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TH E VOIC E O F THE HARDWOOD IN DUSTRY

H A R D W O O D M AT T E R S March 2019

Trends and Expectations for

Domestic Market Growth in 2019

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E N AT I O N A L H A R D W O O D L U M B E R A S S O C I AT I O N S T R O N G R O O T S . G L O B A L R E A C H . | W W W. N H L A . C O M


2x4s are strategically placed between packages to guarantee proper weight distribution. At Pike Lumber Company, our packages are carefully stacked on laser leveled bunks, then topped with lumber covers to ensure the flattest lumber possible.

® AKRON, INDIANA • U.S.A. P: 800.356.4554 F: 574.893.7400

sales@pikelumber.com

www.pikelumber.com

Flat and straight lumber doesn’t just happen. It starts with precision placement of air drying sticks.

SINCE 1904

Getting the Details Right..


CONTENTS March 2019 • Issue 198

WHAT'S INSIDE 10

feature

instant

10 Trends and Expectations for Domestic Market Growth in 2019

TOP POST OF THE MONTH at facebook.com/NHLAOfficial

departments 8

ONLINE

Did you know that the United States' official national tree is the Oak Tree? Oak trees are a wonderful representaition of our nation's great strength and longevity, and over 60 species of oak are native to the US.

6 Accolades 6 Inside NHLA 8 Legislative Log The Hardwood Industry:

Economic Engine of the U.S.

16 Rules Corner Monitoring New Technology,

Let NHLA Help

Follow us

reader services

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4 18 20

President’s Message Educational Calendar Job Board

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H A R D W O O D M AT T E R S T H E VO I C E O F T H E H A R DWO O D I N D U ST RY National Hardwood Lumber Association PO Box 34518 • Memphis, TN 38184-0518 901-377-1818 • 901-382-6419 (fax) info@nhla.com • www.nhla.com

THE MISSION OF NH LA To serve NHLA Members engaged in the commerce of North American hardwood lumber by: maintaining order, structure and ethics in the changing global hardwood marketplace; providing unique member services; promoting North American hardwood lumber and advocating the interest of the hardwood community in public/private policy issues; and providing a platform for networking opportunities.

ADVERTISER INDEX 13 Baillie Lumber Company IBC DMSi 17

TallyExpress by DMSi

7

King City/Northway Forwarding

3

Matson Lumber Company

IFC Pike Lumber Company, Inc.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

MISSION LEADERS

Darwin Murray McClain Forest Products President

Bucky Pescaglia Missouri-Pacific Lumber Co., Inc. Unique Services

Jeff Wirkkala Hardwood Industries, Inc. Vice President

Kevin Gillette Tioga Hardwoods, Inc. Rules

Brent Stief Huron Forest Products, Inc. Past President 2016-2018

Darrell Keeling Northwest Hardwoods Structure

NHLA STAFF

Mike Powers Maley & Wertz, Inc. Industry Advocacy & Promotion

Lorna D. Christie CEO l.christie@nhla.com Amanda Boutwell Marketing and Communications Manager a.boutwell@nhla.com

Jon Syre Cascade Hardwood, LLC Membership & Networking COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Renee Hornsby Director of Communications/Editor r.hornsby@nhla.com

Stephanie VanDystadt DV Hardwoods, Inc. Membership

Melissa Ellis Smith Graphic Designer m.ellis@nhla.com

Rob Cabral Upper Canada Forest Products, Ltd. Promotion & Advocacy

■■■ Trisha Clariana Office Manager Desirée Freeman Controller

Garner Robinson Robinson Lumber Company Convention David Mayfield Mayfield Lumber Co. Inspection Services

5 RossiGroup

Julia Ganey Member Relations Manager

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Southern Forest Products Association

Rich Hascher Inspector Training School Instructor

Bruce Horner Abenaki Timber Corp. ITS/Continuing Education

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TMX Shipping Co.

John Hester Director of Membership and Business Development

John Griffin Frank Paxton Lumber Communications & Marketing

Debbie Horn Executive Assistant/Project Management

Joe Snyder Fitzpatrick & Weller, Inc. Rules

For advertising inquiries: Contact John Hester, Director of Membership at j.hester@nhla.com or 901-399-7558.

