Page 1

WINTER 2017

THE CORNERSTONE OF THE POCONOS

NOTICE: The Township Office will be closed on the following days: Christmas: Monday, December 25, 2017 • New Year’s Day: Monday, January 1, 2018

The Best Of Times, The Worst Of Times And Some Random Thoughts Charles Dickens classic novel, “A Tale of two Cities” opens with that famous line. But many people don’t remember or realize that the opening paragraph also goes on to say, “it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair…” As I sit down to write this article for this newsletter- with all that has been occurring in our community, our country and around the world, as an emergency management professional my thoughts are as scattered as the leaves falling from the trees. I am like many of you, struggling to make sense of it all and frame it all in a cohesive message relating to preparedness for disasters. Tens of thousands of American citizens are still struggling in the aftermath of historic flooding (Continued on Page 16)

IN THIS ISSUE DAILY LIVING Home Improvement Consumer Protection Act Information Important Contacts for Seniors Know the Signs of Elder Abuse PennDOT Traffic Data Township Provides Support to DTVAC Legal Notices & Classifieds Spotted Lanternfly Threat Golden Hands Akenac Park Trunk or Treat a Success

DAILY LIVING

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 3 5 6 8 8 10 12 13 14

LIHEAP Heating Assistance Information — Page 2

Getting Your Vehicle Ready Emergency Travel Kit Winter Fire Safety Tips Where’s My Plow? A Silent Killer Could Be Lurking In Your Home LEGISLATURE Gov. Wolf Reminds Pet Owners of Temperature Restrictions/Penalties Brown Introduces Hands-Free Driving Legislation

17 17 18 19 20

22

DIG DELAWARE Caring for Your Christmas Cactus

24

MEETINGS & EVENTS Township Misc. Boards Meetings 2017 Bulk Disposal Dates & Recycling

25 25

PARKS & REC Akenac Park Events - The Polar Express Ski/Snowboarding Injuries & Prevention

25 26

23

BUDGET

PARKS & REC

Proposed Total Township Budget 2018 — Page 8

Akenac Park Events — Page 25

Newburgh, NY 12550 PERMIT NO. 335

Like Us on Facebook www.facebook.com/DelawareTownship

PAID

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage


DAILY LIVING Heating Assistance The Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, also known as LIHEAP, helps low-income families pay their heating bills. LIHEAP is a grant that offers assistance in the form of a cash grant, sent directly to the utility company, or a crisis grant for households in immediate danger of being without heat.   The Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program opened November 1, 2017. 

How to Apply: DELAWARE TOWNSHIP 116 Wilson Hill Road Dingmans Ferry, PA 18328 Phone: 570-828-2347

There are three different ways you can apply for LIHEAP, online, on paper, or in person.

1. You can apply for the LIHEAP benefits online by using COMPASS. COMPASS is the name of the website where you can apply for LIHEAP and many other services that can help you make ends meet.

HOURS OF OPERATION:

2. Download an application for LIHEAP benefits by printing, filling out and returning the

Building Inspector: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 8:00 am – 10:00 am

3. File an application at your local county assistance office.

Sewage Officer: By appointment only Zoning Officer: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 8:00 am – 10:00 am Office: Monday through Friday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm Road Department: Monday through Friday 7:30 am – 3:30 pm Akenac Park: Nov. 1, 2017 to Date to be Determined Closed to public except on M, W, F 12-3 pm for access to the Delaware Township Library After Labor Day No Swimming Permitted BOARD OF SUPERVISORS: MEETINGS 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of the month, 6:30 pm at the Township Municipal Building WORKSHOPS 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of the month, 5:30 pm at the Township Municipal Building

PAGE 2

application located at this link: http://www.dhs.pa.gov/cs/groups/webcontent/documents/ document/c_266862.pdf

For more information, please contact your local county assistance office or contact the LIHEAP hotline at 1-866-857-7095, Monday through Friday (individuals with hearing impairments may call 711).

Crisis Grants: In addition to the LIHEAP cash program, households experiencing a heating crisis may be eligible for additional benefits through the LIHEAP crisis program. The Crisis program will reopen on November 1, 2017.

Emergency situations include: • Broken heating equipment or leaking lines that must be fixed or replaced • Lack of fuel • The main heating source or second heating source (a source that is used to operate the main heating source or used if the main heating source is not working) has been completely shut-off

• Danger of being without fuel (less than a 15 day supply) or of having utility service terminated (received a notice that service will be shut off within the next 60 days) Assistance with home heating crisis situations will be available 24 hours a day; in most counties, you should contact your local county assistance office: Pike – Pike County Assistance Office: 1-866-267-9181

Turn down. seal off. save up: Additional tips and resources to stay warm this winter Home heating costs are a big part of your budget. Combined with increasing food and gas prices, staying warm all through this winter could be very difficult. Pennsylvania is doing everything it can to provide financial help to pay home heating bills and weatherization expenses, but making sure you have the resources to outlast winter starts with you. With a little planning and a little knowledge, you’ll be protected from the cold and your heat can last all winter.

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


Attorney General’s Office Provides Information on Home Improvement Consumer Protection Act The Home Improvement Consumer Protection Act established a mandatory registration program for contractors who offer or perform home improvements in Pennsylvania.

The statute also: • Establishes minimum insurance requirements.

E BOARD OF SUPERVISORS John Henderson Chair | Secretary jhenderson@delawaretownshippa.gov Ron Hough Vice-Chair rhough@delawaretownshippa.gov

• Requires contractors to provide their registration number in their ads and contracts.

Jane Neufeld Supervisor | Treasurer jneufeld@delawaretownshippa.gov

• Prohibits unfair business practices.

E ADMINISTRATION

• Creates a criminal penalty for home improvement fraud. To learn more about what this act does and doesn’t do, go to attorneygeneral.gov and choose “consumers” and then “Home Improvement Consumer Information.”

TO ADVERTISE

CALL 845.456.1218

Krista Predmore Township Administrator kpredmore@delawaretownshippa.gov Sharon Franks Administrative Assistant | Permits sharonf@delawaretownshippa.gov Robin Jones H.R. | Administrative Asst. rjones@delawaretownshippa.gov Lori McCrory Permit Assistant lmccrory@delawaretownshippa.gov

E ROAD CREW/MAINTENANCE Ed Hammond | Asst. Road Master constablehammond@delawaretownshippa.gov Mike Kolenet | Interim Road Master mkolenet@delawaretownshippa.gov Richard Heimbrook dtbos@ptd.net Mike Moffa mmoffa@delawaretownshippa.gov Vincent Flatt vflatt@delawaretownshippa.gov

E BOARDS & CHAIRPERSONS Planning Commission Lenny Glamann lennyglamann@gmail.com Zoning Hearing Board Max Brinson maxbrinson@yahoo.com Auditors Dennis Lee dennisleedtauditor@gmail.com

E ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS Building Inspector SFM Consulting smcglynn@sfmconsultingllc.org Zoning Officer SFM Consulting smcglynn@sfmconsultingllc.org Sewage Officer David Manter dwmanter@ptd.net

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

PAGE 3


Toll Free Numbers State

DYE HARD SALON

594 ROUTE 6 & 209 · MILFORD, PA 18337

570.296.0613

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Auditor General’s Tipline

1-800-922-8477

Cancer Hotline

1-800-422-6237

Child Abuse Hotline

1-800-932-0313

Consumer Protection Bureau

1-800-441-2555

DEP

1-800-541-2050

Elder Abuse Hotline

1-800-490-8505

Ethics Commission

1-800-932-0936

Health Line

1-800-724-3258

Inspector General

1-800-932-0935

Insurance

1-877-881-6388

LIHEAP

1-800-692-7462

LCB

1-800-932-0602

Military and Veterans Affairs

1-800-645-8924

Mortgage Assistance

1-800-342-2397

PACE/PACENET

1-800-225-7223

PennDOT – Motor Vehicles

1-800-932-4600

PennDOT – Potholes

1-800-349-7623

PennDOT – Roadway and Weather Conditions

1-800-331-3414

PHEAA

1-800-682-7392

Property Tax/Rent Rebate

1-800-222-9190

PUC

1-800-692-7380

Revenue

1-800-728-2937

State

1-888-659-9962

Turnpike Commission

1-800-331-3414

Unemployment Compensation

1-888-334-4046

Welfare Assistance

1-800-692-7462

Welfare Fraud

1-800-932-0582

Worker’s Compensation

1-800-428-2383

Federal Senator Bob Casey

1-866-802-2833

Senator Pat Toomey

1-855-552-1831

Congressman Lou Barletta

1-855-241-5144

Congressman Tom Marino

1-202-225-3731

IRS

1-800-382-1274

Medicare

1-800-829-1040

Social Security

1-800-772-1213

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


important contacts for seniors From the Pike County Area Agency on Aging MEDICARE PLANS AVAILABLE www.medicare.gov Call APPRISE at 800-783-7067 Call Medicare at 800-633-4227 or 877-486-248 (TTY) Or call us at 570-775-5550 for appt. to assist you. PIKE COUNTY TRANSPORTATION Hours 7:30am-4:00pm 570-296-3408 or 866-681-4947 DO NOT CALL REGISTRY If you want to stop those nagging calls from solicitors you can place your phone number on the Do Not Call registry by calling 888-382-1222 or go online to www.donotcall.gov

