Page 1


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

3


5 7 8 10 11 13 14 16 18 20 23 28 29 30 31 33 36 37 40 44 48 50

Welcome Niner Nation Gold On campus mailing Move-in day guide Residence halls Social media tips Campus tour and history Going greek University Career Center Counseling and health centers Campus technologies Campus police Working on campus Academic integrity Library guide Campus gyms Student government Parking and transportation Textbook options Meal plans Roommate tips On campus dining

Editor-in-chief

Eden Creamer

Editors :

Sara Carson, Michelle Liringis

Creative director

Megan Van Emmerik

Marketing Director : Emmanuel Loredo

Writers : Patrick Bogans, Kevin Granados, Jared Green, Sean Grier, Jonathan Golian,

Stephany McMillian, Sydney Wright

Sales : Courtney Bartlett, Andrew Lapointe, Nathan Propst, Dylan Robison, Brandon Weiner NINER MEDIA ADVISER: WAYNE MAIKRANZ MARKETING ADVISER: KELLY MERGES BUSINESS MANAGER: LAURIE CUDDY GRAPHICS & PRODUCTION: PETE HURDLE OFFICE MANAGER: MARK HAIRE

4

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


Niner nation, assemble! EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Welcome to UNC Charlotte! As some of the newest members of the Niner Nation family, you are about to embark on a very exciting college experience. At times, college can be tough. Super villains and foes might try to ruin your perfect story, but by keeping to your character you can come out victorious. Throughout this publication you’ll find plenty of tips and need-to-know information to make your college career super. Below are three of the most important tips I could give you. FIND YOUR NICHE There is something for everyone here at UNC Charlotte, from intramural sports to Greek organizations, and the hundreds of opportunities between them. Whether you live on or off campus, you’ll find yourself wondering what to do with your free time. Find something you are passionate about, and get involved. Immerse yourself in the activities and the people that come along with it. When I joined Student Niner Media my freshman year, I knew I had found my niche. My coworkers at the Niner Times have become my best friends and there is nothing else I’d rather do than produce a copy of the paper. LET UNC CHARLOTTE BECOME YOUR HOME Whether you live on or off campus, you’re bound to be spending a lot of time at the university. That being said, get to know it. Find your favorite spot to hang out between classes. Figure out where you want to nestle down with your notes and textbooks when it’s crunch time

TAILGATING

YARD SHOW

Clockwise from top: Football tailgating, the 2013 Homecoming Lights Parade and National Pan-Hellenic Council’s annual Yard Show. NT File Photos

PARADE

for a class. Pick your favorite spot for a Tuesday lunch. Explore the buildings, gardens and greenway that make up the university. UNC Charlotte has always had a problem of those who live off-campus never spending any time on campus. It’s up to you, as the newest generation of Niners, to fix this. UNC Charlotte is a

beautiful and exciting place to work, study, hang out and eat. DON’T LOSE YOUR ROOTS Yes, yes, I know I just said to let UNC Charlotte become your home. While it is very important to embrace your inner Niner, you should never forget where you came from. Your hometown

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

and the people in it make you who you are. All of the diverse backgrounds of our student body create the wonderful, enriching atmosphere that is UNC Charlotte. Embrace your new home, but never forget your first home. And please, call your parents. BE FEARLESS I’m not going to lie, college is hard. You’ll make tough choices along the way. You’ll make friends and unfortunately you may lose them. You’ll have to give presentations, write papers and do things you had hoped you’d never have to do. No matter what you have to face, hold your head up high. Despite any hardships that may come to you, a positive outlook and an open mind will get you through it. College is a growing experience and you don’t grow from experiences that all go your way. When they say college is the best four years of your life, whoever ‘they’ is, they’re factoring in the trials and tribulations that you face head on and leap over. You can and you will get through it. Don’t let anybody tell you that you can’t. This fearlessness includes not being afraid to ask for help when you need it. Don’t let pride stand in the way. Accept help that is offered to you. While you need to face adversities, nobody said you had to do it alone. UNC Charlotte provides help to students through faculty and staff in the academic departments, the Counseling Center and the Health Center, among others. These people are committed to helping you when the going gets tough.

5


6

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


the fantastic 49ers Niner Nation Gold gives students the opportunity to be part of the biggest student athletic support program STEPHANY MCMILLIAN INTERN

At soccer games, basketball games and even football games the Niner Nation Gold pride will be loud and proud. “Forty-Niners! Forty-Niners! Forty-Niners!” The cheering never stops and the adrenaline only rises. Niner Nation Gold (NNG) is an organization on UNC Charlotte’s campus that encourages students to support and promote all Charlotte athletic events. Joining the organization is a huge commitment and demonstrates the love you have for fellow 49ers. Around campus the organization has gained a reputation of “die-hard” 49er fans that paint their body, wear green wigs and frequently come equipped with green and gold foam fingers. The organization not only supports 49er

athletics while in school, but members are also educated on the importance of giving back to the 49er club after graduation. 49er spirit lasts a lifetime. Membership fees are $20, and come with great perks. As a member of NNG, you will receive a NNG T-shirt; eight athletics loyalty points and priority points; a car decal and 49er pin; and invites to NNG cookouts, tailgates and other social events. NNG is the largest student run organization on UNC Charlotte’s campus and continues to strive for excellence in representing 49ers properly. For more information, visit http://www.sco. uncc.edu/ninernationgold/Niner_Nation_Gold. html.

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

Members of Niner Nation Gold showing their support during a November 2013 basketball game. Photo by: Chris Crews

7


Ship and receive packages faster than a speeding bullet WITH TWO LOCATIONS TO MAIL ON CAMPUS, STUDENTS NEVER NEED TO WORRY EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Available to UNC Charlotte students, faculty and staff are able to utilize the Mail and Package Services provided by Auxiliary Services. Their office is located in Prospector. Mail and Package Services offers express and priority domestic and international mail, certified mail, post cards, bulk mail, package services and more. Mail and Package Services is a fully operational Postal Contract Station through the United States Postal Service. Near the Mail and Package Services office in the lower level of the on-campus Prospector

8

building, students are also able to purchase envelopes, boxes and stamps to aid in their mailing and shipping needs. Students living on campus can receive letters and small packages delievered to their buildings through the Mail and Package Services provided by Auxiliary Services. Larger packages will need to be picked up at the Mail and Package Services offices. When a package has arrived that a student will need to go pick up, they will receive an email alert to their university email account. A few days after the first email

alert, if the student still has not received their package, another email alert will be sent out. After 10 days, if the student still has not picked up the package, it will be removed from the offices. The Mail and Package Services Office is open Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Located in the Student Union, students also have access to Union Station. Here, students are able to mail and ship letters and packages through both USPS and FedEx, purchase boxes and packing materials and more. The Union Station also serves as an official passport processing

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

station, assuming students have an appointment. Students can also rent campus mailboxes through the Union Station. These mailboxes serve as consistent campus addresses for the individual who has the box, as long as they are renting the box. Leases come in six or 12 month terms, and may be renewed as long as the individual remains a current student. Union Station also offers a photo kiosk and graphic services. The Union Station is open Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

9


Move-in in a flash PLAN AHEAD AND GET ORGANIZAED TO AVOID MOVE-IN DAY STRESS JARED GREEN STAFF WRITER

Move-in day for the fall is fast approaching. In order to be ready for this interesting and occasionally hectic experience there are a few things you need to know to make your move-in day run smoothly. Firstly, make sure to check your UNC Charlotte email over the summer. The Department of Housing and Residence Life will be sending out emails over the summer giving you updates and assign you a move-in day and time. It is very important that you only attempt to move in at your appointed time. Attempting to move-in early or late creates problems for housing staff and also creates more traffic that everyone has to deal with. Before the move-in day, be sure you have completed your home pass. This is your electronic housing check-in, and it is how you will find out what day and time you will get to move into your dorm. On your home pass will also be the entrance through which you should enter campus. It is important to enter through the right entrance to keep traffic backup at a minimum and to make sure you get to the right place. On the day that you move in, police and parking staff will be

available to direct traffic and tell you where to go in case you get lost. Once you arrive at your residence hall you will go inside and check in. You will receive your room key and sign some paperwork, which guarantees you will resume responsible for any damage done to your room or the furniture in it, and that you will following housing regulations. Make sure you follow advice from housing and parking staff as to where you need to park your car as it is being unloaded. If you need any advice or have any questions while moving in, talk to your new resident advisor (RA) or other housing staff members. Moving away from home is definitely an emotional experience. It is a new beginning for many, and can occasionally not go as planned. “To make this day the best, it is vital that you come with a sense of humor, patience and flexibility,” said Jacklyn Simpson, associate vice chancellor of Student Affairs and director of Housing and Residence Life. The best piece of advice about move-in day is to come prepared mentally and physically for a great experience.

