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Journal de Nîmes Nº 14

THE AZZURRI ISSUE April 2018

Tenue de Nîmes

THE GOOD THINGS IN LIFE

Italy WWW.TENUEDENIMES.COM -

IN THIS ISSUE:

MAURIZIO DONADI

ATELIER & REPAIRS x CANDIANI DENIM

80 YEARS CANDIANI ‘THE GREENEST MILL ON EARTH’

TDN MADE IN ITALY WHERE DENIM MEETS COUTURE

INTERVIEW CHARLIE HALL THE WAR ON DRUGS & EVERYDAY STYLE

MILANO SHOPPING GUIDE BY WILLEM BOS AND LUIS MENDO

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The Fight for Europe’s Last Wild Rivers patagonia.com/blueheart

REPRESENTING THE RIVERS AND PEOPLE IN THE REGION OF PRESENTING

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© 2018 Patagonia, Inc.

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CONTENTS / Azzurri

Just arrived...

VISVIM

7 INTRODUCING AZZURRI By Menno van Meurs

8 80 YEARS CANDIANI 'The greenest mill on earth'

40 SARTORIAL SHIRTS Factory visit Albiate 1830 43 AMSTERDAM LIMITED EDITION TdN 9 year anniversary varsity jacket

12 MAURIZIO DONADI & THE MILKY WAY Atelier & Repairs x Candiani Denim

46 MILANO SHOPPING GUIDE

17 WHY DISCOUNT SUCKS

48 PEGGY GUGGENHEIM

Column by Steven Pont

By Willem Bos and Luis Mendo

Inside Peggy Guggenheim Venice

18 DAZZLING DREW

52 THE BLUE TRIANGLE By Daphne Bleeker

20 WHERE DENIM MEETS COUTURE

54 VANS OG

Drew Durango: New TdN jeans for women

Baggy blue jeans and Vans authentics

Behind the scenes: TdN factory in Veneto

24 DESIGN THE UNEXPECTED Watch designer Gerald Genta 26 TDN x STOOKER COFFEE

56 LEVI’S MADE & CRAFTED Voodoo Surf

58 FADE Denim enthusiasts and their jeans

Taste the best coffee in town

28 TENUE DE NÎMES PLAYLIST

60 HANDCRAFTED MODERN Italian design by Bloomberry

By Rudy Ross

30 LOGO’S & BRANDS Dylan Griffith's Essentials

62 ICE Column by Roberto Gelato

31 ITALY BY MARC SMIT Photography by a Minox owner

34 INTERVIEW CHARLIE HALL ‘A Deeper Understanding’

38 RED WING PECOS Boots for urban cowboys

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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INTRODUCTION / Azzurri

“The first lesson I learned was that Italy stands for impeccable craftsmanship, but also: Good stuff takes time.” 80th anniversary denim fabric that runs through the entire collection in various shapes. The line will be exclusively launched at Tenue de Nîmes during Denim Days in Amsterdam this April.

AZZURRI

IMAGE: PIET OOSTENBEEK

The Italian word ‘Azzurri’ refers to the Italian sports teams and their impeccable bright blue team jerseys. This Journal is a tribute to a group of Tenue de Nîmes ‘Azzurri’, an inspiring gathering of Italian people who became a vital part of the Tenue de Nîmes brand. 

Introducing

It was thanks to our mentor Marco Bonzanni that we stepped foot into the wonderful world of Italian manufacturing in the first place. Marco introduced me to Manuel Canova and his mother Loretta who run a specialty denim company just outside Padova. Thanks to the Canova family who adopted our Tenue de Nîmes project, I can proudly say the 9th run of Tenue de Nîmes jeans was sent to Amsterdam when this publication went to  print.  I still  remember my first production trip to Italy in 2014 as if it was yesterday. Being a typical direct and restless Dutchman the first and probably most  important lesson I  learned was  that Italy stands for impeccable craftsmanship, but also: Good stuff takes time. 

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

In this issue we celebrate the 80th anniversary of Europe’s largest denim mill Candiani, who supplies us with a substantial amount of Italian denim fabric each year. The inspiring story of the Candiani family started in the 1930s, in a small town near Milan. Today the 4th generation of the Candiani denim masters are doing everything in their power to become the greenest denim mill on earth.

But there is more Italian craft to celebrate! What to think of the Albiate shirt company who made it possible to design a Tenue de Nîmes shirt that strongly exceeds our wildest dreams. Not only did they create a custom heavy weight ‘American Oxford’ for us, they also provided us with the most spectacular poplin fabric I ever layed my eyes on. In this magazine I am proud to introduce you to this inspiring company that dates back to 1830. Like in many of the last issues of Journal de Nîmes we introduce you to a list of the finest stores and hotspots through the eyes of our Tenue de Nîmes team. In this Italian issue we walk you through a list of our favourite addresses in Milan that we believe are all individually worth a ticket into the city. Further we take you to our favourite museum in Europe, from one of the most inspiring women of the 20th century: The Peggy Guggenheim Museum in Venice. Only a couple of miles away from our factory the works of Jackson Pollock, Piet Mondriaan and Pablo Picasso have nowhere felt so close to the real world as they do here.  My personal journey through Italy has only just begun. But if I had to choose one country to personify 'The Good Things in Life’ I would choose Italy with no doubt. I sincerely hope to present you many more Italian treasures during this Tenue de Nîmes anniversary year but for now I hope you enjoy this special blue issue of Journal de Nîmes.  A la proxima.

On top of a Candiani family portrait we interview industry legend Maurizio Donadi who is now collaborating with the Candiani’s with his latest brainchild: Atelier & Repairs. Maurizio worked on a special Candiani x Atelier & Repairs collection from his studio in Los Angeles using a unique

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FEATURE / Candiani Denim

Celebrating 80 years of Denim Fabric Design TEXT: MENNO VAN MEURS IMAGES: CANDIANI ARCHIVE

Candiani is an Italian Denim Mill that proudly celebrates its 80th anniversary this year. With 650 employees and a production of 25 million yards of denim fabric Candiani is the largest denim mill in Europe. Since two years Tenue de Nîmes is fortunate enough to collaborate with Candiani both in men’s and women’s fabrics. This special Italian denim mill is still privately owned and is located in a nature reserve named Tincino Park in between Milan and the Italian Alps. The area has a true textile heritage and is one of the most evolved manufacturing areas in Italy.

The Greenest Mill in the Blue World

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FEATURE / Candiani Denim

FEATURE / Candiani Denim

Candiani combines innovation and sustainability while cherishing heritage Candiani Design Centre Los Angeles, CA.

Historical image of the Candiani family.

4 GENERATIONS OF TEXTILE HERITAGE

RE-GEN FABRIC

The Candiani story begins in 1938 when Luigi Candiani established his workwear fabric company in a small town near Milan. His son Primo converted the workwear facility into the denim mill it is today. Third generation Gianluigi refined the product and created a fabric that is considered the starting point of ‘premium denim’. He was the first to experiment with stretch denim, revolutionizing the denim world. Alberto - Candiani’s fourth generation - who leads the mills though the 21st century elevating the company to an inspiring level of sustainability producing fabric for the most prestigious denim brands in the world.

The denim cloth by the name of 'Re-Gen’ is composed of 50% Refibra and 50% recycled fibres. Technically this means the company did not use a single bit of ‘new’ cotton to create the yarns. On top of that Candiani used a special ingredient named Kitotex to colour the yarns. This revolutionary patent uses 'Chitosan', a natural polymer derived from recycling shrimp shells. Thanks to this Kitotex the company uses 30% less energy, 50% less water and 70% less chemicals to create this denim fabric. Last, Candiani also managed to use a new dyeing technique that is less harmful to the environment. This inhouse technology named Indigo Juice saves about 15% of water and 15% of energy in the dyeing process. All of this resulted in a spectacular ‘selvedge’

FABRIC The Candiani Denim Mill is best known for its exquisite denim fabrics and proudly positions itself as the ’The Most Sustainable Denim Mill on Earth’. Especially for their 80-year anniversary the company did what they do best: Create a memorable fabric that personifies the heart and soul of the company and its rich history. It will not come as a surprise the anniversary fabric became the company’s most sustainable fabric ever.

denim fabric that combines eighty years of heritage with the most sustainable technologies out there.

MADE IN ITALY Candiani has two different plants in Robecchetto con Induno, Italy. Together the two facilities cover nearly 85.000 m2 production floors. The company is fully vertically integrated which means that all the spinning, dyeing, weaving and finishing are done in house. In 2012 the company added a remarkable step to their production process by opening a development centre. The aim is to support denim brands in the development of finished product, rather than just supplying fabric. Knowledge can create better products and more importantly: Optimize the washing process by reducing water, chemicals and energy.

SUSTAINABILITY At Candiani Denim innovation equals sustainability. The development of new, more sustainable technologies are crucial to the Italian company where it comes to the prosperity and quality of life of future generations. But moreover, the company believes that by creating new industry standards, it will improve the entire industry. Tenue de Nîmes is proud to be the first store in the world to sell a garment made from Re-Gen fabric. Candiani teamed up with industry legend Maurizio Donadi to create a special 'Atelier & Repairs’ contemporary workwear line with the Candiani anniversary fabric. The collection will be presented at the Candiani Design Center in Los Angeles before it will be exclusively launched at Tenue de Nîmes during Denim Days in April 2018. 

“The secret behind our success are our people making the ‘Made in Italy’ quality.” Alberto Candiani

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Gianluigi & Alberto Candiani at work.

Roberto Candiani in the Italian factory.

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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INTERVIEW / Maurizio Donadi

INTERVIEW / Maurizio Donadi

“I’ve always appreciated artists who could create something extraordinary with very little.”

&

Maurizio Donadi The Milky Way

AT E L I E R S & R E P A I R S x C A N D I A N I D E N I M what already exists with uncompromised creativity and allowing plenty of room for ingenuity and experimentation. Where do you (re)-produce A&R? We have 2 locations: Our first atelier with 2 tailors in London and a transformation center for scale in Los Angeles.   What were your ambitions when you started making A&R? What are you trying to accomplish? The ambition was, and still is, to do something meaningful, helpful while being creative without compromise. The accomplishment goal is quite simple: we want to lead the movement of reducing the excess that our industry generates. Clothing is the second largest polluter in the world after oil. We produce 150 billion garments every year for a world population of 7 billion. You do the math. There are other fields addressing similar issues around waste and excess that I continue to look to for inspiration, influence as well as appreciation.   What is it that A&R brings to the world? We hope we’re bringing a more relevant, realistic and creative approach to sustainability that others can appreciate and practice. While most of us can confidently commit to sustainable practices in our lives, it is nearly impossible to achieve 100% of them today. Therefore, we’re taking it one step at a time by firstly addressing excess reduction in apparel and textiles. We are mission driven and not a brand. We are a project, a point of view, a creative lab, a textile experiment.   While we began this project purely based on instinct, good will and experimentation, the future of A&R is about its own creative and physical survival in a moment of extraordinary global and social challenges.   What does the brand stand for? We stand for ingenuity, resourcefulness and imagination tasked with reducing excess.   What is it you do yourself at A&R? You are Creative Director I noticed. Do you design? How big is the rest of the team? 