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

SENIOR LAW CENTER Senior Law Center protects the legal rights & interests of seniors in PA through legal services, referral services and advocacy. Call their helpline at 877-727-7529 PIKE COUNTY AREA AGENCY ON AGING Blooming Grove - 570-775-5550 Hours: Mon-Fri 8am-4pm Dingmans Center - 570-828-7812 Hours: Tues & Fri 9am-3pm Lackawaxen/Shohola 570-685-7808 Hours: Mon, Wed, Thurs 9am-2pm Milford - 570-832-1929 Hours: Wed & Fri 1am-3pm

PAGE 5


Home for the Holidays If you’re like most Americans, you don’t get to see your elderly loved ones as often as you’d like. The holidays offer an opportunity to visit with parents and grandparents. Given that 1 in 10 older Americans are abused and neglected, the National Center on Elder Abuse wants everyone to know what they should be looking for when visiting elderly loved ones to ensure that they are aging with respect and dignity. For many of us, the holidays offer a once-a-year time to visit with elderly relatives who live at a distance. These holiday visits are a good time to assess what assistance parents or other elderly loved ones might need to safely age in their homes. There are many things to consider. Prepare a checklist of things to look out for and to discuss with your elderly loved one. It might include questions such as: • Does an elderly loved one require help with chores or housekeeping, bathing, dressing, shopping and meal preparation, managing money, transportation or medications? • Are they isolated? How often do they socialize with others? • If living with another, are they dependent on that person for care? Is that person an appropriate caregiver? Does the caregiver understand the medical conditions that the elder has?

• During your visit, keep an eye out for warning signs of self-neglect, or abuse or neglect by others (see below).Remember that most elder abusers are related to the older person. • If, before you make your trip, you suspect that your loved one needs extra assistance, plan a longer stay so that you can visit local aging service organizations, physicians and attorneys during regular work hours. Make the most of your visits by taking some private time with the elder to discuss future planning. Seniors may not be aware of a gradual decline and may be reluctant or unable to plan for needed care. Support and guidance from family members can help prevent serious accidents and future health complications. Noticing and correcting problems can help keep seniors safely in their homes. Allow time for them to express anxieties and needs. You can decide together what needs to be done and who can help.

Some warning signs to look out for: SELF-NEGLECT If the senior lives alone and does not have anyone providing assistance, self-neglect may become an issue. Some things to look for include: • Senior appears confused • Senior is no longer able to handle meal preparation, bathing, bill paying, etc. • Senior seems depressed • Senior is drinking too much or is abusing drugs • Senior is falling

frequently • Senior appears undernourished, dehydrated, under-medicated, or is not getting care for problems with eyesight, hearing, dental problems, incontinence, etc. NEGLECT OR ABUSE BY OTHERS If the senior lives with others or has someone coming in to help, neglect or abuse may become an issue.

Some things to look for include: • Presence of “new best friend” who is willing to care for the senior for little or no cost • Recent changes in banking or spending patterns • Older person is isolated from friends and family • Caregiver has problems with drugs, alcohol, anger and/or emotional instability • Caregiver is financially dependent on the older person • Family pet seems neglected or abused • You find an abundance of mail and/or phone solicitations for money (“You’re a winner!”) • Senior seems afraid of the caregiver • Senior has unexplained bruises, cuts, etc. • Senior has “bed sores” (pressure sores from lying in one place for too long) • Senior appears dirty, undernourished, dehydrated, over- or under-medicated, or is not receiving needed care for problems with eyesight, hearing, dental issues, incontinence.

What should you do? •If you suspect your older loved one is at risk and he/she lives in the community, call your local Adult Protective Services or Office on Aging. If the person lives in a licensed facility, call the local Long-term Care Ombudsman. You can find the numbers for your state at www.ncea.aoa.gov. PAGE 6

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


• Introduce yourself to responsible neighbors and friends. Give them your address and phone numbers in case of an emergency. • Ask your elderly loved ones directly if they are afraid of anyone, if anyone is taking things without their permission; if anyone is asking them to do things they are not comfortable with, or if anyone is humiliating them. These screening questions may reveal hidden anxieties caused by abuse or neglect. RESOURCES National Center on Elder Abuse: www.ncea.aoa. gov Ageless Alliance: www.agelessalliance.org Eldercare Locator: www.eldercare.gov This toll-free service operates Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. (Eastern time) and can be reached at 1-800-677-1116. AARP: http://assets.aarp.org/external_sites/caregiving/ planAhead/long_distance_issues.html Tips on Long-distance Caregiving.

102 Milford Landing Dr Milford, PA 18337 570-491-2800

M-F 10–8 | SAT 10–5 | SUN 10–4

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This document was completed for the National Center on Elder Abuse (Grant Number 90-AB0002) and is supported in part by a grant from the Administration on Aging, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Grantees carrying out projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Therefore, points of view or opinions do not necessarily represent official Administration on Aging or DHHS policy.

ANY HAIRCUT

Pike County Area Agency on Aging 800-233-8911 or 570-775-5550 www.pikeaaa.org

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LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

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PAGE 7


PennDOT Traffic Data Starting in November 2017 through February 2018, PennDot will be contracting with Tri-State Traffic Date, Inc., a vendor on the Department of Transportation’s Highway Safety and Traffic Operations Division, to collect traffic data on municipally owned roads within Pike County and Delaware Township. The data collected will be utilized by the Department to complete a statewide network screening and prioritize locations for potential safety improvements. The traffic counters will be set in your municipality between October 2017 and February 2018 and are not being set for any road project or speed trap.

$ BUDGET

Delaware Township Board of Supervisors

Proposed total township budget 2018 01 - GENERAL FUND 2018 Cash on hand

GENERAL FUND Revenue 300-310 301

310

320-322

Real Property Taxes Real Estate Taxes 301.100 Real Est. Tax 2018 301.200 Real Est. Tax Prior Yr. 301.400 Real Est. Tax - Delinquent

341

Interest Earnings

The Delaware Township Board of Supervisors recently provided financial support to the Delaware Township Volunteer Ambulance Corps in the amount of $28,805.

342

Rents and Royalties 342.100 Rentals (township bldg)

356

and ask about our special Advertising Rates!

Fines 331.100 331.120 331.300

Sub-Total

District Magistrate(Court) Violations of Ordinances Probation

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

State Shared Revenue 355.010 Public Utility Realty Tax 355.020 (Liquid Fuels Tax direct to Liquid Fuels Fund) 355.040 Alcoholic Beverages License 355.050 (Pension System Assistance direct to Pension Fund) 355.990 Fire Relief Fund State Payments in Lieu of Taxes 356.010 Forest Reserves 356.020 State Gamelands

$ 850,250 $ 10,000 $ 90,000

$ 85,000

$ 200 $ 22,500 $ 75

$ 3,300 $ 800 $ 350

$ 2,500

$ 1,000

361

Fee and Permit Income 361.300 Subdivision/lot improvement fees 361.330 Zoning Permit fees 361.340 Hearing fees 361.342 Sign Applications 361.343 Shed Applications 361.350 Zoning permit fees (commercial)

362

Public Safety Income 362.400 Protective Inspections/UCC fees 362.410 Building permits 362.411 Commercial Bldg permits 362.420 Electrical permits 362.440 Sewage permits 362.490 Well permits

364

Sanitation 364.300 Solid Waste (Dumpster Fees)

365

Health 365.600

Employee Additional Ins. Contribs.

389

All Other Unclassified Operating Revenue

392

Interfund Transfers 392.000 Interfund Transfers In

$ 950,250

$ 85,000

$ 22,775

$ 1,035,250 Taxes total

$ 22,775 Lic/Permits

$ 4,450 $ 4,450 Fines $ 2,500

$ 1,000

$ 3,500 Intr/rents

$ 1,500 $ 600

Sub-total

$ 46,000

$ 48,100

5000 Sub-total

Call

845-456-1218

Sub-Total

Licenses and Permits 321.320 Junkyard 321.800 Cable Franchise rev. 322.500 Street Opening permits

Township Provides Support to DTVAC

355

Sub-Total

Real Estate Transfer Tax 310.100 Real Est. Transfer Taxes

331

According to DTVAC, the monies will be directly used to help offset the cost of repairs to one of their ambulances. Support, such as this, allows DTVAC to continue to provide excellent basic and advanced life support ambulance services to the residents and visitors of Delaware Township.

$ 600,000

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

$ 5,000

$ 3,000 $ 4,000 $ 500 $ 100 $ 150 $ 300

$ 500 $ 31,000 $ 5,000 $ 900 $ 9,000 $ 500

$ 10,000

$ 11,000

$ 1,000

Sub-total

$ 53,100 intergov. Rev.

$ 8,050

$ 46,900

$ 10,000

$ 11,000

$ 1,000

$ 75,950 Chrgs for servc

$ 1,000 misc

$ -

TOTAL 2018 REVENUE

$ 1,196,025

Continued

(NOT including Cash on hand)

PAGE 8

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


364

365

Sanitation 364.300 Solid Waste (Dumpster Fees) Health 365.600

Sub-total

$ 10,000

$ 10,000

$ BUDGET 389

392

Employee Additional Ins. Contribs.