Carol McElya Accounting Assistant & Publications Becky Miller Inspector Training School Administrator Vicky Quiñones Simms Membership Development Manager Dana Spessert Chief Inspector

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Rachel Spiers Marketing Associate r.spiers@nhla.com M A R C H 2 0 1 9 H A R D W O O D M AT T E R S

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Consistency. Yield. Trust. Specializing in Premium Pennsylvania Hardwood Lumber and Logs • Red Oak • White Oak • Hard Maple • Soft Maple

• Cherry • Poplar • Ash • Hickory

® Matson Lumber Company 132 Main St. Brookville, PA 15825

Your trusted source for exceptional quality and consistency for more than 200 years.

Phone: (814) 849-5334 Fax: (814) 849-3811 www.MatsonLumber.com info@MatsonLumber.com


PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

TIME FOR A NEW APPROACH TO PROMOTION

L

ate last year, an acquaintance of mine told me a story of his experiences while building a new home.

Like most consumers, he had a limited knowledge of hardwoods, however he wanted real wood flooring. So, he took to the web for research. He was surprised to find his internet search for “wood flooring” resulted in alternative products to solid wood flooring being heavily promoted. Information on solid hardwood flooring was not as accessible as alternatives through advertising. His next stop was at the local flooring retail store where a salesman did his best to sell him anything but solid wood flooring. When my friend asked questions about hardwood flooring, the salesman responded, “Why would you choose solid wood flooring when you can purchase alternatives that are waterproof and look just like real wood.” At the end, he decided not to purchase hardwood flooring for his new home and installed LVT, tile, and carpet. And, as a result of his internet research, he is now receiving pop-up advertising on Facebook and other places on his computer for Bamboo, LVT, and other non-wood flooring products. I wonder how many times this happens around the world? The moral of this story is pretty clear . . . we are not just losing market share to non-hardwood products, we are not even close to being in the promotional game of the products we produce. Despite our best efforts, we have not yet found a way to connect and educate consumers of the many benefits hardwood products offer. A very important benefit is the low carbon footprint made by utilizing hardwoods as compared to the alternatives while at the same time, generating a healthy and sustainable forest through harvesting. I was opposed to the Hardwood Check-Off campaign due to its structure. But I support a collaborative effort of all hardwood industry associations to develop and implement a promotional campaign. I know I am not the first NHLA President to call for a new dialogue on promoting North American hardwoods. There have been numerous campaigns since the first modern one in 1969. While such efforts achieved some short-term success, they failed to have a long-term impact. We must learn the lessons from our past if we are ever going to succeed at promoting hardwoods. We already have examples of current collaborative efforts. The Economic Impact Study recently introduced by the Hardwood Federation is a perfect example. This game changing report on our industry’s economic contributions would not be possible without our associations working together to fund the study. NHLA has also

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recently worked with AHMI and HMA to offer a very successful Hardwood Leadership Retreat at the BB & T Learning Institute in Greensboro, NC. Proof that collaboration works when the association boards and executive staff work together to serve our members. The current trade dispute with China has once again illuminated the need for promotion of North American hardwood products. I recently attended a promotional webinar with an industry association and heard from another association about the opportunity of receiving state funds as seed money for promotion. NHLA’s Promotion Committee, led by Rob Cabral of Upper Canada Forest Products is currently working on solving the “promotion puzzle.” The Committee will be studying the lessons learned from past efforts, examining the tools in the promotion toolbox, and exploring potential target audiences. Creating a new promotional model that includes collaboration with other associations will also be a key goal. There are many different groups researching, working, and communicating a need for promotion of North American hardwood products. But it seems to me we are all still disconnected from a unified promotional campaign. I question the success of these individual campaigns and what could we achieve if we all worked together through a collaborative group. I am offering a rallying cry for all industry associations - state, regional, and national - along with their executive leadership and boards to unite and develop a promotional campaign that is supported by all members. I’m also challenging association leaders to develop a think-tank session where association executive directors and their executive board leadership meet to begin the dialogue of a unified new approach to promotion. I want to hear your thoughts on creating a new promotional model to promote North American hardwoods. Contact me at d.murray@ nhla. There has never been a more important time to share your thoughts on promotion. I will share comments in future articles as we work through creating a promotion model that will finally put North American hardwoods at center stage.

Darwin Murray, NHLA President McClain Forest Products dmurray@mcclainforestproducts.com W W W. N H L A .C O M


A new beginning for the Gold Standard for Cherry from Emporium, PA The Rossi Group announces the launch of its new State of the Art high-tech sawmill at Emporium in Pennsylvania to serve domestic and export markets from the sustainable Allegheny Forest resources with the highest quality Cherry and many other hardwood species.

