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04 19 March 2007


If you’re in the market for a 2007 diary then come on up to the WSU reception or the Nexus office (both located on the ground floor in the Student Union Building) and grab yourself a free WSU 2007 Student Diary. They’re loaded with heaps of information to help you at Uni and also lots of fun stuff aside from the usual diary things. Come and get ‘em! They’re free!


BY ROCKY Do you like a good smacking? Should the old/new Hilly Bar be part of a heritage trail? Sex, Drugs or Rock n’ Roll? Best fashion trend ever? Do you listen to Contact 88.1?

Duncan

David & friend

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Depends who’s giving the smack down. Sure, why not! Sex. Emo… It’s Hawt. No, but I know I should be.

Tina & friend

Bridget

Ben

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why should I like it? No. I love rock n’ roll. Belly rings. No.

Sure… (Later Changes answer to NO). Yes. A pick and mix of all three. Fluoro Kids. No.

No, it might hurt. FUCK’N AYE. My mum used to drink there back in the day. Sex, big time! Wearing your paints low… Low Ride. Nah, I mostly do the ol’ ipod thing.

Yeah, but it always depends on whose giving the smack. Yeah dude. Sex for sure. Stubbies. No I don’t…

Win a wireless Xtra Broadband pack and get moving! Nexus is giving our readers the chance to go in the draw to win a wireless Xtra Broadband package from Telecom – valued at over $550. We’ve got two packs to giveaway over the next four weeks. If you’re one of the lucky winners you will be able to take the Internet with you almost anywhere in your home.

tion read

For more broadband informa

and xtra.co.nz/wirelessbroadb

To be in the draw, tell us in 100 words or less why you need free broadband for a year and give us your name, address and contact phone number. Send your entries to nexus@waikato.ac.nz. Entries must be received by 28th March, 2007.

March 2007 competition terms and conditions. The first valid entry drawn will receive Wireless Broadband Network Kit including wiring and connection plus free Broadband for a year on an Xtra Go Broadband plan. If Broadband is not available in the winner’s area the winner will receive 12 months free dial-up on the Xtra Value Pack. Winners will be drawn on 29th March 2007 and will be notified by Nexus. Nexus’s decisions are final and no correspondence will be entered into. Prizes cannot be transferred or exchanged or redeemed for cash. Prize draw entry constitutes acceptance of these terms. Sorry - employees of Telecom and their immediate families are not eligible to enter.



ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

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BY THE PANTHER Tip #7: What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. Well that’s not true obviously, what doesn’t kill you will of course make you weaker and eventually lead to the cause of your painful and humiliating death (but lets just pretend the saying is true). So, in order to make yourself more muscular you should in theory stab yourself repeatedly. Yeah, you go do that but don’t mention The Panther when you end up at the ER. I’m not going back to jail. Tip #8: Don’t be smart, dummy. It is a scientific fact that the human brain uses 40% of the bodies ATP (energy) at rest and even more at times of mental strain, so this energy is lost and not able to be converted to protein when exercising. Thus, if you use your brain you will build muscle more slowly. When it comes down to it, which would you rather? A degree of intellect, or a six-pack and a huge pair of cannons. It’s hardly a choice, is it?

ASKEW PRESENTS

GAY MOVIE NIGHT Hedwig and the Angry Inch FRIDAY, 23rd MARCH from 7PM L6 – FREE Food, drink and nibbles provided Askew is a group for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, etc students, staff and supporters. Join our mailing list at groups.yahoo.com/group/askewwaikato

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ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007




Credits VOCALS

Rosalind Case nexus@waikato.ac.nz

GUITAR Matt Scheurich graphics@nexus.npl.co.nz

KEYS Tony Arkell admanager@nexus-npl.co.nz 021 176 6180

DRUMS Joshua Drummond

Contents

news@nexus-npl.co.nz

Features

MAIN FEATURE WRITER

TRIANGLE M. Emery

Nexus Issue 4 · 19 March 2007

17 20 22 24 46

htownslut@gmail.com

Roz Case

The Opposite of Brash – An interview with Nicky Hager Laying the Smack Down – Jane Ritchie on Section 59 Fly on the Wall The Deadly Deaths – Interview with a Hamilton band Meatbix – Interview with an Auckland band

News 8 – 13



Editorial Lettuce WSU columns Notices Agony Art Society Pages Walk Through Sports Thoughts Wackowatch Chuck & Benjo Magic 8 Ball

ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

Chuck & Benjo, Brie Jessen, Leah Graham, Alana Fergusson, Candice Bottomsworth, The Fly, Jessica Ritchie, Gail Brown, Chris Pellow, Art Focker, Jerode Raman, Blair Nicholson, Vitamin C., Burnsy, Matt, Joe Citizen, Guru Moonbeam, Magic 8 Ball, Adam Smith, The Panther, Richard Swainson, Rocky Maeva, Andrew Neal, WSU and maybe some other people whose names we forgot.

Some real news Some fake news Short Shorts Haiku News

CONTACT NEXUS

Regulars 07 14 28 33 34 34 35 35 36 36 37

BACK-UP DANCERS

37 38 38 39 40 40 41 42 43 44 45

Los Libros Third Eye in the Sky Been There, Done That Strips Vitalisa Weird Facts $3 Dinner Citric Gig Guide Books Films

Email: Phone: Fax: Postal:

nexus@waikato.ac.nz 07 838 4653 07 838 4588 Nexus Publications 2003 Ltd Private Bag 3059, Hamilton

Read us online at

www.nexusmag.co.nz The views expressed in this publication are not necessarily the views of Nexus Publications 2003 Ltd, any of our advertisers, WSU or APN Media. Sometimes we wonder what would happen if we wrote something rude here. Why are you even reading this part of the magazine? Nexus is a member of the Aotearoa Student Press Association (ASPA) but they can’t tell us what to wear or how to act. www.nexusmag.co.nz


Editorial BY ROZ CASE

I’ve been looking for a new house to live in for a couple of months now. Its taking me a long time because I’m reasonably fussy and I want to live in Hamilton East. It’s not exactly the most desirable location in Hamilton but, as so many of you are aware, Ham East redeems itself via occasional episodes of quaintness. One might say that Ham East is indeed the Ponsonby of the Waikato. Except, not really at all. But we do have the occasional renovated villa and oxalis grows abundantly in our gardens. Okay, so Ham East is actually a bit of hotchpotch mess of houses from every possible decade (plus some extra decades which never actually occurred in history) peppered with large, decrepit blocks of flats. In spite of this, some seriously high rents are commanded by some seriously sub-standard properties. The same can be said for Hillcrest. You only need to spend half a day looking at rentals in this area to know that landlords are on to a bloody good thing when they purchase in either suburb (hereafter we will refer to the two as Eastcrest). As a home-owner letting houses to students, the only thing

you’re responsible for is making sure that you charge exorbitant rents whilst allowing your investment property to become to become a rundown mould-infested hellhole. This is no easy feat for a landlord, one might argue. But certainly, in the long term, it is worth it. Because the scummier the house, the higher the rent in Eastcrest. At what point in history did students become so despised by the general population that it became acceptable to house them in complete squalor, often to the detriment of their personal health and wellbeing? Popular rhetoric implies that students choose to live in disgusting abodes, because they’re not really members of society. They’re students. A sub-human population, barely tolerated by the landed gentry. World Health Organisation research has shown that New Zealand houses are some of the dampest, most badly ventilated in the world. They recommend that a house have an average indoor temperature of 18-20 degrees, if its inhabitants are to maintain good health. But if you’re living in a house in Eastcrest that was built before 1979 – as most students are - the average bedroom temperature will be sitting around 13 degrees. Some will be closer to freezing. How many of you think your landlord actually cares that your toes are going to be permanently blue for the next six months?

NEXUS AND GORDON HARRIS PRESENT

The call for cover art

Calling all artists, designers, photographers, sculpters, crafters, whatever! Nexus wants to put your art on the cover page of the magazine. We want to spotlight great local talents so please send us some of your original art for the cover page. If your artwork is deemed by the Nexus Designer Demon to be satisfactory enough, you will be rewarded with a $50 Gordon Harris gift voucher! Not to mention have your artwork emblazoned on the cover of Hamilton’s only student magazine. For more info read www.nexusmag.co.nz/coverart 386 ANGLESEA ST, HAMILTON · OPEN 7 DAYS PH: 07 834 3952 · EM: hamilton@gordonharris.co.nz

This week’s cover by

Ryan Bennett MYSPACE.COM/MEGAHEROES

Did they bother to insulate that 80 year old property when they bought it? No, it’s more likely that they threw it on the rental market as soon as the mortgage deal was signed. That’s the thing about investment properties. They’re investments. The person making the investment wants the greatest possible return for the least capital input. For property investors, this will involve buying a shitty house, making no improvements at all and then quickly renting it to as many desperate students as can possibly be crammed in for $400-$600 a week. It wasn’t so long ago that being a student meant paying $30 a week for your room. The houses haven’t improved since then. The minimum wage might have increased but so has the student allowance income-testing threshold. And interest rates are significantly lower today than they were ten years ago. Yet market rents are through the roof. You could argue that this is simply a reflection of our country’s debt-lust – our landlords are mortgaged to the hilt and we’re footing the bill (ie. the baby-boomers came of age and got greedy). But ultimately, we come to the point where students are living in total poverty, barely affording to eat, let alone get drunk every night (although somehow they still manage, those brave souls) and paying 50-75% of their income in rent. And at that point it has to be said that being a landlord in Eastcrest is the equivalent of being a diamondsmuggler in Sierra Leone or a public relations adviser in Wellington. That is, not a very respectable occupation.

MC Stormtroopa would like to give a holla to Jake, Matt and Rory. Cheers for the beers at Ward Lane! www.nexusmag.co.nz

ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007




NEXUS NEWS Young Nats miss Nicky Hager, conservative shame deepens Around 50 to 70 students, lecturers and union members crammed into the downstairs area of the WSU building last Wednesday to hear Nicky Hager, author of ‘The Hollow Men’ speak about his book, journalism and politics. Hager, who was blamed for the downfall of Don Brash’s political career and accused of stealing ‘private’ information from politicians, stopped over at the University as part of his nation-wide book tour. The purpose of the tour was for Hager to answer questions set the record straight about exactly what he had written and how Brash’s emails came into his possession. The basis of his speech was about what he called the ‘dirty politics of National’s 2005 election campaign. Hager explained that National used U.S. Republican think tanks, Australian far-right groups The Centre for Independent Studies and Crosby-Textor Consultants, as well as the Exclusive Brethren to manipulate the public and hide the policies National’s true agenda. Hager also identified the Australian groups as the reason for John Howard’s continued political success. Hager said that his book uncovered how National manipulated facts and the media in order to win votes to such a degree that he felt it could be described as “brainwashing”. While there have been many claims that Hager stole emails and ended Brash’s career, he claims that all information received was directly from National party members and that Brash’s career was on a downhill slide anyway. Questions from the audience were well-mannered, with many expressing curiosity about Hager’s book. While there had been rumours of Young Nats showing up to defend Brash, none appeared to be present on the day. Screen and Media lecturer, Dr Ann Hardy, who will soon present a paper on the Exclusive Brethren at a media conference in Wales, says she “was quite impressed” by Hager’s presentation and says it was good to see the topic being so thoroughly investigated in New Zealand.

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ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

University Games hard sell BY JOSH DRUMMOND

Waikato University students may be forced to pay over $600 each to attend the University Games in Christchurch this year. The high price has been blamed on a lack of funding and preparation, as well as a lack of support for the Uni Games by the University. “It will definitely affect [competitors]” said CSL’s clubs development officer Phil Gilbert. “It means, potentially, you are limited by affordability rather than the quality of the teams.” The lack of funds means Waikato athletes may compete in only six to eight sports in the Christchurch Uni Games, as opposed to last year’s games in Wellington where Waikato entered in 12 different events. The cost for individual students to attend the Wellington games was around $350. “There is a perception that the Uni Games are just a ‘piss trip,’ but that’s not the case,” said WSU Sport and Recreation Officer Glen Delamere. “As Sports and Rec Officer I’m disappointed that while the University supports community events, it seems reluctant to fund Uni Games teams.” The WSU are reportedly working with the University and Campus Services Limited to bring the costs of the trip down so more students can attend. “I think the whole area needs a review from the top down, from the Universities to Uni Sport on how much students should have to contribute to their trip,” said Gilbert. He added that the best way for students caught short by the high cost of the trip to get the money was to start “fundraising hard.” The University Games are held yearly for university students from all of New Zealand’s universities and satellite campuses. Entrants in the Christchurch games will compete in up to 28 different sports in 15 different venues. Last year 110 Waikato students competed in 12 events, and achieved medal results in seven.

News flash! We want your news. We also want you to write news! If you are keen to help us out and exercise your journalistic ability then get in touch with us at nexus@waikato.ac.nz or ring 07 838 4653.

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News

Waikato Students Win Stuff BY Phoebe Meryll

Charlotte Osborne smokes the field in the 400m. Photo: Briar Sefo

Current and ex-Waikato University students featured among the medal winners in the NZ Track and Field Championships in Inglewood March 2nd-4th. Gold medals were picked up by Keshia Grant, for the SW and W19 javelin, and Hillary scholar Charlotte Osborne for the W19 400m. Charlotte also won bronze in the 200m. Tokoroa’s Monique Williams, a Waikato student but competing for Auckland, was a standout performer at the event, winning the 100m, 200m and 400m golds, as well as two relays. Law and politics student Briar Sefo won a silver in the 400m hurdles but was sorry to miss out on another win in the WSU Student Olympics. Waikato alumni also fared well at the championships – Sarah Devoy, a 2005 Hillary scholar, received a bronze medal in the 5000m, finishing a mere 6 seconds behind the winner. All five athletes have been recognised at the Waikato University Blues Awards over the last couple of years. Briar Sefo, also the Hamilton City Hawks Track and Field President, said she enjoyed the Championships experience. The personal highlight for her was seeing Hawks Stuart Farquhar and Keshia Grant defend their senior national javelin titles, with Keshia also defending her under-19 title. For Stuart Farquhar it was his 7th title. “Not only was it cool for them but also a big tribute to their coach Debbie Strange (also coach to other high level throwers such as Beatrice Faumuina) who oozes dedication and enthusiasm. Keshia has had a big summer with so much touch [rugby] on as well so I’m stoked for the three of them.” Keshia Grant and her older sister Conal, who is also a Waikato student, played in the New Zealand Mixed Open Team that beat Australia in the Touch World Cup Final in January. “You can’t beat being in a New Zealand team at a World Cup with your sister, and winning gold,” said Keshia to Femme magazine recently.

Briar Sefo was also pleased to see the younger Hawks members bringing home the medals but also having fun. “It’s important to know when to switch your game face on but also to know when to take it off and chill out too. However, there was a personal downside to representing the region at nationals for Briar – being fully physically prepared meant having to avoid most of O’Week. “It definitely hurt to miss the WSU Student Olympics. It hurt real deep. My Wakatoomba Express guys in Oz were hurting about it too,” said Briar. “After our complete domination last year, it would have been nice to show the freshies just who really are the big men (and women!) on campus because it really is the true test. I still have my scars! But the Wakatoomba Express have had to wear the loss of key team members to Australia so to have left a legacy such as ours is perhaps a fantastic tribute to our historical hardness as well. We have a few newbies in the pipeline though.” Briar was also disappointed to miss Beerfest, a traditional favourite, but is definitely looking forward to the October one. As for providing the debauched lowdown on the Waikato contingent, Briar was reticent, simply admitting to a “a lot of laughs and fun. As if I would tell anyway! What goes on trip stays on trip!” Other stars of the NZ Championships were Beatrice Faumuina who won her 14th national title, Valerie Vili (winning her 7th), Nelson’s Dallas Bowden who took out the M16 3000m and 1500m, national senior men’s road champion Scott Winton, who won the 10,000m in 29m 38.90s, and local Hamilton City Hawk Sarah McSweeney who had a blinder and further reduced her national women’s under-17 2000m steeplechase record to 6m 53.02s.

