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Nilofer Afza Tajuddin Architecture + Urbanism Portfolio Selected Works 2011-2018 email: nilofer.afza@gmail.com mobile: +31-625220382 Linkedin


EDUCATION Graduate - 2016 - 2018 Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Architecture, Urbanism and Building Sciences; Specialisation in Urbanism Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands (Graduation thesis titled ‘Leveraging Socio-Cultural Networks’ explored the means of local communitydriven strategies for flood resilience and adaptation in the Chennai Metropolitan Area, India. Graded 8.5/10 - To view full report, click here)

Nilofer Afza Tajuddin Delft, The Netherlands ARCHITECT + URBANIST Nationality : Indian Work Visa: Netherlands Zoekjaar

Undergraduate - 2011- 2016 Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch) Department of Architecture, School of Architecture and Planning, Anna University, Chennai, India (Final Thesis titled ‘Redefining Resilience’ explored renewal of lost settlement and ecology in the Hemavathi Reservoir, Karnataka through architectural design and master planning strategies. Graded 8.0/10 - To view full content, click here)

CONTACT nilofer.afza@gmail.com +31-625220382

Junior Architect at Ooze Architects and Urbanists, Rotterdam

LinkedIN

September 2018 - Present

PROFILE Architect

and

As a junior architect, I am currently working on the case of Chennai, India as part of Water as Leverage for urbanist

with interest in integrated design

across

WORK EXPERIENCE

all

scales.

Expertise in neighbourhood

Resilient Cities Asia, an initiative founded by the Dutch Water Envoy, the International Architecture Biennale Rotterdam and Architecture Workroom Brussels.

Urban Design Intern at Posad Spatial Strategies, The Hague July 2017 - August 2017 (Reference letter available upon request)

level strategy making and architectural design. SKILLS Public Speaking . Auto-CAD . Adobe Photoshop . Adobe Illustrator . Adobe InDesign . Sketchup . Microsoft Office . Lumion . GIS Team Management . Public Outreach LANGUAGES English (Native speaking)

As a summer intern, I assisted with Research & Urban Design on various projects such as development study of Binckhorst Area in the Hague, a vision for the city of Rotterdam, a circular economy scan for the region of Arnhem/Nijmegen and a competition in Tallinn for street revitalization. I was responsible for conducting small design and research tasks, data compilation, mapping and 3D typology drawings.

Part-time Writer at Agam Sei, Chennai, India August 2015 - July 2016 Agam Sei is a crowd funded No-AD local monthly newspaper trying to create a niche to talk about solely city based issues published in Chennai, India. Agam Sei is a team of journalists, architects and urban designers based in Chennai. It works with various professionals from multi-disciplinary fields.

Architectural Apprentice at Monsoon Design, Bangalore, India December 2014 - April 2015 (Reference letter available upon request) As an architectural trainee, I worked with various design projects and contributed at different levels such as concept and design development, technical detailing, manual model making, 3D model making and design presentation.

Architectural Apprentice at CnT Architects, Bangalore, India May 2014 - October 2014 As an architectural trainee, I worked with various design projects and contributed at different levels such as concept and design development, technical detailing, manual model making, 3D model making and design presentation. In addition to this, I worked closely with large scale residential projects and interior design schemes.

REFERENCES

. Dutch (beginner)

Dr. Marcin Dabrowski, TU Delft M.M.Dabrowski@tudelft.nl

. Hindi , Tamil

Karlijn Kokhuis, Posad-Maxwan mail@posad.nl


EXTRA - CURRICULAR Head of Public Relation - POLIS - Platform for Urbanism and Landscape Architecture Student Body Organization, TU Delft December 2016 - February 2018

Social Media Manager - POLIS, TU Delft December 2016 - February 2018

Community Planning and Participation Event - Curator, Chennai February 2018

Organising Team - Confronting Informality Symposium, TU Delft June 2018 (For full report, click here)

Published Writer at Agam Sei, Chennai and online portal Zingy Homes 2016

Member of Editorial Team of SAP Chronicles, Official School of Architecture and Planning, Chennai (SAP) College Magazine 2016

2 Studio projects exhibited at National Association of Students of Architecture (NASA) Conventions showcasing best student work on national level 2011-2016

1 Studio project showcased at Indian Institute of Architects Exhibition, Chennai 2014

1 Studio project published in the SAP Chronicles, Official SAP Magazine 2011-2016

Delegate the Annual National Association of Students of Architecture (NASA) Convention January 2014

Member and Coordinator of the SAP Dance Team 2013-2014

COMPETITIONS AND WORKSHOPS World Architect’s Day : Team of 4 - Memorial for 26/11 - 3rd place 2014

Louis I. Kahn Trophy: 56th Annual NASA Convention - Team competition- Short-listed 2014

Life on the Streets Workshop- Dakshinachitra, Chennai, India January 2013

Z-axis Convention ‘Great cities, terrible places’ - Charles Correa Foundation, Goa, India March 2015

PUBLICATIONS A. Nepal Decoded - Earthquake Resistant Architecture B. The Bird-man - A place-making routine Agam Sei - Vol. 1 Issue:10 - August 14 - September 14, 2015

A mistake Chennai cannot afford to repeat Agam Sei - Vol. 1 Issue: 12 - October 8 - November 25, 2015


A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


Contents

01 Leveraging Socio-cultural Networks p 06 TU Delft Graduate Thesis in Urbanism exploring local adaptation and flood resilience in Chennai, India

02 Redefining Resilience p 18 Undergraduate Thesis in Architecture exploring revival of a lost settlement through social regeneration and master-planning strategies

03 Power to the Future p 30 Group studio project at TU Delft exploring spatial planning and energy transition for the future Amsterdam Metropolitan Area

04 Urban Temple p 42 Group studio project in Urban Design and Architecture exploring public space and urban transformations in Chennai, India

05 Creating Local Meaning p 52 Individual project TU Delft exploring the revival of the Hart van Zuid in Rotterdam through urban renewal strategies

