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Cultural and Performing Arts Institute Hebbal, Bangalore

Nikita Verma A/2116/2009 School of Planning and Architecture New Delhi

Architectural Thesis 2014 Studio Co-ordinator: Prof. Neerja Tiku Guides: Shri Santosh Auluck, Ms. Tanuja Kanvinde


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 1

Declaration The research work in the thesis titled “Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal, Bangalore� has been carried out by the undersigned as part of the undergraduate program in the Department of Architecture, School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi- 110002, India under the supervision of Ms. Tanuja Kanvinde and Shri. Santosh Auluck and coordination of Prof. Neerja Tiku. The matter contained in this thesis is original and has not been submitted elsewhere.

Nikita Verma A/2116/2009

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 2

Certificate This thesis was carried out during the months of January- May 2014, the tenth semester in the Department of

Architecture of School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi. Thereafter, based on the declaration of the candidate, the thesis was placed in front of the external jury held on 21st and 22nd May, 2014. For this work the candidate was awarded the following marks: 1.

Internal Evaluation during the semester

______ out of 300 marks.

2.

External Jury Evaluation, 21st and 22nd May, 2014

______ out of 350 marks

On successful completion of the Bachelor of Architecture Course by the candidate, the undersigned hereby accepts the thesis Report on behalf of the Department, s that it may be placed in the Architecture Library.

_________________________ (Prof. Neerja Tiku) Thesis Co-ordinator 2014 Department of Architecture, School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi- 110002 Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


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सारााँश मनष्ु य जाति हमेशा से पानी के िट पर बस्िी आई है। चाहे वो कोई नदी का ककनारा हो, समद्र ु ा या कोई सरोवर, इन जलाशयों का बहुि महत्वपर् ू ण सम्बंध रहा है मानव के सामाजजक ऐंव संस्कृतिक जीवन से। प्रोद्योगिकीय ऐंव अर्णसासरीय ववकसन की दौड़ में कई शेहरों ने अपने जल स्रोि ऐंव उनके िटों को नज़रअंदाज़ कर ददया। सार् ही शेहरों के बढ़ने से संस्कृतिक केन्द्द्रों की उपेक्षा हुई है । जहां एक िरफ अचल सम्पिी िेज़ी से शेहर के महत्वपर् ू ण स्र्लों पर अपना तनशान छोड़िी जा रही है , वहीं कला और समाज से जड़ ु े संस्र्ानों की कमी हो रही है । उत्िर बंिलोर में जस्र्ि हे ब्बल सरोवर के ककनारे एक स्र्ल है जो मास्टरप्लॅ न २०१५ के अनस ु ार संस्कृतिक ितिववगधयों से सम्बंगधि योजना के ललये तनयि है । इसी स्र्ान पर मैं एक प्रदशणनीय कला को समवपणि संस्र्ान की रचना करना चाहिी हूूँ। यह संस्र्ान नत्ृ य, नाट्य और संिीि सीखाने के अलावा, ३०० लशष्यों के रे हने ठे हरने की आवस्र्ा, क़ला प्रदशणनीय के ललये लिन्द्‍न प्रकार की जिह, ऐंव कुछ सवणजतनक क्षेत्रों का घर होिा। हे ब्बल सरोवर के िट को जीर्ोद्धार करने का यह प्रयास शहर में एक नया संस्कृतिक गचन्द्ह स्र्ावपि करने की चेष्टा है ।

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 4

Acknowledgements I would like to express my sincere thanks to my thesis guides Ms. Tanuja Kanvinde and Shri. Santosh Auluck for guiding me throughout the research and design process. I also thank my studio coordinator and other faculty members for their constant advice and efforts. I also express my gratitude to Ar. Gerard Da Cunha for his timely help in my case study on ‘Nrityagram’ . I thank my friends and family for their support and encouragement and valuable discussions. I am grateful to my juniors Tushar Verma, Shambhavi Singh, Siriki Priyanka and Priyank Jaiswal for their timely help and support towards the climax.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


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Contents Declaration Certificate Acknowledgements Contents List of Figures

1

1. • • •

Thesis Search Introduction Choice of Topic Proposition

11

2. • • -

Research Areas and Case Studies Research Areas Understanding the spaces Lake systems Design strategies Case Studies Bharat Bhavan, Bhopal Kalakshetra, Chennai Nrityagram, Hessaraghatta The Royal Danish Playhouse, Copenhagen

15

3. Design Project •Project Scope •Area Program •Requirements

44

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4. Site Study •Location of site •Neighborhood, Precinct and the City •Topography, Climate and Natural Features •Accessibility •Masterplan

48

5. Design Initiation •Challenges •SWOT •Psychometric Analysis •Passive Design Strategies •Spatial Organization

57

6. Design Translation •Concept

63

7. Design Evolution •Stage 1 •Stage 2 •Stage 3 •Stage 4 •Stage 5

64

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


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8.The Finale • Final Zoning • Site Plan • Circulation • Floor Plans • Sections • Roof Plan • 3D Views • Model Photographs

69

Glossary Bibliography

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


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List of Figures Figure 1: Bryghusgrunden mixed use, Copenhagen Figure 2: Kilden Performing Arts center, Norway Figure 3: Kankaria Lakefront, Gujarat Figure 4: The city: Location Figure 5: Site location with respect to the city Figure 6: Establishing a Relationship Figure 7: Royal Danish Playhouse on the Harbour, bustling with activity Figure 8: Understanding spaces and their overlaps Figure 9: Typical dance studio plan Figure 10: Internal view of a dance studio and the careful integration of services and architecture Figure 11: Noise reduction between two rooms Figure 12: Suggested layout for a music studio Figure 13: Suitable reverberation times Figure 14; Suggested acoustic treatments to music classroom Figure 15; Suggested acoustic treatments to Riyaaz room Figure 16.1: the three part studio plan and section in case of larger studios Figure 16.2:Suggested general layout for drama classroom Figure 17; Koothambalam at the Kalamandalam, Kerala Figure 18; Mandapa from a temple in Shimoga Figure 19:Most common plan forms for auditoria Figure 20; A 1000 seat amphitheatre plan Figure 21:Lakes of Bangalore Figure 22; Bharat Bhavan Location Figure 23; Bharata Bhavan photographs Figure 24; Bharat Bhavan plan Figure 25; Section Figure 26; Kalakshetra Location Figure 27: satellite view

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 9

Figure 28: The focal Banyan Tree Figure 29: Site Plan, Kalakshetra Figure 30: Roof of the Koothambalam, as seen from far Figure 31: cut-iso view of the Koothambalam Figure 32: Side Elevation, Koothambalam Figure 33: Koothambalam interiors Figure 34: Open air theatre Figure 35: Padma Pushkarini Figure 36: Studios/ Classrooms Figure 37: Hostel Buildings Figure 38: Dining hall Figure 39: Location map Figure 40: Accessibility Figure 41: Site Plan Concept Sketch Figure 42: Gurukul courtyard and stairs Figure 43: Gurukul plan Figure 44: Section of service block and gurukul Figure 45: Guest cottages Figure 46: Temple Figure 47: yoga center Figure 48: Sculpture Garden Figure 49: Ampitheatre Figure 50: Service Block Plan Figure 51: Amphitheatre view and plan Figure 52: Site section through Amphitheatre before and after Figure 53: Satellite Image Figure 54: The Harbour and the context Figure 55: The waterfront Figure 56: site plan Figure 57: Site Figure 58: Bangalore map showing major lakes and roads

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


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Figure 59: Site Demarcation Figure 60: Site Location Figure 61: Masterplan Figure 62: Bangalore Structure Plan Figure 63: The Precinct Figure 64: Hebbal Flyover Figure 65: Neighborhood map Figure 66: Site Photographs Figure 67: Site View from Embassy lake Terraces, opposite side of the site along Bellary Road Figure 68: Climate data Figure 69: Southern edge of site is bordered by lake Figure 70: BMTC Depot Figure 71: Hebbal railway station Figure 72: Hebbal flyover Figure 73: Site Drawing Scale 1:2000 Figure 74: Psychometric Chart Figure 75: Psychometric Chart showing effect of indirect evaporative cooling Figure 76: cooling because of water body Figure 77: Extended comfort zone with proper natural ventilation Figure 78: Suitable natural ventilation techniques Figure 79: The site and lake relationship Figure 80: A connected series of courtyards and open spaces responding to site and program elements. Figure 81: Gradual increase in massing in response to lake Figure 82: Vernacular elements Figure 83: maintaining visual and movement axes Figure 84: Enhancing the ‘amidst the nature’ experience

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


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1.Thesis Search 1.01 Introduction

public uses in the Masterplans lie vacant in wait of

Our view of cities is a mix of reality and truth, hype

government

and perception usually filtered through media

encroached upon or misused in some other way as a

representations. The overall culture of a place and

timely intercession by authorities fails to happen.

the arts help define and shape identity, perception

The fact that most Indian cities have realized the

and image within the city’s own terms. The drive to

importance of developing their waterfronts only in

create rich sensory environments in cities provides

recent years, clearly depicts the missing connection

new opportunities for those working in the creative

between the city an its water bodies.

professions. (Landry, 2010)

Most cities are in transition, especially those with an

With the cities growing into urban sprawls and

industrial past, and need to renew and revitalize

agglomerations, the need for a planned growth of

their economic base in order to move up the value

cultural and public spaces in the expanded city is

chain and to become more knowledge intensive

often ignored. The commercial, residential and other

places. The cultural sphere , without denial is the

forms of works places take the front seat in these

missing link and solution to all these issues.

developments which are a result of real estate

There is a need to switch the question: Not what is

driven projects away from the city centers. The

the value of imagination creativity, culture, heritage,

cultural and public realm falls short in keeping pace

the arts or design for city development. Instead,

with such developments.

what is the cost of not thinking of imagination,

Meanwhile prime pockets of land in the city often

creativity, culture, design, art and heritage?

interventions.

