__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

N ICHOLAS

REDDON AR C H ITE CTU R E PO RTFO LI O


N I C H O L AS

REDDON E D U C AT I O N

AWA R D S

S O F T WA R E

MASTE R S O F AR C H ITE CTU R E

R OYAL AR C H ITE CTU R AL I N STITUTE O F CANADA (R AI C) H O N O U R S

Adobe After Effects Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign Adobe Photoshop Adobe Premiere AutoCAD Google SketchUp Grasshopper Microsoft Office Suite Pachyderm Acoustical Simulation Rhino 3D V-Ray Render

University of Toronto, Canada 2015-2019 (3.5 Years)

H O N O R S S PE C IALIZATI O N I N FI N E ART Western University, Canada 2011-2015 (4 Years)

University of Toronto, 2019 Awarded to the top 4 students of the graduating class

FAC U LTY D E S I G N PR IZE University of Toronto, 2019 Awarded to graduating students for excellence in design studios

PROFESSIONAL

C E RTI FI CATE O F H O N O U R S

BJAR KE I N G E LS G R O U P

University of Toronto, 2019 Awarded annually to “the top graduating master’s students”

New York City, USA Junior Designer 2018 - Present

O NTAR I O ASS O C IATI O N O F AR C H ITE CTS’ S C H O LAR S H I P

SKILLS

University of Toronto, 2018 Awarded to a graduate student for academic excellence

3D Printing Art Handling and Install CNC Milling Laser Cutting Model Making Photography Vacuum Forming Welding Woodshop Experience

D E N E G R I B E SSAI STU D I O Toronto, Canada Part Time Installation Design 2017-18 (2 months)

FR O NT O FFI C E TO KYO Tokyo, Japan Design Assistant 2017 (3 months)

KH O U RY LEVIT FO N G Toronto, Canada Design Assistant 2016 & 2017 (6 months total)

U N IVE R S ITY O F TO R O NTO FE LLOWS H I P University of Toronto, 2018 Awarded to a graduate students “with excellent academic standing”

KO MALA PR AB HAK AR S C H O LAR S H I P University of Toronto, 2017 Awarded to a graduate student at the discretion of the Dean for excellence

FR E D E R I C K C OATE S S C H O LAR S H I P University of Toronto, 2016 Awarded to the first year student who ranks highest in their class

OTH E R WOR K TEAC H I N G ASS I STANT University of Toronto Architecture 5 Undergraduate Studio Courses 2016-2019

D I G ITAL FAB R I CATI O N LAB University of Toronto Architecture Assistant CNC and Laser Cutter Technician 2016-2018

G O LD M E DALI ST I N VI S UAL ART Western University, 2015 Awarded to the graduating student with the highest academic average

TO NY AN D B ETSY LITTLE FI N E ARTS S C H O LAR S H I P Western University,2014 - Awarded to the third year BFA student with the highest academic average

E NTRY S C H O LAR S H I P Western University, 2011 Awarded for quality of portfolio and academic standing

FAV O R I T E S 2001: A Space Odyssey Australian Shepherds Buckminster Fuller Gretsch G6120T Nashville La Fin du Monde Rachel Whiteread Radiohead “In Rainbows” The Myth of Sisyphus Tokyo, Japan


01 TO R O NTO C ITY M U S E U M Comprehensive Design Studio Advisor: Maria Denegri Partner: Shea Gouthro Winter 2017

4

B R I E F: This is a proposal for a City

program and inner workings of the museum. The project developed around this idea for a museum as social condenser, which will blend building with street and park, programmed space with public space, and visitors with pedestrian traffic.

C O N D U IT: This building acts as a

LE F T: Matrix of final renderings.

Museum in Toronto. It responds to a complicated brief with substantial programmatic requirements, complex site conditions and heritage issues. The building was resolved comprehensively; with structural plans, construction details, and environmental systems. public conduit between disparate points in the city fabric. The main gesture is the long, sweeping pathway that ramps up, burrows through the space of the building, and ends at the edge of the proposed Rail Deck Park. Visitors, pedestrians, and even cyclists move along the lanes of this path as it changes from ramp, to tunnel, to bridge: all the while exposing the

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

2017

R A M P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E.

