Page 1

T H E P L AT T E B A S I N PA R K WAY P R O J E C T ADVANCED DESIGN IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Katelyn Nimic| 2021


T H E P L AT T E B A S I N PA R K WAY P R O J E C T ADVANCED DESIGN IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Katelyn Nimic| 2021

ARCH BOOKS LINCOLN

OMAHA

KEARNEY

NORTH PLATTE

SCOTTSBLUFF

CHEYENNE

DENVER


Special thanks goes out to Michael Forsberg and the rest of the Platte Basin Timelapse team for uncovering the stories behind our watershed. Your work has shed light on the management of our water resources and it was a huge inspiration for this project.


CONTENTS THE PLATTE BASIN PARKWAY PROJECT Katelyn Nimic| 2021

01

THE PROJECT BRIEF The Minute City

04-05

02

LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE Class Research & Goals

06-29

03

PRECEDENT STUDIES Individual Research

30-35

04

CONCEPT DESIGN Watershed Education

36-37

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

38-53

05

The Platte Basin Parkway Project


01

THE PROJECT BRIEF THE ‘FIFTEEN MINUTE’ CITY Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Mark Hoistad

Q Street

“What if Lincoln chose to convert the downtown area into a ‘15 minute city’, where residents could walk or bike to the places they work, shop and live within 15 minutes? Can an existing car dominated public domain be transformed into a pedestrian zone that is more of a park than a car-scape, while at the same time allow carefully controlled vehicular circulation through the site?”

K Street

H Street

G Street

17th Street

18th Street

17th Street

18th Street

Antelope Valley Parkway

16th Street 16th Street

14th Street

13th Street

12th Street

11th Street

10th Street

M Street

THE SITE The site for the project is the twenty block area defined by ‘N’ Street of the North, 9th Street on the west, ‘L’ Street of the south and Antelope Parkway on the east. This area was the subject of an urban design effort in the previous semester. The task of this project is to critically understand this plan and then pursue the design of the public space. Each of you will be assigned a subarea plan to program, and design relative to the intentions of the previous urban design plan. The specific definition of the plan of the property boundaries will be developed in the first week of the studio. There will also be an accounting of circulation requirements, topography and existing landscape inventory to establish a greater definition of the site starting point.

Centennial Mall

14th Street

13th Street

12th Street

11th Street

10th Street

O Street 9th Street

benefits of (re)pedestrianizing cities, adding open space and profoundly integrating uses to allow a more localized form of urbanism where everyone can reach everything they need in daily life withing a 15 minute walk, bike ride or mass transit trip. This approach calls for the deconstruction of the modernist car dominated vision of the city manifest in the strait jacket of zoning. The process of conversion requires an assessment of what is there and what is missing. The challenge lies in figuring out how the area under consideration can be (re)designed to match this vision through the strategic removal and addition of new fabric. Central to this is the transformation of the circulation system from one that is dominated by the car to one the values the pedestrian as the base mode of circulation. This transformation makes the (re)design and introduction of open space one of the most important efforts.

9th Street

This studio operates within the belief that sustainable settlement must accommodate the needs of survival, purpose, ecology and heritage. Survival requires the provision of food, water and shelter. Purpose requires the opportunity to improve oneself, earn a living and contribute to making the world a better place. Ecology requires solutions that create integrated and mutually beneficial environmental systems including carbon free energy and the elimination of waste. Heritage requires one to consider tradition, frame identity and nurture the preservation and evolution of place. How sustainable urbanism can be achieved requires a diverse and integrated approach involving many contributory needs and influences. The project will be designed to embrace this more sustainable and holistic approach to city building.As the world continues to navigate the waters of the global pandemic cities are recognizing the

P Street


Church Yard - Caitlin

North Alley - Jessica

West Plaza - Nabhan

W. Transit Mall - Katelyn

STEM Plaza - Aus

E. Transit Mall - Ibrahim

Event Plaza - Rashid

INDIVIDUAL SITE BOUNDARIES

Central Park - Kate & Madeline


02

S T O R M WAT E R M A N A G E M E N T

BENEFITS

• • • •

• • • •

Increased water quality reliability in municipal drinking water supplies, which can lower treatment costs. Increased predictability of water quality, which can reduce long-term capital costs. Increased longevity of water quality investments through reduced wear on system components. Increased development benefits through increased demand and pricing for “green” properties, as shown through premiums for structures employing green infrastructure, reduced non-stormwater expenses such as heating and cooling costs, and increased lots per area available. Multiple benefits to the public good such as flood control and groundwater recharge. Green infrastructure construction costs can be lower than conventional costs. Green infrastructure may not require the same extent of ongoing costs of conventional infrastructure. Green infrastructure benefits can extend beyond stormwater for total project cost-effectiveness.

centennial mall

14th street

13th street

12th street

11th street

L k street

Green infrastructure contributes to greater cost-effectiveness than grey infrastructure by:

10th street

The cost-effectiveness of green infrastructure has also been demonstrated through many municipal programs and research studies. Costeffectiveness means value in terms of relatively low costs for the benefits provided. Both costs and benefits are critical to valuing cost-effectiveness. Green infrastructure construction costs can be lower than conventional costs. Green infrastructure may not require the same extent of ongoing costs of conventional infrastructure. Green infrastructure benefits can extend beyond stormwater for total project cost-effectiveness. Overall there are many benefits associated with stormwater management practices.

9th street

Stormwater is precipitation that becomes polluted once as it flows over driveways, streets, parking lots, construction sites, agricultural fields, lawns, and industrial areas. Pollutants associated with stormwater include oils, grease, sediment, fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, bacteria, debris and litter.. Stormwater washes these pollutants through the storm sewer system and into local streams and drainage basins. In addition, because impervious surfaces prevent precipitation from soaking into the ground, more precipitation becomes runoff, and the additional volumes and velocities of stormwater can scour stream and river channels, creating erosion and sediment problems.

17th street

o street

Rashid Al Musalhi

16th street

LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH


02

S T O R M WAT E R M A N A G E M E N T LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Rashid Al Musalhi

BIOSWALE SYSTEMS

A bioswale is a ditch with vegetation and a porous bottom. The top layer consists of enhanced soil with plants. Below that layer is a layer of gravel, scoria or baked clay pellets packed in geotextile. These materials have large empty spaces, allowing the rainwater to drain off. An infiltration pipe/ drainpipe is situated below the second layer. The water running off from roofs and roads does not flow into the sewers but instead is led into the bioswale via above-ground gutters and/or ditches. Bioswales can be incorporated into the green infrastructure and can help enhance biodiversity and quality of life.

POSITIVE EFFECTS

Water mission: Bioswales are an excellent instrument for improving urban water systems. A properly designed bioswale system buffers rainwater and allows it to infiltrate; this minimises overflow, improves the quality of surface water and prevents the ground from drying out. In periods of groundwater flooding, bioswales can serve as drainage systems.

POSITIVE EFFECTS

Heat stress: Districts with bioswale systems have green-blue veins running through them that can help reduce heat stress. That effect can be enhanced by planting carefully selected vegetation along the bioswales. Air quality: Water surfaces and areas of vegetation have a small positive impact on air quality, in particular by binding particulate matter. Aesthetic value: In most cases, residents regard vegetation and water as positive elements. The same is true of bioswale systems. Bioswales with more diverse vegetation are perceived as even more positive. Bioswales that vary grass with more diverse vegetation can be perceived as flowery veins running through the district. However, bioswales require proper maintenance: otherwise they can quickly become polluted by litter and dog faeces. It is advisable to delineate special dog-walking areas.

STRATEGIES • • • • • • •

Permeable pavement Rain Garden & Bioretention Areas. Rain Barrels and Cisterns. Curb and Gutter Elimination Reduce runoff of rainwater or melted snow into streets, lawns and other sites and the improvement of water quality, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Since the volume of stormwater runoff increases as impervious surface area increases, the two major strategies related to volume management are to increase pervious area or to divert runoff into the green infrastructure system. In addition to increasing imperviousness, removal of vegetation and soil, grading the land surface, and constructing drainage networks increase runoff volumes and shorten runoff time into streams from rainfall and snowmelt.


02

S T O R M WAT E R M A N A G E M E N T LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Rashid Al Musalhi

PERMEABLE PAVEMENT

Permeable pavement is a porous urban surface composed of open pore pavers, concrete, or asphalt with an underlying stone reservoir. Permeable pavement catches precipitation and surface runoff, storing it in the reservoir while slowly allowing it to infiltrate into the soil below or discharge via a drain tile. The most common uses of permeable pavement are parking lots, low-traffic roads, sidewalks, and driveways.

BENEFITS

Permeable pavements help reestablish a more natural hydrologic balance and reduce runoff volume by trapping and slowly releasing precipitation into the ground instead of allowing it to flow into storm drains and out to receiving waters as effluent. This same process also reduces the peak rates of discharge by preventing large, fast pulses of precipitation through the stormwater system.

BENEFITS

Permeable pavement can reduce the concentration of some pollutants either physically (by trapping it in the pavement or soil), chemically (bacteria and other microbes can break down and utilize some pollutants), or biologically (plants that grow in-between some types of pavers can trap and store pollutants). By slowing down the process, permeable pavements can cool down the temperature of urban runoff, reducing the stress and impact on the stream or lake environment. This reduces stress put on the rest of the system during peak flow times. By controlling the runoff at the source, such as a parking lot, permeable pavement can also reduce the need for or the required size of a regional BMP, such as a wet detention pond, which saves money and effort.

Test plot cross-sections showing permeable subsurface materials and runoff flow path. (Illustration created by County Materials Corporation.)

STRATEGIES • • • • • • •

Permeable pavement Rain Garden & Bioretention Areas. Rain Barrels and Cisterns. Curb and Gutter Elimination Reduce runoff of rainwater or melted snow into streets, lawns and other sites and the improvement of water quality, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Since the volume of stormwater runoff increases as impervious surface area increases, the two major strategies related to volume management are to increase pervious area or to divert runoff into the green infrastructure system. In addition to increasing imperviousness, removal of vegetation and soil, grading the land surface, and constructing drainage networks increase runoff volumes and shorten runoff time into streams from rainfall and snowmelt.


02

S T O R M WAT E R M A N A G E M E N T LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Rashid Al Musalhi

RAIN GARDENS & BIORETENTION AREAS

A rain garden is a garden of native shrubs, perennials, and flowers planted in a small depression, which is generally formed on a natural slope. It is designed to temporarily hold and soak in rain water runoff that flows from roofs, driveways, patios or lawns. Rain gardens are effective in removing up to 90% of nutrients and chemicals and up to 80% of sediments from the rainwater runoff. Compared to a conventional lawn, rain gardens allow for 30% more water to soak into the ground.

MAINTENANCE

Inspect pretreatment devices and bioretention areas regularly for sediment build-up, structural damage and standing water. Inspect for erosion and re-mulch void areas on a monthly basis (or as necessary). Remove and replace dead vegetation in spring and fall. Remove invasive species to prevent from spreading within bioretention area. Do not store snow in bioretention areas. Periodically observe function under wet weather conditions. The estimated cost of a bioretention area is between $5 and $30 per square foot.