Rossi Group LLC, www.rossilumber.com Tel: 1(860) 6323505 W W W. N H L A .C O M

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ACCOLADES

INSIDE NHLA

Congratulations

NHLA SUCCESS IN INDIANAPOLIS

Milestone Members

NHLA attended the IHLA Annual Convention February 2-4 and it was an excellent opportunity for us to network with our members.

NHLA would like to recognize our members who celebrated a milestone anniversary of 5 years or more during the months of January and February.

We had a great booth that drew in the crowds. During the exhibitor reception, our booth was “The Place to Be.”

5 YEARS Greatree Forest Products International Co. Ltd. Partner | January 2014 Anthony Oak Flooring, Inc. | Associate | January 2014 Swift River Pecans LLC | Active U1 | February 2014 Oak Valley Hardwoods, Inc. | Active U4 | February 2014

20 YEARS Watson Lumber Co. | Active U2 | January 1999 Snowbelt Hardwoods | Active U2 | February 1999

30 YEARS Bryant Church Hardwoods, Inc. | Active U1 | January 1989

100 YEARS Whitson Lumber Co. | Active U2 | January 1919

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Contact us today for competitive rates and unparalleled service for 40+ years! http://kingcitynorthamerica.com/ USA 1-855-682-1637 CDN 1-800-335-5394 WWW .NHLA .COM

Michael Hilburn - President mhilburn@kingcityusa.com

Lloyd Lovett - CEO

M A R C Hl.lovett@kingcitynorthway.com 2 0 1 9 H A R D W O O D M AT T E R S |

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LEGISLATIVE LOG

THE HARDWOOD INDUSTRY: ECONOMIC ENGINE OF THE U.S. by DANA COLE, Executive Director Hardwood Federation

F

or those of us that work in the hardwood industry, it is no secret that thousands of people are employed by our mills, yards and manufacturing facilities and that the economic impact of this business on local communities is tremendous. However, just how important the industry is economically has never really been known . . . until now.

other key stakeholders in Washington, D.C. We are confident that regional, state and local hardwood associations will also be able to use the data to communicate with Governors, state legislatures and the public about the positive economic benefits of the industry and how policy makers can help support and sustain hardwood businesses. The report will also have a starring role when industry gathers for the annual Fly-In to Washington D.C. in September. The full study may be found at www.hardwoodfederation.com.

Last year thirteen member associations of the Hardwood Federation, including NHLA, came together in a coordinated effort to study the impacts of the hardwood industry on the U.S. economy. The results were staggering. According to the final report, the hardwood indusThe hardwood industry economic impact study was conducted by try helps to employ nearly 21 million people and contributes $394 Agribusiness Consulting. Generous funding for the project was billion to the U.S. economy. Hardwood producers and manufacturprovided by NHLA along with the following Hardwood Federation ers, including sawmills, lumberyards, flooring members: The American Hardwood Export companies, kitchen cabinet manufacturers and This report shines a Council, the Appalachian Hardwood Manufacrailway ties, directly support nearly 750,000 Inc., the Decorative Hardwoods Associabright light on the turers jobs generating $38 billion in annual income. tion, the Hardwood Federation, the Hardwood Related industries, including transportation importance and val- Manufacturers Association, the Indiana Hardretail, forest owners and logging, support more Lumberman’s Association, the Kitchen ue of an industry too wood than 1.4 million jobs and adds $241 billion to Cabinet Manufacturers Association, the Lake the economy. For every $1 million in output of States Lumber Association, the Maple Flooring often overlooked. hardwood products, 5.3 jobs are created. Manufacturers Association, the National Hardwood Lumber Association, the Railway Tie American hardwoods are also an important export commodity. In Association and the Wood Component Manufacturers Association. 2017, U.S. hardwood producers shipped $4.04 billion worth of Additional support was provided by the Hardwood Market Report U.S. products to global markets and supported over 200,000 jobs. and the Pennsylvania Lumbermen’s Mutual Insurance Company. The study also examined individual sectors within the overall hardwood industry, including sawmills, hardwood veneer and plywood, millwork and hardwood flooring. State by state data was also produced and is available for review.

The Hardwood Federation greatly appreciates the support of NHLA in the execution of this project. We simply could not have done it without the financial contribution as well as the input and insight provided by Lorna Christie as we moved through the process.

