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THE NEWS RECORD THE UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI’S INDEPENDENT, STUDENT-RUN NEWS ORGANIZATION / MONDAY, MARCH 31, 2014

CONCEALED CARRY ON COLLEGE CAMPUSES

HEATHER OBRINGER DESIGNER

Legislators consider pros, cons of

ALLOWING

concealed carry at Ohio universities RYAN HOFFMAN NEWS EDITOR

After University of Cincinnati student Trent Amstutz was assaulted by a group of teenagers on the southwest edge of main campus in February, he wondered how the incident would have played out had he been able to legally carry a firearm on campus. Under Ohio law, Amstutz, a fifth-year engineering student and licensed concealed carry holder, and other concealed carry licensees are not permitted to carry on certain public property including university buildings and campuses. However, several bills at the state house could change the law to allow concealed carry on college campuses and other prohibited sites. The polarizing topic is drawing mixed responses from law enforcement officials, students, administrators and advocates on both sides of the issue. “These [current] laws restrict the good guys,” said Ohio House Rep. John Becker, (R – Clermont). “I’m trying to put the good guys on equal footing with the bad guys so nobody has to be a victim or at least you’ll have the opportunity to shoot back. It’s about leveling the playing field.” Becker, whose district includes UC’s Clermont campus, has sponsored three different bills and cosponsored another bill that would eliminate restricted zones where concealed carry is not permitted. One of Becker’s bills, house bill 403, would generally allow concealed carry on public property and in publicly owned secure buildings. The freshman legislator said the issue is all about ensuring the constitutional right to protect oneself. “The idea of a lot of these gun bills, including [HB 403], is to chip away at those restrictions and restore gun rights in the name of safety,” Becker said. But local law enforcement officials aren’t

certain that allowing concealed carry at UC would reduce the number of crimes. Since most of the crimes that victimize students are happening off campus where concealed carry licensees can already carry, it’s unlikely that allowing concealed carry on campus would reduce crime, said Capt. Paul Neudigate, Cincinnati Police Department District Five commander. Of the 39 robberies in which a student was a victim in 2013, four happened on campus, according to data compiled by the university. Also, roughly 60 percent of those students who are victimized are under the influence of alcohol, which disqualifies a licensee from being able to carry at that time, Neudigate said. “I don’t want to say it doesn’t deserve further merit and looking into, but the facts are, in 98 percent of the cases it wouldn’t have made a difference in any of the student victimization that we have,” Neudigate said. Allowing concealed carry would likely impact police officers and their ability to respond to a crime, said Jeff Corcoran, interim UC police chief. “From a police officer’s perspective, the biggest worry with CCW permit holders is how do we tell them apart from the bad guys?” Corcoran said in an email. “In a highstress situation it is very easy to turn toward a police officer giving you commands with a gun still in your hand, which is a recipe for disaster. We teach officers that if they are in plain clothes or off-duty, the uniformed officer is always ‘right.’ They need to follow their commands, and avoid looking like a threat to the uniformed officer.” Both Neudigate and Corcoran said the vast majority of concealed carry licensees are law abiding citizens and Neudigate added that he didn’t think allowing concealed carry would make police officers’ jobs “any more dangerous than they already are.” But firearm advocates are, at the very least,

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2 / COLLEGE LIFE

MONDAY, MARCH 31, 2014 / NEWSRECORD.ORG

SHEILA USTASE CONTRIBUTOR

The third annual “Kickin’ It With Chi O” kickball tournament is Chi Omega’s main philanthropic event of the year. Participants from 19 different Greek organizations competed on teams, which donated money to the Make-A-Wish foundation.

Kickball tournament scores money for Make-A-Wish Fraternity hosts major fundraiser of year, benefitting organization for children with life-threatening illnesses FERNANDA CRESCENTE CONTRIBUTOR

