. There is also a phenomenon associated with horse breeding called “dilution.” Color dilution results in a fading

or silvering of the coat, and sometimes the skin as well. Palomino, buckskin, dun dapple and a few other colorizations are examples of dilution. If You are just beginning to learn horse breeding, it may be a good idea to either read a few books on the subject, or talk to other successful breeders to find out what colorization problems they’ve encountered. If colorization matters to you as a breeder, it is best to do some homework to improve the chances of getting the colors and patterns you seek. Then, there’s the old-fashioned way of simply breeding the horses and seeing what you get when the foal hits the ground.

LEGACY continued on page 24

COLOR continued from page 20

Courtesy

An Overo horse shows off a unique pattern.

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genetically, white horse, but a faded horse that can be born any color. “Allele” genes may also play a part in horse color determination. Allele genes are thought to be wild types, or ancestral genes. For instance, a donkey may be a dark chocolate brown due to recessive allele genes, as that gene produces chocolate in other species aside from equines, such as mice, goats and dogs. These allele genes are thought by some to possibly exist in horses, since chocolate colored horses occasionally occur. Horse coat pigmentation is determined by the absence, presence or relative proportions of certain pigments. These pigments are eumelanin and phaeomelanin. Eumelanin is either brown

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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LEGACY continued from page 22 Rodeo Team member. While Gilkerson was home for the summer, she was crowned Miss Rodeo Niobrara in 1992. She was then named the second runner-up at the Miss Rodeo Wyoming contest in 1993. During her two years at LCCC, Sherri earned a pair of degrees: an associate of applied science/business administration degree, and a degree in horse management. While getting her degrees, she did an internship with Dr. Joe Armstrong of La Mesa, N.M. After graduation, she joined Armstrong and his horse management program. On Dec. 31, 1994, Sherri Hammond married her lifetime friend and partner, Marc Gilkerson. The newly-married couple took employment with the Cheyenne River Quarter Horse Ranch at Hot Springs, S.D. From there, they moved to Glenwood Springs, Colo., to help a friend, and they later bought a home in Silt, Colo. When Sherri wasn’t training, she was showing. She spent her last two years training cow horses in Cave Creek, Ariz., with Jim and Jimmie Paul. By November 2001, she had qualified three horses in the open working cow horse competition at the AQHA World Show: Little Angels Josie, owned by Cynthia MacDonald Singer, who placed fifth in the senior working cow horse event; Peppino Hustler, owned by

Courtesy

Sherri (Hammond) Gilkerson in one of the many rodeos she participated in. Leslie Wright, who placed 13th; and Cute N Cashy, owned by Gusti Buerger. In 2005, Sherri won the NRCHA Limited Open and the Open Bridle Sweepstakes riding Camiseta Peppy, owned by Linda Mars of Jackson, Wyo. She knew that all “Norman” had to do was show his stuff, and he did just that. They got a good cow, something she and her mom had prayed for, and Norman did what

he does best. She also was third in the Limited Open Hackamore on Lenas San Lena, a 4-year-old stallion that Marc and Sherri owned. Gilkerson also placed in the limited open bridle on Colonel Brooksinic, owned by Leslie Wright, with the high fence score. Tragically, Gilkerson died on Oct. 30, 2006, following a horse-related accident. According to family and friends who knew Gilkerson, she inspired many people. But the thing that she would want everyone to understand is that all the awards don’t compare to the joy of knowing Jesus as her Lord and Savior. According to those who knew Gilkerson well, that’s what people saw in Sherri, as she lived out her love for Jesus Christ. According to her family and friends, she is missed greatly. She truly was an amazing person who touched so many in her short life. “I guess, from my standpoint, I always thought Sherri was amazing. You know, I thought it was just because she was my little sister,” Gilkerson’s sister, Julie Hodge, said. “But the first year after she passed on, we went to her show out in Temecula, Calif., and we found out just how amazing she was. A barn out there had already made T-shirts up before she passed away that had her picture and ‘Ride like Sherri,’ written on them. She had touched

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each one of them in their own special way. The thing that kept being shared with us was the fact that she was a woman of integrity. She didn’t brag...in fact, we usually had to check the Internet to see how she did at a show or look at the pictures to see who she showed. Sherri was a wonderful woman, but would be the first to tell you it was because of her relationship with the Lord Jesus. She was the poster child for the phrase, ‘living your faith.’” Her memory will live on, however, as she is remembered every year with the Sherri Gilkerson Memorial Bridle Spectacular and Horse Show, put on by the AZRCHA and the SCRCHA in Temecula, Calif., in May. The AZRCHA (Arizona Reined Cow Horse Association) and SCRCHA (Southern California Reined Cow Horse Association) also sponsor the Sherri Gilkerson Memorial Scholarship, which provides financial assistance to undergraduate college and university students who have demonstrated an interest in reined cow horse, and are members of the National Reined Cow Horse Association. The scholarship is awarded every year during the Sherri Gilkerson Memorial Horse Show in Temecula. For more information about the scholarship, visit www.azrcha.com.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

EVANSTON RODEO SERIES CELEBRATES 21 YEARS POPULAR EVENT ATTRACTS BIG CROWDS TO ANNUAL RODEOS By Liz Hoefler STAFF WRITER

T

he Evanston Rodeo Series has long been a part of Evanston, Wyoming’s colorful history, an event that remains true to the spirit of the Old West. For the last 21 years, fans have been wowed by events ranging from fierce bull riding to bronc riding to a chicken chase for the kids – the Evanston Rodeo Series has it all. The series was started by Evanston resident John Bowns and his family. The family traveled all over the intermountain west to participate in rodeos themselves, before they decided they should do the same thing in Evanston. “We came up with the idea that we could do the same thing here,” Bowns said, “we could put together a series of rodeos. The original idea was to enhance economic development for the area – it would bring people from the outside into the area and help boost and strengthen the economy. It was also a way to provide a good, wholesome activity for residents to participate in, and for Evanston’s families to come and enjoy.” “Then we put the emphasis on try-

The Evanston Rodeo Series is celebrating 21 years.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Courtesy photos

Team roping is a very popular event available to all different age groups. ing to bring people from the outside to come and participate, and spectate as well,” Bowns continued. “We strived to develop family-focused events for all different ages and skill levels. There are events for kids, our junior events. We worked to provide events that everyone in the family could participate in and enjoy. It gave each event a better spectrum. What was lacking at the time was that we had our professional ranks, and then we had the amateur ranks. So, we looked to develop a program that was in the middle, where people could progress their skill level. We don’t want to discourage anyone from participating, no matter their skill level.” The Evanston Rodeo Series was also a pioneer in developing something that, at the time, was unheard of in the rodeo business. “They had developed in the team roping event a number system. You

EVANSTON continued on page 27

Saddle bronc riding produces some of the most spectacular sights in any rodeo.

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


EVANSTON continued from page 26

Courtesy photo

A barrel racer competes to get in the money in Evanston. were given a number based your level of talent or ability. They were doing that and jackpots, in the team roping events,” Bowns said. “The problem was, it wasn’t being done in the entire rodeo series, so we implemented that system into all of our events. We were pioneers in bringing that concept to the rodeo scene and, after that, there were many that followed suit in bringing that number system into their series.” Evanston Rodeo Series offer fun for all ages The 2013 Evanston Rodeo Series is set for June 7-8, June 21-22 and July 12-13 at the Uinta County Fairgrounds. Events begin at 7 p.m. each night. The 2013 series will present stock from the Southwick Rodeo Company, out of Jay Em, Wyo., a company that has had stock in the National Rodeo Finals. Also presented will be stock from the King Cattle Company, based

in Homedale, Idaho. Timed events will include team roping, tie-down roping and 40-over tiedown roping. The ladies events include ladies breakaway and ladies barrel racing. Junior events featured will be junior steer riding, junior breakaway and junior barrels. Rough stock events are bull riding and bareback and saddle bronc riding. And don’t forget the chicken chase for the kids, along with fun clown acts. Enjoy great music and commentary from professional announcers, along with tasty food and drink onsite, plus prize giveaways and other surprises.

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Entries forms to compete in the series are available by calling (307) 7895511 or (307) 789-5512 the Monday and Tuesday before the rodeo weekend. For additional information, call or log on to EvanstonRodeoSeries.com.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

HORSES EARN THEIR KEEP ON WYO. RANCHES WHILE NEW TECHNOLOGY HELPS, THERE IS NO REPLACING THE RANCH HORSE By Kathy Carlson STAFF WRITER

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Photo/ Kathy Carlson

Cotton Bousman still uses horses for many of the day-to-day tasks on the ranch.

ork and ranch horses are the backbone of a traditional cattle ranch. While modern ranchers have moved to using ATVs for moving cattle, many ranchers in Sublette County still prefer to use horses when doing chores and working cattle. Kristi Kainer, who works with her father, John Blaha, on the Blaha Ranch, says there is no replacement for the ranch horse. The Blaha Ranch has more than 350 head of Black Angus cattle, and Kainer says the ranch uses its 15 to 20 horses to move cattle, doctor colts or just get around the ranch. “It’s more practical to use horses. They can go anywhere. You can swim your horse across a stream – you can’t

swim your four-wheeler,� Kainer said. Cotton Bousman, whose family owns and operates East Fork Livestock, agrees. The Bousman family goes back six generations of ranchers in Sublette County, to the late 1880s. Bousman uses his 25 horses for pulling heavy loads on terrains too treacherous for ATVs, in addition to chasing and driving cattle. “Go out there for a walk,� Bousman’s wife, Kari, said about why East Fork Livestock still uses horses. “Horses are better for the terrain, the miles. They have more capability,� Bousman asserted. Horses move better in the snow than an ATV, and ranchers do not have to

EARN continued on page 30

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

29


EARN continued from page 28 worry about starting them up in the frigid Wyoming winter temperatures. Tawny Roberts, who, along with her husband Dru, owns of the Last Resort hunting cabin and ranch, also sees the benefits of using horses. “Where we live, its pretty tough to keep stuff plowed out. You would have to use a tractor. We didn’t have big tractors like that in those days,” Roberts said. In addition to using horses during heavy snowfall, Roberts also used animals for doctoring calves, and for carrying heavy loads. “When we worked mules, we used them in our hunting operation. We used them as pack animals,” Roberts added. “We had big mules to hook up to our sled during the winter so we could use them all year round. We had them so we just as well use them. You just get used to using whatever you have.” Kainer and Bousman both agree the advantages to having horses are worth their upkeep. “You have to feed them hay, get them on a vaccine and worming schedule,

Photo/ Kathy Carlson

Bousman checks on one of his horses in cold Sublette County, Wyo. even finding a well-trained horse takes a lot of time,” Kainer said. Horses also need to rest and, unlike an

ATV, cannot be used for days at a time. Bousman fixes this predicament by taking multiple horses on long cattle drives.

