Ocean Drive - 2014 - Issue 7 - September

Page 1

fall fashion

oceandrive.com niche media holdings, llc

emily ratajkowski







BAL HARBOUR PALM BEACH PALM BEACH GARDENS ORLANDO 800.550.0005 chanel.com ©2014 CHANEL®, Inc.






Bal harBoUr shoPs


michaelkors.com


Penthouse # 4602


Co R A L G A B L e s : A r t e fAc to D e S I G N H o U S e 4 4 4 0 P o N c e D e L e o N B Lv D. 3 0 5 .7 74 .0 0 0 4 Av e n t u R A : A r t e fA c to H o m e 1 7 6 5 1 B I S c Ay N e B Lv D . 3 0 5 . 9 3 1 . 9 4 8 4 d o R A L : A r t e f A c t o w A r e H o U S e c o N c e P t 3 2 9 0 N w 7 9 t H Av e . 3 0 5 . 6 3 9 . 9 9 6 9 B r A z I L 2 5 L o c At I o N S | w w w. A r t e fA c t o . c o m






BA L H A R B O U R E S C A DA . C O M

97 0 0 C O L L I N S AV E , S U I T E # 2 5 9

3 0 5 . 8 67. 9 2 8 3




moncler.com

9700 Collins Avenue — BAL HARBOUR, Miami


shop plein.com

MIAMI / AVENTURA MALL


My AMericAn DreAM – milan – 23.06.14 – 21.18



Redefining Menswear This Fall.


Water Resistance Testing

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Big Bang Gold Ceramic. 18K red gold chronograph, with ceramic bezel. Structured rubber strap.

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B O U T I Q U E

Bal Harbour Shops 9700 Collins Ave Tel: +1 305-865-1855 www.hublot.com •

twitter.com/hublot •

facebook.com/hublot


aventuramall.com


cartier tiffany & co. BurBerry nordstrom rolex emilio Pucci redvalentino Bloomingdale’s Brooks Brothers longchamP omega Boss hugo Boss m missoni PhiliPP Plein plus 300 stores


The Miami Design District is a creative neighborhood and shopping destination dedicated to innovative art, fashion, architecture and dining. On location at Prada, 180 NE 40th Street, Miami, FL 33137 Valet Parking from $3


L U X H

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M IAM I D E S I G N D I STR I C T. N ET 39th to 41st Streets between NE 2nd Avenue and N Miami Avenue, Miami, FL 33137 Phone 305 722 7100




Photo Michel Gibert. Special thanks : Juan Antonio Sánchez Morales - www.adhocmsl.com - www.lafabriquealettres.com - TASCHEN. *Conditions apply, ask your store for more details.

éditionspéciale

$8,495* instead of $11,260

Caractère sectional in leather, designed by Roberto Tapinassi & Maurizio Manzoni *$8,495 instead of $11,260 until 12.31.14 for composition as shown excluding toss cushions (120.9/93.3”l x 32.2”h x 39.4:d) upholstered in Tendresse, pigmented corrected grain leather (over 50 colors available). Contrasted « V » stitching on armrests and back. Base in chromed metal and stained wood, Taupe fnish. Optional toss cushions. Mechanically adjustable headrest available at additional cost. Other dimensions available, straight sofas, armchair and ottoman. PIXL bookcase and cocktail table, design Fabrice Berrux. Les Pescadous vases, design Margaux Keller. Manufactured in Europe. MIAMI - 450 Biltmore Way - Tel. (305) 444-1168 – coralgables@roche-bobois.com - Now open on Sundays from 12:00 am - 5:00 pm - NORTH PALM BEACH - 136 U.S. Highway One - Tel. (561) 835-4982 palmbeach@roche-bobois.com AVENTURA, FL OPENING SOON - ATLANTA - BOSTON - CHICAGO - COLUMBUS, OH - COSTA MESA, CA - DALLAS - DENVER - HOUSTON - LA JOLLA, CA - LOS ANGELES - MANHASSET, NY - NATICK, MA - NEW YORK, 35TH ST - NEW YORK, 57TH ST - PHILADELPHIA - PORTLAND NOW OPEN - SAN FRANCISCO - SAN JUAN, PR - SCOTTSDALE - SEATTLE - TROY, MI - WASHINGTON, DC

Complimentary 3D Interior Design Service*

Showrooms, collections, news and catalogs www.roche-bobois.com


l’art de vivre by roche bobois


“Miami’s Most Established Neighborhood” — FO RT U N E � � � C E O � F U T U RE P A RK GRO V E RE S I D EN T

WWW.PARK - GROVE.COM

� � Foot Ceilings • ��� Feet of Bayfront Pools � � , � � � Sq Ft o f A me nit ies Des ig ned by William Sofield • � Acr es of Pr ivate Garde n s D e sig n e d b y En zo En e a W o r l d - C l a s s , Mu s e u m -Q u al i ty , Pr o f e s s i o n al l y Cu r ate d A r t th r o u g hout the Property

SALES GALLERY ��� ��� ���� � � � � S O U T H B A Y S H O R E D R I V E � TH F L O O R M I A M I F L O R I D A � � � � �


DEVELOPED BY

TERRA GROUP � THE RELATED GROUP

EXCLUSIVE MARKETING � SALES BY DOUGLAS ELLIMAN DEVELOPMENT MARKETING

Broker participation welcome. Oral representation cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representation of the Developer, for correct representation, make reference to the documents required by section 718.503 Florida Statutes, to be furnished by the Developer or Buyer or Lessee. Not an offer where prohibited by State Statutes. Plans, features and amenities subject to change without notice. All illustrations and plans are artist conceptual renderings and are subject to change

without notice. This advertisement does not constitute an offer in the states of NY or NJ or any jurisdiction where prior registration or other qualification is required. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY


WAYS TO SEE THE FUTURE

The frst residential skyscraper in the Western Hemisphere by Zaha Hadid Architects • 83 Museum-Quality Residences • Unobstructed views of Miami’s Biscayne Bay and Museum Park • 60th Floor Sky Lounge and Aquatic Center • Private Helipad • From $5M to over $15M (305) 306-6960 (one.muse) www.1000museum.com ORAL REPRESENTATION CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER, FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCES TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503. FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE, WE ARE PLEDGED TO THE LETTER AND SPIRIT OF THE U.S. POLICY FOR ACHIEVEMENT OF EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY THROUGHOUT THE NATION. WE ENCOURAGE AND SUPPORT AN AFFIRMATIVE ADVERTISING AND MARKETING PROGRAM IN WHICH THERE ARE NO BARRIERS TO OBTAINING HOUSING BECAUSE OF RACE, COLOR, RELIGION, SEX, HANDICAP, FAMILIAL STATUS OR NATIONAL ORIGIN. THIS IS NOT INTENDED TO BE AN OFFER TO SELL, OR SOLICITATION TO BUY, CONDOMINIUM UNITS TO RESIDENTS OF ANY JURISDICTION WHERE PROHIBITED BY LAW, AND YOUR ELIGIBILITY FOR PURCHASE WILL DEPEND UPON YOUR STATE OR RESIDENCY. HELIPAD REQUIRES FAA AND OTHER GOVERNMENTAL APPROVALS WHICH ARE NOT YET OBTAINED.


Sales representation exclusively by


EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY OPPOR TUNITY


LIVE ABOVE IT ALL.

ONE, TWO & THREE BEDROOM RESIDENCES STARTING FROM THE HIGH $300’S. FULLY FURNISHED RESIDENCES AVAILABLE. NINE Sales Gallery: 900 S Miami Ave | Suite 267 | Miami, FL 33130 | Next to Taverna Opa Fortune Development Sales

Developed by

786.220.0943

and STARWOOD CAPITAL GROUP

NINEMIAMI.com


SOUTH OF FIFTH

average $1,765/sq

SOUTH BEACH average

$1,270/sq ft

EDGEWATER

average $650/sq

ft

ft starting at

$350/sq ft 4 MIDTOWN 2 MIDTOWN

DESIGN DISTRICT average $460/sq

ft

MIDBLOCK AT MIDTOWN BEST VALUE IN MIAMI 305-742-0094 |

www.midtownmiamiresidences.com

|

ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. THESE DRAWINGS ARE CONCEPTUAL ONLY AND ARE FOR CONVENIENCE OF REFERENCE.


BRICKELL

average $670/sq

DOWNTOWN

average $570 - $1,000/sq

ft

ft

UNMATCHED PRICING / UNRIVALED NEIGHBORHOOD / ONE OF A KIND LIFESTYLE INCOMPARABLE LOCATION / STELLAR FLOORPLANS / FINEST PANORAMIC VIEWS ENDLESS SHOPPING & DINING

on-site sales center & furnished models 3250 NE 1 AVE, 5th Floor, Miami, FL 33137

A Gold Krown Project Amounts shown are for marketing purposes, only, based on information obtained from various sources, including public and private records, multiple listing services, brokers’ opinions, advertising and prices announced by others. Amounts shown may not reflect actual sales or listings. Figures are approximate and should not be relied upon in the absence of Buyer’s or Lessee’s own investigation and inquiry. Seller disclaims any representation or warranty as to actual amounts or comparable sales.


FRONT RUNNER Earl DeVore in a Miller special race car at the Fulford-Miami Speedway in 1926.

Race foR the ages

In 1925, Miami was home to the world’s fastest speedway, the Fulford-Miami Speedway, located on what was then Flagler Boulevard (an area now occupied by Greynolds Park in the Sky Lake neighborhood). Conceived by Miami Beach builder and auto enthusiast Carl Fisher and built with the help of Ray Harroun, the first winner of the 1911 Indy 500, the 1.25-mile wood track boasted 50-degree banked turns, which were drastically greater than the 31-degree turns at the Daytona International Speedway. Steep banks dictated driving speeds of 110 miles per hour or more to avoid sliding off the track. On February 22, 1926, 20,000 fans packed into the North Miami racetrack to witness the speedway’s first race, paying anywhere from $3 for general admission to stand in the infield to $15 for box seats. Fast cars and high ticket prices—it was a foretaste of decades to come for a then very young Miami.

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As advertised, 18 “daring drivers” competed for the Carl G. Fisher Trophy, donning aviator goggles and the occasional necktie. Only six managed to finish the 300-mile, 240-lap race. Winner Peter DePaolo took home the grand prize of $12,000, crossing the finish line in two hours and 19 minutes and averaging a speed of 129 miles per hour. Unfortunately, Miami’s claim to racing fame was short lived. Just seven months later, in September 1926, the Great Miami Hurricane completely demolished the track after only that one major race. Pieces of the wooden surface, scattered throughout the city, were used to reconstruct damaged buildings along Miami Beach. The track itself was never rebuilt. Though the track is gone, Miami still has a knack for putting on an extravagant show. Just peek into any of our nightclubs, or watch the parade of supercars cruising South Beach on any given weekend. OD

photography by State archiveS of florida, florida MeMory

The FulFord-MiaMi Speedway—Then The fasTesT raceTrack in The world—played hosT To one single race before iTs desTrucTion in 1926 by The greaT MiaMi hurricane. by mercedes vallina


Fendi Boutiques Fendi.com


FRONT RUNNER A penguin holding a Miami Seaquarium brochure. Opened on September 24, 1955, the Virginia Key attraction was one of the first marine-life parks in the country.

Under the Sea

While seeing all manner of aquatic fauna today may be commonplace for many Floridians, it is hard to overestimate the awe the crowds felt when the Miami Seaquarium first opened its doors on September 24, 1955. The culmination of a 14-year dream of industrialist Fred D. Coppock, the Seaquarium cost $2.3 million to build and required 14 months of construction. When fully realized, the 38-acre Virginia Key compound was one of the first and most revolutionary marine-life parks in America. The star attraction? South Florida’s first dolphin show complete with Atlantic bottlenoses in a 600,000-gallon pool. In fact, many episodes of the beloved 1960s TV show Flipper were shot on the premises at the lagoon. The park, however, was not just designed to delight audiences but to educate the public about wildlife conservation and the beauty of the creatures residing within. Today, the Seaquarium boasts one of the leading marine

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mammal rescue and rehabilitation teams in the country; it has released more than 70 manatees back into the wild since 2004 and cares for many other sea turtles, dolphins, and whales. Next year’s 60th-anniversary celebration will also bring many changes— this spring, it was announced that the Seaquarium will be sold to California-based Palace Entertainment. That news came on the heels of the debate over the park’s lone orca whale, Lolita, which preservationists have been fighting to free under the Endangered Species Act, as well as the continued debate over the ethics of all sea parks, brought on by the documentary Blackfish. While the future of the Seaquarium is in flux, there is no doubt that its mark on both the people and animals of Miami remains indelible. 4400 Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, 305-361-5705; miami

seaquarium.com OD

photography by state archives of florida, florida memory

After neArly six decAdes entertAining And educAting south floridiAns, the MiaMi SeaquariuM fAces An uncertAin future. by juliet izon


SAKS FIFTH AVENUE


destination:

PARAMOUNTresidences.com (954) 719-6049 ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE.


ONLY

95

BEACHFRONT RESIDENCES FROM $1.2 MILLION

“The first luxury beachfront condominium in a decade on Fort Lauderdale’s internationally renowned strip. The only location in Fort Lauderdale that is on the beach and neighboring a park. It is an exceptional place to live.” - Dan Kodsi, Developer and Creator of PARAMOUNT Bay


Developed by



E XCLUS IVE SALES BY


WELCOME HOME, GLOBAL CITIZENS Cosmopolitan residences for those who cross continents the way others cross streets, Reach Brickell City Centre welcomes the explorers, fashion-grabbers, culturally curious and independent spirits in search of connection, adventure and sometimes a bit of frivolity. Emerging from Miami’s new multidimensional landmark, the 43-story residential tower acts as an extension of Brickell City Centre’s revolutionary lifestyle concept. The future home to infuential fashion brands, chef-driven restaurants, and uncommon entertainment, residents will fnd themselves at the center of this unprecedented, urban playground.

Miami Residences from $550,000 - $2 million Penthouse pricing available upon request

COME CLOSER

RES I DE NC ES BRI C K E LLC I T YC E N T RE .C O M

Phone: 305 371 2888 Sales Gallery: 700 Brickell Avenue, Miami, Florida

ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, REFERENCE SHOULD BE MADE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. THIS OFFERING IS MADE ONLY BY THE PROSPECTUS FOR THE CONDOMINIUM AND NO STATEMENT SHOULD BE RELIED UPON IF NOT MADE IN THE PROSPECTUS. THIS IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL, OR SOLICITATION OF OFFERS TO BUY, THE CONDOMINIUM UNITS IN STATES WHERE SUCH OFFER OR SOLICITATION CANNOT BE MADE. PRICES, PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE.


L T N H

O V E H Y E I G BO R


investments

REAL ESTATE DEVELOPERS SINCE 1981

Sales Center Located at 1450 South Miami Ave., Miami, FL 33130 Tel. 888-236-5468 • www.BondonBrickell.com


HIGH-DESIGN BEACHFRONT LIVING.

ATLANTIS AS YOUR PERSONAL PLAYGROUND. Originally Priced From USD$695,000 to $3.5 Million

Limited studio, one and two-bedroom residences with private balconies are available and include: • Exclusive access to Cain at The Cove Adults-only Pool

• Curbside Check-In, a direct escort to your residence

• Preferred seating at Atlantis LIVE events

• Largest casino in the Caribbean

• Private Fitness and Business Centers

• Complete access to the world of Atlantis and so much more


FINAL PHASE 30%* OFF

LIMITED TIME OFFER!

JUNIOR SUITE

ONE BEDROOM

888.605.3807 | 242.363.6838 | www.OwntheReef.com/ocean

This commercial message does not constitute an er to sell or a solicitation of an er to buy a unit in the condominium. No solicitation, er or sale of a unit in the condominium will be made in any jurisdiction in which such activity would be unlawful prior to registration under the securities, condominium or land sales laws of such jurisdiction. Only representations and statements in the purchase and sale agreement and other applicable legal documents are binding and correctly state the representations of the developer. * er subject to change without notice and cannot be combined with any othe er. Š 2014 All rights reserved - Kerzner International.


East Edgewater is quickly becoming the frst neighborhood of the new Miami – as much about the city as it is about the bay.

EAST EDGEWATER IS ABOUT CONNECTION WITHOUT CONGESTION. At Biscayne Boulevard and 27th Street, ION East Edgewater is surrounded by the Arts & Entertainment District, Midtown, Wynwood, Design District, Downtown, Brickell, and Miami Beach, with direct access to all the freeways. ION is poised to become the frst luxury condominium built expressly for life in the city – this city – right now. ION will rise, shaped by the visionary minds of Arquitectonica and SAKOR Development. Rounding out this “A-team” is the world’s preeminent luxury hotel and resort interior design frm Hirsch Bedner Associates. Led by Master Designer, Greg Bates, the ingenious HBA group is responsible for the interior design at Mandarin Oriental Miami and Mandarin Oriental New York at Time Warner Center.

37TH FLOOR INFINTY POOL

Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the Developer. For correct representations, reference should be made to the documents required by section 718.503, Florida Statutes, to be furnished a Developer to a buyer or lessee. This ofering is made only by the prospectus for the condominium and no statement should be relied upon if not made in the prospectus. This is not an ofer to sell, or solicitation of ofers to buy, the condominium units in states where such ofer or solicitation cannot be made. Prices, plans and specifcations are subject to change without notice. This condominium is being developed by Edgewater Miami, LLC, a Florida limited liability company (the “Developer”), which has a limited right to use the trademarked names and logos of Encore Housing Opportunity Fund pursuant to a license agreement with Encore Housing Opportunity Fund. Any and all statements, disclosures and/or representations shall be deemed made by the Developer and not by Encore Housing Opportunity Fund or any


AS ENVISIONED BY ARQUITECTONICA

HIGH DESIGN AT A PRICE YOU CAN LIVE WITH

ION EAST EDGEWATER EMERGES IN MIAMI’S HOTTEST NEW NEIGHBORHOOD FROM THE LOW $300s

SPACIOUS OUTDOOR TERRACES

Visit our Sales Center at 275 NE 18th Street

(Next to Chase, across from Publix)

ionmiamicondos.com 866 761 7131

8TH FLOOR RESORT POOL DECK

other party, and potential or actual purchasers shall look solely to the Developer (and not to Encore Housing Opportunity Fund and/or any of its afliates) with respect to any and all maters relating to the marketing and/or development of the condominium and with respect to the sales of units in the condominium. The graphics and text refected are the copyrighted property of the Developer. The renderings illustrate and depict the spirit of a lifestyle; however, amenities and atractions of the condominium are subject to change. While there are water views at the property, views may vary. The restaurant is subject to the Developer obtaining all necessary and appropriate permits, none of which have been obtained. Any restaurant is intended to be privately operated by a third party operator from a commercial space.

Exclusive Sales & Marketing by


contents

september 2014 44 // Front runner 72 // letter From the editor-in-ChieF

74 // letter From the Publisher

76 // …Without Whom

this issue Would not have been Possible

78 // the list 145 // shot on site

Treasures 91 // diamond Jubilee Designer Donna Karan celebrates three decades of her fashion label as well as her ongoing efforts for philanthropy.

94// night moves Accent your ensembles with oversize clutches and powerful pumps.

98 // nothing lost in translation

A former Miss USSR, Julia Lemigova is fnding success in Coconut Grove as the founder of Russie Blanche skincare.

100 // hoW bazaar Shop a global array of treasures at jewelry designer Yeliz Titiz’s Design District marketplace. Plus, what’s new from Roberto Cavalli, Philipp Plein, and Intermix.

102 // gone sWimming

For her 2014 Fall collection, Donna Karan finds inspiration in her own early designs.

106 // steeling time Fall fashionistas are favoring metal bracelet timepieces.

108 // For eyes Miami-based Razón is partnering with global philanthropy Eyejusters to provide glasses to people in need.

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photography by randall slavin

91

New runways, larger trade shows, and countless brands made this the busiest year yet for Miami Swim Week.



contents

september 2014

98

Skincare maven Julia Lemigova, with some of her menagerie, finds a new home in Coconut Grove.

159

Eating House’s nightly spin on Miami’s many flavors keeps foodies coming back for more.

PeoPle 129 // liVing legacy

The high-end rums launched in Miami are having their global debut thanks in part to the leadership of the family heir at the helm, Facundo L. Bacardi.

Beatriz Milhazes, Feijoada, 2010, part of the Brazilian artist’s new show at PAMM.

113 // Visual Jungle

Giant works of art and enticing aromas are popping up all around Miami as part of the three-day Dwntwn Art Days festival.

116 // Breaking MiaMi’s sonic Barrier

Experimental composer Gustavo Matamoros keeps searching for new sounds for his Listening Club, kicking off this month.

120 // Tracking The MiaMi generaTion

Works by María Brito, Pablo Cano, and Humberto Calzada are part of a next-generation exhibition of CubanAmerican artists.

124 // Blue swoon

Beatriz Milhazes mounts a kaleidoscopic new exhibit at PAMM. Plus, the latest news from RedBike, Lily Allen, and Carl Hiaasen.

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132 // she-wolf of

Biscayne BouleVard

Second-generation restaurateur Jessica Sanchez is wowing area gastronomes at her new MiMo eatery, Loba.

134 // oscar winning

Coral Gables-based designer Oscar Garcia-Lopez is moving from the winner’s circle on Project Runway: Under the Gunn into the spotlight.

136 // higher learning

Superintendent Alberto Carvalho has transformed the Miami-Dade County public school system into a national example of excellence.

138 // undefeaTed

The Miami Dolphins kick off another season of community outreach through the team’s eponymous foundation.

photography by Noah Fecks (eatiNg house); collectioN beatriz Milhazes/MaNuel Águas aNd pepe schettiNo/courtesy oF beatriz Milhazes studio (Milhazes); gary jaMes (leMigova)

124

Culture


BAL HARBOUR SHOPS 305.868.2113


contents TasTe 159 // Change Up Chef Giorgio Rapicavoli catapulted a win on Food Network’s Chopped into the hipster-chic Coral Gables hot spot Eating House.

162 // 25 and CoUnting Coral Gables restaurateur Nino Pernetti celebrates a quarter-century of decadent dining at Caffe Abbracci.

september 2014

172

Gone Girl’s Emily Ratajkowski isn’t afraid to blur the lines.

Antonia dress, Cushnie et Ochs ($1,495). Saks Fifth Avenue, Dadeland Mall, 7687 N. Kendall Dr., South Miami, 305-662-2029; saks.com. Yellow-gold Sassi amethyst and pavé diamond ring, Bulgari ($9,300). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-861-8898; bulgari.com

164 // gables staples Whether you’re craving Cuban or sushi, these Coral Gables mainstays cater to local foodies.

168 // gold standard Palme d’Or’s Golden Palm cocktail raises the bar on seasonal imbibing.

170 // breaking the box A look at groundbreaking new bites at Michael Shikany, Hyde Beach, and Niu Kitchen.

FeaTures 172 // More than this From “Blurred Lines” to the big screen, Emily Ratajkowski exceeds all expectations in this fall’s thriller Gone Girl, opposite Ben Affeck.

180 // eternal eleganCe Bulgari keeps alive the mystique of its most famous patrons with 130th-anniversary designs for future collectors.

184 // baCk in blaCk Stand out from the crowd in sculptural fashions, all in this most sophisticated shade.

192 // the art Coast Visit an entire spectrum of creative talent at the museums and galleries along the US-1 corridor between Palm Beach and Miami.

200 // Where everybody knoWs yoUr naMe

210 // the priCe of ivory African elephants are being hunted to extinction for their valuable tusks. Chelsea Clinton talks about the Clinton Foundation’s efforts to save these majestic creatures.

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photography by tony duran

The people, places, and Twitter feeds that make Miami cool.



contents 200

Amanda Del Duca and fellow Miami creatives put this city at the forefront of cool.

september 2014

EminEnt Domain 215 // Upping the Upper east side With her renovation of the Vagabond Hotel and The Royal Motel, developer Avra Jain is leading the revitalization of this long-neglected neighborhood.

218 // exClUsive priCe pOints Got $30 million burning a hole in your wallet? Here are some places to spend it....

220 // living On the edge Two Miami real estate experts expound on Edgewater and the amenities that make it the next hot neighborhood.

222 // a taste fOr style A look at the Miami restaurants where the décor is as decadent as the dining.

anD Finally 256 // take Charge! Thanks to fve multibillion-dollar, world-class shopping destinations coming soon, Miamians will be able to shop till they drop—which is a very good trip!

On the COver Photography by Tony Duran Styling by Garth Condit/ABTP Hair and makeup by Kela Wong/Opus Beauty Digital assistance by Justin Schwan Photography assistance by Cam Video by Emilie Jackson Shot on location at the Dream Downtown (Electric Room and PH-D Rooftop Lounge) Special thanks to Yael Knopf for First Shot Productions Dress, Kaufmanfranco ($3,295). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave, 305-865-1100; saks.com. 18k white-gold Love ceramic and diamond bracelet, Cartier ($46,000). Miami Design District, 151 NE 40th St., 305-864-8793; cartier.us

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photography by maria lankina

Emily Ratajkowski


DISCOVER THE NEWLY EXPANDED BAL HARBOUR SHOP S BOUTIQUE

BAL H ARB O U R SH O P S

2 0 0 WO RTH AV EN U E

TH E GARDEN S MAL L

WATERSIDE SH O P S

SH O P FERRAGAMO .C O M


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We have the inside scoop on Miami’s best parties, style, dining, and more. fitness

WORKOUTS TO STAY SUMMER FIT Don’t fall off your exercise routine just because prime bathing suit season is coming to an end. Try one of these calorie-burning workouts from our favorite local trainers.

photos

Couldn’t attend? Browse the newest photos from Miami’s most exclusive parties.

imbibe

WHAT TO DRINK THIS FALL We’re rounding up the season’s best beer, wine, and cocktails in Miami.

COME FOLLOW US

PHOTOGRAPHY BY WARREN GOLDSWAIN (RUNNER); WORLD RED EYE (ERIN HEATHERTON); KONDOR83 (COCKTAIL)

SEE THE LATEST FROM LAST NIGHT’S EVENTS



JARED SHAPIRO Editor-in-Chief Deputy Editor BILL KEARNEY Senior Managing Editor  JILL SIERACKI Art Director  ADRIANA GARCIA Photo Editor  JENNIFER PAGAN Assistant Editor  JULIA FORD-CARTHER Entertainment and Bookings Editor  JULIET IZON Senior Fashion Editor  LAUREN FINNEY Copy Editor  JULIA STEINER Research Editor  JUDY DEYOUNG

COURTLAND LANTAFF Group Publisher Associate Publishers SUSAN ABRAMS, MICHELE ADDISON Account Executives SUSANA ARAGON, MICHELLE CHALA, LAUREN SHAPIRO Vice President of Public Relations and Marketing LANA BERNSTEIN Event Marketing Manager  CRISTINA PARRA Event Marketing Assistant  SHANA KAUFMAN Assistant Distribution Relations Manager  MICHELLE PETRILLO Sales and Business Coordinator  DARA HIRSH Sales Assistants  ANA BLAGOJEVIC, CRISTINA CABIELLES Office Assistant PELAYO VIGIL

NICHE MEDIA HOLDINGS, LLC Senior Vice President and Editorial Director  MANDI NORWOOD    Vice President of Creative and Fashion  ANN SONG Creative Director  NICOLE A. WOLFSON NADBOY    Executive Fashion Director  SAMANTHA YANKS

ART AND PHOTO

Senior Art Director  FRYDA LIDOR    Associate Art Directors  ANASTASIA TSIOUTAS CASALIGGI, ALLISON FLEMING, JUAN PARRA, JESSICA SARRO    Senior Designer  NATALI SUASNAVAS Designer SARAH LITZ    Photo Director  LISA ROSENTHAL BADER    Photo Editors  KATHERINE HAUSENBAUER-KOSTER, JODIE LOVE, SETH OLENICK, REBECCA SAHN Senior Staff Photographer JEFFREY CRAWFORD    Senior Digital Imaging Specialist JEFFREY SPITERY    Digital Imaging Specialist  JEREMY DEVERATURDA    Digital Imaging Assistant  HTET SAN

FASHION

Fashion Editor  FAYE POWER    Fashion Assistants CONNOR CHILDERS, LISA FERRANDINO

COPY AND RESEARCH

Copy and Research Manager WENDIE PECHARSKY Copy Editors DAVID FAIRHURST, NICOLE LANCTOT, CAROL REED Research Editors LESLIE ALEXANDER, MURAT OZTASKIN, AVA WILLIAMS

EDITORIAL OPERATIONS

Director of Editorial Operations  DEBORAH L. MARTIN    Director of Editorial Relations  MATTHEW STEWART    Editorial Assistant CHRISTINA CLEMENTE Online Executive Editor  CAITLIN ROHAN    Online Editors  ANNA BEN YEHUDA, TRICIA CARR Senior Managing Editors DANINE ALATI, KEN RIVADENEIRA, KAREN ROSE    Managing Editors JENNIFER DEMERITT, JOHN VILANOVA Shelter and Design Editor  SUE HOSTETLER    Timepiece Editor  ROBERTA NAAS    Arts Editor BRETT SOKOL

ADVERTISING SALES

Senior Vice President of Sales and Marketing NORMAN M. MILLER Account Directors CLAIRE CARLIN, KATHLEEN FLEMING, VICTORIA HENRY, KAREN LEVINE, MEREDITH MERRILL, NORMA MONTALVO, ELIZABETH MOORE, GRACE NAPOLITANO, JEFFREY NICHOLSON, DEBORAH O’BRIEN, SHANNON PASTUSZAK, MIA PIERRE-JACQUES, VALERIE ROBLES, JIM SMITH    Account Executives  JUDSON BARDWELL, THOMAS CHILLEMI, MORGAN CLIFFORD, JANELLE DRISCOLL, ALICIA DRY, VINCE DUROCHER, IRENA HALL, SARAH HECKLER, CATHERINE KUCHAR, JULIA MAZUR, FENDY MESY, MARISA RANDALL, MARY RUEGG, ERIN SALINS, CAROLINE SNECKENBERG, JACKIE VAN METER, JESSICA ZIVKOVITCH, GABRIELLA ZURROW    Advertising Business Manager RICHARD YONG      Sales Support and Development  EMMA BEHRINGER, EMILY BURDETT, BRITTANY CORBETT, JAMIE HILDEBRANDT, KARA KEARNS, KELSEY MARRUJO, MICHELLE MASS, NICHOLE MAURER, RUE MCBRIDE, STEPHEN OSTROWSKI, ELENA SENDOLO, ALEXANDRA WINTER

MARKETING, PROMOTIONS, AND PUBLIC RELATIONS

Vice President of Integrated Marketing EMILY MCLINTOCK Director of Integrated Marketing ROBIN KEARSE Integrated Marketing Manager  JIMMY KONTOMANOLIS Director of Creative Services SCOTT ROBSON Promotions Art Designers DANIELLE MORRIS, CARLY RUSSELL Event Marketing Directors  AMY FISCHER, HALEE HARCZYNSKI, MELINDA JAGGER, LAURA MULLEN, JOANNA TUCKER, KIMMY WILSON Event Marketing Managers  ANTHONY ANGELICO, CHRISTIAMILDA CORREA, MONIKA KOWALCZYK Event Marketing Coordinator BROOKE BIDDLE

ADVERTISING PRODUCTION

Vice President of Manufacturing MARIA BLONDEAUX    Director of Positioning and Planning  SALLY LYON    Positioning and Planning Manager TARA MCCRILLIS Assistant Production Director PAUL HUNTSBERRY    Production Manager BLUE UYEDA    Production Artists ALISHA DAVIS, MARISSA MAHERAS, DARA RICCI Distribution Manager MATT HEMMERLING    Fulfillment Manager DORIS HOLLIFIELD    Traffic Supervisor  ESTEE WRIGHT      Traffic Coordinators JEANNE GLEESON, MALLORIE SOMMERS    Circulation Research Specialist  CHAD HARWOOD

FINANCE

Controller DANIELLE BIXLER    Finance Directors  AUDREY CADY, LISA VASSEUR-MODICA    Director of Credit and Collections CHRISTOPHER BEST Senior Credit and Collections Analyst  MYRNA ROSADO    Senior Billing Coordinator CHARLES CAGLE Senior Accountant  LILY WU    Junior Accountants  KATHY SABAROVA, NEIL SHAH, NATASHA WARREN

ADMINISTRATION, DIGITAL, AND OPERATIONS

Director of Operations MICHAEL CAPACE    Director of Human Resources STEPHANIE MITCHELL    Executive Assistant ARLENE GONZALEZ Digital Media Developer  MICHAEL KWAN    Digital Producer  ANTHONY PEARSON    Facilities Coordinator JOUBERT GUILLAUME Chief Technology Officer  JESSE TAYLOR    Desktop Administrators ZACHARY CUMMO, EDGAR ROCHE

EDITORS-IN-CHIEF

J.P. ANDERSON (Michigan Avenue), SPENCER BECK (Los Angeles Confidential), ANDREA BENNETT (Vegas), KATHY BLACKWELL (Austin Way), KRISTIN DETTERLINE (Philadelphia Style), ERIN LENTZ (Aspen Peak), LISA PIERPONT (Boston Common), CATHERINE SABINO (Gotham), ELIZABETH E. THORP (Capitol File), SAMANTHA YANKS (Hamptons)

PUBLISHERS

JOHN M. COLABELLI (Philadelphia Style), LOUIS F. DELONE (Austin Way), DAWN DUBOIS (Gotham), ALEXANDRA HALPERIN (Aspen Peak), DEBRA HALPERT (Hamptons), SUZY JACOBS (Capitol File), GLEN KELLEY (Boston Common), ALISON MILLER (Los Angeles Confidential), DAN USLAN (Michigan Avenue), JOSEF VANN (Vegas)

Managing Partner JANE GALE Chairman and Director of Photography JEFF GALE Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer JOHN P. KUSHNIR Chief Executive Officer KATHERINE NICHOLLS Copyright 2014 by Niche Media Holdings, LLC. All rights reserved. Ocean Drive magazine is published 10 times per year. Reproduction without permission of the publisher is prohibited. The publisher and editors are not responsible for unsolicited material, and it will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication subject to Ocean Drive magazine’s right to edit. Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, photographs, and drawings. To order a subscription, please call 866-891-3144. For customer service, please inquire at oceandrive@pubservice.com. To distribute Ocean Drive at your business, please e-mail magazinerequest@nichemediallc.com. Ocean Drive magazine is published by Niche Media Holdings, LLC. T: 305-532-2544 F: 305-592-7356 niche media holdings: 100 Church Street, Seventh Floor, New York, NY 10007 T: 646-835-5200 F: 212-780-0003 ocean drive: 404 Washington Avenue, Suite 650, Miami Beach, FL 33139

70  OCEANDRIVE.COM


BAL HARBOUR 305.865.1100. DADELAND 305.662.8655.