BENEFITS

Suitable in areas with space constraints. Can provide groundwater recharge. Can treat multiple pollutants. Provides shade, windbreaks, and absorbs noise. Good option for retrofit of existing infrastructure. Can help reduce the “Urban Heat Island Effect”. Preserves native vegetation. Provides localized stormwater and flood control. Attracts beneficial birds, butterflies and insects. Easy to maintain after establishment. Improves water quality.

• • • • •

POLLUTANT REMOVAL EFFICIENCIES

Total Suspended Solids (TSS) 90% (with filter strip or equivalent pretreatment) Total Nitrogen - 30% to 50% Total Phosphorus - 30% to 90% Metals (copper, lead, zinc, cadmium) - 40% to 90% Pathogens (coliform, e coli) Insufficient data

SUITABLE SITE FOR A RAIN GARDEN • • • • • • • • • •

Not suitable where groundwater table is within 6 Feet of ground surface. The site is fed by one or two downspouts Soil tests show the site does not have heavy clay soils (conduct a ribbon soil test) Infiltration tests show the site infiltrates water one-half inch per hour or more. The slope of the site is not more than 12% The site is at least 10 feet from buildings with basements The site is not over or near a septic tank, drainfield, or wellhead The site does not interfere with any trees. If there are trees in the area, make sure they can handle wet soil conditions for lengthy periods of time. Requires careful landscaping/maintenance Requires pretreatment


02

URBAN LIGHTING

Lighting is site are mainly street lights that are in a staggered arrangement and the distance between the poles is 100ft. There are pedestrian lights along centennial mall street, and on the east side walk of 12th street. These are the major sources of lights on site, however there are other sources such as lights coming out from buildings, reflecting lights on street signage, and retail displays on proposal buildings.

IMPORTANCE OF LIGHTS - Increases safety in areas that people use, such as doorways and bus stops. - Help with direction ,as people can use well-lit focal points (fountains, buildings, bridges, towers, sculpture, etc.) As landmarks to help them find their way. - Highlights the identity and history of an area, for well-lit historic details draw attention to the uniqueness of an area.

LIGHT SOURCES - Street poles: Street light poles are major light source in streets, it can be steel or fiberglass, for street and/or pedestrian. - Landscaping: Trees can be illuminated by small white “bee” lights that adds value to the area and bring positive attention, these lights are also known in cities in the holidays. - Entrances: Careful evening lighting around building entrances contributes to the protection of a district, particularly in residential building doorways, even more than the indiscriminate use of bright lighting that is not based on areas of use. - Transit stops: If bus, rail, or trolley stops are well-lit, people feel more safe. Lighting often attracts attention to such amenities and promotes their use.

17th street

16th street

centennial mall

14th street

13th street

12th street

- Edges: To help define and recognize the interior area, the edges of a park or plaza - especially any interesting gateposts, fences, and specimen trees visible from the adjacent street - should be illuminated. There can also be seasonal lighting in buildings clustered on the outskirts of a park, drawing focus to the wider district outside the park. - Retail displays: Lighting retail displays not only provide ambient light for the street, but also facilitate window shopping, including though shops are closed. This technique will help to maximize the number of pedestrians on a route, which is a significant contributor to protection. - Architectural details: Lighting entrances, archways, cornices, columns, and so on will draw attention to the beauty of a house, place, or district and offer the feeling of walking at night with a sense of drama. - Focal points: Another type of wayfinding is provided by lighted statues, fountains, bridges, towers, and other major elements in a district, especially those visible to passing pedestrians and vehicles.

11th street

EXISTING LIGHTING

o street

10th street

Ibrahim Al Kharusi

9th street

LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH

Street Light L

Pedestrian Light

k street

Existing lighting There are different fixtures for lighting on site, street lights, pedestrian lights, and lights from buildings

LIGHT ARRANGEMENTS The distribution of light posts along the street may have a drastic impact on the layout of the street and its secondary purposes, in addition to the functional requirements of the lights themselves. - Staggered arrangement: Staggering light posts across the street from each other makes for a less organized structure that would theoretically use fewer lights, as any overlap lighting can exist. - Opposite arrangement: A more formal situation is defined by light fixtures that are aligned exactly across the street from each other. The opposite layout enables banners or holiday lights

Street Pole

Landscaping

Entrance

Transit Stop

Edge

Retail Display

Light Sources There are different light fixtures that can provide light to the urban environment

Architectural Details

Focal Point


02

URBAN LIGHTING

Staggered Arrangement

Opposite Arrangement

Sensitivity to Existing Conditions

More Closely Spaced Light Posts

Using More Numerous and Closely spaced light fixtures

LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Ibrahim Al Kharusi

- cross the lane. A more formal situation is defined by light fixtures that are aligned exactly across the street from each other. The opposite layout enables banners or holiday lights to cross the lane. - Sensitivity to existing conditions: While it might be possible to define a regular distance between street lights (say, every 40 ‘or 50’), make exceptions to adapt to actual or proposed conditions, such as a street café, compliance or disagreement with current traffic signals, benches, bus stops, and telephones. - More closely spaced light posts: Establish a stronger edge around the pavement, enhancing the sidewalk itself as a habitable area outside. - Using more numerous and closely spaced light fixtures: One way to minimize the wattage of each fixture, and thus the possible glow, is to reduce it.

LIGHTING AND SAFETY The study of lights found that without the new lights, the developments that

received new lights encountered crime rates that were slightly lower than without the new lights. The study concluded, among other things, that improved lighting levels contributed to a 36 percent reduction in “index crimes,” a class of extreme criminal crimes that involves a 36 percent reduction in “index crimes.” ”Lighting decrease crime in indirect ways, - Offenders afraid of identity recognizing: By will the likelihood that they may be heard or remembered while committing crimes, better illumination deters prospective criminals. - Police become more visible: It then leads to a decision to refrain from crime. - Detect offenders: Offenders will no longer commit crimes in the area if better lighting leads to the arrest and detention. - More people in the area: New lighting will allow residents to spend more time in the evenings on their stoops or in their front yards, thus increasing informal surveillance. As well as motivating more persons to walk at night, this will improve informal monitoring.

Light Arrangement There are different light arrangement, and all of these arrangement are on the site, except the opposite arrangement

Visable Police The appearence of police makes the area safer

Well-lit Plaza More people sitting in area the safer it is

RESOURCES • •

“Lighting Use & Design,” December 31, 2008. https://www.pps.org/ article/streetlights. “Improving Street Lighting to Reduce Crime in Residential Areas: Page 2: ASU Center for Problem-Oriented Policing.” Improving Street Lighting to Reduce Crime in Residential Areas | Page 2 | ASU Center for ProblemOriented Policing. Accessed February 21, 2021. https://popcenter.asu.edu/ content/improving-street-lighting-reduce-crime-residential-areas-page-2. “Projects Can Street Lighting Reduce Crime?.” Can Street Lighting Reduce Crime? | UChicago Urban Labs. Crime Lab New York. Accessed February 21, 2021. https://urbanlabs.uchicago.edu/projects/crime-lights-study.

Active Area at Night The more active area the safer it is


02

URBAN TREES LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Caitlin Smith & Madeline McGill

“Every dollar spent on planting and caring for a community tree yields benefits that are two to five times that investment—benefits that include cleaner air, lower energy costs, improved water quality and storm water control and increased property values.” - U.S. Forest Service, 2011 Trees are known to provide shade on a hot day and changing colors in the fall, but trees are constantly working to produce many more benefits beyond what is visible. The table to the right breaks down the main benefits of trees within the social, economic, and environmental categories. It is important to note that, for most of these benefits to happen, the right trees must be chosen, planted correctly, and maintained, in order to reach maturity. Specific varieties and cultivars must be chosen to withstand the intense urban environment and fluctuations between soil pH, salinity, downpours and droughts. Urban trees are chosen for their characteristics, like growth habit and form, and most are required to be wellbehaved with minimal need for pruning after the first few years. Well chosen and

looked after trees will reach maturity faster, and thus be more productive within the urban environment. Trees with larger leaves will be more adept at chemical processes of carbon sequestration, evapotranspiration, photosynthesis, stormwater management, and more. Larger, older trees have a larger capacity for storing carbon in their biomass, intercepting rainwater and sending excess into the ground, and producing shade which can reduce energy consumption and decrease summer temperatures.

RESOURCES •

• •

“Tree Facts.” Tree Facts at arborday.org. Arbor Day Foundation. Accessed February 21, 2021. https://www.arborday.org/trees/ treefacts/#:~:text=Trees%20are%20a%20good%20investment,control%20 and%20increased%20property%20values. Trees in the Townscape: a Guide for Decision Makers. London?: Trees & Design Action Group, 2012. Turner-Skoff, Jessica B., and Nicole Cavender. “The Benefits of Trees for Livable and Sustainable Communities.” Plants, People, Planet 1, no. 4 (2019): 323–35. https://doi.org/10.1002/ppp3.39.


02

URBAN TREES LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Caitlin Smith & Madeline McGill

CONSTRUCTION

Regarding the construction, planting, or transplantation, researching best practices that designers have established in the past will give us a clear idea of the possibilities of street tree construction and maintenance. Beginning with a guide on planting locations, there are certain minimum measurements we should follow, which are making sure trees are NOT planted within: • 20’ of street intersections • 35’ of stop signs • 15’ from fire hydrants • 15’ from utility or light poles • 15’ of driveways Tree islands should have at least 4’ of width when planting trees inside islands, and trees underneath utility lines should be less than 30’ at maturity. Urban trees face a set of unique challenges when it comes to their growth and performance in the harsh urban condition. Access to water, deep soil, and light are all considerations we must address when planting trees in an urban setting, and luckily there are methods to employ to help these trees with their needs. In the second figure we can see a typical construction detail for a tree island with permeable pavers. These permeable pavers allow surface runoff to directly infiltrate the soil which the tree can then utilize. Pipes can then drain excess water underneath the root system to prevent slogging. Inthe third figure, another technology that we can utilize for urban trees are silva cells. Silva cells work as a structural support for both the tree’s root system and the traffic load of the pavement above. It allows the tree to freely grow into a less compacted soil base, but also works to sturdily support the pavement around the tree as well. When planting urban trees, abiding by the minimum layout requirements is a must, but utilizing these methods and technologies can help us reach our goal of having a wellperforming urban forest.

MAINTENANCE

Tree selection and planting strategies have massive impacts on the management plan that will follow. Some key considerations for urban trees are: possible pruning concerns, fruit litter clean up, susceptibility to storm damage, and graft incompatibility problems. The following are recommended maintenance steps within the first year of tree planting: 1. Irrigate the plants frequently to keep rootball moist, not too wet. Start with two waterings per week for the first few months, then drop to once a week through the rest of the growing season. When you water, water well. 2. Maintain the 2 - 3” mulch layer. Keep weeds to a minimum. 3. Use fertilizer only if you have determined, by visual inspection of growth and/ or by a nutrient analysis test, that the plant requires additional nutrients. Usually, nitrogen is the only deficient nutrient. 4. After the first growing season, evaluate the structure of the plant and do any necessary structural pruning (Bassuk, 2009). *Reference pictures on right side.

