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REAL IMPACT MAKING AMERICA A MORE JUST PLACE Annual Report to Stakeholders, 2017


A landmark year

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he National Judicial College was born in 1963 out of the idea that the courts of the United States, admirable as they were, needed to get better. Our founders, who included a Supreme Court justice, Tom C. Clark, weren’t afraid to admit that judging is too important a job to leave to on-the-job training alone. The NJC became—and remains—the only institution in the country that educates judges of all kinds from every corner of the country and at every stage of their careers. The theme of this year’s report is impact, and it was, by one measure, our most impactful year ever. In 2017, we educated more judges, in person and online, than ever; the total exceeded 10,000. But we measure our success not only by how many judges we educate but how well. The best proof of that is in the performance of our alumni. So in this year’s report we spotlight four examples of judges who have taken what they learned through the NJC and applied it to the betterment of their courts and their communities. During 2017, we also paused to take stock of the College and map out a course to greater impact. In consultation with dozens of stakeholders, a new five-year strategic plan was developed titled “Advancing Justice Like Never Before.” We hope you will take time to review it at www.judges.org/NJCSP2017-22. We believe you will be inspired. In these turbulent times, our country is counting on judges who are skilled, principled and dedicated to the rule of law. Thank you for your generous support. Together we are making the world a more just place by educating and inspiring its judiciary.

Benes Z. Aldana President

Kim D. Hogrefe Chair, Board of Trustees

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NEWS

The most judges ever taught In 2017, the NJC exceeded 10,000 enrollments for the first time in its history. The College educated 10,439 judges and other court service professionals in person and online. Enrollment in the College’s three tuition-based product types (Reno, away and online) hit a 10-year high. A new president Benes Z. Aldana, former chief trial judge of the U.S. Coast Guard, officially became the College’s ninth chief executive on May 1, 2017. The 47-year-old attorney was the first Asian Pacific American (Filipino) to serve as chief judge of a U.S. military branch (he immigrated to the United States when he was 10). He is the second person of color and first military judge to lead the College. He is also an alumnus of the College, having completed five courses since 2000.

President Aldana with U.C. Berkeley Law Dean Erwin Chemerinsky

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Among his many postings during a distinguished 23-year military career, he was deployed as a legal adviser to the Department of Defense Criminal Investigation Task Force in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, which conducted criminal investigations against suspected terrorists detained by U.S. forces. He also served as chief counsel of the Legal Engagements Division of the Defense Department’s U.S. Africa Command, which is based in Stuttgart, Germany. He led the U.S. military’s efforts in advancing the rule of law by working with African partner nation militaries and organizations such as the International Institute of Humanitarian Law and the Defense Institute of International Legal Studies. He replaced President Chad C. Schmucker, who retired after three-plus years leading the College. A new strategic plan The College’s Board of Trustees unanADVANCING JUSTICE imously approved a new strategic LIKE NEVER BEFORE plan to guide the College’s decision-making for the next five years. Titled “Advancing Justice Like Never Before,” the plan lays out five strategic priorities: • Maintain Leadership in Academic Excellence

2017-2022 Strategic Plan

Approved by the Board of Trustees, October 21, 2017

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• Achieve Long-Term Financial Sustainability and Institutional Resilience • Raise the Public Profile of the NJC and Build its Brand • Develop and Sustain a High-Performance Team of Professionals and Volunteer Leadership • Strengthen Our Strategic Alliances and Partnerships The entire plan can be accessed online at www.judges.org/NJCSP2017-22.

Two timely courses debut The College developed and delivered two brand-new courses in 2017 that respond to current issues: • Judging in the Digital Age: Conquering Discovery and Admission of Electronically Stored Information looks at a range of issues, including procedural rules and privacy concerns.

• Mindfulness for Judges teaches techniques for coping with trauma and enhancing leadership and communication. Trustee Parks named Plaintiff Trial Lawyer of the Year Trustee Robert L. Parks was named Plaintiff Trial Lawyer of the Year by the Florida Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates. Parks was admitted to the Florida Bar in 1964 and has engaged in extensive plaintiff product liability and aviation practice. He’s also served as chair of the American Bar Association’s Forum on Air & Space Law and is past president of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. ABA salutes faculty member Davis, late board chair Robinson Andre M. Davis, former judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and now city solicitor of Baltimore, received the ABA’s 2017 John Marshall Award for improvement of the administration of justice. Davis has served on the NJC faculty since 1994.


“Best Practices in Handling Cases with Self-Represented Litigants is the best class I have taken since I have been a judge, and I’ve been a judge for 16 years. The instructors were tremendous….” — Hon. Martha L. Mertz, Fifth Judicial District, Iowa

The ABA also posthumously honored NJC Board of Trustees Chair Wm. T. (Bill) Robinson III with a Lifetime Achievement Award. Payant Award goes to longtime California Judge Hora In 2017, the College’s annual V. Robert Payant Award for Teaching Excellence went to retired California Superior Court Judge Peggy Fulton Hora. Judge Hora first attended the NJC in 1992 and joined the faculty the following year. She has since been an instructor in nearly 60 courses, specializing in special court jurisdiction, substance abuse and DUI. Visitor Goodenow named chair of ABA Fellows Reno lawyer Rew Goodenow, a member of the NJC’s Board of Visitors and past president of the Nevada State Bar, was named chair of the Fellows of the American Bar Foundation.

IN MEMORIAM Wm. T. (Bill) Robinson III Board of Trustees Chair Wm. T. (Bill) Robinson, a past president of the ABA, passed away May 9, 2017, at age 72. A tireless advocate for the rule of law and the judiciary, he devoted much of his time as ABA president to lobbying state legislatures to restore funding for courts

and judicial education in the wake of the Great Recession. He served as member-in-charge of the Northern Kentucky office of the multi-state law firm Frost Brown Todd LLC, where he specialized in civil litigation. He was once asked, when he was past 65 but before the cancer diagnosis that would cost him his life, if he planned to retire. His answer: “No. Being a lawyer is who I am, it’s not what I do. You can’t retire from who you are.” Friends of Bill Robinson have established the Wm. T (Bill) Robinson III Scholarship Endowment to fund scholarships for American Bar Association Judicial Division members to attend courses at the NJC. See page 17 for details on how to contribute. Patrick Flanagan Judge N. Patrick Flanagan III, an alumnus and beloved faculty member of the College, passed away on Oct. 6 in Reno. He was 64. At the time of his death, he was the chief judge of the Second Judicial District Court of Washoe County, Nevada. He argued before the U.S. Supreme Court in the landmark death penalty case of Sumner v. Shuman (1987) and won, made numerous appearances before the United

States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and was the lead counsel in the nation’s second-longest criminal trial, U.S. v. Baker (1991). He suffered a paralyzing bicycle accident in 2001 but never let his loss of mobility impede him. After returning to work, he was elected to a district court bench and earned a third-degree Tae Kwon Do black belt while in a wheelchair. In his memory, friends have established the Hon. Patrick Flanagan International Judicial Scholarship Endowment Fund to support a judge who is an alumnus of the Northern Nevada International Center international visitors programs. See page 17 for details on how to contribute. Adam Fisher Judge Adam Fisher Jr., alumnus, instructor and past chair of the Faculty Council, passed away on Aug. 17 in Greenville, South Carolina. He was 76. Judge Fisher joined the municipal court bench in Greenville County in 1973 and served for more than 30 years. He first attended classes at the College in 1985, joined the faculty in 1991, and volunteered as an instructor for more than 20 years.