“We go out with three or four horses in a string, and rotate them around,” Bousman said. The cattle at East Fork Livestock are herded to a land allotment administered by the Bureau of Land Management, and then into a mountain allotment on the Bridger-Teton National Forest to graze. Bousman said horses are much better suited for long trips, because they do not require gasoline or maintenance, and they can graze as they move along the route. The Wyoming Game and Fish Department agrees work horses have a place in modern society. The WGFD contracted Bousman to feed elk on BLM property because Bousman, with a team of Percheron horses and a sled, are able to get to feeding grounds when ATVs can’t. Kainer and Bousman also stress finding the right horse for the job. Bousman believes a good ranch horse can teach the rider a lot about moving cattle. “I like a good, honest horse – one that doesn’t try to buck you off at the end of the day,” Kainer said.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

THE KEY TO THE KINGDOM? A WELL-SHOD HORSE

Ag @ Sheridan College

HOOF MAINTENANCE PIVOTAL TO EQUINE HEALTH By Bud Patterson STAFF WRITER

T

here is nothing more majestic or euphoric than riding a well-gaited, smooth striding horse. The smell of horse sweat, the creak of worn leather and the steady rhythm of the walk, trot, canter or gallop pulls on our collective memories of a time when the relationship between horse and rider was often the difference between life and death. Most of history was made from the back of a horse. Kingdoms were established, and lost, from between the withers of a horse; most wars since the dawn of man were waged astride our noble partners. Even today, we continue to do battle with them: rodeos, horse races (the sport of kings), dressage, jumper, hunters and trotters all take us into the arena to do battle, though now mostly for cash or bragging rights, rarely for land. But in order to make history, to conquer new challenges or simply have an enjoyable afternoon ride, you must start at the beginning. And with a horse, the beginning is the hoof. Before a horse can do any of the things we require of it, go forward, stop, slide, turn, back up, pull, jump or run, its feet must be sound and well-maintained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ninety percent of the problems I see with horses,â&#x20AC;? Rex Rammell D.V.M, Torrington veterinarian and horse doctor, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;can be traced back to the hoof. The hoof is all about physics; the distribution of weight and a horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s balance all start at the feet.â&#x20AC;? It is not uncommon for a horse owner to notice that his or her horse has a sore back, is a little stiff or even, uncharacteristically, shies from the saddle. Often, the ďŹ rst thing the owner thinks is there has been some type of injury directly to the back. An injury or ill-ďŹ tting saddle may be the case for a sore back, but it could also be â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and more often than not is â&#x20AC;&#x201C; problems

with the horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feet. Some tell-tale signs that a horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hooves should ďŹ rst be checked for problems include: â&#x2013;  A shortened stride â&#x2013;  Reluctance to move forward â&#x2013;  Poor performance â&#x2013;  Back problems â&#x2013;  Tight muscles â&#x2013;  Even unusual crankiness or aggressive behavior â&#x20AC;&#x153;A horse carries most of its weight on its front feet,â&#x20AC;? Rammell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If your horse is trying to shift its weight to its hind legs, or standing with its front legs splayed out in front of him, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to get a vet in to assess the problem and get it corrected, immediately.â&#x20AC;? The ďŹ rst line of preventative hoof care, however, is a good, knowledgeable farrier. There are a number of farrier schools, colleges with farrier programs and practicing farriers that are willing to mentor a serious student. Though each increases the odds of ďŹ nding a good farrier, there are a few indicators that the farrier you choose knows how to spot and avoid serious hoof issues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A horse vet (one that does over half their business with horses) will know who the good farriers are in the area,â&#x20AC;? Rammell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Or, talk to another horse owner who actually uses their horse on a regular basis. Find out if they do it part-time or full-time. There are two types of farriers: regular farriers, those that trim and put regular shoes on, and those who do corrective shoeing. A corrective farrier can put on regular shoes, but will be able to identify problems and issues early.â&#x20AC;? Often the issue is the horse owner isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sure what a healthy hoof actually looks like; after years of looking at shod hooves that are contracted, ďŹ&#x201A;ared, have collapsed

Published by News Media Corporation | SPRING 2013

KEY continued on page 32

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KEY continued from page 31

general understanding of a healthy hoof. For more detailed explanations or concerns, the reader should consult his or her horse veterinarian. Dorsal means the front of the hoof, and palmar the back of the hoof. So dorsalpalmar balance Pictures and illustrations are courtesy of www.thenaturalhoof.co.uk means the balance Figure 1. between the front and back of the hoof (figure 4). The distance from the toe to the apex of the frog should be one-third the total length of the hoof and twothirds of the total length should be from the apex of the frog to the back of the heels. Viewed from the side (figure 5), a line from the center of the fetlock joint should dissect the back of the heel. A common problem is the long toe/under run heels (figure 6). This results in Figure 2. inadequate support to the fetlock and heels or flat soles, the owner begins to excessive strain on tendons and ligaments. consider this as “normal,” and therefore “Long toes/under run heels is one of the healthy. But the reality is that these condi- most common problems I see,” Rammell tions are far from healthy. said. “The horse’s toes grow faster than the There are several helpful websites avail- heel, and horses in box stalls or soft dirt able that will help walk the horse owner corrals don’t wear off their toes very fast. through keeping his or her horse’s feet People need to understand that the physics healthy. One of the most useful is www. of the horse allows for most of the weight thenaturalhoof.co.uk, which has excellent of the horse to be carried on the front legs illustrations, photographs and explanations and on the front of the hoof. You don’t want of healthy equine feet, and those that are a horse to be carrying most of its weight on diseased or neglected. the heels.” To understand the healthy hoof, a little In a healthy hoof, a line bisecting the horse anatomy is in order. Figure 1 illus- cleft of the frog should cut the hoof into trates the skeletal makeup of the horse’s two symmetrical halves, (figure 7). foot, figure 2 shows the horse’s sole, and figure 3 is the exterior of the hoof in a fairly healthy hoof. It should be noted the explanaKEY tions and illustrations that follow are for the continued on page 34

32

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Figure 3.

Figure 5.

Figure 4.

Figure 6.

Figure 7.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

HORSES DUMPED NATIONWIDE DUE TO COST OF HAY, DROUGHT AND AMOUNT OF CARE ABANDONEMENT OF HORSES BECOMING AN UNFORTUNATE REALITY By Timilee Wilber STAFF WRITER

T

hree horses were “turned-out” on a Bureau of Land Management lease sometime last fall, south of

Robertson in the Bridger Valley of Wyoming. The horses are two paint mares and a Percheron mixed breed gelding. Kevin Behunin, brand inspector for the Wyoming Livestock Board, said 11 horses were abandoned in Uinta County

Photos by Timilee Wilber

in 2012, and one horse was found dead on Commissary Ridge north of Kemmerer, Wyo., in February. The horse had been shot. And the abandonment of horses isn’t just a local problem. According to Leanne Correl, director of the Wyoming Livestock Board, it is hard to estimate the number of horses abandoned statewide, but she estimated there were at least 48 documented cases last year. There has been a dramatic increase in the number of abandoned horses in the last fi ve years, partially due to the downturn in the economy and, especially in the last year, due to skyrocketing hay prices in Wyoming and across the United States. The fate of abandoned horses often is a slow and agonizing death. The horses

DUMPED

Two paint horses and Percheron gelding.

continued on page 36

KEY continued from page 32 Viewed from the front, a healthy hoof is cone-shaped – wider at the bottom than at the top – and the hairline should be as close to horizontal and level as possible (figure 8). A healthy hoof also has a parallel hoof/ pastern axis (figure 9). Viewed from the side, a line following the angle of the pastern should be parallel to the toe wall. One last healthy foot factor that should always be checked, according to Rammell, is the horse’s frog. “The frog is crucial for good circulation in the hoof and leg,” Rammell said. “The frog acts sort of like a pump, and for it to sufficiently pump blood, it has to contact the ground. Often, you’ll see farriers cutting back the frog until it is way up in the sole. It will never make contact with the ground, especially if shoes are put on.” For Rammell, there is one task that is imperative for every horse owner to do – to make sure his or her horses are in

34

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Pictures and illustrations are courtesy of www.thenaturalhoof.co.uk

Figure 8. good hoof health. “Horse owners have to have their horses feet trimmed on a regular basis,” Rammell emphasized. “Horses weren’t

Figure 9.

Balance is important when shoeing.

meant to be kept in stalls and corrals, with lots of sand and grass to walk on. Rocks and hard ground kept a horse’s toes and heels trimmed and in shape. A good trim will let you know if there are any troubles brewing.”

Richard III said it well in Shakespeare’s play of the same name: “A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a horse!” It would have been more accurate if he had exclaimed, “A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a well-shod horse!”

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DUMPED continued from page 34

are not able to fend for themselves, and often they starve to death. Correl said 200 abandoned horses were gathered in one operation in southeastern Wyoming, from both public and private land, three years ago. These are not wild horses, as many of them have brands. Horses are being turned loose on roadways on both public and private lands. Abandoning animals on Bureau of Land Management lands violates federal law. Abandoned horses are not a new problem, according to a Time Magazine article dated May 28, 2008, where the author states, “There is an epidemic of abandoned horses in the United States, due to the downturn in the economy.” A Denver Post headline dated Aug.19, 2012, read, “Thousands of horses in the United States abandoned amid drought.” From Aztec, N.M., to state parks in Missouri, in backyards and along county roads in Illinois and among ranch herds in Texas, horses are being left to fend for themselves at an alarming rate. Behunin is searching for the owner of the three abandoned horses in Uinta

We welcome our readers to submit editorial on achievements, milestones, local equestrian stories and organizations! Do you know a local horse person who deserves to be Equine Enthusiast’s featured local horseman/woman of the year? Please feel free to contact us with any comments or suggestions to help EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T best suit YOUR needs!

Courtesy/ A Million Horses

This mare, photographed in March 11, 2008, in Keno, Ore., was found frozen to the ground. She was still alive when this picture was taken. A vet euthanized her where she lay. The rescuers posthumously named her Spirit. County, and said for someone to claim them, ownership papers and/or brand inspection documents need to be presented. If no one claims the horses, they will be sold at auction as mandated by Wyoming State Statute. To claim the horses or schedule a brand inspection, Behunin can be reached at (307) 780-8291. Behunin said he believed the horses were abandoned near the Graham Reservoir south of Robertson. Eventually, he got a call and picked them up on the State Line Dam Road. “These horses are gentle and are in good shape,” said Behunin. “The horses have spent the last few months on good feed and water. They are not lost horses; they have been dumped,” he said. “People need to research the cost for care and upkeep of horses before they purchase them.” In other areas, people interested in

owning, taking care of and transporting their horses can contact their own state livestock boards to find out the necessary requirements. The cost to maintain a horse, including feed and veterinary care, for one year is between $1,825 and $2,300, depending on where you live in the United States. Many horses live for 20 years, and some can live for more than 30 years, according to The American Horse Council. According to Erica Castin, director of the Unwanted Horse Coalition, the U.S. is facing the worst drought in half a century, and the price of grain and hay is beyond the reach of many families. Parts of at least 33 states are facing severe drought conditions. A rough estimate of the number of unwanted, abandoned horses is between 170,000 and 180,000 per year nationwide. A Wyoming Tribune Eagle article in Sep-

Travis Pearson

307-532-2184 tpearson@EquineEnthusiast.com

36

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

All Breeds, All Disciplines!

tember reported, “The poor harvest early in the growing season pushed hay prices to the highest level they’ve ever been.” According to the United States Department of Agriculture, hay prices in the state of Wyoming shot up by double-digit percentages in the month of August of last year. On average, alfalfa was priced at $200 per ton, with blends selling for $180 per ton. Compare this to Wyoming hay prices in August 2011, which were $123 per ton for alfalfa, and $115 for blends. A 60-pound square bale at a cost of $8 to $12 is enough to feed one horse for roughly three days. “When legal horse slaughter was ended in the name of ‘being kind to Flicka’ recently, the lack of markets for unwanted horses resulted in a mass abandonment of animals that has become a mainstay of the six o’clock television news. Scrawny, emaciated horses left to starve because their owners couldn’t or wouldn’t feed them are appearing all over the country since there’s no market,” Baxter Black, cowboy poet and former large animal veterinarian, was quoted in March 2009. “The Human Society of the United States argued to have the slaughter of horses stopped in the name of animal cruelty.” Behunin, a brand inspector for the last 20 years in Uinta County, said he wants to educate the public as to the federal and state laws that pertain to buying, selling and transporting horses, cattle and sheep. A brand inspection costs from $10 to $12, and $18 for a lifetime inspection is required when animals are being bought, sold or transported from one county to another within the state of Wyoming. The penalty for transporting animals within the state without inspection documents can be as high as a $500 per animal. To transport animals across state lines, both a brand inspection and a health inspection are required. A health inspection can be obtained from a local veterinarian.

