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The oldest alternative weekly newspaper in the United States.

ISSUE NUMBER 2469

JANUARY 16 - JANUARY 22, 2019

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19) In 1917, leaders

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of the Christian sect Jehovah’s Witnesses prophesied that all earthly governments would soon disappear and Christianity would perish. In 1924, they predicted that the ancient Hebrew prophet Moses would be resurrected and speak to people everywhere over the radio. In 1938, they advised their followers not to get married or have children, because the end of civilization was nigh. In 1974, they said there was only a “short time remaining before the wicked world’s end.” I bring these failed predictions to your attention, Aries, so as to get you in the mood for my prediction, which is: all prophecies that have been made about your life up until now are as wrong as the Jehovah Witnesses’ visions. In 2019, your life will be bracingly free of old ideas about who you are and who you’re supposed to be. You will have unprecedented opportunities to prove that your future is wide open.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) Movie critic Rog-

er Ebert defined the term “idiot plot” as “any film plot containing problems that would be solved instantly if all of the characters were not idiots.” I bring this to your attention because I suspect there has been a storyline affecting you that in some ways fits that description. Fortunately, any temptation you might have had to go along with the delusions of other people will soon fade. I expect that as a result, you will catalyze a surge of creative problem-solving. The idiot plot will transform into a much smarter plot.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) In 1865, Prussia’s

political leader, Otto von Bismarck, got angry when an adversary, Rudolf Virchow, suggested cuts to the proposed military budget. Bismarck challenged Virchow to a duel. Virchow didn’t want to fight, so he came up with a clever plan. As the challenged party, he was authorized to choose the weapons to be used in the duel. He decided upon two sausages. His sausage would be cooked; Bismarck’s sausage would be crammed with parasitic roundworms. It was a brilliant stratagem. The proposition spooked Bismarck, who backed down from the duel. Keep this story in mind if you’re challenged to an argument, dispute or conflict in the coming days. It’s best to figure out a tricky or amusing way to avoid it altogether.

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CANCER (June 21-July 22) An imaginative

27-year-old man with the pseudonym Thewildandcrazyoli decided he was getting too old to keep his imaginary friend in his life. So he took out an ad on Ebay, offering to sell that longtime invisible ally, whose name was John Malipieman. Soon his old buddy was dispatched to the highest bidder for $3,000. Please don’t attempt anything like that in the coming weeks, Cancerian. You need more friends, not fewer—both of the imaginary and non-imaginary variety. Now is a ripe time to expand your network of compatriots.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) In December 1981,

novice Leo filmmaker James Cameron got sick, fell asleep, and had a disturbing dream. He saw a truncated robot armed with kitchen knives crawling away from an explosion. This nightmare ultimately turned out to be a godsend for Cameron. It inspired him to write the script for the 1984 film The Terminator, a successful creation that launched him on the road to fame and fortune. I’m expecting a comparable development in your near future, Leo. An initially weird or difficult event will actually be a stroke of luck.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Psychologists define

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the Spotlight Effect as our tendency to imagine that other people are acutely attuned to every little nuance of our behavior and appearance. The truth is that they’re not, of course. Most everyone is primarily occupied with the welter of thoughts buzzing around inside his or her own head. The good news, Virgo, is that you are well set up to capitalize on this phenomenon in the coming weeks. I’m betting you will achieve a dramatic new liberation: You’ll be freer than ever before from the power of peo-

BY ROB BREZSNY ple’s opinions to inhibit your behavior or make you self-conscious.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) What North America

community is farthest north? It’s an Alaskan city that used to be called Barrow, named after a British admiral. But in 2016, local residents voted to reinstate the name that the indigenous Iñupiat people had once used for the place: Utqiaġvik. In accordance with astrological omens, I propose that in the coming weeks, you take inspiration from their decision, Libra. Return to your roots. Pay homage to your sources. Restore and revive the spirit of your original influences.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) The Alaskan town

of Talkeetna has a population of 900, so it doesn’t require a complicated political structure to manage its needs. Still, it made a bold statement by electing a cat as its mayor for 15 years. Stubbs, a part-manx, won his first campaign as a write-in candidate, and his policies were so benign — no new taxes, no repressive laws — that he kept getting re-elected. What might be the equivalent of having a cat as your supreme leader for a while, Scorpio? From an astrological perspective, now would be a favorable time to implement that arrangement. This phase of your cycle calls for relaxed fun, amused mellowness and laissez-faire jauntiness.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) Trees need

to be buffeted by the wind. It makes them strong. As they respond to the pressure of breezes and gusts, they generate a hardier kind of wood called reaction wood. Without the assistance of the wind’s stress, trees’ internal structure would be weak and they might topple over as they grew larger. I’m pleased to report that you’re due to receive the benefits of a phenomenon that’s metaphorically equivalent to a brisk wind. Exult in this brisk but low-stress opportunity to toughen yourself up!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Writing at

ThePudding, pop culture commentator Colin Morris reveals the conclusions he drew after analyzing 15,000 pop songs. First, the lyrics of today’s tunes have significantly more repetitiveness than the lyrics of songs in the 1960s. Second, the most popular songs, both then and now, have more repetitive lyrics than the average song. Why? Morris speculates that repetitive songs are catchier. But in accordance with current astrological omens, I encourage you Capricorns to be as unrepetitive as possible in the songs you sing, the messages you communicate, the moves you make, and the ideas you articulate. In the coming weeks, put a premium on originality, unpredictability, complexity and novelty.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) In May 1927,

Aquarian aviator Charles Lindbergh made a pioneering flight in his one-engine plane from New York to Paris. He became instantly famous. Years later, Lindbergh testified that partway through his epic journey he was visited by a host of odd, vaporous beings who suddenly appeared in his small cabin. They spoke with him, demonstrating a sophisticated understanding of navigation and airplane technology. Lindbergh’s spirits were buoyed. His concentration, which had been flagging, revived. He was grateful for their unexpected support. I foresee a comparable kind of assistance becoming available to you sometime soon, Aquarius. Don’t waste any time being skeptical about it; just welcome it.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) More than four

centuries ago, a Piscean samurai named Honda Tadakatsu became a leading general in the Japanese army. In the course of his military career, he fought in more than a hundred battles. Yet he never endured a major wound and was never beaten by another samurai. I propose we make him your inspirational role model for the coming weeks. As you navigate your way through interesting challenges, I believe that like him, you’ll lead a charmed life. No wounds. No traumas. Just a whole lot of educational adventures.


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This patriotic, satirical cover from May 14, 1970, shows a missile in the colors and patterns of the U.S. flag. Many students at Syracuse University, and nationwide, were protesting the Vietnam War.

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SPORTS

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The Syracuse University men’s basketball team experienced a topsy-turvy week at the Carrier Dome. The Jan. 9 contest against Clemson (facing page) led to a 61-53 victory; so far, so good. Then came the Jan. 12 shellacking from Coach Josh Pastner (top right) and his Georgia Tech team, with the Orange on the losing end of the 73-59 game. Redemption in the ACC came just two days later with a pivotal away game: SU’s shockeroo upset of No. 1-ranked Duke in a Jan. 14 overtime thriller, 95-91, that had fans dancing up and down Marshall Street. syracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

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Rosemary Krupka’s “Unguilded Truth” (above) and an automotive work by Deborah Walsh (facing page) are on display at the Everson Museum.

ART

GENERATION SUMMATION

The Everson Museum celebrates women artists from ages 60-something and beyond BY CARL MELLOR

T

he Everson Museum of Art’s current show begins with a roster of local artists and then heads in several directions. Indeed, the works in Re (Generation): Women Artists After 60 range from pastels to acrylics and watercolors, from ceramics to a fiber work and a digital piece. And the artists portray a bevy of subjects: wildfires, the old Central Technical High School, guns and a goddess of mercy. Along the way, the lush colors of “Stop for Autumn,” an oil by Linda Cohen, contrast with Mimi George’s “Before the Night,” a tight, sparse acrylic on board that creates a mood instead of emphasizing a beach or body of water. In addition, “Abandoned,” by Joan Applebaum, influences a viewer’s eye to move from a vehicle left for junk to bushes and the branches of a nearby tree.

Two pieces reference downtown Syracuse. Cookie Falcone’s watercolor offers several views of Central Tech, portraying an interior stairway and the exterior of the building. In “Return to Loew’s State,” Carolyn Coit’s black-grease pencil drawing recalls the movie palace on South Salina Street that escaped the wrecker’s ball and became the Landmark Theatre. Sculptural works include “No Fear,”


a ceramic by Sookie Kayne, and Carol Adamec’s “Champagne Bubbles,” made from wielded and stainless steel, brass and copper. The latter artwork extends vertically, with a stack of metal objects. Like many of Adamec’s works, it creates an illusion of movement. Elsewhere, Judith Hand has created a transparent watercolor imagining Kuan Yin, a female Buddha known for compassion and mercy. The painting is beautifully detailed. There are several artworks not easily categorized. “Unguilded Truth,” a digital work by Rosemary Krupka, depicts a male persona seemingly in inner space. Pamela Vogan Lynch’s watercolor goes big and bold with its large-scale portrayal of owl eyes. And Carol Boyer’s “Wildlife,” with tiny images of trees and folds suggesting hillsides, both stands on its own as a fiber work and evokes events of autumn 2018. Some viewers will look at the piece and recall the fires that burned down many buildings in Paradise, California. Joyce Day Homan returns to a subject she’s explored in other works: gun violence. In her acrylic, “Dreaming,” a male figure is surrounded by firearms. The piece has an absurdist flavor but also is topical, as it delves into guns as a cultural entity. “Persistence of Anguish: Lost in Combat” by Irene Layow stretches over two canvasses and is one of the best works in the exhibition.

In the top canvas, there’s a faded tower and a red-and-orange profile that has no specific identity. Perhaps this refers to a fragmenting of humanity. In the bottom canvas, Layow has positioned bullet shells and ribbons constructed from fused glass. And the exhibit has other noteworthy pieces. In Eleanor Price McLess’ mixed-media work, more than a dozen ties are draped across a canvas. Deborah Walsh often depicts cars or motorcycles, playing with reflective surfaces. For her acrylic “Hindsight,” she works with a car and rear-view mirror; a reflection of pedestrians walking nearby appears in the mirror. Re (Generation), presented through the museum’s Community Exhibitions program, nicely accommodates diverse styles while also making connections between some of the pieces. Beyond that, it celebrates the creative vision of its participants. In the group-show format, each artist has only one piece on display. Yet the exhibition is energetic rather than segmented, incisive, not loose. Re (Generation): Women Artists After 60 is on display through Feb. 24 at the Everson Museum, 401 Harrison St. The museum is open Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays, noon to 5 p.m.; Thursdays, noon to 8 p.m.; and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and students and free for children under 12 and military personnel. For information, call (315) 474-6064. SNT

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THINGS THAT MATTER

DEFINING BIAS

The word has become an easy excuse when criticizing the media BY LUKE PARSNOW

W

hile live-tweeting President Donald Trump’s first Oval Office address to the nation on Jan. 8 and the Democratic rebuttal from Sen. Chuck Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a viewer replied to one of my tweets: “Reporters should not be sending biased tweets.” My tweet said: “Nancy Pelosi in re- pothetical poll done by students about buttal to #TrumpAddress: The fact is, youth sports programs would be much President Trump must stop holding the more biased if it’s conducted at a school American people hostage, stop manu- soccer game rather than asking students facturing an emergency, and reopen the at random in a packed cafeteria during lunchtime. government.” In the political realm, many elected ofIt’s rhetoric. It’s hyperbolic. It’s a statement from a politician. But it is not ficials and members of the public consider members of media organizations to be bias to report that she said it. During another particular event in the biased against liberals or conservatives early morning hours after Election Day because they allegedly construct their when I tweeted the breaking news that journalism to fit their respective prejuDemocrats had won control of the New dices. In today’s multi-platform world, there York state Senate, someone tweeted along is certainly bias in the media. Conserthe lines of “nice biased reporting!” Like many journalists, I have faced the vative news outlets and blogs like Brerecent onslaught of accusations of being itbart,Townhall.com and the American fake news and all things similar. But the Conservative are obviously going to word “bias” is also prominent, and for be biased toward conservatives. And liberal ones like Mother Jones, The me, much more perplexing. Bias is defined as a preconceived opin- Young Turks and Thinkprogress.com ion that is not based on reason or actual are designed for a progressive audience. experience in favor of or against a per- I don’t think either one of them would claim instead to be strict, independent son or group that is considered unfair. The first time I really learned about the down-the-middle outlets, although some complexity of bias wasn’t in any polit- of their audience might. In mainstream television and newspaical setting: It was in geometry class in high school. We were taught that a hy- per organizations, I believe perceptions

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of bias can be at least argued in some cases. While I don’t think that necessarily compromises the entirety of a news organization, it’s certainly something that can and should be handled better than it is. But reporting what an elected official says during an address to the nation is not “bias.” Reporting a factual election result is not “bias.” While the word “bias” was in many cases the longtime precursor to the fake news phrase of today, it seems to be making a comeback, maybe because it sounds more sophisticated than the crudeness of “fake.” But its use in this context is intended to be the same, even though the words have two distinctly different definitions. Essentially, the word “bias” has been twisted into something it’s not. And while accusations of bias are most concentrated on national media, local press is just as much a victim to the same complaints, and interestingly enough, those complaints are most often rooted by national issues. I remember taking many calls and reading many letters at my old workplace, The Post-Star, about our alleged bias against Republican office-holders. Our editor was intrigued and did some research on our past candidate endorse-

ments — something many use as a barometer for measuring bias. While the newspaper did endorse Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama in the past presidential elections, the vast majority of past endorsements for congressional seats and lower-level offices had been for Republican candidates. Numerically, it would actually make more sense to accuse the newspaper of being biased against Democrats. Yet because it endorses Democratic presidential candidates, that somehow made it a rampant anti-conservative publication in the eyes of many. That example underscores what this always comes down to. The bulk of political bias lies not within reporters or media organizations at large, but in the readers and viewers. There’s nothing wrong with that. We are free to dislike or disagree with what we see in the news. But we can’t just dismiss a quote from a politician or an election outcome as bias just because we don’t like it. There can be no preconceived opinion about facts. Bias is a trap of our own making, of our own human psyche. It’s up to that same psyche to know the difference so we can climb out of that trap as often as we can.

