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Happiness tastes like

this


18

COLLEGE CAMPUSES

WITH THE MOST SCHOOL SPIRIT


150 YEARS OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL

the greatest

rivalries in college football history

10. Texas VS Texas A&M This game has been on hiatus since the Aggies spurned the Big 12 for the SEC in 2012. For years now, each side has contended it wants to play the other. Alas, no game has been scheduled.

9. Pitt VS West Virginia

The Backyard Brawl, which began in 1895, will take a 10-year break before restarting in 2022. Both fan bases have it circled.

7. Florida St. VS Miami

This is one streaky series. The ‘Noles won seven straight starting in 2010 after the Hurricanes won six straight beginning in 2000. In fact, going back to its inception in 1951, we’ve had two streaks of seven, one of six, two of five and one of four.

8. Mississippi St. VS Ole Miss

Arguably the ugliest, nastiest series in all of college football. In Mississippi, there is Christmas, Easter and Egg Bowl day.

6. Georgia VS Florida

Bring your cocktails! The Gators and Bulldogs have been battling in Jacksonville every year since 1996. The winner of the game usually puts itself into the driver’s seat of the SEC East race.


150 YEARS OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL

5. Notre Dame VS USC

4. Army VS Navy

3. Texas VS Oklahoma

2. Ohio St. VS Michigan

Only a world war could stop this rivalry— and it did. The Irish and Trojans have played every year with the exception of 1943–45, during World War II.

The Red River Rivalry features the Big 12’s dynamic duo. UT or OU has won the Big 12 or shared the title in 12 of the last 15 years.

If you need an explanation as to why this makes the list, then you’ve never been— and you should go.

This one’s been lopsided for a while—a long while (the Buckeyes have won 14 of 15), in fact, but it’s still an annual hatefilled fest.

Honorable Mention Miami vs Florida: Both team renew for a home and home in 2024. Georgia vs Auburn: Deep South’s Oldest Rivalry has been played since 1892 and outside of the gap in the early years, it has been played for 124 years. Yale vs Princeton: is the oldest in college football dating back to 1873. BYU vs Utah: The “Holy War” was tops until the conferences had a realignment in 2012.

1. Alabama VS Auburn

The Iron Bowl takes the top spot because of both its pedigree of powerhouse programs and its pure in-state hatred.

Oklahoma vs Oklahoma St.: The Bedlam Game is an annual BIG 12 and in state game that lives up to the hype. The winner owns the state for a year. Oregon vs Oregon St.: “The Civil War” continues to dominate the Northwest and has been one sided for years with Oregon taking charge.


150 YEARS OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL

the greatest

traditions in college football history

While some have been standing for decades, other college football traditions are just getting started. No matter what, it’s these wacky and wild rituals and customs that make the game that much more fun to watch. In honor of the 150th anniversary of college football, we ranked the sport’s greatest traditions.

Miami

10. The Turnover Chain

It may not be as old as some of the traditions on this list, but that doesn’t make it any less iconic. In fact, Miami’s sideline prop even has its own song and music video. Manny Diaz, now the Hurricanes head coach, was the defensive coordinator when the Turnover Chain was born with the bedazzled “U” in 2017. Last year’s version was a blinged-out Sebastian the Ibis. Any guesses on the 2019 chain?

9. Marching In

The Army-Navy Game

The yearly match-up between the Black Knights and Midshipmen dates back to 1890 and it’s one of the sport’s most special traditions. Before the game itself—which is typically the final regular season game of the college football season—Army and Navy make their way into the stadium with large student sections of cadets and midshipmen. The men and women head onto the field and march in formation before going up into the stands to watch one of the most special games of the year.

8. Cowbells

Mississippi State

Is there any place louder than Davis Wade Stadium on Saturday’s in the fall? Mississippi State fans have been clanging cowbells since the 1930s and nearly everyone in the stands is armed with one on game day. The SEC banned noisemakers in 1974, but in 2010 it was revoked, on the grounds that fans cannot use them while the ball is in play. And even if you’re watching a Bulldogs game from your couch at home, it’s likely that you’ll still hear the clamor of the cowbells through your TV speakers.


150 YEARS OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL

7. Country Roads

West Virginia

There’s karaoke, and then there’s karaoke with 60,000-plus of your closest friends. John Denver’s “Take Me Home, Country Roads” is now the unofficial anthem of the Mountaineers—it has been sung at games since 1972 and Denver even came to Morgantown in 1980 to commemorate the school’s new stadium.

6. The 12th Man

Back in 1922, an Aggie by the name of E. King Gill became the first 12th Man, after he remained standing and ready to play for the entirety of the game, one that the Aggies’ won 22-14 in a stunning upset. Today, the 12th Man honor belongs to the Aggies’ student section, 38,000 strong that stand throughout the game at Kyle Field. A&M has trademarked the name and their stadium is colloquially known as “The Home of the 12th Man.” As the school’s site describes: “The power of the 12th Man is echoed in the unity, the loyalty, and the willingness of Aggies to serve when called to do so.”

Texas A&M

5. Toomer’s Corner

If you’re headed towards the intersection of College Street and Magnolia Ave, where Auburn’s campus and the city of Auburn connect, make sure to watch out for flying rolls of toilet paper. Tiger fans have been rolling the trees and power lines with toilet paper since 1962 at Toomer’s Corner, named after former state senator and 1892 Auburn halfback, “Shel” Toomer. One Alabama fan went so far as to poison the trees with an herbicide in 2010, and while the original oak trees were unable to be saved, State the area wasMississippi completely redone—new white oak trees were planted in clean soil—and the tradition following wins has remained active in Auburn.