Sub-total

All Other Unclassified Operating Revenue

Interfund Transfers 392.000 Interfund Transfers In

$ 11,000

$ 1,000

Sub-total

$ 11,000

$ 1,000

$ 75,950 Chrgs for servc

$ 1,000 misc

$ -

TOTAL 2018 REVENUE

$ 1,196,025

(NOT including Cash on hand)

General Government Legislative Governing Body-Supervisors 400.105 Salaries Supervisors 400.192 FICA 400.193 Medicare 400.420 Dues/Subscriptions/Memberships 400.331 Mileage Reimbursement 400.460 Seminars/Conferences/Continuing educ.

402

Auditor/Accounting Services 402.105 Elected Auditor Salaries 402.310 Indep. Auditor -Prof. Service 402.311 Accounting Services - Other 402.431 Auditing/Financial Advertising

403

Tax Collection 403.105 Elected Tax Collector Wages 402.192 FICA 402.193 Medicare 403.210 Tax Collection Supplies 403.324 Cell fon 403.360 Tax Collection - other

404

Legal Services 404.310 Solicitor-BOS Solicitor-Planning Commission Solicitor-ZHB 404.314 Legal Services -Other (Court Stenographer)

405-406

Other General Govt. Administration 405.110 Twnship Adm. Salary 406.120 Wages 406.210 Office Supplies 406.213 Sm. Equipment/Computer supplies 406.215 Postage 406.249 Other - misc 406.310 Payroll Services 406.321 Telephone 406.324 Cell Fon 406.325 Internet 406.331 Mileage 406.341 Advertising/Printing 406.370 Repairs/Maintenance Services 406.384 Rental/lease office equipment 406.420 Dues, Subscriptions, Memberships 406.460 Meetings/Conferences/Continuing Education 406.470 Testing/Background checks 406.750 Minor Capital purchase

407

IT-Networking Services - Data Processing 407.213 Software/Computer supplies/subscriptions 407.310 IT/Technical Support Services 407.453 Website

408

Engineering Services 408.313 Engineering Services

409

410-419 411

General Govt. Buildings, Plant and Grounds 409.216 General Operating supplies 409.226 Cleaning Supplies 409.230 Heating Fuel (propane) 409.236 Building supplies (light bulbs, etc) 409.260 Small tools and minor equipment 409.249 Other - misc 409.317 Bldg Inspections 409.318 Bldg services 409.331 Mileage 409.361 Electricity 409.367 Garbage removal 409.373 Repairs and Maintenance 409.374 Maintenance Equipment 409.470 Testing/Background, etc 409.750 Minor Capital Purchases

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

$7,200 $470 $110 $850 $385 $1,600

$100 $6,500 $700 $250

$18,305 $1,500 $350 $1,000 $411 $100

$54,000 $7,000 $300 $750

$56,941 $107,531 $3,500 $500 $1,400 $1,100 $5,000 $1,680 $1,644 $732 $600 $4,100 $400 $8,500 $800 $1,200 $350 $1,000

$4,500 $2,500 $1,500

$15,000

$800 $500 $13,000 $100 $800 $300 $4,600 $2,500 $200 $9,000 $6,000 $4,000 $800 $275 $2,400

Public Safety Fire

411.195 Workers Comp Insur. LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017 411.231 411.324 411.450 411.540

Fuel Cell fon Fire Police Township support/contribution

has canceled the meeting scheduled for December 27, 2017. A workshop and regular meeting will be held on Wednesday, December 20, 2017 for the purpose of regular township business, if needed, beginning at 6:00 p.m. at the Delaware Township Municipal Building, 116 Wilson Hill Road, Dingmans Ferry, PA 18328. 3 DELAWARE TOWNSHIP BOARD OF SUPERVISORS Krista Predmore, Township Administrator

GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES Expenditures 400-409 400

NOTICE The Delaware Township Board of Supervisors

$ 25,464 $3,700 $822 $1,200 $11,750

$10,615

$7,550

$21,666

$ 62,050

4

$196,978

$ 8,500

$ 15,000

$45,275

$367,634Continued Gen. Govt.

PAGE 9


LEGAL NOTICES & CLASSIFIEDS PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Delaware Township Board of Supervisors intend to appoint Kirk, Summa & Co, LLP, a certified public accounting firm, to replace the auditors. Said appointment will take place at the January 2, 2018 organizational meeting held at 116 Wilson Hill Road, Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania.

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 2018 Delaware Township proposed budget is available for public inspection at the Delaware Township Municipal Offices located at 116 Wilson Hill Road, Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania. The budget will be available for public inspection from November 20, 2017 until December 10, 2017 during the usual business hours.

NOTICE The Organizational Meetings for Delaware Township are scheduled as follows: Board of Supervisors on January 2, 2018 at 7:00 p.m with an executive session at 6:00 p.m.; Planning Commission on January 16, 2018 at 6:30 p.m., and Delaware Township Board of Auditors on January 3, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. The Regular Meeting for the Delaware Township Board of Supervisors will be held on January 10, 2018 at 7:00 p.m., preceded by the Workshop at 6:00 p.m. All meetings will be held at the Delaware Township Municipal Building, 116 Wilson Hill Road, Dingmans Ferry, PA 18328.

PAGE 10

409.236 409.260 409.249 409.317 409.318 409.331 409.361 409.367 409.373 409.374 409.470 409.750

Building supplies (light bulbs, etc) Small tools and minor equipment Other - misc Bldg Inspections Bldg services Mileage Electricity Garbage removal Repairs and Maintenance Maintenance Equipment Testing/Background, etc Minor Capital Purchases

$100 $800 $300 $4,600 $2,500 $200 $9,000 $6,000 $4,000 $800 $275 $2,400

$ BUDGET 410-419 411

Workers Comp Insur. Fuel Cell fon Fire Police Township support/contribution Foreign Fire Ins/ Fire Relief Payment

412

Ambulance 412.195 Workers Comp. Insur. 412.231 Fuel 412.324 Cell Fon 412.540 Township support/contribution

413

Code Enforcement 413.121 Wages- Bldg and SEO 413.210 Office Supplies 413.249 Code Enforcement - Other

414

Planning and Zoning 414.121 Wages - Zoning 414.210 Office Supplies 414.249 Planning/Zoning - Other

415

Emergency Management 415.110 Emergency Mgr Stipend 415.210 Office Supplies 415.317 Misc 415.321 Telephone 415.361 415.460 415.750

420-425

427

430-439 430

Electricity Continuing Education/Conferences Minor Capital Purchases

Other Public Safety

Health and Human Services 422.000 Animal Control Services 423.000 Human Services

PUBLIC WORKS - Sanitation 427.361 Electricity - Pit 427.367 Dumpsters Collection-Disposal PUBLIC WORKS - Road/Maintenance General Services/Administration 430.110 RoadMaster 430.120 Wages 430.180 Overtime 430.216 General Op. Supplies 430.231 Fuel - gas 430.232 Fuel - Diesel 430.233 Fuel - Propane 430.238 Uniforms and PPE 430.260 Small Tools and Equipment 430.361 Electricity - Repeater/Cell Tower 430.367 Special Waste Collection and Disposal 430.324 Cell phones 430.329 Radio equipment 430.331 Mileage 430.384 Equipment Rental 430.460 Meetings/Conferences/ Continuing Ed 430.470 CDL/Drug/Alcohol /Backgrnd checks/testing 430.750 Minor Capital Purchase

432

Winter Maintenance - Snow Removal 432.115 Part-time winter road crew 432.192 FICA 432.196 Medicare 432.245 Winter Equipment- chains, edges, etc. 432.750 Minor Capital Purchase

433

Traffic Control Devices 433.245 Road Supplies/Signs 433.310 Traffic Signal Maintenance 433.361 Traffic Signal Electric

437

Repairs Tools and Machinery 437.251 Vehicle Parts, tools, etc 437.245 Machinery parts, tools, etc 437.310 Outside Services

438

$45,275

Public Safety Fire 411.195 411.231 411.324 411.450 411.540 411.541

419

Sub-total

Maintenance and Repairs of Roads and Bridges 438.245 Road Maintenance/Repair Materials 438.249 Bridge Maintenance/Repair Materials 438.310 Line Striping

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

$ 25,464 $3,700 $822 $1,200 $11,750 $46,000

$2,400 $5,200 $411 $55,750

$36,200 $300 $100 $15,100 $300 $500

$367,634 Gen. Govt.

