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I N T E R N AT I O N A L

HAR DWOO D M AT TE R S THE GUIDE TO BUYING, SELLING AND GRADING NORTH AMERICAN HARDWOOD LUMBER

Issue 6

STRONG ROOTS. GLOBAL REACH. WWW.NHLA.COM


Consistency. Yield. Trust. Specializing in Premium Pennsylvania Hardwood Lumber and Logs • Red Oak • White Oak • Hard Maple • Soft Maple

• Cherry • Poplar • Ash • Hickory

s ® Matson Lumber Company 132 Main St. Brookville, PA 15825

Your trusted source for exceptional quality and consistency for more than 200 years.

Phone: (814) 849-5334 Fax: (814) 849-3811 www.MatsonLumber.com info@MatsonLumber.com


YOUR QUALITY IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY.

Trust America’s Hardwoods Company. northwesthardwoods.com

Trust the on-grade quality of Northwest Hardwoods, America’s largest and only coast-to-coast hardwood lumber producer. Our inspection and grading ensures that our lumber quality and appearance are both exceptional and consistent. That’s why our customers rank us above other brands – we always live up to our responsibility.


I N T E R N AT I O N A L HARDWOOD MATTERS

2018 | Issue 6 National Hardwood Lumber Association PO Box 34518 | Memphis, TN 38184-0518 +1 901- 377-1818 | +1 901-382- 6419 (fax) info@nhla.com | www.nhla.com

THE GUIDE TO BUYING, SELLING AND GRADING NORTH AMERICAN HARDWOOD LUMBER

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

International Hardwood Matters, the guide to buying, selling and grading North American hardwood lumber is a publication of the National Hardwood Lumber Association.

THE MISSION OF NH LA To serve NHLA Members engaged in the commerce of North American hardwood lumber by: maintaining order, structure and ethics in the changing global hardwood marketplace; providing unique member services; promoting North American hardwood lumber and advocating the interest of the hardwood community in public/private policy issues; and providing a platform for networking opportunities.

Brent Stief Huron Forest Products President

MISSION LEADERS Jon Syre Cascade Hardwood LLC Unique Services

Darwin Murray McClain Forest Products Vice President

Nordeck Thompson Thompson Appalachian Hardwoods Rules

Pem Jenkins Turn Bull Lumber Co. Past President 2014-2016

Orn Gudmundsson, Jr. Northland Corporation Structure

NHLA STAFF

Mike Powers Maley & Wertz Industry Advocacy & Promotion

Lorna D. Christie CEO l.christie@nhla.com John Hester Director of Membership and Business Development j.hester@nhla.com

Kevin Gillette Tioga Hardwoods Membership & Networking

Amanda Hinesley Digital Marketing Specialist a.hinesley@nhla.com

For membership inquiries: Contact John Hester, Director of Membership at j.hester@nhla.com or +1 901-399-7558. ABOUT THE COVER: A major showcase of U.S. red oak is seen in the European headquarters of global financial data, software and media colossus Bloomberg. Designed by a Foster + Partners team, led by Norman Foster himself, the stunning City of London building, is already being lined up for architectural awards. Shown here is the Vortex, this dramatic swirling space features 1,858 m2 of red oak cladding on its intersecting arching walls. Photo by Foster + Partners and Nigel Young.

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Jennifer Reith Marketing Manager j.vandyke@nhla.com Melissa Ellis Smith Graphic Designer m.ellis@nhla.com

■■■

ADVERTISING MEMBER INDEX 5 American Lumber Company 7 Baillie Lumber Company 45 Buchanan Hardwoods, Inc. 30 Cascade 36 Cole Hardwood, Inc. 35 Cummings Lumber Co., Inc. 13 DV Hardwoods, Inc. 31 Frank Miller Lumber 35 Harold White Lumber, Inc. 51 JD Irving, Limited 21 King City/Northway Forwarding IFC Matson Lumber Company 52 Midwest Hardwood Corp.

Renee Hornsby Director of Communications/ Editor r.hornsby@nhla.com

37 BC 20 1 IBC 26 47 3 24 27 25 43

Hardwoods of America Missouri-Pacific Lumber Co., Inc. Newman Lumber Company Northwest Hardwoods Pike Lumber Company, Inc. Ron Jones Hardwood Sales, Inc. Rossi Group Thompson Hardwoods, Inc. Tioga Hardwoods, Inc. TMX Shipping TRN USA Forest LLC Vexco, Inc.

Trisha Clariana Office Manager Desirée Freeman Controller Julia Ganey Member Relations Manager Rich Hascher Inspector Training School Instructor Carol McElya Accounting Assistant & Publications Becky Miller Inspector Training School Administrator Dana Spessert Chief Inspector

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CONTENTS

12

NHLA INTERNATIONAL INSPECTION SERVICES

15 NHLA KD CERTIFICATION PROGRAM 16

NHLA GRADES AT A GLANCE

18

Q&A ON NORTH AMERICAN HARDWOOD LUMBER GRADES with NHLA Chief Inspector Dana Spessert

22

NHLA INSPECTOR TRAINING SCHOOL

28  WHY NORTH AMERICA? By Michael Buckley, World Hardwoods 32

THE FUTURE OF CLT By Andrew Lawrence

38  INSPIRING DESIGN WITH AMERICAN HARDWOOD 48  JOIN US IN TORONTO: FOR THE GLOBAL GATHERING OF THE HARDWOOD COMMUNITY

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CHALLENGE US DOn’T GIVE US YOUR bUSInESS . . . LET

US ShOW YOU hOW WE’LL EARn IT

MIXED LOADS We’ll help you manage your

CUSTOM GRADES

We’ve

developed

inventory with both domestic and imported species.

custom grades for a range of applications, and we’re

DELIVERY We’re committed to having the right

always looking to develop new ones. Our goal is to

people and systems in place to deliver product when you need it.

IMPORTS

Our

same

high

standards

for

consistency and quality, rigorously applied to the

work with you to improve your yield.

SERVICE

Our years of experience, the right

technologies and the right resources with a passion to help you succeed. . . that’s the American way.

most popular African and South American species.

AMERICAn LUMbER COMPAnY / PhOnE: 814.438.7888 / 888.438.7888 / FAX: 814.438.3086 / E-MAIL:

InqUIRY@ALUMbER.COM

/

WWW.ALUMbER.COM


ABOUT NHLA The National Hardwood Lumber Association (NHLA) was formed by industry leaders in 1898 to provide a system of uniform inspection for the rapidly evolving hardwood industry in the United States and Canada. One hundred twenty years later, NHLA is the oldest and largest hardwood association representing all sectors of the hardwood industry across the globe. Today, NHLA’s “Strong Roots” and “Global Reach” are helping a new generation of members sell U.S. and Canadian hardwoods all over the world.