THE NATIONAL JUDICIAL COLLEGE

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Judge Amero congratulates participants on successful completion of Henry County’s Parent Accountability Court.

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ANNUAL REPORT TO STAKEHOLDERS, 2017


Judge Amero has studied with the NJC with scholarship support from the William Randolph Hearst Foundation.

HE FOUND A BETTER WAY TO DEAL WITH CHRONIC NON-PAYERS OF CHILD SUPPORT

Chelsea Prince, Henry Herald

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udge Brian J. Amero was frustrated by the way he had to handle defendants who failed to pay child support in Henry County, Georgia. Over the years, he had witnessed an alarming number of litigants — mostly fathers who represented themselves in court — fall significantly behind on payments. Many hadn’t worked for a year or longer, and when a prosecutor would ask them why, they would just shrug. Amero concluded that the vast majority of them had just given up, believing they were in a hole they couldn’t get out of. The traditional model for contempt at the time afforded him only one legal remedy—incarceration. “It was a scenario in which everyone loses: the father goes to jail, what little stability he may have had is gone, he falls further behind in his payments, and the children don’t get to see their father. Even worse, the children believe that they had some role in sending their dad to jail.” The county also had to pay the bills. “It was a negative, repetitive cycle,” he says. Inspired in part by the exchange of ideas he engaged in with other judges during an NJC General Jurisdiction course in 2007, Amero decided to do something about it. He ended up creating a Parental Accountability Court or PAC, under which a case manager is assigned to help parents deal with addiction issues, obtain job skills, find and keep work, and address transportation issues. One participant in the program had started abusing alcohol after going through an acrimonious divorce. He became estranged from his children and lost his job fol-

lowing an arrest for failing to pay child support. “When [he] got involved in the PAC, he was able to get help for his addiction, get and keep a job, regain some financial footing and begin making child support payments again,” says the judge. Even more gratifying, the participant restored his relationships with his children. “When his daughter called him to ask for help buying a prom dress, he was able to step up and pay for the dress. He described it as one of the happiest moments in his life.” The man is now three years sober and spends one week a month with his kids. Amero has helped expand the program throughout Georgia. In the 2018 State of the Judiciary Address, Chief Justice P. Harris Hines of Georgia’s Supreme Court summarized the program’s success: In six years, PACs have helped 5,000 parents avoid jail time and pay more than $5 million in support for more than 7,000 children. They have also saved counties more than $10 million in incarceration costs. As of today, the courts operate in 33 of Georgia’s 49 judicial circuits. For his next project, Amero is hoping to help those with mental illness who are arrested and too often languish needlessly in county jails. “I’d like to see a post-arrest program that immediately connects the mentally ill with appropriate treatment at a crisis stabilization center without the need for incarceration.”

The traditional model for contempt at the time afforded him only one legal remedy— incarceration.

THE NATIONAL JUDICIAL COLLEGE

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Kenaitze Indian Tribe’s Del Dumi Drum Group performs during the Opening of the Net ceremony. The annual event marks the beginning of the tribe’s summer salmon fishery.

He found a better way to manage chronic non-payers of child support Judge Brian J. Amero was frustrated by the way he had to handle defendants who failed to pay child support in Henry County, Georgia. Over the years, he witnessed an alarming number of litigants – mostly fathers who represented themselves in court – fall significantly behind on payments. Many hadn’t worked for a year or longer, and when a prosecutor would ask them why, they would just shrug. Amero concluded that the vast majority of them had just given up, believing they were in a hole they couldn’t get out of. The traditional model for contempt at the time afforded him only one legal remedy—incarceration. “It was a scenario in which everyone loses: the father goes to jail, what little stability he may have had is gone, he falls further behind in his payments, and the children don’t get to see their father. Even worse, the children believe that they had some role in sending their dad to jail.” The county also had to pay the bills. “It was a negative, repetitive cycle,” he says. Inspired in part by the exchange of ideas he engaged in with other judges during an NJC General Jurisdiction program in 2007, Amero decided to do something about it. He ended up creating a Parental Accountability Court or PAC, under which a case manager is assigned to help parents deal with addiction issues, obtain job skills, find and keep work, and address transportation issues. One participant in the program had started abusing alcohol after going through an acrimonious divorce. He became estranged from his children and lost his job following an arrest for failing to pay child support. “When [he] got involved in the PAC, he was able to get help for his addiction, get and keep a job, regain some financial footing and begin making child support payments again,” said the judge. Even more gratifying, the participant restored his relationships with his children. “When his daughter called him to ask for help buying a prom dress, he was able to step up and pay for the dress. He described it as one of the happiest moments in his life.” The man is now three years sober years and spends one week a month with his kids. Amero has helped expand the program throughout Georgia. In the 2018 State of the Judiciary Address, Chief Justice P. Harris Hines of Georgia’s Supreme Court summarized the program’s success: In six years, PACs have helped 5,000 parents avoid jail time and pay more than $5 million in support for more than 7,000 children. They have also saved counties more than $10 million in incarceration costs. As of today, the courts operate in 33 of Georgia’s 49 judicial circuits. For his next project, Amero is hoping to help those with mental illness who are arrested and too often languish needlessly in county jails. “I’d like to see a post-arrest program that immediately connects the mentally ill with appropriate treatment at a crisis stabilization center without the need for incarceration.”

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Judge Mills has studied with the NJC with scholarship support from the William Randolph Hearst Foundation Endowed Scholarship Fund, the Louis Wiener Jr. Endowed Scholarship, the Tribal Justice Institute and the John Ben Snow Memorial Trust.

A SOVEREIGN NATION SUES TO KEEP ITS CHILDREN AND WINS

M. Scott Moon/Kenaitze Indian Tribe

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ribal Judge Mary Ann Mills’ path to serving as a judge for Alaska’s Kenaitze people did not begin with law school. In fact, it started in the 1970s, when she was employed as a counselor for the Anchorage Urban Native Center. During that time, she saw hundreds of native children removed from their families and placed in state-run boarding schools or with non-native families. In some cases, the children were removed from their parents as soon as they were born because, according to Mills, the state considered the parents unfit. Many of the parents were addicted to drugs or alcohol. Nonetheless, “What the state did was criminal,” she says, because it did not follow the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). In 1978, the ICWA, a federal law, was enacted in response to a crisis involving American Indian and Alaska Native children and families. The law stipulates that a child’s tribe and family must have the opportunity to be involved in decisions affecting services and placements for Indian children. Before the ICWA, a large number of native children were separated from their families and placed with state welfare and private adoption agencies, even when fit relatives were available. Historically, Mills’ people had little recourse when it came to keeping their children out of state custody, she says. But thanks in part to what Mills and her tribal colleagues learned during NJC courses, members of the Kenaitze tribe have been able to keep more children with the tribe, placing them with healthy relatives instead of seeing them placed in institutions or with non-native foster families. At NJC courses, “We learned to follow due

process and write proper court orders,” says Mills, “and that’s what wins cases that are challenged in state court.” For example, in 2004 the Kenaitze people sued the state of Alaska because the state refused to recognize the ICWA. According to Mills, the state took the stance that it didn’t have to honor the ICWA because, the state representatives claimed, Alaska doesn’t have Indian Country. “We took the stance that federal law trumps state law and [in 2011] we won in federal court,” says Mills. “This is where the NJC training has served us well.” What’s more, she says, when designing programs for the Kenaitze, the NJC respected the tribe’s culture and beliefs. “Because of this, we were able to establish our Henu Wellness Court, which deals with substance abuse and is based on traditional values, and our judges sit concurrent with the state court judges,” Mills says.