A kickball tournament held in the Campus Recreation Center Saturday was much more than a competition between members of the Greek community. “Kickin’ It With Chi O,” hosted by University of Cincinnati fraternity Chi Omega, was a philanthropic event aiming to raise money for the Make-A-Wish foundation, which grants wishes to children with lifethreatening illnesses across the United States. A single wish can cost between $8,000 and $9,000, said Katie Buescher, Chi Omega community service director and third-year marketing student. The tournament has served as Chi Omega’s primary philanthropic fundraiser for the third consecutive year. “This event is important to myself and Chi Omega because it really helps to raise awareness and funds for Make-A-Wish,” Buescher said. “It also allows us to come together as a Greek community to raise money while having fun together.” Students from 19 different Greek organizations filled the recreation center courts. Participants made up several individual teams and each team donated participation fees to Make-A-Wish. Members of Chi Omega coached and refereed the tournament. The environment created a fun and competitive atmosphere. Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Alpha Sigma Phi and Pi Kappa Alpha were some of the many Greek

organizations in attendance, with Pi Kappa Alpha taking home the tournament’s top prize: $100 of the money raised would be donated to their own philanthropy, Buescher said. Chi Omega started the tournament in 2012 in an effort to increase participation and socialization. Before “Kickin’ It With Chi O” was established, the fraternity hosted a wing-eating competition to raise money for

their philanthropy. “My freshman year, we moved ‘Kickin’ It’ to make it more of a day event where everyone could mingle and have a friendly kickball competition,” said Allison Stepaniak, Chi Omega secretary and third-year marketing and international student. “It is our hope to grant a wish soon for a child with a life-threatening illness.”

SHEILA USTASE CONTRIBUTOR

Members of fraternity Chi Omega cheered on teams as they faced off in the Rec Center Saturday afternoon.

Artistic performances conclude Women’s History Month ‘Black Women Revealed Showcase’ illustrates personal stories, perseverance through dance, poetry CASSIE MERINO STAFF REPORTER

Black women shared what being black and beautiful meant to them Friday, telling stories through dance, spoken word and poems as part of Women’s History Month at the University of Cincinnati. The fourth annual “Black Women Revealed Showcase,” hosted by the African American Cultural and Resource Center and Sisters Impacting Sisters, revolved around the theme, “My Black is Beautiful.” Participants illustrated personal interpretations of the theme through 12 performances throughout the evening. Preparation for the event took approximately a month and a half, said Tamar Kinebrew, AACRC program coordinator. “It’s always nice hearing other stories from black women, and it’s really uplifting for me being a black woman,” said Tiffany Moody, a second-year communications sciences and disorders student. “I get inspired by them every year.” Partrice Barnes, Ethnic Programs and Services program coordinator, initiated the event after her first year of working at the university. Barnes has pursued a lifelong passion for inspiring and empowering women, earning her bachelors in women’s gender and sexuality studies from UC in 2011.

“Women have always been a passion of mine, and uplifting women, especially women of color,” Barnes said. As a student, Barnes felt there was a need for supportive mechanisms for women, including resources and events. The goal of the “Black Women Revealed Showcase” is to give women confidence and the opportunity to voice who they are as black women, Barnes said.

“It’s always nice hearing other stories from black women, and it’s really uplifting for me being a black woman. I get inspired by them every year.” - Tiffany Moody, second-year communications sciences and disorders student

“A lot of times as black women, there are a lot of misconceptions about who they are, and a lot of times we don’t get to speak up for ourselves and be proud of who we are,” she said. Barnes participated in the event by reciting Maya Angelou’s poem “Phenomenal Woman.” “That Maya Angelou piece for me represents all pride

in being a woman; not just being a black woman, but being alive and saying that I matter,” Barnes said. “I may not look like what society says beauty is, but because I am me, that is worth something.” Another piece that was performed at the program was an abridged version of a piece originally performed by teenage slam poets Team Lightskinned. The performance examined conflict created by various skin pigmentation within the black community. For Sierra Carter, first-year health sciences student, and Lindsay Scribner, first-year political science student, reciting this spoken word meant delving in to their own lives. “It’s a very surreal experience being able to kind of live on one side of the race line and still see how people treat other people darker than you, and then see how you’re treated once people find out you’re of an ethnicity they didn’t originally assume,” Carter said. Scribner said there is not only white privilege in society, but also light skin privilege within the black community. “People just see it as black and white a lot of the times, and they don’t take color into consideration,” Scribner said. Carter believes “colorism” is hurtful to the black community, but the feelings are valid. “During slavery, the lighter-skinned you were, the closer you were to the house,” Carter said. Carter and Scribner hope after their recitation of the spoken word, people will take “colorism” more seriously.