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BY THE EDITORS AT ANDREWS MCMEEL

PULL HER FINGER

Shanetta Yvette Wilson, 37, was standing in line at a Dollar General store in Dania Beach, Florida, on Nov. 25 when the urge struck and she let one rip. John Walker, who was standing nearby, was offended and complained about “the defendant farting loudly,” according to the resulting Broward Sheriff’s office complaint, so Wilson pulled out a small folding knife, opened it and threatened to “gut” Walker as she moved toward him. The Miami Herald reported that police called to the scene tracked down Wilson and charged her with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill.

WELL, EXCUUUUSE ME!

At the Grand Slam of Darts in Wolverhampton, England, there was more in the air than just the sharp projectiles tossed by competitors on Nov. 16. According to Reuters, former two-time champion

Gary Anderson, 47, from Scotland, prevailed over Wesley Harms, 34, from the Netherlands to reach the quarter finals, but Harms had a gripe: He said he was affected by the “fragrant smell” Anderson had emitted as they played. “It’ll take me two nights to lose this smell from my nose,” Harms told a Dutch television station. Anderson objected, saying the smell came “from the table side,” laying the blame on spectators. “If the boy thinks I’ve farted he’s 1,010 percent wrong,” Anderson declared. “If somebody has done that they need to see a doctor. He says it was me, but I would admit it.”

dealership on Aug. 16, where he had allegedly put down a 10,000 yuan payment. Tang asked the group to wait there while he went to get the cash, but instead, according to Shanghaiist, he went to a supermarket and bought a fruit knife. Outside, he found a secluded spot and cut up his own arms, then called Yang and said he had been robbed at knifepoint of the 750,000 yuan he had supposedly withdrawn for the car. While her brothers took Tang to the hospital, Yang waited for police, who eventually excised the story from Tang. He was sentenced to 10 days in jail and a 500 yuan fine.

EXTREME MEASURES

IRONY DEFINED

A man named Tang from Sichuan Province, China, promised his girlfriend, Yang, that he would buy an expensive luxury car for her. The only problem was that he didn’t have the money. So he cooked up a scheme, inviting Yang and her brothers to the Chengdu car

Lona and Joseph Johnson of Bellingham, Washington, survived the Las Vegas mass shooting in October 2017 and decided to get a dog to help with the trauma that haunted them after the incident. “We heard that dogs are good pets to help with the healing and PTSD, and we got Jax,”

Joseph told the Bellingham (Washington) Herald. But on Sept. 2, neighbor Odin Maxwell, 49, shot and killed Jax, telling police the dog was chasing his chickens. An investigation showed no chickens were harmed, and Maxwell was cited for discharging a firearm.

TUBE STAKES

Patricia Ann Hill, 69, of White Hall, Arkansas, called 911 on July 28 to report she had shot her husband, Frank, 65. But she had a motive: Patricia told Jefferson County Sheriff’s investigators she had previously disagreed with her husband’s purchase of a pornography channel on Dish Network, and she canceled the channel, telling Frank that if he reordered it, he’d have to leave. That day, reported the Pine Bluff Commercial, the Dish bill arrived, revealing that the channel had been re-added, so Patricia confronted Frank in his “man cave” and told him to go. When he refused, Patri-

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cia fetched a .22-caliber pistol from the house and shot him twice, killing him. Hill was charged with capital murder and held without bond in the Jefferson County adult detention center.

ANGER MANAGEMENT

Djuan Lewis, 23, landed a new job at Benada Aluminum Products in Sanford, Florida, on Aug. 30, a Thursday. On Sunday morning, his boss fired him. WFTV reported that following his dismissal, Lewis waited for his boss for two hours outside the business, then chased him and his girlfriend for a mile and a half, shooting at their car and hitting the rear bumper, trunk and right rear tire. Neither the supervisor nor his girlfriend was hurt. Sanford police arrested Lewis and changed him with attempted murder.

SCHOOL DAZED

School resource officer and part-time police officer Maryssa Boskoski, 32, was

called into a classroom at Liberty Preparatory School in Smithville, Ohio, on Aug. 30 to help rouse a sleeping student who could not be awakened by the teacher or even the principal. When Boskoski arrived, The Washington Post reported, her solution was to unholster her Taser, remove the firing cartridge and pull the trigger, causing an electric buzz that woke the student and shocked the school community. Smithville Police Chief Howard Funk placed Boskoski on unpaid leave and told WEWS news station Boskoski had been disciplined a month earlier, also for a Taser-related incident. An investigation was ongoing.

WHY THEY CALL IT DOPE

Richard Robert Langely, 46, of Kansas City, Missouri, was working part time for the Platte Woods Police Department in October when he decided to take part

in the department’s drug take-back program. Except, according to court documents, Langely wasn’t disposing of drugs; he was helping himself to pills that had been collected in Lake Waukomis. And to make matters worse, the Kansas City Star reported, his own body camera captured evidence enabling prosecutors to charge him with felony theft of a controlled substance. Langely is scheduled to appear in court on Dec. 10.

RAISING THE WOOF

Colorado Springs resident Klete Keller engaged the services of a female dog-sitter through an app called Wag! for his pet, Jimbo. But Keller’s tail was not wagging when he returned home early the morning of Aug. 27 to find two shirtless men sitting on his couch and “an open bottle of personal lubricant and a camcorder on the end table,” Keller told Fox 21 News, “so it’s pretty self-explanatory what was going on.” When reached for comment,

the unnamed dog-sitter said her keys were stuck in her car and she “didn’t have WD40 so I ended up grabbing what I had in my car, for things, that you know, I do on my personal time.” But Keller also noticed what he suspected was “bodily fluids” on the couch and said Jimbo was locked in a bedroom, sitting in his own urine and acting terrified. “It was just, just a total mess and I can only imagine what poor Jimbo saw in there,” Keller said. The sitter did admit that she shouldn’t have invited guests over, but it’s a good bet her former 4.96 out of 5 rating on Wag! is going to take a hit.

EWWWW!

William Friedman, 68, of Franklin Township, New Jersey, told police officers when he was apprehended that his weird practice of dumping his grandson’s used diapers around town “almost became a game.” Friedman had been disNEXT PAGE

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CONTINUED FROM LAST PAGE posing of the soiled nappies along several roadways over the past year, until an officer spotted him at 3:15 a.m. on Oct. 21 making another deposit. Not only is the littering disgusting, but officials told the Associated Press that a motorcyclist crashed in June after running over a diaper Friedman had allegedly thrown out. He was charged with interference with transportation and faces up to $1,000 in fines.

OVERREACTION

Monica Walley of Holden Heights, Florida, wrote a negative online review Aug. 20 about the Daybreak Diner in Orlando, accusing the restaurant of refusing service to her disabled mother. The negative review didn’t sit well with the diner owner’s son, Michael Johnson, or his housemates, Jesse Martin and Norman Auvil, reported WFTV. That evening, as the three sat drinking beer, Martin looked up Walley’s address, then they drove to her home, where Auvil, 42, shot three rounds into the house. “I actually could feel the air from the bullet as it passed by me,” said Ken Walley, Monica’s father. “I didn’t think anybody was crazy enough to do something like this over something so small,” Monica Walley said. Auvil was arrested Aug. 30 and charged with shooting into a dwelling, according to the Orange County Sheriff’s Office.

tail store requires careful planning and attention to detail — a fact that appears to have escaped three men in North Raleigh, North Carolina, on Nov. 12. That night, The News and Observer reported, an employee of the store called 911 to report that three men had entered the store with semiautomatic weapons and ordered workers into the stockroom. One of them was carrying a cardboard box, officers learned, which he used to load up mobile phones and smart watches. The men also filled two crates with merchandise, which totaled more than $26,000. When the robbers left through the back door, they took the crates with them, but forgot the cardboard box which, serendipitously, sported a shipping label with an address on it. Police used the address, along with a mug shot from a previous crime that matched an image in the store’s surveillance video, to track down Brian Lamonte Clark, 22, and arrest him for robbery with a dangerous weapon and conspiracy to commit robbery.

LEAST COMPETENT CRIMINALS

The Lucardo Escape Rooms in Man-

QUESTIONABLE JUDGMENT

Billy Warren Pierce Jr., 44, an inmate of the Pasco County (Florida) Jail, already awaiting trial on charges of capital sexual battery of a child, compounded his problems by trying to hire a fellow inmate to kill his victim and her family. WFTS reported the unnamed inmate told detectives Aug. 22 that Pierce offered him $9,000 and instructed him about how to get into the house, even suggesting using a gas line fed through a window as the murder method. Jail staff also obtained a contract signed by Pierce, detailing the targets of the killing and the agreed-upon price. When told on Sept. 4 he would be charged with solicitation of murder, Pierce objected, “But I haven’t paid him any money yet.”

CURSES, FOILED AGAIN

A successful heist at an electronics re-

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chester, England, were the site of a misguided break-in on Nov. 29 when two thieves ransacked a fake bank vault as if it were the real thing. The Manchester Evening News reported that more than 50 surveillance cameras captured the duo’s antics as they broke into fake safes and opened drawers that held only puzzles. “They must be Manchester’s stupidest burglars,” said Lucardo director Ian Pownall, 26. The business lost about 100 pounds in cash, but damage amounted to about 1,000 pounds — not to mention lost revenue while the business cleans up. “We’re a small, family-owned business, so even a couple of thousand pounds will have an effect on us, particularly before Christmas,” Pownall said.

GOVERNMENT IN ACTION

Yoshitaka Sakurada, 68, a 22-year member of Japan’s parliament, was named by Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in October to two new posts: cybersecurity and Olympics minister for the country. But according to Reuters, at a committee meeting on Nov. 14, when a member of Jen Sorensen

the opposition asked Sakurada a “gotcha” question about his computer literacy, he admitted, “I’ve never used a computer! I’ve always directed my staff and secretaries to do that kind of thing.” He assured the lawmaker there would be no problems. Mmm-hmm.

OOOOPS!

John Stevenson of Inverclyde, Scotland, hit a bump in his plans to vacation in the United States on Dec. 3 when his visa was denied after he declared himself a terrorist while filling out a Department of Homeland Security online form commonly known as ESTA. One of the questions on the form asks, “Are you a terrorist?” Stevenson, 70, told The Independent that the website “must have jumped from No to Yes without me knowing,” adding that the site kept timing out and crashing as he and his wife, Marion, tried to answer the questions. “I even called the border control in the U.S. and gave them my passport details,” he said. “They looked up my ESTA number and said, ‘You’re a terrorist.’ The only time I’ve been in court was for jury service. Marion is sick about it. I don’t know why that question is on the form in the first place.” United Airlines refunded the Stevensons’ airline tickets and gifted them two free flights to New York once their visa troubles are all worked out.

ARMED AND CLUMSY

A shopper at a Buckeye, Arizona, Walmart was in the meat department on Nov. 27 when his semiautomatic handgun, which he had positioned for a quick draw in the waistband of his sweatpants, began to slip. As he tried to reposition it, he told Buckeye police, it discharged, striking the gunslinger in his privacies. AZCentral reported the unnamed shopper was taken to the hospital with minor injuries, and no one else was hurt. However, police did file a charge of unlawful discharge of a firearm.

BRIGHT IDEA

Zemarcuis Devon Scott, 18, of Texarkana, Arkansas, really wanted to attend a rap concert in another state, so on July 4 he executed his plan to get there. Scott was seen by Texarkana Regional Airport security officers around 2:30 a.m. jumping a fence and trying to get into an American


Eagle twin-engine jet parked there. When police arrived, Scott was inside the cockpit, sitting in the pilot’s seat, The Texarkana Gazette reported. Scott, not a licensed pilot, told officers he thought there wasn’t much more to flying a plane than pushing buttons and pulling levers. On July 31, he was charged with commercial burglary and attempted theft, and was grounded at the Miller County jail.

QUESTIONABLE JUDGMENT

Farah Hashi, 25, of Newport, Wales, is “mad about cars,” so while he was visiting friends in Dubai, they arranged for him to drive a $350,000 Lamborghini Huracan. Hashi, who has one leg shorter than the other and typically drives a custom Vauxhall Corsa mobility car, took full advantage: He was caught on roadside cameras 33 times in less than four hours on Aug. 7 as he reached a top speed of 150 mph and racked up more than $47,000 in speeding fines. Farah’s brother, Adnan Hashi, said the rental company went to Hashi’s hotel room and seized his passport after the fines were issued. Hashi spent two weeks under house arrest in Dubai until the mess was sorted out.

ANIMAL ANTICS

German police took a baby squirrel into custody on Aug. 9 following an incident in which it chased a grown man down the street. The Guardian reported that an unnamed man summoned Karlsruhe police when he could not shake the tiny squirrel. But when officers arrived, the squirrel suddenly lay down and went to sleep. Officers felt sorry for the exhausted little rodent, who apparently had been separated from its mom and was looking for a replacement in the terrified man. Police named their new mascot Karl-Friedrich, then took him to an animal rescue center, where he was doing very well. Workers at the rescue center later determined the squirrel was a girl and renamed her Pippilotta.

BIRD IS THE WORD

Your city may not have the dubious pleasure of pay-per-minute electric scooters yet, but in some places, the handy people transports have over-

stayed their welcome. The Los Angeles Times reported on Aug. 10 that angry residents are throwing Bird scooters off balconies, heaving them into the ocean, stuffing them in trashcans and setting them afire. Robert Johnson Bey, a Venice Beach maintenance worker, said: “Sunday, I was finding kickstands everywhere. Looked like they were snapped off.” What’s worse, the perpetrators are documenting their destruction on social media; Instagram has a Bird Graveyard account devoted to chronicles of scooter desecration. Culver City resident Hassan Galedary, 32, has a visceral reaction to the scooters: “I hate Birds more than anyone,” he said. “They suck. People who ride them suck.” However, he has stopped defacing them: “I can’t put bad energy into the world. I don’t even kick them over anymore.”

PICKY, PICKY

A referee in a Women’s Super League soccer match in Manchester City, England, stayed cool at the start of the televised game on Oct. 26 when he realized he’d forgotten his coin for the kickoff coin toss. Thinking quickly, David McNamara had the captains of the Manchester City and Reading teams play “Rock, Paper, Scissors” instead. But the Football Association, soccer’s governing body in England, was unamused, and on Nov. 26, McNamara began a 21-day suspension after accepting a charge of “not acting in the best interests of the game,” according to the BBC. An FA refereeing manager said: “He should have been more prepared. It’s very unprofessional.”

WHAT IS FAME?