Equine Enthusiast is also available online at www.EquineEnthusiast. com and on Facebook: Facebook.com/ equineenthusiastmagazine

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

THE MAGIC OF MUSIC: TURNING EIGHT SECONDS INTO THREE MINUTES ROGERSON RELEASES NEWEST ALBUM ENTITLED ‘DIRT’ By Megan Neher STAFF WRITER

J

ared Rogerson is a biologist of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. After years on the rodeo circuit riding roughstock, he’s calmed a bit, but he craves the adrenalin that comes with climbing into a chute. While it’s not exactly risking your life on the back of a bucking horse, Rogerson has found some solace in his song writing and live performances of his original country music. “Dirt” is the most recent album from the Pinedale, Wyo. resident, and it’s the second he has had professionally mixed and produced. A few years ago, he released a crowdfunded album he made in Nashville, fully produced with a robust, rocking sound. “Dirt,” while still taking advantage of the professional talents available, is more mixed and gets back to Rogerson’s fiddling around with the guitar roots. A musician who grew up loving rock will never turn down a strong bass line and drumbeat, and there are a number of songs on his new album that reflect the “pump you up” anthems he relied on in his rodeo days. “When you were getting on a horse and your name was being called, you needed a song that rocked,” he said. “And some of these are like that.” “Ninety or nothin’” is one such song. It’s the story of Rogerson’s incredible luck. It never brought him fortune, but it kept him afloat. “There are times when you have enough money to pay your entry fee or your rent but not both,” he said. “What do you do?” If you’re Rogerson, you take the risk, knowing full well the consequences if you come up short. “I’ve been there, when you just know you can do, taking all your money to pay the entry fee and then

38

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

winning at the last second,” he said. “Every time I got down to the last penny, I won.” Writing songs may not be a poundfor-pound replacement of that adrenalin rush, but it’s a risk. Rogerson puts

And Rogerson owes a lot to his listeners. While this album wasn’t fully crowd-funded, the songs were sponsored by Sublette County fans of the hometown strummer. Sublette County has watched Rogerson mature

Courtesy/ Jared Rogerson

Jared Rogerson’s Wyoming-inspired country album “Dirt” will be released April 16.

himself out there in every song. He’s written or co-written all of them, and he said each one has to be personal. “They were all inspired by something real in my life,” he said. “Song writing has to be personal … listeners can tell if you’re authentic.”

as a songwriter, and he is grateful to have the local support as he takes more chances in his music and lyrics. Instead of composing songs behind the wheel driving from rodeo to rodeo as he might have done, most of them come out of long solo trips

into the backcountry with his black Morgan horse, Deets. Morgans are small but sturdy creatures – they live up to their origin story, always ready to work with strength and endurance. Rogerson and Deets have done scores of long trips into the Wind River, Wyoming, Gros Ventre and Uinta mountains. After day trips and overnights, the two have a deep bond, and Deets is Rogerson’s best audience. “I like just being out there and just listening and not hearing anything else,” Rogerson said. That silence lets his brain start turning and the creative juices start churning, and in absence of sound a song starts to form. “It starts in my head,” he said. “I’ll usually get the words and tune at the same time, and I’ll hear it in full production in my head.” All of a sudden, what’s going on in his head starts coming out. A lone man singing a cappella in the wilderness will never live up to what Rogerson hears in his head, but Deets is patient, listening to iteration after iteration until Rogerson is satisfied. Deets was on hand for the creation of the song “Mustang,” honoring one of Rogerson’s favorite horses. More of a traditional country song, it tells of the pain of losing something you love. “It was inspired by a legendary horse we had to put down because he was old,” Rogerson said. “He had been everywhere and done everything and he was a superhero.” That’s a tough pain, and Rogerson still feels it when he speaks about the song. Exposing that sort of pain to the world is not a very cowboy thing to do, and it’s a long way from the rush of watching the chute fly open. But it’s a huge risk that very few people are willing to take, and when it’s successful, the rush can rival an eight-second ride.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

39


EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

LOCAL BUSINESS “BUCKLES” IT UP! THE BLEVINS BUCKLE, MADE IN WHEATLAND, WYO., BECAME AN INTERNATIONAL ITEM By Pat Mitchell STAFF WRITER

C

oming to the stop sign at the west end of Mariposa will put you on Highway 312, unless you drive straight ahead under the overhead pole to a white house and a nondescript metal building. Go into that building, and you will be in a one-of-a-kind manufacturing business. If your fanny spends hours on horseback, you will know about these two small pieces of equipment manufactured there and found on most every saddle made – the Blevins Buckle. Like most businesses, this piece of ingenuity came out of necessity. During World War II, Earl Blevins (1906-1994) was in the U.S. Coast Guard. “It was while riding on horseback along the coast of the Carolinas, watching for German submarine landings, that he invented a device to vary the length of saddle stirrups.” When he got out of the military, he perfected the device and was giving them away at rodeos. According to his nephew, Kevin Bryant, who now owns the business, “Aunt Joan (Anne Van Kleeck Bryant’s sister) decided he should be making these and selling them.” Earl and Joan went into business on “a shoestring” in their basement and turned it into an international business, selling to saddle-makers and leather supply companies. The list of countries to which the buckles are shipped reads like a world map: France, Germany, New Zealand, Ireland, Australia, etc. The buckle was patented (No. 3.314.121; ran out the year Earl died) and named after him. The Blevins Buckle is only made here in Wheatland. Another company in Texas is making a similar buckle, but Bryant thinks they’re really made in Mexico and “hopes they’re not as good.” The original business was located on the ranch out by Shamrock. It was moved to the present location in 1967. According

BUCKLES continued on page 41

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Photos/Pat Mitchell

It takes multiple big pieces of machinery like the one Kevin Bryant is standing in front of to end up with the Blevins Buckle.

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


BUCKLES

We welcome our readers to submit editorial on achievements, milestones, local equestrian stories and organizations!

continued from page 40

to Bryant, Blevins was pretty easy to work for but “if you made a mistake, he let you know about it.” As in all manufacturing, supplies must come first in order to fill the orders. The cow leather comes from a company in St. Louis; the aluminum (or brass) comes from Denver. The four employees (Bryant, Allen King, Vern Olson, David Palmer) use up to 13 machines to produce the leather sleeves and four to five to process the metal tongue with the pins. The Blevins’ obituaries are quite interesting. He left home at age 12 and came west. She was reared in Brooklyn, N.Y. (www.wheatlandtown.com, then click on Cemetery, Obituaries, Bs). He was a bulldogger and won championships in Madison Square Garden and the Denver Stock Show, as well as being inducted into the Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame. Google Blevins Buckles and see how many references come up! For people who either need or love to ride horses, the Blevins Buckle certainly put Wheatland on the map by simplifying the process of changing stirrup length.

Do you know a local horse person who deserves to be Equine Enthusiast’s featured local horseman/woman of the year? Please feel free to contact us with any comments or suggestions to help EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T best suit YOUR needs!

Travis Pearson Photos/Pat Mitchell

Notice that at the time this buckle was made, the patent was pending; now it has run out. These versatile pieces of saddlery last a very long time.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

OKLAHOMA LIFTS HORSE SLAUGHTER BAN FACILITIES SPRING UP, BUT HORSE MEAT CANNOT BE SOLD IN U.S.

O

Republican governor said. “Those of us who care about the well-being of horses – and we all should – cannot be satisfied with a status quo that encourages abuse and neglect, or that rewards the potentially inhumane slaughter of animals in foreign countries.” She noted that law strictly prohibits the selling of horse meat for human consumption in the U.S. Similar efforts are underway in other states, but not without controversy. In New Mexico, a processing plant has been fighting the U.S. Department of Agriculture for more than a year for approval to convert its former cattle slaughter operation into a horse slaughterhouse. In Nevada, state agriculture officials have discussed ways to muster support for the slaughter of free-roaming horses, stirring protests. The Oklahoma legislation received bipartisan support and was approved by wide margins in both the state House and Senate.

klahoma’s 50-year-old ban on horse slaughtering was lifted March 29 when the governor signed a new law that will allow facilities to process and export horse meat, despite bitter opposition by animal rights activists. Supporters argue that a horse slaughtering facility in Oklahoma will provide a humane alternative for aging or starving horses, many of which are abandoned in rural parts of the state by owners who can no longer afford to care for them. Gov. Mary Fallin also noted that horses are already being shipped out of the country, including to facilities in Mexico, where they are processed in potentially inhumane conditions. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, more than 166,000 horses were sent to Canada and Mexico last year alone. “In Oklahoma, as in other states, abuse is tragically common among horses that are reaching the end of their natural lives,” the

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It also was backed by several agriculture orthe American Quarter Horse Association – ganizations including the Oklahoma Farm support the plans. Bureau, the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s AssoThey point to a 2011 report from the fedciation and American Farmers. eral Government Accountability Office that But animal rights groups fought hard shows horse abuse and abandonment have against the plan, including the Humane been increasing since Congress effectively Society of the United States. Cynthia banned horse slaughter by cutting funding Armstrong, the organization’s Oklahoma for federal inspection programs in 2006. state director, They say the said she was disban on domestic “Those of us who care about slaughter has led appointed. “It’s a very sad the well-being of horses – to tens of thouday for Oklahoma sands of horses and we all should – cannot and the welfare of being shipped the horses that be satisfied with a status to inhumane will be exposed quo that encourages abuse slaughterhouses to a facility like in Mexico. this,” Armstrong and neglect, or that rewards Although said. “It’s very re- the potentially inhumane there are no grettable.” horse slaughterslaughter of animals in In addition to ing facilities in animal welfare foreign countries. Oklahoma, the concerns, opHumane Society ponents have said the USDA said slaughterhas received an ing horses for application for human consumphorse slaughtion could pose a ter inspection threat to human Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin permits from a health and safety. meat company American horses in Washington, are often treated with drugs and medicaOkla., about 40 miles south of Oklations that are not approved for use in anihoma City. mals intended for food. Fallin said her administration will work Horse slaughter opponents are pushing with the Oklahoma Department of Agricullegislation in Congress to ban domestic ture to ensure that any horse meat processslaughter, as well as the export of horses ing plant in the state is run appropriately, to other countries for slaughter. Many anifollows state and local laws, and does not mal humane groups and public officials are outraged at the idea of resuming domestic slaughter. But others – including some SLAUGHTER horse rescuers, livestock associations and continued on page 43

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SLAUGHTER continued from page 42 pose a hazard to the community. The law takes effect Nov. 1. “It’s important to note cities, counties and municipalities still have the ability to express their opposition to processing

facilities by blocking their construction and operation at the local level,” the governor said. Associated Press

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EARLY SPRING MEANS IT’S TIME FOR BRANDING Throughout Wyoming and Nebraska, calving and then branding is a sign of the season; here, a roper and her horse drag a calf.

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

BRINDLE BUILDS COWBOY SEATS PLATTE COUNTY SADDLE-MAKER KNOWN FOR QUALITY, COMFORT By Pat Mitchell CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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story on the Brindle Saddle Shop was published in this paper a few years ago when Jim Brindle was selected to make a blanket for Cowboy Joe, UW’s mascot. However, that leather blanket was nothing to the more intricate skill this man has – the saddle itself. Walking into his shop on Brookside Road, one instantly knows this man must be good at what he does. There are nine saddles awaiting his repair skills, one new one awaiting a horse, one almost completed, a beautifully tooled piece, as well as numerous other items like the cutest pair of chaps awaiting their buckles for a little girl in Kansas. The building of saddles started when he was young. “My granddad had been in World War II in New Guinea and the Philippines with Al Stohlman (a world-renown leatherworker, author, subject of the Al Stohlman Museum in Fort Worth, Texas). He came to visit and got grandmother started on carving leather,” Brindle said. “She started me carving (tooling leather) when I was about 11.” Lying on the workbench were some beautiful pieces he was working on to add to a saddle in progress. Building a saddle starts with the tree, the base that has to be strong to take the beating of a saddle bronc ride or pulling down a steer. Brindle purchases those already made. Sitting down with the customer, a discussion ensues as to what he wants in his finished product – a low or high cantle, carving or not, Blevins Buckles or laces, a wood post horn (four inches high and four across the cap) or a smaller one, etc. It’s kind of like buying a car, picking out the features wanted in this custommade piece of animal equipment. “The most important thing is that the animal is taken care of. I won’t build a saddle that could hurt the animal,” said Brindle, and he has the experience to know what is good and what is not.