Auburn

4. Ralphie’s Run

Colorado

Before each game in Boulder, the Buffaloes’ 2,000-pound, live buffalo mascot, Ralphie, takes a big lap around the field, leading the entire Colorado team into the stadium while sporting a CU-themed banner. Though Ralphie is a female bison, which means she has smaller legs and is apparently “less aggressive,” she’s still known to knock her handlers to the ground and run up to 25 mph before kickoff.


150 YEARS OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Ohio State

3. Dotting the “i”

To finish its pregame show, the 225-piece Ohio State Marching Band transforms from a block into a script “Ohio” with an upperclassman sousaphonist typically taking the honor of strutting solo to place the dot on top of the lowercase “i” with 16 measures to go in the song. Just be careful if you’re an ESPN cameraman trying to capture the moment on live TV.

Clemson

2. Howard’s Rock

Originally from Death Valley, Calif., Howard’s Rock is a piece of white flint that was given to longtime coach Frank Howard in the 1960s. The team started rubbing the Rock for the first game of 1967, a 23-6 win over Wake Forest, and it still sits on pedestal overlooking Clemson’s Memorial Stadium. There may be no better pregame buildup in college football as when the Tigers take a bus from their locker room and around the stadium, just to touch Howard’s Rock and run down into their own “Death Valley.”

Oklahoma

1. Sooner Schooner

Just before every game, two horses named Boomer and Sooner (because, of course) lead the trusty old Studebaker Conestoga wagon on the field. OU gets its nickname from those who snuck into the Oklahoma territory before they were actually allowed, hence “sooners,” and the RUF/NEKS, Oklahoma’s all-male spirit squad, have ridden the Schooner for 45 years.


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150 YEARS OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL

the greatest

mascots in college football history

Whether they are real-life animals or fake inanimate objects, mascots have become engrained in college football culture. In honor of the 150th anniversary of college football, herewith an all-time ranking of the best mascots in the sport.

10. Smokey University of Tennessee

Prior to home games the entire Volunteers football team is led onto the field by Smokey, a bluetick coonhound. Smokey X—the current pooch and the first not to descend directly from the original Smokey, who took on mascot duties in 1953—resides with the Hudson family during the week, then hangs out at the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity house on gamedays.

9. Otto the Orange

8. Big Red

Syracuse University

Prior to home games the entire Volunteers football team is led onto the field by Smokey, a bluetick coonhound. Smokey X—the current pooch and the first not to descend directly from the original Smokey, who took on mascot duties in 1953—resides with the Hudson family during the week, then hangs out at the Alpha Gamma Rho fraternity house on gamedays.

Western Kentucky University

Created in 1979, Big Red doesn’t fit neatly in any mascot boxes. The creator, Ralph Carey, told the Bowling Green Daily News that Big Red couldn’t be an animal, and he explicitly wanted to avoid any Kentucky “hillbilly” stereotypes. The end result: a plush, charming, and utterly lovable red blob, with two “signature moves”: the belly slide and the belly shake.


A P R O F O U N D O U T C O M E. EDUCATION – 150 YEARS AGO, the first college football game in America was played. Since then, college football has provided educational opportunities to millions of players.

Time to celebrate the good in the game.

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CFB150.ORG


150 YEARS OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL

7. Cocky the Gamecock University of South Carolina

A mainstay in the old Capital One Mascot Challenges, Cocky has his own workout videos, and is well-regarded among many fanbases for his “Magic Box” entrance on football gamedays.

5. the Tree Stanford University

This one comes with a caveat, as the Tree isn’t the official mascot of the university; it’s a member of the Stanford Band. But an unofficial mascot that everyone associates with the school—and looks like that— couldn’t be left off of our list.

6. Ralphie the Buffalo University of Colorado

Ralphie, the 1,200-pound live buffalo, and her team of five varsity student-athlete “handlers” make Colorado football games a worthy addition to any college football fan’s bucket list. Guiding Ralphie around the field pregame and after halftime is a prestigious honor at Colorado, and the program of handlers has its own coaching staff to ensure student safety.

4. Bevo University of Texas

The live longhorn bull Bevo first made an appearance for Texas at a homecoming celebration on Thanksgiving Day 1916. And now, over a century later, Bevo (XV) is still one of the most beloved mascots in the game. Though he has, on occasion, broken free of his on-field pen during games, Bevo usually stands calmly in the endzone, taking part in some players’ touchdown celebrations.


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150 YEARS OF COLLEGE FOOTBALL

3. Mike the Tiger

2. The Duck

Louisiana State University

In 2005, LSU installed a $3.7 million, 15,000-square foot habitat to house its famed live royal Bengal tiger mascot Mike V. That was 70 years after the school purchased Mike I from the Little Rock Zoo after collecting 25 cents from every student. Until 2016, shortly before Mike VII took over, cheerleaders would stand atop the tiger’s cage as it rolled to its parking spot outside the opposing team’s locker room on football game days. Now, Mike VII spends his game days roaming his habitat and eating ground meat versions of opposing team logos.

University of Oregon

From the 1920s to ‘40s, a live duck named “Puddles” (and subsequently his offspring) found its way to Oregon football and basketball games, becoming a de facto mascot for the school. Repeated complaints from the Humane Society brought the live mascot era to an end, though, and through a handshake agreement with Walt Disney in 1947, the school was able to fashion a mascot costume in Donald Duck’s likeness. Now, the Duck shoots donuts into gameday crowds, rides a motorcycle, and heckles opposing fans, deviating just slightly from his Disney namesake

1

#

1. Uga University of Georgia

Georgia’s line of pure white English bulldogs, now on No. 10, has been a staple of the mascot landscape since 1956. Though every new dog is added to the “Uga” line—Uga X is the latest— each also has its own unique name, is given a custom-made jersey and a varsity letter, and resides in an air-conditioned on-field doghouse. When his day comes, each Uga is buried in a marble vault alongside his fallen predecessors outside the football stadium.