“We took the stance that federal law trumps state law and we won in federal court. This is where the NJC training has served us well.” —Kenaitze Tribal Judge Mary Ann Mills

Judge Mary Ann Mills with (left) activist “Etok” Charlie Edwardsen from Barrow, Alaska, and Chief Robert Charlie of the Minto Tribe from Alaska’s interior. THE NATIONAL JUDICIAL COLLEGE

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Maricopa County’s video appearance system has saved taxpayers millions and kept defendants from languishing in jail and losing their jobs.

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ANNUAL REPORT TO STAKEHOLDERS, 2017


PEOPLE WERE LANGUISHING IN JAIL BECAUSE THEY COULDN’T MAKE BAIL. THE SOLUTION WAS SIMPLE.

Photo

courtesy

M a r i co pa C o u n t y J u st i c e C o u rts

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uring his first few years on the bench, Gerald Williams watched too many defendants sit in jail for up to a week after an arrest awaiting their court date, just because they couldn’t pay a $200 bond. “That bond might as well be $2 million,” says Williams, the North Valley Justice of the Peace in Maricopa County, Arizona. He and other judges who are NJC graduates expanded their weekly video arraignment sessions into a video conferencing program that allows judges to do plea agreements, delay requests, and set release conditions, all by video, every day. Prisoners no longer have to be transported throughout Maricopa County for what were relatively brief court appearances. The program has saved the county millions of dollars in incarceration costs, he says, but its effect on the citizens of his county is priceless. “It has prevented hundreds of defendants from languishing in jail and losing their jobs, which only brings on a whole other cascade of problems,” says Williams. After taking his first NJC course, Decision Making, in 2007, Williams says he returned home and implemented better methods to arrive at decisions logically and to communicate the decision-making process. The NJC’s Procedural Fairness course built on that structure, and Williams says it has changed the way he manages his courtroom. “Procedural fairness can be as simple as explaining to the defendant what will happen, before the proceedings begin, and then giving them five minutes to vent,” he says. “When I say, ‘This is your chance for rebuttal, do you have a response?’ that’s often all it takes to

refocus the litigant and get them to remember what they wanted to say.” When people believe they are being treated with dignity and respect, Williams explains, they generally don’t get angry, even when they lose. Courtrooms can be scary and intimidating, notes Williams, and he believes that by making the conscious decision to listen and explain, he is helping make the experience less threatening. Williams’ commitment to procedural fairness is most evident in landlord/tenant disputes; Maricopa County courts deal with 5,000 residential evictions every month, he says. Most of the people who appear before him haven’t done anything wrong, per se, they simply can’t pay their rent. “In that situation, I take the time to tell them ‘You’re not a bad person, you need to work with your landlord today and come to some sort of resolution. Otherwise this is what you’re facing next week.’” People need to understand what’s going to happen because otherwise they’re going to go home to changed locks, unable to get their belongings. “It might not be a judge’s job to be a teacher or parent or social worker, but in some situations you have to do the extra stuff,” says Williams. “The NJC made me aware of some simple things I could do on a day-to-day basis to really change outcomes for people.” Williams has a colorful sign on the door to his court that he believes sets the tone for his courtroom. It was inspired by a sign he saw at the NJC: “This is an OPEN and PUBLIC courtroom. Please come in and have a seat.”

“The NJC made me aware of some simple things I could do on a day-to-day basis to really change outcomes for people.” —Judge Gerald Williams

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Judge Wright has retired to North Carolina. He is pictured here near the North Carolina Capitol in Raleigh.

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Judge Wright has studied with the NJC with scholarship support from the Bureau of Justice Assistance.

HE GAVE D.C. TENANTS A BETTER CHANCE AT GETTING LANDLORDS TO MAKE REPAIRS

Chris Hildreth/Rooster Media Productions, Inc

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ousing courts are where tenants who are living in dangerous conditions can file complaints and lawsuits against their landlords. Dangerous conditions can include everything from peeling lead paint to dwellings in violation of building, housing, fire or health codes. Until 2010, residents of Washington, D.C., who lived in such environments didn’t have an efficient or affordable way to have their disputes resolved. That’s when Melvin R. Wright, presiding judge of the Civil Division of the District of Columbia Superior Court, developed D.C.’s Housing Conditions Calendar. The Calendar (the word was chosen so there would be no confusing it with a court) was created, in part, as a result of his meeting other judges through courses he took at the NJC, says Wright. Wright worked with various stakeholders in the D.C. Department of Consumer Affairs and city council to develop an approach to resolving disputes that is efficient, fair, and easily accessible by all tenants, especially those not represented by counsel. To file a complaint, tenants are required to pay a small fee (as little as $15), and after hearings they often get results — most often repairs to their housing — on an expedited basis, Wright says. During his years on the bench, Wright, now retired and living in North Carolina, attended four NJC courses. One of the first, after his appointment by President Clinton, was Management Skills for Presiding Judges, which Wright says shaped how he ran the court’s Civil Division. “There was a focus on how to make your ‘organization’ feel more like a

team,” he says, “which is important because being a judge can be quite lonely.” Wright says after the Presiding Judges course, he was more inclined to talk to his colleagues on a weekly basis, assessing how various judges could help all of their calendars function more efficiently. “Even that simple event increased the feeling of teamwork.” Wright explains how on frequent occasions, judges had difficulty keeping up with the number of motions they had before them. “If a judge had, let’s say, 300 cases before him or her, and they’d get ill or have a scheduled vacation, we’d be able to seek volunteers [to help ease their load] and give every volunteer 10 motions in addition to their existing caseload.” The volunteer judge would handle cases for the one who was behind and ultimately help get the number of pending cases down. “The most tangible result from these weekly meetings was that courts became more efficient and we had substantially far fewer complaints from the bar about delays in ruling on motions,” says Wright. “All judges have the same problems, but we all have different problem-solving talents,” adds Wright. If he hadn’t met other judges through the NJC, including some from New York, where a type of Housing Conditions Calendar already existed, Wright might not have had the idea to start one in D.C. What’s more, the NJC helped him create a more collegial environment in D.C. “The NJC acts like a team coordinator so we can learn and then share the best ways to resolve issues,” Wright says.

“The NJC acts like a team coordinator so we can learn and then share the best ways to resolve issues.” —Judge Melvin R. Wright

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FRIENDS

2017 DONORS The NJC acknowledges the following alumni, faculty and friends for their generosity. This list reflects donations of $125 or more received between January 1 and December 31, 2017.