It might not come as a surprise that Candiani, the denim mill that celebrates its 80th anniversary this year, specifically asked Mr. Donadi to design a collection using their recycled Re-Gen denim. Time to meet the man who is adding a new (sustainable) chapter to denim and design. TEXT: MENNO VAN MEURS IMAGES: ATELIERS & REPAIRS

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he first time I met Maurizio Donadi he was Senior Vice President of Levi’s Vintage Clothing. Maurizio had an ambitious plan to take Levi’s back where it belonged: On top of the denim game. Fortunately he chose Amsterdam as his LVC hide-away and with a team full of extraordinary people he spoiled our city with his unlimited energy and ditto charisma. Sadly for Amsterdam Maurizio had to move back to the United States to - after 35 years in the apparel industry - give birth to his (denim 7 apparel) brainchild: Atelier & Repairs. His guiding principle? 0% production, 100% transformation. Atelier & Repairs customizes vintage and dead-stock clothing to give them a new life. Maurizio and his team are achieving unicity by rethinking and reshaping old clothes.Think custom army pants, patched up college sweats and re-designed 501s with Hawaiian repairs. Buy new? No! Reimagine what is there instead.   Please introduce yourself and tell us about your background. My name is Maurizio. Born in Treviso, Italy. Who I am can be summarized in one sentence: I have fully embraced what life has given me: good health and the courage to make life choices that happened to work out, most of the time.   How did it all start for you in the denim and fashion business?

Simply as an alternative to the job I had at that time, and necessity. I was a steelworker in Italy whose profession was not a clean one but an honorable one. I also knew I wanted a change. I was not interested in fashion, and even less so in denim, so I ended up falling into this business in 1980 by taking a job with Benetton in Paris. They were recruiting for their expansion in France so I sold my guitar, moved to Paris by myself and began my career in this industry as a warehouse worker and worked myself up to retail manager and point person to open up new stores Germany, Nashville, Miami and the Caribbean. Everything after this period was due to good fortune, timing and a growing interest in the industry.   At this moment in time you are working on your latest brainchild Atelier & Repairs, How did that idea occur? After 35 years in the business of clothing, I felt the desire to start something that I could create and grow for myself. I didn’t want to start a fashion or denim brand; I needed a clear departure from the experiences, though invaluable, that I had with corporations in my career.   I’ve always appreciated artists who could create something extraordinary with very little – paint and brush, found object. So with these, it felt natural to take what I’d learned in the fashion business and marry it with something personal - Atelier & Repairs became a vehicle for not producing anything new but rather transforming Photo: Riccardo Vimercati

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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INTERVIEW / Maurizio Donadi

INTERVIEW / Maurizio Donadi

“True vintage pieces should be treated with honor and respect. In my opinion, there are 3 ways of handling vintage: 1. Leave them unaltered 2. Repair them with superior knowledge and techniques 3. Enhance their sentimental and aesthetic value without modernizing them…”

As co-founder, I am guilty of conceiving the idea and my partner is burdened with operationalizing it. I am mainly responsible for ensuring the vision lasts for years to come which is where 'Creative Director' comes in. The process of transformation requires utilizing garments already produced: defective, leftover from past seasons, used and new, deadstock and sometimes great vintage pieces in need of some love, etc. With my concept designer and product development team, I create the transformation direction by theme and we collectively apply this around what we source, making the creative process very much a collective effort. What is the hardest thing to do when you are working on a vintage garment to make into an A&R product? True vintage pieces should be treated with honor and respect. In my opinion, there are 3 ways of handling vintage: 1. Leave them unaltered 2. Repair them with superior knowledge and techniques 3. Enhance their sentimental and aesthetic value without modernizing them (which just de-values the item). For example, we repair and patch holes on French workwear from early 60s using Japanese indigo textiles from the same era.   How is your A&R philosophy related to the state of fashion these days? Lately, the fashion industry has been more vocal and proactive about various sustainable practices so it is a good moment for us to dovetail our own parallel initiative of waste reduction with others.  

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Our aim is to be responsible within our industry. I believe that the solution is not just using organic cotton or utilizing less water, but to first to eliminate what we have produced in excess for decades, followed by responsibly producing with technology and fibers that are friendly to humans and our planet. The larger conversation is that our planet will survive without us but we, as human being, are working toward our own collective end as we dangerously enter the phase of being an endangered species ourselves. However, let me also note that I believe that our philosophy relates more to the food industry than it does fashion. There are a number of progressive chefs and F&B professionals who are devising remarkable solutions for the tremendous amount of food waste we, as earth’s citizens, create on a daily basis. Their urgency, due to freshness expiration, is one that speaks volumes to us; there is a lot that can be learned and applied to fashion to expedite the need to resolve fashion and textile excess/ waste.   Does the birth of A&R have something to do with your responsibility and a wish to educate people? For sure. I worked for decades in an industry that didn’t really educate me on the impact of certain business choices and commercial strategies. Every action one takes educates, but not every lesson is well taught. I don’t think I am prepared to educate anyone but I feel that my role is to make people think by action rather than by theory.   Do you like the world better today?  Than last year? Yes, for various reasons. The world can be made better every day by repairing not just pants (!), but also the fabric of community across cultures and societies.   Or do you believe it looked brighter back in the 1980s when you started your career?  I don’t know if it was brighter back then, but maybe because I wasn’t bright enough to understand how bright it could be!   How did the denim world look like when you entered the denim market back in the 1980s? I remember brands from the 1980s that made me curious about the business of blue jeans: Fiorucci, Levi’s, Wrangler, Lee, Goldie, Diesel, Replay, etc. Their brand messages (marketing) were a lot about selling the dream of America, with an Italian twist. For me, denim represented a uniform in which I felt rebellious, free from convention and free in spirit. One brand in particular I blame for bringing me closer to denim and its application in the business of clothing. Classic Nouveau was the men’s division of the Fiorucci brand. Tullio Marani and Pierre Morisset were the designers (I can’t remember their real titles at that time). At that time (circa 1987) i was opening a Fiorucci shop in Miami on behalf of a businessman.

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

Working with them in Milan for a couple of days really made me interested in working in this industry and made me understand for the first time what ‘apparel design’ means and should be. Their obsession for product was contagious. Would you go back if you would have the chance? Please explain. I don’t want to go back. I want to go where I have never been before.   What’s the most important difference between vintage clothing and a garment from A&R?  At A&R, we transform products that already exist, including vintage. There is a misconception about A&R that we only work with vintage goods, but we also work with excess coming from modern and contemporary brands that are leftover, defective, used or from past seasons. Vintage is a small part of A&R. Do you feel people should consider buying more used clothing in general? Yes, without a doubt. They will also feel and look more individualistic, should they wish.   What influences your designs? I am heavily and deeply influenced by art across all media – painting, photography, architecture, music, sculpture, performance…They each embody a constant tension between form, function and aesthetic that I challenge myself and my team to apply to our transformations.   What do you personally look at to get inspiration when designing? Inspiration comes from anywhere but I get the most inspired when I look at art and struggling people’s resourcefulness.

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

“Re-imagining every item differently from next is an absolute work of love. And love, in this case and others, is of great value.”

Do you have any (Italian) style icons? No.   Is it true A&R may be perceived as premium? It feels like a lovely paradox: Vintage v.s. Premium - Can you explain? Being perceived as premium is a compliment as well as what we strive for. The sum of our parts: reconditioning, repairing, reinforcing and uniquely embellishing one-of-akind pieces requires a great deal of time and expertise. No sewing production line would want to do what we do - we slow down the process much like tailors and couture designers do/did. Re-imagining every item differently from next is a commitment and absolute work of love. And love, in this case and others, is of great value.   If you look at the fashion business in general at the moment. What would you say are our major opportunities?  There is opportunity for brands to be smaller, more relevant and comfortably profitable, all of which will ensure longevity and financial security while remaining more creative and innovative.   And what do you consider the most important threats? Greed and creative stagnation.

A&R x CANDIANI Your collaboration with A&R and Candiani is obviously an Italian home game. How did this idea become reality? Please explain. It’s always great to break bread with a fellow Italian! Alberto Candiani is the deux ex machina of this project. He approached us 2 years ago with a singular, ambitious idea in mind: to make the first 100% recycled denim

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INTERVIEW / Maurizio Donadi

COLUMN / Why discount sucks

“Italians are, by nature, resourceful, artistic, problem solvers and have this innate gift of making beautiful objects by hand.”

fabric that is also 100% biodegradable and to ensure it translated into a durable, flexible and utilitarian collection of clothing for work and life (after work). I believe he ultimately approached me because Atelier & Repairs’ philosophy and mission naturally complimented his ambition. The Candiani - Atelier & Repairs cooperation is a global initiative that we’re both very committed to and excited about. For those of us who don’t know Candiani, why is it so special what they make? Candiani is the denim mill that very early on developed and perfected stretch denim. Of course, they do a lot more than that, but stretch denim is what they are wildly famous for.   How do you look at the 80th anniversary of the Candiani family? It is an extraordinary achievement to have an 80-year old family business still thriving. It is also extraordinary that they remain humble and obsessed with innovation, quality and sharing such game changing developments that are good for the planet as they did this year.   Please tell us about your inspiration regarding this particular A&R x Candiani capsule collection. We simply looked at traditional work wear clothing from around the world as inspiration and modernized the most relevant details and functions. This initial series exemplifies the dignity of hard work, in a global sense, through history, since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution.“Il lavoro nobilita l’uomo” we say in Italian (“works ennobles man”).   How is the collection built up? Is it made for both men and women? 10 pieces. Unisex. For work and life. One fabric. Tumbled. No wash treatments. No season. Long lasting. Of value.   Do you feel there is room for more collaborations between designers and mills?