STRONG ROOTS. NHLA’s introduction of the Rules and Measurement and Inspection of Hardwood and Cypress brought structure, order and ethics to the hardwood lumber industry. The rules created a universal system for grading lumber that was instrumental in helping NHLA members prosper. Rapid industry growth and a cycle of economic downturns in the 20th century brought new challenges. NHLA recognized the critical importance of quality assurance to a new generation of customers. While the Rules continued to evolve to meet the needs of a changing industry, the Association quickly recognized that more was needed to ensure compliance and customer satisfaction. The role of the NHLA Inspector was created, managed by a Chief Inspector with the authority to resolve disputes. In 1948, NHLA introduced the Inspector Training School, which now boasts more than 7,200 graduates from all over the world.

GLOBAL REACH. NHLA’s “strong roots” in industry self-regulation have played a critical role by in the hardwood industry’s global expansion. The Inspector Training School has graduated inspectors from all over the world and the NHLA Rules are recognized internationally as an industry standard for lumber trading. And NHLA Inspectors are traveling the world to educate buyers and evaluate hardwood lumber based on the Association’s time-tested standards. The Association has also welcomed global companies as Partner members. NHLA’s partnership with the American Hardwood Export Council (AHEC) has helped identify and introduce the Rules in emerging markets as well. As new global markets open their doors to U.S. Canadian hardwoods, the NHLA Rules will continue to offer stability, strength and structure here to ensure a profitable future for members. Learn more at NHLA.com.

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your SINGLE SOURCE for the world’s HARDWOODS


JOIN NHLA AS A PARTNER MEMBER AND

GROW

WITH US!

As a company engaged in the consumption or manufacturing of North American hardwood outside of the U.S., you are invited to join the National Hardwood Lumber Association as a Partner Member. Membership offers the opportunity to connect with thousands of hardwood lumber producers, access to the latest industry news, discounts on events and advertising, customized training and a team of experienced National Inspectors to support your company in understanding and utilizing the NHLA hardwood lumber grading system.

Join Now!

Applications can be completed quickly and conveniently online by clicking the “Join Now� button at www.nhla.com or call us at +1-901-399-7558.


Come and Grow with NHLA

I

t’s a complex world out there, one filled with unparalleled business opportunities for buying and selling North American grown hardwood lumber in emerging markets around the globe. For over 119 years, the National Hardwood Lumber Association has witnessed the industry’s challenges and opportunities, made the industry stronger through our grading rules and lumber inspection services, and opened up new business opportunities with our networking and educational offerings. Today, like you, NHLA is looking to the future represented by established and

emerging hardwood lumber markets around the globe. Our core value is still defined by our unquestioned ability to maintain order, structure and ethics in the changing hardwood marketplace. We are also hard at work promoting and advocating for the interests of the global hardwood community in public/private policy issues and helping our members build the connections they need to grow their business in a world where sustainability has meaning. We created this issue of NHLA’s International Hardwood Matters to provide you with a glimpse of what’s happening in our world today . . . who knows what tomorrow might bring? Perhaps you can join us to see. Let NHLA help you and your company grow.

Our core value is still defined by our unquestioned ability to maintain order, structure and ethics in the changing hardwood marketplace.

Lorna D. Christie, CEO +1-901-377-1082 direct | l.christie@nhla.com

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF NHLA 2016 NHLA launches new Digital Marketing Initiative

April 1998 NHLA Celebrates its 100th Anniversary. October 2014 NHLA gets a facelift. 1926 Membership hits 1,500.

April 1972 NHLA Board of Managers holds the first mid-fiscal year meeting (outside the parameters of the Annual Convention). April 8, 1898 NHLA is established in Chicago, Illinois (offices are located in the McCormick Building, 332 South Michigan Avenue).

1985 NHLA with other hardwood trade associations, establish the Hardwood Export Trade Council (HETC) as an organization to receive U.S. Department of Agriculture funds in cooperation with industry funding for the promotion of hardwoods in overseas markets.

1948 Nickey Brothers Lumber Company generously offers ground for a building site. (2673 Tutwiler Street in Memphis, Tennessee). A one-story building is erected, specifically designed for the teaching of hardwood lumber grading; it includes a large classroom, lumber storage and facilities for practice grading.

1906 Two firms join NHLA as Canada’s first members.

1934 Great Depression – membership fell to 478 and inspection volume fell to 34 million board feet.

1941 Period of Rebuilding – NHLA Inspection Staff increases from twenty-eight men in December of 1941 to eighty-eight men on VJ Day in 1945.

1991 NHLA approves a building addition to accommodate more staff – NHLA authorizes and provides initial funding for the Hardwood Forest Foundation (HFF) as a public, not-for-profit, 501c3.

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2015 NHLA launches a new social media campaign.

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1939-1941 World War II – NHLA is awarded a Certification of Achievement presented by the United States Navy for its assistance in developing specifications to govern the materials used in training camps, housing and plant construction.

February 1995 The new addition to NHLA headquarters is occupied and dedicated at the spring board meeting in April.

1973 Sustaining Member Category is added to the NHLA Bylaws, welcoming those firms that provide goods and services to the industry.

1920 The NHLA Sales Code is formulated to establish a code of fair practice.

1948 A NHLA Lumber Grading Rules School was “temporarily” created in order to measure the response. In 1948 classes were held in a downtown Memphis classroom. At the time, Memphis was known as the “hardwood capital of the world”.

May 5, 1898 First Annual Convention of NHLA held at the Mercantile Club in St. Louis, Missouri.

1979 NHLA moves headquarters to Memphis, Tennessee. The ten acres of property in a rural area just east of Memphis houses the Inspector Training School and the NHLA offices.

1901 NHLA Inspection Bureau is created.

1948 NHLA celebrates its 50th Anniversary with the Annual Convention being held in Cincinnati, Ohio.

1914-1918 World War I – NHLA establishes a War Service Bureau to oversee the procurement of the necessary huge quantities of hardwood lumber. The NHLA Inspection Staff is at the disposal of the United States government and its allies.

2014 NHLA offers 1st Inspector Training School Progressive “online” Program.

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1989 The Hardwood Export Trade Council (HETC) is reorganized and renamed the “American Hardwood Export Council” (AHEC).

1994 The Inspection Certification Program is initiated.

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NHLA INTERNATIONAL INSPECTION SERVICES

T

he NHLA Lumber Grading Rules were designed to be a voluntary standard, used for trading hardwoods. Hardwood lumber should be inspected when shipped and when received to verify grade and volume accuracy. NHLA has a team of highly skilled lumber inspectors to help members around the world by: • Provide training in the application of the NHLA Hardwood Grading Rules. • Inspect hardwood lumber for both buyer and seller to determine grade for validation purposes.