CORNERSTONES American Bar Association – $220,000 State of Nevada – $125,000

FREEDOM CIRCLE ($25,000–$50,000) Laura and John Arnold Foundation E.L. Cord Foundation E. L. Wiegand Foundation ExxonMobil Corporation International Academy of Trial Lawyers Mrs. Joan Robinson Tort Trial and Insurance Practice Section (TIPS)

LIBERTY CIRCLE ($15,000–$24,999) Atlantis Casino Resort Hon. Sophia H. Hall Mr. John L. Holcomb, Esq. J. F Maddox Foundation M. R. Bauer Foundation

JUSTICE CIRCLE ($10,000–$14,999) Ms. Ann Thornton Field, Esq. Helen Roberti Charitable Trust NV Energy Foundation Mr. Robert L. Parks, Esq. Robert Z. Hawkins Foundation

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Mrs. Kim Sinatra, Esq. South Carolina Bar Foundation Texas Bar Foundation The John Ben Snow Memorial Trust Thomson Reuters

HONOR CIRCLE ($5,000–$9,999) American Board of Trial Advocates, Dallas Chapter Hon. Don R. Ash Mr. Victor K. Atkins, Jr. Mr. Edward R. Blumberg, Esq. Mr. Alan R. Brayton, Esq. Ms. Melissa H. Brown, Esq. Ms. Elizabeth J. Cabraser, Esq. Campbell Campbell Edwards & Conroy Hon. Gary L. Clingman Ms. Augusta S. Dowd, Esq. Mr. A. Clifford Edwards, Esq. Mr. Rew R. Goodenow, Esq. Mr. Richard D. Lawrence, Esq. Mr. Samuel S. Lionel, Esq. Mrs. Stacie Mathewson Mr. Peter Chase Neumann, Esq. Mr. Joseph M. Racicot, Esq. Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community Mr. Roman Silberfeld, Esq. Mr. Matt J, Sweeney, Esq. The Charles H. Stout Foundation The Clinton H. and Wilma T. Shattuck Charitable Trust Mr. Mark G. Tratos, Esq. Mr. Jason Wilson, Esq. Mr. Saul A. Wolfe, Esq.

ANNUAL REPORT TO STAKEHOLDERS, 2017

ANNUAL DONORS DIAMOND GAVEL CIRCLE ($2,400–$4,999) American Board of Trial Advocates, Tampa Chapter Ms. Norma Barnes-Euresti, Esq. Prof. Ronald R. Hofer Mr. Kim Dean Hogrefe, Esq. Mrs. MaryAdele Krolikowski Mr. Brian A. Larson, Esq. Hon. Rory R. Olsen Ms. Dale K. Raggio Rawle & Henderson, LLP R.C. Baker Foundation James T. Richardson, Ph.D. Mr. Robert Saunooke, Esq. Woodburn and Wedge

PLATINUM GAVEL CIRCLE ($1,000–$2,499) Baker, Donelson, Bearman Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC Ms. Marybel Batjer Ms. Lydia I. Beebe Mr. Peter Bennett, Esq. Hon. Janet J. Berry (Ret.) Hon. Donna M. Bevacqua-Young Hon. James G. Blanchard, Jr. Hon. Kimberly Bonner Hon. Toni T. Boone (Ret.) Hon. Michael A. Cherry Mr. Doug Clifford Colorado District Judges Association Community Foundation of Western Nevada Mr. Robert Gabrielli Mrs. Jeanne Marie Hill Mr. Robert D. Hunter, Esq.

Ms. Kimberly A Hunter Turner Mrs. Donna Juell Mr. Adam Paul Laxalt Maddox Segerblom and Canepa LLP Col. Linda Strite Murnane (Ret.) Mr. Carl A. Naumann Trustee Peter J. Neeson, Esq. NV Energy (Reno) Hon. V. Robert Payant (Ret.) Pisanelli Bice, PLLC Hon. James M. Redwine Dr. Kenneth D. Robinson Hon. James D. Rogers (Ret.) Hon. Terry Ruckriegle (Ret.) Mr. Herb Santos, Jr., Esq. Mr. Philip G. Satre Hon. Chad C. Schmucker Hon. Steve L. Smith Sen. Randolph J. Townsend Mr. Warren Trepp Mr. Palmer G. Vance II Hon. J. Scott Vowell (Ret.) Wells Fargo Foundation

CRYSTAL GAVEL CIRCLE ($500–$999) Aetna Foundation Mr. Sam Attisha Hon. Cynthia L. Brewer Mr. William J. Brunson, Esq. Hon. Joseph E. Cirigliano Hon. Jess B. Clanton, Jr. Hon. Toni E. Clarke Hon. Larry J. Craddock, Jr. Mr. Dennis Cuneo Ms. Zelda M. DeBoyes Mr. Victor G. Drakulich Hon. William F. Dressel (Ret.)

Hon. David M. Gersten (Ret.) Mr. Thomas J. Gould Hon. Karl B. Grube Hon. Gregory Holiday Mr. Ronald M. Krump Ms. Joy Lyngar, Esq. Mr. Lorne Malkiewich Dr. Shawn & Mrs. Diane Marsh Hon. J. Matthew Martin Mr. Charles W. Matthews, Jr., Esq Hon. William G. Meyer Mr. Leigh Middleditch Mr. Jerry H. Mowbray, Esq. National Center for State Courts Mr. Ned Payant Ms. Diane Presley Ms. Mary Gough Price Hon. Robert E. Rose Hon. Daniel Patrick Ryan (Ret.) Mr. Walter L. Sutton, Jr., Esq. Mr. Douglas Unger Hon. John M. Vittone (Ret.) Hon. Christopher T. Whitten Mr. Stephen N. Zack

GOLDEN GAVEL CIRCLE ($250–$499) Mr. Mark Alcott Mr. Richard A. Anderson Hon. Steven Andreasen Hon. Philip L. Arnaudo (Ret.) Hon. Patrick B. Augustine Hon. John G. Baker Blanchard, Krasner & French Mr. Kenneth J. Bolen Mr. Talmage Boston Ms. Mary Burdick Mr. Gary T. Canepa

Mr. Glenn Carano Mr. Robert Carlson Hon. William C. Carpenter Mr. David Clark Mrs. Jena Cohen Hon. Robert S. Cohen Hon. William S. Colwell Hon. Andre M. Davis Hon. Samuel G. DeSimone (Ret.) Hon. Michael J. Devine Mr. John Drakulich Dr. Harry English Erickson, Thorpe & Swainston, Ltd. Filipino-American Lawyers of Orange County Hon. Jane D. Fishman Hon. Susan Formaker Hon. Stephen S. Goss Hon. Gary A. Graber Ms. Evelyn Grosenick, Esq. Hon. Denis E. Guest Hon. Richard T. Gurley Hon. Robert C. Halbritter (Ret.) Hon. John J. Haney Hon. David Neil Harris, Sr. Hon. Calvin D. Hawkins Mr. Craig Haynes Mr. Randy Idler Hon. Michael D. Jacobs, Esq. Hon. William G. Kelly Hon. Roderick Kennedy (Ret.) Mr. Jack Krolikowski Mrs. Sarah Krolikowski Hon. Christine Kuhl Hon. Philip T. Kyle (Ret.) Hon. Thomas J Lanphear Dr. Loth Lieberstein, M.D. Hon. Katherine K. MacDonald