Why discount

SUCKS

Love, compassion, laughter, simplicity, love for nature, sharing knowledge, freedom. Oh, and some good food in between! And how does that relate to work? Exactly the same, but with some financial profit so that we can prolong the fun.   You are now based in Los Angeles, CA. If you could go back to Italy in a split second - what is it you would pick up immediately? (Something you miss a lot living in the US). … A good espresso that I still can’t find outside Italy.   YES! It is probably one of the biggest opportunities in our industry. Mills are experts in areas that design offices should not compete with, but compliment and collaborate more with. Imagine how much efficiency and design ingenuity can be achieved.    How do you see the future of Italian craft in general? Italians are, by nature, resourceful, artistic, problem solvers and have this innate gift of making beautiful objects by hand. I can’t predict the future but I can say that without encouraging this artistry (like in any industry) Italy will be a lesser nation of white collar paper pushers.   Is there a bright future ahead of us? Yes, and it is called The Milky Way. What do you personally consider the Good Things of Life? 

O

FUTURE

How do you see the relationship between the history of jeans and the future of A&R? What part of the history do you want to keep and what do you want to push forward/innovate? I would most definitely want to keep the utilitarian value and the original purpose with which jeans were initially conceived-humble and durable work wear. Because we don’t design denim, A&R does a lot of work transforming jeans from all brands and eras and saving plenty of them from ending up in a landfill. This could be perceived as innovative; we see it as sourcing and transforming denim in creative ways from reconditioning to reconstructing them for a longer life. Hopefully this conveys that we should all reduce its global production until we’ve collectively sorted out the current overstock of denim. Once this is balanced, we can start producing better while encouraging creativity and innovation.   How do you see the future of clothing?  Less of it.   What do we need?  A lot less than we think.   What do we have to let go?  Our obsession of the concept of ‘more’.

ne of the most beautiful words in psychology is 'appreciation', one of the most important words in economics is 'value'. Since psychology and economics are much closer related than many people think, this may not come as a surprise. Simply put, when something has value to us, we show it in an expression of our appreciation. In psychology, we show this through our words. In economics, another instrument is used: money.

immediately says something about the appreciation of his own work. After all, if we express value through money and, in the same time, express value through our appreciation, then the sum is quickly made; someone who sells the same product suddenly for less doubts the value he used first and the appreciation he can bring to what he does. And it's never nice to buy anything from someone who doubts too much about his own value and makes it so visible.

When you buy something, the amount you put down is a token of appreciation for what you buy. But this token of appreciation applies not only to the product, but also to the person who made the product. After all, we make it quite clear through our spending that we think someone is on the right track.

Naturally, when you buy a Tesla, you would like to fall into their 20 percent discount campaign. And KLM would also love to buy their new Boeing during the campaign 'get three, pay two'. But Tesla never discounts, nor does Boeing. Because if you know that what you do is valuable, then you don't depreciate your values. Not even for a moment.

This means that when someone decides to reduce the price of his goods and thus literally attaches less value to them, he

Steven Pont is psychologist and writer.

What role do you see for A&R in shaping the future denim and clothing? Our story is simply about doing something meaningful for the community of our planet and neighbors. At the very least, we hope to spark curiosity, provoke a thought and give someone the courage to act – all with a smile. _

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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COLLABORATION / Drew Durango

COLLABORATION / Drew Durango

Dazzling

Drew Tenue de Nîmes

‘DREW DURANGO’ JEANS

Meet ‘Drew’: Our second Tenue de Nîmes women’s jean. A tribute to the first jeans women in the 60s and 70s started to wear: Unisex jeans. Because we felt jeans may be tough for the girls, yet they should always be feminine too - we decided to design a boyfriend jean that compliments the female body to the max. The Drew has a high waist and the back of the jeans really ‘hugs’ the lower back. The leg is cropped and tapered, which means it gets slimmer from the knee down to the hem to give them a real ‘tailored' look. This allows you to wear our Drew with heels, boots or sneakers: It will all work great. Drew is made from the highest quality, selvedge CONE denim fabric from the U.S.A. and manufactured with the utmost attention to detail in our denim laboratory in the North of Italy. They are available in a dark blue, rinsed version and a lighter blue, washed style. Your instant favourite: The kind of jeans you will live in!

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FACTORY VISIT / Manuel Canova

TENUE DE NÎMES MADE IN VENETO, ITALY

Where Denim meets Couture TEXT/IMAGES: MENNO VAN MEURS

Behind the scenes at the Tenue de Nîmes laboratory in Padova, Italy. Interview with Manuel Canova, co-owner of the factory and founder of high-end denim label IMJIT Manufactus. 

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he best way to describe the extraordinary factory in where all Italian Tenue de Nîmes jeans are designed and produced is by admitting it is not really a factory. I look at our facility as a laboratory, a boiler room where jeans are designed, developed and made in one single space. It is the only factory I ever stepped foot in, that actually makes haute couture for Parisian and British designers as well as jeans for companies such as ours. It’s a constant clash of cultures as well as expertise and that to me makes our Tenue de Nîmes factory so unique. But our Tenue de Nîmes factory in Italy would not be the same without the lifework of denim ’scientist’ Manuel Canova and his mother Loretta. The laboratory of the Canova family was established in the 1980s, during the true denim Eldorado in the Veneto area thanks to emerging denim brands like Diesel and Replay. But also labels such as Armani and Dolce & Gabbana made the Venice area their playground for world domination.  "Veneto was the valley of denim during that time. When my mother founded the company, Diesel was a company that housed only six employees.” Despite this modest amount of people Diesel started their operations with, it was the start of an Italian denim era. The story goes that factories in the 90s did not even wait for denim orders to come in: They just produced as much as they could because they new the demand was endless anyway. "During the 1990s my mother was producing 1000 jeans per day”. A lot has changed since then.  Today, the focus for the Canova family is on niche brands and products that actually 'add something to the world'. Take it slow, make something beautiful is what makes every day an exciting day for the Canova family and their team.  "I started assisting my parents in the factory at the age of 14. In the beginning I only got to do the simple things like making belt-loops and applying rivets. Every single holiday, or free afternoon I spent at the factory”. Manuel literally grew up between piles of jeans.  He started his career in knitwear business before he joined his mother in the family company that has been manufacturing jeans in Italy since the 1980s. His employer back then worked for brands like Maison Martin Margiela and Borgonuovo, a made by order line from Armani who make special wool garments in for instance cashmere for their VIP clientele.  “My experience in the knitwear business made me understand that true luxury - although I don’t really like that word - could be translated into denim too. A price was built by the history of the product and the standards it was made by. My time before attending the company feels like a Master's Degree to me, it was my personal University”.

Manuel Canova, owner of the laboratory cutting Tenue de Nîmes patterns.

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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FACTORY VISIT / Manuel Canova

FACTORY VISIT / Manuel Canova

“The ideal concept in my mind is to create denim within the standards of couture. Old cars have that too. How many products actually get better by age? I know denim does.”

When I asked Manuel about the analogy between couture and high-end jeans in one space he answered that high fashion is very important to understand. “In order to create a really great product, you have to capture millimetres, not kilometres. You need to be perfect on a very limited space.”  “In my lab I love to combine working for couture brands and denim labels side by side. Jeans and couture are much more similar than one would think. People tend to underestimate denim design. There is the fit, the touch, a look and sometimes a wash too. When you work on a classic jacket though, you just cut and you sew. Jeans consist of a complex chain of steps that can all make or break the perfect jean.” "If I touch silk today, and tomorrow denim we can approach them both in a different way the next time. Because we know both.”  In Manuel’s world the similarity between couture and denim is the research that goes behind it.  "I believe a great jeans never loses its value. That can of course be said about couture too. The ideal concept in my mind is to create denim within the standards of couture. That is the future of denim in my opinion. I look for the technical development of denim and design. Think of a great timepiece: It is the movement, the image and spirit around it. Old cars have that too I think. How many products actually get better by age? I know denim does.”   Manuel’s facility is so much more than a place where they make what people ask them to make. They co-create.  "We are an a-typical company because we don’t create product. The best way to explain is to say that we create concepts. We take a lot of risk like that, but in my opinion the safe way kills your brain. I have no interest in being part of the mass market. I want to grow with the portfolio I believe in. But in an organic way. I want to create special things for people with the same Manuel and his mother Loreta at the laboratory.

point of view. Mass market product to me is ‘cold’ product. When you touch one of my jeans for one second you acknowledge the passion behind it." So as Manuel never really was interested in the question of numbers, he not once asked us a minimum order quantity from which he knew we could not swallow it. Manuel has been, since day one, interested in the philosophy behind our Tenue de Nîmes brand. In his opinion: The rest will follow naturally. 

Business as usual at the Veneto factory. The Tenue de Nîmes ‘Tapio’ Sundance and ‘Butch’ True Blue are being finished.

“Don’t get me wrong: I have no problem with making a company bigger, but we need to maintain the level of quality at all times. I derive great inspiration from the car industry. Take Ferrari, it's big - but still something special.” “It's interesting to mix our knowlegde with the wants and taste of the designers we work with. Blending their taste with our expertise is really amazing. Their brands are like my children. I take a lot of risk with them. I'm in this to create a ’new history’. The world is full of brands, full of jeans, full of everything. But what is pure in the market? It is product made with passion, it's knowledge. We don’t want to make the same every single day. That’s why we make so much different things in our lab. I love that our masters get to grow their expertise every day. It’s like a continuous research."    “It's the mix of concepts that creates something unique. It brings unusual inspiration. It is not normal, I'm aware of that, but to me it's the way to do it.” SUSTAINABILITY  "Well made products are true sustainability to me. Sustainability is about not making shit. It kills the world. It's the future to everything: Not too much stuff, good stuff. Have a good family. Enjoy good and honest food. That’s what sustainability is all about. I like my workers to have a good life. I wouldn't want myself to become rich by stealing their free time. I believe that I'm not here to make their lives hard in order to accomplish my dreams. I prefer to work hard myself. Walk that extra mile. This is what our family is all about. We are a Catholic community. We take care of each other and the people around us. It's how we were brought up in this part of Italy." Why Italy?  When you walk around in this country there is beauty and taste everywhere. Think of the red marble side walks in Padova, when you walk over it you might not even see it. These things are in our DNA. In Italy people also like to work with their hands. Italian’s tend to invest in good things like food. We have four seasons and we can therefore create a variety of things during the whole year. Everybody in this region grows vegetables in their garden. They grow tomatoes and radicchio. It’s that respect to nature that inspires people."  After the crisis a lot of craftsmanship disappeared but the Italians seem to have the mentality and the strength to look for new ways.  “The future of this business can never be in the hands of the big chains. How is it possible that we think there is free will behind a t-shirt that costs €5,- in the store? You don’t help the system by buying such things. It is killing families you know. Big groups make money thanks to pricing. But did they make something noteworthy?” Instead Manuel makes that one special product you take with you on a journey around the world. He is transmitting values and keeping the spirit of great products alive.  “I want to make something vibrant for the customers. I want to be proud of my products. I prefer to create a few things, but create real value. Something hard to replicate, like a Lamborghini.” 