Typical Tree Island

Trees Plantings with permeable pavers

Tree Pruning Equipment, manpower, and tree knowledge is necessary.

RESOURCES •

• •

Bassuk, Nina, Deanna F. Curtis, BZ Marranca, and Barb Neal. Recommended Urban Trees: Site Assessment and Tree Selection for Stress Tolerance. Ithaca, NY: Urban Horticulture Institute, 2009. “Community Forestry.” Urban Horticulture Institute at Cornell. Accessed February 21, 2021. Salbitano, Fabio, Simone Borelli, Michella Conigliaro, and Yujuan Chen. “Guidelines on Urban and Peri-Urban Forestry.” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2016.

Trees in Silva Cells

Tree Litter: Leaves, buds, pollen, cones, nuts, and fruits all must be removed.


02

URBAN TREES LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Caitlin Smith & Madeline McGill

Creating an arboretum or urban forest can provide us with many benefits to the overall site. Cities are mainly filled with gray infrastructure such as roads and parking lots, and not as much green infrastructure. Creating an urban forest helps introduce the green back into the gray, especially in areas where parkland is harder to come across. When creating a city arboretum or urban forest, we must address the demands of the following dimensions: • Perception: how does the urban forest help create a sense of place or alter how people perceive the location. • Sociocultural Needs: how does the urban forest meet the needs of the users? What is the programming of the spaces within the urban forest? • Ecological Needs: how does the urban forest interact or benefit the local ecology? • Function: what are the demands of the urban forest and how can we as a community address issues relating to the urban forest? • Economic Needs: how can urban forests help develop and sustain the local economy? • Temporality: what are the various time cycles of the urban forest, from ecological to economic considerations? The answers to these questions will vary from site to site, however when it comes to arboretums, there are some typical design guidelines we can abide by. First, an arboretum usually contains different groupings of trees that fit a particular theme. For example, an arboretum could have taxonomic groupings where trees from a specific family are exhibited, such as an oak tree grove. Another grouping theme is geographic groupings, where trees are exhibited to show a specific geographic region such as a lowland forest or a riparian buffer. Making sure trees are

being planted within specific themes provides a good framework for the creation of an arboretum. The next consideration regarding the design is how the trees are making space. A grove of overstory trees can provide places of refuge, corridors can act as ecological “stepping stones” for certain wildlife species, and windbreaks can provide scenic backdrops. Combining the idea of “tree themes” and integrating them with programmed spaces is what creates an arboretum. Educational aspects can be deployed on top of this as well in the form of markers and signs through the arboretum as well. In the state of Nebraska, there are a few ways to become a designated arboretum. For the sake of the conditions of our site, becoming an accredited arboretum underneath the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum makes the most sense. There are five key attributes needed to be designated: • Planned Collection with an identified mission. • Public Access • Ongoing curation and recordkeeping. • Oversight by an organized committee with at least five members. • Education Program An application to the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum must be completed to then become designated. There are a variety of funding opportunities through the NSA, The Trees for Nebraska Towns provides up to $20,000 for a public tree planting project, and the Greener Towns fund provides up to $20,000 matching with paid contributions, donations, and volunteer time. Taking advantage of these funding opprtunities can help us construct and plant the arboretum as well as establish functions that will maintain it as well.

Tree Planting Schemes Aesthetic Function of Trees and Arboretum Groupings

OPPD Arboretum Omaha, Nebraska

Biodiverse Arboretum


02

N AT I V E T R E E S LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Kate Boren & Jessica Schafer

When trees are present in an urban environment, they can help to filter pollutants, CO2, and other dangerous gases, producing oxygen in return. Trees can also improve an area’s character, soften urban hardscape, improve stormwater infiltration, and reduce heating & cooling costs.

JFMAMJJASOND Concolor Fir Abies concolor 30-50’ height 20-40’ spread tolerance: poor drainage

JFMAMJJASOND Emerald Queen Norway Maple Acer platanoides 40-50’ height 35-45’ spread tolerance: heat, drought

JFMAMJJASOND Common Hackberry Celtis occidentalis 40-60’ height 40-60’ spread tolerance: flood, drought, pollution, wind

JFMAMJJASOND Cornelian Cherry Dogwood Cornus mas 15-25’ height 15-20’ spread tolerance: clay soil

JFMAMJJASOND Honeylocust Gleditsia triacanthos f. inermis 30-70’ height 30-70’ spread tolerance: drought, pollution, salt

JFMAMJJASOND American Sycamore Platanus occidentalis 75-100’ height 50-70’ spread tolerance: shade, street, specimen, rain garden

JFMAMJJASOND ‘Cleveland Select’ Callery Pear Pyrus calleryana 40’ height 15 - 20 spread tolerance: drought, clay soil, air pollution

JFMAMJJASOND (Northern) Red Oak Quercus rubra 60-75’ height 60-75’ spread tolerance: dry soil

JFMAMJJASOND Swamp White Oak Quercus bicolor 50-60’ height 50-60’ spread tolerance: Poor drainage, drought conditions

JFMAMJJASOND Shumard Oak Quercus shumardii 40-60’ height 40-60’ spread tolerance: Drought

JFMAMJJASOND Chestnut Oak Quercus montana 60-70’ height 60-70’ spread tolerance: drought

JFMAMJJASOND Chinkapin Oak Quercus muehlenbergii 40-50’ height 50-60’ spread tolerance: adapts to many soil conditions

JFMAMJJASOND Japanese Tree Lilac ‘Ivory Silk’ Syringa reticulata 20-25’ height 15-20’ spread tolerance : clay soil

JFMAMJJASOND New Horizon Elm Ulmus ‘New Horizon’ 30-40’ height 15-25’ spread tolerance: DED, elm leaf miner, and verticillium wilt

JFMAMJJASOND Black Oak Quercus velutina 50-80’ height 40-60’ spread tolerance: drought, salt

why plant native? native plants are adapted to local conditions, requiring less fertilizer and pesticides

nebraska native

full sun

part shade

full shade

attracts birds

attracts pollinators

erosion control

native plants require less watering to thrive and can help control stormwater runoff

rain garden

rock garden

street tree

border

flood tolerant

medium water

drought tolerant


02

N AT I V E P E R E N N I A L S LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Kate Boren & Jessica Schafer

Various shrubs and ornamentals can provide an area with increased color, seasonal interest, and increased habitat opportunities. Many different plants will have different benefits to the urban environment, including attracting birds, softening hardscape, improving stormwater infiltration, and lessening the urban heat island effect.

JFMAMJJASOND New Jersey Tea Ceanothus americanus 3-4’ height 3-5’ spread tolerance: drought, shallowrocky soil

JFMAMJJASOND Arctic Fire Dogwood Cornus sericea ‘Farrow’ 3-4’ height 3-4’ spread tolerance: erosion, clay soil, wet soil

JFMAMJJASOND Allemans Compact Dogwood Cornus sericea ‘Allemans’ 4-5’ height 4-5’ spread tolerance: erosion, clay soil, wet soil

JFMAMJJASOND Fritsch spirea Spiraea fritschiana 2-3’ height 3-5’ spread tolerance: air pollution

JFMAMJJASOND Fringed Bluestar Amsonia Ciliata ‘Half Way to Arkansas’ 2-3’ height 2-3’ spread

JFMAMJJASOND Caesar’s Brother Iris Iris ‘Caesar’s Brother’ 3-4’ height 2.5-3’ spread tolerance: drought, erosion, clay soil, wet soil

JFMAMJJASOND Crested Iris Iris Cristata .5-.75’ height .5’-.75’ spread tolerance: drought

JFMAMJJASOND Purple Coneflower Echinacea purpurea ‘Magnus’ 2.5-3’ height 1-1.5’ spread tolerance: drought, clay soil, dry soil, shallow-rocky soil

JFMAMJJASOND Grey Headed Coneflower Ratibida pinnata 3-5’ height 1.5-2’ spread tolerance: drought, clay soil

JFMAMJJASOND Creme Brulee Coreopsis Coreopsis ‘Creme Brulee’ 1-2.5’ height 1-1.5’ spread tolerance: drought, dry soil

JFMAMJJASOND Black-Eyed Susan Rudbeckia hirta 2-3’ height 1-2’ spread tolerance: drought, clay soil

JFMAMJJASOND Butterfly Milkweed Asclepias tuberosa 2.5-3’ height 1-1.5’ spread tolerance: drought, erosion, dry soil, shallow-rocky soil

JFMAMJJASOND Little Titch Cat Mint Nepeta racemosa ‘Little Titch’ 8-10” height 1.5-2’ spread

JFMAMJJASOND LA Blue Woodland Phlox Phlox divaricata ‘Louisiana Blue’ .5-1’ height .75-1’ spread tolerance: clay soil, dry soil

JFMAMJJASOND Prairie Phlox Phlox pilosa 1-1.5’ height 1-1.5’ spread tolerance: drought, clay soil

why plant native? native plants can help with air quality by reducing area for mowing and sequestering carbon

nebraska native

full sun

part shade

full shade

attracts birds

attracts pollinators

erosion control

native plants provide food and shelter for wildlife and support pollinators

rain garden

rock garden

street tree

border

flood tolerant

medium water

drought tolerant


02

N AT I V E G R A S S E S LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Kate Boren & Jessica Schafer

Utilizing grasses such as those that were present before Lincoln’s development as a part of the tallgrass prairie can emphasize the area’s natural heritage, providing a sense of pride through that heritage. These grasses can also improve air quality, stormwater infiltration, and attract various pollinators and birds.