“I attended the course Drugs in America Today: What Every Judge Needs to Know. I can say without exaggeration, it was the best training I have ever attended.” — Hon. Candyce Cline, Westminster Municipal Court, Westminster, CO

Mr. Ernest J. Maupin III Hon. Patricia McElroy Hon James H. McGuinness, Jr. Mr. Richard Meeker Mr. D. Geno Menchetti Hon. Melvin M. Menegat Hon. James A. Morrow Hon. John F. Muffler Hon. Samuel D. Natal Mr. Frank Neuner Hon. Nancy C. Oesterle Hon. Steven D. Olmstead Col. Tara A. Osborn Hon. Reba Ann Page Ms. Jennifer Parent Mrs. Cary Ann Parrotte Hon. Earl G. Penrod Mr. Michael A. Pope, Esq. Hon. Carole M. Pope Mr. Charles Pritchett Ms. Barbara B. Prupas Ms. Teresa P. Rankin Hon. Frederic B. Rodgers Mr. Federico Rodriguez Mr. Nicholas D. Rossi Mr. Robert Rothman Hon. Lynne K. Simons Hon. Maureen A. Skerda Ms. Margaret Slattery Hon. James L. Spoo Hon. Keith Starrett Hon. Connie J. Steinheimer Hon. Philip S. Straniere Hon. William Sweet Ms. Kristie Tappan Mr. John A. Tarantino, Esq. The Glenview Trust Company The Guido A. and Elizabeth H. Binda Foundation Hon. Jerry M. Vanderhoef

Hon. George D. Varoutsos Hon. Thomas C. Warren Hon. Douglas G. White Ms. Sandra S. Yamate, Esq. Ms. Nancy Neal Yeend Gordon I. Zimmerman, Ph.D.

SILVER GAVEL CIRCLE ($125–$249) Dr. Gary L. Abrass, M.D. Hon. Benes Z. Aldana (Ret.) Hon. David A. Anderson Hon. Anthony J. Baratta Hon. James M. Batzer Hon. James A. Belson Hon. G. Paul Bollwerk III Hon. H. Harrison Braxton, Jr. Hon. Deborah S. Brazil Hon. Dan Breen Hon. Barry L. Breslow Hon. Walter J. Brudzinski Sen. Richard H. Bryan, Esq. Mr. Michael W. Burke Hon. Janet R. Burnside Ms. Patricia D. Cafferata, Esq. Ms. Glynette R. CarsonMcNabb Hon. Michael J. Cassidy Hon. J. Michelle Childs Hon. Augustus Chin Mr. Ryan Cicoski, Esq. Hon. Charles R. Cloud (Ret.) Hon. Daniel J. Crothers Hon. Franklin A. Cruz Ms. Harriet E. Cummings Col. Eric L. Dillow Hon. Frances M. Doherty Ms. Estella A. Dunst Hon. Judith C. Ensor Hon. Peter M. Evans Mr. Harvey C. Fennell

Hon. Patrick Flanagan Hon. Idee C. Fox Hon. Scott N. Freeman Mr. Ronald M. Friedman Hon. Frank Gafkowski, Jr. Hon. Jennifer Gee Hon. Todd George Hon. Richard A. Ginkowski Hon. Kenneth L. Govendo Hon. David A Hardy Col. Rodger C. Harris, USMC Hon. Mark J. Hayes Col. James E. Heupel (Ret.) Hon. Ben W. Hooper II Hon. Peggy Fulton Hora (Ret.) Hon. David E. Humke Hon. Gilbert V. Indeglia Hon. Kevin R. Kelly Hon. Phyllis Williams Kotey Mr. Mark Lanterman Hon. Judith Ann Lanzinger Mr. Patrick R. Leverty Hon. Michael D. Libretto Hon. Allene H. Lindstrom Hon. Robert C. Lovell Hon. Cynthia C. Lu Ms. Melanie S. Matsui Hon. Robert E. McBeth Hon. Bruce E. Moore Hon. William F. Morgan Hon. Sheila M. Murphy Hon. Leslie C. Nichols (Ret.) Hon. George A. Pagano Mr. William G. Paul, Esq. Hon. Jerome M. Polaha Ms. Nancy L. Rasmussen Hon. Bridget E. Robb Mr. Gareth W. Rosenau, Esq. Hon. Elliott A. Sattler II Mr. Frances Shryock, M.D.

Mr. Thomas E Spahn, Esq. Hon. M. P. Stockstead Ms. Elizabeth Stong Hon. Tim Sulak Hon. David R. Sweat Ms. Maria Nina Tirona Hon. Robert J. Torres, Jr. Hon. Jonah I. Triebwasser Hon. Egan K. Walker Hon. Chuck Weller

Mr. Kevin B. Wilson, Esq. Hon. Steven A. Wise Hon. G. Michael Witte Hon. David Wurm

IN HONOR OF In Honor of Col. Linda Strite Murnane (Ret.) Ms. Bonnie S. Alexander

In Honor of Hon. MaryMargaret Anderson (Ret.) Mr. Richard & Clarice Anderson Hon. David & Ms. Marcia Benjamin Ms. Linda Cabatic Hon. Robert S. Cohen Hon. Michael Cohn Hon. Melissa G. Crowell Ms. Darcy Diamantine

THE NATIONAL JUDICIAL COLLEGE

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FRIENDS

Hon. Kirk Miller Col. Linda Strite Murnane (Ret.) Ms. Nancy L. Rasmussen Mr. Michael & Mrs. Patricia Ruffolo Hon. Jill K. Schlichtmann Mr. David Schmidt Hon. Diane Schneider In Honor of Ms. Betty Morgan Hon. Cynthia L. Brewer In Honor of Hon. Benes Z. Aldana (Ret.) Hon. J. Michelle Childs In Honor of Ms. Betty Morgan & Mr. William J. Brunson, Esq. Hon. Karl B. Grube In Honor of Hon. Toni T. Boone Ms. Jeanne M. Hill In Honor of Ms. Ruth Bader Ginsberg

Hon. Peggy Fulton Hora In Honor of Mr. William J. Brunson, Esq. & Mr. Joseph R. Sawyer Hon. Michael D. Jacobs In Honor of Ms. Katheryn Yetter, Esq. Hon. Michael D. Jacobs In Honor of Chief Justice Allen Loughry Hon. Tod J. Kaufman In Honor of Mr. Howard & Hon. Susan Conyers Hon. Reba Ann Page In Honor of Hon. William F. Dressel (Ret.) Hon. Frederic B. Rodgers In Honor of Hon. Gary Graber Hon. Jonah Triebwasser In Honor of The NJC Faculty & Staff Hon. Jonah Triebwasser In Honor of Mr. Gordon & Ms.