Former Toronto Blue Jays star Jose Bautista has another honor to add to his resume, thanks to entomologist Bob Anderson of the Canadian Museum of Nature. On Nov. 22, reported the Associated Press, Anderson named a newly discovered species of beetle after the star third baseman and right fielder. Sicoderus bautistai is a small black weevil found in the Dominican Republic, where Bautista hails from. “I thought what a great way to kind of recognize (Bautista’s) contributions to Blue Jays baseball and to Canadian baseball, really, as a whole,” said Anderson. The scientist has named about 120 weevils over his career. syracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

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SNOW FOOLING The ski season is still in flux, yet snowmaking helps to cover the region’s slopes BY J.T. HALL

A

s the midpoint of the ski season approaches in Central New York, both Alpine and Nordic skiers have more reason to look forward than to look back. After an initial and promising snowfall in November, the weather conditions seem to have gone south, leaving the local and regional ski areas dependent on their own ability to make snow — an expensive proposition — and Nordic skiers stuck at home.

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As a result, Toggenburg, Song Mountain, Labrador, Greek Peak and the other regional areas have concentrated on addressing their main slopes with their snowmaking fan guns ($25,000 to $35,000 each and hundreds of dollars an hour to operate) while watching the weather reports, hoping for better news. These conditions produced an especially challenging situation over the Christmas-New Year’s holiday period, which can amount to 30 percent of a ski area’s seasonal budget. If there is good news, it has to be the temperatures, which have been reliable enough to continue to make snow, however costly. The enduring, existential concern for the entire ski industry is, of course, climate change, an uncontrollable factor. 2018 was the fourth warmest year on record, and the outlook is not promising. Nonetheless, skiing remains a primary recreational option for many Central New Yorkers. Peter Harris, director of Song Mountain, remains optimistic. “The weather has been a typical New York roller-coaster,” he said recently, “but there’s good skiing ahead.” Recent weather conditions — snow and low temperatures — have made Jim Hickey, owner-manager at Toggenburg, optimistic as well, in spite of a disappointing Christmas-New Year season. “We hope to be in a better state soon, with help from lower temperatures and some (natural) snow. We’ll have our (snow) guns rippin’ it, and will be able to cover the entire hill.” 01.16.19 - 01.22.19 | syracusenew times.com

Three years ago, Greek Peak, the yearround resort in Virgil, near Cortland, partnered with Toggenburg (520-foot vertical drop, 21 trails, five lifts, two terrain parks), located on Route 80 in Fabius, to offer season pass holders a range of discounts at the larger Greek Peak (952-foot vertical drop, 55 trails, eight lifts, three terrain parks) including free access to the Nordic ski trail system. Season passes at Toggenburg now start at $575 with the option of a Greek Peak upgrade, a pass good at either facility, at an additional $340. Season passes at Greek Peak are $800 with a $115 Toggenburg upgrade. Both areas also offer discounts for students, military personnel and seniors and other pass options. Complete information on these deals is available at skitog.com or greekpeak.net. Also joined together for the past three years, Song Mountain, off Route 81’s Exit 14 in Tully, and Labrador Mountain on Route 91 in Truxton, will again offer an “Intermountain Passport,” a season pass (or daily lift ticket) good at either site. Season passes at Song Mountain (700foot vertical drop, 24 trails, five lifts, no terrain park) begin at $551, as they are at Labrador (700-foot vertical drop, 22 trails, six lifts, terrain park) and offer discounts for students, seniors and military personnel. The Intermountain Passport is also good for two complimentary lift tickets at Okemo Mountain, the much larger venue (2,200-foot vertical drop, 121 trails, 20 lifts, eight terrain parks) in Ludlow, Ver-


Under The Gun

Wipeout! Children go flying down the hill on tubes at Four Seasons in Fayetteville, while a skier enjoys a calm slope at Labrador Mountain in Truxton (facing page). Michael Davis photos

mont. Visit songmountain.com, skicny. com or okemo.com for information. Thanks to the more consistent lake effect snowfall, the modestly sized Tug Hill ski areas usually offer greater trail coverage. Snow Ridge, off Route 26 in Turin (500-foot vertical drop, 22 trails, six lifts, three terrain parks), compensates for its dimensions with a whopping average snowfall of 230-plus inches, and is now open. Season passes start at $430 (snowridge.com). Watertown’s Dry Hill Ski Area at 18160 Alpine Ridge Road (300-foot vertical drop, three lifts, seven trails) has been “right off the end of Lake Ontario since 1960.” Dry Hill offers skiing, snowboarding and tubing with season passes starting at $295 (skidryhill.com). Woods Valley, located on State Route 46 in Westernville, seven miles north of Rome, has been in operation since 1964. It offers 21 trails served by six lifts, and a terrain park on a 25-acre facility with a vertical drop of 500 feet (woodsvalleyskiarea.com). Smaller yet but much closer, Four Seasons on Route 5 in Fayetteville is “a great

place to learn to ski and have some fun,” according to area owner John Goodfellow. It offers a forgiving vertical drop of 100 feet, enhanced snowmaking capabilities, a chairlift and a conveyor (a.k.a. “magic carpet,”), rails for snowboard tricksters, snow tubing and six trails. Thanks to an expanded snowmaking capability, Four Seasons has a base of 4 to 5 feet and enjoyed its best holiday season in four years. A great, convenient learning facility, Four Seasons has package deals for as little as $110 and also hosts private parties and other events. Seasonal passes start at $165 and day passes are available for as little as $18 (fourseasonsgolfandski.com). Nordic skiers, a.k.a. cross-country skiers, do not benefit from snowmaking and are completely at the mercy of Mother Nature for skiable conditions: frozen ground and a reliable base. Local opportunities abound, however, when conditions permit. Several Onondaga County parks, including Beaver Lake Nature Center in Baldwinsville, Oneida Shores on Oneida Lake, and Highland Forest in Fabius, offer good choices. Highland

Forest, especially, is a premium winter destination, featuring 40 miles of trails, 20 of them groomed, as well as three loops for skating skiers. Admission and/ or trail fees apply at most of these areas (onondagacountyparks.com). Other options include Green Lakes State Park, Route 5 in Fayetteville (nysparks.com). Greek Peak in Virgil operates its own Nordic center with trails for skiers, snowshoers and fat bikes, some of them groomed. Trail fees apply, from $5 weekdays to $16.50 weekends (greekpeak.net). And there is the Osceola Tug Hill Ski Center in Camden, with 40K of groomed trails reserved exclusively for skiers with 300 inches of snow each year. Trail fees start at $15 (uxcski.com; (315) 599-7377). Winona Forest in Boylston, a 9,233acre Tug Hill state forest, offers 70 miles of groomed trails for Nordic skiers, dog sledders and snowmobiles (winonaforest. com). And Breia, a privately owned ski and snowshoe area near Boonville, has 50 km of backwoods trails and is free and open to the public (breia.com).

If Mother Nature has not been as cooperative as ski resort owners would like this season, New York state has stepped in to help. As part of a continuing effort to promote energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority has included the Snow Gun Program, aimed at helping ski areas, both private and public, purchase and install more efficient snowmaking equipment. With an annual budget of $5 million, all of which has been allocated, according to communications manager Aron Ashrafioun, NYSERDA grants of up to $300,000 are available to cover up to 80 percent of the purchase costs, with the ski area owners providing the remaining funds. Local ski hills that have benefited from this program include Song Mountain, Labrador Mountain, Toggenburg, Greek Peak and Fayetteville’s Four Seasons, which used its new $25,000 fan gun to enable the area to achieve full coverage during the holiday season. Snowmaking is an expensive but increasingly necessary requirement for Central New York ski areas, due primarily to unreliable weather conditions. With the right snowmaking capability, however, there can be good skiing even when there is no snow in the backyard.

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TODDY LANGUAGE The hot beverage is just the tonic when the snowflakes fly BY MARGARET MCCORMICK

M

argaritas, mojitos and wine slushies? Those drinks are so summertime. Wintertime calls for its own adult beverages. And some like ’em hot.

Hot toddy is the general term used to describe a mixed drink that is served warm or hot. The hot toddy is said to have originated in Scotland or Ireland, both noted for dreary, cold and wet weather. At its most basic, a hot toddy is made with bourbon, honey, lemon and hot water and enjoyed before bed. Some people mix these ingredients up when they are fighting a cold. Others use them to fight winter. We live in apple country, and lots of places around here offer adult drinks based on fortified apple cider. The Cider Mill restaurant in Taunton, for example, has a drink called the Cider Mull on its cocktail menu. It’s made with Beak and Skiff sweet cider, mulled in-house with honey, lemon, cinnamon and cloves, and topped off with maple syrup and 1911 Established barrel-aged bourbon. The Cider Mull does double duty as both an after-dinner drink and dessert. The 1911 Spirits bourbon isn’t made with apples, but the LaFayette-based distiller also offers an apple brandy that’s tailor-made for hot toddy creativity. Prior to its closing just before Christmas, the tavern at the Beak & Skiff Apple Hill campus offered several seasonal cocktails, including the Hot Apple Bourbon Toddy, made with warm

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apple cider, 1911 bourbon, fresh apple and cinnamon. Speaking of 1911 Established: How about a hot version of 1911’s cold, milkshake-like cocktail enjoyed by many this summer at the New York State Fair? The Tipsy Cow is sweet and slightly boozy, made with 1911 Cold Brew Coffee Vodka, Byrne Dairy chocolate milk and Recess Coffee, topped with whipped cream and a drizzle of chocolate. Heat the coffee and chocolate milk, add a couple glugs of coffee vodka and serve in a warm mug. Whipped cream is recommended. Winter-weary Central New Yorkers know there’s no better place to banish the cold, at least temporarily, than a seat near the roaring wood-burning fireplace at the Scotch N Sirloin’s S2 Bistro, in DeWitt. The seasonal cocktail menu features Hot Buttered Rum, made with Myers dark rum, cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, brown sugar, unsalted butter and hot water. When Chris and Katharine Johnson of the local food and beverage focused Instagram account We Eat CNY hosted a holiday cocktail class at Citronelle in Armory Square last month, bartender Sam Ehrenreich showed participants how to make his version of Hot Buttered Rum. The drink is not on the restaurant’s

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menu but a recipe for it is on page 17. Mulled wine doesn’t show up on a lot of tavern menus, but it has its fans. Many of the wineries in the Finger Lakes sell packages of mulling spices to be used with the red wines of the region, but you can put together your own blend. Combine one bottle of fruity red wine, one orange (cut in wedges), one lemon (cut in wedges; optional), one or two star anise (broken in pieces), two cinnamon sticks, one teaspoon each whole cloves and allspice and some freshly grated nutmeg in a pan on the stove or in a slow cooker, set to low. Heat the mixture, but don’t let it boil. Taste and add some water and a couple teaspoons of brown sugar, if you like. Serve in heated mugs. Rare is the local restaurant or tavern that doesn’t offer Irish coffee — or its own twist on the classic hot drink. Laci’s Tapas Bar in Syracuse has on its menu the Hot Irish Kiss, made with coffee and a boozy trifecta: Jameson’s Irish whiskey, amaretto and Frangelico (hazelnut liqueur). The Stoop Kitchen, in Armory Square, offers both traditional Irish coffee and what it calls Stoop Coffee, made with coffee, Jamaican rum, Gran Gala (orange liqueur), coffee liqueur, brown sugar and cream. With or without alcohol, the Stoop’s coffee of choice is For-

ty Weight Coffee Roasters, based near Ithaca. The Stoop also offers a Scotch Chocolate, made with steamed hot chocolate and Monkey Shoulder scotch, topped with a toasted marshmallow. Meanwhile, wrap your hands around a warm one (or two) at Kitty Hoynes Irish Pub and Restaurant, 301 W. Fayette St., during its annual Irish Coffee Fest, Monday, Jan. 21, to Saturday, Jan. 26. A highlight of the weeklong fest is Irish Coffee Day, which falls on Friday, Jan. 25. Kitty Hoynes makes its Irish coffee with Café Kubal coffee and Tullamore Dew whiskey (but you can sub Jameson’s, if you like). Circling back to the basic hot toddy: Aaron Carvell, a partner in the family-owned Old Home Distillers (Madison County), says they have several hot toddy recipes to take the chill off this time of year. Mother’s Hot Toddy is made with their Brothers’ Cut Bourbon Whiskey, which is available at Vinomania, Liquor World and other Syracuse-area liquor stores, as well as in the A Shed at the Central New York Regional Market, where Old Home sets up each Saturday. Margaret McCormick is a freelance writer and editor in Syracuse. She blogs about food at eatfirst. typepad.com. Follow her on Twitter, connect on Facebook or email her at mmccormicksnt@gmail. com.


Mother’s Hot Toddy From Old Home Distillers 1.5 ounce Brothers’ Cut Bourbon Whiskey 1 tablespoon honey Half-ounce of fresh lemon juice Lemon wedge Slice of fresh ginger 4 to 5 ounces hot water Add whiskey, honey and lemon juice to a mug. Top with hot water. Add lemon wedge and ginger and stir well. Allow to steep for a few minutes.

Hot Buttered Rum From Sam Ehrenreich, bartender, Citronelle FOR BUTTER BATTER:

1 pound salted butter (room temperature) 1 cup brown sugar 1 cup honey 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground cloves 1 teaspoon ground nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon ground allspice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Pinch of kosher salt

OPTIONAL INGREDIENTS: 2 tablespoons molasses 1 cup vanilla bean ice cream

FOR EACH DRINK:

1.5 ounces spiced rum 1 tablespoon spiced butter batter 4 ounces hot water Frozen butter, cut in pieces, for garnish Cinnamon sticks, for garnish

TO SERVE: Stir water and spiced butter batter together in a mug or glass until batter is diluted. Add rum and stir. Top with a piece of frozen butter. Garnish with a cinnamon stick. Makes 16 servings.

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DAILY THRU MARCH 13 Clinton Square Ice Rink. Mon.-Thurs. 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri. & school vacations 11 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Blade runners can enjoy the downtown fun at Clinton Square, corner of West Genesee and South Clinton streets. $3/ adults, $2/seniors and children under 12, $3/skate rental. (315) 423-0129; syracuse.ny.us.

JAN. 19-20 Salt City Winter Antiques Show. Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Warm up with antiquities during the annual show at the Center of Progress

Building, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $7/adults, $8/ weekend pass, free/ages 16 and under. (315) 686-5789; allmanpromo tions.com.