JFMAMJJASOND Pennsylvania Sedge Carex pensylvanica .5-1’ height .5-1’ spread tolerance: flooding, heavy shade

JFMAMJJASOND Freeway / Field Sedge Carex praegraxilis 1-2’ height 1-2’ spread tolerance: wet soil, salt

JFMAMJJASOND Common Spike Rush Eleocharis palustris .5-2’ height 1-2’ spread tolerance: erosion, wet soil

JFMAMJJASOND Common Rush Juncus effusus 2-4’ height 2-4’ spread tolerance: erosion, wet soil

JFMAMJJASOND Blue Dart Path Rush Juncus ‘Blue Dart’ 1-1.5’ height .75-1’ spread tolerance: erosion, clay soil, wet soil

why plant native? native plants can provide a look into Lincoln’s predevelopment natural heritage

nebraska native

full sun

part shade

full shade

attracts birds

attracts pollinators

erosion control

native plants can improve & restore natural habitat, as well as provide solace in an urban environment

rain garden

JFMAMJJASOND Prairie Dropseed Sporobolus heterolepis 2-3’ height 2-3’ spread tolerance: drought, erosion, clay soil, air pollution

JFMAMJJASOND JFMAMJJASOND Blue Heaven Little Blue Stem Carousel Little Bluestem Schizachyrium scoparium ‘Carousel’ Schizachyrium scoparium ‘Minnbluea’ 2-2.5’ height 2-2.5’ spread 2-2.5’ height 2-2.5’ spread tolerance: drought, erosion, tolerance: drought, erosion, dry soil, air pollution dry soil, air pollution

JFMAMJJASOND Big Bluestem Andropogon gerardii 4-6’ height 2-3’ spread tolerance: drought, erosion, dry soil, air pollution

JFMAMJJASOND Northwind Switchgrass Panicum virgatum ‘Northwind’ 1-2.5’ height 1-1.5’ spread tolerance: drought, wet soil, air pollution

JFMAMJJASOND Sand Lovegrass Eragrostis trichodes 3-6’ height 1-3’ spread tolerance: erosion

JFMAMJJASOND Blonde Ambition Blue Grama Bouteloua gracilis ‘Blonde Ambition’ .75-2.5’ height .75-1.5’ spread tolerance: drought, wet soil erosion, air pollution

JFMAMJJASOND Creeping Lilyturf Liriope spicata 8-10” height 1-2’ spread tolerance: dry soil, drought

JFMAMJJASOND Red Creeping Thyme Thymus praecox ‘Coccineus’ 3-6” height 1-1.5’ spread

rock garden

street tree

border

flood tolerant

medium water

drought tolerant

JFMAMJJASOND Indiangrass Sorghastrum nutans 3-5’ height 1-2’ spread tolerance: drought erosion, air pollution, shallow-rocky soil


02

S U S T A I N A B L E M AT E R I A L S LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Aus Perez

In our rapidly expanding society, it is important to remember the significance of sustainability. What is constructed in our cities and countrysides profoundly affects the ecological systems that exist all around us, as well as the health, safety, and wellbeing of our communities. Unfortunately, landscapes, infrastructure, and buildings are often designed without regard to the devastating impacts they have on our environment and the people within it. As climate change continues to shift the way we talk about design, we must focus on eliminating wastefulness and minimizing our environmental impact. Sustainable materials are materials that can produced without depleting non-renewable resources and disrupting the equilibrium of the environment and its ecological systems. The demolition, selection, procurement, and use of materials in site design and construction present considerable opportunities to reduce the amount of materials sent to landfills, to preserve natural resources, and to decrease greenhouse

gas emissions. By choosing low-impact, energy-efficient materials that are designed for longevity and resuse, we will better comply with the principles of ecological sustainability and begin to heal our damaged landscapes.

Recycled plastic: frees up space in fast-filling landfills

Commonly used sustainable architecture materials include timber, reinforced stone composites, Urbanite, recycled plastics (and even trash), bamboo, rammed earth, and other green alternatives. Although used in vastly different ways, these materials don’t aim to be immortal. This is because the products that last well beyond their useful life, like concrete and steel, often cause environmental issues. Timber, as an example, requires much less energy-intensive production methods than other materials. It can also be used alongside by-products of coal burning, steel dust, and naturallyoccuring hemp to create a concrete-like material suitable for building. If we are to reduce our carbon footprint, we must design with sustainable materials in mind.

Bamboo: possible alternative to concrete and rebar

Timber: a renewable resource

Urbanite: a reused/recycled concrete

Compost: organic material that helps plants grow

Gabion Wall: helps stabilize soil and prevent erosion

Crushed Glass: can be incorporated within concrete

Rammed Earth: can be reinforced with bamboo to create concrete-like walls

Brick: can be recycled, reused, and repurposed

Eco-friendly Material: Wood Chips: versatileItlandscape does this...material


02

S U S T A I N A B L E M AT E R I A L S LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Aus Perez

In order to design sustainable landscapes, architecture, and indoor spaces, designers must first take into consideration already-existing sustainability standards. Three of the most commonly used standards for sustainability include the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED, ASLA’s Sustainable SITES Initiative, and LAF’s Landscape Performance Series. LEED, which stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, is the “international standard for the design, construction and operation of high-performance structures,” and is used widely by those in the design community. The Sustainable SITES initiative, on the other hand, is currently “the most comprehensive system for creating sustainable and resilient land development projects,” and is used widely among landscape architects and urban planners.

help designers, agencies, and advocates evaluate performance, show value and make the case for sustainable landscape solutions. Sustainability standards are especially helpful for designers because they assist us in understanding whether its useful to incorporate a certain material into a project. They also take into consideration issues of accessibility. For example, most loose materials - such as cobblestone, gravel, and other rough materials - make it very difficult for people with disabilities to comfortably move about. LEED, SITES, and the Landscape Performance Series address these issues, as well as other important economic, environmental, and social concerns.

Phipps Center for Sustainable Landscapes in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (LEED-certified)

The three mentioned sustainability standards offer a holistic framework for designing for sustainability and should be used further by landscape architects, architects, interior designers, and urban planners alike.

Finally, LAF’s Landscape Performance Series is an “online set of resources to

Chicago Navy Pier in Chicago, Illinois (SITES-certified)

Buffalo Bayou Park in Houston, Texas (Landscape Performance Series Case Study)


02

C O M M E R C I A L I N V E N T O RY LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Nabhan Alhajri

L

Retail & Mixed Use Development

Housing

HealthCare

15 Bank minute city | scale: 1:125

lincoln, ne n street to l street | s. 9th street to antelope valley parkway Leisure ( Hotal, Restaurants)

Material: It does this...

Material: It does this...

Material: It does this...

Material: It does this...


Name

Type

Address

Transit Mall

Housing( Offcial Residantiol)

9th St

Apollo Gardens

Mixed development, Retail, Offical Residentail

9th St

Latitude

Appartments( offical residential)

10th St

( Steam)

Apparatment ( Housing), Retail

10th St

M Place Apartments

Appartment ( Housing )

11th St

The M Street Towers

Residentail, Local Retail

13th St

Mixed use Development

Housing, Retail

206 S 13th St

Mixed use Development

Husing, Retails, Appartments

17th M St

Mixed use Development

Husing, Retails, Appartments

17th M St

Mixed use Development

Husing, Retails, Appartments

17th M St

Community Center

Retail

17th M St

Medical Center & Well-Being

HealthCare

17th M St


02

L I C E N S E S & R E G U L AT I O N S LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Nabhan Alhajri

PUBLIC PROPERTY AND PUBLIC WAYS

–14.40.050 BUILDINGS IN STREET SPACE.

– CHAPTER 14.16 GRADES – 14.16.010 STREETS, ROADWAYS, AND ALLEYS TO BE GRADED TO ESTABLISHED GRADE. –14.24.030 SIZE AND LOCATION OF FIGURES.

Except as provided in Chapter 14.54 and in the Building Code, it is unlawful for any person to erect or place any building or structure, whether temporary or permanent, to include but not be limited to tents, in whole or in part upon any city street, alley, or sidewalk or other public ground within this city.

Each of the figures of every number shall be not less than three inches in length, being so marked as to be distinctly and easily read. The numbers shall be placed in a conspicuous place on the side or above the front door of the building to which the same are attached or on the building premises near a front entrance to the building. Buildings subject to the International Building Code and International Fire Code, as adopted and amended by the City,

– CHAPTER 14.40 OBSTRUCTING STREETS AND ALLEYS –14.40.010 STREETS, ALLEYS, AND SIDEWALKS TO BE KEPT CLEAR; VIOLATIONS; PENALTY. The streets, alleys, and sidewalks in the city shall be kept free and clear of all obstructions, encumbrances, and encroachments and shall not be used or occupied in any other way than as provided in this code.

–14.40.030 PERMITS FOR PRIVATE USE OF STREETS OR SIDEWALKS FOR OTHER THAN PRIVATE CONSTRUCTION PURPOSES; RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT. Permits for the private use of a street or sidewalk in a district which is zoned for residential purposes may be issued by the Department of Transportation and Utilities for not to exceed six hours when from a consideration of an application made and from such other information as may otherwise be obtained, it is determined that: a. The use requested is for a community purpose and is not for the purpose of advertising any product, goods, or event, and is not designed to be held for private profit; b. The use will not substantially interfere with the safe and orderly movement of vehicular and pedestrian traffic; c. The use will not interfere with proper fire and police protection to the area adjacent thereto;

–14.40.040 USE OF STREETS, ALLEYS AND SIDEWALKS FOR PUBLIC MARKET. Any person or persons, or association of persons, company, or corporation with whom the City Council has contracted for the establishment, operation, and regulation of a public market or a market place shall be permitted to locate said public market or market place and any structures necessary thereto on any street, alley, or sidewalk according to the terms and conditions set forth in such contract; provided, however, such public market or market place shall be located only in a district which is zoned for commercial or business purposes.

– CHAPTER 14.42 PAINTED ART ON LOCAL STREETS –14.42.020 PURPOSE AND CRITERIA FOR REGULATIONS. The purpose of this ordinance is to promote the public health, safety and welfare through the regulation of the placement, appearance and maintenance of painted designs on city property in local street rights-of-way so as to: a. Make residentially zoned districts attractive environments; b. Encourage and support neighborhoods to work cooperatively to beautify neighborhoods; c. Promote traffic safety for neighborhood residents and children in particular by calming vehicular traffic; and d. Encourage well designed, creative and aesthetically pleasing local street paintings.

– CHAPTER 14.44 OBSTRUCTIONS ON CORNER LOTS –14.44.010 OBSTRUCTING VIEW ON CORNER LOTS. Except as otherwise provided in Section 27.72.140 of the Lincoln Municipal Code, it is hereby determined that in order to protect and preserve the public welfare and safety, it shall be unlawful for any person, firm, or corporation install, plant, place, set out or maintain, or to allow to be installed, planted, placed, set out or maintained, or to permit to exist any tree, hedge, shrubbery, plant, natural growth, sign, or other obstruction to the view which is higher than two feet six inches above either: a. The top of the curb return at the applicable corner of theintersection; or b. The nearest pavement surface, where there is no curb; or c. The existing traveled roadway at the corner in question where there is no curb, or to pavement on property at any corner formed by intersecting streets within that triangular area bounded by the property lines and a diagonal line joining points on the property lines located twenty-five feet from the point of intersection of the property lines on two intersecting streets, or in the case of rounded corners, the triangular area bounded by the tangents to the curve of property lines on two intersecting streets and a diagonal line joining tangents to said curves at points that shall be located twenty-five feet from the point of intersection of said tangents. The tangents referred to are those at the beginning and at the end of the curve at the corner.

– CHAPTER 14.50 SIDEWALK CAFÉS –14.50.010 SIDEWALK CAFÉ. –14.50.020 PURPOSE. Sidewalk cafés promote the public interest by: a. Making B-zoned districts an active and attractive pedestrian environment; b. Providing the opportunity for creative, colorful, pedestrian-focused commercial activities on a day/night and seasonal basis; c. Encouraging commercial activities which add excitement, charm, vitality, diversity, and good design to B-zoned districts; d. Encouraging the up-grading of store fronts and the development of compatible and well-designed elements within such districts; and e. Promoting land conservation, redevelopment, energy savings, and indirect tax revenue.