TIPS GIFT CREATES LEARNING MODULES Celebrating its 85th anniversary in 2018, the Tort Trial and Insurance Practice Section (TIPS) of the American Bar Association has been a generous supporter of the NJC for more than 15 years. In 2017, TIPS Fellows made a gift of $25,000 to underwrite the creation of five online education modules, on: Insurance Law; Pretrial Procedures: What Works and What Doesn’t Work; Conducting the Trial: What Experienced Trial Attorneys Find Helpful; Expert Evidence; and Managing Jury Trials. TIPS focuses on trial practice and issues of justice that involve tort and

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Elizabeth White Hon. Douglas G. White

IN MEMORY OF In Memory of Hon. James Kingsley Hon. James M. Batzer In Memory of Mr. Arthur A. Gladstone Mr. Kenneth J. Bolen In Memory of Hon. Patrick Flanagan Hon. Kimberly Bonner Hon. Richard T. Gurley Ms. Jeanne Hill Mr. John H. Larson Hon. William D. Old III Hon. Reba Ann Page In Memory of Hon. George Garrett Hon. Robert Childers In Memory of Hon. Adam

insurance law. Its membership includes plaintiffs, defense, corporate and inhouse counsel. Each year the NJC hosts the National Trial Academy, which is sponsored by TIPS and the American Board of Trial Advocates or ABOTA. Named the country’s top “boot camp for lawyers,” the event brings in the country’s top trial attorneys to serve as personal mentors to new attorneys. The NJC’s association with TIPS began with former TIPS Chair and current NJC Trustee Peter Neeson. Board of Trustees Chair Kim D. Hogrefe has served TIPS in many capacities, including TIPS financial officer and treasurer of the TIPS Fellows.

ANNUAL REPORT TO STAKEHOLDERS, 2017

Fisher, Jr. Mr. Frank & Susan Dana In Memory of Mr. Donald A. Graber Hon. Gary A. Graber In Memory of Hon. Burton A. Scott Mr. Roland R. Hofer In Memory of Hon. Mac D. Hunter Ms. Kimberly Hunter Turner In Memory of Hon. Vincent A. Ragosta Hon. Gilbert & Ms. Elizabeth Indeglia In Memory of Hon. David B. Babbitt Hon. Phillip T. Kyle (Ret.) In Memory of Hon. Edwin L. Presley Ms. Diane Presley In Memory of Hon. Adam Fisher, Jr. SC Summary Court Judges Assoc. In Memory of Hon. Joe N. Pigott Hon. Keith & Ms. Barbara Starrett

WILLIAM J. RAGGIO ENDOWMENT Atlantis Casino Resort Ms. Patricia D. Cafferata, Esq. E. L. Wiegand Foundation Mr. Adam Paul Laxalt Mr. Lorne Malkiewich Ms. Dale K. Raggio Sen. Randolph J. Townsend

PAYANT ENDOWMENT Hon. Donald S. Bergin Mr. Terence Boyd Mr. William J. Brunson, Esq. Hon. Carol L. Coppola Judge Armando J. Flocchini, Jr.

Mr. Thomas J. Gould Hon. Andrew J. Hairston Mrs. Jeanne Marie Hill Hon. Tod J. Kaufman Mrs. Sarah Krolikowski Mrs. MaryAdele Krolikowski Mr. Jack Krolikowski Mr. Ronald M. Krump Ms. Nancy Kwapil Hon. V. Robert Payant (Ret.) Mr. Ned Payant Mr. Thomas M. Payant Mr. Robert V. Payant Mr. Paul J. Payant Mr. Nicholas D. Rossi Judge Jean P. Sokol

WM. T. (BILL) ROBINSON III ENDOWMENT Ms. Janet G. Abaray, Esq. Mr. Mark Alcott Hon. Benes Z. Aldana (Ret.) Ms. Bonnie S. Alexander Ms. Lydia I. Beebe Ms. Michelle Behnke Trustee Peter Bennett, Esq. Mr. Talmage Boston Hon. Dan Breen Mr. Charles St. Clair Brown Mr. Robert Carlson Mr. Vincent Chang Mr. Ryan Cicoski, Esq. Mr. David Clark Hon. Toni E. Clarke Hon. Robert S. Cohen Hon. Larry J. Craddock, Jr. Mr. Jeffrey Golden Mr. Benjamin Griffith Mr. Harry & Betsy Hathaway Mr. Craig Haynes Mrs. Jeanne Marie Hill Mr. Kim Dean Hogrefe, Esq.

Mr. Richard D. Lawrence, Esq. Mr. William Lytle Mr. Julian Mann III Mr. Richard Meeker & Ellen Rosenblum Mr. Leigh Middleditch Col. Linda Strite Murnane (Ret.) National Center for State Courts Mr. Frank Neuner Ms. Jennifer Parent Mr. William G. Paul, Esq. Ms. Mary Gough Price Mr. Charles Pritchett Ms. Marsha J. Rabiteau, Esq. Mr. Michael Reed Ms. Joan Robinson Mr. Federico Rodriguez Mr. Joseph Roszkowski Mr. Robert Rothman Hon. Steve L. Smith Ms. Elizabeth Stong Mr. Walter L. Sutton, Jr., Esq. The Glenview Trust Company Thomson Reuters Ms. Patricia Timmons Goodson Mr. Mark G. Tratos, Esq. Mr. Palmer G. Vance II Hon. Mary Vasaly Hon. John M. Vittone (Ret.) Hon. Julia B. Weatherly Hon. G. Michael Witte Mr. Saul A. Wolfe, Esq. Mr. Stephen Wolnitzek Mr. Stephen N. Zack

HON. CHAD C. SCHMUCKER ENDOWMENT Ms. Norma Barnes-Euresti, Esq.


“I had the privilege of attending the course Managing Cases Involving Commercial Driver’s Licenses along with many New York town and village justices. It was an incredible experience! We approached our Board of Directors at our last executive meeting and moved to make a donation towards this great organization, which was unanimously approved!” — Hon. Tanja Sirago, Executive Director, New York State Magistrates Association

Trustee Peter Bennett, Esq. Mr. Edward R. Blumberg, Esq. Mr. Alan R. Brayton, Esq. Sen. Richard H. Bryan, Esq. Ms. Mary Burdick Hon. Jess B. Clanton, Jr. Hon. Toni E. Clarke Mrs. Jena Cohen Ms. Ann Thornton Field, Esq. Mrs. Jeanne Marie Hill Trustee Kim Dean Hogrefe, Esq. Ms. Joy Lyngar, Esq. Hon. J. Matthew Martin Mr. Robert L. Parks, Esq. Hon. Chad C. Schmucker (Ret.) Ms. Lonnie Shodeen Mr. Walter L. Sutton, Jr., Esq. Mr. Matt J. Sweeney, Esq. Hon. John M. Vittone (Ret.) Hon. Christopher T. Whitten Ms. Sandra S. Yamate, Esq.

HON. DON R. ASH ENDOWMENT Hon. Don R. Ash

KIM SINATRA ENDOWMENT Mrs. Kim Sinatra, Esq.