DO’S AND DON’TS OF MOVE-IN DAY

10

Do come with a sense of humor, patience and flexibility.

Do take the time to get to know your roommate(s) beforehand if possible.

Don’t come on the wrong day or before your scheduled time.

Don’t let your family go before hugging them goodbye. They will miss you before they get out of the parking lot.

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


THE FORTRESS OF SOLITUDE WITH 20 RESIDENCE HALLS ON CAMPUS, THERE IS SOMEWHERE FOR EVERY STUDENT TO CALL HOME. EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

With 20 residence halls on campus, there are plenty of options for students to live. Each residence hall is a little different than the others and represent many different types of housing plans. UNC Charlotte offers suite-style, apartment-style and high rise style residence halls for student use. Opening in fall 2014, there is even a new residence hall, Martin Hall. HIGH RISE BUILDINGS The stereotypical college housing unit is a high rise building. At UNC Charlotte, there are four, though two will be closed for the 2014-15 year for renovation. Moore and Sanford Halls will house high rise residents. Holshouser and Scott will be both closed for renovation, and will reopen for fall 2015. In the high rises, each room comes equipped with two beds, two desks, two chairs and two wardrobes. Beds are bunkable to provide for more space in the room. Students living in the high rises generally stay in double rooms (two students per room), but it is possible to have a single room in the high rises. A hall bathroom is shared by the residents of the floor, and buildings also have lounge areas for communal studying, or just for getting to know neighbors. Laundry facilities, vending machines and public kitchen units are also available in each building. SUITE-STYLE LIVING In suite-style rooms, multiple students (either two, three, or four depending on the building) share a bathroom and living area. These students do not have a kitchen area, but buildings with suite-style living have communal lounge and kitchen areas for all

residents of the buildings. These buildings are also equipped with laundry facilities. Suite-style units generally come with a couch and TV stand in the living area. Each student bedroom will also have a bed, desk, desk chair and three-drawer chest for each student occupying the room. Bedrooms in Belk, Hunt, Martin and Miltimore have built-in closet areas in each bedroom, while all other suite-style buildings provide students with a wardrobe. Belk Hall features three bedroom suite-style units. In these units, each student has a single bedroom, and all three residents of the unit share a living and bath area. C.F. Lynch, Hunt and Wallis Halls are comprised of two and four bedroom suites. Two bedroom suites are double rooms, with two students in each bedroom, while four bedroom suites are single rooms. Cedar, Hawthorne, Hickory, Oak, Sycamore and Witherspoon Halls have two bedroom suite units. Each bedroom houses two students. Miltimore Hall has one, two and three bedroom suite units. Suites in Miltimore are all single occupancy rooms. APARTMENT-STYLE LIVING In apartment-style rooms, multiple students (either two, three, or four depending on the building) share a bathroom, living area and kitchen space. These buildings are also equipped with laundry facilities and communal lounge areas. Apartment-style units generally come with a couch and TV stand in the living area, and a table and chairs in the kitchen area. Each student bedroom will also have a bed, desk, desk chair

and three-drawer chest for each student occupying the room. Bedrooms in Belk, Martin and Miltimore have built in closet areas in each bedroom, while all other apartment-style buildings provide students with a wardrobe. Belk Hall has one-bedroom apartments with a kitchen and bath, similar to a studio apartment. These units are only occupied by one student. Belk Hall also has four bedroom apartments. In these units, there is a living room, kitchen area and two bathrooms for all four residents of the unit. Units also have a storage closet. Elm, Maple, Martin, Miltimore, Pine, Wallis and Witherspoon Halls have four bedroom apartment units. These units have a living room, bathroom and kitchen area for all students to share, and have one student in each bedroom. GREEK VILLAGE Greek Village is made up of 13 houses. Nine houses are specifically dedicated to specific university chapters of fraternities and sororities. Two of the other houses are for upperclassmen males, one is for upperclassmen females and the final house is part of the international Global Gateways Program and houses only female students. Each house has a living room or common room area, a kitchen for the house and has individual bedrooms for either 28 or 14 students, depending on the house. Each bedroom comes equipped with a full-size bed, a desk, desk chair and a three-drawer chest. Bedrooms in Greek Village also have built-in closet areas. Most rooms in Greek houses share a bathroom with the individual beside them, but some rooms have

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

individual bathrooms.

HOU SIN G REG ULA TIO NS

MICHELLE LIRINGIS LIFESTYLE EDITOR

Make sure not to overload outlets with multi-plug extension cords. If you want to have internet in your room, make sure to bring your own router. Connections are available in each room, but you will need to connect to it. Candles, or anything with an open flame, are prohibited in all residential areas. Students are not permitted to paint their rooms. If decoration is desired, students may hang posters or pictures on the wall as long as walls are not damaged. Microfridges or minifridges are available for student rental, and both are permitted in rooms, as well as microwaves. Pets, except pre-approved service animals, are not permitted in residence halls. Each semester, residence halls perform Health and Safety Inspections, to ensure students are following all safety codes and are not living in filth. Should a student lose their key, they are permitted to check out a loan key. Loan keys are $10 and a student must turn the key back in before two hours have passed, or they will be charged to have a new lock put on their door.

11


12

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


TWEET

LIKE A PRO PATRICK BOGANS STAFF WRITER

Having a strong social media presence is something everyone strives for in this day and age. But having a strong presence on Facebook or Twitter does not always mean it’s a good presence, especially when an employer is looking at your profile. Now that you’re in college and will soon be looking for a career in the field you’re majoring in, it is extremely important to maintain some sort of professionalism on your public social media accounts, especially Twitter. An employer could possibly take one quick look at your Twitter and see some things that you would not even want your parents to see. Here are some ground rules to have a professional, fun and successful social media presence.

make sure you’re not tweeting only about what interests you; keep up with what’s going on around you to make sure you’re still in the loop with the rest of your followers. SHOW SOME PERSONALITY Your Twitter account could be a feed of news stories and nothing else, which would keep your Twitter professional, but boring. Show some of yourself, show the person behind the Twitter account. If not, you’re just turning yourself into a brand instead of branding yourself. Make sure people know you’re an actual person, but do so through the right ways. Sharing a picture of you and your friends at a fun Charlotte event is great, but calling out someone through social media is not so great.

FIND YOUR NICHE DON’T SUBTWEET Whether its Just don’t do it. sports, music, Speaking about fashion, someone negatively politics, through social TIPS R E photography media in a passive T TWIT or something aggressive manner shtags Use ha wonders for else, make sure speaks to employers . s o er It can d unt of follow o m a r people recognize and your followers u o y er th o you as someone about how you t c ne Discon r ts u n o for a source for would handle a u y o t acc bou cares a . No one y r that info. The situation that r o st, s Pintere smaller the niche, bothers you. It ht the rig @Reply the better. You’ll may feel like the ts accoun r know who e definitely gain right thing to do r v u e o You n y see y actuall followers if you for social justice, might tweet. find a small group but it really just of people who are ends up hurting in the same small your credibility community. But in the long run. Photo by: MCT Campus

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

13


ATKINS LIBRARY

A look at Charlotte HECHENBLEIKNER LAKE

Clockwise from top on page 14: J. Murrey Atkins Library, Belk Tower, Student Union and Hechenbleikner Lake. Hechenbleikner Lake was built by a biology professor at the university and some of his class in the early 1960s. Clockwise from top of page 15: Jerry Richardson Football Stadium, 49er Gold Miner, Star Quad, university founder Bonnie Cone’s on-campus grave site, newly completed for fall 2014 Martin Hall. Photos by: Eden Creamer and Chris Crews

STUDENT UNION

14

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

BELK TOWER


FOOTBALL STADIUM

CA M PU S HI ST OR Y LIZ LANIER GUEST WRITER

MARTIN HALL

49ER GOLD MINER

BONNIE CONE

STAR QUAD

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

In the span of only 68 years, UNC Charlotte has grown from a tiny school for 278 students to a sprawling, urban research institute with over 26,000 undergraduates. In 1946, the Charlotte Center was opened for veterans of World War II in Central High School. Several of these makeshift colleges opened up around the country to serve the educational needs of returning soldiers on the funds of the G.I. Bill, but the school that would be UNC Charlotte persevered when most were closed, as funding dried up in 1949, and the school was renamed Charlotte College. The new campus for Charlotte College opened up in 1961, on 1,000 acres of land just 10 miles from Uptown Charlotte after legislators and business leaders of Mecklenburg and nearby counties started efforts to find a new home for the expanding school. By 1965, Charlotte College became a four-year university and was bestowed with its current name and spot within the University of North Carolina system. 1969 was significant for the university, as programs offering master’s degrees began. In 1992, UNC Charlotte was authorized to offer doctoral programs. Combined, the university now offers over 150 bachelor’s degrees, master’s degrees and doctoral programs. Students began to enjoy a football program in fall 2013, with the first Charlotte 49ers winning their inaugural football game against the Campbell Camels on August 31, 2013. UNC Charlotte has proven itself as the little college that could, and students today are still a part of the living history of the university.