the first game

Rutgers University and its neighbor, Princeton, played the first game of intercollegiate football on Nov. 6, 1869, on a plot of ground where the present-day Rutgers gymnasium now stands in New Brunswick, N.J. Rutgers won that first game, 6-4. The game was played with two teams of 25 men each under rugby-like rules, but like modern football, it was "replete with surprise, strategy, prodigies of determination, and physical prowess," to use the words of one of the Rutgers players. William J. Leggett, captain of the Rutgers team who later became a distinguished clergyman of the Dutch Reformed Church, suggested that rules for the contest be adopted from those of the London Football Association. Leggett's proposal was accepted by Captain William Gunmere of Princeton, who later became Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New Jersey. At 3 p.m. on that memorable afternoon, the 50 combatants and about 100 spectators gathered on the field. Most of the assemblage sat on a low wooden fence and watched the athletes doo hats, coats and vests and use suspenders as belts. To distinguish themselves from the bareheaded visitors, 50 Rutgers students, including players, donned scarlet-colored scarfs which they converted into turbans. The teams lined up with two members of each team remaining more or less stationary near the opponent's goal in t the hopes of being able to slip over and score from unguarded positions. Thus, the present day "sleeper" was conceived. The remaining 23 players were divided into groups of 11 and 12. While the 11 "fielders" lined up in their own territory as defenders, the 12 "bulldogs" carried the battle. Each score counted as a "game" and 10 games completed the contest. Following each score, the teams changed direction. The ball could be advanced only by kicking or batting it with the feet, hands, heads or sides. Events leading up to the game were described by John W. Herbert, Rutgers '72, who was one of the players: "To l appreciate this game to the full you must know something of its background," Herbert wrote in 1933. "The two colleges were, and still are, of course, about 20 miles apart. The rivalry between them was intense. For years each had striven for possession of an old Revolutionary cannon, making night forays and lugging it back and forth time and again. Not long before the first football game, the canny Princetonians had settled this competition in their own favor by ignominiously sinking the gun in several feet of concrete. In addition to this, I regret to report, Princeton had beaten Rutgers in baseball by the harrowing score of 40-2. Rutgers longed for a chance to square Prin things."


A challenge for the game was issued by Rutgers. Three games were to be played that year. The first played at New Brunswick and won by Rutgers. Princeton won the second game, but cries of "over-emphasis" prevented the third game in football's first year when faculties of both institutions protested on the grounds that the games were interfering with student studies. Herbert Herbe gave this detailed account of the play in the first game: "Though smaller on the average, the Rutgers players, as it developed, had ample speed and fine football sense. Receiving the ball, our men formed a perfect interference around it and with short, skillful kicks and dribbles drove it down the field. Taken by surprise, the Princeton men fought valiantly, but in five minutes we had gotten the ball through to our captains on the enemy's goal and S.G. Gano, '71 and G.R. Dixon, '73, neatly kicked it over. None thought of it, so far as I know, but we had without previous plan or thought evolved the play that became famous a few years later as 'the flying wedge'." Fifty Fif years after their historic inaugural game, members of the 1869 Rutgers football team were honored at Homecoming cermonies in 1918. Herbert then related that his teammates failed to note a conference the Princeton's captain was holding with the giant of the Tiger team, J.E. Michael, '71, known to his mates as "Big Mike." "Next "N period Rutgers bucked, or received the ball, hoping to repeat the flying wedge," Herbert's account continues. "But the first time we formed it Big Mike came charging full upon us. It was our turn for surprise. The Princeton battering ram made no attempt to reach the ball but, forerunner of the interference-breaking ends of today, threw himself into our mass play, bursting us apart, and bowing us over. Time and again Rutgers formed the wedge and charged; as often Big Mike broke it up. And finally on one of these incredible break-ups a Princeton bulldog with a long accurate, perhaps lucky kick, sent the ball between the posts for the second score. "The flying wedge thus checkmated, Rutgers might have been in a bad spot had not Madison Ball, '73, come through. He had a trick of kicking the ball with his heel. All the game he had been a puzzle to the Princetonians. The ball would be rolling toward the Rutgers goal, and, running ahead of it instead of taking time to turn, he would heel it back. He made several such plays, greatly encouraging his team. Then he capped all this by one tremendous lucky backward drive directly to Dixon, standing squarely before Princeton's goal...Dixon easily scored, giving us a one-goal lead. Big Mike again rose, however, in a berserk endeavor, and, getting the ball, he called the Princeton men into a flying wedge of their own and straight-away they took the ball right down the Prin field and put it over." It was at this point that a Rutgers professor could stand it no longer. Waving his umbrella at the participants, he shrieked, "you will come to no Christian end!" Herbert's account of the game continues: "The fifth and sixth goals went to Rutgers. The stars of the latter period of play, in the memory of the players after the lapse of many years, were "Big Mike" and Large (former State Senator George H. Large of Flemington, another Princeton player). Someone by a random kick had driven the ball to one side, where it rolled against the fence and stopped. Large led the pursuit for the ball closely followed by Michael. They reached the fence on which students were perched, and unable to check their momentum, in a tremendous impact they struck it. The fence then gave way with a crash and over went the band of yelling students to the ground. "Every "Eve college probably has the humorous tradition of some player who has scored against his own team. This tradition at Rutgers dated from this first game, for one of her players, whose identity is unknown, in the sixth period started to kick the ball between his own goal posts. The kick was blocked, but Princeton took advantage of the opportunity and soon made the goal. This turn of the game apparently disorganized Rutgers, for Princeton also scored the next goal after a few minutes of play, thus bringing the total up to four all."