06 Brigade Exotica p 60 Professional project during apprenticeship at CnT Architects, Bangalore, India

07 List of projects completed p 67 Complete list of academic and competition projects completed 2011-2018

5


1. Leveraging Socio-cultural Networks master thesis in urbanism

Site Location: Chennai Metropolitan Area, India Type: Academic - Master Thesis; Graduation year - September 2017 - July 2018 Work: Individual Project Summary: This project is set in the Chennai Metropolitan Area (CMA) in the state of Tamil Nadu in India. Currently spanning 1189 sq. km, the region forms a unique delta with three rivers. Due to its deltaic nature, the CMA is naturally prone to floods from mainly extreme rainfall and cyclonic activities. Coupled with rapid and unplanned urban development, Chennai has faced an aggravated risk of flooding. Set in this context, this project addresses local adaptation strategies by building socio-ecological resilience at the neighbourhood level. The main problem recognised is a conflict between human and nature and the project attempts a shift towards socioecological harmonies. For this purpose, the relevance of social capital was identified as a crucial link to design for local resilience. Hence, social and cultural networks were used as leverage to link economic aspirations and environmental restoration. To recognise the spatial manifestation of this conflict and to tap into social capital, the edges and community infrastructure were identified respectively. The water edges which are the transition zones from the human to the natural environment were mismanaged and left untreated, in turn influencing perception and its subsequent neglect from regional functionalities. To tackle this neglect and reintegrate these hydrological elements with daily life, community infrastructure was used as the tangible medium to bring people together, engage them and in turn create a sense of ownership and responsibility. Hence the strategies used were that of first designing an integrated water network across multiple scales, second, identifying community infrastructure and open spaces that can support the functioning of the system and third, designing interactions between people and the environmental to motivate them to engage and maintain the network. Together the project made a strong case for a collective community based restoration process. Supervisors (TU Delft): Dr. Marcin Dabrowski Dr.ir. Taneha Kuzniecow Bacchin Dr. ir. Diego Sepulveda Carmona, D.A. For the Full report, Click here

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LEGEND Urbanized Agricultural Barren

Koshashthalaiyar River

Water Infrastructure CMA boundary

Puzhal Lake

Coovum River

Chemberambakkam Lake

Adyar River

Pallikaranai Wetlands Buckingham Canal Okkiyam Maduvu

The Chennai Metropolitan Area

1

0 0.5

2.0 1.0

7


Towards Socio-Ecological Resilience

CLIMATE ADAPTATION AND RESILIENCE

REGIONAL GROWTH AND URBAN PLANNING

The main problem addressed in this project is that of floods being an annual occurrence in the region. The problem here, essentially is a conflict between human and nature and is most tangible NATURE

at the local neighbourhood scale. Hence

HUMAN

this project aims at socio-ecological harmony at the nano scale.

FLOOD RISK

Strong social and cultural networks as a leverage for environmental transformation and restoration Social Capital

Four crucial steps framed the final design approach of the project. First, socio-spatial analysis of the region pointed towards well developed transport infrastructure

Scale

Facilitator: The Institution

Economic Capital

and formal economic cores as the biggest strengths. Second, social capital was seen

Local City Region

as the link between economic aspirations

Environmental Capital

and environmental capacity. In the case of Chennai, social capital was interpreted

Social capital is seen as the link in this case where economic aspirations are in conflict with environmental capacities Environmental Capital

Economic Capital Social Capital

Integrated drainage network Retrofitting drainage infrastructure

as

Social and community infrastructure The edge

Civic Engagement

Restoring tanks and water bodies

The edge

community

infrastructure

such

as

schools, places of worship, parks and other

Encouraging Small scale Economies

amenities. The third step was the relevance

Tapping into CSR: Corporate Social Responsibilities

of human-nature interactions. The fourth

of ecosystem services and the importance was recognising the ‘edges’ as a currently conflicted zone and are envisioned to be active; by either programming them with relevant community activities or by treating them such that they are actively part of a larger hydrological system.

Integrated Drainage Network

Temple Tank

Activation using community infrastructure

Facilitating edge interactions

Buckingham Canal

The edges and their role in how humans perceive and interact with nature

8 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin

Lake


Integrated water network with traditional hydrology + storm water blue-green infrastructure Integrated water management and Reviving Environmental capital: traditional networks

Open space + community infrastructure + social functions to activate network Revive and Tap into social and cultural networks Social capital:

Edges as the transitional space not leftover

Public spaces designed for interactions

Design of water catchments

Direct engagement in restoration efforts

Water rentention landscapes - Eris and more

Increase open space and green cover Social capital: Revive and Tap into social and cultural networks Public spaces designed for interactions Direct engagement in restoration efforts Increase open space and green cover

Retentions and Catchments Water bodies with edge definitions Networks and connections

Civic engagement Community infrastructure activated edges Networks and connections - edge defined 1

0 0.5

2.0

Retrofitting transport infrastructure + supporting small scale economies for engagement Corporate social responsibilities 0

0.5

0 0.5

Economic capital: 1

1

1.0

2.0

1.0

Infrastructure and connectivity Encourage Small scale economies

2.0 1.0

Decentralised decision making + participatory planning and institution as the facilitator Dedicated flood management body with strict Institutional Capacity: policies

1

0

0.5

2.0

1.0

Decentralized water management

Integrate powerful stakeholders

Strict bye-laws that govern flood-resilient construction

Institutional Capacity:

Strict real estate and commodification policies

Dedicated flood management body with strict policies Decentralized water management Strict bye-laws that govern flood-resilient construction Strict real estate and commodification policies

Strict policies Decentralisation (Wards)

Economic centres Small business support

The Approach and Strategies 1

0

0.5

1

0 0.5

2.0 1.0

2.0

1.0

1

0 0.5

1

0 0.5

2.0 1.0

2.0 1.0

9


Pallikaranai sub-basin

Pallikaranai watershed

Pallikaranai watershed Micro

Micro Nano sub- watershed

sub- watershed

Pallikaranai

Blue corridor and Canal watershed

Micro

revitalisation strategies to Micro

sub- watershed

Primary and Secondary sub- watershed

Nano

ood

Pallikaranai watershed

enhance carrying capacity

Roads retrofitted SWD Infrastructure

Tertiary Roads retrofitted

Neighbourhood

with Storm Water Drainage Neighbourhood

Infrastructure (SWD)

Community level strategies planned to bring about collaborative restoration

The Socio-Cultural Network An integrated water network activated by the retrofitting of social, economic and environmental functions at the local scale is envisioned at the Pallikaranai Sub-Basin Level. On the neighbourhood scale this network is activated by community Sub-basin Macro

functions

and

human-

nature interaction is made possible by the design of the edge as a spatial medium of interaction between the people and the environment. The vision is designed across various scales, the macro being the sub-basin level, meso

Watershed Meso

being the watershed level, micro being the sub-watershed level and finally the neighbourhood being the nano level. The vision is hence, a collaborative and inclusive restoration process which seeks

Sub Watershed Micro

to resolve the currently existing conflict between human and nature. Together the community on the whole becomes

Neighbourhood Nano

10 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin

adaptive to the growing risk and socioecologically resilient.