GIVENCHY

saks.com

Bal Harbour & Dadeland


Letter FrOM tHe editor-in-Chief

from left: With Ian Schrager at an intimate cocktail reception at the Bass Museum of Art to celebrate the Residences at The Miami Beach Edition during LE Miami; catching up with last year’s Ocean Drive

September—the end of Summer, the start of school, and

With (from left) Suzie Sayfie, Alexis Rivera, Carolyn Plummer, Dr. Heather Woolery-Lloyd, Iva Kosovic, and Monika Arenas at our annual Real Beauties luncheon at Bianca.

for many residents and part-timers alike, the time when Miami sees its streets and restaurants starting to fill up again. We enjoyed that quiet lull that only a town pushing 100-degree weather can appreciate. It’s not for everyone; this summer was one of the hottest ever recorded on planet Earth. We locals, we’re used to it. But that was then, and this is now. September is the beginning of a new season in so many ways in Miami— the Heat get ready to hit the court in an attempt to avenge their Finals loss; the social calendar fills up with galas, benefits, and celebrations; and the Dolphins are already immersed in a playoff hunt. We see the sun go down a little earlier and rise a little later. And while the temperature is changing to a cooler fall breeze, a growing skyline, new restaurants, and more shopping, design, and art than ever before keep Miami, in many respects, hotter than ever. This month brings the start of the

jared shapiro

72  oceandrive.com

upcoming fashion season, and with this September issue, we are providing nothing short of sexy, classy, and 100 percent Miami. It begins with Emily Ratajkowski, the Gone Girl star who made a name for herself alongside Robin Thicke and Miami resident Pharrell Williams in the very controversial “Blurred Lines” video. Her favorite part of our town? The humidity—something that does stick around through September. You’ll also notice a slight redesign in this month’s Ocean Drive, a subtle reminder that all great things evolve. More fashion and style have been added while maintaining what makes up the essence of Ocean Drive—luxury, art, culture, and most important, the people of South Florida. With just weeks until we start thinking about Art Basel, the holidays, and the new year, it’s hard not to look at our amazing town and the lives we get to lead here and ask, “Will this be the year?” For whatever that applies to, it’s only September, but I can’t stop thinking about it.

photography by Worldredeye.com (Schrager, IrIe, SayfIe); manny hernandez (eStefan)

September cover star, Gloria Estefan, at the grand reopening of her Larios on the Beach restaurant on, where else, Ocean Drive; celebrating, alongside DJ Irie, Lee Brian Schrager’s delicious new book, Fried & True, with a picnic-style launch party at PAMM.


# P E AC E RO C K S

R i n g o S t a r r : C a s a d e l l a Vi s t a , H o l l y w o o d , C A P h o t o g r a p h e d b y D a n n y C l i n c h , 2 014

Sout h Beach

Ba l Ha rbou r Shops

johnvar vatos.com/peacerock s


letter FrOM tHe Publisher

from left: With Peter Max and Carlos Rosso at Ocean Drive’s Peter Max cover reveal celebration at Hyde Midtown; with Chris Radomski and John Kunkel at the Yardbird Southern Table & Bar and Hundred Acre Wines Midnight Dinner; with chef Carla Pellegrino at Ocean Drive’s dinner and wine pairing at Touché Rooftop Lounge & Restaurant.

With Edgardo Defortuna, Jorge Pérez, Allen Morris, and Arash Azarbarzin at the SLS Lux sales center opening.

that our calendars are already filling to the brim. While the weather cools down around the country, we’re still soaking up the sun. Sunny days and balmy evenings mean Miami has its own spin on fall fashion. Take a cue from our fall fashion feature in this issue, where black in Miami means anything but basic. Between Bal Harbour Shops, the Village of Merrick Park, the Design District, and the soon-to-be Brickell City Centre, there’s no shortage of luxury stops to shop for the season’s most in-demand new items. Our cover story is sure to provide inspiration as well. Ocean Drive has a rich history of featuring emerging stars to watch just as their careers begin skyrocketing. Case in point: our September cover model, Emily Ratajkowski. The breakout notable from Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams’s “Blurred Lines” video has scored a role alongside Ben Affleck in the highly anticipated flick Gone Girl, out October 3, where she plays 23-year-old Andie Hardy. We’re excited to be a part of her résumé and can’t wait to see where she takes her career next. Hope to see you around…

courtland lantaff

74  oceandrive.com

PHOTOGRAPHY BY WORLDREDEYE.cOm (DEFORTUNA, mAX, PELLEGRINO)

We haven’t seen any sloWing doWn of soirées and events this summer, and as we roll into fall, it’s no surprise


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huNter BraithWaite arts Journalist

mary Beth koeth Photographer Portrait photographer Mary Beth Koeth launched her career as designer for Hallmark both in the US and overseas with Hallmark UK, where she spent her weekends traveling Europe with a camera in hand. She soon realized her goal of going back to school to pursue photography seemed fathomable. Afterwards, she spent months in Norway assisting photographer Nancy Bundt and interned for Miami photographer Sid Hoeltzell and Joe Pugliese in LA. Today, she has trouble keeping her lens cap on walking down the streets of Miami Beach, where the city produces more visual candy than an artist can possibly consume. “I’ve always been drawn to characters,” she says of the habitués on Ocean Drive. “In Miami, I’m never at a loss when it comes to subject matter.” Her work has won numerous awards, and she hopes to continue to tell important stories with a camera. For this issue, she captures Miami composer and Subtropics music festival founder Gustavo Matamoros, who creates beautifully intriguing “soundscapes” out of everyday noise.

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Hunter Braithwaite lives in downtown Miami, where he writes about art and edits the Miami rail, a quarterly publication devoted to contemporary art and culture. During a hiatus from school, he began writing for national geographic’s travel books department. He then moved to Shanghai, freelancing for numerous publications, including time out shanghai, the wall street Journal, and artforum.com. Back in Miami, he began working for art in america, guernica, and Modern painters. “Miami is such a resource-rich, tight community that any movement, no matter how minor, ripples outward,” says Braithwaite, author of this month’s “The Art Coast” feature. “If you want to get involved in the arts, there’s no better place than South Florida.”

// September 2014

JeSSica QuilliN Fashion Journalist Jessica Quillin has written about fashion, luxury, and culture for publications such as glass and capitol file. She also develops international fashion and lifestyle content for companies across the world and is a regular attendee at fashion weeks in New York, London, Milan, and Paris. In this issue, she profiles project runway: under the gunn winner Oscar Garcia-Lopez. “I found his experience as a self-trained designer fascinating, particularly how he applies his theatrical background in such a muted but beautiful way for eveningwear.” In addition to her work in fashion, she holds a PhD in English from Cambridge and has published an academic book on poetry and music.

NathaNiel SaNdler Writer A Miami native and the founder and “head librarian” of Bookleggers Library, a mobile library that once a month trades books around Miami, Nathaniel Sandler works as researcher/columnist for the University of Miami Libraries Special Collections and the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science, as well as contributing editor for the arts at WLRN. “I’m interested in what Emmett Moore digs up,” says Sandler, who penned this month’s “Hottest Ticket” on Dwntwn Art Days. “His work is a pilgrimage site you have to find. Obviously it’s not complete yet, but I’ve heard it’s some sort of lounge covered in theatrical gel and gunshots underneath the SW First Street Bridge. That sounds gloriously weird.”

“MiaMi is such a consuMMately international city, bringing together an unusual Mix of established and eMerging designers and chic, stylish people who have a very serious interest in fashion.” —jessica quillin

photography by Dottie Millwater photography (Quillin)

...Without Whom this issue Would Not have Been Possible


BAL HARBOUR SHOPS: 9700 COLLINS AVENUE (305) 867-1215 PALM BEACH: 204 WORTH AVENUE (561) 659-7533 WWW.VALENTINO.COM


the list september 2014

Amanda Del Duca

DJ Irie

David Martin

Ariel Burman

Daniela Ramirez

Deborah Slack

Adam Tarnowski

Ashley Liemer

Alan Zelcer

Roma Cohen

Carlos Rosso

Natalie Gee

Elysze Held

Erika Cohen

Elisandra Tomacheski

Tommy Hilfiger

Jessica Goldman

David Pulley

Paul Lehr

Melissa Mosheim

Rachael Russell

Stephen Macricostas

Josh McRoberts

Vanessa Severiano

Anthony Spinello

Jessica Levy Kiibler

Danny Granger

Erica Korman

Robert Onuska

Carlos Galan

Alina Villasante

Lissette Mendez

Jonathan Eyal

Joaquin Chamizo

Donna Karan

John Cooper

Hollen Rosenberg

Wolfgang Zwiener

Stacy Josloff

Michael Nunziata

Kasey Ashcraft

Conrad Gomez

Dune Ivan

Tomi Rose

Chris Paciello

Jarred Grant

Brandon Fogel

Max Alcalay

Bella Thorne

Ana Rivera

Nevena Borissova

Edward Beiner

Annie Vazquez

Shabazz Napier

Cheryl Herger

Luol Deng

78  oceandrive.com


adv e r ti s e me nt

The Art of

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Josh Moody, Director, Miami, Naples & Islands Complex, Merrill Lynch

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Merrill Lynch Wealth Management makes available products and services offered by Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, a registered broker-dealer and Member SIPC, and other subsidiaries of Bank of America Corporation (BAC). Investments involve risk, including the possible loss of principal investment. Investment products:

Are Not FDIC Insured ©2013 Bank of America Corporation. All rights reserved.

Are Not Bank Guaranteed

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IT’S ALL ABOUT THE VIEWS A ND T H E B E AC H C LU B , A ND T H E MA R I N A , A N D T H E M I C H A E L S C H WA R T Z R E S T A U R A N T , A ND T H E T E NNI S COURTS , A ND T H E 4 4 T H F LOO R ROO F TO P S UN R I S E P OO L , A ND T H E S UN S E T P OOL , A N D T H E B O A R D WA L K , A ND T H E B AY F R O N T PA R K . . .

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OBTAIN THE PROPERTY REPORT REQUIRED BY FEDERAL LAW AND READ IT BEFORE SIGNING ANYTHING. NO FEDERAL AGENCY HAS JUDGED THE MERITS OR VALUE, IF ANY, OF THIS PROPERTY. ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. This is not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation of an offer to buy, condominium units to residents of CT, ID, NY, NJ and OR, unless registered or exemptions are available, or in any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law, and your eligibility for purchase will depend upon your state of residency. This offering is made only by the Prospectus for the condominium. The plans, specifcations, designs, amenities, recreational facilities, managing entities, hotel operators, and restaurant operations, (if any) referred to are accurate as of this publication; however, the Developer reserves the right in its sole discretion to change any of these. This condominium is being developed by FOUR PARAISO, LLC which has a limited right to use the trade names, logos, images, and trademarks depicted pursuant to license agreements. The Related Group is not the Developer.



SALES GALLERY 801 SOUTH MIAMI AVE. T 305.521.1619

Sales by RELATED REALTY in collaboration with FORTUNE DEVELOPMENT SALES

Obtain the property report required by the federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the developer. For correct representations, make reference to this brochure and to the documents required by section 718.503, Florida statutes, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer or lessee.


FERNANDO BOTERO, MALE TORSO. FROM THE GARY NADER COLLECTION

®

This is not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation of an offer to buy, condominium units to residents of CT, ID, NY, NJ and OR, unless registered or exemptions are available, or in any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law, and your eligibility for purchase will depend upon your state of residency. This offering is made only by the Prospectus for the condominium only. The plans, specifications, design, amenities, managing entities, hotel operators, restaurants operations, and resort style services (if any) referred to are accurate as of this publication; however, the Developer reserves the right to change any of these, as the Developer deems best it’s sole and absolute discretion. This condominium is being developed by AMCO PRH 801 SOUTH MIAMI AVENUE, LLC which has a limited right to use the trade names, logos, images, and trademarks depicted pursuant to license agreements. The Related Group, SBE Hotels, LLC, The Allen Morris Company and Yabu Pushelberg are not the Developer. © 2014 AMCO PRH 801 South Miami Avenue, LLC. All rights reserved unless otherwise credited to another.


THE PINNACLE OF

URBAN SOPHISTICATION BRICKELL

HEIGHTS

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SALES CENTER 75 SE 6TH STREET SUITE 101 MIAMI, FL 33131 SALES BY RELATED REALTY IN COLLABORATION WITH FORTUNE DEVELOPMENT SALES

Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the developer. For correct representations, make reference to this brochure and to the documents required by section 718.503, Florida statutes, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer or lessee.


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VISIONARY ARCHITECTURE | WORLD CLASS RESTAURANTS | LUXURY RESIDENCES PRIME OFFICES | BUSINESS CENTER | 3 ENTERTAINMENT ROOMS | MIAMI’S FIRST SOUL CYCLE STUDIO This is not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation of an offer to buy, condominium units to residents of CT, ID, NY, NJ and OR, unless registered or exemptions are available, or in any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law, and your eligibility for purchase will depend upon your state of residency. This offering is made only by the prospectus for the condominium and no statement should be relied upon if not made in the prospectus. The Developer (as is defined below) reserves the right to modify, revise, or withdraw any proposed unit finishes, designs, materials, plans, specifications, terms, conditions, statements, managing entities, fitness facilities, amenities, restaurants , or all of same, in its sole discretion and without prior notice. This Condominium is being developed by 9SMA, LLC (“Developer”). EQUINOX® is a registered trademark of Equinox Holdings, Inc. Soul Cycle is a registered trademark of Soul Cycle, LLC. The project graphics, renderings, photographs, and text herein are owned by the Developer unless otherwise noted or credited to another. © 2013, 9SMA, LLC with all rights reserved unless otherwise credited to another.



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®

Obtain the property report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the developer. For correct representations, make reference to this brochure and to the documents required by section 718.503, Florida statutes, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer or lessee. This is not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation of an offer to buy, condominium units to residents of CT, ID, NY, NJ and OR, unless registered or exemptions are available, or in any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law, and your eligibility for purchase will depend upon your state of residency. This offering is made only by the prospectus for the condominium and no statement should be relied upon if not made in the prospectus. Any sketches, renderings, graphic materials, plans, designs, art, specifications, terms, conditions and statements are proposed only, and the Developer (as is defined herein below), reserves the right to modify, revise or withdraw any or all of same in its sole discretion and without prior notice. All improvements, designs and construction are subject to first obtaining the appropriate federal, state and local permits and approvals for same. The photographs contained in this brochure may be stock photography and are used to depict the spirit of the lifestyles to be achieved rather than any that may exist. Nearby attractions, shopping venues, restaurants, and activities referenced or identified in this publication are off-site and not controlled by the Developer and there is no guarantee that these will not change. The managing entities, hotel operators, and restaurant operations within the condominium referred to are accurate as of the date of this publication; however, there is no guarantee that these will not change. This Condominium is being developed by PRH Midtown 3, LLC (“Developer”), which has a limited right to use the trademarked names and logos of The Related Group and of SBE Hotel Group, LLC pursuant to a license and marketing agreement with each. © 2013, PRH Midtown 3, LLC. All rights reserved unless otherwise credited to another. Unauthorized reproduction, display or other dissemination of such materials is strictly prohibited and constitutes copyright infringement.


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LUXURY DESIGNER RESORT CONDOMINIUMS HYDE HOTEL SOUL-INSPIRED SPA FULL SERVICE BEACHCLUB STATE-OF-THE-ART GYM OCEANFRONT RESTAURANT

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Obtain the property report required by federal law and read it before signing anything. No federal agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. Oral representations cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of the Developer. For correct representations, make reference to the documents required by section 718.503, Florida Statute, to be furnished by a developer to a buyer or lessee. This is not intended to be an offer to sell, or solicitation to buy, condominium units to residents of CT, ID, NJ, NY and OR, unless registered or exemptions are available, or in any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law, and your eligibility for purchase will depend upon your state of residency. This offering is made only by the prospectus for the condominium and no statement should be relied upon if not made in the prospectus. Prices, plans and specifcations are subject to change without notice. The Related Group is not the project developer. Hyde Hollywood is being developed by 4111 SOUTH OCEAN DRIVE, LLC (“Developer”), which has a limited right to use the trademarked names and logos of The Related Group pursuant to a license and marketing agreement with The Related Group. Any and all statements, disclosures and/or representations shall be deemed made by Developer and not by The Related Group. The sketches, renderings, pictures, illustrations, and statements are proposed only, and the Developer reserves the right to modify, revise or withdraw any or all of same in its sole discretion. All prices are subject to change at any time and without notice, and do not include optional features or premiums for upgraded units.



STYLE Style Setter

DiamonD Jubilee

Do nn a ar an celebrates 30 years at the top of the fashion industry with a fall collection that references her debut designs and an everexpanding portfolio of philanthropic causes.

photography by randall Slavin; Makeup by bertal CaMal; hair by JoyCe Cohen

by elizabeth thorp

Donna Karan wearing designs from her Fall 2014 30th-anniversary collection.

“It seems like yesterday [that it all began]. I’m writing my autobiography right now and reflecting back on the whole thing,” says Donna Karan of her eponymous label’s 30th anniversary. ocean drive joined Karan in her NYC studio, The Stephan Weiss Studio, named for her late husband, artist-entrepreneur Stephan Weiss, to discuss the milestone year, her new collection, and philanthropic passions. Her Urban Zen Center, headquartered at the studio, raises consciousness and inspires meaningful change in the areas of well-being, cultural preservation, and children’s empowerment—all part of a continuing legacy she focuses on for the future. Karan started her design house in 1984. The initial goals were modest—to create a little company that filled some fashion needs—“trying to make a pair of jeans that actually fit,” for example, and stylish clothes for real women entering the workforce in record numbers. Her tightly edited core collection, “Seven Easy Pieces” continued on page 92

oceandrive.com  91


STYLE Style Setter Models backstage in the designer’s easy yet body-conscious creations.

The finale walk of the Fall 2014 collection. left: A sketch showing Karan’s skilled hand in fluidity.

continued From page 91

(a bodysuit served as the fundamental element), that could take women from day to night, revolutionized the way urban women dressed. “It’s the only place I guarantee you will never show a wrinkle, never show anything,” she says of her timeless Cold Shoulder dress, which bared the naked shoulder. “From the shoulder down, it’s another discussion. But your shoulder is always your best asset. Everything else you

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can cover up.” Her spot-on insights into the needs of working women as they climbed the ranks helped fuel her success, propelling the company into the forefront of American fashion design. Those early design principles impact her collections today. For Fall 2014, she says the scarf dresses are among her favorites. “It’s all about the scarf and the body, and harkens back to the first original collection with the

bodysuit,” says Karan. “You can cover up what you want to cover up and show what you want to show. You can go from day to night easily with the tailoring and the chiffon. Miami is definitely an evening market. Miami has much more of an evening appeal. But it’s nighttime casual. I think it’s sexy, I think probably my skinny pants and my jersey top say ‘Miami,’ totally.” Early in her career, Karan says she realized that while she could dress people, she

wasn’t addressing their inner or personal needs. She was constantly asking herself, “How do you bring consciousness to the consumers, to the retailers, and to the world at large?” Losing her assistant, Clarissa Block, to ovarian cancer recently prompted her to become an activist for finding a cure for the disease, one of many causes she has supported over the years. Today Karan says she remains as committed to her philanthropy as she is to her

company. When asked if she has any specific goals for the next three decades, the designer responds, “It’ll take more than 30 years to accomplish all I want to do—my Urban Zen Foundation is just taking off; I have endless design ideas, wellness centers I’d love to create, so many new places to travel. Like I always say, it’s what I haven’t done that excites me. To be continued...” saks Fifth avenue, bal Harbour shops, 9700 collins ave., 305-865-1100; saks.com OD

photography by jamie beck (backstage)

“How do you bring consciousness to tHe consumers, to tHe retailers, and to tHe world at large?”—donna karan


L I F E

I S

A B O U T

M O M E N T S

C E L E B R AT I N G E L E G A N C E S I N C E 1 8 3 0

PROMESSE STEEL, 34 MM, QUARTZ DIAMONDS 0.68 CARAT www.baume-et-mercier.com


STYLE Accessories LASER CUT Sleek graphic patterns define modern fall style. Dress, Valentino ($5,200). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-867-1215; valentino.com. Minaudière, Reece Hudson ($1,295). Barneys New York, 832 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-421-2010; barneys.com. Booties, Christian Louboutin ($1,595). Miami Design District, 155 NE 40th St., 305-576-6820; christianlouboutin.com

Whether in South Beach or Palm Beach, Fall’S acceSSorieS turn uP the heat.

PhotograPhy by bill DioDato Styling by KaDeem greaveS

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FASHION EDITOR: FAYE POWER; MODElS: VAlERY lESSARD AND VERA CASAgRANDE FOR PARTS MODElS

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STYLE Accessories FUTURISTIC

MENSWEAR

This season, silver adds cool shimmer. Dress,

Sleek masculine lines give a new edge to day wear.

BLACK & WHITE

FLORAL

Updating the city’s favorite achromatic palette.

Autumn flowers are in bloom.

Top, Rag & Bone ($295). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-728-4400; rag-bone.com. Pants, Ralph Lauren Black Label ($665). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-861-2059; ralphlauren.com. Bag box, Chanel ($12,000). Bal Harbour Shops, 305868-0550; chanel.com. Pumps, Manolo Blahnik ($955). Neiman Marcus, Bal Harbour Shops, 305865-6161; neimanmarcus.com

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Dress, Reed Krakoff ($1,790). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-865-1100; saks.com. Rose-gold Arceau Le Temps Suspendu watch, Hermès ($35,100). Miami Design District, 175 NE 40th St., 305-868-0118; hermes.com. Handbag, Giorgio Armani ($2,195). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-861-1515; armani.com. Loafer pumps, Jason Wu ($1,140). Saks Fifth Avenue, Dadeland Mall, 7687 N. Kendall Dr., South Miami, 305-6628655; saks.com

Dress, Hermès ($5,500). Miami Design District, 175 NE 40th St., 305-868-0118; hermes.com. Clutch, Dries Van Noten ($2,015). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-865-1100; saks.com. Pumps, Jimmy Choo ($625). Village of Merrick Park, 360 San Lorenzo Ave., Coral Gables, 305-443-6124; jimmychoo.com

FASHION EDITOR: FAYE POWER; MODElS: VAlERY lESSARD AND VERA CASAgRANDE FOR PARTS MODElS

Stella McCartney ($1,995). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave, 305-864-2218; stellamccartney.com. Bracelet, Lanvin ($2,290). Neiman Marcus, Bal Harbour Shops, 305-865-6161; lanvin.com. Handbag ($3,400) and wedges (price on request), Prada. Miami Design District, 180 NE 40th St., 305-438-2873; prada.com


Rio de Janeiro São Paulo Buenos Aires Punta del Este Mykonos N e w Yo r k Miami To k y o

m i a m i b e ac h 1111 l i n c o l n r oa d n e w yo r k 97 wo o st er st. – s o h o


styLE Beauty Maven Russie Blanche founder Julia Lemigova with her dogs in the backyard of her “happy, hippie” Coconut Grove home.

NothiNg Lost iN traNsLatioN “There’s nothing square about me,” says the statuesque Julia Lemigova, a former Marcus Bal Harbour. Today, the line is also featured at the spa at the Delano. model and the founder of Russie Blanche skincare, when explaining why she was “Growing up in Communist Russia, I remember how women struggled to be beautiful,” she explains of her inspiration. “They had no makeup, no skincare. The drawn to Miami’s “happy, hippie, hidden” Coconut Grove. After falling in love with Miami two years ago while visiting friends, the onetime women still managed to look their best using traditional remedies.” Lemigova moved to Paris at the age of 18 to pursue Miss USSR made the move from Paris just a year later. Now, modeling, and in 2003, made her first foray in the beauty she’s enjoying her neighborhood’s local flavor with her two business, opening the high-end spa Joiya. By 2009, she daughters; partner, tennis great Martina Navratilova; four INSIGHT: Julia lemigova shares her had multiple locations in France and the UK, and began dogs (two from Paris and two “locals”—the last one adopted miami favorites. offering services with the beginnings of her Russie from the Humane Society of Miami), a cat, a tortoise, and an Blanche products. “I wanted to create a line which would African Grey parrot named Coco. “It was a fast move,” says family time consists of… “We take the dogs to the Key Biscayne doggie beach. We have Russian heritage and Russian beauty secrets mixed Lemigova. “[When] I came to [visit], I thought, How long am rent kayaks. This is amazing for me. You with French technology,” she explains of the siliconeI going to be wishing that I was here? Just stop wishing and do cannot do that for a weekend in Paris.” and paraben-free formulas, which include Siberian it. It’s as simple as that.” Dinners happen at… “Graziano’s. And adaptogenic plants, plant-sourced stem cells, and aromaThe move was also an opportunity for the Moscow-born a small hole-in-the-wall Japanese [place] therapy oils. Lemigova to make good on a vow over two decades old. called Matsuri.” Here in Miami, Lemigova is finding that this city’s health“When I was doing Miss Universe in 1991, I didn’t speak a conscious lifestyle is as good for family as it is for business. word of English,” she says. “Dick Clark was hosting the show, and he asked me a serious question and I couldn’t answer because I couldn’t speak Her daughters, ages 12 and 8, have taken to activities like swimming, tennis, and English. I made a promise [to myself] that one day I’d learn the language and come bicycling, and “Martina loves [Florida],” says Lemigova. “It was a very mutual choice. You can have such a rich life here.” Neiman Marcus, Bal Harbour Shops, back to this country with a project, with a life.” Now fluent, Lemigova has mastered that “project” goal as well with the launch 9700 Collins Ave., 305-865-6161; Delano, 1685 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305of her beauty line, Russie Blanche, which she debuted in the US this year at Neiman 672-2000; russieblanche.com OD

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photography by gary james

Former model, beauty queen, and Parisian sPa owner Julia lemigova builds an insPiring new home base For Family and business in CoConut grove. by julia ford-carther


BAL HARBOUR SHOPS

www.cesare-paciotti.com


STYLE Spotlight baubles

DYNAMIC DECO

// ON TREND // 1

This season’s jewelry from Italian designer and Miami favorite Roberto Cavalli gets the decadent Deco treatment, inspired by the Magic City’s signature style of architecture. A traditional Deco palette of gold, white, and black is reimagined in lions,

SWISS MADE

jaguars, and horses to

Swiss brand Philipp Plein knew Miami was a place to debut its unique and playful brand when it opened its first US boutique at Aventura Mall in October 2013. The store is a place to spotlight new products as well, including this leather bag ($10,000; RIGHT) covered in tulle feathers and Swarovski crystals, available this fall. Aventura Mall, 19501 Biscayne Blvd., 305-9351110; plein.com

appeal to the wild South Florida connoisseur and complement a robust, animal-print-heavy

Yeliz Titiz at The Bazaar Project.

1920s-inspired fall collection. Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-865-1749;

2

MIX IT UP

SURA JEWELRY DESIGNER YELIZ TITIZ OPENS AN EXOTIC MARKETPLACE IN THE DESIGN DISTRICT. BY LAUREN FINNEY “Global” and “Miami” go hand-in-hand, so it’s no surprise Turkish jewelry designer Yeliz Titiz has curated a one-of-akind worldly marketplace in the Design District called The Bazaar Project. Titiz traveled the globe looking for the best in artisanal, handmade pieces to bring back to her shop, which includes a mélange of items such as moccasins, decorative pillows, photographs, vintage kilims, and more. Also available is her jewelry line, Sura, an exotic collection of semiprecious rings, earrings, necklaces, and cuffs. 4308 NE Second Ave., Miami, 786-703-6153; thebazaarproject.com

// Arm Candy //

50 Shades of Gray

Leather bag, Dolce & Gabbana ($2,495). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-866-0503; dolcegabbana.com.

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With its new boutique on Lincoln Road, Intermix will mark its 40th store location. Among the boutique’s usual lineup of brands will be a limitededition sweatshirt from typographer/ designer Pieter Ceizer for Eleven Paris, featuring a special “Magic City” design. 1005 Lincoln Road., Miami Beach; intermixonline.com

Swarovski pavé crystal and Colorado topaz sunburst earrings, Roberto Cavalli ($805).

CAPTURE THIS SULTRY SEASONAL NEUTRAL in an elegant handbag with a structured design.

Small shoulder bag, Gucci ($2,350). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-868-6504; gucci.com.

Scottie small satchel, Mark Cross ($2,495). Barneys New York, 832 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-421-2010; barneys.com.

Bag, Prada ($3,400). Miami Design District, 80 NE 40th St., 305-438-2280; prada.com.

Soft Ricky 33, Ralph Lauren ($2,500). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-861-2059; ralphlauren.com.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MORIS MORENO (PHILIPP PLEIN); SETH OLENICK (GRAY BAGS)

How Bazaar

robertocavalli.com

profile



STYLE Swim Week “2015 will be an eclectic year for swim.” —judy stein

from left: At Luli Fama, tasseled ends added flirty

Gone Swimming New ruNways, larger trade shows, aNd a bouNty of braNds marked this the busiest year yet for miami swim week. we took stock of the New treNds. by julia ford-carther Thirty-two years ago, Miami’s SwimShow was the little industry show that could, with just 15 representatives and 30 collections. We’ve come a long way, baby—this year, there were more than 7,500 brands from 60 countries displayed throughout approximately 500,000 square feet. A parallel event, Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim, launched by IMG Worldwide in 2004, now boasts 57 international swim designers, and IMG added new runways poolside and in the penthouse at The Raleigh to accommodate the anticipated debuts from newcomers Clover Canyon, Mikoh,

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Belusso, and Frankie’s Bikinis. Yes, it was an exciting week of beautiful cuts and prints. At each show, the packed house clamored for prime viewing of 2015’s trends and to watch the reactions of those seated in the front row, including LeAnn Rimes and Eddie Cibrian, Nina Agdal, and Real Housewives of New York’s LuAnn de Lesseps. Adding to the swim circus were off-site tradeshows such as Salon Allure and Cabana, which gained traction this year with a well-edited selection of luxury lines ranging from Zero + Maria Cornejo’s architectural minimalism to the art-inspired silk caftans by Cheyann Benedict, one “C” of the original C&C California. For beachgoers, all of this translates into more trends and inspired fashion. “2015 will be an eclectic year for swim,” says Judy Stein, executive director at the Swimwear Association of Florida, which produces SwimShow. “Look for nostalgic prints or kitschy fruit. Ethnic prints will be updated with a sophisticated twist. Romantic floral prints will continue to add a girlish pop, while asymmetrical plunging gives an edgy, sexy appeal. And lace and crochet might be the most inspiring resources of the upcoming year.” As these collections won’t be available until November, here are four looks to start inspiring daydreams of tropical winter getaways. coNtiNued oN page 104

photography by Frazer harrison/getty images For LuLi Fama (LuLi Fama); neiLson barnard/getty images (poko pano)

movement to the designer’s sexy suits; the Poko Pano Swimwear show at The Raleigh hotel during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim 2015 in July.


“NE VER BE AFRAID T O TA K E R I S K S , A N D N E V E R TA K E T H E CLOTHES YOU WE AR T O O S E R I O U S LY ” • PERRY ELLIS


STYLE Swim Week

Neon plus animal print made Mara Hoffman’s bustier stand out.

Mikoh’s surf-inspired bra top in striking neoprene sheen.

Sport silhouettes took a feminine turn at Clover Canyon.

“Romantic floRal pRints will continue to add a giRlish pop, while asymmetRical plunging gives an edgy, sexy appeal.”—judy stein continued fRom page 102

LacE Up

Lace accents carried a heavier stitch in patterns bordering on crochet. Victoria’s Secret bombshell Alessandra Ambrosio, in collaboration with Lunada Bay (Becca, Lucky Brand Swimwear), debuted her Ále by Alessandra collection, which included a high-leg neon tiedyed crochet-lace one-piece layered over a matching two-piece. L*Space by Monica Wise sent out a show-stealing deep-plunge strapless black crop bustier with fine crochet lace overlaying a shimmery gold front. Los Angeles-based A. Ché created a versatile

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skirt bottom, lending a peekaboo effect with its lacecrochet hybrid, and Jantzen did a similar take in its racerback cover-up dress.

BUSTing OUT

Stealing a look from lingerie, crop-top bustiers created shape and sex appeal in many collections. Mikoh drew on its California surfer background to create a sleek, structured glossy neoprene deep-plunge corseted version. Mara Hoffman, a consistent crowd favorite, delivered an inspired collection of her signature geometric prints. This year, designs arrived in creative combinations of neon shades and bold animal prints,

such as a leopard and colorblock crop-top bra, lending a more punk-glam feel. Model-turned-designer Tori Praver picked up the trend in a comfortable crop bralette in a Marrakesh-inspired triangular print. Known for fusing high-end fashion with swimwear, Australian line Zimmermann featured a sculpted, strapless take on the crop bustier with a wide, square plunging neckline in a delicately geometric print.

FLirTY FiniShES

While beads and feather accents were some of the many added details, tassels seemed the go-to tie-on, showing up at the end of

strings, draping down necks, and bopping on the backs of bottoms. At Luli Fama, one of the week’s sexier shows, matchingfabric tassels caught the eyes of onlookers, creating unexpected flair dangling from the back of a modified halter bra top. At Cabana, ViX by Paula Hermanny showcased hand-beaded gold tassels on pieces inspired by the designer’s recent trip to Egypt. Luxury legend Shan tied its long, oversize fringed tassels to the neckline and navel of its sophisticated suits.