Photo/ Pat Mitchell

Jim Brindle has years of experience working leather and creating saddles.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

BRINDLE continued on page 45

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continued from page 44 Then it’s literally to the drawing board, where a plan for the saddle is designed. Brindle also designs the carving patterns on paper so they fit the piece of leather to be tooled. This job is definitely an art form requiring an eye in a medium that includes a leather mallet, many tools and a strong arm to emboss the leather. “A person has to find his own style, one that works for him,” he said. “Brindle uses high-quality leather that is well-conditioned,” said Marina Hadley, a local roper. The cowhide leather is soaked in water to make it malleable, but the work has to be carefully done so the grain is not broken, thus weakening it. There are curves, especially around the pommel (swell) where the horn is attached, that requires molding the leather. This is definitely a job in which strong hands and patience are needed. Many of the parts have to be sewn. He has four different sewing machines that will sew through the thick leathers he uses. On the workbench was a stack of beautifully stitched leather flank straps almost ready for a local customer, all stitched with the grain of the leather.

If the only project he’s working on is a saddle, he can build one in a week; however, he usually doesn’t have the luxury of working on only one item at a time. From the looks of his display room, he has years worth of work awaiting his skilled hands. It’s obvious this is a man who loves what he does, who knows his business and not just from the “building” side but from the “using” side. He spent many years riding for ranches in Colorado and Wyoming, the last being eight-and-a-half years for True Ranches. Even now, he spends time in the saddle when someone could use his help and he needs to get outside. Pictures on the wall attest to the fact that this man is involved with horses not only in the equipment part, but also in the living that goes with them. As he told about the situations illustrated there and the customers he has, he commented, “I’ve ridden for a lot of ranches in several states, but I’ve seen more good cowboys within 100 miles of this place (Wheatland) than anywhere I’ve ever ridden.” Jim Brindle’s saddles make a cowboy’s horseback job as easy on the horse and the fanny as possible.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

BUDGET AXE NICKS BLM WILDHORSE ADOPTION CENTER CENTER SCALING BACK WEEKEND OPERATIONS TO SAVE MONEY

T

he federal Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) largest wild-horse adoption facility in the country is getting nicked by the budget axe. The Palomino Valley National Wild Horse and Burro Adoption Center, 20 miles north of Reno, is scaling back its weekend operations in a move criticized by horse advocates. The facility, which will remain open on weekdays, will limit its Saturday hours to just mornings on the first Saturday of each month beginning in April. The center is closed Sundays. Anne Novak of California-based Protect Mustangs said most people work during the week, and the move shows the BLM doesn’t care about a successful horse adoption program. The facility serves as the primary preparation center for wild horses and burros

removed from public lands in Nevada and surrounding states. Horses that aren’t adopted are shipped to government-funded

to over half of the roughly 37,000 wild horses that freely roam the West. “Shutting down Saturdays for viewing and

“Th BLM’ “The BLM’s Wild H Horse and dB Burro P Program places l a high priority on increasing adoptions. In fact, it is part of our proposed strategy to increase adoptions from about 3,000 per year to at least 4,000 per year.

BLM spokeswoman Heather Emmons Jasinski pastures in the Midwest, where they spend the rest of their lives under protections afforded them by federal law. Nevada is home

tion program to fail. They sure aren’t making it user-friendly by closing on Saturday.” BLM spokeswoman Heather Emmons Jasinski said Saturdays have seen few adoptions and visitors. Only 10 horses have been adopted at the Palomino Valley site since Oct. 1, she said, and very few of those occurred on Saturdays. The BLM also offers adoptions through the internet and special events across the country. “At this time, (the center) is not fully staffed and is not able to complete the necessary paperwork to adopt horses on every weekend,” Jasinski said. “Additional hours worked during the weekend significantly increase the cost to operate the facility.”

adopting will reduce adoptions and increase the costs to care for the unadopted,” Novak said. “It appears the BLM wants their adop-

BUDGET continued on page 47

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continued from page 46

Annual horse adoptions were down nationwide from 7,700 in 2003 to about 3,000 for various reasons, including the economy, the country’s growing urbanization and a saturated domestic horse market, Jasinski said. “The BLM’s Wild Horse and Burro Program places a high priority on increasing adoptions,” she said. “In fact, it is part of our proposed strategy to increase adoptions from about 3,000 per year to at least

4,000 per year.” Novak maintained the agency is not using the economy as an excuse, saying, “There are still plenty of people buying horses these days.” The BLM said the change was prompted by across-the-board spending cuts, which took effect March 1. Associated Press

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AND A-HUNTING WE WILL GO

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Hunting big game is a pastime throughout Wyoming, Nebraska and the West. For outďŹ tters and individuals that take to the woods, the horse is a pivotal tool for quietly getting into the backcountry, packing out meat after a kill and various other tasks.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | COLUMN

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S IN YOUR HORSEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MOUTH? A HAPPY HORSE STARTS WITH A HAPPY MOUTH: HORSE PACIFIERS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ROLLERS, COPPER AND RUST By Amy K. McLean, Ph.D. CONTRIBUTOR

F

inding the right bit for your horse is a huge key to how successful you are in getting the most out of your horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance. A happy horse starts by being happy with whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in its mouth. There are many options for bits and not all horses like the same mouthpiece in their bit. Granted, sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the bit, but whose hands the bit is in, that can ultimately determine if the horse is responsive or accepting. Generally, good signs that a horse has accepted, or actually approves of, its bit are the way the horse will carry his head and neck as well as relaxing in its jaw. A horse that is â&#x20AC;&#x153;soft,â&#x20AC;? or accepting of the bit, is ďŹ&#x201A;exing at the poll and throat latch, relaxed at the jaw, as well as not mouthing the bit, meaning constantly chewing on the bit or tossing and slinging its head. If one sees his or her horse displaying such behavior, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always a good idea to have your

Amy K. McLean, Ph.D.

Courtesy photos/ Tom Balding Bits and Spurs

Bit Clearwater Mouthpiece Copper Roller.

Bit Mouthpiece Clearwater Ace of Spades Correction Roller. horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teeth checked, as well as consider your horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s equipment such as the bit, the curb (if it has one), etc. A horse that is quiet in the mouth and not displaying any adverse behavior, such as tossing its head and neck, is typically a content horse. Another major sign to look for is if the horse is producing saliva. Various metals used to make bits, such as cooper or sweet iron, will help increase saliva

production in your horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mouth. This is a good sign the horse is responding positively to the bit, not a sign a horse has been administered a pharmacological agent to relax or produce extra saliva. Increased saliva production will increase the effectiveness of the bit to properly roll and rotate in the horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mouth. So, what type of bit does your horse wear?

MOUTH continued on page 51

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MOUTH continued from page 50

Courtesy photos/ Tom Balding Bits and Spurs

Bit Mouthpiece Cathedral A Correction Roller Copper inlay. If your mouthpiece is shiny and the color of silver then it’s probably not sweet iron or cooper. A shiny silver colored bit is more than likely stainless steel or a combination of metals. Many bits are made of stainless because it stays shiny and is thus appealing to many horsemen due to its appearance. Another metal that is some times used is aluminum and generally associated with a more economy type bit. Some horseman do use bits made of rubber or synthetic materials. Such bits may be used to start young horses, but the rubber can provoke a horse to “chew on the bit” and this is something one should avoid.

A sweet iron bit or mouthpiece will generally be brown in color and, over time, will even rust, which is a positive thing. Most horsemen prefer a sweet iron or cooper mouthpiece as the horse finds these most palatable. Most of your bits that are made of such materials like cooper or sweet iron will not be inexpensive. The cost of copper and special metals are continually rising, but, remember, you get what you pay for, especially when it comes to bits. Many bit makers design bits to encourage a horse to be more accepting of the bit by adding mouth pieces that help the horse to stay quiet in mouth, as well as prevent the horse from wanting to put its tongue over the bit. Such mouthpieces may include a port that has a roller. Most often the rollers are made of either copper or sweet iron. The roller aides in the production of saliva, as well as keep the horse occupied inside its mouth, allowing for the horse to relax and accept the bit. Rollers are often seen in traditional cathedral bits, but, keep in mind, the roller itself does not affect the severity of the bit. The same is true for the port. A taller port may or may not be as harsh as a lower port or even a snaffle in the wrong hands. Ideally, we want to keep the horse comfortable

and accepting of the bit. Some of the first types of pacifiers for horses were keys that were added to bits. The keys simply hung from the center of the mouthpiece and helped increase saliva production, as well as acceptance. The mouthpiece of the bit can help the horse respond to the bit from calming a nervous tongue to making the horse softer in its jaw. When selecting a bit for your horse, consider the size of your horse’s mouth, the level of training your horse has, the rules for the event you are using your horse for and, last but not least, consider purchasing a handmade bit that’s custom to your horse’s need. A happy horse starts with what’s in its mouth!

Tom Balding Bits & Spurs Mouthpieces Correction with roller.

Dr. Amy McLean is an equine lecturer and equine extension specialist with the University of Wyoming. This article is sponsored by Tom Balding Bits and Spurs (http://www.tombalding.com). All photos are provided by Tom Balding Bits and Spurs and are intended for the sole use in this article.

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UPCOMING ISSUES:

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All Breeds, All Disciplines! Local Horseman & Facility Features | Event Coverage | Equine News Business Pro¿le | Calendar of Events | Regular Editorial Columns | Classi¿eds DISTRIBUTION Equine Enthusiast is produced locally and distributed quarterly to feed/tack stores,event facilities, hotels, fairgrounds and other equine related businesses. It is also packaged with The Business Farmer, a weekly specialty publication that covers agricultural issues in eastern Wyoming and the Nebraska panhandle, and available at the Wyoming State Fair in Douglas, Cheyenne Frontier Days and numerous county fairs. (12,000 copies total, each issue)

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KINDNESS RANCH: A SANCTUARY SAN FOR RESEARCH ANIMALS

BRED TO RUN, RACE ACE AND BARREL 7 LAZY K RANCH QUARTER HORSES BOASTS SOME OF THE NATION’S FINEST

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ar out, on the edge of Sublette County, even out past the edge of the small town of Boulder, is a ranch that, come early next spring, will welcome four registered racing quarter or paint horses into the world. The small breeding outfit of 7 Lazy K Quarter Horses is, despite its size, home to children of some of the nation’s top moneymakers in the field of racing and barrel racing. The stud in residence is Dashing Move Fame, whose sire, Dash Ta Fame, was a barrel champion that produced millions of dollars in race earnings. Two of this spring’s foals will be Dashing’s, and owner, operator, breeder, trainer and all-around head honcho Heather Wells said she is already looking forward to meeting the young ones and gauging their potential. This has been Wells’ first year breeding Dashing, although she and her partner Bill Kelly have been breeding racing and barrel horses for eight years. Dashing’s previous offspring were too young to race the 2011 season, so no one will know how his progeny will perform until the 2012 season starts May 1. But Dashing’s bloodline is solid. His father, grandfather and great-grandfather, as well as his grandmother and great-grandmother, all have speed indexes over 100. A speed index of more than 80 earns a horse recognition for merit. Wells and Kelly are among the more than 100 performance breeders in Sublette and Sweetwater counties, and Wells said they are much smaller than many of the other breeders. “We do it for the fun of it,” she said. “We may make some supplemental income, and the horses we sell typically cover our expenses.” But it’s clear by the smile in her eyes it’s the love of it that keeps her going. It’s a lot of work monitoring mares to determine when they’re in heat, conducting the breeding and then monitoring mares to see if they’re in foal, not to mention raising foals from birth to when they are released into pasture. Kelly