JAN. 25-27 New York Sportsman Expo. Fri. noon-7 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. If you love the great outdoors, traveling and adventures, head to the Tractor Supply Co. Exhibit Center, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $12/adults, $10/ seniors, police, fire and military with ID, and children ages 6-12, free/ages 6 and under. (315) 730-7992; newyork sportsmansexpo.com.

JAN. 26

AM-JAM Tattoo Expo. Fri. 6 p.m.-midnight, Sat. noon-midnight, Sun. noon-6 p.m. The 33rd annual show presents many inkers and piercers in their element with Lizardman as emcee at the Ramada Inn, Carrier Circle, 6555 Old Collamer Road, East Syracuse. $10/daily, $25/weekend pass. (518) 893-2273; am-jam.com.

Bill Engvall. Sat. 5 & 8 p.m. The Blue Collar Tour veteran brings his comic style to The Vine, del Lago Resort and Casino, 1133 State Route 414, Waterloo. $35, $45, $65. (315) 946-1777; dellagoresort.com.

Robert Burns Weekend. Fri.-Sun. various times. The annual weekend features live music and bagpipers, Scotch tasting, a formal seven-course dinner and more at the Brae Loch Inn, 5 Albany St., Cazenovia. $70/dinner, call for other pricing. (315) 655-3431; braelochinn.com.

January JAZZFest. Sun. 1-9 p.m. Eight-hour event with saxophonist headliner Bobby Militello plus Melody Rose, Andrew Carroll, Lawless Jazz Collective and many more at Mohegan Manor, 58 Oswego St., Baldwinsville. $25/advance, $30/door, $15/students. (315) 479-5299; cnyjazz.org.

JAN. 27

JAN. 31

CENTRAL NEW YORK BREWFEST FEB. 2 HORTICULTURE BUILDING NYS FAIRGROUNDS

Hot Club of Cowtown. Thurs. 8 p.m. Rave-up riffs Texas-style at Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St., Auburn. $15/advance, $20/door. (315) 253-6669; auburnpublictheater.org.

FEB. 1-3 Jurassic Quest. Fri. 3-8 p.m., Sat. & Sun. 9 a.m.-8 p.m. More than 80 lifesize dinos all in one location at the Tractor Supply Company Exhibit Center, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $22/adults and kids ages 2-12, $20/seniors, $36/kids VIP. (936) 588-3332, jurassicquest.com.

FEB. 1 Scrabble Mania Tournament. Fri. 5-10 p.m. Literacy CNY presents the ninth annual word battle for teams of eight to 10 people, featuring refreshments, music from Ronnie Leigh and more at the Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St. $650/ table. 471-1300, Ext. 172, literacycny. org.

FEB. 1, 3 Michael Davis photo

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Don Giovanni. Fri. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Syracuse Opera stages the Mozart triumph at the Mulroy Civic Center’s


HORSE-DRAWN SLEIGH RIDES FEB. 2-3, 9-10, 16-17, 23-24 HIGHLAND FOREST Crouse-Hinds Concert Theater, 411 Montgomery St. $10-$136. (315) 4767372; syracuseopera.org.

FEB. 2 Central New York Brewfest. Sat. 1-4 p.m., 6-9 p.m. The long-running craft beer festival offers more than 120 breweries pouring samples in the Horticulture Building, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $45/ general, $65/VIP. (315) 422-0606; cny brewfest.com.

Annie and the Hedonists. Sat. 7:30 p.m. A jazzy good time is assured at the Oswego Music Hall, McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St., Oswego. $16$19. (315) 695-6477; oswegomusichall. org. The Lettermen. Sat. 8 p.m. Expect a mellow evening of harmonies at the Turning Stone Resort and Casino Showroom, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $19, $29. (315) 361-SHOW; turning stone.com.

FEB. 2-3, 9-10, 16-17, 23-24 Horse-drawn Sleigh Rides. Sat & Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Enjoy a 20-minute wagon ride through the woods of Highland Forest, 1254 Highland Forest Park Road, Fabius. $8/adults, $5/ages 5 and under. (315) 683-5550; onondagacountyparks.com.

FEB. 8 Snow Leopard Soiree. Fri. 6:30 p.m. The zoo’s annual black tie gala returns

for another effort to celebrate and raise money for the Rosamond Gifford Zoo, 1 Conservation Place. $220/person, $1,750/table. (315) 435-8511, Ext. 132; rosamondgiffordzoo.org. Grand Funk Railroad. Fri. 8 p.m. The 1970s-era “American band” will party down at The Vine, del Lago Resort and Casino, 1133 State Route 414, Waterloo. $25, $35. (315) 946-1777; dellagoresort.com.

FEB. 8-10 Winter Fair 2019. Fri. 3-11 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-11 p.m., Sun. noon-8 p.m. The inaugural indoor mini-fair features rides, sausage sandwiches, pizza frittes, music by Todd Hobin and more at the Exposition Center, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $4/adults, $2/teens and seniors, free/ ages 12 and under. (315) 727-9393; nyswinterfair.com.

FEB. 9, MARCH 9 Winter Farmers Market. Sat. 10 a.m.1 p.m. The second Saturday of every month features local growers and vendors at Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. Free admission. (315) 673-1350; baltimorewoods.org.

FEB. 9-10 Cycle Expo Super Swap. Sat. 11 a.m.6 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. The motorcycle showcase will fill the Center of Progress, New York State Fairgrounds,

HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS MARCH 9-10 WAR MEMORIAL ARENA

Michael Davis photo

581 State Fair Blvd. $15/adults (Saturday), $12/adults (Sunday), free/ages 16 and under. (315) 472-7931; cycleexposuperswap.com.

FEB. 10

vided. $30/couple. Baltimore Woods Nature Center, 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. (315) 673-1350; baltimore woods.org.

FEB. 14

Gin Blossoms. Sun. 8 p.m. The enduring pop outfit visits the Center for the Arts, 72 S. Main St., Homer. $24.50$49.50. (607) 749-4900; center4art. org.

FEB. 12

Gladys Knight. Thurs. 8 p.m. The soulful singer performs at the Turning Stone Resort and Casino Event Center, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $43, $49. (315) 361-SHOW; turningstone.com.

FEB. 14-17

Father-Daughter Valentine Ball. Tues. 6:30 p.m. Upstate Foundation presents its annual dance to benefit Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital at Wysockis Manor, 6574 Lakeshore Road, Cicero. $55/couple (before Jan. 25). (315) 464-4416; foundationforup state.org.

FEB. 12-17 Cinderella. Tues.-Fri. 7:30 p.m., Sat. 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun. 1 p.m. Famous Artists presents the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical smash at the Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St. $25, $35, $50, $65. (315) 475-7979; landmarktheatre.org.

FEB. 14 Sweetheart Snowshoe. Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Bring your valentine for a lantern-lit snowshoe romp through the woods, followed by hot drinks and desserts. Limited to 20 couples; registration is required; snowshoes pro-

Central New York Boat Show. Thurs. & Fri. 1-9 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The annual floater-friendly showcase features a wide selection and demonstrations in the Exposition Center, Center of Progress and Horticulture Building at the New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $10/adults, $15/multi-day pass, free/ages 13 and under. (585) 5265460; cnywinterboatshow.com.

FEB. 14-24 Syracuse Winterfest. Days and nights of cook-offs, mix-offs, ice carving, chicken wings, music and more throughout downtown Syracuse. For a list of times, locations and prices, visit syracusewinterfest.com.

FEB. 16 April Verch Band. Sat. 7:30 p.m. Enjoy a mix of bluegrass, country and Americana at the Oswego Music Hall, McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St., Oswe-

syracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

19


HOT CLUB OF COWTOWN JAN. 31 AUBURN PUBLIC THEATER Discover

Inlet, NY InletNY.com

February 23, 2019

Frozen Fire & Lights

Bonfires, Skiing, Skating, Sledding, Snowshoeing, Skishoeing, Fireworks! Kite Flying & Cardboard Sled Races!

FrozenFireandLights.com New for 2019!

Kites will be flying!

go. $16-$19. (315) 695-6477; oswego musichall.org Lorrie Morgan. Sat. 8 p.m. The country music star entertains at the Turning Stone Resort and Casino Showroom, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $29, $34. (315) 361-SHOW; turningstone.com.

FEB. 21-23 New York Farm Show. Thurs.-Sat. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. One of the Northeast’s biggest farm shows returns with exhibitors, products, informative demonstrations and more sprawling across six separate buildings at the New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $5/adults, free/ages 18 and under. (315) 457-8205; newyorkfarm show.com.

FEB. 22

The AKA will join us during Frozen Fire & Lights for some fun with kites!

All Year Long

Live Snow Cams in Inlet, NY

Lots of webcams in the Inlet area.

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InletSnow.com

All About Elvis. Fri. 8 p.m. Enjoy a short documentary on The King plus music from Rex Fowler and the Rockabilly Kings at Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St., Auburn. $20/advance, $25/door. (315) 253-6669; auburn publictheater.org.

FEB. 22 Queensryche. Fri. 8 p.m. Scant seating remains for these durable rockers at the Turning Stone Resort and Casino Showroom, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $118, $139, $143, $149, $157, $168. (315) 361-SHOW; turningstone.com.

01.16.19 - 01.22.19 | syracusenew times.com

FEB. 23 Dennis Miller and Mark Steyn. Sat. 8 p.m. The standup comics bring their “Adorable Deplorable Tour” (guess which one is which) to the Mulroy Civic Center’s Crouse-Hinds Concert Theater, 411 Montgomery St. $55, $75. (800) 745-3000; oncenter.org.

FEB. 24 Lake Effect Half Marathon. Sun. 9 a.m. The seasonal 26.2-miler returns for its annual jaunt, starting at the East Shore Recreational Trail at Onondaga Lake Park. $75-$80. lakeeffecthalf marathon.com. Hammond Jammin’ 15. Sun. noon-6 p.m. The annual Hammond B-3 organ concert features music by many local acts including Mike “Groove” Davis Plus and more, as this signature Winterfest event returns to Upstairs at Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 246 W. Willow St. Free. (315) 458-8753; syracuse winterfest.com.

FEB. 28-MARCH 1-3 CNY RV & Camping Show. Thurs.Sat. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. One of the largest showings of RVs, campers, equipment and more at the Exposition Center, Center of Progress Building, Horticulture Building, Tractor Supply Co. Exhibit Center and Science & Industry Building at the New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $10/adults, $12/multi-day

pass, free/ages 16 and under. (877) 228-8240; cnyrvshow.com.

MARCH 2 Steve Martin and Martin Short. Sat. 8 p.m. Two top entertainers team for funny business at the Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St. $85, $125. (315) 475-7979; landmarktheatre.org.

MARCH 3 World Wrestling Entertainment Live. Sun. 7 p.m. AJ Styles, Daniel Bryan and more take the “Road to Wrestlemania” in multi-match action at the Onondaga County War Memorial Arena, 800 S. State St. $15, $25, $35, $50, $70, $100. (315) 435-8000; wwe.com.

MARCH 8 Sinbad. Fri. 8 p.m. The longtime standup visits the Turning Stone Resort and Casino Showroom, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $54, $70. (315) 361-SHOW; turningstone.com.

Town Mountain. Fri. 8 p.m. Bluegrass mixes with boogie-woogie rock at the Nelson Odeon, 4035 Nelson Road, Nelson. $23. (315) 655-9193; nelson odeon.com.

MARCH 8-9 Syracuse Indoor Race. Fri. 6-11 p.m., Sat. 3-11 p.m. The Indoor Auto Racing Series makes its premiere at the


JAY LENO MARCH 15-16 DEL LAGO

Michael Davis photo

Exposition Center, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. Pricing to be announced. (609) 888-3618; indoorautoracing.com.

MARCH 9 Christopher Cross. Sat. 8 p.m. The soft-pop rocker best known for “Arthur’s Theme” and other winsome earworms performs at the Turning Stone Resort and Casino Showroom, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $50, $60. (315) 361-SHOW; turningstone.com.

MARCH 9-10 Greater Syracuse Antiques Expo. Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Collectibles galore during the annual show at the Horticulture Building, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $7/adults, $8/weekend pass, free/ages 16 and under. (315) 6865789; allmanpromotions.com. Harlem Globetrotters. Sat. 7 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. The wild and crazy basketballers take the court during a twoday stint at the Onondaga County War Memorial Arena, 800 S. State St. $15, $18.75, $26.25, $32.25, $56.25, $115. (315) 435-8000; oncenter.org.

MARCH 14 Jeff Dunham. Thurs. 7 p.m. The popular ventriloquist and his cast of motley fools visit the Onondaga County War Memorial Arena, 800 S. State St. $46.50. (315) 435-8000; oncenter.org.

Michael Davis photo

AM-JAM TATTOO EXPO JAN. 25-27 RAMADA INN

MARCH 15 Marshall Tucker Band. Fri. 8 p.m. The veteran rockers take on the Turning Stone Resort and Casino Showroom, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $27. (315) 361-SHOW; turningstone.com.

MARCH 15-16 Jay Leno. Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m. Seats are going fast for the late-night fave during his two-night stand at The Vine, del Lago Resort and Casino, 1133 State Route 414, Waterloo. $25, $55, $75, $95. (315) 946-1777; dellago resort.com.

MARCH 15-17 CNY Home and Garden Show. Fri. & Sat. 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Pick up some good ideas and supplies for spring-to-fall projects and more at the Exposition Center, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $10/adults, free/ages 16 and under. (315) 463-6261; hbrcny.com.

MARCH 16 St. Patrick’s Parade. Sat. noon-3 p.m. Don your green and get downtown for the annual Irish celebration and parade, which begins on Erie Boulevard East and then travels through South Salina Street. This year’s co-grand marshals will be Joanie and Bernie Mahoney. Free. syracusestpatricksparade.org.

MARCH 16-17 Peter Pan. Sat. 6 p.m., Sun. noon & 4 p.m. Syracuse City Ballet visits Never Never Land at the Mulroy Civic Center’s Crouse-Hinds Concert Theater, 411 Montgomery St. $10, $20, $35, $45, $60. (315) 435-8000; syracuse cityballet.com.

MARCH 22 Pat Metheny. Fri. 8 p.m. The Grammy-winning jazz guitarist visits the Center for the Arts, 72 S. Main St., Homer. $27.50-$55. (607) 749-4900; center4art.org.