SpOrTY SpicE

Style met function in sport-

appropriate minimalist cuts and romantic prints. Clover Canyon’s whimsical florals appeared on a range of crewneck, zip-down crop tops and one-pieces sturdy enough for an ocean swim. Catering to the chic standup-paddleboarding set, Body Glove’s new Breathe collection featured mix-and-match surf briefs and long-sleeve fashion crop tops. UK brand Orlebar Brown, famous for revolutionizing tailored swimwear for men, presented its third women’s collection, applying signature side fasteners to its Bond Girl-esque bikinis. OD

photography by Frazer harrison/getty images For mercedes-benz (L*space); randy brooke (mara hoFFman); Frazer harrison/getty images For mikoh (mikoh);Joe schiLdhorn/bFanyc.com (cLover canyon)

Black lace over gold shimmer added unexpected detail at L*Space.


est. 1818

t h e fa l l s

b ro o k s b rot h e rs.c o m

ave n t u ra m a l l


STYLE Time Honored

Steeling time

Bracelet watches, which made a strong reappearance at this year’s swiss watch shows, are finding their way onto the wrists of miami’s women of style.

While timepieces with colorful leather and rubber straps offer women a bold and vivacious way to accessorize, metal bracelets that wrap beautifully around the wrist are providing a shimmering alternative, particularly in Miami where they offer cool comfort in contrast to the warm climate. Many watch brands offer stainless steel bracelets in soft, supple links or in fixed styles that mimic a cuff bracelet for a look that blends wristwatches with fine jewelry. For more watch features and expanded coverage, go to ocean drive.com/watches. OD

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From Baume & Mercier, the all-new Promesse collection, several years in the making, was created for women only. This stainless steel Promesse ($3,850), which makes its debut this month, features a supple multilink bracelet.

Mayors Jewelers, 1000 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, 305-672-1662; baume-etmercier.com

From Frédérique Constant , this Classics Art Deco watch ($2,995), crafted in stainless steel with a convex sapphire crystal, houses a quartz movement and offers a mother-of-pearl dial. Tourneau, Aventura Mall, 19501 Biscayne Blvd., 305-932-2280; frederique-constant.com clockwise from top left:

From David Yurman, this Classic watch ($2,800) is a 30mm quartz Swiss-made timepiece with a supple bracelet and mother-of-pearl dial. Bal Harbour Shops, 9700

Collins Ave., 305-867-1772; davidyurman.com

Devereaux vanity tray, Ralph Lauren ($295). Town Center at Boca Raton, 6000 Glades Road, Boca Raton, 561-3957656; ralphlaurenhome.com . Gardenia Rattan eau de parfum, Aerin ($110). Neiman

Marcus, Bal Harbour Shops,

9700 Collins Ave.,305-8656161; neimanmarcus.com . Fifi slip, Agent Provocateur ($550). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-865-3909; agent provocateur.com. Oval minaudière, Aerin ($700). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 305-865-1100; saks.com. 18k white-gold L’Heure du Diamant earrings,

Chopard (price on request). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-868-8626; chopard.com. 11.09-carat emerald-cut diamond ring, Graff Diamonds (price on request). Bal Harbour

Shops, 305-993-1212; graffdiamonds.com. Lipstick, Tom Ford ($49). Saks Fifth Avenue, see above

Styling by ChriS Stone

by roberta naas photography by jeff crawford


LINCOLN ROAD COMING SOON • BAL HARBOUR SHOPS • COLLINS AVENUE INTERMIXONLINE.COM


STYLE Style of Generosity “Our first wOrld activatiOn was here in Our Own backyard.”

—sebastian leguizamon

clockwise from far left: Sebastian

Leguizamon; a woman in South Sudan receiving a pair of Eyejusters glasses via a project run by Mobile Health International; Razón’s limited-edition handcrafted aviators in sustainable exotic woods ($305 each).

For EyEs According to the World Health Organization, more than 250 million people in the world are vision impaired. Sebastian Leguizamon, CEO and founder of Razón eyewear, a Miami-based fashion brand, aims to significantly lower that number. “You have [millions of] people that can’t read, children that are not even interested in school, people who can’t contribute to the world or the economy,” he says of the challenges that come from having impaired vision.

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Inspired by his hometown of Miami, Leguizamon fashioned Razón after the Toms shoe business model of corporate-social responsibility. “Eyewear made perfect sense in Miami,” he says of the collection—three styles of oversize aviators handcrafted from biodegradable and sustainably sourced woods like African ebony, bamboo, and rosewood, available for $305 each. For every pair of luxury sunglasses sold, Razón has teamed up with Londonbased eyewear company Eyejusters to donate three

self-adjustable eyeglasses to global citizens in need. Taking consumer participation one step further, Razón sends buyers a tracking number for each individual pair of Eyejusters donated, so they know to whom and where in the world their new donated pair of lenses is going, and to ensure that the eyeglasses arrive in the hands of those who need them the most. Each Razón collection features a limited run; once a line sells out, that’s it. Future collections, like its second, which will be released later

this month, will feature new colors and woods, as well as artist collaborations, but no two collections will ever be the same, creating a sense of über-exclusivity that even fashionistas such as Nina Agdal and Monique Abbadie are getting behind. Leguizamon and his team of Miami cofounders tapped into the city’s global appeal and launched Razón during this year’s Winter Music Conference, where DJs and celebs like Afrojack, Kaskade, and Agdal took note. A few months later, the company

made its first philanthropic drop here in Miami, cementing its commitment to its home base. “Our first world activation was here in our own backyard for the world to see how [our program] works and how big of an impact it’s going to have,” says Leguizamon. “People don’t realize how bad [the inability to see] is for the global economy and society. We’re in a world where everything’s dictated by that sense [of vision]. It wasn’t about making cool sunglasses; it’s an overall movement.” seetherazon.com OD

photography by Karmoie/eyejusters (eyejusters)

For MiaMi-based eyewear coMpany Ra zó n , a buy-a-pair, give-a-pair attitude is helping the world see things diFFerently. By Julia Ford-Carther



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SALES CENTER 305.521.1313 8500 NW 52ND STREET, DORAL FL 33166 WWW.DOWNTOWNDORAL.COM Developed by CODINA PARTNERS. Exclusives Sales by FORTUNE INTERNATIONAL REALTY. Interiors by ADRIANA HOYOS. Architectural Design by SIEGER SUAREZ.


Created by INNOVART.US

ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, MAKE REFERENCE TO THIS BROCHURE AND TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. OBTAIN THE PROPERTY REPORT REQUIRED BY FEDERAL LAW AND READ IT BEFORE SIGNING ANYTHING. NO FEDERAL AGENCY HAS JUDGED THE MERITS OR VALUE, IF ANY, OF THIS PROPERTY. All images and designs depicted herein are artist’s conceptual renderings, which are based upon preliminary development plans, and are subject to change without notice in the manner provided in the ofering documents. No guarantees or representations whatsoever are made that existing or future views of the project and surrounding areas depicted by artist’s conceptual renderings or otherwise described herein, will be provided or, if provided, will be as depicted or described herein. These materials are not intended to be an ofer to sell, or solicitation to buy a unit in the condominium. Such an ofering shall only be made pursuant to the prospectus (ofering circular) for the condominium and no statements should be relied upon unless made in the prospectus or in the applicable purchase agreement. In no event shall any solicitation, ofer or sale of a unit in the condominium be made in, or to residents of, any state or country in which such activity would be unlawful. This condominium is being developed by Parcel C2 Property, LLC, a Florida limited liability company (“Developer”), which has a limited right to use the trademarked names and logos of Codina Partners pursuant to a license and marketing agreement with Codina Partners. Neither Codina Partners, nor Armando Codina, is the developer of this condominium. Any and all statements, disclosures and/or representations contained herein shall be deemed made by the Developer and not by Codina Partners or Armando Codina and you agree to look solely to Developer (and not to Codina Partners, Armando Codina and/or any of their respective afliates) with respect to any and all matters relating to the marketing and/or development of the Condominium and with respect to the sales of units in the Condominium.


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VISUAL JUNGLE

Daniele Frazier’s temporary installation It Takes Two towered over passersby on North Miami Avenue during last year’s Dwntwn Art Walk.

WITH THIS MONTH’S ANNUAL DWNTWN ART DAYS, THE CONCRETE JUNGLE OF DOWNTOWN MIAMI GETS AN ARTISTIC FACE-LIFT. BY NATHANIEL SANDLER In the mid 1980s, downtown Miami commissioned big-time art world talent, from the innovative sculptor Claes Oldenburg to famed Japanese designer Isamu Noguchi, to create striking public art projects around town. There was a bit of a creative lull in the ensuing decades, but for the past two years the Downtown Development Authority (DDA) has been molding the staid landscape among the office buildings while boldly infusing energy into the place with a three-day festival of public art and activities called Dwntwn Art Days. That means three days of talks, exhibitions, walking tours, bike tours, and panel discussions involving independent galleries and artists, as well as major institutions like the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science and the CONTINUED ON PAGE 114

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cuLtuRe hottest ticket Who Doesn’t Love Lucy? I Love Lucy Live on Stage brings the tropicana to life at the Adrienne Arsht center. by jordi lippe

“PeoPle are going to encounter these things without realizing that they’re art.” —amanda sanfillipo continueD FroM Page 113

Pérez Art Museum Miami. There’s action all over downtown, with the central business district being a main focal point, via a series of public art encounters. According to Sonja Bogensperger of the DDA, there will be much more family-friendly programming this year. Add to that the vibrant culinary scene, a growing crop of galleries, artist residencies such as Cannonball, and the already-on-display Art in Unexpected Places, and downtown is more and more becoming a place not just for business or Heat games but for an entire cultural experience. “People are going to encounter these things without realizing that they’re art,” explains

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Amanda Sanfillipo, a curator for Fringe Projects, the group behind deciding which artists create the installations for Dwntwn Art Days. “It’s an experience,” she says of the works, such as Nick Lobo’s planned scent clock that uses aerators to disperse perfumes purchased from downtown shops at certain times throughout the day. Last year, there was a gigantic 18-foot inflatable Godzilla from the mind of artist Reed van Brunschot, and local artist Misael Soto’s 1,680-square-foot beach towel that accommodated 400 people in Bayfront Park. These projects are meant to jar downtown visitors and residents and take them out of their normal routine while giving them a collective experience to enjoy.

Brandi Reddick, from Miami-Dade County’s Art in Public Places, which funds the project, believes that temporary and time-sensitive public art projects can have a large impact. “When you encounter something that’s beautiful,” she says, “you’re not quite sure why it’s there, what it’s there for, but everyone somehow engages with it.” The event is really a celebration of art, artists, and downtown itself, tailored specifically to the area. This year, the public art commissions will be on display after the festival—10 days in total—so there will be more time to experience the wonder of a reinvented downtown Miami. Dwntwn art Days takes place september 19 through 21, around downtown, 305-579-6675; dwntwnartdays.com. OD

Sirena Irwin and Bill Mendieta as Lucy and Ricky in I Love Lucy Live on Stage.

photography by Jeremy Daniel (irwin)

Pontus Willfors’s Latticework, on view in downtown’s Grand Central Park last year.

Fifty-seven years after the fnal episode of I Love Lucy aired on tV, audiences are still captivated by lucy’s famboyant red hair, her latin love, ricky ricardo, and their effortlessly entertaining antics. with that infnite nostalgia in mind, the memory and the spirit of these beloved characters come to life in I Love Lucy Live on Stage. unlike typical stage performances, I Love Lucy Live on Stage has a level of interactivity as you step back in time to 1952 at the Desilu Playhouse soundstage, where you become a member of the studio audience waiting for the flming of two I Love Lucy episodes. “it’s really like a time machine,” says co-adaptor and producer Kim Flagg of the production. “you walk in and it’s as if you’re truly watching a taping. there’s even a host addressing the audience and the crystaltone singers singing advertisements from that era.” with 179 I Love Lucy episodes to choose from, the creators carefully combed through the show’s eight seasons of footage to fnd the two that would best represent everything fans loved about the classic. “we knew we needed episodes with music for the theater, ricky singing ‘Babalu’ at the tropicana, lucy desperately trying to get into show business, and of course that famous lucy cry.” the 90-minute experience captures it all, but it wouldn’t be complete without a grand fnale of ricky singing, “i love lucy and she loves me.” I Love Lucy Live on Stage makes its way to Miami as part of a 35-city tour. “we’re very excited about coming to Miami because of the strong cuban infuence,” says Flagg. “Desi was a cuban actor and musician, so i think the people in south Florida will connect in a new way.” i love lucy live on stage runs from September 30 through October 5 at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, 1300 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-949-6722; arshtcenter.org.



CULTURE Magic City Composer Gustavo Matamoros at Miami Beach’s Audiotheque performance space.

“The idea ThaT an audience has To feel comforTable is a liTTle biT depressing.”

—gustavo matamoros

Breaking Miami’s Sonic Barrier ExpErimEntal ComposEr Gustavo MataMoros kEEps sEarChing for nEw sounds for his listEning Club and subtropiCs musiC fEstival. by brett sokol “My music is all about the audience,” explains composer Gustavo Matamoros, though his brand of populism is a far cry from being radio-friendly. “My job isn’t to entertain—people already get enough entertainment. When you do things based on what people want, you only get one kind of result. I do things based on what creates an interesting experience.” Inspired by the avant-garde trailblazer John Cage, Matamoros has spent the

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past three decades alternately bemusing and baffling Miami audiences—both with his own performances and as the artistic director of the now biennial Subtropics music festival, presenting an array of kindred artists who fall between the cracks of classical, jazz, and underground rock. “I’m not sure there’s a name yet for what I do. How about ‘composer in the community’?” he offers. Matamoros has created a soundscape for the Miami Beach Botanical Garden based on recordings from a nearby bus stop, as well as fashioned a fully immersive sound installation for Coral Gables’ Vizcaya Museum and Gardens. There he deployed the mansion’s 1917 pipe organ to fill the entire mansion with resonant tones, bouncing notes from room to room, playing the mansion itself as if it were a musical instrument. This past fall saw Matamoros spend a month in Everglades National Park with AIRIE (Artists in Residence in the Everglades), battling swarms of mosquitoes as he recorded the evening singing of bats. The trick was deploying specially modified microphones to capture frequencies otherwise inaudible to the human ear. Matamoros then digitally transposed these bat “songs” several octaves lower to a range perceptible to our own hearing. The end results, “Distant Bats,” evoke prehistoric eagles crying continued on page 118

photography by Mary beth Koeth (MataMoros); stephen Malagodi (triana)

Composer and curator Alba Triana (below left) talks to the audience during a session of the Listening Club, a series of music-focused salons founded by Matamoros.


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CULTURE Magic City from left: John McMinn and Noah

Brandmark of the Abbey Rader Generations Quartet playing tenor sax at Audiotheque.

“I’m not sure there’s a name yet for what I do. how about ‘composer In the communIty’?” —gustavo matamoros

out to each other contInued from page 116 across the sky—eerily disturbing at first, and then slowly beautiful. Call that a good description for what Matamoros plans this month with a new season of intimate salons he’s christened Listening Club. Unfolding within Miami Beach’s Audiotheque, a performance space that Matamoros runs inside the ArtCenter/South Florida, Listening Club invites local arts-scene notables to put on their pedagogical caps and offer a guided tour of their own musical passions. Previous editions have featured gallerist Brook Dorsch and Spam Allstars bandleader Andrew Yeomanson (aka DJ LeSpam). This fall also sees Matamoros staging a concert with his Frozen Music Ensemble, recording a new piece for the ArtCenter’s Listening Club, and preparing for the 23rd Subtropics festival. The common thread throughout all this activity is Matamoros’s playful sense of exploration, one he traces back to his childhood in Caracas, Venezuela. As a small boy at family gatherings, he recalls, “the adults always wanted to talk to each other, so they put me in a room with a shortwave radio. I would spend hours turning the knobs. The

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idea of fishing for sound amidst the static stuck with me.” By his teenage years, Matamoros was busy wandering the streets with a tape recorder, capturing the roar of jets flying overhead and chatting passersby, splicing it all together into offbeat sonic collages. After a year of college in Caracas, he was unsure of what exactly he was seeking in a musical education, but was certain the answer wasn’t within Venezuela’s tradition-bound universities. In 1975, with a US college scholarship in hand, he left for upstate New York. That winter at Elmira College was brutal, and the culture shock no less jarring: “I was one of seven people who spoke Spanish there,” Matamoros says. Still, he was fortunate to stumble across a poster for a campus concert by the New England New Music Ensemble. “I figured any group with the word ‘New’ in their name twice had to be special,” he says with a laugh. Indeed, the concert turned out to be life-changing. “Four people came out onto the stage with what looked like a queen-size mattress,” he recalls. “They set it down, hooked up some contact microphones to it, and then left. So there’s now a big, brown bag in the middle of

the stage, and we’re all waiting to see what happens. There’s a slight sound. Then another rustle as the bag moves a little bit. The more the bag moves, the louder it gets. Three minutes later, there’s this bag jumping around the stage and the amount of sound being produced—by a bag!—is just amazing. Suddenly a person breaks out of the bag and the lights go dark before we can see him clearly. The rest of the world fell away. I remember thinking at that exact moment, If this is music, then I want to be a composer!” By 1979, Matamoros found an academic program in music theory with a simpatico spirit at the University of Miami, and the years since his graduation from UM may have turned him into a veritable institution in South Florida’s art circles. But Matamoros says he still feels unsettled—and happily so. “For me, music has always been about discovery. The idea that an audience has to feel comfortable is a little bit depressing,” he chuckles. for a full schedule of Listening club and audiotheque events, visit subtropics.org; Listening club hosts its sessions at artcenter/south florida, 800 Lincoln road, miami beach, 305-674-8278; artcentersf.org. OD

photography by Stephen Malagodi (McMinn); Juan cabrera (MataMoroS)

Matamoros performing “Small Sounds” from his​ Music on a Budget​at Miami Dade College in 1993.


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culture Art Full

Tracking The MiaMi generaTion A new exhibition At NSU MUSeUM of Art fort LAUderdALe returns the spotlight to A pioneering group of CubAn-AmeriCAn Artists. by brett sokol “At that time, the art market was close to zero,” recalls César Trasobares of the seminal 1983 exhibition “The Miami Generation: Nine CubanAmerican Artists.” Staged at the now-defunct Cuban Museum of Arts and Culture, the show featured artwork by Trasobares as well as fellow Cuban exiles Mario Bencomo, María Brito, Humberto Calzada, Pablo Cano, Emilio Falero, Fernando García, Juan González, and Carlos Macía—all of whom were born in Cuba and subsequently came of age in Miami. “There were no collectors waiting in the wings, expecting to snap up work,” Trasobares adds of that pre-Art Basel era. “What you saw in that exhibition was work of conscience as opposed to work made to be sold.” The much-heralded show grabbed local headlines and then traveled on to Washington, DC, Philadelphia, and Panama, serving as an aesthetic shot across the bow of an art world either transfixed by Havana’s radical chic or simply dismissive of Latin art altogether. More than three decades later, the NSU Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale brings us an update with “The Miami Generation: Revisited,” featuring artwork from the original show as well as pieces completed by the nine artists

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in the years since. The net effect is bittersweet: García, González, and Macía all died from AIDS at the turn of the ’90s, and their displayed output is a painful reminder of how much talent was cut down in its prime. Yet there is also a spirit of triumph here; the surviving six artists have all produced dazzling bodies of work in sculpture, painting, and conceptualism, continuing to draw upon and ultimately transcend their shared heritage. As the late curator Giulio Blanc concluded in his catalog essay for the 1983 exhibition, “They are Cuban, they are American, and they are something more.” “The

Miami Generation: Revisited” is on display through September 21 at the Nova Southeastern University Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale, 1 E. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, 954-525-5500; moafl.org. Three Works You musT see Self-Portrait, maría Brito No one was more surprised by the flames crowning María Brito’s SelfPortrait than its creator herself. “I think of my work as an exorcism of sorts, getting out certain states of mind and cONTiNUEd ON PAGE 122

photography by gerhard heidersberger/NsU MUseUM of art | fort LaUderdaLe, fort LaUderdaLe, fLorida (goNzáLez)

Juan González, Double Portrait of Jimmy, N.Y.C., 1984.


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CULTURE Art Full María Brito, Self-Portrait, 1989. left: Pablo Cano, La Santa Sebastiana, 1983.

Creative Corner at “The Miami Generation: Revisited” exhibition.

“This mural was a meTaphor for The exile experience, using symbols of liberTy bound and oppressed.” —pablo cano conTinued from page 120

emotions,” says Brito. “I start with a general idea of what the piece is going to be, but I pay a lot of attention to the process. Things happen. And by ‘things’ I mean everything from my thinking evolving to my using a discarded part of a previous sculpture that I happen to see in my studio.” As for her figure’s caged and immolated head, “I don’t necessarily want viewers to experience that pain,” Brito chuckles, “but if someone is feeling

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something similar in their life, hopefully there will be some kind of communion.” The Collapse of an Island, Humberto Calzada “When my family arrived in Miami in 1960, very soon everyone we knew in Havana was here,” remembers Humberto Calzada. “The food was here in the markets, the music was here on the radio. But the architecture was so very different.” Calzada’s youthful memories of classically styled Cuban

buildings have since fueled many of his paintings, including The collapse of an island. And the submerged edifice in this piece? “Flooding means total disaster, but it also means purification and rebirth,” he says. “I love that duality as the island is literally sinking.” La Santa Sebastiana, Pablo Cano Pablo Cano is best known these days for his inventive marionette and theater work. But at the start of his career, he was a ferocious

draftsman, as evidenced by the visceral punch of the six-foot-high, 12-footlong mural la santa sebastiana. Having digested Catholic iconography, Russian Constructivism, and Pablo Picasso’s guernica, Cano was determined to create his own social statement. “This mural symbolizes all those feelings—it was a metaphor for the exile experience, using symbols of liberty bound and oppressed,” Cano says. In hindsight, he now admits

wryly that the mural’s equine stand-in for the United States owes a lot to the “Marlboro Man” cigarette ads of his teenage years. But la santa sebastiana’s overpowering sense of stasis across the Florida Straits is even more personally frustrating than when he first fashioned it. “Now it’s 2014 and we’re still waiting, we’re still in the same limbo,” he says. “Hopefully, in my lifetime, I’ll be able to see a real political change occur.” OD

photography by pablo Cano/ColleCtion of Mr. and Mrs. John and lauren oraMas (Cano); gerhard heidersberger/Courtesy Mosquera ColleCtion (brito); CarMen Kohly Calzada/ColleCtion of the artist (Calzada); steven brooKe (Creative Corner)

Humberto Calzada, The Collapse of an Island, 1998.


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CULTURE Spotlight // MUST READ // spotlight

BIKE CULTURE

1

RedBike, the first dedicated indoor cycling studio in Brickell, brings a full-body, 45-minute workout to the area’s time-crunched finance types and fitness buffs. Simply click on your preferred class on the studio’s site, hop onto one of 40 bikes, and prepare to sweat it out during a high-energy,

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A New York Times best-selling master of snark, local author Carl Hiaasen is back, this time with a fast-paced thriller for young adults. In this true-to-form misadventure, Skink, an ex-Florida governor gone renegade, helps a teen rescue his runaway cousin held captive in the Florida wilderness. Books & Books, 265 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables, 305-442-4408; booksandbooks.com

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BEATRIZ MILHAZES MAKES A SPLASH STATESIDE WITH THE PREMIERE OF “JARDIM BOTÂNICO.” BY STEPHANIE DUNN The kaleidoscopic works of Beatriz Milhazes will be on display at the Pérez Art Museum Miami, marking the Brazilian abstract artist’s first exhibition in the United States. With more than 40 large-scale paintings, collages, and screenprints—as well as two new paintings made specifically for PAMM’s presentation—“Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico” will span 25 years of the artist’s prolific career, including such works as Dancing and Chora, menino (Cry, Boy; SHOWN). Fittingly, the domestic debut is being made in a city both as tropical and modern as the works being showcased. “Beatriz Milhazes: Jardim Botânico” is on display September 19 through January 18, 2015, at the Pérez Art Museum Miami, 1103 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-375-3000; pamm.org.

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LILY ALLEN AT THE FILLMORE

THE SONGSTRESS PERFORMS TRACKS from her latest album, Sheezus, September 9.

A wilting flower Lily Allen is not. After a five-year mommyhood hiatus, she’s blazed back into the spotlight with Sheezus, the title track of which name-checks rival divas Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, and

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Beyoncé. Catch her offbeat brand of sometimes venomous, always infectious pop on September 9 at The Fillmore. 1700 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-7300; fillmoremb.com OD

2

THE CLAIRVOYANT OF CALLE OCHO Miami native Anjanette Delgado drops readers into the heart of Little Havana to follow mistressturned-psychic Mariela Estevez as she uncovers the truth about her lover’s murder, the steamy secrets of her neighbors, and her own uncertain fate. Books & Books, 265 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables, 305-442-4408; booksandbooks.com

Lily Allen at a benefit concert in London this June.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY COLECCIÓN PATRICIA PHELPS DE CISNEROS, CARACAS AND NEW YORK ©BEATRIZ MILHAZES (MILHAZES); DAVE HOGAN/GETTY IMAGES (ALLEN); BILL KEARNEY (REDBIKE)

Beatriz Milhazes, Chora, menino (Cry, Boy), 1996.



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PEOPLE View From the Top

Living Legacy

At the helm of the world’s lArgest privAtely held spirit compAny, Facundo L. Bacardi looks to expAnd BAcArdi’s new upper-tier rums from miAmi to the world. by matt stewart

photography by nick garcia

Bacardi is a juggernaut of the spirit industry. In 2013, the brand enjoyed sales of more than 19 million nine-liter cases, making it the premier rum globally. Combining this with the company’s additional holdings, including stalwart brands such as Dewar’s, Grey Goose, and Martini & Rossi, Bacardi is the largest privately held spirits enterprise in the world. Steering this rather massive ship into the 21st century is Facundo L. Bacardi, great-great-grandson to Don Facundo Bacardi, the founder of the company. When speaking to Facundo L. Bacardi, it becomes immediately apparent that family and its Cuban heritage are continued on page 130

Facundo L. Bacardi, great-great-grandson of founder Don Facundo Bacardi, carries on the family tradition of top-shelf rums.

oceandrive.com  129


PEOPLE View From the Top Facundo L. Bacardi holding one of the oldest known bottles of Bacardi rum in the company’s archive, from the United States’ pre-Prohibition era of 1909.

The Bacardi Cup, an annual sailing race in Coconut Grove, began as El Trofeo Bacardi in 1920s Havana.

The iconic Bacardi Building, now home of the YoungArts Foundation.

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Cid and master blender Manny Oliver, Facundo Bacardi has attempted to honor 152 years of distilling. “Collaboration is the key to unlocking the best of everyone and everything,” he enthuses. “It has played a role in the development of the Facundo Collection. It started with me, senior family members, and Manny as the rum maestro, and even the liquids themselves that were made long ago. So in a way, the collection represents a generational level of collaboration. To me it’s always about a team effort, and when you can put together a group of people who share the same vision and the same passion and the same desire, the end result is always going to be better than that of what any one single person can do.” OD

MiaMi Musts A look at the hometown places and events to which Facundo Bacardi will gladly raise a glass. Never Miss:

Bacardi Miami Sailing Week: “In the 1920s in Havana, we began hosting a regatta called El Trofeo Bacardi. It was part of the midwinter championship, but then the Cuban Revolution came along and it was moved to Coconut Grove, [and] to this day the Bacardi Cup continues.” Favorite Place:

The Bacardi Building, now home to the National YoungArts Foundation: “The National YoungArts Foundation supports

young artists in several different areas of the arts. Our family’s philanthropic ventures are really about education and young people, so this foundation melds well with some of the activities that the broader family conducts.” oN the rocks:

Bacardi chilled: “I love to sip rum on ice. It’s what the Bacardi family has been doing for generations and how I was taught. There is no better way to drink it.”

photography by nick garcia (bacardi); greg clark photography (youngarts)

always front of mind. CONTINuEd FROM pAGE 129 As the man who chairs this global endeavor, there is a deep respect for the legacy of his namesake, who began the business in 1862 from a small rum distillery in Santiago, Cuba, and the family enterprise that grew from that rich, Cuban soil. “When I was growing up, it was Cuba, Cuba, Cuba,” says Bacardi. “There was a sense of trying to imbue what Cuba was about and what Bacardi was in Cuba. It’s funny because you would think that it would be about the family business first, but for us it was about the love for Cuba, and that’s because of the dispossession of [our] homeland.” The family and its rum have survived colonial rule by both the Spanish and Americans and then the revolution that swept Castro into power, prompting the family and business to eventually settle in Miami, where they established headquarters in 1964. “Miamians embraced exiles that fled the chaos and bloodshed of the Cuban Revolution,” Bacardi explains. “My family was among them— Miami felt very warm to them, like a place where they could stay for a long time. We are Miamians, but we’ll always be Cubans.” Facundo Bacardi’s introduction to the family business began at a young age under the tutelage of his grandfather, who instilled in him the idea that each generation is the product of those who came

before, and they are the stewards of the family business for future generations. “Growing up, I was very close with my grandfather,” Bacardi remembers. “There was a 70-year difference between us, and although he passed away when I was 16, I downloaded many stories and much information from him during that short time.” One of Bacardi’s key memories involved a drink that represented a great deal to the Cuban people and defined rum drinking for countless millions around the world—the Cuba libre (“free Cuba”). This drink of Bacardi and Coke came about as the US freed Cuba from the Spanish at the end of the Spanish-American War. “He told me the story about Bacardi and Coke, and no matter where we would go, he would point out Cuba libre,” Bacardi continues. “That taught me about the family and the things that Cuba went through and still goes through today. It taught me about the troubles of Cuba, the intersection of Bacardi product and what it meant to my grandfather.” Heritage has always been a major influence, and these are heady times for the family brand—an apt moment, perhaps, to launch one of Facundo’s most beloved projects. This month, Bacardi rolls out the upper-tier Facundo Collection—four rare blends of what they call their finest aged sipping rum, leveraging some of the rarest available reserves—nationally after successful runs in test markets of Miami and New York. “I will tell you that right now we are most proud of the Facundo Collection because it is the ultimate tribute to Don Facundo Bacardi,” Bacardi says of this labor of love. “When you think about where we launched the collection, what better place than in our home city, Miami? It’s just coincidental that Miami has become the world’s most sophisticated rum market, but for us, it is just home.” Working closely with Bacardi brand master David


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PEOPLE Beach Patrol INSIGHT: Best cooking advice received:

“Quality, simplicity, and consistency. I learned from my mom and other great cooks to pay attention to the balance of each dish.”

LocaL favorite:

“Anything and everything from Michael’s Genuine.” secret craving:

“Subway cookies.”

She-Wolf of Biscayne Boulevard A determined second-generAtion restAurAteur, Jessica sanchez gAve up the life of A Brickell BAnker to pursue her dreAm. by jordan melnick Endless competition, fickle customers with fluctuating disposable income, and myriad other external factors combine to make the restaurant business notoriously success-stingy. So why would 28-year-old Jessica Sanchez leave a job as an analyst at a big Brickell bank to open a restaurant in a promising but relatively rundown MiMo district, even though her parents’ own stint as restaurant owners had met a “really sad” end a few years prior? “I just became hungry,” says Sanchez, who quit when performing risk analysis and filing return on investment reports came to feel “robotic.”

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Sanchez had always planned to open a restaurant. In fact, she had earned a degree in economics at the University of Florida and an MBA from Florida International University (FIU) specifically so the financial troubles that befell her parents’ eatery wouldn’t thwart her own venture. “I wanted to understand how money works so that wouldn’t happen to me,” she says. After a few years working at the bank, her culinary ambitions surfaced on Brickell Avenue when Sanchez launched a catering company that served her mother’s Colombian cooking to hungry coworkers. It was popular, but Sanchez shut it down after a boss labeled the side business a distraction. However, that was just a temporary setback: In February 2013, Sanchez quit her job at the bank, spent the next year working as a commercial real estate agent, and then poured her savings into a 700-square-foot former Indian buffet on Biscayne Boulevard and 74th Street. The newly open restaurant is called Loba (translation: “she-wolf”). Sanchez hardly comes across as a bloodthirsty predator, but she chose the name as a personal declaration. “My experiences have made me realize that I need to rely on myself,” she says. “‘Stay hungry,’ Loba’s motto, is a lot more than it seems. For me, it’s hungry for life. Being in that 8-to-5 rotation [at the bank]—it wasn’t for me. I’m done with being safe, and I’m going out there by myself to figure it out.” Of course, the name also hints at Loba’s carnivore-friendly menu. There is a pork belly appetizer and large plates featuring slow-cooked pork ribs, a bacon-and-egg-topped burger, fried chicken, and a churrasco steak dish named after her parents’ restaurant chain, Patacon. (Sanchez’s mother cooks the dish using a secret recipe she refuses to share with anyone, including her daughter.) Warm lighting, sturdy wood tables, salvaged mirrors and picture frames, and walls lined with bookshelves (made by Sanchez and her father) create a “homey, cozy” atmosphere, while the price point—approximately $25 per entrée—matches the vibe. At Loba, there’s also something of a pack mentality: Sanchez has hired staff from FIU’s hospitality management program. “I wanted passionate people here,” she explains. “This is an investment in my soul.” 7420 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 786-536-6692; lobarestaurant.com OD

photography by nick garcia

Jessica Sanchez at Loba’s communal table, a design feature that contributes to the restaurant’s “homey” vibe.


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PEOPLE Beach Patrol INSIGHT: Best advice:

“You have to keep your identity. Be you.” His take on fasHion:

“People make a big deal about things that aren’t, like the color of a shoe sole. Fashion needs to be beautiful and make women feel amazing.” favorite red carpet moment:

“When Kelly Lynch (Magic City) wore my cocktail dress to the Independent Spirit Awards—she looked simply stunning.”

Oscar Winning Coral Gables-based desiGner Oscar Garcia-LOpez wowed the judGes on Project runway: under the Gunn with his beautiful Gowns. now, he’s set on dressinG the stars. by jessica quillin

The winner of Project Runway: Under the Gunn’s debut season, Oscar GarciaLopez seemed somehow above the fray as reality-TV drama unfolded around him. “I try not to lose my inner child,” he says of dealing with the pressure. “Remembering this helps me stay happy.”