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B

efore coming to the Kindness Ranch, RayAnne, a tall thoroughbred, was not adoptable. The mare had been used in research and had behavior problems and no manners. Today, she is able to run free through a pasture with other horses in rural southeast Wyoming. The once ill-mannered RayAnne now has good manners, thanks to the new culture that surrounds her. RayAnne’s story is just one of the Kindness Ranch’s success stories. Located near Hartville, the Kindness Ranch American Sanctuary For Research Animals is a 1,000-acre ranch that takes in all kinds of animals formerly used in research. Dr. David Groobman founded the sanctuary, which opened in the summer of 2007. Groobman dedicated 10 years of planning to the sanctuary. Ranch manager David Sleeper said Kindness Ranch staff members are not animal activists. “Our job is to provide the research laboratories a wonderful alternative to euthanasia,” he said. In order to do that, the Kindness Ranch fosters a working relationship with the researchers. While at the Kindness Ranch, animals

Courtesy photo

Dashing Move Fame is the stud for Heather Wells’ 7 Lazy K Quarter Horses outside of Boulder. works out of town much of the time, and many of these tasks are left to Wells. Mares are monitored with an ultrasound machine Wells has at the ranch. Images can tell her when mares are beginning their fertility cycle, to give Wells as much time as possible to administer the artifi cial insemination to impregnate them. The ultrasound can also tell when fertilization has occurred, even before there’s a heartbeat. The day-in, day-out work comes once the foals are born. “It’s a lot for one person to halterbreak, trim the hooves and pick up the feet of all the foals every day,” she said, explaining part of the routine to get the newborns accustomed to being around people. But when the foals aren’t being handled, they’re running around the paddocks, bucking and carrying on like the ability to walk was their own personal discovery, which, in a way, it was.

After 11 months and two weeks growing slowly in a mare, foals are born and able to walk within hours. It’s not the most graceful walk, as their legs unfold from nearly a year curled beneath them. But they figure out what it means to be a horse. Soon enough though, they’re walking and running – then racing. If Wells can’t fi nd buyers for her foals, she’ll keep them and race them when they’re a year old, with the hopes of selling them as finished racehorses. Unlike thoroughbreds, who race between 3/4 and 1 1/2 miles, quarter horses typically run between 300 and 400 yards, around one quarter of a mile – hence the name. Wells takes her horses to Idaho to ce, where there are fi five race, ve tracks. The ock Springs track recently opened, and Rock shee said she’s looking forward to doing me racing closer to home. But Idaho some n’t that bad, she said, when compared isn’t

to traveling to Oklahoma to race her paint horses. Quarter and paint horses belong to different associations, so their races are separate, although the races themselves are similar. When their racing career is over, Wells’ horses transition into running barrels, and this is where Dashing’s bloodline emerges to take center stage. Wells said in the barrelracing world, Dash Ta Fame is a household name, and often all the promotion needed to get Dashing’s name recognized. And with that should come demand for breeding opportunities. That’s all the more so, since Wells is keeping the stud fee at $650, when most performance stud fees exceed $1,000. g , though, g , when That mayy change, Dashing’s potential, as realized through his offspring, is recognized. If his foals do well next season, Wells and Kelly may not be doing this all just for fun anymore.

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

– which include horses, dogs, cats, sheep and pigs – are rehabilitated in a homelike environment. Though Sleeper says he doesn’t consider himself a horse whisperer, he has a philosophy that has allowed him to form relationships with once untrusting animals. The more afraid an animal is, the more powerful and “permanent” is the response to his techniques. Although the philosophy is given in much better detail when Sleeper relays it to visitors at the Kindness Ranch, the bottom line is that animals mimic our behavior. If a human shows respect by using certain listening and intuiting techniques, coupled with an unwillingness to enter in to the animal’s “zone of intimacy” unless invited, the fearful animal becomes attracted like a magnet to this energetic safety exhibited by the human. The human basically focuses on evolving themselves to their higher form with no agenda and the animal amazingly is attracted and mimics that behavior. The fearful animal ends up being the instigator and choreographer of the deep bonding on an energetic level that emerges. Techniques then follow which encourage non-impulsive thinking behavior with the resulting boost in self esteem. Sleeper said that he can’t tell who is the

Members of the Kindness Ranch are welcome to stay in “yurts” while visiting. For more information on visiting the ranch, visit www.kindnessranch.org.

| FEATURE

Photos by Amber Ningen

Horses at the Kindness Ranch roam a pasture on a sunny October morning. The Kindness Ranch is made up of 1,000 acres. lead mare at the Kindness Ranch. “They all have manners, squabbles are rare and the pecking order seems to be non-existant,” he said. The former lead mare now has the most manners and perhaps the others are following her lead. In RayAnne’s case, the thoroughbred had been getting treats and sweet feed before coming to the Kindness Ranch and she was ill mannered towards people and equines. Sleeper’s idea is that having a relationship with an animal’s stomach leads to impulsive and addictive behavior with poor manners. Whereas relating the heart and mind encourages thinking and evolving and good manners. Sleeper said the 15 horses at the Kind-

ness Ranch now have their own culture that is based on manners and thinking. When a new horse arrives like RayAnne, instead of pecking order battle, the whole herd helps her to leave her impulsiveness behind and become a thinker with manners. “This sounds so strange and impossible until one sees it in action. It is a very rewarding for us folks to see animals that were subject to the trials of research end up living harmoniously with high selfesteem in a Wyoming paradise,” he said. The Kindness Ranch welcomes visitors. It offers well-appointed cabins for its members to stay in while visiting. For more information on the Kindness Ranch, visit kindnessranch.org.

Ranch Manager David Sleeper demonstrates his First Lite technique on Stormy.

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Published by News Media Corporation | FALL 2011

FALL 2011 | Published by News Media Corporation

21

FRONTIER DAYS FINALIST FOR ARENA VET NAMED PRCA AWARD DR. NORM SWAN SON KNOWS A THING OR TWO ABOU T BIG-TIME RODE

OS

STAFF REPORT

serving of this award, which makes he Professiona the job of the l Rodeo Cowselection committee boys Association very difficult,” said Doug Corey, is proud to announce the DVM, Pro Rodeo Hall of Famer sen out of a stellar five finalists choand chairman of the fi PRCA Animal for the 2011 “PRCA eld of nominees Welfare Committee Veterinarian of “It is an honor the Year Award,” to be associated with presented by Purina. such The field includes group of veterinarya distinguish ed profession son of Cheyenne, Dr. Norm Swanals that advocate for the welfare nated by Cheyennewho was nomirodeo livestock.” of Frontier Days Rodeo officials. The original field of 16 nominees The 2011 recipient was narrowed to these five will be announced in late distinguished veterinarian October and will s: honored at the be ■ Dr. Joseph PRCA Contract Coli, Reno, Nev.; Personnel Banquet nominated by Wednesday, Nov. the Reno Rodeo in Las Vegas, 30, and Bob Feist and Wrangler National during the 53rd ■ Dr. Garth Lamb, Finals Rodeo SatLas Vegas, Nev.; urday, Dec. 3, nominated by 2011, at the Thomas Shawn Davis Mack Center in & ■ Dr. Norm Swanson, Las Vegas. Cheyenne; The award was nominated by created in 2010 Cheyenne Frontier recognize dedication to Days Rodeo to the health and welfare of ■ Dr. Jake Wells, rodeo livestock San Antonio, veterinarian s across by Tex.; nominated the country. The by the San Antonio award is made Stock Show & possible by a partnerRodeo ship with Purina ■ Dr. Wes Mills to sponsor Wittman, Sonora, the award. Calif.; nominated by the Mother “Every nominee Lode Roundup is absolutely deRodeo and Tuolumne County Sheriff’s Posse

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ABOUT DR. NORM SWANSO

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Swanson has served as the arena son veterinaria n for has been an active the Cheyenne member Frontier Days of the contestants for 42 committee in years. In this capacity,consecutive Cheyenne for more than 40 years, he has coordinated with the general com- volunteering his time to ensure the mittee, the contestants contestants and hired personnel chairman, at PRCA judges and stock contrac- Cheyenne are taken care of during tors to oversee their stay. His the health and care the committee involvemen t with of all livestock has been on-site during the event. Cheyenne on providing immediate focused had nearly attention medical 1,700 competitors to animals if this year and needed. the rodeo lasted “I have personally twelve days with witnessed Dr. nine sections of slack and nine Norm Swanson’s dedication to the performances. The sport of rodeo. He is extremely total number of livestock exceeded qualified for this award,” said 4,000. SwanPRCA stock contractor Harry Vold.

$198 ea Dr. Norm Swanson

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‘The Daddy of ‘em

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All’ for 42 years.

Days Rodeo

| FALL 2011

WILD

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST | FEATURE

continued from page 46

EQUINE ENTHUSIA ST

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WILD HORSES: A SYMBOL OF THE AMERICAN WEST THE LARGEST NUMBER OF WYOMING’S WILD HORSES ARE IN THE SOUTHWEST By Virginia Giorgis STAFF WRITER

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yoming boasts the second largest wild horse herd in the nation, second only to Nevada. Wild horses are symbols of the West – they are untamed spirits and have free range on a wide-open landscape. Today’s wild horses are descendants of horses brought to the United States by the Spanish, as well as horses subsequently turned out by ranchers or led away by the wild horse herds. As of February, there were 5,333 wild horses in Wyoming, according to June Wendlandt, Wyoming’s BLM wild horse and burro program lead. Currently, the number of wild horses is around 2,000 head over the projected management level, which is set at between 2,490 and 3,725 horses.

The wild horses are regulated under the Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act of 1971. The act sets guidelines for maintaining the wild horses and their forage. “We have healthy horses in Wyoming, and we want to keep it that way,” Wendlandt said. Wild horses differ from domestic horses, as they have naturally bred for survival in the wild countryside. They are more compact and have thicker, sturdier legs to carry them over the open ranges. Wendlandt said a large part of management requirements for wild horses is determined by the vegetation and forage on BLM land. She explained the BLM is a multiple-use agency, so the land they manage is divided into multiple purposes, such as wildlife, wild horses, livestock and recreation. BLM analyzes the “amount and type of forage and divides it into pieces of the pie.”

Courtesy of BLM

BLM Wyoming Herd Management Areas (HMAs) for 2011.

Wild horses are found in Wyoming on the western half of the state from as far north as the Cody area to the state’s southern border. Wendlandt said wild horses in Wyoming are managed in 16 management areas, with the largest number of wild horses in the southwest. Wild horses can be seen from I-80 as motorists drive across the western portion of the state. There are Courtesy photos of BLM also a number of wild horses in the Some of the scenes of the horses living in the wild make for worthRed Desert area. while touring.

FINDING WILD HORSES Courtesy of BLM

Pilot Butte Wild Horse Scenic Tour.