These

often

get

Figure 1: Bryghusgrunden mixed use, Copenhagen

Figure 2: Kilden Performing Arts center, Norway

next to natural features, water bodies, ecological sites etc, though demarcated for public and semi

Figure 3: Kankaria Lakefront, Gujarat

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


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1.02 Choice of Topic

and as a result only 17 good lakes exist as against 51

With my family currently staying in Bangalore, this thesis

healthy lakes in 1985. Urban development has caused 16

gives me the opportunity to look at city level issues and

lakes getting converted to bus stands, Golf courses,

through my observations, readings, research and

playgrounds and residential colonies.

discussions with various people in and off the field, I

The Bangalore Development Authority and Lake

tried to identify a subject which could be solved by an

Development Authority over the past few years are now

architectural intervention that suited my interests and at

working on conservation of the lakes and developing the

the same time to create an example of how such

waterfronts for public and semi public uses.

interventions could do justice to similar problems at a

Secondly, Bangalore being overshadowed by its IT image

larger scale.

in the recent past has overlooked the need to expand

Bangalore is the capital city of the Indian state

the cultural institutions specially in the regions that have

of Karnataka. Located on the Deccan Plateau in the

become a part of the agglomeration lately. It lacks

south-eastern

landmark cultural complexes that a metropolitan city

part

of

Karnataka.

Bangalore

is

India's third most populous city and fifth-most populous

demands.

urban agglomeration. Bangalore is known as the Silicon

Thus overlapping the two identified major concerns, a

Valley of India because of its role as the nation's leading

cultural intervention on a waterfront site seemed idyllic

Information Technology (IT) exporter. The city blessed

in a truly urban context.

with a salubrious climate, was once famous for beautiful

Moreover, it would help create a development model at

gardens, parks and natural lakes.

a national level, helping to create awareness abut the

The effect of urbanization has taken a heavy toll on

water eco system and lake conservation at the same

the Beautiful lakes in Bangalore. The lakes in the city

time. Generating activity along a lakeside site in a

have been largely encroached for urban infrastructure

sensitive architectural fashion would be essential.

Karnataka

Bangalore

Figure 4: The city: Location

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 13

1.03 Proposition

To Bellary

The Site Hebbal is an area in Bangalore, which was once

Outer Ring Road

Hebbal

indicative of the north endpoint of the city. Though originally famous for Hebbal Lake, it is now better known for the serpentine maze of flyovers that network the Outer Ring Road and Bellary Road. The Hebbal Lake is located in the north of Bangalore at the mouth of National Highway 7, along the junction of Bellary Road and the Outer Ring Road(ORR). It was one of the three lakes created in 1537 by Kempe Gowda. A project for lake restoration funded under

the

Indo-Norwegian

Environment

Programme which led to major changes in the ecosystem began in 1998. Two artificial islands were created using the soil from desilting under this project. These vegetated islands have become

the roost sites of many water-birds. At the north eastern end of the lake there lies a plot of approximately 4 ha. demarcated for a public or semi public use in the Masterplan 2015.

BANGALORE CITY MAP Figure 5: Site location with respect to the city

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 14 Architectural Intervention

Through this project, an attempt will be made to

Establishing an integrated multi arts institute,

amalgamate the Gurukul tradition and the

housing residential schools for the performing arts

contemporary ways of teaching the performing

-dance, music and drama. The center is to have a

arts in the same complex. It will be an effort to

dedicated public zone that would have an

provide a holistic environment for learning and

auditorium, art and exhibition galleries, silk

performing the arts, close to the nature yet within

museum, arts and crafts workshops and a

the urban context- establishing a harmony in the

restaurant.

teaching traditions, spaces and lifestyle. The

The proposal is an effort to establish a link

learning, performing and residential areas will be

between the city and its lakefronts through

included in one whole complex to remove the gaps

cultural public or semi-public spaces built in a

between theses activities.

sensitive manner. The idea is to generate a

The complex will try to use the waterfront for

landmark for Bangalore and offer a boost to its

activities spreading across a wider range of time

lake conservation and rejuvenation aspirations.

and kind and not limit them to recreational and

It is a well established fact that cultural landmarks

amusement parks as done to most lakesides in

on waterfront sites have led to enhancing of

Bangalore.

awareness and activities regarding the water

The

ecosystems and their importance apart from

architectural design to a sensitive and prime site

revitalizing the waterfronts throughout the world

amidst the urban context

cities . Sydney Opera House in Australia, Kilden

traditional Gurukulasampradaya with the modern

Performing arts Center in Norway, The Royal

pedagogy.

Danish Playhouse in Denmark etc. are a few examples to name.

challenge

is

to

create

a

City

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute

Culture

Lakefront

•Expansion •Identity

•Cultural Spaces •Missing link

•Rejuvenation •Sensitive architecture

Figure 6: Establishing a Relationship

responsive

harmonizing the

Figure 7: Royal Danish Playhouse on the Harbour, bustling with activity

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 15

2. Research Areas and Case Studies 2.01 Research

The following case studies will be done:

The primary research would focus on studying the

-Bharat Bhavan, Bhopal

various spaces- their meaning, requirements and

- Kalakshetra, Chennai

qualities.

-Nrityagram, Hessaraghatta

Performing Arts Institute:

- The

•Teaching and Learning spaces

Denmark

•Performing Spaces

The tertiary research would be concerned with the

•Residential Spaces

design development and would go hand in hand with

•Common facilities

it. The theories and philosophies related to concept

Waterfront Development

development, design strategies, suitable landscaping

•The lake systems

etc that is responsive to the context, climate and the

•Lake conservation and rejuvenation

lake would be taken up briefly.

•Sensitive ways for developing the immediate

Overall the research would aim at comprehending

lakefront

the needs of the various spaces and their overlaps

The secondary research would be the case studies

with each other and the surroundings.

and their analysis. The inferences and learning from

All the investigation would aim at creating a design

them would help in the design development and will

and development model for similar sites exploring

be an important part of the research. The case

suitable architectural ways

studies would also supplement the primary research

achieved.

Royal

Danish

Playhouse,

The site and surroundings

Copenhagen,

Lakefront development

Performing arts Institute

Figure 8: Understanding spaces and their overlaps

in which it can be

in understanding the spaces that are part of the area program.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 16

Teaching and Learning Spaces

Dance Studio Requirements as per NDTA-

and for this reason a rectangular space is most

•The Traditional or Gurukul System:

National Dance Teachers Association , UK are as

useful.

The Gurukul is the traditional system of learning,

follows. All forms of dances including Indian

•10m x 9m is a minimum size, providing space

specially classical music and dance, whereby the

dances are taken care of in these specifications:

for eighteen adults to take part in any dance

Guru (teacher) and the shishyas (students) lived

1. Floor area

technique

nearby or in the same house.

The teaching

The amount of floor area required depends on

dimensions for choreographic work without a

activity happened mostly in open spaces and

three variables: the number of participants

feeling of being cramped.

there were no designated classrooms. The

normally expected to take part in activities, the

2. Vestibule

system often existed in large ashram complexes.

age of participants and the type of activity

A space of 6-12 square metres within the dance

•The Modern system

envisaged.

studio, but separated from the area of the dance

The moderns system of performing arts training

•Realistically, in a cost-conscious world, it would

floor, is invaluable. The entrance to the studio

consists of studio where the pupils learn and

be unwise to envisage catering for less than

should be into this area.

rehearse. The studios are attached to other

eighteen participants.

•It accommodates space for any musical

spaces like lecture rooms, libraries, recording

•A useful rule of thumb is to provide a minimum

instrument/electronic

studios etc. Most often they are treated like

of three square metres for each participant of

locker space etc.

classrooms for any other subject minus the

the primary school age range and five square

furniture.

metres for those in the secondary and tertiary

In the present Indian scenario- there exist a

age range.

variety of typologies of performing arts schools.

•Studios have been built with a variety of

From the gurukul adaptations to contemporary

shapes, ovals, circular and with curving walls.

class

Such spaces impose limitations; for many dance

room structure, many

followed.

systems

are

class

and

providing

device,

appropriate

visitor

space,

VESTIBULE

activities it is necessary to be able to locate front Figure 9: Typical dance studio plan

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 17 3. Studio Height

4. Sound

6. Floor surface

The height of the studio relates to the

It is important that sound accompaniment is

The floor is the most important attribute for the

circulation of fresh air and to the opportunity to

heard crisply within the studio, but it is essential

dancer, and for the dance teacher. Every step

jump and lift. But the height requirement goes

that

and jump is responded to by the quality of the

beyond the purely physical.

workspaces.

• A plentiful supply of fresh air is necessary for

it

does

not

contaminate

adjoining

floor underfoot. Every dance step or jump on an

• Sound insulation is a primary structural

unyielding surface wears down the resilience of

the dancer to replenish energy quickly. But

consideration. Cavity walls are invaluable, and

the body and brings the risk of injury, and the

beyond the physiological need the dancer

these may have baffling material enclosed or on

prospect of long term damage, closer.

performs best with a sense of being able to

the surface. Inner and outer doors should be

•The ideal is a fully sprung floor permanently

expand into the space. The dancer not only

close-fitting and solid, with spring closures, and

laid, and exclusively used, for the purpose of

moulds lines and shapes in personal space, but

the space between such doors needs to be

dancing.

also creates implied lines, streaming out into the

thoroughly baffled.

space beyond. Height is important for the

Smooth wooden floor is suitable for barefoot

• Within the space excessive reverberation from

expression of aspiration.

hard surfaces needs to be avoided. Partial wall

• Physically it is important to have headroom so

curtaining has acoustic as well as aesthetic value.

that the dancer never feels inhibited in achieving

5. Interior design

height. The opportunity for one dancer to stand on the shoulders of another and raise her/his arms in the air, makes a height of at least 3.5m

ideal. This height gives an appropriate sense of spaciousness.

dancing. Adequate steps should be taken to eliminate the introduction of grit on the floor as

this will cause damage to the surface.