New York style restaurant enhances ordinary meatballs Meatball Kitchen INFORMATION: 2912 Vine St., Cincinnati 45219; 513-407-7405; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday-Thursday; Friday, Saturday 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; meatballkitchenusa.com

RATING:

Meatball Kitchen comes to Short Vine, spices up classic dish as well as other local favorites SARAH MULLINS STAFF REPORTER

Channeling the ambience of an eclectic New York eatery, a Short Vine restaurant offers its diners an appealing, cozy atmosphere and whips up extensive variations on a popular culinary cuisine: meatballs. Despite its carnivorous name, Meatball Kitchen serves dishes that appease both meat lovers and vegetarians. Four variations of meatballs are offered: beef, spicy pork, turkey and vegetarian. The meatless balls are comprised of black beans, brown rice, mushrooms, walnuts and parmesan. A bar at the back of the restaurant serves as an ordering station. After choosing the type of meatballs, diners can add them to a sandwich, pasta or salad. Meat, tomato or béchamel sauces can be added for flavor. I chose vegetarian meatballs on a sandwich with

tomato sauce and provolone cheese. Meatball Kitchen also offers multiple side items. I chose the seasonal roasted vegetable, sesame broccoli. The restaurant itself, complete with slated tables, modern metal chairs and a bar, creates the illusion of high dining. Glass pendant lights set a casual mood. When my sandwich arrived at the table, its presentation was appealing, served on fresh-baked focaccia, a slice of provolone cheese and a generous dollop of tomato sauce. The freshness of the salt-speckled focaccia pulled together the flavorful meatballs, tantalizing my taste buds from the first bite. Tangy tomato sauce complimented the stringy slice of provolone cheese. The sandwich was filling and the sesame broccoli accented the meal. The sesame flavor added a sweet and salty taste to the bland vegetable. Meatball Kitchen offers a variety of other dishes with their meatballs, including tacos, chili conies and burgers. Happy hour specials, which offer non-alcoholic choices too, include JELL-O shots and house wines.


3 / NEWS SPOTLIGHT

MONDAY, MARCH 31, 2014 / NEWSRECORD.ORG

FROM PAGE ONE: skeptical of Neudigate’s and Corcoran’s claims, as well as other explanations typically made by law enforcement officials. “If you don’t accept the assertion that crime goes down when people are legally able to carry then I would ask the question ‘why do you think crime is as high as it is around UC when you’re not able to carry?’” said Jeffry Smith, a UC alumnus and firearm instructor and advocate. Smith, who is planning a firearm-education event for April 12 on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, said even if most of the crime occurs off campus, by prohibiting concealed carry on campus, the law prohibits anyone who might have to cross or step on campus from being able to legally carry. He said he doubts police have data extensive enough to show how many victims were walking to or from campus. Therefore, it is unclear how large an impact prohibiting concealed carry on campus is having, he said. “I guess one would have to engage in a real analysis in all these crimes and where they’re happening,” Smith said. Amstutz, the student who was attacked in February, said by simply allowing concealed carry on campus most criminals would likely think twice about robbing or assaulting a student. “I don’t know specifically what would have happened differently with my experience but the biggest thing that happens is you don’t get attacked in the first place,” Amstutz said. “The moment the criminals know that you could potentially be armed, they stop attacking. It’s a deterrent. My situation would have been completely different if I had had a gun on me.” Opponents argue that the make-up of a university possesses too many risk factors — including alcohol abuse and high rates of suicide — to warrant concealed carry. “It’s something that the vast majority of college presidents and chancellors are all against,” said Andy Pelosi, director of the Campaign to Keep Guns off Campus. “I do understand there are some folks that want it, but we think there’s just too many risk factors at play here.” While many universities deal with safety concerns, introducing concealed carry is not the solution, Pelosi said. “If there’s a concern, and I can see it’s a legitimate concern, about safety, then the schools should be looking at ways to improve safety on campus, as opposed to allowing students or faculty to carry,” Pelosi said. UC has not taken a formal stance on Becker’s bill or the other bill that the university is keeping a distant eye on. Neither of the bills has made it out of its designated house committee. “We’ve not taken up a position on any of the bills,” said Margie Rolf, associate vice president of government relations, who tracks legislation in Columbus that could have a possible impact on the university. “We’re simply monitoring them at this stage of the game until we get a signal that they are going to move.” An increasing national, local issue All 50 states have concealed carry laws in one form or another. Ohio allows residents who have lived in the state for at least 45 days and are at least 21 years old to apply for a concealed carry license. An applicant must meet certain standards and complete a minimum of 12 hours of training with a certified instructor. Applicants found guilty of certain criminal offenses or who have a documented history of mental health issues are not eligible for concealed carry. Currently, concealed carry licensees must renew their licenses every five years. According to the National Conference of State Legislators, a bipartisan organization that tracks state legislation, Ohio is one of 21 states that specifically ban concealed carry on college campuses, while 22 states leave the decision up to each individual university. Currently, seven states have statutes requiring universities to allow concealed carry on campus. Efforts to expand or restrict concealed carry on college campuses drastically increased across the country in 2007 after a mass shooting at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University claimed 33 lives, according to the NCSL. “This is one of those issues that over the last couple of years is becoming more and more popular,” said Suzanne Hultin, a policy specialist at the NCSL. “We’re seeing a lot more bills come up and it’s not just college campuses but also K-12 schools and just in general.” In 2008, 14 states proposed legislation to expand concealed carry in some capacity on college campuses, and two states considered legislation to prohibit concealed carry on campuses. None of those bills passed. The number of states that proposed legislation to expand concealed carry increased in 2011 to 18, while the number of states considering prohibiting concealed carry remained unchanged at two. Of the 19 states that considered allowing concealed carry on campuses in 2013, two of the states passed legislation. Kansas passed a bill creating a provision to keep public institutions from prohibiting concealed carry unless a building has “adequate security measures.”The bill allows institutions to request a four-year exemption from the requirement. Arkansas passed legislation allowing faculty to carry concealed on campus; however, the bill allows individual institutions’ governing boards to disallow concealed carry if they so choose. None of the five states that considered prohibiting concealed carry on college campuses in 2013 passed the