Integrated drainage network activated by local strategies at the neighbourhood level

Neighbourhood 1

Proposed Drainage infrastructure retrofitted transport corridors

Neighbourhood 2

Buckingham Canal with revitalised edge Existing channels revitalised as Proposed Blue Corridors Pallikaranai Wetlands Proposed Pallikaranai extension Neighbourhoods selected Waterbodies Drainage lines 1km

0

2km

11


Network open space + community 15m infrastructure 4m 4m of water +15m 4m g 1m 2m 1m

4m

g

5

1

Shopping complex

1

2

School 3

a

24

Shopping complex

3

4

13

a

Temple

6

Temple

School Collective Housing

b

A

7 b 7 School

School

b

10

Church

Primary green-blue transit corridor SWD infrastructure

School

Park

School

c

with School

Proposed Connector Street with Residential streets with trenchretrofitted to direct water Primary green-blue transit corridor SWD infrastructure to main corridor

20

20 17

12

18

d e20

19

14

21 Temple

18

d

15 18

14

21

22

21

12 d

15

School

22

22

16

Park

14

Sports centre

17

12 Park

Park

8 Proposed Connector Street retrofitted with SWD infrastructure Proposed Connector Street retrofitted

c School

11 Park

A’

8

16

Collective Housing

16

c

17

9

9

School Park

10

11

10 Church School

Church

8

1113

School

9

7

Collective Housing

Collective Housing

13

Sports centre

24Sports centre

6

Temple

Collective Housing 3

Collective Housing

24

6

5

4

School

2

g

a

4 5

1

2

Shopping complex

19

25 Temple

School

f

e

19

School

School

e

Pallikaranai Bird watching Area

Temple

25

f

P w

f

School 15

Pallikaranai Bird watching Area

School

Residential streets with corridor trench to direct water Existinggreen-blue Built-up Areas Primary transit to main corridor

Proposed Mixed-use activated facades Residential streets with trench to direct water Existing Built-up Areas to main corridor Existing Socio-cultural Community infrastructure

g

23

6m

Existing Built-up Areas(Retrofitting Proposed Mixed-use activatedoffacades Proposed Water tanks existing swamps)

2m

23

2m

Proposed Mixed-use facades infrastructure Pallikaranai wetlands activated Existing Socio-cultural Community

g

23

Existing Community ExistingSocio-cultural in-use open / green spaces infrastructure

Proposed Water tanks (Retrofitting of existing swamps)

Proposed Water tanks (Retrofitting existing swamps) Unmanaged open spaces retrofitted of with bio-retention gardens

Pallikaranai wetlands and public accessible spaces

COLLECTIVE EFFORTS - Neighbourhood 1

Pallikaranai wetlands

0 60m / green spaces Existing in-use open

Existing in-use open / green spaces

30m Unmanaged open spaces retrofitted with bio-retention gardens

Unmanaged open spaces retrofitted with bio-retention gardens and public accessible spaces and public accessible spaces 00

The different socio-cultural and economic

60m 60m

drivers are then mapped out and the types

30m 30m

and open spaces along with them will be integrated. The first neighbourhood is a primarily residential one called Kamkotti Nagar. A main ‘connector street’ is identified and houses

different

economic,

leisure

and

recreation functions. These activities are planned on the pedestrian zones which not

Typical Section AA’

only form street edges but also edges of 4,5m

6,5m 2m

different

5m

green-blue

infrastructure.

Water

tanks, bio-retention gardens are proposed

2m

and unmanaged open spaces are used as potentials for neighbourhood level water harvesting and drainage. To facilitate humannature interactions, civic engagement activities are planned for the local citizens to take care of their surroundings and maintain this drainage network. In addition to the social significance of the connector street, it is also retrofitted with relevant storm water infrastructure such as bioswales, permeable pavements and sub-surface drainage channels.

12 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin

6,3m

8,5m

13

5,2m

9,8m

5,2m


Hydrological performance activated by community engaging design strategies

Hindu temple activating the water tank and extended unmanaged open spaces through festive programmes and markets

13


Network of water + open space + community infrastructure

14

1

Sports complex

15

6

2

20

16 19

5

17

18

11

m

m

a

21

7 10 8

e

B

b

Shared housing

B’

22

3 12

4 c

13 9

Proposed Connector Street retrofitted with SWD infrastructure d

Built up

Proposed Connector Street retrofitted with SWD infrastructure

Industrial Built up and Corporate Existing Socio-cultural Industrial and CorporateCommunity infrastructure Residential Existing Socio-cultural Community infrastructure Residential and Retail Commercial

Temple

Commercial and Retail Primary Green-Blue Corridor Primary Green-Blue Corridor

Secondary Green-Blue Corridor Mosque

Secondary Green-Blue Corridor

Tertiary Green-Blue Corridor

5m 2m

Tertiary Green-Blue Corridor

Residential streets with trench Residential trenchcorridor to directstreets waterwith to main

Existing Water bodies Existing Water bodies

Existing in-use open / green spaces Existing in-use open / green spaces

to direct water to main corridor

Landscaped Areas

Landscaped Areas

Unmanaged spacesretrofitted retrofitted with Unmanaged open open spaces with bio-retention andpublic public accessible spaces bio-retention gardens gardens and accessible spaces 00

60m 60m

COLLECTIVE EFFORTS - Neighbourhood 2

30m 30m

The second neighbourhood was located in the ELCOT Special Economic Zone area. In this neighbourhood’s connector street, the resultant pattern of programmes and open

spaces

consisted

of

community

functions, managed open spaces to reflect corporate social responsibilities of corporate stakeholders, managed open spaces for leisure and recreation, water bodies for retention and unmanaged open spaces for bio-retention. 6,3m

8,5m

Typical Section BB’

13 2m

5,2m 2,5m

9,8m

5,2m

8,8m 2,5m

This corridor is retrofitted with relevant storm water

infrastructure

permeable

such

pavements

as

and

bio-swales, sub-surface

drainage channels. Due to its economic significance and outreach, a large open space which became a pilot bioretention and civic engagement model was designed as part of the connector street. This pilot houses plantation activities, festivals 5,5m

and training and becomes an important area of exchange of information between the corporate social responsibility and the various societal groups that they extent their outreach to. For example, weekly visits organised to educate slum dwellers about the flood risk can be designed for within this pilot.

14 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


Hydrological performance activated by community engaging design strategies

Central open space which integrates corporate social responsibility related activities with water and green

15


MADRAS OFFICE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN (MOAD)

Architecture and Urban Design

Non-Governmental Organisations

Chennai City Corporation

Madras Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Private)

Active in city: Global Climate change agencies

Indo-German Centre for Sustainability (Research)

Engaging Stakeholders + Expansion In order to recognise the key actors and assess their demands, fieldwork was conducted in different formats. Based on actor assessments, demands and potentials across various capitals were recognised and this coupled with the project approach framed the vision. Gradually, the entire region is envisioned to be a network of neighbourhood scale strategies which together, restore the ruptured hydrological system and bring about community driven flood resilience.