$ 88,936

$63,761

$ 36,600

$ 15,900

$1,000 $800 $1,200 $2,200

Sub-total

Sub-total

$3,500 $1,800 $1,500

$1,100

$12,000

$1,100

$8,000

sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

Sub-total

$ 8,000

$1,500 $13,000

$218,297 Public Safety

$8,000 Health/Welfare

$ 14,500

$56,182 $175,946 $5,000 $500 $5,000 $5,000 $3,900 $3,700 $1,500 $576 $400 $4,110 $200 $100 $500 $960 $475 $2,400 $ 266,449 $1,000 $150 $35 $4,800 $2,400

$2,200 $4,000 $4,200

$2,000 $2,000 $16,500

$ 8,385

$ 10,400

Continued $ 20,500

$19,500 DELAWARE | WINTER 2017 LIVING $7,500 $15,000


432

Winter Maintenance - Snow Removal 432.115 Part-time winter road crew 432.192 FICA 432.196 Medicare 432.245 Winter Equipment- chains, edges, etc. 432.750 Minor Capital Purchase

$1,000 $150 $35 $4,800 $2,400

$ BUDGET

433

Traffic Control Devices 433.245 Road Supplies/Signs 433.310 Traffic Signal Maintenance 433.361 Traffic Signal Electric

437

Repairs Tools and Machinery 437.251 Vehicle Parts, tools, etc 437.245 Machinery parts, tools, etc 437.310 Outside Services

438

Maintenance and Repairs of Roads and Bridges 438.245 Road Maintenance/Repair Materials 438.249 Bridge Maintenance/Repair Materials 438.310 Line Striping 438.750 Minor Capital expenditure

481

484-486

487

Employer Taxes, Withholdings + Paid Benefits 481.192 FICA 481.193 Medicare 481.194 Unemployment 481.197 Pension contribution (additional) 481.198 Other group benefits

Insurance 484.000 486.100 486.200 486.317 486.400 486.600

Workers Compensation Insurance Liability Property/Casualty/Automobile Volunteer Insurance Public Officials Fidelity and Surety Bonds

Sub-total

$2,200 $4,000 $4,200

Sub-total

$2,000 $2,000 $16,500

Sub-total

$19,500 $7,500 $15,000 $2,400

Sub-total

$ 8,385

$ 10,400

Medical Insurance Dental Life/Disability Vision, AFLAC

489

All Other Unclassified Operating Expenditures

492

Interfund Operating Transfers 492.000 Interfund Transfers Out

$44,400

$364,634

$ 24,431 $ 5,713 $ 5,000 $ 15,000 sub-total

$50,144

sub-total

$ 15,020 $7,010 $25,442 $600 $9,647 $4,246

$50,144

$61,965

sub-total

$ 87,720 $ 4,800 $ 3,300 $ 1,700

$ 97,520

$1,000

$61,965

sub-total

Revenue-Expenditures =

Cash on hand end 2018

-

-

$1,169,194

The Delaware Township Volunteer Fire Company is pleased to announce, that with the help of SANTA himself, they will take the 7 message of holiday fire safety “on the road” throughout the community on Saturday, Public Works-Roads Public Works-Roads/Maintenance /Maintenance December 16, 2017, from approximately 11am to 4pm. SANTA and his firefighting elves will tour the area, accompanied by the company’s fleet of fire trucks. Making stops at key locations within Delaware Township, Employer Paid Taxes Employer Paid Taxes/Benefits we will spread some Christmas holiday /Benefits cheer and reinforce the message of home fire prevention and fire safety. Especially during the coming weeks. While we all know that the focus of the season is the joy and happiness of celebration with friends and family, the officers and members of our fire Insurance company feel it is also an important time to remind the public of the danger of fire and the added risk the season brings. For our firefighters, it provides a happier reason to have the fleet on the road and a chance to Employee Medical Employee Medical Ins and other Ins and other see our neighbors and friends under different circumstances than those usually associated with the arrival of the fire trucks in your neighborhood. So, if you hear the sirens that Saturday afternoon, don’t be alarmed. This time they are being used to help spread Holiday Cheer. 8

$26,831 "profit"

Locations / Times Of Santa’s Arrival

600,000 26,831 $ 626,831

Available for returning to capital reserve funds or other funds. 01- GENERAL FUND

$ 97,520

$1,000 $ 1,000

Total 2018 Expenditures

Cash on hand start of 2018 " profit"

14th Annual Holiday Fire Safety Run

$ 20,500

Health Insurance 487.196 487.197 487.198 487.199

Delaware Township Volunteer Fire Company Presents:

(All Times Are Approximate Within 20 Minutes) *Additional stops may be added* • Village At Delaware Ridge – 11:00 AM

$26,831

Total Revenue

$ 1,196,025

Total Expenses

$ 1,169,194

cash on hand

$ 600,000

*** Income-Exps. = cash on hand

$ 26,831 $ 600,000 $ 1,796,025

$ 1,796,025

05 - Recreation/Parks Fund 2018 Cash on hand

$ 35,000

300

Tax Revenue 301.100 Parks/Recreation Tax 340.000 Interest

367

Charges for Services 367.130 Wilson Hill - Concession Stand 367.140 Wilson Hill - Pavilion Rentals 367.200 Wilson Hill - Field Use Fees 367.150 367.300 367.310

389

392

Akenac - Rec Rentals Akenac - Day Passes Akenac - Boat Rentals

Misc Income 389.000 Misc Income Interfund Transfers 392.000 Interfund Transfers In

9

• Birchwood Lakes Clubhouse – 12:00 PM

• Pocono Mtn Lake Forest Clubhouse – 1:15 PM sub-total

sub-total

sub-total

$ 143,000 $ 250

$ 800 $ 100 $ 2,500 $ 450 $ 600 $ 700

• Along Juniper Terrace – 1:30 PM

$ 143,250 Taxes

• Wild Acres Clubhouse – 1:50 PM $ 3,400

• Pmle Sec. 5,6,7 Along Mountaintop Drive – 2:20 PM

$ 1,750 $ 5,150 Chrgs for servcs.

sub-total

$ 100

$ 100

• Emery Road / Chestnut Ridge Road – 3:00 PM

$ 100 Misc.

$ -

TOTAL REVENUE (Not incl cash on hand)

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

• Flair Home Center Parking Lot – 11:30 AM

• Marcel Lake Estates Clubhouse – 12:30 PM

RECREATION/PARKS REVENUE Revenues

• Arnolds Country Market – 11:15 AM

$ 148,500

Continued PAGE 11


$ BUDGET RECREATION/PARKS EXPENDITURES Expenses 403

408

Spotted Lanternfly If you’re in one of these Pennsylvania counties, it is crucial that you look before you leave for adult Spotted Lanternfly hitchhikers or egg masses on your vehicle (or anything else you’re bringing on your travels).

451-454 452

Help stop the spread of this bad bug. Quarantined counties: Berks, Bucks, Carbon, Chester, Delaware, Lancaster, Lebanon, Lehigh, Monroe, Montgomery, Northampton, Philadelphia and Schuylkill.

Engineering 408.313 Engineering fees

Recreation Recreation - Wilson Hill 452.325 Internet 452.361 Electric 452.367 Trash Hauling 452.371 Field Maintenance 452.375 Community Garden 452.376 Concession stand maintenance

454

Recreation - Akenac Park 454.15 Wages 454.192 FICA 454.193 Medicare 454.216 Park Operating Supplies 454.241 Security monitoring 454.243 Life Guard Supplies 454.260 Sm tools, minor equipment 454.261 Repair Maintenance supplies 454.262 Equipment rental 454.317 Water systems testing 454.318 Lake Management 454.319 Contracted Services (Other) 454.321 Telephone 454.325 Internet 454.363 Electric 454.362 Propane 454.367 Trash Hauling 454.800 Recreation Programs

456

Library/Historical Society 456.321 Telephone 456.325 Internet 456.362 Propane (heat) 456.363 Electric 456.540 Support

The Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) is a serious threat to Pennsylvania’s agriculture sector, longterm economic and environmental wellbeing, and quality of life in Pennsylvania. This invasive pest is a threat to $18 billion worth of agricultural commodities, including Pennsylvania apples, grapes and hardwoods. The state’s interstate and international export industry faces a serious risk on the world market. Trade barriers that prevent shipments from Pennsylvania would lead to the potential loss of orchards, vineyards, hardwoods export market. During 2016, the U.S. shipped $280 million in agricultural and related products to Europe. Any prohibition on exporting our agricultural commodities would have devastating consequences the state’s economy.

Tax Collector 403.105 Tax Collector wage 403.192 FICA 403.196 Medicare

492

$ 3,800 $ 200 $ 50

sub-total

$ 4,050

$ 5,000

sub-total

$ 5,000

$ 480 $ 1,700 $ 700 $ 6,800 $ 200 $ 300

sub-total

$ 10,180

$ 45,820 $ 2,500 $ 800 $1,500 $1,700 $ 650 $ 300 $ 24,300 $ 300 $ 4,500 $ 6,000 $ 5,000 $ 3,200 $ 1,560 $ 7,500 $ 4,500 $ 400 $ 6,100

sub-total

$ 116,630

$ 1,200 $ 1,450 $ 500 $ 4,500 $ 1,000

sub-total

$ 8,650 $ 135,460 Recreation/Parks

Interfund Transfers 492.000 Interfund Transfers Out

-

Total expenditures

$ 144,510

income-expenditures =

$ 3,990 "profit"

cash on hand "profit"

$ 35,000 $ 3,990 $ 38,990

Cash on hand end 2018

$ 38,990

$3,990

Available for returning to capital reserve funds or other funds. 05 -Recreation Fund