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ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007




News

New Pro Vice Chancellor (Maori) appointed Internationally renowned researcher in Maori and indigenous education, Professor Linda Tuhiwai Te Rina Smith (Ngati Awa,Ngati Porou) has been appointed Pro Vice-Chancellor (Maori) at the University of Waikato. Professor Smith, who holds a Chair in Education at The University of Auckland and is joint director of Nga Pae o te Maramatanga (Horizons of Insight), the National Institute of Research Excellence in Maori Development and Advancement, will take up the Waikato position later this year. The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Waikato, Professor Roy Crawford, and the University’s Kaumatua, Hare Puke, joined in congratulating Professor Smith on her appointment.

“The University is extremely fortunate to have someone of Professor Smith’s calibre take up this important role. Her work in the field of Maori education, and indigenous people’s education generally, is renowned both here in New Zealand and internationally,” they said. “Her leadership as Pro Vice-Chancellor Maori, and her contribution to research and teaching at Waikato, will be immensely valuable to the University, students and the wider community. We look forward to working alongside her.” They also thanked Professor Tamati Reedy, the outgoing Pro Vice-Chancellor (Maori) for his significant contribution to the University. Professor Reedy has been a member of the senior management team at the University and has been responsible for a number of major innovations in regard to the education of Maori

students. Professor Smith has a strong interdisciplinary research and teaching background, primarily in the field of education, including Maori and indigenous education, and the sociology and history of education. Her book, “Decolonising Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples”, received international attention and is now used as a text across a range of disciplines and institutions. It has been translated into Spanish, Chinese, Arabic, Italian and Bhasa Indonesian. Many of Professor Smith’s publications are credited with having helped to create the academic field of Maori and indigenous education. She is highly sought after as a speaker and has delivered a large number of international keynote addresses.

The Shape of Water Issues of women’s working rights, female genital mutilation, and Women in Black are brought to the screen as the international documentary The Shape of Water premiers in New Zealand at the University of Waikato this Wednesday.

The University of Waikato will be the first place in the country to experience stories from women from the poorest countries in the world as they are given a voice in the inspirational feature documentary, The Shape of Water, as it premiers in New Zealand here at the university on Wednesday, 21st March. The film shares intimate encounters with women from Brazil, India, Senegal and Israel/Palestine as they work to challenge and change destructive traditions and methods

of development in their native countries. These women are by no means portrayed as passive victims to the world around them, but instead as ‘activists’ seeking to preserve the Brazilian rainforest; fight against female genital mutilation in Senegal; protect the female work force in India; and oppose the Israeli occupation of Palestine. The film, narrated by Oscar winner Susan Sarandon, has already won several awards in America, and has now been short listed for the Human Rights Film Festival in New Zealand, to be held in May 2007. Director of the film, Professor Kum-Kum Bhavnani, from the University of California, Santa Barbara, founded her concerns of social justice through her scholarly research and teaching, which emphasised Third World women, ethnography, cultural and feminist studies. Bhavnani soon found her passion for

these subjects growing outside the realm of the classroom, concluding that her subjects needed to be bought to life on film. “I felt in my heart that their stories should be made known to a wider audience. These women are showing us how to make change - change in both the grand gesture and at the micro level - in their everyday lives”. Preceding The Shape of Water screening will be a lecture by Professor Bhavnani on Tuesday, 20th March, titled “Dancing on the edge: Women, culture and a passion for change”. The film will then go on to screenings in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch in May for the Human Rights Film Festival.

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News

Punks riot and engage in earnest whinging BY LAURA MCQUILLAN - SALIENT

The NOFX show in Wellington on March 2 ended in violence and damage to the Victoria University student union venue, Union Hall, after a large number of ticket holders were refused entry. Union manager Rainsforth Dix said the venue’s capacity of 750 had been oversold by more than 50 tickets. He said that the union believed that allowing further ticket holders in would have constituted a safety risk. “Because of concerns about venue capacity and safety, Student Union staff contacted Campus Care and it was decided that because of safety concerns no further admissions would be allowed,” Dix said. “When this decision was advised to the crowd, about 50 persons broke through the security barrier into the building. The police were called and when they arrived the crowd was quickly dispersed.” Dix said the 50 who broke through the barrier were able to remain in the building, “as it was impossible to ensure they left safely.” It is understood that a misunderstanding between the union and the promoter of the NOFX show, Dynamo Promotions, over ticket sales resulted in 806 tickets being sold in total. However, a post on PunkAs.com by Dave McDermott of Dynamo Promotions says the number of tickets sold was still less than that of the Pennywise show at the Union Hall last year. According to a union incident report, the crowd problems resulted in four to five people receiving injuries substantial enough to require first aid and a “small scale riot and many break ins.”

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Bitch Still Crazy Reports have emerged from Britney Spears’ therapist that she has entered a treatment facility in Los Angeles in order to recover from an addiction to rehab. The news comes after what seemed to be a revival in fortune for the deposed pop princess, with many Hollywood directors having expressed interest in casting her for upcoming movies. Britney was due to begin filming with Demi Moore at the end of March in GI Jane 2: Cobras Revenge, and had also appeared in a cameo as the Borg queen in the upcoming new Star Trek film. Rumours have surfaced of a potential film project with legendary leading man Richard Gere, although the possibility remains that he’s just hanging with her because he thinks that she’s a Buddhist now. A spokesperson for Spears said that while she is “nearing the light at the end of the tunnel” she is still currently “bat-fuck crazy” and that a team is on standby to freeze her in carbonite should the need arise.

Global Warming Still Crazy Top researchers in the United States and Europe have discovered shocking new information about the global warming phenomenon. Recent research suggests that the thermal threat is the result of a previously unknown object in space. A supermassive hydrogen combustion located 150 million km from the earth has been bombarding the atmosphere with infrared radiation, which can have the energy to penetrate the ozone layer and the various greenhouse gases that protect our planet from non-carbon based life. This radiation heats the globe, and the heat is unable to escape the powerful force of gravity. Global Warming has long been a problem for scientists, as they struggle to reverse its

REUTERS

various effects. It has a drastic effect on the environment, and many species of plants and animals are forced to adapt or seek new living areas. Late last year a colony of ice-bergs drifted past New Zealand, a small Antipodean island nation located directly under the Ozone Hole. Scientists suspect that the ice-bergs were forced to leave their natural home in Antarctica due to the increased temperature, and were beginning a perilous trek to colder climes near the arctic circle. Global warming was first discovered in 2001, when weather pattern analysts observed that it failed to rain for two days in a row in Detroit and it was also kind of warm on both days.

Afterlife Still Crazy Officials in New York announced yesterday that Frank Sinatra is still dead. The iconic entertainer died of a heart attack in 1998, and apparently has remained dead ever since. Sinatra’s swagger and overall sense of unbridled Italian mafioso rage made him an legend amongst drunks and in popular music history, and his continued state of unloving is the source of international mourning. His singing, drinking, dancing and womanising made him the greatest man in history along with fellow rat-pack members Sammy Davis Junior, Dean Martin, Peter Lawford and Joey Bishop, except more so. Proponents of the resurrection of history’s greats predict that when Sinatra does return “it’ll be like Easter, but with blackjack and hookers.”

ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

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News

Paris: ‘that’s hot’, Reporters: ‘Shut up already’ BY ANDREW SCORESBY

International news organisation the Associated Press recently declared a week-long ban on all news stories relating to New York socialite and incessant attention-whore Paris Hilton, inspiring student journalists across the globe to cease mentioning her in their articles. AP Entertainment Editor Jesse Washington said in an article in the New York Observer that even protestations against the ban generally ignored the plight of Ms. Hilton. “There was a surprising amount of hand-wringing. A lot of people in the newsroom were saying this was tampering with the news.” Washington says that while the official ban has ended, Ms. Hilton is still on probation. “We’ll continue to use our news judgment on each item, individually.”

Fear of evil sweat droplet contamination rife US President George Bush is unpopular.

Everybody knows that. But it turns out that in Guatemala, he’s so unpopular that Mayan elders have opted to ceremonially cleanse the ground he walks on. The leaders told Reuters they would hold a spiritual ceremony to restore “peace and harmony” at the Mayan ruins of Iximche after Bush tours the site on Monday. “No, Mr Bush, you cannot trample and degrade the memory of our ancestors,” said indigenous leader Rodolfo Pocop during a press conference. “This is not your ranch in Texas.”

Can rugby players read? Get up close and personal with your favourite Chiefs and State Northern Knights at Hamilton City Libraries this month as part of a national campaign to show public libraries as being inspirational, modern and fun. The nationwide Inspire Me campaign was launched on 11 March. The Chiefs and the Knights are lending their support to Hamilton City Libraries’ local initiatives.

On Wednesday, 28 March from 2pm3pm the Knights are visiting Chartwell, Dinsdale and Hillcrest community libraries. Hamilton Central Library will host the Chiefs on Thursday, 29 March from 11.30am. Both teams will be reading to school children, talking to library patrons and making themselves available for questions. Patrons of all Hamilton City Libraries can win a chance to see the Chiefs in action. Anyone who issues an item from a Hamilton City Library from now until 27 March can go in the draw to win tickets to the 31 March homegame at Waikato stadium when the Chiefs take on the Blues. Entry boxes will be placed at library counters. Nationally, several high profile New Zealanders have lent their name to the Inspire Me campaign including Oscar Kightley, Trelise Cooper, Brooke Fraser, Peta Mathias and Daniel Vettori. All personalities have found libraries and reading to be a source of inspiration in their chosen careers and share this message with all New Zealanders through the campaign.

Haiku News

BY DRUMMOND-SAN

Because if we don’t present the news in (approximately) 17 syllables, who will? Petrol prices rise 3 cents Oh great, not again Want a tip to save money? Don’t buy SUVs

Chief suspect confesses responsibility for 9/11 Guantanamo transcript All right! Guilty, I plead! I did it! I admit! Please stop hitting me!

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ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

Gay-rights groups criticise Pentagon on dismissals

95 Labour MPs say no. But Blair gets nuclear missiles

Officers surprised: Some of the men under them Are homosexual

Blair gets missiles for nuking Maybe he’s Compensating for something

Wife googles “How to commit murder” then commits murder

Bill will hurt families, says mother who used horsewhip

Dude should have checked Her Google search history Could have got her first

Smacking bill hurts families? Much like horsewhips hurt kids? Clever woman.

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News

Mr Safety Bigglesworth in the Fight Against Stupidity (and also Crime) Hello, readers. People often ask me why I’ve dedicated my life to fighting crime. I always tell them it’s not really crime I fight against ��� it’s stupidity. You see, criminals are stupid. Some blame society for criminality. I blame stupidity. As Jesus should have said, “The stupid will always be with us.” So, this week, I’m going to point out examples of some low-key stupidity that, while not criminal, is still costing the people concerned. Students of the Waikato, I give you stupid:

Gate One exit – it does become a bit of a frustration for us. If people continually park on the grass we’ll continually clamp them. It’s not something we want to do. We think it’s a case of follow the leader – people see one person doing it, they do it as well.” So there you go. Don’t be stupid, and you shouldn’t get clamped. For those having trouble finding a park, Ray Hayward of Uni Security suggests: • Take the bus • Carpool (The Uni runs the RideLink service for carpoolers. Cheap, easy and effective, or so we’re told.) • Ride a bike • Walk, if you’re close enough. In other, actual-crime related news – well, it’s not good. Students have been leaving valuable stuff in the library. Is it really any surprise that it then gets stolen? The library’s not a safety deposit box. Take your shit with you. On the more sinister side – there’s been a report that some guys got followed around campus by some shady sorts who were scoping cars, buildings, valuables, things like that. If you see anything similarly suspicious, call security (838 4444) or The Cops. There’s also been a car stolen (from near Gate 10) and a breakin to a car (at Gate One.) Both occurred during the daytime. Moral? Take your stuff out of your car, even during the day. And be paranoid.

That’s right. If you’re dumb enough to park outside a normal parking space, you’ll get clamped. And don’t come whining to us. Here’s what Security had to say about the matter: “On Tuesday the 6th March, ten people parked on verge by

BeMate

That is all.

Mr Safety Bigglesworth

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ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

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LETTUCE

Get it to nexus@waikato.ac.nz by 5pm and Tues for the final issue – our study week special. Letter of the week wins a $5 voucher from Campus Kiosk (up at the Cowshed) Alternatively, sign up to www.nexusmag.co.nz/forum and post your letters, notices, events, discuss various student topics and issues and just shoot the shit. Brian

Letter of the week Chicken abuse is not finger-lickin’ good Dear Editor I am a third year psychology student and also a proud vegan. I’ve just been informed by some classmates that one of the prerequisite papers for most graduate study in the psych department, psyc314 Behaviour Analysis, involves experimenting with animals. Apparently students are expected to modify the behaviour of chickens. I am horrified that in order to succeed academically in this department, I am expected to sacrifice all of my beliefs, ethics and morals in order to train some bloody chickens to do god knows what. In fact, there is rumour in the department that the work we do on the chickens actually assists other animal torturers with their masters thesis, and this is kept secret from the third year students. Why is animal experimentation acceptable in this university? Many students feel the same way as I do, but everyone is too scared to make formal complaints because we know that it will hinder our progress in the department. Ally Thanks for the letter Ally, you’ve earnt scored a $5 Campus Kiosk voucher. Come claim it at the Nexus office in the Student Union Building.

Te Whakahiapo issues Dear Ed Yet again have Maori students come together and resolved nothing. The idea of starting another representative group is allowing the old one and its problems to be hidden from sight. Te Whakahiapo you need to clean your own house before backing this venture re-tw minutes dated 27/02/07. This is getting old that even though KA has debt ($120,000 - approx) no one knows where the accounts are or what the status of these accounts are – get real people the newbies need your guidance not your excuses. Kahu Nikora

Watch where those money shots go Letter to the Editor It came from your crotch; not a truer word has been written. Congratulations on the article. Of interest is the fact that Chlamydia lives in eyes very happily. Unfortunately this is why babies born to women who have Chlamydia when they give birth end up with “sticky eyes” which is sometimes Chlamydia. I have also seen Chlamydia in the eyes of adults as a result of not washing hands after going to the toilet etc. ( contact lens wearers beware!!!) I was surprised to read that no one you spoke to had seen or used a dental or oral dam. We sell them at FPA – they come in a variety of flavours and are used not just by sex workers but by people who have had genital herpes and don’t wish to pass it on – both gay and straight. Jan Gilby Nurse FPA Hamilton

Where is he?

Where’s the education?