HEATHER OBRINGER DESIGNER

legislation. In Ohio, the previous three general assemblies have proposed legislation removing restricted areas for concealed carry. None of those bills made it out of the committee it was assigned. “I definitely am noticing an uptick in the number of bills dealing with concealed carry,” UC’s Rolf said. “I would say that most of the bills would have an impact on UC’s campus simply because we are a public institution and most of the bills deal with public facilities.” The two current bills are both still in committee. Becker’s bill hasn’t had its first hearing yet, and he’s not sure when it will have its mandatory first hearing. He said his bill likely would not make it out of the house. All the bills not passed expire at the end of the general assembly’s term, in this case Dec. 31. However, another bill proposed by Rep. Ron Maag (R-Lebanon) could very likely make it out of the house and head to the Ohio Senate, where it would need to be approved as is before Ohio Gov. John Kasich could sign it into law.

Maag’s bill had its third committee hearing in midJanuary. The committee hasn’t scheduled a fourth hearing yet, according to his office. Maag is out of town visiting an ill relative and couldn’t be reached for comment. But Becker said Maag’s bill is receiving a lot of support from gun lobbies. “If the Johnson bill and the Maag bill are the only two to get signed into law that’s good progress,” Becker said. “I’ll take that and then you know in the next general assembly we’ll work on some more.” Even if none of the bills pass, they could be reintroduced in the same exact state in the next general assembly, Rolf said, while noting that there are still eight months left in this general assembly and more bills could still be introduced. The one thing both sides agree on is that the issue is not going away anytime soon. “When we do have victories they’re temporary,” Pelosi said. “Because we know the issue is going to come up again.”

Adding up concealed carry weapon permits in Ohio 800

70

40

64,650

50

900

800

800

700

700

700

60

600

600

50

500

500

500

400

400

400

300

300

300

200

200

100

100

100

Licenses suspended

Licenses revoked

Applications denied

40

30

30

20

20

10

10

*New licenses issued

*In thousands

*Licenses renewed

2013

2012

889

80

60

900

1,142

900

741

90

70

1,000

286

90 80

1,000

1,154 1,030

1,000

48,370 12,160

100

96,972

100

600

200


4 / SPORTS Let’s riot, Ducks fly past Bearcats with 10-5 win preferably with MONDAY, MARCH 31, 2014 / NEWSRECORD.ORG