15


GOING GREEK UNC CHARLOTTE HAS MANY OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDENTS TO JOIN GREEK ORGANIZATIONS EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Becoming a member of a Greek organization on campus is something that each student will at some point consider. Some will have decided for sure that they plan to rush, others may be completely against it, and some haven’t decided yet. For those already sure that rushing a fraternity or sorority is right for them, the next step is to rush, and hopefully receive a bid. To rush, students should register in the online database and pay a registration fee. Once rush week begins, those registered will be able to participate in many events, meet new people and learn about many organizations across campus. For those on the fence, it is important to consider the many facets of Greek life. Greek life, despite what movies and television may imply, is more than just parties. Most Greek organizations will serve as a great source of leadership experience to members, giving them abilities to lead others in their chapter, or in other conferences or clubs. Many also involve members in philanthropy projects which benefit children, animals, the environment and others less fortunate in the community. Students who have already decided against Greek life should not worry. There are other organizations they are able to join on campus. If a student decides later in their college career that they would like to join Greek Life, it is never too late to sign up for rush via the online database.

16

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

CHAPTERS AP TER S CH AT UN UNC C CHARLOTTE AR LOT TE CH

PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION • Alpha Delta Pi • Chi Omega • Delta Zeta

• Kappa Delta • Sigma Kappa • Zeta Tau Alpha

NATIONAL PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL • Alpha Phi Alpha • Omega Psi Phi • Alpha Kappa Alpha • Phi Beta Sigma • Delta Sigma Theta • Sigma Gamma Rho • Kappa Alpha Psi • Zeta Phi Beta INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL • Alpha Sigma Phi • Delta Chi • Kappa Alpha Order • Kappa Sigma • Lambda Chi Alpha • Phi Delta Theta • Phi Sigma Kappa

• Sigma Alpha Epsilon • Sigma Chi • Sigma Phi Epsilon • Sigma Tau Gamma • Triangle • Zeta Beta Tau

DIVERSIFIED GREEK COUNCIL • Chi Upsilon Sigma • Delta Phi Lambda • Lambda Theta Alpha • Lambda Theta Phi

• Mu Sigma Upsilon • Pi Alpha Phi • Psi Sigma Phi

INDEPENDENT COUNCIL • Alpha Omega Epsilon • Phi Mu Alpha • Interest groups


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

17


University Career Center provides students with career preparation and planning resources EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

The University Career Center (UCC) has a vast variety of helpful resources for students looking to make the transition from college to employment before and after graduation. From career advising and counseling to interviewing tips and tricks, services provided from the UCC will be a benefit to any motivated student. According to the mission statement of the UCC, they hope to “provide a comprehensive approach to career preparation and development with experiential learning as a key component resulting in an enhanced and engaged academic and life long career experiences for students.� NINERJOBNET NinerJobNet is one of the most important services offered at the UCC. It is an online database of job postings for UNC Charlotte students and alumni, as well as jobs posted to the network for more than 800 other schools across the country. Students can search through various employment types: fulltime, part-time, internships and more. And students have the option to post their resumes to the database for potential employers actively searching for new employees. NinerJobNet is also the system for students to sign up for oncampus interviews by employers during the fall and spring semesters. Any student looking to register with NinerJobNet must attend an orientation session to familiarize themselves with the procedures and features of the site. The 45-minute session will also teach students the most effective way to use the site for the best job search results.

18

PATRICK BOGANS STAFF WRITER

UNIVERSITY CAREER CENTER

Photo by: Patrick Bogans Face-to-face orientation sessions will be available throughout the school year, but students also have the option to complete the session online through the UCC website. OTHER ELECTRONIC RESOURCES The UCC also offers many resources on their website for students to utilize in their job search. Through numerous online presentations, students can learn how to get the most out of a job fair, how to network, how to develop a positive self brand and more. Links to many of these resources can be found on the main UCC webpage, while advisors at the center would be happy to provide to students looking to utilize them. Through the Career Search and Preparation tab on the website, students are able to find effective interview tips,

occupations by major, a quick link to NinerJobNet and tips for transitioning into the workplace after graduation. IN OFFICE RESOURCES By calling the UCC and speaking with someone there, students are able to schedule all sorts of helpful career planning one-on-one sessions. These include mock interviews, resume critiques and individual career planning and advising. During a mock interview, students will sit down with their assigned career advisor and will be asked a series of common interview questions. Students can choose to either submit a job description for a job they would like the interview tailored toward, or they may just do a general interview for their field. At the end of the interview, the advisor will go through the responses the student provided to the questions

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

and grade them on how well they performed during the interview. During a mock interview, it is recommended that the student arrive 10 to 15 minutes early and dress appropriately for a job interview. Resume critiques allow students to show their resume to someone trained in career development. The content as well as the appearance of the resume may be critiqued in a constructive way. Individual planning and advising can help in particular students who are unsure what they want to do after graduation, or what major will put them in the direction that they wish to go. Advisors are trained to know the ins and outs of the current job market and are an excellent resource for students who are still on the fence. JOB FAIRS AND EXPOS Throughout each semester, the UCC plans and organizes career fairs at the university. At these day-long events, employers from around the area attend to hopefully recruit talented Niners to come work for them. Students should ensure that they dress professionally before attending a career fair, as they may be put in a situation where they are attempting to impress a future employer. These fairs and expos can include either full time employers, or those interested in hiring part time employees or interns. All of these services are free and available to any enrolled student at the university. Alumni services are also available through the UCC. You can learn more at http://career.uncc.edu/.


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

19


COUNSELING

The Health Center is here to save the day SEAN GRIER INTERN

Photo by: Eden Creamer

CALM YOUR INNER HULK UTILIZE THE COUNSELING CENTER TO KEEP YOUR COOL EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

The University Counseling Center provides free mental health services for students designed to assist them in coping with personal, relationship and developmental issues or academic concerns. Counseling is available on a one-on-one basis or in a group setting. Every student at UNC Charlotte is allowed a maximum of 12 free individual sessions per academic year. Individual counseling can focus on coping with crisis, resolving conflicts, managing depression and addressing identity issues, among other concerns that counselors are trained to help students cope with. Students may also seek couple’s counseling if both partners are enrolled at UNC Charlotte. If a student requires treatment by a psychiatrist, the staff of the Counseling Center can provide a referral to the Student

20

Health Center. Many group counseling sessions are offered every semester on a variety of topics, or as a general group therapy. Commonly offered topic groups include: meditation and relaxation, mood management, anxiety management and LGBTQ identity. Groups typically meet each week of the semester. Some groups may be attended without prior registration, while others that involve more sensitive topics require a pre-group interview, usually lasting about 30 minutes. Appointments can be made by calling the Counseling Center at 704‑687‑0311, or by dropping by the center in Atkins 158 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Built in 2007, the University Health Center at nearly 32,000 square feet features 21 medical exam rooms, including two negative pressure rooms that are used to prevent the spread of infectious bacteria. The Health Center provides medical care, disease prevention, wellness promotion, and a variety of educational resources and health services to all registered UNC Charlotte students. They are staffed with experienced medical doctors, pharmacists, physician assistants, family nurse practitioners, a team of nurses and a psychiatrist. The Health Center offers a wide variety of vaccines for those that request, as well as a variety of disease testing to ensure a healthy campus environment. The center caters to the student body better than most students know.

For more information, visit the center’s website: counselingcenter.uncc.edu.

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

Students who are injured in a sport or simply require a surgery can go to physical therapy through our health center after a referral from your doctor, and there is an on-site pharmacy for medication needs. There is no charge for students to see a physician, physician assistant, nurse, nurse practitioner, health education consultant or physical therapist. However, certain services provided will result in fees. Appointments that are non-emergency must be made in advance of your arrival. Requests for appointments and prescription refills can be made online through the Health Center's website or in person. The Student Health Center is open Monday through Thursday 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. and Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.


NOW LEASING 704.595.9218

www.arwenvista.com

BRING IN THIS AD FOR $200 OFF MOVE IN! Located minutes away from UNCC, Arwen Vista Apartment Homes offers the best of resort-style living, highlighted by an enormous 10,000 square foot Amenity Center. At Arwen Vista Apartments, you can play ball in our multi-purpose SportsPlex, get fit in our state-of-the-art Strength and Cardio Centers, and unwind in the Jacuzzi or Saunas. Arwen Vista’s one, two and three bedroom apartments have been designed with careful attention to detail. Each home offers a wealth of fine upgrades, such as granite countertops, maple cabinets, black finish appliances and nine-foot ceilings with crown molding. In addition, Arwen Vista Apartment Homes boasts an impressive pool area with sun deck and WiFi, outdoor fireplace, sand volleyball, dog park, walking trails and more! Come see what everyone is talking about. Visit Arwen Vista Apartment Homes today!