Dear Editor Why is the Kahu Nikora not longer anymore in the my Nexus? He is always the happiest moment when I open Nexus on Monday morning and my lecturer says “brian, not when speaking, learn html” (god it is truthly so funny). Every time for last year I read and sometimes always Kahu is rant. Crazy time for political but when Nikora action take and scare establish. Thankinf you,

Dear Lettuce, In regards to the lecturing of FINA201-07A. Last weeks lecture was beyond a joke. As I was sitting in the back-half of the PWC lecture theatre I was becoming agitated and some what at dis-ease. I actually had to pinch myself, ask a friend beside me and then txt another companion to reassure myself that I was actually in FINA201-07A. It was actually an experience to be in the lecture theatre that day. The amount of

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ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

students using their phones during the ‘what are we doing here, where are we going in life’ movie was amazing- it felt like I was at Christmas in the park with all the individual lights. Before this encounter with finance at the Waikato University I had talked with a few people in the finance industry. I thought this was a bit of me, and even considered it as a major for my BMS degree. But the last couple of weeks have turned me sour on that idea and I’m sure that’s the case with a lot of other students also. But here I was thinking that the aim of each department was to lure in potential under graduates into their specified field of education; obviously not in this situation. Now don’t get me wrong, the lecturer is a good guy and I am rather intrigued by why we are in this world and what we are doing here and it’s something that I still haven’t taken a side on, but to put it blatantly if this stuff really spun my wheels, don’t you think I would have opted for a psychology degree? And the fact that we are going to get examined on this at the end of the semester shits me. So what I am trying to get at is the simple fact that we as students studying this course are not getting a fair bang for our buck and we all know that uni is not cheap. Learning from the computer really doesn’t do anything for me and I find it hard learning the week’s work in a few 20 minute online lectures. And as for the tutorials; I’m not learning too much there either. Surely these 2 hour sessions on Thursday at 3pm could be used a bit more constructively. I

Lettuce Policy Nexus welcomes your letters and encourages debate through the letters page. Keep it under 250 words. Letters must be received by 5pm on the Tuesday before publication. Letters may be edited for sense, brevity or legal reasons. No correspondence will be entered into over unpublished or edited letters. Pseudonyms are acceptable but all letters must include your real name and contact details even if you don’t want them printed (and they won’t be printed!). We discourage the use of pseudonyms for serious letters.

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mean I thought finance was to do with numbers; something I’m still waiting to witness in these lectures. Come on aye, let’s sort this out. Signed pissed off

This is the second letter about poo stink this year

staff seem to spend the bulk of their comparing the stamps they got from clubbing last night and flirting with eachother. It’s pretty pathetic, especially when students face hardship because of it. Get it right, Gateway! M Smith

Dear Lettuce In response to the letter written by Harlief Skankhammer ll. We are both clubs on campus that are keen to chalk, have meetings and our own opinions. I personally chalked the Student Life messages from the banks to the library and I know Id be disappointed if someone rubbed out our stuff. I can tell you that I did not do it and I’m pretty sure none of our group would be so rude. However if someone from Student Life did do it, we are publically apoligising for it and ask you guys to forgive us. Hope you guys have a good year. Renee Solomona.

Dear Nexus Why is there such a poo smell at the university? Its always wafting from down by the banks and it depends where the wind is blowing but man its disgusting. It didn’t always used to be there but I reckon that it must of got worse when they dug up the earth and put that weird grate in. Is it the smell of reall poo or is it duck poo coming out of the stagnant lake? Why didn’t they do something about the stagnant lake when they redesigned all that lake boardwalk thingy? They could have got some decent filtration system happening down there but instead they’ve spend thousands of bucks building ugly random seats in the middle of what could be a perfectly good bike or horse riding area. Why does the university always have to make such a fuck up of everything? Shit. David Hillcrest

Lazy student diary graphics designer

Gateway closing off students

Anxiety support group

Dear Nexus, I finally picked up a copy of the nice new student diary, flipped through and whilst doing this, discovered the timetables.. the timetables which started at 9 am in the morning. Have none of you heard of the bachelor of Computer Graphic Design? We have at least two 8 am starts a week, where are we going to write in that extra hour of class? Other than that, it was pretty cool other than that, nice cover art Matt. Gemma

Dear Editor, It has been brought to my attention that the Gateway were particularly useless when it came to processing enrolments this year. I know of at least four individuals who signed and returned their enrolment forms last year only to be told last week that there was no record of their re-enrolment. These students might face late fees and some are unable to access online content of their papers because they are now officially unenrolled. Why is Gateway not held accountable for their mistakes? Every time I go in there, I can’t see anyone working – the

Dear Ed, For almost two years now I have suffered from anxiety. Anxiety isn’t just the fear of exams, or the fear of driving a car, or riding a bus- it’s the fear of a panic attack. Sufferers’ can avoid places that they feel will trigger an attack, like riding a bus or being stuck in traffic. Depression and panic attacks are just a few feelings that are symptoms of anxiety. What’s worse is that the people around you don’t quite understand what you are going through- and can’t unless they themselves have experienced the often terrifying grip of anxiety. I joined a support group in my home town and was amazed at the amount and range of anxiety sufferers. To know that you are not alone is an incredible relief to a sufferer like me. The knowledge that you are not the only one going through hell is great comfort. On coming to Waikato University I expected to find a group of a similar kind to join. After spending around two hours searching and asking at Student Services and around campus, I was extremely disappointed to find there is none. I am neither gay nor disabled, but what I and many others experience is real and very debilitating, and I feel there should be support here for it. If there is anyone on campus who experiences anxiety and would like to talk or meet up, contact me at klmv1@waikato.ac.nz. Yours cheerfully, Krysten

Nice

ADVICE BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE

CITIZENS ADVICE BUREAU

It sounds BAD Mervyn paid $50 for a beat-up old stereo from a second-hand shop. The shopkeeper told him it goes, but she didn’t know how well. The sound quality is poor. Can he take it back? The University branch of Citizens Advice Bureau can give you information about this or other hassles you might have. They have heaps of pamphlets and a huge database to help answer anyone’s questions. Visit them at the Cowshed from 11am – 2pm daily during semesters or phone 838 4466 extn 6622 or 0800FORCAB. By the way, Mervyn can ask for his money back, but the shopkeeper is under no obligation to refund the money. She could argue that, bearing in mind what she told him at the time of sale, plus the age, condition and price paid, it was of ‘acceptable quality’ under the Consumer Guarantees Act.

www.nexusmag.co.nz

More sports coverage is appreciated Dear Nexus Everything is looking real good for this year. Keep up the good work.. Especially the sports stuff. So many people at uni play sports and nexus doesn’t pay much attention to that, but the sports column is making up for it. Cheers. Kane Thanks for the comments Kane If you or anyone else feels we’re lacking in something that would make this magazine more enjoyable or applicable to the student populace then you’re more than welcome to submit ideas and magazine content to nexus@waikato.ac.nz.

ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

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WELL THEN, WE’ll HELP YOU Put your free time to good use! Write for us, and impress thousands of beautiful women and men every week! Nexus needs volunteer writers, reviewers and columnists to contribute to Nexus magazine in 2007. We can’t pay you, but you’ll make great friends, get real publishing experience and have really cool something to boast about. And sometimes we can give you beer and chocolate.

* Groupies may differ from those advertised. Your results may vary.

So what are you waiting for? Fame, fortune and fabulously hot groupies await.* You can either send your story ideas to nexus@waikato. ac.nz, fill in the Nexus contributor form on page 15 and hand it in, visit www.nexusmag.co.nz/contribute and fill in an electronic contributor form, or come see us in person on the ground floor of the Student Union building on the Uni campus.

The voice of the students.


Feature

THE OPPOSITE OF BRASH W

hen nicky hager’s book, the hollow men,

came to the attention of the New Zealand public last year, Don Brash was still riding a political high which had begun with his controversial Orewa speech in 2004. When Brash panicked in response to news that his private emails detailing his dealings with the Exclusive Brethren were about to be made public, he took a high court injunction preventing the release of Hager’s work. Brash’s response was widely criticised and signalled that the end of his political career was most certainly nigh – and that was before anyone had even read the book. Andrew Neal from Nexus met with Hager during his visit to the University of Waikato a couple of weeks ago. This is the interview in most of its entirety - some parts have been abridged, because we here at Nexus are deeply concerned (one might say obsessed) with brevity. Nexus: The Hollow Men describes the National Party’s manipulation of the democratic process. Why do you think that National believe voters will respond to that sort of manipulation? Hager: What I see going on is two things at once, they’re using tactics which actually put people off politics, creating people like that, at the same time they’re thinking up tactics to win over those sort of inattentive people, who aren’t thinking very hard about their vote, just kind of doing as an impulsive or reactive way.

continue under his leadership? The first thing I’d say is that it is too early to say. However, one of the big stories of my book was the relationship between the National party and the Exclusive Brethren, and John Key and Don Brash were the two main members they liaised with. Even if John Key hadn’t been one of the main people to liaise with the Exclusive Brethren… it is inconceivable that the main people like Gerry Brownlee and Murray McCully and John Key didn’t know it was coming up. It completely lacks credibility to argue that. Unfortunately John Key has come in, in that sense, on the back of a lie and as soon as he became leader he was repeating things which were not true about his links with the Exclusive Brethren. The only thing I can say about John Key, based on my impressions and what his colleagues are saying, is that he’s different from Brash; he’s not driven by deep ideological motivations for the country, he’s just incredibly personally ambitious. He’s made his fifty million and now he wants to be Prime Minister. It’s very much his own personal ambition…his motivation is personal achievement for himself, in a sense.

In regards to the ‘gone by lunchtime’ statement, who do you think don Brash was really lying to – the Americans, or the New Zealand public? I think there is little doubt from his behaviour afterwards, which I have a chapter on in the book that he fully planned, and hoped, that he would be the one that pleased the Americans and his other New Zealand mates by ending the nuclear free policy.

Bryan Sinclair was one of the people who pushed through voluntary unionism at the University of Waikato in the nineties before going on to become a private advisor to Don Brash in the build-up to the 2005 election. Can you shed some light on the relation between voluntary student unionism and the dominant ideology of the National Party under Brash? Yeah, kind of that far-right position. That Student Choice group (Sinclair’s group that pushed for voluntary unionism) - this is my impression, I don’t have any secret information - there were two things going on there. One was that they were philosophically anti-unions and compulsory membership and that was an expedient position to take because they were also against the politics of the NZUSA and the kind of prevailing [student] politics. So it was an expedient campaign which was a vehicle to try and move student politics to the right or at least to make it more centralist or apolitical. And they had an effect, unfortunately.

How do you feel about John Key? Do you think he has more integrity than Brash or is this manipulation of the electoral process going to

Prior to publication, how did you feel The Hollow Men would be received by the New Zealand public?

www.nexusmag.co.nz

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Feature

Because my previous books had got piles of publicity, for not very good reasons, something else I wrote was going to get noticed. So I knew it would get noticed. However, about halfway through this project I knew that I had gotten my hands on unique information; really important stuff; things that were going to shake the National party, which it has. Mostly invisibly, but it has really had an effect there. I expected it to be big and it was bigger, shall we say? Do you think Brash’s resignation was an inevitability? Absolutely, he had no choice. Do you think that the goings-on in the National Party, in your book, would have been revealed if you hadn’t have written it? Would they have come out in the wash so to speak?

that. It might happen but it’s not likely to happen. So, it’s not fair to blame people who are doing their best to do that job and expect them to do things that aren’t possible as a daily journalist. So, I wouldn’t say that there’s a failure of journalism in that. I would say, from a long term perspective, there’s this weird phenomenon; we live in this country that is very free, where none of us are going to get shot when we walk out of our work or go to our flat, where we don’t get harassed by the police for what we do, we’ve got official information laws, we’ve got all this opportunity. And the weird thing is, that seems to make the journalists less energetic, less pushy. If you talk to a journalist in the Phillipines or someone who’s working in the Gaza strip, they’re incredibly motivated about their job. They’ve got a mission, they’re saving the world

Party in the build up to the 2005 election reflect corruption right across the political spectrum, or is this corruption exclusive to the National Party? This distinctive, low-level, marginally legal, corrupting of the system - is that right across the political spectrum? No. I’d say it’s much more a large party thing than a small party thing. More or less across the political spectrum but more likely in the large parties because they’re wielding more power in that there’s more people wanting to influence them. The reason why National used particularly extremist tactics, more so than Labour, in the 2005 election, my guess is that they had more to hide. They just had more hidden agendas, more hidden alliances and some donors who were less than desirable.

Do you think that the goings-on in the National Party, in your book, would have been revealed if you hadn’t have written it? Would they have come out in the wash so to speak?

No, the sad thing is I think that they probably would never have come out. No, the sad thing is I think that they probably would never have come out. Because, lets remember, for the year after the election - far from this coming out - National was riding high. They were riding this huge and effective campaign; talking about Labour being the most corrupt government in New Zealand history. In other words, Labour, which had done that decidedly wrong thing with the election pledge card, was being hammered. National was riding high and doing well in the polls, Brash was looking quite good in Parliament. So, no, instead of being held accountable they were taking a very strong hypocritical, high moral ground. Is that a failure of journalism do you think? (Looks decidedly unsure for a moment) I hate attacking journalism. Many of the things I revealed are the kinds of things you can’t get out without months and years of digging. There are leaks that happen from motivated individuals or chance but if you actually want to get some information which is really hard to get it’s going to take you ages. Your average daily journalist is not given the hours to do 18

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It’s them or nobody for making sure there’s some justice in their country. In this country there’s often this kind of sleepy attitude. It’s the downside of a safe, free country. Do you think the National Party have been scared off from dealing with the Exclusive Bethren or is there still the possibility of a relationship between the two in the build up to 2008 elections? Pure speculation right? Yes. Because the Exclusive Brethren have not said that they’ll never do it again. They’ve fudged all around it. I’d imagine they’ll try it again. And my guess would be that the National party will run a mile. That’s my guess. There could be some stuff that the National party have had nothing to do with already or have even discouraged. But I think National, and particularly John Key - who only just wriggled out from accountability last time - I think will just stay right away from it. Do you think the actions of the National

What makes you decide to investigate something? So few people investigate like I do. I do the things that I’m interested in. It’s not like I have competition… I’m quite happy to say that the things that motivate me and the things which have offended me are deception, tricking the public, undemocratic activities, lobby groups, P.R. companies and their activities; those are the things which I get excited about. Because I feel like this is the greatest public service showing the other side of that. The kinds of things I write about are often going to be the Labour government, because they’re government at the moment. My previous book, that corn one, was about Labour. The other thing, which I talked about in my speech [on campus] about declarations of interest. I am personally from the left of politics. I’ve never tried to hide that. I don’t try to adopt a pseudoneutrality because if I’m a completely neutral blank page that just reflects the world as it is. Like practically anyone in the media, the way that my politics show is in the things that I write about. Which is why I’m writing about democratic issues and political corruption. www.nexusmag.co.nz


A message from HCC Watch out noisy party holders and goers. O Week often sets the scene for a long year of loud music pulsating through the Hamilton airwaves – but here’s a piece of news that may have you reaching to turn the volume down rather than up. If you decide to turn your property into a mini concert venue and your neighbours are sufficiently deafened by your blasting stereo, you may find yourself getting a visit from a warranted Hamilton City Council noise control officer. As a tenant, you’re an occupier of land and that makes you responsible for ensuring noise does not exceed a reasonable level as set out by the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). The intention of these regulations is not so much to be a killjoy to those who enjoy a good party or booming sounds, but to protect people from unreasonable and excessive noise. Definitions of excessive noise may vary so the RMA states

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that it is noise that is under human control that unreasonably interferes with the peace, comfort and convenience of any person. Council noise control officers patrol the soundwaves to make sure noise doesn’t get out of hand and start annoying and distressing other people. Once you start making excessive noise, it could cost you. A noise control officer can direct you to immediately reduce your noise to a reasonable level. Once this has happened, nobody on your property can make excessive noise for 72 hours – otherwise you stand to lose out. If you or somebody at your property carries on making excessive noise after being given an excessive noise direction, the noise control officer accompanied by a police officer can enter your property and: • Remove the noise source; or • Render the equipment inoperable; or

if you’re loud they’ll kick your arse and take your money It’ll also hurt your pockets. You’ll have to pay $200 to get your equipment back and if you become a repeat excessive noise offender, you could end up being issued with a formal abatement notice under the RMA to all the occupiers of the noisy property. In some cases non-compliance with a direction or abatement notice may see you being issued with an infringement fine, which is $500 and $750 respectively. Extreme, repeated instances of non-compliance can land you a severe fine up to $10,000. So – making noise can be a costly business! Enjoy the social side of University but spare a thought for those within earshot of your property if you’re cranking your stereo or having a party. Just as you have the right to enjoy your property, your neighbours have the right to enjoy theirs and if your noise interferes with that you may well get a visit from a Council noise control officer.