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On Under the Gunn, hosted by Tim Gunn, Garcia-Lopez was an undeniable favorite with the show’s judges, including stylist Jen Rade and designer Rachel Roy, who all praised his ability to produce finished looks in a short period of time, such as designing a collection in three days. Indeed, he walked away with Roy as a client, designing both her dress for the Met Gala in early May as well as the Kim Kardashian-Kanye West wedding. These days, he gets a little more time to think creatively from his house/studio in Coral Gables, creating body-flattering eveningwear inspired by his upbringing in Cuba and his early career as a performer. His designs boast both drama and technical craftsmanship, and he uses color with panache—a plus when designing for Miami’s stylish, daring women. A self-taught designer, Garcia-Lopez learned to sew by watching local seamstresses, and he designed clothes for his female friends. Later, Garcia-Lopez went on to graduate from the prestigious Tropicana dancing school in Havana and became part of a singing group that toured throughout Latin America for several years; outside of designing the costumes for the group, he did not pursue fashion until he moved to the US in 2004. Upon his arrival in Miami, Garcia-Lopez started working for a local designer, performing fittings, designing pieces, and building relationships with high-end clients. In 2008, when he opened his own boutique in Coral Gables, he took the bulk of these clients with him. Today, GarciaLopez is keen to keep doing what he does best: designing custom gowns for fabulous women from all over the world. “I learned so much about myself and what I can produce from [Under the Gunn],” he says. “Now I love anything that forces me outside my comfort zone.” ozcarg.com OD

photography by Nick garcia; LocatioN courtesy of rex fabrics

Oscar Garcia-Lopez at Rex Fabrics.


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PEOPLE Thought Leader “You need to show up everY daY readY to risk Your job in the pursuit of what You believe is right.”

Alberto Carvalho at iPreparatory Academy.

Higher Learning As MiAMi students stArt A new school yeAr, 2014 nAtionAl superintendent of the yeAr Alberto CArvAlho is MAking Moves to estAblish our schools As A nAtionAl Model. by jon warech

These days, everyone is asking Miami-Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Alberto Carvalho for advice. It’s what happens when you take a failing school system facing economic bankruptcy and academic ruin, including nine schools on the brink of permanent shutdown, and turn it into a model for change, earning the title of National Superintendent of the Year in the process. “From the impossible to the inevitable, there’s nothing but belief, skill, and will,” says Carvalho. “You need to show up to work every single day ready to risk your job in the pursuit of what you believe is right.” Carvalho’s biggest risk came early on when he made the decision to remove the principals of those nine failing schools and subsequently replace underperforming teachers. “It had never been done before, and if the data had not

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shown a year later that it had worked, it would have been terribly embarrassing,” he says. “It’s all about the culture changing the fundamental elements that spell out school success, and that begins with leadership.” These days, Carvalho says the district-wide graduation rate is up, from about 62 percent to 77 percent (higher than the state average), and there’s not a single F-rated school in the district where Carvalho estimates 77 percent of the students live at or below the poverty level. Miami-Dade also has the highest passing rate in the nation on Advanced Placement exams and is a leader in technological advancements in the classroom. “Innovation is a strong motivator, particularly for the millennial learners,” he says. Carvalho is using a $1.2 billion bond referendum as well as federal grants and aid from organizations like City Year, Teach for America, College Summit, and Diplomas Now to keep Miami-Dade changing for the better. This is all part of a roughly $5 billion budget in a system that educates nearly half a million students, employs 52,000 people, and operates the largest school bus fleet in the world. Under this kind of system, every move is a calculated risk, even when Carvalho decided to do some franchising of his own. He successfully branched out the famed MAST Academy, a local maritime and science technology high school program, by opening outposts with specialty programs in Homestead and Hialeah and at FIU. He also turned one iPreparatory Academy—a career and leadership magnet school that advances education through technology in nontraditional classroom environments— into 60 around the county in just a few short years. With all the risk comes reward, and both Carvalho and Miami-Dade have received many, including The Broad Prize for Urban Education and AP District of the Year, as well as presidential recognition via a Hispanic Heritage Award for education. “We have an opportunity to emerge as the new American city,” he says. “Fifteen years from now, demographers predict that the face of America will be [like] Miami’s face today. So socially, economically, politically, educationally, if we cracked the code of success here, we are providing to the nation a skeletal replicable model for other communities, and that to me is the exciting thing.” dadeschools.net OD

photography by gary james

—alberto carvalho



PEOPLE Spirit of Generosity

clockwise from top left: Former Dolphins linebacker Twan Russell talking with kids at North Dade Regional Library during a Most Valuable Reader event; Russell gets a little help from the team mascot; the Miami Dolphins Foundation initiative makes reading fun by letting kids win prizes.

Undefeated

While Football season kicks oFF this month, the MiaMi Dolphins launch a neW program through the team’s eponymous Foundation to help Further give back to the south Florida community. by brett graff

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leadership of former linebacker Twan Russell, who, while playing in the NFL, won the team’s Nat Moore Community Service award, given each year to a Miami Dolphins player recognized for his involvement in the South Florida community. Today, he is the team’s senior director of community affairs and works with the Miami Dolphins Foundation, which provides support to South Florida organizations in the areas of education, health, youth athletic programs, and volunteer work. Activities range from

preparing meals for needy seniors—in a new partnership with the AARP Foundation, on September 20—to the two-day Dolphins Cycling Challenge and the annual Fins Weekend, a three-day extravaganza that includes a golf tournament, a 1,200-person party at Miami Beach Marina, and a fishing tournament. “Our organization is extremely community oriented,” says Russell. “We are truly a South Florida brand. People feel they have ownership in our organization, and we consider that a responsibility.”

“Our OrganizatiOn is extremely cOmmunity Oriented. We are truly a sOuth FlOrida brand.” —twan russell

Ocean Drive: What are some new initiatives for the year? Twan Russell: We’re very excited about a new partnership with the AARP Foundation and our Special Teams Driven by Chevy

program (of which Chevy has been the ongoing sponsor). Beginning this year, AARP and the Special Teams Unit will execute events throughout the region focusing on four main continued on page 140

photography by gary james

It’s football season and Miami is ready to root once again for its beloved Dolphins. And while the city will cheer the team’s on-field efforts, it’s the untelevised and off-field teamwork that will arguably have the mightiest impact on the community. That’s because when the players aren’t worrying about touchdowns, they focus on touching lives, using their days off to visit schools, raise funds for cancer, feed the hungry, fight childhood obesity, and promote reading by teaming up with local libraries. It’s all done under the



PeOPLe spirit of generosity Charity register Opportunities to give.

Live Like BeLLa Foundation

Come to the inaugural Bella’s Ball; the Miami-based organization supports clinical trials for cancer research involving children. When: Saturday, September 13, at 7 pm Where: Jungle Island Treetop Ballroom, 1111 Parrot Jungle Trail, Miami Contact: livelikebella.org

MiaMi ChiLdren’s hospitaL Foundation

from left: Boards at last year’s Dolphins Cycling Challenge invited participants to write down the person or cause

they rode for; Dolphins General Manager Dennis Hickey, team President and CEO Tom Garfinkel, AARP President Lisa Marsh Ryerson, and coach Joe Philbin at the announcement of the team’s new partnership this May.

“ThaT’s The capaciTy our players have—To go inTo The communiTy and inspire youTh.” —twan russell

Take part in the Hyundai Hope on Wheels fourth annual Miami Children’s Hospital 5K Run/Walk to beneft the Miami Children’s Hospital and the Miami Children’s Health Foundation, providing medical care to kids in need. When: Saturday, September 20, at 7:30 am Where: Coral Gables City Hall, 405 Biltmore Way, Coral Gables Contact: mch5k.com

aMeriCan diaBetes assoCiation

Join in the annual Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes; the event has raised over $175 million in its more than 20-year history to fund educational programs and defer medical care costs for those with diabetes. When: Saturday, September 27, at 8:30 am

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foods, and make positive choices. We recently had our millionth kid declare to be “Dol-Fit.” And how do you promote learning? We believe that a child who can read can learn anything. That’s why through a partnership with 92 participating libraries in both Broward and MiamiDade Counties we have the Most Valuable Reader Program. Each library has a game board, and every time a child completes a book, he or she moves up spaces while being entered to win prizes (including a Dolphins Home Game Experience—a VIP day at the Miami Dolphins training camp with a pizza party provided by Papa John’s Pizza). The goal is to keep kids reading all year long. What is the medical component of the Miami Dolphins Foundation? I don’t think there’s anyone who hasn’t been impacted by cancer, so in a collaborative effort between the Dolphins and The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, we raise money through our Dolphins Cycling Challenge (February 7–8, 2015). It’s entering its fifth year and has to date raised over $7 million. Last year alone, we had more than 2,500 participants with 100 percent of funds going toward the cause. miamidolphins.com OD

Where: Marlins Ballpark, 501 Marlins Way, Miami Contact: diabetes.org

the Woody Foundation

Rock out to the Gipsy Kings, Cris Cab, and Musical Beat, among others, at the Woodystock 2014 concert; the annual event raises money for the Florida-based organization that aims to improve the quality of life for people who have sustained spinal cord injuries. When: Saturday, September 27, at 4 pm Where: Peacock Park, 2820 McFarlane Road, Coconut Grove Contact: woodyfoundation.org

ann storCk Center

Sample dishes from 25 of South Florida’s leading toques at the 21st annual Celebrity Chefs Food Tasting & Auction to beneft the Ann Storck Center, serving more than 300 children and adults with developmental disabilities, including epilepsy, Down syndrome, and autism. When: Saturday, September 27, at 7 pm Where: Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, 1 Seminole Way, Hollywood Contact: annstorckcenter.org

photography courtesy of MiaMi Dolphins

priorities—hunger, isolation, income, and housing. On September 20, we will transform our Doctors Hospital Training Facility into a packing station and prepare meals to deliver to over 1 million adults over age 50. Volunteers will include the full roster of Dolphins players, coaches, executives, fans, and corporate partners. What are some moments that have directly touched your heart? Just yesterday we served special needs students who spent the day with our players. Our general manager, Dennis Hickey, spoke to them beforehand, explaining that we all have something special to do and that we all have a place in this world. Afterward, a child walked up to me, pointed to Dennis, and said, “I want to be like him.” That’s the capacity our players have—to go into the community and inspire youth. How do you help these kids become athletes like the team players? Through our Youth and Community Service Program. We run Dol-Fit Kids, launched in 2005; it’s a commitment kids make to consider their health when it comes to eating and exercise. They vow to take school seriously, read books, eat balanced COnTinueD FROM pAGe 138





miamicocktail.com


shot on site Lauren Conrad at the Malibu Island Spiced Summer Soirée at the Mondrian South Beach. Dress, Aqua.

cali blue

Bride to Be Lauren Conrad wore something Blue while hosting a summer soiree in south Beach.

PhotograPhy by gustavo Caballero/getty

By Julia Ford-Carther

California styling hit the shores of Miami Beach when Lauren Conrad arrived at the Mondrian South Beach to celebrate summer and host a launch event for Malibu Island Spiced. The fashion designer, author, and former star of MTV’s Laguna Beach and The Hills took some time out from wedding planning to refresh with Caribbean-inspired cocktails and chat with an intimate group of guests. Conrad, whose lines include Paper Crown and LC by Lauren Conrad, donned a breezy royal blue drop-waist shift dress by Aqua and Miamiperfect white single-sole strappy heels. To accessorize, Conrad tapped into her creative side at a flower bar and strung together a petal necklace, something she blogged was “a cute and crafty idea for a party or even a bridal shower.” While she’s kept mum on her impending nuptials to fiancé and recent law school graduate William Tell, there’s no doubt that this lifestyle expert has chosen a white dress to suit her classically chic signature style.

oceandrive.com  145


SHOT ON SITE Photography by Seth Browarnik

Mase and Sean “Diddy” Combs at Story. Carlos and Maryam Miranda with David Beckham at Seasalt and Pepper.

Gabrielle Union and Lenny Kravitz at Hyde AmericanAirlines Arena.

Lil Jon at LIV at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Ariana Grande at the iHeartRadio Ultimate Pool Party at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Dascha Polanco and Adrian Grenier at the Irie Weekend X Hublot VIP kick-off reception at The National Hotel Aqua Bar & Grill.

Iggy Azalea at the iHeartRadio Ultimate Pool Party at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Diplo at Mansion.

A-LIST AFFAIRS

A STELLAR LINEUP, including

Jennifer Lopez, Iggy Azalea, and Ariana Grande, performed to a packed poolside at the annual two-day iHeartRadio Ultimate Pool Party at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach. Downtown, devoted Miami Heat fans Gabrielle Union and Lenny Kravitz chatted it up over drinks at Hyde AmericanAirlines Arena during the Heat’s playoff run. Actor Ryan Phillippe and girlfriend Paulina Slagter slipped into Hyde Beach for a fun night while on vacation in Miami.

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Jennifer Lopez at the iHeartRadio Ultimate Pool Party at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

David Guetta and Erick Morillo at LIV at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Ryan Phillippe and Paulina Slagter at Hyde Beach at the SLS Hotel South Beach.



SHOT ON SITE Photography by Seth Browarnik

Aino Jawo and Caroline Hjelt of Icona Pop at LIV at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach. Calvin Harris and David Grutman at Story.

Gloria and Emilio Estefan at Estefan Kitchen’s grand reopening of Larios on the Beach.

SUMMER NIGHTS ENTOURAGE STAR Kevin Dillon laced up for charity at DJ Irie’s 10th annual Irie Weekend Celebrity Bowl at Lucky Strike Miami Beach. South of Fifth hot spot Story hosted a few familiar faces, including singer Estelle and comedian Kevin Hart, who arrived with girlfriend Eniko Parrish. Gloria and Emilio Estefan made sure guests had a flavorful experience with their Cuban-inspired specialties at Estefan Kitchen’s grand reopening of Larios on the Beach.

Eniko Parrish, Kevin Hart, and Simply Jess at Story.

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Ian Schrager and Ben Pundole at The Residences at The Miami Beach Edition cocktail party at the Bass Museum of Art.

Elaine Bradley, Chris Allen, Tyler Glenn, and Branden Campbell of Neon Trees at the iHeartRadio Ultimate Pool Party at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Kevin Dillon at the Irie Weekend Celebrity Bowl at Lucky Strike Miami Beach.

Maxwell, Brandon Cauff, and Sidney Rice at Wall at the W South Beach.

Chris Paciello and DJ Tiësto at FDR at the Delano.

Estelle at Story.

Maximillion Cooper and Eve at Wall at the W South Beach.


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SHOT ON SITE Photography by Seth Browarnik

Alberto Ibarguen, Justin Peck, Sufjan Stevens, and Paul Lehr at the YoungArts Salon event with Justin Peck and Sufjan Stevens sponsored by The Knight Foundation.

Donae Burston, Katharine Rubino, and Stephen Brunelle at the Dom Pérignon Dinner at Mariposa at Neiman Marcus Coral Gables.

Allen Susser and Lee Brian Schrager at Schrager’s Fried & True book launch at the Pérez Art Museum Miami.

Ted and Justin Trabert at the third annual Doctor’s Hospital Whimsical Wonderland Ball at the US Century Bank arena at Florida International University.

Valerie Riles, Columba Bush, and John Richard at the 2014 Arts for Life! Luncheon at Knight Concert Hall at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts.

Samantha Hoopes and Dashil Hernandez at LIV at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Lucy and John Yanopoulos at the third annual Doctor’s Hospital Whimsical Wonderland Ball at the US Century Bank arena at Florida International University.

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Alan Palomo of Neon Indian at The Gap’s grand reopening on Lincoln Road.

Anastasia Wachter and Geraldine Paz at the SLS Lux sales center opening.

Katie and David Simpkins with Alan Roth and Barclay Gang at the Friends Fun Wine mixologist competition at Broken Shaker at the Freehand Miami.

Christy Martin and Rene Ruiz at the Dom Pérignon Dinner at Mariposa at Neiman Marcus Coral Gables.

Meghan and Justin Leckey with Susan Penrod at a VIP Summer Soirée kick-off at Shooters.


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SHOT ON SITE Photography by Seth Browarnik

Sofia Salvat, Asif Farooq, and Typoe at the Mykita + Maison Martin Margiela eyewear collection launch in the Design District.

Sasha Lauzon and Bonnie Beats at the Desperados Seize the Night party at ToeJam BackLot.

Dominic Purvis, Brian Williams, and Clare Laverty at the launch of Swire Hotels East, Miami at the Mandarin Oriental, Miami.

Michael Martin, Steve Bauer, and Tommy Pooch at Villa Azur. Ian Staller, Colin Watson, Larry Ruvo, and Romero Britto at Adore. Andre Berto and Christopher Lee at The Forge.

Kiko Baixauli, Felicia Marquez, and Clif Loftin at Bâoli Miami.

Rebekah Keida and Brianna Niemann at the Dom Pérignon Dinner at Mariposa at Neiman Marcus Coral Gables.

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Dr. Eldredge “Biff” Bermingham and Marko Dimitrijevic at the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science’s third annual Miami Underwater Festival VIP kick-off.

Mauricio Claveri, Pedro Frugone, and Beto Cuevas of La Ley at the inaugural MO Bar Unplugged Show with the band at the Mandarin Oriental, Miami.

Allison Schnurle, Anya Freeman, Chelsea Hlavach, Audrey Barth, Lydia Fundaro, and Lynn Earnest at The Gap’s grand reopening on Lincoln Road.


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SHOT ON SITE

Teddy Del Villar, Athina Marturet, and Robert Guedez at the Hublot 2014 Timepiece Collection exhibition at The Mansions at Doral Sales Center.

Jeff Ransdell, DJ Irie, and Jamie Foxx at DJ Irie’s private birthday dinner hosted by Merrill Lynch at Verde at the Pérez Art Museum Miami.

Philip Spiegelman, Ryan Shear, Kevin Maloney, and Craig Studnicky at The Echo Aventura Brazilian World Cup event.

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Stephen Macricostas, Doc Rivers, and David Pulley at the A.Z Araujo show at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Swim at The Raleigh.

Susie Cabrera and Andres Asion at the One Paraiso sales gallery opening.

Elise Sande-Kerback and Matt Turzo at the Lyft Miami launch at LMNT. Dan Hetchkopf , Glen Rice, and Reid Heidenry at The Biltmore Hotel golf course.

Shobie Callaghan and Eric Veguilla at DJ Irie’s private birthday dinner hosted by Merrill Lynch at Verde at the Pérez Art Museum Miami.

Alex Hamdan, Claudia Betancur, Marines Duarte, and Andrea Chediak at the L’Oréal Paris It’s That Worth It campaign launch at the Mondrian South Beach.

Monica Carrero and Jeromre Berrebi at Internum Showroom’s Matteo Grassi unveiling.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALBERTO E. TAMARGO (CABRERA, PEREZ); ANTHONY CARO (MACRICOSTAS); IVAN NAVA (DEL VILLAR); JOSE LARROTTA (SPIEGELMAN); MANNY HERNANDEZ (ORTIZ); WORLD RED EYE (CALLAGHAN, HAMDAN, RANSDELL).

Jon Paul Perez, Sonia Figueroa, and Jorge Pérez at the One Paraiso sales gallery opening.

Roland Ortiz and Eddy Martinez at Pawpurrazzi 2014 at Jungle Island.


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taste so Many Dinners (so Little time) At Eating House, the strawberry gazpacho is given a twist from raw and pickled vegetables, house-made vinegar, and Lucini olive oil.

Change Up

photography by noah fecks

How Eating HousE gave tHe gables’ food scene a sHot of delicious adrenaline. by jordan melnick It was the most memorable dish of the night—grilled squid stuffed with braised short rib, topped with burnt onions and crispy purple cabbage, the plate splattered Jackson Pollock-style with black squid ink that had seeped into a bed of potato puree. “How’d you like it?” asked the lanky 20-something who had been garnishing plates a few feet away for most of the night. Savory, unctuous, decadent, visually striking—what wasn’t to like? “It’s the first time we’ve ever had it on the menu,” he said before quietly returning to his station to garnish plates within view of the happy diners packing his restaurant. The garnisher was chef Giorgio Rapicavoli, and his restaurant, Eating House, serves up many satisfying continued on page 160

oceandrive.com  159


TasTe so many dinners (so little Time) hauTe home Turf

Giorgio Rapicavoli; a salad of Florida tomatoes with nuoc cham, peanuts, coconut ice, and garden herbs; the dining room at Eating House.

CoNTINuED fRoM PAGE 159

surprises. “We jokingly call it Calle Ocho cuisine,” says Rapicavoli. “We try to really capture the flavors of Miami.” That is to say, pretty much anything goes on a menu that changes often, reflecting the cultural diversity of Rapicavoli’s hometown. One night, it included an heirloom tomato salad drizzled with nuoc cham (a Vietnamesestyle dipping sauce) and topped with a flurry of coconut ice and fresh mint. Taken together, it evoked a traditional Southeast Asian curry even as the tomatoes came from a local farm and the coconut ice attested to Rapicavoli’s enthusiasm for molecular gastronomy. After the stuffed squid came roasted bone marrow, a rich dish under any circumstances but especially so when accompanied by a helping of scrambled eggs and bacon. Delicious, hedonistic, and

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dietetically dangerous, the dish shows that Rapicavoli doesn’t take himself too seriously. “If cooking is art,” he says, “we’re making graffiti.” In 2012, Rapicavoli competed on the popular Food Network show Chopped and was the first Miami native to win. He took his $10,000 prize and launched a pop-up restaurant called Eating House with his business partner, Alex Casanova. Sharing space with a daytime café on the border of Coral Gables and Little Havana, the nighttime eatery’s brash spirit and ever-changing menu invigorated the area’s staid dining scene. “We wanted to make a place for people our age,” says Rapicavoli. Eating House’s unique balance of Slow Food philosophy and youthful experimentalism quickly earned loyal foodie fans. “I had no idea it would make

“If cookIng Is art, we’re makIng graffItI.”

—giorgio rapicavoli

such an impact,” Rapicavoli recalls. “I remember telling my chef that it would probably just be her and I cooking for like 20 people a night, doing our own dishes. We still laugh about that one.” The reception gave Rapicavoli and Casanova the confidence to make Eating House permanent in November 2012. While the menu still changes by the day, month, and season, Eating House has matured with time. “It’s become a very consistent restaurant,” says Rapicavoli. In their newest venture, a tapas bar in the MiMo district called Taperia Raca,

Rapicavoli and Casanova are charting a somewhat different course. The menu comprises a selection of small plates that hew relatively closely to Spanish tradition, with a few twists tossed in to keep things interesting. The space accommodates just 16 inside (40 more can sit in the garden) and the lounge-like décor is meant to lull guests into a state of relaxation. “I divide my time between the two [restaurants],” he says, “but since the menu at Eating House changes daily, I spend a bunch of my time there.” That’s no surprise. 804 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, 305-448-6524; eatinghousemiami.com OD

The early Bird… The most popular dessert is called Dirt Cup. It’s a generous helping of whipped Nutella, cookie crumbs, and pretzel served in a fowerpot topped with an edible fower. “I have a love-hate relationship with that dirt cup,” Rapicavoli says. “It’s quick to make, a great seller, and consistently delicious, but I hate it because it’s what diners always go to, and they ignore other desserts that are also fun but a bit more risky.” Dirt Cup photography by noah fecks

clockwise from far left: Chef

Despite certain hipster hallmarks—exposed light bulbs, graffti-clad walls—Eating House remains refreshingly approachable, from its delightful food—Australian lamb served with lightly fried plantains in a mojo jus—and affable service to its cubbyhole collection of Miami Heat paraphernalia.



taste Milestone Owner Nino Pernetti sitting outside Gables mainstay Caffe Abbracci. below, from left: With Julio Iglesias at a charity ball in Miami, circa 1990; the restaurant’s bar with its Florentine stained-glass ceiling.

INSIGHT: ItAlIAn HerItAGe:

“We are warm, we have good food, good wines. Eating here means living a good life. Some of these are my grandmother’s recipes.” A-lIst pAtrons:

Robert DeNiro, Tony Bennett, Robin Williams, Antonio Banderas, Frank Sinatra WHere:

318 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables, 305-441-0700; caffeabbracci.com

25 and Counting As Caffe abbraCCi hits A quArter century, owner nino Pernetti tAlks fAmous PAtrons, mirAcle mile in the ’80s, And oPening one of the gAbles’ most enduring eAteries. by ana heretoiu 162  oceandrive.com

How did you come to open Caffe Abbracci? First, I opened a restaurant on Ponce de Leon—Baci. In Italian, it means “kisses.” It was an overnight success, but it was too small. So when a friend of mine closed the restaurant next door [and the adjacent space became available], I called the landlord. It was about 2 o’clock, and by 6 o’clock, I signed a $10,000 check to secure both places. And what comes after baci? Hugs—abbracci. So I opened Caffe Abbracci. Describe Coral Gables before you opened. Miracle Mile wasn’t hustling and bustling, no fast food restaurants, no high buildings, no corporations. Now, there’s been a 180-degree turnaround. Who was one of your favorite famous patrons? The best—what touched my heart—was when Phantom of the Opera came to Fort Lauderdale and they called to make a reservation for the lead singer. It was my favorite show. I asked him to sing, and he did. It was one of the zeniths of my life. What’s another moment over the last 25 years that you won’t forget? It was during Hurricane Andrew. On the radio, they kept saying people are suffering, no water, no electricity. I called the city manager of Coral Gables and said if you call FPL and they send a couple of trucks here for electricity, we can feed people. He said, “Nino, consider it done.” It looked like a scene during the war when somebody’s dispatching food and hot soups— lines of people. It was such a beautiful, sentimental moment, one of the best moments of my entire life. OD

photography by gary james (pernetti); Courtesy of nino pernetti (iglesias)

Upon stepping inside the Coral Gables mainstay Caffe Abbracci, you’re greeted with cheerful faces, swiftly guided to your seats, and sipping un po’ di vino before you can even think to utter a grazie. And the cuisine: unquestionably authentic Italian—from homemade pastas, risottos, and carpaccios to fresh branzino, steaks, and chops. “We are artists in our own way,” says owner Nino Pernetti. In celebration of Caffe Abbracci’s 25th anniversary this year, we sat down with Pernetti for an insider take on the eatery’s beloved run here in Miami....


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One-hand wonder


TASTE Neighborhood Favorites Ortanique’s crispy breadfruit fish tacos.

Alberto Cabrera at Bread + Butter, where Little Havana meets Brooklyn.

Shishito peppers at Sushi Samba.

Gables Staples There are hundreds of eateries along the tree-lined streets of Coral Gables and its surrounding neighborhoods. But only a few manage to keep their guests coming back in droves. Here are six notables that do it with a distinctive style.

ricE ANd bEANS rEdoNE: Bread + Butter | Pan con Mantequilla

Miami native and Cuban American chef/owner Alberto Cabrera uses a mantra of “Little Havana kitsch and Brooklyn chic” when he remixes quintessential dishes served at every

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rinconcito in town. Modernized culinary techniques and thoughtful décor elevate B+B, attracting a younger generation of Miamians. “The old-school Cubans, or los viejos, expect tradition on their plates,” says Cabrera. “But after a few bites, they warm up, and after a few dishes, they’re almost always on board.” What usually seals the deal? Cabrera’s media noche croquetas with spicy mustard aioli and soda crackers on the side, a must-have in which the beloved Cuban sandwich’s flavors (ham, roasted pork,

Swiss cheese, pickles, and mustard on Cuban bread) are playfully replicated. 2330 Salzedo St., Coral Gables, 305-442-9622; breadandbuttercounter.com

whErE EvErybody kNowS your NAmE: Whisk Gourmet

Every Friday at 6 pm, the same nine savvy regulars post up at the bar at Whisk in South Miami to beat the rush for seats at the small Southernstyle gem. It all stems from chef/owner Brendan Connor and sister Kristin Connor’s original catering business in Coral Gables, which evolved

into a restaurant. “Our regulars have become our friends,” says Brendan. “Many of them have been invited to our weddings, baby showers, and house parties.” Their intimate spot, often with a line out the door, feels like a home, offering seasonally driven and organic items such as the chef’s remarkable buttermilk biscuits and house-made jam—a special treat served during brunch on Sundays. Additional favorites include the fried green tomato salad with crumbled bacon pieces, and the blue crab and roasted-corn fried rice with

okra, baby carrots, ginger, shallots, and sweet chili sauce. 7382 SW 56th Ave., South Miami, 786-268-8350; whiskgourmet.com

divE oN ThE ouTSidE, diviNE oN ThE iNSidE: Matsuri

Hidden in a strip mall on the edge of Coral Gables, Matsuri’s soothing space fills up fast for lunch and dinner with stylish Gable-ites in search of premium slices of sashimi and a high-end twist on classic cooked dishes. Veer to the masterpieces listed in continued on page 166

photography by ENVISIoNWorKS INc. (ortaNIquE); aNdrEW MEadE (SuShI SaMba)

Despite an increasing number of choices, loyal locals continue to crowD these six coral gables restaurants year-rounD. by galena mosovich


MICHAEL MINA 74 L I V E LY B I S T R O FA R E S C A R P E T TA AWA R D - W I N N I N G I TA L I A N STRIPSTEAK I N N O VAT I V E S T E A K H O U S E HAKKASAN MODERN GOURMET CHINESE EXPERT SOMMELIERS ARTISANAL MIXOLOGISTS ENTER A WORLD OF E X T R AO R D I N A RY TA ST E S EXPERIENCE THE ECLECTIC A N D D E L I C I O U S S I G N AT U R E FINE DINING COLLECTION F O N TA I N E B L E A U MIAMI BEACH F O N TA I N E B L E A U .CO M


TASTE Neighborhood Favorites Diners at Graziano’s Restaurant.

The daily vegetable plate at Whisk Gourmet.

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the “New World” section—the negitoro wasabi Ae is a standout, featuring chopped toro and scallions mixed with a spicy wasabi sauce and topped with a quail’s egg. Another is the unagi tofu, where the chef stuffs cubes of deep-fried tofu with unagi (freshwater eel, consumed during Japan’s hottest months to increase stamina) and drizzles it all with Matsuri’s signature ginger sauce. If you don’t speak Japanese, enter with an omakase attitude (trust the chef). 5759 Bird Road, Red Bird Shopping Center, Miami, 305-663-1615

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Sushi Samba Coral Gables Sushi Samba plates artful blends of Japanese, Brazilian, and Peruvian cuisines in the heart of the Gables’ business district, and offers plenty of bar space for worldly professionals in suits. The irresistible happy hour, dubbed “Samba Hour,” boasts more than a dozen signature dishes, including gunkan sushi (a vertical variation of traditional nigiri with cooked and raw items), treats from the grill, and select cocktails. “We’ve been creating an accessible environment where people don’t feel like they need a special occasion to stop by,” says Shimon Bokovza, founder and managing

partner of Samba Brands Management. “The happy hour often leads the crowd straight into dinner.” The Westin Colonnade Hotel, 180 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables, 305-4484990; sushisamba.com

cuiSiNE oF ThE SuN: Ortanique on the Mile Catch a Caribbean vibe at Ortanique on the Mile, which has been providing the area with authentic dining experiences for 15 years. Chef/owner Cindy Hutson and business partner Delius Shirley are known for highlighting the brightest flavors from Florida’s nearby islands: West Indian pumpkin bisque; island conch and corn fritters with

scallions, Holland and Scotch bonnet peppers, and roasted pepper coulis; and jerk-rubbed foie gras served over a warm mâche salad with duck confit and burnt orange marmalade. There’s even a West Indian-style bouillabaisse with diver scallops, mussels, middleneck clams, shrimp, grouper, mahi mahi, and jasmine rice in a coconut curry broth. 278 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, 305-446-7710; ortaniquerestaurants.com

liviNg high oN ThE hog: Graziano’s Restaurant Serious meat lovers swear by Graziano’s Restaurant in Coral Gables. The family became a household name in

the early ’90s after Mario Graziano began grilling for customers in the parking lot of his market on Coral Way. Many believe this bold move was Miami’s introduction to the Argentine style of cooking. At the Gables location, the fire pit and set of grills sit center stage, setting this restaurant apart from others. The family even sources Quebracho wood from Argentina for dense and superior flavors. You can’t go wrong with any of the meats or empanadas, but to really go big, they can source you a whole pig from a farm in Tampa with two days’ advance notice. 394 Giralda Ave., Coral Gables, 305-774-3599; grazianosgroup.com OD

photography by sebastian grey photography (whisk)

“the old-school cubans expect tradition on their plates, but after a few dishes, they’re almost always on board.” —alberto cabrera


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taste Cheers! The Golden Palm 2 oz. Grey Goose vodka 3/4 oz. Galliano liqueur 3/4 oz. crème de cacao 1 oz. whipped cream Stir vodka, Galliano, crème de cacao, and ice in a shaker. Prep the cream—a combination of heavy whipping cream and halfand-half—in a clean shaker. Shake cream vigorously to create a light consistency. Strain the cocktail into a martini glass and layer the cream on top. Sprinkle with 23k edible gold fakes.