– CHAPTER 14.54 OCCUPANCY ABOVE OR BELOW PUBLIC PROPERTY –14.54.035 FENCES AND RETAINING WALLS. a. Retaining walls may be permitted on City property under the following conditions: 1.The wall is not higher than six inches above the land that it supports. 2.The wall shall comply with Chapter 14.44 of the Lincoln Municipal Code. 3.The wall shall be safe and aesthetically compatible with the neighborhood. b. Fences may be permitted on City property under the following conditions: 1.The fence shall comply with Chapters 20.10 and 27.71 of the Lincoln Municipal Code. 2.The fence shall comply with Chapter 14.44 of the Lincoln Municipal Code. 3.Fences installed after August 1, 2008 shall be no closer than two feet to any existing or proposed sidewalk unless installed so as to not interfere with pedestrian and bike traffic. 4.Fences shall not be allowed between a sidewalk and the street. If no sidewalk is present, the fence may be no closer than twelve feet from the curb. 5.The fence shall be safe and aesthetically compatible with the neighborhood.

–CHAPTER 14.55 SIDEWALK VENDORS –14.55.010 PURPOSES. It is found and declared that sidewalk vendors promote the public interest by: a. Making B-zoned districts an active and attractive pedestrian environment; b. Providing the opportunity for creative, colorful, pedestrian-focused commercial activities on a day/night, year-round, and seasonal basis; c. Encouraging commercial activities which add excitement, charm, vitality, and diversity to B-zoned districts; d. Encouraging the up-grading and development within such districts; and e. Promoting land conservation, redevelopment, energy saving, and indirect tax revenue.


02

L I C E N S E S & R E G U L AT I O N S LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Nabhan Alhajri

–14.55.075 ADDITIONAL RESTRICTIONS ON PUSHCARTS OPERATING IN THE B-3 COMMERCIAL DISTRICT. The below restrictions are in addition to the restrictions in Section 14.55.070: a. No vendor shall vend within any sidewalk space other than the sidewalk space designated in the approved permit application. b. The designated sidewalk space may not abut more than one property. c. The designated sidewalk space may not occupy any parking space(s) or a portion thereof required under the B-3 Commercial District parking requirements. d. No vendor shall operate a pushcart or stand in front of any abutting property without the written approval of the record owner of such property. e. No vendor shall operate a pushcart or stand within 50 feet of the property line of any building used for residential purposes without the written approval of the owner of said building. f. A vendor who has been granted approval to operate a pushcart or stand at a designated sidewalk space in the B-3 Commercial District is also authorized to operate a pushcart or stand within designated sidewalk space areas zoned B-4 Lincoln Center Business and P Public Use within, and abutting, the B-4 Lincoln Center Business District without obtaining a separate permit therefor.

–CHAPTER 14.56 WORKS OF ART –14.56.020 PURPOSE AND CRITERIA FOR REGULATIONS. The purpose of this ordinance is to promote the public health, safety, and welfare through the regulation of placement, appearance, maintenance, and insuring of works of art on city property and public rights-of-way so as to: a. Make B-3, B-4 and “P” zoned districts an active and attractive pedestrian environment; b. Encourage and support development of the arts in the City; c. Provide for pedestrian and driving safety and convenience; d. Restrict the unreasonable interference with the flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic including ingress into or egress from any residence or place of business, or from the street to the sidewalk by persons exiting or entering parked or standing vehicles; e. Provide reasonable access for the use and/or maintenance of trees, shrubs, poles, posts, traffic signs or signals, hydrants, mailboxes, and access to locations used for public transportation purposes; f. Encourage well-designed and aesthetically compatible works of art; and g. Reduce unnecessary exposure of the city to personal injury or property damage claims.

–14.56.060 STANDARDS FOR LOCATION AND OPERATION. No work of art shall be located: a.Within five feet of kiosk, bench, trash receptacle, drinking fountain, or bicycle rack, or three feet of mailbox, post, pole, or any area planted with grass, shrubs, flowers, or trees; except that such standards may be waived if pedestrian circulation space between such items and the work of art is not needed and sufficient space for maintenance of such items and the work of art is provided; if the original design of such items specifically provides for works of art in an integrated design; or if the work of art may be incorporated into an integrated design of such items. b.Within five feet of a bus shelter, unless the height of the work of art does not exceed a height of three and one-half feet measured from the surface of the sidewalk; c.Within the sight triangles of street, alley, and driveway intersections; d.So as to reduce the clear, continuous sidewalk width to less than eight feet; e.Within five feet of any fire hydrant or other emergency facility; f.Within five feet of any driveway or alley; g.Within five feet ahead of, and twenty feet to the rear of any sign marking a designated bus stop: h.Within six feet of a display window or building entrance; i.Within six feet of the curb face; j.So as to impair or interfere with pedestrian traffic; k.So as to interfere or impair the vision of operators of vehicles at street intersections;

–CHAPTER 14.58 STREET POLE BANNERS –14.58.010 PURPOSE. The purpose of this chapter is to regulate installation of street pole banners over public ways in a safe, coordinated and aesthetically acceptable manner.

–CHAPTER 14.80 SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION –14.80.010 SPACE BETWEEN CURB AND LOT LINES; DESIGNATION. The space between the lot line and existing or projected curb line on each side of every street in the city (hereafter known as the sidewalk space) shall be used only for the location of sidewalks, street trees and landscape plantings.

–14.80.030 WIDTH OF SIDEWALKS. All other sidewalks in the city shall be not less than four feet wide.

–14.80.170 SPECIFICATIONS FOR CONCRETE SIDEWALKS. Sidewalk construction shall be in accordance with the City standard specifications for municipal construction established by the Director of Transportation and Utilities and adopted by the Mayor.

REFERENCE:

http://online.encodeplus.com/regs/lincoln-ne/doc-viewer.aspx#secid-9427


02

IDENTITY SYNTHESIS LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Caitlin Smith & Katelyn Nimic

GOALS •

By creating this green transit corridor we hope to create a memorable destination in Lincoln that connects active young professionals & diverse family housing to the surrounding cultural & environmental centers. The hope is that this unified community is inclusive & welcoming.

MEMORABLE •

One of the most important aspects of the identity of this corridor is to make it a memorable destination. This can be accomplished by highlighting the unique aspect of bus-only transit along this corridor & by making the pedestrian the focus of this area.

UNIFIED •

In order to create a unified corridor our designs should connect the different community spaces such as the active young professionals & the accessible family housing. This can be accomplished through a unified plant & material palette.

INCLUSIVE •

As we redesign the M Street Corridor it is important that the new design feels inclusive & welcoming to the existing community in this area. We hope to celebrate the diversity of this space and provide designed areas that encourage postive community exchange.


02

SOCIAL SYNTHESIS LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Kate Boren & Katelyn Nimic

GOALS •

In order to accomplish our goals of designing a socially equitable corridor in the downtown district of Lincoln we must promote the well-being of the users, increase safety measures though design, & support the positive exchange of ideas through public meeting spaces and opportunities for artistic expression.

Promoting the well being of the users on site means having a gradient of diverse social activities and spaces that allows for an active social exterior environment. This environment supports community engagement, personal relaxation and reflection, as well as provides opportunities for physical activity.

WELL BEING

SAFETY •

Improving the perception of safety in the downtown area is a critical component of social design. In order to improve the perception of safety in this area our design aims to improve lighting, reduce traffic accidents, & encourage a sense of community though designed spaces.

IDEA EXCHANGE •

A great way to improve a sense of community is to provide platforms for the exchange of ideas. To accomplish this we have placed an emphasis on designing community meeting spaces & increasing opportunities for positive artistic expression along the corridor.


02

ENVIRONMENTAL SYNTHESIS LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Aus Perez & Katelyn Nimic

GOALS •

The environmental goals of this project are to responsibly manage water use, implement native plantings to create a productive environment for local ecology, and design visible infrastructure that educates visitors on landscape management techniques.

SUSTAINABILITY •

Our environmental goal is to promote sustainable design through careful selection of materials, intentional resilient plant choices, and key water management strategies, in order to increase visitor engagement in local ecology, and create a long-lasting design.

NATURE AS CIVIC PRIDE •

Utilize Nebraska’s historic natural environment to emphasize heritage, education, and sustainability while also promoting habitat diversity & stormwater management

Improve the local ecology by providing habitat for native species in the downtown area. Accomplish this goal by planting Nebraska native trees, grasses, & perennials along the corridor while also providing opportunities to improve urban wildlife habitat.

LOCAL ECOLOGY


02

ENVIRONMENTAL GOALS LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Rashid Al Musalhi & Nabhan Alhajri

WATER • • • •

Retain approximately 90-100% of surface runoff from the district 1/3 of all designed areas will be permeable Reduce irrigation needs by 50% compared to traditional landscapes Reuse graywater by 75% and output reduction

CARBON, ENERGY, & AIR QUALITY • • • • • • •

Each block (side) will have at least 10 Lincoln-approved trees planted. Improved forestry or agricultural practices, and revegetation Limiting the amount of pollutant emitted by a source Increase the planting surface by 10% Increase green roofs/walls (vegetation reduces the amount of heat absorbed by hardscape) by 25 “Blue-green alleys” Alleys and Pedestrian walkways need to have at least 25% of total area vegetated. Reducing surface heat by 3-5 F degree (using reflective materials and colors)

HABITAT • • • •

Eliminate up to 100% of invasive species 3/4 of all plantings must either be native to the midwest, or support local habitat creation Invite 2-5 new bird species through native tree plantings Conservation of mature trees

MATERIALS & WASTE • • • •

30% of project materials must be reclaimed or recycled. Adds cultural/locational significance by using locally sourced materials All light bulbs must have a lifespan of at least 50,000 hrs Increase renewable energy sources in the area by 50%


02

SOCIAL GOALS LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Ibrahim Al Karusi & Nabhan Alhajri

SAFETY • • • •

Decrease traffic accidents/conundrums between cars, pedestrians, and cyclists by 60%. Decrease the speed limit & add stop signs next to the crossing walk Elevated crossing opportunities (bridges) Decrease crime rates by 30% through increased lighting

HEALTH, WELL-BEING, & RECREATION • • • • • • • • •

Improve human health & wellbeing Increase activity by 70% Create child-centric recreational spaces: positively impact child health & development Implementing up to half a mile of new bike-friendly infrastructure + trails Promotes play & activity as well as encourages relaxation Increase social value Inclusion of public protest space with the capitol building as the anchor. Accommodate many different sizes of groups by frequent (qty:10+) gathering spaces throughout the site

EDUCATIONAL VALUE • • •

Reinforce educational values to the district’s historic aspects STEAM Building Provide sustainable landscape design education, as well as areas for experimentation, discovery, and exploration

SCENIC QUALITY & VIEWS

• • •

NOISE MITIGATION • •

Reduce noise mitigation within our site by at least 25% Create at least noise mitigation integration on each block with a major road nearby

ACCESS & EQUITY •

Maximize ADA accessibility throughout entire site

TRANSPORTATION • •

Increase biking, walking, and bus transit Increase key connections (along transit mall and alleyways)

CULTURAL PRESERVATION •

• Increase asthetic value by increasing the amount of public art Commission art spaces on 50% of available or potential surfaces (building walls, • • sidewalks, etc.) • Increase quality of scenic views to Capitol building

Identify key areas to create markers/plaques that help inform and instruct events/ historical movements/etc Historic Haymarket District Centennial Mall + Lincoln Capitol Building University of Nebraska-Lincoln Churches/places of worship/cultural centers


02

ECONOMIC GOALS LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE RESEARCH Madeline McGill & Nabhan Alhajri

OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE SAVINGS • • • •

Ensure that 50% of the overall plant palette consist of drought resistant/ tolerant plants. Smarter maintenance strategies, such as a reduction of mowing area Reduce water costs through improved irrigation, gray water recycling, etc. Reduce energy costs through solar installations and use of clean/renewable energy

VISITOR SPENDING • • •

Increase visitor spending by 30% within the retail area through street strategies. Implement strategies such as increasing street trees, which studies show is positively correlated with increased visitor spending. Increase sidewalk width and store frontages for ample interaction between pedestrian and business.