16 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin

Government bodies


Community co-evaluation organised as part of project

Group 1

Group 3

Group 2

Community Co-evaluation Workshop

d? upporte t be s can i How

In addition to the citizen interviews, a community co-evaluation workshop was conducted to assess neighbourhood level perceptions. This format

?) d who at an (Wh ? f i at Wh

not only can be used as a research tool but also for implementation processes in the future in order to enhance inclusive development. Based

s? on ati lic p Im

on actor assessments, demands and potentials

) cific (spe

across various capitals were recognised and this coupled with the project approach framed the

M ai n

vision.

es ng le al h C

Social and Community development

Flooding in Chennai

17


2. Redefining Resilience reviving a lost settlement into a place of meaning

Site Location: Hemavathi Reservoir, Karnataka, India Type: Academic - Undergraduate Architecture Thesis, Bachelor of Architecture - Semester X / December 2015 May 2016 Work: Individual Project Summary: While water has been an important criteria for setting up settlements, the same has also been as a threat. The Holy Rosary Church or ‘Shettihalli’ church is located in the Gorur-Hemavathi Reservoir of the Hassan District of Karnataka in India. Due to the changing extent of the reservoir, the church ‘drowns’ every year during the reservoir filling period (monsoon) and re-emerges during the depletion period (summer). The church today, stands as the lone survivor of a glorious past of a thriving community which was submerged during the construction of the reservoir. Taking inspiration from this historic landmark, the project seeks to rejuvenate and renew the lost settlement through social, economic and environmental restoration. By doing so, diverse economic opportunities are created through tourism, agriculture and collaborative restoration. These opportunities are a way of giving back to the local community which are currently neglected from the benefits of large scale infrastructure such as dams. The project hence tackles the disjunction between sacrifice and benefit in the case of Hemavathi Reservoir in India by using the submerged church as a significant opportunity to negotiate these possibilities. Resilience here is inspired by the presence of the church on site despite environmental changes and uses this emotion as way to drive the local community towards rebuilding the damaged ecosystem together for larger economic benefits. As a thesis carried out in the track of architecture, the project focuses on the design of the individual proposals as well as the master plan of the entire trail of programmes. Three main proposals are made, first, an experiential building which is concentrated on emoting the problem and the implications of dam construction. The second is a research and implementation centre which is aimed at the study and restoration of the dam ecosystem. The third is a collaborative effort towards the restoration which is achieved by creating a farming community which is composed of the local residents but also external collaborators who are interested in the larger vision. Subsidiary programmes to support the functioning of these programmes are further integrated. Project Supervisor: Dr. Meenakumari P.; Head of Department, School of Architecture and Planning, Chennai Ar. Shaktivel Raja ; Principal Architect; Shaktivel Associates, Chennai. For the full report, click here

18 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


The Shettihalli Church

19


CREATING MEANING THROUGH OPPORTUNITY The Problems

Water storage Irrigation Power generation Flood control Drinking water

Social disintegration

Gradual decay of

and dislocation

landmark

Local agriculture

Irreversible changes

threatened

to ecology

Potentials

20 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin

1. Visitors and Culture

2. Research and

3. Community Farms

Centre

Implementation centre

village

Local collaborations

Historical landmark

and social cohesion

not preserved

Agriculture and

Tourist and external

ecology restoration

interest


Designing a trail of activities

The two seasons are studied in depth: Filling and Depletion. A trail of activities responding to the various potentials are planned so that all target groups

are

responded

to.

Local villagers are the prime focus and they receive the maximum

benefit

through

economic opportunity, restored environmental

and

social

integration. The trail during filling season

The trail during depletion season

1

Agriculture

3

2

Tourism

The trail during depletion season

Research Tourism

1

3

2

Fish spawning Agriculture Fish spawning

Reef plantation

The trail during filling season Fish breeding

Tourism

Filling season - activities

Depletion season - activities

21


PLAN

1 - VISITORS AND CULTURE CENTRE Transitions through time Situated on the reservoir banks, this first Pre-Dam setting (Past)

Land setting (Past)

proposal is intended to make people aware of the consequences of Dam construction, through experiential architecture. The spatial

Dam consequence (Present)

Water Setting (Present)

sequences are designed to tell a story, and land and water is used as a terrain for the same. The sequence represents the changes that

Genesis of Resilience (Future)

Land and water setting (Future)

the community and environment go through over time. While architectural language is the main medium of expression, programmes

Spatial sequences

22 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin

are overlaid in order to create usable and meaningful spaces.


Aerial View of Visitors and Cultural Centre

Entrance Area The dam wall like feature in the design is the prime element in this proposal and becomes the turning point in both the experience and the story. While the spaces before the wall are lush and vibrant, the spaces after the wall are dry and decayed. This play of texture and also programme, further enhances the experience and messages to raise awareness.

Performance Gallery and Dam Wall

The Dam Wall and Transition Zone

23


The Dam museum which submerges during the filling season

Transition Pathway symbolising the steep struggles

The Mural wall depicting the story of the place

24 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


Dead Trees Debris of Church

Aerial View of the Market plaza and Viewing Deck overlooking the church

The

next

sequence

of

spaces

further

elaborate on the story of the struggles and the history behind the church and the current state of the reservoir. The sequence ends in a market plaza which supports the sale of locally produced items and leads finally into a viewing deck overlooking the church. The entire building houses different activities like leisure, performances, art, markets and prayer services.

25


2 - RESEARCH AND IMPLEMENTATION CENTRE Enhancing collaborative restoration Spatial configurations

The

Hatchery

accommodate Implementation Tourist wing Collaborative zones

Research wing

activities

in

is all the

designed the

to

Staggered floor planes are used

technical

in order to create a multi-layered

restoration

of

view

of

the

collaboration

and the sedimentation pond. The

from various labs to breeding tanks,

sedimentation pond also functions

the spaces flow continuously to

as a recreational water body. Visual

facilitate all the cyclic activities.

connect between all spaces leads to constant involvement of the users in all activities that function in this zone.

PLAN AT +8.70m

The Hatcheries and sedimentation pond

26 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin

zone

biodiversity in the reservoir. Ranging


Collaboration zones overlooking the sedimentation pond

The Research Centre

Taking inspiration from the traditional concepts of congregation spaces around trees, the collaboration zone is designed. This zone houses various activities from interaction, awareness and

deliberation

and

is

hence

detailed to house group activities.