Gold Standard OctaviO GOnzalez’s Golden Palm cocktail at Palme d’or is an extension of the Biltmore hotel’s hollywood-halcyon exPerience. by galena mosovich There­are­few­things­more­luxurious­than­gold.­Pair­that­with­hints­of­citrus,­ chocolate,­and­silken­cream,­and­you’ve­got­yourself­quite­a­cocktail.­To­find­ this­lovely­nightcap,­you’ll­need­to­follow­Coral­Gables’­leafy­back­roads­to­the­ historic­Biltmore­Hotel—a­magnificent­structure­with­Italian,­Spanish,­and­ Moorish­architectural­influences.­The­hotel­is­home­to­the­longest-running­ fine­French­restaurant­in­the­area:­Palme­d’Or­(“Golden­Palm”),­where­formal­

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multi­course­meals­are­whipped­up­by­Michelin-starred­ chef­Gregory­Pugin,­who­draws­from­his­life­experiences­ in­southwestern­France.­Guests­dine­on­delicacies­from­ roasted­rabbit­loin­to­sweetbread­fricassee,­or­the­ seven-course­tasting­menu,­which­starts­with­La­ Langoustine­au­caviar­and­might­end­with­chilled­peach­ with­verbena­ice­cream­and­black­currant­coulis.­ The­magic­continues­at­the­bar,­where,­since­1998,­ head­bartender­Octavio­Gonzalez­has­crafted­chic­ cocktails­for­the­elite—including­presidents,­Hollywood­ superstars,­and­local­legends—as­they­dine­to­the­sounds­ of­a­live­jazz­pianist­amid­black-and-white­photographs­of­ actors­and­actresses­in­their­halcyon­days,­all­designed­in­ part­to­pay­homage­to­the­original­Biltmore­Hotel­ restaurant.­Rare­and­highly­coveted­bottles­are­on­ display,­including­the­Chivas­Brothers’­62­Gun­Salute­ whisky­(a­cool­$600­for­a­one-ounce­pour)­and­the­ luxurious­Grand­Marnier­Cuvée­1880,­an­expression­ made­from­Grand­Champagne­in­the­Cognac­region­as­a­ tribute­to­the­founder­of­the­Marnier­Lapostolle­House­ and­the­“golden­age”­of­the­late­19th­century.­ Gonzalez­suggests­that­after­dinner­you­sip­on­his­ tribute­to­the­restaurant’s­namesake,­The­Golden­Palm­ (which­also­happens­to­be­the­name­of­the­Cannes­Film­ Festival’s­highest­honor).­To­make­this­luxurious­cocktail,­ Gonzalez­gently­stirs­vodka­with­Galliano,­a­golden-hued­ Italian­liqueur­made­from­30­herbs­and­spices,­including­ anis,­vanilla,­cinnamon,­juniper,­and­lavender.­He­then­ stirs­in­some­chocolaty­crème­de­cacao,­adds­a­layer­of­ house-made­whipped­cream,­something­he­says­his­guests­ love­watching,­and­dusts­the­top­with­23k­edible­gold­ flakes­for­a­stylishly­sweet­finale.­1200 Anastasia Ave., Coral Gables, 305-913-3200; biltmorehotel.com­ OD

photography by noah fecks

The Golden Palm cocktail at the Palme d’Or restaurant in the historic Biltmore recalls the hotel’s glorious past.



TASTE Spotlight // OPENING //

Michael Shikany shows off some creative plating.

recover

HYDE BEACH LAUNCHES BRUNCH

Breaking the Box

profile

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Sit poolside and recoup with a menu created by José Andrés’s ThinkFoodGroup, with breakfast-y options such as brioche French toast with fresh fruit and tamarind, or the Catalan Breakfast (jamón serrano, manchego, and Catalan tomato bread), or go all-in with a whole yellowtail snapper with papaya and charred corn. That should prep you for a dive into Hyde Beach’s cocktail menu. Brunch is Sundays only. 1701 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-1701; slshotels .com/southbeach

Karina Iglesias and chef Deme Lomas at Niu Kitchen.

NIU KITCHEN

Operated by Karina Iglesias, formerly of Soya e Pomodoro, and chef Deme Lomas, who hails from Barcelona, Niu opts for an experimental angle on Spanish cuisine. Although it’s located in urban downtown, the interior has a rustic charm, and the menu holds gems like cold tomato soup with mustard ice cream and basil oil; scallops with jamón ibérico and artichoke cream; and pork cheeks braised, then glazed, accompanied by potato foam. 134 NE Second Ave., Miami, 786-542-5070; niukitchen.com

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MICHAEL SHIKANY IS PUSHING BOUNDARIES AT HIS WYNWOOD RESTAURANT. BY BILL KEARNEY

// drink up //

Brioche French toast with tamarind.

Zak Stern learned his craft in Europe, brought his own “mother” fermenting stock back from Israel, and started supplying restaurants such as Oak Tavern and Books & Books Café with raved-about loaves. He recently opened his own kosher café serving toasts topped with loveliness such as Paradise Farms honey butter, whipped ricotta, or anchovy shallot butter; or try a salad of arugula, fennel, Florida watermelon, and mint Dijon. 405 NW 26th St., Miami; zakthebaker.com

MACCHIALINA’S GOT BOOZE

MIXOLOGIST WILLIAM RIVAS crafts the eatery’s new flavor-forward cocktail menu.

After a few years serving only wine and beer with its beloved Italian fare, Macchialina Taverna Rustica now has a full liquor license and William Rivas, previously of Khong River House and 1826, concocting

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libations. Rivas says his approach avoids “over-stylizing” the cocktails so “you can still taste the quality of the spirit.” Offerings include the El Diablo with Olmeca Altos blanco tequila, crème de cassis, and ginger

beer; the Allegheny with Rittenhouse rye, blackberry liqueur, and lemon; and the Rising Sun, made with Pierde Almas mezcal and blood orange. 820 Alton Road, Miami Beach, 305-5342124; macchialina.com OD

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GESI SCHILLING (SHIKANY); BILL KEARNEY (HYDE BEACH); STEPHAN GOETTLICHER (IGLESIAS)

Food can be lots of things, from comforting to creative. Chef Michael Shikany’s eponymous eatery, a clean, almost austere space between warehouses in Wynwood, opts for a bit of both. Shikany, who graduated with honors from the French Culinary Institute in New York and who has stints at Le Bernardin, Babbo, and Gramercy Tavern under his toque, applies avant-garde techniques to traditional food from all over the world. Menu standouts include the Akaushi wagyu tenderloin tartare with cayenne apple chutney, pickled mung bean, shiso, and chili oil powder; and the duck-fat-poached black cod with japchae noodles and shimeji mushrooms in a broth of coconut milk jus. 251 NW 25th St., Miami, 305-573-0690; shikany.com

ZAK THE BAKER



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photography by tk; illustration by tk


photography by tk; illustration by tk

Black sleeveless dress with horsebit belt, Gucci ($3,200). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-868-6504; gucci.com. 18k white-gold, diamonds, and ceramic Love bracelet, Cartier ($46,000). Miami Design District, 151 NE 40th St., 305-864-8793; cartier.us. High-heeled boots, Gucci ($1,595). see above

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iami’s renowned humidity can be polarizing—people love it or hate it. Sports Illustrated model and “Blurred Lines” video vixen Emily Ratajkowski is in the former camp. “I’m a huge fan of humidity,” raves Ratajkowski, who loves the immediate effect the Magic City’s natural climate has on her. “Something about it is kinda sexy, and it always makes my skin feel really good. And luckily for me, my hair is naturally very straight; I just feel kind of sultry, and a little dewy.” If anyone knows a thing or two about heat, it’s Ratajkowski, who is about to get her big-screen close-up opposite Ben Affleck in David Fincher’s adaptation of Gillian Flynn’s page-turner Gone Girl, out next month. Ratajkowski vaulted to fame last year with her scenestealing jaunt in the video for Robin Thicke’s 2013 song of the summer, “Blurred Lines,” in which she danced around topless wearing only a skin-toned thong, sarcastically rolling her eyes at the camera and the fully suited men in the video—a spot seen by more than 324 million YouTube viewers.

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The controversy and ensuing discourse over the song came as a welcome surprise for Ratajkowski. “Anything that’s in pop culture and involves naked women and dressed men should be criticized or at least inspected, so I felt glad that it was criticized, because it gave me an opportunity to say the things that I felt about feminism today and about women in general in pop culture.” And just what did she have to say? “There’s a larger thesis that I carry with me in general and that translates over to work like Gone Girl that I’ve been doing. We’re at an interesting time where women have been told to take the pill is cool, to sleep with whomever you want, or wear what you want. But if you’re naked, it can be offensive or sexist in some way. That’s the last step our culture needs to deal with. We have this culture of men, especially, watching pornography, but then offended by a classic nude portrait or photograph, and I’ve never felt that way.” Maybe it was her formative years, obsessing over Helmut Newton


Ivory long-sleeve silk dress, Versace ($2,995). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-864-0044; versace.com. Yellow-gold Sassi amethyst and pavĂŠ diamond ring, Bulgari ($9,300). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-861-8898; bulgari.com. Black lace-up boots, Versace ($1,675). see above opposite page: Black one-shoulder

photography by tk; illustration by tk

silk crepe dress, Kaufmanfranco ($3,295). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave, 305-865-1100; saks.com

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and Herb Ritts books, but Ratajkowski has always felt at ease with the bare form. She was cast in the “Blurred Lines” video after the director saw her nude photo on the cover of Treats! magazine. At first she turned the offer down, but a talk with the director convinced her to go for it. “The female body is a beautiful thing, and it should be embraced and celebrated, and there’s nothing wrong with being comfortable in your own skin. If anything, it can be really beautiful,” she says. “And the way that I was dancing, sort of sarcastically and I felt silly, it wasn’t for men—it was for myself and for other women, just like you would dance around your apartment.”

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photography by tk; illustration by tk

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precocious, early bloomer, the driven Ratajkowski began acting and modeling at age 14. By 17, she had a two-episode spot on Nickelodeon’s iCarly, but had no desire to hang around with the young Hollywood set. Rather, she would hightail it two hours back to her little surf town of Encinitas, near San Diego (“everybody’s idea of a California beach town”), where, she says, “I was hanging out with skater boys.” While iCarly was a solid early experience, she was eventually drawn to the high-fashion modeling scene, citing Bianca Jagger and the androgynous looks of rocker Patti Smith as life-long style inspirations. (“I like playing with male silhouettes and boyfriend-type looks but also balancing it with something sexy, having one part of your body showing.”) Besides, she says, “I never saw myself as the Disney or Nickelodeon type of girl; I’ve looked pretty much the same since I was 14 and felt pretty much the same.” Inspired by her artist dad, she enrolled in art school at UCLA, but soon dropped out when her modeling career began to soar. That work has brought her to Miami several times over the years, her most recent visit being this February, for the 50th anniversary of Sports Illustrated’s Swimsuit Issue. “We took a private plane from New York to Miami with all of the girls. You’d think it might have been like a punch line for a joke: 25 models on a private plane to Miami, what’s going to happen?” she cracks. But it ended up being a fun, family-style affair, with no hint of a midair catfight over who gets the coveted cover (although Emily can take comfort in that all three cover girls—Nina Agdal, Chrissy Teigen, and Lily Aldridge—each first appeared on the cover of Ocean Drive). They danced the night away inside LIV at the Fontainebleau, where SI put them up, after filming wrapped. Ratajkowski turned 23 on June 7, also the day she appeared at the Guys Choice Awards for Spike TV, where she was crowned “Our New Girlfriend.” She brought her BFF from high school, Barbara, a preschool teacher who had the pleasure of meeting Sandra Bullock and Comedy Central’s Key & Peele. But Ratajkowski herself is not exactly starstruck. “Who you connect with is important—I’ve never


photography by tk; illustration by tk

Cady Greta dress, Stella McCartney ($4,775). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-864-2218; stellamccartney.com

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worried about what people do professionally.” While music video fans across the globe have viewed her nearly naked body, she still holds a few secrets. “Not a lot of people know this, but my one and only tattoo is of a window, on the back of my ankle,” she confides. It was inspired by her mixedmedia collage artwork and her exploration of a sense of place and memories of home. She seems to have a good handle on being grounded no matter where she is, or what role she’s giving life to. And, modellooks aside, it’s that realness that gives Ratajkowski her star quality.

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photography by tk; illustration by tk

Black belted dress, Lanvin ($4,650). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-864-4250; lanvin.com. 18k white-gold with tsavorite garnet, onyx, and lacquer Panthère de Cartier ring, Cartier ($12,500). Miami Design District, 151 NE 40th St., 305-864-8793; cartier.us Hair and makeup by Kela Wong/ Opus Beauty Digital assistance by Justin Schwan Photography assistance by Cam Video by Emilie Jackson Shot on location at the Dream Downtown (Electric Room and PH-D Rooftop Lounge) Special thanks to Yael Knopf for First Shot Productions For behind-the-scenes video of the Ocean Drive cover shoot with Emily Ratajkowski, visit oceandrive.com.

he’ll be back in the pop culture hot seat this fall, playing a character who she knows will be audience-dividing: Andie Hardy, Ben Affleck’s character Nick Dunne’s mistress in Gone Girl. “Some viewers are going to think, I see why he was cheating on his wife: Not only was he unhappy, he has this sweet, beautiful girl that totally loves him,” she says. “And then a lot of women are going to go, That little slut!” It was Affleck who suggested her to director David Fincher for the part, after seeing her in “Blurred Lines.” “I came to the audition in Los Angeles and not only were the casting director and David there but also Ben Affleck, and I realized that they were pretty serious about me. We sat for 45 minutes running the scene and just talking about Gone Girl as a story, and Andie as a character. I left feeling pretty confident but also knowing that it was Sunday of Labor Day weekend and I probably wouldn’t hear for a few days. But an hour and a half later, my agent called and said that they were offering me the part.” As for the on-screen cads she’s had to tango with, she’s more or less mum on Robin Thicke (switching the subject to her talks with the director when asked about the blue-eyed soul Lothario) and sticks to the character and plot points when discussing Affleck. Throughout filming in the small town of Cape Girardeau, Missouri, where the cast holed up at the Drury Suites and carpooled to dinner, Ratajkowski and Affleck’s on-screen time was kept in a bubble: “He’s the main character I’m in touch with during the film; I’m actually hidden from any other parts of his life, like with his sister and obviously his wife, so most of our scenes were together.” If that led to any offscreen bonding, she’s not one to say. In fact, she demurs when asked anything even remotely about her personal life across the board. Smart woman. After Gone Girl, her next appearance on the silver screen is in the movie edition of HBO’s Entourage (due out next year), in which she plays a version of herself “on steroids”—“I drive an Aston Martin, and I’m in full hair and makeup when the guys run into me on the street.” In real life, she rolls a bit more down to earth: “I drive a little Nissan Versa.” OD

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Elizabeth Taylor became an ardent fan of Bulgari while filming in Rome in the early 1960s. She even had a private room at the Via dei Condotti boutique to try on the jewels. (Here seen wearing a Bulgari necklace and earrings at the premiere of Lawrence of Arabia in Paris, 1963.)

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eternal

photography courtesy of bulgari; opposite page: reporters associes/gaMMa/gaMMa-rapho via getty iMages

elegance Bulgari has enchanted tastemakers with its exquisite pieces for 130 years, establishing a glamorous heritage and creating a legacy of true luxury. By Roberta Naas

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ince 1884, the House of Bulgari has dazzled and delighted the beau monde with its style and elegance. This year, as the Italian brand celebrates its 130th anniversary, it embarks on a series of projects that recount its rich past with a visionary eye to the future. “The 130 years of Bulgari is a particularly special celebration for us in Miami because we also will be opening our new Design District boutique later this year,” says Mary Cunsolo, store manager of Bulgari Bal Harbour. “We are beyond thrilled to be able to celebrate the anniversary of our brand with this opening because Miami symbolizes the next frontier for Bulgari.” As part of its anniversary celebration, Bulgari hosted a multiday gala event in Rome that included the unveiling of the newly refurbished flagship boutique, the announcement of its cultural support of the city of Rome, and—the pièce de résistance—a tour of the brand’s gemstone room and craftsmanship laboratory. Bulgari is one of the biggest purchasers of top-quality

colored gemstones in the world. At any given time, the company’s workshops have thousands of jewels on the premises as it designs statement pieces and collections. In a single well-lit room, with walls lined in sketches and colorful concepts for necklaces, brooches, bracelets, earrings, and rings, was a table brimming with rubies, emeralds, sapphires, amethysts, citrines, and other gems. “Bulgari is known for its use of big stones and for combining colors,” says Lucia Silvestri, Bulgari’s creative director. “When most houses were creating single-color gemstone necklaces and brooches, we were mixing gems and colors for artful presentations that left people breathless. It is very important for us to bring together rare stones with semiprecious stones of all colors for dramatic appeal. That is our signature.”

Artful Origins Almost since its inception, Bulgari’s aesthetic has been about color, texture, and romantic appeal. That may well

from top left: The Parentesi cocktail ring ($10,400) is created in 18k white gold with amethyst and pavé diamonds; the Serpenti necklace (price on request) draws its inspiration from the sinuous form of the snake.

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The Elizabeth Taylor necklace from the Heritage collection is made of platinum with 16 step-cut octagonal Colombian emeralds (60.50 carats) and brilliant-cut and pear-shaped diamonds.

search of perfect gifts for their beloveds. American artist Andy Warhol, ever obsessed with color and design, never missed a chance to visit the store when in Rome, calling Bulgari the “best exhibition of contemporary art.” Today Bulgari can be seen on the wrists of such boldfacers as Naomi Watts, Kate Hudson, Julia Roberts, and Jessica Lange.

Evolution of StylE Pinpointing what draws attention to Bulgari is easy: The brand has established a style that is at once inimitable and timeless. The original intricate Byzantine designs paved the way for the lavish and elegant Art Deco styles of the 1920s, when pendants, brooches, tiaras, and wristwatches came into popularity. Bulgari’s prominent use of large diamonds, rubies, emeralds, and sapphires in its designs for these pieces became a signature of the brand. Stunning floral motifs that brought together multiple colored gemstones in one piece stole the limelight in the 1940s, ’50s, and ’60s. It was a time of great innovation for Bulgari. In the decades to come, the brand developed new methods of gemstone carving and setting, metalworking, and gold engraving that brought Bulgari world renown for presenting jewelry as art. The next step for the brand was to create jewelry not just for special occasions but also to wear all day—while maintaining Bulgari’s elevated style. This evolution manifested in some of the brand’s most iconic collections, developed in the latter half of the 20th century: Parentesi (using straight and curved interlocking elements), Bulgari Bulgari

photography by tk; illustration by tk

“When most houses were creating single-color gemstone necklaces and brooches, we were mixing gems and colors for artful presentations that left people breathless.” –lucia silvestri

be due to the brand’s Greek ancestral roots that date back to the early 1800s, when the Voulgaris family of silversmiths created Byzantine-style works of art. Residing in a small village in the Pindus mountain range, the family was adept at making unique silver belts, buckles, earrings, and sword sheaths. They passed the art form from generation to generation, eventually arriving at the creative scion Sotirio Voulgaris, who was also an astute entrepreneur. Sotirio relocated to Italy and established his first jewelry shop in Rome in 1884. As the business flourished, he Italianized his name and opened his second Bulgari store, and the first on Via dei Condotti, in 1894. (It would be another decade before a third boutique was established at the current landmark address, Via dei Condotti, number 10, at the foot of the entrancing Spanish Steps.) Throughout the ensuing century, the familyowned and -operated Bulgari thrived. Family members contributed different aspects to the business: talent for design, expertise in precious gemstone selection, and business acumen. Together they built an empire based on vivid and evocative jewelry designs that were so enthralling and intriguing that they quickly caught the eyes of socialites and celebrities, of politicians and aristocrats. The glamorous Clare Boothe Luce—who, as the first American woman to hold a major ambassadorship, was posted in Italy—was particularly fond of the brand, as were Sophia Loren, Jayne Mansfield, Audrey Hepburn, and Elizabeth Taylor. Bulgari creations have also captivated leading men. Celebrities such as Richard Burton, Eddie Fisher, and Kirk Douglas frequented the store in

from left: Jack Lemmon and his then new wife, Felicia Farr, window shopping on Via dei Condotti; the entrance to the newly refurbished Taylor

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Room, where Elizabeth Taylor spent time with Gianni Bulgari while filming Cleopatra; the façade of Bulgari on Via dei Condotti in the 1920s.


(incorporating the brand name into the designs), Tubogas (malleable gold coil designs), and Serpenti (the beloved serpent collection). “We always strive for dynamic designs that offer color and creativity, and top-quality craftsmanship,” Silvestri says. Whether it is one of the brand’s million-dollar unique offerings or a $1,000 production, every piece results from expert handcraftsmanship. Bulgari has an elaborate team of designers and an equally complex manufacturing process, with every step being closely monitored by the company for quality control. “We hire our craftsmen right out of school, and then train them ourselves to learn the Bulgari style,” says Massimo Di Valentini, high jewelry internal workshop manager. “In addition to their schooling, it takes about seven to eight years to learn our style and implement our standards.”

photograhy courtesy of bulgari (watch); opposite page: reporters association (lemmon); courtesy of bulgari (necklace,); bulgari historical archive (entrance)

Timeless TempTaTions With its rich roots firmly in mind and in celebration of the 130th anniversary, Bulgari has released an exquisite anniversary collection inspired by Rome and offering global appeal. The collection, now in Bulgari boutiques, includes a high jewelry Serpenti necklace, extraordinary special editions, a re-edition of the B.zero1 ring, precision timepieces, a new fragrance, and accessories embellished with gemstones. The one-of-a-kind Ultimate Temptation necklace reinterprets the iconic snake motif. It is set with more than 60 carats of fancy-shaped diamonds in a mosaic pattern that is a deft blend of superlative design and craftsmanship. Exactly 70 diamonds trace a path along the snake’s tail, leading to a spectacular 12.16carat diamond drop. Further highlighting this motif, Bulgari releases three elegant diamond Serpenti pendants on a necklace that resembles scales. Each Serpenti pendant is clad in diamond pavé and features a burst of color via a fancy-cut mandarin garnet, rubellite, or emerald center drop. The mandarin garnet is a 30.97-carat pear-cut rare stone; the 13.86-carat rubellite is cut in a geometric shape; the 23.75-carat emerald swings freely in a drop cut that respects the stone’s natural shape. On a more approachable level, Bulgari has also created a pink gold and bronzed ceramic B.zero1 Roma ring. The piece merges the Bulgari Roma logo with a Tubogas inspiration, symbolizing the brand’s respect for its Roman origins and its visions for the future. Another large endeavor to honor its anniversary was Bulgari’s renovation of its Via dei Condotti 10 boutique. For this project, the brand hired acclaimed architect Peter Marino. The redesign—with rich

woods, Italian marble, and a new watch room—will serve as the inspiration for all future Bulgari boutique openings and updates. Marino even paid close attention to a small secret room with sliding doors that was the “salottino Taylor,” where Elizabeth Taylor often spent time during her work in Rome on the famous film epic Cleopatra. The salon was reachable through a secret door from a private courtyard. While it has been closed for decades, Marino brought it back to service, ready for today’s VIPs. “The renovations in the boutique clearly make it a store for the future,” says Jean-Christophe Babin, CEO of Bulgari worldwide. “Marino’s creativity in combining the historic aspects of the building with timeless woods, paints, and other touches makes it something we can emulate in future boutiques.” Additionally, in an effort to pay homage to the Eternal City, from which the brand continually draws inspiration, Bulgari has become the sole financier of the restoration of the famed Spanish Steps—just minutes away from the store and the focal point of the celebrated street. OD

“In addition to their schooling, it takes [craftsmen] about seven to eight years to learn our style and implement our standards.” —massimo di valentini

The Serpenti watch from Bulgari’s High Jewelry collection is crafted in 18k pink gold with pavé diamonds and turquoise (price on request).

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on ana:

Charcoal gray sleeveless artisan applique dress, Donna Karan New York ($2,995). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-865-1100; saks.com. Cushion-cut Empress diamond stud earrings, Daniel K. (price on request). Yamron Jewelers, Waterside Shops, 5555 Tamiami Trail N., Naples, 239-592-7707; yamron.com. Silver-plated brass structural cuff, Robert Lee Morris ($895). Neiman Marcus, Bal Harbour Shops, 305-865-6161; neimanmarcus.com. So Kate pumps, Christian Louboutin ($625). Miami Design District, 155 NE 40th St., 305-576-6820; christianlouboutin.com. on andrea: Pale gray mélange Millbank suit jacket ($1,395) and Tabernacle sweater ($450), Burberry London. Aventura Mall, 19575 Biscayne Blvd., 305-932-9023; burberry.com. Light gray mélange Reagle flannel pants, Bottega Veneta ($920). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-864-6247; bottegaveneta.com. Leather lace-ups, Ermenegildo Zegna ($795). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-865-8652; zegna.com

This six-bedroom, seven-bath house located on the water in Miami’s Venetian Islands is currently on the market for $11.5 million. A true trophy residence on an oversize 12,250-square-foot lot, it offers 70 feet of direct unobstructed bay views. The contemporary home features smart technology by Control 4, an eight-foot chandelier, marble and glass flooring, riverstone in the bath areas, a European kitchen, separate guest house, and two-car garage. Courtesy of Adriano Resende/Douglas Elliman; Listing ID: A1908351

back in

black

Fall fashion in a sultry monochromatic palette is a stark contrast to the vivid shades of Miami. photography by jason mcdonald styling by michelle mccool

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Bistretch tech cut-away dress, Yigal Azrouël ($1,050). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-865-1100; saks.com. Cushion-cut Empress diamond stud earrings, Daniel K. (price on request). Yamron Jewelers, Waterside Shops, 5555 Tamiami Trail N., Naples, 239-592-7707; yamron.com. 18k white-gold Serpenti pavé diamond necklace, Bulgari ($100,000). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-861-8898; bulgari.com

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on ana:

Jumpsuit, Dior ($6,100). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-865-1100; saks.com. Green resin and metal cuff, Gucci ($1,250). Village of Merrick Park, 342 San Lorenzo Ave., Coral Gables, 305-441-2004; gucci.com. 18k rose-gold Cartier Paris Nouvelle Vague diamond and colored stone ring, Cartier ($18,700). Miami Design District, 151 NE 40th St., 305-8648793; cartier.us. on andrea: Knit shirt, Ermenegildo Zegna Couture ($1,050). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-865-8652; zegna.com. Trekking trousers, Louis Vuitton ($1,341). Miami Design District, 170 NE 40th St., 305-573-1366; louisvuitton.com. Espresso leather buckle boots, Bottega Veneta ($1,200). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-864-6247; bottegaveneta.com. 40mm SS Cosmograph Daytona watch with black index dial, Rolex (price on request). Miami Design District, 135 NE 39th St., 305-576-5391; rolex.com

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Light gray mĂŠlange organic cotton wool jersey merino sweater, Bottega Veneta ($1,120). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-864-6247; bottegaveneta.com. 40mm 18k Cosmograph blue Arabic dial watch, Rolex (price on request). Miami Design District, 135 NE 39th St., 305-576-5391; rolex.com

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Embroidered organza patchwork circle dress, Yigal AzrouĂŤl ($1,690). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-865-1100; saks.com. Silver-plated brass power cuff, Robert Lee Morris ($595). Neiman Marcus, Bal Harbour Shops, 305-865-6161; neimanmarcus.com. Pumps, Dior ($1,050). Saks Fifth Avenue, see above

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Wool blazer ($3,195), long jersey skirt ($1,390), Victoria long necklace ($1,990), and patent leather pointy ballerina flats ($695), Lanvin. Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-865-1100; saks.com Hair and makeup by Cherie Combs with Creative Management @ MC2 using Chanel Beauty & Oribe Manicure by Isis Antelo using Cuccio/abtp. com Models: Ana Lisboa @ Mega Model Management, Andrea D @ Wilhelmina Miami Shot on location at 1337 N. Venetian Way, Miami Beach, courtesy of Adriano Resende/ Douglas Elliman Real Estate Chanel Base Lumière ($45), Le Blanc de Chanel ($45), Vitalumière Aqua Cream Compact in 20 Beige ($58), Vitalumière Aqua Cream Compact in 30 Beige ($58), Le Blush Crème de Chanel in Intonation ($38), Rouge Allure in Précieuse ($35), and Le Vernis Nail Colour in Secret ($27). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-868-0550; chanel.com. Oribe Superfine Hair Spray ($32), Dry Texturizing Spray ($42), Maximista Thickening Spray ($28), and Gold Lust Nourishing Hair Oil ($48). Neiman Marcus, Bal Harbour Shops, 305-865-6161; neimanmarcus.com

beauté:

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on ana: Macro zebra-print trench coat, Gucci ($2,700). Bal Harbour Shops, 9700 Collins Ave., 305-868-6504; gucci.com. 18k pink-gold Serpenti onyx and pavé diamond bracelet, Bulgari ($50,000). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-861-8898; bulgari.com. Accordion clutch, Devi Kroell ($3,200). devikroell.com. Berlin chain ankle-strap heels, 3.1 Phillip Lim ($495). Saks Fifth Avenue, Bal Harbour Shops, 305-865-1100; saks.com. on andrea: Light gray mélange organic cotton wool jersey merino sweater, Bottega Veneta ($1,120). Bal Harbour Shops, 305-864-6247; bottegaveneta.com. Marlo pants, Theory ($225). Macy’s, 22 E. Flagler St., Miami, 305-577-1500; macys.com. Moinier sunglasses, Moncler Lunettes ($270). Moncler, Bal Harbour Shops, 786-477-5343; moncler.com. Black leather Derbies, Dior Homme ($760). Miami Design District, 161 NE 40th St., 305-571-3576; diorhomme.com

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photography by tk; illustration by tk


GAVLAK’S GUY: JOSE ALVAREZ Most of Florida seems “just off the highway.” This holds especially true for our area’s now booming art scene. The 67-mile stretch of US-1 from West Palm Beach to downtown Miami takes you from the art world’s first foothold nearly three quarters of a century ago, past landmarks both new and forgotten, neighborhoods dicey and chic, to the hanging gardens of the new Pérez Art Museum Miami. It’s an ever-connected archipelago of art, and our journey starts, both geographically and historically, in the north. Before the Swiss architecture, before the red-carpeted sand dunes of Art Basel and blockbuster shows by Brit Tracey Emin and Beijing-born Ai Weiwei, there were a Chicago steel man and West Palm Beach, circa 1939. That’s when industrialist Ralph Hubbard Norton retired to this sturdy middle-class community across the Intracoastal from the Gatsby-esque lights of Palm Beach, Henry Flagler’s resort island. A longtime patron of the arts, Norton in 1941 built and endowed one of South Florida’s first museums (Naples’s Ringling Museum opened in 1927), and one of its greatest. The Norton Museum of Art’s (1501 S. Dixie Hwy., West Palm Beach; norton.org) mission is “to preserve for the future the beautiful things of the past.” That preservation is achieved by way of a stately Art Deco/Neoclassical structure designed by Marion Sims Wyeth, which will soon undergo another expansion at the hands of design team Foster + Partners. Today, the Norton’s holdings can be divided into five categories: European, American, Chinese, contemporary, and photography; at more than 7,000 pieces, it is the finest historical collection in a state where the new has lost much of its novelty. Palm Beach may be wealth spelled backwards, but the greater Palm Beach County, with more than 1.3 million

When Sarah Gavlak returns from Los Angeles this fall, she’ll bring with her a new crop of hot artists from around the country: Liz Craft, Michael John Kelly, Vince Szarek, Lecia Dole-Recio, and Judie Bamber. But she also shows Florida-based artists, including Jose Alvarez, who is known for his kaleidoscopic wallpapers as well as for using exotic materials such as mica, sequins, and feathers in his compositions. Alvarez has shown internationally and was included in the 2002 Whitney Biennial.

people and a median household income hovering around $50,000, is decidedly middle class. Realizing this, the museum now serves the entire community, from “the most esoteric, the most influential, to the absolute bedrock of our society,” says Hope Alswang, the Norton’s director. On one wall, you see Night Mist, Jackson Pollock’s 1945 painting that foreshadows his later adventures in dripping; on another, an existentially raw Paul Gauguin, in which the post-Impressionist has rendered himself as Christ, but with a shock of red hair referencing his relationship to Vincent van Gogh. Then, there is the treasured Chinese wing. “There is not an institution with a major Chinese collection who would not remove most of their teeth to be able to have our bronze and jades,” Alswang puts it bluntly. The Norton also has outstanding local private collectors to turn to when putting together its impressive displays. Contemporary art curator Cheryl Brutvan is currently working on a selection of pieces from local collector Beth Rudin DeWoody opening in February. DeWoody stands apart from other art patrons not only because of the size of her collection but her continual devotion to emerging artists. And since she lives in West Palm Beach, she is more accessible than the rest of the slipper set. The museum also knows how to strike a balance, putting on populist shows that encourage snickers from the Basel crowd. This summer’s show, “Wheels and Heels: The Big Noise Behind Little Toys,” had more than 1,000 people at the opening. From here, begin your journey south. From the Norton, take a brief detour across the Intracoastal to the Sarah

Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.), The Energy of Dreams, 2014. 194  oceandrive.com


Paul Gauguin, Christ in the Garden of Olives, 1889. INSET: Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.), NGC5194, mica on wood panel, 2012.

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A visitor taking in a piece by Daina Stabulniece at the Guild 5 Forty Five in Fort Lauderdale’s FATVillage.

Tracey Emin, I Whisper to My Past Do I Have Another Choice, 2013, from the Girl’s Club Collection.

photography by tk; illustration by tk

Nova Southeastern University’s Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale.