common sense JOSHUA MILLER SPORTS EDITOR

To burn the couch or not to burn the couch: That is the question. Whether ‘tis nobler in the mind to suffer the rubber bullets and tear gas of outrageous revolt or to take arms against the sea of riot police, and by opposing them? To riot: to celebrate no more; and by a riot to say we end the heartache and the thousand tear gas canisters that flesh is heir to, ‘tis a consummation devoutly to be wish’d. To rejoice, to revolt, to riot … Did I just defile the brilliance of the late, great William Shakespeare to stretch a reference about drunken college students rioting across the country? Yes. Yes, I did. Why? Because college students have all gone mad, mad with The Madness. As of Saturday night, it’s become ultra-violently clear that we as college students have lost all sense of when it’s appropriate to A: Storm the court, and B: Riot after a game. I feared this would happen. The lines blurred hazier and hazier throughout this season, with victories of lesser and lesser significance prompting court storming of an alarming frequency and scope. I feared that, as any victory over a rival or any unranked team beating a ranked team was celebrated with uncalled-for angst and gusto, a late-season loss could very well lead to barrages of tear gas shot from assault rifles by men with helmets and shields, riding horses and touting night sticks. Saturday night at the University of Arizona, that fear became all too real. As chronicled brilliantly by a few of our brave student-newspaper brethren at The Daily Wildcat, well, things escalated quickly, didn’t they? “Students protesting against TPD Presence.” “Police fire tear gas at crowds.” “Students have been shot with bean bag rounds.” “Students throw Sparklers at police.” “Officers beating a crowd member.” “Students throwing up due to tear gas.” “Daily Student reporter shot by beanbag round.” “Students shout ‘Don’t fall back’ as police approach.” “Crowd Members yelling ‘They can’t take us all.’” Then an all-out-Twitter-induced panic: “Dozens of fans shot by riot officers.” Oh God. Oh no. Kent State all over again … “CLARIFICATION: Dozens of students shot with beanbags. Apologies for Confusion.” Good Lord, Daily Wildcat that was a hell of a time for a Freudian slip. Things finally tapered off after the police did indeed start “taking them all.” When all was said and done and the tear-gas haze finally lifted, at least nine individuals were arrested, and the better part of the several hundred that assembled were beaten, tear gassed or bean bagged into submission. Thank God no one was killed, which briefly seemed possible after the mis-tweet. What it comes down to is pretty simple; don’t start shit with the police. Why was Arizona rioting in the first place? Out of anger because their team was only one of the eight best in the country and not one of the four best? Dammit, the agony. Based on the reporting, this was not a situation in which the Tucson Police came in, guns blazing to break up a college party. Arizona students assembled across from police that were in place as a precaution, according to reports from The Daily Wildcat. They made the conscious — alright, probably semi-conscious — decision to invoke the debacle that followed. Now, let me be clear, I’m not anti-riot. As a matter of fact, I’m pro-riot. If and only if it’s a joyous riot, which is really more just drinking and falling down in the street than it is actually rioting. But there have to be simple guidelines to college athletics rioting: 1. Thou shalt not riot out of anger, only joy. Angry riots are only appropriate in times of government repression (i.e. the Boston Tea Party, Civil Rights, the City of Cincinnati trying to extend parking meter hours near campus, etc.). 2. Thou shalt not damage thy neighbor’s car. 3. Thou shalt not burn a couch if said couch is on thy neighbor’s porch. 4. Thou shalt not flip thy neighbor’s van, unless thy neighbor’s van is a TV news van. Thou shall always, always, always flip TV news vans. 5. Thou shalt not ruin the festivities for everyone else by throwing anything — beer bottles, beer cans, bottle rockets, smoke bombs, sparklers, lawn furniture, lawn gnomes, lawn darts, traffic cones, female undergarments, etc. — at police. Students at the University of Dayton did it pretty much right Thursday night, for a while anyway. There were people everywhere, every last one of them drunk and exuberant as can be. It was beautifully collegiate, and yes, a few couches were burned, but if something has to be burned, an outdoor couch that almost assuredly had bed bugs isn’t the worst place to start. Eventually, a few individuals — probably of the Y chromosome, higher testosterone variety — ruined it for everyone by (see rule five) throwing things at the police and they were gassed and arrested much like the Arizonans. But, for the most part, the kids at UD were having themselves a damn good time. I envy them. Keep it classy. Keep it happy. Riot on, dude.

MADISON SCHMIDT CHIEF PHOTOGRAPHER

Courtney Curtis (No.3) defends an Oregon attacker during UC’s 10-5 loss to the Ducks Saturday at Gettler Stadium.