The bottom line is that we now have undeniable evidence that the hardwood industry is an economic driver, particularly in small towns and rural America. Hardwood companies are often a top employer in their communities, and support significant numbers of spin off jobs locally. Wood and wood products are literally the building blocks of this country and the industry takes pride in their history and the environmentally sustainable products they produce. This report shines a bright light on the importance and value of an industry too often overlooked.

The Hardwood Federation was established as a coordinating body within the industry to represent common interests on federal policy Washington D.C . . . a mandate I am proud to continue. The economic impact study project is a natural extension of our daily activities on the Hill: identifying unifying goals, gathering supportive industry and association leaders, jointly developing solutions and serving as an organizing body for implementing those solutions. The result is a product that has far reaching value beyond one company or one organization. I look forward to continuing to work with all the wonderful members of the hardwood community to identify future ways to serve the industry in this manner.

The report will be used by the Hardwood Federation to educate Trump Administration representatives, members of Congress and

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The Hardwood Industry helps to employ nearly 21 million people and contributes $394 billion to the U.S. economy.

Hardwood producers and manufactures directly support nearly 750,000 jobs generating $38 billion in annual income.

In 2017, U.S. hardwood producers shipped $4.04 billion worth of U. S. products to global markets and supported over 200,000 jobs.

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02 04

03 For every $1 million to output of hardwood products, 5.3 jobs are created.

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Related industries, including transportation retail, forest owners and logging, support more than 1.4 million jobs and adds $241 billion to the economy.

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

Trends and Expectations for Domestic Market Growth in 2019 TRADE WAR: two simple words that have caused great turbulence

in the hardwood industry over the past year. Throw in headlines about tariffs and falling export markets, and soon enough everyone is reaching for the Alka Seltzer. While foreign trade is (and always will be) vital, it is imperative not to let it overshadow domestic markets, in which several hardwood sectors are proving to be guiding lights through the trade-war fog that has settled over North America. 10

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I

n December of 2018, Forisk held their annual “Wood Flows and Cash Flows Conference.” One of the highlights of the event was a panel discussion with forest industry executives, where participants discussed how their companies prioritize forest industry capital projects. Brooks Mendell, the president and CEO of Forisk, reports “Even with turmoil in trade policies, senior executives repeated the same theme—we have more projects than capital available. In short, they saw opportunities in hardwood manufacturing and timber investments to generate returns exceeding their cost of capital.”

Wood pallets tracked eight percent higher and accounted for nearly 40 percent of the hardwood lumber consumed in the U.S. in 2018, while exports represent about 18 percent.

Despite the ups and downs in trade, Mendell remains optimistic, asserting, “The hardwood lumber sector continues to attract capital, echoing activity in other forest industry sectors.” Examples include NHLA members Edwards Wood Products and Kennebec Lumber Company. Edwards Wood Products recently announced they are building a new 30 MMBF facility in Laurinburg, North Carolina, while Kennebec Lumber has been investing more money in its hardwood mill over the past two years. Mendell continues, “Market demand and maximizing our facilities means dedicated maintenance, strategic capital projects, and vigilance. Investments must deliver measurable results, and this can be achieved many ways, from cash accretive projects to cost reduction to safety enhancements to production gains. Executives and investors in the forest industry continue to find these opportunities at hardwood facilities for 2019.” According to Forisk, the U.S. consumed nearly 8.4 billion board feet of hardwood lumber in 2018 (Figure 1). Gains in many sectors were offset by a steep decline in hardwood lumber exports for the year, resulting in a four percent drop in total hardwood lumber use; however, it’s important not to let the headlines of falling exports disguise the fact that some hardwood sectors are experiencing growing domestic

use. Wood pallets tracked eight percent higher and accounted for nearly 40 percent of the hardwood lumber consumed in the U.S. in 2018, while exports represent about 18 percent. Another hardwood sector experiencing growth is the stave market, which is often overlooked. Staves are the narrow strips of wood used