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photography by jan ausbon (brown); opposite page: gary james (guild 5fortyfive), teodora dakova (emin)

Gavlak Gallery (249B Worth Ave., Palm Beach, 561-833-0583; gavlakgallery.com). scene of Miami-Dade to that of Palm Beach County. “We’re not bound by geogGavlak, a curator and writer, opened her gallery in 2005 with a prescient show of raphy and our buildings,” says Clearwater of her vision, building a bridge Wade Guyton, establishing her space as the gallery in Palm Beach. The unique between the two worlds. “It’s about fluidity and connection. It’s about making an program features a blend of Hollywood, New York, and South Florida in which extended art coast.” Sensing this, Miami artists are also heading north. This summer’s exhibipinups by Bunny Yeager share walls with the scuffed glitz of Jack Pierson. From Gavlak, head south 10 miles until Lake Worth, not quite yet Boca, but tion, “Research and Development: Concerning Belonging,” has Tom Sicluna, just far enough away from Palm Beach for a change of scenery. Although home Agustina Woodgate, Antonia Wright, Rick Ulysse, and Natasha Lopez de to a slew of restaurants boasting cheap shots of Fireball, on the corner of South L Victoria moving their studios into the museum and orchestrating community outreach programs. With the exception of Ulysse, who lives Street stands an old Deco movie theater with a fluted in Sunrise, all of those artists are based in Miami. façade. Here, in 1981, a wealthy collector from Palm Beach Fort Lauderdale also has some collections worth visiting. A named J. Patrick Lannan opened a museum, bringing in a GET FAT block away, the Girls’ Club Collection (117 NE Second St., Fort young scholar and curator named Bonnie Clearwater to FAT stands for Flagler Arts Lauderdale; girlsclubcollection.org), founded in 2007, showcases run it. The museum closed in 1988, but Clearwater stayed Technology, and while the area isn’t the collection of Francie Bishop Good and David Horvitz in the area. After nearly two decades as director of the necessarily bulging right now, give it through a series of annual exhibitions. This year, Miami’s TM former Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami some time to grow. Just a few blocks Sisters have compiled 50 works by 42 artists ranging from (MOCA), she recently moved to Fort Lauderdale, the next from Las Olas Boulevard, the village Tracey Emin and Cecily Brown to hometown heroines like stop on our journey. Jen Stark and Jiae Hwang. is a small group of warehouses that learwater’s new home, the Nova Southeastern are home to artist studios, galleries, University Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale ust blocks away a nd yet worlds apa r t a nd and design frms. Brew Urban Cafe (1 E. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale; moafl.org), you’re in FAT Village Center for the Arts/ serves coffee and beer during the day opened in 1986 in an 83,000-square-foot Flagler Arts Technology (NW Fifth St., Fort and then turns into a cocktail bar at building by Edward Larrabee Barnes. Until Lauderdale; fatvillage.com), a pint-size creative and night. If the murals aren’t enough the mid-’80s, Fort Lauderdale was known mainly as a spring tech hub that has Wynwood’s aerosol-covered break destination, the place “Where the Boys Are,” as the façades but lacks its sprawl, for now. Artist Sri Prabha moved to claim this as Fort Lauderdale’s 1960 coming-of-age film had it. But that began to change into a FATVillage studio in March 2014. Not only is Fort Wynwood, then the monthly art walk, with the opening of the museum. Now there’s much more to Lauderdale centrally located, allowing him to easily head complete with food trucks, certainly is. do than chug, chug, chug. north and south, it’s effective for business—every month 500 Art Walks are held from 7–11 pm The museum boasts two niche collections amid its to 700 people pass through his studio. “It’s easier for people on the last Saturday of the month; 6,000 pieces, including the nation’s largest collection of to find you,” says Prabha. “The art walks are crazy. There’s a visit fatvillage.com. William Glackens, the American realist painter associton of people, an older art collecting crowd.” ated with the Ashcan School, and a large body of work Leaving Fort Lauderdale, you slip under the New River on from COBRA artists. (The name is an acronym for US-1. Soon the road changes names to Biscayne Boulevard; Copenhagen, Brussels, and Amsterdam—three bases for continue south, and it will lead you to the grand finale: this group of post-WWII avant-garde artists.) Attached Miami. to the museum stands the AutoNation Academy of Art + Today, seven large museums of all different contexts, Design (4 W. Las Olas Blvd., Fort Lauderdale; moafl.org/ from the histories of the Wolfsonian to the curated exhibits art-academy), a 17,000-square-foot educational facility. of the Bass museum; four private collections that are open to Clearwater has always stressed education: Since a the public (and many more which are not); a smattering of museum helps us “rethink how we look at the world, it legitimate galleries and a smorgasbord of less legitimate raises our empathy,” an education department is a must. ones—not to mention several artist-run or alternative art But more than the collection and the resources, Fort spaces—the street art and gallery crawl of Wynwood (32 galLauderdale represents a hub, a gyre connecting the art leries there alone); and two jam-packed residency programs

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from top: Jen Stark, Double Take, 2009 (front); Weird Sisters by Leah Brown, from the “Nocturnes III-Hyperstition” group show at Projects Contemporary Arts Space-FATVillage.

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make up the largest art community south of the Mason Dixon. After tourism and real estate, the art scene, which saw over $3 billion worth of art displayed at Art Basel Miami Beach 2013, might give any other industry down here a run for its money.

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rom his corner office on the third story of the new Pérez Art Museum Miami (1103 Biscayne Blvd., Miami; pamm.org), museum director Thom Collins’s view is allegorical to say the least. Not only does Biscayne Bay glisten in the sun, it laps against the ruins of the Miami Herald building, once a landmark. Things change quickly here. Miami is a place where history collects around the storm drains—many are tempted to divide art time into Before Art Basel and After Art Basel. But 19 years prior to the fair’s 2002 arrival, Christo and Jeanne-Claude wrapped islands in Biscayne Bay. In 1985, Ed Ruscha painted his third public commission, Words Without Thoughts Never to Heaven Go, a series of literary-inspired murals, in the rotunda of the then-recently constructed Miami Dade Central Library (now at the Miami Dade Cultural Plaza). And in 1989, Claes Oldenburg and Coosje Van Bruggen completed the 16-foot-tall sculpture of a shattered fruit bowl in a downtown park. “One should expect a city of this size to be this culturally rich, and it is,” says Collins, who arrived in 2010. “Cultural institutions, by their very nature, resonate here because so many people who visit or relocate here enjoy the kind of rapid change and frequent refreshment of ideas and experiential offerings that a town like this one promises.” The broad and flat PAMM, half 21st-century temple and half banyan-tree homage, opened in December 2013 to unanimous applause. Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron designed an open, flowing network of galleries to display the museum’s growing collection. Works by Cuban luminaries such as José Bedia, Wifredo Lam, and Ana Mendieta share the galleries with pieces by Duchamp and a beautiful Gerhard Richter squeegee painting from 1991. (The painting, which last sold at auction in 1998 for $168,341, would go for a lot more 1. today; at Sotheby’s in February 2014, his 1994 painting Wand (Wall) sold for $29.2 million.) In the first four months, PAMM saw 150,000 visitors, blowing past its yearly prediction of 200,000. Even as Art Basel Miami Beach powerwalks into its second decade, the city’s large-scale private collections distinguish the community year round. Some, like the Bramans’ $900 million worth of art are, for the 4. most part, out of sight. (Take the 125th Street Causeway clockwise from top left:

1. Emmett Moore sands down the line between sculpture and design, creating forms both beautiful and useful, and has a preternatural, locals-only grasp on Miami’s visual vernacular that is immediately recognizable. emmettmoore.com 2. Joseriberto Perez’s playful, understated paintings brim with references to art history and life in Florida. Ivy and sea foam mix with the crisp cutouts of late Matisse and the faux-naïf style of Paul Klee. facebook.com/joseriberto.perez 3. Felice Grodin studied architecture at Harvard—and it shows. She works on paper, with sculpture, and most recently has completed a gallery-flling installation at Locust Projects. felicegrodin.com 4. Johnny Laderer rearranges old Florida’s leftovers in giddy, often disarming assemblages of found objects. He also has forays into fashion, running the upstart Algae Clothing. johnnyladerer.com

to the beach and look right just as you hit the first Bay Harbor island. You’ll see a Richard Serra the size of a racquetball court in the backyard of their Indian Creek home.) Others, like CIFO (1018 N. Miami Ave., Miami; cifo.org), the de la Cruz Collection, the Rubell Family Collection, and the Margulies Collection, all within a short drive from PAMM, are more open and have larger spaces and stronger collections than most museums. While the collections all point towards blue chip, CIFO is the world-renowned Cisneros Fontanals Art Foundation collection, which focuses on Latin American art. Carlos and Rosa de la Cruz have been instrumental in preserving the legacy of Felix Gonzalez-Torres, the deceased artist whose heart-baring art draws in viewers with free candy and takeaway souvenirs. Don and Mera Rubell’s space, an old DEA warehouse in Wynwood, houses a rotating assortment of art, but certain pieces remain: Jason Rhoades’s Technicolor orgyscape, for instance, or Cady Noland’s This Piece Has No Title Yet, which is, simply put, a room filled with cans of Budweiser. Then there is Martin Z. Margulies, whose $700 million collection includes Willem de Kooning and Jasper Johns. These collections schedule programming, host interns, commission projects, even, in the case of the de la Cruz collection, take groups of highschool students on European trips.

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o capitalize on this local jackpot of collectors (although not all are willing to fork over their collections), PAMM and the other museums have worked to both build relationships with truly private collections behind the city’s closed doors, and to develop a new generation, those who were “inspired by Basel, and collect at a much smaller scale, but collect thoughtfully and energetically,” as Collins puts it. Another thing that sets Miami apart from the region is a number of alternative, not-for-profit, and artist-run spaces. Locust Projects (3852 N. Miami Ave., Miami; locustprojects.org), which was founded in 1998 by a group of local artists, has grown in stature and reputation, alternating exhibitions by local artists with big 2. names like Theaster Gates. Meanwhile, Swampspace (3940 N. Miami Ave., Miami), in its new home next to Harry’s Pizza, keeps it hyperlocal, giving Miamibased artists free rein and showing student work. Then, there are the artists themselves. “The glue that holds it all together is the actual artist community,” says Collins. “It’s the stuff, the dark matter.” And with new opportunities stretching up the coast, they’re 3. busier than ever. OD

Emmet Moore, Xanadu, slab table digital print on ash plywood, Corian; Joseriberto Perez, Cannibalize, 2014, oil on canvas; Felice Grodin, A Fabricated Field (detail); Johnny Laderer, Cutty Cab, 35mm film.

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opposite page: photography Courtesy of the Cisneros fontanals art foundation and the ella fontanals-Cisneros ColleCtion (Cifo); rubell family ColleCtion, miami (Zhen), Worldredeye.Com (loCust projeCts)

MiaMi artists to watch


An installation view of CIFO’s 2005 “Beyond Delirious” exhibition. from left: Andreas Gursky, São Paulo, Sé, 2002, and Massimo Vitali, San Marco, Venice, 2005.

photography by tk; illustration by tk

Miami’s Locust Projects. left: Xu Zhen, Empire’s Way of Thinking, 2011, produced by MadeIn Company, from the Rubell Collection.

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Cat Shell

Zack Bush

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY BILL KEARNEY (GRAFFITI); ADRIAN GAUT (BROKEN SHAKER)

A graffiti mural by La Pandilla outside of Wood Tavern in Wynwood.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TK; ILLUSTRATION BY TK

Stacy Glover


Carlos Reyes

Broken Shaker

WHERE

EVERYBODY PHOTOGRAPHY BY TK; ILLUSTRATION BY TK

KNOWS YOUR NAME

Amanda Del Duca

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escape grew into a breakfast club of creatives, nerds, gym trainers-turned-real-estate moguls, and born-and-raised locals who’ve created social scenes and subcultures. Somewhere along the lines, Miami also became a place to call home, without valet parking. “The Miami local is one of many faces,” says Miami Beach native Dan Binkiewicz, co-owner of the dive Purdy Lounge in Miami Beach and Blackbird Ordinary in Brickell. He opened Purdy Lounge in Sunset Harbour 14 years ago, when that section of South Beach had little else to offer besides tow trucks and impounded cars. “When we opened, it was an industrial area—a couple doors down, they were making nail polish.” These days, it’s packed with Pubbelly restaurants, fitness fads, and a sense of insidery community. “Now it’s a neighborhood,” says Binkiewicz. And it’s about a mile and a half from the buzz of Collins Avenue and the beach, meaning it takes effort to get there. Local-friendly bars like Purdy Lounge, Abbey Brewing Company, The Room, and Mac’s Club Deuce have been around for years, surviving in a club town by not being clubs. But now newcomers such as Radio Bar, Foxhole, and Regent Cocktail Club have joined in, continued on page 205

ON TWITTER @BILLYCORBEN The director of Cocaine Cowboys rigorously updates with local news alerts, calls out government wrongdoing, and points out the Florida connection to every crazy news story in the world. @DESIGNDISTRICT From design to art to fashion and dining, you’re sure to find it here. And if you’d like to read about it first, their Twitter account is top notch. @LEBATARDSHOW A Miami Herald writer since 1990 and a regular correspondent on ESPN, Dan LeBatard has opinions on

ON INSTAGRAM @____22 Miami’s sexy and sweaty underbelly is captured to perfection on a feed that offers enough looks at fast cars and hot models to have you feeling 22. @DAVEGRUTMAN For a star-studded look behind the scenes at LIV and Story or an insider’s guide to his collection of pool toys, there’s no better follow than Grutman. @FATGIRL HEDONIST Food porn at its finest, followers can comb through the greatest meals in town and get inspired to

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South Florida sports that are better than yours, and he’ll shout them in 140 characters or less until you agree. @MATTHAGGMAN The award-winning journalist-turned-Knight Foundation program director tweets the latest on @Knightfdn investments, the official sign something cool is about to happen. @SWEATRECORDS This old-school vinyl shop has had its pulse on Wynwood cool before Wynwood was Wynwood. You’ll be sure to find your new favorite jam on this feed, as well as your weekend plans.

eventually hit the gym. @ROBERTSKRAN This street-art-obsessed Miamian meticulously catalogs seemingly every new street mural to go up in Wynwood, many of which you’ve probably never seen, but should. @SHAYNABATYA Visual artist and photojournalist Jenny Abrams captures Miami in a beautiful light, reminding locals that art is everywhere. @WORLDREDEYE The biggest stars at the hottest parties with the sexiest people are all captured by photographer Seth Browarnik and his crew of night owls.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TK; ILLUSTRATION BY TK

eople come from all over the world to live it up in our town. They rent Lamborghinis, eat filet mignon next to Shaquille O’Neal at Prime 112, and pop bottles of Dom Pérignon until 4 AM while raging alongside Calvin Harris at LIV. Then they come back during the next Art Basel, New Year’s Eve, Super Bowl, or spring break, and they do it all again. It’s always a party here and everyone’s invited (unless of course you’re not). We’ve hosted Super Bowls and MTV Video Music Awards. We have Real Housewives and Million Dollar Listings. We remake shot girls into supermodels and turned LeBron James into a champion. Twice. And like so many visitors, he left after he got what he wanted. Sure, the Magic City has become the reveler’s go-to for megaparties the world over—a legacy we’ll happily continue to carry on—but we’ve always had our own personality, our own spots to escape, and our own local-focused cool factor, maybe today more than ever. Despite appearances, Miami is not a big city (ranked the number 16 TV market, behind Minneapolis-St. Paul). Amid the bright lights and luxury towers, it’s an oceanside community that craves art, music, and occasionally a cocktail that costs less than $25. This 72-hour beach town


uch like the city she calls home, there are many layers to Amanda Del Duca, the founder of slashergirl.com, an online retail store for women with multiple passions. Acting as a stylist, blogger, and now company founder, Del Duca says our town inspires her to capture Miami fashion on her blog and help others dress for whatever their passion may be. “Our motto is ‘You’re done finding yourself, now create yourself,’” she says. “I want people to look at the content we produce and feel that it really represents the new Miami.” amandadelduca.com

photography by tk; illustration by tk

Cool FACT: Del Duca was selected as a muse for luxury eyewear company Linda Farrow’s 10th-anniversary campaign.

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uthentic is cool, and there’s nothing more authentic than Miami native Zack Bush and his newest venture, Ball & Chain, a revamped version of a classic Calle Ocho nightclub. From 1935 to 1957, jazz greats like Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong took Ball & Chain by storm, and now Bush is bringing it back with live music and a top-notch beverage program. “The vibe will be totally preserved—just modernized a bit,” he says. “Little Havana is an incredibly authentic area of Miami. When you walk the streets of Calle Ocho, you know you are in a special place.” 1513 SW Eighth St., Miami, 305-643-7820; ballandchain miami.com COOL FACT: The first big party thrown at the new Ball & Chain was Bush’s wedding in August.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Cocktails at

Radio Bar; Bardot; Wood Tavern.

continued from page 202 making for a bit of a Cheers revolution on the Beach—no confetti, no DJs wearing giant mouse heads, and no planes flying overhead announcing tonight’s musical acts. And according to Jared Galbut and Keith Menin—cousins and principals of Menin Hospitality who own, among other things, Radio Bar and The Gale South Beach & Regent Hotel (home to local favorites Rec Room and Regent Cocktail Club)—they are a hit. “We actually do even better with most of our venues during the summer,” says Galbut. “All of the locals love coming out when the beach is dying down a bit.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHARLIE GARCIA (RADIO BAR); WORLDREDEYE.COM (BARDOT)

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maller restaurants have found their niche as well. Step into chef Michael Pirolo’s intimate Macchialina on Alton Road, and you’ll be greeted like one of the family by partner—and chef Pirolo’s better half—Jen Chaefsky. In South of Fifth, if you walk too fast down Washington Avenue, you might miss some of the best ceviche in town at My Ceviche. Locals know to place their order at the window and take a seat at the nextdoor SoBe Hostel to enjoy the aji amarillo shrimp and an ice-cold Pacifico. If you’re in the mood for a chilled glass of après-sun rosé, the breezy patio of The Local House on Ocean Drive is just steps from Third Street beach—the quieter end of South Beach’s sands, where locals rule. The truth is, some of the best parts of Miami aren’t flashy. Joe’s Stone Crab has lasted (or should we say triumphed? ) over 100 years, and it’s only open half the year. Restaurants and bars designed more for Miamians are so popular that owners of Foxhole and the new Korean barbecue restaurant Drunken Dragon don’t even attempt to make their venues easy to find. “Foxhole is in an alleyway with no lights or signage,” says co-owner Navin Chatani of the West Avenueadjacent bar. “You’d never imagine it was there. It’s a word-of-mouth place.” Chatani and partners Angel Febres, Jarred Grant, and Conrad Gomez have all been in this business on the beach for 20 years, know tons of folks, and are still heavily involved with some of the hottest clubs in Miami, so word travels fast. It’s why on any given night you can find “everything from realtors to the artsy types in flip-flops or three-piece suits” taking dates to Drunken Dragon and leaving with someone else’s date from Foxhole. (It is still Miami, after all.) The less-is-more, simple approach has spawned spots like the Freehand Miami—a hip Miami Beach hostel that houses tourists, but is buttressed, and made more interesting, by locals. Around the clock, guests lounge by the pool, play ping-pong and bocce, and sip cocktails at Freehand’s Broken Shaker, where the drink menu changes every 10 days or so. “It’s like hanging out in your friend’s backyard,” says Roy Alpert, who oversees continued on page 208

BARDOT: A cozy hipster haven in Midtown, Bardot brings top live music acts to the carpet and provides some serious eye candy behind the bar. 3456 N. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-576-5570; bardotmiami.com BLACKBIRD ORDINARY: The suits that stroll around Brickell by day may guzzle beers at Fado or Brother Jimmy’s after work, but late night, there’s no vibe better than Blackbird. 729 SW First Ave., Miami, 305-671-3307; blackbirdordinary.com BLUES BAR: Inside the revamped National Hotel, guests turn back the clock to 1940s Miami and sip mojitos or glasses from the bar’s jazzy selection of wines. 1677

Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-532-2311; nationalhotel.com DRUNKEN DRAGON: Hidden next to a Subway and Domino’s is a Korean barbecue joint with a local see-and-be-seen that’s hotter than the barbecuestyle table you cook your dinner on. 1424 Alton Road, Miami Beach, 305-397-8556; drunkendragon.com ELECTRIC PICKLE CO.: The best place to find a high-energy disco party off the beach with a touch of style that you won’t find anywhere else. 2826 N. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-456-5613; electric picklemiami.com GRAMPS: Pleasingly rough around the edges,

this place has simple booths designed for actual conversation, and a bar program of surprising sophistication. 176 NW 24th St., Miami, 786-752-6693; grampsbar.com HY VONG: Amid the Cuban cuisine in the resurgent Calle Ocho is this authentic Vietnamese restaurant that offers an amazing meal in a laidback atmosphere and cooking classes for those who want to attempt this at home. 3458 SW Eighth St., Miami, 305-4463674; hyvong.com LAGNIAPPE: With sweet sounds every night, Lagniappe is a place for musicians to call home, literally, as a fourbedroom flat above the

wine house is available for their acts (or other visitors) to stay. 3425 NE Second Ave., Miami, 305-576-0108; lagniappehouse.com MAGNUM LOUNGE: Sing us a song, you’re the piano man…. or woman. It may be hard to tell at this piano bar, but either way you’ll have a good time. 709 NE 79th St., Miami, 305-757-3368 RADIO: You’re not in South Beach anymore inside Radio, where South of Fifth meets Brooklyn in the area’s coolest down-to-earth dive underneath a giant radio tower. 814 First St., Miami Beach, 305-3978382; radiosouth beach.com

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eing comfortable in your skin is the definition of cool, but being comfortable in your clothes is the next step, according to Stacy Glover, a self-taught fashion designer and founder of Caveat, a made-to-order custom jeans company run out of his Silowet Couture Wynwood workshop. Yes, custom-tailored denim. From size and style down to zipper and pattern, Glover has men and women in all shapes and sizes tailored to perfection. “Superb fit is our vice, and we’re a bunch of junkies that seek out the same high every day,” he says. “We design, manufacture, and sell staple pieces with modern updates in high pursuit of cool.” 448 NW 28th St., Miami, 305-501-4646; caveatmiami.com Cool FACT: Glover changes his clothes twice a day, every day, because as a child he was a huge fan of Mister Rogers.

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o matter how you slice it, the coolest part of Miami is the sand and surf, and while our waves aren’t exactly killer, Carlos Reyes has locals surfing in style with C-Shapes, his custom surfboard label. As the local surfboard shaper, Reyes is a one-man surfboard factory grinding out boards for the in-the-know beach crowd. “We do have a large surfing community,” he says. “You should see the joy on their faces when we do finally get some surf. The motto ‘Life’s the beach’ applies here, too.” cshapes.com

photography by tk; illustration by tk

Cool FACT: Reyes starts every day with an early-morning prayer and bible study.

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: PAMM; DecoBike; DJ Shadow at III Points last year.

Freehand and has been in continued from page 205 the Miami hospitality scene for a decade. “We have travelers who come in and instantly feel the Miami culture. That mix creates a special environment.”

Give yourself a tour by pedaling around town in a rented DECOBIKE (decobike.com). And for the record, we had these before New York did. Rage at the III POINTS FESTIVAL (iiipoints.com). The art/ music/technology love fest in Wynwood kicked off in 2013, but it already feels like it’s been here forever. Flying Lotus and Lykke Li are among the 68 acts performing over three days in October (October 10–12). The art world is blossoming in Miami, but so is the music.

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Worlds collide on the third Thursday of every month when PAMM hosts internationally acclaimed artists for the outdoor music series JAM AT THIRD THURSDAY AT PAMM (pamm.org). The BROKEN SHAKER (2727 Indian Creek Dr., Miami Beach), located in the upscale hipster Freehand Miami hostel, is always a great hangout, but the barbecue on Sunday is the best way to keep the weekend alive. Join the folks at Blue Moon Outdoor Center

(bluemoonoutdoor.com) for their FULL MOON KAYAK TOUR, a nighttime ride out of Oleta River State Park. Police hate (MIAMI) CRITICAL MASS, and so does anyone stuck in the resulting traffic mess while trying to make a 7 PM dinner reservation. But the monthly bike ride around Miami’s streets is the best way for you and a thousand of your closest friends to see the city and make a statement. Private-room karaoke is always fun, and still cool according to Beyoncé and Jay Z, who

belted out tunes at SING SING KARAOKE (singsingmiami.com) on a recent visit. The outdoor SoundScape Cinema Series is cool, but the center of cinema culture lives in the historic City Hall building built in 1927 for MIAMI BEACH CINEMATHEQUE. Happy Hour at BRICK HOUSE TAVERN & TAP in Wynwood—you can’t beat starting a weekend with drinks under $5, lamb sliders, and sounds from popular local DJs.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY WORLDREDEYE.COM (PAMM, DECOBIKE, III POINTS)

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ross the causeway and this culture resonates even more. Ball & Chain hopes to help Calle Ocho make a comeback, Blackbird Ordinary keeps Brickell hip, and the art and music scene has Wynwood blossoming into the place to party. The artfocused kids who roam there today wouldn’t have had a place to go 10 years ago, yet now they’re the prime audience. Live music runs the show at places like Bardot, Lagniappe, and Gramps, where every Wednesday night courtesy of the Secret Celluloid Society they also throw on an old-school movie at Shirley’s, the movie theater in the back room. Every place has a grittier, hipster vibe, but each spot is very different—including Brick House Tavern & Tap, where at a Friday happy hour you’ll find an array of characters sipping $4 Jameson and playing Cards Against Humanity. “There’s a lot of eye candy in Wynwood—and by that I mean art and stylish people,” says Supermarket Creative’s Michelle Leshem, whose marketing and branding company fits right in in Wynwood. “There are way more locals that are living on this side of the tracks, so it’s easier to sustain a local crowd more than it was years ago.” The Electric Pickle Co., a dance hall devoted to noncommercial house and other EDM, was a pioneer when it opened in 2009. Little did they know that within five years there’d be half a dozen more bars in the hood, and even a brewery (with another one slated). “The clubs are small and intimate—it’s nightlife simplified,” says Leshem, who points out that no matter where people party, it’s comfort that they want. “Ultimately everyone wants that feeling of a home base—that Cheers feeling,” she says. “Even the die-hard fans that go to LIV, Adore, and Story every weekend feel that there. In Wynwood the places are small, so it’s easier to establish that feeling while also supporting burgeoning talent.” Miami, in general, is small, even though at times it seems like the biggest place on the planet. And whether you’re strolling around Sunset Harbour, barhopping in Wynwood, or even sitting at Dave Grutman’s table at LIV, it’s nice to know that somewhere in Miami there’s a place you can walk into where everybody knows your name. OD


PHOTOGRAPHY BY TK; ILLUSTRATION BY TK

here’s a degree of nuance and sophistication that often gets lost in the South Beach scene, but Cat Shell is bringing it back one note at a time as alter ego Kitty Carmichael. Alongside her band, she belts out old-school jazz and soul remixed with modern beats at Regent Cocktail Club, the beach’s ultimate date-night lounge. “Some people know the songs and sing along, others just dig the groove and the vibe,” she says. “It’s a great mix of people looking for something slightly more sophisticated than the norm.” Regent Cocktail Club, 1690 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-0199; catshellmusic.com COOL FACT: The Kitty Carmichael band just got back from a two-month residency at The Peninsula Hotel in Hong Kong.

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The Price of ivory

With the ever-expanding worldwide market for luxury goods, African elephants are being hunted to extinction for their valuable tusks. Here, Chelsea Clinton shares her passion for these exceptional animals, and the Clinton Foundation’s efforts to save them.

photography by tk; illustration by tk

by elizAbetH e. tHorp

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photography by max orenstein/clinton foundation (clinton); opposite page: mark deeble and Victoria stone/markdeeble.wordpress.com

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t’s an unimaginable horror. Satao, an iconic male African bush ele- Hillary and Chelsea Clinton unveiled an $80 million endeavor to stop the ivory phant who was born in the late 1960s, should have lived a natural life trade. The Partnership to Save Africa’s Elephants initiative partners include the of 70 years. But he was found dead in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Wildlife Conservation Society, World Wildlife Fund, African Wildlife Park in June. Poachers took down Satao, who weighed an estimated Foundation, International Fund for Animal Welfare, the Nature Conservancy, seven tons, with a single poisoned arrow to his flank. His signature Conservation International, and 11 other nongovernmental organizations, workivory tusks, which weighed more than 100 pounds each, had been ing together to halt the decline of African elephants. Chelsea Clinton, due to have her first child in the fall, still keeps a packed schedhacked off. The Tsavo Trust, a conservation group that monitors the elephant populations of Tsavo in partnership with the Kenya Wildlife ule at the foundation, passionately promoting initiatives close to her heart: Service, knew Satao well because of its focus on protecting large “tuskers,” which empowering women and girls, clean drinking water, combating childhood obesity, and the elephant poaching crisis. We sat down are lucrative targets for poachers. But Satao was so with Clinton, vice chair of the Clinton Foundation, to horribly butchered that the conservation groups talk about its efforts to save African elephants. who tracked his every move for years could not immediately identify him. Ocean Drive: When did you first learn about Why would anyone want to kill the world’s largthe horrors of elephant poaching? est land mammal—a highly intelligent species with Chelsea Clinton: I remember vividly: My motha lifespan as long as a human’s? An animal with er’s parents moved to Arkansas right before powerful family bonds and a memory that far surChristmas in 1987, and I remember my grandpasses ours and spans a lifetime? Scientists have parents asking what I wanted for Christmas. My found that elephants are capable of elaborate grandmother said, “We’ll give you a membership thought and deep feeling; they mourn deeply for and a subscription to anything that you want,” so I lost loved ones, even shedding tears and suffering picked National Geographic and possibly Greenpeace from depression. They have a sense of empathy that or Conservation International. I just wanted to know projects beyond their species. everything I could about what was happening with the So why are these gorgeous creatures being environment and conservation. I was so shocked that slaughtered? It’s for that objet d’art on your mantelelephants were under such duress, and the only thing piece, the necklace in your jewelry box, the hair that I could do was ask my grandparents to continue ornament on your dresser, and the ivory keys of to support organizations that were trying to save the your custom piano. elephants as my Christmas present every year. While elephant poaching has been a grave How does CGI coordinate this gigantic underchallenge at different times during the last century, taking with so many different partners? it has recently risen to alarming levels. In 2012, There are three parts of the CGI commitment: You some 35,000 African elephants were killed, about stop the killing, stop the trafficking, and stop the a 10th of the remaining population, representing demand. One of the first things we did was assess the worst mass slaughter of elephants since the what each organization was doing and where there international ivory trade was banned in 1990. were gaps—whether functionally or geographically— Roughly the same number were killed last year as so that the additional monies could be invested in well. African forest elephants in particular have helping to fill those voids. Or continue to double been devastated by poaching and have declined down on strategies that were working: The Howard by about 76 percent since 2002. At this rate, African G. Buffett Foundation made an investment in Gabon, forest elephants could effectively become extinct —Chelsea Clinton because Gabon had already started to increase its over the next decade. emphasis on conservation and increase its number of The wildlife trade is one of the world’s most profitrangers and ranger training to try and protect its eleable criminal activities, ranking fifth globally in terms of value—estimated at $7 billion to $10 billion a year, behind trafficking in phants. Now we have US Marines training Gabon rangers, because it’s not only drugs, people, and oil, and counterfeiting. Today’s ivory traffickers are well- about protecting the elephants, it’s about the security of the country. Gabon, like organized syndicates that function as transnational criminal networks and often so many countries where poaching is happening, is being preyed upon by armed participate in trafficking drugs and weapons. Some have links with terrorist groups that are destabilizing forces throughout West Africa and East Africa. Tell me more about security concerns and government cooperation. networks. According to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of The FBI is working with Interpol, as are various national intelligence groups, Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), as much as 70 percent of elephant ivory is trans- because, increasingly, poaching is part of the most nefarious activities throughported to China, where it is sold for up to $1,500 per pound and carved into out Africa—whether it’s running guns or people or drugs—so there’s a real security interest not only for the countries that are affected but for all of us to jewelry, religious figurines, and trinkets. In September 2013, at the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) annual meeting, stop poaching.

“SToP The

killing, SToP

The Trafficking, and SToP

The demand.”

opposite page: Satao, a male bush elephant born in the late 1960s, was killed for his tusks in Kenya’s Tsavo East National Park earlier this year.

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Chelsea Clinton photographing wild elephants during her 2013 trip to Africa. Elephants form deep emotional bonds with family members that may rival our own.

Government-issued weapons for fighting poachers and tusks seized in Chad’s Zakouma National Park. In the last decade, 90 percent of the park’s elephants have been poached.

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photography by tk; illustration by tk

While working to protect elephants in Garamba National Park in the DRC, park rangers show a tusk they confiscated.


illustration by shutterstock.com; opposite page: photography by barbara kinney/clinton foundation (clinton); mike hill/getty images (elephants); alvaro canovas/getty images (garamba national park); jean liou/afp/getty images (weapons)

Having lived through 9/11, I think people will be very interested to know that poaching has direct links to terrorism and Al Qaeda in North Africa. There’s irrefutable evidence that Al Qaeda in North Africa, the Lord’s Resistance Army in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), and the Janjaweed from Sudan who are coming into Uganda and the DRC are all engaged in poaching, because ivory is an easily accessible commodity to them. It’s become a lubricant that continually greases the wheels for the shipment of drugs, guns, and people. I don’t think many people realize the brutality involved when elephants are killed for ivory. One misconception is that taking off the tusk is like extracting a tooth. Elephants cannot live without their tusks; they are absolutely crucial to their survival. What happens with the ivory after the elephants are killed? Is there a black market? The tusks are removed and then trekked out to a port. In East Africa, a lot of ivory flows out of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, Mombasa, and Kenya, up and down the coast, and it largely goes to Asia. China, by far, is the biggest market; Vietnam and Thailand are also significant markets. The vast majority [of ivory] is transported in tusk form. When it gets to China, the tusks are then cut down and made into commodities and luxury goods—whether it be ivory Buddhas, chopsticks, hair clips, or the handles of a luxury handbag. Why the high demand for ivory in Asia? In China, historically, ivory has been synonymous with ascension into the middle class and prosperity. One of the challenges along the continuum with trying to stop the demand is to find replacement products—so that ivory is no longer synonymous with rising affluence, but that, say, a Louis Vuitton handbag could be. When you went to Africa last summer, what did you learn from being on the ground? We went where there are indigenous elephant populations— from Malawi up to Tanzania. In Tanzania we were in Tarangire National Park; it was amazing not only to see the elephants in all of their magnificence but to see the families, to understand on a deeper level why it’s so important that the matriarchs—which are increasingly the ones that are killed because they’re the oldest and have the biggest tusks—not be slaughtered. Without the guidance of those older figures, it’s hard for younger families to survive. And the park rangers are in such peril protecting the older elephants. Yes. More than a thousand rangers have been killed over the last decade protecting elephants and other wildlife. They feel called to this work for the elephants’ sake, but also recognize this is important to their country’s future. Why do you think elephants mean so much to you and your mother? The first elephants that I saw were in the Little Rock Zoo when I was little. What I felt then was just magnified profoundly

when I went with my mom to Africa as a teenager. It is this sense of a family, ultimately—the family unit of elephants and the affection and the commitment to their families and to the other elephant families in the area. Also, elephants are so crucial to the ecosystem. They’re sort of the honeybees of the African savannah or their forest environment. Can you share any progress reports? Judith McHale—who worked for my mom in the State Department, liaising on conservation efforts there—is chairing the [President’s Advisory Council on Wildlife Trafficking]. We fully support everything the Obama administration has done and strongly support an ivory ban here at home. We think that’s a critical move for the United States to make—not only for our own moral standing, but also because there is no argument for ivory being indispensable. There are very good substitute materials— whether it’s for a piano or a musical pick, or any of the utilitarian uses of ivory—so we really have been deeply enthusiastic about the commission’s work. I understand you’re planning on doing something during Fashion Week? Most of the major luxury goods houses don’t use ivory. The challenge is: How do we help their products become substitutions for ivory, in East Asia in particular? Something like a Louis Vuitton bag or an Hermès scarf or Donna Karan dress? How can those become the same types of status symbols that ivory historically has been? Also, how can we work with the fashion industry here in the US to raise awareness about this issue so that American consumers become aware of why you should never buy ivory? How can someone who is reading this help? One, don’t buy ivory, which sounds self-evident, but it isn’t. You’ll see stores that still sell ivory, because there is no carbon-dating equivalent for ivory. It’s impossible to assess its age, so a lot of new ivory gets laundered through antiques stores. The second thing is to support organizations that are really making a difference in this fight—whether that’s big organizations like the Wildlife Conservation Society, which has the most extensive efforts throughout Africa, or more localized organizations like the African Wildlife Foundation, which is helping to provide economic opportunities to many of the vulnerable communities around parks, often through eco-tourism programs. There’s such a range of organizations doing tremendous work that are part of our CGI commitment—yet even more work could be done if there were even more resources to do it. And also use your voice to help educate others about why this issue is so important, particularly given the number of misconceptions around ivory. I think that’s really where young people can help play a big role, using their voices offline and online, because a lot of people just don’t know what a tragedy elephant poaching really is, not just for the elephants but for the most affected communities. Ultimately, we all bear responsibility. OD

Save the elephantS Be active in the Battle to stop elephant poaching.