Customized Education NHLA offers multi-day lumber grading workshops throughout the world, as a way to gain an overview of the North American hardwood lumber grading Rules. These short courses are taught by a member of the Inspection Services team or by the Chief Inspector. The course can be held at your facility and customized for your company’s particular needs. NHLA Inspectors will instruct at your location the proper way to:

• Serve as impartial experts to help resolve grade disputes.

• Apply the NHLA hardwood grading Rules.

• Administer the NHLA Facility Grade Certification Program.

• Measure and tally hardwood lumber.

If you are an international company that is producing, buying or selling North American hardwoods, it is in your best interest to have trained inspectors on staff. Not having a thorough knowledge and understanding of the hardwood grading rules can cost a company thousands of dollars. Education is key to your company’s economic success.

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• Complete purchase orders and other relevant documents. • Teach common hardwood industry terms Companies interested in organizing customized education should contact the NHLA Chief Inspector Dana Spessert by email at d.spessert@nhla.com or call +1 901-399-7551.

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HARDWOOD STRATEGIES & CUSTOMIZED SOLUTIONS FOR LASTING PARTNERSHIPS WE ADDRESS THE NEEDS OF INDIVIDUAL CLIENTS AND PLAN PRODUCTION SCALES FOR THE FUTURE State of the art equipment, environmental commitment, outstanding service and dedicated multilingual staff with locations across the globe make our success. Managing our forests, planning our future, understanding customer needs and delivering superior quality products make DV Hardwoods an undisputed leader in the hardwood lumber sector.

SPECIALIZING IN CANADIAN QUALITY HARDWOODS

OFFERING THERMALLY MODIFIED LUMBER Ecologically Friendly • Aesthetically Pleasing • Natural Beauty Resistant to Insect and Pests • Dimensionally Stable Product

CERTIFIED MEMBERS

131 PRINCIPALE, FASSETT, QUEBEC JOV 1H0 T: 1.819.423.2338 F: 1.819.423.5102 WWW.BOISDV.CA


Dispute Inspections

NHLA KD Certification Program

Should traders of North American hardwood lumber have a disagreement on the grade and/or value of a shipment, NHLA offers a dispute inspection in which a NHLA Inspector, as an impartial third party, is called in to help resolve the issue.

The National Hardwood Lumber Association has an agreement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture to operate an Animal and Plant Health Inspection Services (APHIS) approved Certificate of Kiln Drying Sawn Hardwood Lumber Program. The Program achieves the same goals as the APHIS Phytosanitary Certificate but at less cost. The Program involves regular inspections of subscribing hardwood facilities in the United States by both NHLA inspectors and APHIS inspectors to ensure continuing conformance to the Kiln Drying Sawn Hardwood Standard.

NHLA Facility Grade Certification Program The NHLA Facility Grade Certification has been in place for nearly 30 years. The NHLA members who participate in the Facility Grade Certification Program are committed to a higher standard and are willing to show this by submitting to independent quality checks. NHLA reviews and verifies the company’s grading methods and then formally licenses the company as “Grade Certified”. The “Grade Certified” companies are highlighted in the NHLA Membership Directory and can be recognized by the Grade Certified logo. International hardwood companies can be part of this elite program, just ask us how.

If your company needs international inspection services in China contact John Wang, at j.wang@nhla.com. Companies outside of China please contact Chief Inspector Dana Spessert at d.spessert@nhla.com or +1-901-399-7551. 14

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NHLA KD CERTIFICATION PROGRAM S av e

O R

t h i s

S p e n d

NHLA KILN DRYING CERTIFICATE

1

Easy setup Apply clips to bundles

Half way there Create Certificate

Ship Lumber

2

Apply Waiting on Response

Back to step 1

2

Inspections

A NHLA member company who exports using 10 PHTYO’s per month at a cost of $1,060 saved $593 per month by switching to the NHLA KD certificate. That’s more than $7,000 in savings in just one year!

3

• Take Time

• Possible Cancellations • Delay in Kiln Process

3

Inspection Rejected Back to step 1 OR Inspection Approved $106.00 per shipment*

The following countries accept the NHLA KD Certificate as an equivalent to the PHYTO.

Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Hungary Ireland Italy

USDA PHYTOSANITARY CERTIFICATE

SWITCH AND SAVE WITH NHLA

$450 (per month) For All Shipments! Australia Brazil Austria Belgium Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic

1

t h at

Latvia Lithuania Luxembourg Malta Mexico Netherlands Poland Portugal

Romania Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden United Kingdom Venezuela Vietnam

Specifications and species accepted may vary by country. Please contact Chief Inspector for details.

Potential Costs To You Waiting on approval

Port Costs

Rejected

All Shipments Inspected

X *Phyto costs could vary from state to state.

To learn more about the NHLA KD program please contact Dana Spessert, Chief Inspector at +1-901-399-7551 or email d.spessert@nhla.com


NHLA GRADES AT A GLANCE The chart to the right provides a quick reference guide for the NHLA Standard Grades. The chart does not take into account species specific exceptions. In no way is this reference chart intended to replace the current NHLA Rules Book.

FAS

F1F

SAME AS FAS FOR SPECIES BEING GRADED

MINIMUM SIZE BOARD

6”

X

8’

MINIMUM SIZE CUTTING

4” 3”

X

5’ 7’

BASIC YIELD

SM X 10 83 1/3 %

FORMULA TO DETERMINE NUMBER OF CUTS

SM 4 (4 max)

SM NEEDED TO TAKE EXTRA CUTTING

6-15’ SM

X

SELECT

4”

X

6’

BETTER FACE TO GRADE FAS POOR FACE TO GRADE #1 COMMON

EXTRA YIELD SM X 11 NEEDED FOR 91 2/3 % EXTRA CUTTING

SPECIAL YIELDS

97% RULE 2 CUTS FULL WIDTH ANY LENGTH; PCS.6” & WIDER WITH 6-12’ SM SM X 11.64 FOR YIELD

97% RULE ON BETTER FACE

97% RULE ON BETTER FACE 2’ OR 3’ SM TO BE 100% CLEAR OR SM X 11 IN ONE CUTTING

© COPYRIGHT NHLA 2018. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

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#1 COM #2A & #2B #3A COM

#3B COM

FAS LIMITS WANE IN FAS 1 FACE FAS LIMITATION APPLIES TO BETTER FACE

3”

X

4’

3”

X

4’

3”

X

4’

3”

X

4’

PITH SM IN INCHES WANE 1/2 LENGTH

4” 3”

X X

2’ 3’

SM X 8 66 2/3 %

SM + 1 3 (5 max)

3-10’ SM

3” X 2’

SM X 6 50%

SM 2 (7 max)

3”

X

2’