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The two easiest places to view wild horses are in the Pryor Mountains outside Lovell and in southwest Wyoming, near Rock Springs. A loop tour has even been developed near Rock Springs, known as

the Pilot Butte Wild Horse Scenic Loop Tour. The area is easily accessible and is on the top of Pilot Butte, which lies on the east side of Rock Springs. The 24-mile self-guided tour can begin

WILD continued on page 47 FALL 2011 | Published by News Media Corporation

in either Green River or Rock Springs. Travelers should plan on about 1 1/2 hours to complete the tour, most of which is on gravel roads. “It is a good tour to take,” Wendlandt said, “and most likely the wild horses will be there.” Another sizable herd is in the Adobe Town area, south of I-80 near Rock Springs. The Pryor Mountain Wild Mustang Center features a museum. Visitors can learn about the horses there, as well as the current location of the herd before driving out to locate it. Another benefit is often the sighting of other wildlife in the area. Wild horse management tools include a count of the herds, maintaining the forage, roundups and adoptions, and managing the reproduction of the herds, Wendlandt said. Other management tools for the wild horses include “gathering and removing excess horses, treating the mares with PZP – a form of birth control which prevents the mares from breeding for two years – and adjusting the ratio of the released horses so more males are released than females. That helps maintain a slower growth rate of the herd so the time between round ups can be lengthened, Wendlandt said. Another option that has been considered has been spaying mares and neutering studs. This option has been sidelined until it can be determined what its impact would be on geldings being released back into the herds.

ADOPTING WILD HORSES

Roundups are conducted periodically if the wild horse numbers are deemed too large. The gathered horses are then put up for adoption. To adopt, applications must be submitted by interested parties that contain many specific, including what type of trailer will be used to pick up a horse, and what type of pen will be employed. Requirements include maintaining a fence six feet or higher, a 20by-20 foot enclosure constructed of substantial pipe or wood and connected to a shelter of at least 12by-12 feet. Such specifications are required because most of the ad-

Published by News Media Corporation | FALL 2011

opted horses are “untouched,” or have had little training, though some of the adopted horses may be halter or saddle broken. In Wyoming, the process runs through the spring and summer, though in other states the adoption process is handled year-round. The corrals in southwest Wyoming were closed Sept. 30. There were 128 horses adopted in Wyoming this year, Wendlandt said. The aim is to have 2,000 to 3,000 wild horses adopted nationwide; these numbers were not met this year. Wendlandt blamed the lower adoption rate on the weak economy. “It is hard for people to think about feeding a horse,” Wendlandt suggested, “when they are thinking about feeding their family.” Wild horses have been adopted by a wide variety of individuals. Some are retirees who want to trail ride, others are younger p e o p l e who need a good working horse for their ranch. Others just wa n t to pleasure ride. W i l d horses, Wendlandt said, are “very versatile and

can do almost anything.” She added a wild horse was “the best horse I ever had. She would wait for me to get home from school. I could catch her with no halter, no lead line, and ride her to the house” after Wendlantdt got off the bus from school.

MUSTANG DAYS

A prime wild horse-related event in Wyoming is Mustang Days. The event is held in conjunction with the Mustang Heritage Foundation, a non-profit group. The event was most recently held at the Wyoming State Fair Aug. 16-20, and included competitors as young as 5 years old showing their wild horses. Competitions consisted of mustang owners competing in things like halter, trail courses, western pleasure and freestyle, which can include a theatrical bent. Cheyenne resident Kathi Wilson’s performance with her wild horse was “so cool,” Wendlandt said. Wilson “laid her horse down on the ground. It was done to music, and then she got on and road bareback.” Another important part of Mustang Days is the competition between wild horse trainers. Members of the Honor Farm at Riverton work with some of the wild horses before they are adopted. Also, three members of the Mantle Wild Horse Training Facility competed against one another. The horses have been trained anywhere from 20 days to a year. Jeff Martin of the Honor Farm earned the belt buckle for being the best trainer. The adoption rate was 20 out of 20 – 18 horses and two burros – at the Mustang Days. Wendlandt credited this to the fun and excitement of the event, which made others want to participate next year.

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout: Oncorhynchus clarki bouvieri

Snake River Cutthroat Trout: Oncorhynchus clarki behnkei

As you travel around the great state of Wyoming this summer, we hope you’ll get to know the natives. Conserving and protecting Wyoming’s coldwater fisheries and their watersheds. That’s what we do. Join us.

Bonneville Cutthroat Trout: Oncorhynchus clarki utah

Colorado Cutthroat Trout: Oncorhynchus clarki pleuriticus

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250 North 1st Street • Lander, WY 82520 307.332.7700 • www.wyomingtu.org

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EQUIPMENT AUTOMOTIVE WOLF PINEDALE DODGE Everything from Recreational to Heavy Duty, Best Deals Guaranteed! 307-367-3880 Reganis Auto Center Great deals on a New or Used vehicles. Full-service Service Department 2006 E Overland, Scottsbluff, NE 69361 (308) 632-8200 Tons of trucks in stock.at Cowboy Dodge in Cheyenne. Work trucks, trucks with towing power to get you and your horses to your next show, rodeo, or competition. CowboyDodge.com, 307-634-5887. Big Sky Ford Ford, Lincoln Dealership No Reasonable Offer Will Be Refused. 1209 East M Street Torrington, Wyoming 307-532-2114 or 888-532-2114 Trucks & Trailers Laramie Ford 3609 Grand Ave Laramie, WY 82070 307-745-7315 We offer Featherlite Trailers Ask us about our special truck & trailer combo pricing

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MISCELLANEOUS Memorial Hospital of Converse County Advanced Medicine Hometown Care 111 South 5th Street Douglas, WY 82633 Tel: 307-358-2122 www.conversehospital.com Eastern Wyoming College 3200 West C Street Torrington, WY 82240 1-866-327-8996 ewc.wy.edu Sheridan College 3059 Coffeen Avenue Sheridan, WY 82801 800.913.9139 Sheridan.edu

GET THE WORD OUT! Join the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST EVENT CALENDAR! Submit a short description of your club, business or organization’s event for our calendar. Be sure to include relevant dates, times, locations and contact information. Email your event to: Megan at: mrawlins@ EquineEnthusiast.com

REAL ESTATE Wyoming West Realty “Your Real Estate Professionals” 40 S. Wyoming Guernsey WY 82214 307-836-2222 www.wyomingrealty.com

Benedict’s Market Nature Intended Produce 950 North Highway 414

FARRIER SERVICES

Do you want a flat broke horse?

Farrier Services Experienced Horse Shoeing. Local, Reliable, Affordable. Shoeing all classes of horses in Northern Wyoming. Call Clint at 307-254-4410

Offering training services for all classes and ages of horses and mules, with an emphasis on building a trusting and trustworthy equine partner.

Flat Broke Performance Horses Sarah Barton, Trainer, Upton, WY (307)290-0027 or flat_broke_horses@hotmail.com

HORSE BOARDING

Larame L. Pope Financial Representative 152 N Durbin St Ste 404 Casper, WY 82601

307.473.7070 office 307.267.3013 cellular 207.473.8006 fax

larame.pope@nmfn.com www.nmfn.com/laramepop

Horse Boarding Horse Leasing

ADVERTISE IN THE CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE! EQUIPMENT • TACK • HORSES FOR SALE/LEASE TRAILERS/ TRACTORS/ TRUCKS RENTAL PROPERTIES • BOARDING FACILITIES

Full Care or Overnight Stays Trailer Storage Riding Lessons

LINE ADS FOR ONLY $15 DISPLAY ADS FOR ONLY $25 EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CALL 307-532-2184 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Horseshoe 7 Ranch bavicky@aol.com

se H o u Horse

Trader

Terry Kimbrel

Realtor®®

of

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Cell 307-575-5669 Website: www.buywyo.com

Local Horseman & Facility Features | Event Coverage | Equine News Business Pro¿le | Calendar of Events | Regular Editorial Columns | Classi¿eds Equine Enthusiast is produced locally and distributed quarterly to feed/tack stores,event facilities, hotels, fairgrounds and other equine related businesses. It is also packaged with The Business Farmer, a weekly specialty publication that covers agricultural issues in eastern Wyoming and the Nebraska panhandle, and available at the Wyoming State Fair in Douglas, Cheyenne Frontier Days and numerous county fairs. (12,000 copies total, each issue) ™

All Breeds, All Disciplines! 56

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

Equine Enthusiast is also available online at www.EquineEnthusiast.com and on Facebook: Facebook.com/ equineenthusiastmagazine Looking to expand your coverage even more? Ask about our Equine Enthusiast publications in Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico and California.

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE Brannan’s Homes LTD Deliver in 4 states: NE, WY, CO, SD 1520 East Overland Scottsbluff, NE 69361 308-632-3422 fax: 308-632-3019

SADDLES AND TACK Balding Bits and Spurs Hand Crafted Bits and Spurs Made in America www.tombalding.com 307-672-8459

Kings Saddlery Ropes & Museum King Ropes 184 N. Main Sheridan, WY 82801 1-800-446-8919 1-307-672-2702 Fax 1-307-672-5235

307-472-1872

RESTAURANT Coffee Cup Fuel Stop Open 24/365 Easy in and out for Big Rigs Moorcroft, WY 307-756-3493

City Shoe & Saddle Shop “YOUR ONE STOP WORK AND WESTERN SHOP” Boot Repair, Western Wear Horse Tack Jewelry, Buckles & Knives, Boots & Shoes 104 N 2nd Street Douglas WY 82633

RIDING LESSONS Riding Lessons Have just completed the Western Dressage Association of America ™ Train-the-Trainers Certification program. Offering single and group lessons, clinics and schooling shows. Improve your riding skills, hands, seat and balance. For more info call: 307-780-4750

Sheridan Leather 2047 Coffeen Avenue, Sheridan, WY (307) 674-6679 www.sheridanleather.com Wild Man Riggins Custom Built Chaps Larry Sandvick Kaycee, Wyoming Shop 307-738-2608 Cell 307-696-2882

GET RESULTS! Advertise in the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CLASSIFIEDS! Line ad classifieds for only $15! Display ad classifieds with color photos for only $25! Call 307-532-2184 and ask for Jeanie at jwright@EquineEnthusiast.com to get more information or to place your ad TODAY!

Probst Western Full line of: Tack, workwear, cowboy boots, clothing and jewelry. Visit Probst Western and Outdoor Clothing Co in Greybull, Wyoming. Visit us online at www.probstwesternstore.com

TRUCKING SERVICES

Frannie Tack Quality Tack at a Great Price. Full Service Repair Shop. Custom saddles and gear. More than 100 saddles in stock! The Frannie Tack Shop - 58 Lane 2 1/2 in Frannie, Wy 307-8662344 or 800-552-8836

GET THE WORD OUT! Join the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST EVENT CALENDAR! Email your equine-related

STEEL BUILDINGS Morton Buildings, Inc. High-quality, post-frame or “timber-frame” structures. 190810 Highway 26 Scottsbluff, NE 69361 (308) 635-2414

Moss Saddles, Boots & Tack Most Major Brands of Tack Plus a Whole Lot More 4648 W Yellowstone Hwy Casper, WY

Wyoming West Realty Marci Barker, Owner/Broker

Jody Garver, Assoc. Broker

P.O. Box 881 Buffalo, WY 82834

Phone: 307.836.2222 Fax: 307.836.2226 wyomingwestrealty@wyoming.com

40 S. Wyoming/P.O. Box 490, Assoc. Broker Guernsey, Wyoming 82214 www.wyomingwestrealty.com

Eldon Garver,

Repairs, tack, leather products, cowboy gear and unique gifts!

event to Megan at: mrawlins@EquineEnthusiast.com

Bryan Pickeral (307)217-0451

UTILITIES/SERVICES

SR Express/ Trucking Hauling Hay and Cattle Garrett Smith Lusk, Wy 307-334-3333 cell 307-340-1751

Ferrellgas better prices and best service, call today for no fees/one price propane. 307-276-3944 For all your Farm and Ranch needs call the professionals at Burns Insurance Agency. 307634-5757

ADVERTISE IN THE CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE! EQUIPMENT • TACK • HORSES FOR SALE/LEASE TRAILERS/ TRACTORS/ TRUCKS RENTAL PROPERTIES • BOARDING FACILITIES

LINE ADS FOR ONLY $15 DISPLAY ADS FOR ONLY $25 EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CALL 307-532-2184 FOR MORE INFORMATION

Full Line Of: r5BDLr8PSLXFBS r$PXCPZ#PPUT r$MPUIJOH If Not Corraled in Ten Days Return to r+FXFMSZ Probst Western and www.probstwesternstore.com

Outdoor Clothing Co

(SFZCVMM"WFOVF (SFZCVMM 8ZPNJOHr&TUBCMJTIFE

Work Western & Outdoor Apparel Shoes, Boots, Gift Items Western Jewelry, Knives Shoe Repair

Jim & Nancy Young (307) 358-2734 104 N. 2nd Street Douglas, WY 82633

OPE6N5 24/3

CITY SHOE & SADDLE SHOP

A Better Understanding is Coming...