MARCH 23-24 Syracuse StadiumCross. Sat. 9 a.m.11 p.m., Sun. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. The local motocross event revs its engines in the Toyota Coliseum, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $15/ adults, $25/weekend pass, $5-$7/ages 6 to 12, free/ages 5 and under. (800) 753-3978; syracusestadiumcross.com. Syracuse Motorama. Sat. 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The annual car show returns with many models on display in the Center of Progress Building, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $10/adults, $4/ ages 6 to 15, free/ages 5 and under. (315) 516-0560, (315) 672-3904; syracuse-motorama.com. PAW Patrol Live: Race to the Rescue. Sat. & Sun. 10 a.m. & 2 p.m. The

TV kiddie show returns to the Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St. $20, $29, $35, $50, $45, $65. (315) 4757979; landmarktheatre.org.

MARCH 26-31 Les Miserables. Tues.-Fri. 7:30 p.m., Sat. 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun. 1 & 6:30 p.m. Famous Artists presents the touring blockbuster at the Landmark Theatre, 362 S. Salina St. $25, $40, $55, $75. (315) 475-7979; landmarktheatre.org.

MARCH 27 Celtic Woman: Ancient Land. Wed. 7 p.m. The Grammy-winning Irish songbirds take on at the Mulroy Civic Center’s Crouse-Hinds Concert Theater, 411 Montgomery St. $39, $69, $150. (315) 435-8000; oncenter.org.

MARCH 29 Clint Black. Fri. 8 p.m. The country megastar gallops into The Vine, del Lago Resort and Casino, 1133 State Route 414, Waterloo. $35, $55. (315) 946-1777; dellagoresort.com.

MARCH 31 Sesame Street Live: Make Your Magic. Sun. 2 & 5:30 p.m. Elmo, Big Bird and the rest of the gang in a family-friendly musical at the Mulroy Civic Center’s Crouse-Hinds Concert Theater, 411 Montgomery St. $15, $25, $30, $40, $60, $80, $105. (315) 4358000; feldentertainment.com.

syracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

21


STEPPING OUT Paths aplenty greet snowshoers hiking through the wintry woods and open fields BY KIRA MADDOX

L

ocal venues offer several options for people who wish to get in some outdoor exercise, without having to travel far or leave the whole family behind.

is more likely to retain water and take longer to dry when wet than wool or fleece.

3. Bring a backpack

With snowshoe trails, simply strap the paddle-like shoes onto your normal winter boots, and trudge on top of the snowbanks. Rarely is there a need for things like membership fees or resort admission. Although it seems like an easy task, people who underestimate snowshoeing can quickly find themselves in a less than ideal situation. New York state’s Department of Environmental Conservation has five tips for anyone wishing to do some wintertime hiking:

As the Scouts say: “Be prepared.” A pack of essentials is vital before heading out in harsher conditions. The range of items you may need will depend largely on where you choose to snowshoe, but things like snacks, water and some basic first-aid items can never go wrong.

While it’s smart to check the weather forecast before heading outside for wintertime hiking, you should always prepare for the worst. Keep in mind that it’ll be windier, colder and snowier at higher elevations, so also check out any available trail maps ahead of time to gauge what you may be up against. If the weather appears to get worse, it’s safer to quit early and head back to shelter than to try and tough it out.

While most trails in Central New York are made for beginners to intermediate snowshoers, it’s still important to know your limits. An experienced hiker could find themselves in a rough spot if their overconfidence leads them to underestimate the extra energy it takes to hike through snow. Make sure to take breaks and stay energized.

1. Check the weather conditions

2. Dress in layers

Layers are your friend in winter! The easy-to-take-off clothes make it easier to regulate body temperature when out and about. When choosing fabrics, try to stay away from cotton. Cotton won’t hold in as much body heat, and

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01.16.19 - 01.22.19 | syracusenew times.com

4. Know your ability level

5. Never travel alone

Bring a buddy before you hit the trails, in case of an emergency. If no one else has any interest, then at least let someone know where you plan to hike and an estimated return time. If you’re not back by the designated time, then a search party can be alerted immediately.


Places to Snowshoe Baltimore Woods Nature Center. 4007 Bishop Hill Road, Marcellus. (315) 673-1350; baltimorewoods.org. This private nature park sits on more than 180 acres of land with six miles of trails. The paths are open to snowshoers in winter and hikers in the summertime. They also have guided snowshoe hikes throughout the year. Free admission. Trails are open daily, dawn to dusk. Bring your own equipment. Bear Swamp State Forest. Bear Swamp Road, Sempronius. (607) 753-3095; Dec. ny.gov. This state-run park has a 14.3-mile, multiuse trail system aimed at beginners and intermediate-level users. Each trailway is marked by a color level. It’s open for snowshoeing and cross-country skiing, and has separate trails for snowmobilers. Free admission. Bring your own equipment.

Beaver Lake Nature Center. 8477 E.

Mud Lake Road, Baldwinsville. (315) 6382519; Beaverlakenaturecenter.org. Beaver Lake boasts three separate trails, ranging from a half-mile to 2.2 miles, that wind through open fields and wooded areas throughout the campus. They also have weekend guided walks and an hour-long beginners snowshoe clinic for people who want an introduction to the sport. Snowshoe rentals are $5 per hour and are available from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Green Lakes State Park Golf Course. 7900 Green Lakes Road, Fayetteville. (315) 637-6111; parks.ny.gov. While no carts will be driving along the green for a while, the golf course at Green Lakes won’t go completely ignored until spring. The state park opens it up for snowshoeing, giving wintertime hikers a place to walk away from the traditional cross-country ski trails. Free admission. Park is open daily, dawn to dusk. Bring your own equipment.

Highland Forest. 1254 Highland Park Road, Fabius. (315) 683-5550; onondaga countyparks.com. Six trails snake around Highland Forest, with the shortest at a half-mile and the longest at nearly nine miles. All trails begin at the Skyline Lodge for easy navigation. Snowshoe rentals are $10 per day, or $5 per day for children ages 15 and under, and are available from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Onondaga Lake Park. 106 Lake Drive, Liverpool. (315) 453-6712; onondagacountyparks.com. Enjoy the familiar Shoreline Walking Trail, the West Shore Trail or the Long Branch Park loop, but on picturesque, snowy grounds. Free admission. Bring your own equipment. Rogers Center. 2721 State Route 80, Sherburne. (607) 674-4733; friendsofrogers.org. Rogers Center’s four trail sections — the main property, Adams Farm, the farm tower and Cush Hill — are full of scenic forests, frozen ponds, marshlands and more. More than

six miles of trails snake through the 600-acre property. Free admission. Trails are open from dawn to dusk. Bring your own equipment. Selkirk Shores State Park. 7101 State Route 3, Pulaski. (315) 298-5737; Parks. ny.gov. Nestled on the bluffs of Lake Ontario, Selkirk’s snowshoeing trail takes you on a magical walk along the waterfront. Make sure to dress warmly and check for hazardous lake effect snows before heading out! Park is open from 7 a.m. to sunset. Free admission. Bring your own equipment. Winona Forest. Route 13, Lacona. Winona forest.com. Head to Tug Hill to enjoy more than 50 miles of groomed, forest trails, built for snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, mushing and more. On Sunday, Jan. 20, the venue will also host the 2019 Stone Wall 5K Walk/Run and Empire State Snowshoe Championship Race. Free admission. Bring your own equipment.

15 South Broad Street, Norwich, NY 13815

Winter Escapades in CHENANGO Call 607-334-1400 for your free Outdoor Recreation Guide or visit www.visitchenango.com

/ChenangoTourism @CmrceChenango syracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

23


TOME RAIDERS Area book clubs offer fun suggestions for cold-weather page-turners BY KIRA MADDOX

W

intertime in Central New York commonly conjures up images of neon windbreaker jackets, reflective goggles, packed skis and tucked-in scarves as resident snow bunnies flock to the nearest athletic resort to make the most of the cold weather. But for those who find no love in the winter winds, whose faces and hands are flush red with pre-emptive pain instead of exhilaration at the thought of flying down a hillside on two planks of fiberglass and plastic, it can be hard to find entertainment during the long season. Cramped up indoors, the threat of stir craziness becomes a strong possibility as the outside temperatures continue to plunge. For those folks, we call to mind another seasonal image: a steaming cup of coffee (or a hot toddy, feel free to pick your poison) resting on a side table, a thick fleece blanket waiting across a chair, a knit sweater scratching at your arms and an unopened book waiting to have its pages turned. For those looking for inspiration before heading out to grab the latest hardcover at their local library, or for readers who want to incorporate a social aspect as they thumb through their wintertime page-turners, a book club could be a place to start. Here are several clubs throughout the area:

Betts Book Discussion. Betts Branch Library, 4862 S. Salina St. (315) 4351940. Third Tuesday of the month, 10 a.m. Next book: Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah.

Brewerton Book Discussion. North-

ern Onondaga Public Library (NOPL) Brewerton, 5440 Bennett St. (315) 6767484. Final Tuesday of the month, 6:30 p.m. Next book: Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah.

Inspired Reads Book Club. NOPL Cicero, 8686 Knowledge Lane. (315) 699-2032. Every Monday at 5:45 p.m. Next book: A Return to Love by Marianne Williamson. Books to Die For Discussion Group.

NOPL Cicero, 8686 Knowledge Lane. (315) 699-2032. Second Wednesday of the month, 6:30 p.m. Next book: Selections from In Death by J.D. Robb (Nora Roberts).

North Syracuse Book Discussion Group. NOPL North Syracuse, 100

Trolley Barn Lane. (315) 458-6184. First Monday of the month, 6:30 p.m. Next book: To be announced.

Between the Covers: Romance Book Club. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane. (315) 458-6184. Third Thursday of the month, 6:30 p.m. Next book: To be announced.

Mystery & More Book Club. Hazard Branch Library, 1620 W. Genesee St. (315) 435-5326. Check calendar for dates. Next book: The Masterpiece by Fiona Davis.

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Non-Fiction Book Discussion. NOPL North Syracuse, 100 Trolley Barn Lane. (315) 458-6184. Fourth Wednesday of the month, 6 p.m. Next book: Selections of biographies on famous Americans. Connect with the Classics. Manli-

us Library, 1 Arkie Albanese Ave. (315) 682-6400. Last Monday of the month, 6:30 p.m. Next book: The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins.

Contemporary Book Club. Manlius

Library, 1 Arkie Albanese Ave. (315) 6826400. First Tuesday of the month, 2 p.m. Next book: Pachinko by Min Jin Lee.

Real Life Readers. Manlius Library, 1 Arkie Albanese Ave. (315) 682-6400. Third Thursday of the month, 2 p.m. Next book: Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” by Zora Neale Hurston. Let’s Talk About Books. Manlius Library, 1 Arkie Albanese Ave. (315) 6826400. Fourth Thursday of the month, 2 p.m. Open book discussion. Unraveling Yarns Book Club. Max-

Paine Book Club. Paine Branch Library, 113 Nichols Ave. (315) 435-5442. Fourth Friday of the month, 10 a.m. Open book discussion. Westcott Readers at Petit. Petit Branch Library, 105 Victoria Place. (315) 435-3636. Check calendar for dates. Next book: Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. Page Turners Book Club. Salina Free

Library, 100 Belmont St., Mattydale. (315) 454-4524. Final Tuesday, 6:30 p.m. Next book: Fly Girls by Keith O’Brien.

Afternoon Book Club

Skaneateles Library, 49 E. Genesee St. (315) 685-5135. Second Thursday of the month, 1:30 p.m. Next book: To be announced.

Evening Book Club

Skaneateles Library, 49 E. Genesee St. (315) 685-5135. Last Monday of the month, 6:30 p.m. Next book: Bel Canto by Ann Patchett.

“Meet the Author” Book Club

well Memorial Library, 14 W. Genesee St., Camillus. (315) 672-3661. Second Thursday of the month, 10:30 a.m. Next book: The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare.

Tully Free Library, 12 State St. (315) 696-8606. First Monday of the month, 6 p.m. Next author: Susie Schnall, author of The Subway Girls.

Between the Lines Book Club.

Onondaga Free Library, 4840 W. Seneca Turnpike. (315) 492-1727. Last Thursday of the month, 7 p.m. Next book: Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng.

Maxwell Memorial Library, 14 W. Genesee St., Camillus. (315) 672-3661. Fourth Monday of the month, 2 p.m. Next book: The Ninth Hour by Alice McDermott.

OFL Book Club


1.16 – 1.22 MUSIC

LISTED IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER:

THURSDAY 1/17 Neglected Foot. Thurs. 9 p.m. Enjoy an evening of dirty funk, plus Buggin’ Out at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $5/advance, $7/door. (315) 474-1060; funknwaffles.com.

FRIDAY 1/18 The Baby Boomers Band. Fri. 7:30 p.m. Featuring oldies favorites from the 1960s and 1970s at the Brewerton Center for the Arts, 9660 Brewerton Road, Brewerton. $10. (315) 676-5838; brewertoncenterforthearts.org. Against the Wind. Fri. 8 p.m. Bob Seger tribute group performs at the Turning Stone Resort Casino Showroom, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $15. (877) 833-SHOW; turningstone.com. The LYNNeS. Fri. 8 p.m. Award-winning songwriters Lynn Miles and Lynne Hanson play off each other live, with acoustic and electric guitars, piano, harmonica, mandolin and percussion. May Memorial Unitarian Universalist Society, 3800 E. Genesee St. $18. (315) 446-8920; Mmuus.org. Bad Mama Blue’s Band. Fri. 9 p.m. The smallest, loudest band in Auburn, plus The Primates at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $7/ advance, $10/door. (315) 474-1060; funknwaffles.com.

SATURDAY 1/19 Baldwinsville Pep Band. Sat. 6 p.m. The gang celebrates 10 years and an album release, plus My So-Called Band, Matthew Blake and The Blues Dragons. Palace Theatre, 2384 James St. $15-$50. (315) 4639240; palaceonjames.com. Battle of the Bands. Sat. 7 p.m. The 17th annual high school bands competition takes place at the Sam Pomeranz Jewish Community Center, 5655 Thompson Road, DeWitt. $10. (315) 445-2360; jccsyr.org. Neal Francis. Sat. 7 p.m. Liberated from a self-destructive past and

TIMESTABLE

born anew in sobriety, Francis has captured and inspired a collection of songs steeped in New Orleans rhythms and Chicago blues. Westcott Theater, 524 Westcott St. $10/ advance, $15/door. (315) 299-8886; thewestcotttheater.com. Tony Trischka. Sat. 7 p.m. The Syracuse native is a consummate banjo artist and a highly influential banjo player in the roots music world, inspiring a generation of bluegrass and acoustic musicians. Temple Concord, 910 Madison St. $25. (315) 475-9952; templeconcord.org. Loren Barrigar and Co. Sat. 7:30 p.m. Barrigar started playing guitar when he was 4, and by age 6 played in front of thousands at the Grand Ole Opry. Oswego Music Hall, McCrobie Building, 41 Lake St., Oswego. $15-$18. (315) 695-6477; oswegomusichall.org.

fles, 307 S. Clinton St. $5. (315) 4741060; funknwaffles.com.