SM X 4 33 1/3 %

UNLIMITED

NOT LESS THAN 1 1/2” WIDE CONTAINING 36 SQ. INCHES SM X 3 25%

UNLIMITED SOUND CUTTINGS

2-7’ SM

SM X 9 75%

SM X 8 66 2/3 %

1’ SM SM X 12 OR 100% CLEAR 2’ SM SM X 9

1’ SM SM X 8 #2A COM CLEAR CUTTINGS #2B COM SOUND CUTTINGS

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KNOT 1/3 SM WARP ENTIRE BOARD MUST BE FLAT ENOUGH TO S2S TO SST SPLITS NOT TO EXCEED 2 X SM OR 12” WHICHEVER IS GREATER SPLITS SHALL NOT DIVERGE 1” IN 12” FIRST LINEAL FOOT RULE APPLIES TO BOTH ENDS OF BOARD TO CONTAIN NO LESS THAN 50% CLEAR WOOD, 25% SOUND WOOD

#2A COM ON BETTER FACE AND REVERSE SIDE OF CUTTINGS SOUND WILL ALSO QUALIFY FOR #3A COM

#1 COMMON SIDE: 1/3 W OR 1/2 L WIDEST WANE ADDED TOGETHER LENGTH CAN BE ON BOTH EDGES

WANE IN SELECTS PCS.6” & WIDER FAS LIMITATION APPLIES TO BETTER FACE. #1 COMMON SIDE: 1/3 W OR 1/2 L WIDEST WANE ADDED TOGETHER LENGTH CAN BE ON BOTH EDGES PCS. 4” & 5” WIDE 1/3 W OR 1/2 L APPLIES TO BOTH FACES. ADD WIDEST WANE TOGETHER ADD TOTAL LENGTH OF WANE FROM BOTH EDGES

NOTE: THIS CHART SUMMARIZES THE MAIN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE STANDARD GRADES. FOR COMPLETE INFORMATION CONSULT THE APPROPRIATE SECTION OF THE NHLA RULES FOR THE MEASUREMENT & INSPECTION OF HARDWOOD & CYPRESS.

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QA &

on North American Hardwood Lumber Grades with NHLA Chief Inspector Dana Spessert

T

he NHLA Grading Rules for North American hardwood lumber were established more than 119 years ago by the National Hardwood Lumber Association. A basic understanding of the Rules is required for the successful trade and use of North American hardwood lumber. In this collection of questions and answers, NHLA Chief Inspector Dana Spessert provides an explanation of frequently asked Rules questions. Questions not answered here can be directed to the Chief Inspector at d.spessert@nhla.com.

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Q: Why is the thickness not measuring 1 inch (25.4 mm) for 4/4 on many boards in shipments I receive? The NHLA Rules were written based on green (not seasoned) lumber for trading between sawmills that process the logs and selling to operations that were designed to kiln dry the lumber to make furniture, flooring and many other products. In order for the NHLA Rules to accommodate the trading of the kiln dried or seasoned wood, the industry voted to add the “Standard Kiln Dried Rule” that is on page 56 of the 2015 version of the NHLA Rules Book.

STANDARD KILN DRIED RULE Kiln dried lumber will be graded and measured as such, the grading rules for air dried lumber to be applied in all respects, unless otherwise specified. Rough kiln dried lumber specified 3/8” to 1-3/4” thick may be 1/16” scant of the nominal thickness; 2” and thicker may be 1/8” scant and the 10% of scant quartered lumber admitted by Paragraph 36, may be 3/32” scant on one edge in 1” to 1-1/2” lumber and 3/16” on one edge in 2” and thicker. The minimum widths mentioned in all grades may be 1/4” scant in width and the 10% admitted by Paragraph 10 may be 1/2” scant in width. In other respects, the rules for grading air dried lumber shall apply.

As is written in the above Rule, there is allowances made for under thickness in the varying sizes of lumber thickness due to shrinkage during the drying process. For example, a 4/4 or 1 inch (25.4 mm) thick board can be 15/16 inch (23.8 mm) for plain sawn lumber after kiln drying and be within the tolerances of a 4/4 kiln dried board. In addition to the thickness shrinkage allowance, there is also an allowance for width shrinkage of ¼ inch (6.35 mm) that applies to the minimum widths for all grades.

Q: Why are many of my shipments short on footage? This can be a very challenging question to answer. The NHLA Rules book describes the proper way to measure random width, random length lumber on page 7, paragraph 18 of the 2015 NHLA Rules Book.

MEASUREMENT & TALLY Random width lumber of standard grades and thicknesses shall be tallied surface measure and this tally shall be the number of feet, board measure, of 1” lumber. In lumber thicker than 1” the tally so obtained is multiplied by the standard thickness as expressed in inches and fractions of an inch. Except squares, lumber less than 1” thick shall be counted surface measure.

The industry has adopted a more efficient way of tallying, “End Tallying” or “Width and Length” tallies, which by contrast have a very different approach to totaling the volume. With a Surface Measure tally, each board is rounded to the nearest Surface Measure, where the “Width and Length” method rounds up or down W W W. N H L A .C O M

on the ½ inch. This variance in the rounding at different points in the system can cause a difference in the overall volume, especially if the lumber is tallied and shipped using inches and then measured at destination using millimeters. During the Rules change process completed in 2013, there was an addition to the Rules Book covering the very popular way of measuring, “End Tallying” which is a form of “Tallying on 12 Ft. Basis“ or “Width and Length” tally. This Rule is also on page 7, of the NHLA Rules Book under paragraph 16. Note: End Tally refers to the method of board footage measurement where lumber is tallied on a 12 Ft. basis as described in paragraph 21 except all width measurements are taken from the ends of boards after the lumber has been stacked in bundles. It is recognized that there will be some minor differences in end tally measurement from “board measure” method. In cases of footage dispute caused by the use of both measurement methods, the footage as determined by “board measure” will supersede. As stated in the above paragraph, NHLA does recognize the “End Tally” method of tallying lumber, but also states that the “Surface Measure” measurement will be the measurement used if there is a difference. The explanation of the “Tallying on 12 Ft. Basis” or “Width and Length” tally is on page 8, paragraph 20 of the 2015 NHLA Rules Book.

TALLYING ON 12 FT. BASIS The terms “export tally,” “width and length tally” and “tally on 12 ft. basis” are synonymous. The term “tally on 12 ft. basis” is more definite because the width of 12’ lumber is the same as the surface measure on the board rule. On this basis, the lengths are tallied separately. In tallying the widths, pieces measuring to the even half inch are alternately counted as of the next higher or lower width. Fractions below the half inch are dropped and fractions above the half inch are counted as of the next higher width. After the tally is figured, the proper fraction is added or subtracted in order to obtain the correct measure, thus: for 4’ lengths, divide the total by 3; 6’ divide by 2; 8’ subtract 1/3; 9’ subtract 1/4; 10’ subtract 1/6; 11’ subtract 1/12; 13’ add 1/12; 14’ add 1/6; 15’ add 1/4; 16’ add 1/3; 5’ and 7’ multiply by the length and divide by 12. A short method to figure width and length tallies is to multiply the width by number of pieces for each width. Multiply this total by length of pieces and divide by 12. If lumber is thicker than one inch, multiply by thickness. This method of tallying should not be confused with tallying stock widths such as 1 x 6”, 1 x 8”, etc.