HON. CAMERON BATJER ENDOWMENT Ms. Marybel Batjer

HON. JANET J. BERRY ENDOWMENT Dr. Gary L. Abrass, M.D. Hon. Nancy Allf Mr. Victor K. Atkins, Jr. Atlantis Casino Resort

Mr. Sam Attisha Hon. Janet J. Berry (Ret.) Hon. Donna M. Bevacqua-Young Blanchard, Krasner & French Hon. Barry L. Breslow Mr. Michael W. Burke Mr. Gary T. Canepa Mr. Glenn Carano Hon. Jess B. Clanton, Jr. Mr. Doug Clifford Community Foundation of Western Nevada Mr. Dennis Cuneo Hon. Frances M. Doherty Mr. Victor G. Drakulich Mr. John Drakulich Ms. Estella A. Dunst Dr. Harry English Erickson, Thorpe & Swainston, Ltd. Mr. Harvey C. Fennell Hon. Patrick Flanagan Hon. Scott N. Freeman Mr. Ronald M. Friedman Ms. Evelyn Grosenick, Esq. Hon. David A Hardy Mrs. Jeanne Marie Hill Hon. Gregory Holiday Hon. David E. Humke Mr. Randy Idler Mrs. Donna Juell Hon. William G. Kelly Hon. James W. Kerr, Jr. Hon. Christine Kuhl Mr. Brian A. Larson, Esq. Mr. Patrick R. Leverty Dr. Loth Lieberstein, M.D. Hon. Cynthia C. Lu Maddox Segerblom and Canepa LLP Mrs. Stacie Mathewson

Mr. Charles W. Matthews, Jr., Esq. Mr. Ernest J. Maupin III Mr. D. Geno Menchetti Mr. Jerry H. Mowbray, Esq. Trustee Peter J. Neeson, Esq. Mr. Peter Chase Neumann, Esq. Hon. Nancy C. Oesterle Mrs. Cary Ann Parrotte Hon. Jerome M. Polaha Mr. Michael A. Pope, Esq. Hon. Carole M. Pope Ms. Barbara B. Prupas James T. Richardson, Ph.D. Hon. Bridget E. Robb Hon. Robert E. Rose Hon. Elliott A. Sattler II Hon. Deborah E. Schumacher Mr. Frances Shryock, M.D. Hon. Lynne K. Simons Ms. Margaret Slattery Hon. Connie J. Steinheimer Ms. Kristie Tappan Mr. Warren Trepp Hon. Egan K. Walker Hon. Chuck Weller Woodburn and Wedge

GRANT SUPPORT In 2017, The National Judicial College held cooperative agreements with the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance. The NJC also serves as a sub-recipient on U.S. Department of Justice cooperative agreements with the University of North Dakota School of Law Tribal Judicial Institute, the Council of State Governments, and the American Probation and Parole Association. The NJC partnered with the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s Commercial Driver’s License program to provide traffic safety education to judges. The NJC also receives grants from the State Justice Institute, a nonprofit organization established by federal law in 1984 to award grants to improve the quality of justice in state courts, and to foster innovative, efficient solutions to common issues faced by all courts.

HON. TONI T. BOONE ENDOWMENT Hon. Toni T. Boone (Ret.) Mrs. Jeanne Marie Hill

HON. WILLIAM F. DRESSEL ENDOWMENT Hon. William F. Dressel (Ret.)

HON. SOPHIA H. HALL ENDOWMENT Hon. Sophia H. Hall

THE NATIONAL JUDICIAL COLLEGE

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FRIENDS

PARTNERS AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety American Bar Association ABA Tort Trial and Insurance Practice Section (TIPS) American Board of Trial Advocates American College of Trust and Estate Counsel American Probation and Parole Association American Institute of Certified Public Accountants American University Annie E. Casey Foundation Bureau of Justice Assistance Center for Court Innovation Center for Health and Justice Center for Human Trafficking Court Solutions Center for Public Policy Studies Civil Justice Reform Group

Conference of State Court Administrators Council of State Governments Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration Foundation for Advancing Alcohol Responsibility Fox Valley Technical College Institute for the Advancement of the American Legal System International Academy of Trial Lawyers Judicial Studies Graduate Degree Program National American Indian Court Judges Association National Association of Administrative Law Judges National Association for Court Management National Association of Drug Court Professionals National Association of Hearing Officials

FACULTY WHO VOLUNTEERED Hon. Karen Adam Mr. Thomas Alaksa Hon. Efrain Alvarado Hon. Robert Anchondo Hon. Barbara Arnold Harcourt Hon. Don Ash Hon. Jason Ashford Hon. Neil Axel Hon. Jennifer Bailey Mr. Darin Balaam Hon. Anthony Baratta Hon. Scott Bergstedt Hon. Margarita Bernal

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Hon. Louis Butler, Jr. Ms. Colleen Camenisch Mr. Jac Charlier Hon. Joseph Charter Hon. Linda Billings-Vela Hon. Sharon Chatman Hon. Archie Blake, Hon. Thomas Cheffins Ph.D. Hon. Augustus Chin Hon. Toni Boone Hon. Gary Clingman Sgt. Eddie Bowers Hon. Sue Bell Cobb Mr. Kevin Bowling Prof. Terence Coonan Hon. Susan Braden Hon. Patricia Costello Mr. Alf Brandt Hon. Daniel Crothers Mr. Christopher Mr. Franklin Cruz Braun Hon. Andre Davis Prof. Todd Brower Hon. Peggy Davis Mr. Bech Bruun Mr. Carl Dawson Prof. Michelle Bryan Zelda DeBoyes, Ph.D. Hon. Janet Burnside

ANNUAL REPORT TO STAKEHOLDERS, 2017

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Judges Association National Association of State Judicial Educators National Center for State Courts National College of Probate Judges National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges National District Attorneys Association Nevada State Bar Foundation Pew Research Center State Justice Institute State of Nevada U.S. Department of Justice U.S. Department of Transportation University of North Dakota Law School Tribal Judicial Institute Pretrial Justice Institute University of Nevada, Reno William S. Boyd School of Law and others

Hon. James Dehn Hon. David Denkin Hon. W. Donaldson Hon. Thomas Donnelly Hon. Elizabeth Drews, Esq. Prof. John Echeverria Mr. Ben Ekelund Hon. Sherrill Ellsworth Ms. Patricia Etzold Hon. Peter Evans Prof. David Faigman Ms. Kristina Famolare Hon. Joseph Farah Mr. Jim Farley Dr. Michael Fienen Hon. Elizabeth Figueroa

Hon. Jane Fishman Ms. Christine Folsom, Esq. Hon. Susan Formaker Lt. Tim Fox Ms. Randi Fredholm Hutchinson Hon. Ben Fuller Ms. Sarah Garner Hon. Jennifer Gee Hon. David Gersten Hon. James Gilbert Hon. W. Gillette Hon. Stephen Goss Hon. Gary Graber Burke Griggs, Ph.D. Ms. Maura Grossman, Esq.