$ 9,050 General

Total Revenue

$ 148,500 Total Expenses

$ 144,510

Cash on hand

$ 35,000 Income-Exps. = Plus Unused Cash on hand

$ 3,990 $ 35,000

$ 183,500

$ 183,500

RESTRICTED OTHER FUNDS 03 FIRE TAX FUND 2018 iNCOME

EXPENSE

cash on hand 301.100 301.200 301.300 341.000

411.430 411.000

Fire Tax 2018 Fire Tax Prior Fire Tax Delinquent Interest earnings

0 $ 143,000

sub-total TOTAL INCOME

Fire Tax $ to DTVFC other

$ 143,000 $ 143,000

$ 143,000 sub-total

$ 143,000

TOTAL EXPENSES

Continued $ 143,000

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

PAGE 12

Income - Expenses cash on hand end 2018

$ -

0


03 FIRE TAX FUND 2018 cash on hand

0

$ BUDGET

iNCOME

EXPENSE

301.100 301.200 301.300 341.000

411.430 411.000

Fire Tax 2018 Fire Tax Prior Fire Tax Delinquent Interest earnings

$ 143,000

sub-total TOTAL INCOME

Fire Tax $ to DTVFC other

Golden Hands

$ 143,000 $ 143,000

$ 143,000 sub-total

$ 143,000

TOTAL EXPENSES Income - Expenses cash on hand end 2018

$ 143,000

$ 0

35 LIQUID FUELS TAX FUND 2018 Income

Expenses

cash on hand 341.000 355.020 380.004

$ 110,000

Interest Income Liquid Fuels Tax Emergency Reimb. PEMA

$ 1,200 $ 211,890 sub-total

TOTAL INCOME 432.000 432.740 438.000 439.000 471.000 472.000

Salt, calcium chloride, cinder, etc. Major Equipment Purchase Maintenance and Repairs Highway Construction + Rebuild Debt Principal Debt Interest

Income-expenditures= cash on hand loss

$ 213,090

$ 213,090

$ 40,000

$ 200,000

TOTAL EXPENSES

sub-total

$ 240,000

$ 240,000

$ (26,910) $ 110,000 $ 26,910

-

Cash on hand end year

$ 83,090

Available to 2018 spending or to accrue for 2019

$83,090

65 Pension State Aid Fund 2018 Income

355.050

State Pension System Aid TOTAL INCOME

Expenses

483.300

Pension Contribution TOTAL EXPENSES

sub-total

sub-total

Cash on hand end 2018

$ 36,706

$ 36,706

$ 36,706

$ 36,706

Golden Hands is a group of women, many of whom are members of Milford Valley Quilters’ Guild who meet every Monday at the Delaware Township Building. We work on our own projects and also contribute to the community by making items such as quilts for the Gino Merli Veteran’s Home in Scranton, baby blankets for the baby pantry, walker bags, ouch pillows, baby hats for Newton Hospital, and heart monitor bags for Wayne Memorial. Along with the guild, Golden Hands made 76 lap quilts for the Honor Flight on Nov. 4, which took veterans from Stewart International to Washington D.C. Golden Hands also provides a children’s craft table 13 at the township Christmas event at Camp Akenac. Please bring your project and join us every Monday, from 10:00 AM to 03:00 PM. The coffee is always on, bring your own lunch. All are welcome.

$ 36,706

$ 36,706

0

95 Operating Reserve Fund - GF 2018 Income

cash on hand 392.100 341.500

$ 310,535

Transfer In from Gen. Fund Interest TOTAL INCOME 25% of General Fund monies $1,796,025 is

Expenses

492.100

$ 310,535

$ 449,006

Transfer OUT to General Fund

Cash on hand end 2018

sub-total

sub-total TOTAL EXPENSES 14

SPECIAL FUNDS 30 Capital Reserve Fund - General Fund 2018 Township Bldgs, Lands, Machinery Equipment (not to include Akenac Park) Cash on hand Income

Expenses

392.100 341.500

$ 155,553

Transfer In from Gen. Fund Interest TOTAL INCOME

492.100

Transfer OUT to General Fund

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017 Cash on hand end 2018

TOTAL EXPENSES

sub-total

sub-total

currently in GF Capital reserve….

?? Transfer $ in from GF Cap. Reserve… along with additional from GF unallocated monies

Continued PAGE 13


SPECIAL FUNDS

$ BUDGET

30 Capital Reserve Fund - General Fund 2018 Township Bldgs, Lands, Machinery Equipment (not to include Akenac Park)

Cash on hand

Income

Expenses

392.100 341.500

$ 155,553

Transfer In from Gen. Fund Interest

TOTAL INCOME 492.100

Transfer OUT to General Fund TOTAL EXPENSES

sub-total

currently in GF Capital reserve….

?? Transfer $ in from GF Cap. Reserve… along with additional from GF unallocated monies

sub-total

Cash on hand end 2018

31 Capital Reserve Fund - REC/Parks 2018 Recreation/Akenac Park

Annual Trunk or Treat at Akenac Park Delaware Township hosted its annual trunk or treat event at Akenac Park on Saturday, October 21, 2017. Delaware Township Volunteer Ambulance Corp., Delaware Township Volunteer Fire Company, The Dingmans Ferry Lions Club, Birchwood Swim Team, Kona Ice, Farmer’s Insurance, Kelly’s Automotive, State Line Golf Carts, and the Dime Bank were among the local organizations to help make this event a huge success for children in our community. Hundreds of pieces of candy were provided. A special thank you goes to the Arnold family for donating candy to the event. Mark your calendars for Christmas at Akenac Park on Saturday, December 9th.

Cash on hand Income

392.100 341.500

$ 50,068

Transfer In from Gen. Fund Interest TOTAL INCOME

Expenses

492.100

Transfer OUT to General Fund

Cash on hand end 2018

sub-total

currently In Cap. Reserve REC….

?? Transfer $ in from Cap. Reserve Rec along with additional from unallocated GF monies…

sub-total TOTAL EXPENSES

18 Roads, Bridges, Vehicles, Related Equipment, Machinery Fund 2018 Roads, Bridges, Vehicles, Equipment, Machinery Cash on hand Income

392.100 341.500

Transfer In from Gen. Fund Interest TOTAL INCOME

Expenses

492.100

Transfer OUT to General Fund TOTAL EXPENSES

sub-total

Transfer $ in from GF Unallocated monies

sub-total

Cash on hand end 2018

19 Emergency Services Fund 2018 Emergency Services Cash on hand Income

392.100 341.500

Transfer $ in from unallocated GF monies

Transfer In from Gen. Fund Interest TOTAL INCOME

Expenses

492.100

Transfer OUT to General Fund TOTAL EXPENSES

sub-total

sub-total

Cash on hand end 2018

PAGE 14

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


$ BUDGET

Delaware Township 2018

TOTAL BUDGET SUMMARY DELAWARE TOWNSHIP 2018 TOTAL BUDGET SUMMARY Catagories -Acct Classification

Total All Funds ASSETS/INCOME Opening Cash on Hand $ 1,261,156

General Fund $ 600,000 $ 1,035,250 $ 22,775 $ 4,450 $ 3,500 $ 53,100 $ 75,950 $ 1,000

Rec/Park Fund

Liquid Fuels Fund

Fire Tax Fund

Pension Fund

$ 35,000 $ 110,000 $ 143,000 $ 143,000

Op. Reserve Fund

Cap. Reserve Fund Twnship

Cap. Reserve Fund Recreation and Parks

$ 310,535 $ 155,553 $ 50,068

Taxes Licenses/Permits Fines Interest/rents Intergovernmental Charges for service Misc. Interfund transfers

$ 1,321,250 $ 22,775 $ 4,450 $ 4,950 $ 301,696 $ 81,100 $ 1,100 $ 1,485,530

Total Assets/Income

$ 4,484,007

$ 1,796,025 $ 183,500 $ 323,090 $ 143,000 $ 36,706 $ 385,535 $ 356,003 $ 260,148

$ 212,212 $ 361,297 $ 8,000 $ 372,506 $ 86,340 $ $ 442,420 $ 90,150 $ 97,520 $ 61,965 $ 1,000 $ $ 2,750,597 $ 4,484,007

$ 203,162 $ 9,050 $ 218,297 $ 143,000 $ 8,000 $ 132,506 $ 240,000 $ 86,340

EXPENDITURES

General Govt. Public Safety Health/Welfare PW-Roads/Maintenance Culture/Recreation Debt Service Employee Wages Employer Paid Taxes/Benefits Employee Health Insurances Insurance Misc Interfund Transfers ---- Year End Balance Total Expenditures

$ 250 $ 1,200 $ 211,890 $ 5,150 $ 100

$ 36,706

$ 75,000 $ 200,450 $ 210,080

$ 396,600 $ 45,820 $ 50,144 $ 3,300 $ 97,520 $ 61,965 $ 1,000

$ 36,706

$ 626,831 $ 38,990 $ 83,090 $ 385,535 $ 356,003 $ 260,148 $ 1,796,025 $ 183,500 $ 323,090 $ 143,000 $ 36,706

GENERAL FUND budget INCOME EXPENSES

$ 1,196,025 $ 1,169,194

REC/PARKS FUND budget INCOME EXPENSES

$ 148,500 $ 144,510

Call

845-456-1218 to Advertise in this Publication!