Horsemanship Clinic with

Chris Ellsworth

May 4 & 5 Scottsbluff, NE

Easy In And Out For Big Rigs Hot Stuff Pizza • Deli Depot Moorcroft, WY

307 756-3493

Published by News Media Corporation | SPRING 2013

All Breeds, All Disciplines! Equine Enthusiast is also available online at www. EquineEnthusiast.com and on Facebook: Facebook.com/ equineenthusiastmagazine

SUMMER

2 0 12

FREE

10-day dedicat ion to history

WYOMING/NEB RASKA PANHANDLE EDITIO N

For More Info:

307-575-6674 chearthorses@yahoo.com www.chearthorses.com

Local Horseman & Facility Features | Event Coverage Equine News | Business Pro¿le | Calendar of Events Regular Editorial Columns | Classi¿eds

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

57


EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

CLASSIFIED MARKETPLACE We welcome our readers to submit editorial on achievements, milestones, local equestrian stories and organizations! Do you know a local horse person who deserves to be Equine Enthusiast’s featured local horseman/woman of the year? Please feel free to contact us with any comments or suggestions to help EQUINE E N T H U S I A S T best suit YOUR needs!

Trendsetters: High speed, low cost satellite internet. Local providers for: HughesNet, DISH NETWORK and DIRECTV trendst77@yahoo.com for more info

Harnish Veterinary Services “Quality Veterinary Services For Large & Small Animals” Laser Surgery Boarding 172 W Frontage Rd Wheatland WY 82201 Tel: 307-322-3751

VETERINARY SERVICES Casper Animal Medical Center Veterinary Services 4700 S. Valley Road Casper, WY 82604 307-237-8387 Western Skies Veterinary Services, LLC Dr. Jared Sare, large animal exclusive, full-line of livestock supplies and vaccine. 307-367-3185 Pinedale, Wy Laramie Peak Veterinary Associates Steve Lucas, D.V.M. John Koger,D.V.M. Brenda Unrein, D.V.M. Large & Small Animal Practice Hills Prescription Diets & Pet Food Grooming & Boarding Available 28 West Frontage Road Wheatland, WY 82201 Tel: 307-322-3640

Goshen Veterinary Clinic Inc. Veterinary Services 4548 US Hwy 26/85 Torrington, WY 307-532-4195 Animal Clinic of Pinedale, Equine and Small Animals-Medicine, Surgery, Equine Reproduction, Acupuncture, Hospitalization, and Boarding. 307-367-4752 GET RESULTS! Advertise in the EQUINE ENTHUSIAST CLASSIFIEDS! Line ad classifieds for only $15! Display ad classifieds with color photos for only $25! Call 307-532-2184 and ask for Jeanie at jwright@EquineEnthusiast.com to get more information or to place your ad TODAY!

Quality veterinary services available for large & small animals Harnish Veterinary Services 172 West Frontage Road Wheatland, WY 82201 Office 307-322-3751 Cekk 307-241-0011

Travis Pearson

Dr. Daniel Harnish, DVM

July!

307-532-2184 tpearson@EquineEnthusiast.com 307-532-2184

58

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


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Published by News Media Corporation | SPRING 2013

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

59


EVENT CALENDAR APRIL

■ Ed Wright Barrel Clinic, April 12-14 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds in Marbleton.

■ Jackpot #10 Handicap Team Roping, April 28 at the Sweetwater Events Complex in Rock Springs.

■ Pat Wyse Horsemanship Clinic, May 15-19 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds.

■ Tuesdays and Fridays, Team Roping at the Sweetwater Events Complex in Rock Springs.

For more information, call Shelly McAdams at (307) 360-7002.

For more information, call (307) 350-8292.

For more information, contact Dari at (307) 231-5978.

For more information, call (307) 350-8292.

■ Thar’s Ranch Sorting, April 13 at the Cam-Plex in Gillette.

■ Tuesdays, Barrel Racing at the Sweetwater Events Complex in Rock Springs. For more information, call Vicky Taylor at (307) 389-4778. ■ Wednesdays, Sweetwater Ranch Sort at the Sweetwater Events Complex in Rock Springs. For more information, call Carol Fritzier at (307) 389-4064. ■ Beginners Horse Progress Show, April 7 at the Cam-Plex in Gillette.

For more information, call Stacey Thar at (307) 682-0149. ■ Spring Series Barrel Race, April 13-14 at the Sweetwater Events Complex in Rock Springs. For more information, call Landa Guio at (307) 260-3007.

For more information, call Ty Yost at (208) 863-4310.

For more information, call Trudy Slagowski at (307) 350-8660.

For more information, call (307) 350-8292.

■ Powder Basin Equestrian Association Clinic and Show, April 20-21 at the Cam-Plex in Gillette.

GET YOUR EVENT IN THE

For more information, call Teresa Craig at (307) 682-9429.

60

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 733-5289.

For more information, call Bobby Harris at (605) 870-0228.

■ Jackpot #10 Handicap Team Roping, April 7 at the Sweetwater Events Complex in Rock Springs.

GET THE WORD OUT! Submit a short description of your club, business or organization’s event for our calendar. Be sure to include relevant dates, times, locations and contact information. E-mail your event to: tpearson@EquineEnthusiast.com

■ Bar S Bar Rodeo Series, Thursdays 6-10 p.m. at the Teton County Fairgrounds.

■ Bobby Harris Roping School, April 13-14 at the Cam-Plex in Gillette.

For more information, call the 4-H Office at (307) 682-7281.

EVENT CALENDAR

MAY

■ Team Roping – National All Amateurs, May 4-5, Cam-Plex in Gillette, 9 a.m. - 10 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday in the East Pavillion.

■ High School Rodeo Cutting, Barrel Race, April 19-21 at the Sweetwater Events Complex in Rock Springs.

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST™

■ Teton Equestrian Club, May 17-18, Teton County Fairgrounds.

■ Wyoming Junior Rodeo Finals with Wyoming High School Rodeo, April 26-28 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds in Marbleton.

■ Bits and Spurs Horse Show, May 4-5 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds.

For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 733-5289. ■ Wrangler Roping, May 1719, Teton County Fairgrounds Heritage Arena, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 733-5289. ■ Jackson Hole Rendezvous Rodeo, May 25, Teton County Fairgrounds, outdoor arena and Heritage Arena, noon to 11 p.m. For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 733-5289.

■ 11th Annual Outfitters Memorial Weekend Team Roping, May 25-26 at the Sublette For entry information, contact Stuart County Fairgrounds. Thompson at (307) 360-8273. ■ Gillette High School Rodeo, May 10-12, Cam-Plex Morningside Park.

For more information, contact Todd Stevie at (307) 367-6507.

For more information, call Michelle Beck at (307) 680-4253.

■ 351 Productions Cowgirl Classic Barrel Jackpot, May 25-26 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds.

■ Spring Series Barrel Race, May 11-12, Sweetwater Events Complex.

For more information, visit www.351productions.com

■ Race for Dreams Barrel Race, April 26-28 at the Cam-Plex in Gillette.

■ Thar’s Ranch Sorting, May 1112, Cam-Plex East Pavillion.

■ Cowboy States Reining Horse Association Energy City Classic and Derby Horse Show, May 30 to June 2, Cam-Plex East Pavillion, beginning at 8 a.m. daily.

For more information, call Tanya Jolovich at (307) 686-8075.

For more information, contact Stacy Thar at (307) 685-0149.

For more information, contact Barbara Stugart at (307) 682-0552.

For more information, contact Landa Guio at (307) 260-3007.

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


EVENT CALENDAR ■ National Cutting Horse Association Days Area 4 (Montana & Wyoming) May 31 to June 2 at the Sublette County Fairgrounds. For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 749-3546.

■ Ranch Roping, June 7, Sublette County Fairgrounds. For more information, contact Todd Stevie at (307) 367-6207. ■ SWEAT Horse Show, June 8, Sweetwater Events Complex, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.

JUNE ■ Sublette County Barrel Racers Club Barrel Jackpot, Wednesdays at the Sublette County Fairgrounds. Time only at 6 p.m., races at 7 p.m. For more information and to enter, contact Jessie at (307) 260-5266. ■ Campbell County Cowboys/ Cowgirls, Thursdays at the Wrangler Arena, Cam-Plex, 6:30-10 p.m. For more information, contact Paula O’Connell (307) 687-0566. ■ Teton County Fairgrounds Rodeo Series, Saturdays at the Teton County Fairgrounds. For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 733-5289. ■ 4-H Horse Judging Contest, June 2, 8 a.m. to noon at the Wrangler Arena, Cam-Plex.

■ Turn-It-Up Productions Barrel Jackpot, June 29, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sublette County Fairgrounds. For more information, contact Shelly at (307) 360-7002.

For more information, call 307-362-5099.

JULY

■ Select Gelding Sale, June 8, Sublette County Fairgrounds.

■ Campbell County Cowgirls/ Cowboys, Thursdays (excepting July 4), 6:30-10 p.m., Cam-Plex Wrangler Arena.

For more information, contact Todd Stevie at (307) 367-6507. ■ 4-H Horse Progress Show, June 9 and 30, Wrangler Arena, Cam-Plex, noon to 7 p.m. For more information, contact the 4-H Extension Office at (307) 682-7281.

For more information, contact Paula O’Connell at (307) 687-0566. ■ Teton County F airgrounds rodeos, July 3-6, 10, 12-13, 17, 20 and 31. For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 733-5289.

■ Red Desert Futurity Barrel Race, June 14 - 16, Sweetwater Events ■ Chuckwagon Days Lil’ Buckaroo Complex, beginning at Rodeo, July 3, Sublette County 9 a.m. daily. Fairgrounds Lance Kopenhafer Arena, 6 p.m. For more information, contact Landa Guio at (307) 260-3007. For more information call Chuckwagon officials at ■ Holmes Rodeo Camp, (307) 276-5424. June 20-22, Teton County Fairgrounds Grassy Area, ■ Powder Basin Equestrian Heritage Arena and Outdoor Association Horse Trials, July 4-7, Arena, 8:30 a.m. Cam-Plex Equestrian Arena.

■ Lloyd Brower Memorial Slide National Reining Horse Association horse show, July 12-13, Sublette County Fairgrounds Arena. For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 749-3546. ■ National High School Finals Rodeo, July 14-20, Sweetwater Events Complex. Details available at www. sweetwaterevents.com ■ Sublette County Barrel Racing Club Barrel Jackpot, July 17, Sublette County Fairgrounds. Time only 6 p.m., race at 7 p.m.

For more information and to enter, contact Jessie at (307) 260-5266.

■ Sublette County Fair, July 2228, trick riders, horse shows and rodeos. Pre-fair events July 19-21. For more information, check the online schedule at www. sublettecountyfair.com ■ Teton County Fair, July 19–28, Teton County Fairgrounds. For an event schedule, see www.tetoncountyfair.com ■ Red Desert Roundup Rodeo, July 25-27, Sweetwater Events Complex.