01

R I G HT: Rendering of central atrium, showing feature stair and geometry of the roof.


01

5

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

2017


6

01

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

2017


These dominant walls are interrupted by a large east-west atrium in the middle of the building’s plan. Together, the heavy walls and the central atrium aid in way-finding and programmatic separations throughout the building, while also lending haptic material, spatial, and experiential identities to the project. They also allow for a building with no corridors, and many long, unbroken interior sight-lines.

public path of travel through the museum. Plan drafted collaboratively with Shea Gouthro*

R I G HT: Concept Diagram, showing the pedestrian connection through the building.

FO LLOWI N G: 1:100 physical model,

2017

The main structural walls in the project are oriented on a number of roughly north-south axes, which run parallel to the longest length of the ramped path.

LE F T: Plan at grade, highlighting

CNC milled cedar base, baltic birch ply, and 3D printed details. 80 x 30 cm. Model constructed by Shea Gouthro* Rendered interior view behind south facade sun shelves. Rendered view of south facade illuminated at night.

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

figure is shaped around the path running through it, as well as a number of moves that enhance sight lines between the Rail Deck Park to the south and a parkette to the north west.

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

PLAN: The museum’s planometric

01

7


8

01

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

2017


01

9

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

2017


LAN G UAG E: The building shifts in its

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

2017

tectonic and material expressions as visitors move through it, from lightweight on the southern end to heavy in the north. This linear path begins with a floating suspension bridge at the rail deck, then a fourstorey glass facade behind a screen of thin sun shelves. Visitors then enter the soaring heights of the main atrium, see the depth of the auditorium, and end at the heavy walls of concrete on the north end of the site. This sequence of state changes is intended to emphasize the motion of the visitor as a critical component of the project.

O PPO S ITI O N S: This building is above

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

all meant to blur what my partner and I believe to be harmful oppositions inherent to the design of many public buildings. This project is aimed towards the seamless integration of building and street, of landscape and architecture, of programmed space and public place, and of visitors and pedestrians alike; so that the character and identity of the Toronto City Museum will be ever-changing and heterogeneous.

10

01

LE F T: Rendered view at the base of Wellington Street ramp.

R I G HT: Rendered view of the

suspended walkway passing through the auditorium. Rendered view of south elevation and bridge to the proposed Rail Deck Park.


01

11

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

2017


12

01

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

2017


PE R FO R MAN C E: The intention

to bluntly express environmental performance objectives informed many of the decisions in our design process. For instance, the south facade and the clerestories resulting from the shifting roof planes are oriented to true south in order to capitalize on daylighting and winter solar gains. The high-performance sun shelves that screen the south facade reduce the need to artificially light the deep galleries, and also help to shade harsh summer sunlight. Similarly the large atrium between the primary volumes of the building is oriented east-west in order to utilize the prevailing west winds in Toronto, and naturally ventilate the building in shoulder seasons.

LE F T: Schematic wall section of

south curtain wall and sun shelves.

R I G HT: Rendered 3D construction sequence for parapet.

Physical model explaining sun shelves and curtain wall (1:10).

RAM P. TU N N E L. B R I DG E

TORONTO CITY MUSEUM

2017

Physical model explaining atrium roof system (1:50, model by Shea Gouthro*).

01

13


02 TH E PALPAB I LITY O F I LLU S I O N M.Arch Thesis Advisor: John Shnier Winter 2019

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019

AFTE RI MAG E

14

02

AB STR ACT: “Afterimage: The

Palpability of Illusion” is my M.Arch thesis project, the culmination of a year of research on image-making practices and their relationship to optical illusion. The project is a manifesto on architectural representation, presented through several novel drawing experiments. Informed by media theory, phenomenology, and perceptual psychology, “Afterimage” highlights the effect that photographic “realism” and virtual simulation have had on the once-distinct ontological categories of illusion and reality. The experiments reimagine historical techniques for simulating spatiality and producing optical illusion— from stereoscopes to holograms— that manipulated perception, but plainly exposed the mechanisms of their

effect. “Afterimage” blends those techniques with the digital, reinstating their perceptual immediacy while also demonstrating the inherent contrivance of virtual simulacra.

LE F T: Matrix of final renderings. R I G HT: Partial view of final project installation, April 2019.