Hon. Karl Grube Ms. Ellen Hanak Ms. Amy Hardberger Hon. James William Hardesty Hon. Kristi Harrington Hon. David Harris, Sr. Hon. Jenifer Harris Hon. Patrick Harris Ms. Teresa Hendricks Mr. Travis Herbert Mr. Benjamin Holden Hon. Ilona Holmes Hon. Peggy Hora Hon. Thor Hoyte Hon. Carol Ann Hubbard Hon. Jamey Hueston Hon. Mary Katherine Huffman Hon. Karen Hunt Ms. Lisa Jaeger Ms. Melissa Jones Hon. Melissa Jones Hon. Daniel Jurkowitz Hon. Fred Karasov Hon. Eileen Kato Hon. Michael Keasler Hon. William Kelly Hon. Roderick Kennedy Hon. David Kimberley Kevin Knight, Ph.D. Prof. Phyllis Kotey John Lacey, Ph.D. Mr. Mark Lanterman Mr. Matthew Lee Hon. John Lenderman Mr. Carl Liggio

Hon. Teresa Liston Nathan Lowe, Ph.D. Hon. Christopher Maravilla Mr. Theodore Martens Hon. Robert McBeth Prof. Wayne McCormack Hon. Robert McCune Ms. Dottie McDonald Hon. Mark McGinnis Hon. Phyllis McMillen William Meinecke, Jr. Ph.D. Hon. John Molaison Hon. Bruce Moore Prof. Francis Mootz Hon. Michael Morgan Mr. Jan Morris Hon. James Morrow Mr. John Muffler Ms. Leslie Murphy Hon. Michael Noble Hon. Judith Olean Hon. Steven Olmstead Ms. Kimberly Papillon Mr. Josh Patashnik Hon. Earl Penrod Roger Peters, Ph.D. Mr. Marc Picker Mr. Michael Pietrykowski Hon. Michael Pitman Prof. Steven Platau Hon. David Prince Mr. Charles Pullen Mr. Robert Redmond Hon. James Redwine Hon. John Reif Ms. Terese Neu Richmond Hon. Daniel Ryan

Hon. Meenu Sasser Hon. Edwin Scales Hon. Louis Schiff Hon. Chad Schmucker Hon. Daniel Shanes Prof. Stephen Simon Hon. V. Sinclair, Jr. Ms. Cindi-Elaine Smith Hon. Gregory Smith Hon. John Smith Hon. Steve Smith Ms. Kathryn Sorensen Prof. Sophie Sparrow Yvonne Stedham, Ph.D. Mr. Mark Stodola Mr. Roy Stralla Hon. Philip Straniere Hon. Caroline Streater Hon. David Suntag Prof. Barton Thompson, Jr. Mr. Don Tomlinson Hon. Allan Toubman Ms. Ramona Tsosie Hon. Richard Vlavianos Hon. Edward Wahl Hon. Lori Walkley Hon. Brian Watkins Hon. Charles Weller, Ph.D. Prof. Penny White Hon. Steven Wise Hon. Lisa Woodruff-White Hon. Danny Woods Hon. Jerome Woods,II Hon. Thomas Zonay Mr. Mark Zyla


“I have often been the lone voice regarding raising these issues in my community. With the strength of the science behind my presentations, it has helped raise the credibility of my position. This program was phenomenal, and I would take any such course offered as it enhances my work beyond measure.” — Judge Mary Logan, Spokane (WA) Municipal Court She was writing about a forensic evidence self-study course, When Science Comes to Court, funded by a grant from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES Kim Dean Hogrefe, Esq., Chair Sandra S. Yamate, Esq., Chair Elect Hon. J. Matthew Martin Secretary Peter Bennett, Esq. Treasurer Wm. T. (Bill) Robinson III, Esq., Immediate Past Chair (decd.) Hon. Mary-Margaret Anderson Norma Barnes-Euresti, Esq. Edward R. Blumberg, Esq. Alan R. Brayton, Esq. Richard H. Bryan, Esq. Douglas A. Cannon, Esq. Hon. Toni E. Clarke Hon. Leslie A. Hayashi (Ret.) Robert Hunter, Esq. Peter J. Neeson, Esq. Robert L. Parks, Esq. Walter L. Sutton, Jr., Esq. Matt Sweeney, Esq. Ann Thornton Field, Esq. Mark G. Tratos, Esq. Hon. Christopher T. Whitten

BOARD OF VISITORS A. Clifford Edwards, Esq., Chair John L. Holcomb, Esq., Co-Chair Hon. Bobbe J. Bridge (Ret.) Jon Bridge, Esq. Melissa H. Brown, Esq. Elizabeth J. Cabraser, Esq. Timothy R. Donovan, Esq.

Augusta S. Dowd, Esq. Randall M. Ebner Rew R. Goodenow, Esq. Hon. Sophia H. Hall Irwin A. Molasky Ed Neugebauer, Esq. Marsha J. Rabiteau, Esq. Joseph M. Racicot, Esq. Patricia K. Rocha, Esq. Tom C. Rodgers, Esq. Hon. James D. Rogers (Ret.) Robert Saunooke, Esq. Roman M. Silberfeld, Esq. Dick A. Semerdjian, Esq. Jason Wilson, Esq.

FACULTY COUNCIL Hon. V. Lee Sinclair, Jr. (Ret.) Chair Hon. Toni T. Boone (Ret.) Immediate Past Chair Hon. Jennifer Gee Secretary Hon. Efrain Alvarado Hon. Ilona M. Holmes Hon. Jess B. Clanton, Jr. (Ret.) Hon. Kristi L. Harrington Hon. Vincent L. Knight Hon. Robert E. McBeth (Ret.) Hon. Daniel P. Ryan, J.D., Ph.D.

JOIN IN IMMORTALIZING THESE GREATS OR SOMEONE ELSE YOU ADMIRE In 2017 and early in 2018, family and friends of the following five outstanding individuals established endowment funds at the College to honor them in perpetuity: • Attorney Wm. T. (Bill) Robinson III, former NJC board chair and ABA president who passed away in May 2017. The Robinson fund supports scholarships for members of the American Bar Association Judicial Division. • Judge Chad Schmucker, who retired as president of the NJC in 2017 after three-plus years at the helm. The Schmucker fund supports NJC scholarships for Michigan judges. • Judge Janet J. Berry, NJC alumnus, faculty member and former board chair who retired in 2017 from the Nevada District Court. The Berry fund supports educational programs focused on addiction and mental health treatment. • Judge N. Patrick Flanagan III, NJC alumnus, faculty member and chief judge of the Second Judicial District Court of Washoe County, Nevada, who passed away in October 2017. The Flanagan fund provides scholarship support annually to enable a judge who is an alumnus of the Northern Nevada International Center international visitors programs to attend a four- or five-day course at the NJC’s Reno campus.

• Professor Emeritus James Richardson, former longtime director of the Judicial Studies program at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). The Richardson Judicial Studies fund provides scholarships for Judicial Studies students to take 700-level UNR graduate courses. An endowment fund creates a permanent source of support for an organization because only the earnings on the principal are spent. That principal can be added to at any point. Here is how to join in honoring any of the above individuals and amplify the gift named in their honor: 1. Visit the NJC website, www.judges.org 2. Click on the Donate button 3. Fill out the form on the screen 4. In the Donation Designation field, enter the name of the individual whose endowment you wish to support. Checks may also be mailed to the NJC at 1664 Virginia St., M.S. 358, Reno, NV, 89557. Please note the fund to which you wish to contribute on the comment line. To learn how to establish an endowment in someone’s name, please email Development Director Diane Marsh at dianemarsh@judges.org or call (800) 25-JUDGE.

THE NATIONAL JUDICIAL COLLEGE

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MAKING THE WORLD A MORE JUST PLACE

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