JOB CREATION • •

Create a specific number of part-time and full-time jobs within the area, which will be determined through research. Use maintenance needs for job creation.

ECONOMIC EQUALITY • •

Allocate 35% of funding towards low-income residents and their community. Equalize access to all spaces designed within the district to peoples of all socioeconomic statuses.


03 3. Plaza

NICOLLET MALL

2. Theater

JAMES CORNER FIELD OPERATIONS

1. Trails

Precedent Research Study | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

The goal of the Nicollet Mall redesign was to increase the vitality of the downtown area by implementing pedestrian friendly architecture along Nicollet Mall. This project focused on diversifying green space opportunities by adding various green zones like rows, groves, woods, & permeable paving. Signage and wayfinding helped give this space an identity. It also worked alongside tabled intersections to create a safe, ADA accessible route through downtown.

LIGHTING

light, color and movement into Nicollet Center, the busiest and most urban area of downtown.

GATHERING SPACES

Generously-scaled and clearly marked walkways, curb-free intersections, new social spaces and destinations that are attractions year-round, and a curated outdoor gallery of public art offer pedestrians the highest quality downtown walking experience. These are defined by a trail system, plazas, and a series of various parklet opportunities like a theater or community seating.

The Nicollet Mall lighting system EVENT DRIVEN started with hundreds of thousands of feet in below-ground utilities and ARCHITECTURE grew to include 1,500 LED lights The mall has been designed for year illuminating the new sidewalks and round activation. This means that street. A special feature is the Light community spaces must be versatile in Walk which illuminates Nicollet order to adapt to the changing weather Lanterns and street light beacons. This conditions. While summer features is a key architectural and experiential outdoor seating and games, these element of the new Nicollet. The Light spaces are converted in the winter to Walk and Nicollet Lanterns bring support winter games like curling. Reference: James Corner Field Operations. “Nicollet Mall”. 2015. https://www.skyscrapercity.com/threads/nicollet-mall.1820523/

Event Driven Architecture: The interior transit island has been adapted for a pop-up marketplace, bringing food, commerce, & activity to a central location on the mall.

Lighting Installation: Bega flood lights & RGB LED color changing Lumenpulse beacon lights have been mounted atop 40’ tall poles for general illumination and coordinated light shows.

Gathering Opportunities Curvilinear pathways for transit and pedestrians minimizes the perception of this landscape as a street. Parklets and landscaping create gathering spaces.

Event Driven Architecture: Seasonal activation and event planning engage the public with this streetscape design throughout the year. Winter activities are especially important as they activate the seasonally cold & barren outdoor landscape.


03

1 8 S H A D E S O F G AY CLAUDE CORMIER & ASSOCIATES Precedent Research Study | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“As gay culture evolves and the LGBT community becomes more nuanced, as attested by the addition of new letters, the diversity of tones to a redefined resin-ball canopy was an indisputable artistic choice… also, the concept of ’18 shades of gay’ is to some degree a reflection of this ongoing evolution…” -Claude Cormier Above the summer pedestrian axis of Sainte-Catherine Street East, in the Gay Village of Montreal between StHubert Street and Cartier Street lies a 1 kilometer chromatic ribbon. The 18 Shades of Gay installation evolved as part of the Aires Libre festival in Canada which turns this street into a pedestrian only zone from May to September. After 6 years of the Pink Ball installation (also completed by Claude Cormier + Associates) this street was transformed into a colorful and unified pedestrian safe zone. Inspired by the LGBTQI+ flag, this vibrant installation helps define the identity of Montreal’s Gay Village. This installation celebrates the evolving spectrum of LGBTQI+ identities while

bringing a sense of inclusivity, diversity, and safety to a once dilapidated area of Montreal. 18 Shades of Gay marks key urban thresholds into the city while also creating a landing point for three major subway systems which connect to the rest of the city. This project has been a social catalyst for this sector of the city by increasing tourism and sales revenue while decreasing crime and vacancy rates. This project, with its modest budget, was able to provide a central identity to this space through the installation of 180,000 recycled plastic balls. Each ball, while colorful and flamboyant, works as part of the larger community in the space beautifully highlighting the diversity and unity which has been created here.

Reference: Claude Cormier and Associates. “18 Shades of Gay”. 2017. https://www.claudecormier.com/en/projet/18-shades-of-gay/

Identity Creation: The Pink Balls installation was the predecessor to 18 Shades of Gay as part of the Aires Libre cultural event in Montreal’s Gay Village.

Overhead Plane: Fabricated in two sizes, the balls are suspended 5m above the street, attached to strands of nylon tension wire that connect to cables right above tree top level.

Overhead Plane: Each ball was locally manufactured from recycled plastic, with many reused from one year to another.

Identity Creation: By increasing visitation this installation reduced crime and vacancy rates while boosting safety and visitor spending. It also activates this corridor day and night.

Identity Creation: 18 Shades of Gay created a memorable and unified identity along this pedestrian promenade by adapting the LGBTQI+ flag’s 6 colors. These base colors were refined into 3 distinct shades creating 18 shades total. This project celebrates the evolving spectrum of contemporary identity.


03

P L AC E D ’ YO U V I L L E CLAUDE CORMIER & ASSOCIATES Precedent Research Study | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

Claude Cormier’s Place D’Youville is a beautiful example of connecting architecture with history. This project elegantly responds to the site’s context and history in order to create a reflective, memory driven design that grabs users attention.

CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE

In this design Claude Cormier implemented a diversity of materials in order to respond to the various contextual conditions along this street in Montreal. Exploring the 500 year history of sidewalk construction within the city, these pathways were constructed using a variety of techniques and materials. While these sidewalks correspond to a deep history of pedestrian architecture they also relate to the present as the crisscrossing of paths direct users to a range of functional building archetypes. The timber boardwalks connect to domestic buildings surrounding the linear parkway, concrete to commercial, and

granite or limestone to institutional contextual access points. In order to respond to the site’s archaeological history, the designers mapped out a patchwork of archaeological data which helped them visualize the project’s quilt-like appearance. The bold, central pathway reveals this historical investigation as it tracks the route of an ancient creek, the Petite Reviere, now buried underneath layers of Montreal’s infrastructure.

Cultural Significance: Markers along this historical site reference the archaeological heritage of the site while materiality and placement raise questions about the memory of this space.

CIRCULATION

This design stands out for its ability to choreograph human movement and the memory of space. As individuals approach the park, they are drawn toward the diagonal access points and collected into the central pathway which directs them toward one of two nodes located on either end of the parkway. Benches, abundant greenery, and the soft lighting of adjacent buildings create a restive atmosphere that invites pause and reflection.

Reference: Claude Cormier + Associés. “Place D’Youville”. 1997. https://www.claudecormier.com/en/project/place-dyouville/

Pedestrian Circulation: The pedestrian zone is divided into different spaces: frontage, pedestrian through way, enhancement, and transit.

Cultural Significance: The central path in this linear park relates back to the history of the site by tracking the route of an ancient creek that once ran through the site.

Material Use: Different materials indicate the functional movement of timber boardwalks (domestic), concrete (commercial), and granite or limestone (institutional) to contextual access points.

Pedestrian Circulation: While the pathways of this project reference the archaeological and cultural heritage of this site, they also connect surrounding buildings to the central pedestrian route which acts as a collector. Once on the main path materials, cultural markers, and landscaping encourage the user to reflect on the memory of


03

AUSTIN BELO CENTER TEN EYCK LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS Precedent Research Study | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“Place-based landscape architecture to address pressing global issues such as drought, climate mitigation and aging infrastructure. TELA is dedicated to creating restorative outdoor environments that are infused with natural beauty, provide habitat, purify air and water, encourage social interaction, and foster human healing. Our designs prioritize native plant communities, water harvesting technologies, and durable materials, artfully expressed through form, color, and texture.”

Ten Eyck Landscape Architects is known for their water conscious designs, especially their techniques for water harvesting in dry, arid landscapes. The University of Texas at Austin Belo Center for New Media is a great example of this and the design techniques used in this project help the public to visualize and learn about water while experiencing a beautiful, native landscape. Visible and interactive infrastructure engages users in the landscape, fostering a connection between them and nature. This 1.5 acre project transformed a barren parking lot into an active and performative

Water Management: Permeable pavers and drains help direct water to open green space so it can be absorbed into the soil.

urban plaza. This project took inspiration from Lady Bird Johnson, a graduate of the college, by implementing a native plant palette which is seen throughout the entry plaza, outdoor cafe, performance space, and outdoor classroom. This largest achievement in this design was the comprehensive collection system for rainwater and mechanical condensate that provides 100% of the water required for landscape irrigation. A recirculating biofiltration fountain at the center of the plaza celebrates this integration of natural and built systems.

Reference: Ten Eyck Landscape Architects. “The University of Texas at Austin Belo Center for New Media”. 2012. https://www.teneyckla.com/projects/academic/

Visible Infrastructure: Interactive components of Ten Eyck’s designs allow for participation with the natural environment and encourage water education.

Water Management: Captured stormwater has been elevated to increase visibility & interaction with the water feature. Plantings absorb & clean excess water helping absorb it into the soil.

Water Management: This design captures stormwater runoff from the building roof & uses it to irrigate the surrounding plantings. This makes the water cycle visible & performative.

Planting Palette: 18 Shades of Gay created a memorable and unified identity along this pedestrian promenade by adapting the LGBTQI+ flag’s 6 colors. These base colors were refined into 3 distinct shades creating 18 shades total. This project celebrates the evolving spectrum of contemporary identity.


03

P R E C E D E N T A P P L I C AT I O N IDEAS & GOALS

PRECEDENTS

PRECEDENTS

Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“What if Lincoln chose to convert the downtown area into a ‘15 minute city’, where residents could walk or bike to the places they work, shop and live within 15 minutes? Can an existing car dominated public domain be transformed into a pedestrian zone that is more of a park than a car-scape, while at the same time allow carefully controlled vehicular circulation through the site?” While all of these precedents had an impact on my design, probably the most visible influence is the Austin Belo Center by Ten Eyck Landscape Architects. This project opened my eyes to the world of visible water infrastructure, which quickly became a central goal for my project. Ten Eyck Landscape Architects has a unique way of showcasing water and irrigation in their designs and engaging people with the natural environment. Place D’Youville by Claude Cormier ultimately helped shift my project from the design of a transit corridor to the design of linear parkway, allowing for this project to become a destination on its own as well as providing more greenspace for this project to incorporate native plant materials. The project 18 Shades of Gay by Claude Cormier & Associates not only made me think how I can create an inclusive environment that caters to all people in the surrounding neighborhoods, but

this project implements a relatively simple and inexpensive installation to create a sense of art and culture through the space. The cheap, recycled plastic balls became a major component for the water cycle installation above the 10th street intersection. Again, this inexpensive material was able to make a big impact in the design by providing an new layer to the landscape, an overhead plane. Again we see use of the overhead plane to define space in the wet meadow & food truck alley programming. Lastly, Nicollet Mall by James Corner Field Operations helped give me a frame of reference for the design of a transit mall. It really is all encompassing; the creation of space through active vs. passive zones, thinking about seasonal changes, circulation between transit, pedestrian, and bicycles. The lighting as well as pavement design helped me think about safety on my site, and develop those indicators between modes of transit.