02

15

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


2019 M.ARCH THESIS

I N FI N ITY: This experiment is based on

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

the fairly common effect of the“infinity room.” The infinity room shown here is more complicated, however, because the front face of the box is a two-way interrogation mirror. As a result, the viewer does not see their reflection in the infinite space, as one would in a Yayoi Kusama artwork. This illusion requires control of the light contrast between the outside and inside of the box (where the inside is brightly lit, and the exterior room is quite dark).

16

H O LO G R AM S: Inside the infinity box

an LED monitor plays 24 moving films simultaneously. The films are arranged in 6 cruciform patterns that are then calibrated to the circles that you see on the ground. When the images appear in the circles, they are reflected in the glass pyramids above— producing three-dimensional holograms, infinitely arrayed in the depth of the infinity mirrors. This is 3D reimagining of the 19th century Pepper’s Ghost illusion.

LE F T: Diagram explaining construction of the infinity box and holograms.

R I G HT: Photograph from final install. 02


02

17

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


2019 M.ARCH THESIS

PAN O PTI CAL PLAN: This drawing

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

is etched in plexiglass, with a linear LED strip along the circumference of the semi-circle. The light carries through the plexiglass, reflecting only where lines are etched, producing the effect of lines drawn with light. The semi-circle is reflected in the mirrored surface that it comes into contact with, completing the circular drawing. A second mirror is then placed at a 30-degree angle, which produces the illusion of multiple plans floating in the space of the mirrors, arrayed 6 times around a polar centroid.

18

02

LE F T: Diagram explaining the effect of the 30-degree mirrors.

R I G HT: Photograph from final install.


02

19

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


2019 M.ARCH THESIS

WH EATSTO N E STE R E O S C O PE:

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

These experiments reimagine one of the earliest type of stereoscope, which was invented by Sir Charles Wheatstone in 1838 and named eponymously. It used a pair of mirrors at 45 degree angles to the user’s eyes, each reflecting a picture located off to the side. When two pictures simulating left-eye and right-eye views of the same object are presented so that each eye sees only the image designed for it, the brain will fuse the two and accept them as a view of one solid three-dimensional object.

20

02

LE F T: Diagram explaining the

construction of the Wheatstone stereoscope, and how each image is simultaneously viewed.

R I G HT: Photograph from final install.


02

21

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


2019 M.ARCH THESIS

R E N D E R CAM E R AS: The images in

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

each of the Wheatstone stereoscopes are rendered from a digital model, where the left and right eye cameras are positioned 2.5 inches apart (the distance between human eyes). The difference between the two images is barely perceptible without close investigation.

22

02

LE F T: Diagram explaining the location of the two different “cameras� in the render model.

R I G HT: 2 of 8 examples of the subtle

difference between the left eye and right eye images used to produce the 3D effect


02

23

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


2019 M.ARCH THESIS

TH E D EAD ZO O: The vessel

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

represented throughout the “Afterimage” project is a diagram of the displacement of reality that occurs as the resolution of simulation techniques increases. The vessel is an artificial island that would serve as a research and protection facility for animal species in the near future, when the threats posed by the “6th mass extinction” become increasingly real. The vessel is designed as a failsafe that would on the one hand act as a DNA and data storage facility, and on the other hand as a traveling zoo sanctuary where the last of every species is taken to die.

24

For clarity, the building’s plan is a diagrammatic explication of the concept of how reality can be blurred

02

with representation and simulation. At the perimeter there are habitats for real animals, the last living specimen of every species. The next ring is a sort of natural history museum that exhibits items like skeletons, taxidermy, photographs, and images and information. The next ring shows extremely high-resolution film footage of various animals and their habitats. Beyond that there is a gallery of holographic projections, then a virtual reality park, a data center, and a reality park, a data center, and a storage facility for DNA and cryogenic freezing.

LE F T: Aerial rendering of the vessel. R I G HT: Plan drawing of the vessel at 7 meters above sea level.