At this point Leggett introduced strategy to turn the tide in favor of Rutgers. Noticing that Princeton obtained a great advantage from its taller players, Leggett ordered his men to keep the ball close to the ground. Following this strategy, Rutgers kicked the ninth and tenth goals, thus winning the match. An analytical account of the game appeared in the November, 1869 issue of the Targum, Rutgers' undergraduate newspaper. "To describe the varying fortunes of the match, game by game, would be a waste of labor for every game was like the one before," wrote the student re-porter. "There was the same headlong running, wild shouting, and frantic kicking. "In every game the cool goaltenders saved the Rutgers goal half a dozen times; in every game the heavy charger of the Princeton side overthrew everything he came in contact with; and in every game, just when the interest in one of those delightful rushes at the fence was culminating, the persecuted ball would fly for refuge into the next lot, and produce cessation of hostilities until, after the invariable 'foul', it was put in straight. "To sum up, Princeton had the most muscle, but didn't kick very well, and wanted organization. They evidently don't like to kick the ball on the ground. Our men, on the other hand, though comparatively weak, ran well, and kicked well throughout. But their great point was the organization, for which great praise is due to the captain. The right men were always in the right place." One of the Princeton players, William Preston Lane, in 1933 contended in a newspaper interview that Rutgers "ran Prin us Princeton men out of town. I never found out why they did that," he related. "But we don't ask any questions. When we saw them coming after us, we ran to the outskirts of New Brunswick and got into our carriages and wagons and went away as fast as we could." Lane's contention is refuted in the Targum account. "After the match the players had an amicable "feed together," the paper reported. "At 8 o'clock our guests went home, in high good spirits, thirsting to beat us next time, if they can." The Daily Fredonian, a New Brunswick paper of that era, supported the Targum account in its issue of November F 9, 1869. "Though the generous liberality of the students of Rutgers College," the Fredonian reported, "a bountiful entertainment was prepared for our Princeton friends, at the favorite resort in Church Street known as Northrop's where 'mine host' and his estimable lady know how to get up a good supper." Regardless of what actually happened after the first game, football was here to stay. Rutgers got Columbia University started in the grid sport the following season and in a few years most of the colleges and universities in the East were represented on the gridiron. The foregoing account of America's first intercollegiate football game was prepared from material obtained from reliable sources. Previous drafts of the account were authenticated by surviving members of the first Rutgers and Princeton teams. The last surviving Princeton player, Robert Preston Lane (Class of 1872) died November 5, 1938. The last surviving Rutgers player, George H. Large (Class of 1872) died in the spring of 1939.


GUIDE TO GRILLING


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A R T X E N TRY A T N E B R ABSO ! N I K P A N

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Go, Team!

STUFF ON STICKS! PRETZEL PANINI! WE PARTNERED WITH OUR FRIENDS AT ALLRECIPES TO CREATE FUN DISHES THAT WILL SCORE BIG AT YOUR NEXT TAILGATING PARTY.

SERVES 4 | ACTIVE: 45 MIN TOTAL: 1 HR, 45 MIN

1⁄2 1⁄2 1⁄4 2 1⁄4

11⁄4 12 12 1 24 1

cup apple cider vinegar cup soy sauce cup honey scallions, finely chopped cup canola oil, plus more for brushing lb. boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into bite-size pieces white mushrooms, halved slices thick-cut bacon, halved crosswise can (8 oz.) pineapple chunks, drained cherry tomatoes large green bell pepper, cut into bite-size pieces

1. In a large bowl, whisk the first 4 ingredients with 1⁄4 cup canola oil. Toss with the chicken and mushrooms. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour.

2. Heat a grill to medium-high. 3. Drain the mushrooms and chicken over a small saucepan. Bring the marinade in the pan to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low. Simmer the marinade for 10 minutes. Pour half into a small bowl for basting the kebabs.

4. On 12 skewers (soak wooden SPONSORED

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ones in water for 30 minutes), thread the mushrooms, chicken, and the remaining ingredients.

5. Lightly brush the grill with oil. Cook the kebabs, turning occasionally and brushing with the basting marinade, until the chicken is cooked through, 12 to 15 minutes. Serve with the remaining marinade.

FROM THE EDITORS OF

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY JACOB FOX

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GAME DAY WINNERS

Chicken & Bacon Kebabs


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Go, Team!

Spicy Sliders

MAKES 8 | ACTIVE: 30 MIN TOTAL: 30 MIN

1 1⁄4 1 2 1⁄2 4 1 1⁄2

1⁄2 1 1 8 1

lb. ground beef tbsp. chili powder tsp. garlic powder tsp. ground cumin slices cheese, cut in half cups (lightly packed) fresh cilantro leaves, plus more for garnish cup mayonnaise jalapeño chile, seeded and coarsely chopped tbsp. fresh lemon juice slider rolls, toasted cup shredded cabbage

1. Heat a grill to medium-high. In a large bowl, mix the beef, spices, and 1⁄2 tsp. salt. Form into 8 patties. Grill for about 3 minutes per side; top the patties with the cheese during the last minute of cooking.

2. In a food processor, puree 11⁄2 cups cilantro, the mayonnaise, jalapeño, and lemon juice. Spread the mayo on the roll bottoms. Top with the cabbage, more cilantro, the patties, and roll tops.

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Go, Team!

Ham & Cheese Pretzel Panini

MAKES 8 | ACTIVE: 10 MIN TOTAL: 10 MIN

16 slices deli ham 16 slices dill Havarti cheese 16 frozen soft pretzels (such as SuperPretzel), thawed Grainy mustard, for dipping

1. Divide the ham and cheese among 8 pretzels, salt-side down. Top with the remaining pretzels, salt-side up.

2. Heat a grill to medium. Place the sandwiches on the grill. Using bricks wrapped in foil or a heavy ovenproof skillet, weigh down the sandwiches. Close the grill and cook the sandwiches until the cheese melts, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Serve the sandwiches with mustard for dipping.