• Take any other steps needed to reduce the noise

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Feature

Laying the

down BY ROZ CASE

S

UE BRADFORD’S PROPOSED ‘ANTI-SMACKING’ BILL

has aroused strong feelings in the New Zealand public since it was first introduced in 2006. What hasn’t been brought to the public’s attention is the fact that the research which supports this bill began here, at the University of Waikato in the 1960s when Professor Jane Ritchie and her husband, Emeritus Professor James Ritchie, embarked on what was to become a longitudinal examination of child-rearing patterns in New Zealand. ‘We did the first study in the sixties and we noted the mothers were smacking, even though they said it didn’t work very well’, says Ritchie. The researchers mused over this in their book ChildRearing Patterns in New Zealand and noted that it was interesting to find that parents were smacking in spite of the there being more effective forms of discipline available to them. But it wasn’t until the study was repeated in the late 1970s that they experienced their “moment of enlightenment,” as Ritchie calls it. “We found that a lot of things had changed, and for the better,” she says. Their research revealed that family sizes were smaller, one third of the mothers were working outside the home, fathers were helping more and mothers were happier. But physical punishment continued. This discovery led the Ritchies to write their books Spare the Rod, and later on Violence in New Zealand. It was in the latter that they set out to examine smacking within a societal context. “We started saying to ourselves, okay, you’ve got this punitive practice; parents hitting children. Is this the only punitive practice? Logically, this can’t exist all by itself,” Ritchie explains. What followed was an in depth analysis of New Zealand’s culture of violence, from historical relations between Maori and Pakeha, to child abuse, sport and the media. As Ritchie says, they were making the argument that smacking is “not an isolated practice - it does fit in to what is a culture of violence.” 20

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When I met with Ritchie last week to discuss their research and her feelings about Bradford’s bill, MPs were coming together to debate whether the bill should pass in its present form, or if National MP Chester Borrows’ proposed amendment (which includes a definition of “reasonable force”) should replace it. While Bradford looked set to overcome that hurdle last Wednesday, opponents of the bill managed to stall its progress by engaging in fierce, often one-sided debate for most of the afternoon. Debate will resume after Easter but at this stage it is expected that, in spite of delays, the bill will pass into law sometime in May. “It’s not really an anti-smacking bill,” says Ritchie. Originally, Bradford sought to repeal Section 59 of the Crimes Act (1961)

“All we want to do... is remove the defence which would put children on a par with adults in terms of protection from assault...” PROFESSOR JANE RITCHE www.nexusmag.co.nz


Feature

which states every parent of person in the place of a parent is justified in using force by way of correction towards any child if the force used is reasonable in the circumstances. However, after going through the select committee stage the bill was amended according to drafts by Geoffrey Palmer and the Law Commission to allow reasonable force by a parent to prevent harm or stop a child committing a criminal offence. Ritchie considers this to be a significant amendment in itself. “[Bradford] has already modified her stance,” she says. While Ritchie considers that a full repeal of Section 59 would have been the ideal outcome of Bradford’s bill, she can understand what Chester Borrows is trying to do with his proposed amendment. “He was a former police man for 30 years, he’s got a law degree, he’s now an MP in Parliament and he’s trying to define reasonable force,” says Ritchie. But Borrows’ amendment states that any “reasonable force” must not cause more than “transitory and trifling harm.” “Well, we’re still going to have a problem in defining what that is, aren’t we?” argues Ritchie. “Sue [Bradford] doesn’t find that acceptable because she doesn’t think any force is reasonable on a small, vulnerable child.” Some have argued that Section 59 already precludes assault against children but Ritchie presents evidence to show otherwise. In 2001, a Hawkes Bay father hit his son on the buttocks with a piece of firewood, causing extensive bruising. Later that year, a man from Ngaruawahia hit his 12 year old daughter across the back with a length of hosepipe, leaving a large red welt. In 2005 a Timaru mother hit her son with a horse whip and bamboo cane, which she argued was a reflection of her Christian beliefs. Ritchie points out that in all of these cases the parent used Section 59 as a defence. And in all cases, juries accepted that defence and the offending parents were acquitted. “All we want to do — all Sue Bradford wants to do — is remove the defence which would put children on a par with adults in terms of protection from assault,” Ritchie states. So what does Ritchie think of the argument that police are going to start raiding people’s homes and locking everyone up in jail for lightly smacking their children? “Well I just don’t think the police will investigate [that sort of thing] – that would be ridiculous,” she says. “After all, the police have actually got enough to do!” Ritchie considers these sorts of arguments against Bradford’s bill to be nothing more than “scaremongering” and believes that parents who do occasionally lightly smack their children will be safe

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from prosecution. Ritchie points to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child as another important reason for the repeal of Section 59 and notes that Bradford hasn’t referred to this in her campaign, as it might arouse anger in members of the public who rebuke international “meddling” in New Zealand law. New Zealand signed the convention in 1989 under a Labour government and ratified it in 1992 under National; so it was with the support of both major parties that we agreed to the convention. However, Ritchie points out that we have failed to meet our obligations since then. ‘Article 19 says that children must be protected from all forms of violence’, she says. ‘We didn’t do what [the United Nations] said we should do, which was removing section 59. And we still haven’t done it.’ While the government has tried to argue in the past that reasonable force doesn’t constitute violence, there has been a shift in opinion over the past few years. Even the Prime Minister, Helen Clark, waded into the debate stating that she “cannot accept that it is fair and reasonable for the law to allow a defence for those who assault children,” although she has stated

“The bill just toughens up the laws so parents who horsewhip their kids can be prosecuted” HELEN CLARK she does not wish to criminalise “light smacking.” “The bill just toughens up the laws so parents who horsewhip their kids can be prosecuted,” Clark recently told the New Zealand Herald. Presuming that Bradford’s bill passes into law later this year, how does Ritchie feel about all these years of campaigning against Section 59 coming to an end? “Well, there’s still a place to talk more about those alternative forms of discipline,” she reasons, “but we have come quite a way!” Ritchie sees the education of parents as an important part of the campaign against smacking and points to programmes like Strategies with Kids, Information for Parents (S.K.I.P) which receives government funding to educate the general community about basic parenting and discipline strategies. The S.K.I.P programme mixes information about the nature of childhood and what sort of expectations parents should have of their children, with tips for discipline and conflict resolution. Ritchie hopes to see further programmes of this nature made available for parents regardless of whether Bradford’s bill becomes law. Until then, Ritchie waits anxiously and hopes that 2007 will be the year that anti-smacking campaigners finally see the fruits of their labour. But she remains philosophical until then. “I’m not going to count my chickens, not yet! Not until it’s done.”

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T

here was an insect present at the wsu’s first

official meeting last week (the first since December last year!) Before being swatted and killed, she managed to leak this un-privileged information. These are not official minutes. The fly hasn’t got any hands so how could she write minutes? The meeting opened at 4.30pm on Tuesday afternoon and most executive members were present. Minutes of the last meeting, held 14 December 2006, were accepted as true and accurate, as were the emergency meetings held over the summer break. The fly noted that amongst those minutes was a motion “that the WSU will hire vehicles to travel to and from NZUSA January Conference and that those attending will have to accept that”. There were no members of the student general body present. The fly was also interested to see that the order of the agenda was altered by decree of the President rather than by resolution of the committee to say that at 6pm, wherever they were in addressing matters arising, they would skip to General Business. The fly was heartened by a letter of thanks which was sent to the WSU to acknowledge a contribution to boost holiday programmes aimed at the children of students. This allowed student parents to take work over summer. Around the time the monthly bills got paid, the fly found a rice cracker crumb on the floor and dined heartily for 15 minutes. The presidents report was a little too in depth for the fly to understand. It was all very important, obviously. Mr Harnett presented a report on Orientation; apparently the day events were ‘great’ and evening events left a little to be desired. Interesting to note that it was claimed attendance at the Concord Dawn event was quoted at 500 people; the fly was talking to a bee who knows a praying mantis who attended the Concord Dawn event and would put the attendance at around 10% of the quoted figure. The vice president reported on a busy quarter since the last meeting. Of particular interest was a working party on Academic Transcripts and Certificates. The fly gave birth to fully developed larvae during this report, which pupariated shortly afterwards. The office managers report was largely verbal and including 22

ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

comment on the lateness of the student diary shipment, which resulted from port clearance problems for the boat from China. The fly considered speaking up at this point as she had actually entered the country in one of the crates with the student diaries but attended to her larvae instead. The fly enjoyed a presentation from the co-presidents of the New Zealand Union of Student Associations [NZUSA]. They outlined how their kaupapa is the serving of students nationwide, policy and direction is determined by NZ student union execs and presidents, and they provide; a coherent student voice for NZ government and for campaigns. When they reiterated the fact that students have accrued $9 billion of debt, the fly had a little cry but this was mostly because she was post-natal. The larvae were fully developed by the time the meeting moved on to the issue of the WSU Pages in Nexus. Students have deemed them boring and poorly written and they detract from readership and interest. Various suggestions were made as to how to improve the WSU content of Nexus. Everyone was starting to get quite hungry. The fly thought about what it would be like to eat Nexus. The fly was more inspired by talk of the Maori Hui, which will bring students together who are interested in reestablishing the campus-wide Roopu. The fly also made a mental note to attend Hakinakina on Wednesday 21st March, down by Don Lewellyns Bar. There would likely be some potato chips or nuts left around which could be valuable at that late stage in the life cycle. Some other stuff happened and then there was talk about the 89FM frequency, which the students own broadcasting rights over. The fly resolved to write a letter to Steve Maharey or someone to express disgust at the fact that the WSU have not yet managed to retrieve the frequency in spite of the terms of the Radio Communications Act not being met by the current broadcaster. One of the baby maggots turned into a fly and sat on the mummy fly’s back. A whole bunch of general business stuff happened and the fly wondered for a long time what Sehai’s hair might taste like. The next WSU exec meeting will be held on Tuesday 20th March at Guru Phabians on the ground floor of the Student Union Building. The fly encourages students to attend and drop food on the carpet.

www.nexusmag.co.nz


Sustainability and the Hamilton Farmers’ Market BY GAIL BROWN AND CHRIS PELLOW

L

OOKING FOR LOCALLY GROWN, FRESHER FRUIT AND

vegetables? Want to contribute to a sustainable local economy? Want to try something different? How about yellow or red carrots, juicy red ‘Blackboy’ peaches, wine grapes, organic blueberries and blueberry wine, banana capsicums, rocket lettuce, scaloppini’s, gem squash and much more. This is the type of produce for which the Hamilton Farmers’ Market is becoming renowned. A farmers market is essentially a food market, where local growers, farmers and artisan food producers sell their products directly to consumers. Vendors may only sell what they grow, farm, pickle, preserve, bake, smoke or catch themselves from within a defined local area. The Hamilton Farmers’ Market recently celebrated its first birthday. After initially being held on a fortnightly basis, the market became a weekly event in October last year. Produce at the Hamilton Farmers’ Market is from the Waikato region, with the majority of stallholders operating either within Hamilton or in its proximate rural surrounds. So, who benefits from a farmers’ market?

The shopper • Food is fresher and tastier. Produce is picked as close to the market’s opening time as possible. • Shoppers have knowledge of their food source and can speak directly to the person who knows most about the product, namely the grower or food producer. • Short supply chains for fresh produce

generally allow for cheaper prices at the market.

The producer • Small growers who can’t supply in the quantities required by wholesalers still have an outlet for their produce. • Stallholders get direct feedback on their products and can test new products before planting or manufacturing in large quantities

The local community • Buying local means your food dollar is reinvested back into the local economy, which is essential for the sustainability of local business.

Food is fresher and tastier. Produce is picked as close to the market’s opening time as possible. The environment • By buying local produce, you are contributing to the reduction of food miles around the globe. Low food miles contribute towards a decrease in carbon dioxide emissions, and hence a more environmentally sustainable practice. • As Farmers market produce does not travel large distances, it does not need to be packaged and preserved to maintain freshness, which eliminates the need to use plastics which are often non-biodegradable.

Farmers’ markets have much to offer in regards to more sustainable modes of living. Essentially, these are related to the small rural producer. Due to limits (such as farm size and investment) maximum produce yields are low, which means the small farmer has fewer demands for energy and other external inputs such as fertilizer. Thus, the negative environmental impacts associated with energy use and fertilizers are reduced. They can also contribute to limiting urban sprawl by making it desirable to maintain surrounding fertile land for local food production, which helps contribute to local agricultural diversity. Another advantage of the farmers’ market setting is the friendly social atmosphere present on site. The customer has the chance to meet the producers of their food and build a relationship with them, as well as with other regular customers. Shopping then strengthens the social bonds of the local community, due to the opportunity for regular personal interactions. The customer is able to receive direct information from the producer in relation to the quality of the food and the conditions of production, while the producer is able to obtain feedback from the customer about how well their product is being received. In response to highly-publicised food scandals, such as Mad Cow Disease and Bird Flu, the ability to trace the food product back to the producer has become an important component of food consumption practice, particularly if the customer has any concerns or complaints about their purchase. The Hamilton Farmers’ market presents an opportunity to support local producers and contribute to the sustainability of our local environment and economy.

Every Sunday from 8AM – 12PM at the Wintec car park on the corner of Collingwood & Tristram Streets. www.nexusmag.co.nz

ISSUE 1 · 26 FEBRUARY, 2007

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Feature

THE

DEADLY DEATHS WORDS AND PHOTO By Petra Jane

T

he deadly deaths are

everything that modern rock isn’t: quiet, slow and unassuming, the kind of music you can have a conversation over or fall asleep listening to. But in a good way. It’s good old-fashioned, well-crafted pop without posturing or anything to prove. In the year since Nick Feisst and Tu Mutu (refugees of the defunct Nimbus) joined forces with former Dead Pan Ranger Bevan Galbraith, they’ve appeared on the Area07 compilation album, made a slew of fans with live shows, including two A Low Hum tours (which led to a personal invitation to play at Blink’s Camp A Low Hum), made their own stop-motion video for the single ‘See The World’, and recorded and released a fantastic self-titled album. I dragged Nick away from work on their next video for a few questions. How did The Deadly Deaths come about? I had talked with Bevan at the end of 2005, after he had come back from touring Europe with Dead Pan Rangers, about the possibility of having a jam sometime with Tu and I. I don’t really remember a lot after that. Eventually we had a jam together with a few songs that I had written for this new project. We had something like two practices and then recorded the song “See the World”.

I heard your dreamy, three-part vocal harmonies are a ploy to distract us from the fact you and Tu can barely play. Or is that just a nasty rumour perpetuated by Woman’s Day gossip columnists? Both. To be fair, Tu (our keyboardist) is a guitarist, Bevan (our drummer) is a bassist and, well, I don’t really have any excuses for my poor guitar playing. Bevan’s also been known to drum for Te Pahu noise outfit Kill The Zodiac. He seems such a nice boy - how come all his bands either have ‘Dead’, ‘Death’ or ‘Kill’ in their names? Yeah, that’s a weird coincidence... You’ve already made fans in some high places. You were the local opening act for two A Low Hum tours last year, which I’m pretty sure hasn’t happened with a Hamilton band before. is it true you sold your soul to Blink for a crate of Foxton Fizz? I’ve had a few people tell me that. Does somebody keep statistics on A Low Hum tours or something? Maybe they have a kind of A Low Hum book of records: “The record for the longest set played by a support act on a A Low Hum tour in Wellington was by....”. No Foxton Fizz either - Bevan doesn’t drink fizzy drinks. Blink has been great. The first few shows we played were on the A Low Hum tour, which really motivated us to get out of the practice

room. We were also stoked to be opening for Jakob for our first gig. Tu and I had been big fans of their “Subsets Of Sets” album when it came out. He also invited you to make your nonHamilton debut at Camp A Low Hum. Tell us about that experience. Camp A Low Hum was truly amazing. I find it hard to describe. It was three days of great music, meeting really cool people, partying and camping with friends. We really enjoyed performing there. We also released our album over that weekend - we had actually just got it back from the printers the day before we drove down. I noticed the t-shirts sold really fast as well, especially amongst people who hadn’t heard you yet... Yeah, there were a few people who had bought t-shirts and hadn’t actually heard the band. I guess that is testament to the great design work from our designer Heath Lewis. He designed the t-shirts, has helped me out with the design of our website and also created all of the artwork for our album. All that AND he chased away the scary stone-throwing neighbour from our album release party. How important are the visual elements like videos and artwork to you?

“A lot of the interest we’ve had from overseas really came as a result of the ‘See the World’ video” 24

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Feature

“At the time I’d never made a video of any sort before, and I’d never tried stop-motion animation” NICK FEISST

I guess the videos and artwork are an important part of The Deadly Deaths experience. A lot of the interest we’ve had from overseas really came as a result of the ‘See the World’ video. Originally it was interest in the blog (www.thedeadlydeaths.com/blog) that I kept while making the video. Halfway through shooting I was also approached by Boinx Software, who make the software that I used to capture my animations with, who wanted to feature the blog on their website. Since finishing the video it has been featured on a bunch of websites, and I keep finding new places that it pops up, from music video blogs to MilkandCookies. The other day I read a news article about my blog and video that said that I was obviously influenced by one of the early Aardman films (they’re the studio that produced Wallace and Grommit) - I think it was called “Adam” or something like that. I’d never even heard of the film until I’d read that article. I still have issues with music videos though - I’m not certain how I feel about them. I used to hate the idea of them when I was younger, possibly because I don’t really like the idea of television in the first place. A lot of the music videos you see these days seem more like

marketing than art. I’m going to stop my answer here though; otherwise I’ll end up writing an essay on this topic. I hear you didn’t sleep or shave for the four months it took to make your ‘See the World’ video. That’s some devotion to the DIY ethos! I did manage to sleep, but didn’t shave. I thought it would give me a bit of a push to get the video finished quickly, or at all. At the time I’d never made a video of any sort before, and I’d never tried stop-motion animation, so I didn’t really know that it was going to take me so long to make. And yet you’re already working on a video for ‘Bury It’. When can we expect to see that? I imagine it’ll be finished within the next 2 months (but that’s what I thought about the last one). I’d try and describe the concept, but apparently I make it sound really boring, so you’d be better off checking out the few clips I’ve uploaded on the blog. The great thing about the blog is that it kind of forces me to get on with it and finish the video. If I make something like that public, then I don’t want to experience the public failure of not finishing it, haha.

So with all this overseas interest you mentioned, do the DDs have any aspirations to try their luck in a bigger pond? We’ve had a bit of fan mail, mostly from Germany, Finland, Australia, Canada and the USA. We’ve also had some interest from promoters in Germany. I’m not really sure how the whole “touring overseas” thing works, but Bevan knows a bit about it (after touring through Europe with Dead Pan Rangers). We would definitely love to travel/tour with the band, but I don’t feel the need to permanently move to a bigger scene. It’d be nice to grow the music scene we have here in Hamilton. The album sounds and looks fantastic, by the way. Where can people check it out and grab their own copy? Currently the album can be purchased online from our website (www.thedeadlydeaths.com) or Amplifier ( www.amplifier.com). You can also download the first 3 singles for free from our site. We will hopefully have the album in stores soon. You can catch The Deadly Deaths with The Shrugs and Urban Tramper next Saturday, 31 March at Ward Lane.

STILLS FROM THE MUSIC VIDEO FOR “SEE THE WORLD” www.nexusmag.co.nz

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Keeping you informed about your union www.wsu.org.nz

WSU PRESIDENT

VICE-PRESIDENT

Sehai Orgad

Moira Neho

president@wsu.org.nz I know this may sound a little too serious for you guys, but I thought I should give you a break down of what University committees the WSU has representation on and what this mean to you as students. So here goes: Council – This is probably the highest level of representation that you can get. The president (ME!) sits on council and as a councillor, takes part in making governing and strategic decisions in regards to the way that the university operates Finance Committee – This is standing committee of council, and is basically responsible for overseeing the financial direction of the University finances. The President also sits on this committee, and is quite involved in discussions specifically related to student fees. Honours Committee – This is a pretty cool committee to be a part of. We basically discuss and recommend honorary awards to people who have contributed to the University community and people who have contributed to society overall, Academic Board – The Board is made up of representatives from each faculty in the university. As a committee, its purpose is to advise Council on matters relating to courses of study or training, and general academic matters. As the student representative, the President has an official agenda item to speak to under “Student Matters” where I can speak on any matters that the WSU and the student body feel is relevant to address in this forum.

basically where capital expenditure is approved for developing the university grounds and buildings. So every time you have seen some changes to the campus e.g., the banks area development, you now know who and what has been decided on. Te Ropu Manukura – I take great pride in this committee, as this University is the ONLY University which reflects its partnership and relationships with the iwi in the Waikato catchments area. This committee effectively acts as the guardian of the Treaty of Waitangi for the University of Waikato, with a purpose to ensure the tertiary needs of iwi groups in the region are met. I could go on about every other committee that the WSU has representation on, but I have a limited word count! So the other committee’s that we have a stake in are listed below, and as we proceed throughout the year, you can be sure that I will be reporting on issues, news and events as they unfold in relation to each of them. • Foundation and Bridging Programmes Committee • Student Admission Committee • Admission Appeals Committee • Human Research Ethics Committee • Post Graduate Studies Committee – • Adult Learners Week/ He Tangata Matauranga Committee • Chaplaincy Committee • Cultural Committee • Environmental Policy Committee • International Student Support Group

Capital Development Committee – This is 28

ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

• Staff Awards Committee

vicepresident@wsu.org.nz Here are the answers to last weeks quiz: 1) What does OSM stand for? Open Student’s Meeting 2) How many members are needed to make quorum? 50 3) Who is The Chair and what do they do? The Vice-President (me), they control the meeting 4) How do you get an item on the agenda? Bring it to WSU reception 5) If you forget to get your item on the agenda how can you bring it up at the OSM? Under ‘General Business’ Unfortunately no one got all of these right so last weeks $20 Bennetts voucher is being offered again this week. All you have to do is correctly name 5 WSU executives and their matching portfolios. The first person to my office with these answers will be the winner! On the whole winning note, there are plenty of scholarships available to you for all kinds of reasons. If you’re good at sports there’s something for you. If you’re good at music there’s something for you. If you’re involved in community work (I don’t think PD counts) there’s something for you. The point is, go and see the helpful team in the scholarships office because there is bound to be a scholarship that you can apply for. So many people don’t apply because they think that everyone else is going to. Apparently, last year there were only 3 applicants for a $20k scholarship!!!! The odds are fantastic whanau. Don’t forget whanau… “you gotta be in to win!” www.nexusmag.co.nz


Education Officers Sport and Recreation Officer

Glen Delamere

Edupene & Eduwhets education@wsu.org.nz

sport@wsu.org.nz On Friday 9th of March I was fortunate enough to be able to watch our mighty Law School students as they battled that other lot from over the Bombays (Auckland Uni Law School) at a variety of sports. Unfortunately yours truly tried to help by playing indoor netball and may now need to use some of our Law students as part of my defence team for possible assault charges (still to laid). Where is Denny Crane when you need him? It would also make a good Tui Billboard…Netball a Non-Contact Sport…Yeah Right! The final result was a Draw, didn’t realise you could get one of those in Law. The next sporting event due on our calendar is Hakinakina (interschool Maori sport) 21st March. So all you Maori get out there and get give it a go, if you need more information come and see your MSO’s or me. Enough on sport for now, time to give a warning to all clubs affiliated to WSU. Your Sport & Recreation Officer is going to be coming to check you out during cultural hour and will let our fellow students know more about what your club is about and what you have to offer. So when you see that strange dude sitting in while you are having a meeting scribbling on a piece of paper, be nice it may be me writing about you or it could just be the police taking names…I am open to bribes to write nice things about you, although I’m sure that will not be required. So watch this space as your club will appear here. If your club meets outside of cultural hour let me know and I will make a time to catch up with you.

It’s week 3 of Uni 07 and the buzz/fuzz of O-week activities must’ve worn off by now? The reality of studying is starting to hit the body and mind as lecturers start talking about assignments, tutorial attendance and tests. Do not fear because week 3 actually means we’re half way to mid semester break yyyyeeeeeaaaaahhh. By now most of your papers should have class reps whose fundamental role is to advocate on your behalf if you believe there are problems/mistreatment within your paper. Class reps advocate on your behalf to the paper convenor on any issue e.g. lecturer is unclear about assignments/lectures/tuts; can’t hear lecturers properly; or the lecturers is being a bit of a punk. If you need any extra help for any educational advocacy come to the WSU and make an appointment to see eduwhets or edupene…bring a feed (Just kidding…maybe not). Tip of the week: Get up and go to your tut ow! (Don’t try and pull the “I was sick” two weeks in a row).

Environmental Officers

Claire Taylor & Kate Dimmendaal environment@wsu.org.nz Here is our first update of our progress this year… We are just in the process of sorting out a couple of projects to help make campus more pleasant and environmentally friendly. Our main goal is to improve recycling on campus and we are currently writing a proposal to apply for a grant from Envirofund. At the moment the only outdoor recycling station on campus is located outside the banks, if possible, we would appreciate if you could use this, as we can all improve the state of the environment if we all do our little bit. We are currently trying to find smaller and more efficient stations that we can put in different places around the campus. We are hoping to attend a conference over Easter weekend in Wellington with all the other student environmental reps. This will be a good place for us to get some fresh ideas to bring back to you. If there are any environmental issues that you would like to bring to our attention, you can get hold of us at: environment@wsu.org.nz, or you can pop in at the WSU office.

Finding it hard to make some ends meet? Come and see us at the Student Union Building and we’ll help you out. Phone: 07 856 9139 Email: wsu@wsu.org.nz

www.nexusmag.co.nz

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Mature Students Officer

SOMETHING YOU MIGHT NOT KNOW ABOUT THE WSU...

WSU ADVOCACY

Vincent Malcom-Buchanan mature@wsu.org.nz This is, of necessity, a very quick announcement in regards to the ALMS Commons Room. Throughout the duration of 2006 I proudly undertook the position of President for the newly formed A.L.M.S, in conjunction with my responsibilities as portfolio holder for the Mature Students Representative on the WSU. In 2007 it has become logistically appropriate to hand this position over – and since making this decision I have duly appointed Kerry Mackay to the position of President Elect for 2007. This position is by no means enviable; it involves significant effort and industry on the part of the holder. Kerry is a successful full-time student, in the final semester of her BSocSci in Labour Studies, and fully intends to continue with graduate work in the second semester of the year. Kerry is also, simultaneously, a dedicated full-time home-maker and Director of a family business. Having become acquainted with Kerry most recently in the September 2006 Executive Elections, I am confident that as President Elect she is an appropriate person to be in charge of following through with the varied interests of the registered members for ALMS Commons Room. In approaching Kerry to undertake this role, she has assured me that she is confident of keeping her finger on the pulse and maintaining a one-on-one communication system by means of the Commons Room facilities. I shall endeavour to respond to all enquiries regarding this appointment and I look forward to working with Kerry in formulating the 2007 Committee and undertaking its obligations. Also, it is appropriate to point out that CSL (Campus Services Limited), to whom we are grateful for the use of the rooms, has recently undergone internal staffing changes. This issue is relevant in so much as the distinct lack of clean facilities over the past couple of weeks. Thank you to Kerry and the team who attempted to keep ahead of the problem until the new staff were employed.

WSU advocacy is a service provided to you as a member of the Waikato Students’ Union. When you have a problem, be it with the University, WINZ, Studylink or any other group, the WSU executives can help you find a solution.

What is it?

The WSU Advocacy Service provides WSU members with free access to a confidential service which is empathetic to your needs as a student. As the WSU is run by students for students, we know the pressure of studying full time, or working and studying. The Waikato Students��� Union has many links within the University Of Waikato as well as outside of it. Therefore we may have a better chance of assisting you with problems than you would have as a lone individual.

WSU advocacy can help you...

• By sorting out problems with academic staff • By advocating on your

behalf on disciplinary matters • By mediating with an unpleasant landlord • By providing assistance with WINZ • Or by simply listening and offering advice

Who can use it?

All WSU members during office hours.

What can it do for me?

As a WSU member, the Advocacy service can help you with problems on and off campus with representation, advice and total confidentiality. Often, all a situation needs is the advocacy of a large organisation like the WSU with access to resources like Nexus on hand - people tend to act more fairly when negative media attention is at stake.

How can I get an advocate?

Phone the WSU office and ask for the Advocacy service (if after hours you will need to leave a message). The number is (07) 856 9139.

Get your education paid off by someone else Scholarships are available to apply for various different courses and conditions. Check them online at: www.waikato.ac.nz/scholarships 30

ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

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ACCOMODATION 2 bedroom plus office - brick house available in Hillcrest from early May 2007 for a year. Two double bdrms, one sunny office, large sunny living room, separate dining, double garage. 20m walk to Uni. Quiet no exit road. Friendly neighbours. Nice yard. FULLY FURNISHED. $280 per week + expenses. Please ring 856 4193. Flatmate required: A room in Hamilton east is now available. The room is large enough for queen size bed, decks, drawers etc. The rent is $100 per week and includes food, power, phone, wireless broadband, digital sky. To live with students and one full time worker. Text or call Mark on 0273212154. Flatmate wanted: 1 bedroom available. $90 per week (includes internet/power/phone) in Hamilton East area. To live with 3 students and 1 worker. Text Rob 027 277 6704 or ring 856 6083 Flatmate wanted: We’re looking for a laidback student to join us in our flat. It’s close to uni, the bus and shops. $100 per week inc power, phone and broadband. If you’re interested call 859 2555 or txt 027 200 2161 Flatmate wanted: $100 p/w inc phone & power. Broadband avail. 1 student, 2 professionals, mid 20s, 2 guys 1 girl. North end of town on Charlemont St, 20mins walk to town, close to shops, bus etc. Quiet, off street parking. No bond. Phone 8391080 or 021 1473965 www.nexusmag.co.nz

Room for Rent: nice house, close to everything you need. Close to Uni. Cheap rent. 4 current flatties, want someone clean who can pay the rent, and laid back - preferably a guy. Txt/ring 0273812304.

EVENTS Race Relations Day Festival: Make your way to outside S Block on NZ Race Relations Day this Wednesday between 1-2pm to experience both culinary and cultural delights. On offer for the foodies will be a delicious array of national and international treats including a hangi, sausage rolls, lamingtons, sushi, spring rolls and fried rice. Then allow yourself to feel the rhythm as the Faculty showcases its diversity with a kapahaka performance alongside the cool grooves of a flamenco guitarist and percussionist.

Student radio at its most... studenty.

FOR SALE 2x vacuum cleaners - 2 years old. $30.00 each or $50.00 for both. Phone Tom on 07 856 3909 King size inner sprung mattress: $50.00. Phone Tom on 07 856 3909 Ironing board: $10.00. Phone Tom on 07 856 3909

Need to advertise? Notices are free for students to advertise. You can either come up to our office with your notice, email the notice to nexus@waikato.ac.nz or post it to our forum at: www.nexusmag.co.nz/forum ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

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A thank you to Professor Joyce Stalker For decades leading into the 21st century the unique circumstances of an ever-increasing number of adult-learners were, more often than not, relegated to one of two equally significant processes. Their interests were either superseded by the demanding pursuits of much younger, more vocal, and somewhat more active tertiary counterparts; or were lost within the superstructure of sports teams, faculty-specific interest groups and so forth. Fortunately this significant student population—which has come to include parents, grandparents, war-veterans, qualified care-givers, public sector employees, and corporate business professionals to name but a few—drew the considerable interest of international academics and the wider international community. The collective influence of mature students has emerged, albeit with incremental progress – firstly at an institutional, then national, then international level – giving hard earned credence to adult-learners and mature students the world over. Almost a decade ago, our Aotearoa was introduced to the influential and redoubtable achievements of this student population; and today the University of Waikato (UoW) now proudly supports multiple initiatives aimed at recognising and facilitating their academic careers. In developing such resources, our institute has reflected its commitment to the considerable interests of its entire student population – regardless of perceived age barriers or associated challenges. In beginning or returning to study as a mature student, numerous issues may arise: • Could I cope with the unavoidable technological advancements? After all, it’s a quantum leap going from a blackboard to a Pentium! And the last time I was at school a notepad was just that – as opposed to today’s electronic version known more commonly as a laptop. 32

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• What of my domestic, familial and cultural obligations and responsibilities? • Could I shift from the relative comfort of an independent income, to that of a considerably lesser student allowance? • How could I even think of competing against vast numbers of students almost half my age? • Would I be the only ‘older’ student in the lecture theatre? The journey I undertook four years ago was by no means comparable to the far more socially tolerable transition of my youthful peers, and today I am completing the last of my Graduate work in readiness to enter the Masters Program. In coming this far, I remain confident of entering into Doctoral work in 2008. Conversely, the amazing journey which I, and many mature students have embarked on, has been made significantly easier due in no small part to the industry of predecessors – and it is to this aspect which I draw the attention of you, the reader. In 2007 the University of Waikato Adult Learners Working Committee warmly welcomes its newly appointed Chairperson Dr Julie Jackson-Gough, as Professor Joyce Stalker (former Chairperson from 2000-2006) steps aside to allow fresh ideas and new energy to advance the tremendous work for which she has been instrumental in laying a most astute foundation. On a personal note, you have reminded me that the cup of abundance must first be emptied in order that it may be replenished again. Our institute’s current support programs and considerable recognition of adult-learners and mature students is largely due to the vigorous enthusiasm of Professor Stalker, who introduced and advocated the forum of mature students from its international roots. The fullest extent of her arduous and hard fought accomplishments is no less recognisable than in the forum of Adult Learner’s Celebratory Week Events, UoW and WSU Adult Learners

Awards, and her personal challenge for all other NZ tertiary institutes to follow in kind. This involved years of dedication, beginning with participation at various International conferences and forums, lobbying various interest groups, gathering and collating crucial data overseas; then proceeding to petition NZ academics and multiple support networks to bring to bear resources, facilities and opportunities specifically catering to the academic journeys of these students. I shall be so bold as to state that, were it not for your determined focus, guidance, good-will, and efforts over the past several years, I doubt seriously that the UoW would be as progressive in this area as it is today – a momentous achievement in light of Ministry of Education statistics which reveal up to 40% of tertiary education students fall into this significant group. I remain unsure that you will comprehend the degree to which your work in this area has subsequently made my own academic career all the more enjoyable and undoubtedly successful – and I am confident that I am not alone in this accolade. I shall hope that these few words might reflect, in some small measure, the heartfelt gratitude of adultlearners and mature students of yesteryear, today and tomorrow. But for you, our academic careers might otherwise have been, a journey most perilous. As an aside, I can almost hear you declaring “Hey, I didn’t do it alone Vincent!” But modesty aside, you came upon an idea, transplanted the seed of that idea, then inspired and nurtured it to fruition. Perhaps I might similarly plant a seed within the lines of this dialogue by mentioning the University’s newly established Distinguished Alumni Awards As you return to pursuing your academic commitment to the University of Waikato School of Education along with your private life’s ambitions, we take this moment to say: thank you! www.nexusmag.co.nz


Spot prize winners LAST CHANCE Please come to WSU Reception and pick up your spot prizes from clubs day if your name is on the list. Last day to pick them up is FRIDAY 23rd of March

Join and win competition Suafaia Suifua Ana Vaise Peter Stowers Katie Clake Elizabeth Williams Brooke Thomas Caleb Jordan Wang Hui

Best Site Competition Michelle Tukuafu Poonam Kumar Ebony Wikaira Shaneel Kumar Laura MacKey Sujeetha Prakash Shefali Kataria Bart Traslouski Hilary Lata

Banner Competition Enid Devon Shah Ali Joyce Cruz Michelle Tukuafu Jessie Hutenings

Affiliation Forms Affiliation time is coming around again so all those clubs who haven’t re-affiliated yet OR anyone who would like create a new club, head to www.freewebs.com/wsuclubs and pick up a 2007 affiliation form

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Columns

MeEt Nexus’ new relationships counsellor Dear Agony Art I’m a first year in College Hall. I’m having a really hard time getting girls to interact with me, even on the most basic of levels. How can I meet girls Agony Art? I’m so lonely! Whucking Awesome from Whangarei Dear Whucking Awesome I have one piece of advice for you and one only. It may well be the best piece of advice you can get for anything ever in your entire life. And that advice is: be confident! If you are confident and not creepy, you will be meeting girls in no time. As a girl I loved once told me: insecurity isn’t hot. But, just in case that doesn’t work here is some more advice for you to take into account: nice shoes are winners, so is clean hair. Girls like guys who give them attention (again, not in a creepy way), so texting while talking is way out (women have this belief that men can’t multi-task, so adhere to that belief). Money is good too. Girls don’t like boys, as the greatest band in the world says(ed spews in hand), they like cars and money. Actually… yeah, nah, confidence isn’t going to work. Lots of money, expensive shoes, an expensive haircut and Good Charlotte albums are the key to getting laid in this materialistic world of ours. Confidence is for poor people. Sincerely, Agony Art Dear Agony Art Recently I completely lost my sense of satire (and my brain) and went into Venom thinking it was a Metal bar. All that was in there was a nice bunch of people and a couple of drunken idiots smashing bottles. So my question is, now that the infinitely cool 6 ft Under is shut: where can a “Crusty-Bogan-About-Town” find the Metal girl of his dreams? Signed Burton C Bogan

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Gotcha!

Dear Burton C Bogan Your problem is a very interesting one. I read a report online recently which stated that a lack of satire is often a problem at this time of year. But back to your key problem: metal girls. Now that 6ft Under (may it rest in peace) has gone the way of the Dodo, your options are sadly limited. The only consistent substitute is Axces, which is apparently a rock bar, but more like Cazbah with balls. Other than that, my only suggestions are Upsett Records if you want a hardcore girl, Altitude during a Battle of the Bands or some other bar which is hosting live metal music. Also, be confident. And have lots of money. Sincerely, Agony Art

With Candice Bottomsworth I know I promised you a tell-all expose of the seedy dealings of the SPCA this week, but the other day I found this letter in my gorgeous new silk-and-stainless-steel Marc Jacobs letterbox: Dear Miss Bottomsworth, I was intrigued by your speculative piece on Rotary International in last week’s Nexus magazine. I myself have been investigating the Rotarian Conspiracy for many years now. In the course of these investigations I have witnessed secret ceremonies which would make your blood run cold; I have interviewed ex-Rotarians about their horrifying experiences inside the group; and I have uncovered frightening connections between Rotary and the world’s governments. Recently, my research has led me to understand that the location of Rotary International’s headquarters, which hitherto has been a complete mystery to all but the highest-ranked members of the organization, is an underground bunker complex deep within the Guatemalan jungle. I am currently planning an expedition to infiltrate this hidden lair and expose the workings of this insidious cult once and for all! Candice, you and I have met, just once, at the Viscount Hitchingbrooke’s birthday party at Mapperton – do you remember? I suppose you do not; but the memory of that brief moment burns brightly within my breast and can never be extinguished by the dull candle snuffer of time. I have loved you since I first saw you, Candice. Come with me! Come with me to Guatemala and help me to cleanse the world of this cancerous growth that even now, as I write, grows more powerful and threatens our very reality! I must sign off now; I must go and collect a consignment of high explosives. Please consider my offer. In any case, I shall remain, Yours with sincere and everlasting devotion, James William Botheringham-Smythe III This letter, written in genuine India ink on watermarked rice paper from a tiny island off the coast of Taiwan, took me by complete surprise. I do remember meeting James, of course. As I recall, he holds a minor barony somewhere or other. He is rather dashing… Dear reader, I am in a quandary! Just what is a beautiful, talented young member of the upper-middle class supposed to do when she receives an invitation from a young(ish), single, reasonably good looking and wealthy man with a courtesy title, to go into the Guatemalan jungle to hunt down and destroy the leaders of Rotary International?

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Columns

BY VITAMIN C Pay attention again, you grubby little mole-people. Chances are you have been getting your quest on, Barry White styles. Barry White was a man, well… he was really a kind of dragon-man, and then he was a dragon. But he was still Barry White. That means you probably still have a few questions about this whole questing thing, so through the glory of printed media I will anticipate your questions, and then address them. One thing you’ve probably encountered if you spend time with some higher level players is a Summon. A summoned creature is exactly that, an ally you can summon for a limited time to augment your questing. Arguably the most common use for a summon is when one is alone on a Thursday night, vigorously questing away and running into some serious trouble, probably relying on pre-recorded questing sessions for help getting to the treasure. This is when you whip out your summoning stone and call upon a Summon to arrive and help out. First of all you need to get the Summons information, known in waiKato as ‘digits’. The beauty

Sports Thoughts By Joseph Ross In the Caribbean, international cricket’s Holy Grail - the ICC World Cup - is just getting underway. How will New Zealand go? Will Australia become the first team to win three World Cups in succession? Will the West Indies thrive or dive under home-team pressure? Expect some of the matches during pool play to be one-sided fizzlers with the big teams playing the minnows. However, each pool has one big match for cricket fans to lick their lips about. As you read this, Group C’s big match, New Zealand versus England, will have already been played, as will Group D’s West Indies v Pakistan. The other big games will be India v Sri Lanka (March 23) and Australia v South Africa (March 24). New Zealand’s other matches will be against Kenya (March 20) and Canada (March 22). The Black Caps will be going in to the tournament with their confidence fairly high after their recent

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of a Summon is that they can be used by multiple players, so all you have to do is find one who has a Summon you want and get its digits. From there it’s a simple matter of building up affinity with the summon, but this is pretty straightforward work. Other summons have different uses, for example the free summon you get when you subscribe to waiKato, called the FiveO. Their digits, in case you don’t know, are 111, but it seems they haven’t been implemented correctly by the moderators, and in worst case scenarios the summon has known to be replaced by a taxi instead. On a more deadly and dangerous note, there were a couple of level 50 trolls spotted at The Bank the other night - may I please stress to you young male questers out there, full of your bravado and Woodstock, do not engage. I repeat, do not engage. . Why don’t you leave it to a Samurai or a Reverse-Amish, whose technological superiority can overcome the angry eyebrows and heaving bosom of these feared creatures? Go form a party with that cute little river-nymph in the corner. Your melee weapon will love you for it in the morning.

clean-sweep of the Chappell-Hadlee series against Australia and even though they lost a warm-up game against Bangladesh, they will still be rating their chances of winning their first World Cup. If captain Stephen Fleming can find some form with bat in hand and the batsmen around him fire, and Shane Bond continues to decimate opposition batting line-ups, the Kiwis will be pretty hard to beat. Even though Fleming has publicly stated that he wants to continue playing after the World Cup, this is probably his last hurrah. If NZ win the tournament, there would be no better note for him to bow out. Conversely, if the Kiwis don’t win, the selectors may well decide that Daniel Vettori’s time has come. Fleming has been the national captain for over a decade now and under him NZ have played well over 200 matches for a winning record of only 47%. IF Fleming has a good World Cup, he may well become the first NZer to score 8000 ODI runs (he currently sits on 7684 with potentially 11 matches to play). I believe the Black Caps will be bundled out in the semifinals, as will the Sri Lankans. The final, on April 28 at Kensington Oval, Barbados, will be between South Africa and Australia. Jacques Kallis (Sth Africa) will have a great all-round match to deny the Aussies of a third straight World Cup title.

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Columns

GURU MOONBEAM’S

Feeling depressed, ill, or otherwise incomplete? If so, then why not try one of many ‘healing instruments’ available from the good folks at ‘Gentle Wind’. Of course, if you actually intend on getting better, you may want to consult a psychologist or your local general practitioner. Granny’s book of home remedies or seeking medical advice from your neighbour’s cat Bo Jangles, who has worms, may be just as effective as the ‘healing instruments’ on offer. Mary Miller is one of the founding members of ‘Gentle Wind’ in New Zealand and is very open about the inspiration and technical workings behind the healing instruments. ‘The information about how to construct the healing instruments was given to this project through telepathic impressions in the form of engineering blueprints. It is the understanding of this project that these blueprints come from the non-physical, spirit world from a place outside of this earth and its astral system. While it is ultimately not possible for us, as human beings, to know where these blueprints come from, the project can say they come from a source of good.” Well, that’s

reassuring. For the cool $500,000 donation, some of the options available to me included a ‘universal healing and alignment symbol’ designed to rebuild and restore my “energetic structure” and provide ongoing emotional stability and relief from stress. I don’t know what my energetic structure is exactly, but I do know that the requisite donation significantly distanced this Guru from any sort of emotional stability or stress relief. The symbol did not grab my attention, so I moved on to ‘the rod of light healing’. This bad boy is a clear plastic-like rod filled with herbs, cell salts, minerals, coloured bands and, if charged in the proper fashion, I’m guessing some balding fat guys’ jizz. Holding this rod just once grants the holdee healing, and a permanent sense of serenity; how many times have you heard that line? My favourite would have to be the instrument simply known as ‘the healing puck’. It looks like Miller’s benevolent friends from the aether forgot to telepathically transmit the instructions for this one. All we have to go on is that it is a puck and that it does some kind of healing. Unfortunately, the NZ branch of ‘Gentle Wind’ is in the process of disbanding. It seems like the project will have to continue their honoured traditions of misappropriation, inventing scientific evidence, and deviant activities from off shore locations.

to spawn a legion of boy bands and pop princesses. Each would eventually have their own set of groupies, largely consisting of 10 year old boys in love with Geri Halliwell and the frequent public display of her black knickers under that Union Jack dress, or 11 year old girls who were misguided enough to think they were going to marry Justin Timberlake.

“The great state of Vermont will not apologise for its cheese.” Hola! Welcome to the 2007 edition of Chuck and Benjo’s Guide to Pants. Now in its second year, and with one member of the duo frolicking in the tulips of Holland, this column continues to cast a roving eye on a specific group and then attempt to humiliate them. This week we examine the cheese and lollipop world filled with gleeful joy and exuberance that is bubblegum pop. Bubblegum Pop was a style of music that gained immense popularity during the late 90s, partly as a result of the success of the Spice Girls. Although untrustworthy and completely unreliable sources have confirmed that the band’s success was largely to do with the tight and bright outfits worn by the band members, the Spice Girls went on

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C’MON BARBIE LET’S GO PARTY

Things changed in the 21st Century though and the focus shifted from abstinence and purity to the act of being a dirty slut. Britney Spears stopped wearing underwear and started popping out children to a drugged-up dancer; Christina Aguilera began to get a little bit dirty (with an extra R) and lose a little of her own self-respect. The guys fared a little better than the girls, maintaining their composure in spite of the hookers in their videos. Justin Timberlake declared that he was, indeed, bringing sexy back and that it is okay to murder your cheating girlfriend, which may or may not be a thinly-veiled reference to his failed relationship with Britney Spears. This spelt the end of the beginning of bubblegum pop as it has been amalgamated into other styles such as electro-clash, whilst also influencing breakbeat and other styles of music that we don’t really know anything about.

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Columns

The Magic 8 Ball

Los Libros

Miscellaneous Musings from M-block

Magic 8 Ball is a lying, manipulating scumbag.

Sex and Violence

Can the Magic 8 Ball define ‘reasonable force’? Without a doubt. It is unfortunate that juries are easily confused by such a term.

University libraries are sometimes seen as mere storehouses for dry academic tomes, but amongst our shelves there is much sex and violence to be found.

So, is smacking your kid with a plank of wood ‘reasonable force’? Don’t count on it. But juries in the past have found otherwise.

If you are a Screen & Media student, or have a friend who is, you can disguise your wanton bloodlust as valid academic research and immerse yourself within a violent fantasy world courtesy of our Xboxes. We even have the controversial Grand Theft Auto for all of you scholars who want to unleash yo’ inna gansta and pop some caps in dat bitch’s ass.

If Graham Capill wasn’t in jail, would he proudly campaign against Sue Bradford’s anti-smacking bill? As I see it, yes. What a tragedy that this great Christian figure is currently imprisoned and therefore unable to defend the rights of people who want to beat the shit out of their kids. Does Magic 8 Ball ever smack? Without a doubt. Some people might argue that the lack of hands thing would obstruct my smacking power, but I laugh in the face of obstructions. If Sue Bradford is smackaphobic, does this mean that actually she is repressing her smackuality? My sources say no. What a ridiculous suggestion. That’s like saying that homophobic people are actually gay. Ludicrous. In the olden days, did university lecturers used to smack students? Most likely. This was one of the ancient university traditions, administered during tutorials to students with the most ‘potential’. Nowadays, such a practice is commonly referred to as ‘sexual harassment’. Does smacking increase the likelihood that a child will grow up to have a blog which links to Ann Coulter and The Drudge Report? Yes, definitely. Smacking increases anger levels in the child, leading him/her to develop libertarian views and create idols out of the American extreme right. If I were to smack a child, would I get hairy palms? My sources say no. But the child might grow up to have a hairy bum. Was Clint Rickards smacked as a child? Yes. Enough said.

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If you do not want to shed the academic facade by spending hours in front of a television, or you are just prone to epilepsy, you can always borrow that archaic form of technology known as a book. Perhaps Bret Easton Ellis’ American Psycho, a delightfully humorous romp with lashings of sex and violence. But please, read the book, do not bother with the DVD, which in some respects can be seen as a symptom of the type of society Elis was taking a ‘stab’ at. If you feel like non-fiction would be more in keeping with your scholarly outlook, then perhaps you may decide on something like Krafft-Ebing’s Psychopathia Sexualis, a catalogue of sexual behaviour ranging from the mundane to the bizarre. Of course, we also have the classics, such as the divine Marquis de Sade. Although the majority of the literature we have by de Sade is in the original French. We did have an English translation of The 120 days of Sodom, which J.G. Ballard refers to as “a black cathedral of a book [that shows] that anything can serve as the raw material for a compelling work of art, even those whistling whips and flowering bruises.” However, some lowlife lifted it; may they suffer the same fate as Aline on the 27th day of the final month. Nonetheless, we do have Pasolini’s adaptation of the 120 Days on DVD, a stomach turning critique of modern consumer society. Also on the same shelves you will find Cronenberg’s adaptation of Ballard’s Crash, a disturbing look at the contemporary “nightmare marriage of sex and technology.” Browse our catalogue using whatever risqué keywords happen to be lurking in your devious minds. The Library of Congress has even provided us with subject terms such as sadomasochism and sexual deviance to use. And feel free to partake of the sordid filth you find.

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Columns

pores and makes us cry out for less and less stimuli. Technology and the speed at which it evolves is amazing these days, but we human beings (who can adapt to our surroundings) sometimes find the changes to be too much, too quickly. The overexcitement created by corporations when they are trying to hawk their wares and services to us, drives our collective consciences further into a suppressed state of mind, stifling our true being. Yes, the over-abundance of “stuff” represses us and our desire to be individual. Instead, we are force fed a will that is not our own; a desire to own all that we can in order to make ourselves feel better.

BY KRANG The third eye reveals all that is unseen by the public. This week it reveals something of great importance to all involved. The suppression of this information is a constant reminder of why I must make my vigilant stand against The Man and do all I can to help those who are too underdeveloped to realise the sinister intention of the rich and powerful to do all that their black hearts’ desire. Yes, this piece of information is divulged to you so you may chew and savour it. Taste the delectable fruit of knowledge and act upon it. Throw down the oppression, take up your arms and fight for the rights of equality, respect, love and sandwiches. Have you ever felt the cancer of modern technology to be somewhat draining? The over-stimulation that we suffer every day through entertainment, communications and advertising clogs up our sanity

The reason people need to feel better is because advertising and consumer goods are telling us that we aren’t good enough already. The reason people need to feel better is because these goods and services that we all supposedly need are creating more dreams and wishes that which can only be attained through money - The Man’s dirty, drug-pumped, blood-stained money. The Man controls your dreams and aspirations with materialistic longing, suppressing your desire to learn and create by forcing you to buy “Made by Slave Labour” goods. The things you long for are supposedly easy to obtain. So, whatever happened to furthering one’s knowledge, experiences, creativity and ability? That has been replaced with SUVs, mobile phones and iPods. But you’re only a tool of The Man if you give him the ability to use you.

hear, my back was to her and I thought she was a back-up singer.

BY THE BOGAN

Halls of Residence Okay, so it’s been a few weeks and if you’ve just moved out of your parents basement you’re probably in one of the halls of residence. So here are some tips in case you haven’t worked out how to survive already.

Always take your keys with you. This isn’t your parents house, there’s no spare key hidden in one of those ceramic frog things or under a garden gnome. Even if you’re walking down to the toilet or something – RA’s get really sick of unlocking doors for people.

Always keep your door open. It’s a good way to meet new people. Chances are someone will walk past and make a nice comment about a poster, or the music being played or something and you could make a new friend.

Apparently there was a rumour in my year that Bryant got the food, Student Village got their leftovers and College Hall got Student Village leftovers. So, if you have a friend or girlfriend in a hall higher in the food chain then you can pay $5 for a voucher so you can eat there. That’s how it was back in the day; chances are there’s a similar system now.

Be tolerant of others music. You just have to put up with crap. I used to get woken up by Xzibit every morning and then listen to Nelly as I was walking to breakfast. Then when I played Dimmu Borgir real loud, the manager came and screamed at me from the doorway. Luckily I didn’t

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Hopefully you have a cool RA who lets you drink in the lounge like mine did, back in College Hall in 2001. If you don’t, chances are there are some strict rules at your hall. For instance, usually they have it so that you can’t have more than five people in one room at a time (otherwise it’s a party). Also, you can’t drink alcohol in the hallways. The easy answer to this is to keep your doors open in rooms that are next to each other and only have five people in each room. Then you can just switch rooms when you’re ready to mingle.

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And be nice to your RA. While you’ll meet the odd harsh one, they’re generally awesome people.

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Comics

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Columns

BY ISA

BY BLAIR NICHOLSON

Exercise your demons Exercise may be one of my least favourite words, in connotation and also to spell. It brings to mind traumatic childhood memories of team sports where my insufficient co-ordination and fear of hard flying objects brought me social ridicule and a plethora of avoidance habits. Those of you more comfortable in your skin may feel differently as you toddle off to the gym night after night to perform routine self flagellation or roll around in the mud in short shorts for our homoerotic viewing pleasure. Good for you. Physical activity is vitally important to your general wellbeing so find something that works for you. Walking in the sun is one of my favourite pastimes; this can produce feelings of elation as the serotonin from the sun coupled with endorphins from exercise combine in a happy-juice cocktail, a natural high that would be exceptionally lucrative if only we could bottle it. Sex may yield similarly congenial results, but not if you just lie there. Doing crazy or slightly ridiculous things in public can also be a good way of fitting physical activity into your day. Try cartwheels or roly-polys on various grassy areas around campus, invest in a unicycle or learn to stilt walk. If you do these things while wearing odd clothing you may have the added bonus of receiving donations from delighted observers. Laughing is fantastic exercise and good for the advancement of your abdominal muscles. Practice this whenever possible by watching comedy or reading bad jokes and then repeating them to everyone you know. If a wave of schoolyard nostalgia strikes, take out your skipping rope, find a big piece of elastic or chalk up the hopscotch and get into it. Try playing tag, hide and seek or catch and kiss when you’re with friends around campus. Dancing, particularly in the rain, is good for the soul as well as the figure. Take the opportunity whenever it arises and don’t just wait until you’re good and drunk and partial to hypothermia. Celebrate life and all its oddities, because strangeness has the benefit of boosting immunity and metabolism. Let your hair down every now and then and run around like a mad chicken - it’s good for you.

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This week, a subject close to my heart: money. Before being caught by the police, Canadian Salim Kara stole over $2 million from slot machines using a rod with a magnet on the end. He was sentenced to four years’ imprisonment. Woodpecker scalps, porpoise teeth and giraffe tails have all been used as money at one time or another. Until the nineteenth century, solid blocks of tea were used as money in Siberia. Before the 6th century BC, Chinese coins were cast in the shape of miniature shells, spades, and knives (the principal items of barter prior to the minting of coins). The average civil servant wage in Laos is less than $25 a month. There was a rain of silver coins on Meshchera, Russia, in 1940. Seventeen years later it was raining 1,000franc notes on Bourges, France, while in 1976, Limburg, Germany, also had a rain of banknotes. More Monopoly money is printed in a year than real money. Alberto Ramirez of Chatsworth, California, had money thrown at him by a stranger after being asked for directions. When the stranger had cooled down and driven away Ramirez and others on the scene collected hundreds of dollars from the pavement. Walter Cavanagh of California, USA has 1,397 valid credit cards with a credit worth of $1.65 million.

Last week we (Nexus) accidentally printed someone else’s writings under Blair’s name. We want to apologise for that. Sorry Blair!

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Columns

Stir Fry

The $3 Chef

As the name would suggest, the basic tenets of a stir fry require that the ingredients are stirred and fried. Though a few other restrictions exist; poking a DVD and some grass clippings around in a hot pan is not going to be a stir fry. You really need the right ingredients. Let’s cover the basics: 1 cup of rice 1 handful of frozen vegetables Between 1 tbls – ¼ of a cup of Soy sauce A tbls of Oil A pinch Salt As with the drunken person you brought back from town last week, you need to start with the essential groundwork before you even think of getting creative. Now let’s work on the pick up line that got you there; rice. A stir fry revolves around it, so that is where you must start. For those who don’t know, rice is simple to make. Put one cup of rice in a pot, add one and a half cups of cold water, turn to highest heat, reduce when it begins to boil, then wait until it’s ready, approximately 10 or 15 minutes. While this is happening, we will get to work on our multitasking gland (located just above your ‘don’t pee yourself when drunk’ gland). Heat oil in the pan and throw in the vegetables. When they are cooked to your preference, add the rice to the pan. While stirring, add the soy. If you’re a newb, add a little soy at a time so you don’t end up with a sticky, salty brown mess. In essence, that is a stir fry. If a three dollar dinner is beyond your

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by Chef Cyril

financial means then you might want to stop there. But since we are all gourmands on par with the fattest of French men, this stir fry is going to be stepped up a notch or two in the ‘yummy in my tummy’ scale. From here you can add anything to the meal. You probably need some pointers in this area in case you start adding toothpaste, strawberry candle wax and an unfinished pie for a topper: You can make a small omelet out of one egg with little or no milk and a little bit of soy. Spread it so it’s as thin as possible. Cut it into thin strips, this can be added at the last stage of cooking. Small pieces of bacon can be added for the meat eaters amongst us, prawns and chicken strips work too. I like toenails and blonde hair. For a more interesting taste, fry three or four slices of garlic and ginger at the oil-heating stage. And a little ginger powder in the last minute of cooking greatly improves the flavour.

Price list 1 cup of rice Frozen veges Soy sauce

30c 50c free if you know the right people

This leaves you roughly $2 for extra ingredients, for example: 1 egg 30c 1 slice bacon 30c 1 chicken $2 Ginger for cooking 30c Prawns $1 Squid $1

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CITRIC BY M EMERY There are a lot of international acts that are well worth the trek up to Auckland to check out but unfortunately a lot of them receive very little publicity beyond Auckland. On a recent visit to Auckland I was surprised to see posters up for shows from the Eagles of Death Metal and Herbie Hancock, which I was completely Oblivious of. Beyond going online, one way you can keep up with things is by picking up a free Groove Guide from Texas Radio And The Big Beat in Worley Place, Hamilton City. Your favourite Hamilton student magazine, Nexus are after a gig guide writer to keep folks up to date with upcoming shows, apply within.