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

PAGE 15


EMERGENCY MGMT. The Best Of Times, The Worst Of Times And Some Random Thoughts Continued from Page 1 and devastation from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria and the scorched earth of the California wildfires where entire communities have been wiped out. These folks are facing an unprecedented period of recovery, forced to endure significant periods of time without basic services and total loss or personal possessions. Others are dealing with the physical and psychological effects of the myriad of “active shooter” events that challenge not only the victims, but the emergency planners who cannot possibly envision every mitigation effort needed to prevent the next incident and the responders who have the responsibility for minimizing the loss of life and regaining control of a situation that they often cannot imagine happening in their community. Who would have ever expected that a shootout would occur between neighbors on Milford Road, just down the street? It truly is the epoch of incredulity!

nuts. And the deer seemed to change “coats” quickly – both harbingers – they say of a bad winter to come. Point being, are you paying attention to what’s going on around you and incorporating that into your personal planning and preparedness? As responders, we refer to this as “situational awareness”- we’ll come back to that a little later

At the same time as all of this is going on and as each event fades from the limelight of the evening news for all but the victims and the responders, we can look at the words of Charles Dickens and surmise that these types of dichotomies between success and suffering are not unique to our current time or circumstances.

Which poses the greater hazard to any personal travel during a weather event, ice or snow? What determination do you use personally to decide of going out on the roads is “essential” or necessary? If you or someone in your family are already out of the area and can’t get back, what is your plan? Do you have a “communication” plan that everyone knows of?

Now, more than ever, we have the ability to use all the “wisdom” of our age to prepare for and mitigate against the disasters that may affect us. Technology provides us with options and resources unimagined in Dickens time, from long range weather forecasting, to updates on road conditions and online purchase of disaster preparedness equipment and supplies to name a few.

Do you have back up battery/ charging capability for cellphones if power goes out?

However, everyone in the community must avoid the foolishness of believing that some type of event will never occur, or that events that do occur will not impact them and their family or that during catastrophic or long duration events responders will be available immediately or solely for their benefit. With this concept in mind, allow me to offer some “random thoughts” in no particular order - on “personal” preparedness amidst the turmoil of the approaching winter season. Based on the opinions of my “old timer” local friends, winter here in the poconos is likely to be bad again, my yard like many others have been inundated with acorns, hickory and other

PAGE 16

As the normal seasonal cycles seem to fade again, and we move seemingly right from summer to winter, how does that impact your readiness? Does time to do all the normal things you do to prepare for winter at your home seem to be getting away from you? Are we getting less snow it seems and more freezing rain and ice as precipitation these past few years? Which is more likely to cause power outages? Are you capable of surviving without electricity for an extended period?

Is your personal vehicle prepared for winter road conditions? Do you have emergency supplies in your vehicle? Despite the recent “economic” recovery both state and local public works entities are stretched very thin in our area and it can take considerable time during and after a storm to clear roads so that they are safe for travel. The same applies to the availability of utility crews, who are not usually “prestaged” in the immediate area just waiting for a service interruption. Do you have a “checklist” of tasks to prepare for winter emergencies? Or a list of supplies you should have on hand? Have you consulted websites such as FEMA ,PEMA or Ready. gov for recommendations? Are you and your family(including pets) prepared to survive for up to 3 days without assistance from the outside?(food, water, medicines)

If you have generator is it properly maintained? Is the fuel fresh and do you run it regularly to insure reliability? Do you have sufficient fuel for the expected outage period? If the fuel is gasoline, is it stored someplace outside of the residence or at least outside of any living spaces? Do you have carbon monoxide detectors installed and are they working properly? Do you know the signs and symptoms of CO poisoning? Are all smoke detectors less than 10 years old, properly installed and working? If you use any type of supplementary heating (fireplace, wood, pellet, coal stove) has the chimney been cleaned within the last year? Do you inspect the system before use for the season? Do you have a fire extinguisher present in your home and do you know how to use it after you have called 911? These are just a few of the things that come to mind to keep you and yours safe as we approach the “season of Light”. Among the best ways to protect yourself and all that you value from darkness and despair is to be “situationally aware” – in the world now it is critical that you personally commit to this concept and teach it to your family. It means that no matter where we go or what we do we consider all that is going on around you and what the impacts will be if something goes wrong or doesn’t go as planned. It is not being a pessimist to notice where the fire exits are when you are at a restaurant or theatre when you first go in. Or to check weather updates routinely when inclement weather is forecast and adjust travel or work plans accordingly. “Situational awareness” and “personal preparedness” go hand in hand for all hazards from fires to power outages to the scourge of the active shooter incidents in recent years are those two concepts are the keys to your safety and the safety of your loved ones. Take the time to ask yourself the hard questions about how aware and prepared you are NOW. Keep in mind that responders cannot help you in advance of event and as emergency planners we seem to be faced with new hazards and scenarios every day. Collectively we must work together and use all of the wisdom and belief that Dickens alluded to overcome any disaster that comes our way. Best wishes for a safe and happy holiday season and a happy new year.

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


Getting Your Vehicle Ready Preparation is one key to successfully navigating winter roads. Winter weather can bring unexpected conditions, so make sure your vehicle is ready for ice and snow. Prior to the winter driving season, you should have a mechanic check the brakes, battery, hoses and belts. Below are some additional tips for getting your vehicle ready for winter.

• Check that your fluid levels are full. • Make sure your wipers don't streak. You may want to consider installing winter wiper blades.

• Ensure your heater and defroster are working properly.

• Check that your vehicle's radio is working properly so you can receive weather and traffic reports.

• Make sure all lights are working. • Check to be sure tires are properly inflated

EMERGENCY TRAVEL KIT...DON’T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT!

and have sufficient tread depth.

• If you live in an area prone to heavy snow,

you may want to use dedicated snow tires on your vehicle or carry a set of tire chains. At a minimum, your all-weather tires should be mud and snow rated.

• In the case of a problem, contact a mechanic immediately.

 Warm clothing and gloves Also remember to include warm clothing and gloves, blanket, ice scraper, sand, non-perishable food andBlanket anything else you may need to accommodate family traveling with you (special medication, baby  supplies, pet food, etc.).  Ice scraper  Sand  Cellphone and car charger  Flashlight  Jumper cables  Small shovel  First aid kit  Water  Nonperishable food PERSONAL NEEDS:

(such as special medications, baby supplies or pet food):

      

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________

      

___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________ ___________________________

PAGE 17


Winter Fire Safety Tips

Pike County Fire Departments

Bushkill Fire Company (Dept. 24)

The cold weather is upon us. Which means most people will be spending a lot more time indoors. The heat will be on and you’ll be spending more time in the kitchen cooking. Fire safety may not be the first thing you think about, but steps can be taken to make sure your family stays safe. The top 2 most common causes of house fires involve cooking and heating. Here are a few simple tips you can take to protect your family and home from household dangers that could cause harm to you and your loved ones.

124 Evergreen Dr., Lehman, PA - 570-588-6033

Smoke detectors

Lackawaxen Twp. Volunteer Ambulance Service (Dept. 21) 109 PA Rt. 590, Greeley, PA - 570-685-4022 Greeley Fire Department (Dept. 23) 245 PA Rt. 590, Greeley, PA - 570-685-7537

Blooming Grove Fire Dept. (Dept. 25) 484 PA Rt. 739, Hawley, PA - 570-775-7355 Dingman Twp. Fire Dept. (Dept. 26) 680 Log Tavern Rd., Milford, PA - 570-686-3696 Central Fire Dept. (Dept. 27) 574 Westcolang Rd., Hawley, PA - 570-685-7344 Delaware Twp. Fire Co. (Dept. 28) 131 Wilson Hill Rd., Dingmans Ferry, PA - 570-828-2223 Delaware Twp. Ambulance Corp. (Dept. 28) 135 Park Rd., Dingmans Ferry, PA - 570-828-2345 Hemlock Farms Fire & Rescue (Dept. 29) 1053 Hemlock Farms, Lords Valley, PA - 570-775-6447 Lackawaxen Fire Dept. (Dept. 31) 116 Township Rd., Lackawaxen, PA - 570-685-7330 Matamoras Borough Fire Dept. (Dept. 32) 506 Avenue Q, Matamoras, PA - 570-491-4154

Seconds count when there is a fire. Smoke detectors that work provide warning of a fire, which can double survival chances. Smoke detectors can be the difference between life and death. Smoke detectors should be installed on every level of your house. Outside all sleeping areas and in every bedroom. Smoke detectors should be checked every month. Install carbon monoxide detectors in your home- Winter season can increase the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide cannot be seen. It is an odorless, fatal gas that is produced by heating systems, water heaters, chimneys, kerosene heaters, gas stoves, fireplaces and car exhausts. It can cause flu-like symptoms, vomiting, loss of consciousness, brain damage and even death. Install at least one on every floor approximately 5 feet from the ground. *Smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector batteries should be changed at least twice a year. Fall and spring when the clocks are changed is a great way to remember to change them. Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors should be changed every 10 years.

Milford Fire Dept. (Dept. 33)

Electric outlets & extension cords

107 W. Catharine St., Milford, PA - 570-296-6121

Fires can be caused by overloaded extension cords and circuits or even incorrectly installed wiring. Use the right extension cord of gauge and length for the intended use. Make sure the cord is of proper wattage and current rating for what you are using it for. Never splice or cut an extension cord for any reason. A cut cord could possibly cause a weak point in your wire, making it unsafe. Use the correct extension cord. Make sure you have the proper gauge and length for the intended use.