02

25

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


26

02

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


02

27

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


28

02

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


02

29

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


30

02

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


02

31

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


32

02

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


02

33

AFTE R I MAG E

THE PALPABILITY OF ILLUSION

M.ARCH THESIS

2019


03 SU PE R FU N[D]

Affordable Housing and Water Remediation for Newtown Creek Design Studio V: Option Studio Advisors: Amale Andraos, Dan Wood and Sam Dufaux (WORK AC) Fall 2017, 8 Weeks

34

THE PROBLEM: Decimated by

THE FIX: This project addresses these

GROWING PAINS: Alongside pollution

LE F T: Axonometric buildup, explaining

centuries of shipping and industry, Newtown Creek in Brooklyn, NY is one of the most polluted waterways in North America. The objective of this studio was to design experimental housing that would help remediate it. issues, this project addresses New York City’s affordable housing shortage; of particular importance in the face of rapid population growth and gentrification in North Brooklyn. With this crisis comes the issue of affordable food produce, because the farm land required to feed New York City is approximately equal to the land mass of the State of Virginia, and 90% of all produce sold in New York is shipped from California.

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

NEWTOWN CREEK

2017

A PA R T M E N T S

03

problems by combining affordable housing with the infrastructure needed to purify water; which, once cleaned, irrigates vertical farms, thereby reimagining the creek as a place of growth and production, rather than decay. water intake, oyster filtration locks, bar building division, vertical farming, and public access through the site.

R I G HT: Collage view showing the public face of the apartment building.


03

35

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

NEWTOWN CREEK

2017


2017

PRODUCE: The infrastructure on the

GREENHOUSE: After the water has been

LE F T: 1:200 model. CNC-milled foam,

NEWTOWN CREEK

project is shaped around a series of oyster locks. Oysters, known as “nature’s filter,” can each purify 50-70 gallons of water in a 24 hour period. New York City has an initiative called the Billion Oysters Project that aims to rebuild the decimated oyster population along the Hudson River, and in so doing help to purify the water.

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

36

OYSTERS: The ground plane of the

purified, it is used to irrigate the vertical farms. 1 acre of indoor farm land can yield as much as 20 outdoor acres, and can be operated year-round regardless of weather. The greenhouse is placed and designed relative sun angles to maximize exposure.

03

site would produce jobs that would benefit the low-income neighborhood. These jobs would include specialized farming, as well food processing, packaging, and shipping facilities on site. Leftover spaces in the greenhouse and beneath the oyster beds are programmed for a public marketplace, cafe, and restaurant, which would call for many more employees. laser-cut plexiglass, and 3D printed details. 40 x 90 cm.

R I G HT: Site analysis, mapping solar

paths and major public transit access.


03

37

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

NEWTOWN CREEK

2017


38

03

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

NEWTOWN CREEK

2017


LAYE R S: There are 4,100 m2 of

commercial and industrial space and 2,300 m2 of public park packed onto the 7,800 m2 site. The amount of space dedicated to these programs was made possible by layering them, as shown in this perspective section. A large ramp brings the public up to the second level (its slope concealing the ramp of the parking garage), where people can see the oyster beds; the produce from the greenhouse is moved down to processing, packaging, and shipping facilities buried beneath the oysters; the public route through the site runs into the building, where a spiral stair brings visitors up to the greenhouse and restaurant. These intersections of program kept the plan tight, allowing the required 23,000 m2 of residential program without overwhelming the site or impeding on its low-rise locale.

PR EVI O U S: Site Plan at +3.00 m and floor plans at +10.00 m, +13.00 m, and +22.00 m, with diagrammatic section as plan key.

LE F T: Perspective section showing

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

NEWTOWN CREEK

2017

food production facilities, public route through site, parking, unit interiors, and residential amenities.

03

39


40

03

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

NEWTOWN CREEK

2017


U N ITS: Each unit type is modulated

around a double-height central space, which ensures consistent light and air quality for all apartments.

NEST: The repetition of unit types

would make it possible to pre-fabricate parts, thereby reducing costs of production and assembly. The units inter lock in a tetris pattern, and the removal of pieces create the terraces for vertical farming.

GRADIENT: The various tones of purple,

2017

chosen to avoid the aesthetic tropes of “green” architecture, codify the unit types, making their distribution legible in the building’s elevations.

LE F T: All unit types, codified

NEWTOWN CREEK

with diagrammatic elevations, axonometrics, and floor plans.