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TailgaTing on a BudgeT 10 penny pinching ideas for a wallet friendly parking lot party By carrie anton

wheTher you’re in college, a recent college graduate or just someone who has limited financial resources similar to a college student, tailgating may seem out of reach for your empty wallet. Add up the cost of food, alcohol, tents, grills, plates and cups, games, and so on, and it’s no surprise the endless list of expenses feels too rich for your blood. And that doesn’t even include tickets into the game! Before you ditch the parking lot party to retire to the couch, catching the game on a poor-reception TV, try these cheap and easy tips for throwing a boss tailgate without the boss’s budget.

grab some friends #1 to help you.

X 1

dOn’T GO SOLO:

delegate!

pool funds.

Red adult beverage cups aside, now is not the time to be a hero and run the tailgate show on your own. Achieving Game Day Guru status is as much about your delegating skills as it is about being a kick-butt host. Bring in your buddies to pool available funds and abilities with the goal of throwing an impressive party that doesn’t break the bank. Assign duties to each person, putting one person in charge of food, one in charge of beverages, one in charge of serving pieces and so on. Be the point person for everyone to check back with, but don’t get stuck footing the entire bill on your own.

2

GO BACK TO THE BASICS:

3

CHOOSE LESS PRICEy PARKInG:

The origin of the word “tailgate” comes from the hinged door that opens and closes on the back of a truck. Parties started here, where coolers of snacks and beverages were packed for people to grab and enjoy while swinging their legs from the open bed of the parked vehicle. Tents, tables, chairs, grills and more may be nice additions to have, but not at all a must. Stick to brass tacks and don’t get ahead of yourself on items you can invest in later when money isn’t so tight.

If you’re going to the game, parking lots closer to the stadium are typically more expensive than those requiring a bit of pavement pounding. Find a lot that’s still full of fans but saves you $10 to $20 in exchange for the scenic walking route to the game. If you’re really strapped for cash, skip the live game (tickets are probably out of your budget anyway), and move the team cheering section to your garage, backyard, driveway or local park.


4

SERVE FROZEn FARE:

If you’re in charge of bringing food, get more for your money by shopping the frozen section of your grocery store. While fresh may be best, frozen hamburger patties, bratwursts, chicken breasts and other foods can be bought in bigger quantities for less money. Bonus: Throw them in the cooler to thaw, and they’ll reduce the amount of ice you need to buy.

5

SHOP SMARTER:

Since you’ll likely be in need of large volumes of food and beverages, find a friend or family member with a warehouse club membership to get better deals on the sustenance you serve than most grocery stores offer. Using pooled resources, stock up on just about everything you need from this one-stop shop, including meats to grill, premade sides of coleslaw, baked beans, and potato salad, filler foods of chips, dips, and other apps, and of course, beer and liquor aplenty.

6

PARKInG LOT POTLUCK:

Want to host a food-packed event but don’t have the spendy budget to serve it up? Invite a bigger group of people. You may think that a larger party means more expenses, but when you turn that party into a potluck, with each guest bringing a dish to share, you’ve really created a more efficient way to feed the masses. Create an online sign-up sheet where guests can add their names to categories of appetizers, sides, main dishes and desserts. After all, you don’t want to end up with 12 bags of chips and 12 jars of salsa.

7

BE A BUM:

If you really want the over-the-top experience without the matching price tag, up your borrowing game. Talk to friends and family members or put a call out on social media, asking to borrow the gear you need to feel like a true guru. If you feel like a heel bumming things from people, offer a barter system. For example, swap your lawn-cutting skills at a friend’s house in exchange for his fancy team tent and bench-sized cooler.

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GAME dAy STRATEGy:

Cornhole, ladder toss, ring toss and bocce might be signature tailgating activities, but if you don’t have the equipment (or a friend from whom to mooch), then it’s game over. Instead of purchasing a new set to play, go for throwback backyard-style games such as tossing the football around or playing catch with a flying disc. Don’t like to move much? We get it! Instead, sit back with a game of sports trivia or find a group game to download as an app on your tablet or smartphone.

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GET CRAFTy:

Compare two foldable lawn chairs-one plain and one with a team logo--and the evident difference will be in dollar signs. Instead of trying to deck out your party with official fan gear, use some DIY ingenuity and design your own custom cheering decor and apparel. Cut up worn-out T-shirts to make into banners. Draw the mascot on poster board with a complementing rah-rah line. Or spell out the team name with stick-on adhesive letters decorating dollarstore koozies to keep everyone’s brews chill.

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ByOE:

As in “Bring Your Own Everything.” At the end of the day, a party is really about having a good time with the people invited. While it would be great if you could be the host with the most, providing everything to make the tailgating experience unforgettable, is really not the point. The point is to spend quality time together making memories that last a lifetime. Throwing a killer tailgate can be as simple as reaching out to the crew, naming a date and a time, and asking everyone to bring their own food, beverages, places to pop a squat, and good spirit to have the best day celebrating the home team.


How to Grill Pizza By Anna Hezel

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f there’s one indelible piece of wisdom fourth grade instilled in us, it’s that pizza parties are the only parties that matter. Want to teach a bunch of 10-year-olds the joys of reading? Bribe them with a pizza party. Want to convince a bunch of teenagers to set their apathy aside for a moment of school spirit? Bribe them with a pizza party. Want your adult friends to show up at your home with some really nice bottles of wine? Bribe them with a pizza party. In the heat of the summer, a grill in your backyard can act as the centerpiece of a great pizza party.

Guests can help stretch the dough, customize their pies, and delight in the novelty of an ongoing, relaxed, off-the-cuff dinner menu. It will taste so much better in your backyard than at an expensive, hip restaurant. As Ken Forkish, author of The Elements of Pizza, writes, “The hidden reality of pizza is that you can easily make better pizza at home than you can buy at any but the best independently owned, quality-focused pizzerias.” With just the tiniest bit of ingredient prep and a hot fire, you will be ready to roll.