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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FEATURE / Gerald Genta

FEATURE / Gerald Genta

Design the  unexpected

GERALD GENTA TEXT: JASPER LIJFERING IMAGE: AMSTERDAM VINTAGE WATCHES

Ask a pack of watch aficionados to name the most important watch designer of the past century and I’ll bet you a watch of your choice that Gerald Genta (1931-2011) wins the contest. In an industry where the designer usually remains anonymous, unlike say fashion or furniture, Genta was single handedly responsible for creating the luxury sports watch category and shaking up the usually stuffy watch industry with a revolutionary design aesthetic. Though he designed thousands of watches at every imaginable price point, a closer look at three of them helps us to appreciate the mark he has left.

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n 1954, at just 23 years old, Genta was commissioned by Universal Genève to design an anti-magnetic watch to commemorate the first ever commercial polar flight, performed by Scandinavian Airline System (SAS). The Polerouter shows the earliest hints of Genta’s unique design language, combining the performance of a toolwatch with the looks of a luxurious wrist piece. Genta perfected this marriage in the 1970s, ushering in the era of the luxury sports watch. Before, watches were either elegant gold dress watches or utilitarian steel sports models. The notion of a luxury steel sports watch was an oxymoron. Yet, Genta designed two watches for two of the most traditional and distinguished Swiss watch houses that were exactly that.   In 1970, Audemars Piguet instructed Genta to come up with an “unprecedented steel watch.” As the story goes, he found inspiration whilst seeing a diver at work with an old-fashioned diver’s helmet near Lake Geneva. Staying up all night, Genta drew the design for a circular case with an angular, octagonal bezel, eight visible screws, and an integrated bracelet. The Royal Oak was presented in 1972 as the most expensive steel watch available and it caused an uproar: why was a distinguished maison d’horlogerie putting out a sports watch, let alone in such a pedestrian material? Some experts even predicted that the Royal Oak would put Audemars Piguet out of business. Though it took a while to catch on, the Royal Oak is now one of the most iconic and long-lasting watch designs, and has spawned an entire product line. It wouldn’t be the first time that Genta would prove a brand’s owners, customers, and industry experts wrong.   Just a few years later Genta created the Nautilus for Patek Philippe. He drew the design in five minutes while observing a group of Patek executives having dinner during a watch fair. The kinship between the Nautilus and Royal Oak is evident. Genta again relied on a nautical theme, this time with a rounded octagonal bezel inspired by the portholes of a sea vessel. Even the ‘ears’ on the sides of the case are reminiscent of porthole hinges. The aquatic theme was also carried through with the sandwich construction of the watch case, which is secured on two sides just like a ship’s porthole.   Genta’s designs expose what is normally hidden, such as the case screws, turning them into deliberate design cues. The industrially styled watch cases and bold bezels are a breath of fresh air compared to the understated elegance of a dress watch or the sober instrumentality of a tool watch. And, by integrating the bracelet into the watch the whole molds to the wrist in a perfect continuum.   The next time you look at that shiny steel sports watch on your wrist, give a little nod to Gerald Genta!

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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FEATURE / Stooker Coffee

FEATURE / Stooker Coffee

The lads from Stooker selected their # 7 for us to serve in our stores. Expect tones of plums, syrup and fresh blue grapes.

TEXT: WILLEM BOS IMAGES: STOOKER ARCHIVE

TENUE DE NÎMES Filter Coffee Our filter coffee is from Rwanda, more specific the Gakenke region. The beans are processed at the Rushashi Washing Station. The current ‘lot’ is the first unwashed coffee produced by this washing station. A well executed experiment. The beans grow at 1.700 to 2.000 metres above sea level. A mix of several Bourbon varieties. This results in a splendid cup of coffee with hints van ripe plums, the sweetness of syrup and freshness of blue grapes.

Espresso Our favourite espresso from Stooker Roasting Co. is sourced from Brazil, from the Cerrado Mineiro region. At 1.130 above sea level, farmer Paulo Veloso dos Santos harvests the beans, being a mix of Yellow Catuaí, Red Catuaí and Acaía Cerrado. Expect a smooth shot of espresso with tones of caramel, nuts and confectionary chocolate. 26

Stooker founders Onno van Zanten and Florian Hessel at work in Amsterdam.

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

From left to right: Stooker Co-Founder Florian / Stooker x Tenue de Nîmes Espresso / Fresh beans at Stooker Roasting Co

STOOKER COFFEE Ask ten people about their morning rituals and chances are big coffee plays a central role in all of them. Prior to opening the doors of our Elandsgracht and Haarlemmerstraat stores around the break of day, we automatically and systematically push the button of the store's coffee machines. But what is a machine without fuel?

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roviding us with the finest beans since 2016, Stooker Coffee are our purveyors of the affectionately called ‘black gold’. Since 2014, founders Onno van Zanten and Florian Hessel have a mission to make specialty coffee accessible to every coffee-drinker and coffee-serving entrepreneur. Florian and Onno take great pride in controlling the entire process: from selecting the perfect bean to personally deliver roasted coffee to clients across our precious Amsterdam. he guys met in a local branch of The Espressofabriek - a coffee-place in the Westerpark. Onno started as coffee roaster whereas Florian was preparing espresso and cappuccino as a barista. After having worked at Espressofabriek for a while, the lads wanted to spread their wings. The first step of their adventure consisted of setting up a roastery annex coffee-bar for an Australian acquaintance, named Lot61. Only a stone’s throw away from our Elandsgracht store, Lot61 became Onno’s and Florian’s playing field on which they could explore how they could exert their love for coffee.  The two coffee enthusiasts realized multi-tasking between bar and roastery was costing them too much time and effort, lacking dedication to one of both. The next logical step was establishing their own brand, and Stooker was born. With 100% focus on serving local entrepreneurs,

Stooker guarantees a unique level of commitment due to the niche they are operating in. Their service stretches far beyond the supply of beans: Onno and Florian advise on the purchase of the right machine and train staff on their barista skills. Stooker take their job very serious. They buy coffee beans straight from coffee farmers or importers. The unroasted beans are subsequently roasted by hand using a 100% Dutch Giesen W15 executed in ‘Stooker Blue’. Onno and Florian branched out last winter by expanding their operations from East-Amsterdam to the West. With their HQ in the east, being the location for tastings and training purposes, the site in the West is in use as roastery. Both spots are open by appointment and exude the brand’s motto: ‘Together we make the best coffee in the world.’  As we already mentioned in the introduction of the article, coffee plays a vital role in our stores. Not only as a catalyst for the ‘Equipe de Nîmes’, we serve it throughout the day to the visitors of both our Amsterdam locations. The lads from Stooker selected their #7 for us to serve in our stores as we’ve replaced our Rocket Espresso machines with a Dutch built Technivorm Moccamaster: a filter machine. #7 is a filter coffee from Rwanda. Expect tones of plums, syrup and fresh blue grapes.  27


MUSIC / Tenue de Nîmes Playlist

MUSIC / Tenue de Nîmes Playlist

Tenue de Nîmes

Playlist

“I’ve never been afraid of darkness, it’s just a different kind of light.”

TEXT: RUDY ROSS

HISS GOLDEN MESSENGER - HALLELUJAH ANYHOW Hiss Golden Messenger’s faithful new album is loaded with exhilarating soulgrooves, thriving on influences various from regional folk, blues and gospel traditions. He sings on what it means to be a compassionate citizen this day and age. Hallelujah Anyhow teaches us hope and faith in times when we are in need for love and togetherness. “I’ve never been afraid of darkness, it’s just a different kind of light.” - M.C. Taylor is a life-saver.

KHRUANGBIN - CON TODO EL MUNDO The instrumental trio Khruangbin from Houston, Tx crafts a unique, psychedelic sound that floats from continent to continent and transcends many eras. Taking inspiration from Afghani desert rock to 60's surf and adding analog breakbeat drums (by phenomenal gospel-chop drummer Donald ‘DJ’ Johnson) they create a trip-hop like atmosphere with retro guitar riffs and bass grooves. Interstellar!  

NATHANIEL RATELIFF AND THE NIGHT SWEATS - TEARING AT THE SEAMS Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats have taken their authentic late '60s soul aesthetic and refined it with solid songwriting and sensational instrumental performances, creating a thrilling album experience. The Night Sweats’ tight grooves are hypnotising and are perfect to accommodate Rateliff's road-worn raspy voice. Tearing At The Seams was recorded in the New Mexico desert and it proved to be a coming of age for them.

THE WAR ON DRUGS - A DEEPER UNDERSTANDING If you visit our Tenue de Nîmes stores on a regular basis you might have noticed this record has been on repeat since it came out. Adam Granduciel is known for his fanatic studio work and creates outer-body experience like no other. A Deeper Understanding is his most layered and perfectly balanced album, an un-conscious world in which you will lose yourself! 

THE BARR BOTHERS - QUEENS OF THE BREAKERS Brothers Brad and Andrew Barr and Sarah Pagé seem to have a wide spread sense of curiosity, they choose a vast bunch of musical instruments to which they paint their sonic picture with.  On their latest LP, Queens of the Breakers, The Barr Brothers don’t shy away from using Mexican Requinto guitars or a West African stringed Ngoni next to their core set-up; guitar, percussion and harp. This brings new layers to their already huge range of genres.

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MOLLY PARDEN - SAIL ON THE WATER Molly Parden is a Nashville-based singer-songwriter originally from Jonesboro, Georgia. Initially settling in Nashville as a harmony singer, borrowing her angelic voice to others. Parden began recording her own music after recognizing her strength and being encouraged by other artists and it was time to further step out on her own as a recording singer-songwriter. Now returning with Sail On The Water it proves to be a very righteous decision to do so.  

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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ESSENTIALS / Dylan Griffith

PHOTOGRAPHY / Marc Smit

‘Essentials’ by Dylan Griffith W I H AYO

Italy

BY M A R C S M I T

JEANS TdN Pablo Stone Blue. Momotaro 15oz tight straight. Hiut Denim Selvedge Denim Hack/Slim.