“Each day, it is estimated that 96 elephants are brutally killed in Africa for the ivory. Only a global movement will end the slaughter and help to ensure the survival of this magnificent animal. The Clinton Foundation is an important part of this movement,” says Cristián Samper, president and CEO of the Wildlife Conservation Society. “Secretary Clinton and Chelsea Clinton have used their leadership to bring attention to the threat facing Africa’s elephants and to help gather partners across the globe to join together in this fight. We are working on all fronts to stop the killing, and to stop the trafficking and demand for ivory.” to learn more aBout this crisis and to make a donation, go to:

african Wildlife Foundation: awf.org clinton Foundation’s partnership to save africa’s elephants: clintonfoundation.org conservation international: conservation.org international Fund for animal Welfare: ifaw.org nature conservancy: nature.org Wildlife conservation society: wcs.org World Wildlife Fund: worldwildlife.org

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2830 Sunset Drive | Miami Beach | $3,500,000 | Elegant Sunset Island One 1936 Art Deco/ Mediterranean estate in secluded guard gated neighborhood close to Lincoln Road, South Beach and Downtown Miami. Tricia Sandler 305.753.6655

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155 S Ocean Avenue | Singer Island | $995,000 to $1,650,000 | Impressive 3 bedroom, 3.5 bathroom condominiums that live like a single family home. Graciously proportioned rooms, expansive terraces, resort-style amenities and stunning views. Only 5 remain. Jeff Cohen 561.654.7341 | Chris Cox 561.714.6815 | Marisela Cotilla 561.249.6843


eminent domain Gold Coast Report

Upping the Upper east side For AvrA JAin and Biscayne Boulevard, what’s old is new again. by sean mccaughan

photography by gary james

Miami’s Upper East Side—the area many erroneously call “MiMo” because of Biscayne Boulevard’s main architectural style—is booming, and developer Avra Jain has emerged as its champion. Jain is, more than anybody else, the person who represents the unique underdog nature of the neighborhood. As archaic as it seems, real estate development in Miami is dominated by men, but Jain is making her mark by going against the grain. Instead of going for new and flashy, she’s restoring an eclectic mélange of faded MiMo gems to their former glory along this iconic stretch of Biscayne Boulevard continued on page 216

Avra Jain at the Vagabond Hotel, one of the Upper East Side’s MiMo gems she’s restoring to its former glory.

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eminent domain Gold Coast Report

“LittLe RiveR couLd become the ‘back of the house’ foR the design distRict. stiLL industRiaL, but aRtistic.” —avra jain between 50th Street continued fRom page 215 and 79th Street. Jain’s Upper East Side flagship is the Vagabond Hotel, a midcentury classic long shuttered but the trophy of Biscayne Boulevard’s motel row. “Everyone wanted the Vagabond, but I got it,” says Jain in her beautifully candid way, and she’s since put it through a massive renovation. The Vagabond shines via its details: Guest rooms are decorated with cool, flamboyant retro furniture. Underground gas lines circle the pool deck, awaiting the installation of

A rendering of the Knoxon Motel, formerly The Royal Motel, originally built in 1951.

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tiki torches, and waterspouts decoratively gush into the pool. A retractable screen will descend behind the poolside bandstand for outdoor movies and, when not swimming, guests can relax in custommade rattan chaise lounges. Designed in 1953 by B. Robert Swartburg, a prominent architect of his day who also designed the Delano Hotel in South Beach, the Vagabond has always stood out. “As a building, it functions very well,” says Jain. “In the way the pool is placed, the way the pool deck is elevated, and the way the rooms are oriented around it, all with an amphitheater-like setting. The only thing ‘motel’ about it is the parking on the exterior.” Jain is also saving The Royal Motel next door, dating from 1951, as an annex to the Vagabond. The Royal—to be renamed the Knoxon Motel postrevamp—is a full gut job, and will house a cooking school from chef Norman Van Aken, a pioneer in Floribbean cuisine, and fellow chef Candace Walsh. With John Kunkel’s 50 Eggs headquarters going in a former Art Deco motel just across the street, it seems this neck of the district has a great gastronomical future ahead of it. Up the street at Motel Blu, a new restaurant will come to the old Red Light space and, word is, the long-shuttered Gold Dust lounge in the Blu’s basement (after the Blu’s original name, Gold Dust) is eventually reopening, too. Back at the Vagabond, the hotel’s new restaurant will be operated by Alvaro Perez Miranda, a former New York gallerist making his culinary debut.

At 64th Street, Jain is working on the Stephen’s International Motel, where she has maintained the building’s two Midcentury Modern “bookends.” Between them, she’s inserting a new glassy vitrinelike building, with a Starbucks and a drive-through window. A block south, she’ll convert the circa-1953 South Pacific Motel into offices (but keep the lovely signage and angled stone façade), and The Bayside Motor Inn on 51st Street, built in the same era as the others, will be preserved as an operating motel with the help of the architect she’s using on many of her projects, Dean Lewis. Jain is also widening her sphere of influence. “You begin to see things in corridors, and the way the corridors relate to each other shows how neighborhood populations shift to other neighborhoods,” she says. Just this summer, she bought the beloved piano bar Magnum Lounge just east of the boulevard on 79th Street, but won’t change much, since she’s charmed by what previous owner Jeffrey Landsman was doing. As Miami’s Upper East Side grows, the frontier naturally expands west to Little River. Jain says she is “digging” the area: “It’s the alternative to Wynwood. Artists have already moved there, and galleries are looking.” She sees the area attracting people from Wynwood and the Design District, forming an artist neighborhood of creatives. “It could become the ‘back of house’ for the Design District,” Jain says. “Still industrial, but artistic.” To facilitate this vision, Jain is partnering with realtor and fellow developer Tony Cho to buy and manage a large warehouse at the center of a railroad junction called Rail 71, where they will create work space for small manufacturers, start-ups, and other creative types. It’s just another example of Jain’s knack for seeing possibilities before others do. OD

check it out by checking in These Avra Jain properties are changing the face of Miami’s Upper East Side: Bayside Motel 5101 biscayne blvd., miami the Royal Motel 7411 biscayne blvd., miami stephen’s inteRnational Motel 6320

biscayne blvd., miami VagaBond hotel 7301 biscayne blvd., miami;

thevagabondhotel.com

photography courtesy of DB Lewis architect (BaysiDe, Knoxon)

The old Bayside Motor Inn on 51st Street will be preserved as an operating motel, seen in this rendering.



eminent domain tall Stories

Exclusive Price Points Four MiaMi Beach palaces pushing $30 Million reFlect the ever-growing luxury Market. by sean mccaughan

One Bal Harbour’s penthouse unit, #2604, with views that take advantage of the building’s location at the northern tip of Bal Harbour, is listed for sale. At the nexus of the Atlantic, Baker’s Haulover Inlet, and Biscayne Bay, there are water views in three directions—a rarity on the beach. The price tag: a whopping $30 million, proving the Miami real estate boom is as hot as ever. The unit comes with five bedrooms, five and a half baths, expansive living and dining areas spread out over 7,779 square feet, a hot tub on the wraparound balcony, a sauna, and a private two-car garage downstairs. Eduardo Gonzalez, Century 21 Realty, 12955 SW 42nd St., Miami, 305-221-7221; century21.com At the opposite end of Miami Beach, an 8,229-square-foot duplex listed for $29.9 million at the Continuum also faces water in three directions with views of the ocean, the bay, and Government Cut. The apartment—a combination of three smaller units—has seven bedrooms, six and a half baths, a double-height living room, home theater, custom security and audiovisual features, and according to the listing, “the largest square footage on any one level of any unit at the Continuum.” Jill Eber, Coldwell Banker, 1682 Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach, 305-9152556; thejills.com Built in 2013, the newly completed mansion at 2920 North Bay Road was designed according to the

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principles of feng shui by architect Kobi Karp, who himself lives just down the street and over two short bridges. The 9,815-square-foot house, listed at $29.5 million, comes with Balinese and Chinese architectural influences, a 60-plus-foot saltwater pool, an elevator, a wine cellar, a dock, a roof deck with bar, and a generous 170 feet of Biscayne Bay frontage, with views of the Sunset Islands to the left and the Julia Tuttle Causeway in the distance to the right. Jill Hertzberg, Coldwell Banker, 1682 Jefferson Ave., Miami Beach, 305-788-5455; thejills.com A historic Mediterranean Revival estate built in 1932 and dripping in original architectural details such as carved wooden ceilings, large stone fireplaces, and wrought iron balustrades is on the market for $26.77 million. The house comes with a large courtyard, putting green, six bedrooms, and a tower containing a private library and office from whence to survey your domain. It’s also a great perch for the kids to play “fort.” The 10,383-square-foot house lies on a deep Indian Creek lot with 100 feet of water frontage with views of Collins Avenue and its glittering towers, a dock, and a pool. Eli Nektalov, Big International Realty Inc., 18090 Collins Ave., Sunny Isles Beach, 305-931-9063; biginternational realty.com OD

from top: At the Continuum,

this $29.9 million duplex combines three smaller units and affords waterviews in three directions; the feng shui-aligned 2920 North Bay Road home includes a 60-plus-foot pool and 170 feet of Biscayne Bay frontage; the historic Mediterranean Revival estate at 4855 Pine Tree Drive comes complete with its own putting green and a tower with a private library.


YO U R L I F E . YO U R H O M E . YO U R

ARTIST CONCEPTUAL RENDERING

ARTIST CONCEPTUAL RENDERING

ARTIST CONCEPTUAL RENDERING

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304 FULLY FURNISHED LUXURY RESIDENCES STUDIO | ONE BEDROOM | ONE BEDROOM + DEN | TWO BEDROOMS

CONDO RESORT AT HOLLYWOOD BEACH, FLORIDA

SALES OFFICE 201 NORTH OCEAN DRIVE, HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33019 954 239 8383 | INFO@COSTAHOLLYWOOD.COM

EXCLUSIVE SALES BY

STAY CONNECTED

ORAL REPRESENTATIONS CANNOT BE RELIED UPON AS CORRECTLY STATING THE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DEVELOPER. FOR CORRECT REPRESENTATIONS, REFERENCE SHOULD BE MADE TO THE DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY SECTION 718.503, FLORIDA STATUTES, TO BE FURNISHED BY A DEVELOPER TO A BUYER OR LESSEE. THIS OFFERING IS MADE ONLY BY THE PROSPECTUS FOR THE CONDOMINIUM AND NO STATEMENT SHOULD BE RELIED UPON IF NOT MADE IN THE PROSPECTUS. THIS IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL, OR SOLICITATION OF OFFERS TO BUY, THE CONDOMINIUM UNITS IN STATES WHERE SUCH OFFER OR SOLICITATION CANNOT BE MADE. PRICES, PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE.

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eminent domain Real estate Roundtable “Having a value proposition witHin edgewater was a missing niche.” —barbara salk

from left: Barbara Salk and Taylor Collins at the Biscayne Beach

Living on the Edge Two independenT, smaller-scale developers Take on easT edgewaTer To round ouT The ciTy’s nexT iT neighborhood. Moderated by Julia Ford-Carther

As Miami’s real estate market continues to expand, everyone has an eye on the next great neighborhood. Taylor Collins, partner at Eastview Development, and Barbara Salk, principal of Sakor Development, discuss the potential of East Edgewater as Miami’s newest coveted location. Barbara Salk: East Edgewater is the new South

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of Fifth. It’s connecting the city to the great museums, entertainment district, Design District, downtown, access to the beach with both bridges. It’s a great value proposition because it’s so well situated in Miami. At the comeback of the real estate market, people moved along the Brickell corridor; that was the first signal that there’s a real need for people who want to live in the city.

Taylor Collins: You have sophisticated buyers today, and they’re not flippers. We’re seeing people move off the beach and move here. BS: As smaller developers, we’re working together to have a successful neighborhood. TC: We’ve worked side by side saying, “What does the market need?” You brought in Hirsch Bedner Associates—great interior

designers and something that you’ve never seen in the Edgewater area. We brought Thom Filicia to [Biscayne Beach and] Tutto il Giorno, the restaurant in the Hamptons [co-owned by Donna Karan’s daughter, Gabby Karan De Felice]. That just shows you the strength of what’s happening. BS: Having a value proposition within Edgewater was a missing niche, especially with high design at [about $475 a square foot]. That’s what I’m bringing to the market [with Ion East Edgewater]. Everyone has their niche. Your niche is the beach club. TC: We created this massive man-made “beach” for

residents. The bottom floor is dedicated to the beach club with cabanas, beach club amenities, and the infinity edge pool, which we raised up about six and a half feet so when you’re looking [out], you don’t see anything [except] the water. That’s given us our own identity in the market, which is bringing the beach to the city. You have all the amenities of living on the ocean without the costs of living on the ocean. Biscayne Beach, 254 NE 30th St., Miami, 305-767-1414; biscaynebeachresidences.com. Ion East Edgewater, 2751 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-890-2026; ion-east-edgewater.com OD

photography by jim arbogast (salk)

sales center; amenities at the new Ion East Edgewater include a waterfront deck with infinity pool.


Solerno & Sparkling

1 part Solerno Blood Orange Liqueur 5 parts Prosecco or any dry sparkling wine Glass: Hi-Ball Garnish: Orange slice Build ingredients in a tall glass over ice, stir to incorporate. Garnish with an orange slice.

DiScOver mOre reciPeS at SolernoliQUeUr.CoM Great cOcKtaiLS Start WitH reSPONSiBLe meaSUriNG


Abode & beyond best Seat in the House Roberto Cavalli’s beloved leopard and zebra patterns abound at Cavalli Restaurant & Lounge, the designer’s stylish eatery in South Beach.

A TAsTe for sTyle

Man y of MiaMi’s Mo st l avish din in g ho t spo t s co Mbin e foo d, f ash io n , an d st yl e fo r th e u l t iMat e dé co r exper ien ce. by jordan melnick

Miami has long exhibited a flair for décor, dating back to the sumptuous interiors of the magnificent Magic City-era hotels. So now that the city’s food scene is coming into its own, it’s no surprise that some restaurants are distinguishing themselves as much by their interior design as by their menus. Least surprising of all, perhaps, is Cavalli Restaurant & Lounge, located in a Tuscan-style villa in South Beach’s exclusive South of Fifth neighborhood. Even if the restaurant didn’t name-check Roberto Cavalli, you’d recognize the iconic fashion designer’s inimitable imprint in an instant. Do you prefer leopard spots or zebra stripes? Either way, there’s a patterned seat for you. Naturally, fauna needs flora, and the bright purple flowers printed on the silk tablecloths and variegated floral centerpieces prove Cavalli knows this. “I wanted to communicate all my passion for beauty and sensuality, combining them in a hospitality project in Miami,” says Cavalli, who teamed up with Italy-based architect Italo continued on page 224

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ANASTASIA BOKAREVA PROVIDING INSIGHT. CREATING VALUE.

Inspired by a desire to fnd the inherent beauty of real estate, Anastasia Bokareva lends a keen perspective to the journey of discovering the ideal luxury property. As a long-time resident of Miami, she is not only passionate about the one-of-a-kind South Florida lifestyle, but also in sharing it with an international audience seeking to do the same. This includes stunning single-family homes and estates, elite condominiums, and waterfront residences of all types, particularly one-of-a-kind properties that make elegant statements time and time.

646.599.1183 abokareva@onesothebysrealty.com www.anastasiabokareva.com

By leveraging her innate ability to recognize opportunities, respond with confdence, and handle every detail, Anastasia Bokareva ensures that you spend less time looking for the right real estate match, and more time enjoying your new home or recent sale.

©MMXIV Sotheby’s International Realty Affliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Affliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing opportunity. Each offce is Independently Owned and Operated. If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully.


aBoDe & BeyonD Best Seat in the house

“I wanted to communIcate all my passIon for beauty and sensualIty, combInIng them In a hospItalIty project In mIamI.” —roberto cavalli contInued from page 222

Rota for this establishment that showcases Murano glasses from Venice and Italian marble floors. A profusion of extravagant details combined in kaleidoscopic harmony is the hallmark of a Cavalli space. But just in case a guest had any trouble guessing the identity of this textile tamer, there are several large photographs of Cavalli hanging on the restaurant’s patterned walls. Because what’s a meal at Cavalli without l’uomo himself in attendance? 150 ocean dr., miami beach, 305-695-4191; miami.cavalliclub.com

The Bazaar

The atmosphere often feels a degree or two removed

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from reality, and in that sense The Bazaar’s interior is successfully dreamy (as is chef José Andrés’s boundary-pushing cuisine). There are two distinct dining rooms. One is a re-creation of designer Philippe Starck’s memory of his grandmother’s dining room. It has floorto-ceiling shelves stocked with books and old photos, acid-yellow walls, and a 10-foot-tall, seashell-encrusted chandelier that reflects on the space in a tall mirror flanked by zebra-print paneling. The other, separated from its counterpart by the bar and kitchen, eschews nostalgia for allure. Its long red curtains and red-and-black area rug pop against dark seating. Off to the side, a wax candelabra

melts onto the counter, casting faint light on thick columns covered in scrawled handwriting. Commanding the room is a black bull’s head, mounted on the wall among black-and-white photos of beautiful women and proudly wearing a pink wrestling mask. Deciding which room to dine in depends a bit on your idea of a good dream. 1701 collins ave., miami beach, 305-455-2999; thebazaar.com

The DuTch

The Dutch describes itself as “NYC meets Miami Beach”— this is true in a couple of ways. The restaurant originated in the Big Apple, and its décor, designed by NYC-based Meyer Davis Studio, honors those origins with brick

walls and varied seating arrangements, chair types, and table heights suitable for a packed Manhattan bar. Even so, The Dutch manages to evoke a Miami state of mind: Sunlight washes over light oak floors, nautical lamps hang from driftwood beams, and the brick walls feel beachy under a thick coat of white paint. And of course, the long red surfboard, mounted on the wall among various found objects, is a bright-red reminder that a warm ocean lies just feet away. w south beach, 2201 collins ave., miami beach, 305-938-3111; thedutchmiami.com

The Forge

In 2010, when The Forge spent $10 million to renovate

its interior, the goal, says owner Shareef Malnik, “was to create a feeling of a home living space that pays homage to its roots and, at the same time, looks towards the future.” The opulent result, from interior designer François Frossard, is a fantastic success even if your idea of home doesn’t include elaborate stained-glass wall panels, columns topped with Corinthian capitals, silken upholstered chairs, and a crystal chandelier that looks like an upside-down, multitiered wedding cake. With all these flourishes, The Forge somehow still manages to make you feel at home. 432 41st st., miami beach, 305-5388533; theforge.com OD

photography by Noah Fecks (the Dutch); simoN hare photography (the Forge); skott sNiDer photography (bazaar)

The Dutch evokes Miami Beach, with nods to a Manhattan bar. right, from top: The Forge’s opulent interior turns dining into grand theater; a seashell-encrusted 10-foot chandelier at The Bazaar adds to the dream-like ambience.


2920 N BAY RD | MIAMI BEACH | BAY VIEWS | MODERN MASTERPIECE $29.5M | 7BR/7+2BA | 9,815 SF | LOT: 52,360 SF | WF: 170’

36 INDIAN CREEK DR | MIAMI BEACH | PRIVATE DOCK $19.8M | 6BR/6+2BA | 8,510 SF | LOT: 54,844 SF | WF: 137’

THE JILLS

®

552 N ISLAND DR | GOLDEN BEACH | PRIVATE GATED COMMUNITY $15.9M | 7BR/9BA | 10,171 SF | LOT: 33,771 SF | WF: 300’ | INTERCOASTAL VIEWS

300 S POINTE DR | #3105 | PORTOFINO TOWERS | OCEAN & BAY VIEWS $6M | 3BR/4+1BA | 5,450 SF | OVERSIZED TWO-STORY CONDO IN THE SKY

#1 TEAM IN AMERICA AS RANKED BY THE WALL STREET JOURNAL 2012 & 2013

JILL HERTZBERG | 305.788.5455 | JILLH@THEJILLS.COM JILL EBER | 305.915.2556 | JILLE@THEJILLS.COM

THEJILLS.COM 10225 COLLINS AVE | #2004 | BAL HARBOUR | WRAP-AROUND TERRACE $3.775M | 4BR/4+1BA | 2,918 SF | OCEAN, INTRACOASTAL & CITY VIEWS

COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE

The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verifcation. ©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker logo, Coldwell Banker Previews International and the Previews logo are registered and unregistered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


COCONUT GROVE, CORAL GABLES, KEY BISCAYNE Artisan | The newest hot spot in Key Biscayne perfect for sandwiches or tapas. 658 Crandon Blvd., Key Biscayne, 305-365-6003 Bizcaya | Mediterranean-influenced cuisine serving fresh fish and prime cuts of beef, at the Ritz-Carlton Coconut Grove. 3300 SW 27th Ave., Coconut Grove, 305-644-4680 Cantina Beach | Miami’s only oceanfront, coastal Mexican restaurant located at The Ritz-Carlton Key Biscayne. 455 Grand Bay Dr., Key Biscayne, 305-365-4622 Caffe Abbracci | Dine beneath the glow of a ruby-red starlight chandelier and the brilliance of Venetian glass on Italian-inspired foods including great carpaccio’s, the freshest fish, homemade pastas or succulent NY meats. 318 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables, 305-441-0700

Ortanique on the Mile | New World Caribbean cuisine, island elegance. 278 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables, 305-446-7710

Cafeina | Diverse hot-spot offering intriguing art, nightlife and tasty cuisine in the heart of Wynwood. 297 NW 23rd Street, Miami, 305-438-0792

Palme d’Or | Fabulous French fare, at the landmark Biltmore Hotel. 1200 Anastasia Ave., Coral Gables, 305-913-3201

The Cypress Room | The Genuine Hospitality Group’s latest Design District haunt gives an elegant nod to 1920’s American fine dining. 3620 NE 2nd Ave., Miami, 305-520-5197

Pascal’s on Ponce | Contemporary French cuisine. 2611 Ponce De Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, 305-444-2024 Peacock Garden Cafe | The ideal setting for outside dining at anytime of day. 2889 McFarlane Rd., Coconut Grove, 305-774-3332 Red Fish Grill | Romantic, waterside seafood dining experience. 9610 Old Cutler Rd., Miami, 305-668-8788 Sushi Samba | The finest fusion of Japanese, Brazilian and Peruvian cuisine at the Westin Colonnade Hotel. 180 Aragon Ave., Coral Gables, 305-441-2600

Christy’s Restaurant | The steak house meets the piano bar at this Miami staple. 3101 Ponce de Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, 305-446-1400

Swine Southern Table & Bar | This joint is a place to hang with friends, sip a little whiskey, and indulge in genuine Southern cooking. 2415 Ponce De Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, 786-360-6433

Cioppino | Tuscan cuisine capturing the romance of Old World Italy, at the Ritz-Carlton Key Biscayne. 455 Grand Bay Dr., Key Biscayne, 305-365-4156

Town Kitchen & Bar | Global comfort foods and an irresistible brunch special. 7301 SW 57th Ct., South Miami, 305-740-8118

Eating House | Not your typical steakhouse, this hipsteresque hotspot is known for its eclectic menu serving playful dishes such as “Cap’n Crunch” pancakes for brunch. 804 Ponce De Leon Blvd., Coral Gables, 305-448-6524

Versailles | The authentic and famous Miami-Cuban classic. 3555 SW 8 St., Miami, 305-444-0240

George’s in the Grove | Lively, casual bistro featuring French classics. 3145 Commodore Plaza, Coconut Grove, 305-444-7878 Love Is Blind | A culinary adventure that takes you all over the globe. 225 Altara Avenue, Coral Gables, 305-748-6118 Monty’s Raw Bar | Scenic waterside spot offering seafood goodies. 2550 S. Bayshore Dr., Coconut Grove, 305-856-3992

Love Is Blind

DESIGN DISTRICT, MIDTOWN, WYNWOOD Bocce Bar | Midtown’s latest addition distinguishes itself from the rest with a bocce ball court and its rustic feel and cozy ambiance. 3252 NE First Ave., Miami, 786-245-6211 The Butcher Shop | Trendy addition to Wynwood that fuses retail, restaurant and beer garden into one gourmet hot-spot. 165 NW 23rd Street, Miami, 305-846-9120

The Federal | Tackling comfort food classics like pot pies, biscuits and gravy, this eatery will rock your world. 5132 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-758-9559

Harry’s Pizzeria | Chef and owner Michael Schwartz’s newest creation offers a cozy and comfortable neighborhood spot to enjoy some creative, wood-oven pizzas, craft beers, and a selection of delectable desserts. 3918 N. Miami Ave., Miami, 786-275-4963 Gigi | Bustling and hip hot spot featuring Asian-inspired fare. 3470 N. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-573-1520 Mandolin Aegean Bistro | Authentic countryside cuisine from Greece and Turkey. 4312 NE 2nd Ave., Miami, 305-576-6066 MC Kitchen | Modern Italian cuisine offering seasonal dishes with ingredients selected on the basis of quality, harvest maturity, and farming integrity. 4141 NE 2nd Ave., Suite 101A, Miami, 305-456-9948 Michael’s Genuine Food & Drink | Michael Schwartz’s highly successful Design District eatery. 130 NE 40th St., Atlas Plaza, Miami, 305-573-5550 Morgans | Modern, home-style comfort food for brunch, lunch and dinner. 28 NE 29th St., Miami, 305-573-9678 Oak Tavern | This Design District eatery cooks up modern home-style fare including hearty dishes such as “grown-up mac and cheese.” 35 NE 40th Street, Miami, 786-391-1818

A culinary adventure that takes you all over the globe. 225 Altara Avenue, Coral Gables, 305-748-6118


5840 NORTH BAY ROAD MIAMI BEACH $15,900,000 6 bedrooms | 5 bathrooms 6,218 sf | 37,895 sf lot This private compound is ideal for the end user, investor or developer planning to build a new Large Luxury Waterfront Estate on prestigious upper North Bay Road. The property offers 191’ of water frontage.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT

Cyril Matz

Estate Agent 305.926.2600 cmatz@onesothebysrealty.com ©MMXIV Sotheby’s International Realty Afliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a licensed trademark to Sotheby’s International Realty Afliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing oportunity. Each ofce is Independently Owned and Operated. If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the oferings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully.

Wraps • Bowls • Salads • Shakes • Fruit Juices • Pitas • Burgers • Coffee

Miami Beach’s new premier healthy eating restaurant, SoFi Café, is committed to offering fresh, organic foods at an affordable price! Smoothies

500 S. Pointe Dr. #180, Miami Beach, FL 305.763.8692 • sofi-cafe.com Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner • Dine-In, Take-Out


Sakaya Kitchen | This delicious offering from chef Richard Hales re-imagines Asian fast food in a decidedly gourmet way. 3401 N. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-576-8096 Salumeria | 104 Authentic Northern Italian salumi shop and trattoria serving traditional dishes and cured meats. 3451 NE 1st Ave., Miami, 305-424-9588 Sugarcane | From the creators of Sushi Samba, a raw bar and grill with a South American spirit. 3250 NE 1st Ave., Miami, 786-369-0353 Wynwood Kitchen & Bar | Affordable global Latino cuisine meets cutting-edge art. 2550 NW 2nd Ave., Miami, 305-722-8959

DOWNTOWN/BRICKELL Area 31 | Great seafood from the namesake region encompassing the Florida coast and Central America. 270 S. Biscayne Blvd. Way, Miami, 305-424-5234 Atrio Restaurant and Wine Room | A contemporary restaurant and lounge offering guests an innovative and international menu paired with a minimalistic setting to complement the view of an incandescent Miami skyline. 1395 Brickell Ave., Miami, 305-503-6529

Dr., Miami, 305-947-6263 Novecento | Argentinean and Mediterranean cuisine. 1414 Brickell Ave., Miami, 305-403-0900 The Oceanaire | Ultra fresh seafood and American Steak house. 900 S. Miami Ave., Miami 305-372-8862 OTC | Comfort cuisine is served as the name suggests — over-the-counter. 1250 South Miami Ave., Miami, 305-374-4612 PM Buenos Aires Fish & Steak House | Born from the nostalgia felt from the “Porteño”-like cuisine, PM has the influence of not only the parrilladas but also all the different styles all over the world. 1453 S. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-200-5606 Pollos y Jarras | Authentic Peruvian cuisine with an extensive selection of BBQ, grilled meats, and tapas all ideally complimented by signature cocktails. 115 NE 3rd Ave., Miami, 786-567-4940 Seasalt and Pepper | A seafood brasserie and lounge, is a celebration of the sense that marks the return to the core values of gastronomy. 422 NW North River Drive, Miami, 305-440-4200

La Mar by Gaston Acurio | Features the acclaimed Peruvian cuisine of celebrity chef Gastón Acurio in a high-energy setting with dramatic water views of Biscayne Bay and the Miami skyline, at the Mandarin Oriental. 500 Brickell Key Dr., Miami, 305-913-8358 Lippi | A New American dining experience with fresh flavors and craft spirits, in the bustling heart of Brickell. 600 Brickell Ave., Miami, 305-579-1888 Naoe | Experience natural Japanese cuisine as Chef Kevin Cory serves a unique Chef’s Choice menu. 661 Brickell Key

Baires Grill | This casual and trendy establishment satiates your appetite with an authentic, high-quality Argentinian cuisine. 1116 Lincoln Rd. Mall, Miami Beach, 305-538-1116 The Bazaar by José Andrés | Masterfully re-imagined Spanish cuisine, at the SLS Hotel South Beach. 1701 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-455-5000 Bâoli Miami | A dining experience that truly excites the senses: an elegant and vibrant ambiance with an alluring menu. 1906 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-8822

Big Pink | Bright and fun diner, serving full-bodied classics. 157 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-532-4700 BLT Steak | at The Betsy Hotel Laurent Tourondel’s interpretation of the American steak house. 1440 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach, 305-673-0044

CVI.CHE 105 | This bustling Peruvian eatery has quickly become a hip downtown landmark. 105 NE 3rd Ave., Miami, 305-577-3454

Il Gabbiano | Decadent, exquisite Italian cuisine served inside or out, overlooking Biscayne Bay. 335 S. Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-373-0063

AltaMare | Neighborhood gem with great seafood and pasta. 1233 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 305-532-3061

Bianca | Modern Italian fare at the Delano’s signature restaurant. 1685 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-6400

Cipriani | Exquisite Italian restaurant with impeccable service and elegant design. 465 Brickell Ave. CU1, Miami, 786-329-4090

Garcia’s Seafood Grille & Fish Market | Fabulously fresh fish, right on the river. 398 NW North River Dr., Miami, 305-375-0765

A Fish Called Avalon | Contemporary tropical menu featuring award-winning seafood dishes. 700 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach, 305-532-1727

Barton G. The Restaurant | Upscale American eatery, plus lots of dazzle. 1427 West Ave., Miami Beach, 305-672-8881

Biscayne Tavern | Located in the B2 Miami downtown, this casual neighborhood gathering post serves up the next evolution of comfort food. 146 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-358-4555

Fratelli Milano | This tiny downtown gem serves unexpectedly divine pasta dishes. 213 SE 1st St., Miami, 305-373-2300

15 Steps | Seasonal farm-to-table dining at the Eden Roc hotel. 4525 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-5594

Barezzito/One Lounge | A nighttime hangout spot with live music, djs, and a Latin-Asian fusion menu. 2000 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-397-8882

Batch | Fresh off a successful opening, this Gastropub, with cocktails on tap, is soon to be Brickell’s favored hotspot. 30 SW 12th St., Miami, 305-808-5555

Edge Steak & Bar | This stylish departure from the traditional steak house is the new crown jewel of The Four Seasons Hotel Miami. 1435 Brickell Ave., Miami, 305-381-3190

MIAMI BEACH

Barceloneta | Catalan Bistro and Mercat that will transport you to Spain through taste alone. 1400 20th St., Miami Beach, 305-538-9299

Azul | French inspired cuisine with an Asian twist at the Mandarin Oriental. 500 Brickell Key Dr., Miami, 305-913-8358

db Bistro Moderne | The New York sensation from chef Daniel Boulud, in downtown’s JW Marriott Marquis. 255 Biscayne Blvd. Way, Miami, FL 33131, 305-350-0750

Zuma | Internationally acclaimed Japanese “pub fare” from London restaurateur Rainer Becker, at the Epic Hotel. 270 Biscayne Blvd. Way, Miami, 305-577-0277

Garcia’s Seafood Grille & Fish Market Fabulously fresh fsh, right on the river. 398 NW North River Dr., Miami, 305-375-0765