The Dough Whether you’re picking some pizza dough up from the store or making your own, it’s a good idea to have your dough ready for action. Form the dough into softballsized mounds, and set them on a lightly floured baking sheet. Cover them with a dish towel until you’re ready to use them.

The Sauce The best pizza sauce takes about 30 seconds to make. Open a large can of good-quality (like San Marzano) crushed tomatoes. Stir in a healthy few tablespoons of good olive oil and a few pinches of kosher salt.

The Toppings To keep omnivores, vegetarians, and vegans all happy, it’s a good idea to have a balance of great meats, cheeses, and vegetables. Prosciutto, coppa, and sopressata are all great meat options, and they tend to come pre-sliced and ready to go. It’s smart to have a balance of soft and hard cheeses — a few rounds of fresh mozzarella, some grated Pecorino Romano, and maybe some fresh ricotta for white pizzas. To add some seasonal summer ingredients, consider sprinkling some asparagus shavings or thin slices of grilled eggplant or zucchini. You might try some pickled onions or peppers for a little bit of crunch and acidity, or olives for a briny saltiness. Finish with some chili flakes, honey, or some fresh arugula or basil for a burst of green freshness. Ken Forkish’s “Brooklyn Hot Honey Pie” combines coppa, pickled onions, honey, and chili flakes in a sweet-hot-crunchy tribute to Paulie Gee’s Pizzeria in Greenpoint.

From the pages of Men’s Journal

Throwing it on the Grill When your grill is hot and ready, stretch a ball of pizza dough on a lightly floured surface into a thin circle. Brush the top generously with olive oil, and then pick up the dough, flipping it carefully onto the grill, oil-side down. Brush the exposed side with olive oil, and after about 2 minutes, flip the dough over, using a set of tongs. Working quickly, add your sauce, cheese, and other toppings, and put the lid on the grill. After about 5 minutes, your pizza should be ready to eat.


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eggies are ranked low on the list of popular grilled foods. Burgers are No. 1, followed by steak, chicken, hot dogs, pork chops and potatoes. Vegetables come in at No. 7, according to the NPD Group, a market research firm. That’s too bad, because grilling vegetables adds pizzazz to a meal, cooking experts say.

“ALMOST ANY VEGETABLE CAN BE A STAR ON THE GRILL” “It’s a perfect technique for someone who thinks they don’t like vegetables,” says Tina Ujlaki, Food & Wine’s executive food editor. “The grill brings out the best qualities of these nutrient-rich superstars by intensifying their natural flavors. If you brush another sauce or marinade on the top of them before, during or after cooking, you have three different opportunities to add even more flavor, interest and complexity.” Almost any vegetable can be a star on the grill, says Jessie Price, food editor of Eating Well. Asparagus is one of her favorites. She tosses it with olive oil, salt and pepper, lays it across the grate so it doesn’t fall through, and grills about six minutes. “Adding a little heart-healthy olive oil to almost any vegetable adds a great flavor and helps it cook nicely.” Ujlaki, also a contributor for the Food & Wine 2009 Annual Cookbook, is a big fan of cooking corn on the cob outside. “It adds a really nice dimension to corn. It gives it a little of that popcorn flavor.” You can grill it in the husk or out of the husk, without the silk. You can pull back the husk and use it as a handle. Afterward, you can brush the corn with a little olive oil mixed

with salt and chopped fresh herbs, she says. The grill is also “a really good friend to zucchini,” Ujlaki says. “It improves its flavor dramatically. You can cook it on the skewer with lemon wedges, and then when it’s done, squeeze the lemon over the zucchini.” Some harder, denser vegetables, including potatoes, carrots and celery root, should be cooked inside until just barely tender, and broccoli and cauliflower need to be blanched for a couple of minutes ahead of time -- then put on the grill, Ujlaki says.


Most vegetables are ready in under 10 minutes, but the exact time depends on the size and density, she says. You may want to use a grill basket for cooking cut-up vegetables outside, Price says. Pay close attention because they get done quickly, she says. Afterward, sprinkle them with a little vinaigrette, lemon juice or balsamic vinegar. “These are simple things that can add a lot of flavor but not a lot of calories.” Another way to spice them up is to make them into a salad, such as grilled pepper salad with different colored peppers or a potato salad with red potatoes. And throw some lettuce on the barbecue. “It does something magical to escarole or romaine,” Price says. In fact, grilled Caesar salads are becoming increasingly popular, Ujlaki says. To make one, you lightly brush olive oil on halved hearts of romaine lettuce, grill until just beginning to brown and then dress whole or cut them up in the salad. During the summer, Ujlaki sometimes offers her dinner guests a chance to create and grill their own kebabs. She sets out chunks or slices of vegetables (cherry tomatoes, onions, peppers, yellow squash, asparagus, sugar snap peas, zucchini, mushrooms, scallions, green beans) along with similarly sized pieces of quick- cooking meats, poultry and/or fish, and different sauces and marinades. “What’s great about this is some people like one vegetable, some like another, some only like one,” she says. “It’s a very, very easy way to make everybody happy, not do too much work and serve something healthful.”