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e do not believe anyone needs particular brands and logo's to define themselves, or to have them make statements on their behalf. Nevertheless, we acknowledge that we all have particular brands we identify with, or even feel a kinship with. In particular specific items of clothing that we will always pack, whether we're off to Paris for a day or two, or taking a longer break in Bali. We like to characterize these as Tenue de Nîmes essentials. Think of your favourite slup-yarn t-shirt, or that one and only pair of jeans. For this issue, we asked our dear mate Dylan Griffith. When we launched our first run of Tenue de Nîmes jeans, Dylan picked up a pair and wears them ever since, alternating with his beloved ‘Momotaro’. He landed in Amsterdam in 2008 where he started working as Creative Director of MTV Netherlands. Having created the Channel's first international rebrand in 2011 he promptly left to seek new challenges, namely the founding of his current studio Smörgåsbord. Besides that, Dylan is the co-owner of WIHAYO - a smooth drinking, triple distilled premium Korean rice spirit made in the Netherlands, called ‘soju’. WIHAYO's soju is a fusion of all good things Korean and Dutch: Korean rice, the core ingredient, is ground by a classic Dutch windmill dating from 1785, and the subtle aftertaste carries a hint of Holland’s national tipple: Jenever, the birth mother of gin. WIHAYO gives an alcoholic boost to every Tenue de Nîmes event, serving their delightful spirit. Beside Dylan shares and explains his essentials.

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SWEATER Andersen & Andersen.   SHIRT/TEE Always a sweatshirt. Always a Sunspel loopback in grey melange.   JACKET  Belstaff Trialmaster. Bought in 2001, not much wax left on it, smells like a dead horse when it gets wet and is held together by duct tape.   JEWELLERY Not really jewellery but I bought a vintage honey spoon featuring an engraving of a koala bear in a flea market in Sydney years ago that had been cut down and bent into a ring. Closest I’ll get to jewellery I think.   WATCH Vintage TAG Heuer Carrera Carrera Chronograph Manual   SHOES Red Wing. Blundstone steel toecap.   SOCKS Holebrook Brommo Raggsocka.   SUNGLASSES Ray-Ban Aviator.   PERFUME  Son Venin 01. Le Labo Bergamot 22.   HAND BAG Cycling musette.   TRAVEL BAG Filson Duffel.   STATIONERY Moleskine journal & Uniball Eye 0.5.   TRANSPORT/CAR Land Rover Defender/Heritage.

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

Italy is many things. La dolce vita (Fellini and co), women and elegance (see Io sono l'amore), desolation and estrangement (L'avventura or any Antonioni film), political and social realities (De Sica, Sorrentino and others), the end of an era (Death in Venice, il Gattopardo or any Visconti film), nostalgia. The weight and the light. A photo trip by a Minox owner and movie aficionado.

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

Clockwise: Old glory, sun-drenched Sicily / Getting an ice cream, Nerano / Dog walking in Venice

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PHOTOGRAPHY / Marc Smit

PHOTOGRAPHY / Marc Smit

Marc Smit runs film distributor Cinéart. He worked as a strategy consultant and investor prior to that. Photography is not his profession; however, since his 17th birthday, he carries a little Minox camera on all his travels. Drawing is another discipline he cherishes. Find some of his pictures on www.issuu.com/ drawn

Clockwise: Women and coffee, Siena / Landscape, Puglia / Carabinieri waiting, Venice/ Sunglasses, Guggenheim, Venice /6 AM: peace in the early morning / Lead actors ran away from the ovation to have a cigarette, Venice

Clockwise: Diane Kruger arriving at the Excelsior, Venice / Tilda, Venice Film Festival / The eternal summer, the light, on a boat / Lifeguard

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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INTERVIEW / Charlie Hall

INTERVIEW / Charlie Hall

Charlie Hall

Was there lots of music in the family house? Is there a history of musicians in your family?   There was always music in the house as long as I can remember, mostly because of my older brother and sister. They are nine and eleven years older than me, respectively, and so from a very early age I got the classic rock stuff – Zeppelin, The Who, and The Stones – from my brother and I got things like The Beatles, Blondie and The Cars from my sister. Those bands are all still part of my musical DNA. And although on one in my family really played an instrument, there was a piano and a guitar in the house, which I taught myself to play, so I am very grateful for that.   So, you’re pretty much the drummer of the world’s biggest band! How does it feel to be in the midst of it and have it become your whole life? Next to being a member of TWOD, do you have more musical outlets?   Hah! It sounds like you have been talking to my mother. But yes, I do enjoy staying busy with different projects when I have time off. I record with other bands, I am working on my own music, and I have a mens choir in Philadelphia that I conduct and arrange music for as well.   How do you find a balance in being TWOD drummer and away for long periods of time and coming home again? Do you have a certain ritual or structure to get back to ‘reality’?   I feel like the best way to get back to reality is to just jump right back into it. While it can be disconcerting being on the other side of the world on a travelling circus, the best way to get back into the rhythm of being home is to hop on in – pack the kids’ lunches, pick them up from school, go to the grocery store, do the laundry, all of it. But yes, it can be an adjustment. I don’t know if this is true or not, but I remember hearing somewhere that Bono’s wife makes him stay in a hotel for a week when he’s back from tour – like keeping the goldfish in the plastic bag when you bring it home from the pet store to get it acclimated before you drop it in the tank. Again, I don’t know if that’s true or not…but I get it. The flow is different. But our band and crew is also a family so whether it’s on the road or at home – it’s all about taking care of each other and being thoughtful and also taking care of business.   Which drummers influenced you the most and helped you find your style?   That is such a tough one, though I know it should be easy. Early on, it was Ringo and Charlie Watts. Then it was Bonham and Larry Mullen Jr. Then it was Elvin Jones, Stevie Wonder and Al Jackson Jr. And then it was a couple friends of mine – Brian Jones (from Richmond, VA) and Darren Jessee – both of whom had a fire to their swing and their pockets when we were coming up that really affected me. But it is an ongoing learning process, and I feel like I am always learning and picking up new ideas from listening to music new and old. My musical outlook and drumming is as much a result of actual drummers as it is of songwriters and composers, in particular Joni Mitchell and Miles Davis.   Did a specific record or group ever make such impact that it changed your perspective in life?   In a way I feel like I can trace my life through the records that have impacted me at any given time. It’s one of the beautiful things about music – there are records that when you hear them you can remember exactly where you were when you first discovered it, what you were going

THE WAR ON D R U GS TEXT: RUDY ROSS IMAGES: THE WAR ON DRUGS

When you go to a The War On Drugs concert there’s no way you can avoid being mesmerized by their drummer Charlie Hall. He stole my heart a long time ago, but many more are captured by his way of performing and exquisite style. Hall never took lessons and doesn't spend much of his limited time off from touring with The War on Drugs practicing his rudiments- that's because things like ‘spirit' and ‘musicality' can't be learned from a book. He’s our hero and therefore I asked him about his heroes.

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

through at the time, how you felt, what you were feeling, what it smelled like, everything. There are too many of these to name for me personally, but among them would be Joni Mitchell ‘Hejira’, U2 ‘The Unforgettable Fire’, Miles Davis ‘Bitches Brew’, The Blue Nile ‘Hats’, The Cars ‘The Cars’, Gaussian Curve ‘Clouds’, Brian Eno ‘Apollo’, Pink Floyd ‘Animals’…these are all records that have profoundly impacted me in my life. And there are hundreds of others. Who are your favourite percussionists/drummers?   In addition to the ones I’ve already mentioned, I would have to say that the drummer I most admire of our generation is Brian Blade, whose musicality, feel, and soulfulness I am constantly in awe of. Though he certainly has chops for days, I’m most interested in drummers who play with heart and soul and who serve the song and the music. Brian is the real deal, and whether he’s playing with Wayne Shorter or Bob Dylan he’s always serving the music and bringing a spirit of real, true joy. And speaking of joy, I’ve always admired Billy Higgins’ spirit and approach. I’m also a big Jim Keltner fan. Did I mention Ringo?   So you always wanted to be a drummer? What made it happen for you to become one?   I guess I always wanted to be a drummer, as I’ve played drums since I was four years old. My grandmother bought me a Muppet Show drum set when I was four, and then I got my first set of Ludwigs when I was six.   I noticed you mainly play Ludwig Drums. Are you a big fan of vintage drum gear or do you prefer newly made drums? And is there a difference to it for you in studio recording or live performance?   While I do favor vintage gear in general – I have been collecting vintage drums, guitars, and keyboards for my entire life – I also am a believer in finding inspiration from instruments no matter where or when they are from. If you pick up an instrument and it speaks to you in some way and inspires creativity, who cares when it was made? We could get into the ins and outs of the quality of craftsmanship of certain eras or the maturation of wood and how that affects sound, but at the end of the day, if an instrument inspires you for any reason, then that’s the magic. What it inspires in YOU is what’s important. Technically speaking, the Ludwig Vistalite drums that I use live sort of have the best of both worlds because they do have a vintage vibe and remind me of what made me super excited about drums when I was a little kid but they are really well made and are even better because of some modern advancements, so they are perfect for me. I use a combination of new and vintage drums when I record. My cymbals are made by a company called IstanbulAGOP in Turkey and have the complex, smoky quality of the cymbals I’ve been trying to get a hold of my whole life (1960 K’s, for example), and these things are modern. Again, it’s about how the instrument inspires you as much as anything.   You’re a very stylish performer; you seem to have fun with it, you wear bandanas, beaded necklace, polka dotted shirts etc. You always seem to have the perfect wardrobe with you on tour. Do you enjoy dressing up? Do you have a certain pre-show ritual?   Hah! Well, thank you. It’s funny you should mention it, because I am visiting my childhood home as we speak, and looking though the old family photo albums it seems that more often than not I was dressed rather

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INTERVIEW / Charlie Hall

lavishly. I suppose I have always enjoyed dressing up. As humans, we express ourselves through words, through music, through our actions, and through how we present ourselves, which includes how we dress. I enjoy dressing in a way that is both fun and interesting yet is honest and a sincere extension of who I am. And while I pretty much dress the same offstage as I do on, there are some things that might not fly at the grocery store, such as the paisley kaftan. But also, I don’t really care. Which bands/artists may have had an influence on your taste of clothing? Are you inspired by a certain time/ era in history?   In my opinion, a couple of drummers that have always had a keen sense of style are Charlie Watts and Roy Haynes. Those dudes are impeccable. I find inspiration in lots of different eras and enjoy finding my own blend of things that suits my feeling. Denim is a big part of it for me, certainly, and I like how it can work together with things like polka dots, cravats, etc. It’s fun to juxtapose different styles sometimes.   How about nowadays? Do you look for inspiration in clothing or do you find everything naturally? Do you like finding vintage treasures?   I love finding vintage treasures. I love digging. I find it to be a really fun and strangely soul searching exercise to look at a piece of clothing that catches your eye and try to figure out if it is an authentic expression of yourself. Of course, every once in a while I’ll come home and my wife will just shake her head in embarrassment.   What’s your favourite city/country to go on tour to and for what reasons would that be?   There are records shops and vintage shops all over the world that I look forward to hitting when we are on tour. Amsterdam is always great for both. Record Palace and Red Light are my favorites for records. There are so many cool vintage shops for clothes in Amsterdam too. Tokyo is great. In the US, smaller cities and towns are better in general, as places like New York City tend to be really overpriced. Mystic Disc is my favorite record shop, in Mystic, Connecticut. My wife and I used to live in San Francisco, so there are still some old favorite spots I like to go there, and there’s a really cool newer spot there called Pyramid Records.   What’s your signature drink? And are you TWOD’s biggest party animal?   'TWOD’s biggest party animal'! What a dubious distinction. I hope not. We are a pretty reasonable bunch, actually. I’m not sure what my signature drink would be – I suppose my usual is a vodka martini, straight up, very dry, slightly dirty, with two olives and a twist. I like that sweet/salt thing with the olives and the twist. I guess it’s like the denim and the polka dots.   How would your perfect day look like when not on tour with TWOD?   My perfect day not on tour would be in my house with my family – possibly involving, in no particular order, making pancakes for my sons, doing a crossword puzzle, listening to records, playing some piano, and putting some songs on the jukebox and having a long, early dinner and laughing with my family.   I read you were a music teacher in the past? Would you like to go back to being one?   Not particularly, no. I’m quite happy, as a matter of fact.   In our Journal de Nîmes ‘Playlist’ I always write up our most played records in our shops that season. I’ve read you’re a big record collector. What were your most precious vintage finds this year?