UC lacrosse drops second game in row after sloppy first half THE NEWS RECORD

The University of Cincinnati lacrosse team couldn’t overcome a dismal first half Saturday, falling 10-5 to the University of Oregon Ducks after trailing 9-2 heading into the second half. UC’s leading scorer Courtney Curtis got things started off on the right foot

for the Bearcats, scoring two goals in the first 10 minutes of the game. “I think we were feeling a little pissed off about our game on Friday so we came out upset and wanted to compete in this game,” said UC head coach Gina Oliver. “We definitely ruffled some feathers in the first couple of minutes.” Unfortunately for UC, not much else went right from that point on. The Ducks used a seven-goal outburst over the final 10 minutes and 37 seconds of the first half to build a 9-2 lead at the

break. Oregon held a 21-10 advantage in shots at the half and a 7-3 edge in draw controls in the opening frame. UC played a near-perfect second half defensively but they could only muster three goals, not nearly enough to make up the seven-goal deficit they’d been dug into in the first half. “The second half, we made some adjustments,” Oliver said. “Offensively we were a little scared of their pressure going in and we attacked them a little bit better, but didn’t get the shots off that we wanted.” For the game, Oregon out shot UC 38-17. The Ducks held a slight edge in ground balls, 29-28, and turnovers with the Bearcats committing 21 to Oregon’s 19. Curtis led UC with three goals, while Ashley Helmrath and Taylor Young each contributed one. Helmrath and Dani Tunnel both registered assists, and goalkeeper Meg Gulmi made 14 saves. UC will look to rebound with its first American Athletic Conference victory of the season against the University of Louisville Sunday. The game is scheduled to start at 2 p.m. at Gettler Stadium. “Louisville is a great team, they’re coming off a big win this past weekend,” Oliver said. “We’re just really focusing on ourselves. The more we focus on the opponent the more we take steps backwards. We’ve got to keep working on the shots we need to get in the games.”

UC baseball struggles in USF series Bearcats fail to overcome missed opportunities in pair of one-run losses EMILY WITT STAFF REPORTER

Despite a walk-off victory in game one of the doubleheader Sunday, the University of Cincinnati baseball team fell 2-1 in a weekend series against the University of South Florida Bulls. Both losses, 2-1 Friday and 7-6 in game two of Sunday’s doubleheader, came after a slew of blown opportunities. “We’re not losing baseball games, we’re giving games away,” said UC head coach Ty Neal. “There’s a lot of stuff that went on today in the second game that we just handed it to them. We put too much pressure on ourselves to battle back and try and win it in the ninth. To me, we should have had the lead the whole game.” Senior Justin Glass, who secured UC’s only victory of the series with a walk-off single, said the victory should have been secured from the first few innings of the game. “It was nice to win the walk-off, but we lost two one-run games,” Glass said. “Both of those games we fought back in the later part of the innings but it makes you wish that for whatever reason we could have done something earlier in the game.” Friday’s 2-1 loss featured a pitching gem by RHP Connor Walsh (3.45 ERA), who threw his first career complete game. The redshirt sophomore gave up two runs on four hits and struck out four. Walsh threw 132 pitches and faced career-high 35 batters. The two runs of the game were

courtesy of a throwing error by senior Ryan Quinn. The infielder later redeemed himself in Sunday’s first game, going 2-3 with two runs. The Bearcats collected four hits Friday, two from senior Matt Williams and two from sophomore Woody Wallace. Wallace, who has only appeared in 17 games and started in nine, has been struggling offensively so far with a .138 average and .207 slugging percentage. By contrast, sophomore catcher Russell Clark has played in 18 and has started 15 with an average of .281 and slugging percentage of .368. The first game of Sunday’s doubleheader brought a 3-2 win for the Bearcats. Glass went to the plate with the bases loaded, and drilled a line drive to right field that just missed the second baseman’s glove. Ryan Quinn scored easily from third, giving Glass the RBI walk-off single. “You always have to be confident no matter what the situation is when you’re hitting,” Glass said. “It’s more mental than physical. I wouldn’t say I was confident that I was going to get the game-winning hit, but I was confident enough that I was going to hit the ball hard enough to hopefully make something happen. It worked out.” UC’s go-to pitcher Bryan Chenoweth threw 3.0 innings and gave up two runs on five hits. Ryan Atkinson entered to pitch in relief, throwing 4.0 innings and only giving up two hits. The Bearcats collected a total of six hits, with Quinn Glass each notching two. Senior Matt Williams, freshman