Mill Rift Fire Dept. (Dept. 34) 139 Bluestone Blvd., Mill Rift, PA - 570-491-4850 Promised Land Fire & Ambulance (Dept. 35) RR 390, Greentown, PA - 570-676-3818 Tafton Fire Co. (Dept. 37) 235 PA Rt. 507, Hawley, PA - 570-226-4273 Westfall Fire Dept. (Dept. 39) 101 Mountain Ave., Matamoras, PA - 570-491-4717 Shohola Fire Dept. (Dept. 41) 325 PA Rt. 434, Shohola, PA - 570-559-7525 Forest Fire Dept. (Dept. 81) 1129 Towpath Rd., Hawley, PA - 570-226-5022

Do not place electrical cords under carpets, because they are too long. This could cause the cord to overheat and start a fire. Have an electrical professional install GFI outlets inside and out where water is present, which would include bathrooms, kitchens and laundry rooms.

Fireplaces and wood stoves Did you have your fireplace and chimney cleaned and inspected? Cracks, broken brick and mortar along with creosote, can block the

PAGE 18

chimney. Burn dry seasoned wood to minimize chimney build up. Place ashes in a metal bucket container outside at least 5 foot away from house or anything that could catch fire. Do not set ash bucket on your porch or wood deck. Use a sturdy metal screen or tempered glass to stop sparks from escaping your fireplace. Child guard your fireplace and wood stove , if you have children in the house.

Space heaters Always read the label on the cords to make sure the electric heater is set up correctly. Keep all furniture, curtains, papers or combustibles at least 4ft away from space heaters. Check your space heater power cord to make sure they aren’t cracked or frayed. If they are cracked or frayed, do not use them. Always turn off heaters when your family is asleep or not home. Heaters should be used by adults only. Make sure the electric heater is UL approved, that it has a temperature control, it should also have a shut off to protect if it tips over.

Escape plan You need one! Almost all home fires that are fatal happen between midnight and 8 a.m. During times people are asleep. When a smoke detector goes off, it’s possible you could have less than 2.5 mins to get out. Therefore every family should have an escape plan. Make sure to have a family meeting place, everyone should know it. Good plans are knowing two ways out of each room and having your meeting spot outside the house. Practice your escape plan at least two times a year. When you are safe outside, stay outside. Call 911 once outside. Remember, your family’s safety starts with you. Wishing everyone a safe and happy holiday season, from our family to yours, Stacy Hughes Delaware Township Volunteer Fire Company Station 28, Fire Prevention Committee Volunteers are always needed. If you are interested please contact us at: info@dtvfc.net You can make a difference.

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


Where’s My Plow? The public can view all of PennDOT’s snow plows on the road during a winter storm at www.511PA.com. In 2014, PennDOT began a pilot equipping 119 plow trucks with the Automated Vehicle Location (AVL) system, which uses in-truck technology to log and share data in real-time for that truck. That pilot expanded to more than 700 plow trucks last winter that were publicly viewable on www.511PA.com. This winter, all of the more than 2,200 PennDOT-owned and rented plow trucks will be equipped with AVL technology — meaning the public can view the trucks on interstates and expressways this winter at www.511PA.com. The AVL unit in each truck sends a cellular signal through the system showing where a truck is located and whether or how much material is being spread from the truck.

FIND YOUR PLOW AT 511PA.COM PennDOT uses AVL to:

• Monitor vehicle movement and plow-route coverage; • Monitor the system during winter storms or emergencies and, if needed, see the closest truck to an area that needs additional service and direct trucks to that location;

• Review data on effectiveness in returning traffic to pre-storm conditions; • Review usage of materials such as salt and anti-skid through the various stages of a weather event; and • Interface with other department technology to combine real-time weather and road conditions with corresponding material-usage rates. The AVL system pilot is part of Governor Wolf’s GO-TIME initiative that leverages interagency coordination and collaboration to maximize efficiency, modernize state government operations, and provide the highest-quality services. The pilot, as one of seven GO-TIME projects identified by PennDOT in 2016-2017, is expected to realize a cost savings of $1.4 million over the next four to six years based on a combination of reduced salt usage and better use of department equipment.

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A ‘Silent Killer’ Could Be Lurking in Your Home Pennsylvania leads the country in the number of accidental carbon monoxide poisonings, which result in an estimated 450 deaths and more than 20,000 emergency room visits each year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports. Here is some useful information to help you protect yourself and your loved ones against this silent AND deadly gas, which could be lurking in your home.

Where does carbon monoxide come from? Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas that often goes undetected, striking victims who least expect it, sometimes in their sleep. This “silent killer” is produced by burning fuel in cars or trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges, portable generators, and furnaces. When the gas builds up in enclosed spaces, people or animals who breathe it can be poisoned, and ventilation does not guarantee safety. The Consumer Product Safety Commission says about 170 people in the United States die every year from carbon monoxide produced by nonautomotive consumer products, such as room heaters, so as the weather turns colder, it’s important to take extra precautions. PAGE 20

“Carbon monoxide is created when combustible materials burn incompletely,” Pa. State Fire Commissioner Tim Solobay says. “Carbon monoxide detectors should be tested and batteries changed, particularly as the weather turns colder and people start using things like wood stoves and gas furnaces to heat their homes.”

Who is at risk? Exposure to carbon monoxide can result in permanent neurological damage or death, and anyone can be at risk. The CDC says infants, the elderly, and people with chronic heart disease, anemia, or breathing problems are more prone to illness or death. However, carbon monoxide doesn’t discriminate, especially if certain conditions are present. In July 2015, for example, four young people and a dog were found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning inside a cabin in Maine. Authorities believe they went to bed without shutting off a gas-powered generator in the basement.

How can I prevent carbon monoxide poisoning in my home?

Carbon monoxide, often called a “silent killer,” is produced by burning fuel in cars or trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges, portable generators, and furnaces. A tasteless, orderless gas, it lurks in homes, threatening the people and animals who breathe it.

Winter can be a prime time for carbon monoxide poisoning as people turn on their heating systems and mistakenly warm their cars in garages. The National Safety Council recommends that you install a battery-operated carbon monoxide detector in your home near the bedrooms. Check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall. The CDC offers these additional tips:

• Have your heating system, water heater, and LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


any other gas- or coal-burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year.

• Do not use portable, flameless, chemical heaters indoors.

• Never use a generator inside your home,

• immediately move outside to fresh air;

in the home is accounted for; and

• call emergency services, the fire department, or 911;

• do a head count to make sure that everyone

• do not re-enter the premises until

emergency responders have given you permission to do so.

basement, or garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent. Fatal levels of carbon monoxide can be produced in just minutes.

• Have your chimney checked and cleaned

every year and make sure your fireplace damper is open before lighting a fire and well after it is extinguished.

• Make sure your gas appliances are vented properly.

• Never use a gas oven to heat your home. • Never let a car idle in the garage. • Know the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning.

The symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning The U.S. Fire Administration has put together materials on the dangers of carbon monoxide, including a list of poisoning symptoms.

Low to moderate carbon monoxide poisoning is characterized by: • headache • fatigue • shortness of breath • nausea • dizziness High-level carbon monoxide poisoning results in: • mental confusion • vomiting • loss of muscular coordination and consciousness

• death

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Symptom severity varies depending on the level of carbon monoxide and duration of exposure. Mild symptoms sometimes are mistaken for the flu.

Steps to take when the carbon monoxide alarm sounds The Consumer Product Safety Commission says never ignore a carbon monoxide alarm and don’t try to find the source of the gas. Instead, follow these steps:

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

PAGE 21


LEGISLATURE Governor Wolf Reminds Pet Owners of Temperature Restrictions, Penalties in Place with New Animal Cruelty Laws Governor Tom Wolf reminded Pennsylvanians to bring pets indoors as temperatures continue to drop statewide. Pennsylvania’s new animal cruelty protections, signed into law in June 2017 and championed by Governor Wolf,

included new protections and penalties for cold weather. “This is the first cold weather season since we strengthened the animal cruelty laws in Pennsylvania, which include temperature and shelter restrictions for outdoor pets,” said

Governor Wolf. “For far too long we have heard stories of neglected and abused animals who suffered because of deplorable treatment, and with our new landmark anti-cruelty legislation in place, penalties will be enforced for individuals who abuse or neglect an animal.” Act 10, which strengthens Pennsylvania’s animal cruelty laws, states that a dog cannot be tethered for longer than 30 minutes in temperatures above 90 or below 32 degrees Fahrenheit. Additionally, animals must be provided sanitary shelter that allows the animal to maintain normal body temperature and keeps the animal dry all year. “The Humane Society of the United States, Pennsylvania Vet Medical Association, and a number of state and federal agencies strongly support the anti-tethering components of Act 10, which include long overdue, reasonable stipulations regarding the length of time and conditions in which a dog can be kept outside during inclement weather,” said Kristen Tullo, Pennsylvania State Director of the Humane Society of the United States. “Continuous tethering can cause severe physical damages such as cracked and bleeding paws, frostbite and hypothermia. We encourage the public to help to keep the dogs of Pennsylvania safe and warm this winter by reporting animal neglect to the local humane society police officer, local or state police. If it’s too cold for you, it’s too cold for them.” Earlier this year, the governor signed the package of bills, which includes Libre’s Law. The updated measures clarify the definition of abuse and raise penalties and training and education programs are being developed to prepare authorities responsible for protecting animals through identification and prosecution of animal cruelty crimes.