MONDAY 1/21 Pearly Baker’s Best. Mon. 8:30 p.m. This band knows more than 230 Grateful Dead songs, making sure they never play the same track twice. Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $5. (315) 474-1060, funknwaffles.com.

TUESDAY 1/22 Salt City Showcase. Tues. 6 p.m. Anthony Saturno, Dan Wagner and Shawn Tallet at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $5. (315) 474-1060; funknwaffles.com. Jakals. Tues. 9 p.m. Boston-based alternative rock band in concert, plus Hope & Things and the Mattydale Music Collective at Funk N

Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $5. (315) 474-1060; funknwaffles.com.

CLUB DATES WEDNESDAY 1/16 Ronnie Leigh. (Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St.) 5:30 p.m. Jen Cork & Mike Brown. (The Stoop, 311 W. Fayette St.) 7 p.m. Menage A’ Soul. (Club 11, 1799 Brewerton Road, Mattydale) 7 p.m. Open Mike. (Dominick’s Pub-NGrub, 145 Camic Road) 7 p.m. Open Mike. (Moondog’s Lounge, 24 State St.), 7 p.m. Diana Jacobs, Dave Kuykendall & Jimmy Richmond. (Press Room Pub, 220 Herald Place) 8 p.m.

Crystal Gayle. Sat. 8 p.m. Award-winning country music favorite performs at the Turning Stone Resort Casino Showroom, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $34. (877) 833SHOW; turningstone.com. Astro Collective. Sat. 9 p.m. Five-member jam band focuses on psychedelic rock, plus Bothership at Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St. $5/advance, $7/door. (315) 4741060; funknwaffles.com.

SUNDAY 1/20 Riggies, Greens & Rock. Sun. noon. Celebrate Central New York’s best culinary experiences-- riggies and Utica greens-- accompanied by local acoustic rock musicians at the Stanley Theatre, 259 Genesee St., Utica. $10/advance, $15/door. (315) 724-4000; thestanley.org. Old-Time Music Jam. Every Sun. 1 p.m. Jam session for all sorts of ramblers and pickers is open to both spectators and players, followed by a potluck dinner at 5 p.m. Kellish Hill Farm, 3192 Pompey Center Road, Manlius. $5/suggested donation. (315) 682-1578. Kmase Storytellers In the Round. Sun. 9 p.m. Nadine Prince, Cliff Carey and Dougla at Funk N Wafsyracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

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SALT CITY WINTER ANTIQUES SHOW

Sat., Jan. 19th 9am-5pm • Sun., Jan. 20th 10am-5pm

ALLMAN PROMOTIONS LLC | (315) 686-5789 | SYRACUSEANTIQUESHOW.COM

THURSDAY 1/17 Bill Ali. (Guilfoil’s Irish Pub, 501 Burnet Ave.) 6 p.m. Karaoke. (Phoenix American Legion, 9 Oswego River Road) 6 p.m. Melissa Gardiner. (Sugar Magnolia Bistro, 316 S. Clinton St.) 6 p.m. Mike Fedorchuk. (Moondog’s Lounge, 24 State St.) 7 p.m.

Brendan Gosson. (Phoebe’s Restaurant, 900 E. Genesee St.) 9 p.m.

John Spillett Jazz/Pop Duo. (Bistro Elephant, 238 W. Jefferson St.) 7 p.m.

Brian Golden Blues Experiment. (Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 246 W. Willow St.) 9 p.m.

One Hard Krank. (Blue Spruce Lounge, 400 Seventh North St., Liverpool) 7 p.m.

Frita Lay Dance & Drag. (Trexx Nightclub, 319 N. Clinton St.) 10 p.m.

Otherworldly Entities. (Maxwells, 122 E. Genesee St.) 7 p.m.

FRIDAY 1/18

Open Mike. (Kellish Hill Farm, 3191 Pompey Center Road) 7 p.m.

Infinity. (Sharkey’s, 7240 Oswego Road, Liverpool) 6 p.m.

Open Mike. (Monirae’s, 688 Route 10, Pennellville) 7 p.m.

Keith Ford & Sean Fried. (McAvan’s, 1217 W. Fayette St.) 6 p.m.

Lawless Jazz Collective. (Green Gate Inn, 2 W. Genesee St.) 7:30 p.m.

Todd Hobin Band. (Club 11, 1799 Brewerton Road, Mattydale) 6 p.m.

Mark Nanni. (Shifty’s, 1401 Burnet Ave.) 8 p.m.

Jesse Derringer. (Phoenix American Legion, 9 Oswego River Road) 7 p.m.

Mark Zane. (Cazenovia Sports Bowl, 5 Carriage Lane) 7:30 p.m.

FRI 1.18

SAT 1.19

Moonshine River Band

CATERING FOR UP TO 350

Learn more at wanderersrest.org. Call Wanderers’ Rest at (315)697-2796 or stop by to meet Panther.

Clam bakes • BBQs • Receptions Showers • Birthdays • Anniversaries Benefits • School sports functions

Standard packages or create a custom menu to suit your needs!

26

7138 Sutherland Dr., Canastota, NY 13032 wanderersrest.org

01.16.19 - 01.22.19 | syracusenew times.com

CORPORATE PARTNER

SUNDAY 1/20

Dale Randall. (Wegmans, 6789 E. Genesee St., Fayetteville) Noon.

Ron Spencer Band. (Shifty’s, 1401 Burnet Ave.) 9 p.m.

Timeline Band. (WildCat Pizza Pub, 3680 Milton Ave.) Noon.

The Ripcords. (Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 256 W. Willow St.) 10 p.m.

Jazz on Tap. (Finger Lakes On Tap, 35 Fennell St.) 2 p.m.

Merger, Rut, NEBS. (Otro Cinco, 206 S. Warren St.) 11 p.m.

John Spillett Jazz/Pop Duo. (Owera Vineyards, 5276 East Lake Road) 7 p.m.

Don’t mistake me for a wild animal — I’m actually super loving and small enough to fit on your lap. I don’t know why I have not found a home yet... I promise I would entertain you for life. I will do figure eights around your feet, which means I will love you infinitely! Come meet me today and give me a chance. I would love to have a nice warm bed to sleep in every night with my new family.

New Day. (Coleman’s Irish Pub, 100 S. Lowell Ave.) 10 p.m.

3 Inch Fury. (Roadhouse 48, Route 48) 9 p.m.

Jesse Derringer. (Baldwinsville American Legion, 8529 Smokey Hollow Road) 7 p.m.

Hi, I’m Panther!

Los Blancos. (Shifty’s, 1401 Burnet Ave.) 9:30 p.m.

Tim Herron. (Empire Brewing Company, 120 Walton St.) 10 a.m.

John Spillett Jazz/Pop Duo. (Wegmans Market Cafe, 6789 E. Genesee St.) Noon.

Brett Falso

Dirtroad Ruckus. (Roadhouse 48, Route 48, Fulton) 9:30 p.m.

Party Sharks. (Moondog’s Lounge, 24 State St.) 8 p.m.

SATURDAY 1/19 7 East River Rd, Central Square 315- 668-3905

Godsmack’d. (Club 11, 1799 Brewerton Road, Mattydale) 9 p.m.

LTN (Last Thursday Night). (Limp Lizard, 4628 Onondaga Blvd.) 7 p.m.

Jesse Derringer. (Phoenix American Legion, 9 Oswego River Road) 2 p.m. Donal O’Shaugnessy. (Coleman’s Irish Pub, 100 S. Lowell Ave.) 4 p.m. Mark Nanni. (Sherwood Inn, 26 W. Genesee St.) 4 p.m. John Spillett Jazz/Pop Duo. (Blue Water Grill, 1100 W. Genesee St.) 5 p.m. Seed Sander. (Funk N Waffles, 307 S. Clinton St.) 6 p.m.

TUESDAY 1/22

13 Curves. (Inside Out Tavern, 2206 Lemoyne Ave.) 8 p.m.

Salsa Heat. (Mattydale VFW Post 3146, 2000 Lemoyne Ave.) 6:30 p.m.

Barn Busters. (The Reef, 1061 Old Route 31) 8 p.m.

Kevin Barrigar. (Average Joe’s, 2119 Downer St.) 7 p.m.

Chad Bradshaw. (McCarthy’s Irish Pub, 64 Albany St.) 8 p.m.

Jess Novak & Friends. (Maxwells, 122 E. Genesee St.) 9 p.m.

Dark Hollow Trio. (Dave’s Hideaway, 68 Route 11) 8 p.m.

Wednesday 1/23

Diana Jacobs Band. (Moondog’s Lounge, 24 State St.) 8 p.m.

Edgar Pagan’s GPL. (Le Moyne Plaza, 1135 Salt Springs Road) Noon.

Gina Rose and The Thorns. (Soft Rock Bar & Grill, 2026 Teall Ave.) 8 p.m.

Jon Seiger. (Marriott Syracuse Downtown, 100 E. Onondaga St.) 5:30 p.m.

Inside Job. (Green Gate Inn, 2 W. Genesee St.) 8 p.m.

Open Mike. (Moondog’s Lounge, 24 State St.) 7 p.m.

Oogle. (Dominick’s Pub-N-Grub, 145 Camic Road) 8 p.m.

Paul the Beatle. (Listening Room, 443 Burnet Ave.) 7 p.m.

Party Sharks. (Press Room Pub, 220 Herald Place) 8 p.m.

Three Amigos. (Eskapes Lounge, 6257 Route 31) 7 p.m.


Mark Nanni. (The Stoop Kitchen, 311 W. Fayette St.) 8 p.m. Ben Wayne. (Maxwells, 122 E. Genesee St.) 9 p.m.

STAG E

LISTED ALPHABETICALLY:

The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. Fri. & Sat. 8 p.m.; closes Feb. 2. Popular comedy about sixth-graders as they gird for spelling battle; mounted by the Baldwinsville Theatre Guild at the First Presbyterian Church Education Center, 64 Oswego St., Baldwinsville. $28/adults, $24/students and seniors. (315) 877-8465. Blithe Spirit. Thurs.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m.; closes Jan. 26. Noel Coward’s ghostly comedy classic continues the season at the Central New York Playhouse, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. E. $20/Fri. & Sat., $17/Thurs. & Sun. (315) 8858960. Grandfather Frost’s Stories of Russia. Sat. 11 a.m. The “World of Puppets” series continues with this family-friendly show at Open Hand Theater, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. E. $5. (315) 476-0466. No Time for Death. Every Thurs. 6:45 p.m.; through Feb. 28. Timewarped wackiness in this interactive dinner-theater comedy whodunit; performed by Acme Mystery Company. Spaghetti Warehouse, 68 AUDITIONS AND REHEARSALS The Media Unit. Central New York teens ages 13-17 are sought for the award-winning teen performance and production troupe; roles include singers, actors, dancers, writers and technical crew. Auditions by appointment: (315) 478UNIT.

COMEDY

Mark Riccadonna. Thurs. 7:30 p.m. The Saturday Night Live writer takes on the Funny Bone Comedy Club, Destiny USA, off Hiawatha Boulevard. $10. (315) 423-8669. Nate Bargatze. Fri. 7:30 & 10 p.m., Sat. 7 & 9:45 p.m., Sun. 7:30 p.m. Clean comic from Tennessee performs at the Funny Bone Comedy Club, Destiny USA, off Hiawatha Boulevard. $25. (315) 423-8669.

LEARNING

North Syracuse Art Group. Every Wed. 10 a.m. Bring your own supplies and learn, exchange art knowledge, share fine art with others and

work your media. North Syracuse Education Association, 210 S. Main St. Free. (315) 699-3965. Improv Comedy Classes. Every Wed. 6-8 p.m. Drop-in classes at Salt City Improv Theater, Shoppingtown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. $15. (315) 410-1962. Open Figure Drawing. Every Wed. 7-10 p.m. All skill levels are welcome: if you can write your name, you can draw. Westcott Community Center, 826 Euclid Ave. $8. (315) 453-5565. Learn to Paint. Every Thurs. & Sat. 10:30 a.m., 1 & 3:30 p.m. Learn in four easy lessons for beginners and intermediate painters. CNY Artists, Shoppingtown Mall. $20/two-hour class. (315) 391-5115, CNYArtists. org. Onondaga Lake Open House. Every Fri. noon-4:30 p.m. Come experience the lake cleanup firsthand at the Onondaga Lake Visitors Center, 280 Restoration Way, Geddes. Free. (315) 552-9751.

Club 11 presents: WED, JAN 16 ....... Menage a Soul FRI, JAN 18 ....... Todd Hobin Band WED, JAN 23 ......................... Monkey Fever FRI, JAN 25 ............................ Prime Time Horns 1799 BREWERTON ROAD • MATTYDALE • 315-999-1100

RESERVE NOW...

and bring your sweetheart to

Improv Drop-In Class. Tues. 6:45 p.m. Every other week Syracuse Improv Collective provides instruction to help a person gain confidence with becoming a better improviser, actor, listener and communicator at Echo, 745 N. Salina St. $10. syracuseimprovcollective.com.

SPORTS

Syracuse Crunch Hockey. Fri. 7 p.m., Mon. 1 p.m. The puck-slappers take on the Belleville Senators (Friday) and the Binghamton Devils (Monday) at the Onondaga County War Memorial Arena, 515 Montgomery St. $16-$20. (315) 473-4444, Syracuse crunch.com.

Local Farm Fresh Tues-Sat 11:30am-2:30pm, 5-10pm 315-214-5408 | stonessteak.com 3220 Erie Blvd E, Dewitt

HALF OFF BOTTLES OF WINE EVERY TUESDAY

ESPN Top Rank Boxing. Fri. 7 p.m. Purveyors of the sweet science Bryant Jennings and Oscar Rivas clobber each other during a heavyweight championship bout at the Turning Stone Casino and Resort’s Event Center, Thruway Exit 33, Verona. $45, $62, $79. (315) 361-SHOW.

Thought to Have

agic Powers & Bring Good Luc

R E A D Y TO G I V E U S A T R Y ?