R I G HT: View from unit interior,

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

showing double-height room and oyster locks beyond. Diagram of “tetris” assembly pattern and physical model of a 1-bedroom unit. 1:50 scale, bass wood and plexiglass. 18 x 16 x 14 cm.

03

41


42

03

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

NEWTOWN CREEK

2017


03

43

SU PE R FU N D[D] APARTM E NTS

NEWTOWN CREEK

2017


04 DOUBLE VISION

Design Studio II & Architectural Photography (Hist. Theory) Adrian Phiffer & Peter Sealy Winter 2016 & Fall 2017

DOU B LE VISION

RESIDENTIAL PROJECT

2016

R E S I D E NTIAL PR OJ E CT

44

PR EAM B LE: This project was

surfaces and aligned them to be looked through simultaneously, thus producing a singular photographic image of overlapping “fragments,” obscuring the architecture of the project but in some way implying what it might be like to move through its elongated form.

ALI G N: I drafted 3 perspectives from

LE F T: Plan of lower level.

developed to support a paper in a seminar course on architectural photography, where I developed a thesis about the relative ambivalence of static images in representing architecture. Merleau-Ponty famously argued that Cézanne’s paintings divided images into “fragments,” showing sequential vantage points simultaneously. He suggests that such images represent the phenomenal, kinetic experience of space. This idea was a point of departure for me on this project. slightly different, sequential locations in the building. These images were then treated as planes, layered in space. I printed the drawings on transparent

04

Concept diagram showing sequenctial perspective views.

R I G HT: Physical concept model


04

45

DOU B LE VISION

RESIDENTIAL PROJECT

2016


46

04

DOU B LE VISION

RESIDENTIAL PROJECT

2016


VO LU M E S: The architectural subject

of this project comes from a formal exercise that I completed early in my educated, where a square block was split into two separate volumes. In successive stages of the fast-paced project, these two volumes were developed and programmed as a pair of residences in a single building.

B R I D G E: As the project progressed,

RESIDENTIAL PROJECT

2016

narratives were constructed about the house’s inhabitants and the site. This project proposes a land bridge (over hypothetical river rapids) that doubles as a residence for a wildlife photographer and a biologist, with shared spaces for research and image processing in the glazed bridge.

LE F T: Rendered view of bridge house

DOU B LE VISION

spanning the river. Rendered view of residence interior.

R I G HT: Physical model, the final

deliverable in Design Studio II. 1:100, museum board, 40 x 40 cm.

04

47


05 VI LLA

2018

STU D I E S O N O PTI CAL I LLU S I O N S

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

OBSCU RA

Thesis Preparation Studio Advisor: John Shnier Winter 2018

an optical illusion on the grandest scale. The complex was built on several kilometers of underground service tunnels so that Emperor’s place of leisure would not expose the trouble and effort required to upkeep it. Many of the tunnels, known as the cryptoporticus, are still undiscovered or uncharted today: everywhere, but never in sight.

sensorium. The project is informed by perceptual psychology and fits into discourse around ocularcentrism. However, rather than focusing explicitly on non-visual perception, the thesis endeavors to understand optical illusions and the remarkable tendency that the human mind has to see things that are not truly there.

PR OJ E CT: The Villa Obscura is

an illustrated book that explains a collection of subterranean chambers in the cryptoporticus at Hadrian’s Villa, presented as useful fictions in the elaboration of a thesis project that interrogates the relationship between architecture, sight, and the human

VI LLA OBSCU RA

48

HAD R IAN’S VI LLA: Hadrian’s Villa is

05

LE F T: Matrix of renderings that illustrated the final folio.

R I G HT: Various models ranging from

conceptual to illustrative, presented at final review alongside the folio.


05

49

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


2018

CAM E R A O B S C U R A: The first actual

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

record of something like a Camera Obscura dates back to Ancient Greece, when Aristotle noticed that a partial eclipse could be safely viewed by looking at the ground underneath a tree. The tree’s canopy created a nice, dark space, and the tiny holes between the leaves allowed light to pass through and “project” a mirror image of the sky onto the ground.

VI LLA OBSCU RA

In the 16th century, artists made use of the Camera Obscura to produce drawings with perfect perspective. In Victorian times, larger Camera Obscuras became popular seaside attractions, allowing groups of people to experience the phenomenon together. The live images were a great source of entertainment.