Newly renovated clubhouse

AVALON

Resort style pool with cabanas

BERWYN

SURVIVAL GUIDE

Upgraded interiors with granite countertops

CAMEO

2014

21


A LOT! TWO MODERN dining halls and 25 ADDITIONAL CHOICES!

@unccdining

aux.uncc.edu/dining aux.uncc.edu/meal-plans 22

dineoncampus.com/unccharlotte A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


DON’T LET TECHNOLOGY BE YOUR KRYPTONITE CAMPUS COMPUTER LABS, YOUR UNC CHARLOTTE-ISSUED EMAIL ADDRESS, MOODLE, 49ER EXPRESS AND ORGSYNC CAN MAKE COLLEGE LIFE EASIER IF YOU KNOW HOW TO UTILIZE THEM EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

For many classes you’ll take at UNC Charlotte, you’ll need access to some sort of technology. Whether it is a class with many components on Moodle, or you’re just waiting for your professor to send out an email canceling class, you will use technology at UNC Charlotte. Use this guide for some of the campus technologies that you’ll utilize as a Niner. CAMPUS COMPUTER LABS In various places across campus, there are student computer labs equipped with computers and printers to help students finish any assignment that might come their way. Students can log into the computers using their NinerNet credentials. All computers are equipped with Microsoft Office products to assist students in completing assignments. Computers are also all either linked with a grounded printer, or have access to any of the Ink Spot locations on campus. Ink Spot allows students and faculty to print remotely using a computer, tablet, or cell phone. To print from a computer or laptop, an individual would connect to the Internet and open the Ink Spot upload page. Following the directions on screen, the user will select whether they want to send the document to a black and white or color printer, and then upload the file. The main campus computer lab locations are on the first floor of the Barnard Building. These facilities are open 24/7 to students. Technical assistants working at the labs may ask to see a valid student ID upon entry, so it is encouraged to make sure you bring yours. In J. Murrey Atkins Library, there are plenty of computers available for student use as well. These computers are available as the

library is open. Labs in the McEniry Building are open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., unless scheduled for an event, and are located in rooms 203, 420 and 445. The Center City Building, located in Uptown Charlotte, also has computer labs which are open 24/7 for students on that side of the city, unless the lab is reserved for an event. Those labs are located in rooms 801 and 802. Computers are also available through the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of Education. All computers are maintained by the university’s Information and Technology Services. @UNCC EMAIL ACCOUNT Upon applying to be part of Niner Nation, students all receive a unique @uncc. edu email account. This email account is a randomized combination of your first initial, last name and potentially numerals. The email accounts use Office 365, and students can access it either through 49er Express or by going to myninermail.uncc.edu. These email accounts are important to check frequently because they are the official way that the university will contact you. Students will receive emergency email notifications, emails from academic departments regarding scholarships or internships and can receive emails from professors regarding classes to these accounts. MOODLE Many courses utilize Moodle, the university’s online course manager. Students taking online classes will work entirely through Moodle for all of their course’s work. Faceto-face or hybrid classes may choose to use Moodle as just a gradebook; to allow stu-

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

dents to do discussion forums; to administer tests or quizzes; to have students submit assignments; and as a place for students to download course materials. Students and faculty also have access to previous semesters' courses that they were participants of, to allow them to access materials from those courses. 49ER EXPRESS Through 49er Express, students can access essentially everything they need to be a successful Niner. Once a student has logged in with their NinerNet credentials, they are able to access a myriad of information. Through the main page, students can access campus mail, Moodle academic advisors and the bookstore. Students will also use 49er Express to register for classes, check final grades and view unofficial transcripts. Students who are employed on campus will also find an “Employment” tab where they can view pay stubs and fill out electronic time sheets. ORGSYNC Many university clubs and organizations use OrgSync to keep up with members and to distribute information. Designed to look similar to a social media page, members of organizations have a main news feed for information clubs on campus choose to make public. On individual organization pages there are also organization specific news events. Groups can use OrgSync to have members complete forms or polls, participate in discussion forums, upload photos and more. To log into OrgSync, go to orgsync.com, select UNC Charlotte from the drop-down of universities and log in using your NinerNet credentials.

23


24

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

25


26

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

27


Campus police vanquish foes UNC CHARLOTTE’S POLICE AND PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENT WORKS AROUND THE CLOCK TO KEEP CAMPUS SAFE SARA CARSON NEWS EDITOR

Composed of 50 full-time sworn officers, three auxiliary part-time sworn officers, 11 full-time nonsworn officers and five part-time non-sworn officers, the UNC Charlotte Police and Public Safety (PPS) department is more than equipped to provide safety and security to all 28,000 students, faculty and staff. Police Chief Jeffrey Baker, having served with the CharlotteMecklenburg Police Department (CMPD) for 28 years, has developed a close alliance and regular communication between CMPD and the 49er police department. The two agencies assist one another on both oncampus events as well as off campus events, nearly tripling the number of officers available to assist Niner Nation. “UNC Charlotte PPS is a state authorized Police Department focused on crime prevention,

dedicated to protecting the welfare and safety of the university and committed to building strong campus and community partnerships that support and advance the research and educational goals of UNC Charlotte,” stated Baker on the department’s web page. The UNC Charlotte police department is split into two divisions: patrol operations and support services. The patrol operations division is composed of officers who provide 24/7 campuswide security on foot, bikes and patrol cars. Some of their services include preliminary investigations, crime prevention and response to any campus crimes. In addition to enforcing UNC Charlotte policy, these officers also have the ability to enforce North Carolina state law. Officers in this division are

PATROL CARS

28

CA MP US PO LIC E FA ST FA CT S

CONTACT INFO

CALL BOX required to undergo continuous training and education throughout each year. As for the support services division, it takes many different roles, including Clery and compliance mandates, follow-up investigations, special events and private security services, 911 communications center, auxiliary personnel, career development, fleet management, lost and found and other business support services. In addition to these two units, the department has a myriad of special units. Some of these units are bike patrol, R.A.D. (Rape Aggression Defense), a tactical or S.W.A.T. unit and University Rangers who serve to secure academic buildings in the evenings. To find out more information about the UNC Charlotte police department and the variety of services they offer, visit http:// police.uncc.edu/

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

Emergency: 704‑687‑2200 Non-Emergency: 704‑687‑8300 9151 Cameron Blvd. Charlotte, NC 28223

POLICE MISSION

The mission of the Police and Public Safety Department is to provide a safe and secure environment supporting the university’s pursuit of research and academic excellence. Our highly dedicated law enforcement professionals continually strive to reduce crime, accidents and loss of property through investigative processes and effective community partnerships.

POLICE VISION

We envision a crime free campus, supported by a university wide spirit of collaboration that encourages students, faculty, staff and visitors to experience the full spectrum of opportunities offered by the university.

POLICE VALUES

We adhere to the core values of integrity, excellence and service as we continue to integrate a culture of safety supporting the research and academic mission of the university.


EXCEL AT CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT STUDENT EMPLOYEES MUST FOLLOW VARIOUS REGULATIONS

EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Across campus, there are many opportunities for students to seek part time employment while they get their education. Students can be hired in places ranging from the Student Union to J. Murrey Atkins Library to the Student Activity Center. No matter where students find a job on campus, there are a couple things that they need to know. EMPLOYMENT REGULATIONS To be a student employed on campus, there are a few rules you must follow. First, it is important that you do not work more than 20 hours during academic semesters that you are enrolled. Student employees are also held to high standards by their direct supervisors. Generally, they are expected to report to work on time and dressed appropriately for their job.

however, are federally funded and need-based positions. This program offers both undergraduate and graduate students with opportunities to work in order to receive funds for their education. The program is organized and administered by the Office of Student Financial Aid and the Student Employment Office. Graduate Assistantships are opportunities provided to either current graduate students, or those who are planning to become graduate students. The goal of the program is to help the student gain experience toward their graduate degree, and to provide the university and faculty with additional resources and assistance. There are three categories of Graduate Assistantships: Administrative Assistants, Research Assistants and Teaching Assistants.

TYPES OF EMPLOYMENT As a student on campus, there are a few different types of employment available. These include Student Temporary Wage positions, Federal Work Studies and Graduate Assistants. Student Temporary Wage positions are open to any enrolled UNC Charlotte student, and the pay for these positions is funded entirely through departmental funds. These positions are selected not based on financial eligibility, but based on skill of the applicants. Federal Work Studies,

FORMS Before your first day on your new job, you’ll need to complete an electronic I-9 form and complete the hiring packet available through the Human Resources website. Once the packet is complete, you will need to bring the packet, as well as an unexpired passport or Permanent Resident Card, or a government-issued photo ID and either a Social Security Card or birth certificate, to King 222. Here you will get entered into the HR system, and ensure that you are eligible to work on campus.