•A complete wall of mirror up to the height of 2200mm, in which all participants can clearly observe their dance image, is ideal. There are, however, situations where being able to see ones image while dancing is a hindrance. Mirrors should have curtaining, which is independent of other curtaining, to cover them

Figure 10: Internal view of a dance studio and the careful integration of services and architecture

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 18 Music Studio Requirements

Acoustics: Suitable reverberation time for

The spatial requirements of a music studio is

music rehearsals ranges between 0.6 and 1

similar to that of the dance studio. The music

second. There are two ways to reduce the

classroom needs better acoustics and sound

reverberation time of a room: either the

insulation though. The requirements for

sound absorption must be increased or the

good rehearsal facilities are

volume must be decreased. Increasing the

• good sound insulation (should be ensured

sound absorption in a classroom is generally

when built, as it is difficult to improve

easier to achieve than reductions in volume.

later without extensive repairs) and proper

(www.acousticalsociety.org, 2014)

background noise levels;

Small music rooms vary in size, and

• a sufficient amount of absorption;

accommodate diverse groups ranging from a

• special requirements for the instruments

solo

need

ensembles. Louder instruments need larger

to be met (floor, reflecting wall, etc.);

rooms. As music students can spend up to

• other environmental controls were needed

40 hours per week in music practice and

(ventilation, lighting, temperature).

rehearsal rooms, these rooms are very

Apart from the group studios, Indian

important in the daily activity of a music

Classical Music requires spaces for Riyaaz

school or department [Lamberty, 1980].

instrumentalist

to

small

Figure 11: Noise reduction between two rooms

music Figure 12: Suggested layout for a music studio

(individual practice). These don’t necessarily have to be always closed. These require a space of approx 10 sq.m per room, capacity single person. The music studios need to be attached to storage spaces for instruments.

Figure 13: Suitable reverberation times

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 19 full length drapes on two sides used to framed pinboards set at an vary acoustic angle provide surface response modelling to promote diffusion

Although rooms with non parallel walls, floors and ceilings are

storage provides sound insulation between two classrooms

preferred for music rooms, to maximize the utilization of the available space, the rooms are normally designed rectangular in

size with floors and ceilings perpendicular to walls. Curved walls solid core door with small vision panel

are not recommended for small rooms to avoid focusing and

Door frame should be properly designed and sealed

(Osman, 2010)

undesirable effects. Wall at an angle to avoid flutter echoes and standing waves

Shelving for sound diffusion

Small window to minimize external noise

Thin pile carpet on floor

Drapes can be used to vary acoustic response

Window with good sound insulation

Figure 14; Suggested acoustic treatments to music classroom

Figure 15; Suggested acoustic treatments to Riyaaz room

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 20 Drama Studio Requirements As per Time Saver Standards, a large drama studio is generally divided into three parts: A- a raised platform acting as a stage. B-

some fixed seating on an inclined floor accommodating about 30 students, with chairs equipped with movable tablet arms . Within some individual teaching practices the area might be preferred with a flat floor

with movable chairs , C- A flat floor area between the two which acts as the playing area for rehearsal, demonstration etc. The total length of the room in this case is about 20m. For practical reasons these large

Figure 16.1: the three part studio plan and

studios are also used for performances for

section in case of larger studios

small scale productions.

A . Fixed seating ; B. potential arena staging ;

The stage depth should be at least 4m and

C. elevated stags, no fixed proscenium ; D.

height over it more than the usual classroom

elevated walkways on each side of the room

height.

serve as work tables and arena seating and

For smaller studios the seating area is

provide

omitted. The studios require a green room/

underneath ; E . projection room.

dressing room in all cases along with storage for props and costumes.

chair

and

platform

storage Figure 16.2; Suggested general layout for drama classroom

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 21

Performing Spaces

Thrissur in central Kerala is approximately 72 ft

•The Temple Mandapa-

The performing spaces will be studied under two

x 55 ft (22 m x 16.75 m)and is one of the large

In the Hindu temple the Mandapa is a porch-like

heads: traditional and contemporary, looking at

examples. The stage and backstage extend up to

structure

both indoor and outdoor types.

half the length of the space and therefore the

gateway) and leading to the temple. It is used for

Traditional Performing Areas:

auditorium can be considered to be only about

religious dancing and music and is part of the

•The Koothambalam-

36 ft (11 m) deep x 55 ft (16.75 m) wide. The

basic temple compound. The Koothambalam is

Koothambalam or Kuttampalam meaning temple

unique feature of the Koothambalam from a

an enclosed space while the temple Mandapa is

theatre is a closed hall for staging traditional art

modern perspective is its method of enclosing

open except for the columns/ pillars

forms in Kerala. A square platform with a

space from the sides. Instead of walls, it has a

Many classical dance and music performances

separate pyramidal roof supported by pillars in

slanted and sometimes curved plane of trellis-

traditionally happened in these Mandapas.

the center called natyamandapam is constructed

work, which always lets the breeze – along with

as s separate structure within the large hall of

intimations of everyday life outside – into the

Koothambalam. The floor of the hall is divided

performance space.

through

the

(gopuram)

(ornate

into two equal halves and one part is for performance (including stage, instruments, green room etc.) and other half for seating audience. The structure is rectangular in plan with a hipped roof with a slope of 45º.Within its dark, cavernous interior stands another wooden structure which is the roof over the stage. The Koothambalam is a small space by modern standards – the one in the temple complex at

Figure 17; Koothambalam at the Kalamandalam, Kerala

Figure 18; Mandapa from a temple in Shimoga

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 22 Contemporary Performing Areas: •Auditoriums-

•Amphitheatres-

An auditorium is a room built to enable an

An amphitheatre is an open-air venue used for

audience to hear and watch performances at

entertainment, performances, and sports.

venues such as theatres.

contemporary amphitheatre, in the sense in

-The floor area of the hall including ,gangways

which the word has come to be popularly used

(excluding the stage) should be calculated on the

now,

basis of 0.6 to 0.9 m2 per person.

performance space, particularly one located

-The height of the hall is determined by such

outdoors. Contemporary amphitheatres often

considerations as ventilation, presence (or

include standing structures, called bandshells,

absence)

sometimes curved or bowl-shaped, both behind

of

balcony

and

the

type

of

is

a

curved,

acoustically

A

vibrant

performance.

the stage and behind the audience, creating an

-The average height may vary from 6 m for small

area which echoes or amplifies sound, making

halls to 7.5 m for large halls. Ceiling may be flat

the amphitheatre ideal for musical or theatrical

but it is preferable to provide a slight increase in

performances.

the height near the centre of hall.

One of the first aids to good sightlines is an

-The volume per person required to be provided

effective slope . Seats may be set on a rising

should normally range between 3.5 to 5.5 m3.

parabolic curve, or on two different inclines, a

-it is recommended that the distance of the

fairly mild slope for the lower half of auditorium

‘farthest seat from the curtain line should not

(the half near the main stage) and a steeper

normally exceed 23 meters.

slope for the upper (rear) half . The slope

(Code Of Practice For Acoustical Design Of

recommended for the lower portion is 12 and

Auditoriums And Conference Halls, 1998)

for the upper 24’ or steeper .

Figure 19; Most common plan forms for auditoria

Figure 20; A 1000 seat amphitheatre plan

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 23

Lake Systems and Hebbal Hebbal Lake: Like most lakes or "tanks" in the Bangalore region it was formed by the damming natural valley systems by the construction of bunds. The spread of the lake

in a study in 2000 was found to be 75 ha with plans for extending it to make up 143 ha. The catchment area of the lake was found to be 3750ha and this area includes the residential areas of Yeshwanthpur, Mathikere, Rajmahal Vilas Extension, Bharat Electronics

Limited and Hindustan Machine Tools Limited colonies. In 1974 the lake area was 77.95 ha and in 1998 it was 57.75 ha.Based on the rainfall of the region, the annual catchment was estimated at 15.2 million cubic metres with 3.04 million cubic metres during the Northeast Monsoon, 10.12 million cubic metres during the Southwest Monsoon and 3.28 million cubic metres in the dry season. The storage capacity of the lake was estimated in 2000 to be 2.38 million cubic metres with desilting raising it to 4.07 million cubic metres. Sewage inflow into the lake has altered the chemistry and biology of the lake. Most measured physico-chemical properties of the waters of the lake exceed the acceptable standards for sewage effluent discharge set by the Indian Standards Institute.