U.S. Hardwood Lumber Consumption by Sector (Q1 2019 FRQ) Sector 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Pallets 3.20 3.26 3.27 3.64 3.69 3.59 3.27 Furniture .35 .29 .30 .43 .44 .47 .44 Exports 1.11 1.23 1.36 1.52 1.73 1.50 1.67 Millwork .43 .24 .26 .39 .39 .41 .43 Cabinets .40 .34 .36 .39 .41 .41 .43 Flooring .59 .51 .55 .75 .75 .73 .78 Railway Ties .89 .98 1.04 1.11 1.03 1.08 1.09 Board Road/Mat Timbers .20 .24 .27 .42 .41 .37 .36 Total Estimated Consumption 7.16 7.09 7.41 8.66 8.85 8.56 8.46 Data Sources: Hardwood Market Report; U.S. Census; Forisk Consulting

2017 3.06 .43 2.02 .47 .46 .81 1.06 .37 8.68

2018E 3.31 .44 1.50 .47 .46 .82 .99 .39 8.38

Note: units Billions Board Feet; totals may not sum due to rounding W W W. N H L A .C O M

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aged in new, charred oak barrels. These barrels are made (almost exclusively) of white oak. The white oak used as staves is typically high quality and free of knots and other imperfections. Most staves are made using only the bottom one-third of the tree trunk (which is where you find the highest quality wood). Bourbon is an $8.5 billion industry in Kentucky alone, employing 17,500 people and providing about $800 million in annual wages. Therefore, a wide variety of stakeholders have joined forces to create the “White Oak Initiative,” including the American Forest Foundation, KFIA, the U.S. Forest Service, and many more. The “White Oak Initiative,” strives to ensure that white oak continues to thrive in America’s forests to protect forest animals that depend on the oak’s acorns and to sustain the white oak lumber industry. To learn more about the “White Oak Initiative,” please visit www.forestfoundation.org/woodland-fall-2018. to create barrels and are a rapidly growing domestic market sector. Bob Bauer with the Kentucky Forest Industries Association (KFIA) is excited about the growth in the stave market, saying, “The stave market is driving increased demand for white oak due to the booming bourbon market. The bourbon industry plans to keep increasing production, which will drive strong markets for white oak.” For bourbon to be called bourbon (and not whiskey), it must be

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Flooring is yet another hardwood sector experiencing domestic growth. National Wood Flooring Association (NWFA) President/ CEO, Michael Martin, emphasizes that “wood flooring continued to maintain its market share in 2018 while experiencing an overall shift to domestically sourced products. Currently, domestic oak (red and white) represent about two-thirds of all wood flooring sales in the United States, but other domestic species have been strong as well (hickory, maple, walnut, etc.). Along with this shift, wood W W W. N H L A .C O M


IT’S ALL ABOUT

WHO YOU KNOW

NHLA helps hardwood companies achieve profitability and solve their top business challenges with data-driven, expert advice and hands-on training with our dedicated team of National Inspectors. How Can We Help You Reach Your Goals? Let's Talk!

Meet Jack English

Specialty: Dispute Resolution, Lumber Inspection, Maple Inspection, Quality Control, and Training Territory: USA - Northeast, Pacific, and Pacific-Northwest Jack began his hardwood lumber career at the age of 16 when he found summer work at Brownell Lumber Company in Edinburg, New York. After graduating from Northville Central School in 1979, he continued his employment with Brownell Lumber and later attended the NHLA Inspector Training School in September of 1981 (class #76). Jack’s first lumber inspection job was at Finger Forest Products in Clifton Park, New York. From there he moved to Vermont and worked at North Heartland Dry Kiln.

Jack can be reached at 518-366-1161 or by email at j.english@nhla.com.

In 1983, Jack was hired by NHLA as a National Inspector. Jack also held the position of Interim NHLA Chief Inspector from March to October of 2010. Jack’s favorite part of being a National Inspector for NHLA is helping members increase their profits by teaching their Inspectors how to grade accurately. To quote Jack, “I can take an employee that can’t even read a lumber rule, and in a few days, they can give me an accurate grade on a board. Sometimes I run into Inspectors that I have trained, and it makes me smile to know that I taught them a valuable skill.”

To find the National Inspector in your area visit NHLA.com.