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“My grandmother bought me a Muppet Show drum set when I was four and I got my first set of Ludwigs when I was six.” Hmmm…there were quite a few this year. I remember when we headed out on tour after ‘A Deeper Understanding’ first came out last fall, saying to the guys “I’m not buying any records this time around, dudes. I swear to god.” Well, that lasted about a half a day, as I found a couple ECM records that I’ve been looking for in Portland, Maine right across the street from where we were doing production rehearsals. Then we turned our tour manager’s old production case into a travelling hi-fi system with a U-Turn Audio turntable and some powered speakers and it just became an all-out fucking free for all. Everyone was buying records like they were going to be executed in the morning. Our pack got insanely heavy, but we were listening to sweet records backstage every night. What were my most precious finds? Well…I collect ECM records from a specific timeframe, so a couple that I have been looking for – Eberhard Weber & Gary Burton Quartet ‘Ring’ and Jan Garbarek ‘Withci-Tai-To’ – are among my favorite recent aquisitions. I finally found a clean Linn Records copy of The Blue Nile ‘Hats’ and a nice copy of John Martyn ‘Glorious Fool’. In Germany I got an original copy of Pink Floyd ‘Atom Heart Mother’, which has always eluded me. Lately, I’ve been most interested in collecting 45s for the jukebox we have at home, so I’ve added three or four hundred sweet 45s to add to the mix. In fact, Dave Hartley (TWOD bass player) and I were in Aukland, New Zealand in this great record shop digging through thousands of 45s when both our wives called to tell us we’d won the Grammy for ‘Best Rock Album’. I had a really sweet stack of 45s in my hand (including a picture sleeve copy of Weird Al Yankovic “Fat” for my son because it’s his favorite song right now) so that grip of singles will always be special for that reason. I leave again for tour next week. I’m not going to buy any more records. But actually, I will. Charlie and The War on Drugs will be on tour through 2018 in support of their new album ‘A Deeper Understanding’, which was awarded a Grammy for Best Rock Album and was released on August 25th on Atlantic Records.

Journal | WIHAYO Ad.indd 1

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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COLLABORATION / Red Wing Pecos

COLLABORATION / Red Wing Pecos

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JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

R

ed Wing Shoe Company is perhaps best known for the work boots made for farmers, miners, and sportsmen of the Upper Midwest but early on, we introduced another boot for a different group of workers in the American West. We had an office in Dallas, Texas as early as 1923 to serve the unique market of ranchers, cowboys and oil drilling roughnecks in the region. At the time, most of these workers wore pull-on riding boots, often with decorative stitching, and Red Wing responded with one of its own in the 1930s. By the 1950s, with typical Minnesota understatement, we did away with the decorative flourish and introduced a pull-on boot of our own devising. This pull-on boot was given a new name, the Pecos, after a town in Texas and it evolved into one of our most popular styles. The renowned Red Wing durability worked as well on the ranches of the Southwest as they did on the farms and fields of Minnesota. The appeal of the Pecos spread, thanks to its simple design, comfortable fit, and rugged good looks. Still made the same way with quality leathers in our factory in Red Wing, the Pecos is now seen on hardworking feet from coast to coast, both ends of the Mississippi, and everywhere in between. Call it a cowboy boot, with a Minnesota twist.

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Urban Cowboys

RED WING PECOS

Boots for

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FACTORY VISIT / Albiate

FACTORY VISIT / Albiate

Sartorial Shirts

T E N U E D E N Î M E S x A L B I AT E 18 3 0

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he Lombardy region in Italy - with Milan as its regional capital - traditionally is home to a dazzling amount of textile related companies. The Albini story started in 1830 as a yarn distributor for textile weavers in the Italian countryside. After a decade, Giuseppe Caprotti, founder of Albiate, decided the high quality yarns deserved a weaving process that guaranteed equal dedication. That left him no other option than buying his own weaving looms. The years to follow Albiate kept integrating extra stages of the shirt manufacturing process. This ultimately made the mill one of the first companies owning a full production line, giving them full control on quality.

TEXT: WILLEM BOS IMAGES: ALBIATE 1830

Italy is synonymous with sartorial class. The country has a long history in shirt-making, with Albiate as one of the founding fathers. Relying on almost two centuries of experience, the fabric mill is the perfect collaboration partner for our special line-up of Tenue de Nîmes shirts. This has resulted in the first two iterations: an 'American’ button-down shirt named ‘Ralph’ and an ‘Italian’

We immediately fell in love with the richness and utmost in quality Albiate offers. Our first visit to their factory in the mountains 60 kilometres outside of Milan, instantly persuaded us to cut our shirts from Albiate cloth. The amount of love and dedication that is put into the fabrics is unrivaled. If Italy would be the sports car manufacturer of the world, Albiate is Ferrari.

sartorial shirt by the name of ‘Frank’. How Italian craftsmanship and ancient traditions brought us two modern day staples.

The journey started with the careful selection of fabrics for our Tenue de Nîmes shirts. We picked the most precious

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poplin cotton for the ‘Frank’ shirt - the name Frank is derived from Frank Sinatra. The fabric is so dense, the hand feel is almost like silk. For ‘Ralph’ we challenged the craftsman at Albiate to find us a thick yet soft fabric, comparable to the cloth used in American Ivy League style, made into an art form in the 80s and 90s by our personal icon Ralph Lauren, hence the name ‘Ralph’. You can imagine it feels like an incredible honour that our shirts are cut from fabric made by the masters among the fabric weavers. The quality that has been put into the weaving and manufacturing process is a derivate of our ‘Buy Less Pay More’ motto. By investing in high standard, timeless garments, we can really contribute to a more environmental friendly fashion industry. Both Frank and Ralph are made to last: The shirts age beautifully over time. Even after hundreds of washing spins, they will keep their appeal. Making sure one can enjoy their shirt or jean for a seriously longer periode of time, you have to work with the best. Therefore Albiate. Word. Or like the Italians say: “Basta.”

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FACTORY VISIT / Albiate

TENUE DE NÎMES 9 YEARS/ Harold Pereira

‘Frank’ and ‘Ralph’ are the result of our quest for the perfect shirt and both contemporary interpretations of our favourite alltime classics. Frank is a sartorial dress shirt from a premium poplin fabric. The shirt is offered in four colours: black, navy, white and the latest addition: a light blue version. It has a normal collar with removable collar stiffeners. 

‘Ralph’ is a button-down shirt crafted from oxford fabric and available in a light blue and white version. Both shirts are styled with a subtly embroidered Tenue de Nîmes cross logo at the hem and mother of pearl buttons: the ultimate sign of luxury in shirt making.

Model: Harold Pereira

AMSTERDAM

TEXT: MENNO VAN MEURS IMAGES: JULIAN RÖBLING

TENUE DE NÎMES 9 YEAR ANNIVERSARY VARSITY JACKET Handmade in Manchester - UK / Limited to 24 pieces

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POPLIN

INDIGO FABRIC

OXFORD

Poplin is a ‘plain weave’ fabric. That means the horizontal and vertical yarn alternate over and under each other. Applying this method, makes the fabric dense and strong. Although the first ‘poplin’ cloths date back to the 15th century, the cotton poplin we know nowadays was first used in the 19th century. Cotton poplin has the ability to adapt to weather conditions: keeping you warm when it’s cold, and vice versa. We cut our ‘Frank’ shirt from cotton poplin, a more formal version that perfectly functions as a dress shirt, due to its ‘silky’ hand-feel.

Indigo fabric for shirts is a thinner and light-weight version of the cloth generally used for denim. The dyeing process for both garments is similar, hence a shirt cut from indigo fabric, will show equal fading patterns like jeans. Otherwise, after every wash and wear, indigo fabric will become lighter, making it a ‘living fabric’. The evolution is so personal: every wearer will leave his personal ‘blueprint’.

As the name suggests, Oxford fabric is derived from the Universities. Students in the 19th century campuses were fond of the ‘basket’ structure. Oxford cloth has a rougher structure compared to poplin. This is due to the fact the multiple yarns are horizontally woven over a single vertical thread. The more yarns you use, the thicker and sturdier the cloth. You can experiment by using different dyed yarns and create a unique hue. Our ‘Ralph’ is made from oxford cotton.

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For this editorial, we walked the streets of 'De Wallen': the most ancient area of Amsterdam. To most of you, 'De Wallen' are synonymous with the imfamous Red Light District. We captured Dutch photographer Harold Pereira on analogue film. The result is a homage to our beloved city Amsterdam, with Tenue de Nîmes' 9-year anniversary varsity jacket in the context of one of the most picturesque and quintessential sights of our precious 'Dam’. The jacket is made in a limited run of only 24 pieces in the Private White factory in Manchester, England, by legendary coat maker Michael Stoll, aka ‘Stolly’. Made from a melton wool body with ultra-soft indigo lambskin leather sleeves and has ribbed neck, hem and cuffs. A 80.000 stitches custom embroidery adorns the back, whilst the front is emblazoned with a custom Tenue de Nîmes logo patch.

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CITY REPORT / Milano

CITY REPORT / Milano

SHOPPING GUIDE TEXT: WILLEM BOS ILLUSTRATIONS: LUIS MENDO

Football Culture

Fantastic Wines

SAN SIRO STADIUM

CANTINE ISOL A

As true football devotees, we simply cannot go past one of the most illustrious football stadiums in the world. Home to both AC Milan and Internazionale, make sure you pay a visit to this football temple. The atmosphere can be hostile during the ‘Derby della Madonnina’, when ‘AC' and ‘Inter' play each-other. For most matches you can obtain a ticket. Go, you will enjoy Italy’s beloved ‘Calcio'!