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

29


Truth, justice and the American Way ACADEMIC INTEGRITY IS A VITAL PART OF EDUCATION AT UNC CHARLOTTE EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

2200

uncc.edu

30

As a student at UNC Charlotte, it is extremely important to be aware of the policies in place regarding academic integrity and honesty. It is important to maintain an environment of honest work, as this allows growth of the academic community on campus. UNC Charlotte holds students to the highest standards of honesty and academic standards, as detailed in the University Policy 407, or the Code of Student Academic Integrity. All types of academic integrity violations are detailed in this policy. The Policy also details the way violations of academic integrity are dealt with. Academic integrity includes students doing their own coursework. Should students plagiarize, or hire another individual to do their work for them, they are breaking rules of proper student conduct, and could be taken in front of the Dean of Students Office, where the next steps will be decided on a case-tocase basis. In an attempt to thwart attempted plagiarism, many faculty members at UNC Charlotte use TurnItIn.com, an online plagiarism prevention system that pulls from a database of previously submitted works, as well as work found on the Internet, to quickly and easily determine if a student has copied another’s work. UNC Charlotte also implements an honor code called The Noble Niner. This policy includes scholarship, integrity, respect, accountability, dignity, honor, compassion, character and nobility. The entirety of University Policy 407 can be found through the Office of Legal Affairs’ website.

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

THE NO BLE NIN ER Scholarship: A Niner shall strive for academic excellence in and out of the classroom while maintaining academic honesty and ethical values. Integrity: A Niner shall act to uphold and improve one’s self, the community, and the high standards of the institution. Respect: A Niner shall welcome all aspects of individuality and self-worth while embracing the learning opportunities that diversity provides. Accountability: A Niner shall hold others responsible for their actions while accepting responsibility for one’s own. Dignity: A Niner shall appreciate the intrinsic value of the institution and work to preserve the 49er environment. Honor: A Niner shall appreciate students, faculty, administration, and staff as contributing members of the University community. Compassion: A Niner shall demonstrate genuine consideration and concern for the needs, feelings, ideas, and well-being of others. Character: A Niner shall exemplify all qualities and traits that promote fellowship and camaraderie among the student body, faculty, staff, and administration. Nobility: A Niner shall exhibit the virtues and values listed above which befit all members of our Niner Nation.


WELCOME TO ATKINS LIBRARY MICHELLE LIRINGIS LIFESTYLE EDITOR

Whether it is finals, midterms, a research paper or studying, the J. Murrey Atkins Library becomes a second home to many Niners during their college careers. However, the library can be more than a quiet place to do work if students are informed about all of the resources it has to offer.

FIRST FLOOR

COMPUTERS The library has over 200 computers for student use. Computers are located on the first, second and third floors. Students may view how many computers are available on the main page of the library’s website. There are also laptops available for student check out at the circulation desk. Laptops may be checked out for a period of 24 hours with no renewals and may not be checked out an hour before the library closes. When a laptop is returned to the circulation desk, the student must wait four hours before they may check out another laptop. If any part of the laptop is lost or stolen, the student whose 49er card is associated with the laptop is responsible for paying for the cost of replacement of missing or damaged parts. Computers can also be used for the online book reserve. To reserve, click “reserve this item.” The website will then prompt students to login with their Ninernet credentials. The books will be reserved for a week, and the students will receive an email when they are ready to be picked up. While there is no limit to how many books may be checked out under the student’s name, they may only reserve five books per day.

STUDY SPACES The library is a favorite study spot among students. There are numerous places around the library to buckle down and get some work done or work with friends or classmates. The ground floor of the library reopened last academic year after a remodeling in the spring of 2012. It features comfortable furniture, tables, new technologies and a few rooms for group study. Some tables feature screens that students may hook their laptops up to in order to

display content. The screens have a touchpad that allows for navigation. The library also has group study rooms available for reservation on the first and second floors. All rooms may be reserved by students under the “services” tab on the library home page and selecting “reserve study room.” Students may then view what is available right then or select the day and time which they wish to use one.

J. Murrey Atkins Library features everything students need to help them get that ‘A’ in a class. Above Photo by: Chris Crews. Illustration by: Lindsey Hunt.

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

RESEARCH The university gives students and faculty members access to databases they would otherwise have to pay for. These databases can be accessed through the library’s website under the “research” or “find” tabs. From there, there are links to different subjects and topics. Students are able to find full articles on a variety of topics as long as they are logged in through the library’s website. There are also research librarians and subject librarians available for help with research. The name and contact information of subject librarians is available under the “research” tab on the library’s home page. These librarians can help direct students to specific resources in the library, such as newspapers, reference texts, books or online materials. SPECIAL COLLECTIONS The 10th floor of the library houses the university’s special collections and archives. It is open Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. There students can find historical artifacts, articles and texts. Most of the information is about Charlotte and the university’s history, but there are a variety of subjects to be found here. There is also a special collections librarian available to help students locate what they need. Items found in special collections may not be checked out. Not pictured: Quiet zones on ground floor, first, third, fifth, sixth, seventh and eight floors, Library Cafe on ground floor.

31


32

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


IT’S CLOBBERING TIME PLACES TO WORKOUT AND GET FIT ON CAMPUS JARED GREEN STAFF WRITER

UNC Charlotte has two athletic facilities. Unfortunately for the 2014-15 academic year, Belk Gym, one of the two facilities, will be closed for renovation. When Belk reopens, however, it will be better than ever. BELK GYM The building, built in 1970, is the school’s original gym and, since then, has seen a fair share of sporting events, exercise and sportsman-like camaraderie. The building is also home to the Department of Kinesiology and the Department of Recreational Services. Construction will not affect activities or classes this semester as renovations have already begun. The building will be closed during the next academic school year as the construction is planned to take anywhere from 12 to 18 months. The building is reported to reopen in the fall of 2015. Students can expect to be surprised when the renovation is complete, as Belk Gym will see some much needed structural and cosmetic improvements. A new lobby, entrance plaza and building facade will resurrect the once state-of-the-art facility, bringing it into the modern era. New staircases will be efficient for traffic flow. “Architecturally, the best building features are the transparent open lobby and vestibule spaces both on the main

Students can use the facilities in the Student Activity Center to do cardio or strength training, using a variety of different types of equipment. NT File Photo

JONATHAN GOLIAN INTERN

and upper levels,” said Donia Schauble, the project manager for the building’s renovations. Schauble also mentioned how new lighting and finishes would liven up the visual appearance of the building. While closed, the floor in Belk Gym’s gymnasium will be resurfaced and new lines will be painted. The gymnasium, as well as the rest of the building, will also have a new HVAC system to regulate the climate of the building. Unfortunately, the pool will be closed during renovations. This means several activities that take place in the pool area such as Venture’s kayak roll clinics will be displaced until renovations are complete. A new administrative office suite will be built for the Department of Recreational Services as well as the Department of Kinesiology. In addition, new classrooms, labs and a new lecture hall will be constructed The building will see a new 8,000 square foot fitness center which will include a free weight room and group fitness rooms. New programs offered by Recreational Services will include an expanded personal trainer staff and fitness assessment services. The Department of Recreational Services hopes that the new features of the building will expand and diversify students’ fitness options. “We hope to offer more types of classes as well as more time

slots, to give students more opportunities to find a place for Group Fitness in their busy schedules,” said Hans Kaufmann, associate director for operations for the Department of Recreational Services. The rescheduling of events that take place in Belk Gym is still a bit of a challenge. “When you figure out what will happen to the activities and classes that take place in Belk Gym, do let the rest of us know,” added Student Activity Center (SAC) Director Nina Simmons. The department of Recreational Services, the Kinesiology Department and the SAC have been working with reservations to find a place for all of Belk Gym’s activities. Some of the Kinesiology Department’s classes will be moved to the group fitness room in the SAC; others will be moved to various buildings around campus. The SAC will experience more crowding as many of the events that normally take place in Belk Gym will be moved into the SAC. “We are asking students to be patient. The SAC will be more crowded but things will be better when the renovations are complete,” said Kaufmann. To accommodate the crowding in the SAC, its business hours will be extended. THE SAC The SAC is open from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

and Friday, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday and weekends from 12 to 11 p.m. Inside the SAC, there are plenty of facilities available for student workout use. The fitness center is a spacious area filled with plenty of equipment to help a student customize their workout, including elliptical machines, reclining and upright bikes, treadmills and rowing machines, plus a full area of weights and weight machines for building and toning. If there’s a specific area a student wants to work on and can’t do it alone, the SAC also offers group classes, free to anyone with a valid UNC Charlotte ID Card. The center offers over 45 classes, including various yoga and kickboxing classes. This is also a good way to get to know other students. The recreational areas feature four courts for various activities, including basketball, badminton and volleyball. Nets can be obtained from the center’s office anytime there is an open area. The facility also features an indoor climbing wall and running track. The indoor climbing wall features a variety of difficulty settings, from beginners steps to hanging spots for the more advanced. Hanging gear can be rented at the ticket office for an afternoon of fun. The indoor track is an eightmile track with three lanes. It is located on the upper levels of the Activity Center.