For more information, contact the 4-H Extension Office at (307) 682-7281.

For more information, contact the fairgrounds at (307) 733-5289.

For more information, contact Don Gerlach at (307) 686-1573.

For more information, contact the Red Desert Roundup Committee at (307) 389-1643.

■ 4-H Rodeo Timed Event, June 3, 10 and 17, 6-10 p.m., Wrangler Arena, Cam-Plex.

■ U.S. Team Roping Championships, June 22-23, Sweetwater Events Complex, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

■ Chuckwagon Days Rodeo, July 4, Sublette County Fairgrounds Buss Fear Arena, 1 p.m.

■ Campbell County Fair, July 29Aug. 5, Cam-Plex all arenas.

For more information, call A Diamond Productions, Boone & Jeni Snidecor, (307) 859-8835.

For schedule, see www. campbellcountyfair.com or contact Bobbi Jo Heald at (307) 687-0200.

For more information, contact the 4-H Extension Office at (307) 682-7281.

For more information, contact Bill Cornea at (435) 793-2465

Published by News Media Corporation | SPRING 2013

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

61


ADVERTISERS

A WESTERN WYOMING BRANDING

I N D E X ADVERTISER

PAGE #

ADVERTISER

PAGE #

Americas Best Value ............................ 37

Laramie Ford........................................ 29

Animal Clinic of Pinedale.................... 15

Laramie Peak Vet Assoc....................... 43

Balding Bits & Spurs ............................. 3

Linton’s Big R ...................................... 12

Baymont Inn & Suites.......................... 24

Longhorn Tack & Gift.......................... 45

Benedict’s Market ................................ 35

McCulloch Peaks Mustangs................. 46

Big Horn Co-op.................................... 37

Memorial Hospital of Converse Co. .... 64

Bits and Spurs #1 ................................. 13

MJB Animal Clinic .............................. 49

Bits and Spurs #2 ................................. 43

Morton Buildings ................................. 37

Boot & Bottle Club .............................. 55

Moss Saddles Boots & Tack ................ 42

Brannan Homes.................................... 30

Park County Fair .................................. 39

Burns Insurance Agency ...................... 28

Picks Saddle Shop ................................ 57

C Heart Saddle ..................................... 57

Platte Valley Riders .............................. 47

C&K Equipment .................................. 41

Probst Western ..................................... 57

Casper Animal Clinic ........................... 45

Rawhide Valley Quarter Horse ............ 45

City Shoe & Saddle.............................. 57

Real Estate Page................................... 59

ClassiÀed Form .................................... 55

Reganis Auto ....................................... 27

Cleary Buildings .................................. 21

Sandberg Implement ............................ 19

Coffee Cup Fuel Stop........................... 57

Scottsbluff Cty Fair .............................. 19

Cooper Performance Horses ................ 50

Sheridan College .................................. 31

Cowboy Dodge .................................... 23

Sheridan Leather .................................... 8

Eastern Wyoming College ................... 47

Sheridan Rodeo .................................... 20

Equine Enthusiast................................. 53

SR Express .......................................... 49

Equine Enthusiast................................. 52

Stitchin Post ......................................... 57

Photos/ Megan Neher

Evanston Rodeo Series ........................ 11

Sublette Co. Fairgrounds...................... 17

FarrellGas............................................. 16

Sublette Co. Fairgrounds...................... 30

At the Blaha Ranch in Sublette County, Wyo., branding won’t take place until May, but calves are being born and horses are being readied for the big annual event.

Flat Broke Perf. Horse ......................... 56

Terry Kimbrel....................................... 57

Floyd’s Truck Center............................ 25

Trendsetters .......................................... 27

Frannie Tack ......................................... 13

Trout Unlimited.................................... 54

Goshen Co. Fair Grounds .................... 63

Western Skies Vet................................. 51

Goshen Veterinary Clinic ..................... 46

Wheatland Country Store..................... 51

Greiner Motors ....................................... 2

White Horse ......................................... 31

Harnish Veterinary Services ................. 58

Wild Man Riggins ................................ 50

HorizonWest Inc. ................................... 7

Wolf’s Pinedale Dodge .......................... 9

Horseshoe 7 Ranch .............................. 56

Wyoming Equipment ........................... 33

Kemmerer Riding Club ........................ 28

Wyoming Horse Expo .......................... 49

Kings Saddlery ..................................... 15

Wyoming Quarter Horse ...................... 19

Larame Pope ........................................ 56

Wyoming West Realty.......................... 57

62

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

A checkup with a horse veterinarian and a farrier is always a good idea before the real spring work begins on the ranch.

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


THURSDAY, JULY 25 9:00 am

Supreme Cow Program Vet Check, Weigh-in and Interviews

SATURDAY, JULY 27 GOSHEN COUNTY TEAM ROPING- Outdoor Arena Enter @ 8:00 am***Rope @ 9:00 am

GOSHEN COUNTY BARREL RACE- Pavilion Enter @ TBA***Exhibitions start TBA

Noon – 9:00 pm 4-H Building & Ag Hall Open 7:00 am Chamber of Commerce Ranch Breakfast (RC) 7:00 am FIRST milk-out for Dairy Goat Milking Competition

10:00 am

GOSHEN COUNTY FAIR PARADE

10:00 am Noon 12:30 pm 12:45 pm

Carcass Contest (Kelly Pack) 4-H Cloverbud Show (Grass Arena) 4-H Pocket Pet Show (Grass Arena) 4-H/FFA Static Exhibit Auction (FS)

1:00 pm

SUNDAY, JULY 28 10:00 am 2:00 pm

THURSDAY, AUGUST 1 HAPPY 100TH BIRTHDAY GOSHEN COUNTY

SONrise Church Service (RC) 4-H Dog Agility (P)

MONDAY, JULY 29 8:00 am – noon 8:00 am – noon

4-H Exhibit Interview Judging (4-H Bldg) Ag Hall Exhibit Check-In (Ag Hall)

1:00 pm 5:00 pm

Fabric and Fashion Judging (RC) Horse Showmanship & Halter (P)

(NON PERISHABLE ITEMS ONLY )

1:30 2:00 5:00 7:00

pm pm pm pm

7:00 pm

Breeding Sheep & Breeding Swine Shows (Grass)

YOUTH RODEO SERIES & FINALS (P)

NO ANIMALS ALLOWED IN BARNS BEFORE 6:00 AM WEDNESDAY (EXCLUDING HORSES & BREEDING)

WEDNESDAY, JULY 31 3:00 – 9:00 pm 4-H Building Open 7:00 – 11:00 am Open Class Entries (Ag Hall) Floriculture & Horticulture 7:30 – 8:00 am Carcass Swine Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 8:00 – 10:00 am Market Swine Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 9:00 am 4-H/FFA Rodeo Events followed by 4-H/FFA Barrels & Poles (P) 10:00 – noon Market Lamb Weigh-In (Swine Barn) NOON-4:00 pm AG HALL CLOSED FOR JUDGING 1:00 – 2:00 pm Market Goat Weigh-In (Swine Barn) 2:00 pm 1st/2nd Yr Lamb Project Conferences (RC) 2:00 – 4:00 pm Market Beef Weigh-In (Swine Barn) Heifers followed by Steers

4:00 pm 4:30 5:00 5:00 5:00 5:30 6:00

BAKE SALE (AG HALL)

pm Market Heifer Preg Check (Swine Barn) – 8:00 pm Ag Hall Open for vendor set up pm Arrival deadline for all other livestock pm 4-H/FFA Team Sort (P) pm Mandatory Livestock Exhibitor Meeting (Grass) pm Goat Costume & Agility Contest (TBA)

7:00 pm

PINNACLE BANK MUTTON BUSTIN’ & TEAM SORT (P) $5

Sort Entries CLOSE @ 6pm* Calcutta will follow Mutton Bustin’

7:00 pm Release of all Horses 7:00 pm 4-H Style Review (RC) 7:00 pm Pre milk-out for Dairy Goat Milking Competition 4:00 pm – Midnight***ESCAPE LOUNGE OPEN

Torrington Lions Club partner to present: GORDY PRATT IN CONCERT (P) $5

1913 Model “T”

2013 F150

9:00 am – 9:00 pm 4-H Building & Ag Hall Open 8:00 am Sheep Show-Showmanship, Market, 1st/2nd Yr Lamb Project (Grass) 8:30 am Rabbit/Poultry Show- Rabbits followed by Poultry Classes & Costume Contest (Rabbit Barn) 2:00 pm Goshen County Bred/Fed Lamb Show (Grass) 2:00-5:00 pm TALENT OPEN STAGE-All Ages Welcome (FS) 3:00 pm Market Goat Show-Showmanship, Market, Goshen County Bred/Fed Market Goat Show (TBA) 5:00 pm Goshen County Sheep Producers BBQ 5:00 pm Sheep Lead Contest (Grass) 5:30 pm Dairy Cattle Show (Grass) 6:00 pm 4-H Cat Show (RC) 6:00 pm Market Beef Show (Grass) 7:00 pm WIENER DOG RACES (Grass following Beef Show)

8:00 pm

FORD TOUGH BULL RIDING (P) $8

Noon – Midnight***ESCAPE LOUNGE OPEN

SATURDAY, AUGUST 3 9:00 am – 9:00 pm 4-H Building & Ag Hall Open 8:00 am Dairy Goat Show-Showmanship, Dairy Goats (TBA) 9:00 am Breeding Beef Show & Showmanship (Grass)

10:00 am

Ranch Horse Competition (Outdoor Arena)

11:30 am WY State Fair Exhibitors Meeting (FS) 3:00 pm JR LIVESTOCK SALE (FS) Followed by Livestock Sale Buyer Dinner (RC) 6:30 pm 4-H/FFA Round Robin Showmanship Contest Presentation of Herdsmanship & Special Awards (Grass) Over The Hill Showmanship Contest Immediately following Round Robin & Special Awards

7:00 pm 7:30pm 8:00 pm

GREEN VALLEY HOMESTEADERS (RC) GOSHEN COUNTY & 4-H 100th BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION SUPERCROSS * $8

Noon – Midnight***ESCAPE LOUNGE OPEN

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4 6:00-10:00 am ALL EXHIBITS RELEASED 10:00 am

VISIT EAT STREET Enjoy the sound of HEARTLAND PRODUCTIONS Wed-Sat in the Frontier Shelter

SECOND milk-out for Dairy Goat Milking Competition

FORD FRIDAY, AUGUST 2

-8:00 am Carcass Lamb Weigh-In (Swine Barn) – 8:30 am Carcass Beef Weigh-In (Swine Barn) am Horse Performance Classes (P) am – 3:00 pm Trail Class (Outdoor Arena) pm Breeding Meat Goat, Breeding Sheep Showmanship,

6:00 pm

Rally (RC) followed by Dog Costume Contest

Supreme Cow Contest (Grass) Goshen County Bred/Fed Beef Show (Grass) Swine Show- Market & Showmanship (Grass)

Noon – Midnight***ESCAPE LOUNGE OPEN

TUESDAY, JULY 30 7:30 8:00 7:00 9:00 4:00

5TH ANNUAL RANCH RODEO * $8

1:00 pm 4-H Dog Show -Obedience, Showmanship, Conformation,

SONrise Church Service (RC)

CRABTREE AMUSEMENTS Wednesday, Friday & Saturday Midafternoon til Midnight Thursday* Noon to Midnight Every Night is Bracelet Night

Paid for in part by Goshen County Tourism Promotions Joint Powers Board

Published by News Media Corporation | SPRING 2013

EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

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EQUINE ENTHUSIAST

SPRING 2013 | Published by News Media Corporation


Wyo-Braska Spring 2013