Café Mistral | A quaint neighborhood café serving fresh product with a French twist. 110 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-763-8184 Café Prima Pasta | Authentic Italian meats, cheeses, pastas and desserts since 1993. 414 71st St., Miami Beach, 305-867-0106

Soya y Pomodoro | Intimate Italian located in a quaint Neoclassical alcove. 120 NE 1st St., Miami, 305-381-9511

Canyon Ranch Grill | Wholesome seasonal dishes with an emphasis on local farming methods. 6801 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-514-7474

Touché Rooftop Lounge & Restaurant | From celebrity chef Carla Pellegrino, featuring an array of dishes ranging from meat to pastas to seafood and sushi. 15 NE 11th Street, Miami, 305-358-9848

Casa Tua | Italian restaurant with a private upstairs lounge and la dolce vita vibe. 1700 James Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-1010

Toscana Divino | Brickell’s Italian trattoria features an Italian happy hour, “Aperitivo Italiano,” every Wednesday. 900 S. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-371-2767 Truluck’s Seafood Steak & Crab House | A fantastic combination of the freshest Florida Stone Crab, juicy steaks and a selection of over 100 wines. 777 Brickell Ave., Miami, 305-579-0035 Tuyo | Sitting atop Miami Dade College’s new Miami Culinary Institute, Tuyo is an exquisite fusion of New World flavors. 415 N.E. 2nd Ave., Miami, 305-237-3200 Wolfgang’s Steakhouse | Wolfgang Zweiner’s famous steak house has finally arrived in Miami. 315 S. Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 305-487-7130

Cavalli Restaurant & Lounge | Illustrious designer Roberto Cavalli presents his latest project: a twostory Art Deco Villa set to be the ideal space where world-class cuisine, fashion, and design will combine. 150 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach Cecconi’s | The Italian sensation from Mayfair and West Hollywood has brought its A-list vibe to the Soho Beach House. 4385 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 786-507-7902 De Rodriguez Cuba | Reminiscent of the exhilarating nightlife of old world Havana, Cuba, serving Modern Cuban Cuisine in South Beach’s chic South of Fifth neighborhood, at the Hilton Bentley. 101 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach, 305-672-6624 DiLido Beach Club | A casually elegant oceanfront restaurant and lounge with ocean-table cuisine and a



FDR

Subterranean lounge at the Delano. 1685 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-5752

DESIGN DISTRICT, WYNWOOD Bardot | Intimate lounge featuring live music and an edgy scene. 3456 N. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-576-5570 Gavanna | “Vibe dictates the night” at Wynwood’s hot-spot. 10 NE 40th St., Miami, 305-573-1321

features a lavish lighting and video design set to host Miami’s most exclusive. 2000 Collins Ave., Miami Beach Bamboo | This renovated Paris Theatre features superior entertainment technology and sleek, modern, Gatsby-style décor. 550 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-695-4771

Ricochet Bar & Lounge | Art and music-centric bar and lounge in the heart of Midtown. 3250 NE 1st Ave., #122B, Miami, 786-353-0846

The Broken Shaker | Laid-back indoor-outdoor bar featuring exotic handcrafted cocktails, at the Freehand Miami Hostel. 2727 Indian Creek Dr., Miami Beach, 305-531-2727

Wood Tavern | Artsy and relaxed indoor-outdoor enclave where hipsters, art-walk crawlers, and collectors mingle. 2531 NW 2nd Ave., Wynwood, 305-748-2828

Club Deuce | Everyone’s favorite timeless dive bar. 222 14th St., Miami Beach, 305-531-6200

DOWNTOWN, BRICKELL Blackbird Ordinary | Catchy and energetic vibe with delicious cocktails hidden downtown. 729 SW First Ave., Miami, 305-671-3307 Blue Martini | Upscale atmosphere with a local-bar mentality, at Mary Brickell Village. 900 S. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-981-2583 E11EVEN MIAMI A unique 24 / 7 No Sleep international cabaret, nightclub, and after-hours experience that features beautiful entertainers and 11-style theatrics in an environment that is as sexy as it is sophisticated. 29 N.E. 11th Street, Miami, 305-829-2911 Grand Central | Former railRd. station turned contemporary event space with weekly events for Miami’s most discerning music lovers. 697 N. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-377-2277 Hyde AmericanAirlines Arena | A posh VIP lounge on the court-level of the Arena. 601 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 855-777-4933 Tobacco Rd. | Miami’s oldest bar, serving patrons for more than 95 years. 626 S. Miami Ave., Miami, 305-374-1198

MIAMI BEACH Adoré Nightclub | This fallen Cathedral Inspired Venue

FDR | Subterranean lounge at the Delano. 1685 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-5752 Foxhole | New watering hole and neighborhood bar owned by nightlife veterans. 1426A Alton Rd., Miami Beach, 305-534-3511 Hyde Beach | Enjoy artful mixology and José Andrés cuisine at Hyde Beach — the first oceanfront location of sobe’s premier nightlife brand at SLS Hotel South Beach. 1701 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-1701 Jazid | Intimate, live jazz and blues and nightly drink specials. 1342 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-9372 Kill Your Idol | Hipster kids plus cheap drinks plus high irony equals a perfect night. 222 Española Way, Miami Beach, 305-672-1852 LIV | The hip, high-energy megaclub, at the Fontainebleau. 4441 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-4680 Mansion | Plush, oversized dance club with copious VIP nooks. 1235 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-695-8411 Mokaï | A modern lounge with New York sensibility and Miami joie de vivre. 235 23rd St., Miami Beach, 305-673-1409 Mynt | A vibrant club that plays host to South Beach’s fabulous crowd. 1921 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-532-0727 Nikki Beach | Mostly outdoor hot spot to see and be seen. 1 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach, 305-538-1111

Public House | A 1960s vintage surf-style saloon with a post-modern Miami twist. 423 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 786-408-2917 Purdy Lounge | The perfect dark and laid-back local bar. 1811 Purdy Ave., Miami Beach, 305-531-4622 Radio Bar | Hip local bar, new to the SoFi area. 814 First St., Miami Beach. 305-397-8382 Rec Room | New York-influenced upscale basement lounge, at the Gale Hotel. 1690 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-0199 The Regent Cocktail Club | Dimly lit and classically elegant cocktail bar and lounge, at the Gale Hotel. 1690 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-0199 Set | A modern South Beach tribute to Old Hollywood glamour. 320 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 305-531-2800 SkyBar | The Shore Club’s exclusive nightlife setting overlooking the ocean. 1901 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 786-276-6772 Story | “A new chapter in Miami Nightlife”. 136 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 305-479-4426 Sunset Lounge | Mondrian South Beach’s indoor-outdoor lounge is comprised of multiple spaces, offering the only bayside destination for watching the sunset over Miami’s downtown skyline. 1100 West Ave., Miami Beach, 305-514-1941 Sweetwater Beer Garden | A new members-only poolside oasis that is attracting some of Miami’s hippest locals. 236 2st St., Miami Beach, 786-516-7961 Ted’s Hideaway | A laid-back local bar with a pool table and a delightfully grungy scene. 124 Second St., Miami Beach, 305-532-9869 Twist | Popular gay pit stop with late-night action and seven uniquely themed bars. 1057 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-538-9478 Wall | The W South Beach’s on-site hot spot from a dream team of nightlife innovators. 2201 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-938-3000



Pollos y Jarras

Authentic Peruvian cuisine with an extensive selection of BBQ, grilled meats, and tapas all ideally complimented by signature cocktails. 115 NE 3rd Ave., Miami, 786-567-4940

relaxed, chic ambiance perfect for people-watching, at The Ritz-Carlton, South Beach. 155 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 786-276-4000 Dolce Italian | Contemporary take on Italian classics located at The Gale Hotel. 1690 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-0199 Drunken Dragon | South Beach’s first Korean barbecue restaurant presents a unique method of table side cooking while offering a combination of Asian inspired dishes as well as tropical, exotic cocktails. 1424 Alton Rd, Miami Beach, 305-397-8556 The Dutch | A roots-inspired restaurant, Bar and Oyster Room at the W South Beach. 2201 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-938-3111 Escopazzo | Excellent romantic Italian cuisine with an organic emphasis. 1311 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-9450 Estiatorio Milos | Costas Spiliadis Celebrates the arts, culture and cuisine of Greece and is committed to providing guests a true understanding of fresh ingredients simply prepared with integrity. 730 1st St., Miami Beach, 305-604-6800 Fogo de Chão | The original Brazilian steak house with continuous tableside service and 15 cuts of meat. 836 1st St., Miami Beach, 305-672-0011 The Forge Restaurant & Lounge | Chef Christopher Lee brings his award-winning talent to this culinary institution with an innovative take on the classic American steakhouse. 432 41st St., Miami Beach, 305-538-8533 Fratelli La Bufala | Sumptuous pizzas and pastas prepared with the freshest buffalo mozzarella imported from Italy. 437 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-532-0700 Fung Kú Asian Cuisine | Korean BBQ and Sushi Bar, at The Catalina Hotel & Beach Club. 1720 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-534-7905

and innovative craft cocktails. 1237 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 305-987-8885 Icebox | Offering the finest deserts in Miami Beach. 1855 Purdy Ave., Miami Beach, 305-538-8448 Il Mulino | From Abruzzo to South Beach, Il Mulino New York presents unforgettable, classic Italian cuisine in a chic, modern dining experience. 840 First St., Miami Beach, 305-466-9191

Macchialina Taverna Rustica | The Italian spot for locals with rustic, seasonally inspired cooking by acclaimed chef Michael Pirolo. 820 Alton Rd., Miami Beach, 305-534-2124

Maxine’s Bistro | At The Catalina Hotel & Beach Club, is somewhat of an institution on Collins Avenue, serving American bistro fare with an international twist, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. 1732 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, 305-674-1160

Juvia | Artistic food presentation and an innovative take on Asian fusion, with stunning views of South Beach. 1111 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 305-763-8272

Michael Mina 74 | Award-winning chef Michael Mina, brings sophisticated, American bistro-style fare to the iconic Fontainebleau Miami Beach, with a dynamic menu that features whimsical dishes and handcrafted cocktails from across the globe. 4441 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-4636

Katsuya | Traditional Japanese cuisine with a provocative twist, at the SLS Hotel South Beach. 1701 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-455-5000

Meat Market | Chef Sean Brasel has created an imaginative, top-flight menu with flair at this packed hot spot. 915 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 305-532-0088

Khong River House | Authentic Northern Thai cuisine served in a farmhouse-styled interior. 1661 Meridian Ave., Miami Beach, 305-763-8147

Monty’s Sunset | Miami’s ultimate Seafood Bistro features a raw bar and ceviche bar with breathtaking sunset views and a bay front location. 300 Alton Rd., Miami Beach, 305-672-1148

La Locanda | Classic Italian just south of Fifth Street. 419 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-538-6277

Moreno’s Cuba At the Riviera South Beach | A Cubaninspired eatery developed around an authentic Havana-style café, with a culinary ethos based around Cuban Tapas and small plates made for sharing. 318 20th St., Miami Beach, 305-538-7444

Joe’s Stone Crab | A must-see Miami institution since 1913. 11 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-0365

La Piaggia | A St-Tropez beach club without the jet lag. 1000 South Pointe Dr., Miami Beach, 305-674-0647 Larios on the Beach | Gloria and Emilio Estefan’s award winning go-to destination for cuban cuisine. 820 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach, 305-532-9577

Mr Chow | Iconic Chinese showplace at the W South Beach. 2201 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-695-1695

The Lido Restaurant & Bayside Grill | Stunning waterside dining featuring chef Mark Zeitouni’s cuisine, at The Standard. 40 Island Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-1717

My Ceviche | This indoor-outdoor eatery will flaunt the brand’s signature seafood selections alongside seasonal, craft, and local beer options. 235 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-397-8710

Lucali | Brooklyn’s most coveted pizza in the heart of South Beach. 1930 Bay Rd., Miami Beach, 305-695-4441

Hakkasan | The exquisite Chinese creations of London restaurateur Alan Yau, at the Fontainebleau. 4441 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 786-276-1388

Lure Fishbar | A seafood-driven menu, overseen by Josh Capon, includes raw bar, sushi bar and Miami-inspired plates. Robert Ferrara helms the beverage program with nautical-themed libations including the Catch and Release, at the Loews Hotel. 1601 Collins Ave, Miami Beach, 305-695-4550

HaVen Gastro-Lounge | An intimate, high-tech gastrolounge featuring global small plates by Chef Todd Erickson

Macaluso’s Restaurant | Staten Island home-cooked Italian. 1747 Alton Rd., Miami Beach, 305-604-1811

News Cafe | This 24-hour spot remains the heart and soul of South Beach. 800 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach, 305-695-3232 Nobu | Legendary Japanese seafood delicacies, at the Shore Club. 1901 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-695-3232 Orange Blossom | A modern bistro featuring internationally, high-quality, affordable fare inside the Boulan South Beach Hotel. 2000 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-763-8983 Porfirio’s | A contemporary take on flavorful Mexican cuisine. 850 Commerce Street, Miami Beach, 786-453-2657


Culturing Life

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COURTYARD CADILLAC MIAMI BEACH OCEANFRONT HOTEL WHERE 39TH MEETS COLLINS AVENUE

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Porfrio’s

A contemporary take on favorful Mexican cuisine. 850 Commerce Street, Miami Beach, 786-453-2657

Prime Fish | Fish shack meets sophisticated fine dining; renowned restaurant owner Myles Chefetz has done it again with his new restaurant that is sure to please all seafood lovers. 100 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-532-4550 Prime Italian | Upscale American-Italian sister restaurant to Prime One Twelve. 101 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach, 305-695-8484 Prime One Twelve | Extraordinary, modern take on the classic steak house. 112 Ocean Dr., Miami Beach, 305-532-8112 Pubbelly Gastropub | This innovative tavern features a menu of homemade pâtés, specialty terrines and braised dishes, and its signature Asian street food. 1418 20th St., Miami Beach, 305-532-7555 Pubbelly Steak | Barn-style meatery in the old Georgia’s Union digs serving an extensive lineup of crazy beef cuts with even crazier toppings. 1787 Purdy Ave., Miami Beach, 305-695-9550 Pubbelly Sushi | Japanese small plates with Latin, Indian and Italian influences. 1424 20th St., Miami Beach, 305-531-9282 Pura Vida | Serving raw Brazilian organic acai bowls, fresh made fruit protein smoothies or cold-press veggie juices with soups, salads, sandwiches, pitas & wraps with vegan options. Eat-in, pick-up or delivery. 110 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-535-4142 Quattro Gastronomia | Italiana Twin chefs Nicola and Fabrizio Carro stir up traditional Northern Italian cuisine. 1014 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 305-531-4833 Red The Steak house | Hot Mediterranean-influenced steak house. 119 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-534-3688 Restaurant Michael Schwartz | Locally inspired dishes and a fantastic ambiance at the iconic Raleigh Hotel pool deck. 1775 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, 305-612-1163 The Restaurant at Mondrian South Beach | Modern American brasserie and sushi bar serving globally inspired cuisine that is locally sourced and designed to be shared. 1100 West Ave., Miami Beach, 305-514-1940

The Restaurant at The Setai | Five-star, trans-ethnic cuisine with a strong Asian influence. 2001 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-520-6402 Scarpetta | Ravishing Italian cuisine from chef Scott Conant, at the Fontainebleau. 4441 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-538-2000 Serendipity 3 | A famous New York original, known for the best desserts in town. 1102 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 305-403-2210 The Setai Grill | Prime steak house with the finest seafood selections, accompanied by The Setai’s impressive wine list. 2001 Collins Ave., Miami, 305-520-6400

Smith & Wollensky | Classic steak dishes, outstanding seafood, and an award-winning wine selection. 1 Washington Ave., Miami Beach, 305-673-2800 Sushi Samba Dromo | Japanese-Brazilian fusion fare amid a bustling ambience. 600 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach, 305-673-5337 Terrazza at Shore Club | This casual, Italian chophouse offers the ultimate in indoor-outdoor dining with the cool vibe and energy of Shore Club. 1901 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-695-3226 Texas De Brazil | A unique concept that offers diners a parade of meats and an extravagant seasonal salad area. 300 Alton Rd., Suite 200, Miami Beach, 305-695-7702 Tongue and Cheek | Upscale American cuisine with a trendy, yet relaxing ambiance. 431 Washington Ave., Miami Beach. 305-704-2900

Traymore Restaurant and Bar | Locally sourced seafood fare, as well as the hotel’s signature COMO Shambhala cuisine by Executive Chef Jonathan Lane at Metropolitan by COMO, Miami Beach. 2445 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, 305-695-3600 Umi Sushi & Sake Bar | A communal, Japanese-style dining experience in the lobby at Delano. 1685 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, 305-674-5752 Yardbird Southern Table & Bar | Farm Fresh Southern Cooking, Bourbon and Blues. 1600 Lennox Ave., Miami

Beach, 305-538-5220 Villa Azur | A taste of South of France combining exquisite food, fine wines, friendly service and inviting atmosphere. 309 23rd St., Miami Beach, 305-763-8688

NORTH DADE, BROWARD Carpaccio | Bal Harbour Shops’ most bustling spot for delicious Italian fare. 9700 Collins Ave., Bal Harbour, 305-867-7777 J&G Grill | A contemporary bar and grill featuring a curated selection of Jean-Georges’ innovative dishes, at the St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort. 9703 Collins Ave., Bal Harbour, 305-993-3333 La Goulue | Fantastic French bistro in the Bal Harbour Shops. 9700 Collins Ave., Bal Harbour, 305-865-2181 Makoto | Modern Japanese cuisine in the Bal Harbour Shops. 9700 Collins Ave., Bal Harbour, 305-864-8600 Palm Restaurant | Old New York-style steak house. 9650 E. Bay Harbor Dr., Bay Harbor Islands, 305-868-7256 S3 | An island-chic retreat with indoor-outdoor seating, lush patio with fire pits and custom-designed lounge seating with breathtaking views of the ocean serving steak, seafood and sushi. 505 N. Fort Lauderdale Beach Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, 954-523-SURF St. Regis Bar & Sushi Lounge | A modern Miami atmosphere with a Japanese twist, this Sushi Lounge is nothing short of luxury, at the St. Regis Resort. 9703 Collins Ave., Bal Harbour, 305-993-3300 Taco Beach Shack | World famous gourmet farm fresh tacos and cocktails, at Hollywood Beach Hotel. 334 Arizona Street, Hollywood Beach, 954-920-6523

Tap 42 | Enjoy a combination of Fort Lauderdale’s finest American Craft Beers, hand-crafted cocktails made from fresh local ingredients, a creative menu of burgers and other inventive dishes. 1411 S Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale, 954-463-4900


SOUTH MIAMI - U.S. 1 & 73RD STREET - 305.341.0092 PEMBROKE PINES - THE SHOPS AT PEMBROKE GARDENS - 954.342.5454 PALM BEACH GARDENS - DOWNTOWN AT THE GARDENS - 561.340.2112 RASUSHI.COM


SHOT ON SITE Photography by Manny Hernandez

Nathalie Doucet, Sofia Casarin, Maria Elena Guijarro, and Andrea Aguera at the Lionheart Capital and Guijarro de Pablo Gallery celebration with Garcia de la Nuez at The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach.

Chapman and Kristin Ducote at Lee Brian Schrager’s Fried & True cookbook launch at the Pérez Art Museum Miami. Tyler Blake and Michael David of Classixx at The Gap’s grand reopening on Lincoln Road.

Kathryn Mikesell and Amanda Sanfilippo at the Lionheart Capital and Guijarro de Pablo Gallery celebration with Garcia de la Nuez at The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach.

Susanne Birbragher and Carlos Garcia de la Nuez at the Lionheart Capital and Guijarro de Pablo Gallery celebration with Garcia de la Nuez at The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach.

Dan Whitford of Cut Copy at his show at Grand Central.

Rosario Dawson and Wilmer Valderrama at the Voto Latino Power Summit at Florida International University.

Ginger Harris, Edison Lozada, Ellen Marchman Larkey, and Eric Briggs at the Cut Copy show at Grand Central.

PRIDE AND JOY

Ruth Riley at Taste of the Nation at The Loews Miami Beach Hotel.

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ROSARIO DAWSON joined actor and Voto Latino Power Summit cochair Wilmer Valderrama on the second day of the two-day event that helps empower Latinos to claim a better future for themselves and their community. Downtown, racecar-driver-turned-entrepreneur Chapman Ducote and wife Kristin joined fellow foodies and renowned culinary connoisseur Lee Brian Schrager on his Fried & True book tour at the Pérez Art Museum Miami. On the Beach, the highly anticipated grand reopening of The Gap on Lincoln Road featured beats from Neon Indian and DJ Classixx.

Morrissey at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts.



shot on site Photography by Manny hernandez

Maria Elena Salinas and Laurie Jennings at Jorge Plasencia’s 40th birthday at Gary Nader Fine Arts Gallery in Wynwood.

Kat Jimenez, Jon Nusz, and Mayleen Gonzalez at The Gap’s grand reopening on Lincoln Road.

Peter Max at his Ocean Drive magazine cover reveal at Hyde Midtown.

Jorge Plasencia at his 40th birthday at Gary Nader Fine Arts Gallery.

Cecilia Hinojosa, Diego Ojeda, and Valeria Hinojosa at David Beckham’s visit at The Bond on Brickell’s sales center.

honorable mentions

Carlos Navarro and Natalia Zardon at Jorge Plasencia’s 40th birthday at Gary Nader Fine Arts Gallery.

Brian Elias and Josh Capon at Taste of the Nation at the Loews Miami Beach.

Legendary pop artist Peter Max

arrived in Miami at Hyde Midtown to celebrate the reveal of his exclusive Ocean Drive cover. Over in Wynwood, Chairman and CEO of Repùblica Jorge Plasencia celebrated his 40th birthday among family and friends, including news anchors Maria Elena Salinas and Laurie Jennings, at the Gary Nader Fine Arts Gallery. The Loews Miami Beach Hotel hosted this year’s Taste of the Nation, which brought together top chefs, mixologists, and more, like Lure Fishbar chef Josh Capon and Lucky Strike Lanes co-owner Brian Elias, who donated their time, talent, and passion to end childhood hunger in America.

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Anna del Rio Chong at Jorge Plasencia’s 40th birthday at Gary Nader Fine Arts Gallery.

Elise Sande-Kerback and Matt Turzo at the Lyft Miami launch at LMNT.

Max Pierre and Donnamarie Baptiste at the Cut Copy show at Grand Central.



SHOT ON SITE

Dr. Sonjia Kenya, Robin Diamond, and Allison Woolery at Ocean Drive’s Real Beauties event sponsored by Hublot at Bianca at the Delano.

Kelly Nugent and Ninfa Chavez at Ocean Drive’s Real Beauties event sponsored by Hublot at Bianca at the Delano.

David Staples, Mathy Garcia Chesnick, and Javier Cuadros at Ocean Drive’s Peter Max cover reveal at Hyde Midtown.

DJ Danny Stern at Ocean Drive’s Peter Max cover reveal at Hyde Midtown.

Daniella Bianchi, Griselle Tudisco, and Cathy Coffman at Ocean Drive’s Peter Max cover reveal at Hyde Midtown.

Jessica Anderson, Messias Schneider, Elisandra Tomacheski, and Elizabeth Pena at Ocean Drive’s Peter Max cover reveal at Hyde Midtown.

Gaudi Castro and Natalie Marchionni at Ocean Drive’s Peter Max cover reveal at Hyde Midtown.

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OCEANDRIVE.COM

Nathalie Chazyn and Jessica Wade Pfeffer at Ocean Drive’s Real Beauties event sponsored by Hublot at Bianca at the Delano.

Suzie Sayfie, Alexis Rivera, Carolyn Plummer, Dr. Heather Woolery-Lloyd, Iva Kosovic, and Monika Arenas at Ocean Drive’s Real Beauties event sponsored by Hublot at Bianca at the Delano.

Lisa Sayfie, Stephanie Sayfie Aagaard, and Suzanne Murphy at Ocean Drive’s Real Beauties event sponsored by Hublot at Bianca at the Delano.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY WORLD RED EYE

Michael Bernstein, Jay Parker, and Luca Turiello at Ocean Drive’s Peter Max cover reveal at Hyde Midtown.



SHOT ON SITE

Fiorella Chipoco, Andrea Quesada, and Renzo Chipoco at the Wasska Lounge grand opening celebration.

Andrea Buoniconti, Hilda Morello, and Fabiana Bosca at the Biscayne Beach groundbreaking celebration.

Kaye Nagle-Wood and Silvio Leal at Ocean Drive’s dim sum brunch at Hakkasan.

Rob Milton and Katherine BejaMcLennan at Ocean Drive’s dinner and wine pairing at Touché Rooftop Lounge & Restaurant.

Stephen Macricostas and David Pulley at Ocean Drive’s dim sum brunch at Hakkasan.

Luis Hoyos, Lilyan Lam, and Juan Chipoco at the Wasska Lounge grand opening celebration.

Pam Rediker, Reid Boren, Larry Baum, Maria Baum, Thom Filicia, and Rob Rediker at the Biscayne Beach groundbreaking celebration.

Gingi Beltran and Alicia Cervera at the Biscayne Beach groundbreaking celebration.

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Peter and Eriko Willis at Ocean Drive’s dim sum brunch at Hakkasan.

Janice Combs and Yolanda Berkowitz at Ocean Drive’s dinner and wine pairing at Touché Rooftop Lounge & Restaurant.

Alicia Peristeris, Erica Korman, and Alexandra Van Gemerden at Ocean Drive’s dim sum brunch at Hakkasan.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY WORLD RED EYE

Michael Colaluca and Alex Kowaleski at Ocean Drive’s dinner and wine pairing at Touché Rooftop Lounge & Restaurant.


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SHOT ON SITE Photography by Seth Browarnik

Carl Pascuzzi, Brandon Grom, and Phoebe St. Germaine Fellows at the Mykita + Maison Martin Margiela eyewear collection launch in the Design District.

April Donelson and Anthony Vitnell at Miami’s First-Ever Divorce Party at the Riviera South Beach.

Tara Sokolow Benmeleh, Pepe Mar, and Monica Benner at the First Day of Summer pop-up at the Mondrian South Beach.

John Dadzie of 12th Planet, Usain Bolt, Danny Scott, and Travis Rogers at Mansion.

Natalia Sturla and Gladimar Sturla at the Feast of Species Dinner at Primary Projects Miami.

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Dennis Rodman and Mark Strickland at E11even.

Jerry Libbin, Steven Marco, and George Matto at the Lionheart Capital construction commencement ceremony at The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach.

Angeles Almuna and Jhon Jairo Santos at the Mykita + Maison Martin Margiela eyewear collection launch in the Design District.

Ophir Sternberg and Belkys Nerey at the Lionheart Capital and Yardbird Southern Table & Bar celebration of Lee Brian Schrager’s Fried & True book at The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach.

Daniela Urzi and Maria Elena Uzcategui at the Inspirations of Morocco Summer 2014 preview presented by Uzca.

Kimberly LeCompte, Sage Kantor, and Ella Goldberg at Shop for a Cause at Henri Bendel at Aventura Mall.


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SHOT ON SITE Photography by Seth Browarnik

DJ Danny Avila and Hulk Hogan at LIV at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Serge de Troyer and Sofia Joelsson at the Serge de Troyer Home/HINT 2014 Spring/ Summer Collection release at MiMo District Miami.

Mike Tyson and Brad Friedlander at Red, The Steakhouse.

Slick Rick and Mike Epps at LIV at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Lindsey Barrow and Brent Stuart at Pérez Art Museum Miami’s Contemporaries Mixer.

Ania Danilina, Jenine Howard, and Gina Nguyen at Sand to The Beach at Hyde Beach at the SLS Hotel South Beach.

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Ricardo Dunin and Raul Valdes-Fauli at the American Nicaraguan Foundation VIP Thank You cocktail event at The Ritz-Carlton Residences, Miami Beach.

Darleen Santore and Bella Weems at Origami Owl’s jewelry breakfast at the SLS Hotel South Beach.

Braylon Edwards and Richard Sherman at LIV at the Fontainebleau Miami Beach.

Alicia Piazza and Nevena Borissova at the Staying.



SHOT ON SITE Photography by Seth Browarnik Steve Arwood and Ashra Noble at Rec Room at the Gale South Beach.

Kelly Hall, Alyssa Stilwell, Dina Roud, Audra Stilwell, and Magdalena Fuchs at FDR at the Delano.

Rafael Carvalho and Anja Zvicer at Wall at the W South Beach.

Raffaella Modugno, Giulia Lupetti, and Tika Camaj at Adoré.

Maria Petrovic, Monica Mejia, and Casi Davis at Adoré.

DJ Ruen, Los de la Vega, DJ PS1, and Reid Waters at Wall at the W South Beach.

Alyssa Riley and Sanja Radulovic at Cavalli Club Miami.

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Granville Adams and Mike Levy at Haven.

Lauren Saigh and Alexis Gardner at Mokai.

Alexandra Mendoza and Daniela Jaramillo at Mynt Lounge.

Liana Lovett, Brian Moshayedi, and Daniel LeDisko of LA Riots at Mansion.

Armando Prando and Antonio Martucci at Wall at the W South Beach.



SHOT ON SITE Photography by World Red Eye

Diana Rubiano and Cynthia Aceves at the Catalina Hotel & Beach Club.

Oliver Jay, Dana Danger, and Alex Ghariana at Set.

Lauren Arrington, Jamie Bowling, and Gina Smurro at The Forge.

Melissa Rossi, Joana Peixoto, and Adriana Doria at The Forge.

Ashley Vargas and Elana Rumhuld at The Forge.

Steph Cudillo and Monica Munoz at Mansion.

Sabrina Maclean and Fernanda Estevez at Mynt Lounge.

Sarah Hoghra and Jessica Smith at Villa Azur.

Jessica Lee, Nancy Lala, Sue Ballard, and Christina Lombardi at The Forge.

Steve and Christian Martinez of The Martinez Brothers at Mansion.

Sherie Price, Teresa Coleman, and Michelle Dee at Nikki Beach.

Priscilla Huggins and Brianna Morris at B창oli Miami.

Ocean Drive, Vol. 22, Issue #7 (ISSN: 1092-7530, USPS No. 016-535), is published monthly, except combined issues of May/June and July/August, for $70 annually, by Niche Media Holdings LLC, 404 Washington Avenue, Suite 650, Miami Beach, FL 33139-6651. Ocean Drive is owned and operated by Niche Media Holdings LLC, a Nevada corporation. Telephone (305) 532-2544; fax (305) 532-4366. Periodicals postage paid at Miami, FL and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send changes of address to Ocean Drive, Niche Media Holdings LLC, P.O. Box 16057, North Hollywood, CA 91615. Ocean Drive does not assume liability for products or services advertised herein. We are not responsible for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, artwork and/or photographs. The entire content of Ocean Drive is copyright Niche Media Holdings LLC. All column names are the property of Niche Media Holdings LLC, and may not be used or reproduced without the express written permission of the publisher.

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Parting Shot September 2014

Take Charge!

With billion-dollar neW meccas and hundred-milliondollar add-ons, shopping just got a major dose of caffeine in the miami market. by betsy f. perry Van Cleef & Arpels are planting their flags there. Robins is not alone. On deck is the $1.05 billion Brickell City Centre, a mixed-use project bringing with it 625,000 square feet of shopping, as well as downtown’s Miami Worldcenter, a nine-block “city within a city”—nearly 30 acres of shopping, living, and playing, anchored by a Bloomingdale’s and Macy’s. Credit card still not maxed out? Bal Harbour Shops is expanding, with 250,000 new square feet, including a Barneys New York anchor set for a 2016 opening, while the Aventura Mall is readying for its third expansion, setting its sights on becoming America’s second-largest mall. On a no-traffic day, you could wave hello to all of these in 20 minutes flat. But what about our local fashionistas? Will their heads spin when faced with this ubiquitous buffet? Alexa Wolman, a lawyer and philanthropist who ranks herself a 10 on the shopping scale, says, “I’ve never had buyer’s remorse for something I’ve bought, only something I haven’t bought.” Wolman admits she might be the type to go out for a coffee and come back with a Prada. Bitten by the shopping bug and itching to spend, we may soon find that our malls and boutiques—like gas stations—stay open 24/7, so even the most compulsive consumer can always snare something with a logo. But the other day as I lay like a tortoise sunning after an ocean dunk, a pack of dazed tourists crossed the sand asking directions to the nearest mall. After waving them toward Lincoln Road, I realized they were sadly missing out on what makes Miami special—and it was right under their toes and as far as the eye could see…. and free! OD

—betsy f. perry

illustration by Daniel o’leary

Had the Statue of Liberty ended up on Miami’s Star Island instead of New York’s Ellis Island, chances are those stirring words inscribed on her base—“Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses”—would have been, “Give me those with disposable income, great plastic, and a yen to spend.” And not inconceivably, Lady Liberty could have held up a Fendi shopping bag instead of a torch. Although once known primarily for beaches and bikinis, in the not-so-distant future Miami will add more world-class shopping centers than most medium-size countries, making it easier than ever to pick up a pair of Louboutins along with a quart of milk (almond) and a burger (quinoa, of course) with a side of Chanel. No, it’s not the hundreds of cranes, or 18-wheelers and bulldozers, building these gigantic cash registers that are a danger—it’s the idea that from Aventura to Brickell, five of the world’s top shopping destinations will be within a 20-mile radius! Worry not—so huge a shopping mecca are we that the Greater Miami Convention and Visitors Bureau reported $22.8 billion spent in 2013, and of that, 70 percent came from international visitors (a big shout-out to the Brazilians) who are on record admitting shopping is Miami’s best feature. As Craig Robins, one of the wizards of our retail destiny and CEO and president of Dacra, developer of the Miami Design District, shared, “Miami is a huge market,” where he created a cultural, culinary, and retail destination attracting shoppers “half of whom don’t have Miami as a primary residence but are very qualified buyers.” Luxury fashion brands such as Givenchy, Miu Miu, Tom Ford, Marc Jacobs, Valentino, Fendi, Dolce & Gabbana, Giorgio Armani, and

“Had Lady Liberty ended up on MiaMi’s star isLand, sHe couLd Have HeLd up a Fendi sHopping bag instead oF a torcH.”

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