Connor McVey and Glass each gained an RBI. Game two brought a loss for UC as they fell 7-6. Left-handed pitcher Colton Cleary pitched 3.2 of innings in the game, giving up six hits and four runs and striking out three. Mitch Patishall, RHP, entered in the fourth to pitch in relief, giving up five hits and three runs and striking out five. The Bulls scored a total of seven runs and collected 11 hits, with the Bearcats gaining five runs and 10 hits. Ian Happ, who went 3-4, collected one RBI, two doubles, three hits, one walk and scored two runs. “I just couldn’t pull the last one out,” Happ said. “It was a little bit frustrating.” UC wasted no time getting on board in game two with an RBI double by Happ, a sophomore. USF came back full force in the top of the third, driving in three runs on an RBI triple by Austin Lueck. UC responded in the second half of the inning, while Happ collected his second double of the game and Seeger collecting his first career RBI and second career hit. Heading into the eighth with a fiverun deficit, UC pushed back against USF, scoring four runs and loading the bases twice. However, multiple pitching changes for USF proved to be the downfall for UC, as they failed to gain more offensive momentum in the ninth. “Our approach got better as the game went on,” Happ said. “We had a really good eighth inning, but we need to be doing that every inning.” The Bearcats (9-16) will play Miami University at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday.

UC sweeps Oliver-Nickoloff Invitational Men’s, women’s track teams cruise to easy victories ELLEN HADLEY CONTRIBUTOR

The University of Cincinnati women’s and men’s track and field teams fought through the rain Saturday to dominate the Oliver Nikoloff Invitational, sweeping the team titles and finishing in first place 13 times. The women’s team totaled 219 points while the men’s team picked up 150.50 points. Both teams won comfortably with Marquette University’s women’s team finishing with 141 points for second and Miami University’s (Ohio)’s men’s team tallying 103 points, finishing second. Cameron Gardner and Liz Carr finished day two of the heptathlon earning first and second places respectively. Gardner earned 4,156 points and produced a personal best in the javelin. Carr finished with a careerbest point total with 4,146 points and earned personal-bests in the long jump and javelin. Gardner, along with Olivia Lopes, Shanice Smith and Morgan Gordon, also secured first-place finishes for the women’s 4x100-meter relay. The Bearcats also took home first and second in the women’s 4x400 meter relay. Jalisa Jarrett, Kelsey Mueller, Taylor Hill and Kaele Lightfoot finished first with Lopes, Alexis Anton, Laurel Cooney and Erin Milner finishing almost exactly seven seconds behind. Kenya Woodall took home first-place finishes in both the women’s 100-meter dash and 200-meter dash, finishing with three Bearcats right behind her in both events. The sophomore managed to add herself to the ranks as ninth in UC history with a personal-best time of 12.13 seconds in the 100-meter. Gabby Calderone (1:04.35) and Milner (1:05.61) finished as the top two in the women’s 400-meter hurdles while Javette Lee (15.38) and Kaitlyn Good

PHIL DIDION PHOTO EDITOR

Competitors on the men’s 5k run at the Oliver-Nickoloff Invitational on a rain-soaked track at Gettler Stadium. The University of Cincinnati took first place in both the men’s and women’s meets.

(16.00) took second and third in the 100-meter hurdles. UC finished strong in field events. Erika Hurd won the high jump (1.68 meters) and Alyssa McBride won the pole vault (4.05m). Mekayla finished second in the shot put (14.16m). Mary Bridges (48.23m) and Jessica Molyet (46.35m) finished second and third in the women’s discus throw while Monica Phillips (48.95m) took third in the hammer throw. The men’s 100-meter and 200-meter dashes belonged to Nick Kowalski, claiming personal-best times in both events: 10.99 in the 100m and 21.90 in the 200m. Bearcat Nathan Jones took third in the 100-meter and Darnell Gilbert took third in the 200-meter. Ethan Bokeno ran a 1:56.64 800-meter, coming within tenths of a second from his career-best time. Josh Dangel broke his Gettler Stadium record in the pole vault with

a 17-foot-7-inch clearance, beating the previous record he set last spring. The new discus school record holder, Macklin Tudor, won the discus and shot put events Saturday. The Bearcats now prepare to head to the University of South Florida to compete at the USF Dual Friday.

ONLINE EXCLUSIVE Check out newsrecord. org for continued coverage of March Madness. The Final Four begins Saturday when Florida and UConn tipoff at 6:09 p.m.