The Research centre and collaboration zone

27


3 - COMMUNITY FARMS VILLAGE Creating a resilient community

PLAN

A street community like experience

overlook this community zone such

is sought to be created through the

that there is visual connectivity to all

cottage design. By projecting a sit-

activities that may take place in this

out in the upper level, the street is

zone. The landscape design allows

framed using the structure on one

free movement of the people along

side. A well integrated community

the natural contours of the site.

space is designed in the central void of the street community. All decks

Amenities

28 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


The Cottages

Cottages

Community hub

Market Spatial configurations

The Congregation spaces

The community hub

Field shed with green roof 29


3. Power to the Future exploring energy transition through regional design

Site Location: Amsterdam Metropolitan Area Type: Academic - R&D Urban Design Studio; Masters in Urbanism, TU Delft - February - April 2017 Work: Worked in a team of four Project Summary: The region at the focus of the course Spatial Strategies for the Global Metropolis is the Amsterdam metropolitan area. AMA encompasses the city of Amsterdam and 36 smaller municipalities. It is located in the North of the larger poly-centric Randstad region and spans across the boundaries of two provinces (North Holland and Flevoland). Its total population is about 2.4 million. Regional design assignment of this quarter addresses the peri-urban areas of AMA. This edition of Spatial strategies for the Global Metropolis is related to the ongoing Horizon 2020 research project Resource Management in Peri-urban Areas: Going Beyond Urban Metabolism (REPAiR). The working definition of circular economy in this project is: ‘Circularity accommodates economies based on resource cycles that flow through man-made and natural systems without losing the value represented by the resource in question – or the function it supports. This value can manifest itself in multiple ways: not based on monetary principles alone but addressing social, ecological and economical aspects. Important in this notion is the establishment of (sub-) systems that enable restorative processes at their highest utility and value, while phasing-out waste production and down-cycling. Keeping this brief in mind, the project envisions energy transition for the AMA through a decentralised energy network. This decentralised network is achieved by the design of specific nodes across the region. These nodes are designed to play a certain role such as energy production, technical transition of large stakeholders, transport and most importantly household consumption and awareness. Four pilot projects are selected based on these node criteria and are detailed in the project, thus giving insight into the projected vision for the AMA. These pilot projects will eventually replicate and spread across the region, hence gradually creating an intricate network of nodes which together bring the AMA closer to energy transition in a post fossil age. Project Supervisor: Lei Qu, Hamed Khosravi Al-Hosseini, Marcin Dabrowski TU Delft For the full report, click here

30 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


Decentralised energy network

31


THE AMSTERDAM METROPOLITAN AREA

ENERGY

CONSUMED 7073 kW PRODUCED 6777 kW FOSSIL FUEL CONTRIBUTION 5767 kW

Centralised to decentralised energy system

A Post Fossil Scenario 70% of all energy consumption in the region is directed into electricity and heating supply to buildings (Amsterdam, a different energy). 78.6% of this energy is produced by burning fossil fuels. With an overall dependency of energy resources on fossil fuel, the AMA needs to address the need for energy transition urgently in order to future proof itself in the projected future scenario.

In this post fossil scenario, is the Amsterdam Metropolitan region equipped to cope with this possible probable future? Energy transition and the potentials in the circular economy concept

LANDSCAPE POTENTIAL NATURAL GAS

WIND

SOLID WASTE SOLAR

OAL

LANDSCAPE POTENTIAL

INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS

WIND

LAND

ELECTRICITY (FF)

BIOMASS

ELECTRICITY (GREEN)

LAND

BIOFUEL

ELECTRICITY (FF)

OIL

WASTE WATER

SOLAR

COAL

RESIDUAL HEATING

HEATING

BIOMASS

ELECTRICITY (GREEN)

BIOFUEL

FOOD

THERMAL ORGANIC ENERGY WASTE INORGANIC WASTE

WASTE WATER

FOOD REUSE RECYCLE

ORGANIC WASTE

WATER

Potential links EXISTING LINKS links Existing TRANSITION Transition POTENTIAL LINKS

INORGANIC WASTE

REUSE RECYCLE

POTENTIAL LINKS EXISTING LINKS TRANSITION

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Carbon Emissions

Electricity consumption

Diverse renewable sources of energy

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CI

CI

CI

SC

AV

EC

SC

CO

AV

REP

EC

SC

CO

AV

EC

CO REP

REP

SMART GRID Technical transition hubs

Criteria for the Technical transition: Shift of currently fossil dependent

LEGEND

Buildup Area Rural Area High Way Train

FACILITIES

industries to renewable sources of energy

Main connections Industry

Biomass collection Waste collection

Connection to infrastructure Energy consumption Co2 Emissions Renewable Energy potential Available land vacancy Stakeholders

HARBOUR HARBOUR CI

Connection of Infrastructure Energy Consumption CO2 Emission Renewable Energy Potential Available Vacancy Stakeholder Cluster

CO REP

REP

CI P

CT

CI

EC

CT

AV

LD

SC

EC LD

AV

P

CT

SC

LD

AV

CO

EC

CO AV

AV

SC

AV REP

EC SC

SC

CI

EC

CI

CI

P

SC

EC

REP

REP

REP

SMART GRID Electricity System

Criteria for the Energy production: Identifying potentials that act as

LEGEND Buildup Area Rural Area

renewable

High Way Train

energy

production

nodes

PRODUCTION Biomass

Wind Turbes(Existing) Wind Turbes(Proposed) Solar Farm

Connection to infrastructure Commuting time Energy consumption Landscape Diversity Renewable Energy Potential Available Vacancy Stakeholder clusters Population

Power Plant (Coal & Natural Gas) Power Plant (Biomass)

Power Plant (Proposed toTransfer)

FACILITIES Electricity Grid Green house

Biomass collection Waste collection

GREENPORT GREENPORT

CI P

CT

AV

LD

SC CI P

CT

AV

LD

SC

EC

CI

CI P

CT

AV

LD

SC

LD REP

P EC

AI

P EC

AI

HW

CT

HW

Connection of Infrastructure Commuting Tme Energy Consumption Landscape Diversity Renewable Energy Potential Available Vacancy Stakeholder Cluster Population

EC

REP

EC

P EC

CT

AV

REP

P AI

CT

SC

EC

REP

P

HW

CT

EC

AI

CT

HW

Criteria

SMART GRID Consumption system LEGEND Buildup Area Rural Area High Way Train

CONSUMPTION

for

the

Identifying consumption areas that can be directly influenced through

High fossil fuel consumption area

small scale strategies

CITY OF AMSTERDAM

LELYSTAD

P

P

EC

CT

P

P

P AI

HW

EC

AI

CT

EC

EC AI

AI

Population Energy Consumption Household Waste Commuting time Infrastructure access