Nicollet Mall

Claude Cormier & Associates

1. Gathering Opportunities

6. Pedestrian Circulation

-Active vs. Passive Zones -Parklets & Programming

2. Event Driven Architecture

Be Memorable | Be Unified | Be Inclusive | Promote Well-being | Increase Safety Promote Idea Exchange | Be Sustainable | Celebrate Nature as Civic Pride Improve Local Ecology | Retain 90% of Surface Run-off | 1/3 Permeable Surfaces Reuse 75% of Graywater | Increase Planting Surfaces | Reduce Surface Heat Through Reflective Materials and Colors | Over 75% Native Plantings | Locally Sourced Materials | Implement Renewable Energy Sources | Decrease Traffic Accidents | Increase Lighting | Provide Educational Opportunities | Increase Public Art Installations | Increase Walking, Biking, and Mass Transit | Link Site to Nebraska History | Increase Drought Resistant Plantings | Reduce Water & Energy Costs | Reduction of Maintenance Costs | Increase Visitor Spending

-Linear Movement

7. Material Use -Paver Design

-Seasonal Activation

8. Historic Significance 3. Lighting Installation

-Cultural Markers

-Efficiency -Programmable

18 Shades of Gay

Austin Belo Center

Claude Cormier & Associates

Ten Eyck Landscape Architects

4. Identity Creation

9. Water Management

-Art & Culture

5. Overhead Plane -Pedestrian Scaling

GOALS

Place D’Youville

James Corner Field Operations

-Visible Infrastructure

10. Plant Palette

-Drought Resistant Plantings -Seasonal Color


PRELIMINARY SKETCHES

2. 4. 1. 3. 4.

6.

7.

5. 4.

5. 1. 10.

1. 3. 9.

9.

10. 8.

4. 1.

A

B

Interior Parkway Flood/Programmable Lighting Separate Transit Lanes

Bus Stop Design Integrated Plaza Groundplane

Curbless Design

Native Plantings

Store Frontages Raingardens & Bioswales

Section A

Interaction with Event Plaza & Church

Section B

Retail Frontages

Permeable Paving


04

SEMINOE DAM

FORT LARAMIE IRRIGATION

GUDMUDSEN SANDHILLS LABORATORY

CONCEPT DESIGN

One of a series of Wyoming dams that regulate the flows of the North Platte for downstream irrigation, power generation, and flood protection.

In the drier, more arid regions of Western Nebraska, agriculture is made possible by the construction of irrigation canals which carry water to the surrounding fields.

The sandhills are a unique ecosystem with the surrounding streams fed by their headwaters, the Ogallala aquifer. Residents within this habitat often use prescribed burns to reinvigorate the fields and eliminate the invvasive Eastern Red Cedar

THE PLATTE BASIN PARKWAY PROJECT Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“The Platte River Basin is one of the most appropriated river systems in the world. Every drop of water is spoken for, and little is free. The basin supports an industrial, agricultural powerhouse laid over one of the most endangered and altered grassland ecosystems on earth. Beneath the ground, it harbors more than half of the mighty Ogallala Aquifer; fossil water whose quantity and quality are at stake. In an age of climate change and economic uncertainty, this basin is being asked to be both food producer and energy pump.” - The Platte Basin Timelapse (PBT) After reviewing the Platte Basin Timelapse website and interviewing Michael Forsberg, one of the co-founders of the Platte Basin Timelapse Project, I have identified 6 main areas across our watershed that showcase the importance of water management and the diversity of ecosystems supported by our water resources. At the highest elevation point and the headwaters of the North Platte river, we have Lake Agnes which collects precipitation and snowmelt from the surrounding mountain peaks along the Continental Divide. From this lake, water travels down through Wyoming only to be intersected and regulated by the numerous dams across the state. Here the water is used for power generation and flood protection while the outpouring water is regulated closely in order to meet downstream water requirements. After flows are measured along the state line, some of the water from the North Platte is redirected for use in agricultural fields. The water carried by these irrigation canals gets reused up to 7 times before being released back into the system.

North to the sandhills, we highlight another headwater of the Platte Basin watershed, the Ogallala aquifer. This unique ecosystem derives its water from fossil water deep underground. That groundwater is pumped up from the surface by farmers and ranchers who have a close connection to this land, often undegoing prescribed burns to keep this landscape intact. Moving south, we run across Mormon Island which is one of many wet meadows found across the Central Platte. These edge habitats provide critical nesting grounds for migratory birds such as the sandhill and whooping cranes. While these meadows are dry in the summer, they flood in the spring as the water table rises, just in time for the migratory stopover by these bird species. Lastly, I’ve highlighted the saline wetlands and bordering tall grass prairie in the Lower Platte watershed. Saline wetlands are the rarest ecosystem in Nebraska. Marsh Wren located by Lincoln is undergoing restoration, in order to mitigate invasive species and restore salinity in this area.

REFERENCES Platte Basin Timelapse. Stories. Retrieved April 27, 2021, from https://plattebasintimelapse.com/stories/ Platte Basin Timelapse. Timelapse. Retrieved April 27, 2021, from https://plattebasintimelapse.com/gallery/ Platte Basin Timelapse. Platte Basin Timelapse. Retrieved April 27, 2021, from https://plattebasintimelapse.com/about/

LAKE AGNES

MORMON ISLAND

Sitting just below the continental divide, this lake is an example of a cirque lake which collects precipitation and snowmelt while acting as a headwater for our rivers.

Managed by The Crane Trust, this wet meadow provides critical habitat for the sandhill and whooping cranes on their spring stopover during their migration north.

MARSH WREN Saline wetlands are the rarest ecosystem in Nebraska, fed by the Dakota Aquifer and bordered by tall grass prairie, which covers only 2% of its original expanse of land.


The Water Cycle

Evaporation, Condensation, & Precipitation Cloud Installation

Eastern Nebraska

Central Nebraska

Marsh Wren Saline Wetlands & Tall Grass Prairie

The Panhandle

Prescribed Burns

Mormon Island Wet Meadows & Crane Installation

Fort Laramie Irrigation District Visible Infrastructure & Food Truck Alley

Gudmudsen Sandhills Laboratory Eastern Red Cedar Fire Installation

Ogallala Aquifer

Gudmudsen Sandhills Laboratory Splash Pad Fountain

Nebraska Sandhills

Gudmudsen Sandhills Laboratory Mounding Play & Grassy Lawn

CONCEPT MAPPING / PROGRAMMING

Lake Agnes Rainwater Collection & Storage

Wyoming Infrastructure Seminoe Dam Interactive Water Play

Continental Divide


05

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT TOPOGRAPHY & DRAINAGE Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“Like diamonds and gold, water is a precious commodity. But unlike 24kt earrings, water is essential to human, plant, and animal life. Although most of the earth’s surface is covered in water, about 97.5 percent is saltwater. Of the 2.5 percent remaining, only one percent is freshwater accessible for human use (rivers, lakes, aquifers — the rest is locked up in glaciers, ice floes, etc.). Freshwater is taken for granted, but as a finite resource, it’s not always available when or where it’s needed.” - Emma Brinley Buckley (PBT) Essential to life on this planet, water plays a critical role in where we live, what we eat, and what we make. Without Nebraska’s abundant freshwater sources, the state could not be the agricultural powerhouse that it is. Yet, in order to make and grow all that we do in Nebraska, we need water management systems in place to regulate, treat, disperse that water to where it needs to go. Not only does this project showcase the journey of our water, but it highlights different water management techniques that help conserve, reuse, and manage our water so that we get the most sustainable use. Studying the topography of the site, we see that most of the water drains to the North across the site, with Centennial Mall as a highpoint. Water drains either to the west or east of this highpoint, similarly to the continental divide, a

headwater for the North Platte River. At this highpoint, a large cistern has been placed to collect and store rainwater as well as any site runoff which is collected along M street. Two main stormwater management techniques have been employed along the mall. Permeable pavers along the transit corridor help water infiltrate back into the water collection system or into the ground, while rain gardens filter and collect site run-off from the neighboring plaza spaces and west draining streetscape. As this water collects, it is treated in the pre-treatment cisterns and pumped back up to the clean water cisterns. These clean water cisterns then pump out this purified water for use in either the water features or irrigation along the transit mall. As the water fulfills its purpose, it is then again collected, treated, and pumped out for reuse.

GOALS • • • • • • • • •

Work with the site topography to control drainage on site Retain approximately 90-100% of surface runoff from the district 1/3 of all designed areas will be permeable Reduce irrigation needs by 50% compared to traditional landscapes Reuse graywater by 75% and output reduction Smarter maintenance strategies, such as a reduction of mowing area Reduce water costs through improved irrigation, gray water recycling, etc. Provide sustainable landscape design education, as well as areas for experimentation, discovery, and exploration Employ numerous water management techniques through visible infrastructure


STORM WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM


05

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT THE PLATTE BASIN PARKWAY PROJECT Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

In order to create a unified streetscape that highlights various ecosystems and water management practices the spacing, materials, colors, and site furniture has been curated to provide uniformity through a changing landscape. Permeable pavers are made from locally sources materials, with yellow undertones that speak to the prairie atmosphere. Site furniture features painted black steel, wood panels, and corten steel accents which weather and change with the landscape. The educational signage on bollards and plaques reference the Platte Basin Timelapse in order to share stories for each installation along the Platte Basin Parkway.

12’ Pedestrian Throughway

Landscape Zone

12’ Bus Transit Lane

Landscape Zone

8’ Sidewalk

Landscape Zone

12’ Bus Transit Lane

Landscape Zone

12’ Pedestrian Throughway


05

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT WYOMING INFRASTRUCTURE Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“All living things are related through their need for water in order to survive. But only we humans make determinations that can completely alter the natural world. We, most of whom have come here from afar, have dispersed through our continent taking everything that we determined to have value, calling those things “natural resources” and using them to build a remarkably complex and productive society. But there has been a cost. We tend to stand outside nature’s complexity and see it as separate things, not as our giving Mother.” - Michael Farrell (PBT) The North Platte Project set in place by the Bureau of Land Management was one of the first federal scale projects to alter our way of life in the Midwest. With the creation of the Pathfinder Dam in 1909, followed by the construction of the Seminoe and Kortes Dams, agriculture in an arid region became possible on a large scale. Learning from Michael Farrell’s story “My Path to the River” found on the Platte Basin Timelapse website, this project aims to reconnect us with nature, integrating built and natural systems. Visible infrastructure has been put in place to help educate and engage the public with our water resources. The

large cistern stands at the highpoint of the parkway collecting and pumping out water to the rest of the site for installations and irrigation. An interactive water feature is found on this block, starting the conversation on water management and mirroring the Wyoming dam infrastructure that ensures a livelihood in the western portions of our state. Native plantings mimick the arid Wyoming habitat with plantings of aspen, juniper, and sage. As this is the starting point for this story, a map of our watershed is embedded in the concrete, illustrating the 900 mile journey our water undergoes before coalescing with the Missouri River.