The differences in tallies can vary from method to method, but if both buyer and seller agree on a method before trading, then they should be very close to the same after measuring.

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䰀漀漀欀 昀漀爀 䘀匀䌀글 洀愀琀攀爀椀愀氀 20

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NHLA INSPECTOR TRAINING SCHOOL

WHAT IS A LUMBER INSPECTOR?

T

he high value of North American hardwood lumber dictates that boards are graded each time they are bought or sold within the hardwood industry and on their way from the sawmill to their final use in furniture, flooring, paneling, etc. Hardwood Lumber Inspectors are responsible for determining the species, grade and volume of each piece of lumber. Inspectors are employed by sawmills, dry kiln operators, wholesale lumber distributors, manufacturing plants, exporters, importers and countless other types of firms that utilize hardwood lumber. Due to the highly regarded reputation of the NHLA Inspector Training School, graduates are often in demand as many 22

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The NHLA Inspector Training School (ITS) is regarded as the world leader in hardwood lumber grading education. Students from 46 U.S. states and 34 countries have attended the School – the first and only hardwood lumber grading institution – to learn the established Rules for the Measurement and Inspection of Hardwood & Cypress. companies require their inspectors to be NHLA graduates. As a career in the hardwood industry begins with the NHLA Inspector Training School, the possible uses of the knowledge that graduates receive has limitless growth potential.

THE TRUSTED LEADER IN HARDWOOD LUMBER GRADING EDUCATION The NHLA Inspector Training School (ITS) is regarded as the world leader in hardwood lumber grading education. Students from 46 U.S. states and 34 countries have attended the school W W W. N H L A .C O M


ALUMNI TRACY YANG’S EXPERIENCE AT THE NHLA INSPECTOR TRAINING SCHOOL (184TH CLASS)

– the first and only hardwood lumber grading institution – to learn the established Rules for the Measurement and Inspection of Hardwood & Cypress. NHLA offers multi-day lumber grading workshops throughout the world, as a way to gain an overview of the hardwood lumber grading Rules. The only way to have a full understanding and become a NHLA trained Lumber Inspector is to attend the 12-week School held at NHLA headquarters in Memphis, Tennessee.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS The NHLA Inspector Training School welcomes international students to all of its traditional programs. All international students must be fluent in English before they enroll. International student applicants must also have successfully completed a secondary school program that is equivalent to high school in the United States for admission to the School. The School only accepts M-1 Visas.

Interested individuals can learn more and complete an application for any of these programs by visiting www.nhla.com.

W W W. N H L A .C O M

I'm Tracy from Rich-Mount Wood Trading, Ltd., located in Dongguan, China, which is the largest furniture making city in China. I’ve been working as a purchasing assistant for two years, becoming increasingly aware of the rapid growth in the timber industry. I have a burning desire to learn everything about the lumber industry and have always felt like “where there Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor and Tracy is a will, there is a way.” My positive and responsible attitude toward work is highly appreciated by my boss (Mr. Ko). In order to have a better understanding of how the lumber industry operates, my boss sent me to the NHLA Inspector Training School, without hesitation. How time flies, we’re more than half way through the class and I am actually sad that the time is passing so quickly. During my time here, I have wished I could stay longer to learn even more. The school is beautiful and well equipped. The teacher is full of caring and patience as he teaches us facts and applications. There’s no doubt that encountering this kind of teacher makes one hope they never graduate. My classmates come from different geographic areas and have a variety of experiences. Some come from long time lumber industry families and some are new to the industry. They are all friendly and helpful to each other. Although we have lots of” word for word” memorization of the Rules for grading lumber, we work in groups to help each other out. We work hard and get satisfying scores and a sense of success. If you want to have a professional understanding of lumber or you want to change your career to the lumber business I genuinely suggest you join this class in Memphis, TN. In the meantime, I’m grateful for my company which supports me with the things I need so that I have appropriate knowledge, industry contacts and such great unforgettable memories.

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Cherry • Ash Red Oak • White Oak Hard Maple • Soft Maple

Beech • Walnut Poplar • Basswood Hickory • Yellow Birch

Commitment, Quality, Customer Service Finest Northern Appalachian Hardwood Lumber Family-owned & operated for over 30 years Experienced & Close To The Source

SSteven t JJones

President & Export Sales Phone (814) 438-7622 Fax (814) 438-2008 steve@ronjoneshardwood.com 2 East High St. P.O. Box 232 Union City, Pennsylvania 16438 Dry Kilns & Warehouse: 192 Howard Street Franklin, Pennsylvania 16323

www.ronjoneshardwood.com


WHY North America? The world’s forests offer hardwoods of every description and increasingly more and more hardwoods are being planted, especially in Asia. Why therefore is the North American natural hardwood forest resource so important to Asian manufacturers? Michael Buckley FIWSc MPhil, explains.

T

he hardwood forests of the USA and Canada hold the most diverse array of hardwood species anywhere in the temperate regions of the world – and they are under-utilised. Whereas the hardwood diversity of Europe was largely eliminated in the last ice-age by the east-west Alps, the same did not happen in North America where the Appalachian mountains run north-south allowing the trees to come back as the ice melted. In consequence, for example, there are very many oaks in the USA, of which sixteen are commercially available, compared with two in Europe. Other native species, such as tulipwood, black cherry, black walnut and hard maple are unique to the North American continent. Many of these American hardwood species, from alder to walnut, are preferred by designers for the choices of colours and grains they exhibit for furniture, flooring and high end joinery. Equally important is the fact that they perform well, depending whether the priority is strength, hardness, machinability or the need for a

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first class finish. Many of them stain easily and well, providing further choices for designers of interior products. Another issue is the composition of the forests. While species diversity is important, so is the fact that oak is dominant, representing nearly 40% of the standing timber, at a time when oak is the most popular temperate hardwood in world markets for hardwood flooring and furniture. More recently research projects by the American Hardwood Export Council, of which NHLA is a member, have produced new opportunities for exterior applications. Thermally Modified Timber (TMT) in ash, oak and tulipwood and Cross Laminated Timber (CLT) in tulipwood offer new opportunities for American hardwoods in Asia. For many product applications (and for paper) Asia’s plantations of fast growing species (rubber, acacia, eucalyptus) do provide some vital material, but their small diameter logs require more processing of laminating, finger-jointing and gluing. They cannot match the larger diameter American species for yield in solid wood. However, there is room for both W W W. N H L A .C O M


Left: Red Oak table by Matteo Thun. Right: Red oak project in The Wish List for Sir Terence Conran. Photo by

Petr Krejci Photography.

in Asia’s burgeoning production and consumption. For decorative veneer, the USA is also an essential provider of raw material. But to come back to the point about harvesting, all twenty main commercial hardwoods are readily available in volume on a consistent basis. When consistency is vital to large scale manufacturers in Asia, there is another unique benefit which is the widely accepted NHLA Grading system offered by American and Canadian exporters that is capable of providing container after container of material produced to the same standard. This is not the case for other major hardwood producers around the world. Key to NHLA grading is the ability to predict useable yield with the accuracy not matched by most other sawing and grading systems. In the end it is the environmental credentials of this resource that are second to none which influence buyers from governments and retailers to individual consumers. All the scientific evidence shows that they are growing – by natural regeneration - faster than they are being harvested; a true measure of sustainability. The national hardwood forest inventory of standing timber in the USA is estimated at 13.9 billion cubic meters. Recent work with interactive maps has revealed that in every hardwood-growing U.S. State the annual growth exceeds annual harvest and mortality. Some time ago the UN expressed concern that the American hardwood forests are not sufficiently harvested and utilised. Reduction in harvesting, during the economic downturn of 2008/9, can lead to greater tree mortality returning CO2 to the atmosphere as well as a build-up of dead fibre presenting forest fire risk. Why therefore is the North American hardwood resource so important to Asian manufacturers? By using American hardwoods, no forests are threatened, which is one way to take the pressure off Asia’s natural forest resources. In any case many of the W W W. N H L A .C O M

unique American species offered are highly acceptable in world markets which, for wood product manufacturing exporters in Asia, ensure market access. While the USA contains only 8% of the world’s hardwood forests, it is by far the largest exporter of sawn hardwood, the majority of which is shipped to Asia, surely a demonstration of its availability and competitive pricing. Finally, American hardwood exporters increasingly understand the requirements of Asian manufacturers and their need to work together – at such events as the annual NHLA convention each October where huge numbers of producers and traders gather together under one roof for days. Michael Buckley, Fellow of the Institute of Wood Science, is an independent wood industry consultant who has specialised in temperate hardwoods since 1988. 2 0 1 8 I N T E R N AT I O N A L H M

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THE FUTURE OF CLT BY ANDREW LAWRENCE

J

Andrew Lawrence, Arup’s global timber specialist, examines why CLT has become so popular and asks what the future holds for the material.

Just twenty years since it was invented and only ten years since its introduction into the UK, CLT is becoming a mainstream construction material for housing, schools and even offices. At the same time, exciting new products are emerging such as tulipwood CLT that combine the speed of construction and fire resistance of CLT with the strength and appearance of hardwood, helping to open up new uses for the material as combined structure and finishes in high end applications.

Top:The Smile by Alison Brooks Architects and Arup in tulipwood CLT (internal view). Photo courtsey of AHEC. Bottom: Installation of The Smile took just 7 days. Photo courtsey of AHEC.

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How things change! CLT was developed 20 years ago as a use for waste “waney-edged” sideboards. CLT made from square edged boards was originally thought too expensive for the mainstream market. Then advances in CNC fabrication enabled the CLT to be accurately cut and therefore quickly assembled on site, like a giant piece of flat-packed furniture. At the same time high strength self-tapping screws emerged, enabling fast strong on-site connections. CLT now offered an incredibly easy way of building, with walls and floors entirely made of CLT. The resultant programme and site set-up savings offset the higher material costs of the CLT. CLT was now able to match the overall cost of a steel or concrete building, but with the added advantage of a faster income stream thanks to the earlier completion date. The timing also coincided with the move towards offsite construction; as a relatively lightweight material, machined to high tolerances, CLT was the ideal choice. W W W. N H L A .C O M


Left: Close up detail of tulipwood CLT panels. Photo courtsey of AHEC. Right: Endless Stair by dRMM and Arup. Photo courtsey

of AHEC.

Building with CLT walls rather than steel or concrete columns creates cellular spaces that are best suited to residential applications. To create more open plan spaces for offices, CLT floor slabs can be combined with a timber or steel frame and such buildings are now starting to emerge. Compared to pouring wet concrete onto a metal deck, the CLT slabs again offer significant programme savings.

Thus, there is a real possibility that in the future, hidden floor and wall construction will be made from laminated veneer products and that floors will be made from stressed skin panels. While such hollow stressed skin floor panels are lighter and therefore more prone to vibration, this can easily be overcome by pumping sand into the voids to add weight.

So far, the majority of CLT has been used for residential applications and therefore hidden behind plasterboard. The purpose of the plasterboard is mainly to limit sound transmission between dwellings. But as CLT finds more uses in non-residential applications, with lower acoustic demands, it is increasingly being left visually exposed. Even in residential applications, as wood starts to become a selling point, architects are looking for ways to expose the CLT ceilings and so engineers are developing ways to hide all the acoustic treatment on top of the CLT slab.

Over the next 10 years, as the demand for timber increases and likely approaches the sustainable annual cut of the traditional softwood species, it will also makes sense to look for other species that are suitable for structural use. A third of the temperate forests in North America and Europe are actually hardwood, including some of the most beautiful and strongest timbers.

Of course, as more of the CLT becomes exposed, the increased fire load does need to be considered. However, exposing just one CLT surface such as the ceiling in a compartment, limits the amount of extra fire load. The single exposed surface should also safely stop burning after the contents of the room have burnt out. This is because a significant amount of heat is needed to drive the flammable gases off the surface of the wood. Therefore, without an external heat source a single piece of wood will stop burning, much like a single log on a fire. However, where the structure is hidden behind the plasterboard, is CLT really the best choice? As timber becomes more popular and prices increase, the raw material will need to be used as economically as possible. One way this can be achieved is by the use of hollow “stressed skin� floor panels instead of solid CLT panels. Apart from using less material, a stressed skin panel can be made from laminated veneer lumber. LVL is fabricated from peeled veneers enabling 90% (tbc) of the log to be utilised. By comparison, sawing and planing the planks for CLT utilises only about 50% (tbc). LVL is also stronger than CLT because the veneers are so thin that the knots in one layer have little effect on the overall strength. W W W. N H L A .C O M

The concept of hardwood CLT was pioneered by Arup and dRMM in the Endless Stair, built for the 2013 London Design Festival. The team was looking for a low- density hardwood species. Low density was important not only for ease of machining and transport but also to ensure that the self-tapping screws, really intended for use with low density softwood, could still be used without slow and expensive predrilling. Tulipwood appeared to be the ideal choice, easy to glue and machine, close to the density of softwood but with the strength of a hardwood, and relatively cheap and plentiful. Excitingly, testing showed that the Tulipwood was particularly strong and stiff in rolling shear. Because CLT is cross-laminated, rolling shear has a relatively large influence on the stiffness and therefore vibration performance of a floor slab. And because timber is relatively light, it is vibration that always governs the design of floors to ensure they are not too lively under foot traffic. Like any new product, it takes time to create a supply chain and the relevant product approvals, but the first two projects have now been built using large Tulipwood CLT panels and more are sure to follow. With increasing amounts of CLT now being left exposed, hardwood CLT really comes into its own, offering an enhanced appearance as combined structure and finishes. The ability to leave off the finishes also offers additional programme savings. 2 0 1 8 I N T E R N AT I O N A L H M

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Maggies Centre, Oldham by dRMM in American tulipwood CLT, engineered by Booth Kin. Photo by Alex de Rijke. As well as using all the forest species, and making more efficient products such as stressed skin LVL panels, it is also important to develop more efficient ways of building in CLT. For the Haut project in Amsterdam, Arup and Team V Architectuur sought to build the tallest timber building in the world. The team also wanted to free up the facades and to make adaptable internal spaces. The solution was to use long thick CLT panels for the loadbearing party walls between the apartments; these will carry the vertical weight of the floors (which will span 6m between the party walls) and will provide torsional wind resistance to the building (although the main lateral resistance is provided by a concrete core). Internal walls will be cheap lightweight stud partitions. Unlike the early CLT buildings where all the walls were loadbearing, these partitions will be non-structural enabling them to be adapted in the future. This should help to prolong the life of the building and make it more attractive to potential tenants. Finally, it should be remembered that CLT construction is still in its infancy, dominated by proprietary products much like the early concrete industry 100 years ago. The industry is currently undergoing a period of standardisation, which will help to make costs lower and more predictable. This in turn will help to grow the market. At the same time, research is ongoing into the performance of whole timber buildings (rather than just elements), to ensure reliable performance under extreme events such as earthquake, fire, explosion and strong winds. 34

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Research is also ongoing into the maximum heights achievable in timber. As research for the Haut project has shown, the height of 100% timber buildings is limited to about 10 storeys or so because a timber “shear� wall, made from many small pieces of CLT is simply not stiff enough to limit the sway or vibration of a taller building. But there is no reason why taller timber structures cannot be built incorporating a concrete core. Thus the future is likely to see increased use of LVL in hidden areas with CLT being increasingly reserved for visually exposed applications. There will be increased use of different species, including hardwoods and increased use of timber slab systems on steel frames. There will also be increased standardisation of components and connection systems, which in turn will help create lower and more predictable costs and give clients more confidence in using the various mass timber products. All of this will help engineered timber become a standard construction material alongside steel and concrete. All the materials have their advantages and there is no doubt that the real advantage of engineered timber is speed, being easy to machine to high tolerances and also light and therefore easy to transport. While 100% timber buildings will be limited to about 10 storeys, timber will also be used as the floors of taller structures, combined with concrete cores and steel frames. Composite floor systems are also being developed which combine the advantages of timber and concrete in a single composite element. It is indeed an exciting time for timber! W W W. N H L A .C O M


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Dave Bramlage, Sales Manager, size 11

Dave’s gone through a lot of shoes traveling to a lot of countries, meeting the needs of Cole hardwood across the globe. No matter where you are, Cole means quality, fair price and on-time delivery. Right, Dave? Dave? Where did he go now?

SOLID HARDWOOD.

SOLID PEOPLE.

Call 800-536-3151 for a quote, or visit www.colehardwood.com.


YOUR QUALITY SOURCE FOR FINE HARDWOOD LUMBER FROM AMERICA TO THE FAR EAST Specializing in Red Oak, White Oak, Poplar, Ash, Hickory, Cypress and Pecan

AMERICAN OFFICE

Scott Wesberry - Sales Manager P.O. Box 857 Woodville, MS 39669 scottw@nettervillelumber.com WeChat ID: Scott_Wesberry Mobile: 601-870-9400 Office: 800-343-4577 Fax: 601-888-6469

SHANGHAI OFFICE

Bruce Zhang - Sales Room 10A38, Shanghai Mart 2299 YanAn Road West Shanghai 200336 China bruce_zhang1@aliyun.com WeChat ID: bruce_zhang1 Mobile: 86-13801815621 Office: 86-21-6236 3851


INSPIRING DESIGN with American Hardwood

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The significance of red oak to the interior aesthetic is obvious from the moment you enter the lobby. In fact it helps make the building’s dramatic opening statement. Called the Vortex, this dramatic swirling space features 1,858 m2 of red oak cladding on its intersecting arching walls. “The Vortex is a literal and metaphorical modern twist on the timber-lined entrance hall you find in so many classical English buildings, particularly in London,” said Mr. Jones. Photo by Foster + Partners and Nigel Young W W W. N H L A .C O M

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AMERICAN CHERRY BRINGS SOPHISTICATION TO LONDON HOME Amin Taha Architects + GROUPWORK have renovated a 1950s house in London’s Bayswater area, cleverly restoring travertine and cherry panelling using American cherry. The house is in Caroline Place, a quiet enclave of late 1950s terraces north of Hyde Park and Kensington Gardens. Built with a modern Northern European sensibility of sharp brick lines and crisp mortar joints layered with softer timber detailing, the interior layouts remained firmly rooted in an earlier English Edwardian tradition. “We were thrilled to be using cherry in this project as it is a much underused wood,” says Amin Taha. “It’s the perfect material for interior projects because it’s smooth, warm and very easy to finish as a luxurious surface.” Photography courtesy of Amin Taha Architects.

WOMEN WEARING WOOD These wooden dresses were designed and produced by Dr. Eva Haviarova of Purdue University with the intention to demonstrate hardwood value added.

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American cherry is one of the world’s fastest growing temperate hardwoods, yet it is still being vastly underutilised. Caroline Place is a superb example of how this sustainable species’ rich reddish-brown colour can add a layer or warmth and sophistication to a project.” David Venables, European Director at AHEC


U.S. red oak interior flooring.

WARMTH, WELLBEING AND WOW FACTOR The European market must, till now, have been something of a frustration for U.S. red oak suppliers. The species is America’s most prolific hardwood, so, in those terms, its most sustainable. In the U.S. itself it’s used extensively in a huge range of construction, interiors and manufacturing applications, while other markets, such as China and Japan, also can’t get enough. But in Europe red oak has lagged some way behind its ubiquitous U.S. white cousin in popularity. The market breakthrough it’s needed, say admirers, has been a major showcase project to demonstrate its aesthetic and performance appeal. Well now it has one – and wow. They don’t come much more major or more showcase than the just opened 1.1 million ft2 European headquarters of global financial data, software and media colossus Bloomberg. Designed by a Foster + Partners team, led by Norman Foster himself. Photography by Foster + Partners and Nigel Young 42

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SEED TO SEAT Seed to Seat was conceived by AHEC in late 2015 as a collaborative project with a select group of designers based in Australia and New Zealand. The idea was to introduce these designers to three American hardwood species, which are less widely-specified in those markets, while challenging them to design a seat using only solid lumber and as little non-wood material as possible. The project proved so successful that the concept was rolled out to the Middle East and South Africa in 2017.