LELYSTAD

CITY OF AMSTERDAM

HW

EC

AI

CT

HW

CT

HW

CT

HW

Population Energy Consumption Household Waste Commuting Time Accessibility of Infrastructure

Regional Spatial Strategy - Nodes derived from specific criteria 34 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin

Reduce

consumption of fossil fuels:


Smart energy system as a new growth factor

01 - Transition of Harbour Area from a fossil fuel hub to Green energy and knowledge hub 02 - Green port - Circular hub for biomass and clean energy production 03 - Household consumption Integrating every citizen in local self production through waste and solar energy 04 - Transportation sector Transitioning Lelystad transport hub as a electric transport system

The derivation on strategy stems from the fundamental principles of energy transition – technical transition, energy landscape and reducing consumption of fossil fuels. These form the basis of selection of hubs or nodes that form the elements of the smart grid. Pilot projects are chosen to demonstrate specific design solutions. The hubs are the foundational elements in each of the pilot projects proposed.

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To accommodate the energy transition the harbour is divided into three parts. Each part collaborates in a different way to increase efficient use of the harbour. As the city of Amsterdam keeps growing the need for space increases to develop housing. Therefore the east part of the harbour will change from industries to residential area. The current facilities will be transferred to the large amount of vacant lands situated in the west part of the harbour. The middle part of the harbour connects everything together through a knowledge hub which focuses on research and education on sustainable technologies.

HARBOUR- TECHNICAL TRANSITION

Research into the use of biomass in Aalsmeer, and by extension: the realisation of a biomass plant in Greenport Aalsmeer. The project also identifies the contribution of biomass plants for energy existing in the agricultural lands. This further provides opportunity for district heating in homes. Governments, civil society and business in the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area will make joint efforts to create a regional heating network. Energy that is otherwise wasted, is so recycled. This is better for the environment and the regional economy.

GREENPORT - ENERGY PRODUCTION

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The Harbour Area - Technical transition of industries

Greenport - Circular hub enhancing energy production

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The focus lies in the peri-urban area. The ongoing policies for Amsterdam, aim at eventually empowering each household with solar panels and providing relevant subsidies. Furthermore, using the potential household waste produced by each household and making waste separation and management efficient at the ground or local level, waste as an energy resource can be utilised. Awareness is created by involving each citizen directly in the process. In addition to this, art installations, pavilions, second hard markets in public spaces and buildings and revamping of municipal waste collection points as landmarks that relate to people are crucial elements. These awareness initiatives also serve as a portal for awareness of other strategies that are ongoing in the region. As a result these are crucial region-citizen connections.

REDUCING FOSSIL FUEL CONSUMPTION HOUSEHOLD LEVEL

The shifting centre in Lelystad central will be improved to encourage the use of railway for the regional travel encourage the use of bus and bicycles inside the city area. The bicycle and car sharing points are proposed to be added in the Lelystad central as well as each community centre. Also the current bus will be transformed to the electric-powered bus. And the quick charging points will be added in the shifting centre to power these buses. And these points will directly connect will each community through more Park and Ride locations. It is expected in the future that almost all the kilometres travelled by car in the future will be powered by green electricity generated by windmills, solar panels and biomass power stations.

REDUCING FOSSIL FUEL CONSUMPTION TRANSPORT LEVEL 38 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


WASTE COLLECTION POINT - REDESIGN

TRANSPORT LEVEL

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The new energy system is envisioned as a collective system of different types of nodes that work together to form the smart grid. Each pilot project gradually spreads across the regional. These nodes together form a constantly growing energy network, the smart grid. Together they form a symbiotic system which forms the new system that can influence future urbanisation of the region. The smart grid as a result now acts as the ‘new growth factor’ that guides the growth of different parts of the region. In the future, densification along the smart grid is suggested and these new densification further plug into the smart grid and achieve efficiency of energy.

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4. Urban Temple facilitating urban transformations

Site Location: Gemini, Chennai, India Type: Academic - Urban Design Studio project; Bachelor of Architecture - Semester IX / July - October 2015 Work: Worked in a team of two Project Summary: Cities are integral to human society as loci of political, economic, social and cultural life. The role and power of architecture in this physical reality is very strong, either as one of the pieces of the city or a standalone catalyst or focus. Existing contexts in the city of Chennai are taken as sites for design intervention. Each context bears a significant historic and geographic relation to the rest of the city. The many layers of urban and architectural changes over the years have resulted in unique characteristics of each context. The goal of the studio is to create design interventions which are derived through unique perspectives of the city and architecture, both as a universal and as a particular for the given context. The context is thoroughly studied and an existing element is narrowed down as a prospective site for the intervention. This site is identified by its existing impact on the context and the intent is justified. In the context presented, the project identified a significant disconnect between people and public. This project manifested in the presence of a public building which was exclusive to its surroundings hence acting as a barrier to uninterrupted public flows. A decision was hence made to replace this public building with a free-access public programme that responded to the immediate surrounding and nearby programmes. The presence of a major Church and Mosque in the context paved the way for the introduction of a Hindu temple which not only completed the cluster of religious programmes but also presented a unique opportunity to interpret religious spaces as publicly accessible. Owing to the fact that in the context of India, religious spaces were the first impressions of public space, this programme was extremely appropriate. However to truly trigger massive urban renewal, this temple was redefining using architectural language to create a strong sense of place and legible images. Hence a ‘modern’ urban temple was designed which kept the core beliefs in intact as well as responded to the context as the heart of public activity. Multiple layers such as temple architecture, vaastu, urban design and place-making techniques have been juxtaposed to eventually create a vibrant public space that fuses religion with city level public function. Project Supervisor: Dr. K. R. Sitalakshmi Professor, School of Architecture and Planning, Chennai. For the full report, click here

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View of temple entrance

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GEMINI CIRCLE, CHENNAI, INDIA. Located along the Central Business District (Mount Road) and at the junction of two high density corridors : Mount Road and Cathedral road, the Gemini circle bears a high transitional quality and has recorded one of the highest vehicular density in the city. A gateway to six regions of the city, the quality of the circle is ever changing and has undergone rapid development and face change since the construction of the Chennai’s first flyover at Gemini in 1973. The area is of prime location to the city and has the city’s most important landmarks: from

1900-1972

integral public parks to religious symbols.