Figure 21; Lakes of Bangalore

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 24

2.02 Case Studies Bharat Bhavan, Bhopal Bharat Bhavan is multi art centre set up to create an interactive proximity between the verbal, visual and performing arts. It provides space for contemporary expression, thought, quest and innovation. It is aptly located in the heart of country in Bhopalcapital of Madhya Pradesh. SITE AREA: 9968 sqm. ARCHITECT: Charles Correa COMPLETION: 1982 VICINITY: The site is located on the upper lake’s front. It is accessed by Swaminathan Marg. Various public schools, a polytechnic, CM’s house are nearby FUNCTIONS: it houses an art gallery, a fine art workshops, an open-air amphitheatre, a studio theatre, an auditorium, a

Figure 22; Bharat Bhavan Location

museum tribal and folk art, libraries of Indian poetry, classical music as well as folk music ARCHITECTURE: Charles Correa the architect found here the possibilities of a series of terraced gardens, which would be seen cascading down to the lake. The visitors enter at the highest level and walk down a pedestrian spine, flanked by a pattern of courtyards, to reach the various parts of the complex Figure 23; Bharata Bhavan photographs

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 25 The terraces and courtyards reflect Correa’s concern with progression through space – the maze or puzzle – where parts are casually relieved and the complex of internal street act rather like a village layout . o

The site is on a gently sloping plateau overlooking the lake such that contours are used in design.

o

The natural contours have been used to create a series of sunken courts and terrace gardens around which are cultural facilities.

o

The terraces and courtyards are connected like a progression in space, where complex of internal streets acts like a village layout.

o

It can also be called as a non building which corresponds to the context in a very positive way.

o

The view of lake is visible from all possible terraces.

o

The materials used are red sandstone, brick sand and exposed concrete.

o

The internal finish is of marble, granite and sand-stone.

o

The OAT called Bhairang is located near the lake giving an ideal view for cultural performances.

o

Figure 24; Bharat Bhavan plan

The proportions of the building are well ordered, borrowing geometric patterns from Indian cultures making it more relevant to context.

o

.Each curve and space defines itself. Each of the part of the building is distinct yet flows easily one another, linked by meandering paths.

Figure 25; Section

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 26 COMPONENTS

SPACES

NO. USERS

ARTS CENTER (admin. Block)

Foyer+ lounge Reception Director’s office p.a. room Accounts Office Toilets Store

15-20

Conference facilities

Studio/ workshops

Lounge+ info desk Conference room-2 Store Pantry Seminar rooms-2 Dance studio-2 Music studio-2 Painting studio Textiles studio Drama studio Lithography studio Photography studio Photography lab. Sculpture workshop Pottery workshop Ceramic workshop Modelling workshop

AREA(SQ. M.)

50 20 50 15 50

REQUIREMENTS/REMARKS

Should have lake view Main office for organizing festival events and activities

20 20 10 25

80

100 75 10 10 150

Used by the centre during festival time and available for hire rest of the year

120 120 60 60 120 60 60 60 120 75 75 75

With attached spill out spaces

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 27 COMPONENTS

SPACES

Library

Circulation desk,12 reading carrels, periodicals 20 comp. terminals Stack Room(20000 books) Photocopy Store Office

NO. USERS

AREA(SQ. M.) 100

REQUIREMENTS/REMARKS Academic zone Desirable-north light

60 150 10 20 20 ____________ 360

Exhibition galleries Art galleries

Galleries Security+ office Curator’s room+ office Workshop+ storage

650 50 60 100

Includes display galleries for works done in the center.

RETAIL Retail shops

40@20 sq.m.

800

To be developed as a mix of retail

Restaurants:2

Seating: @2/ppl. Kitchen: @0.8/ppl Service yard: @0.3/ppl

75

150 60 22

With lake view

Restaurants:2

Seating: @2/ppl. Kitchen: @0.8/ppl Service yard: @0.3/ppl

50

100 40 15 ____________ 760

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 28 COMPONENTS

SPACES

Auditorium(300)

Foyer Admin. Office Rehearsal room Green room Toilets Hall

Theatre(500)

Foyer Ticket office Toilets Office Rehearsal room Dressing room Stage workshop Loading/unloading Projection room Auditorium

NO. USERS

15-20 20-25 20 300

20-25

AREA(SQ. M.)

REQUIREMENTS/REMARKS

250 40 60 60 50 560 ____________ 1000

Should open out into spill out area

350 10 70 50 60 60 60 20 40 800

40 20 40 5 2 500

Special acoustical treatment

No secure area, retail outlets With access to canteen Doors 3-4 m wide, extra height Controlled environment

1560 7100+35% circulation =9785 sq. m.

FAR achieved is 0.98

The landscape of the Bhavan is the built form itself that gently terminates

hierarchy in the organization of spaces, is what allows for the transition

at the lakefront forming into an amphitheatre with the cityscape itself for

courtyards to develop an informality and openness which gives this space

a backdrop reflecting in the shimmering water of the lake . The profound

its character, as a platform for sharing and building up cultural ideas.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 29 Kalakshetra Kalakshetra literally means a holy place of

FUNCTIONS:

arts

academy dedicated to the preservation of

(Kala

:

Arts,

Kshetra

:

Field

Kalakshetra

is

a

cultural

or Holy place). Deriving inspiration from this

traditional values in Indian art, especially in

noble ideal, Kalakshetra was established, in

the

the words of Rukmini Devi, "with the sole

and Gandharvaveda music.

purpose of resuscitating in modern India

Kalakshetra focuses on Bharatanatyam,

recognition of the priceless artistic traditions

carnatic vocal and instrumental music, the

of our country and of imparting to the young

visual arts, traditional crafts and textile

the true spirit of Art, devoid of vulgarity and

design, textual heritage, aesthetics, history

commercialism." The training of young and

and philosophy.

talented people by masters of art, with the

COMPONENTS:

background of a religious spirit, has been its

comprises

main aim.

Theosophical High School, The Besant

SITE AREA: 40 ha

Arundale Senior Secondary School, A Craft

LOCATION :

Tiruvanmiyur village on

outskirts of Chennai COMPLETION:

1962,

field

of

Bharatanatyam

dance

Figure 26; Kalakshetra Location

Kalakshetra Kalakshetra,

Foundation The

Besant

Education and Research Centre including the Weaving

Koothambalam

of

Department,

the

Kalamkari

Natural-Dye Printing & Painting unit, the

auditorium in 1985

Visual Arts Center, The Bharata Kalakshetra

VICINITY: Besant Nagar, South Chennai, the

Auditorium, the Rukmini Arangam, four

complex is only a few metres away from the

libraries, the Rukmini Devi Museum, hostels,

sea.

staff quarters and guest houses.

Theosophical Society and Besant

Theosophical High School nearby.

Figure 27: satellite view

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 30 With a huge banyan tree in the center

The Craft Education and Research

of the Kalakshetra campus, the classes

Center of Kalakshetra is famous for

are held in cottages and in the open

reviving traditional South Indian sari

sometimes. The institution follows a

patterns and colors in silk and cotton.

gurukula system and is associated with

The Hand Block Printing Unit works

the cultivation and promotion of the

with hand-carved wooden blocks to

ancient cultural traditions of India.

create attractive saris, dress materials

The theater within the Kalakshetra is

and home linen. These units are also a

built according to the Natya Shastra.

good source of livelihood for destitute

The institute conducts research into

women from poorer sections of the

works of several renowned Sanskrit

community.

scholars to stage dance productions, not only for an Indian audience but also for major world theaters.

Figure 28: The focal Banyan Tree

Figure 29: Site Plan, Kalakshetra

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 31 The Auditorium

Because the auditorium is used primarily for

Designed by Appukuttan Nair, the

Bharata

dance performances, the level of the stage is just

Kalakshetra

like

18 inches higher than the lowest level of the

Auditorium

was

built

a

traditional Koothambalam in Kerala style.

seating area, enabling all audience to see the foot

Measuring 40'x40', the auditorium can seat 750.

work

50 can be accommodated on the floor directly in

Shakespearean theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon,

front of the stage. There are 428 chairs in the

thrusts forward into the audience, and there are

octagonal well of the theatre, 168 chairs on the

doors on each side for entrances and exits. There

peripheral veranda, and 104 in galleries in the

are no pillars that mar the view of the stage. The

balcony. The stage itself is raised only a foot-and-

stage is equipped with advanced lighting and

a-half from the rest of the floor, allowing the

sound systems.

clearly.

The

proscenium,

like

the

Figure 30: Roof of the Koothambalam, as seen from far

audience to clearly observe the footwork of the dancers. The building has walls of wooden slats, which allows the breeze to blow through, along with sounds from the outside. Dressing rooms are available for artists, on the ground floor. "...my intention was that the dance, now abolished in the temple should create the temple atmosphere on the stage..."- Rukmini Devi

Figure 33: Koothambalam interiors

Figure 31: cut-iso view of the Koothambalam

The stage area is 45% of the audience seating area,

reflecting

the

emphasis

that

the

auditorium's designers laid on the art and the artists. The dressing rooms are generously sized.

Figure 32: Side Elevation, Koothambalam

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 32 RUKMINI ARANGAM

CLASSROOMS

It was designed with the help of architect

oKalakshetra Foundation is an institution

Kiffin Peterson.

dedicated to the teaching of the arts in a

Measuring 70'x80', the

open-air space can accommodate 300 and

traditional

gurukul

an additional 50 can be accommodated on

“classrooms” here are thatched cottages

the floor directly in front of the stage.

where

Dressing rooms are available, on either side

classical music — singing, and instruments

of the stage which is covered under a

like the violin, veena, flute and mridangam

thatched roof, each measuring 10'x12'. The

are taught.

stage is made of black oxide which is

oThese are naturally lit and ventilated

suitable for effective lighting. The Rukmini

spaces. Practice sessions are often held

Arangam - open-air theatre is equipped

outdoors.

with lighting and sound systems.

oThe cottages have attached accomodation

dance

setting.

Bharatanatyam,

The

and

Figure 34: Open air theatre

for the guru to whom shishyas come for PADMA PUSHKARINI

learning in small groups of about 5 to10.

A pond in the campus — a stage for

oOpen spaces, spreading trees, buildings

musicians was inaugurated. Three elegant

which are open to the light and the breeze,

mandapams surround the pond, one of

cultivate a spirit of reverence for learning

which is the stage for the musicians. The

and for the environment. The cottages are

pond is bordered by granite steps and

arranged such that they for a courtyard

terraces. It is named after Dr. Padmasini,

amidst them which is landscaped and

who was a revered teacher at Kalakshetra.

maintained to act as spill outs.