33


34

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

35


WITH GREAT POWER COMES GREAT RESPONSIBILITY OPPORTUNITIES TO BE A STUDENT LEADER ARE ABUNDANT FOR ALL IN THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION SEAN GRIER INTERN

The Student Government Association (SGA) is the governing body on campus in charge of representing the student body. SGA is comprised of three distinct branches which work with each other to accomplish a myriad of things across campus.

when speaking to all university officials, including but not limited to Chancellor Phillip Dubois, the vice chancellors and Board of Trustees members. The 2014-15 Student Body President and Vice President are Steven Serio and Ruthie Schorr, respectively.

THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH The SGA’s Executive Branch is led by the Student Body President and Vice President and consists of the class presidents, treasurer and others. It is the job of the President to be the voice of the student body

THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH The next branch of the SGA is the Legislative Branch. The Student Senate writes, presents and passes resolutions on behalf of the student body. They are assigned committee meetings that meet on Tuesday and have a full body meeting every Thursday in the Student Union. Some committees make rules on in-house procedures, others determine whether or not to approve a travel grant or even grant funds to student organizations. The Legislative Branch also votes to approve or deny the creation of new student organizations. The Legislative Branch is led by the Student Body Vice President and is comprised senators from the eight academic colleges, AtLarge senators, Freshman At-Large senators and the Resident Student Association representative. These voting members are selected by their respective college through a ballot accessed through 49er Banner SelfService.

2014-15 SGA SGA 2014-15 EXECUTIVE BOARD BOARD** EXECUTIVE According to sga.uncc.edu, as of June 1, 2014 *Class presidents not listed

STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT Steven Serio VICE PRESIDENT Ruthie Schorr CHIEF OF STAFF Davonte Belle SECRETARIES Andrew James (Press), Ryan Hess (Academic Affairs), Paula Ilonze (Diversity Affairs), Michael Mendoza (Student Affairs), Elizabeth Koehler (Information Technology), Nicholle Rentas (State and National Affairs), Mitch Daratony (Athletic Affairs), Jake Emerson (Sustainability) STUDENT BODY TREASURER Max Bauer

36

THE JUDICIAL BRANCH The last branch of the SGA is the Judicial Branch. The Judicial Branch operates under the

authority of the UNC Charlotte Constitution of the Student Body Article IV, and handles student cases involving The UNC Charlotte Code of Student Responsibility (Policy Statement # 406) which exercises the duty of the Chancellor to regulate matters of student conduct in the university community. The UNC Charlotte Code of Student Academic Integrity (Policy Statement # 407) governs student behavior relating to academic work and it is also regulated by the Judicial Branch. The Judicial Branch is here to act as a judge, jury and trial by your peers in the unfortunate case that you are caught cheating or plagiarizing. It is possible your case will be heard in this setting, decisions and recommendations for further action can be made by this board. JOINING SGA SGA officials must maintain office hours and the hours are posted on their individual SGA profile pages. SGA is a great way to become involved and to practice some of the leadership and public speaking skills that will propel your career in the future. SGA elections are held during the spring semester of each academic year. In the event that a seat remains unfilled after an election it is still possible for you to become a legislator within your respective college if you fill out the Student Senate Vacancy Application which provides clear instructions for how to continue forward.

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

2014-15 14- 15 20 SGA A SG SENATORS AN TO RS SE According to sga.uncc.edu, as of June 1, 2014

BELK COLLEGE OF BUSINESS: Cole Binkley, Jared Dobbertin, Brandon Maddux, James Nail, Nick Woolard COLLEGE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES: David McHenry COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND

SCIENCES: Landis Barber, John Daley, Adriana Hernandez, Amber Lowe, Erika Morton, Bridget Ogburu, Nathan Seedorf, Joseph Turkson WILLIAM STATES LEE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING: Charles Hazzard, Garret Ratcliffe AT-LARGE: Brijesh Kishan, Joshua Niday, Sam Polad FRESHMAN AT-LARGE: Andre Jefferies, Spencer Kwolyk RSA REPRESENTATIVE: Dominique Hughes VACANCIES Two seats for the College of Arts and Architecture, two seats for the College of Computing and Informatics, three seats for the College of Education, two seats for CHHS, one seat for the CLAS, one seat for the Engineering, three seats for the University College, one At-Large seat and two Freshman At-Large seats


Transform and roll out THERE ARE MANY TYPES OF PARKING PASSES STUDENTS CAN PURCHASE, AND A CAMPUS SHUTTLE READY TO HELP YOU GET TO CLASS

EDEN CREAMER EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

With plenty of parking lots and decks on campus, it is important to have organized ways for students, faculty and staff to park. That is why UNC Charlotte Parking and Transportation Services (PaTS) offers eight different options for campus parking permits, as well as campus shuttles to help individuals get from one side of campus to the other. PARKING PERMITS There are two types of on-campus resident permits, depending on where the student lives. Students who live in Greek Village will purchase a Greek Village (G) permit. Individuals with this permit may park in Greek Village and any orange coded lot. Residents of all other areas on campus can purchase a Resident (R) permit. These can be used 24/7 in any blue or orange lot. Commuter students can purchase one of five types of permits. The basic Commuter (C) permit allows 24/7 access to yellow and orange coded areas. Monday/ Wednesday or Tuesday/Thursday only permits are also available for commuters. These permits are for one semester only, and allow the student access to yellow or orange coded areas during the days the

permit is valid. Night (N) permits are valid after 3 p.m. and give commuters access to yellow and orange coded areas. Two different Remote Access permits are available, for either Lot 6A or 27. These passes are only valid in these lots, unless during academic break. The final type of pass is a Faculty/Staff (F/S) permit and allows for parking in yellow and orange lots, and residential lots. PaTS has developed a new online widget to help students determine which pass is right for them. An online interactive ticket prevention test will also be available to help students learn how to protect themselves from receiving a ticket. For more information, visit pats. uncc.edu. CAMPUS SHUTTLE There are three different shuttle lines on campus, the Yellow (Route 47), Green (Route 49) and Red (Route 50). Information on the list of stops for each line can be found below. All shuttles are equipped with GPS tracking which connects to the UNCC NextRide mobile application. The free application, available on iOS and Android, allows the user to see where all active shuttles on campus are located at the time.

ROUTE 47 - YELLOW LINE • South Village Deck • Harris Alumni Center • Cone Deck

• Reese Curb • Robinson • East Deck 1

• Fretwell • PaTS Building • Student Union

• Woodward • Cone Deck • Reese curb

ROUTE 49 - GREEN LINE • South Village Deck • South Village Dining • Robinson Hall • East Deck 1

• Fretwell Building • Hickory Hall • Student Health Center

• North Deck • Wallis Hall • Woodward Hall • Student Union

• Auxiliary Services • Fretwell Building • Cato Hall • Robinson Hall

• Reese curb • Cone Deck • Harris Alumni Center

ROUTE 50 - RED LINE • Student Union • Woodward • EPIC Building • Grigg Hall • PORTAL

• CRI Deck 1 • Duke Hall • Grigg Hall • EPIC Building • Woodward Hall

• Student Union • Auxiliary Services • Hickory Hall • Student Health Center • Hawthorn/Greek Village

• Lot 6A • Lot 5A • East Deck 2 • Fretwell Building • PaTS Building

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

37


38

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

39


THINK OUTSIDE THE COVER CONSIDER NON-TRADITIONAL TEXTBOOK OPTIONS THIS YEAR

KEVIN GRANADOS INTERN

Textbooks are one of the most expensive investments in college but also one of the most necessary. This guide will help you find several cheap, or even free, solutions to help manage inflating textbook fees. BUY DIGITAL VERSIONS OF BOOKS Print textbooks are still the most popular choices among college students, but the fact is that digital copies of the same book are only a fraction of the cost. Production of digital books is much cheaper and distribution is easier since you can simply download them directly to your smartphone, tablet or computer. This also cuts out the middle-man (the retailer) and saves you a bundle of money. There is no disadvantage in owning the digital copy of a book, since you can still highlight paragraphs, take notes on them or even print them out. BUY PRE-OWNED BOOKS Buying used books is another great way to save. Most students don’t want to hold on to their textbooks after they finish their classes, so finding these and negotiating a price may be very beneficial to both parties. Bookstores like the Barnes and Noble on campus and Gray’s Bookstore both have buyback programs and sell used textbooks to students at a fraction of the cost of new ones. Websites like Half.com and Amazon also sell used books, which combined with their search features, make it really easy to find what you need. RENT YOUR BOOKS Renting books is another option when trying to save money.