FIRE UP THE FLAVOR OF VEGGIES

Start off the barbecue meal with these cooking tips Here are some tips on grilling vegetables from Jessie Price, author of Eating Well in Season: The Farmers’ Market Cookbook. First, brush vegetables lightly with olive oil, then season with salt and pepper. Asparagus --Grill over medium heat, turn occasionally until browned, about 6 minutes. Cherry tomatoes -- Skewer or use a grill basket, grill over medium-high heat, turning occasionally until tender, 4 to 6 minutes. Eggplant -- Slice into 1/2-inch rounds, grill over medium-high heat, turning once until tender, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Onions -- Cut into 1/4-inch slices, grill over mediumhigh heat, turning once until lightly browned, 2 to 3 minutes per side. Portobello mushrooms -- Grill over medium-high heat, turning once until tender, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Summer squash or zucchini -- Cut lengthwise into 1/2-inch slices, grill over medium heat, turn once until lightly browned, 3 to 4 minutes.


SINCE 1915 ®

Creamy Citrus-Herb Spinach Penne Serves 4

Ingredients: 1 vvv 2 Tbsps 2 Tbsps 2 cups 1/4 cup 1 Tbsp 1 tsp 2 Tbsps 1 tsp 1/2 tsp 2 cups

(8.8 oz) Ronzoni®® Homestyle™ Penne butter all purpose flour milk grated Parmesan cheese lemon juice lemon zest parsley, chopped fresh rosemary, stemmed and chopped thyme leaves fresh baby spinach leaves

Cooking Directions: 1. Prepare pasta according to package directions; drain. 2. In a large skillet melt butter over medium heat. Add flour and stir until incorporated into butter. Continue to cook and stir for 1 minute. Do not brown. 3. Gradually add milk, stirring constantly, until mixture is smooth. Stir in parsley, rosemary and thyme. Simmer, stirring frequently, until sauce begins to thicken, about 3 minutes. 4. Add Parmesan, lemon juice and zest. Add cooked pasta and spinach. Cook and stir until spinach wilts and all ingredients are well coated.


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BY CAITLYN DIIMIG, RD PHOTOS BRIE PASSANO FOOD STYLING CHARLIE WORTHINGTON PROP STYLING SUE MITCHELL

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Healthy Tricks The burger on the right has 14 fewer grams of fat and 604 fewer milligrams of sodium. Here’s how we did it. Subbing lean bison for fatty beef cuts major calories. Adding portobello mushrooms to the bison ensures patties are juicy. Omitting toppers such as cheese and bacon keeps saturated fat down. Instead, opt for heart-healthy fat from avocados. Skipping pretzel buns saves on sodium. Wholewheat buns provide extra good-for-you fiber.


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The sandwich on the right has half the fat and 417 fewer milligrams of sodium. Here’s how we did it: Opting for lean pork shoulder instead of country-style ribs lowers the total fat and saturated fat. Using a lower-calorie barbecue sauce makes all the difference. Look for a sauce with less than 50 calories per 2 tablespoons. We like Annie’s Organic. Vinegar-based sauces are a safe bet, too. Serving your sandwiches slider-style on small buns with healthful coleslaw rather than on large buttery Texas toast with pickles keeps sodium from skyrocketing.


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The Selection of College Football’s AllTime All-America Team to Provide Grand Finale to ESPN’s College Football 150 Initiative • •

The 150 Greatest Teams, Games, Coaches and Players also to be Determined Personal Testimonials Anchor 150 Consecutive Days of Original Content across ESPN’s Platforms, from August 17, 2019 through January 13, 2020

College football’s All-Time All-America Team will be announced in January 2020 and recognized around the College Football Playoff National Championship in New Orleans, providing a grand finale to ESPN’s College Football 150 initiative. ESPN’s year-long endeavor is in conjunction with the sport’s overall sesquicentennial celebration, led by the CFB150 organization. “The unrivaled passion of sports fans led to ESPN’s creation and no sport exemplifies that passion more than college football,” said ESPN President Jimmy Pitaro. “The 150th anniversary will be an unparalleled celebration of college football, providing the backdrop for ESPN’s vast platforms to explore the sport’s deep-rooted affiliation with American culture. Emerging from that rich history will be the formation of The All-Time All America Team, representing the single best player at each position on the field.” The All-Time All-America Team will feature 25 players: 11 on offense, 11 on defense, a kicker, punter, and return specialist. The team will be voted on by a select 150-member panel from across college football, made up of former coaches and players as well as media members, administrators, and additional key figures in and around the sport. “The All-Time All-America team is a great way to culminate the year-long celebration of the sport,” noted Kevin Weiberg, Executive Director of the College Football 150th Anniversary. “ESPN consulted with us in assembling a broad-based national panel of voters and will keep us informed as the voting process takes place. We look forward to recognizing these extraordinary athletes as part of the Anniversary celebration.” The All-Time All-America Team announcement will conclude ESPN’s year-long, College Football 150 storytelling experience. A sampling of what is to come: The 150 Greatest Coaches, Games, Players, and Teams Let the debates begin. College football’s all-time best coaches, games, players and teams will be determined by the same select 150-member panel from across the sport that will do the voting for the All-Time All America Team. All divisions and eras will be considered by the panel. The greatest teams will be unveiled around the launch of 150 consecutive days of original content in August. The greatest games will be revealed on November 6, 2019, the 150th anniversary of the first college football game, followed by the announcement of the greatest coaches during Heisman week in December. Finally, the greatest players will be revealed along with the All-Time All-America Team announcement in January 2020.