Italy and wine are inseparable. The good thing about Milan, and probably Italy in general, they barely serve you poor wine. It’s perceived as a mortal sin. Cantine Isola has the largest selection of wines on the menu. Just north to the Brera district, indulge yourself in an endless discovery of the country’s finest.

Where most people would name Florence, Rome or Venice as their favourite Italian city, I’m totally crazy about Italy’s economic engine. Rich in culture, unrivaled in shopping, among the best gastronomically.

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Best pasta in town

Culture

Stellar Streetwear

Palace of Fasion

TR ATTORIA TORRE DI PISA

THE L AST SUPPER - LEON ARDO DA VIN CI

SL AMJAM

ANTONIA

Italians laugh at our Dutch tradition of taking home-made lunch to the office. Lunch in Milan is an experience on itself and taken very serious by the locals. Most offices give their employees coupons which they can spend on lunch in a bar or trattoria. Trattoria Torre di Pisa is one of the best. Just ask the waiter for the daily special or pick your favourite.

Not only one of the most famous paintings in the world, also unique as the piece of art hasn’t moved an inch over time. Argumentative though, as the iconic artwork of Christ and his disciples is a wall-painting in the chapel of the Santa Maria Delle Grazie. Book your tickets early in advance, only an extremely limited amount of visitors is allowed into.

Slamjam is a store, agency and distributor with an incredible influence on global streetwear. The first Slamjam store is located in Ferrara, a small city in the North-East of Italy. Luckily, after a one year absence, a new location in the former Nike building, an architectural masterpiece. Slamjam has an insane line-up of streetwear and Japanese brands. Take your creditcard with you.

Located close to the world famous Scala (if you like the classical opera, go!), Antonia is a fashion store fully constructed from marble offering a dazzling mix of the globe’s best brands. A one stop cash disposal depot for men and women. The store has a special department dedicated to Italy’s most important accessory: shades. Don’t miss the collaboration with fellow Milanese sunglasses brand Retrosuperfuture.

Italian Ceramics

The Real Deal Gelato

Vintage Heaven

Don't argue about coffee

MV CER AMICS

TOLDO

CAVALLI E N ASTRI

ORSONERO

In a small pottery shop, Mariavera Chiari handcrafts coffee cups, saucers, plates, basically anything related to food and drinks. The 100% Italian brand adds another dimension to ‘hand-made’, their espresso cups are hand painted. During Christmas period, you can even find silver painted variations. But if you ask kindly, Mariavera will craft anything on demand.

Gelato culture. Toldo exists for eighty years and serves you the most delicious gelato, pastries and coffee. The employees are extremely skilled in using the spatula. Sometimes, Toldo has more than four variations of chocolate ice. Don’t be afraid for the long queue in front of the store. It’s worth it.

A vintage shop that feels like a museum. You can find a women’s shop in the Brera district, and two branches in the ‘Carrobbio’ district in the Southwest of the city. The staff is friendly and more than willing to help you find your designer ‘grail’. Don’t expect second hand prices, the people at Cavalli e Nastri know their stuff.

Orsonero is a relatively young coffee spot, that combines traditional equipment (La Marzocco machine) and modern coffee beans. The beans are sourced from local roaster Gardelli. Nice to know, every month Orsonero invites a guest roaster to supply their shop with a custom blend.

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ART / Peggy Guggenheim

TEXT: WILLEM BOS IMAGES: ALAMY

INSIDE PEGGY GUGGENHEIM VENICE The impact Peggy Guggenheim has had - and actually still has - on modern art is enormous. Operated by the Salomon Guggenheim foundation, the Guggenheim Museum in Venice is the lifework of Salomon's charismatic and flamboyant niece: Peggy. Home to one of the most eclectic and rich collections of modern art in the world, we visited the 'Peggy Guggenheim Collection' this December. The only museum on the globe that is accessible by boat straight from the airport. How a bohemian lady made Venice one of the leading cities for modern art.

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ART / Peggy Guggenheim

The Peggy Guggenheim Collection is the lifework of a visionaire: one of the most charismatic people in the history of art collecting

T

o understand more about The Peggy Guggenheim Collection, some information on the enigmatic godmother will definitely add context. Born in New York in 1898, Peggy grew up in a wealthy family of Swiss immigrants making a fortune in the steel industry. In the 30s, Peggy traveled to Europe for the first time and found herself in the middle of the Parisian bohemian society. She rubbed elbows with artists such as Marcel Duchamp and rapidly became one of the central figures in the European art scene. The quote “I soon knew where every painting could be found,” became her trademark. She collected art at an incredible pace, alongside her other hobby, collecting lovers. According to various sources, the flamboyant Peggy has had over a thousand bed partners. Among them many artists she acquired work from. After a decade in Europe - due to the Nazi occupation - jewish Peggy returned to New York together with her husband and two children. Back in the United States, she played an active role in popularizing American Expressionism with painters such as Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko (she discovered Pollock when he was a carpenter in the Guggenheim in New York). Above: Vasily Kandinsky, Paesaggio con Macchie Rosse, Nº2 - 1913 Below: Jackson Pollock, 'Circumcision' - 1946

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After the Second World War ended, Guggenheim moved back to Europe. The last 30 years of her life she spent in Venice, acquiring the palace that is now home to the

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museum in which she collected a vast amount of some of the most exquisite pieces of art ever produced. For many reasons, The Peggy Guggenheim Collection is unique of its kind. Not only because of its specific location straight at the world famous Venetian canals, moreover since the museum is the lifework of a visionaire: one of the most charismatic people in the history of art collecting. From the moment we started Tenue de Nîmes in 2008, art has always played a pivotal role in the development of our brand. During our various trips to the Veneto region in Italy, where a substantial part of our Tenue de Nîmes collection is manufactured, we took the opportunity to explore the region for inspiration. Only a half hour drive from the factory, you enter the graceful museum. But beware, Venice is totally car-free, even the police, ambulances and fire brigade maneuver through the canals. 

missionary ‘avant la lettre’, making her treasures available to the public. Nowadays, popular pieces of art are often bought by wealthy collectors who add the paintings and sculptures to their private collections and basically withdraw these treasures from society. Peggy Guggenheim made it her mission to function as a talent scout in the middle of bohemian Europe and America. She didn't buy art as an investment, she acquired work because her perception and impression of the piece told her to. This disruptive way of looking at art, created the basis for a one of the most quirky line-ups modern art has to offer. Treat yourself to a weekend in paradise; book a trip to Venice and find your own inspiration accordingly.

The Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice is one of those places that has impact on every visitor. Although not tangibly visible in our collections, we love how art can add an invisible layer to our perceptivity. It changes that way we look at the world, how we create and see things. Peggy Guggenheim not only amassed an insane amount of art, she also functioned as a modern

The Riva boat arrives in at Guggenheim, Venice.

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ILLUSTRATION / The Blue Triangle

ILLUSTRATION / The Blue Triangle

The Blue Triangle ILLUSTRATION: DAPHNE BLEEKER

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COLLABORATION / Vans

COLLABORATION / Vans

Vans

The archetypal Californian skate shoe exists for over a century. Worn by homeless people, Hollywood stars and everybody in between, Vans is one of those brands that truly exceeds stereotyping. We rather speak about

OG

B AG GY B L U E J E A N S A N D VA N S AU T H E N T I C S

‘a way of life’, when referring to the shoe manufacturer that made wearing slip-ons underneath a suit savvy. Vans has many sub-labels under its umbrella. We are proud to be among the very few stockists in the world that are allowed to offer their ‘OG’ or ‘Originals’ line: re-imaginations of how it all started: with the ‘Made in USA’ skateboarding shoe.

HOW TO RECOGNIZE AN OG

TEXT: WILLEM BOS IMAGES: VANS

Every pair of Vans sits atop of a vulcanized sole with the quintessential ‘waffle’ structure, finished with the ‘heel tab’. This little logo tab is red on ‘OG’ pairs, with the addition of ‘Originals’ underneath the brand’s pay-off ‘Off the Wall’. What further marks up the shoe is the ‘foxing’, the area just above the midsole. On OG pairs, this foxing is thicker and higher, approaching Vans’ original silhouette.

N

ot many things feel better than breaking in a crispy pair of Vans. We love how versatile the shoes actually are. Don’t worry if you travel light on a city trip for instance, one pair of Vans will make you stroll around any neighbourhood on the planet. Comfortable enough for everyday wear, whilst no doormen will ever dare to refuse you access to a fancy place wearing your beloved pair of OG’s.

Moreover, Vans uses higher quality materials in their OG models, compared to their general releases. The shoes have a longer lifetime and are more comfortable to wear. The use of these materials is often translated in the product title with the letters ‘LX’ which stands for ‘luxury'.

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What makes a pair of OG special? First, they are more comfortable compared to general release Vans, due to the use of more luxurious, lusher materials, that furthermore last longer. The models are inspired on the 70s skateboarding scene of sun-drenched California, amazingly captured in Hugh Holland's photo-book ‘Locals Only’, a real recommendation if you are interested in this particular sub-culture. Holland drove around Los Angeles and spotted characteristically dressed youth, wearing

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washed, baggy blue jeans, white tube socks and Vans Authentics. The way these kids cruised the streets of downtown Los Angeles on their decks, bare chested, with so much elegance and energy captivated the young photographer. With sunny California as the perfect, romantic decor, Holland photographed skateboarders for over three years. Fun fact: due to severe drought in the state of California in the 70s, the local government prohibited swimming pools to be filled with water. These empty pools appeared to be ideal for skateboarding, and any new skatepark built nowadays is still inspired on the shape of the ‘empty pool’. Glancing through the pages of the book, you realize how big the influence is of the skateboarding culture on contemporary style. Vans has played a crucial role in blending culture with fashion.  And that’s why we truly admire

the Californian brand. Inspired by vintage and heritage items, infusing their collections with little nods from the past. We also like the given fact that Vans can’t be categorized, doesn’t serve a certain subculture, but is part of something bigger. The brand is all about freedom, spirit and being laidback. To commemorate this, the iconic American skate brand and Tenue de Nîmes decided it was time for a special collaboration. Although a distance measuring more than 7.000 miles between California and Amsterdam, we utterly feel there’s a strong connection serving as fertile sole for a special iteration on the Vans OG Authentic, the shoe where it all started with for Vans.

Vans can’t be categorized, doesn’t serve a certain sub-culture, but is part of something bigger.