Figure 35: Padma Pushkarini

Figure 36: Studios/ Classrooms

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 33 HOSTEL AND DINING ROOM

SANKARA MENON LIBRARY

The students reside in hostels, the buildings

The Sankara Menon Library, located next to

for which are on one end of the site for

the banyan tree, the hub of the college, is for

reasons of privacy and face the sea. Students

students, researchers and staff. The library

are housed in dormitories with large airy

contains over 10,000 books covering subjects

rooms. Three college students share a room

such as dance, music, painting, literature, and

with an attached bathroom. Each dormitory is

religion. It contains fiction in Kannada,

supervised by a resident house mother.

Malayalam, Tamil and English, and some

There is a large dining hall open to the sea

Sanskrit texts.

breeze where meals are served. It has

RUKMINI DEVI MUSEUM

attached kitchen facilities. A basic dispensary

The campus is host to a museum dedicated to

and an infirmary with two beds are available.

Rukmini Devi, the founder of Kalakshetra. The

There is a small library that may be used for

personal office of Rukmini Devi is now the

private study.

Rukmini Devi Library which has restricted

Hostel names with capacity:

access.

• Manasvini (20)

Other components of the campus are:

• Padmasini (70)

Reception and resource center

• Rukmini Vihar (25)

2 guest houses

• Seshammal Vihar (25)

Administration block

• Ananda Ashram (27)

A senior secondary school

• Arundale Ashram

Outdoor sports areas

Figure 37: Hostel Buildings

Toilet blocks- 6 in all Covered prayer hall

Figure 38: Dining hall

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 34

Nrityagram

offers residential courses in Odissi and

Nrityagram is a community of dancers in

Kathak and plans to expand its gurukuls

a forsaken place amidst nature. A place

to the 7 classical dances of India. The

where nothing exists, except Dance. It

gurus and students work together in the

was designed by Gerard Da Cunha,

fields and grow their own food.

following the vernacular architecture of

COMPONENTS: The gurukul is a place of

the region.

holistic living. It comprises the odissi

It is in North western part of Bangalore

gurukul, kathak gurukul, mohiniattam

about 30 kms from Hebbal

gurukul,

SITE AREA: 4 ha

amphitheater,

LOCATION : Hessaraghatta, outskirts of

block, guest cottages, dormitories and

North western Bangalore

various gardens.

COMPLETION: Inaugurated in 1990

“A place where nothing exists except

VICINITY: Hessaraghatta village, cut off

dance.

from main city.

breathe, eat, sleep, dream, talk, imagine

ARCHITECT: Gerard Da Cunha. The

- dance!� - Protima Gauri

buildings are built of mud giving the feel

ACCESSIBILITY: The nearest bus stop is

of a village. Open areas have large green

the Hessaraghatta village stop, from

cover and many trees dot the place

there an auto ride takes one to

FUNCTIONS: Nrityagram is a gurukul

Nrityagram

a

A

temple,

yoga

centre,

admin

block,

service

place

where

Nrityagram

Hebbal Figure 39: Location map

you

based residential dance school in the form of a dance village.

Currently it

Figure 40: Accessibility

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 35 "I dream of building a community of dancers in a forsaken place amidst nature. A place where nothing exists, except dance. A place where you breathe, eat, sleep, dream, talk, imagine - dance. A place where all the five senses can be refined to perfection. A place where dancers drop negative qualities such as jealousy, small-mindedness, greed and malice to embrace their colleagues as sisters and support each other in their journey towards becoming dancers of merit.� "A place called Nrityagram." - Protima Gauri

Traditional forms of design

-Construction –

Classrooms –

- Organic Masterplan with the architecture having

-willful agglomeration of stone, brick, mud, tile

- a hall attached with residence of teacher is used

origin in traditional forms and construction.

and thatch

for teaching - odissi and mohiniattam gurukuls

- different types of construction for different

-all external walls are mud plastered

have closed walls with small window openings

gurukuls

-three types of roof pattern

only for ventilation and light is from courtyard

- to avoid disturbances gurukuls are placed

- flat rough granite slabs

-kathak gurukula has semi open arched walls

separate and O. A. T. is kept at end

- Mangalore tile

-The entire complex is actually a garden. Most

-common dining and yoga center are placed at

-thatch pitched

food from fruits and vegetables to grain and dal,

center

even olive trees is grown. There are many sculptures used as landscaping elements.

Figure 41: Site Plan Concept Sketch

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 36 The design of each gurukul consisted of four elements: 1.Guru’s residence 2. Male student residence 3. Female student residence

4. Practice hall These 4 elements were gathered around a courtyard, which became a central gathering point, with the stair to the roof placed here as an element to sit on and watch the activity of the practice hall. The use of stone slab roofs determined the simple rectilinear geometry of the

residences and the guru's house was located that it had a private spillover to the east. The practice hall requiring a larger span, had a palm thatch roof. Service block had a curved shape to smoothen the passage of entry, and this geometry led to the decision of a thatched roof. Figure 43: Gurukul plan

Figure 42: Gurukul courtyard and stairs

Figure 44: Section of service block and gurukul

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 37 Guest cottages

These round structures, inspired by the yurts of Tibet and Ladakh, have housed some of the greatest maestros of dance and music, who have come to perform at Vasantahabba. Temple Fashioned from the raw mud of Nrityagram and fired after it was built,

the temple is dedicated to space. It is decorated with panels depicting Figure 45: Guest cottages

the elements, dance motifs, mudras and designs from costumes and ghungroos. Inside is a granite rock scooped out to hold water and a flame that stays lit. Designed and built by Ray Meeker in 1998. Yoga centre

Reminiscent of Stonehenge, the Yoga centre is an open structure attached to the temple. This space is also used for in-house performances under an open sky. Amphitheatre Figure 46: Temple

Scooped out of the red earth and built along the lines of Roman

Figure 47: yoga center

amphitheatres, this is one of the most famous structures at Nrityagram. It is here that several thousand people congregate every February for the annual Vasantahabba. Service Block Built like a reverse 2, this structure is the heart of the village. The entire community eats together here. Figure 48: Sculpture Garden

Figure 49: Ampitheater

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 38 The service block contains the common dining hall, kitchen and services and accommodation for the cook. It s plan is in the form of a reverse ‘2’. One reaches the gurukul by going around the service block to find a Torana which takes us further into the gurukul. The element of discovery is always there in the path and a sense of entry for every gurukul.

Figure 50: Service Block Plan

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 39 The Amphitheatre

Figure 51: Amphitheatre view and plan

before

Figure 52: Site section through Amphitheatre after before and after

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 40 The Royal Danish Playhouse, Copenhagen,

•This promenade, on the harbor side, allows the

Denmark

Playhouse to make its most open invitation to

The

New

Royal

Playhouse

the

the public, joining the city, the water, and the

Copenhagen harbor, a monument to culture

building. This sense of connection extends

and a nuanced design that reflects a respect for

inside the building’s lobby, creating a kind of

its place.

public urban room. The building then becomes a

•The building, by Danish firm Landward and

place for everyone, not just for those with

Tranberg

tickets.

Arkitekter,

sits

is

on

completely

contemporary and yet seems as though it has

•Along the more intimate Kvæsthusgade, the

always been there.

height of the New Royal Playhouse facade

•Completed in 2008, the 21,000 m2 (226,044

mirrors the buildings opposite, maintaining a

sq. ft.) building opened to strong praise from

kind of scale place-marker.

the architectural community and the general

•The New Royal Playhouse also relates to its

public and has won several awards.

context in its materials, which primarily

•Occupying the former site of a ferry terminal,

are brick, copper, and glass. The selection of

the New Royal Playhouse reflects many positive

brick was inspired by the historic brick

aspects of the Nordic/Danish architectural

warehouses nearby, although the Playhouse

tradition.

bricks were custom-made (and will be described

•The New Royal Playhouse addresses the

in more detail shortly). The copper that clads

various sides of the site with appropriate

the Playhouse tower was inspired by the use of

attitudes. The building makes way for the Sankt

copper on Copenhagen’s historic church towers.

Annæ Plads, which is a vital public square that

PLAYHOUSE. (2014, March 2). Retrieved from dac.dk: http://www.dac.dk/en/dac-life/copenhagen-xgallery/cases/playhouse/

connects to the harbor via a promenade.

Figure 53: Satellite Image

Figure 54: The Harbour and the context

Figure 55: The waterfront

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 41 The new Royal Danish Playhouse is an effective ‘theatre-machine’ that takes form as a pronounced, yet respectful completion of the surrounding city. The building consists of three compositional elements: 1. The oak-clad promenade, a public walk floating on thin columns over the water, gives access to the foyer with its panoramic views of the harbour and historic skyline. 2. The scene building, containing the auditorium and three scenes, echoes the material character of the harbour front with rustic brickwork and copperclad tower. 3. The expansive and unifying roof level contains personnel facilities and gives spectacular views in all directions through varying nuances of green glass. Figure 56: Site Plan

The playhouse is placed with careful regard to the

In deferring to these existing urban streets and

surrounding urban context. The building is located

public spaces, the volume of the playhouse

The

as close as possible to Nyhavn canal and maintains

extends naturally over the harbour edge and

conscientious conclusion to Frederiksstadens

the street line along Kvæsthusgade, holding the

over the water

continuous

street space intact. The contour of Sankt Annæ's

The playhouse acts as an anchor for this

simultaneously embracing the harbour and

Plads is also maintained, allowing the existing urban

meeting of city and sea, revealing and

opening up to both theatregoers and those

room to continue to the harbour front.

reinforcing the existing urban spatial qualities.

passing by.

playhouse

provides urban

a

striking,

structure

yet while

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 42

FIRST FLOOR

SIDE ELEVATION

SECTION THROUGH MAIN THEATER

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 43

Inferences KALAKSHETRA, CHENNAI Site Plan

Materials

BHARAT BHAWAN, BHOPAL

NRITYAGRAM, BANGALORE Organic master plan. Village like site plan. Vast open spaces and gardens

ROYAL DANISH PLAYHOUSE, DENMARK Merging with the urban fabric. Connects existing pedestrian routes to a plaza. Prjecting over water.