Five designers were chosen in Australia and New Zealand, From left to right: O.C.S. by Ben Percy, Emi by Anne-Claire Petre, Don Chair by Adam Goodrum, J.A.C. chair by Todd Hammond and Stripped by Greg Natale. Photo by Tom Ferfuson.

Northern Canadian Hardwood Lumber Manufacturer RED OAK, BLACK WALNUT, WHITE OAK, WHITE ASH, BLACK CHERRY, YELLOW BIRCH, HARD MAPLE Export Sales (China): YVON MILLETTE Mobile: 1-819-621-7787

Mobile: 1-819-621-9325

Office: 1-819-362-3233

Email: info@vexco.com

We are available on WeChat et Whatsapp! W W W. N H L A .C O M

Export Sales: FRED VIENS

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INTERNATIONAL MEETINGS 2018 American Hardwood Export Council and American hardwood companies will be in attendance at the following: MARCH March 6-9 | M&M (Wood Processing and Furn.) | Bogota, Columbia March 7-10 | Vietnam International Furniture Fair | Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam March 8-11 | International Furniture Fair Singaporel | Singapore March 8-12 | Indiawood | Bangalore, India March 12-14 | Dubaiwood | Dubai, UAE March 28-31 | Interzum Guangzhou | Guangzhou, China MAY May 24-26 | Habitat Expo | Mexico City JUNE June 12-14 | ExpHotel | Cancun, QR, Mexico June 14-16 | Denfair | Melbourne, Australia June 19-21 | Expo AMPIMM | Mexico City June 21-22 | 23rd SEA and Greater China AHEC Convention & Mini Trade Show | Xi’An, Shaanxi, China June 25-27 | Sylva Wood Trade Show | Shanghai, China June 28 | Nagoya Wood Seminar | Nagoya, Japan JULY July 10-13 | ForMobile | Sao Paulo, Brazil AUGUST August 8-12 | 100% Design South Africa | Johannesburg, SA August 15-18 | TecnoMueble | Guadalajara Jal, Mexico August 28-30 | Centro Banamex | Mexico City SEPTEMBER September 11-14 | FMC Premium Trade Show | Shanghai, China September TBD | London Design Fair | London, UK September 26-29 | iFMAC & WoodMAC | Jakarta, Indonesia OCTOBER October 2-4 | NHLA Convention | Toronto, Canada October 16-20 | Expo CIHAC | Mexico City NOVEMBER November TBD | Wood Awards Ceremony November 13-16 | Downtown Design Dubai | Dubai, UAE November 14-16 | International Furniture Fair Tokyo | Tokyo, Japan DECEMBER December 6-9 | Cairo Woodshow | Cairo, Egypt December 13-16 | Taipei International Building, Construction & Decoration Exhibition | Taipei, Taiwan 44

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rd Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood •

HARDWOODS

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Emporium, PA, USA

rd Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood •

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SALES Sales@rossilumber.com rd Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood • www.rossigroup.net Middletown, CT, USA Ph 01 (860) 632 3505 Fax 01 (860) 613 3727

rd Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood •

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rd Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood •

rd Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood •

rd Maple • Soft Maple le • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Maple • Soft Maple le • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tulipwood •

rd Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood •

rd Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood •

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S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 6 H A R D W O O D M AT T E R S

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OCT 2-4 The NHLA Annual Convention & Exhibit Showcase serves as the premier North American hardwood industry networking and educational event – attracting thousands of hardwood industry professionals from nearly 400 different companies across the United States, Canada and the world. These attendees are producers, suppliers and decision-makers from the industry’s most influential companies.

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JOIN US IN TORONTO

FOR THE GLOBAL GATHERING OF THE HARDWOOD COMMUNITY • ATTEND EDUCATIONAL SEMINARS • NETWORK WITH HUNDREDS OF NEW BUYERS AND SUPPLIERS • MEET NEW AGENTS AND DISTRIBUTORS FOR YOUR PRODUCTS • LEARN FROM HARDWOOD INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS WHO SHARE COMMON INTERESTS AND CONCERNS 2018 REGISTRATION: MEMBER $625 US (ON-SITE $675 US) NON-MEMBER $825 US (ON-SITE $875 US) FOR MORE INFORMATION, HOTEL BOOKING AND CONFERENCE REGISTRATION VISIT NHLA.COM.


JOIN US IN TORONTO

FOR THE GLOBAL GATHERING OF THE HARDWOOD COMMUNITY www.nhla.com

OCT. 2-4


HIGH QUALITY NORTHERN HARDWOODS SPECIALIZING IN HARD MAPLE & BIRCH GREEN AND KILN-DRIED LUMBER, S2S, S4S Capacity: 40 million MBF - Hardwood 8 million MBF kiln-dry annually Certified Sustainable Products

Join Us in Toronto for the Maple Leaf Sawmill Tour 2018 NHLA Partner Members are invited to attend a pre-NHLA Convention tour of sawmills and distribution yards in the Toronto area. See how hardwood logs are cut and turned into lumber, machinery used, and the overall day-to-day operations of a North American hardwood sawmill. Please note, only NHLA members who register and pay in advance can attend the pre-convention tour. Space is limited. Interested parties should contact John Wang at j.wang@nhla.com.

www.fsc.org FSC® C081657 The mark of responsible forestry

oo Hardw

isi d Div

on

) Division ardwood (H r e ag Sales Man Dubé, ivision) Denis is@jdirving.com wood D n e ve (Hard ti ta n Dube.d 2-9025 se 9 es Repre Ph: 506-9 eau, Sal com ve Nad ng. Marie-E arie-eve@jdirvi ion) od Divis Nadeau.m 2-9024 (Hardwo r o at 9 in Ph: 506-9 rn, Sales Coord bu ) Jan Co n@jdirving.com Division .ja rn u b o ardwood C 92-9040 eral Manager (H -9 6 0 5 : h P Gen Volpe, Bruno no@jdirving.com ru .b e Volp 92-9023 Ph: 506-9

632 Principal Street, Clair NB Canada E7A 2H2 Tel: (506) 992-9020 Fax: (506) 992-9021 W W W. N H L A .C O M

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Midwest Hardwood Corporation is a complete forest-to-customer lumber company. Our process begins in the forest harvesting trees and ends with the delivery of a top quality lumber product. We offer a wide variety of products and services, including forest management, logs, green- and kiln-dried domestic and imported hardwood lumber, ripped-to-width lumber, and FSCÂŽ certified lumber.

Bill Long | Email: billlong@midwesthardwood.com WeChat: blongview | Skype: blongview 9540 83rd Avenue North, Maple Grove, MN 55369 USA

www.midwesthardwood.com


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Producing other fine Appalachian Hardwoods

Proudly NHLA Grade Certified

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