Brooke Fraser will be touring all the major centers of New Zealand excluding Hamilton in April. Htown’s long lost downbeat act Southern Tribe has been resurrected. Check him out in the myspace valley: www.myspace.com/ southerntribe To the best of my knowledge Edgefest has been cancelled this year because of the Kooks. Darn. Hard working local lads, 48 May release their second album, Streetlights and Shadows, on the 16th of April. Also recently, OLD ONES OUT, NEW ONES IN has been applied with Jarod leaving to be replaced by Stan who is leaving New Caledonia soon or should I say they are leaving him. As far as I know everything is amicable. Wednesday 28th March at Bahama Hut, 48May will be playing a handover show with I believe both Jarod and Stan handling drum duties for portions of their set. This Show is R18, so no young folk

are allowed to attend. Guests include New Zealands most accurate Green Day/Blink 182 mimics, Goodnight Nurse as well as Quarter 2 and Lapser. Best of all this show is free! Hamilton’s favourite out of work porno extras, Amy Racecar, are set to release their second album in a couple weeks. It was actually recorded before their first but was completion was delayed due to sulking. Your favourite person with the initials L.T., Luke Thompson is currently out on his Perfect Drive Acoustic tour with a show at Ward Lane, 23rd March. Door entry is $10. Local young talent Kimbra plays support. Check Luke out at: www.myspace.com/lukethompson Contact FM, your favourite local student radio with limited transmitting power is up and running with a lovely collection of announcers. Tune into 88.1 FM to hear your favorite bands like Amy Racecar, The Clerics and Gertie. Also have a look at www.contactfm.co.nz for more information about Contact FM.

Greatest Hits: The Atlantic Years P.O.D. REVIEWED BY SHANE DUDFIELD Whenever a band that’s only been around for two or three albums releases a Greatest Hits album, it’s an obvious sign that they’ve run out of material to fulfil their recording contract. Which is forgivable, considering every single nu-metal song that ever needed to be made (and virtually zilch did) was created before the turn of the century. But it does beg the question: why did P.O.D. ever exist in the first place? ‘The Atlantic Years’ is a collection of about 4 or 5 songs I recognise with wincing recollection, scattered amongst a sludge of turgid fillers with much harping on about Jah and Jesus. And it’s a bit ironic, really, that they proudly proclaim their success as a mainstream Christian rock band, when it’s no secret that every time someone purchases a P.O.D album God kills a kitten.

WOMAD CD Competition The world arts, music and dance festival WOMAD would have finished on the 18 March but if you missed out on it and really wanted to experience some part of the WOMAD fun, we’ve got something for you. There are two copies in our hot little hands of the WOMAD CD “Sounds of the Planet” that we want to give away so the first two people who email nexus@waikato.ac.nz and ask for a CD can have one!

Hamilton's newest and biggest

CD DVD & Vinyl store 07 839 4435 PHONE

CORNER OF WARD AND VICTORIA ST , HAMILTON 42

ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

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March. Support slot is filled by The WBC and tickets are available at Ticketek. Could be worth the travel up to Auckland if you are so inclined! Gnarls Barkley and The Rapture rock the Auckland’s St James Theatre on Wednesday 28th March. Tickets are $80 and worth every single cent (www.ticketdirect.co.nz). Missing the show would make you crazy.

It’s your last week to see “Mrs Brown’s Big Day Out - Hamilton women in the 1950s” at Waikato Museum. And it won’t cost you a cent. The Hamilton Film Society meets every Tuesday, 8 PM at Victoria Cinema. A one-off screening will set you back $12 but you can pay just $100 for a whole year’s membership.

Wednesday 21 March The University of Waikato Lunchtime Recital Series presents classical guitarist Hans Jonkers from the Netherlands in the Academy of Performing Arts at 1pm. Entry is by donation.

Voom, The Sneaks, Phony Bone and Dynamo Go at Ward Lane on Friday 30th March. $10 before 9:30 PM, $15 after 9:30 PM In Dread Response, Antagonist, The Chase, A Calm Before on Saturday 31st March at Upsett Records. Urban Tramper, The Shrugs, and The Deadly Deaths at Ward Lane on Saturday 31st March It’ll be a while ‘til they come but Bloc Party will be hitting NZ shores and playing Auckland’s St James Theatre on August 8th. Tickets go on sale on the 22nd March so you’ve got plenty of time to save up some ping and organise your ride to Auckland.

Friday 23 March Luke Thompson and Kimbra will be performing as part of The Perfect Drive Acoustic Tour at Ward Lane tonight. The gig starts at 8pm and it’ll cost you $10 on the door.

Saturday 24 March The Loft and Sekure play host to some of New Zealand’s finest DJ’s, including General Lee, Daniel Farley, Jonathan Marshall and Nic Moon. Doors open at 9pm.

Sunday 25 March Upsett Records presents Brick vs Face, Roll With The Punches, Fuck The World, Vehement. It’s an afternoon show and only costs a fiver.

Upcoming Reel Big Fish are hitting King’s Arms in Auckland on Tuesday 27th

Got something on that isn’t on here? Want to list an event on here? Email us at nexus@waikato.ac.nz or submit an event via our website at www.nexusmag.co.nz www.nexusmag.co.nz

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Reviews

BOOKS

By The Sea

The Book of Lies

Alternatives to Sex

ABDULRAZAK GURNAH

MALCOLM GREEN

STEPHEN McCAULEY

Reviewed by Brie Jessen

Reviewed by Alana Fergusson

Reviewed by LEAH GRAHAM

Saleh Omar is an old man and an asylum seeker when he arrives at Gatwick airport. He is a raiiya (citizen) of Zanzibar, an island off the coast of continental Africa. He arrives in England under a borrowed name, believing that silence is his only protection. Silence may offer protection, but it is only once Saleh finds the voice and the strength to tell his story that he is able to resolve issues from the past. When Saleh and Latif Mahmud meet in a quiet English seaside town, their separate and shared histories begin to unravel. They find that there is much to remember which has been forgotten and much to come to terms with. The story is told in first person, predominantly through the eyes of Saleh, the refugee, but also in part from Latif’s point of view. From the first word you have the sense that the author is a man born to write, unusual though his style may be. He deftly portrays the trials and tribulations suffered at the hands of others by those who seek asylum and refuge. “By The Sea” starts slowly and takes its time in speeding up. However, it didn’t lose my attention as some books with slow beginnings are wont to do. In spite of the initial slow pace, I found myself (somewhat surprisingly) unable to put it down. Just as the book begins to seem tediously slow, the pace quickens dramatically and the horror and heartache of Saleh’s life in Zanzibar is revealed. This novel is an unusual and beautiful story. The romantic tone mixes with a realist’s view of the world to tell a story which is somewhat harsh, but truthful nonetheless.

Very rarely do I have the patience to read an entire book in one sitting; I have reserved that feat for four books alone, all of which are incomparable to this one. The Book of Lies is a funny, intelligent book that will inevitably leave you in stitches.

This is the story of William Collins, a real estate agent from Boston whose sales figures have plummeted due to his obsession with anonymous sex with the disappointingly unattractive men that he meets online at night. The realisation that this habit is negatively affecting his work, social life and, in particular, his relationships with close friends, William decides that a period of celibacy is in order.

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From survival tips of the urban legend ilk (if you are attacked by a great white shark, pouring dry turmeric in its eyes will not make it retreat) to quotes from famous and respected people, this book is made up entirely of lies. There are the lies you tell your doctor, lies you tell to your loved ones and (my personal favourite) lies that parents tell their teenage children. Have mum and dad ever told you that if you don’t come home, they’ll tear up your driver’s license? According to The Book of Lies, they will be far too tired to even care by the time it gets to that point. The book will teach you how to catch a liar, as well as how to detain them and use their own tricks against them (that is also a lie). It’s a marvelous piece of art that I now keep as a coffee table book and also as a reference when annoying salespeople turn up on my doorstep.

What follows is an incredibly funny but thoughtful look at love, friendship, relationships and marriage with a fair dose of real estate thrown in for good measure. McCauley displays in this book an uncommon level of understanding and insight into human issues with characters who are interesting and unique, yet incredibly believable. Overall this is a poignant but comedic novel and a highly entertaining and enjoyable read for almost anyone.

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Reviews

FILMS

THE

AUTEUR HOUSE INTRODUCTION TO

Preston Sturges The Descent SKYCITY CINEMAS Review by Joe Citizen There’s a reason why I don’t watch horror much, apart from the fact that after a bit of life experience there’s not much of a reason to actually pay to get frightened. Mainly I just find them so boringly predictable. The Descent is no exception – it fits fairly snugly inside a genre definition: main character is a survivor of other trauma, friends in the wilderness encounter supernatural/ mutant that wants to cause them harm, survivor(s) must become like said monsters to conquer them. There’s all the usual accoutrement of horror elements to take into consideration – the premonitions, the warnings and the crucial mistake that turns out to be so important later on. Not to mention the soundtrack that so regularly pendulums between the absence of sound (apart from over emphasised body grunts and the like) and the extreme eek eek eek [did somebody torture the domestic pet with feedback?] that arrives suddenly and leaves so slowly… And fade into relative silence with grunting sounds. Not to mention the de rigueur meaty thuds and eyeball gouging squishes. Um. The plot. Let’s not go there. Perhaps it’s enough to say that the story follows the ever so familiar three act classical narrative that Hollywood pursues blindly despite its increasing financial losses. Hero, inciting incident, goal, obstacles, increased obstacles, and eventually resolution. OK, so horror is allowed to be a bit more psychological, what with its primitive directive to overcome adversity by becoming the thing that you hate, but this is not by any stretch the thriller that other more mainstream reviewers have declared it to be. They don’t have to have happy endings either, what with the mental trauma of losing all of ones friends. (Oops, sorry hope I haven’t spoilt it for you, but if you haven’t figured that one out you should take out liability insurance.) For the cynical like me however, this is for the purposes of enabling a sequel. Please, if there is a god, let that not be the case. One good point – there’s no men. Six women go caving and encounter blind cannibalistic mutants. (What was I thinking?) They’re all way too hard-arse for me, except the existing survivor whose normality is condemned to disintegrate as she overcomes her own demons. And there’s not a nightie/homo-erotic/obligatory panty shot to be seen. Yay for politically correct horror. Shame it’s not even worth waiting to watch on video. www.nexusmag.co.nz

BY RICHARD SWAINSON How’s this for a premise: a young single woman goes to a party, gets blind drunk and wakes the next morning to discover that she has “fallen” pregnant and cannot remember who the father is. A run-of-the-mill post-O-week Saturday night for some, perhaps. The start of a ‘kitchen sink’ drama in the hands of Mike Leigh or Ken Loach, maybe. But a 1940s farce? The special genius of Preston Sturges brooked no compromise with the censorship or sentiment of his day. “The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek”, from which the above scenario is drawn, becomes a quest to find the expectant mother’s missing husband. At no point is it ever suggested that she might not have gotten married, even if the eventual birth of quadruplets teasingly alludes to more than one sexual partner’s involvement. Just how daring this sort of thing was in 1944 is hard to convey today. “Morgan’s Creek” came at the end of a golden run for Sturges, the last of five masterpieces made in as many years, together with two other films of worth and a singular dud (the result of studio tampering). His satirical approach to Americana built on the Capra fantasies of the 1930s, starting with 1940’s “The Great McGinty”, the tale of a blatantly crooked politician, and continuing with “Christmas in July”, a sharp comedy of capitalist excess in which a lowly paid office-drone spends a fortune believing he’s won a jingle competition. In 1941 Sturges had a year to rival that of Orson Welles. “The Lady Eve” is probably the ultimate screwball comedy, matching Henry Fonda’s sheltered millionaire snake enthusiast with Barbara Stanwyck’s hard bitten con-artist. “Sullivan’s Travels” addresses the hitherto unexamined issue of the artist’s place in Hollywood, coming down movingly on the side of entertainment over pretension. 1942’s “The Palm Beach Story” deals farcically with divorce, the best of a number of films to do so in that era, as a woman separates from her inventor husband so that he might better realise his potential free from the burden of supporting her. The premise is revolutionary; the execution exemplary. Finally, came 1944, when Sturges proved himself one of the very few filmmakers willing to satirise World War II and its resultant jingoism. Both “Hail the Conquering Hero” and “The Miracle of Morgan’s Creek” feature Sturges regular Eddie Bracken as the antithesis of the American fighting man: a weedy, pathetic figure, manipulated into posing as a pin-up boy for masculinity. Most of Sturges’ films are available in a gigantic DVD box set from Auteur House, at a very competitive price. ISSUE 4 · 19 MARCH, 2007

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M

EAT-BIX FOUND THEMSELVES BURSTING ONTO

the Auckland music scene around three years ago in a mad flash of flying meat and controversy. From early on, they were more infamous than famous for their onstage capriciousness, which has included a cross-dressing (if dressed at all) rhythm section, flying trapeze vocalists and, of course, the notorious meatthrowing gig. Equally as unpredictable is their music, ranging from what critics have described as “warped but strangely brilliant,” “weird and wonderful” and even “acid hardcore dance accordion garage operatic with a touch of Nokia ringtone.” Progressive jazz rock? Metal burlesque? Avant garde cabaret guitar? Whatever they are, they’ve finally gotten around to releasing their first studio recording, Collection, Volume 4. Their genre-defying sound is represented nicely on this self-released EP, with songs running right over and squashing the gamut of standard music industry categorization. Ever-evolving, Meat-Bix’s line-up the Gaylord Jeezus (bass), Dogfhart Axilla (guitar), handpuppet and Max CHOICE! (drums), Tennessee Pussycat (vocals, keyboards and melodica), Derek (vocals), BiCurious George (vocals), Pants (vocals) and Rebeccarl (vocals). I sent Meat-Bix some questions via electronic mail waves to achieve deeper penetration into what they are all about. How did Meat-Bix form? A group of unlikely-minded folk were doing not much. But we all liked to dress up in funny costumes so we decided to form a band. Why should people listen to Meat-Bix?

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Most people should stay well clear, but our predilection for unpredictability will always keep people guessing. And we look hot on stage. Well, some of us. How have Meat-Bix found the process of creating your debut CD release? Long. Very long. Lots of unappreciated hard-work, but quite rewarding. Actually, too much work for an independent group, but at least we aren’t being fleeced by some shitty record company. What is the worst thing that has ever happened to Meat-Bix? We used to have this great life-sized cardboard cutout of Colin Meads that some fucker stole from us during a gig. And our singer keeps getting up the duff, which inconveniences the band terribly. Ah well. What is the worst band meat-bix have ever played with? Please don’t ask us to commit social suicide. How are relations with Dominic Bowden these days? (Dominic was a vital component of early Meat-Bix Poster campaigns.) He’s one of our biggest fans. He’s always welcome to join us on stage at any time. What has been a highlight of the Meat-Bix experience so far? Playing with Kevin Blechdom. Being cool for about a month, fading into obscurity, then teetering on infamous. Currently. Anyway. What do Meat-Bix have lined up for the future? A theremin-inspired rock opera. And some videos (if anyone is interested?)

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d n a l k c u A s v n o t l i Ham

Two law schools compete for the Log of Wood...

Busted Photos Wanted! Taken some good pictures lately? Piss-up shenanigans? Bar-hopping fun? Did two chicks hook up? Did two guys hook up? Did someone get stupidly drunk and pass out in their own filth, thus earning everybody’s rapt attention? Then send us your pictures! Pictures can be emailed to nexus@waikato.ac.nz, or brought in person to the Nexus offices (in the Student Union Building) www.nexusmag.co.nz

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issue 4