Syracuse University Men’s Basketball. Sat. 2 p.m. The Orange battles Piitsburgh at the Carrier Dome, 900 Irving Ave. $15-$125. (888) DOMETIX.

SPECIALS

Syracuse Toastmasters. Every Wed. 8 a.m. Learn leadership and public speaking qualities in a positive, constructive environment at the

DAILY HOMEMADE LUNCH SPECIALS STARTING AT $6.50 HAPPY HOUR 11-7, 52 BEERS! $1 OFF PINTS, WELL LIQUOR, WINE & BOTTLES 253 E. Water Street Hanover Square 315.937.5824

SUNDAY BRUNCH

W/ BOTTOMLESS MIMOSAS

syracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

27


Syracuse Tech Garden, 235 Harrison St. goodmorningsyracuse.toastmastersclubs.org. Smartass Trivia. Every Wed. 7-10 p.m. Brainy fun with Steve Patrick at Vendetti’s Soft Rock Café, 2026 Teall Ave. Free. (315) 399-5700. Trivia Night. Every Wed. 7-9 p.m. Brain power with DJs-R-Us at Cicero Country Pizza, 8292 Brewerton Road, Cicero. (315) 699-2775.

Trivia Night. Every Wed. 8-10 p.m. Nightly prizes. The Distillery, 3112 Erie Blvd. E., DeWitt. Free. (315) 449-BEER. Trivia Night. Every Wed. 8-10 p.m. Winning the mental match leaves a bad taste in your opponents’ mouths, plus nightly prizes. Saltine Warrior Sports Pub, 214 W. Water St. Free. (315) 314-7740.

Trivia Night. Every Wed. 7-9 p.m. Nightly prizes. The Brasserie, 200 Township Blvd., Camillus. Free. (315) 487-1073.

Smartass Trivia. Every Thurs. 7-10 p.m. Steve Patrick hosts his quiz show at Pizza Man Pub, 50 Oswego St., Baldwinsville. Free. (315) 6381234.

Trivia Night. Every Wed. 7-9 p.m. Come out and test your brainpan against others. Stingers Pizza, 4500 Pewter Lane, Manlius. Free. (315) 692-8100.

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7 p.m. Nightly prizes to those with the answers to general knowledge questions. Lamont Tavern, 108 Lamont Ave. Free. 487-9890.

Y L K E WE WIN! 2

TONY TRISCHKA 1/19 TEMPLE CONCORD

TICKETS

A BENEFIT FOR

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Prizes for contestants, who needn’t be part of an established team. Sitrus Bar, Sheraton Syracuse University Hotel, 801 University Ave. Free. (315) 380-6206. Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Gray matters at this DJs-R-US contest at Spinning Wheel, 7384 Thompson Road, North Syracuse. Free. (315) 458-3222. Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Brainstorming at Trappers II Pizza Pub, 101 N. Main St., Minoa. Free. (315) 656-7777. Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7 p.m. Cranium conundrums at RFH’s Hideaway, 1058 Route 57, Phoenix. Free. (315) 695-2709.

Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Battle of the brains with DJs-R-Us at Smokey Bones, 4036 Route 31, Liverpool. (315) 652-7824. Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Nightly prizes. Dublin’s, 7990 Oswego Road, Liverpool. Free. (315) 6220200. Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Nightly prizes. RFH’s Hide-A-Way, 1058 Route 57, Phoenix. Free. (315) 695-2709. Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7-9 p.m. Show your zest for knowledge and competition, plus nightly prizes. Sitrus on the Hill, 801 University Ave. Free. (315) 475-3000. Trivia Night. Every Thurs. 7:30 p.m. Diamond Dave knows the answers at Munjed’s Mediterranean Cafe and Metro Lounge, 505 Westcott St. Free. (315) 425-0366. Trivia Night. Every Fri. 7-9 p.m. Nightly prizes. Lamont Tavern, 108 Lamont Ave., Solvay. Free. (315) 4879890. Salt City Winter Antiques Show. Sat. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun. 10 a.m.5 p.m. Warm up with antiquities during the annual show at the Center of Progress Building, New York State Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd. $7/adults, $8/weekend pass, free/ages 16 and under. (315) 6865789, allmanpromotions.com. Mindfulness Meditation. Every Sun. 10 a.m.; through Feb. 3. Focus on deep breathing and open up your mind at Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St., Auburn. $5. (315) 253-6669, auburnpublictheater.com. Trivia Night. Every Mon. 6:30 p.m. Knowledge is good at Marcella’s Restaurant, Clarion Hotel, 100 Farrell Road, Baldwinsville. Free. (315) 457-8700. Smartass Trivia. Every Tues. 7 p.m. More brainy fun with Steve Patrick at Nibsy’s Pub, 201 Ulster Ave. Free. (315) 476-8423. Team Trivia. Every Tues. 8 p.m. Drop some factoids at Coleman’s Authentic Irish Pub, 100 S. Lowell Ave. Free. (315) 760-8312.

JANUARY 27 8:00 PM MOHEGAN MANOR

ENTER TO WIN BY

Tuesday, Jan. 22 @ Noon Visit syracusenewtimes.com and click the WIN tab!

28

01.16.19 - 01.22.19 | syracusenew times.com

Rosamond Gifford Zoo. Daily, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. The zoo, located at 1 Conservation Place, features some pretty nifty animals, including penguins, tigers, birds, primates and the ever-popular elephants. $8/ adults, $5/seniors, $4/youth, free/ under age 2, half-price admission in January and February. (315) 4358511. Onondaga Lake Skatepark. Daily,


& 6:55 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 9:35 p.m. Movie Tavern. Daily: 10:45 a.m., 2:30, 6:15 & 10:55 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 1:05, 3:35, 6:25 & 9:20 p.m.

Free Solo. Soaring National Geographic documentary about mountain climbing thrills at Yosemite. Hollywood (Recliners). Sat.-Mon: 11 a.m.

Aquaman. Jason Momoa as the beefcake underwater warrior in this

Bumblebee. Hailee Steinfeld and John Cena in a Transformers offshoot. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 1:10, 4:15, 7:10 & 10:15 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1:35, 4:35 & 7:30 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:10 p.m.

Escape Room. Students encounter mayhem in this familiar scare package. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 12:05, 2:35, 5:10, 7:40 & 10:20 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1:50, 4:50 & 7:45 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:30 p.m. Movie Tavern. Daily: 11 a.m., 2:30, 6:15 & 10:30 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 1:10, 4:05, 6:35 & 9:10 p.m.

DC Comics romp. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:30 & 9:50 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1:10, 4:10 & 7:20 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:20 p.m. Movie Tavern. Daily: 12,

A Dog’s Way Home. Family flick about one pooch’s 400-mile journey. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:25 & 10:10 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1:30, 4:30

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald. Witches, wizards and more in this second helping in the Harry Potter franchise. Hollywood (Recliners). Daily: 3:10 & 8 p.m.

Glass. Bruce Willis, James McAvoy and Samuel L. Jackson in the follow-up to both Unbreakable and Split. Destiny USA 19 (IMAX). Daily: 12, 3:10, 6:20 & 9:30 p.m. Destiny USA 19 (RPX). Daily: 1, 4:10, 7:20 & 10:30 p.m. Destiny USA 19. Screen 1: 11:30 a.m., 2:40, 5:50 & 7:50 p.m. Screen 2: 12:30, 3:40, 6:50 & 10 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1:15, 4:15 & 7:15 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:15 p.m. Movie Tavern. Screen 1: 11 a.m., 2:30, 6 & 9:30 p.m. Screen 2: 12, 3:30, 7 & 10:30 p.m. Screen 3: 1:30, 5 & 9:30 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Screen 1: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 &

noon-4 p.m.; through March, weather permitting. The park is open for anyone older than age 5. Helmets must be worn, and waivers (available at the park) must be signed by a parent. Onondaga Lake Park, 107 Lake Drive, Liverpool. Free. (315) 453-6712.

FILM

STARTS FRIDAY

FILMS, THEATERS AND TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

1:45, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 1:20, 4:30 & 7:35 p.m. Bohemian Rhapsody. Rocking biopic about Freddy Mercury and the glam-rock band Queen. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 11:50 a.m., 3:05, 6:25 & 9:40 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 12:45, 3:45, 6:45 & 9:45 p.m.

! T U O T GE DON’T MISS THESE EVENTS ENKYKLIOS (EN-KEE-KLEE-OHS) at Cazenovia College JAN. 17

Open Hand Theatre Presents:

MOONGOBBLE AND ME: THE NAUGHTY NORK FEB. 2 & 3

Open Hand Theater Presents:

WORLD OF PUPPETS: RIP VAN WINKLE FEB. 9

CNY GLITTER GALA FEB. 23

BUY TIC

KETS

m o c . x i t y cn CRYSTAL GAYLE 1/19 TURNING STONE SHOWROOM

A service

of the Syra

cuse New

Times

info@cnytix.com

syracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

29


Replicas. Science-fiction thrills with Keanu Reeves. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 9 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 9:55 p.m. Second Act. Breezy romcom with Jennifer Lopez. Movie Tavern. (Stadium). Daily: 11:15 a.m. & 3:30 p.m. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. The webslinger flies high in this Marvel Comics cartoon. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 1:20, 4:20, 7:30 & 10:25 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1:45, 4:45 & 7:25 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10 p.m. Movie Tavern. Daily: 11:30 a.m., 3, 6:45 & 9:15 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 12:25, 3:05, 6:20 & 9:15 p.m. Vice. Christian Bale under lots of makeup to portray the lovable Vice President Dick Cheney. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 12:10, 3:20, 6:35 & 9:35 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1:40, 4:40 & 7:35 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:25 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15 & 10:15 p.m.

THE LYNNES 1/18 MAY MEMORIAL 9:30 p.m. Screen 2: 1, 4, 7 & 10 p.m. Screen 3: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 & 10:30 p.m. Green Book. Director Peter Farrelly’s acclaimed comedy-drama about race relations with Viggo Mortensen. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 12:50, 4:05, 7:05 & 10:15 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 12:55, 3:55 & 6:55 p.m. The Grinch. Benedict Cumberbatch lends his voice to this Dr Seuss cartoon. Hollywood (Recliners). Daily: 6 p.m. Sat.-Mon. matinee: 1:10 p.m. If Beale Street Could Talk. James Baldwin’s love story set in 1970s Harlem. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 12:45, 4, 6:55 & 9:55 p.m.

30

Mary Poppins Returns. Emily Blunt, Meryl Streep and Dick Van Dyke in the much-anticipated Disney sequel. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 12:20, 3:30, 6:45 & 9:45 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1:20, 4:20 & 7:10 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 9:55 p.m. Movie Tavern. Daily: 11:50 a.m., 2, 5:45 & 9:15 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 12:50, 3:50, 6:50 & 9:50 p.m. Mary Queen of Scots. Saiorse Ronan tangles with Margot Robbie in this sumptuous period piece. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 12:15 & 3:15 p.m. The Mule. Clint Eastwood as a senior-citizen cocaine smuggler in this offbeat character study. Destiny

01.16.19 - 01.22.19 | syracusenew times.com

USA 19. Daily: 12:55, 3:35, 6:40 & 9:20 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1 p.m. Movie Tavern. Daily: 7:15 & 10:15 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 1:25, 4:20, 7;05 & 9:35 p.m. On the Basis of Sex. Felicity Jones plays Ruth Bader Gisnburg during her early days as a lawyer. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 11:55 a.m., 2:55, 6 & 9:15 p.m. Manlius Art Cinema. Daily: 7:30 p.m.; Sat.-Mon. matinee: 2 & 4:30 p.m. No 7:30 p.m. show Mon. Movie Tavern. Daily: 11:15 a.m., 3, 6:45 & 9:45 p.m. Ralph Breaks the Internet. Disney’s frenetic follow-up to the 2012 Wreck-It Ralph cartoon. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 11:35 a.m., 2:20 & 5:05 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 1:30 & 4:25 p.m.

The Upside. Thoughtful comedy with Kevin Hart and Bryan Cranston. Destiny USA 19. Daily: 12:40, 3:50, 7 & 10:05 p.m. Great Northern 10. Daily: 1:05, 4:05 & 7:05 p.m. Late show Fri. & Sat.: 10:05 p.m. Movie Tavern. Daily: 11:30 a.m., 3:45, 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. Shoppingtown 14. Daily: 12:40, 3:40, 6:40 & 9:40 p.m. FILM, OTHERS

LISTED ALPHABETICALLY:

Allelujah. Sat. 10:30 a.m., Mon. 7 p.m.

The National Theatre Live production, presented digitally at the Manlius Art Cinema, 135 E. Seneca St., Manlius. $18/adults, $15/students and seniors. 682-9817. Dinosaurs Alive. Wed. Jan. 16-Sun. noon. Michael Douglas narrates this large-format travelogue about paleontologists in search of Jurassic-era critters. Bristol IMAX at the MOST, 500 S. Franklin St. Film: $6.


BLITHE SPIRIT 1/17-1/26 CENTRAL NEW YORK PLAYHOUSE Film and exhibits: $17/adults, $15/ children under 11 and seniors. (315) 425-9068. Hubble. Wed. Jan. 16-Sun. 2 p.m. Leonardo Di Caprio narrates this large-format Space Shuttle spectacle. Bristol IMAX at the MOST, 500 S. Franklin St. Film: $6. Film and exhibits: $17/adults, $15/children under 11 and seniors. (315) 4259068. Mary Queen of Scots. Wed. Jan. 16-Sat. 4 & 7 p.m.; Sun. 1 & 4 p.m.;

D

Mon.-Wed. Jan. 23, 7 p.m. Saiorse Ronan tangles with Margot Robbie in this sumptuous period piece. Cinema Capitol Twin, 234 W. Dominick St., Rome. $7/adults, $6/military and students. (315) 337-6453. Pandas. Wed. Jan. 16-Sun. 1 & 3 p.m. Kristen Bell narrates this large-format study of several cute cubs in China at the Bristol IMAX at the MOST, 500 S. Franklin St. Film: $6. Film and exhibit hall: $17/adults, $15/children under 11 and seniors. (315) 425-9068.

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Stagecoach. Tues. 1 p.m. John Wayne finally achieved stardom in director John Ford’s classic 1939 horse opera at Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St., Auburn. Free. (315) 253-6669. A Star Is Born. Fri. & Sat. 4:15 & 7:15 p.m.; Sun. 1:15 & 4:15 p.m.;

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Mon.-Wed. Jan. 23, 7:15 p.m. Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga tackle the evergreen drama. Cinema Capitol Twin, 234 W. Dominick St., Rome. $7/adults, $6/military and students. (315) 337-6453.