5 / ARTS ‘Awake’ transforms music into living dreams

MONDAY, MARCH 31, 2014 / NEWSRECORD.ORG

Tycho creates album that defines electronica while pushing genre where it has never been before JEREMY SIMMONS STAFF REPORTER

In his 12-year career as an electronic artist, Tycho has created evocative, eclectic music that begs for an exquisite set of headphones. “Awake” is Tycho’s fifth release and his most cohesive and achingly beautiful effort to date. Guitars, electric bass and drums combine with synthesizers and unapologetic digital effects to create a blissful atmosphere. Part of Tycho’s genius is creating music that can’t be pigeonholed into a particular genre, or even an era. It’s not trendy or hip, it’s just damn good. There are sound textures in this collection of tracks that echo film score composer Vangelis’ early works of the ’70s as well as contemporary electronic artists like M83 or Ulrich Schnauss. The title track starts the album and sets the tone, letting the listener know that although this is electronica or ‘ambient’ music, “Awake” isn’t 40 minutes of drowsy tunes intended for meditation. Nearly every track is beat-driven and most are more than 90 beats per

minute, which seems to be the status quo for electronica, and key to its growing popularity. Swooping in after the first song, “Montana” is reminiscent of the English shoegaze skiffle-shimmer genre of the ’90s, but carries a sonic sheen all on its own. The track slips seamlessly between choruses built from synthesizer pads and lush echoplexes, with suspended beats that anticipate the return of its full drum riff and bass line. The last few tracks slow down after the majority of songs relied on fast tempo. “Apogee” is an aural treat with constant repetition while other instruments and harmonic layers pile on, creating a haunting sound. The final track, “Plains,” is worth waiting for. At first, acoustic and electric guitars entwine in a duet with light reverb. The song twists and changes itself as certain instruments and melody lines dissolve while others take their place. By the end of the song, you realize that you’ve been given an atonal reprise of “Awake,” until digital fuzz claims the last faded threads of music. If you’ve never listened to Tycho, then “Awake” is an ideal opportunity. If you have, then you know what to expect: this is music for people who love music, not just a ditty to sing along to, but harmonic beauty to experience on an immersive level. This is the music of dreams, of motion that’s capable of suspending time and reaching emotions deep enough that you never quite forget it.

PROVIDED

‘Mistaken For Strangers’ perfect family portrayal The National gives insight into Berninger brothers’ relationship in hilarious, heartfelt documentary MONROE TROMBLY STAFF REPORTER

Cincinnati-native band The National hit a high point of fame in 2010 with the release of “High Violet,” their most commercially successful album up to that point. While the band had been making music since 2001 with the release of its self-titled album, the later released “High Violet” marked a turning point, having been consistently popular among critics and devout followers. Following the release, The National toured extensively throughout the U.S., Europe and Australia, documented along the way by Tom Berninger, lead singer Matt Berninger’s brother. As a band that has two sets of brothers to start with, the addition of Tom Berninger seemed fitting and natural. As “Mistaken for Strangers” begins, we learn that Tom Berninger has made a relatively simple and easygoing life compared to Matt Berninger, who has reached a peak of rock-star fame throughout the realm

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of indie-rock. Tom Berninger spends his time making homemade horror and slasher films, but it’s clear he has a distinct type of creativity that differs from his brother’s style. In an effort to spend more time with his brother, Matt Berninger invites him to join the tour as a roadie and crewmember. Tom Berninger suggests filming a documentary of the band’s tour, and the final product is an untraditional yet entertaining and intimate look at the relationship between two disparate brothers. “Mistaken For Strangers” is a documentary about the process of making a documentary of a band on tour. But more than that, it is a documentary that focuses on the dynamics of an emotional relationship between two highly creative individuals, only one is in the limelight and the other is not. “Mistaken for Strangers” is refreshing in how different it is from the highly calculated and streamlined music documentaries of today. In a live Q&A via Skype following a screening at the Esquire Theatre, Matt Berninger said it is probably one of the most authentic and truthful portraits of The National and its members to ever be presented.

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The narrative has no need for plot arcs or devices because the narrative is of family, complex relationships and pivotal points of people’s lives. In the Q&A, Tom Berninger admitted it was “hard and weird to edit yourself,” but in the end he wanted to make a film that was above all comedic, heartfelt and genuine. “The movie ended when I finally figured out what the movie was about,” he said. “And at the very end of it the movie is kind of this audience-participation movie, because you guys are the last puzzle piece to completing my movie, and because you sat down and watched it.” If you’re looking for a traditional biopic of a band’s experiences while on the stressful road of touring, look elsewhere. Tom Berninger’s documentary is among the funniest films ever to be made because you simply have no idea what the documentary is about while watching it. That is the genius behind it. “Mistaken for Strangers” is a story within a story, a film about filming a film, yet that is the very reason the documentary is so hard-hitting and emotionally gratifying.

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6 / ADVERTISEMENT

MONDAY, MARCH 31, 2014 / NEWSRECORD.ORG

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