Organic, no master plan. Different buildings designed by different architects as per need of time

Planned to form a series of courtyards and terraces open to sky. Uniform, single built mass. Uses natural contours well.

Granite, Timber, thatch roofs, mangalore tiles, oxide floors, concrete structural elements.

Red sandstone, brick, sand, exposed concrete.

Vernacular materials: mud, thatch roof, bricks

stone,

Bricks, glass and copper- in response to the contest and past

Functions

School of classical music, dance, crafts and weaving, museum, auditorium. Gurukul system with residential premises

Auditorium, art galleries, museum, multi arts complex, no residential component

Gurukul for classical dances with residential component. Guest cottages available.

Peforming spaces for theatre mainly

Learnings

•Passive design strategies •Indoor and outdoor spaces mingle into each other •A prior thoughtful site plan would have led to better usage of space and uniformity in designs of different buildings •The site has a seafront, but it has not been incorporated in the design which could have created waterfront spaces. •The kund like elements with pavilion for music classes and performances is enchanting and mesmerizing.

•Spill out space with every indoor space creates a conducive atmosphere for cultural activities •The transition of spaces from one to other is interesting as there is an element of curiosity at every level. •Vast expanse of open hard surfaces- could have been greener. •Good example of contemporary meets Indian architectural style •Teaching schools could have been incorporated more boldly. •Lake view used appropriately.

•Ideal example of gurukul existence in modern times. •Interaction of indoor and outdoor spaces is commendable •Many semi public spaces like yoga center and gurukuls are quite near the entrance, could have been further away for more privacy •Guest accommodation is right in the center of the site, probably the central position should have been more related to the gurukul. •Element of water is lacking, inspite of good rainfall region.

•Good example of building responding to its context in every possible way. •The waterfront location of the Royal Playhouse is utilised in a seawater cooling system •natural cross ventilation, use of high thermal mass, •Focus on creating public spaces •Projecting over the water might not be an ecologically viable option •Successful in creating a landmark cultural magnet •The promenade visually and physically connects the various city quarters along the water,

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 44

3. Project Instigation 3.01 Project scope

The major components:

A Cultural and Performing Arts Institute next to the

•School of drama

Hebbal Lake in North Bangalore is the proposed

•School of Music

program. The primary objective of the center being

•School of Dance

promoting classical dance, classical music and

•Auditorium

theatre in an integrated complex which offers an

•Koothambalam

amalgamation of the guru-shishya and modern

•Gurukuls

teaching pedagogy. It is also an effort to rejuvenate

•Art and Crafts workshops

and use the lakefront for cultural and public uses.

•Studios

The thesis would have a mix of cultural and

•Art gallery

institutional component including residential wings

•Exhibition spaces

for the students and limited staff.

•Library

The Institution would serve 300 students, 100 each

•Restaurant

The Site

in the schools of music, dance and drama- providing

•Lakefront landscaping and decks

•47,900 sq.m along the Bellary highway bordering partly the

accommodation to all.

•Open air theatre

northern boundary of the Hebbal lake.

form of an auditorium, an ampitheatre, informal

•Public plaza

•Land use permits developing public or semi public facilities as

spaces would be provided. For making it more active

•Guest house for artists

per Masterplan 2015

for the public, art and exhibition galleries, arts and

•Hostels for students

•The immediate lakefront up to at least 30m is to be

crafts workshops, a silk weaving center and museum

•Dining facilities

demarcated for open/green spaces that can have no

will also be to the program.

•Allied facilities

permanent construction

Performing spaces in the

SITE

HEBBAL LAKE

Figure 57: Site

•A temple

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 45

3.02 Area Program COMPONENT ADMINISTRATION

VISITORS ADMIN AND RECEPTION

SCHOOL OF DRAMA

SPACES Directors office Director's section office Dean Registrar Section office dean and registrar Waiting Board room Accounts Chairperson office Pa chairperson Staff toilets TOTAL Reception desk Waiting Manager office Cloak room Ticket counter Souvenir shop Toilets TOTAL Studios- 5 Lecture hall Toilets and changing room Locker room Hod room Section office Staff room Staff cubicles Staff toilets Meeting room Recording studio Music studio Make up studio Voice studio Lghting studio TOTAL

NO. OF USERS 1 2 TO 3 1 1 5 30 5 to 6 1 1

2 10 1 2

20 X 5 100

1 5 10 to 15 3 20

AREA IN SQ.M 60 20 20 20 40 20 50 50 20 15 25 340 5 40 15 15 10 40 40 165 250 100 60 25 20 40 40 45 15 40 20 20 20 20 30 775

REMARKS includes attached toilet, desk, seating includes PA

includes PA to dean & registrar

includes cashier's desk, safe etc

for shows etc

50 Sq.m each including ancillary room, seating, etc

including HOD PA staff lockers included 15 sq. m each 1 male and I female

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 46 SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND DANCE

COMMON FACILITIES

ARTS AND CRAFTS CENTER

MUSIC STUDIO DANCE STUDIO INDIVIDUAL CLASSROOMS CHANGING ROOM AND TOILETS LECTURE HALL LOCKER ROOM HOD ROOM SECTION OFFICE STAFF ROOM STAFF CUBICLES STAFF TOILETS MEETING ROOM RECORDING STUDIO MUSIC STUDIO MAKE UP STUDIO VOICE STUDIO LGHTING STUDIO TOTAL WORKSHOPS CARPENTRY PHOTOGRAPHY CRAFTS RESOURCE CENTER COSTUME DESIGN ARCHIVES LIBRARY YOGA AND PRAYER HALL STATIONERY CANTEEN TOTAL STUDIOS-10 WORKSHOPS EXHIBITION PERMANENT ART GALLERIES SOUVENIR SHOP TOTAL

10 x 10 10 x 10

400 400

40 sq.m each 40 sq.m each

5 to 6 per class x 6

240

40 sq.m each x 6 for rehearsals etc

100 50 40 40 80 80 90 20 50 40 40 20 40 20 1750

may be divided into two sets including ancillary room, seating, etc

50 2 10 20 to 30 6 20 to 30

50 30 50 25 75 40 100 200 30 150 (indoor) 10 X 10 5 X 10

250 850 500 100 100 500 50 800

one each for music and dance includin Pas 15 sq.m each x 6 2 male and 2 female cubicles 2 x 20 sq.m 2 x 20 sq.m 2 x 20 sq.m

internet café, print media includes a store, tailors etc keep records of in house productions common and accessible to public can be a mutipurpose hall photostat, printing etc including kitchen and seating, outdoor spill out not included 50 SQ.M each 50 SQ.M each to be split up into flexible galleries

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 47 AUDITORIUM

PUBLIC FACILITIES

HOSTEL

NET BUILT UP CIRCULATION 30 %

500 FOYER TOTAL RESTAURANT SERVICES CONFERENCE ROOM M.P. HALL GUEST HOUSE TOILETS TOTAL accomodation mess and other facilities TOTAL

100 2 x 50 200 10 double rooms

300

1500 100 1600 200 50 80

backstage, green rooms included washrooms, reception, snacks counter

300 250 20 1200 3500 1500 5000

PUBLIC GATHERINGS, FUNCTIONS, ETC 25 sq.m each. For visiting artists etc

incuding kitchen 40 sq.m each

12480 16300

Maximum FAR : 1 Ground Coverage < 40%

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 48

4. Site Study 4.01 Site Location

site

Figure 59: Site Demarcation

•Site Area: 47,900 sq.m

Figure 58: Bangalore map showing major lakes and roads

•North East of the Hebbal Lake •Along Bellary Road •Around 4 to 5 acres land within site is non buildable and is to be landscaped if possible merging with the existing park on the south of lake. •It is 14 kms from city center and around 26 kms from the airport.

Figure 60: Site Location

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 49

4.02 Masterplan and Landuse

Marked in green is area for parks, landscaping etc That allows temporary structures Remaining is under â&#x20AC;&#x2DC; Large public and semipublic infrastructure, PSU or defence. Blue is for commercial And activity areas

Figure 61: Masterplan

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 50

4.03 Site and the city •According to the 2015 structure plan of the Bangalore master plan, the Hebbal area being along the outer ring road area lies in the third belt. “3rd Belt - Recent extensions (2003) of the City flanking-

Hebbal

both sides of the Outer Ring Road, a portion of which lacks services and

infrastructure facilities and is termed as a shadow area;” The master plan shall ensure that vacant lands in strategic areas are occupied. Schemes to integrate natural components in their programs for new development. •The commencement of the Bengaluru International Airport (BIAL) at

Devanahalli in 2008 has ensured that Hebbal has become a very important location for the passengers flying out of Bangalore. All arterial roads and road networks leading to the BIAL intersect at Hebbal.

Figure 62: Bangalore Structure Plan

4.04 The Precinct Hebbal area hosts several companies, such as AstraZeneca, Integra Micro

Embassy Manyata Business Park is one the largest technology and business

Software Services, CEFA and MRO Tech. Embassy Kirslokar Business Park

parks in the city of Bangalore. Global brands like Philips Software

has changed this small semi-urban neighbourhood of Hebbal Kempapura

and IBM have moved in. Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) has also built its

into a sprawling modern office commercial hub. The Columbia Asia

corporate office opposite the Embassy Manyata Business Park.