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Currently, domestic oak (red and white) represent about two-thirds of all wood flooring sales in the United States, but other domestic species have been strong as well (hickory, maple, walnut, etc.).

species are incorporating more of wood’s natural characteristics, including knots, mineral streaks, burls, and other naturally occurring visuals. This is one of the unique aesthetics of wood compared to look-alike products, as these random, natural characteristics cannot be mechanically duplicated.” NWFA recently completed its 2019 Industry Outlook Survey, which lends credence to expecting ongoing growth in the hardwood flooring sector. When evaluating the results of the survey, Martin explains, “NWFA members expect strong demand for wood flooring will continue into 2019. More than two-thirds of respondents expect sales to be up at least three percent this year. The survey also revealed that the growing demand for non-wood/wood-look floor coverings is among the top concerns of wood flooring manufacturers, distributors, retailers, and contractors. As a result, NWFA recently launched a consumer campaign called “Real Wood Real Life,” which explains how to identify real wood products. Not only does the new campaign promote real wood flooring, but all real wood products from moldings to furniture and cabinets.” To learn more about the National Wood Flooring Association’s “Real Wood Real Life” campaign, visit www.WoodFloors.org. Tom Inman, President of Appalachian Hardwood Manufacturers, Inc.

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(AHMI), echoes NWFA’s concern over consumer's lacking knowledge regarding hardwoods. Inman points out, “Substitute materials like engineered flooring, plywood, multi-density fiberboard, and composite flooring have captured markets that were formerly solid wood. This trend is likely to continue as wood product manufacturers find these cheap substitutes are accepted by consumers who do not understand what they are buying. There are efforts by trade associations to educate consumers on the long-term health benefits and lasting value of solid hardwoods. There will be a greater emphasis on “Real Wood” for residential and commercial applications this year.” Inman continues, “The U.S. economy has been steady for 18 months with markets for industrial hardwood products like road mats, pallets, railroad ties, and crane mats increasing. Throughout 2019, the demand for these products is expected to be stable or possibly increase. “ Taking the spotlight off foreign trade to focus on domestic markets reveals a silver lining to 2019’s dark cloud. The hardwood lumber industry’s engine continues to roar with several hardwood sectors experiencing domestic growth and industry leaders remaining constant in seeing value in hardwood manufacturing and timber investments because they expect the growth to continue. W W W. N H L A .C O M


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RULES CORNER

Monitoring New Technology,

Let NHLA Help by DANA SPESSERT, NHLA Chief Inspector

that the high rates of production are actually producing a profitable product, utilizing as little raw material as possible. The NHLA Inspection Services Team can and does actively evaluate member company Inspectors for Grade accuracy as well as types of defects found in the lumber. During an evaluation the NHLA National Inspector can identify certain defects that are caused by different processes that affect the Grade and recovery.

The NHLA National Inspectors can perform tests on the

following processes in the production of lumber:

• Debarker

• Dip Tank

• Edger and Trimmer

• Kiln Operation

• Log Scale

• Lumber Thicknesses

• Minimum Opening Face

M

• Package Appearance

• Pallet Cants

• Ripsaw

• Yard Packaging

One of the biggest challenges is keeping new processes in check and monitoring the manufacturing results from this new technology. There are several ways to keep things in check and NHLA would like to help in any way it can.

These are the standard processes that the team can test but we have the ability to design testing in other areas of your operation as necessary.

ost industries have moved towards optimization technology and the hardwood industry is no exception. Over the past 30 years most of the hardwood industry has adopted new technology to help improve efficiency and quality in one form or another. This is a positive move as long as things are kept up-todate and monitored.

One way that NHLA can help is by training employees that are monitoring the Grades being produced by the mill or consumed by the manufacturer.

If you are interested in speaking with someone about monitoring your processes, please contact me. Dana Spessert, NHLA Chief Inspector can be reached at 901-399-7551 or by email at d.spessert@nhla.com.

NHLA can also assist by offering a Quality Control program. The Program monitors different areas of the production process to assure

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EDUCATION & TRAINING For hardwood business owners and their employees Register for classes at www.nhla.com.

MARCH

APRIL

APRIL

APRIL

25-June 7

2-4

8-19

29-May 1

Inspector Training School 189th Class

Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Traditional 10-week hands-on training to achieve the certificate of completion in Hardwood Lumber Inspection. Venue: Haliburton Forest & Wild Life Reserve Haliburton ON Canada

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber.

Two weeks of hands-on training.

Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber.

Venue: Hardwood Industries, Inc. Sherwood, OR

Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN

Instructor: Jack English NHLA National Inspector

Block 2: Online study Block 3: Three weeks handson training and final testing at NHLA headquarters

Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JUNE

29-May 11

20-July 26

3-14

10-13

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Inspector Training School 190th Class

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Instructor: Tom Byers NHLA National Inspector

Two weeks of hands-on training.