Consulate building St. George’s Cathedral Thousand Lights Mosque Public Parks

Existing nature of transition

1972-2015

Potential: Creating a pause

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Site

View of consulate building Bus stop Primary route Alternate routes

View of flyover-transit intersection

Site

To trigger a change in the introverted and formal nature, the site of the Consulate is chosen. The intervention should hence be capable of bringing about extroverted and informal activities. Originating from the corner, the intervention can influence the circle and its surrounding character. Bus stop Site access routes Site study 45


Typology derivation: Temples in the past, acted as integral cultural and public spaces in the Indian context and triggered informal activity around them. They are important nodes, triggering various activities around them. With the development of other public spaces over the years, the meaning of temples in our everyday lives has been limited to a religious symbol. However they have the potential to act as extended public spaces and there is scope for redefining this typology in the context of a city.

An Urban Temple is perceived as a temple redefined to suit the urban context. Breaking formal character and relieving the built environment, it acts as an extended open public space. It is highly accommodative in nature yet retains its religious core. As a cultural and social magnet, it transforms into a core of constant activity that extends beyond its premises. As a result, a variety of activities are

Contrast Represents the contrast between built and open in terms of volume and material. The designed space is a contrast to the built context around.

triggered al around.

Abstract models are made to visualise the essence and character of the desired design intent. Each model represents a certain quality that the design intervention

should

bear.

Existing

traditional

planning principles and qualities are taken, iterated and redefined to a meaning in the given context.

Chaos The central core rises above from the chaos of the city, the busy life and relieves it through a social focus. Activities are refined from the exterior to the inner most religious core.

Abstract models are made to visualise the essence and character of the desired design intent. Each model represents a certain quality that the design intervention should bear.

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Design Evolution: A Diagrammatic approach

A strong axis is defined due to the EAST facing nature of the idol. Hence the religious core is placed at the centre with the axis aligned as compared to the site and is along the East West direction.

Layering-I Layering which is a common trait of Indian temple form is interpreted using planes. By varying the heights towards a focus, the religious journey is represented.

The religious core is defined at the centre. Access routes are made as per temple planning principles towards the temple complex (core) . Anticipated people’s pathways also considered.

Grid planning along the axis to create public spaces. The sanctity of the core is maintained. Layering-II The axis is highlighted by stacking along the length. Further qualities of light and shade are explored by varying the stack distance.

The entire site, open on all sides, has entry to the temple complex on two sides, along the axis and is in the form of a void. The main temple complex is surrounded by a water body, resembling the temple tank. 47


Section AA’ Each element is recognised by its form. The primary entrance is larger than the secondary entrance hence symbolising the actual entry point as per temple planning principles. 48 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


01 - Mandapas 02 - Parking 03 - Temple street market 04 - Mounds for seating 05 - Mounds for seating 06 - Street market 07 - Primary entrance 08 - Stambam 09 - Nandhi statue 10 - Sanctum Santorum 11 - Subsidiary shrine 12 - Subsidiary shrine 13 - Subsidiary shrine 14 - Secondary Entry 15 - Steps to water tank 16 - Mandapas 17 - Name board 18 - Admin block 19 - Amphitheatre 20 - Towards Cathedral

Along the access paths, stalls are designed in order to heighten the activity potential of the public space. Semi-covered seating spaces called ‘Mandapas’ are also planned as magnets in these open spaces. The movement of people organically flows throughout the site. The sunken temple complex acts as a culmination point, with its steps functional as extended seating all around.

Section BB’ 49


View of the amphitheatre

View of street leading up to the temple

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Form Generation

The form of the entrance (Gopuram) is derived

The

from the existing expression of temples. The

continues as a single entity as the ‘Vimana’.

Sanctum

Sanctorum

(Garbagriha)

basic trapezoid form is de-constructed with a

The entire structure is designed with planes

central slit. The texture is further enhances by

and is perceived as the Vimana when looked

layering with step like planes that resemble

as a whole.

the present day temples.

View of the Temple Complex

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5. Creating local meaning revival of the Hart van Zuid

Site Location: Zuidplein, Rotterdam Zuid Type: Academic - R&D Urban Design Studio; Masters in Urbanism, TU Delft - November 2016 - January 2017 Work: Individual Project Brief: In this quarter the context is the southern part of Rotterdam. Currently, the National Program Rotterdam South (NPRZ14) is focussing on improving the liveability of this urban area. The program focusses on the social structure, including safety, participation, education and the economic potential of ‘Zuid’. To achieve this, the municipality proposes to demolish and transform a substantial part of the housing stock. More specifically, we will focus on the ‘Hart van Zuid’ (‘heart of south’) and surrounding neighbourhoods. Carnisse, located in the west, is one of the neighbourhoods aimed to be ‘transformed’ – but the scattered ownership makes it difficult to intervene. According to the structural vision, the ‘Hart van Zuid’ area should become the vibrant city centre of Rotterdam South. In contrast to Carnisse, the neighbourhoods on the eastern side are, to a large extend, exploited by housing corporations. The cluster of hospitals, located in the east, is undergoing a transformation process. In the southern part, the Zuiderpark is located – with the challenge to improve the connections between the park, the surrounding neighbourhoods, and the ‘Hart van Zuid’. Integrating the social and environmental dimensions in our proposal requires knowledge on several levels. On a system level we need to have a basic understanding of human systems which are social and technical, natural systems, and their interaction. On a domain level we need to understand the nature of urban design, urban engineering, and their interaction. As a sub-studio group, a unanimous decision was made to intervene directly with the Zuidplein mall. In this project, the north section of the mall is demolished and redesigned in order to reconnect the neighbouring areas back to the public realm and to also use this public realm to address sociocultural conditions of the residents. Having established the relevance of the north section as a potential for sociocultural functions, the project through urban design and massing exercises explores the juxtaposition of various programmes aimed at reconnecting the people with one another and to also facilitate social rehabilitation. The end result is envisioned as a vibrant community which actively engages with their surroundings and is provided with a platform to freely express and renew their existing exclusive sociocultural conditions. Project Supervisor: Rients Dijkstra Chair of Urban Design, TU Delft For the full report, click here

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The streets of the Zuid

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HART VAN ZUID - ROTTERDAM ZUIDPLEIN AREA

Study Area

Tarwewijk

Carnisse Zuidplein

Landmarks

Road network

Metro lines

Ecology

Neighbourhoods

Water networks

Vreewijk

Ahoy

Layers Analysed 54 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


PROGRAMMATIC REJUVENATION

1. Mobility environment induced 2. Local Value < Regional Value 3. Inactive Facade Partially transform Zuidplein into a centre for the local residents while retaining its core. The northern zone has a stronger potential of establishing direct connections to the immediate neighbourhoods.