Hospital is definitely one of the high-end secondary care hospitals in the

Because of the presence of so many companies around Hebbal, other

north of Bangalore. With Godrej Properties developing the Woodsman

residential areas around Hebbal like RT Nagar, Sahakarnagar have also

Estate, residential development in the area has also been incubated. Along

grown rapidly with many IT professionals staying in these places.

the Outer Ring Road (ORR) just after the Nagawara Lake (Lumbini Gardens),

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 51 â&#x20AC;˘The site precinct is also host to a number of institutes, the nearest being- University of Agricultural Sciences and Institute of Animal Health and Veterinary Biology on the south of the Outer Ring Road, schools in every direction, The GKVK a further northwards, and the Ramaiah group of colleges in the extended precinct. â&#x20AC;˘The institutions, the technology parks and other companies along with the neighboring residential areas will give an impetus to the performing arts center.

â&#x20AC;˘The precinct does not host any other major cultural or performing arts center.

Figure 63: The Precinct

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 52

coconut grove on the right of lake

ORR

Upcoming residences for army

Residential twin towers

4.05 Neighborhood

Esteem mall

Figure 62:The Neighborhood

Across the Bellary Road is a commercial strip which has a mall, under construction commercial structures, an upcoming private hospital. The recently constructed Hebbal Flyover is very close to the site. There are upcoming luxury apartments, army residences in the vicinity.

Figure 64: Hebbal Flyover

Figure 65: Neighborhood map

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 53

4.06 Site Photographs Figure 66: Site Photographs

Fenced edge of the lake

Bellary Road along the site

Lake and site interface

Figure 67: Site View from Embassy lake Terraces, opposite side of the site along Bellary Road

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 54

4.07: Climate Study

Micro

Macro •Located at a height of over 3,000 feet (914.4 m) above sea level, Bangalore is

monsoon water for later use.

known for its pleasant climate throughout the year

•Also being centers of rich ecosystem, the lake with its flora and fauna

•Moderate climate throughout the year. •Bangalore

receives

rainfall

from

•Lakeside experience cooler micro climates and also help store the

both

the

northeast

and

the

southwest monsoons and the wettest months are September, October and

provide for psychologically soothing atmospheres. •There is a huge opportunity to create an energy efficient intervention as the need for air conditioned spaces is reduced.

August, in that order

•The lake’s edge is on the south of the site- thus larger openings will not

•Relative humidity varies between 30 to 80%

only let natural light in but provide a view as well in southern direction. •The eastern edge being along the Bellary highway is a weakness as the road experiences heavy traffic throughout the day and is noisy and dusty. •The wind direction is south west and is the major strength of the site, the lake being on its way to the site. Southern edge: Important

factor

that will determine the design.

Figure 68: Climate data

Figure 69: Southern edge of site is bordered by lake

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 55

4.08: Transport and Accessibility

Hebbal Railway Station:

Road Accessibility

•10 minutes away from the site. It is going to be

•It's the junction of a national highway leading to

connected to the high speed airport rail link in

BIA and Outer Ring Road that encircles the city

the future

•The 5.23-km Hebbal flyover records movement

BMTC stand:

of 1.24 lakh passenger car units per day.

• 5 minutes from the site, bus terminal is

•The flyover is a crucial point for daily

proposed for near future. BMTC has a large

commuters bound to and from North Bangalore

chunk of land at the corner of Hebbal flyover,

who switch buses at Hebbal. Many board and

now used as a depot

disembark

Namma metro:

Chikkaballapur

•Metro station to come up during phase 2.

after/before alighting from intra-city public

Hebbal's small railway station will emerge as a

transport

big Metro one as two lines will intersect here.

• Crowds waiting for buses and other vehicles at

Hebbal is the emerging inter modal transit hub of

the flyover entrance are in danger of being run

North Bangalore.

over by speeding vehicles.

buses and

to Andhra

Figure 70: BMTC Depot

Doddaballapur, Pradesh

here

Figure 71: Hebbal railway station

Figure 72: Hebbal flyover

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 56 BELLARY ROAD

30 m set back from lake

LAKE

N Figure 73: Site Drawing Scale 1:2000

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 57

5. Design Directions: 5.01 Challenges:

5.02 SWOT analysis FACTOR

STRENGHTH

WEAKNESS

OPPORTUNITY

THREAT

Site

-Lakefront - Quadrilateral -North-south orientation

-sensitivity to lake may restrict design and add limitations

Rejuvenating the dead waterfront and create an example

Might increase activity along the lake very rapidly

Accessibility

Easily accessible, upcoming transit hub

Service road only along the north west corner of site, no other road

Exploit the good connectivity and create a cultural hub and identity for the city

Might increase traffic on the existing infrastructure

Orientation and waterfront

Lake on south side- favorable for wind and lighting

30m from lake buffer for built.

Creating terraces and levels with lake view and also suiting the climatic needs

Schools of dance, music and drama

Close to nature, independent yet in same complex

Not all parts will be towards the lake, priorities to be allotted

Explore indoor and outdoor learning and performing spaces

Might have to be buffered from open public activities for privacy

Auditorium

500 capacity, major host for events

Lacks expanding capability. Large events cannot take place

Attract artists and culture vultures from the city

Excessive activity might disturb the schools in campus

Residential

To have both gurukuls and hostels

Limited capacity. In the same campus as auditorium etc

Wholesome institute for learning performing arts. Dedicated atmosphere.

•Sensitivity to lake and fruitful utilization of prime land •Landscaping and

designing of accessible open

spaces specially along the lakefront is critical. • Create awareness on how lakefronts can rejuvenate public spaces

•Take into account the nalah that is part of the site. •Integrating the schools with public cultural activities yet keeping their privacy and identities. •Being on the highway, it needs to take advantage

of the connectivity but be buffered against the traffic and noise. According to BDA for public or semi public complexes regulations are as follows: For Site area >2000 sq.m •Ground Coverage <45% •FAR 2.25 •30 m buffer around lake’s periphery for no development except activities related to lake, reservation for parks, landscaping etc. •10% land area to be earmarked for parks and civic amenities and 5% for parking •Ramps for physically handicapped is mandatory

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 58

5.03 Psychometric Analysis

Psychrome tric Chart Location: Bangalore, IND Frequency: 1st January to 31st December Weekday Times: 06:00-22:00 Hrs Weekend Times: 06:00-22:00 Hrs Barometric Pressure: 101.36 kPa Š Weather Tool

AH

As we can see from the psychometric chart derived using the software Autodesk weather tool, indirect evaporative cooling and natural

SELECT ED DESIGN T ECHNIQUES: 1. passive solar heating 2. thermal mass effects 3. exposed mass + night-purge ventilation 4. natural ventilation 5. direct evaporative cooling 6. indirect evaporative cooling

30

ventilation are the most important design technique in order to provide comfortable and energy efficient spaces.

25

This is going to be important while designing..

20

15

10

5 Comfort

DBT(°C)

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

Figure 74: Psychometric Chart

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 59

5.04 Passive Design Strategies. After studying the psychometric chart, the three main effective strategies are included in the

Psychrome tric Chart

AH

Location: Bangalore, IND Frequency: 1st January to 31st December Weekday Times: 06:00-22:00 Hrs Weekend Times: 06:00-22:00 Hrs Barometric Pressure: 101.36 kPa © Weather Tool

30

COMFORT: Indirect Evaporative Cooling

design of spaces. Indirect Evaporative Cooling:

25

•Considering that the site is lakefront and wind direction is from the lakeside itself, having major

20

openings towards south (lakefront) and orienting

it the same way would lead to cooling because of 15

the lake. •For interiors of the site, rain water can be 10

collected into a large water body which would help in the cooling of spaces near it..

5

•Cool air is drawn in through the openings in the

Comfort

front wall, after passing over the lake or water body for additional cooling. This sustainable solution replaces air conditioning, keeping the building cool and naturally ventilated throughout

DBT(°C)

5

10

Figure 75: Psychometric Chart showing effect of indirect evaporative cooling

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

the summer months

Figure 76: cooling because of water body

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore

50


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 60 Psychrome tric Chart

Natural Ventilation: •Including courtyards in the design gets indirect light into classrooms

AH

Location: Bangalore, IND Frequency: 1st January to 31st December Weekday Times: 06:00-22:00 Hrs Weekend Times: 06:00-22:00 Hrs Barometric Pressure: 101.36 kPa © Weather Tool

30

COMFORT: Natural Ventilation

and helps in the creation of naturally ventilated spaces.

25

• Having placement of openings to allow cross-ventilation the 20

summer months •The residential parts of the built up (hostels) can easily follow the

15

night purge ventilation by manual/mechanical opening of windows.

10

During the day, the thermal mass soaks up heat; and at night it is 5 Comfort

cooled by outside air. DBT(°C)

5

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

Figure 77: Extended comfort zone with proper natural ventilation

50

Figure 78: Suitable natural ventilation techniques

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 61 Most private, closest to lake Close to lake, less privacy Further from lake, but has privacy

Maximization of view

Close to road Least private Design Determinants: •Maximization of lake view, at the same time maintaining north-south orientation. •Hierarchy determining

of

spaces zoning

in and

massing. •The

residential

component

being densest and needing privacy is kept in the north west quadrant while the public in north east being nearest to the road. •The area towards the lake is for academic use.

Figure 79: The site and lake relationship

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 62

5.05 Spatial Organization Typical Condition

Proposed Condition Parking Gallery Parking

Auditorium

Admin

Residential Parking

Residential

Plaza

Services

Mess

Auditorium Entrance Mandapa

Sports Residential

OAT

Guest

Guest house

Gurukuls

Koothambalam

Restaurant Sculpture Gallery lawns Plaza Cultural

Spill outs Academic

Koothambalam Gurukuls

courts Drama School

Music School

OAT

Dance School

Promenade

Nataraj Idol

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 63

6. Design Translation: 6.01 Concept: •Deriving the geometry and forms from vernacular architecture of Karnataka. •Elements like courtyards, stone columns and masonry, sloping roofs, Mangalore tiles etc to play a major role. •Maintaining visual axes to maximize the lake view and ease movement . •Connected open spaces and landscaped courts to form a sense of unification. •Massing and zoning to respect the lake and increase gradually. •The

four

main

components

are

Figure 80: A connected series of courtyards and open spaces responding to site and program elements.