Venue: Allard Lumber Brattleboro, VT

Traditional 10-week hands-on training to achieve the certificate of completion in Hardwood Lumber Inspection.

Instructor: Jack English NHLA National Inspector Block 2: Online study Block 3: Three weeks handson training and final testing at NHLA headquarters.

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Venue: NTC Wood Technology Center of Excellence Antigo, WI Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

Two weeks of hands-on training.

Venue: Dabney S. Lancaster College Clifton Forge, VA

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber.

Instructor: Barry Kibbey NHLA National Inspector

Venue: Yoder Lumber Company, Inc. Millersburg, OH

Block 2: Online study Block 3: Three weeks handson training and final testing at NHLA headquarters.

Instructor: Barry Kibbey NHLA National Inspector

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EDUCATION IS KEY TO YOUR COMPANY’S SUCCESS “Very nice people and Rich, the instructor, is the best. He makes everything so simple and easy to understand. I am very thankful that Pike Lumber Company is sending me through this class. Best class that I ever took!” — Elliot Woolums

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

SEPTEMBER

8-19

12-23

2-14

4-Nov. 22

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Inspector Training School 191st Class

Two weeks of hands-on training.

Two weeks of hands-on training.

Venue: Ron Jones Hardwoods Franklin, PA

Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN

Instructor: Tom Byers NHLA National Inspector

Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

Block 2: Online study Block 3: Three weeks handson training and final testing at NHLA headquarters.

Block 2: Online study Block 3: Three weeks handson training and final testing at NHLA headquarters.

SEPTEMBER

23-27 Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber. Venue: Wood-Mizer, LLC Indianapolis, IN Instructor: Barry Kibbey NHLA National Inspector

W W W. N H L A .C O M

Two weeks of hands-on training.

Venue: Northwest Hardwoods Marion, NC Instructor: Mark Bear NHLA National Inspector Block 2: Online study Block 3: Three weeks handson training and final testing at NHLA headquarters.

Traditional 12-week hands-on training to achieve the certificate of completion in Hardwood Lumber Inspection. Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

28-Nov. 9

DECEMBER

4-22

2-13

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 3

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Two weeks of hands-on training.

Venue: Purdue University West Lafayette, IN Instructor: Kevin Evilsizer and Barry Kibbey NHLA National Inspectors Block 2: Online study Block 3: Three weeks handson training and final testing at NHLA headquarters.

Three weeks hands-on training and final testing for the certificate of completion in Hardwood Lumber Inspection.

Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

Two weeks of hands-on training.

Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor Block 2: Online study Block 3: Three weeks handson training and final testing at NHLA headquarters.

M A R C H 2 0 1 9 H A R D W O O D M AT T E R S |

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JOB BOARD HARDWOOD LUMBER INSPECTOR

HMI Hardwoods LLC is seeking a Hardwood Lumber Inspector to inspect and grade lumber to NHLA Standards. This includes lumber we produce through our sawmill, lumber purchased from other sawmills, and lumber which has been dried through our drying facility. Experience Required Must be NHLA Certified Compensation and Benefits: Competitive salary based on qualifications. Benefit package includes medical insurance, 401(k), and paid vacation/holidays. Four Ways To Apply: Email resume to hr@hmilumber.com Fax resume to the attention of Human Resources at 517-456-4931 Mail resume to 430 Division St, Clinton MI 49236 Call HR at 517-456-5715. HMI Hardwoods LLC Clinton, Michigan

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M A R C H 2 0 1 9 H A R D W O O D M AT T E R S

HARDWOOD LUMBER INSPECTOR

American Hardwood Industries is seeking a Hardwood Lumber Inspector who can apply NHLA grading rules to inspect lumber at fast-paced production rates, while maintaining the required grading accuracy. Communicates with sawyers, machine operators and maintenance to ensure a consistent flow of quality lumber. Works safely and helps maintain a safe work environment. Experience Required NHLA certified or equivalent experience, ability to accurately apply NHLA grading rules, minimum of one (1) year experience grading green and kiln dried domestic lumber (this is not an entry level position), and experience working in a fast-paced manufacturing environment with a focus on safety and quality Compensation and Benefits: Competitive Pay, Full Time, First Shift, Full Plan of Benefits To apply, email your resume to Bill Kelley at bkelley@ahiwood.com American Hardwood Industries Waynesboro and North Garden, Virginia

* To view current job postings or to post a job, visit www.nhla.com/industry-services/job-board.

W W W. N H L A .C O M


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