STRATEGIES STRATEGIES APPLIED APPLIED

Programmatic rejuvenation

Improving local connections

Strategies applied

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Future extension

Parking extension Urban farm

Art-Culture extension

Parking

Urban Farm

Art Culture centre

Parking garage

Art Culture centre

Theatre extension Library Exhibition and gallery Social rehabilitation

By clustering cultural activities that resonate with the needs of the local community, programmes such as social rehabilitation, art galleries, exhibition and performance spaces and public libraries are introduced into the newly acquired portion of the site. A local image is superimposed over the parking facade of the mall on the ground and first floor using everyday shopping and leisure elements like grocery stores, bars, pubs, eat outs and restaurants. The bus station is rezoned to facilitate this transformation. To facilitate tangible connections from Carnisse, The residential blocks are altered to create a direct connection to intended local centre.

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Pedestrian pattern intensity analysis

Metro Elevated Pathway Bus

Pedestrian pattern

Bus

To facilitate tangible connections from Carnisse, The residential block between Goereesestraat and Van Swietenlaan is altered in two zones to establish a direct vehicular and pedestrian connection to intended local centre.

Gallery

Pavilions

Skill Training

Swimming pool

Elevated Pathway

Hospital

Residential

Bus

Parking

Ahoy

Bus

Bus Station

Cinema

Daily shops

Green

Direct connection to Carnisse

Leisure

Metro

Gallery

Pavilions

Skill Training

Swimming pool

Hospital

Residential

Parking

Ahoy

Bus Station

Cinema

Daily shops

Green

Pedestrian pattern intensity anal

Leisure Metro Elevated Pathway Bus Bus

Gallery

Pavilions

Skill Training

Swimming pool

Hospital

Residential

Parking

Ahoy

Bus Station

Cinema

Daily shops

Green

Leisure

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PROPOSED MASTER PLAN

LEGEND 1 - Pedestrian Over-bridge 2 - Urban Farm- Art - Culture 3 - Art-Culture Building 4 - Urban Farm - Parking 5 - Parking Building 6 - Theatre 7 - Pavilion Zone 8 - Water Square zone 9 - Transition - Pause zone 10 - Pedestrian zones 11 - New residential blocks 12 - Vehicular zone 13 - Proposed swimming pool 14 - Metro station 15- Shopping mall - Zuidplein 16 - Office buildings 17 - Towards Ahoy 18 - Parking - Shopping mall 19 - Daily retail and leisure 20 - Bus station 21 - Metro exit 22 - Parking - Office exit 23 - Mall Parking - Entry Exit 58 A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin


Section through parking garage and public square

Pedestrian access

Mall entry Metro exit Pedestrian access Vehicular access

The secondary axis along the metro platform is designed as vibrant shopping street with green and blue landscape elements. The Sectionpublic through Art-culture building central square with multiple spines feeding into it, becomes a hub of local social and cultural activity.

Art-culture

Urban farm

SECTION AA

SECTION AA Theatre

Pedestrian access Vehicular access

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5. Brigade Exotica - Lobby Interiors Professional work during apprenticeship at CnT Architects, India

Site Location: Bangalore, India Type: Professional Project at CnT Architects Work: Tasks supervised by Junior Architect Role & Contribution: Trainee, Worked on 3D modelling and complete set of final drawings for GFC stage Level of Work: Bachelor of Architecture - Apprenticeship / May 2014 - October 2014 Project Brief: Designed as the entrance lobby of Brigade Exotica in Bangalore. The Exotica project consists of two premium 34 storey luxury apartment towers with high-end amenities. My role was mainly in assisting with the preparation of drawings for design development and construction purposes. My tasks included 2D Drafting using AutoCAD, 3D Modelling using Sketchup, preparation of material sample boards, selection of material samples and coordination with vendors.

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View of lobby interiors

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[Author of drawings: Drawings

final changes made used as Go execution.]

PLAN OF THE ENTRANC

Site photograph of completed project

Concept: The design was meant to tailor-made and specially crafted for the premium apartment. The interiors were inspired primarily by dynamism and directional quality as the lobby further led to the service core. The floor pattern hence reflected this directional quality and a contrast of material was used to highlight the pathway.

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ELEVATION B


s re-drafted from previous references and

ood for Construction drawings for project

CE LOBBY

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Further the two main shapes were expressed

through

perforated

View of two towers of Brigade Exotica

brass metal plates with strip lighting behind to highlight them. The reception desk, by use of sharp angle and lighting through brass sheets also exhibits a sense of dynamism.

The mural was inspired from the composition of the two towers on site. A dynamic shape was used to represent the two tower and subsequent planes were used to accentuate it. By projecting and recessing the planes, the two main shapes were emphasized.

The Mural

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Ceiling pattern The

ceiling

pattern

was

a

reflection of the floor pattern which angled in order to create a visual direction. By the use of cover lighting, the dynamic, directional nature is achieved. The lobby screen was designed to provide semi-visual access.

Wooden screen

View of lobby interiors

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LIST OF PROJECTS COMPLETED: UNDERGRADUATE: Sem 01: Basic Design exercises Nine Squares Sem 02: Kitchen Design Weekend Cottage Sem 03: Montessori School Bamboo Cafe Micro-architecture Sem 04: Rural Study (Village of Vembar in Tamil Nadu) Cafe and Book Shop Sem 05: Mid-Rise Apartments Parametric Design Sem 06: Cancer Centre Sem 07: Internship at CnT Architects, Bangalore Sem 08: Internship at Monsoon Design, Bangalore Architectural Dissertation : Process based design (To read, click here) Sem 09: Urban Transformations - Urban Temple (To view the project, click here) Entrance design Sem 10: Thesis : Redefining Resilience- Restoring a lost settlement with socio-economic and environmental collaboration (To view the project, click here) GRADUATE: Q 01: R&D Studio : Analysis and Design of urban form Study city : Leiden(To view the project, click here) Q 02: R&D Studio : Design of Sustainable urban environments Study area : Rotterdam Zuid (To view the project, click here) Q 03: R&D Studio : Spatial strategies for a global metropolis Study area : Amsterdam Metropolitan Area (To view the project, click here) Q 04: Architecture and Urban Design Studio Study area : Zagreb, Croatia (To view the project, click here) Graduation Thesis: â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Leveraging Socio-Cultural Networksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; - Local adaptation strategies to bring about flood resilience in Chennai Metropolitan Area, India. (To view the project, click here)

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A+U Portfolio Nilofer Tajuddin

Nilofer Afza Tajuddin_Architecture and Urbanism Portfolio  

Select projects_2011-2018

Nilofer Afza Tajuddin_Architecture and Urbanism Portfolio  

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