50

05

At Hadrian’s Villa, a number of Camera Obscura boxes appear throughout the complex, bringing images of the world above into the cryptoporticus as wayfinding beacons for explorers of the tunnels.

LE F T: Axonometric section of a

camera obscura chamber, explaining how the pinhole, mirrors, and convex lens bring the image into the chamber below.

R I G HT: Possible location of a camera

obscura monolith in Hadrian’s Poecile.


05

51

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


52

05

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


05

53

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


2018

I N FI N ITY C HAM B E R: At Hadrian’s

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

Villa, 4 “infinity” rooms are arranged in a cruciform plan, around a central chamber that is entered from above. The inner walls of the chamber are one-way interrogation mirrors, so that the central chamber and stair are not reflected in the 4 rooms. The result is the illusion of an uninhabitable, infinity.

VI LLA OBSCU RA

Whenever there are two parallel reflective surfaces which can bounce a beam of light back and forth an indefinite (theoretically infinite) number of times, this effect is produced. The reflections appear to recede into the distance because the light is actually traversing the non-existent distance that it appears to be traveling. Each additional reflection adds length to the path that the light must travel before

54

05

exiting the mirror, thus producing the phenomenon of the “dark horizon.” When studied using the principles of geometrical optics, the infinite space form the mathematical surface known as Torricelli’s Trumpet, named in honor of the mathematician who first studied it. In theory, such a surface is infinite in area, but encloses a finite volume.

LE F T: Section explaining interrogation mirror and required contrast between interior/exterior light levels.

R I G HT: Rendered view of infinity

chamber interior. Rendered view of chamber entrance.


05

55

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


2018

I NTE R R O GATI O N M I R R O R S: In order

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

to test the efficacy of the concept for the Infinity Chamber, I constructed an “infinity box� with a piece of oneway interrogation mirror on the front elevation of the model. The light on the interior and exterior sides of the interrogation mirror were carefully calibrated with dark materials and an LED light table to maximize the effectiveness of the effect. The moon figure, etched in the mirrors, was infinitely mirrored to represent various possible phases.

56

05

AB OVE: model photograph


05

57

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


C LO U D C HAM B E R: In meteorology,

a cloud is an aerosol comprising a fleeting visible mass of liquid droplets, frozen crystals, or particles suspended in the atmosphere above the surface of a planetary body. On Earth, clouds form as a result of saturation of air when it is cooled to its dew point.

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018

At Hadrian’s Villa, the Cloud Chamber occurs as a result of three layers of very different air. In the subterranean cryptoporticus, there is a natural reserve of cold dry air. Above this, in the middle, hot humid air is fed into the chamber, and above grade, a plasticwrapped greenhouse intensifies the relative heat of Tivoli’s countryside and produces a very hot and dry interior environment. The layering of these three distinct air qualities causes intense condensation, and the cloud effect.

VI LLA OBSCU RA

The atmospheres above and below the cloud have different qualities of light, temperature, and humidity, separating the spaces with a barrier that is visible but permeable. The cloud can be touched, transversed, and felt, as you move through a series of very different microclimatic conditions and varying layers of visibility.

58

05

LE F T: Rendered view of cloud chamber below grade.

R I G HT: Rendered view of cloud chamber above grade.

FO LLOWI N G: Diagrammatic section describing how the cloud effect is produced.


05

59

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


60

05

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


05

61

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


2018

ARTI FACTS: Throughout the

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

development of the project, models were used to test the efficacy of the perceptual and optical effects being explored in the various “chambers” of the Villa Obscura. These photographs represent several of those artifacts.

box at UofT’s open studios exhibit, “Specimens and Fragments.”

R I G HT: Infinity box with a one-way

interrogation mirror in viewing hole. The folio case, finished with gold leaf and embossed title. Various artifacts in background.

VI LLA OBSCU RA

62

LE F T: Man looking into an infinity

05


05

63

VI LLA OBSCU RA

INDEPENDENT RESEARCH FOLIO

2018


Profile for Nick Reddon

Nicholas Reddon Portfolio 2019  

Nicholas Reddon Portfolio 2019  

Advertisement