The key components of the legislation include: • Improved tethering conditions for outside dogs

• No more than 9 hours tethered in 24-hour period.

• Tether must be the longer of 3 times length of dog or 10 feet.

• No more than 30 minutes in 90+ or -32-degree weather.

• Must have water and shade. PAGE 22

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


• Must be secured by an appropriate collar

Brown Introduces Hands-Free Driving Legislation

• Tethered space must be clear of

Rep. Rosemary M. Brown (R-Monroe/Pike) recently introduced legislation to prohibit calls on hand-held mobile telephones, except with the use of hands-free accessories, while operating a motor vehicle in Pennsylvania.

— no tow or log chain, nor choke, pinch, prong, or chain collars. excessive waste.

• No open sores or wounds on the dog’s body. Added protections for horses • Currently, most crimes against horses are graded as summary offenses — similar to traffic and littering violations.

• This law aligns penalties for crimes against

horses with penalties for crimes against dogs and cats.

Increased penalties for animal abuse • Neglect: Summary offense (up to 90 days in

jail and/or a $300 fine) OR misdemeanor of the third degree (up to 1 year in jail and/or $2,000 fine) if neglect causes bodily injury or places the animal at imminent risk

• Cruelty: Misdemeanor of the second degree (up to 2 years in jail and/or a $5,000 fine)

• Aggravated cruelty: Felony of the third degree (up to 7 years in jail and/or a $15,000 fine)

Ensures convicted animal abusers forfeit abused animals to a shelter • Requires forfeiture of animal of anyone

“Depending on which source you review, millions of automobile crashes occur across our nation each year where cell phone usage is to blame,” Brown said. “The intent of this legislation is to make our roadways safer and create consistency for motorists driving through our state from border states that ban hand-held cell phone use.” Under Brown’s legislation, all motorists age 18 and over would be prohibited from using a handheld phone while driving, but would be allowed to use hands-free devices. Additionally, drivers under the age of 18 would be prohibited from using both hand-held and hands-free devices. Exceptions would be permitted during emergency situations if the vehicle is not equipped with hands-free technology. The legislation would permit emergency responders, while in their official duties, to only use hand-held mobile telephones if their vehicles do not include hands-free service. The first offense for violating this law would be $50 and three points to a license and $150 for a second or each subsequent offense. The northeastern region of the United States including New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Maryland, Delaware, Vermont, New Hampshire and West Virginia, all ban hand-held cell phone use. For more information about this legislation, or any state-related issue, contact Brown’s district office in East Stroudsburg located at 143 Seven Bridge Road, by calling 570-420-8301. Information can also be found on online at RepBrown.com or Facebook.com/RepRosemaryBrown.

convicted of a felony violation and allows for fortitude upon other convictions.

Grants civil immunity for veterinarians and veterinary technicians • Shields licensed doctors of veterinary medicine, technicians, and assistants who report animal cruelty in good faith from lawsuits.

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PAGE 23


DIG DELAWARE Caring for Your Christmas Cactus By Carol Padalino The Christmas Cactus is a beautiful plant that can bloom year after year, living long after the holidays pass. When properly cared for, the plants can even be passed down through generations of families. The Christmas Cactus is a tropical plant that was bred from two parent plants that both grow in the South American rainforests, specifically in Brazil. The Schlumbergera genus, of the family Cactaceae, was named after Frederick Schlumbergera, a Belgian amateur gardener of the 18h and 19th centuries. The plant, Schlumbergera x buckleyi, commonly known as Christmas Cactus, reaches a height of 9 inches with a spread of 12 inches.

The plant consists of arching, flattened stems that cascade downward. The segmented stems have bright blooms appearing at the ends. The stem segments have rounded notches and rounded ends. In winter the plant will produce magenta flowers resembling ornate trumpets. The blooms can appear at different times throughout the year, but most notably near Christmas which is how the plant gets its name. The Christmas Cactus does not require a lot of special care, but they need to be properly maintained in order for buds to appear. Like most succulents, a moist soil is required; however, these plants do not like to be sitting in a pool of water. Once the top of the soil feels dry to the touch, water the plant. Too much water can cause root rot, while too little can cause issues with the blooms. The soil should be well draining; a mixture of potting soil and fine bark works well. Sand or small stones at the base of the pot helps with drainage. Feed the plant a high potassium fertilizer once every two weeks throughout the year except immediately following the flowering period. The Christmas Cactus prefers indirect light. Direct sunlight can easily burn the leaves of the plant.

Placement in an eastern or northern facing window is best. The cactus is able to adapt to low light conditions, but it thrives in bright, indirect light. This is a tropical plant, so it requires a moderate temperature with high humidity. Normal room temperatures are suitable throughout the year. The Christmas Cactus requires 50-60 percent humidity, so if your home has drier air, you will need to create this level of humidity artificially. The plants prefer to be confined to a pot where the roots barely fit. This small space for the root system actually produces the best blooms. Repotting the plant every 2-3 years should be sufficient. Never repot the plant while it is in bloom. Repotting in spring or summer works best allowing the plant to settle in before the next blooming season. Although it is common to see a Christmas Cactus covered with buds or in full bloom in stores at Christmas, don’t be disappointed if the plant in your home fails to flower by the calendar. They will usually bloom later. Professional growers have perfected the art of forcing these plants for the Christmas market. Sometimes the Christmas Cactus can be difficult to care for, but with a bit of effort you can have a beautiful blooming plant right around the holiday season.

PAGE 24

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


EVENTS 2017 Bulk Dump Disposal Dates The Delaware Township Bulk Disposal will be open the first and third Saturday of each month from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. during the Spring, Summer and Fall. Bulk will only be available one Saturday per month during the winter months: December 16, 2017 • January 20, 2018

Akenac Park Events THE POLAR EXPRESS At Akenac Park - Saturday, December 9th from 4:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. FREE ADMISSION You are cordially invited to take a ride on the Polar Express for a few hours when Akenac Park is turned into a time of train travel, live reading of the Polar Express, pictures with Santa, train craft by Milford Valley Quilters Guild, hot chocolate and holiday treats for purchase. There will also be a toy store where children may do their Holiday shopping at a minimal cost. Dressing in your pajamas is encouraged. www.delawaretownshippa.gov

Board of Supervisors Meetings The Delaware Township Board of Supervisors will hold regularly scheduled meetings on the second (2nd) and fourth (4th) Wednesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. Workshops will be held the second (2nd) and fourth (4th) Wednesday of each month at 6:00 p.m. These meetings will be held at the Delaware Township Municipal Building(s), located at 116 Wilson Hill Road, Dingmans Ferry, PA 18328 Wednesday, October 11 & 25, 2017 Wednesday, November 8 & 22, 2017 Wednesday, December 13 & 27, 2017

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETINGS:

The Delaware Township Planning Commission will hold regularly scheduled meetings on the first (1st) and third (3rd) Tuesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m.; with the fourth (4th) Tuesday as a workshop on an as needed basis. These meetings will be held at the Delaware Township Municipal Building, located at 116 Wilson Hill Road, Dingmans Ferry, PA 18328.

BOARD OF AUDITORS MEETINGS:

The Delaware Township Board of Auditors meetings in 2017 will be held quarterly, as needed, at 10:30am on the 3rd (third) Saturday of March, June, September and December 2017. These meetings will be held at the Delaware Township Emergency Management Building, located at 116 Wilson Hill Road, Dingmans Ferry, PA 18328.

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

PAGE 25


PARKS & REC Ski/Snowboarding Injuries and Prevention By Sensei Albert Casale With the arrival of winter, many people head to the ski slopes for some fun and physical activity. Although the overall injury rate is low, a few individuals will find their weekly physical activity routines significantly impacted because of banged heads, dislocated shoulders, broken wrists, and mangled knees. Fortunately, there are a number of steps people can take to avoid to have to rest and recover from those precious activity days from a preventable incident. I would like to share some tips that I learned to keep my winter mountain adventure enjoyable when I was a competitor in ski and snowboarding.

Fitness and Conditioning - A well-rounded physical conditioning program should be initiated before the season arrives. Proper Equipment and Clothing - Using equipment that fits and is adjusted appropriately is critical to reducing injury risk. It is never a good idea to borrow equipment that is not specifically fitted to the person using it. Layer light, loose, and water/wind-resistant clothing for warmth and protection. Proper Instruction - Injury risk is greater in beginners. Consider proper instruction and develop progressive skills. Warm-up - Cold stiff muscles are more prone to injury. Start gradually with some walking, easy runs and some calisthenics before your challenging runs. Stay Within Your Ability - While tempting, it is best to avoid the persuasion to attempt slopes or speeds beyond your skill level because this dramatically increase injury risk to you and others. If You’re Going to Fall Down - Trying to stop a fall only increases your rigidity and likelihood of incurring an injury. When you start to fall, go with it, stay down, and don’t try to get up until you’re finished Wear a Helmet - Although helmets do not decrease the risk of incurring a ski or boarding injury, they can reduce the severity of injury. Know When to Stop - A high percentage of injuries occur in the afternoon when fatigue sets in. “One more run” is not always the best choice. My snowboard is getting sharpened - I will be looking forward to meeting you all on the slope, I am the one with the silver hair and the big smile.

PAGE 26

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017


LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2017

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