Figure 83: maintaining visual and movement axes

distributed into four uneven quadrants, keeping identities yet intermingled. •The spaces move from the public spaces on the periphery to the more private spaces as one moves towards the core,

Figure 81: Gradual increase in massing in response to lake

reflected through variations in scale & proportion, producing very interesting spaces

Figure 82: Vernacular elements

Figure 84: Enhancing the ‘amidst the nature’ experience

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 64

7. Design Evolution

The initial approach was to divide the site into four quadrants based on the Char Bagh concept

7.01 Stage 1

.Trying to arrange all components in north-south

N

orientation, two major central axes were created. •Creating a series of vistas and view terraces was also attempted. •This stage was mainly about zoning and

understanding

the

mass

of

individual

components. •A central Mandapa was created as a gesture to connect the four quadrants. •The north-east quadrant was the public domain

while all others were kept to be a mix of residential and academic. Inference: •The symmetry generally followed in a char bagh was restricting the site plan and also making the

whole of it very rigid. •The residential element being the bulk of the massing

and

having

its

own

functional

requirements should not be mixed with the low density academic massing..

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 65

7.02 Stage 2 •In the second stage the central axes from the previous stage was continued and different functions were arranged

around them. •The residential blocks- also the bulk was kept in the northwestern part of the site keeping the lighter academic blocks towards the lake. •The smaller gurukul units were arranged organically along

the western edge with a small shrine dedicated to Nataraj in the center facing east- as in traditional temple architecture. •Vehicular movement was restricted to the edges only. •An ampitheatre with the lake as a backdrop was put at the end of the central north-south axis. Inference: •There was a lack of coherence in the spaces. Apart from looking onto the lake, the buildings needed to respond to each other as well. •The central Mandapa should have been more connected to other functions. •The site plan still seemed stiff.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 66

7.03 Stage 3

•The

third

stage

included

detailing

of

individual

components along with working on the siteplan. •The massing was re-zoned as per functions and all the open spaces were connected to one another for a wholesome experience. •Performing and recreational spaces were interspread amongst the built. •The central Mandapa gave way to a courtyard complex inspired by the South-Indian temple complex which had an east facing Nataraj shrine and A Koothambalam facing the shrine. The Gurukuls were placed in an Ashram like setting with an ampitheatre in the center.

Inference: •The unbuilt spaces needed to be better connected and create unity in the overall plan. • The academic blocks- the three schools needed to form a unified complex and not three separate entities.

•More clarity in circulation across the site was needed from the point of view of a general user. •Lake-view needed to be exploited further. •The zoning was appropriate and carried forward.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 67

7.04 Stage 4 •The orientation of all the components was tilted slightly to the south-west to maximize the lake view- yet maintaining the advantages of north-south direction. •The paths connecting the various spaces was allowed to be more free flowing and less rigid. •The academic schools now created unison, yet maintaining their individual identities. •A water body was introduced in the center- to collect rainwater and act as a point of interest for the visitor. •The Koothambalam was shifted amidst the gurukuls to complete the ashram and traditional setting.

Inference: •The hostel block needed re- alignment as they were creating ‘two large walls’ like feeling in the site plan. •The gesture to connect the different zones through open courts needed to be more formal and prominent. •Immediate lakefront needed to be further treated and taken advantage of.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 68

7.05 Stage 5 •Stage 5 was more about re-adjusting the block and unbuilt spaces for a better coherence. •One of the hostel blocks was moved to the western edge, allowing a gradual staggering down of massing as one moved from north to south. This enhanced the lake view and helped create a visual connection. •The three academic blocks were linked further with an ampitheatre in their center which also acts as a student plaza. •The lake was allowed to flow into the site and create usable spill-out spaces along the water’s edge and at the same time getting water nearer to the built..

Inference: •The central plaza with the water body needs to be more formal and probably be integrated into an alternative

performance area. •The public block with the gallery and restaurant needs to be more efficient.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 69

8.The Finale 8.01 Final Zoning Public

Public

Institutional

Residential The Public Block is kept in the quadrant that is least

Residential

private and is next to the

massing wise has been kept

vehicular access of the site.

northwards

being

with

densest

vehicular

access for services. It is placed in a peaceful part of the site.

Institutional

Public

The

Institutional

components

are

towards

the

placed

lake-

teaching-learning

the

spaces

taking most of the serene environs and view

Public

Institutional

Residential

Greens

Greens, spill out and informal performing

spaces

are

interspersed and connected with each other and the built. All built is in a way placed

within a landscaped court.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 70

8.02 Site Plan

N

Plan Not to Scale.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 71

8.03 Circulation Vehicular Movement Services Circulation Primary Pedestrian Secondary Pedestrian The vehicular movement has been restricted to the periphery only so as to have a maximised pedestrian zone. Two service bays have been provided- one near the mess and the other near the auditorium backside. The major pedestrian circulation connects the three main visual axes facing the lake, also linking the five major courts, central to each group of spaces. The secondary paths lead to private/ semi-private spaces and help create a journey full of smaller elements throughout the site. The three main axes culminate at a focus point each which have the serene lake as a backdrop, doing justice to the beautiful lakefront.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 72

8.04 Floor Plans

Hostel Block

Ground Floor

The massing of the hostel block has been staggered floor wise to create terraces and common spaces on every floor. The structural system consists of load bearing walls stacked one on another at a regular interval.

First Floor

Plan Not to Scale.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 73

Hostel Block

Third Floor

The ground and first floors have twin sharing rooms while the second and third floor rooms are single ones. Laundry rooms, pantries and TV lounge are present on alternate floors

Fourth Floor

Plan Not to Scale.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 74

Mess and Hostel Block

Ground Floor

Plan Not to Scale.

First Floor

The Mess is located along with the second hostel block. -The mess dining hall has a capacity of 150. -The services and kitchen are connected to a service bay at the backside. -Accommodation for three staff members is available above the kitchen with common bath facilities. -The dining hall is accessed by the students from a separate entry through a lobby. -Mess has utensil rinsing facilities for students after which they are properly washed and stored by the staff in a separate washing area.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 75

Third Floor

Fourth Floor

Plans Not to Scale.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 76

Academic Wing

Ground Floor

First Floor

Plans Not to Scale.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 77

Guest Block

Ground Floor

First Floor Gurukul

Ground Floor

First Floor

Plans Not to Scale.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 78

Public Block Visitors enter the Mandapa from the drop off and then proceed to their next destination. The Public Block consists of a reception-lounge, a cafe overlooking the Kalyani, an exhibition gallery that opens into sculpture courts and connects with the rest of the open spaces. The first floor has a library on performing arts, the administration offices and specialised studios related to recording, costume and set design etc. that exhibit their work in the gallery space outside of them.

Cut 3D section of auditorium

Plans Not to Scale.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 79

8.05 Sections

SECTION CC

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 80

8.06 Roof Plan

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 81

8.07 Hand Sketches

Sketched view of the treated lakefront: Ghats, spill outs, Open air Theatre with the lake as a backdrop, pavilions and a boating deck formed a part of the lakefront landscaping and intervention. The idea was to rejuvenate this edge of the site and fill it with activities in collaboration with the overall program. The lake was let into the site a bit, so that the waterfront got closer to the built without encroaching the lake. The OAT was extended into the water to create a unique experience for the performer and audience.

Sketch Credits: Tushar Verma

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 82

The central axis culminated into a traditional styled pavilion placed in the water to act as a focus point in the visual line. The Kalyani- inspired from stepped ponds of Hampi acts as a central node. It collects rainwater from the surroundings and again acts as an informal performing space. The path from the Kalyani extends onto a deck at the end providing a mesmerising view of the lake and the horizon

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 83 The steps of the Kalyanistepped pond act as a spill out for the students while also serving as a performing space with the columned pavilions arranged on one side. This is the central attraction and node for the whole site plan.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 84

The Nataraj idol with the lake in its background acts as a point of spiritual focus in the Gurukul area. It helps set the mood of the Gurukul zone.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 85

8.08 3 D Views

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 86

Birds Eye View of the site and intervention. Overall its an attempt to create a wholesome atmosphere for a performing arts institute inspired from vernacular forms and typologies, amidst the nature.

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 87

8.09 Model Photographs

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 88

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 89

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 90

8.09 Model

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 91

Glossary: •Gurukula: Gurukul is a type of school in India, residential in nature, with pupils (shishya) living near the guru, often within the same house. Prior to British rule, they served as South Asia's primary educational institution. •Kalyani: Stepwell, also called pushkarani in Karnataka •Koothambalam: Koothambalam or Kuttampalam meaning temple theatre is a closed hall for staging Koothu, Nangiar koothu and Koodiyattam, the ancient ritualistic art forms of Kerala, India. Koothambalams are said to be constructed according to the guide lines given in the chapter 2 of Nātyasāstra of Bharata Muni. •Mandapa: A Mandapa (Sanskrit: मण्डप, Hindi: मंडप, also spelled mantapa or mandapam) in Indian architecture is a pillared outdoor hall or pavilion for public rituals. •Nataraj : Nataraj is the Lord of Dance. Nāṭaraja is derived from the Sanskrit words "Natya" (dance) and "Raja" (king) meaning "Lord of dance".

Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore


Architectural Thesis 2014 | 92

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Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal Bangalore

Undergraduate thesis 2014  

Thesis Report submitted as part of final semester during B.Arch at SPA, New Delhi. The Cultural and Performing Arts Institute, Hebbal lakefr...

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