The shoe will be launched in the Summer of 2018, and will be a homage to high quality indigo fabrics, the OG silhouette and the city of Amsterdam.

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COLLABORATION / Levi's Made & Crafted

COLLABORATION / Levi's Made & Crafted

Levi’s Made & Crafted

TEXT: MENNO VAN MEURS IMAGES: LEVI'S

VOODOO SURF

This season Levi’s Made & Crafted celebrates impeccable Japanese craftsmanship and blends this with Australian Aboriginal tribal culture.   A study of these two inspirational cultures led to the brand’s seasonal concept ‘Voodoo Surf’. Indigo surf culture meets contemporary aboriginal expression, with the unmistakable denim twist the label is renowned for and represented in every item.

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L

eaving behind the hustle and bustle of Sydney and Tokyo and venturing into the open, the natural wonders of the vast ocean seascapes that dominate the coasts are reflected in the shades of indigo and woven textures used throughout the collection: “We traveled from Byron Bay, Australia, to Chiba, Japan, discovering the eclectic organic nature of one and immaculately curated nature of the other,” said Nicolle Arbour - Womenswear Design Director of Levi's Made & Crafted. During this journey, the Levi's Made & Crafted design team discovered an ancient production technique in Japan – named Shibori – they directly applied into their collection. Shibori is one of the earliest Japanese hand dyeing techniques dating back to the 8th century. Unique patterns are created by folding, tying, stitching, twisting or binding fabrics and dip dyeing them, creating unique patterns. In the womenswear collection, the iconic trucker jacket is positioned as the must-have silhouette, as you can see in the Tribal Trucker Jacket that has just landed in our stores and online.

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FEATURE / Fade Tenue de Nîmes

FEATURE / Fade Tenue de Nîmes

TEXT: WILLEM BOS IMAGES: RENÉ KRAMERS

Staying true to where it all started with, jeans, and its denim evolution in particular remains at the core of Tenue de Nîmes. Every day, denim enthusiasts enter our stores with the most mesmerizing fading patters. And every

Going into the fitting room with this particular pair of jeans is something for pro’s. Ad is a loyal client who got infected with the blue virus via his brother in law. Two years ago, the time was right to go extreme with the purchase of this '0306' 18oz. beast from Japanese Momotaro.

single sign of wear has a story behind it, that always gives us something to talk about. As a homage to ‘the beautiful blue’, we selected two pair of jeans, photographed

He can still recall the battle he fought inside the fitting room, resulting in a set of blisters on his fingers, as he simply couldn’t close the buttons. What started as a struggle, soon became a lovestory. Ad wears his jeans to the office, during maintenance around the house and when going out.

them and letting the owners take the floor.

As professional model, photographer and freelance project manager, Florence leads a busy and demanding life. Residing in the south of Amsterdam, she’s a regular visitor of one of our city's most beautiful parks: Vondelpark.

Otherwise he is a watersport enthusiast; during summer he sails at the IJsselmeer with his dad. His precious ‘Momo’ serves many purposes as you can see from the different signs of wear. The dark, double indigo tones are mixed with vague greenish hues.

About a year ago Florence purchased this vintage pair of Levi’s 501. From this moment on, jeans and lady barely spent a moment without each other. The vintage 501 became the direct object in all her activities: photoshoots, walking the dog, cycling to work, you name it.

Because of the rope dyeing process Momotaro applies to their jeans, the core of the yarn stays white, which gives the jeans an allround lighter blue tone.

It didn’t take long before she brought this stunner in for a crotch repair at our Haarlemmerstraat store. As the fabric was exposed to tons of washes, it had become incredibly soft, but unfortunately also very fragile. We repaired the crotch and bottom with a serious amount of zigzags. Florence continued wearing and tearing the pair, resulting in a mindblowing series of holes and rips throughout.

AD MENKEN Profession: Application Manager WMS/ERP

When we approached her to feature in this issue of Journal de Nîmes she immediately assented, yet she felt bad about the state of the jeans: weren’t they too dismounted and dirty? No Florence, this is how we like them: complete with coffee stains, exactly how you treated them and lived in them, a real gem. As a replacement, she recently bought an AGoldE Hi Rise Cuff, the start of a new denim wear in project. We can’t wait.

Jeans: Momotaro 18oz. Tight Tapered App. Date of Purchase: December 2015 Treatment: 1 soak, 1 machine wash

FLORENCE SCHREINEMACHERS

Best memory wearing the jeans: “I simply can’t recall one specific memory, but what definitely is worth mentioning is the quality of the cloth. Even after hundreds and hundreds of wears, the jeans are still so beautiful that I enjoy wearing them every single day.”

(IG: @florencefloor) Profession: Photographer / Freelance Project Manager / Model Jeans: Vintage Levi’s 501 Appr. Date of Purchase: January 2017 Treatment: Several machine washes Best memory wearing the jeans: “This winter I was at work when someone pointed at my bottom: ‘Florence, do you realize there is a horizontal tear of at least 20 centimetres in your jeans?’ Luckily I was wearing a pantyhose that day as it was so horribly cold outside.” 58

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DESIGN / Handcrafted Modern

DESIGN / Handcrafted Modern

Handcrafted Modern Nº6 TEXT: MENNO VAN MEURS IMAGES: BLOOMBERRY

Our partnership with design company Bloomberry is much like the relationship between Wharton’s wooden staircase and a Hickoree Stripe overall by Lee: they have more in common than one would think. We believe the following Italian pieces of art from the Bloomberry collection would take any collectors' interior to the next level.

Blue/green glass mirror by Luigi Fontana

A round glass mirror by Luigi Fontana for Fontanit. The mirror is made of a concave, green glass frame with the mirror in the centre.

A pair of oak lounge chairs by Paolo Buffa The chairs have a removable seating with upholstery with a floral motif in original condition. The chairs are well made and are both stylish and very comfortable, typical for Paolo Buffa's designs.

Side tables by Osvaldo Borsani

A unique pair of end tables by Osvaldo Borsani. They are made of fruitwood with reverse painted glass at the front of the drawers. The drawers have elegant bronze pulls. The paintings of the floral motifs are attributed to Adriano Spilimbergo, an exponent of the neo-romantic Chiarismo movement, who collaborated with Borsani on a few occasions.

Table lamps by Paolo Tilche

A pair of chrome model '3H' table lamps, designed in 1971 by Paolo Tilche for Sirrah. Two of the four corners of the cube shaped lamps are pivoting, which ables you to direct the light as you wish. Four magnets with felt underneath function as the feet. By placing the feet on another side, you can choose between light that shines sideways or upwards. Published in Repertorio del Design Italiano, p. 196.

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Table lamp by Umberto Riva

A very rare table lamp in blue, yellow and red polyester, by Italian architect and designer Umberto Riva for VeArt. The lamp was published in Domus 520, March 1973.

Vittorio Intrioni lounge chair

A very rare lounge chair designed by Vittorio Introini for Saporiti. The chair is made of beige leather.

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COLUMN / Roberto Gelato

CE Roberto Gelato

R ED W I NG FOR WOMEN B E ST B O OT S I N TO W N !

TEXT: CARLINA DE LORENZO ILLUSTRATIONS: LUIS MENDO

S

ome keep their work and personal life strictly separate, according to them it’s better for the balance in their lives. I wouldn’t know, I have no balance. Roberto and I are the owners of an ice cream parlor that is open eight months a year. My younger sister once criticized me for running our ‘Roberto Gelato' like a hospital: each single thing has to be perfect, yet everything must be possible. In October, we close the doors of our shop for four consecutive months. We do maintenance on all the ice machines whereas the painter applies a new layer of paint for next season.

After this eight month hustle, we also use these quiet months to go on a welldeserved holiday. But can an ice-cream maker stop being an ice-cream maker? Roberto, my business partner, literally translates everything he encounters into ice cream. Everything he sees, tastes or smells, he questions himself whether it would be a good match either as a single ingredient or even a complete new flavour. Mostly, these ingredients become icecream ‘one-day-flies’… but sometimes it’s different. This reminds me of a holiday we spent, 20 years ago on Sicily. Completely by mistake, we drove into the small village of Bronte - while travelling along the Etna volcano. At that right moment, the ‘Sagra del Pistacchio’ was held. A ‘Sagra’ is an Italian village festival. It is always centered around one specific ingredient or saint patron - we’re in Italy for heaven’s sake. During the Sagra, that can last for several days, the whole village is in absolute party mode. In Bronte, the Sagra is held bi-annually during harvesting season

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and as I already mentioned everything is intertwined with pistachio: Mortadella and pistachio, linguine with pistachio-pesto, little cakes with pistachio-cream, pistachio nut sausages, caramelized pistachio, salted pistachio… I simply wasn’t aware one could eat and enjoy pistachio in so many varieties. Another fact we didn’t know back then, the village of Bronte was renowned for growing the most delightful pistachio nuts of the entire country. And worse still, all villagers defended the honour of their green gold ‘with drawn sword’.

Colophon EDITOR IN CHIEF Menno van Meurs menno@tenuedenimes.com CREATIVE DIRECTION Joachim Baan joachim@tenuedenimes.com

The surroundings of Bronte are far from ideal for farming pistachios. The soil is inhospitable and all bushes and trees are growing against a slope, whereby picker machines don’t stand a chance. The only option is to pick the nuts by hand, whilst harvesting is only done on even years. During the even years the flowers are removed before they can outgrow to fruit. The farmers let the bushes and trees ‘rest’ for a year which guarantees the quality for the next run of pistachio nuts. The Brontese pistachio-farmers could rather join forces with fellow farmers on the island. Yet the economic benefits simply don’t equipoise against the pride and reverence they have for their product. And that pure love for the product, you will find in every single element and fibre. On that day 20 years ago we talked to people we are still sourcing our pistachio nuts from. Every two years we purchase our biannual stock of pistachios from Salvatore. Sometimes we have just enough, other years we eagerly wait on a new ‘even year’. Pistachios from Bronte for us most definitely are not a one day fly.

COPY DIRECTION Willem Bos willem@tenuedenimes.com GRAPHIC DESIGN Gaby Dam www.gabydam.nl

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Carlina de Lorenzo and Roberto Coletti are the owners of Roberto Gelato, the imfamous ice cream parlour in Utrecht, Netherlands. Although Utrecht has many things to offer for visitors, we believe Roberto Gelato is worth the journey all by itself. Their dedication and professional know-how are unrivaled.

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 — THE AZZURRI ISSUE

JOURNAL DE NÎMES Nº 14 —THE AZZURRI ISSUE

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Journal de Nîmes Nº14 The azzurri Issue  
Journal de Nîmes Nº14 The azzurri Issue