40

Though it’s not the best plan since it can still be quite expensive and you can’t sell the book after you’re done with it, the option should always be considered. Most retailers will allow you to make notes in the book as long as you don’t damage any of the pages, but you can expect to see others’ scribbles and highlights in there as well. Renting books can frequently be done through the campus Barnes and Noble, Gray’s Bookstore and other retailers. BUY BOOKS ONLINE AND EARLY Buying online is almost always the more economic decision. Sources like Amazon and Chegg offer amazing savings when buying books, compared to brickand-mortar stores. Amazon even offers students six months of free Amazon Prime – that means you can get select items with two day shipping, all for free. Buying books early, when no one else is, also allows you to find them at even more competitive prices. CHECK OUT BOOKS AT THE LIBRARY Sometimes students can find the book needed for a class in the school library. Instructors will often receive free samples of books or extra copies for these purposes. An instructor that is willing to take the time can place the book in the library, making it available for checkout, which means students can use the book for free when they need it, assuming the book isn’t already checked out by someone. Depending on the size of the class, this option may be a little risky, but it’s another great, and free, way to save money on textbooks.

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

41


42

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

43


FEEDING THE INNER HERO REVAMPED PLAN OFFERINGS DESIGNED FOR FLEXIBILITY, VALUE, AND THE MODERN STUDENT LIFESTYLE LOUANN LAMB

MARKETING DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS SERVICES, @UNCCAUX GUEST WRITER

THAT WAS THEN Back in the 1970’s, when all oncampus housing comprised four highrise residence buildings, the Residence Dining Hall (RDH) was the only place on campus for hot meals three times a day. Food was prepared “back of the house,” in a huge kitchen, and dished out from pans lined up on a steam table. A meal plan took the form of circles printed on a vinyl sheet that was folded multiple times and affixed to the back of the UNC Charlotte ID. Students would unroll the sheet for the cashier to punch. Every hole represented a meal eaten, every skipped-over circle was a meal not used. It was a very simple, low-tech system. As the university grew, new residence halls were built with multiple living configurations like suites and apartments. Meal plans changed and expanded, too, as did dining options. Favorite national

brands were established all over campus: Chick-fil-A, Salsarita’s, Bojangle’s, Subway, Starbucks, Einstein Brothers Bagels, Papa John’s and Wendy’s all have presence at UNC Charlotte. Declining Balance (DB), by itself or as part of a traditional and block meal plan, provided easy, card-swipe access to all the retail choices. THIS IS NOW Crown Commons opened in the Student Union as the new all-youcare-to-eat dining hall in 2009. Its gas-fired pizza oven, madein-front-of-you cooking stations and ability to apply endless customization to numerous entrees made RDH appear as tired as the linoleum floor in grandma’s kitchen. Equally dated and due for an upgrade were the meal plans UNC Charlotte offered. Plans had become overly complicated and

1973

Photo courtesy of: Atkins Library Archives

44

ill suited to the fast-emerging trend of eating several smaller meals during the course of a day. Social meals with friends are now as likely to be for mid-morning coffee or a late evening burger but “traditional” meal plans are modeled on old-fashioned breakfast, lunch and dinner. TIME FOR A CHANGE, JUST IN TIME UNC Charlotte Business Services in collaboration with dining services partner, Chartwells, spent two years studying meal plans and developing a new model. The goal was to retool meal plans so they would provide: simplicity in purchase, meal flexibility, greater value, be financially sustainable, balance facility use and balance/ lessen wait lines.

2013

Photo by: Chris Crews

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

HOW 2014-15 MEAL PLANS MEASURE UP Simplicity. Plans are based on housing assignment and hours earned. Students living in “required housing,” which are residences without private kitchens, require selecting a meal plan as part of the housing contract. There are two meal plan choices for first-year resident students (freshmen/those with 29 or fewer credit hours). There are four meal plans available to sophomore residents, five for juniors residents and six for seniors. Commuter students may pick any offered plan, regardless of class status. All plans for 2014-15 offer either unlimited meal swipes or are block plans that have a set number of swipes that may be used at anytime throughout the semester. All plans have either $200 or $300 attached Declining Balance (DB) funds that can be used at any dining facility, including all the national retail brands. Flexibility. At the end of Spring semester, after four decades of service, RDH closed. This fall, South Village will have a new meal-plan dining room, to be called SoVi, in South Village Commons. The new facility will, says Bill Bremer, resident district manager for Chartwells Dining Services, “serve students with a 22nd Century program.” New unlimited plans (seven days or five weekdays) fit the modern “action station” dining model of SoVi and Crown Commons to a T. These plans allow students to eat smaller meals throughout the day on a


CROWN COMMONS

Photo by: Chris Crews frequent basis. No more having to load up on a full meal to get their money’s-worth. Students can stop in for cereal and juice before class, grab a sandwich for lunch, a yogurt at midafternoon, some dinner and then coffee and dessert later. Meal swipes are truly unlimited throughout service hours, and, at SoVi2Go, may be used for meals from a take-out venue. In addition to flexibility in when students eat, the new dining facility further expands the flexibility of what they eat. SoVi, like Crown Commons, is set up in multiple stations, with food preparation and action stations in the front of the house. “This gives us a real opportunity to improve choices, said Bremer. “We will go from seven to eight entrées per meal to 15-18. There will be expanded menus for vegans/ vegetarians and those with dietary restrictions [e.g., gluten and dairy sensitivity]. And just about everything can be customized to individual preference.”

Greater Value. The design of the meal plans is based specifically on data from meal plan use on the UNC Charlotte campus. “We know that students with traditional [set number of meals per week] plans tend to lose meals,” said Bremer. A primary reason is because those plans limit the amount of meal swipes given per day and the time in which those meals can be taken. “If a student has meal times fixed by their plan but a class schedule that’s all over the place, that student is going to miss meals.” So, to provide greater value, traditional meal plans had to go. “Block plans are used more fully,” he explained, “because swipes can be anytime throughout the semester. There’s no reason to lose meals.” Therefore, block plan choices remain and have been refined based on how students historically use them (first-year students typically use more meal swipes per semester than upperclassmen). The new unlimited swipe plans

may be the best value for many students, particularly first or second-year students who will take most of their meals and make most of their first social connections in the dining halls. Athletes and those who enjoy bigger meals as well as those who prefer to eat smaller portions several times a day will also benefit from an unlimited plan. And with two new, state-of-the-art dining facilities to use — Crown Commons in the Student Union and SoVi at South Village, meal plan dining is more convenient than ever before. Unlimited meal swipe and block meal plans also come with either $200 or $300 in DB. The amounts were chosen to be practical; dining habit data indicates these are amounts proven to be sufficient for most students. Financial sustainability. Meal plan sales provide a framework to ensure maintenance of existing dining facilities and expansion when needed. Business Services’ mission statement mandates providing “essential human, financial, facility and administrative support to the university…” Supplying wholesome food from properly equipped kitchens is most certainly essential! The last part of that mission statement, “…customer focused, results oriented, fiscally sound, and integrity bound,” is equally important. Plans designed to give students the most value for the dining services they need and expect, falls fully in line with that mission. Balance facility use and wait lines. All restaurants experience peak times around meals, but dining venues on a college campus are subject to concentrated surges around class times. The new SoVi at South Village Crossing will take some pressure off Crown Commons by providing convenient premier dining for the thousands of students who will live on the South side of campus. Unlimited meal swipes mean that quick meals and snacks can be had in the dining halls, too. And while a burger from Wendy’s and nuggets from Chick-fil-A will always be very popular, expanded healthy

SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

and customizable entrée options will attract students who seek greater balance in their diet. New plans take advantage with expertise in the kitchen. The trend in dining halls now demands broader menus and greater opportunity to eat a balanced diet. Chartwells has a full team of campus chefs with over 100 years of combined experience. And, to underscore their commitment to good nutrition, Chartwells added a full-time Registered Dietitian (RD) to the UNC Charlotte culinary staff. The chefs and the RD work together to plan menus that offer meal options for students with different palates and diverse dietary needs and preferences. The updated Meal Plans set the table for the students, providing the broadest dining choice, best value and an experience that’s as much about ‘breaking bread’ and connecting as it is about being fed. WANT TO KNOW MORE? Meal Plan specialists can answer questions and help you choose a plan. Call 704-687-7337 (M-F 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.) or write 49erCard@uncc.edu

MEAL PLAN N AL PLA ME OPTIONS TIO NS OP FRESHMAN RESIDENTS PLANS • 175 meal swipes with $300 DB • Seven day meals (unlimited swipes) with $200 DB UPPERCLASSMEN IN REQUIRED HOUSING PLANS • 150 meal swipes with $300 DB • Five day meal plans (unlimited swipes) with $200 DB • 125 meal swipes with $300 DB (juniors and seniors only) • 65 meal swipes with $300 DB (seniors only) COMMUTER AND NONREQUIRED HOUSING RESIDENTS PLAN • $845 DB

45


LEARNING COMMUNITIES AT UNC CHARLOTTE

Residential B.E.S.T. (Building Educational Strengths and Talents) Business Computing & Informatics Engineering English Health Connections History,Politics, and International Affairs Leadership Journey Teacher Education UCLAS (University Libe College/ Liberal Arts & Sciences) UTOP (University Transition Opportunities Program)

Non - Residential Communication Studies Community Psychology Criminal Justice The Gender Excellence (GEN X) Global Village Ps Psychology

........................................................................................................