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LEGAL NOTICE 0731, LLC with SSNY on 12/04/18. Office: Onondaga. SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: 500 Westcott St, Syracuse, NY, 13210. Any lawful purpose.


720 Livingston LLC with SSNY on 1/02/19. Office: Onondaga. SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: 500 Westcott St, Syracuse, NY, 13210. Any lawful purpose. 723 Livingston LLC with SSNY on 1/02/19. Office: Onondaga. SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: 500 Westcott St, Syracuse, NY, 13210. Any lawful purpose. Cornish Heights Partners 2 LLC with SSNY on 12/10/18. Office: Onondaga. SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: 4760 Cornish Heights Parkway, Syracuse, NY, 13215. Any lawful purpose. D&C Real Estate Ventures, LLC with SSNY on 02/23/18. Office: Onondaga. SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: P.O. Box 2231, Liverpool, NY, 13088. Any lawful purpose. Fort Columbus LLC with SSNY on 1/20/19. Office: Onondaga. SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: 500 Westcott St, Syracuse, NY, 13210. Any lawful purpose. Fort Euclid LLC with SSNY on 1/02/19. Office: Onondaga. SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: 500 Westcott St, Syracuse, NY, 13210. Any lawful purpose. Fort Livingston LLC with SSNY on 01/02/19. Office: Onondaga. SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: 500 Westcott St, Syracuse, NY, 13210. Any lawful purpose. Jorya Realty LLC with SSNY on 11/28/18. Office: Onondaga. SSNY desg as agent for process & shall mail to: 7342 Dartmoor Crossing, Fayetteville, NY, 13066. Any lawful purpose. Notice is hereby given that a license (serial #2215112) has been applied for by the undersigned to sell wine and beer on-premises at a bar/ tavern under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 170 Township Blvd., Suite 30, Camillus, NY. Bad Axe Throwing USA, Inc. dba Bad Axe Throwing.

Notice is hereby given that a license, number pending, for beer, wine & cider has been applied for by the undersigned to sell beer, wine & cider at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 3801 Milton Ave, Camillus, NY 13031, for on premises consumption. Notice of Formation of 103SAvery, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/19. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1174 Fillmore St, Denver, CO 80206, Attn: Mr. David North. Purpose: any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of 315 Beauty Bar, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/15/2018. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2761 Connors Rd, Baldwinsville, NY 13027. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of A&K Jerky, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on December 12, 2018. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom processing may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8377 Salt Springs Rd., Manlius, New York 13104. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of ANDERSEN HOLDINGS OF CORTLAND, LLC — Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York on 12/6/18. Office location: Cortland County. Secretary of State of New York designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. Secretary of State of New York shall mail process to 2197 Greenwood Road, Cortland, New York 13045 which is the

principal office of the limited liability company. The limited liability company was formed for any lawful business purpose. Notice of Formation of Anvil Opportunity Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/10/18. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Michael J. Relyea, 4269 James St., East Syracuse, NY 13057. Purpose: Opportunity Zone Fund. Notice of Formation of Armani East LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/18. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 6500 New Venture Gear Dr. East, Syracuse, NY 13057. Purpose: any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of Armoured One Assessments, LLC Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New Yo r k (SSNY) on 11/30/2018. Office location: County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: LLC, 386 N Midler Ave, Syracuse, NY 13206. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Billone West LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/18. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 6500 New Venture Gear Dr. East, Syracuse, NY 13057. Purpose: any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of Branches of Growth Mental Health Counseling, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/10/18. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be

served. SSNY shall mail process to: 6017 Jerusalem Drive, Cicero, NY 13029. Purpose: practice the profession of mental health counseling. Notice of Formation of BRF DEVELOPMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/5/18. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 5765 Stonykill Street, East Syracuse, NY 13057. Purpose: any lawful activity.

York (SSNY) on 9/21/2018. Office is located in the County of Cortland. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall

mail copy of process to Legallnc Corporate Services Inc., 1967 Wehrle Dr, Suite 1#086, Buffalo, NY 14221. Purpose is any lawful purpose.

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY; Name of LLC: 132-134 Seneca Street W. LLC; Date of Filing: 01/09/2019; Office of the LLC: Onondaga Co.; The NY Secretary of State (NYSS) has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. The NYSS may mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 7000 Highfield Road, Fayetteville, NY 13066; Purpose of LLC: Any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Fitness for Motherhood, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New

located in County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 4974

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Notice of Formation of Coppertop Tavern Catering, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/19. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: One Technology Plaza, East Syracuse, NY 13057, Attn: Mr. Daniel M. Giamartino. Purpose: any lawful activity. NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY; Name of LLC: 132 West Chapel Street LLC; Date of Filing: 12/03/2018; Office of the LLC: Onondaga Co.; The NY Secretary of State (NYSS) has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. The NYSS may mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 7000 Highfield Road, Fayetteville, NY 13066; Purpose of LLC: Any lawful purpose.

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2019-20 ANTICIPATED VACANCIES The Penfield Central School District anticipates the following probationary teaching openings for the 2019-20 school year:

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All positions require appropriate NYS certification. Please complete an application online at www.penfield.edu and apply to appropriate job. Penfield Central School District is in compliance with the United States Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Title IX Educational Amendment of 1972, Part 86, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The School District provides equal employment opportunity to all individuals and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, disability, marital status, sexual orientation, gender, military/veteran status, genetic status, prior criminal record, or victim of domestic violence.

syracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

33


REAL ESTATE APTS/HOUSES FOR RENT

1 & 2 Bedroom, Living Room, Kitchen, Dining Room, all utilities, a/c, free parking. No pets. 915 James St. 472-3135. Greenberry Drive, Clay, New York 13041. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Greg Jennings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/18. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1107 Rail Fence Road, Camillus, NY 13031. Purpose: any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of Hotchkiss Media Group, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of the State of

New York (SSNY) on 1/9/2019. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8759 Raulli Dr, Cicero, NY 13039. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of JCW Services, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of the State of New York (SSNY) on 11/27/2018. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 7402 Eastgate Cir, Liverpool, NY 13090. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Joe Armideo Clay Commons, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/20/2018. Office location: Cortland County, NY. SSNY is the designated agent of the LLC upon whom process may be

served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Joe Armideo Clay Commons, LLC at 101 North Main Street Homer, NY 13077 which is also the principal business location. The purpose is any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of JR. HOLMES ENTERPRISES, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New Yo r k (SSNY) on 08/27/2018. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 305 N. Crouse Ave., Syracuse, NY 13203. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Level Up: Job Offer Negotiation, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on January 2, 2019. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8375 Turnberry Drive, Manlius, NY 13104. Purpose is any lawful purpose.

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NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: LOGAN BUILDING, LLC. Articles of organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on December 12, 2018. Office location: County of Onondaga at 1083 Jewett Road, Skaneateles, NY 13152. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, C/O Cheney & Blair, LLP, 40 South Main Street, Canandaigua, New York 14424. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Notice of formation of MYOUTDOORART LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/12/2018. Office location is County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Advance, One World Trade Center, NY, NY 10007. Purpose: Any lawful activity. NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PINE CREEK PROPERTIES LLC Please take notice that PINE CREEK PROPERTIES LLC filed its Articles of Organization with the Department of State on December 14, 2018 and became effective on that date pursuant to the Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. The name of the Limited Liability Company is to be PINE CREEK PROPERTIES LLC with its principle place of business located in Onondaga County. The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address within or without the State to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against him or her is P.O. Box 201, Baldwinsville, New York 13027. The Company is authorized to engage in all business permitted in the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of

New York. The purpose of the Company is to conduct any lawful business permitted in the Limited Liability Company Law or the law of other states in which the Company may conduct its business. Notice of Formation of Plunkie Point Road LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/26/18. Office location: Onondaga Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 4000 Old Stone Lane, Camillus, NY 13031. Purpose: any lawful activities. Notice of Formation of Pure Clothing of NY, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on December 17, 2018. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Jacob Honan, The Sugarman Law Firm, 211 W. Jefferson St., Syracuse, NY 13202. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of RICHARDS ENTERPRISES I, LLC — Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York on 1/3/19. Office location: Cortland County. Secretary of State of New York designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. Secretary of State of New York shall mail process to P.O. Box 137, Homer, New York 13077. The principal office of the limited liability company is located at 137 South Main Street, Homer, New York 13077. The limited liability com-

Call Anne! 315-422-7011 ext.116 34

13212. Purpose is any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of RICHARDS ENTERPRISES II, LLC — Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York on 1/4/19. Office location: Cortland County. Secretary of State of New York designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. Secretary of State of New York shall mail process to P.O. Box 137, Homer, New York 13077. The principal office of the limited liability company is located at 137 South Main Street, Homer, New York 13077. The limited liability company was formed for any lawful business purpose.

Notice of Formation of Shady Pond LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/23/2018. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 5700 South Bay Rd, Cicero, NY 13039. Purpose is any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of Rita Armideo Clay Commons, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/20/2018. Office location: Cortland County, NY. SSNY is the designated agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Rita Armideo Clay Commons, LLC at 101 North Main Street Homer, NY 13077 which is also the principal business location. The purpose is any lawful activity. Notice of Formation of Sadlocha Superior Structures, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of the State of New York (SSNY) on Jan 2, 2019. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 7159 Willow Road, N. Syracuse, NY

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Notice of Formation of Shannon Doepking Softball Camps LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 12/19/2018. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1301 E. Colvin St., Syracuse, NY 13244. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of formation of TRIM Accounting & Tax Consultant, LLC, Art of Org filed with the Sec’y of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/2/2018. Office location: Onondaga County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: LLC, 8662 Snowshoe Trl, Cicero, NY 13039 Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of Wysocki Construction, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on Jan 1, 2019. Office is located in the County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 103 E. Molloy Rd., Syracuse, NY 13211. Purpose is any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of: Henderson Harbor Mariners’ Marina, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on: 1/9/19. Office location: County of Jefferson. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall

mail copy of process to: Marla Cohen, 5201 Hoag Ln, Fayetteville, New York 13066. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of: NRM Property Holding, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on: 1/9/19. Office location: County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to:Jeffrey Cohen, 5201 Hoag Ln, Fayetteville, New York 13066. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Formation of: T. D. H. Development_, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on: December 21,2018. Office location: County of Onondaga. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 5858 E. Molloy Rd., Syracuse, New York 13211. Purpose: any lawful purpose. Notice of Qualification of 613 Walnut Avenue LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/28/18. Office location: Onondaga County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/27/18. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 200 E. 72nd St., NY, NY 10021. DE address of LLC: 874 Walker Rd, Ste C, Dover, DE 19904. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy of State, 401 Federal St, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. WERTH WEALTH PLANNING, LLC Notice of formation of the above limited liability company (“LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on December 19, 2018. Principal business location is in Onondaga County, NY. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The White House 7030 E. Genesee St., Fayetteville, NY 13066, Attn: Member. Purpose: any and all lawful activities.


U Eat p! Local Cravings Restaurant Guide

ASIAN

DINER

SANDWICH SHOP

at Turning Stone Resort

501 Westcott Street Syracuse, NY 13210 315-477-0141

at Turning Stone Resort

Peach Blossom Restaurant 5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 1-800-771-7711 Turningstone.com

BAKERY Opals

at Turning Stone Resort

5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 1-800-771-7711 Turningstone.com

BAR/LOUNGE/PUB Monirae’s

668 County Route 10 Pennellville, NY 315-668-1248 Moniraes.com

Exit 33

at Turning Stone Resort

5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 1-800-771-7711 Turningstone.com

Mom’s Diner

Stella’s Diner

110 Wolf St. Syracuse, NY 13208 315-425-0353 Stellasdinersyracuse.com

SPORTS BAR

5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 1-800-771-7711 Turningstone.com

IRISH

Coleman’s Authentic Irish Pub 100 S. Lowell Avenue Syracuse, NY 13204 315-476-1933 Colemansirishpub.com

NEW AMERICAN

The Tavern at Colgate Inn

5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 1-800-771-7711 Turningstone.com

CHINESE

Noodle Noodle

at Turning Stone Resort

5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 1-800-771-7711 Turningstone.com

Westvale Fish Cove

at Turning Stone Resort

Pino Restaurant

BUFFET

at Turning Stone Resort

SEAFOOD

FINE DINING

916 Riverside

Season’s Harvest Restaurant

5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 1-800-771-7711 Turningstone.com

2130 West Genesee Street Syracuse, NY 13219 315-468-4767

Jakes Grub & Grog

7 E. River Road Central Square, NY 13036 315-668-3905 Jakesgrubandgrog.com

The Food Hall

916 County Route 37 Central Square, NY 13036 316-668-3434 916riverside.com 1 Payne Street Hamilton, NY 13346 315-824-2300

PIZZA

Patsy’s Pizza

1205 Erie Blvd. W Syracuse, NY 13204 315-472-4626 Patsyspizza.net

POLISH

Eva’s European Sweets 1305 Milton Avenue Syracuse, NY 13204 315-487-2722

Upstate Tavern

at Turning Stone Resort

5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 1-800-771-7711 Turningstone.com

SAVE THE DATE

SATURDAY, APRIL 27

10am – 2pm

NYS FAIRGROUNDS CENTER OF PROGRESS BUILDING G A N N O U NUCR NINO F THE RET

R MONSTES TRUCK

STEAKHOUSE

Steakhouse Portico by Fabio Viviani 1133 State Route 414 Waterloo, NY 13165 315-946-1780 Dellagoresort.com

TS Steakhouse

at Turning Stone Resort

5218 Patrick Road Verona, NY 13478 1-800-771-7711 Turningstone.com

WANT TO BE LISTED IN LOCAL CRAVINGS?

CALL TODAY 315-422-7011

MAIN ATTRACTIONS Monster Trucks Music and Dance Performances Kid affiliated vendors Summer Camp/Activity Booths Face Painting & Food Vendors FREE & FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY To sponsor this event or register a booth, contact us at (315) 422-7011 syracusenew times.com | 01.16.19 - 01.22.19

35


How do you know you’ve chosen a winner?

IT’S NOT OUR FIRST

CALL THE HEAVY HITTERS™ 1-800-LAW-1333

AlexanderAndCatalano.com

6713 Collamer Rd. | E. Syracuse, NY 13057

PRACTICE AREAS: Car Accidents, Truck Accidents, Motorcycle Accidents, Work-site Injuries, Premise Liabilities, Wrongful Death, Dog Bites

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