Football is US: Two Documentaries Exploring the Evolution of the Sport Football Is US: The College Game debuts August 24 immediately following Florida-Miami game). College football’s story begins with Rutgers vs. Princeton in 1869, the first game, and follows with those who moved the sport forward, the university programs that led college football from the so-called “Rag Days” of the 1800s through today, and the most pivotal onfield moments in college football history. From the ideals of amateurism and loyalty, to the pageantry and tradition, to the narratives of American history woven so deeply into the annals of the game itself, the film will seek to explore a seminal question: What sets college football apart from every other sport? Football Is US: The College Player debuts in January 2020. It will focus on the evolution of the young student-athletes who’ve played the game over its long and storied history. As much as any other facet of the sport, the backgrounds, identities, priorities, and collegiate experiences of its players have all been transformed over the last 150 years. Those changes are a reflection of fundamental changes in America and the massive growth of the game. From recollections of the all-time greats to explorations of the lives of the players today, this film debuting in January 2020 will be a reminder that the story of the game is their story. After all, more than anyone else, it’s the players on the field who’ve created the unforgettable moments and fueled college football’s unabated rise in popularity. The Football Is US documentaries will be directed by Jonathan Hock, an Emmy Award winner from ESPN’s critically acclaimed 30 for 30 franchise. Hock has directed multiple 30 for 30 films, including The Best that Never Was, the story of running back Marcus Dupree. The two films join the previously announced eight-part, 12-hour ESPN Films SEC Storied documentary Saturdays in the South: A History of SEC Football, which will debut on SEC Network on September 3, comprising three significant films as part of the ESPN College Football 150 initiative. My Story: 150 Personal Anecdotes to be Featured Daily, Starting August 17 Threading throughout the 150 consecutive days of original content, this series of one-minute testimonials from all parts of the college football tapestry – current and former players, coaches, administrators, media, and fans – will offer memories of the game through engaging tales and some of the best untold stories, breathing new life into the history of the sport. For one minute, every day, for 150 days, these stories will capture the very essence of college football and be featured across multiple ESPN platforms.


Weekly Themes to Guide Content Across ESPN’s Platforms Throughout the 2019 Season, Beginning September 10 ESPN will have weekly themes serving as a guide for its College Football 150 content for 11 weeks during the 2019 season. The themes are: • • • • • • • • • • •

The Culture College vs. Pro Evolution Games of the Century The Heisman Bowls, Polls and Champions Integration Notre Dame Recruiting Rivalries Television

Two documentary series, The American Game and The Greatest (both previously announced in October), will debut September 10 and 12 respectively and will explore these themes. The weekly content themes will also be woven through ESPN’s programming, including on SportsCenter and College GameDay Built by The Home Depot. Additionally, ESPN will designate a College Football 150 Game of the Week during the 2019 season, as well as other related content throughout the year. “Our goal is to give a wide-ranging, intensive look at the sport’s history, with each part of content adding an element to the entire CFB150 portfolio,” said ESPN Vice President & Executive Producer John Dahl, who is overseeing College Football 150. “We’ll delve into a variety of topics, including sensitive subjects around race and issues that have challenged the game, but also celebrate the sport and its position in American history.” There will be a vast array of digital content to be highlighted by a series of major feature stories throughout 2019. The features will span the breadth of the game’s 150 years, as well as college football’s place in American life through the decades. ESPN.com and the ESPN App will also be the first to reveal each of the 150 Greatest lists, including the fans’ picks, and will repost historical features that have run on the site in recent years.

Down and Distance: New Podcast Series to Debut in August A series of original podcasts spotlighting different stories and perspectives from the 150 years of college football and how they reflected American culture will drop around the launch of the 150 consecutive days of original content in August. They will be written and narrated by Maisel, who also co-hosts the ESPN Campus Conversation podcast.


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What Causes Heartburn? A Checklist

Your daily habits may be triggering your heartburn. While most heartburn sufferers may recognize the symptoms of the condition, few are aware of how it starts. The root cause of heartburn stems from a weakened lower esophageal sphincter (LES), or when the LES relaxes abnormally. The LES is a circular band of muscle at the bottom of your esophagus, and it acts like a ‘valve’ as it enters the stomach. Normally when you swallow, your LES relaxes to let food and liquid flow into your stomach, and then it closes again. For some people, though, the LES may open too often or not close tight enough. When this happens, the acid in your stomach can flow back up into your esophagus. Since your esophagus doesn’t have the same protective lining that your stomach does, the acid can irritate its more sensitive tissues, triggering heartburn and discomfort.

Foods That May Trigger Heartburn Although the actual cause of heartburn is physical, people generally view their heartburn triggers as the root cause. Though scientifically that’s not the case, it’s still worth noting which behaviors can trigger the experience of heartburn. Food, for instance, is a common heartburn trigger.

Check out this list of common offenders to see if any could be triggering your heartburn:

Tomatoes, tomato sauce, and ketchup

Oranges, grapefruit, and other citrus fruits and juices

Garlic

Vinegar

Onions

Chocolate

Coffee, tea, or other caffeinated products

Alcohol

Peppermint

Fried & fatty foods

Carbonated drinks

Mustard, pepper, and other spices


Habits That May Trigger Heartburn Many people realize that their behaviors around mealtime, or the activities they take part in, also can cause heartburn. Here are some habits that could be triggering your heartburn symptoms:

 Medication for a urinary tract infection  Muscle relaxants  Prescription pain killers  Antidepressants

Physical Changes & Conditions That May Trigger Heartburn

Eating large meals or eating too fast

Laying down right after eating

Eating close to bedtime

Drinking alcohol or smoking

Pressure on the stomach from frequent bending over or tight clothes

Here are some physical reasons you could be suffering from heartburn: 

Pregnancy

Stress and/or anxiety

Acid Reflux

Exercising soon after eating

GERD or Acid Reflux Disease

Weak esophageal muscles

Stomach emptying muscles

Obesity

Anxiety or depression

Hiatal hernia

Peptic ulcer

Medications That May Trigger Heartburn There are some medications that can cause heartburn, because they may relax the LES. You may want to talk to your pharmacist or doctor about your heartburn if you’re taking any of the following: 

Medications for asthma or allergies

Prescription blood pressure or angina pills

It’s true that your meals, habits, or even medication could be triggering your heartburn. But the fact is that heartburn is a real condition with biological causes.

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© 2019 The Kraft Heinz Company


think “college football” by myles mellor

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