........................................................................................................

Find out more about Learning Communities at

WWW.LC.UNCC.EDU BENEFITS OF JOINING A LEARNING COMMUNIT Y

• Feel of small college life with the advantages of a major university • Interaction with faculty who are committed to your success at UNC Charlotte • Instant community of peer support • Shared classes with other students • Access to on-site tutors and mentors • Experiential learning 46

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

47


Tips for becoming a dynamic duo STEPHANY MCMILLIAN INTERN

Entering college opens fears to things we never thought about before, such as roommate trouble. We all hope for that amazing roommate who becomes our best friend, almost immediately, and end up spending all four years in college together. But let’s face the facts that one out of three roommates may not be a perfect match. That is OK! Here are a few rules to remember when dealing with the infamous roommate situation. THE 10 “ROOMIE” RULES: Maintain an open mind: Students from various backgrounds and different religions, sexual orientations and political affiliations make up the university. It’s a time to take risks and learn more about your passions. Experience something new and don’t assume before

48

giving it a try. Hold a brief roommate meeting: Allow all roomies to state their pet peeves, and personal needs like quiet time after 10 p.m. or if he/she is a morning person. Get everything off your chest ahead of time in order to prep your roomies. This will provide a chance to fill out the roommate contract agreement given by your dorm. Directly state problems: Don’t be passive or a pushover. If there is something bothersome then politely discuss the issue with whom it concerns. Going directly to the roomie will cut out the drama and misunderstandings. Get out there: Even though there are roommates to hang out with, try and experience the college life. Explore new organizations and create new friendships. There are plenty of campus events like the

Union Takeover or even sports events. Go support the 49ers! Announce your guests: Don’t frighten your roomies with strangers. Give a warning when people are over. Providing knowledge of guests in advance establishes trust and care. It wouldn’t be nice for your new friend to catch your roomie in her shower towel.

No one likes someone who doesn’t keep his or her word. Be courteous: Sharing is caring. It is okay to allow roomies to use your stuff. As long as each roomie has a mutual understanding to respect everyone’s food and stuff. Remember to clean up after yourself and don’t leave it for others.

Give respect: Don’t judge. Respect a roomies' culture. Even try learning more about it to serve as a bonding moment. Treat their stuff as if it were your own and take pride in what is yours as well.

Keep calm and carry on: Stay cool if something is not going your way. Take time to truly get to know your roomies. Don’t sweat the small stuff, instead get your roommate’s perspective before jumping to conclusions. Later, move on and don’t let problems linger.

Do your part: Whatever was agreed during the roommate meeting, hold up to it and play your role in the room. Keeping the room, shower and living space clean can play a huge part in making sure everyone gets along.

Enjoy college: Take up a new hobby or focus more on your grades and start that GPA high. No matter what stay positive and enjoy college!

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA


SURVIVAL GUIDE

2014

49


on-campus dining options

SOUTH UT H SO VILLAGE LA GE VIL CROSSING OS SIN G CR

MICHELLE LIRINGIS LIFESTYLE EDITOR

SYDNEY WRIGHT Whether using a meal plan or not, eating on campus is convenient for students during a busy day of classes and activities. There are various dining areas all over campus with many different options to cater to all of your cravings. This year, campus welcomes the new South Village Crossing facility, where the new dining hall will replace what was once the Resident Dining Hall (RDH). STUDENT UNION The Student Union houses Einstein’s Bagels, Wendy’s, Mamma Leone’s, Starbucks, Outtakes, Crown Commons and Bistro 49. Einstein’s, Wendy’s, Outtakes and Starbucks do not take meal swipes for the dining halls. Mama Leone’s, the on-campus destination for pizza and pastas, takes meal swipes at dinner on Mondays through Thursdays. Starbucks provides a caffeine fix seven days a week and has all of the familiar favorites. Outtakes is similar to a convenience store. They have snacks, candy and drinks. There is also a cooler that has fresh fruit, sushi and salads. During lunch and dinner times, the Outtakes sub station is open, where students can build custom subs. Other Outtakes locations on campus are in the Duke Building, and does not feature subs. Crown Commons offers typical dining hall style food. Students may pay with meal swipes or any other form of payment. The cost if not using a meal swipe is $6.50 for breakfast, $8.15 for lunch or brunch and $10 for dinner. There are various stations in Crown such as pizza, homestyle, deli, grill, soup and salad bar and a

50

cereal bar. Bistro 49 is also located on the second floor of the Student Union. It has more upscale dining and is open for lunch and dinner. The menu changes every season and always has the freshest ingredients. STUDENT ACTIVITY CENTER The SAC has a Papa John’s Pizza that accepts declining balance, 49er account and cash or card. Students can get their fix of pizza and bread sticks here. CONE UNIVERSITY CENTER Main Street Market in Cone features a Subway, Bojangle’s, Use Your Noodle, Sushi with Gusto and Au Bon Pain soups. The Subway is a full service Subway, featuring your favorite $5 footlongs. At Bojangle’s, students can have their fill of sweet tea and Bo Berry biscuits. Use Your Noodle features Japanese style noodle and rice bowls that students may enjoy. It is a nice place to go for something a little different than what is offered at other dining locations. Sushi With Gusto features different sushi options made fresh daily, and also provides the sushi that can be purchased at other locations on campus, including Outtakes and Prospector. Au Bon Pain offers fresh soups and salads with different options every day. There are other locations in Outtakes and Prospector. ATKINS LIBRARY AND FRETWELL CAFES The cafes in J. Murrey Atkins Library and the Fretwell Building features Peet’s Coffee and Tea

beverages, as well as snacks, bagels and other cooler items. It is perfect for late night study sessions in the library or a quick bite between classes. PROSPECTOR Prospector has two food courts - an upper level and lower level. The lower level features Chick-fil-A and Feisty’s hot dogs. The upper food court has a Salsaritas, Mama Leone’s, Mondo Subs, Grill Nation and a soup and salad bar. Salsarita’s is Mexican style food, including tacos, nachos or quesadillas. Mondo Subs serves up sandwiches of all different varieties. At Grill Nation, students can custom order their burgers and chicken sandwiches to get exactly what they like. None of the vendors located in Prospector accept meal swipes. PORTAL BUILDING New for Fall 2014, the PORTAL Building will feature Orbis Grill. The grill serves fresh lunch fare, salads and sandwiches with a global menu. They have an Evo grill action station for healthy options that are made to order. FOOD TRUCKS Campus dining also includes the Herban Legend Food Truck, which has been on campus for two years now. The truck is usually stationed in front of the Student Union or near Prospector and provides students with unique food options for lunch. Whatever your dining preferences, there is an option conveniently located on campus to suit that need.

A PRODUCT OF STUDENT NINER MEDIA

INTERN

Students, faculty and staff have anxiously watched construction for two years, waiting for the South Village Dining Hall to open. Newly named South Village Crossing, it will be the newest building on the south side of campus and the newest campus eatery. The new dining hall will consist of two state-of-the-art levels and a patio to allow students to eat, hang out, or study. On the lower level, there will be “action stations.” Similar to Crown Commons, at the “action stations” food will be prepared and cooked in front of students. There will be an Asian station with a Teppanyaki grill like in Japanese restaurants. There will also be a Euro station that features healthy cooking and interaction with the chef. There will also be pizza, pastas, a deli, a salad bar and more options for people who are vegetarians, vegans, or have a gluten sensitivity. Prices for the dining hall will be the same as Crown Commons. The second level will include various things such as a bakery named “The Den” and modeled after a Denny’s, meeting rooms and take out dining. The SoVi Market and Bakery will be similar to Outtakes yet feature freshly baked goods and convenience style snacks. “The Den” by Denny’s will feature dinner and late night dining with the Grand Slam and other Denny’s favorites. Three sided fireplaces will be featured on the upper level for the winter time along with student lounges for studying and relaxing. Before South Village Crossing, students on the south side of campus ate at Residence Dining Hall (RDH). RDH served and nourished students for more than four decades. The facility was recently closed with the opening of South Village Dining Hall for repurposing.


— Officially —

THE BEST CHOICE FOR TEXTBOOKS — and more —

Main Level of the Student Union

uncc.bncollege.com

2014 Survival Guide  
2014 Survival Guide  
Advertisement