Woodchip Mulch Corten Steel Stamped Concrete Permeable Pavers

Prairie Clover White Yarrow Silver Mound Evening Artemisia Primrose

Cheesehead Potentilla

Russian Sage

Mint Julep Juniper

Quaking Aspen

Farrell, Michael. “My Path to the River.” Platte Basin Timelapse, January 17, 2017. https://plattebasintimelapse.com/2018/01/my-path-to-the-river-2/.


05

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT PANHANDLE IRRIGATION Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“On a warm summer morning in western Nebraska, 77-year-old farmer Bob Busch stood next to a sugar beet field in a worn denim shirt, black suspenders and a mesh hat. At his feet, water coursed past in a concrete-lined irrigation ditch. A series of slender, curved pieces of aluminum pipe siphoned the water out of the ditch and onto the field. This is one style of flood irrigation, a method that has been in use in western Nebraska since the late 1800s when enterprising settlers began to divert water from the North Platte River to irrigate croplands and build an agricultural economy.” - Ariana Brocious (PBT) Across Nebraska, farmers like Bob Busch implement irrigation techniques to bring water to their sugar beets, dry beans, corn and alfalfa. In the arid western portions of the state, this is a necessary technique to provide water to our crops and this water is often reused up to 7 times by irrigaters downstream. Yet, with new advances in technology we see more farmers moving away from these irrigation ditches which help to replenish our groundwater supply and provide reusable water to farmers downstream. Again, we are reminded that we must be consciour of our water

management practices and the repercussions they impose on our neighbors down river. Mimicking, the irrigation canals which brought life to areas like Scottsbluff and Gering, the water canals here are constantly moving water around each planting bed. This water is continually recycling through the cistern at the highpoint of the street. Native pollinator species have been planted, further supporting the connection between our water, food, and the wildlife that supports it. A food truck alley and food court lie on the south western end of the block.

October Skies Aster Prairie Smoke Lanceleaf Coreopsis Kobold Gayfeather

Prairie Clover White Yarrow Purple Showy Coneflower Goldenrod

Blue Grama

Maiden Grass

Rising Sun Redbud

Littleleaf Linden

Brocious, Ariana. “One Irrigator’s Waste Is Another’s Supply.” Platte Basin Timelapse, January 20, 2015. https://plattebasintimelapse.com/2015/01/oneirrigators-waste-is-anothers-supply/.


05

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT NEBRASKA SANDHILLS Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“The Sandhills are characterized by large stabilized sand dunes, mixed-grass and short grass prairie grazed by beef cattle, and the expansive Ogallala Aquifer, which is deepest under the region. Most of the water flowing south-east out of the Sandhills is spring fed, where the high water table of the aquifer bubbles to the surface. In the valleys between dunes, the water table visibly rises, filling the valley with water. These features make the Sandhills a unique landscape, vulnerable to intensive grazing and drought, as evidenced in the past. - Steven Speicher (PBT) A breathtaking landscape of rolling hills hidden away within the larger expanse of the flat Nebraska landscape. The Sandhills in the Loup Watershed provide an unique ecosystem within the state. Located at the deepest part of the Ogallala Aquifer, water rises up from springs, acting as the headwater that feeds this system of rivers and streams before they coalesce with the Platte. This landscape has a unique duality at play. An over abundance of water lies below the surface of a ground often plagued by drought. Naturally, these grasslands would experience wildfire, renewing the vegetation and keeping the Eastern Red Cedar trees at

bay. With the introduction of ranching and agriculture, this land now has to be carefully managed. In the absence of wildfire, prescribed burns by farmers help to burn back the invasive Eastern Red Cedar and renew the pastures for agricultural use. This event is showcased at the center of this block, dividing the grassy lawn from the sandy play mounds. Capturing the playful beauty of the Sandhills, these mounds act as both a playground and a resting space along the parkway that connects to the various programming around it. A splash pad depicting the size, shape, and depth of the Ogallala aquifer complements this playscape.

Speicher, Steven. “Field School in Archaeology.” Platte Basin Timelapse, August 24, 2014. https://plattebasintimelapse.com/2013/08/field-school-in-archaeology/.


05

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT CENTRAL NEBRASKA WET MEADOWS Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“The blinds, small, camouflaged buildings perched on the bank have windows facing out onto the river. Islands sandbars and the indigo current are barely visible in the early morning light. The sun arrives slowly and as it does, visitors realize those islands aren’t sand but thousands of cranes, crowded so closely together they appear as one body. With the light comes a building cacophony, a rising and falling chorus of calls unlike anything else.” - Ariana Brocious (PBT)

The braided sandbars of the Platte River, formed and reshaped by ice jams and floods, have created the perfect habitat for migrating birds on their spring stopover during their migration north. People from all over the world come to see the sandhill cranes roost here, alongside whooping cranes and other endangered bird species. This is a critical habitat that it threatened by the appropriation of our rivers which drain the already low water river depth. This spectacle is deeply connected to place and deserves to be celebrate alongside the diminishing ecosystem that supports it. The wetmeadow habitat found here is made up of grasses and

forb prairies that flood with the rising water tables in the spring. This block celebrates that habitat while showcasing an origami crane installation. Thirteen thousand white aluminum cranes hang from the corten steel overhead frame, which supports a boardwalk across the wet meadow habitat. Seating pulloffs reminiscent of the viewing infrastructure in Central Nebraska provide a reflection point along the installation, while strategically placed QR codes allow visitors to tune into the Platte Basin Timelapse website. Various QR codes take you to related stories about the wet meadows and crane populations showcased here.

Cotton Grass Barnyard Grass Marsh Skullcap

Swamp Milkweed

Northwind Switchgrass Indian Grass Prairie Dropseed

Water Sedge

Northern Catalpa London Plane Tree

Whitespire Birch

Yellowwood

Brocious, Ariana. “Craniac Migration.” Platte Basin Timelapse, April 21, 2015. https://plattebasintimelapse.com/2015/04/craniac-migration/.


05

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT EASTERN NEBRASKA SALINE WETLANDS Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“There’s lots of birds and amphibians and things that are giving their breeding calls, so there’s lots of noise and activity. If you were to take someone and drop them into that setting or to play the audio for them and ask them where that was, they might guess the Amazon or some tropical forest somewhere, and if you told them that that was 10 miles from Lincoln, Nebraska (in the saline wetlands), I think they’d have a hard time believing that there’s that much life in a place that they regularly just drive by.” - Ted LaGrange (PBT) Saline wetlands are an underappreciated resource. Not only are saline wetlands the rarest ecosystem in Nebraska, providing habitat for hundereds of species but they are a natural source for water management. Saline wetlands clean and treat water, improving water quality. They increase groundwater recharge and they provide flood control which is especially important for the human settlements around these habitats. This block celebrates this rare ecosystem, and while we cannot recreate the saline environment, similar species have been planted here such as willow, aster, and

water sedge. Saline wetlands are also naturally bordered by tall grass prairie, which helps protect the environment from outside stresses by creating a buffer. Grasses and forbs have been planted on either side of the wetlands to recreate this relationship. At the terminus of the parkway is a large installation. Recycled plastic balls have been strung together by wire and suspended above the 10th street intersection. Mimicking a cloud, this installation is a reminder of the rest of the water cycle. Our water is recycled so we must be responsible with how we use it.

Arctic Blue Willow Heath Aster Prairie Dropseed Water Sedge

Prairie Clover Karl Forester Showy Kobold Goldenrod Gayfeather

Greenvase Zelkova

Heritage Oak

Ginkgo New Biloba Horizon Elm

Brocious, Ariana. “Ted LaGrange: Wetland Biologist.” Platte Basin Timelapse, April 23, 2016. https://plattebasintimelapse.com/2016/04/ted-lagrange-wetlandbiologist/.


05

DESIGN DEVELOPMENT LANDSCAPE PERFORMANCE REVIEW Advanced Design Studio | 2021 | Katelyn Nimic

“...the water was just a visitor traveling through on its journey, connecting stationary locations, like my spot or maybe yours, for hundreds of miles. And whether it’s the over-consumption of water, polluted runoff, or a canoe paddle, how we impact our water resources reaches further than a human delineated boundary of one location.” - Emma Brinley Buckley (PBT) This studio project is about connections, connecting people to place. That place might be where they live or work, where they eat or exercise, or it could be where they connect with nature and history. In its basic form, The Platte Basin Parkway Project is a transit corridor that minimizes reliance on automobile while supporting sustainable modes of transportation. But this project goes deeper, it connects residents to the history of their water, the foundation of Nebraska’s ecosystems and societies. None of the cities in Nebraska could be supported if they didn’t have these water resources. From the original settlement of salt mines in Lincoln, to the agriculture supported through

irrigation in Scottsbluff, these moments of Nebraska’s history are intertwined with the journey of water through Nebraska. This project educates its visitors through interactive landscapes, visible water infrastructure, and curated references to the stories on the Platte Basin Timelapse website. The user can experience the journey of our water from Colorado to Wyoming to Nebraska just by traveling one transit corridor in Lincoln. The user learns about the smart water management strategies used on site and experiences the beauty of Nebraska’s native plant palettes. Not only does this project connect us to where we are going, but it connects us to our place, Nebraska.

Buckley, Emma Brinley. “Water Resources: Managing a Basic Human Right.” Platte Basin Timelapse, July 6, 2015. https://plattebasintimelapse.com/2015/07/ water-resources-managing-a-basic-human-right/.


INCREASED SAFETY

REDUCTION IN ENERGY USE (LED / SOLAR LIGHT)

CARBON SEQUESTRATION

INCREASED HEALTH & WELL-BEING

INCREASED VISITOR SPENDING

HABITAT CREATION FOR POLLINATOR SPECIES

WATER CONSERVATION THROUGH RE-USE

RECYCLED MATERIALS

INCREASED SITE VISITATION

IMPROVED AIR QUALITY (REMOVED BY TREES)

REDUCTION IN URBAN HEAT ISLAND EFFECT

DECREASED VACANCY RATE

INCREASED SCENIC QUALITY & VIEWS

RUN-OFF RETAINED & TREATED ON SITE


THE PLATTE BASIN PARKWAY PROJECT https://youtu.be/nA0wWBmZU10

Profile for Katelyn Nimic

The Platte Basin Parkway Project  

In its basic form, The Platte Basin Parkway Project is a transit corridor that minimizes reliance on automobile while supporting sustainable...

The Platte Basin Parkway Project  

In its basic form, The Platte Basin Parkway Project is a transit corridor that minimizes reliance on automobile while supporting sustainable...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded