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Tragedy of 9-11, a decade later

Sabers open with blowout

Readers reflect on how attack changed their lives

Fridley was no match for Shakopee in season opener

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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER TEMBER 8, 2011 1

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COOL JOBS: JOHN BEHR, KING HENRY AT MINNESOTA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL

Bow to the

Council at odds on how to fund road overlays, projects in future

KING

BY SHANNON FIECKE sfiecke@swpub.com

BY KRISTIN HOLTZ kholtz@swpub.com

Editor’s note: This is an occasional series focusing on local residents’ interesting, unusual or even oddball occupations. ho says a lowly street hawker can’t grow up to be king? John Behr has been a performer at the Minnesota Renaissance Festival for 30 years — most of them wooing young women from his royal state. The hawker-turned-princeand-now-king is one of the only Renaissance Festival performers in the nation to secede to the throne, according to Behr, who has played the charming, smoothtalking King Henry since 2005. “How many guys do you know have their face on a coin?” he asked. While Behr, 42, spends his autumn weekends parading around a 16th-century village in doublet and crown, he’s pretty humble about his role. Playing His Majesty is an honor and privilege thanks to the wonderful interactions he has with the audience, especially children. Wherever he turns, the Minnetonka resident has the opportunity to leave a knightly impression on a new clump of festival-goers, as well as himself. He calls it: “Three Feet of Magic.” “You can walk three feet and have just this amazing exchange with a child that has a lasting and profound impact on you,” he said. Much like real royalty, life in the Royal Court is incredibly scheduled, Behr said. The 18-member group opens and closes

As the Shakopee City Council wrestles with whether it can start socking money away for a coming bubble of road overlays without raising taxes, Councilor Matt Lehman and Mayor John Schmitt are at odds over whether the city can continue to save for future buildings at the same time. The city, which charges departments annual rent for facility depreciation, has been able to pay for five of the last seven municipal buildings entirely with cash. Only one — the Public Works building constructed in 2005 — required a complete loan. City Finance Director Julie Linnihan has recommended the city do the same for road projects to avoid future spikes in the levy. Councilors agreed to put $200,000 away next year for future road overlays, but don’t see eye-to-eye on how to pay for it. Last week, the council split 3-2

W

Do you know someone with an unusual job? Let us know at editor@shakopeenews.com.

$1

COUNTY FACING ‘PERFECT TAX STORM’ ON PAGE 2. on reducing department rent by 20 percent — which is enough to save for road overlays in 2012 without raising taxes. “It’s going to help every department’s bottom line,” said Heitzman, who was in the majority with Punt and Lehman. But it also means the buildingimprovement fund will shrink, rather than grow, going forward. The council could adopt a stance to only partially fund new buildings with cash, but Lehman would prefer the city not save at all for them. On Tuesday night, the council also split on whether to raise the preliminary 2012 tax levy by $355,000 — a 1 percent increase. Schmitt and Councilors Steve Clay and Heitzman want wiggle

City to page 5 ®

FIRST-DAY JITTERS As King Henry of the Minnesota nesota Renaissance Festival, John Behr of ng Minnetonka loves interacting with the guests, especially children. He is in his 31st season performing at the Renaissance Festival.

each day of the festival and presents at special events, such as wedding toasts, the knighting ceremony and Ales and Tales. In between, the nobility parades through the grounds.

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

Job to page 5 ®

Raised river crossing here: $31 million BY MARK OLSON AND SHANNON FIECKE sfiecke@swpub.com

The Minnesota Department of Transportation has been hesitant to publicly state how much it could cost to flood-proof a local river crossing, other than it would be in the tens of millions of dollars. Preliminary design estimates provided by the city of Chaska to the Chaska Herald show the cost could be quite high. Raising the County Road 101 crossing in downtown Shakopee could be about $31 million, while flood-proofing Highway 41 between Shakopee and Chaska would cost $12 million less, at about $19 million. The down-

town Shakopee cost is higher because a land bridge across its narrow crossing would be more than twice as long as one in Chaska. Approximately $30 million was left for state flood-mitigation projects, but the pool may shrink due to the state government shutdown. However, funding could also come from other sources. “At this point, I think it’s a financial decision,” said Chaska City Engineer Bill Monk. Additional funds could be made available if the state relinquished control of the Carver County side of the 101 crossing in Shakopee. When a road comes off the state highway grid, the new owner gets turn-back

funds for future renovation, similar to what was done with County Road 101 through Shakopee. Scott and Carver counties could possibly contribute internal funds and apply turn-back funds to make the 101 crossing project a go or build it wider than the state would otherwise do. With limited bonding dol lars available, only one crossing can be chosen. Engineers are also looking at modifying Highway 169 for both flooding and routine congestion relief. Options include adding a temporary lane during seasonal flooding on Highway

PHOTO BY KRISTIN HOLTZ

Anh Hudspeth helps her son, Marcus, pull on his backpack for the first day of school at Jackson Elementary Tuesday. See additional first-day-of-school photos on Page 10.

Crossing to page 5 ®

INSIDE OPINION/4 OBITUARIES/6 SPORTS/17-18 CALENDAR/19 CLASSIFIEDS/23-26 HAPPENINGS/26 TO REACH US SUBSCRIBE: (952) 345-6683 EDITOR: (952) 345-6680 OR E-MAIL EDITOR@SHAKOPEENEWS.COM.

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Page 2 | September 8, 2011

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

County in ‘perfect tax storm’

WE WANT YOUR …

Commissioners not expected to backfill state cuts BY SHANNON FIECKE sfiecke@swpub.com

Even if Scott County freezes its tax levy next year, the average homeowner will still pay $60 more in county property taxes just to make up for changes at the state level. After years of covering state reductions, the County Board appears unwilling — and in their minds unable — to eat such a large tax increase set in motion by the state Legislature. “Someone else is painting us into the corner,” said Scott County Board Chair Tom Wolf of Credit River Township, who was elected on an anti-tax increase platform. County Administrator Gary Shelton said the elimination of a state property tax credit program alone is estimated to increase property taxes 5 percent statewide. That doesn’t include losses in direct aid that counties received for implementing state and federal programs. Instead of trying to backfi ll for the state, which Shelton said would require drastic changes, the administrator is recommending the County Board just focus on its own problems — how to pay for higher fuel and energy costs, equipment pu rchases a nd slight increases to employee pay and health insurance. Commissioners will be asked Tuesday to raise

the gross tax levy by about $ 560,000, a nearly 1 percent increase that is the equivalent of the growth in properties across the county. The remainder of that $4.3 million gap will be covered through budget contingencies and staff restructuring. It’s likely that a dozen or more positions will be eliminated or restructured through retirements and attrition, resulting in an estimated $1.5 million in ongoing savings. The proposed $ 61 million tax levy would result in an approximately $70 tax increase per home — although only $10 of that is attributable to the 1 percent proposed gross levy increase. The rest (approximately $3.3 million) is due to the loss of state aid and changes in the state’s property tax credit program, which is shifting the tax burden of lower valued homes onto businesses, farmers and higher valued homes. Additionally, the county is expecting to lose approximately $161,000 in tax revenue from a mandatory program that redistributes commercial property taxes throughout the metro area. “If you had a perfect tax storm this is a perfect tax storm,” said Shelton. “The reason it’s hitting all at once is because for years they haven’t done anything.” Wolf believes state legislators are being disingenuous

by stating they balanced the budget without tax increases. He asks where’s the state tax reductions to make up for the loss to property taxpayers. “I don’t want to be the only one getting called when those property tax statements go out,” said Commissioner Barbara Marschall of Prior Lake during a budget workshop last week. “I want legislators to get more calls than I.” Com missioners i nsist the state has simply shifted its problems onto cities and counties without undertaking structural changes the county has been force to make. While the number of state employees grew the last couple years, Scott County reduced its number of full-time-equivalent employees by approximately 25 (or 3.6 percent) from 2009 to 2011, officials here say. “If the state was run more like Scott County, I don’t think we’d be in this mess,” said Commissioner Joe Wagner of Sand Creek Township. Scott County is second to last in the state in terms of general operating expenses per capita. Self-insured, it has the second-lowest cost for employee health insurance in the metro area. It is second to Washington County, which funds only half of its employee benefits, while Scott County covers 80 percent. The county is budgeting for a 4 percent increase next year.

Scott is the only county in the country known to have a true pay-for-performance compensation model. It is budgeting nearly $500,000 to account for 2011 merit increases, but is hoping to negotiate a hard salary freeze with unions for 2012. Despite $8.6 million in losses from the state since 2008, the county has managed to increase its operating balance to recommended levels with a flat tax levy in 2010 and a 1.6 percent increase in 2011. Shelton said the county must begin making up for equipment pu rchases a nd facility maintenance that it delayed to get through the past few years. He has $1.8 million in capital requests for new fleet (squad cars, snow plows, etc.); facility upgrades like roof and carpet replacement; upgrades to the 911 dispatching equipment, phone system and servers; and natural resources management work. He wants t he cou nty to maintain a strong fund balance and not rely on one-time savings to balance the 2012 budget. “I strongly encourage you to not make short-term decisions. Look five years out. Leave something in the tank because the whitewaters are clearly not over,” Shelton advised commissioners on last week. Sh ann on F i e ck e c an b e reached at (952) 345-6679 or sfiecke@swpub.com.

City still among new-housing leaders

Detours gone in downtown Shakopee

While August housing construction activity in the metropolitan area showed an 18 percent spike in units over July, primarily due to the inclusion of a 120-unit project in Minneapolis, overall the industry remains stable. Total permits were 4 percent higher than in August 2010 while units were down 5 percent, according to statistics from the Builders Association of the Twin Cities (BATC). The report showed there were 256 permits (one fewer than in July) for a total of 437 units during four weeks in the month of

After months of reconstruction, much of the work on County Road 101 in downtown Shakopee is done. The roadway opened to a single lane of traffic in each direction Friday. Final paving is anticipated in midSeptember. Street light pole installation is scheduled to begin late this week.

The one-mile reconstruction project includes replacing the current roadway, sidewalk pavement, sanitary sewer and storm sewer facilities due to the age of facilities and condition of the roadway. Reconstruction began on April 11 and is scheduled for completion in October 2011. Shannon Fiecke

www.shakopeenews.com

August. So far this year, 1,837 permits have been issued for a total of 2,731 units. Shakopee was among the top five cities in new-home permits issued in August with 12. The leader was Woodbury with 22, followed by Maple Grove (21), Blaine (18), Chanhassen (14) and Shakopee. In the total number of permits issued for the year through August, Shakopee is fi fth in the metro area. Blaine is fi rst with 178, followed by Maple Grove (138), Woodbury (128), Plymouth (106) and Shakopee (83). Pat Minelli

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Breast cancer awareness stories In honor of October, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we’re looking for your stories of how the disease has affected you or your family. Share your triumphs, your tragedies and what you want other survivors to know. Share your thoughts with Shakopee Valley News readers; send your essay, no longer than 200 words, to Editor Pat Minelli, editor@shakopeenews.com, before noon on Wednesday, Sept. 28. Include your name, city of residence, and a daytime phone number. We’ll run some submissions online at shakopeenews.com and some in the Oct. 6 Valley News print edition. E-MAIL: editor@shakopeenews.com PHONE: (952) 345-6680

Chaska Farm & Garden, longtime business, closing One of Chaska’s most prominent corners is about to be completely empty. After 26 years on the northwest side of Highway 41 and County Road 61, Chaska Farm & Garden is closing. “It’s always been an option,” said owner Tom Hayden of closing. “But it was never my Plan A.” “The business has changed over the years,” he continued. “There’s not enough demand.” Hayden said that his profits began to wane noticeably in 2 0 0 8 when the economy t a n ke d a nd new H i g hway 2 1 2 op e n e d t o t h e n o r t h . “It was difficult,” he said. “Both the stock market crashed and the road moved.” B u si ne s s r eb ou nde d i n 2 0 0 9 on ly to fa l l of f agai n over t he l ast t wo yea rs. “If compliments were sales, we’d be doing just fine,” he said. Hayden kept waiting for things to pick up and the economy to bounce back, but it hasn’t happened yet and he doesn’t foresee it happening in the next five years. “I saw the sales last year and they were scary,” he said. “My employees made more last year than I did.” This year’s late spring didn’t help matters either, although Hayden conceded, “You can only blame so much on the weather.” A fter initiating eminent domain on the corner in 2006, Chaska city staff “bent over backwards” to work with him, Hayden said. The city sought to keep Hayden, who leases the space, on the site temporarily while seeking a more permanent location for his gar-den center. For a time, Hayden was working with Mike and Sarah Hanlon to relocate next to the Mill House Gallery. More recently, Hayden was eyeing a deal that would have moved him to the Cooper’s Foods parking lot across Highway 41. “That would have required an investment on my part,” Hayden explained. “But I just don’t see things improving.”

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Hayden said that for the last decade, he has seen fewer avid gardeners – many of the baby boomer generation – coming to his business. “The older, serious gardeners are dropping off the map,” he said. “And the next generation is not that keen on [garden-ing].” The economy plays a big role in that, too, he believes. “What I sell is not something you have to have,” he said. Hayden intends to sell off his existing product before closing up shop, but there’s one thing he knows about his timeline. “I won’t be here for the Christmas season,” he said. Hayden is planning to get out of the garden business all together, although he isn’t quite sure what his next job will be yet. He said he’ll miss his customers most of all. “We have the loyalist customers,” he offered. H ayden got his st a r t i n Chaska 30 years ago when he teamed up with Tim Kenny and Julie Alden to take over a farm hardware and feed store on Chestnut Street. They added a garden center and two years later moved to Second Street. It was 1986 when Chaska Farm & Garden moved to its current location adjacent to Firemen’s Park. And there it will remain until there are no more flowers, no more ornamental grasses, no more bags of birdseed left to sell. Hayden and his two full-time employees – Barrie Anderson and Kevin May – are preparing for plenty of customer disappoint-ment in the coming weeks as news of their closure spreads. “We’ll have to put out a box of Kleenex,” joked Anderson. They’ll miss working at the garden center too. “I’ll miss the camaraderie,” said Anderson. “And the customers. And working outside.” For May, it’s the end of a long chapter in his life. He started working at Chaska Farm & Garden 25 years ago. “It was a high school job that I never left,” he said.

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September 8, 2011 | Page 3

Meth task force golf tourney is Friday

PUBLIC SAFETY BRIEFS

Fundraiser has aided in halting drug abuse

A Shakopee man was so upset his employer would not give him days off to memorialize the one-year anniversary of his mother’s death that he threatened to kill his co-workers, according to a criminal complaint fi led in Scott County District Court. John Dinh, 50, allegedly said he would kill a human resource manager and others at the Shakopee manufacturing plant if he did not get additional days off. According to a criminal complaint, Dinh angrily punched himself in the head with his fi st and told a co-worker, “I don’t care about my life. If I die, others die. I kill her.” The man said Dinh had the scariest look on his face that he’d ever seen, according to court documents. Dinh, who admitted to his superiors that he made the threats, was fired. Afraid he might return, Toro secured its doors, pulled shades down on windows and arranged for armed security. Two union stewards also reported that Dinh told them people would die if he didn’t get his job back. Dinh allegedly told police he understood why people were afraid of him, but did not feel he did anything wrong and he thought it was Toro’s fault. Dinh was arrested and jailed. He has been released on $50,000 bail and faces one felony count of making terrorist threats. Shannon Fiecke

BY SHANNON FIECKE sfiecke@swpub.com

On Friday, golfers will tee off for the fifth-annual golf tournament that has raised thousands to combat meth abuse in the area. The dividends have been great, organizers say. In 2005, the year the Scott County Meth Task Force was formed at the height of the meth epidemic, 24 children were removed from their homes due to their parents’ meth addictions. Payments to county fostercare providers alone totaled $134,000. In 11 cases, children were eventually adopted or custody was given to a relative. The cost of those who remained in foster care until 2008 was $253,000. Last year, only three chil-

dren had to be put in foster care due to meth abuse in their homes. “We do attribute it in part to the educational efforts,” said Scott County Attorney Pat Ciliberto. The number of people prosecuted in the county for meth has also dropped, from 136 to 84 cases, and the nature of cases has changed, with most now involving just meth possession and none for meth production in local labs. While the task force counts these successes, its fight continues. The golf tournament has raised approximately $20,000 each of the last three years, much of which has gone toward drug prevention programs. The county contracts with Climb Theatre, a nationally recognized children’s theater group, to present interactive a nti- gateway d r ug presentations at all schools in the county. Youths don’t start out abusing hard drugs like meth, but

Tee It Up for the Task Force Golf Tournament What: 18 holes of golf with $2,500 putting contest and chance to win $100,000. When: Friday, Sept. 9 (7:30 a.m. registration opens; 8:30 a.m. shotgun start). Lunch, awards immediately follow. Where: Stonebrooke Golf Course, 2693 County Road 79, Shakopee. Cost: $100 per player Sign up: stonebrooke.com/ tournaments instead alcohol, marijuana and prescription drugs they might have found in their homes, said Ciliberto. Following the theater’s presentations, underage drinking and marijuana use dropped, but there was still a spike in illegal usage of prescription

drugs, Ciliber to told Scott County commissioners this week. That led the Scott County Meth Task Force to help put drop-boxes in area police departments recently for people to safely dispose of unused prescription drugs, pet medications and illegal drugs and paraphernalia. “We have made great progress,” says Scott County Sheriff Kevin Studnicka. County Commissioner Dave Menden, a former county sheriff, told the County Board this week the educational efforts are important. “You got to get to those kids,” he said. “That prevention is worth its weight in gold.” During a discussion about the upcoming fundraiser, Menden moved that the county contribute $ 5,000 to the task force. “You already are,” responded Ciliberto. S h a n n on F i e c k e c an b e reached at (952) 345 -6679 or sfiecke@swpub.com.

Community Center roof could cost $600,000 City officials were expecting to replace the leaky 16-year-old roof on the Shakopee Community Center, but what they weren’t anticipating was the cost. The city budgeted $300,000 to reroof next year, but the City Council has been told the project could reach $400,000 to $600,000, depending on the quality of the insulation under the existing flat roof. The council hired the engineering fi rm Skyline Building Envelope Consultants to design and oversee the project. The firm, one of three to submit proposals to the city, came highly recommended from the Shakopee School District. It will provide design and bidding

services for $16,000 and project management, including a fulltime on-site inspector during the roof installation, for an additional $12,000. In addition to replacing the 58,000-square-foot roof, a contractor may be asked to construct an internal opening to the roof. Currently, the roof can only be reached from an outside ladder. In response to a question from city Councilor Pamela Punt about the engineering contract cost, Assistant City Administrator Kris Wilson said the roof installation is expected to last eight to nine weeks. The type of roof on the Community Center has a 15-year life.

Parks and Recreation Director Jaime Polley has recommended another $180,000 in major maintenance projects at the Community Center next year, including resurfacing the running track ($30,000), replacing black flooring throughout the ice arena ($ 85,000) and replacing the radiant heating system ($50,000). Smaller recreation projects (totaling $37,000), which might come from the department’s 2012 operations budget, include a $10,000 movie screen for Huber Park (it’s currently rented, so there would be a 2.5-year payback) and $14,000 to replace flooring in the vending and entrance area of the community center. During her 2012 budget pre-

sentation, Polley also asked for $600,000 from the city’s building fund to add a second floor to the fitness center, which was one of the projects in last year’s failed levy referendum. Given the outcome of the referendum and the city’s tight economic situation, it seems unlikely to be approved. Each city department contributes annual rent to the building fund. The long-term capital improvement plan for the recreation department also shows $6 million for a second ice sheet in 2013, $3 million for an indoor turf facility in 2015, $2 million for a senior center in 2017 and $5.4 million for an indoor pool in 2021.

Child awakens to find stranger in room Savage police issued a warning advising parents to secure their homes and supervise their children closely as the department investigates a report of a suspicious person near the 4400 block of 137th Street W. At noon Tuesday, police received a report that a child awoke during the previous night and saw an unknown

person in their bedroom. The screen window of the child’s bedroom had been removed. The report comes one week after a resident of the same area informed police that a chair had been found under the window of their child’s bedroom and that the window screen had been removed. No evidence of entry was apparent in that case.

“We are aggressively investigating these incidents and have increased patrol of the affected area,” said police Capt. Dave Muelken. He stressed that parents should lock their home’s windows and doors at all times, walk their children to and from school, and do not leave their children unsupervised. A description of the suspect

is not available at this time. The Police Department is also asking for the public’s help as officers continue their investigation. Anyone who has information that they think could be related to these incidents is asked to call the Savage Police Department. Residents should call 911 immediately if suspicious activity is in progress.

Man accused of threatening co-workers

Charges: Man grabbed officer’s Taser A 35-year-old St. Paul man who was upset his girlfriend was being kicked out of Arizonas Restaurant & Lounge in Shakopee allegedly tried to take a police officer’s Taser. Police were called to the restaurant on Canterbury Road at 1 a.m. Aug. 22 on the report of a disorderly female refusing to leave. The woman told police she would leave, but as officers spoke with her, the woman’s boyfriend, Mark John Decourcy, allegedly told her to stop talking to the officers. He took a hold of her arm, and the officer told him there was no reason to be upset because no one was in trouble. According to the criminal compliant, Decourcy then turned toward the officer and attempted grab his shoulder. The officer stepped back and Decourcy quickly moved toward him, grabbing his Taser. The officer immediately pushed Decourcy away, but the Taser holster broke off the officer’s belt. It took two pairs of handcuffs to restrain Decourcy because of his size. He was arrested and charged in Scott County District Court with one felony count of disarming a police officer and one gross misdemeanor count of obstructing the legal process. Shannon Fiecke

Regional sewer work resumes in various areas in Shakopee Metropolitan Council Environmental Services, operator of the metro-area wastewater collection and treatment system, has resumed work on its repair of the regional sanitary sewer pipe in Shakopee. The work, which began in late 2010, was halted during the state government shutdown. Cured-in-place pipe is being used for the repairs, which is under way on an approximately two-mile segment of the sewer, located on the south side of Highway 169 between Marystown Road on the west, and Eagle Creek Boulevard on the east. The majority of this segment of the sewer is in the Highway 169 right-of-way.

L a met t i a nd S on s wa s awa rded t he cont rac t for t hi s projec t a nd i s u si ng fast-curing pipe to minimize inconvenience. The old, damaged pipe is not actually removed, so digging is confined to the locations of 34 manholes that also are being replaced. This repair method minimizes damage to road surfaces, tree loss and nearby landscaping. The sewer repair will continue to progress to the east, ending at Highway 169 and Eagle Creek Boulevard late this year. Repair of the section of sewer that crosses under Tow n li ne Avenue wi l l be scheduled for sometime this fall. Work began in late 2010.

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www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

commentary EDITORIAL

Motorists: Extra caution needed as school opens School opened in Shakopee and most of the area on Tuesday and as some of us adjust to new schedules (and, perhaps, quieter homes), it’s a good time for motorists to be reminded that extra caution is important. Drivers should pay particularly close attention to students crossing streets and getting on or off school buses. Drivers need to use caution as they approach school buses, particularly their “danger zone” — the area near where students get on and off and where most school bus injuries and deaths occur. According to the Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS), more children are killed outside of a school bus than as occupants of a bus. According to the DPS, Minnesota school buses make at least 10,000 daily trips, yet that mode of transportation is relatively safe. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that school buses are the safest mode of transportation for children. In fact, children are eight times safer riding in a bus to school than in any other vehicles, the national organization says. But preventable accidents still happen each year. The DPS offers these safety tips for students: I When getting off a bus, look to be sure no cars are passing on the shoulder (side of the road). I Before crossing the street, take

five “giant steps” out from the front of the bus, or until the driver’s face can be seen. I Wait for the driver to signal that it’s safe to cross. I Look “left-right-left” when coming to the edge of the bus to make sure traffic is stopped. Keep watching traffic when crossing. I Cross only at intersections or crosswalks. I Obey all traffic signs and signals. Motorists must stop at least 20 feet from a school bus that is displaying red flashing lights or stop arm when approaching from the rear and from the opposite direction on undivided roads. Red fl ashing lights on buses indicate students are either entering or exiting the bus. While motorists are not required to stop for a bus if the bus is on the opposite side of a separated roadway, they should remain alert for children. But bus safety is not only the responsibility of motorists: Parents should discuss safety with their children, including how to approach and exit a bus. Another reminder: State law requires vehicles to stop for all pedestrians in crosswalks. Caution and slow speeds are the most important things for motorists to remember around schools.

Suburban transit is cost-effective service Transit is an important part of our regional transportation infrastructure in both the Twin Cities and the metropolitan suburban areas. Over the last 20 years, suburban transit providers have shown they can not only deliver frequent service, but can do so cost-efficiently and in cooperation with one another. The cost to provide suburban express service is generally higher (longer routes) than the cost of urban local service; however, when you measure efficiency by subsidy per passenger per mile, suburban express trips are among the most efficient, averaging about $30 cents per passenger per mile. The unmeasured, and often unrecognized, benefits suburban transit providers bring to the region are: I A reduction in the number of vehicles on some of the most congested highways in the region (three buses carrying an average 30 passengers per day will result in 660 fewer vehicles on Highway 169 per day). I The suburban providers are cost-effective micro labs where new transit techniques are tested and refined for use by all. Transit and transit funding were the subject of great debate during the 2011 legislative session. The debate was between the Metropolitan Council and Metro Transit against the so-called “opt-out” Suburban transit providers. At the core of the issue was cost and funding. Suburban providers said in light of the economy they would live with the existing amount of motor vehicle sales tax (MVST) funds (the primary revenue source for transit providers). But a freeze was not enough; suburban provides also took a $3.3 million cut in MVST receipts. The second issue is the size of the fund balances carried by some of the suburban providers. There is no question some suburban providers have healthy fund balances, especially when viewed as a percentage of a provider’s operating budget, but these also need to be placed in the proper context. Fund balances are used to help pay the local share for facilities such as park-and-ride stations and buses and to fund additional operational costs, especially as MVST receipts decline. For example, between 2007

SHAKOPEE

VALLEY (USPS 491-740)

Jane

KANSIER GUEST COMMENTARY

Jane Kansier is Prior Lake assistant city manager

and 2011, Shakopee, Prior Lake and Scott County built two transit stations, acquired a third site, and increased routes from four per day to 30 per day. BlueXpress rider numbers have doubled since the opening of the Southbridge Crossings Transit Station in July 2007. Suburban transit providers have experienced more growth in the region than any other transit provider, already averaging 7 percent growth in the first six months of 2011, compared to the 2 percent growth experienced by Metro Transit. Suburban providers have proved they can not only provide frequent service, but can do so cost-efficiently. Prior Lake, Shakopee and Scott County partnered several years ago to do transit planning and operate the BlueXpress community service. More recently, Scott and Carver counties partnered to form SmartLink Transit and to provide Dial-a-Ride and mobility service to residents of both counties. Between January and August 2010, SmartLink carried more passengers than Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin and Washington counties combined. On average, SmartLink carries four passengers per hour, double the two passengers per hour average of the other providers. The cost for this service is approximately $15 per passenger, compared to $25 per passenger for other providers. The cost to provide suburban express service is generally higher

news

Kansier to page 14 ®

Newspaper rates: Single copy, $1; one-year subscriptions, $33 in Scott and Carver counties, $45 elsewhere in Minnesota, $50 outside Minnesota, and $4 per month for partial subscription. Subscriptions are non-refundable.

About us: The Shakopee Valley News, founded in 1941 but with roots that can be traced to Shakopee’s first newspaper in 1861, is published by Southwest Newspapers, a division of Red Wing Publishing Company. We are an active member of the Minnesota Newspaper Association and the official newspaper for the City of Shakopee and School District 720. Published weekly on Thursdays; periodicals postage paid at Shakopee, MN. POSTMASTER: Send change of address notice to Shakopee Valley News, P.O. Box 8, Shakopee, MN 55379. Location: The Shakopee Valley News is located at 327 Marschall Road in Shakopee. Its mailing address is Shakopee Valley News, P.O. Box 8, Shakopee, MN 55379. For general information call (952) 445-3333; send faxes to (952) 445-3335.

LETTERS

Shakopee Derby Days Committee thanks The Shakopee Derby Days Committee would like to thank everyone who helped make this year’s festival a huge success. The festival relies on support from businesses, volunteers, community organizations and the city in order to be successful. Special thanks to: I Our major sponsors, including the Shakopee Jaycees, Canterbury Park, Lenzen Chevrolet-Buick, Shakopee Cub Foods, Shakopee Lions Club, Shakopee Public Utilities, Shakopee Rotary Club, St. Francis Regional Medical Center and Valleyfair. I The city of Shakopee’s in-kind donation of staff time, effort and resources; Parks and Recreation (Huber Park facility use, events, logistics), Public Works (preparation, equipment, banners, cleanup and more), Fire Department (tents, inspections), and Police Department (patrol, safety, parade). I Business sponsors that donated cash and prizes. When you visit a Shakopee business, look for the Derby Days Certificate of Sponsorship and let them know that you appreciate their community support. I Family Fun Park crews, including Catholic Education Center, River Valley Trailblazers, Eagles Club Co-Ed Softball Team and Shakopee ECFE. I Volunteers, including Ishant Bhalla, DeeJay Bohlmann, Erica Eichhof, Penny Eichhof, Brandon Grunst, Theresa Hang, Sue McPherson, K at y O elt jenbr u ns, M a rk Oeltjenbruns, Breanna Olson, Matt Ott, Ebony Riley, Gerry Schibur, Sue Sichmeller, Ken Weber, Jen Zeman, Citizens State Bank, ShakopeeCon-

nect, Cash bingo volunteers and 5K turf run volunteers. I Shakopee Derby Days committee members. The annual commitment to attend meetings, make decisions and chair events or subcommittees is appreciated: Samara Anderson, Dean Bauleke, Shawn Berens, Brian Burgeson, Heidi Burville, DeeDee Currier, Brian Dahl, Brad Eller (city of Shakopee liaison), Lauri Glenn, Mandy Harrison, Sara Havran, Gwen Hennen, Becky and Jeff Jerve, Shirley Keller, Matt Lehman (City Council liaison), David McGovern, Jens Thorsen, Jodi Vine, Lois Vold, Heidi VonBokern and Lois Weckman. Through their hard work, this core group of people contributes to and brings a true sense of community to Shakopee. Without them, Shakopee Derby Days would not be possible.

Jack McGovern, Jay Whiting, Wes Reinke Shakopee McGovern is president, Whiting vice president and Reinke secretary of Shakopee Derby Days.

Many who died in war have no memorial In last week’s paper, the family of Richard L. Cox asked why we should honor Pfc. James Herrgott and not all the soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines who died in service to their country. That’s a great question. But throughout the letter was a tone that implied if we honored Pfc. Herrgott we would be dishonoring the memory of Richard Cox and others like him. I disagree. I did not know Richard Cox. I did not know James Herrgott. But I

command and serve with hundreds of men and women just like them. They did not die for you, they did not die for me or for God and country; they died for each other. They didn’t worry about who got the “credit” or who got the medals, they worried about their buddies. The Cox family is angry. I understand that. For them, the family of James Herrgott and thousands of families just like them that anger will never go away. Their hopes and dreams for their loved one died on that day. I am sorry that Richard Cox wasn’t recognized by the community in some way. I don’t know who to blame. But that anger doesn’t need to be directed at Pfc. Herrgott or the people working to honor him and others like him. Richard Cox’s name is forever etched on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial wall in Washington, D.C. Where is the memorial with the names of World War II veterans killed in action? Where is the memorial with the names of Korean War veterans killed in action? Where is James Herrgott’s name memorialized? Why did Richard Cox get a memorial with his name on it and not other war veterans? How far do we want to go with this? If you could ask Richard Cox what he would do, I would bet he would say, name the road for Pfc. Herrgott. Richard Leigh Cox was a Navy corpsman and a combat veteran who lived and died serving others. I know this veteran, and perhaps many of his buddies, would agree.

Lt. Col. James Smith Shakopee James Smith is battalion commander for the U.S. Army Reserve 407th Civil Affairs Battalion in Arden Hills.

Finger food at fancy restaurant I had a little trouble at the drivethrough window of a fast-food place one morning this week. The voice on the other end of the magical speaker goofed up my order, and when I corrected her she got a little snippy with me. I felt kind of foolish arguing with a speaker and a display screen, but at least I got a straw to go with my iced coffee. In a fast-food environment, particularly with the faceless speaker box, there isn’t the same personal connection you get with a slow-food restaurant (as my kids used to call them). When you have a waiter or a server they are with you for a longer period of time and hence should have a greater interest in your well-being; at least in theory. There’s a restaurant in town I frequent because they have a bar where I can sit and eat my lunch, drink my iced tea, read the paper, watch eight TVs, and listen to music being played through speakers above my head. I only do this when I am alone, for it would certainly be rude to be so distracted with a dining partner.

Jerry

KUCERA COMMUNITY COLUMNIST

I had a meeting in town the other night so I had supper there. The bar stools were filled with people I didn’t recognize (the regular lunch crowd had shuffled out). I took a spot at a booth but I felt a little out of place. I couldn’t see the TVs very well and the music was hard to hear, and although I brought a book to read, it wasn’t the same as reading the paper. When I was finished and ready to leave the server brought my receipt and said, “You guys have a nice day.” I looked around to make sure

that someone hadn’t slipped into my booth unnoticed. Not seeing anyone I considered that perhaps there was a character sitting with me that only the server could see — kind of Elwood P. Dowd (the character Jimmy Steward played in “Harvey”) — only different. I left a large enough tip to cover both of our meals, just to be on the safe side. The wait staffs in restaurants have it tough. I’ve never been a waiter and am quite sure I don’t have the patience for it. Also, servers are expected to anticipate a customer’s needs and satisfy them before they are requested. For example, water, menus and condiments are usually brought to the table automatically, but not silverware. In some restaurants you must ask for it. I was eating lunch some time ago with my friend Jeff. He and I try to get together once a month for lunch, and it was my turn to drive to his town. He selected a restaurant at a golf course. It was

Kucera to page 14 ®

Guest columns and letters to the editor: Letters to the editor and guest commentaries stating positions on issues facing the local community are especially welcome but are reviewed by the editor prior to publication. The newspaper reserves the right to edit letters for length, grammar and clarity. We will not print letters of a libelous nature. Letters should be 400 or fewer words in length. Exceptions are at the editor’s discretion. Deadline for letters is noon Monday before the Thursday publication date. Letters must contain the address and daytime phone number of the author, as well as a signature (except on e-mails). We prefer letters that are e-mailed to editor@shakopeenews. com. Editorials that appear on this page represent the institutional voice of the newspaper. Any questions or comments should be directed to the editor.

Publisher: Laurie Hartmann (952) 345-6878; lhartmann@swpub.com Publisher Emeritus: Stan Rolfsrud Editor: Pat Minelli (952) 345-6680; editor@shakopeenews.com Staff Writer: Shannon Fiecke (952) 345-6679; sfiecke@swpub.com Staff Writer: Kristin Holtz (952) 345-6678; kholtz@swpub.com Sports Editor: Todd Abeln (952) 345-6587; tabeln@swpub.com Advertising Sales: Paul TenEyck (952) 345-6674; pteneyck@swpub.com Advertising Sales: Tess Lee (952) 345-6675; tlee@swpub.com Circulation: Ruby Winings (952) 345-6682; circulation@swpub.com Imarketplace Advertising: (952) 345-3003; self-serve at www.imarketplace.mn Composition: Lorris Thornton Ad Design: Renee Fette

Deadlines News: Noon Monday; 5 p.m. Friday for events calendar Advertising: 4 p.m. Friday Imarketplace: 3 p.m. Tuesday for paid ads; noon Tuesday for Thrift ads Legal notices: 4 p.m. Thursday, one week before publication

For breaking news and news updates, go to www.shakopeenews.com or follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Find sports scores online at www.scoreboard.mn. Leave news tips at (952) 345-6680. © 2011 Southwest Newspapers (www.swnewspapers.com)


Shakopee Valley News | www.shakopeenews.com

September 8, 2011 | Page 5

CITY  continued from page 1

room as the budget is finetuned before the fi nal levy is set in December, but Lehman and Councilor Pamela Punt say they won’t budge from a flat levy. (Lehman still voted for the $15.2 million preliminary levy, however, on Tuesday). “At the end of the day, I’m not going to be supportive of any kind of increase,” said Punt. “It’s the equivalent of giving my 14-year-old son $50 and telling him to only spend $25 and expecting to get $25 back. Human nature is to spend it.” Clay said he was leaning toward a fl at levy, but wants to leave a buffer as the city decides how to pay for a third fi re station and better understands the fallout from changes to the state property tax relief program. Clay, a property assessor by living, recently sat at a meeting with four statisticians from the Minnesota Revenue Department and said “their apparent level of confidence didn’t inspire a lot of confidence in me.” As the city looks toward opening a third fi re station in Shakopee’s Southbridge area in the next few years, it will also need to determine how to pay for the station, new e qu ipment a nd add it ion a l

Pamela Punt

Matt Lehman

fi refi ghters. Lehman, who philosophically opposes charging today’s taxpayers for future buildings, thinks Shakopee has too much cash — $6 million — in its capital improvement fund. (This fund is also used for new roofs and boilers, etc.) Lehman also wants the city to once again be able to bond for road overlays. “Two years from now we’re looking at $1 million for overlay projects,” Lehman explained to the Valley News. “I want to go back to our assessment policy so we can bond and pay for it over 10 years. That will minimize the impact on taxpayers.” The fi re station to be built in Southbridge could deplete half of the building fund in one year. Schmitt believes it’s in the best interest of the city to try to save for such buildings. “In the long-run and shortrun, we’re saving taxpayers’

John Schmitt

Steve Clay

money,” said Schmitt. “Those communities that bond have a whole lot tied up in interest payments.” Having cash reserves is also important for the city’s bond rating, Clay said. Linnihan said other cities are in crisis mode because they don’t have a building fund like Shakopee’s. “Now the crisis will be on the street,” declared Lehman. “What do we do, just tax everybody out of their homes?” “We’re not taxing anybody out of their homes!” responded Schmitt, pointing out that the average household income in Shakopee is more than $77,000. “We’re not proposing to overtax folks; we’re proposing to maintain and do what we’ve done all along.” The city has to look at the bigger picture, Lehman said, including a federal government t hat ’s close to ba n kruptcy and a likely county tax increase of $70 on average per

household. “There’s going to be multiple impacts hitting people,” he said. Schmitt said it’s not the city’s job to buffer the county and state. “We’ve frozen spending. We’ve been dong our share for three years,” he said. The council has declined to refill a natural resources coordinator position that it previously cut, but last week authorized the Police Department to finally fill its 47th sworn officer slot. The Police Department, which is at its lowest officer/population ratio in recent history, will still be five officers short of the recommended level. The council has also opted to slightly increase the hours for an accountant position and allow the Fire Department to adopt a day-duty crew at the cost of $25,000 next year. (This will grow to $50,000 per year when fully implemented). But the council declined 3-2 to realize $27,000 in savings by laying-off the remaining city custodian. The city has transitioned all other cleaning staff over to a private cleaning fi rm as custodians resigned or accepted an early-retirement offer. Councilors Clay, Heitzman and Lehman voted to retain the full-time custodian, whose annual wage and benefits total $57,000. Shannon Fiecke

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169 from County Road 101 to Pioneer Trail, similar to what was done this year. The state could also permanently add a lane on Highway 169 from County Road 18 to Pioneer Trail — something that might be prohibitive because of a projected $51.3 million cost. A final MnDOT report is expected in October. The outcome will be used to determine which crossing should be used to apply for state bonding dollars. Another new fact highlighted by Chaska officials is how much traffic has decreased across the Chaska river crossing. In a 2007 MnDOT traffic study, 18,500 vehicles traveled along Highway 41 through downtown Chaska every day. However, the numbers in a 2009 study — which MnDOT is using to decide which river crossing to flood-proof — 12,500 vehicles headed through Chaska, a 6,000 vehicle drop. “It’s a complete turnaround,” Monk told Chaska city councilors last week. Furthermore, the earlier study projected 36,500 vehicles headed through Chaska by 2040. The updated numbers, projected to 2030, estimate 20,200 vehicles traveling through Chaska daily. “This is almost half of what the projection was,” Monk noted. The drop in estimated traffic is a huge deal for the city of Chaska which, for decades, has struggled with how to maintain a massive traffic flow through its historic downtown while trying to maintain some sort of

community identity and viable business district. There may be a couple reasons for the drop, Monk said. The numbers used before the river crossing study were at the peak of the development era, Monk notes, “before the economy crashed and before [new Highway] 212 was open. And the numbers they were projecting at that point have seriously been impacted by both.” The numbers will undoubtedly help determine which river crossing MnDOT will flood-proof.

SHAKOPEE OR CHASKA? Creating a f lood-proofed river crossing is nothing new. For years, MnDOT has studied the feasibility of a major new river crossing connecting Highway 212 in Carver County and Highway 169 in Scott County. It recently chose a path for the road, along the west side of downtown Chaska. However, with construction likely decades off, the state has been seeking lower-cost solutions to the seemingly increasing flood closures in this area (three since spring 2010). Each day floods close crossings in Chaska and Shakopee costs commuters an estimated $ 670,000. This is expected to reach $1.7 million by 2030. MnDOT is considering raising the river crossing in Chaska or Shakopee by constructing a land bridge, sitting on pilings, across the flood bottoms, and using fill to raise other portions of the roadbed. The project can’t affect water-flow, due to federal environmental rules. Unless federal permission were granted, Highway 101 riv-

er crossing in Shakopee would have to fully close for one year to raise the crossing without treading on outside the rightof-way. Alternatively, Highway 41 in Chaska could remain open during an estimated 18-month construction window.

FLOOD-PROOFING A new crossing elevation of 724 feet in Shakopee would be higher than all 10 floods that triggered closures in the past. In Chaska, the river bridge constructed a few years ago wasn’t designed to hold traffic if water hits its metal beams, according to Monk. Since the bridge will remain in place, the heightened crossing could only achieve a new elevation of 722.5 feet — below the level of the historic 1965 flood. The ultimate cost/benefit ratio is only slightly higher for 101, according to MnDOT studies. However when it comes to vehicle crossings per day, Highway 101 is clearly on top. According to MnDOT, using 2009 numbers, County Road 101 would carry an estimated 27,900 vehicles per day if Highway 41 is closed due to flooding. If Highway 41 were to remain open, it would only carry 22,300 vehicles per day — 5,600 vehicles fewer than the 101 option. And by 2030, County Road 101 is estimated to carry 7,000 more vehicles per day than the Highway 41 option.

THREE LANES? The city of Chaska wouldn’t necessarily be opposed to MnDOT choosing the County Road 101 option. “We get concerned if there’s no options for being able to cross the river during those

flooding times. Keeping 41 open is important,” said Chaska City Administrator Matt Podhradsky. However, if the improved crossing goes to 101, Podhradsky asked the hypothetical question: “Is there an opportunity to regain our main street downtown?” In the past, the city of Chaska had prepared for removing parking entirely from the east side of Highway 41, while adding a center turning lane to the four-lane roadway. Now, with the lower traffic counts, officials ponder returning Highway 41 in downtown Chaska to one lane in either direction, with parking on both sides and a center turning lane, with some areas for a dedicated right-turn lane. The city discussed the option at its work session last week night. However, before the city begins studying a three-lane road through its downtown, it needs MnDOT to make a decision. “Once a decision [has been made] the city will step back and say, ‘How will that potentially influence the short- and long-term plans for 41 through downtown?’” Monk said. Chaska leaders have also expressed reservation about 41 being raised because the state would also widen the road so much the entire river crossing could conceivably someday become four lanes south of the bridge. Although the new crossing would initially be only two lanes, area officials worry the state would someday make it four as an alternative to building a more robust — and vastly more costly — new river crossing west of downtown Chaska.

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“The Royal Court is just about everywhere, as is the king, during the course of the day,” Behr said. Besides the morning gate show — where you’re never quite sure what you’ll get — Behr’s favorite part of the day is the children’s knighting ceremony. Behr became involved with the Renaissance Festival at age 12. His family had just moved to the area from Arizona when a friend active in children’s theater asked if he wanted to audition. He landed the role of Lance the Squire, walking around the grounds hawking for Witchwood and Puke & Snot. As a teen, he joined the

five years ago. Today, he owns Converdia, a Twin Citiesbased mobile marketing and technology fi rm that develops mobile applications. “I still wear my tights in the office on Mondays through Fridays,” Behr joked. “My employees get a little concerned when I wear the crown.” Though Behr has been at the festival 30 years, he’s not the actor of the family. His brother, Jason, lives in Hollywood and starred on the television show “Roswell.” Behr calls the Renaissance Festival his annual holiday. “I honestly really do this because I love the interaction and I love all the people and I love the festival,” he said. As a senior member of the court, Behr is also responsible for training the

Bruce Bade

court, which includes Queen Elizabeth, Prince James and Lady Tayrn, the king’s administrative assistant and schedule keeper. His group rehearses every other weekend, May through opening day. He has a couple of rules for the court: pay attention to the audience and treat everyone you meet like he or she is the most interesting person on the planet. “Our guests are coming through our gates because they want to forget all their troubles,” Behr said. “They want to come and experience laughter, all these moments of magic out there.” The Minnesota Renaissance Festival runs weekends through Oct. 2 on the festival grounds just south of Shakopee.

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Royal Court as Prince Philip, a role he played for 20 years before his coronation as King Henry. Behr attributes his success to great mentors, like longtime Renaissance King George Hermann, and paying attention to the crowd’s cues. Unlike normal theater where you have script and back story, each interaction is improv. “It really is kind of like life, where it evolves as you evolve as a character and a performer out there,” he said. The skills he’s learned about paying attention to an audience and reacting to its response have carried beyond the festival, too, Behr said. Outside the Ren Fest, Behr is an entrepreneur. His fi rst company, Wireless Ronin Technologies, went public


Page 6 | September 8, 2011

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

POLICE REPORT The following are selected initialcomplaint reports filed by Shakopee police. You can listen to police, fire and sheriff’s department calls 24/7 through our online police scanner at www.shakopeenews.com/crimebeat. Aug. 29 A road-rage incident was reported at 7:38 p.m. on Marschall Road and Norton Drive. Aug. 30 A 19-year-old Shakopee woman was arrested for driving while intoxicated and possession of a controlled substance and drug paraphernalia at 12:49 a.m. on the 1200 block of Shakopee Avenue E. A motor vehicle crash was reported at 12:21 p.m. on Seventh Avenue and Dakota Street. Theft from a motor vehicle was reported at 5:56 p.m. on the 1000 block of Merritt Street. Theft from a motor vehicle was reported at 6:14 p.m. on the 1500 block of Primrose Lane. An injury crash was reported at 9:35 p.m. on the 9100 block of Highway 169. A road-rage incident was reported at 9:54 a.m. on Fourth Avenue E. and Marschall Road S. Aug. 31 A 17-year-old Shakopee boy was

EDUCATION NOTES cited for no proof of insurance at 7:40 p.m. at Cub Foods. A road-rage incident was reported at 8:37 p.m. on County Road 18 and Southbridge Parkway. Sept. 1 A 38-year-old man from Spooner, Wis., was arrested for possession of a controlled substance and drug paraphernalia at 1:57 a.m. on Canterbury and Valley View roads. Theft was reported at 9:08 a.m. on the 100 block of Lewis Street. Theft from a motor vehicle was reported at 10:12 a.m. on the 400 block of Mint Circle. Assault was reported at 10:30 a.m. on the 8000 block of Old Carriage Court N. Theft was reported at 4:49 p.m. on the 2000 block of 12th Avenue W. A hit-and-run property-damage incident was reported at 6:40 p.m. at Lowe’s Home Improvement Store, 4270 Dean Lakes Blvd. An injury crash involving a recreational vehicle was reported at 7:39 p.m. on the 1200 block of Bluff Avenue. Sept. 2 Theft was reported at 7:59 a.m. on the 100 block of Arabian Avenue. Theft was reported at 12:22 p.m. on the 100 block of Sixth Avenue E. Theft was reported at 6:35 p.m. on

the 2000 block of Heritage Drive E. A 23-year-old Minneapolis man was arrested for violation of an order for protection at 10:54 p.m. on Canterbury Road and Kinlock Way. Sept. 3 Theft was reported at Americas Best Value Inn, 1244 Canterbury Road S. at 1:58 a.m. A 29-year-old St. Paul man was arrested for DWI, open bottle, driving after revocation and possession of a small amount of marijuana in a motor vehicle at 4 a.m. on Canterbury Road and Eagle Creek Boulevard. Theft from a motor vehicle was reported at 8:09 a.m. on the 3400 block of Molina Street. Theft from a motor vehicle was reported at 9:58 a.m. on the 2000 block of Valley Creek Lane. Motor vehicle theft was reported at 10:50 a.m. on the 1500 block of Maras Street. Theft was reported at Best Western Inn, 511 Marschall Road S. at 12:25 p.m. A 45-year-old Savage woman was arrested for shoplifting at Walmart at 3:22 p.m. A 52-year-old man from Brooklyn Park was arrested at Canterbury Park for disorderly conduct at 5:04 p.m. Theft was reported at Canterbury Park at 6:26 p.m.

A St. Paul man, 31, was arrested for DWI at 10:26 p.m. on Marschall Road and St. Francis Avenue. An Eden Prairie man, 28, was arrested on an outstanding warrant and for driving after cancellation at 10:59 p.m. on Highway 13 and Dakota Avenue. Sept. 4 A 24-year-old Shakopee man was arrested at 12:36 a.m. for DWI and open bottle on Orchard Parkway and Applegate Lane. A Shakopee man, 35, was arrested for second-degree assault at 1:38 a.m. on the 1200 block of Fourth Ave. E. Theft was reported at 12:28 p.m. on the 1200 block of Shakopee Avenue E. Motor vehicle theft was reported at 6:13 p.m. at Cub Foods. A hit-and-run property-damage incident was reported at 11:37 p.m. on Old Carriage Road and Old Carriage Court. Sept. 5 Theft was reported at 11:29 a.m. on the 1100 block of Shawmut Street. Theft was reported at Walmart at 5:23 p.m. Sept. 6 A 37-year-old man from Minneapolis was arrested for DWI at 1:16 a.m. on Canterbury and Valley View roads.

Be informed.

www.shakopeenews.com Get more local news online.

Jonathan Fox of Shakopee has been chosen by the Scholarship Committee of the Minneapolis Builders Exchange to receive a $1,000 scholarship. Fox is studying HVAC Design at Dunwoody College of Technology. The University of WisconsinRiver Falls spring semester dean’s list includes six Shakopee students. They are Abby Doyle, mathematics; Kelsey Greening, pre-professional; Joshua Koesters, accounting; Katherine Nibbe, modern language; Jean Theis, pre-professional; and Abbigail Witt, journalism. Concordia University Wisconsin officials released the spring dean’s list for the 2010-11 academic year. Included on list was April M Forar of Shakopee, a senior nursing major. Katie Baumann, Katlyn Spadino and Amber Talcott, all of Shakopee, were named to the spring semester dean’s list at Bemidji (Minn.) State University. Rachel Reicks and Kelsey P iep er of Shakopee g raduated from Winona (Minn.) State University following the spring term 2011. Reicks earned a bachelor of arts degree in psychology. Pieper earned a bachelor of science degree in nursing. Ten Shakopee residents were named to the dean’s list for the spring term 2011 at Winona (Minn.) State University. They are Kelsey Pieper, Emily Loerzel, Lukas Spellerberg, Matthew Lake, Nicole Webber, Tara Breeggemann, Samantha Wolf, Nathan Clay, Ashley

Edberg and Gabriel Velez. Abbigail Mary Witt of Shakopee earned a bachelor of liberal arts degree in journalism from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls following the spring semester. She graduated with senior merit honors. Normandale Community College is pleased to announce its spring 2011 semester dean’s list. Shakopee students are Korin Anderson, Aaron Arnevik, Josiah Bodenhamer, Elizabeth Boyd, Darian Buel, Matthew Bushard, Julia Cervera, Matthew Conrad, Vy Dam, Andre Duvic, Mary Egan, Megan Gearey, Samantha Giles, Martin Godinez, Veronica Gomez, Leah Hallstein, Daniel Hellkamp, Benjamin Hestness, Jason Hetland, Brianna Hinrichs, Linh Huynh, David Juarez, Emily Klehr, Samantha Kosse, Karina Kuloverova, Alyssa Lacy, Wesley Lieser, RaeLynn Limberg, Joanna Lyons, Kristin Macklin, Jennifer Meyer, Craig Migliori, Ellie Monjoseph, Cindy Ngo, Doan Ng uyen, Long Nguyen, Heather Nibbe, Ricky Nikhomvan, Alina Nikitina, Sreytouch Nou, Jan Olson, Maristella Omanyo, Courtney Paaverud, Leah Partyka, Andrew Poole, Mitchell Pricer, Sandy Prochaska, Lorrin Rhone, Ryan Saralampi, Darcy Schaller, Alexandra Schewe, Brittany Smith, Tosha Sohns, Sara Stanley, Paul Tessmer, Dalika Tiev, Bridget Visger, Thang Vo, James Warner and Adam Worm.

LIVESREMEMBERED Dominic Andrew Ceccoli

Jayme Hennen

Dominic Ceccoli, 46, of Shakopee, died unexpectedly Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2011 at his home. Memorial services were held Sunday, Sept. 4, at 3 p.m. at St. Casimir Catholic Church, Wells, MN. Visitation was Saturday, Sept. 3, from 4-8 p.m., with a prayer service at 8 p.m. at Bruss-Heitner Funeral Home in Wells, and continued one hour prior to the service at the church. Father Tom Niehaus and Father Eugene Stenzel officiated and a private burial will take place at a later date. Bruss-Heitner Funeral Home in Wells is assisting the family with arrangements. Dominic was born Aug. 30, 1965 in Bethpage, Long Island, NY, the son of Marino and Mary Grace (Piscitelli) Ceccoli. He was raised in Ronkonkoma, NY, and attended college in Melbourne, FL, where he received his degree in Aviation Science. He was a professional Pilot/Captain with Northwest Airlines from March of 1996 and then with Delta Airlines after they merged. On June 14, 2008, he was united in marriage to Nancy Anne Johnson in Wells. He spent many years in Ft. Myers, FL. He loved being with his children and his family. He also loved music, playing the piano and singing. He enjoyed working out, working on the lawn and farming. He was a fun, big-hearted and playful person, and loving to all those around him. Dominic is survived by his wife, Nancy, of Shakopee; daughter, Deanna Ceccoli; son, Christopher Ceccoli of Ft. Myers, FL, and twin boys, Daniel and Aiden of Shakopee; mother, Mary Grace Ceccoli of Ft. Myers, FL; brother, Joseph (Stephanie) Ceccoli of Farmingville, NY; sister, Joanne (Michael) Conde of Punta Gorda, FL; father-in-law and mother-in-law, Don and Judy Johnson of Wells; brother-in-law, Mitch (Margaret) Johnson of Wells; many loving nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his father.

Jayme Hennen, 46, of Duluth, formerly of Shakopee, died Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011 at St. Luke’s Hospital in Duluth from injuries due to an accidental fall in his home. Jayme was born in Shakopee, Aug. 4, 1965 to Jack and Mary (Kelzer) Hennen. Jayme was employed in retail sales for Goodwill Industries at the time of his death. He was a graduate of Shakopee High School and was a avid hunter. He is survived by parents, Jack and Mary Hennen of Shakopee; sister and brother-in-law, Jonelle and Denny Bartlett of Winnebago, MN; brother and sister-in-law, Joel and Dana Hennen of Prior Lake; niece, Cassidy; nephews, Zac Bartlett and Jack Hennen; housemate, Dennis Crumb. Visitation Thursday, Sept. 8, 4-8 p.m. at the McNearney Funeral Home, 1220 E. Third Ave. Shakopee and Friday one hour prior to the service at the church. Funeral service Friday, Sept. 9, 12 noon at Peace United Church of Christ, 1111 N. 11th Ave. E., Duluth. The Rev. Kathryn Nelson is officiating at the service. Graveside service, Saturday, Sept. 10, 11 a.m. at St. Mary’s Cemetery, Marystown, MN. Funeral arrangements through McNearney Funeral Home in Shakopee, 952-445-2755. www.mcnearneyfuneralhome.com

Larry V. Blue Larry Blue, 82, of Lydia, and a member of the Upper Sioux Community in Granite Falls, MN, died Monday, Sept. 5, 2011 at St. Francis Regional Medical Center in Shakopee. He was born in Granite Falls, Nov. 28, 1928 to Wesley and Harriet (Pearsall) Blue. Larry served in the United States Army. He was a paratrooper for the 82nd Airborne Division. He was a member of the American Legion in Granite Falls. Prior to retirement he worked as a lineman, and casino manager. He loved to travel and spend time in California with his wife, Gail. One of his hobbies included golfing with his friends. Larry is survived by wife, Gail, member of the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community; and their son, Lynn (Laura) Blue; other children, Jackie (Brent) Anderson, Alex (Tracy) Blue, James Blue, Laurie (Ron) Blue-Pooler; adopted grandson, Tony Blue; brother, Dean (Pat) Blue; stepchildren, Jan Lawrence, Alan, Mickey, Anita, and Scott Campbell; many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces, nephews, other relatives, and many friends. He was preceded in death by daughter, Sandy Coursolle; brother, Oliver Blue. Visitation Friday, Sept. 9 beginning at 4 p.m., with Prayer Service at 7 p.m., followed by a Traditional All Night Wake. Funeral services Saturday, Sept. 10 at 1 p.m., all at the Tiowakan Spiritual Center, 14625 Prairiegrass Dr., Prior Lake. Officiating at the funeral service will be the Rev. Jerry Zephier. Pallbearers are Frank Barrios, Mike Wentland, Sheldon Bryant, David Bryant, Sparky Mahowald, and Dan Burr. Interment at the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community Cemetery. Funeral arrangements through McNearney Funeral Home in Shakopee, 952-445-2755. www.mcnearneyfuneralhome.com

Reese W. Spurrier Reese Spurrier, 96, died Sunday, Sept. 4, 2011, in Topeka, KS. He was born April 26, 1915. Reese was a lifelong Topeka citizen. He was the second son of Clyde and Mabel (Franklin) Spurrier. He graduated from Topeka High School and attended the University of Kansas. He was married to Rita M. (Holst) Spurrier on Oct. 12, 1940. They had five children, ten grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren. Reese was a member of Most Pure Heart of Mary Catholic Church, the Arab Shrine Temple, the Masonic Lodge and the Scottish Rite. He was a fan of the Kansas Jayhawks and the Washburn Lady Blues. He was an avid golfer, having a hole-in-one at the age of 70, and an accomplished musician. He played clarinet for the Santa Fe Band, the Shrine Band, and the KU Alumni Band. His business career included thirty three years with the Santa Fe Railroad. His parents, his wife of over sixty years, and two brothers, Francis and Leo, preceded him in death. He is survived by his children, Barbara (Bobbie) Fleming, Topeka; Henry (Bo) Spurrier, Shakopee; James (Buzz) Spurrier, Fresno, CA; Michael Spurrier, Sacramento, CA; and Mark H. Spurrier, St. Louis, MO. Visitation was held Wednesday, Sept. 7, from 6-8 p.m. at Kevin Brennan Family Funeral Home, 2801 SW Urish Rd., Topeka, KS 66614 with a prayer service at 6 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 8 at Most Pure Heart of Mary Catholic Church, Topeka. Burial will follow at Mount Calvary Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Shrines Traveler Fund sent in care of the funeral home. Online condolences may be sent to www.kevinbrennanfamily.com.

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T h a n k Yo u The family of Viola Weiers wishes to thank all who helped in any way at the time of her death. The expressions of sympathy, the memorials, the flowers, masses and food brought were greatly appreciated. In lieu of individual thank you's, a charitable contribution will be made to St. John’s Cemetery fund. Shirley & Oscar Budin, LeRoy & Bonnie Weiers, Rosemary & Richard Schoenecker, Victor & Jonila Weiers, Jerry & Janice Weiers, Helen & Bud Kager, Donna & Dennis Franke, Bonnie & Dan Valek, Nancy & Albert Simon, Denie & Norm Sticha, Lee & Debbie Weiers, Laverne Weiers (deceased), 33 grandchildren & 54 great-grandchildren

In Loving memory of

Charles Lucas

It’s been 10 years since you’ve passed, when cancer took you away. A decade since we saw you last, we lost our hero that day. Delicate silver tears will fall and waltz onto the ground, it’s been a torture all these years to not have you around. You didn’t leave without a fight, you fought it just for us. Staying alive with all your might, to see your last child get on that bus. A beautiful mother, strong and true, two young children, 5 & 7, she helps us keep our memories of you, 10 years older since you went to heaven. Our angel is with us day & night, with life you’ll help us through. Even though you are out of our sight, we’ll always love & miss you. by Kelsey Fondly missed by Vickie, Grant, Kelsey and family

Bridgette Elizabeth Twining Bridgette Twining, 18, of Chanhassen, died Saturday, Sept. 3, 2011 in Carver, tragically due to an automobile accident. Visitation will be Friday, Sept. 9, from 47 p.m. at the Bertas Funeral Home, 200 W. Third St., Chaska, with a service at 7 p.m. In lieu of flowers memorials are preferred to an equestrian jump to be erected in honor of Bridgette. Bridgette was born March 22, 1993 in Minneapolis, to Thomas and Natalie (Wittenhagen) Twining, one of two children. She graduated from Chanhassen High School in 2011 and attended Normandale College, Bloomington, during her senior year of high school for post secondary education. She was planning to attend U.W. Stout, in Menomonee, WI, for Environmental Science and Pre-Veterinarian degrees. Her true love were her horses, Mayya and Corner Pocket, and enjoyed the outdoors, camping, running, and spending time with family and friends. Bridgette was preceded in death by her grandfather, Richard Twining, and cousin, Abigail Marie Wade. Survivors include her parents, Tom and Natalie Twining; brother, Michel Twining, all of Chanhassen; grandparents, Delmar and Joyce Wittenhagen of St. Cloud, Marilyn Twining of Dexter, MI; aunts and uncles, Stacey Wade of Eagan, John (Susanne) Twining of Stockbridge, MI, James Twining of Plano, TX, Tim (Maggie) Twining of Houghton, MI, the Rev. Kathryn Twining of London, England; and many cousins. Funeral arrangements were with the Bertas Funera Home, of Chaska, 952-448-2137.


Shakopee Valley News | www.shakopeenews.com

September 8, 2011 | Page 7

PETS OF THE WEEK These and other friendly pets are available from the Carver-Scott Humane Society (368-3553). All pets are checked for good temperament, shots are updated, and they are vet-checked, spayed/neutered if possible, and an Infopet chip is implanted. Adoption fees: The donation for a cat is $100-plus and $150 for a dog. If you can give it a home, call the Humane Society at 952-368-3553.

1st Annual

CARNIVAL OF Fletcher

Omar

F letcher, a n e a sygoi n g , 51-pound pointer, would like to be a companion to you and your other dog. He is houseand crate-trained. His foster home lets him have the run of the house, and he is wellbehaved. Fletcher likes to sleep on your bed or on a dog bed in your room. If you head for the car, he hopes you’ll take him along. This smart, friendly 6- to 7-year-old dog gets along with kids, dogs, cats and new folks.

I hope you’ll leave some water in the sink so I can play and I’ll also drink from running water. When you sit I jump onto your lap and will stay for a little while and then I’m off to play with the toy mice and balls. I ankle rub, door-greet strangers and follow you. I’m an active, easygoing, affectionate kitten born in August 2010 who likes to sleep in your bed. I’m fi ne with most cats and kind kids. I enjoy chattering and trying to communicate with you.

CABLE CHANNEL 15 All programming is recorded unless noted and subject to change. Refer to the channel 15 bulletin board for the most up-to-date information. Friday, Sept. 9 10:00 Twin City Fellowship 11:00 Backstage 11:30 Amp It Up 12:00 Army Newswatch 12:30 House Call 1:00 Vets Visits on TV 1:30 Comm. Ed. Monthly 2:00 Lions Club 2:30 Youth At Risk 4:00 Friend. Set to Music 5:00 Twin City Fellowship 6:00 Backstage 6:30 Amp It Up 7:00 Army Newswatch 7:30 House Call 8:00 Vets Visits on TV 8:30 Comm. Ed. Monthly 9:00 Lions Club 9:30 Youth At Risk 11:00 Friend. Set to Music Saturday, Sept. 10 10:00 Heatherlyn 11:30 Daddy Daughter Dance 12:30 Twin City Fellowship 1:30 Judicial Election Debate 3:30 Backstage 4:00 Amp It Up 4:30 Army Newswatch 5:00 Heatherlyn 6:30 Daddy Daughter Dance 7:30 Twin City Fellowship 8:30 Judicial Election Debate 10:30 Backstage 11:00 Amp It Up 11:30 Army Newswatch Sunday, Sept. 11 10:00 House Call 10:30 Vets Visits on TV 11:00 Comm. Ed. Monthly 11:30 Lions Club 12:00 St. Marks Mass 1:30 F.I.S.H. Youth At Risk 3:00 Mt. Olive Church 3:30 Friend. Set to Music 4:30 Backstage 5:00 House Call 5:30 Vets Visits on TV 6:00 Comm. Ed. Monthly 6:30 Lions Club 7:00 St. Marks Mass 8:30 Youth At Risk 10:00 Mt. Olive Church 10:30 Friend. Set to Music 11:30 Backstage Monday, Sept. 12 10:00 Heatherlyn 11:30 St. Marks Mass 1:00 Daddy Daughter Dance 2:00 Amp It Up 2:30 Mt. Olive Church 3:00 Program Potluck 5:00 Heatherlyn

6:30 St. Marks Mass 8:00 Daddy Daughter Dance 9:00 Amp It Up 9:30 Mt. Olive Church 10:00 Program Potluck Tuesday, Sept. 13 10:00 Army Newswatch 10:30 Mt. Olive Church 11:00 Heritage Slide Show 12:00 House Call 12:30 Vets Visits on TV 1:00 Comm. Ed. Monthly 1:30 Meet The Lions Club 2:00 Backstage 2:30 St. Marks Sunday Mass 4:00 Friendship Set to Music 5:00 Army Newswatch 5:30 Mt. Olive Lutheran Church 6:00 Heritage Slide Show 7:00 House Call 7:30 Vets Visits on TV 8:00 Comm. Ed. Monthly 8:30 Meet The Lions Club 9:00 Backstage 9:30 St. Marks Mass 11:00 Friend. Set to Music Wednesday, Sept. 14 10:00 Youth At Risk 11:30 Daddy Daughter Dance 12:30 Heritage Slide Show 1:30 Amp It Up 2:00 Program Potluck 4:00 Twin City Fellowship 5:00 F.I.S.H. Youth At Risk 6:30 Daddy Daughter Dance 7:30 Heritage Slide Show 8:30 Amp It Up 9:00 Program Potluck 11:00 Twin City Fellowship Thursday, Sept. 15 10:00 Judicial Election Debate 12:00 Backstage 12:30 Amp It Up 1:00 Army Newswatch 1:30 House Call 2:00 Vets Visits on TV 2:30 Comm. Ed. Monthly 3:00 Lions Club 3:30. Youth At Risk 5:00 Judicial Election Debate 7:00 Backstage 7:30 Amp It Up 8:00 Army Newswatch 8:30 House Call 9:00 Vets Visits on TV 9:30 Comm. Ed. Monthly 10:00 Lions Club 10:30 Youth At Risk

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Check out Shakopee Public Access online: www.shakopeepublicaccess. com. On the site you can find an interactive version of the cablecast schedule along with information about how to make your own show a reality, a list of available equipment, our policy and forms, FAQs and a live video stream of our channel.

CABLE CHANNEL 16 All programming is recorded unless noted and subject to change. Refer to the channel 16 bulletin board for the most up-to-date information. City of Shakopee meetings may also be viewed by visiting the city Web site, www.ci.shakopee.mn.us, and click the video-on-demand link on the righthand side.

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Page 8 | September 8, 2011

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

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Shakopee Valley News | www.shakopeenews.com

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COBRA is an easy option if you’ve just left a job, but it can be expensive. Consider what you need based on your health and your family’s medical habits.

Shop around. Online insurance brokers, such as eHealthInsurance or HealthPlanOne, allow you to type in your information and receive multiple quotes to compare the plans’ details. Or, find someone local, by contacting area insurance agents and brokers in our Southwest Metro region.

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While medical costs are only deductible if you itemize, the self-employed can deduct their insurance premiums straight off their adjusted gross income.

Cost out different plans. Look beyond the premium and deductible to figure out which plan will save you most in the long run. Consider co-pays, in-and-out-of-network providers and benefit limits.

Do the (fuel) math Buying a new car? While the gizmos and gadgets might dazzle, it’s the miles per gallon that typically win us over. Visit fueleconomy.com for a tool that calculates your annual fuel costs and the total fuel cost for the life of your vehicle. For example, did you know that a car that gets 30 MPG will save you $913 a year over a truck that only gets 20 MPG? Bring your numbers to the table to find out which new vehicle is really the best money saver.

Shop smart The Iowa State University Extension Office has a fun Spend Smart-Eat Smart quiz that challenges consumers’ shopping skills. The online quiz breaks down food groups and explores each of them by money, nutrition and time. For example, one question asks: “Food at convenience stores usually costs more than the same product at grocery stores. Are convenience stores ever a good choice?” Answer: Yes, when you’re only purchasing one item, like milk, since a “quick

TiPb.com, an online blog for iPhone, iPod and iPad users, recommends these five personal finance apps to help you track your pennies. iReconcile features a budget tracker that’s quick and easy to use. Personalize with your own categories and subcategories to track your money by day, month or year. Price: $2.99.

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Page 10 | September 8, 2011

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News 6:40 A.M. Jackson Elementary custodian Marty Schmitt unlocks the school’s front doors before teachers arrive Tuesday. Schmitt had been up since 3 a.m. thinking about all the unexpected issues he figured would pop up on the first day of building use. Sure enough, Schmitt handled several last-minute tasks, such as getting electrical power to the kitchen counter to serve breakfast.

Photos by Kristin Holtz

8:07 A.M. Physical education teacher Kathy Mareck greets kindergartner Joshua RodriguezMeneses off the first bus to arrive at Jackson Elementary Tuesday. Students arrived by bus, car and foot, many with their parents snapping pictures.

PHOTOS ONLINE THE VALLEY NEWS FOLLOWED JACKSON STAFF ON ITS FIRST MORNING. SEE MORE PHOTOS ONLINE AT

www.shakopeenews.com

Good morning, Jackson Jackson Elementary opened its doors Tuesday with all the customary excitement and chaos of a brand-new building. Yet, teachers and staff pulled it all together to welcome 700 students to a new school year.

7:27 A.M. Second-grade teacher Mary Ramert, left, helps her fellow teacher, Melanie Altonen, put the finishing touches on her classroom Tuesday. There’s excitement in the air, let me tell you that,” Altonen said. “This is my 24th year teaching, and I still get the first-day jitters. That excitement. That apprehension. It’s all there.”

8:25 A.M. Jackson kindergartners, from left, Deyanira Rivera, Daniela Guerrero-Garcia and Aylin Ramirez, wait outside the school building. Teachers lined their students up by class before they ushered them into the school. It was a cool morning to start the year. “Tomorrow I’m wearing pants and long sleeves,” one little girl said.

Home repairs for when the kids head back to school A

s your family heads back to school, take some time to complete a few simple home repairs. Doing your “home”-work projects now will allow you to spend more time with your family and less time fi xing, cleaning and repairing things this fall.

Get outside for some yard work After a summer full of outdoor fun, it’s time to tidy the yard before winter comes. Clean and safely place any outdoor furniture in storage. Once the furniture is put away, give your deck or patio a good power washing. Bring your indoor plants back inside and prune your trees and shrubs to encourage healthy growth. You should also remove any leaves or debris from your gutters to avoid clogs or other drainage issues.

Inspect the driveway While you’re outside, check your driveway and patch any cracks or potholes that may have resulted from the summer heat. You

may also want to consider resealing your driveway in the fall to keep it smooth and even all year long. Sealing your driveway will also protect it from any winter snow or ice damage.

Organize your garage Fall is an ideal time to clean the garage and clear out any unwanted items your family has collected over the summer. Invest in a good storage system that will keep you organized, and clear pathways around vehicles and doors. Move your rake or leaf blower to the front of the garage and consider placing holiday or winter items in an accessible spot for the coming season.

Install a remote thermostat With the kids back in school, your home may now be unoccupied for a large portion of the day. Lowering your thermostat while the family is away can provide substantial cost savings. A programmable thermostat will allow you to create custom

temperature settings for the hours you are home and away. Some models, like the AccuLink(TM) Remote Thermostat from American Standard Heating & Air Conditioning, allow you to set and control your home’s temperature remotely using most Web-enabled cell phones and computers.

Check and seal your windows Proper insulation will not only keep your family comfortable, but it may also help to improve the overall energy efficiency of your home. Air drafts are often easy to spot. First, make sure your windows are tightly shut. Then, feel around the edges of your windows for air leaks. If you feel a draft, you can easily seal the leaks with do-it-yourself caulk or weatherstripping. Seasonal maintenance will help to protect your home and prepare it for winter. With a little effort this fall, your “home”-work will be sure to make the grade. Source: ARA Content

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September 8, 2011 | Page 11

DISTRICT COURT The following are Scott County District Court felony and gross-misdemeanor dispositions. Defendants either pleaded guilty or were found guilty by the court unless otherwise indicated. Steven Albert Aguilar, 53, St. Paul, terroristic threats, a felony. Five years’ probation, 58 days in jail, follow recommendations of evaluation, abstain from alcohol, provide DNA sample, $85 in fines. Kim Richard Kraus, 43, Prior Lake, driving while intoxicated (DWI), a grossmisdemeanor. Two years’ probation, 30 days in jail, follow recommendations of evaluation, abstain from alcohol, random tests, $510 in fines. Lynette Renee Thomas, 51, Hopkins, fifth-degree possession of controlled substance, a felony. Adjudication stayed: Five years’ probation, 80 hours of community service, abstain from alcohol, random tests, $300 in fines. Nathan Reed Nordmeyer, 20, Jordan, false name to police officer, a gross-misdemeanor. Two years’ probation, 90 days in jail (concurrent to previous sentence), $185 in fines. Ricardo Alvear Jr., 24, Carver, DWI, a gross-misdemeanor. Two years’ proba-

SCHOOL MENU

tion, 60 days in jail, 60 days under electronic home-monitoring (concurrent to previous sentence), abstain from alcohol, random tests, $285 in fines. Daniel Caesar Newell, 38, Madelia, Minn., DWI, a gross-misdemeanor. Two years’ probation, two days in jail, 28 days under electronic home-monitoring, follow recommendations of evaluation, $610 in fines. Angelica Renae Brasher, 22, Mankato, fifth-degree possession of controlled substance, a felony. Three years’ probation, 80 hours of community service, follow recommendations of evaluation, abstain from alcohol, random tests, provide DNA sample, $375 in fines. Donald Henry Revord, 40, Belle Plaine, domestic abuse, a felony. Five years’ probation, 30 days in jail, comply with orders for protection, undergo counseling, follow recommendations of evaluation, $385 in fines. Norman Alexander Drake Zink, 20, Eagan, terroristic threats, a felony. Three years’ probation, follow recommendations of evaluation, anger-management counseling, abstain from alcohol, random tests, provide DNA sample, restitution, $160 in fines. Fourth-degree as-

sault of fire/emergency personnel, a felony. Two years’ probation (concurrent). Lloyd Joseph Michael Skluzacek, 29, Montgomery, obstruction of the legal process, a gross-misdemeanor. Two years’ probation, 30 days under electronic home-monitoring, follow recommendations of evaluation, abstain from alcohol, random tests, provide DNA sample, $385 in fines. Jill Marie Hazel, 32, St. Paul, ineligible voter knowingly votes, a grossmisdemeanor. Two years’ probation, 60 hours of community service, $85 in fines. Anthony Allen Lancette, 42, Savage, third-degree assault, a felony. Five years’ probation, five days in jail, 40 days under electronic home-monitoring, follow recommendations of evaluation, domestic abuse treatment, no contact with victim(s), provide DNA sample, restitution, $85 in fines. Brooks Joseph Burmeister, 21, Belle Plaine, use of artificial light to hunt, a gross-misdemeanor. Adjudication stayed: One year probation, $375 in fines. Ronald David Green, 51, Plymouth, driving after cancellation, a gross-mis-

demeanor. Two years’ probation, five days of community service, $185 in fines. Andrew James Holmquist, 28, Norwood Young America, fifth-degree possession of controlled substance, a felony. Ten years’ probation, 180 days in jail, abstain from alcohol, random tests, provide DNA sample, $160 in fines. Lance Vernon Picha, 24, Shakopee, fifth-degree possession of controlled substance, a felony. Five years’ probation, 20 days under electronic homemonitoring, provide DNA sample, $85 in fines. Martha Corrales-Garcia, 43, Elk River, wrongfully obtaining public assistance, a felony. Serve year and a day in prison, provide DNA sample.

Monday, Sept. 12 Mini corn dogs, oven potatoes, garden salad, fruit. Tuesday, Sept. 13 Sloppy Joe on bun, baked chips, assorted fresh veggies, fruit. Wednesday, Sept. 14 Super nachos, fi xings, corn, fruit. Thursday, Sept. 15 Grilled chicken or fish sandwich, sweet potato fries, Malibu blend vegetables, fruit. Friday, Sept. 16 Macaroni and cheese, peas, dinner roll, fruit, cookie. An alternate to any meal is salad/veggies and peanut butter and jelly sandwich. School menus are subject to change. Elementary lunch is $1.85; secondary lunch is $2; milk is 40 cents. Choice of milk served daily with hot lunch. Menu items may vary due to availability. Breakfast also is available daily.

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Page 12 | September 8, 2011

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

REMEMBER WHEN Collected by Don McNeil, Shakopee Heritage Society

View from the Shakopee water tower on 10th Avenue in 1957.

25 years ago… From the Shakopee Valley News, 1986 When the new State Women’s Prison is Shakopee opens its doors, the book will be closed on more than 65 years of local history. The original prison was built in 1920 according to Assistant Superintendent Warren Higgs. Before that, it was housed in the administration building at Stillwater. The new prison is designated to hold 132 to 144 women. One year after the gala opening of Canterbury Downs, the new Canterbury Inn Hotel has now been opened. The new facility features the same architectural style as the race track complex. There will be a total of 176 guest rooms. As long as the track is open, it is expected that 65 to 70 percent of guests will be race track patrons; however, a year-round market is needed.

50 years ago… From the Shakopee Valley News, 1961 Shakopee Banker Ed Huber

PHOTO COURTESY THE HUBER FAMILY

and Shakopee Mayor J.C. Huber displayed one of the red and white safe driving pledge car stickers now being sold by the First National Bank of Shakopee. The reflectors are being sold at cost (40 cents) to any person who wishes to participate in the safe driving campaign by signing a special safe driving pledge. One copy is retained by the driver and the second is forwarded to Gov. Anderson’s office. Details of the Urban Renewal Program, as a stimulus to repair old and run down business and residential areas, were explained to an interested audience at the Chamber of Commerce meeting at the First National Bank. The Shakopee Community Theater will present a three-act drama, “My Three Sons.” Performances will be in the new

community theater building in Riverside Park Gary Ries and George Muenchow, Shakopee recreation director, displayed a picture painted by Ries, a Shakopee resident, and exhibited at last week’s Shakopee Festival of Art, where he was awarded a blue ribbon for his display.

100 years ago… From the Scott County Argus, 1911 Announcement: I believe it due my friends, the voters of this city, to offer an explanation on my action in allowing my name on a petition for Mayor and later withdrawing same. After being urged for sometime to make the run for the office, at the last moment I consented to the wishes of my friends;

Kindergarteners invited to Cub Scouts open house

my sole object in doing so was to further the continuance of our public improvements, namely sewer and water works. After fi ling I learned that the current mayor, who was seeking re-election, was in favor of these improvements being extended. I made an appointment to discuss this with him and he assured me he was in favor of the improvements and their extension and I decided to withdraw my name from the ticket...Mr. Thiem. News from the Fatherland: A brief resume of the most important happening in the German Empire: In the near future, perhaps before the end of the year, Austria will have the greatest navy in the world. Only in the course of the last few days the information has leaked out that for sometime past the administration of the army has been secretly engaged in building a number of flying machines of an entirely new type, which will be called the “Kaiser Aeroplane.” This most modern of all airships consists of an ingenious combination of an aeroplane and the dirigible balloon. Experts who are familiar with the construction of these machines claim that they cannot possibly fall from the sky.

Shakopee Cub Scouts invite boys in kindergarten through fi fth grade from all Shakopee schools to join Cub Scouts. Boys and an adult are encouraged to attend the open house from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 in the Sun Path Elementary cafeteria to learn more and sign up. Cub Scouts explore a variety of

new interests and activities with other boys their age. Cubs meet weekly or biweekly in small groups (dens) and monthly with the entire group (pack) to share experiences, activities and recognition. Additional information on Cub Scouts can be found by visiting joincubs.org.

Girl Scouts registration is on Sept. 12 Shakopee Girl Scouts information and registration night is 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 in the Shakopee Middle School ca feteria, 1137 Marscha l l Road, Shakopee. All girls from kindergarten through high school and

their parents are welcome. Hear about all Girl Scouts’ fun events and learn about becoming a member. If you can’t make this date, contact the Registrar at registrarshakopeegs@gmail.com for information.

Engaged? Just Married? Share your good news with your friends and neighbors who read the Shakopee Valley News! For more information, call 445-3333. There is no fee for this service.

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September 8, 2011 | Page 13

publicnotices NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in the conditions of the following described mortgage: DAT E O F M O R T G AG E : 02/28/2007 MORTGAGOR(S): John Ulibarri and Mary Ulibarri, husband and wife. MORTGAGEE: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Decision One Mortgage Company, LLC SERVICER: CitiMortgage MORTGAGE ID #: 100077960000670936 DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded March 07, 2007,Scott County Registrar of Titles, Document No. T182783 Against Certificate of Title no. 44438. ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to: CitiMortgage, Inc. Dated: December 14, 2007,Recorded December 26, 2007,Scott County Registrar of Titles, Document No. T188051 Against Certificate of Title no. 44438. LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 7, Block 4, Sand Pointe 3rd Addition, according to the plat thereof on file and of record in Scott County, Minnesota. TAX PARCEL NO.: 252140410 ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 14389 Aspen Avenue NE Prior Lake, MN 55372 COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Scott O R I G I N A L P R I N C I PA L A M O U N T O F M O RT G AG E : $194,000.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $247,755.52 That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required by statute; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Tuesday, September 27, 2011, 10:00 a.m. PLACE OF SALE: Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within 6 months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns. DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: The date on or before which the mortgagor must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under Minnesota Statutes section 580.30 or the property redeemed under Minnesota Statutes section 580.23 is 03/27/2012 at 11:59 p.m. If the foregoing date is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, then the date to vacate is the next business day at 11:59 p.m. MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE: NONE THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED. Dated: July 25, 2011 CitiMortgage, Inc. Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: CitiMortgage, Inc. Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 209-7599 THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. 12890-110201 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, August 4, 11, 18, 25 and September 1, 8, 2011; No. 5075) NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in the conditions of the following described mortgage: DAT E O F M O R T G AG E : 12/19/2007 MORTGAGOR(S): Todd Nemitz and Heather J. Nemitz, husband and wife. MORTGAGEE: ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc. by merger now known as CitiMortgage, Inc. SERVICER: CitiMortgage MORTGAGE ID #: n/a DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded January 02, 2008,Scott County Registrar of Titles, Document No. 188106 Against Certificate of Title no. 38947. LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 2, Block 4, Southbridge Cove 2nd Addition, Scott County, Minnesota. TAX PARCEL NO.: 272960350 ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 6870 Sussex Ln Shakopee, MN 55379 COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Scott O R I G I N A L P R I N C I PA L A M O U N T O F M O RT G AG E : $390,000.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $381,237.10

That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required by statute; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Tuesday, October 11, 2011, 10:00 a.m. PLACE OF SALE: Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within 6 months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns. DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: The date on or before which the mortgagor must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under Minnesota Statutes section 580.30 or the property redeemed under Minnesota Statutes section 580.23 is 04/11/2012 at 11:59 p.m. If the foregoing date is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, then the date to vacate is the next business day at 11:59 p.m. MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE: NONE THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED. Dated: August 10, 2011 ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc. by merger now known as CitiMortgage, Inc. Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc. by merger now known as CitiMortgage, Inc. Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 209-7599 THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. 12890-110368 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, August 18, 25 and September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2011; No. 5089) NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in the conditions of the following described mortgage: DAT E O F M O R T G AG E : 11/24/2004 MORTGAGOR(S): Dana P. Scarlett and Kaycee E. Scarlett, husband and wife. MORTGAGEE: Argent Mortgage Company, LLC SERVICER: CitiMortgage MORTGAGE ID #: n/a DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded January 20, 2005,Scott County Recorder, Document No. A686230. ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to: CitiFinancial Mortgage Company, Inc. by reason of merger now known as CitiMortgage, Inc. Dated: August 26, 2005,Recorded September 06, 2005,Scott County Recorder, Document No. A711955. LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 17, Block 1, Woodbridge Ponds 3rd Addition. TAX PARCEL NO.: 262000170 ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 14599 Alabama Ave S Savage, MN 55378 COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Scott O R I G I N A L P R I N C I PA L A M O U N T O F M O RT G AG E : $346,500.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $371,598.23 That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required by statute; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Tuesday, October 18, 2011, 10:00 a.m. PLACE OF SALE: Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within 6 months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns. DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: The date on or before which the mortgagor must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under Minnesota Statutes section 580.30 or the property redeemed under Minnesota Statutes section 580.23 is 04/18/2012 at 11:59 p.m. If the foregoing date is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, then the date to vacate is the next business day at 11:59 p.m. MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE: NONE THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW

FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED. Dated: August 12, 2011 CitiFinancial Mortgage Company, Inc. by reason of merger now known as CitiMortgage, Inc. Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: CitiFinancial Mortgage Company, Inc. by reason of merger now known as CitiMortgage, Inc. Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 209-7599 THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. 12890-110365 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, August 25, and September 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011; No. 5093) NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in the conditions of the following described mortgage: DAT E O F M O R T G AG E : 03/31/2006 MORTGAGOR(S): David Miller and Cheryl Miller, husband and wife. MORTGAGEE: Bank of America, National Association SERVICER: Bank of America, N.A. MORTGAGE ID #: N/A DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded April 26, 2006,Scott County Recorder, Document No. A 736533. LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot Four (4), Maple Knoll, Scott County, Minnesota TAX PARCEL NO.: 110240040 ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 3070 Maple Dr. Prior Lake, MN 55372 COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Scott O R I G I N A L P R I N C I PA L A M O U N T O F M O RT G AG E : $204,800.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $201,668.93 That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required by statute; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Tuesday, October 18, 2011, 10:00 a.m. PLACE OF SALE: Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within 6 months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns. DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: The date on or before which the mortgagor must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under Minnesota Statutes section 580.30 or the property redeemed under Minnesota Statutes section 580.23 is 04/18/2012 at 11:59 p.m. If the foregoing date is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, then the date to vacate is the next business day at 11:59 p.m. MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE: NONE THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED. Dated: August 17, 2011 Bank of America, National Association Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: Bank of America, National Association Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 209-7599 THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. 16751-111682 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, August 25 and September 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011; No. 5095) NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in the conditions of the following described mortgage: DAT E O F M O R T G AG E : 12/17/2003 MORTGAGOR(S): Thongsavanh Phung, a single person.

MORTGAGEE: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for River City Mortgage Corp. SERVICER: Bank of America, N.A. MORTGAGE ID #: 100060677002256444 DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded January 12, 2004,Scott County Recorder, Document No. A 641409. ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to: BAC Home Loans Servicing LP Dated: August 17, 2009,Recorded September 01, 2009,Scott County Recorder, Document No. A 834992. LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 3, Block 1, Wensmann 3rd Addition, CIC No. 1106, according to the recorded plat thereof, Scott County, Minnesota. TAX PARCEL NO.: 253930030 ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 3705 Fox Tail Trail NW Prior Lake, MN 55372 COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Scott O R I G I N A L P R I N C I PA L A M O U N T O F M O RT G AG E : $240,000.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $252,351.94 That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required by statute; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Tuesday, October 18, 2011, 10:00 a.m. PLACE OF SALE: Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within 6 months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns. DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: The date on or before which the mortgagor must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under Minnesota Statutes section 580.30 or the property redeemed under Minnesota Statutes section 580.23 is 04/18/2012 at 11:59 p.m. If the foregoing date is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, then the date to vacate is the next business day at 11:59 p.m. MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE: NONE THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED. Dated: August 17, 2011 Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: Bank of America, N.A., as successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 209-7599 THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. 16751-105657 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, August 25 and September 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2011; No. 5096) NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in the conditions of the following described mortgage: DAT E O F M O R T G AG E : 07/13/2007 MORTGAGOR(S): Nicholas H. Kelvie and Carey L. Kelvie, husband and wife. MORTGAGEE: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Bank, FSB SERVICER: Bank of America, N.A. MORTGAGE ID #: 10013370002332022-2 DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded August 06, 2007, Scott County Recorder, Document No. A 779826. ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Dated:February 26, 2010, LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 1, Block 3, Credit River Highlands Scott County, Minnesota TAX PARCEL NO.: 040730120 ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 20430 Boone Ave S. Prior Lake, MN 55372 COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Scott O R I G I N A L P R I N C I PA L A M O U N T O F M O RT G AG E : $768,750.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $882,989.16 That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required by statute; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said

mortgage, or any part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Tuesday, August 24, 2010, 10:00 a.m. PLACE OF SALE: Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within 6 months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns. DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: The date on or before which the mortgagor must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under Minnesota Statutes section 580.30 or the property redeemed under Minnesota Statutes section 580.23 is 02-24-2011 at 11:59 p.m. If the foregoing date is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, then the date to vacate is the next business day at 11:59 p.m. MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE: NONE THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED. Dated: June 21, 2010 BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. 16751-101031 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, July 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 and August 5, 2010; No. 5237) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, November 02, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: August 19, 2010 BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-101031 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 2, 2010; No. 5402) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, January 18, 2011, at 10:00a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: October 27, 2010 BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-101031 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, November 4, 2010; No. 5572) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, April 12, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: January 14, 2011 BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-101031 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, February 3, 2011; No. 5743) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, July 12, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: April 07, 2011 BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-101031 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, April 21, 2011; No. 5923) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, September 06, 2011, at

10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: July 06, 2011 BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-101031 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, July 14, 2011; No. 5047) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, October 11, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: August 30, 2011 BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-101031 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 8, 2011; No. 5106) NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE THE RIGHT TO VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT AND IDENTITY OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY LAW IS NOT AFFECTED BY THIS ACTION. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that default has occurred in the conditions of the following described mortgage: DAT E O F M O R T G AG E : 05/25/2006 MORTGAGOR(S): Gary D. Eggenberg and Barbara Eggenberg, husband and wife. MORTGAGEE: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Countrywide Bank, N.A. SERVICER: Bank of America, N.A. MORTGAGE ID #: 10013370001431130-5 DATE AND PLACE OF RECORDING: Recorded June 28, 2006, Scott County Recorder, Document No. A743516. ASSIGNMENTS OF MORTGAGE: Assigned to: The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Dated:October 06, 2009, Recorded December 15, 2009, Scott County Recorder, Document No. 842858. LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: Lot 2, Block 2, Harvest Moon, Scott County, Minnesota TAX PARCEL NO.: 07-023006-0 ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 13325 Skyline Circle Shakopee, MN 55379 COUNTY IN WHICH PROPERTY IS LOCATED: Scott O R I G I N A L P R I N C I PA L A M O U N T O F M O RT G AG E : $440,000.00 AMOUNT DUE AND CLAIMED TO BE DUE AS OF DATE OF NOTICE, INCLUDING TAXES, IF ANY, PAID BY MORTGAGEE: $555,153.41 That prior to the commencement of this mortgage foreclosure proceeding Mortgagee/Assignee of Mortgagee complied with all notice requirements as required by statute; that no action or proceeding has been instituted at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured by said mortgage, or any part thereof; PURSUANT to the power of sale contained in said mortgage, the above described property will be sold by the Sheriff of said county as follows: DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Tuesday, August 17, 2010, 10:00 a.m. PLACE OF SALE: Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee to pay the debt then secured by said Mortgage, and taxes, if any, on said premises, and the costs and disbursements, including attorneys’ fees allowed by law subject to redemption within 6 months from the date of said sale by the mortgagor(s), their personal representatives or assigns. DATE TO VACATE PROPERTY: The date on or before which the mortgagor must vacate the property if the mortgage is not reinstated under Minnesota Statutes section 580.30 or the property redeemed under Minnesota Statutes section 580.23 is 02-17-2011 at 11:59 p.m. If the foregoing date is a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday, then the date to vacate is the next business day at 11:59 p.m. MORTGAGOR(S) RELEASED FROM FINANCIAL OBLIGATION ON MORTGAGE: NONE THE TIME ALLOWED BY LAW FOR REDEMPTION BY THE MORTGAGOR, THE MORTGAGOR’S PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OR ASSIGNS, MAY BE REDUCED TO FIVE WEEKS IF A JUDICIAL ORDER IS ENTERED UNDER MINNESOTA STATUTES SECTION 582.032, DETERMINING, AMONG OTHER THINGS, THAT THE MORTGAGED PREMISES ARE IMPROVED WITH A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING OF LESS THAN FIVE UNITS, ARE NOT PROPERTY USED IN AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, AND ARE ABANDONED. Dated: June 14, 2010 The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as

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KUCERA  continued from page 4

a fancy place: linen napkins and table cloths, lead crystal goblets filled with water, black menus with gold tassels — the whole shebang. After we ordered the waitress brought our salads, which were included with our lunch (you get that kind of treatment at your fancier places). With food now in front of us we looked around the table but couldn’t find any silverware — no forks, knives or spoons — nothing. We waited patiently and tried several times to get our server’s attention but still no silverware. Jeff may have started it, or it could have been me, but one of us picked up a crouton with our fingers and put it in our mouth, then another and another. Pretty soon both of us were picking up all the croutons on the salad, even the ones with dressing on them. After

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News that we grabbed the lettuce with our fingers as well. In between bites and bouts of laughter I asked him, “What kind of town do you live in where have to eat a salad with your fingers?” Within a few minutes the waitress brought the rest of our lunch. By then we had attracted some attention from the other tables. “Do you think we could have some silverware for the rest of our meal?” Jeff asked her. “It looks to me like you’re both doing just fine without it,” she said with a huff as she turned her back on us. Maybe I should just stick to the drive-through window — at least there you get a straw. Check please. Jerry Kucera of Sand Creek Township owns a Shakopee insurance agency and is a Valley News community columnist. Read his past columns on his blog: www.jerrykucera.blogspot. com.

KANSIER  continued from page 4

than the cost of urban local service. The suburban providers operate the longest transit routes in the region. Fares are set by the Metropolitan Council for the entire region, and there is no distance-based fare. This means the fare for a 10-mile express trip is the same as the fare for a 35-mile trip. When you factor in the cost of providing service that takes longer to provide (more miles equal more fuel and driver time), plus factor in the inability to turn that bus around to make multiple trips during the peak hour, you begin to see why suburban service generally costs more to provide. And, when you measure efficiency by subsidy per passenger per mile, suburban express trips are among the most efficient, averaging about 30 cents per passenger per mile. The challenge of transit is to have all segments of the population embrace its benefits. The suburban providers are doing just that, and in a prudent, innovative and cost-effective manner.

publicnotices Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. 16751-102267 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, June 24 and July 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 2010; No. 5206) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, October 26, 2010, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: August 11, 2010 The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-102267 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, August 26, 2010; No. 5384) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, January 11, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County and State. Dated: October 15, 2010 The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-102267 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, November 4, 2010; No. 5564) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, April 05, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: December 29, 2010 The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-102267 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, January 13, 2011; No. 5702) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, June 28, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State.

Dated: April 04, 2011 The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-102267 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, April 21, 2011; No. 5924) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, September 06, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: June 21, 2011 The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-102267 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, June 30, 2011; No. 5041) NOTICE OF POSTPONEMENT OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the above Mortgage Foreclosure Sale is hereby postponed to Tuesday, October 11, 2011, at 10:00 a.m., Scott County Sheriff ’s Office, Civil Unit, 301 Fuller Street S., City of Shakopee in said County and State. Dated: August 30, 2011 The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee Peterson, Fram & Bergman, P.A. By: Steven H. Bruns Attorneys for: The Bank of New York Mellon fka the Bank of New York as successor to JP Morgan Chase Bank, NA as Trustee for holders of SAMI II 2006-AR4, Mtg Pass-through cert, Series 2006-AR4 Assignee of Mortgagee 55 E. 5th St., Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 (651) 291-8955 16751-102267 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 8, 2011; No. 5107)

DISTRICT COURT FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Court File No. 70-CV-11-16725 In the Matter of the Petition of Bank of America, N.A., as successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE In Relation to Certificate of Title No. 43448 issued for land in the County of Scott and State of Minnesota and legally described as follows: Lot 10, Block 1, Classics at SouthBridge 2 nd Addition, Scott County, Minnesota. TO: Johnny K. Khith, Chanthyma Chhom, Chhit Savon, Tor Van, Chhit Vichika, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., and Home Loan Center, Inc., dba Lending Tree Loans. Upon receiving and filing the Report of the Examiner of Titles in the above entitled matter, IT IS ORDERED, that you, and all persons interested, appear before this Court on the 6 th day of October, 2011, at 9:00 a.m. in the Scott County Government Center, 200 Fourth Avenue West, in the City of Shakopee, County of Scott, State of Minnesota, and then, or as soon thereafter as said matter can be heard, show cause, if any there be why this Court should not enter an Order as follows: The Registrar of Titles, upon the filing with him of a certified copy of this Order, shall cancel Certificates of Title No. 43448 and enter a new certificate of title for the land therein described in favor of Bank of America, N.A., subject to the memorials of Document Nos. T94129, T96789, T96791, T103255, T111376, T111432, T112093, T112094, T113191, and T120965, but free from all other memorials now appearing on the present Certificate of Title, the last which is Document T209441, and free from the memorial of this Order. Attendance is required only by those who wish to object to the entry of the above-described Order. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED, that this Order be served: (a) at least 14 days prior to such hearing upon the above named parties residing in this State in the manner provided by law for the service of Summons in a civil action; (b) at least 14 days prior to such hearing upon any of the above named non-residents by sending a copy of this Order to such nonresident at his post office address, by registered or certified mail, return receipt requested; and (c) except as provided in Paragraph (d) belown upon any party who cannot be found by three weeks published notice and by sending a copy of this Order at least 14 days prior to the hearing by first class mail to such party at his last known address and by sending another copy of this Order at least 14 days prior to the hearing by first class mail to his address as stated on the Certificate of Title if an address is so stated; which service shall be deemed complete 21 days after the first publication; and (d) upon dissolved, withdrawn, or revoked business entity governed by Minn. Stat., Chp. 302A, 303, 317A, 322A, 322B, or 323 in the matter provided by Minn. Stat. 5.25. Dated this 15th day of August, 2011. Michael A. Fahey Judge of District Court APPROVED AS TO FORM THIS 9TH DAY OF August 2011 Bryce D. Huemoeller Examiner of Titles

NOTICE OF SALE AND DISPOSAL OF PROPERTY Notice is hereby given that the personal property listed below will be sold at public auction held on Date: September 13, 2011, at Time: 10:30 AM. Location of Auction: 240 Shumway Street, Suite 600, Shakopee, MN 55379. Description of the goods and name of the person(s) whose personal property is to be sold is as follows: Unit F16 5W X 15L x 13H Amanda Duncan of Shakopee Minnesota: All the contents of unit: may include: “Antiques, Collectibles, Electronics, and Tools!” Boxes, Totes, Wood Furniture and Desk, Household belongings, Garage articles/lawnmower and much more:” Kevin Hauerwas General Manager Scott Co. Mini Storage Office 952-445-6858 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 1 and 8, 2011; No. 5103)

Tracy Halliday, Atty. Lic. No. 034610X 55 E. Fifth Street, Suite 800 St. Paul, MN 55101 Phone: 651-209-7582 Fax: 651-228-1753 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 8, 15, and 22, 2011; No. 5105)

STATE OF MINNESOTA COUNTY OF SCOTT

Legal Notice Scott County has released an Environmental Assessment Worksheet (EAW) for public comment on a proposed aggregate mining operation called Great Plains Sands Non-Metallic Mineral Mining Operation. The project site is located in Section 4 of Sand Creek Township and Section 33 of Louisville Township, Scott County. Copies of the EAW are available at the Shakopee and Jordan Library. Copies are also available for review during County Courthouse office hours in the Environmental Health and Inspections Department. This EAW is also presented on the Scott County Web site (www.co.scott.mn.us). The comment period will be open from September 5th, 2011 through October 5th, 2011,

MILITARY NOTES Air Force Airman Matthew D. Sotelo g raduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. Sotelo is the son of Leonel and Dollie Sotelo of Shakopee. He is a 2010 graduate of Shakopee High School.

Jobs Fair planned for Sept. 19 U.S. Rep. John Kline will host a free Career and Jobs Fair from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday, Sept. 19 at the Eagan Community Center. Scheduled to attend are several dozen private-sector employers that have job openings in a wide variety of fields including health care, technology, financial and retail, Kline’s office said. Employment-assistance organizations and a variety of educational institutions are also scheduled to attend. Last year, more than 750 people attended a similar event. For more information, visit Kline’s website at http://kline. house.gov or e-mail Sally Bryant in Kline’s Burnsville office at Sally.Bryant@mail.house.gov.

High school students can audition for ‘Grease’ “Grease” is the word for this fall’s Shakopee High School musical. Interested actors must attend a vocal, dialogue and dance audition workshop from 3 to 5 p.m. Monday, 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday or 3 to 3:20 p.m. and 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesday.

Callbacks are from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday. Bring a prepared 24-measure musical selection, 1- to 2-minute monologue that emphasizes character and dress for movement. Monologue does not have to be memorized.

It’s Library Card Sign-up Month S ept emb er i s L ibr a r y Card Sign-Up Month, and it is being recognized by the American Library Association and Scott County Public Libraries. Customers with library cards will have access to books and magazines, DVDs, eBooks, test-prepa ration materials, job hunting resources and online research resources, as well as use of

library computers for free Internet access. For those who have lost their library card, a replacement card is free in September. For more information on how to sign up for a library card, visit any Scott County public librar y, ca l l (9 52) 707-1770 or visit the library on li ne at w w w.scot t .lib. mn.us.

catch up online ... ... www.shakopeenews.com

continued from previous page as noted in the Minnesota Environmental Quality Board’s newsletter, the EQB Monitor. Publication of the EQB Monitor is scheduled for September 5th, 2011. Comments must be received before 4:30 P.M., October 5th, 2011, for consideration. Comments or questions regarding the EAW should be directed to Kate Sedlacek, Environmental Health at (952) 496-8351 or mailed to: Kate Sedlacek, Environmental Health Office, 200 Fourth Avenue West, Shakopee, MN 55379-1393. E-mailed responses will also be accepted at (ksedlacek@co.scott.mn.us) which is also accessible by link from the County Web site. (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 8, 2011; No. 5108) Canterbury Storage 1895 Eagle Creek Blvd. Shakopee, MN Sale will be held on Monday, September 26, 2011at 11:30 Registration will begin at 11:00am Unit A12 10 x 14 Debralee Wrycza Last known address: 12400 Geneva Way Apple Valley, MN 55124 Lien amount $260.00 Unit F6 10 x 16 Shannon Sanders & Cory Deen Last known address: 530 6th Ave. E. Shakopee, MN 55379 Lien Amount $400.00 Unit 55 10 x 10 Timothy Douglas Last known address: 1639 W 140th St. Burnsville, MN 55337 Lien amount $358.00 Unit 40 10 x 20 Charles Witt Last known address: 2705 W. CR 42 #329 Burnsville, MN 55337 Lien amount $550.00 (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 8 and 15, 2011; No. 5109) OFFICIAL PROCEEDINGS OF THE CITY COUNCIL REGULAR SESSION SHAKOPEE, MINNESOTA AUGUST 3, 2011 Mayor Schmitt called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m. with Council members, Pat Heitzman, Steve Clay, Matt Lehman, and Pamela Punt (7:01 p.m.) present. Also present Mark McNeill, City Administrator; Jim Thomson, City Attorney; and Judith Cox, City Clerk; R. Michael Leek, Community Development Director; Bruce Looney, Public Works Director/City Engineer; Julie Linnihan, Finance Director; and Jamie Polley, Park, Recreation and Natural Resources Director. Clay/Heitzman moved to approve the agenda as amended. Motion carried 5-0. Clay/Heitzman moved to approve the Consent Agenda as presented. Mr. McNeill read the Consent agenda. Motion carried 5-0. Clay/Heitzman moved to approve the appropriate City officials to execute a Cooperative Agreement for the improvements to the intersection of CSAH 69 and 10th Avenue. (Motion carried under the Consent Agenda) Clay/Heitzman moved to approve the promotion of Raoul Boudreau to the position of IT Coordinator, effective August 1, 2011, with a starting salary of Step C. of Grade 8 ($67,205) of the city pay plan and subject to a one-year probation period; and direct staff to advertise and begin the hiring process for the position of IT Specialist. (Motion carried under the Consent Agenda) Clay/Heitzman moved to approve the bills in the amount of $443,302.99 and electronic transfers in the amount of $849,423.65 for a total of $1,292,726.64. (Motion carried under the Consent Agenda) Clay/Heitzman moved to approve the minutes of July 12, 2011 and July 19, 2011. (Motion carried under the Consent Agenda) Mayor Schmitt asked if there was anyone in the audience who wished to speak on a topic that was not on the agenda. No one responded. Bruce Loney, Public Works Director/City Engineer, presented Council with the Amendment to Resolution No. 6469, by Approving a Full Access on Crossings Boulevard at Penstemon Lane East. Mr. Loney said that since the installation of a right in/right out access to the neighborhood commercial property there have been problems with trucks exiting the commercial property and turning

eastbound on Crossing Boulevard at Penstemon Lane West. Mr. Loney said that the Traffic Safety Review Committee (TSRC) has met to discuss alternatives to the problem. Mr. Loney shared with Council three alternative plans. He said the TSRC preferred Option 2 as the alternative for opening the median. Option two reduces Crossings Blvd. median and provides a full access at Crossings Blvd. and Penstemon Lane East. Mr. Loney said the cost to open the intersection and reduce the median as well as the design work will be paid for by Steve Soltau of Shakopee Crossings Limited Partnership. Lehman/Clay offered Resolution No. 7113, A Resolution Amending Resolution No. 6469, Approving the Final Plat of Southbridge Fields Addition, and moved its adoption with a modification to section II. M., the City reserves the authority to close the median at the easternmost access to Crossings Boulevard and go back to a right-in/right-out if traffic patterns warrant a change. Motion carried 5-0. Julie Linnihan, Finance Director, presented Council with the 2012 General Fund Budget discussion. Ms. Linnihan reviewed the 2012 proposed budget. Discussed at earlier meetings is the issue to initiate a capital levy for infrastructure in the amount of $200,000 and to levy $200,000 for debt service levies under the General Fund Revenues. The proposal has been to establish a specific levy for infrastructure and debt service levies. She said these two items need to be considered during budget discussions. Under Administration expenditures the Human Resource department is requesting $20,000 for a classification study that is mandated and cannot be avoided. However, there is a Telecommunications budget reduction request of -$28,000 for the discontinuation of service for public access check out. This would result in a total net reduction of -$8,000 for the Administration Budget. In the Finance Department there is a request of $8,500 to return an Accounting position to full time status. The Police Department is asking to re-classify a CSO position to part-time evidence technician position which results in a reduction of -$24,000 from their budget. The Fire Department is asking for a total of $37,000 to initiate a Duty Crew system, pay enhancement program, and potential legal fees for agreement updates with the townships. Ms. Linnihan then discussed an estimated transfer of $400,000 to pay off the debt service for the existing debt that the City has for the different debt issuances from 2002 to 2010. Ms. Linnihan said with all of the requests by the departments the total request costs is $414,000. Ms. Linnihan then discussed the building/facility improvements requests for 2012 for the Community Center. She discussed the proposed and prioritized projects which include the replacement of the arena flooring, track surfacing, and radiant heating in the arena which could be handled by the Building Internal Service Fund. The divider curtain could be funded under the Building Maintenance account. The total cost of all of the projects is $181,500 which would not need to be funded by the levy. The Community Center roofing project of approximately $300,000 cannot be presented to Council because there is not enough information for actual costs at this time. The estimated $600,000 for a 2nd Floor Fitness Center addition should be discussed by Council on whether to proceed with this project. Ms. Linnihan said that staff will initiate a policy development for the use of funds within the Building Internal Service Fund which will address the percentages of funds to be designated for significant repair projects and tasks; what percentages of funds will be designated for replacement or upgrade of existing facilities and the percentages of funds to be designated for the replacement of an existing structure or building of a new structure. Ms. Linnihan said that there is a 1% cost of living increase currently built into the budget for 2012. There will need to be continued discussion regarding a potential reduction in the Transit budget for Van Pool funding in 2012. There was no support for a 2nd floor fitness center at the community center. With regard to the General

Fund Levy, Ms. Linnihan asked Council to consider the following: a) discuss keeping a flat levy, b) increasing it slightly to allow for a Capital levy or c) to increase the levy and start incrementally preparing for the future road repairs for the General Fund. She also asked Council to discuss the EDA Levy and policies for use, as well as preparing a clearer format as to how the levied funds are to be used. Discussion followed. There was a consensus among council members to approve the compensation study in the HR budget for $20,000 and decrease the public access check out expense of $28,000 in Telecommunications; to approve the $8,500 increase in Finance to increase the accounting position to full-time and to re-classify a CSO position in the Police Department to part-time evidence technician resulting in a reduction of $24,000. There was also a consensus that a work session was needed to discuss the 2014 proposed fire station, duty crews and compensation changes in the Fire Department and a work session to discuss the Economic Development Authority (EDA) budget and future funding programs. After Council discussed all of the issues that Ms. Linnihan presented, Ms. Linnihan said she would bring back to the August 16th meeting a formal budget based on the discussions by Council. Clay/Heitzman moved to adjourn to Tuesday August 16, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. Motion carried 5-0. The Council meeting ended at 9:32 p.m. Judith S. Cox City Clerk Kim Weckman Recording Secretary (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 8, 2011; No. 5110) NOTICE OF HEARING ON PROPOSED PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT PROJECT NO. 2011-6 CSAH 69 UTILITY IMPROVEMENTS TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Shakopee will meet in the Council Chambers of City Hall at 129 South Holmes Street on Tuesday, September 20, 2011 at 7:00 P.M. or thereafter, to consider the making of an improvement by sanitary sewer and watermain and any appurtenant work pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, Sections 429.011 to 429.111. The Area proposed to be assessed for such improvement is: Those properties lying within Section 1, Township 115, Range 23, Scott County. Said properties being further described, but not inclusive: Properties adjacent to CSAH 69 between Scott Street and 100 feet west of Apgar Street. The estimated cost of said improvement is $115,752.00. A reasonable estimate of the impact of the assessment will be available at the hearing. Such persons as desire to be heard with reference to the proposed improvement will be heard at this meeting. Dated this 16th day of August, 2011. Judith S. Cox City Clerk (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 8 and 15, 2011; No. 5111) PUBLIC NOTICE The Shakopee Police Civil Service Commission is now accepting applications for the position of Police Officer. Applications can be obtained from the City of Shakopee by calling (952) 233 – 9320 or online at www.ci.shakopee.mn.us/employment.cfm. Applications must be received by 4:30 p.m. on Friday, September 23, 2011. Must possess valid driver’s license and be POST eligible by November 1, 2011. (Published in the Shakopee Valley News on Thursday, September 8, 2011; No. 5112)

The Public Notice deadline is at 4:00pm on Thursday for the following week's issue. Faxes not accepted.


Shakopee Valley News | www.shakopeenews.com

September 8, 2011 | Page 15

ENGAGEMENT

BIRTH

Gregory-Gelhaye

Morrison

Ashley Gregory and Daniel Gelhaye of Shakopee announce their engagement and upcoming wedding. Ashley is the daughter of Peter and Candise Gregory of Sioux Falls, S.D. Daniel is the son of Ron and Deb Gelhaye of Shakopee. A Sept. 17, 2011, wedding is planned at The Landing in Shakopee.

Matthew Morrison and Laura Jensen of Chaska announce the birth of their daughter, Lainie May, who was born at 7:51 p.m. June 8, 2011, at St. Francis Regional Medical Center in Shakopee. Lainie weighed 7 pounds, 4 ounces and was 21 inches long. She has blue eyes and medium brown hair. Grandparents are Daralinn Williams of Chaska, Charles

dining &

entertainment Lainie Morrison Morrison of Florida and Mike and Karen Jensen of Shakopee.

SVN

Steak & Shrimp Dinner

Friday, September 9 5:00 – 8:00 pm

Gelhaye-Gregory

$15 Steak and Shrimp $12 Steak or Shrimp $3 Children’s Menu

SEND US YOUR …

$1.00 OFF

FAMOUS HAMBURGER DINE IN ONLY

Please present coupon when ordering. One coupon, per person, per visit. Not valid with other offers.

OFFER EXPIRES OCTOBER 8, 2011 • Friendly Service

Every Saturday

1760 4th Ave. E. Shakopee, MN 952-445-5555 www.knightseventcenter.com

July 30th – November 26th 8:00am–1:00pm Knights Event Center 1760 4th Ave E, Shakopee, MN

Stories to raise awareness about breast cancer

952-445-5266

Welcome

1583 East First Avenue (Highway 101) • Shakopee Comedy Club is in the lower level of Comedian Derick Lengwenus

LUNCH SPECIALS Served Tuesday–Friday 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Sept. 9-10 Fri 8:30 pm Sat 8 & 10:30 pm

Friday, Aug. 19 11am–8pm Pork Loin Dressing, Mashed Potatoes, Gravy, Applesauce & Dinner Roll…$9.00

SUNDAY BREAKFAST Serving 8am-Noon Menu includes Pancakes, Sausage, Eggs, Hashbrowns, biscuits & gravy & more!

Serving a full menu on Fridays only. Dine-In or Take-Out. 952-445-5266. We deliver from 11:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.

Dinner & a Show for On l y $

29

(1 ticket plus entrée) (No discounts or coupons accepted on dinner/show packages)

Comedian Gabriel Rutledge

Sept. 16-17 Fri 8:30 pm Sat 8 pm

Show only prices Early $ Shows

13

Late $ Show Sat.

10

Call Dangerfield’s to make your dinner reservation, or to inquire about menu selections 952-445-2245

RESERVE YOUR SEATS NOW www.minnehahacomedyclub.com • 612-860-9388

214996

Shakopee American Legion E. 1st Ave., Shakopee Everyone

214021

news

• Take-out

Homemade baked goods, homemade crafts, homemade canned goods, breads and pastry items, fruits, vegetables, honey, maple syrup, jams, herbs, seedlings, plants, fresh cut flowers, organic meats, homemade soaps.

In honor of October, Breast Cancer Awareness Month, we’re looking for your stories of how the disease has affected you or your family. Share your triumphs, your tragedies and what you want other survivors to know. Share your thoughts with Shakopee Valley News readers; send your essay, no longer than 200 words, to Editor Pat Minelli, editor@shakopeenews. com, before noon on Wednesday, Sept. 28. Include your name, city of residence, and a daytime phone number. We’ll run some submissions online at shakopeenews.com and some in the Oct. 6 Valley News print SHAKOPEE VALLEY edition.

• Craft Beer

• Our Famous Hamburgers have been served for over 50 years. • Rated as the Best Hamburger by Just About Every Newspaper and Magazine in the Twin Cities Area. • Recognized as One of the 500 Best Rated Restaurants in the U.S. Bert & Bonnie Notermann, Your Hosts 16180 Flying Cloud Drive 952-934-5299 (Just west of Flying Cloud Airport) www.lionstap.com Hours: Monday – Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.

Is returning to this area on Saturday, Nov. 5, Prior Lake High School

TICKETS ON SALE TO THE PUBLIC SAT., SEPT. 24 9 - 11 a.m. At the Prior Lake High School (7575 150th St., Savage) and Shakopee Valley News office (327 Marschall Road) General Admission $17 | VIP $55

2178825

If tickets remain after Sept. 24, phone orders will be accepted by calling 952-445-3333 on Monday, Sept. 26 at 8 a.m. Tickets for last year’s show sold out weeks before the event.

As a VENDOR at the Holiday Taste of Home Cooking show you will be able to demonstrate, sell and display your products and services in front of a captive audience of up to 1,400 people prior to the show

VENDOR SPACE IS LIMITED! Call 952-345-6477 or email jsorenson@swpub.com to RESERVE YOUR SPACE TODAY!

Show Date: Sat., Nov. 5, 2011 Doors open: 11 a.m. Show begins: 2 p.m. Location: Prior Lake High School

Brought to you by: Southwest Newspapers and Prior Lake-Savage Area Schools Community Education Presenting Sponsor

St. Francis Regional Medical Center

Grocery Sponsor

Village Market

Best Seat in the House Sponsor

Stage Decor Sponsor

FurnitureMart

Iris Valley Boutique & Gifts

Home for the Holidays Decoration Sponsor

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Page 16 | September 8, 2011

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

What moved you on 9/11? “What kind of world have I brought you in to? What will your future be like?” And 10 years later, I still wonder.

The events of 9/11 – three numbers seared into our minds – changed our country and our lives. The tragedies of Sept. 11, 2001, sent the United States to war, dramatically changed air travel, slowed the world’s economy, spawned hate crimes, and put us in mourning for the more than 2,700 persons who died as a result of the terrorist attacks. This newspaper asked southwest area readers to describe how they were changed by 9/11, and here’s what they had to say:

Jan Geis, 73 Chaska

When I see a shooting star When I see a shooting star, I close my eyes and indulge in a little wish, and when I blow the wispy seeds off a dandelion, I stop for a moment and hope for something trivial. And when the sun rises and marks the day as Sept. 11, I bow my head in prayer. But this prayer isn’t about some small thing, not about something trivial. It’s a prayer of sorrow, gratitude, and hope. Deep in my mom’s closet are stacks of old newspapers chronicling the attack. When I see pictures of anguished faces, of America’s twin towers in flames, and read about the raw pain of a nation … grief wells up in me. And yet, I can walk out of the closet and back into a blessed life of normality. I look at the American flag hanging on my wall before I go to sleep. Oh, I feel gratitude. It’s unimaginable that so much hatred could cause the kil ling of thousands: we all live with a bit more fear in our hearts than a decade ago. But we also found courage, solidarity, and a renewed faith in God. Because of this, I continue to hope: never again.

Michelle Jablonsky Jordan High School, Age 14

Sharing values with people around world I am a teacher of immigrants in Minneapolis, interacting with adults from all over the world. Since 1999, one of my roles has been to be an English and citizenship teacher. I act as a cultural

Pamela Johnson Prior Lake

Heidi Keyho Victoria

A new era of watchfulness

We have all been changed

Why does it take something like this? My thoughts that morning as I got up were “It’s my birthday today, and I’m meeting my new doctor.” And I was wondering if I would hear from my two oldest sons – my youngest was coming over after work. I poured myself a cup of coffee, turned on the TV, and was forever changed. I was frozen with shock. What was I watching? It was ‘Oh my God, what is happening?’ You forget where you are, and your surroundings. I called someone – don’t remember who. It was days before things started making sense. I was praying and praying for the people and families. For the fi rst three to six months, people I would meet showed kindness to one another. The anger and rudeness was gone. People were very polite. I thought “W hy does it take something like this to change people towards one another?” We never know when God is going to call us.

the pain and understood. Walking through those halls, he squeezed my hand very tight. He seemed to know more than I did.

SUBMITTED PHOTO BY JOSH HED

Patriotism in flight Chaska resident Josh Hed took a photo of a bald eagle in flight just north of St. Bonifacius, and later added the U.S. flag “as a tribute to this great country.” He submitted the photo illustration for the 9/11 essay project. broker, explaining idiosyncrasies of American culture to these newcomers. In discussing 9/11 (part of the citizenship curriculum), it’s often necessary to explain how life changed in America since that fateful day. These discussions have changed me. I realize how fortunate I am to live in the United States. Many students come from war-torn countries where individual rights and security are unknown. Here we view it as our God-given way of life. I am all too aware that there are peace-loving people in every country. Just because a student is from Afghanistan or Iraq or Somalia does not mean that person is a violent terrorist. Many of my students have suffered great tragedy. I am more proud of my American heritage than ever; more conscious of the value of our Constitution and Bill of Rights; more grateful for those who defend our country and our rights. Nine-eleven stirred up all of these values in me. I share them daily with people from around the world.

Julie Tewinkel Sharpe Carver

One mother helping another I was working at home in my office listening to the radio when I heard an airplane had crashed in New York City. I turned on the television and watched in horror, as the events of the day unraveled. No one knew what to expect or who was responsible for the attacks on the twin towers. They issued warnings about large cities and shopping centers, especially the Mall of America. I couldn’t concentrate on work and decided to go to the Eden Prairie shopping center. As I was going up the escalator, a Muslim family, father, mother and two sons began their descent on the down escalator opposite me. The mother wore the traditional Muslim dress with a hijab covering her body, head and face. The mother and youngest son stepped on the escalator and the father followed. The oldest son stopped, terrified of the moving stairs. The father, mother and youngest son went down, as the oldest stood frozen in fright, at the top of the escalator. The mother, young son and father, now at the bottom of the escalator realized what had happened and began shouting in their native tongue

for the son to come down. The boy, about 7, was franticly screaming. I was now at the top of the escalator near the frightened boy, as a crowd of people gathered around him. I’m not sure if I reacted from so many years of being around young children, I certainly didn’t think through my actions. I went to the boy, put one arm around his chest, grabbed the escalator railing with the other hand and nudged him onto the fi rst step. As I held him tight, I felt his little heart beat rapidly. About half way down the father entered the up escalator and both mother and father were shouting at me. Soon we were at the bottom of the escalator. I was greeted with words I could not understand. Our body language said it all. I was one mother helping another mother. On that fateful day of the attack I didn’t see a family from another country or know the attack on the twin towers was Muslim terrorists; I saw a family from another country shopping and a young boy in distress. I still believe we live in the land of opportunity. With the current political climate, the influence of money, and bias in the courts, I am worried our freedom is at risk. My hope is it’s not too late.

Dianne Corder Eden Prairie

Still wondering a decade later The Midwestern skies were a perfect blue on Lake Susan Drive in Chanhassen on Sept. 11, 2001. I had just put my first-grade son on the bus bound for Chanhassen Elementary. I also had a toddler by the hand and a newborn on my hip. I tuned in just as the fi rst airplane hit the twin towers in NYC. I saw the second one slam into the second tower and my mind couldn’t grasp what I was watching. Was this a promo for some extreme action movie??? I sat glued to the TV the entire day. What was happening? Should I pick my son up from school? If the terrorists went after our country’s fi nancial and governmental centers for maximum impact, would they hit the heart of a small town next? My mind was racing and thinking terrible thoughts. It felt as though the sky was a giant door that closed up. All flights were suspended and the only sounds above were military airplanes on patrol. I looked at my two young daughters and thought,

Take your car search for a spin.

I remember the beautiful day and then seeing images of the World Trade Center burning on television. How a small kernel of fear started to take hold knowing my daughter was in training for her first job just three blocks away from that building now on fi re. I wanted to receive as much information as possible, so I turned on the radio as well. That station was speculating that the planes could have been carrying anthrax. Now my fear was starting to take control. What could I do? How could I help? I could only pray that God would keep her safe. She called me late that afternoon and told me of how they felt the impact three blocks away. How her desk slid back and forth when each plane hit the World Trade Center. How over the loudspeaker, they were instructed to remain at their desks. She told her friend, I’m not sure what is happening, but we are leaving now. Once on the sidewalk, there already was a lot of debris flying around. They saw on a storefront window a television viewing exactly what all of us were watching. With no sound they assumed we were under attack. How they ran in terror when others shouted, “The fi rst tower is falling.” When I remember 9/11 these vivid memories return and it feels more recent than 10 years ago. It is important to honor and remember those who lost their lives on that day, and later because of responding to the events of that day. Our history changed with that event. The elusive safe and secure feeling is gone. We have all been changed by that historical day.

Janis Mayer Eden Prairie

A little boy’s hands and heart I was a special-education assistant, walking down the hallway at Five Hawks Elementary with a fi rst-grader. There were whispers from the adults as I passed by the school library. I noticed a small TV and thought it was odd for it to be on. I paused and witnessed the second plane crash through the twin towers as the first one was still on fi re. I took that little boy’s hand and continued to walk to his speech therapy. He was a child with autism. I had no idea what I had just witnessed. I just felt a somber mood within every hallway we walked down. Tears were hidden behind a “normalcy mask,” while phone calls were made by the staff to make sure their families were OK, and parents called to pick up their children. We all upheld our responsibilities for our students, staying calm and continuing the day’s activities. The school day ended with so many unanswered questions. We were all shocked and confused. Understanding the reality of that infamous day, 9/11/2001, I’ve often reflected on holding that little boy’s hand. He couldn’t speak, but somewhere in his innocent heart he felt

The attacks of 10 years ago did change my world view. There is a lot of evil and hate in this world. Ten years ago, we saw the worst of it. There is a lot of good in this world, too. Evil and hate need to be confronted in an effective way. My world view is clearer now in that the good people of this planet can get along. If we can overcome the evil and hateful people and make sure we have honest and effective leaders, the world will be a better place. I think we should vote for the best candidate and be on the watch for evil, hateful and criminal activities and make the call when you see it. I think it’s best if people get involved with making their community a better place, not always expecting someone else to do it. I think it is time to re-evaluate how we do things. An updated and effective business model in most areas would be a good thing. My sense of security is changed some. I hope for the best, but it may be a good idea to be prepared for the worst. It may be the way to go in case of emergencies. My life is changed, as I am on the watch for suspicious activity more now than before 10 years ago. I am also more active in volunteering for my community and charitable organizations.

Steve Pany Prior Lake

Nothing could divide nation after attacks “Our greatest glory is not in never failing, but in rising up every time we fail.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson How insightful this American treasure was, how true this quote is. For me 9/11 was more than an inhuman attack on the innocent. It was two of the greatest messages this world would ever know. First: WE ARE NOT ALONE! Days after the attacks newspaper pictures and video clips show the world mourning with us, their outcry of rage not unheard. The news at times paints the picture that the world dislikes the American attitude, yet when we needed our friends and allies the most, they were there for us. Second: WE WILL RISE! Our country did not ask for this and did not deserve this yet when we were attacked without warning or chance to prepare, we triumphed. Americans were helping and sacrificing for fellow Americans. Religion, political differences or race could not divide our country that day ... we were all Americans. I am allowed to write this because of the history that is America. America is the great experiment and is the greatest achievement in history. I am so proud and honored to be part of our American story.

Sarah Kirchner Belle Plaine Sarah Kirchner is a student at the Minnesota School of Business, Shakopee.

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Shakopee Valley News | www.shakopeenews.com

September 8, 2011 | Page 17

scoreboard Contributions welcome to tabeln@swpub.com, (952) 345-6587

Missota Conference standings

SHAKOPEE FOOTBALL

Rolling along

FOOTBALL Conference W L 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Football team rushes for over 500 yards in easy win BY TODD ABELN tabeln@swpub.com

Before the season, Shakopee football head coach Jody Stone said this year’s team would win its fair share of games but it wouldn’t be as stylish as last year. If one game is any indication, Stone was wrong. Shakopee rolled up over 500 yards as the Sabers cruised to a 56-6 victory against Fridley last Friday at Shakopee Junior High School Stadium. “I thought we played well,” head coach Jody Stone said. The Sabers did most of the damage on the ground as Shakopee ran the bal l for 518 yards on 60 carries and seven touchdowns. That worked out to an average yards per carry of 8.6. Thirteen different players carried the ball for Shakopee with just about every one of them having success. Anthony Valient led the way with 129 yards on 14 carries and a touchdown. Quarterback Zak Hoffman

PHOTO BY PETER CONRAD

It takes three Fridley tacklers to take down Anthony Valient in Shakopee’s season-opener. had 87 yards on nine carries and two touchdowns. Nick McBeain had 76 yards and two touchdowns. Josh Botten and Connor Neal each ran for a touchdown in the game. Five different runners fi nished with over 45 yards in the game. Shakopee put the game away early as it scored 14 fi rst-quarter points and then tacked on 28 in the second quarter to go into halftime leading 42-6. The Sabers scored two more touchdowns in the third quar-

MORE ONLINE FOR UPDATES ON THE SABERS, VISIT

www.scoreboard.mn

ter and then pulled the starters.

CONFERENCE OPENER The Sabers open up Missota Conference play on Friday when they travel to Chanhassen for a 7 p.m. start. Stone thought Chanhassen

would be one of the teams that Shakopee would be battling with for the Missota Conference crown before the season started. They still may but Chanhassen opened the season with a 36-21 loss to Owatonna. The Storm fell behind 15-0 and 29-7 before cutting the lead to 36-21 by the end of the game. If the fi rst game is any indication, Chanhassen will try to throw the ball as it passed the ball 30 times compared to only 24 rushes.

“The challenge will be much different this week with Chan being a school of near equal size,” Stone said. “Chan is much better than last year and I am worried we may not have learned enough versus Fridley. But as long as we take care of the football, tackle well and are mentally ready for a better opponent, I am sure we will have a good chance against Chan.” Shakopee beat Chanhassen twice last year, once in the regular season and once in the playoffs.

SHAKOPEE CROSS COUNTRY

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Shakopee girls cross country team, all 55 members, start the season running together at the Rolf Melby Invitational.

Junior Hauger starts strong, wins opening meet BY TODD ABELN tabeln@swpub.com

Maria Hauger just put everyone on notice. The Shakopee junior started the 2011 cross country season by putting up a blistering time at the same course she won her second state title almost 10 months ago. Hauger won the season’s opening race — the Rolf Melby Invitational at St. Olaf College in Northfield — in style.

She ran 13 minutes, 56 seconds to win the race by over a minute and a half. That is the fastest 4 kilometer time in the country this year, Hauger’s fi rst time ever breaking 14 minutes, and 18 seconds faster than last year’s state championship run. With Hauger winning the race and three other Saber runners fi nishing in the top 20, Shakopee fi nished in third place as a team. “Overall we did well,” head

coach Mark Neu said. “Our top four runners placed in the top 20 out of 500 [runners].” After Hauger, junior Winona Rachel was third with a time of 15:41. Seventh-grader Tess Misgen ran a 16:16 to finish in 16th place in her fi rst varsity run. “An amazing fi nish for her fi rst race,” Neu said. A l l i Ly nch f i n i she d i n 16:27 which placed her in 20th place. Freshman Maggie Jakubiak

ran a 17:49 to finish in 82nd place. Alyson Walker and Katie Mulcrone fi nished in 90th and 98th place, respectively. Shakopee ended the meet with 122 points to finish behind Roseville’s 77 and East Ridge’s 92 points.

BOYS The boys started their 2011 season by finishing the 26team Rolf Melby Invitational in 21st place. Shakopee fi nished with 490

points. Eastview won with 104. Senior Aaron Wood led the Sabers by fi nishing the race in 18:01, which placed him 42nd. He was followed by freshman Bryon Olfert, who finished in 87th place with a time of 18:52. Kyle Rachel was next for Shakopee in 90th place followed by Nick Wagner in 118th, Jacob Ames in 153rd, Allen Lynch in 154th and Nathan Coleman in 156.

SHAKOPEE GIRLS SWIMMING

Saber’s slow start doesn’t slow down expectations Katie Nadeau returns after swimming at state last year BY TODD ABELN tabeln@swpub.com

It hasn’t been the start they were hoping for but once things settle down, the Shakopee girls swi m team is expecti ng a strong season. The Sabers have lost their f i rst two meets despite 11 returning swimmers and a couple of newcomers who are expected to help. “We’ve had a slow start but I’m very optimistic about the season,” head coach Kathy Carlson said. “We have a lot of enthusiasm.” Junior Katie Nadeau returns for the Sabers a fter qualifying for the state meet last year in the 200 freestyle and 100 butterfly. Carlson said that Nadeau will most likely compete in those events again this year

but will get moved around throughout the year. “She has put her time in the pool and it’s paying off for her,” Carlson said. “She’s just an allaround swimmer.” Other returning swimmers are seniors Gretta Berens, Sarah Curren, Alex Fernholz, Cassie Lindstrom and Kara Rognrud. Juniors returning are Sara O’Brien, Alex Schmid, Taylor Vaughan and Amber Sinnen. With that many swimmers returning with experience, Carlson said the team should be strong in sprints. “We’ve got some strengths and weaknesses that we have to fill,” Carlson said. “I’m excited to see what we can do this year.’ The Sabers do have eight divers retu r ning but on ly Amber Sinnen has varsity

experience. Carlson said that sophomores Melody Minea and Mariah Lattery and freshmen Tawnie Graff, Somi Yi, Chrissy Yost, Jessie Lindsstrom and Channa Duong will provide depth to the team.

ROUGH START The Sabers have lost its fi rst two meets to Buffalo and Chanhassen. Against the Storm, Shakopee lost 95-83. Nadeau won the 100 fly with a time of 1 minute, 1.05 seconds. Nadeau also finished second in the 200 free. Berens fi nished second in the 100 free with a time of 58.9 seconds. Teammate Rognrud was fourth followed by Mariah Lattery in sixth. In the 500 free, Alexandra Doebel finished second with

PHOTO BY TODD ABELN

Senior Gretta Berens is one of 10 seniors on the Shakopee girls swim team. a time of 5:51.1 while Chrissy Yost fi nished in fourth. Sara O’Brien was fourth

in the 200 individual medley while Cassie Lindstrom was third in the 50 free.

2011 Shakopee girls swimming schedule Thursday, Sept. 8 ............. at Chaska .............................................. 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15 ........... at Farmington ..................................... 6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 ............ at Lakeville South .............................. 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22 ........... New Prague ......................................... 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27 ............. Minneapolis South............................ 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 29 ........... Minneapolis Southwest .................. 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6 ............... Red Wing .............................................. 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13 ............. at Northfield ........................................ 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15 .............. at Edina (True Team section) ........... noon Tuesday, Oct. 18 ............... at Watertown-Mayer ........................ 6 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 25 ............... Saint Peter ............................................ 6 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29.............. at Missota Conference .................... 1 p.m.

Overall W L 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1

Holy Angels Northfield Shakopee Red Wing Chaska Farmington Chanhassen New Prague Friday, Sept. 9 Shakopee at Chanhassen, 7 p.m. Northfield at Chaska, 7 p.m. Farmington at Red Wing, 7 p.m. Holy Angels at New Prague, 7 p.m. Results Thursday, Sept. 1 Mankato West 60, New Prague 14 Northfield 11, St. Paul Central 9 Owatonna 36, Chanhassen 21 Friday, Sept. 2 Shakopee 56, Fridley 6 Red Wing 19, Austin 9 Holy Angels 28, Chisago Lakes 0 Roch. Century 34, Chaska 7 Roch. Mayo 35, Farmington 28 VOLLEYBALL Conference Overall W L W L Shakopee 0 0 1 0 Chanhassen 0 0 5 1 Red Wing 0 0 4 3 Farmington 0 0 2 1 Holy Angels 0 0 1 2 New Prague 0 0 0 3 Northfield 0 0 0 3 Chaska 0 0 0 3 Tuesday, Sept. 13 Shakopee at Wayzata, 7 p.m. Roch. Century at Red Wing, 7 p.m. Roch. JM at Northfield, 7:30 p.m. Results Saturday, Sept. 3 Eden Prairie def Chanhassen 24-26, 3129, 15-9 Chanhassen def. Waconia 22-25, 25-14, 15-12 Chanhassen def Mayer Lutheran 27-25, 25-18 Chanhassen def Minnetonka 25-20, 26-24 Chanhassen def North St. Paul 25-18, 18-25, 15-12 Thursday, Aug. 25 Lakeville South def Northfield 25-9, 2514, 25-19 Minnetonka def New Prague 25-13, 2325, 25-16, 25-13 Bl. Kennedy def Holy Angels 25-19, 2225, 25-14, 23-25, 15-7 Farmington def Albert Lea 25-13, 25-15, 23-25, 25-23 Saturday, Aug. 27 Prior Lake def Chaska 25-15, 25-16, 25-22 BOYS SOCCER Conference Overall W L T W L T Farmington 0 0 0 3 0 1 Northfield 0 0 0 2 1 1 Holy Angels 0 0 0 2 1 1 Shakopee 0 0 0 1 2 1 Red Wing 0 0 0 1 2 0 Chanhassen 0 0 0 1 2 0 Chaska 0 0 0 0 2 1 New Prague 0 0 0 0 3 0 Thursday, Sept. 8 Watertown-Mayer at Chanhassen, 5 p.m. Mankato West at New Prague, 5 p.m. Northfield at Farmington, 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Waconia at Shakopee, 11 a.m. Holy Angels at Armstrong, 1 p.m. Red Wing at Kasson-Mantorville, 2 p.m. Eastview at Northfield, 3 p.m. Chaska at Lakeville South, 3 p.m. SW Christian at Chanhassen, 5 p.m. Results Thursday, Sept. 1 Bl. Kennedy 3, Shakopee 2 New Ulm 5, New Prague 0 Lakeville South 2, Northfield 1 Pine Island 2, Red Wing 0 Waconia 0, Chaska 0 Farmington 2, Rosemount 1 Friday, Sept. 2 Holy Angels 13, Two Harbors 0 Saturday, Sept. 3 Holy Angels 2, Duluth Marshall 2 GIRLS SOCCER Conference Overall W L T W L T Shakopee 0 0 0 3 1 0 Farmington 0 0 0 3 2 0 Holy Angels 0 0 0 2 2 1 Chaska 0 0 0 1 1 1 Chanhassen 0 0 0 1 3 0 Northfield 0 0 0 0 2 1 New Prague 0 0 0 0 3 1 Red Wing 0 0 0 0 2 0 Thursday, Sept. 8 Watertown-Mayer at Chanhassen, 7 p.m. New Prague at Mankato West, 5 p.m. Northfield at Farmington, 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Waconia at Shakopee, 1 p.m. Winona at Red Wing, 10 a.m. Chanhassen at Prior Lake, 1 p.m. Mpls. Southwest at Northfield, 1 p.m. Chaska at Lakeville South, 5 p.m. Results Thursday, Sept. 1 Shakopee 7, Bl. Kennedy 1 New Ulm 3, New Prague 0 Farmington 3, Roch. JM 0 Chaska 4, Waconia 1 Lakeville North 2, Northfield 0 Friday, Sept. 2 Pine Island 4, Red Wing 2 Burnsville 5, Chanhassen 1 Holy Angels 7, Two Harbors 0 GIRLS TENNIS Results Wednesday, Aug. 31 Edina 7, Shakopee 0 Thursday, Sept. 1 Wayzata 6, Shakopee 1 GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY Results Friday, Sept. 2 Rolf Melby Invite, Northfield Roseville 77, East Ridge 92, Shakopee 122, Chanhassen 124, Anoka 135, Holy Family 136, Chaska 203, Woodbury 250, Owatonna 269, Red Wing 302 BOYS CROSS COUNTRY Results Friday, Sept. 2 Rolf Melby Invite, Northfield Eastview 104, Owatonna 132, Centennial 158, Chanhassen 177, Mound Westonka 180, Roseville 189, Woodbury 261, Chaska 262, Anoka 267, Mankato West 269. Shakopee 490 (21st place)


Page 18 | September 8, 2011

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

SHAKOPEE BOYS SOCCER

SHAKOPEE GIRLS TENNIS

Sabers rebound for win Boys soccer team shuts out Tonka BY TODD ABELN tabeln@swpub.com

The Shakopee boys soccer team rebounded from a disappointing loss with a big win on Tuesday. Shakopee lost 3-2 to Bloomington Kennedy last Thursday but got back on the winning track with a 1-0 victory over Minnetonka on Tuesday night. M a r io Pen a sc or e d t he game’s only goal on an assist from Fatah Abdelfatah. “The team moved the ball well and showed consistency throughout the match,” head coach Jon Poppen said. Junior goalie Lucas Kinsel preser ved the win for the Sabers by making three pointblank saves in the second half. That win came after the Sabers played f lat against Kennedy in the fi rst half and couldn’t rebound from it. Kennedy scored two firsthalf goals and went into halftime leading 2-0. Shakopee picked up its pace in the second half but could not overcome the two-goal deficit. Alexi Johnson and Pena scored the goals for the Sabers.

PHOTO BY TODD ABELN

Sam Root returns a ball while playing No. 1 doubles for the Sabers.

Top teams too much for Sabers Girls tennis falls to top-ranked Edina PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

Alex Kubitz shields the ball from a defender for the Shakopee boys soccer team. The Shakopee girls tennis team wanted to get the best opponents it could for its 2011 schedule. It was thought that in doing so, it might hurt the team’s record but by the end of the season it would make it a better team. We will see if that turns out to be true. In its last three matches, Shakopee faced three of top-five ranked teams. This past week, Shakopee lost 0-7 to top-ranked Edina and 1-6 to fi fth-ranked Wayzata. Against Wayzata last Thursday, Shakopee’s lone victory came at No. 4 singles when Taylor Koenen won 6-1, 6-3. The Sabers lost three matches in three sets. Dannick Boyogueno lost 6-2, 6-7(2-7) 2-6 at No. 3 singles. In

SHAKOPEE GIRLS SOCCER

Girls win twice Sabers rally for win against Rosemount BY TODD ABELN tabeln@swpub.com

The Shakopee girls soccer team improved to 3-1 on the season with a blowout victory and a nice come-from-behind win. The Sabers routed Bloomington Kennedy 7-1 at home last Thursday. Prior to that they beat Rosemount 2-1 on Tuesday last week. In the Kennedy win, Shakopee got goals from four different players. Gracie Vau g h a n net te d the hat trick while Jolyssa O’Fallon added two. Roxanne Roemer and Michaela Brown each had a goal in the win. “Several pretty goals in this

BY TODD ABELN tabeln@swpub.com

one,” head coach Mike Ceola said. “Every goal had an assist. Nice job of combination play by the girls.” O’Fallon also added two assists in the win. Against Rosemount, Shakopee fell behind 1-0 just 37 seconds into the game. Shakopee answered by tying the game at 1-1 15 minutes later when Haley Bass scored on an assist from Vaughan. Vaughan delivered a pass to Bass at the 18-yard line. Bass quickly turned and fi red the ball past the Rosemount goalie inside the far goal post. “Haley did a great job of joining the rush and fi nishing the chance,” Ceola said. The Sabers took a 2-1 led just before halftime when Vaughan raced past two defenders and beat the goalie with two minutes left. Amy Menke earned the win in net for the Sabers. “The girls did a great job of

doubles, Jojo Lindstrom and Kayla Schmidt fell 6 -2, 0 - 6, 4-6 at No. 2 and Anna Hauser and Jess Svac lost 2-6, 6-4, 3-6 at No. 3. Shakopee’s other losses were 1-6, 0-6 by Vonnick Boyogueno at No. 1 singles and 3-6, 2-6 by Haley Lick fold at No. 2 singles. Kristina Worm and Sam Root lost 1-6, 2-6 at No. 1 doubles. A gai nst Edi na, Sha kop ee lost all seven matches in straight sets. Vonnick fell 0-6, 2-6 at No. 1 singles while Lickfold lost 1-6, 2-6 at No. 2. Dannick fell 0 - 6, 3- 6 and Hauser lost 1-6, 1-6 at three and four singles. Worm and Root lost 6-7, 2-6 at No. 1 doubles. Koenen and Jess Svac lost 1-6, 0-6 at No. 2 doubles and Schmidt and Lindstrom fell 2-6, 6-7 (4-7) at No. 3 doubl`s. Shakopee is now 2-3 on the season.

ATHLETE HIGHLIGHTS

PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

Cara Zastrow and the Sabers improved to 3-1 on the season with two straight wins. fi nding the trailing midfielder the whole game, leading to

many quality shots,” Ceola said.

SHAKOPEE VOLLEYBALL

Straight-set win in opener Volleyball team starts strong BY TODD ABELN tabeln@swpub.com

The sixth-ranked Shakopee volleyball team opened the season with an impressive win. Shakopee traveled to Eastview High School in Apple Valley and defeated the Lighting in straight sets on Tuesday last week.

MORE ONLINE FOR UPDATES ON THE SABERS, VISIT

www.scoreboard.mn The Sabers won 25-20, 25-21, 25-19 to start the season with a win. Eastview is unranked so far this year but started the 2010 season as the No. 1-ranked team in the state. Shakopee beat Eastview in 2008 for its

second of three-straight state championships. Head coach Matt Busch said the Sabers played efficient ball in the victory. Shakopee was led by Claire Sames, who had 14 kills and two aces in the game. Carlee Hoppe added 13 kills and Kari Monnens had seven in the victory. Junior Maggie Holcombe had 36 assists in her varsity debut for the Sabers. Busch said Holcombe was fl awless in the win and that

her communication kept the team in sync. “Maggie did a g reat job running the offense,” he said. “She made really good choices, played great defense and appeared to have little trouble adjusting to the varsity level.” Alex Berger led the team in digs with 11 while Hoppe and Sames each had nine in the victory. Shakopee had seven aces against only four service errors for a very efficient night.

Alli Lynch Girls cross country

Ahmed Abshir Boys soccer

Alli Lynch has been a fiveyear starter for the Shakopee girls cross country team and has helped the Sabers earn a conference championship and three state tournament entries. Lynch has earned two all-conference honors and an all-conference honorable mention award. Lynch’s 20th place fi nish out of 500-plus runners on Sept. 2 helped her team place third at the Rolf Melby Invitational at St. Olaf College. The honor roll student’s other activities include track, LINK, band, SADD and Student Council. Her parents are Julie and Rich Lynch.

Senior Ahmed Abshir is a captain for the boys soccer team. He had a goal and an assist last week while playing both center-mid and forward for the Sabers. Abshir will be counted on to help in all phases of the game for the Sabers this fall. His other activity is LEAP. His father is Najah Ibrahim.

Session I at Classic Gymnastics in Chanhassen. Session I runs 8 weeks from Sept. 6 - Oct. 29. Classes are offered to both boys and girls aged 2-17. To view the schedule, visit www.classicgym. com or call: (952) 368-1909.

For more i n for mation contact Doug Krohn at doug. krohn@comcast.net.

Prior Lake Area Running Club

The Shakopee Valley News welcomes information on athletes from the Shakopee who don’t attend Shakopee High School and are excelling somewhere else including those who are competing at the college level. To submit an athlete for consideration for a feature story, send an e-mail to Todd Abeln at tabeln@swpub.com or call (952) 345-6587.

Honorees are selected by “The Committee” in the Shakopee High School Activities Department.

SPORTS BRIEFS

Ulferts to play as freshman Dylan Ulferts, a 2010 Shakopee graduate, will not be redshirted this year at Winona State University. Ulferts, a freshman, helped the Sabers to the 2010 Missota Conference title with 50 catches for 820 yards and 11 touchdowns. He also rushed for 10 touchdowns and 509 yards this past season.

Maria Hauger top-ranked runner Two-time defending state

champion Maria Hauger is once again the runner to beat. Hauger begins the season as the top-ranked girls cross country runner in the preseason Class 2A rankings. The Shakopee girls team, which has reached state meet the last couple of seasons, begins the year unranked.

BAC season set to begin The Barracuda Aquatics Club fall/winter season is set to start in September. Fees for the fall/winter season are not set but the developmental level (entry level) fees

will be close to the following (based upon a Sept. 7 start date until Dec. 2 end date, which is the fi rst of two sessions offered for developmental). Developmental Team — $290 (plus a $56 USA swimming registration fee) The developmental team practices on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 5:45 to 7 p.m. at the Shakopee Junior High School pool. The full fall/winter season is Sept. 7 to March 2 for the developmental team. The season is broken into two sessions for the developmental team and swimmers do have the option to swim one or two sessions.

T h e f i r s t s e s sio n r u n s through Dec. 2. Second session is Dec. 5 to March 2. Registration is set for Tuesday, Sept. 6 at the Shakopee Junior High School pool from 5 to 6:30 p.m. You can also sign up anytime after Sept. 6 during the season. For more information, contact Jeff Lee at MNFEDCUDAS@aol.com or call the BAC Hotline at (952) 884-3703 or visit the BAC website: at offtheblocks.org/barracuda/

Classic Gymnastics fall registration open Registration is now open for

The Prior Lake Area Running Club meets weekly for group runs and also has guest speakers and can provide discounts at local running stores. All levels of runners and joggers are welcome. You don’t have to be from Prior Lake to join the club.

Send in athlete information


Shakopee Valley News | www.shakopeenews.com

September 8, 2011 | Page 19

let'sGo!Calendar Location: Legion Clubroom, 1266 First Ave. E., Shakopee Info: (952) 250-2207

WE WANT YOUR LISTINGS!

Upcoming

Listings are printed free but not guaranteed, although we do our best to include them. Submit your events through our www.LetsGo.mn website, where you can find many more local and regional fun things to do. You can also send an e-mail to editor@shakopeenews. com. Deadline is one week prior to publication. For information call (952) 345-6680.

Thursday

SEPT. 8 MN VALLEY CHRISTIAN WOMEN The “The Seasons Are A Changing” MN Valley Christian Women’s Connection luncheon’s featured speaker Ann Henzlik, sharing her message “Who Am I?” Sisters Holly and Robin Berry will share their musical talents. Free child care provided by reservation only. Sponsored by Stonecroft Ministry. Time: 12:30-2 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8 Cost: $16 Location: ENJOY! Restaurant, Apple Valley Info: (952) 403-0773

HOW ’BOUT THEM APPLES A Master Gardener will share information about how to grow, maintain and harvest apples. This program is part of the Evenings in the Garden series. Time: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8 Cost: Free Location: Scott County Fairgrounds, 7151 W. 190th St., Jordan Info: (952) 492-5410 or esmith515@umn.edu

Dr., Jordan Info: (952) 492-2355; (952) 4926211 for Run of the Mill info

SHAKOPEE HISTORIC SITE TOUR

COMEDIAN DERICK LENGWENUS Comedian Derick Lengwenus currently resides in Chicago where he performs stand-up and studies improv at Second City. Comedian Pete Borchers will also perform. Time: 8:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Sept. 9-10; 10:30 p.m. Sept. 10 Cost: $13 for 8:30 Friday and 8 p.m. Saturday shows; $10 for 10:30 p.m. Saturday show Location: MinneHAHA Comedy Club, 1583 1st Ave., Shakopee Info: minnehahacomedyclub.com/ shakopee

JORDAN HEIMATFEST Jordan’s Heimatfest kicks off on Friday, Sept. 9, with the annual car cruise, and a street dance. Then, on Sept. 10, the parade will start at 11 a.m. at the Jordan fire station. A lineup of events are held, including the 9 a.m. Walk/Run of the Mill 5K race, fishing contest, noon events in the park, and the Miss Jordan coronation at 4 p.m. Saturday. Time: Car cruise starts 5 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9; events run throughout the day and close with 9 p.m. fireworks Cost: Free festival entry with a $4 Heimatfest button ($5 at the gate) Location: Water Street in downtown Jordan, and Lagoon Park, 300 Park

Get ready for dazzling ball-handling tricks, high-flying slam-dunks and hilarious family comedy when the Shakopee Rotary Club presents the Harlem Ambassadors Basketball show against the local Shako Dunkers. Purchase tickets at Shakopee Community Center or the Scott County Historical Society or at the door. All proceeds benefit Shakopee Rotary projects and select area charitable organizations. Time: 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22 Cost: $5 students/seniors, $8 adults, free children 4 and under Location: Shakopee High School gym Info: shakopeerotary.org

LIVING PROOF

MILITARY APPRECIATION DAY

The Shakopee Knights of Columbus is hosting a shrimp and steak dinner with fried shrimp, sirloin steak with mushrooms, baked potato, Texas toast, salad bar, dessert and coffee or milk. Time: 5-8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9 Cost: $15 for both, $12 for shrimp or steak and $3 children’s meal Location: Shakopee Knights Events Center, 1760 Fourth Ave. E., Shakopee

HARLEM AMBASSADORS VS. SHAKO DUNKERS

Shakopee Heritage Society is hosting a tour of nine historic homes and sites. Tickets available at the Scott County Historical Society, 235 Fuller St. S., Shakopee. Time: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: $10 Location: Downtown Shakopee Info: (952) 445-2002, ploumenp@ aol.com

SEPT. 9

KC SHRIMP AND STEAK DINNER

Games, music, food and fun. Time: 3-6 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18 Cost: Free Location: Living Hope Lutheran Church and School, 8600 Horizon Dr., Shakopee

SEPT. 10

Friday The Minnesota Valley Rally is a biweekly classic car show. Time: 6-10 p.m. Fridays, Sept. 9 and Sept. 23 Cost: Free Location: Downtown Shakopee

BLOCK PARTY

Saturday

Christian author and speaker Beth Moore will be featured in a Living Proof Live simulcast event. The event offers powerful messages to women that will challenge them to dig deeper into a more intimate relationship with God. Grace Church is one of over 700 churches from around the world that is participating in this live simulcast. Time: 9:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 (doors open 8 a.m.) Cost: $20 (includes lunch) Location: Grace Church, Eden Prairie Info: atgrace.com/events, (952) 224-3064

CAR SHOW

RALLY SUNDAY East Union Lutheran Church is celebrating Rally Sunday with the beginning of Sunday School, a blessing of the backpacks, communion and a car show. Children can be registered for Sunday School. Pastor Tom Stutelberg will be retelling the Story of Jonah with hats. Time: 9 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 18 Location: East Union Lutheran Church, Carver

Beyond the Yellow Ribbon South of the River host first annual Military Appreciation Day. Welcome all branches of the military (members and their families) to attend. Family activities and demonstrations. Time: 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: Free Location: Lions Park, Shakopee

2011 ROCK & WALK The public is invited to the fundraising event for Alzheimer’s disease, hosted by McKenna Crossing senior living community and the River Valley YMCA. The event, which includes a 5k walk/ run, includes live music, horse-drawn wagon rides, and children’s activities including a “Diaper Dash” and “Toddler Trot.” Time: 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 10; 10a.m. walk/run Cost: $20 Location: Shepherd’s Path Campus, 13810 Shepherd’s Path, Prior Lake Info: mckennacrossing.org or (952) 230-3300

BIRD WATCHING FOR BEGINNERS Learn from a professional birder how to find birds in their different habitats and how to use a field guide. Learn how to look for identifying features of birds such as eye rings, wing bars and other distinctive markings. Dress for the weather and bring bug spray, if needed. There will be extra binoculars to loan. Led by Volunteer Refuge Naturalist Craig Mandel. Time: 10-11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: Free Location: Old Cedar Avenue Trailhead, 9500 Old Cedar Ave. S., Bloomington Info: (952) 854-5900 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley

FREE GUIDED HIKE Take a free guided hike to commemorate the season. Search for flora and fauna and walk along the colorful trails. Learn about other Three Rivers parks to visit, and the dates of other hikes to participate in for completion of the program. Bring binoculars and enjoy the splendor of fall on one of these guided hikes.

SCHS HANGAR DANCE

PHOTO BY KRISTIN HOLTZ

Babe’s Place, 124 Holmes St., is one of nine historic sites featured in the Shakopee Historic Site Tour.

Spotlight

HISTORIC SITE TOUR

S EVENT

tep back into time during Shakopee Heritage Society’s Historic Site Tour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10. The biennial tour features nine Shakopee

homes and businesses in downtown Shakopee. Tickets are $10 and available at the Scott County Historical Society, 235 Fuller St. S.

Time: 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: Free Location: The Landing - Minnesota River Heritage Park, 2187 E. Hwy. 101, Shakopee Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

CANTERBURY’S FAN APPRECIATION DAY On Canterbury’s Fan Appreciation Day race fans will be admitted free of charge and one fan will drive away in a new car. Time: 1:30-6 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: Free admission and programs Location: Location: Canterbury Park, 1100 Canterbury Rd. S., Shakopee Info: canterburypark.com

Sunday

SEPT. 11 SHEPHERD OF THE LAKE GOLF TOURNAMENT Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church is holding its 15th annual golf tournament. Cost includes18 holes of golf, electric cart, range balls and dinner. Register at sollc. org or print the form on the site and mail to Ron Bickle, SOLLC, 3611 North Berens Rd. NW, Prior Lake, MN, 55379. Time: Noon, Sunday, Sept. 11; 1:30 p.m. shotgun start

Cost: $75 per golfer Location: The Wilds Golf Club, Prior Lake

POND HOUSE See samples of wild rice in various stages of preparation, and learn how important this food was for Native Americans and white settlers on the Minnesota frontier. Time: 1:30-4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11 Cost: $2, free for youth through high school Location: Pond House, Pond Dakota Mission Park, 401 104th E. St., Bloomington Info: (952) 563-8738; ci.bloomington.mn.us

FAMILY STORY TIME For kids of all ages, no reservations needed. Local author Cathy Isles will be the special guest on Sept. 13. Time: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 13Oct. 11, Nov. 15- Dec. 6. Cost: Free Location: Shakopee Library, 235 Lewis St. S., Shakopee Info: scott.lib.mn.us, (952) 2339590

SEPT. 13 EDEN PRAIRIE WOMEN’S CONNECTION Speakers are Linda Stai sharing the message, “You Control You Life: True or False?” and Janine Knack and Michele Obermeier with fun and festive table settings. RSVP by Sept. 7. Time: Noon-1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13 Cost: $13 Location: Grace Church, 9301 Eden Prairie Road, Eden Prairie Info: (952) 995-1117; (952) 9943324; edenprairiewc@aol.com

SCOTT COUNTY CITY TO COUNTRY TOUR The 13th annual Scott County City to Country Tour is a drive-ityourself tour hosted by University of Minnesota Extension to demonstrate the importance of agriculture and the rural character of Scott County. Each site leaves a positive, lasting impression on visitors about agriculture and horticulture in Scott County and Minnesota through demonstrations, hands-on activities and educational displays. Car passes will be available at the tour sites. Time: 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Cost: $10 per car Location: Sites in Elko New Market and southern Prior Lake Info: (952) 492-5410, torb0022@ umn.edu or facebook.com/ citytocountrytour

Wednesday

SEPT. 14 GARAGE AND BAKE SALE

Tuesday

The “Bees Knees – 1920s” Hangar Dance will raise funds for the Scott County Historical Society. Get dolled up in your ’20s glad rags and get a wiggle on. Music by the Roseville Big Band, silent and live auctions, moonshine cash bar (wine/beer), light supper, costume and Charleston dance contests and more. Tickets available at SCHS or the Shakopee Chamber of Commerce. You must be 21 or older to attend. Time: 6:30-10:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Cost: $30, $25 SCHS members Location: Flying Cloud Airport – Gate H Info: (952) 445-0378, info@ scottcountyhistory.org

Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church will hold its annual garage sale and bake sale. Friday, Sept. 16 is half-price day. Time: 4-8 p.m. Sept. 14; 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Sept. 15; 8 a.m.-noon Sept. 16 Location: Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church, 3611 North Berens Road NW, Prior Lake Info: rbree70@yahoo.com, (952) 447-2082 or (952) 447-2692

CASSEROLE/SALAD LUNCHEON The Shakopee American Legion Auxiliary is hosting a casserole/salad luncheon. Time: 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14 Cost: $7

KC TURKEY DINNER The Shakopee Knights of Columbus Home Association is hosting a turkey dinner with turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes, corn, coleslaw, cranberries and dessert. Time: 4-7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25 Cost: $10, $4 ages 3-10 and free for 2 and under Location: Shakopee Knights Events Center, 1760 Fourth Ave. E., Shakopee

HOLY REDEEMER CHURCH FALL FESTIVAL Full-day outing includes children cake walk, mini golf and fishing pond; polka Mass; music by Shelly Galvin, The Czech Lites and The Flemming Fold; bingo; silent auction; chicken and ham dinner; and raffle. Time: 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 25 Location: Holy Redeemer Parish Festival, Montgomery

letsGo.mn discover minnesota music, art, theater & family fun


Page 20 | September 8, 2011

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

LET’sGO!CALENDAR More Fun Things To Do

suspender-style horse costumes and play in a safe “jousting field” with foam-rubber lances and soft targets. Time: Through Sept. 11 Cost: Ages 1-101 $8.95; museum members and children younger than 1 free Location: Minneapolis Children’s Museum, 10 W. Seventh St., St. Paul Info: (651) 225-6000 or mcm.org

JAPANESE MOON VIEWING See the ornamental grass collection and enjoy a traditional harvest celebration, based on Japanese tradition. Enjoy poetry and music around a campfire. Time: 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8 Cost: Free with gate admission of $9 for adults; free for ages 15 and younger; free to Arboretum members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu or (952) 443-1422

VICTORY LUTHERAN BREAKFAST AND PUPPET SHOW First Light puppeteers will perform at Victory Lutheran Church as a part of their fall kickoff events. After the 9 a.m. service and a free breakfast, the First Light puppeteers will then take center stage to bring the gospel message to children of all ages in story and song. These Rally Day events are designed to kick-start fall education and spiritual growth programs. Time: 9 a.m. service; 10:15 a.m. free breakfast followed immediately by puppet show Sunday, Sept. 11 Cost: Free Location: Victory Lutheran Church, 6200 Berger Drive, Eden Prairie Info: victorylcms.org or (952) 9340956

CLEAN WATER SUMMIT AT THE ARB The 2011 Clean Water Summit will focus on trees and the role they play in protecting and achieving clean water. Speakers will address technical aspects, as well as policy and planning issues related to using trees in stormwater management, including current treatment practices, operations and maintenance concerns, assessment tools and methodologies and the multiple community benefits trees provide. The event will also feature a “tree city panel” of local city leaders and public works staff who will provide their perspective on the role of trees in obtaining clean water goals. A tree giveaway and cash bar will conclude the event. Time: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8 Cost: $50 for Arboretum members; $60 for non-members. Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: (952) 443-1422 or www. http://www.arboretum.umn.edu/ greeninfrastructureforcleanwater.aspx

FAMILY ARCHERY Learn proper safety and shooting techniques with instructors from Three Rivers’ Outdoor Recreation School. Bring family and/or friends and discover who has the hidden talent for the time-honored sport. All equipment is provided. Reservations required; reference activity #424611-00. For ages 8 and older. Time: 1-4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11 Cost: $10 Location: Cleary Lake Park, 18106 Texas Ave., Prior Lake Info: (763) 559-6700 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

BIRD WATCHING TREK

‘A DON’T HUG ME COUNTY FAIR’ It’s county fair time in Bunyan Bay, Minnesota, which means one thing to Gunner and Clara Johnson, owners of a little bar called The Bunyan: The Miss Walleye Queen Competition. Bernice, the pretty waitress, sees this as her chance to win Miss Walleye Queen, to be discovered and more importantly, to have her face carved in butter at the State Fair. Things get ugly when Gunner’s wife, Clara, and Gunner’s estranged twin sister, Trigger, decide they also want to win Miss Walleye Queen. Time: Evening and matinee showtimes Sept. 8-Oct. 16 Cost: $24 Location: Camp Bar, 490 N. Robert St., St. Paul Info: ticketmaster.com or 800-9292787

PHOTO COURTESY HENNEPIN THEATRE DISTRICT

Yo Gabba Gabba will perform at the State Theatre Sept. 15.

YO GABBA GABBA! LIVE!’ Yo Gabba Gabba! will infuse retro-style and beat-driven music to teach simple life lessons through song in their “It’s Time to Dance!” show. The audience will enjoy a mix of music, animation, games and new songs. Time: 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15

Cost: $25-$45 Location: State Theatre, 805 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis Info: hennepintheatredistrict.org or (612) 339-7007

‘BUS STOP’ A young headstrong rodeo cowboy falls head-over-heels for a nightclub singer and whisks her onto a bus to go home to Montana. But theirs is just one story on a bus of likeable misfits who find themselves stranded for a night in small town Kansas. Time: Evening and matinee showtimes Sept. 9-Oct. 2 Cost: $15 Location: Theatre in the Round, 245 Cedar Ave., Minneapolis Info: theatreintheround.org or (612) 333-3010

BRAVA WOMEN’S CHORAL AUDITIONS BRAVA! women’s choral ensemble is seeking new members. BRAVA! performs throughout the year and offers a diverse repertoire of sacred, secular, classical and popular music for a wide variety of venues. The ensemble is looking for women of all ages who love to sing, can read music moderately well and who can commit to creating the unique BRAVA! sound: a special blend of vocal skills and sparkling enthusiasm. Those interested are invited to attend an open rehearsal. Time: 9-11:45 a.m. Friday mornings Sept. 9-Oct. 28 Cost: Free Location: Colonial Church, 6200 Colonial Way, Edina (off Crosstown Highway and Tracy Avenue) Info: bravasings.net or (952) 5836256 or email bravasings@gmail.com

CONCRETE AND GRASS LOWERTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL The Concrete and Grass Lowertown Music Festival is a free three-day festival that welcomes performers from the McNally Smith College of Music, Minnesota Opera, Dave Pirner (of Soul Asylum), Bomba De Luz, Alma Brasileira, The New Primitives, Alison Scott, Freedy Johnston, the Schubert Club Scholarship Competition winners and finalists and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. Food, wine and beer from restaurants in the Lowertown district will be available in the park all weekend. Time: 5:30-10 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9; 1-10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10; 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11 Cost: Free Location: Mears Park, 221 E Fifth St., St. Paul Info: concreteandgrass.com

‘ED ASNER AS FDR’ Minnesota Public Radio presents Ed Asner as FDR. This solo performance drama is based on Dore Schary’s hit “Sunrise at Campobello,” which ran 70 weeks on Broadway. Asner stars as one of America’s best-loved presidents, Franklin D. Roosevelt. FDR explores the events and decisions that shaped a nation. The play follows the iconic president as he reflects on his years in office, from inauguration to the trials of World War II. Time: 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9 Cost: $39-$75 Location: Fitzgerald Theater, 10 East Exchange St., St. Paul Info: (651) 290-1221 or fitzgeraldtheater.publicradio.org

WATERCOLOR JOURNALING FALL WORKSHOP Instructor Sandra Muzzy will demonstrates techniques in watercolor, ink and colored pencil in this workshop. The topic of the workshop is “In the Orchard and Vineyard.” Time: 9:45 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturdays, Sept. 10, 17, 24 and Oct. 1 Cost: $95 for Arboretum members; $110 for non-members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn. aspx or (952) 443-1422

WALKS FOR THE CURIOUS Walk the Arboretum prairies and natural areas with an Arboretum naturalist. Time: 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. Saturdays, Sept. 10 and 17 Cost: $7.50 for Arboretum members; $15 for non-members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn. aspx or (952) 443-1422

WEEKEND FAMILY FUN Enjoy nature-based fun for the whole family. The September theme is Cattail Creations. Time: Noon-4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays, Sept. 10-11, 17-18, 24-25 Cost: Free with gate admission of $9 for adults; free for ages 15 and younger; free to Arboretum members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska

Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu or (952) 443-1422

MINNESOTA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL The 41st annual Minnesota Renaissance Festival features 16 stages of live entertainment, live armored jousting, food, drink, artisan booths and seven themed weekends. Themed weekends are as follows: Sept. 10-11 – Highland Fling featuring World Highland Games and Minnesota Highland Games, Scottish vendors, free beer tasting, kilt competition and sign language Saturday; Sept. 17-18 – Wine, Chocolate and Romance featuring wine and chocolate festival, charity auction, free wine tasting, free vow renewals, chocolate pie eating contest and grape stomp; Sept. 2425 - High Seas Adventure featuring backyard barbecue competition, barbecue vendors, homebrew competition and pirate games; Sept. 30 – Festival Friday featuring visits by school groups and home school students; Oct. 1-2 – Shamrocks and Shenanigans featuring harvest market, Irish vendors, Irish dancers and music, free Guinness beer tasting and kilt competition. Time: Weekends through Oct. 2; Labor Day, Sept. 5 and Friday, Sept. 30 Cost: Adults $20.95; seniors $18.95; children 5-12 $11.95; age 4 and younger free; dogs $10 with registration; free parking; discount tickets available at SuperAmerica, Walgreens, Menards, Whole Foods Market; discount coupons available at Subway Location: Three miles south of Shakopee on Hwy. 169 Info: (952) 445-7361 or renaissancefest.com/MRF

FIRST FINGER FOODS CLASS AT THE ARB Instructor Michelle Horovitz will teach participants how to make their own baby food from healthful garden produce. Time: 10 a.m.-noon, Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: $40 Arboretum members; $45 non-members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn. aspx or (952) 443-1422

SNAKE MOON Take a full-moon, naturalist-guided hike and learn about Minnesota snakes and how they prepare for fall and winter hibernation. For ages 6 and older. Time: 7:30-9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: $5 Location: The Landing - Minnesota River Heritage Park, 2187 E. Hwy. 101, Shakopee Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

PRESERVING THE HARVEST COOKING CLASS Build a foundation of skills to prepare healthful and delicious meals from scratch. Taste everything that’s made during the class and ask all the questions you want. The focus will be on preserving the harvest. Reservations required; reference activity #437411-00. For ages 16 and older. Time: 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: $30 Location: Gale Woods Farm, 7210 County Rd. 110 W., Minnetrista Info: (763) 559-6700 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

APPLE CIDERING Make and taste apple cider the oldfashioned way. Squeeze apples with a wooden press. Taste the fresh cider as you learn about apple varieties and cidering history. For all ages. Time: 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: Free Location: Lowry Nature Center (Carver Park Reserve), 7025 Victoria Dr., Victoria Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

‘MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING’ The play centers on two couples: young lovers Claudio and Hero and middle-aged Lord Benedick and Beatrice, sworn enemies who become the victims of a clever scheme. In a world where everyone eavesdrops, meddles and mind others’ business, Benedick’s friends fool him into believing Beatrice loves him and the women do the same for Beatrice. Thus begins their inevitable and entertaining journey to finding true love late in life. Time: Evening and matinee

showtimes Sept. 10-Nov. 5 Cost: $24-$68 Location: Guthrie Theater, 818 South 2nd St., Minneapolis Info: guthrietheater.org or (612) 377-2224

TOMMY EMMANUEL

Migration is in full swing by September. During this season, the group will search for migrating birds including warblers, raptors and waterfowl. Birders of all skill levels are welcome. Bring binoculars, a field guide and dress for the weather. Program led by Volunteer Refuge Naturalist Craig Mandel. Time: 8-10 a.m. Sunday, Sept. 11 Cost: Free Location: Rapids Lake Education and Visitor Center, Carver Highlands Lot, 15865 Carver Highlands Dr., Carver Info: (952) 361-4500 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley

FILM SERIES: ‘LIFE: PART 1’ How living things stay alive is at the heart of “Life” the latest series from the BBC to be presented at the Refuge’s Bloomington Visitor Center. Narrator David Attenborough engages his audience in an up-close look at the world’s creatures, this time examining survival strategies. Exploring the full range of habitats, viewers discover the distinct adaptations used by living creatures to find food, procreate and escape danger. Each episode includes behind-the-scenes footage. “Life: Part 1” focuses on the Challenges of Life, Reptiles and Amphibians and Mammals. Time: 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 11 Cost: Free Location: Bloomington Visitor Center, 3815 American Blvd. E., Bloomington Info: (952) 854-5900 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley

Two-time Grammy Award nominee Tommy Emmanuel’s unique style of guitar playing uses all ten fingers for melody, rhythm, bass and drum parts. Time: 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10 Cost: $40 POND EXPLORATION Location: Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville Meet a naturalist at the nature Info: (952) 895-4680 or center’s dock and use a net and bowl ticketmaster.com to scoop critters out of the pond. Discover the many small animals BOOTS & BOAS FUN that lie in a pond and make up the DASH & 5K RUN/WALK aquatic food chain. For all ages. Stomp out domestic violence by Time: 3-4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11 participating in the inaugural Boots & Cost: Free Boas Fun Dash & 5K Run/Walk. Bring Location: Richardson Nature Center, along your favorite boots and don a 8737 E. Bush Lake Rd., Bloomington complimentary boa for the 50-yard fun Info: (763) 559-9000 or dash. A portion of proceeds will benefit threeriversparkdistrict.org two local organizations dedicated to ‘CENTER OF ending domestic abuse: Cornerstone GRAVITY’ EXHIBIT and Southern Valley Alliance for Battered Women. The 5K Run/Walk On exhibit in the Arboretum’s takes place on easy, flat terrain that Restaurant Gallery will be incredible wraps around a scenic wetland. balanced rock photographs by Peter Presented by St. Francis Regional Juhl. Medical Center, Eden Prairie News and Time: Through Sept. 11 Savvy.mn Magazine. Major Sponsor: Cost: Free with Arboretum admission LasikPlus. Nutritional Food Sponsors: of $9 for adults; free for ages 15 and Complete Nutrition and Pure Market younger; free to Arboretum members Express. Water Station Sponsor: Anytime Location: Minnesota Landscape Fitness, Eden Prairie and Chaska. Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Time: 8-11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 10. Chaska Race starts around 9 a.m., awards at Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu or 10:30 a.m.; exhibitor booths open (952) 443-1422 8-11 a.m. EXHIBIT: ‘UNDERWEAR: Cost: $35 Race Day. Includes a T-shirt A BRIEF HISTORY’ while supplies last. Location: Purgatory Creek Park, See the kinds of underpinnings worn 13001 Technology Drive, Eden Prairie by generations past, from 1920s Info: Register at active.com by flappers to 1970s modsters. Peruse searching “Boots & Boas 5K.” Find the business records and product more training tips and info on samples of Munsingwear, Inc. View Facebook. items from the collection including photos, advertisements and clothing LEGO CASTLE ADVENTURE including the union suit and men’s Children and families are transported briefs with the “kangaroo pouch.” to a LEGO kingdom where they can Time: Through Sept. 11 become master castle builders Cost: Adults $10; seniors and college using LEGO bricks. Create a LEGO students $8; children 6-17 $5; masterpiece in age-appropriate build children younger than 5 and MHS areas; use a 3-D computer program members free and catapult to virtually build and Location: Minnesota History Center, test the castle walls; dress up like 345 W. Kellogg Blvd., St. Paul a princess, knight or dragon; or don Info: mnhs.org or (651) 259-3000


Shakopee Valley News | www.shakopeenews.com

September 8, 2011 | Page 21

LET’sGO!CALENDAR SNAKE MOON Take a full-moon, naturalist-guided hike and learn about Minnesota snakes and how they prepare for fall and winter hibernation. For ages 6 and older. Time: 7:30-9 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11 Cost: $5 Location: Richardson Nature Center, 8737 E. Bush Lake Rd., Bloomington Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

MEN OF MUSIC

CANOE WHEN THE MOON IS FULL Enjoy a leisurely paddle as a guide leads you on a canoe trip under the full moon. Watch for deer, muskrats, heron and other wildlife while being entertained by stories of the full moon. Reservations required; reference activity #427506-00. For ages 5 and older. Time: 6-8 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11 Cost: $8 Location: Gale Woods Farm, 7210 County Rd. 110 W., Minnetrista Info: (763) 559-6700 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

‘AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY’

SNAKE MOON

NEW PRAGUE CLASSIC CAR CRUISE

ALISON KRAUSS AND UNION STATION PHOTO COURTESY MYSTIC LAKE

DOŽÍNKY ALAN JACKSON A staple of country music, Alan Jackson opened Mystic Lake Casino Hotel’s Mystic Showroom on Sept. 15, 2007. Nearly four years later he’ll take the stage of Mystic Lake’s newest concert venue, the Mystic Amphitheater. Jackson is one of the most successful and respected singer-songwriters in music. He’s sold nearly 60 million albums worldwide, topped the country

singles charts 35 times, and scored more than 50 Top-10 hits. Time: 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $35-$55 Location: Mystic Amphitheater, 2400 Mystic Lake Blvd., Prior Lake Info: mysticlake.com or (952) 496-6563

BELLY DANCE LESSONS

Discover the magic of historic Eagle Creek village with your child. Play, sing, read stories and explore the outdoors. Dress as a pioneer if you wish; bring outdoor clothes as some activities will be outside. Enter park through west entrance. During the September Early Explorers session, participants will discover the importance of bees, learn how they make honey and observe an active beehive from the safety of a screen tent. For ages: 2-5 with adult. Reservations required; reference activity 438407-47. Time: 1-2:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13 Cost: $5 per person Location: The Landing - Minnesota River Heritage Park, 2187 E. Hwy. 101, Shakopee Info: (763) 559-6700 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

FAMILY STORYTIME WITH CATHY ISLES Local author Cathy Isles will be the special guest at the library’s Family Storytime. Time: 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13 Cost: Free Location: Shakopee Library, 235 S. Lewis St., Shakopee Info: (952) 233-9590 or scott.lib. mn.us

GARDEN TOUR Enjoy the changing beauty of Norenberg Gardens with Three Rivers Park District’s Horticulture Supervisor Arla Carmichiel. During the tour she will share her knowledge of plants and garden design, answer questions and share thoughts about the garden as the summer progresses. Time: 6-7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13 Cost: $5

Dožínky is Czech Harvest Festival patterned after the “Old Country” original. New Prague’s Main Street will be transformed into an open-air market with vendor booths lining the sidewalks and a beer garden featuring authentic Czech beer. Food booths, including those with traditional Czech dishes, will be featured. Main Street will be closed to through traffic. No dogs, bikes or golf carts are allowed. Time: Sept. 16-17 Cost: Free Location: Main St., New Prague Info: newprague.com/Dozinky

MODEL RAILROAD SHOW More than 200 tables of new and used trains, toys, models, tools and many other hobby or collectable items will on display at the Twin Cities Model Railroad Show. Time: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: Adults $6; children 5 and younger free Location: Education Building, Minnesota State Fairgrounds, 1265 Snelling Ave. N., St. Paul Info: tcmrm.org or (651) 647-9628

PUPPET ESCAPADES: ‘THE THREE LITTLE PIGS’

EARLY EXPLORERS: BUSY BEES

New Prague’s Classic Car Cruise will start and end on Main St. Registration for cruisers is from 5-6:30 p.m. by the New Prague Middle School on County Rd 37, by the bus garage. Fee to cruise is $10. No pre-registration necessary. Time: 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16 Cost: Free Location: Main Street, New Prague Info: newprague.com/Dozinky

Country superstar Alan Jackson will perform at the Mystic Amphitheater Sept. 17.

This class is for people with no experience with belly dance or those who have had some instruction but want to solidify the basics. Students will learn basic movements, techniques and isolations and zills (finger cymbals). Students will learn a choreographed dance to practice combining movements, and there is a possible performance opportunity at the end of the session for students who are interested. Wear comfortable clothing and ballet slippers or bare feet. Socks are not recommended. Time: 7:15-8:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 13, 20, 27; Oct. 11, 18, 25 Cost: $55 Location: Central Family Center West Gym, 505 Holmes St. S., Shakopee Info: (952) 496-5029

“The Three Little Pigs” is a favorite story of the 19th century and today. Enjoy theme activity stations together, and then join the silly puppets as they recreate this classic story. For ages 2-6 with adult. Reservations required; reference activity 43840-50. Time: 10-11 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 13 Cost: $4 per person Location: The Landing - Minnesota River Heritage Park, 2187 E. Hwy. 101, Shakopee Info: (763) 559-6700 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

A Master Gardener will share information about how to prepare landscape plants, lawns and gardens for winter survival and successful spring return. This program is part of the Evenings in the Garden series. Time: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15 Cost: Free; pre-registration requested Location: Scott County Fairgrounds, 7151 W. 190th St., Jordan Info: (952) 492-5410 or esmith515@umn.edu

In this fiercely funny, bitingly sad story, a large extended family returns to the homestead when their alcoholic patriarch disappears. Forced to confront unspoken truths and secrets, the family must also contend with Violet, the acid-tongued, pill-popping grandmother at the center of this storm. Time: Evening and matinee showtimes Sept. 16-Oct. 2 Cost: $20-$60 Location: Park Square Theater, Historic Hamm Building, 20 W. 7th Place, St. Paul Info: parksquaretheater.org or (651) 291-7005

Take a full-moon, naturalist-guided hike and learn about Minnesota snakes and how they prepare for fall and winter hibernation. For ages 6 and older. Time: 7:30-9 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 Cost: $5 Location: Lowry Nature Center (Carver Park Reserve), 7025 Victoria Dr., Victoria Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

The music of Alison Krauss bridges the gap between country, rock and pop. Time: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13 Cost: $55-$88.50 Location: Orpheum Theatre, 910 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis Info: hennepintheatredistrict.org or (612) 339-7007

GETTING READY FOR WINTER

MORNING PHOTO HIKE

PHOTO COURTESY HENNEPIN THEATRE DISTRICT

PHOTO COURTESY HENNEPIN THEATRE DISTRICT

Lindsey Buckingham will perform at the Pantages Theatre Sept. 16.

Singer-songwriter Gordon Lightfoot will perform at the State Theatre Sept. 17.

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM Grammy-winning Fleetwood Mac guitarist and lead male singer Lindsey Buckingham will perform. He is touring with his band in support of his sixth solo album, “Seeds We Sow,” set to be released in September. Time: 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16 Cost: $43.50-$53.50 Location: Pantages Theatre, 710 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis Info: hennepintheatredistrict.org or (612) 339-7007

GORDON LIGHTFOOT Gordon Lightfoot, the legendary Canadian songwriter known for enduring hits including “Sundown” and “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald,” will perform. Time: 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $48.50-$58.50 Location: State Theatre, 805 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis Info: hennepintheatredistrict.org or (612) 339-7007

Spend the morning exploring the Wilkie Unit. Look for early signs of fall, migrating birds and wild flowers. The route will take the group over by Blue Lake past wildflowers, water and wildlife. Anyone with an interest in nature photography is encouraged to attend. Bring any type of camera, sturdy footwear, bug spray, sunscreen and a hat. The hike will be led by Volunteer Refuge Naturalist Don Tredinnick. Time: 8-10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: Free Location: Wilkie Unit, 7701 Cty. Rd. 101 E., Shakopee Info: (952) 854-5900 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley

APPLE-TASTING WEEKENDS Location: Noerenberg Gardens, 2840 North Shore Dr., Wayzata Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

FOO FIGHTERS The Foo Fighters are touring in support of their most recent No. 1 album, “Wasting Light.” Also appearing will be Rise Against and Mariachi El Bronx. Time: 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14 Cost: $34.50-$54.50 Location: Xcel Energy Center, 175 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul Info: xcelenergycenter.com or (651) 265-4800

talent will star in the show, and it will also feature WCCO TV and Minnesota legend Don Shelby as “The Narrator.” Time: Evening and matinee showtimes Sept. 15-Oct. 31 Cost: General admission $46.50; VIP tickets $55 Location: The Lab Theater, 700 N. 1st St., Minneapolis Info: (612) 333-7977 or thelabtheater.org

‘EVERYBODY LOVES OPAL’

Set in 1961, “Everybody Loves Opal” is an upbeat comedy about the kind-hearted, loveable optimist, Opal Kronkie, who lives in a tumble-down mansion at the edge TRADITIONAL of the municipal dump. The general AFTERNOON TEAS disarray of her establishment is AT THE ARB aggravated by the fact that Opal Enjoy traditional formal tea complete collects things, anything that can be toted home in her little red wagon. with handmade sweets and savories. Time: 2:30-4 p.m. Wednesdays, Sept. Into her rather strange world come the con artists Gloria, Bradford 14, Oct. 12 and Nov. 9 and Solomon. The crooks decide Cost: $23 for Arboretum members; that what Opal needs is plenty $26 for non-members of insurance, a rapid demise and Location: Minnesota Landscape three beneficiaries (themselves). Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., The unsavory trio concoct several Chaska elaborate schemes to “do in” Opal, Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu or only to be thwarted by her oddball (952) 443-1422 antics. Through it all, Opal radiates ‘‘THE ROCKY kindness, affection and an abiding HORROR SHOW’ faith in the goodness of human nature. “The Rocky Horror Show” is the biggest, baddest rock-n-roll musical of Time: Evening and matinee performances Sept. 15-Feb. 4 them all. Bursting at the seams with Cost: $19.50-$32 timeless classics, including “Sweet Location: Old Log Theater, 5185 Transvestite,” “Damn it Janet” and Meadville St., Excelsior “Time Warp,” the show is a non-stop party. A professional cast of Twin Cities Info: oldlog.com or (952) 474-5951

HAPPY HOUR AT THE ARBORETUM Enjoy wine flights, beer and appetizers at the Arboretum restaurant. Time: 4:30-6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15 Cost: Free admission every third Thursday after 4:30 p.m. Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu or (952) 443-1422

4X4 CULINARY CLASSES AND WINE PAIRINGS

auction items. Canvas and Vines is hosted by the Burnsville Convention and Visitors Bureau. Must be 21 to attend. Time: 6-9 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15 Cost: $35 Location: Second Floor Reception, Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville Info: (952) 895-4690 or canvasandvines.com

ALL THINGS MINNESOTA BOOK CLUB

The book featured at the September meeting of the All Minnesota Book In four Thursday evening dinners, Club will be “Another Planet: A Year in food- and wine-lovers will experience Minnesota wines and gourmet menus. the Life of a Suburban High School” by Elinor Burkett. A leading chef will demonstrate how Time: 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15 to create the four-course dinners Cost: Free served and University of Minnesota Location: Scott County Historical Enologist Katie Cook will guide participants through the wine pairings. Society, 235 Fuller St., Shakopee Info: (952) 445-0378 or Time: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays, scottcountyhistory.org Sept. 15, Oct. 20, Nov. 10, Dec. 1 Cost: per dinner: $55 for Arboretum JUNK BONANZA members; $60 for non members The Junk Bonanza hosts more than Location: Harvest Kitchen Minnesota 100 juried junk vendors of antiques Landscape Arboretum, 3675 and one-of-a-kind and artisanArboretum Dr., Chaska repurposed pieces. This year’s event Info: Visit www.arboretum.umn.edu will include a farm market with local and click on Learn, Education for harvest goods, special displays and Adults and Cooking or call (952) giveaways. 443-1422 Time: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday, Sept. CANVAS & VINES 15; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Sept. 16-17 Enjoy an evening of sampling and learning about various wines and craft Cost: $8 per day; children younger than 12 free beer and tasting a variety of foods Location: Canterbury Park, 1100 from local restaurants, while viewing Canterbury Rd. S., Shakopee fine art, listening to music from Greenwood Tree, and bidding on silent Info: junkbonanza.com

Taste-test University of Minnesota research apples and rate for flavor, size and texture. Time: 1-3 p.m. Sept. 17-18, 24-25 and Oct. 1-2, 8-9 Cost: Free with gate admission of $9 for adults; free for ages 15 and younger; free to Arboretum members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu or (952) 443-1422

PLANT DYES: COLOR FROM THE GARDEN Learn the essentials of plant dyes in this hands-on class. Take home two skeins of dyed wool and recipes for dyeing more. Time: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $85 for Arboretum members; $90 for non-members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn. aspx or (952) 443-1422

DAVE RYAN’S 5K AND 10K Dave Ryan’s 5K & 10K is open to all ages and ability levels — walk or run at your own pace. Participants can come alone or bring friends for a little morning exercise alongside the beautiful scenery of downtown Minneapolis. Time: 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $25-$30 Location: Boom Island, 800 Sibley St. NE, Minneapolis Info: daveryan.kintera.org or (612) 604-1255


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www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

LET’sGO!CALENDAR ORNAMENTAL GRASSES

teacher is Miss Viola Swamp and the kids can see she is a real witch. Will Miss Nelson ever return? Time: Evening and matinee showtimes Sept. 23-Oct. 23 Cost: Adults $15; children 2-7 and seniors 60 and older $12 Location: Stages Theatre Company, 1111Mainstreet, Hopkins Info: (952) 979-1111 or stagestheatre.org

View the Arboretum’s ornamental grass collection at its peak and learn which ones work best for your landscape. Instructor is University of Minnesota professor Mary Meyer. Time: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $35 Arboretum members; 45 non-members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn. aspx or (952) 443-1422

AN EVENING WITH ANI DIFRANCO Singer, songwriter, guitarist and activist Ani DiFranco will perform. Time: 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23 Cost: $43 Location: Pantages Theatre, 710 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis Info: hennepintheatredistrict.org or (612) 339-7007

HEAVENLY HARVEST WITH KRIS JAMES Create family-pleasing recipes using Minnesota-grown apples and cucurbits. The menu will include penne with pumpkin, sausage and sage; shrimp salad with apple cider vinaigrette; apple, squash and quinoa salad; and pumpkin dumplings. Time: 9-11 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $30 for Arboretum members; $40 for non-members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn. aspx or (952) 443-1422

JOHN OLIVER John Oliver is a British-born stand-up comedian, actor and writer. He is best known for his work on “The Daily Show” with Jon Stewart. Time: 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Cost: $40 Location: Pantages Theatre, 710 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis Info: hennepintheatredistrict.org or (612) 339-7007

FLATWATER KAYAKING ESSENTIALS

BUCKTHORN BUST

This hands-on beginner class is set up to teach beginning paddlers about safety, proper paddling form and paddle strokes. Participants will learn the basics of kayaking from qualified instructors. All equipment provided. For ages 14 and older. Reservations required; reference activity #42391100. Time: 9 a.m.-noon Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $50 Location: Bryant Lake Regional Park, 6800 Rowland Rd., Eden Prairie Info: (763) 559-6700 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

Buckthorn is a woody plant that destroys habitat by invading the forest and killing other plants wildlife use for food and cover. This results in poor quality habitat for many wild animals. The group will celebration National Public Lands Day by using saws and loppers to fight the invasion. Call (952) 858-0715 to register. Time: 10-11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Cost: Free Location: Bloomington Visitor Center, 3815 American Blvd. E., Bloomington Info: (952) 854-5900 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley

NATURE YOGA FOR WOMEN: REAPING THE HARVEST

CLEAN UP FOR WATER QUALITY

Yoga instructor Annalisa Bragg will lead simple yoga to tune the body to autumn. Take stock of personal bounty and take time to reflect on fall with a naturalist-led walk. No prior yoga experience necessary. Natural refreshments will be available. Bring a journal or make one during class. Reservations required; reference activity #411317-01. For ages 18 and older. Time: 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $25 Location: Lowry Nature Center (Carver Park Reserve), 7025 Victoria Dr., Victoria Info: (763) 559-6700 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

BEN FOLDS Singer-songwriter Ben Folds, known for his singularly subversive rock style, made a wildly successful Orchestra Hall debut in October 2009, selling out his first performance with the Minnesota Orchestra. In this return engagement, the audience will hear more favorite Folds hits, including “You Don’t Know Me,” “Kylie from Connecticut,” “Cologne,” “Smoke,” “Fred Jones” and “Evaporated.” Time: 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $25-$80 Location: Orchestra Hall, 1111 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis Info: minnesotaorchestra.org or (612) 371-5656

CHEF’S HARVEST CELEBRATION DINNER Come for an evening of food, a cooking lesson, music and fun as Gale Woods Chef Mary Jane Miller hosts a progressive dinner on the farm. Those attending will dine their way from the wood-fired pizza oven in the herb garden, through the pastures on a wagon tour, appetizers and music at the chicken coop, and then settle into the harvest kitchen set with long tables filled with the farm’s bounty. Mary Jane will demonstrate how the dinner was cooked so those attending can recreate the meal at home. An array of desserts and coffee will be available to enjoy by a bonfire on the patio. Those attending may bring their own wine to enjoy with dinner. Reservations required by Sept. 14; reference activity #437411-01. For ages 16 and older. Time: 5-8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 Cost: $50 Location: Gale Woods Farm, 7210 County Rd. 110 W., Minnetrista Info: (763) 559-6700 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

BIRD BANDING See wild birds safely trapped, studied and tagged with numbered rings. Hear a bird’s heartbeat and help release it. For ages 4 and older. Time: 9 a.m.-noon Saturdays, Sept. 17, Oct. 15 and Nov. 12 Cost: Free Location: Lowry Nature Center (Carver Park Reserve), 7025 Victoria Dr., Victoria Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

RAPTORS IN THE YARD Meet a captive merlin and barred owl and learn about these birds of prey. Cameras welcome. For all ages Time: 2-4 p.m. Sundays, Sept. 18,

Celebrate National Public Lands Day by cleaning up trash in the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge. Trash can kill wildlife when they eat it or get tangled in it. It also pollutes the rivers and can contaminate drinking water. Everyone is welcome. Call (952)-8580715 to register. Time: 10-11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Cost: Free Location: Lyndale Avenue Trailhead, 11135 Lyndale Ave. S., Bloomington Info: (952) 854-5900 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley PHOTO COURTESY XCEL ENERGY CENTER

André Rieu will perform at the Xcel Energy Center Sept. 16.

AN EVENING WITH ANDRE RIEU Classical artist André Rieu, renowned for his energetic and festive concerts, will present “An Evening with André Rieu.” Time: 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16

Oct. 16 and Nov. 13 Cost: Free Location: Lowry Nature Center (Carver Park Reserve), 7025 Victoria Dr., Victoria Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

‘OKLAHOMA!’ Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Oklahoma” tells the tale of a highspirited rivalry between farmers and cowboys, a love story’s journey and the birth of a new state. The score includes “Oh, What a Beautiful Morning,” “People Will Say We’re in Love” and “Oklahoma!” Time: Evening and matinee showtimes through Sept. 18 Cost: Adults $28; students and seniors $25 Location: Bloomington Civic Theatre, 1800 W. Old Shakopee Rd., Bloomington Info: bloomingtoncivictheatre.org

HONEY HARVEST See what the busy bees have been up to all summer. Learn about the process of harvesting honey. Help spin the frames in the extractor, add honey to the setting tank and watch the Lowry staff pour honey into bottles. Visitors will get a chance to taste a sweet honey sample. Reservations required; reference activity #41130102. For ages 5 and older. Time: 1-2:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18 Cost: $5 Location: Lowry Nature Center (Carver Park Reserve), 7025 Victoria Dr., Victoria Info: (763) 559-6700 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

APPLE CIDERING Make and taste apple cider the oldfashioned way. Squeeze apples with a wooden press. Taste the fresh cider and learn about apple varieties and cidering history. For all ages. Time: 3-4 p.m. Sundays, Sept. 18, Sept. 25 and Oct. 2 Cost: Free Location: Richardson Nature Center, 8737 E. Bush Lake Rd., Bloomington Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

WALKER EXHIBIT Sex, celebrity, violence, and

surveillance are the themes of the exhibit “Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance, and the Camera since 1870.” Through photographs of private, candid, spontaneous, and secret moments, the exhibition explores the powerful and invasive role of the voyeur, provoking an array of uneasy questions about the relationship between photographer and subject. Time: Through Sept. 18 Cost: Adults $10; seniors $8; students/teens with ID $6; free Thursdays from 5-9 p.m. and the first Saturday of each month Location: Walker Art Center, 1750 Hennepin Ave., Minneapolis Info: walkerart.org or (612) 3757600

JOHN HIATT AND THE COMBO “Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns,” the new album from acclaimed musician and songwriter John Hiatt, was released Aug. 2 and is his 20th solo album. Hiatt’s career as a performer and songwriter has spanned more than 30 years and in 2008 he was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame. Time: 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 19 Cost: $40-$42 Location: Guthrie Theater, 818 South 2nd St., Minneapolis Info: guthrietheater.org or (612) 377-2224

WRITING CHILDREN’S BOOKS This class explains how to get the basic idea for a children’s picture book, organize thoughts and find an illustrator. Time: 7-9 p.m. Monday, Sept. 19; registration closes Sept. 12 Cost: $17.50 Location: Shakopee Junior High School Room E111, 200 10th Avenue E., Shakopee Info: (952) 496-5029

LET’S TALK PHOTOGRAPHY Amateur photographers who are interested in improving skill, sharing their work and receiving feedback are invited to this monthly meeting on the topic of photography. Photographer Darrell Tangen will listen to the interests of the group and lead

Cost: $41-$141 Location: Xcel Energy Center, 175 Kellogg Blvd. W., St. Paul Info: xcelenergycenter.com or (651) 265-4800

discussions on these topics. Those participating are encouraged to bring digital images to share. Time: 6-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Sept. 21, Oct. 19, Nov. 16 Cost: $25 per night Location: Savage Art Studios & Gallery, 4735 W. 123rd St., Suite 200, Savage Info: savageartstudios.com

FALL GARDEN FESTIVAL The public is invited to celebrate fall with Master Gardeners as they present information about fall and holiday container design, planting fall bulbs, how to select wines to serve with harvested garden vegetables and fruits, fall lawn care, seed saving, creating cards and stationery from garden photos and line dancing. Time: 6-8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22 Cost: Free; pre-registration requested Location: Scott County Fairgrounds, 7151 W. 190th St., Jordan Info: (952) 492-5410 or esmith515@umn.edu

SEASONAL COMFORT FOOD Chefs Beth Fisher and Caroline Glawe will demo the following menu: apple cheddar crostini; fennel carrot salad with vanilla balsamic vinaigrette; pork chop with tomato jam and vegetable paparadella; and sweet corn bread with fruits and basil whipped cream. The evening will include wine tasting. Time: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22 Cost: $45 for Arboretum members; $55 for non-members Location: Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, 3675 Arboretum Dr., Chaska Info: www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn. aspx or (952) 443-1422

‘GOLDEN NIGHTS ON THE SILVER SCREEN’ Jawaahir Dance Company will present “Golden Nights on the Silver Screen” inspired by Egypt’s film heyday. The all-new dance production features the renowned Georges Lammam Ensemble and will feature Arabic musicians from across the nation creating a lush musical environment for all-new dances sparked by the music and movies of the time. Audience members will see clips of old Egyptian movies in the Ritz

Theater lobby before taking their seats for the big show. Time: 8 p.m. Sept. 22-25, 28-30 and Oct. 1-2 Cost: Adults $29; children 8 and younger $15 Location: Ritz Theater, 345 13th Ave. NE, Minneapolis Info: jawaahir.org or (612) 436-1129

WILDLIFE AND FITNESS HIKE Celebrate National Public Lands Day by exploring the Refuge in one of its finest seasons. Sense the pulse of resident and migrating wildlife. Come prepared for two hours of fast-paced walking with short breaks. Time: 7-9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Cost: Free Location: Old Cedar Avenue Trailhead, 9500 Old Cedar Ave. S., Bloomington Info: (952) 854-5900 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley

DEFINED BY NATURE

Bring needles, yarn, fabric and trim for an evening a needlework. Beginners through masters welcome. Time: 6:30 p.m. Thursdays, Sept. 22, Oct. 27 and Christmas Potluck Dec. 1 Cost: Free Location: Scott County Historical Society, 235 Fuller St., Shakopee Info: (952) 445-0378, (507) 8684058 or scottcountyhistory.org

Celebrate National Public Lands Day by exploring the natural history that created the unique network of Twin Cities communities and public lands. Discover how to appreciate and enjoy diverse and easily accessible natural areas, and learn about the long history of natural resource conservation in the major metropolitan area. Learn about the agencies and organizations working together to create, preserve and enhance public lands. Time: 1-2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Cost: Free Location: Bloomington Visitor Center, 3815 American Blvd. E., Bloomington Info: (952) 854-5900 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley

BROADWAY SONGBOOK: IRVING BERLIN

NATURE PHOTOGRAPHY FOR BEGINNERS

The program will feature a mix of stories of composer Irving Berlin’s life, discussion of his work and performances of his music by an ensemble of artists from the Twin Cities. Time: 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Sept. 23-24; 2 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25 Cost: $24 Location: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, 345 Washington St., St. Paul Info: ordway.org or (651) 224-4222

This is a class to introduce participants to their cameras. It will begin with basic camera operation and follow up with a walk down trails to find photo subjects. For those who don’t have cameras, there will be cameras available to borrow. Those attending will have the opportunity to print photos after the class. Space is limited; call (952) 858-0715 to register. Time: 10-11:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Cost: Free Location: Bloomington Visitor Center, 3815 American Blvd. E., Bloomington Info: (952) 854-5900 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley

SCOTT COUNTY CRAZY QUILTERS

DESIRING GOD 2011 NATIONAL CONFERENCE People from around the world will gather for the Desiring God 2011 National Conference. The theme for the conference will be “Finish the Mission: For the Joy of All Peoples, Bringing the Gospel to the Unreached and Unengaged.” Speakers will include Louie Giglio, David Platt, Michael Ramsden, Michael Oh, Ed Stetzer and John Piper. Time: Sept. 23-25 Cost: Register before Aug. 31 $470 per person; register Sept. 1-16 $185 Location: Minneapolis Convention Center, 1301 Second Ave. S., Minneapolis Info: desiringgod.org

‘MISS NELSON IS MISSING’ “Where is Miss Nelson?” ask the students of Room 207. Their new

RIDING THE REFUGE Celebrate National Public Lands Day by exploring the Refuge in one of its finest seasons during a guided bike ride. Find hidden treasures on this ride through river valley trails. Rest stops will include looking for migratory birds. All participants will need a trail bike and helmet and should be prepared for a strenuous ride. Call (952) 858-0715 for reservations. Time: 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24 Cost: Free Location: Bloomington Visitor Center, 3815 American Blvd. E., Bloomington Info: (952) 854-5900 or fws.gov/ midwest/minnesotavalley


Shakopee Valley News | www.shakopeenews.com

September 8, 2011 | Page 23

Place an ad

Deadlines

Costs

Locations

Go to imarketplace.mn/PlaceAnAd to place your ad, or call imarketplace.mn at 952-345-3003 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday for help.

Ads are posted promptly to the imarketplace.mn website. Print deadlines for Thursday editions are 3 p.m. Tuesday for the Chanhassen Villager, Chaska Herald, Eden Prairie News, Jordan Independent, Shakopee Valley News. Deadlines for Saturday editions are 3 p.m. Thursday for the Prior Lake American, Savage Pacer, and Southwest Saturday editions in Chaska, Jordan-Belle Plaine and Shakopee.

Thriftmart ads are free; Thriftmart PLUS ads start at just $15. Ads start as low as $22 for announcements, farm / garden / animals, transportation, services, rentals, real estate and recruitment. Call 952-3453003 for pricing, or place your ad online at imarketplace.mn/PlaceAnAd

Reach more than 150,000 readers every week. Our offices are located in the communities below.

Recruitment Looking for work? Find local job ads here. Need a new employee? Get great response with imarketplace.mn recruitment ads.

Rentals

Garage Sales

Find your new rental home – whether it’s an apartment, condo, townhouse or single-family home – in our print listings or at imarketplace. mn/homes.

Buy other people’s stuff, or sell yours – it’s as American as it gets! Our comprehensive list and map fuel area garage-sale fever.

HENNEPIN COUNTY

CARVER Chaska COUNTY

Chanhassen Eden Prairie

Shakopee

Savage

Jordan Prior Lake

N

SCOTT COUNTY

SERVICES

Chaska Rentals

Jordan Rentals

Prior Lake Rentals

Shakopee Rentals

Houses

Lots/Acreage

1 mth FREE w/Lease

1 & 2 BR apartments, (heat, hot/cold water, garbage included) $575$675, no pets. 612-5996245 2 BR apt., heat/ soft water included+ more! $725+ damage deposit. Oct. 1. 952-913-6026

3 BR duplex, patio, garage, $995. Pets okay. 952-237-0221 On Prior Lake, 2BR, 1BA, walkout apt. Garage, dock space available, $995/mo includes utilities. 952-4127160 Prior Lake- Lg 1 BR, $575/ mo. 2 BR. $735/ mo. Available now. Patio/ balcony, cats OK, please call 952-6532105, 952-594-1791, or 651-470-4017

3 BR in 4-plex, 1-car garage, $850/ month+ utilities. Immediate. No dogs. 952-448-2333

House for sale: 9875 Spring Rd, EP $324,700 952-240-8940

Real Estate Bargains

RENTALS

Child Care

Office/Commercial

25 yrs. Loving, licensed childcare. All ages welcome. Cindy, 952-4451932 Becky's Daycare: 3 openings, Shakopee. Food program, licensed. 10 years experience. 952-445-2908

LIGHT INDUSTRIAL Drive-In's & Docks Available Immediately Intersections of 41/ 169. 952-484-9675

Boutique Apt. Bldg 2 BR Fireplace, Elevator, Heat paid, Heated parking included. Cats Welcome. Available 9/1. 952-914-0357 2/ 3 BR townhomes, garage included, $795 & $950. 952-448-6549

Room to Rent Bedroom for rent, new listing Shakopee. Nonsmoking. 612-275-9522

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

Roommates

Large 2 BR, 2 bath, W/D dishwasher, elevator, security system. $800+ utilities. Available 9/1. 952-492-2800

Chaska’s Luxury Adult Community 1 & 2 Bedroom Homes Cats & Small Dogs Welcome

Exceptional Value

New Prague Rentals

Heat Included Washer/Dryer in your Home Y Spacious Floor Plans Y Garage Available Y Calendar of events Y Y

Country Living. Share 3BR home. Male or Female. After 3:30 952368-3084

Health Supplies Diabetic test strips wanted. Most brands. Will pay cash. Local pick up. Call Ted at 612-216-6266

Share my house across street from Lake. 3BR $625/mo., utilities included. 952-913-7168

Warm & Inviting – A Must See!

Carver Rentals

Cologne Rentals

Misc for Sale Tanning bed, Super Ultra, 35 lamp, 3 high pressure facials, 15 min. exposure. $5,500. 952496-3331, Bonnie.

1 BR, $685, all utilities included. No pets/ nonsmoking. 952-361-3245 1BR, all utilities included, no pets. $650. 612741-2255

2BR, 2BA, Townhome style living. All units private entrance, pets welcome. $725 pr/mo. 651775-8936 3BR, 1.5BA., double garage. DR, LR, No pets, all appliances. Near park. $1400. 612759-2055

952-448-9201

Prior Lake Rentals

1 BR Apartment, HUD/ Section 8, Elderly/ Disabled housing. EHO. 612-702-1472

Eden Prairie Rentals

Chaska Rentals Classifieds 952-345-3003

2 BR apartment, in-floor heating. No pets. $775. 612-718-3163

Jordan Center Apartments

1+BR, LR, DR, PO, in 6 plex. No pets, smoking. Lease, $725. 952-9371959

2 Bedroom Home. Single car garage. Dogs o.k. $1200/month. Available Sept 1st 612-6180644 2 BR, 2 BA twinhome. Everything new. $1050. Randy, 952-270-9221 3 BR 1 BA apartment. Detached garage. $895. Randy 952-270-9221

Savage Rentals 1 BR $635, 1 month Free. Pets ok. 952356-0611

Shakopee Rentals

1 BR APARTMENT Section 8 project Low income rent to qualifying persons. Age 62 or older. 30% of income Smoke-free units available

3BR/1BA $800. Apt. Remodel! Safe,cln,brght,quiet,Priv deck,plygrnd 1yr lse NrCub/Marshall 722Garden Ln 612-325-7954 Arlington Ridge Apts 2 BR Apts. For Rent Updated unit-Ready for move in! Starting at $805 CALL 952-496-3281 1219 S. Taylor St. #103 Large 2 BR apartment, utilities furnished, except electric. Nice condition. $750. 10/1. 952445-2739 Sandalwood Studiosfull kitchenettes, nightly/ weekly/ monthly rates available. 952-277-0100

REAL ESTATE

Shakopee Housing 952-403-1086

Houses

2 BR apt. in 4-plex, clean, updated, available immediately. $695. 612-518-6737 Hillview Motel Micro/ Refrig. Weekly $175 & Up. Daily, $35 & Up. 952-445-7111

House for Sale (Great Rental Property)

Lots/Acreage 70 tillable acres. Owner/ Agent, 612-756-1899 Farmland for Sale & Wanted. Randy Kubes, Realtor... 612-599-7440

3286 sq ft commercial bldg, $109,900. New home, 3 car garage, $154,900. 24 acres of farmland, $109,900. 2-1/2 acre lots, $39,900-$69,900. Cabin on Spring Lake, $239,900. Randy Kubes Realtor 612-599-7440

Rec room a wreck? Kitchen decor down the drain? Do some thing about it! Check out our Building Services section in this paper.

952-345-3003 to place your Classified ad

4823 Dakota St., SE Prior Lake, MN

2 BR, 1 BA, kitchen, living room and porch. Selling price $89,100. Dave.... 952-484-9048

To learn more about these businesses, go to www.imarketplace.mn Call (952) 345-3003 to place an ad

BUILDING

BUILDING

Highland Home Services Inc. Remodeling ...Repair ... Design www.highlandhomeservices.com

30 years experience

Steve Jenness

cell 612-418-2277

fax 952-447-1211

sjenness@integraonline.com

lic#20628802

WE TURN HOUSES INTO HOMES •ROOFING •ADDITIONS •KITCHENS •BATHROOMS •DECKS •PORCHES

CLEANING 952-454-7591, Melanie. Home and Office Cleaning. Experienced, reliable, reasonable rates. Custom Cleaning. Housecleaning done your way. Call Nancy, 952-820-5245 nancy.braun@yahoo.com

CONCRETE/MASONRY

612-250-6035

Lic # 20292641, Insured & Bonded

Brick Work

Residential, Commercial,

Stone Work

Homeowner Associations, and Property Managers

New

We specialize in all of your Repair Needs! www.mrhandyman.com Member of the SouthWest Metro Chamber of Commerce

MAGNUM CONSTRUCTION CO.

Over 19 Years Experience Licensed and Insured

Remodel

Free Estimates Licensed Insured

Big Enough To Help~Small Enough To Care

952-233-1099

~ PARAMOUNT REMODELING, INC. ~ Where Your Dreams Are Paramount *Lower Level Finishing *Decks & Exteriors

NO JOB TOO SMALL *** Mention this ad for a 10% discount. Call today for a free consultation (952) 607-6726 MN Lic. 20483289, Fully Insured

JC's Remodeling Co.

Gerald Fugate, 18 yrs exp. lic#20636523CR Ins.

952-681-8013 www.jcsremodeling.com

From the Unique to the Ordinary... Specializing in drives, patios and imprinted, colored and stained concrete. Interior acid stained floors and counter tops.

References- Fully insured

www.staincrete.com

Feel free to text, call or Email andydciinc@gmail.com Andy, 612-221-1849

CLEANING

612-221-2181

Free estimates/Insured Decorative stamped concrete, Driveways, Concrete Firepits, Tear-out & replacement, Steps, Floating garage slabs, Swimming pool decks, Poured Wall Foundations & Flat work www.mnvalleyconcrete.com

in se s... i t r d ve fie !! Ad ssi ks! 3 r a 00 Cl wo -3 5 It 34 295

Blue Skies Window Cleaning, LLC • Free Estimates • 14 years experience • The Residential expert! • Insured

Luke 952-467-2447 ! 952-239-4110 Bumble Bee Services Housecleaning. Insured

CONCRETE/MASONRY

www.bumblebeeservices.com

CABINETRY KB Custom Cabinets Kitchens, Entertainment Centers, Bars, Built-ins Vanities, Counter Tops. 952-445-7790

952-461-3710 info@staincrete.com

Monyok Masonry 16 years in business Driveways, Sidewalks, Patios, Floors, Steps, Block Foundations, Brick Repairs, Footings Call Joe: 952-492-3671 MonConServ.com

Free Estimates

www.magnumconstructioncomp.com

Remodeling, basements, kitchen, bathrooms, decks, drywall/painting

We are a very diverse company that has expertise inDriveways Patios Foundation repair Chimney restoration Stone fronts Outdoor fireplaces Floor staining, etc....

952-448-7037

952-461-4540

Builder's Edge Remodeling, Windows, Basements, Additions, Cabinets. Licensed. 952-492-3170

DCI Inc.

Lowell Russell Concrete

Decorative Concrete Additions - Patios Garage Floors Steps - Sidewalks Aprons - Driveways Stamped, Colored Exposed Aggregate

Chimney Repairs

Lebens Masonry

BUILDING

CONCRETE/MASONRY

DON WHERLEY MASONRY INC

Basements • Room Additions Complete Home Remodeling Decks/Porches

*Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling *Distinctive Hardwood Flooring

CONCRETE/MASONRY

! Country Touch Clean. Several years in business. Reliable/Trusting 612-483-1092

• Block Foundations • New Additions, Repairs • Driveways • Patios • Steps • Garages • Pool Decks • Tear-out, Remove, Replace/New • Decorative • Colored, Stamped, Exposed Aggregate Free Estimates

952-758-7742

www.chconcretemn.com

DRAPERIES Drapes, Blinds, Fabrics, Upholstery, Bedspreads. Lakes Interiors. 38 yrs. 952-447-4655.

DRIVEWAYS Radloff & Weber Blacktopping Inc.

ELECTRICAL POWERTECH Electric. Local. Owner operated. Licensed, insured, clean. Rich: 952-292-8683

FLOORING ABOVE ALL HARDWOOD FLOORS & CARPET Floor Installation Sanding & Refinishing Carpet, Tile & Vinyl Installation Exceptional Quality Great Service

952-440-WOOD (9663)

Duffy’s HARDWOOD FLOORS •Floor refinishing & sanding •Real wood floors •Dustless refinishing •Water damage specialists •Board patching •Custom staining •Best quality •Best pricing •Most experience in your area •Family owned, 28 years •Free Estimates

952-469-5713 952-426-2790 www.duffyshardwoodfloors.com

HEATING/AIR COND Heating, plumbing, remodel and repair, and replacement, new construction. 952-492-2440

~Since 1971~ Free Estimates

6 Miles S. of Shakopee on 169

952-447-5733

Pulverized Dirt $12.50/ yd. Colored Mulch $26.50/ yd. Cypress, Cedar, Hardwood

#Priority Electric Inc. Licensed- Bonded- Insured. No job too small. 952-403-9200

LAWNS ARE US X Complete

Landscape & Irrigation Services Block Walls, Paver Driveway, Patios X Drainage Correction X Lakeshore Restoration X Complete Irrigation Winterization X Aeration & Over Seeding X Dethatch & Fall Clean-Up X Boulder,

952-492-3160 R.D. & Associates

Country Trail Tree Moving & Landscaping Service/Tree Sales Boulder Walls

Specialized Services Inc.

952-492-6289 952-292-2050

• Tree Removal • Stump Grinding • Brush Chipping • Overgrown Areas Mowed • Excavating • Sand & Gravel • Crushed Limestone

www.country trailtreemoving.com

www.rdandassociates.com

Caola

Landscape Services 952 445-0663

XComplete

Landscaping

Design, Build, Maintain XWater

Problems resolved Systems XRock/Mulch/Edger XTrees & Shrubs XBrick Pavers XRetainingWalls Over 30 yrs of quality workmanship Visit our website:

LANDSCAPING

LANDSCAPING

C r e a t e s D i s t i n c t i v e O u td o o r L i v i n g

XSprinkler

Driveways, Parking Lots

ELECTRICAL

LANDSCAPING

www.caolalandscaping.com Credit Cards Accepted

952-445-7302

Retaining Walls, Concrete & Paver Drives, Patio & Walks, Boulder walls, & much more!

952-292-2261 Premiere One Landscapes #1 Schieber Outdoor Services LawncareLandscaping. Commercial Residential. Senior Discount. Joe: 952-2924445

Rock Engraving at Hermans

612-275-2574. AJ's Tree & Lawn Service LLC. Trimming & removal. Licensed, insured.

Flagstone, Steppers Decorative Rock Edging/ Poly/ Fabric Retaining Walls, Pavers

952-445-1812 Paul Bunyan Tree Service. Tree Removal and Trimming. www.paulbunyantree serviceinc.com

Call for Hours Wever i l 952-492-2783 De www.HermansLandscape.com

AA Tree Removal/ trimming/ firewood/ brush hauling, stump grinding. Steve, 952-445-5239


Page 24 | September 8, 2011

EMPLOYMENT

Full-Time

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

Full-Time

Full-Time

Allure Salon, adding 10am-3pm, M-F shift for experienced motivated sylist & PT Nail Tech. 952-496-3331, Bonnie

ASSOCIATE TRAINEE Real Estate Career Excellent Potential Fast Growth

WORK FROM HOME!

Coldwell Banker Burnet Eden Prairie Irene: 952-949-4759 Rolland: 952-949-4724 EOE

ASSEMBLY 2nd shift

Put your faith first, Family second with an Opportunity to earn a Great income! 952-270-6190

We are looking for a large number of people to work in a cold room environment packaging food items. Excellent opportunity for extra money over the next four Holiday months. Apply ASAP for immediate placement!!! Team Personnel Services Shakopee 952-746-3346 www.teampersonnel.com

nd

2 Shift Shop Help. Applicants should be: Experienced, clean driving record. Towing experience gets more pay. $10+ starting. Taking applications at: 4805 Dakota St. Prior Lake. For more information call; 952-447-5286

Finish carpenters wanted with 2-5 years of experience. Position is full time and benefits eligible. Must have valid D/L, reliable transportation and be able to pass background check, drug screen and physical. Call our job line at 952-380-3720 or send resume to jobs@carpentrycontractors.com

Truck Driver/ Mechanic Ditch Witch of Minnesota, Inc. is currently seeking a full-time truck driver/mechanic. Qualified applicants will have 5+ years experience with formal training. Class A license is required. Benefits include: medical, dental, 401k & uniforms. Fax resume to: 952-4450035 or mail to: 12826 Emery Way, Shakopee, MN 55379 or come in to fill out an application.

Full-Time Avon needs 100 representatives in Chaska for the holiday selling season. Start your business for only $10! Call today, Peggy... 952-955-1624 janikula@frontiernet.net Carpenters/ Framing. Apprentice & lead position. FT year-round, SW Metro. Mark: 612-6854966

Nutrition & Culinary Assistant F-T or P-T

Auburn Homes & Services is currently seeking a Nutrition & Culinary Assistant on our Chaska Campus. See our website at www.auburnhomes.org for details. EOE

Next Steps is hiring aides, assistants, lead teachers. Send resumes to: info@nextsteps learningcenter.com

Full-Time

Deli Manager Full Time Radermacher's Fresh Market is accepting applications for 2 Full Time Deli Management positions in our Jordan and Le Center locations. Outgoing, energetic, & organized candidates with Retail Food Service, Sales and Management experience preferred. Weekends & some evenings are required. Great pay & benefits available for the right individual. Applications & resumes can be submitted to: crystalw@radermachers.com

by fax 952-403-5926 or in person.

Full-Time Framing, Siding and Window carpenters wanted with all levels of experience. Positions are full time and benefits eligible. Must have valid D/L, reliable transportation and be able to pass background check, drug screen and physical. Call our job line at 952-380-3720 or send resume to: jobs@carpentry contractors.com

Visit: iMarketplace.mn to place or view ads

Full-Time

ROUTE DRIVER Allied Waste Services seeks FT Route Drivers for residential routes in the Twin City area and suburbs. WE OFFERExcellent pay Advancement opportunities Benefits-including medical, dental, vision and life insurance plans, long-term disability, shortterm disability, health spending account, dependent spending account, 401k, uniforms, paid holidays, personal and vacation time APPLICANT MUST POSSESClass B (CDL) license w/Air Brake Endorsement Excellent driving record High School Diploma or equivalent Stable employment history 1 year commercial driving experience Knowledge of Twin Cities area and suburbs Excellent communication skills Physical ability to lift 45+# repeatedly Position requires strenuous physical labor with 45+ hours per week in all kinds of weather. Candidate must pass DOT physical and drug screen as well as assessment for essential physical job skills. If you are interested in joining our team, stop in and fill out an application, Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Applications accepted through September 19, 2011.

Store Management & Crew Members Opportunities Available Now hiring for a full time Assistant Store Management position. Stores are located in the Shakopee, Chanhassen, and Excelsior areas. Please call Michelle at 612.718.3520 or Lauren at 952.239.1466 for interested inquiries. WE OFFER: Flexible scheduling Opportunity to run your own store Competitive pay Pleasant atmosphere Multi-store opportunities

Full-Time

POLICE OFFICER The Shakopee Police Civil Service Commission is now accepting applications for the position of Police Officer. Minimum Qualifications: Candidates must have a valid driver's license and be POST licensed or have taken and passed the POST exam by November 1, 2011. Hiring Range: $4,146 to $5,183 per month, DOQ. Application Deadline: September 23, 2011. Obtain application from the City of Shakopee at www.ci.shakopee.mn.us/employment.cfm or (952) 233 9320. EOE. TTY/TDD: (952) 233-3837.

9813 Flying Cloud Drive Eden Prairie, MN 55347 An Equal Opportunity Employer, m/f/d/v

Place an ad! 25 words for $25 | online mapping Call (952) 345-3003

GARAGE SALES AUCTIONS Boutique/Craft Sale

15th Annual Old Barn Boutique Crafts, furn., antiques, Don't miss! Once a year 9am-6pm 9/14-18 & 9/23-25 2 Miles N. of Emma Krumbee's on Hwy 169, Belle Plaine

Carver Sales

Chaska Sales

Excelsior Sales

Prior Lake Sales

Prior Lake Sales

Shakopee Sales

Shakopee Sales

Man Sale Thurs-Sat. 9/8-9/10 9am-5pm. 15830 Carver Highlands Dr, Man Sale commercial elect. contactor boxes, Skid steer, wheel loader 8 gauge elec wire, sm. excavator, JD diesel eng., trailer 6000, roller conveyor sections, office partitions, elec. scooter & HoverRound, outboard 7.5hp, skidsteer wood splitter, concrete breakers, shop air compressor 220v, lots, lots more!! 952-4482429

Fri. & Sat. Sept. 9-10th 8am-5pm 942 Conner St Chaska. Garage sale. Gently used Boy/Girl Toys and Clothes 0-3yrs. Double stroller, Adult clothing, TV, Dryer.

Estate Sale: 70 yrs, one home! Wicker furniture, freezer, hidabed. Vintage: dinnerware, Christmas ornaments, hand tools, lamps, doll accessories, records. Sat. 9/10, 9am4pm. Sun. 9/11, 12noon-4pm. 240 3rd St.

Block Party Sale! Fountain Hills Ct. Townhomes (CR 42 & Pike Lake Tr.) Sat. 9/10, 9am-3pm. Furniture, linens, China, crystal, holiday decorations, bikes, clothes for all ages. Lots more!

Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church Annual MEGA Sale! Wed., 9/14, 4-8pm. Thur., 9/15, 9am-7pm. Fri., 9/16, 8am-12noon. 3611 N. Berens Rd. NW. www.sollc.org 952-230-2988

Friday, September 9th 9-6. Multi-family sale. Dining room & patio tables, Pottery Barn king and baby bedding, baby furniture, handmade bibs, burpcloths & onesies. 3606 Karner Drive.

Garage & Estate Salejewelry, electronics, furniture, artwork, collectibles, lots of misc. Thurs-Fri-Sat., 9/8-9-10, 8am-6pm. 15568 Skyline Ave. NW (Eagle Creek & Highland) Follow signs

The Enclave at Cleary Lake Neighborhood Sale. Thursday/Friday, September 15th-16th from 9:30am-4:00pm. Kid's clothing and toys, housewares, furniture, bikes and much more! Off Cty Rd. 21 on Cty Rd 87.

Super Huge Organized Fri. & Sat. 9/9 & 9/10 8:00 - ? Multi Family CLEAN READY TO WEAR brand name clothing size 3 juniors plus size womens, uniforms, mens, HH, bedding, Lots of misc. 1040 Eastview Circle

Thrift Stores

Thrift Stores

Chaska Sales

Carver Sales 16170 Delarma Drive, Off CR 11, follow signs. 9/8-9-10, 9am-4pm. HH items & tools, misc. odds & ends from Man cave.

Thursday, Friday, Saturday 9/8, 9/9, 9/10. 9am-5pm. Carver Hwy 212 West of Chaska. Maps available. carversteamboatdays.org

Book Sale - hundreds of paperbacks, romance, mystery, thrillers, fiction Friday - Saturday, Sept. 9-10. 110275 Village Road, Chaska Fri & Sat. September 9&10. Fri 8-5, Sat 8noon. Garage sale. Pool table, loft bed. craft supplies. toys. girls clothes. household items, knicknacks. misc. 2873 Mark Twain Drive, Chaska

Garage Sale! Downsizing. Thurs-Fri 9/8-9 7am-5pm. Sat 9/10 7am-? Whirlpool washer/ dryer, excellent condition. Round oak dining table/ 6 chairs, newer lift chair, sm oak entertainment center, oak tv stand, old china cabinet glass front/ sides, old tea cart, misc furniture. Gas grill/ tank, lots of kitchenware, misc items. 112088 Stone Creek Dr. More info 320-296-5005. Cash only

Eden Prairie Sales Thursday, Friday, Saturday 9-8, 9, 10. 9am5pm. Tiffany Lane Neighborhood sales We're housecleaning you benefit! A wide variety of good stuff! Prairie Center Dr. to Franlo (behind library) to Tiffany Lane

Jordan Sales Barn Sale- full of goodies! Furniture, lots of HH, clothes, children's toys, little boy clothes, tools/ power tools. Come check it out! Thurs-Fri, 9/8-9 8am5pm. 634 Broadway St N. Garage Sale, antiques & more! Thurs-Fri-Sat., 9/8-9-10, 8am-6pm. 406 Wood St. St. Paul's Lutheran Church 7th Annual GARAGE SALE 6th & Varner St. Thurs, 9/15, 8am-7pm Fri., 9/16, 8am-6pm Sat. 9/17, 7am-11am (½ price & bag sale) Concessions available

Savage Sales

Harbor Neighborhood Annual Garage Sale: Thurs-Fri-Sat. 9/15-17 9am-5pm. A little bit of everything... furniture, clothes, knick-knacks, much more! Off Hwy 42, across from NTB.

Fri-Sat., 9/9-10, 8am3pm. Garage Sale, A-Z. Hand & power tools, tool storage. 7633 PONDS EDGE PATH

Moving Sale Thursday 9/8, Friday 9/9, Saturday 9/10. 8-4pm. Furniture, toys, tools, HH goods. Antiques, much misc. 18076 Luedke Lane

Moving Sale, FridaySaturday 9/9-9/10. 85pm. Furniture, tables, area rugs, bedroom/set, cabinets, glass items, dishes, glassware. Off 42 & Dakota 1blk S 14446 Edgewood Ave.

STUFF! For Sale 128 Meridian St. N., Belle Plaine. 952-873-6617 Mon., Thurs-Fri., 2-8pm. Sat-Sun 12-6pm.

BIG SALE!! Everything reduced. 4 bedroom sets from $75. 2 dinette sets from $50. 23 c.f. stainlness steel side-by-side refrigerator and stainless steel electric stove, $950/both. Couches, chairs, coffee, end tables. Craftsman 42” riding mower, 18 HP, $750. 21” self-propelled Toro mower, $35. 2 Singer sewing machines from $25. Truck tool box, $30. Furnish your apartment with a bedroom set, living room set & kitchen set, $365/ all. Glassware & kitchen utensils, ½ price.

To learn more about these businesses, go to www.imarketplace.mn Call (952) 345-3003 to place an ad

LANDSCAPING

ODD JOBS

Schmidt and Son Lawn Care Aerating Leaf clean-up Mowing for 2012

Quality Remodeling and Home Repairs

Contracts

A Minnesota Greenstar Qualified contractor

Free estimates

952-496-1365

MOVING/STORAGE

MOVING?

You Call - We Haul

Completely Enclosed Truck Very Reasonable Rates

References, Lic & Ins Mn Lic. 20632058 Kevin Hayes

(612)867-8287 kevin@hmwhome.com www.hmwhome.com

952-758-2552 We Haul Moving New Prague

ODD JOBS

ODD JOBS

PAINT/WALLPAPER

NEED HANDYMAN? Little Job Expert! For all the odd jobs needing Attention!!! Painting: • Interior & Exterior Finish Carpentry: • Basements • Bathrooms • Ceramic Tile • Sheet Rock & Taping Dennis 952-334-1755 952-445-9034

-- ML Smith Painting -Exterior/Interior/Power Washing. 20+ Years Exp Residential & Farm. Top Quality & Affordable rates. Free Estimates. Call Marty 952-270-1001

Bruce Mackenthun Does It All! WindowDoor- Deck specialist! Professional services. 952-270-9166. Lic #20452534 Ins. www.brucedoesitall.com

Breimhorst Painting. Interior/ Exterior. Insured. Albie: 952-261-2234

Ken's HANDYMAN SERVICE Repairs, Installations & Home Improvements. Call Ken: 952-445-1836

MJ Painting Interior/ Exterior painting & staining. 952-445-2904 Marvin Jeurissen

PLASTER/DRYWALL

PAINT/WALLPAPER

Bob Wagner (952) 686-4833 www.bobshandymanservices.com for available services and rates. Fully Insured LOW HOURLY RATES, TELL ME WHAT YOU CAN AFFORD AND WE WILL MAKE A DEAL!

*A and K PAINTING* Schedule your Fall painting now!

Free Estimates Ins/ Bonded

Any Task... Just Ask

952-474-6258

Insured, References, Licensed #20374699

612-201-6316, bgmach3_3@hotmail.com www.handyhomereapairservice.com Need a new Paint Job, Roof, Lawn, Driveway, Patio, Remodel Job? Find a Professional in the Classified Section

Major credit cards accepted

“Bill's Painting” Exterior/ Interior/ Decks. 29 yrs/ guaranteed work. 10% scheduling discount. 952-448-6633/ 952-220-1090

651-480-3400 sundanceexteriors.com Family owned since 1979

UPHOLSTERY

Monnens Custom Builders

Discounted fabrics... drapes, bedspreads, residential/ commercial. 38 years' experience. 952-447-4655

952-496-0921 Lic. 4960

PLUMBING/SEPTIC KREUSER ROOFING, INC. 952-492-3842 952-412-4718(cell) Storm damage repairs Defective shingle claims Family owned & operated Thousands of satisfied customers Professional and Courteous

952-448-3761 No wall too small

ROOFING

Roofing/ Additions New Construction Siding/ Windows Locally owned 20 + Years Jim's Cell: 612-859-4618 Mike's Cell: 612-859-4620

Free wind & hail damage inspections... We can handle all of your insurance claims. Roofing, Siding, Windows & all home improvement needs. We do it all!

Lic# 20632183

Ext/Int Paint/ Stain ~Carpentry/ Repair~

Handy Home Repair Service, Inc.

ROOFING

Always Quality Interior RELIABLE, Painting. Professional, Experienced 952-334-0977 Jerry Fehn

Handyman Ser vices PROFESSIONAL, PROMPT, COURTEOUS SERVICE 28 YEARS OF TRADE EXPERIENCE

ROOFING

Father/ son plumbing company. Licensed, bonded, insured. Working for you! R&D Plumbing952-237-0115 Plumbing, heating, remodel and repair, new construction. 952-4922440

Classified Ads 952-345-3003

ROOFING

Why Wait Roofing LLC Offering best extended manufacturers warranty! Tear-offs, Re-roofs, Siding & Gutters, New Construction Insurance Specialist Over 18 years experience FREE ESTIMATES Rodney Oldenburg Cell # 612-210-5267 952-443-9957 Lic. ID-20156835

Let us know how we can earn your business. (952)873-6078 Roofing OWindows OSiding ORemodeling O

Locally Owned & Operated Licensed & Insured #20631439

Best Drywall LLC Serving SW Metro 18 yrs. Small crew/no subs/ painting. New Const/ Basements/ Repair. BBB Reg/Ins/Free Est. All work guaranteed Mic 612-685-0476 bestdrywallminnesota.com

•Roofing •Siding •Windows

952-882-8888 Call today for your Free Inspection! Family Owned & Operated www.capstonebros.com

Lic# 20609967

Regal Enterprises, Inc. Roofing, siding, windows, gutters. Insurance work. Since 1980. regalenterprisesinc.net 952-201-4817

Put Your Special Skills To Work ROPE A BETTER JOB IN THE CLASSIFIEDS To easily place your ad, call 952-345-3003


Shakopee Valley News | www.shakopeenews.com

Full-Time

Part-Time Cleaning Patrol seeking Housecleaner, 20-30 hrs/ week. $10-$15 DOQ. DL required. 952564-8590 Cook, weekend breakfast, PT; Experienced. Please contact TJ Hooligans, 952-4476668 Male PCA position available in Chaska. Call Sheila 651-7892299

Metro area asphalt paving contractor has openings for qualified experienced personnel. Skilled positions are available in all areas of excavation/ grading and asphalt installation. Clean driving records with Class A CDL is required. For more information please contact Pam at 952-4962651

Newspaper Route: Weekday/Weekend Routes now avail. Bloomington area. Must be 18 yrs. & have own vehicle. (952) 451-8188

NOW HIRING! FT Account Executive Looking for a self motivated, self starter to service and grow accounts in the Scott and Carver County Area. Duties include, but are not limited to maintaining existing accounts, building new accounts, commercial script writing, and marketing the radio station through community events. Please send resume for consideration by 9/16/2011 to GM, Kristin Guerrette at

NOW HIRING SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS 2011-2012 SCHOOL YEAR No experience Necessary will train Starting wage $13.25 an hour DOE No dui's, must have class d license at least 3 years And be 21 years of age Positive Connections 460 N Hickory Street Chaska, MN 55318 952-361-0899

kguerrette@kchkradio.net

No phone calls please Ingstad Mediactive is an Equal Opportunity Employer

StarTribune Newspaper Carrier Needed immediately Shakopee & rural Waconia Weekend routes. For further information see our website at; www.Chaskadelivery.com

A New Career

September 8, 2011 | Page 25

Part-Time

Boats/Motors

Carver County office: Are you fun and outgoing? Take the real estate style test and find out if a real estate career is right for you.

www.askwyn.com

Wyn Ray 952-556-1750

www.chandepot.com

Part-Time

To fill out an application

Southern Valley Alliance for Battered Women is in need of additional volunteers to answer its 24-hour crisis line and provide childcare at support groups. Free training for crisis line volunteers will begin Oct. 1. No training is required for childcare volunteers. For more information, call Kim by Sept. 14,

FT Executive Chef and FT Line Cooks Flexible hours Tuesday Sunday evenings and Wednesday & Saturday days. All pt positions require a 3 shift minimum per week. We offer a competitive salary, benefits package for FT positions, reduced cost show tickets and a fun work environment. Visit us online at www.chanhassendt.com or apply in person at 501 W 78th Street, Chanhassen, MN.

PT LIVE-IN, FT PAY! GROUP HOME Work in a comfortable home with six women with a Developmental Disability. Schedule is Sunday, 7:00pm until Friday, 9:00am. Includes sleep nights, free time during the day and three days off! Supervise personal care, routines & skill building & accompany into community. Need CPR & Med passing certificate or obtain immediately. Requires related experience, solid judgment, a valid drivers license & safe driving record. Pay $600+/wk, full benefits - more details at our website.

Apply on-line at CommunityLivingHomes.com Community Living Inc, 952-443-2048

eoe

Motorcycles

Sporting Goods CASH$$ We buy guns SPORTS STOP Shakopee 952-445-5282

1998, Bayliner Capri Fish & Ski boat, 19 ft. 135HP. Inboard, stored inside. Excellent condition $6900. 952-4126417

1998 Holiday Rambler Vacationer 36' motorhome, great condition, sleeps 6, 60,000 miles, $31,900 or best offer. Call Gary at 952492-1129.

27' 2007 Palomino Thoroughbred, 1 slide out, triple bunk, queen bed sleeps 7-8. $17,499, Parked in Waseca. Call Mitch 612-325-7365

2004 Harley FXST Softail 24,000 miles. Extras too much to list. Call for details. $8,800. 952836-6773

Motorcycles

EZ-GO Gas Golf Cart with Rear Seat. White with White Top and Seats. $2195. 952-2390446

952-873-4214

Seasonal Positions

2001, 17ft. Starcraft, 90HP, Mercury. Excellent condition. $9,000 952-890-2630

Need 2 seasonal FT individuals with basic tools for construction work. Reliable vehicle. Call Joey, 612-490-1139

Sales Positions Marketing Executive; Growing Registered Pharmaceutical Company; Office From Home; Flexible Hours; Great Financial Opportunity; Bonuses; Car Allowance Available; Excellent Training to Help You Grow! Contact:

2001 Camper, 5th wheel 2 slideouts, golfcart, shed $14,500. Excellent condition. Parked on beautiful wooded lot in Zumbrota, MN 612-7208683/ 612-599-0184

2002 Larson 19' FishNSki, SEI 190, 135 HP Outboard, stored indoors. $11,900.00 or BO, NADA guide suggested $13,945.00, Jon 612-730-8116

1994 Harley Heritage Softtail, 26300k, all service records avail, extra set of pipes. $7500. Call Mike @ 612-309-6737

2005 black Yamaha R6, 6,000 miles. Yoshimurd customized exhaust. With OEM cover & tank bra. $5,500. 952-3610142

TRANSPORTATION

2006 Crestliner Lsi Angler 2285. Lots of extras. 60 HP Mercury 4 stroke and dual axle trailer. 763-360-6251

Boats/Motors

1973 14' Alumacraft boat/ trailer, 15 HP Johnson motor. Needs carb work. Trolling motor/ battery, steering console. $1,125/BO. 952-448-3128

1979 Mark Twain 17' Runabout, trailer, 115 HP Mercury. Power tilt, swim step, custom canvas seats/carpet. Registered 2013, $1,999. 612-590-1595

1981 Sea Nymph 16' fish/ ski boat, 1989 Evinrude 60hp tracker, Spartan trailer, trolling motor, livewells, locators, anchormates, pedestal seats. REDUCED! $3200. 952445-5473

1992 Vibo 21' Hexagon pontoon. Low hrs. 2 motors. '96 Merc 90HP + 9.9. Marine radio. Trailer. Clean. $9,500. 612720-2262

Cars $$ Paid for Junkers/ Repairables FREE TOW. Immediate pickup. Serving Carver/ Scott counties. 952-220-TOWS, 24/7 $$ Wanted $$ JUNK CARS Viking Auto Salvage 651-460-6166

2004 41' SportsCoach Elite. Fully equipped. 23,000K. Well-maintained. 3 slides. $100,000. 952-797-6264

2000 Harley Davidson 883 Sportster, wife's bike, never rode, must go. 1300 miles, Lots, lots of extras, mint! $7000. 952-890-0905

2007 27' Colorardo RL 5th Wheel, 2 Slide $29,500 or best offer. 507-934-4834 M-F after 5:30

2003 Harley Softtail Deuce Anniversary model. 5500 miles. $13,000. 952-447-4280

2005 Kawasaki 1600 Vulcan Classic with Vance & Hines pipes. New tires. 10,895 miles. Mint condition. $5900 Call (952) 934-7358

Dlacina@healthierforlife.net

Immediate Openings for: PT Servers, Service Assistants, Expeditors, Banquet Captain, Banquet Servers, Banquet Bartenders

Campers Travel Trailers

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

$100 Signing Bonus Newspapers Routes in cities surrounding Lake Minnetonka Area. Must be 18 yrs old & have valid drivers license. Call Dolores 952-994-5437 or

Campers Travel Trailers

Honda style 2007 JMST 250cc Scooter. 1329 miles, original owner, 80 mpg, 4 stroke 2 passenger, $2900.00, call Ray 952-402-9110

1963 Buick Custom Convertible. V6 A/T. Completely rebuilt 3000 miles ago. New white/top, brakes. Excellent condition some minor restoration needed. $5000. 605-2127283 1996 Geo Prism. 4D, High mileage, great condition. $1800. or best offer. 952-361-8700

94 Starcraft, 17ft. Aluminum. Walleye, Bass ½ Console 75hp. Mariner & 8hp. Kicker. $6500. 612-554-6725 or bsehlers3242@gmail.com

S-C-O-R-E BIG

Hydro Stream Vegas. 20'. 200 HP+++. Complete restoration. 5 passenger. A real head turner! $8,900 or all trades welcome. 952215-5421

Campers Travel Trailers

with savings in the Classifieds

1991 Fleetwood Southwind Motorhome, Class A, 33ft. Only 38k miles! Smooth runner, fully loaded, sleeps 6, hydraulic leveler, $10,500, 612-669-4172

Call: 952-345-3003 to place an ad

1996 Itasca Suncruiser Motorhome. Class A, 39'. Excellent condition, shedded at all times/ winterized. Loaded! 29,300 actual miles. $35,000/BO. 507-6656019

powered by Print/online package can be renewed until auto sells, all for the best deal price of $39. To place your ad, go to www.imarketplace.mn/autos or call (952) 345-3003.

Cars

Cars

1972 rare triple black 'Cuda, with high compression 340 HP. 727 slapstick tranny. Posirearend, PS, bucket seats, Recession reduced!! $42,500. 612804-4074

1976 Classic Cadillac Convertible. Low mileage. 8 cyl. 440 engine. Complete facts available by calling. 559-435-3751

Cars

Cars

1988, Cadillac Eldorado 78,000 miles. All original, with maintenance records. $6500. b/o 952233-2148

1998 Dodge Stratus, 6 cyl, AT. 156K. $1,500. 952-445-6173

Cars

2007 Ford Focus. 5 speed, manual. 37 MPG 19k + miles. One owner, $10,500. 612-8400884

Trucks

1964 Chevy C20, 350 engine, 350 auto tranny, every bolt, nut, part replaced, or sandblasted and painted. 8K. REDUCED- $12,500. 952913-7808

Trucks

2004 Chevy Silverado Z71 Ext. Cab. 77,XXX perfect cond. Loaded, leather, Bose, 6Disc, Topper and many xtras. $15,700 B/O 612-2030804

Sport Util Vehicles

2002 Ford Expedition, original owner, 4.6 liter, A/C, 6CD, third row seat, no accidents, runs, looks very good. $5,700. 952-270-8292

Vans

Place your Classified ad on....

iMarketplace.mn or call 952-345-3003

1990 Audi Quattro V8, very good engine, tranny & drive train. Pearl white, loaded! Needs limited work. $750, 952426-5657

2000 Ford Windstar LX 7 Passenger Van, 133,349 Miles. $2,250. 6 Cyl Engine, Automatic Runs and drives great. Craig 952-368-9689

2000 Jaguar XJR. Well maintained. $9700 Silver and black interior, 83,000 miles. Call 612655-6680

Quit Idling. Put your car search in drive!

powered by


Page 26 | September 8, 2011

www.shakopeenews.com | Shakopee Valley News

HAPPENINGS CLASSES A meditation class led by a Buddhist Monk from 10:10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturdays at the Chanhassen Library. Classes are open to all regardless of experience. There is no charge but donations are welcome. Call Ralph at (952) 934-9727, meditation@triplegem.org. CPR anytime classes are from 6 to 7 p.m. once a month at St. Francis Regional Medica l Center, Shakopee. T he free class teaches lifesaving skills in case of an emergency. Call the Ask St. Francis information line at (952) 428-2000; stfrancis-shakopee.com. DivorceCare video series will be offered from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays beginning Sept. 8 at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church, 12650 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley. DivorceCare provides an opportunity for education and support for those separated, going through divorce or who have recently gone through divorce. Cost is $15 and includes the workbook. KidCare is available for $60 per child for the 15-week session. Pre-register online at sotv.org/ events or (952) 432-6351. Women with Spirit Bible Study runs from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Sept. 13 to March 27 at Pax Christi Church, 12100 Pioneer Trail, Eden Prairie. Tuition of $100 covers lectures, books, retreats, and child care. Registration is available online at paxchristi. com/womensbiblestudy.aspx and the church reception desk. Register by Sept. 1. Call Donna (952) 944-2861. UCare Fitness exercise class 9 to 10 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, beginning Sept. 13, at St. Gertrude’s Health and Rehabilitation Center in Shakopee. UCare members may attend at no charge; $14 for others. Contact Yvonne Anderson at St. Gertrude’s (952) 233-4488 or Yvonne.anderson@bhshealth. org. Registration information also available stgertrudesshakopee.org. 55+ Driver Improvement course from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Sept. 15 at McKenna Crossing, 13810 Shepards Path NW., Prior Lake. Advanced registration required at (888) 234-1294 or mnsafetycenter.org. Cost is $20. GriefShare video series will be offered from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursdays beginning Sept. 15 at Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church, 12650 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley. Each night combines a video session with a grief support group discussion time to allow group participants to

talk about the content of the video and about how they are dealing with the death of their loved one. Cost is $15 and includes the workbook. KidCare is available for $27 per child for the entire series. Pre-register online at sotv.org/events or (952) 432-6351. F ree cer v ica l c a ncer screening by St. Francis Regional Medical Center is 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 20 at St. Francis Cancer Center. This screening is intended for the uninsured and underinsured only. Register by calling (952) 428-2000. The next HomeStretch Seminar, sponsored by the Carver County Community Development Agency is 6 to 9 p.m. Sept. 22 and 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sept 24 at the Carver Co. CDA, 705 Walnut St., Chaska. Class is necessary for some special “down-payment assistance” loan programs approved by MnHousing and HUD. Cost is $25/family; pre-register at (952) 448-7715, ext. 2773.

MEETINGS Small-business owners meet at 7:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Knights Event Center, 1760 Fourth Ave. E., Shakopee, to promote your business. Free continental breakfast served. Call Charlie at (952) 445-4056 to RSVP. Great Scott Cycling Club meets at 6:15 p.m. Mondays and Thursdays at Michael’s Cycle in Prior Lake. Three groups of riders to cover all levels. Helmets are required; road bikes recommended. Call Al at (952) 220-4585; greatscottcycling.com. Savage Area Women of Today meets at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 8 in the dining room of the Savage American Legion, 12375 Princeton Ave. S. At this meeting the club will also be collecting teacher supplies for the local schools. Contact Stacy at SavageAreaWT@gmail.com; (952) 226-6815. Shakopee Toastmasters meet from noon to 1 p.m. the second and fourth Thursdays of the month at the Minnesota School of Business, 1200 Shakopee Town Square, Shakopee. Call Julie Kopf (612) 251-5697; http://shakopee.freetoasthost. org. Senate District 35 DFL business meetings are 7 p.m. the second Thursday of every month at the Prior Lake Public Library, 16210 Eagle Creek Ave. SE., Prior Lake. Call Nancy at (612) 791-8344. MOMS Club of Sha ko pee meets at 9:30 a.m. the second Thursday of each month at Cross of Peace Lutheran Church, 1506 Wood Duck Trail,

Shakopee. Call Erin at (952) 496-2163. Business Women’s Network meets at 11:30 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month at Crystal Lake Golf Course in Lakeville. Luncheon is $ 20 for members, $ 30 for guests. Register at reservation @ bu si nesswomensnetwork.org. River Valley Trailblazers Snowmobile Club meets at 7:30 p.m. the second Wednesday of the month in the presidential suite at Canterbury Park. Contact Chuck Doherty at (952) 445-9130. Scott Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) Board of Supervisors will be from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 21 at the Spring Lake Town Hall, 20381 Fairlawn Ave. Note time and location changes. Following their regular board meeting, the Scott SWCD Supervisors will join the Prior Lake-Spring Lake Watershed Board for a special meeting at approximately 6:30 p.m. Contact Scott SWCD Administrative Clerk Shelly Tietz (952) 492-5412 for more information.

SUPPORT GROUPS Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meets at 7 p.m. Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Thursdays and 9 a.m. Saturdays at St. John’s Lutheran Church, 119 Eighth Ave., Shakopee; at 7 p.m. Mondays at the church at 2488 Vierling Dr. E.; and at 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays at the Shakopee Community Center, 1255 Fuller St. S., Shakopee. The 24-hour AA hotline number is (952) 922-0880 or visit aaminneapolis.org. 12-step groups for individuals struggling with addictive or compulsive behaviors meet from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursdays through July at Grace Church in Eden Prairie. The workbook costs $12. Contact atgrace.com/ directions; (952) 224-3180. Low Vision Support Group meets from 10 to 11:30 a.m. the second Thursday of every month at St. Francis Regional Medical Center, Shakopee. Call (952) 428-2002. Arc Great Rivers offers a coffee group for parents of children with developmental disabilities and adults with developmenta l disabi lities from 6:30 to 8 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at Carasim Coffee House, 106 First St. E., Jordan. Families Advocating for Change in Education meets from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at Ridgeview Medical Center, 500 S. Maple St., Waconia. The group is for parents and others who

want to work collaboratively with schools to achieve better educational outcomes and help children with special needs exceed expectations. Contact Arc Greater Twin Cities at (952) 920-0855. General Support Group for parents of school-age children with any type of intellectual or developmental disability meets from 6:30 to 8 p.m. the second Thursday of each month at Awakenings Coffee Shop and Café, 106 First St. E., Jordan. Call (952) 920-0855. Celebrate Recovery, dealing with hurts, habits and hang-ups for all individuals in our community, runs from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Fridays at Friendship Church, 17741 Fairlawn Ave., Prior Lake. Cost is $16. Contact celebraterecovery@ friendship-church.org; (952) 447-0546. Step Up, a student-led youth group, meets from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Sundays at the Hub of Jordan, 231 Broadway St. S. Call (952) 492-5553. Alanon meets at 7:30 p.m. Mondays at First Presbyterian Church, 909 Marschall Road S. Call (952) 920-3963. Depression Support Coalition meets at 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, 4625 125th St. W., Savage. Former Minnesota State Legislator John Hottinger will present “Depression: An Illness, Not a Character Defect.” Contact (952) 890-9465, ext. 114. Heart support group meets at 7 p.m. the fi rst Tuesday of each month at St. Francis Regional Medical Center in Shakopee. Call (952) 428-2080. G a mbler s A nony mou s (GA) meets at 7 p.m. Tuesdays at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 5634 Luther Drive in Prior Lake. Overeaters Anonymous meets from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays at Christ Lutheran Church, 1053 Jefferson St., Shakopee. Call Nancy (612) 250-0075 or Steve (612) 845-2672. TABLE, a small group for parents whose children have special behavioral, learning or emotional challenges, meets from 7:15 to 8:45 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month at Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church, 3611 North Berens Road, Prior Lake. Call Mary Wangerin at (952) 4471884 or visit sollc.org. Gra ndpa rents R a isi ng Grandchildren with Disabilities, a group sponsored by ARC, meets from 10 to 11:30 a.m. the second Tuesday of each month at Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church, 3611 N. Berens Road NW., Prior Lake. Call (952) 920-0855.

Minnesota Valley Mothers of Multiples meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Apple Valley Community Center, 14601 Hayes Road, Apple Valley. E-mail info @ mvmom.org. Parkinson’s Disease Support Group meets from 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. the second Wednesday of the month at Prairie Adult Care, 16200 Berger Drive, at Victory Lutheran Church in Eden Prairie. Call Joanne Bartel at (952) 949-3126.

MISCELLANEOUS Loaves and Fishes offers free community meals from 5 : 3 0 to 6 : 3 0 p.m. Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Church of St. Mark, 350 Atwood St. S., Shakopee. Visit loavesandfishesmn.org. Mobi le hea lt h cl i n ic through a partnership with Scott County Public Health and the Shakopee Mdewakanton Dakota Community will be from 2 to 5 p.m. Thursdays, Sept. 8 at the Scott County Fairgrounds, 7151 190th St. W., Suite 100, Jordan; and Sept. 22 at the Savage Public Library, 13090 Alabama Ave.Call (952) 4968555; http://co.scott.mn.us. Friendship Church teams up with Second Harvest Heartland to provide a free surplus food and household products from lower-income families the second Thursday of each month at Friendship’s Prior Lake campus, 17741 Fairlawn Ave. Bring your own boxes or laundry baskets to carry items and an I.D. Call (952) 447-8282. Southwest Metro Animal Rescue and Adoption Society will host a pet adoption event from 4 to 7 p.m. Sept. 9 and 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 1112 at PetsMart, 11200 Prairie Lakes Dr., Eden Prairie. Visit swmetroanimalrescue.org; 952-368-PAWS (7297). American Red Cross blood drive from 2 to 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 at Living Hope Lutheran Church, 8600 Horizon Dr. S., Shakopee. Schedule an appointment at redcrossblood. org or call (800) RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Shakopee Girl Scouts information and registration night is 7 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 in the Shakopee Middle School cafeteria, 1137 Marschall Road, Shakopee. All girls from kindergarten through high school and their parents are welcome. If you can’t make this date, contact the Registrar at registrarshakopeegs@gmail.com for information. Shakopee Cub Scouts open house from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 12 in the Sun Path Elementary cafeteria.

All boys kindergarten through fi fth grade are invited to learn more about Cub Scouts and sign up. Additional information at joincubs.org. CAP Agency WIC voucher pick-up for residents of Scott County is from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. the second Monday, third Thursday and fourth Tuesday of each month at the CAP Agency, 712 Canterbury Road S., Shakopee. Call (952) 402-9869. Free family law clinic from 4 to 6 p.m. the second Monday of every month at the Scott County Law Library. People can make a half-hour appointment to come in and talk to a volunteer attorney for free regarding general questions about the legal processes of family court. Pre-registration is required at (952) 496-8713. Chaska American Legion hosts a burger night from 5 to 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month at Chaska American Legion Post 57, 102 Fourth St. W., Chaska. Open House Tea in observance of National Assisted Living Week from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 14 at The Gardens at St. Gertrude’s. RSVP to Yvonne at (952) 233-4488 or Yvonne.anderson@bhshealth. org. Carver Scott Humane Society will host a pet adoption event from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17 at Eden Prairie Petco, 8020 Glen Lane. Adoption fees start at $195+ for dogs and $165+ for cats. Call (952) 386-3553; carverscotths.org. American Red Cross blood drive from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 17 at New Spirit United Church of Christ, 14394 Quebec Ave, Savage. Schedule an appointment at redcrossblood.org or call (800) RED CROSS (1-800733-2767). Homeward Bound Theatre Company auditions for “Children’s Letters To God” are 4 to 9 p.m. Sept. 19-20 at Normandale Hyla nds United Met hodist Church in Bloomington. Children 9 through 13 can audition for the musical that follows the lives of five young friends as they voice beliefs, desires, questions and doubts common to all people but most disarmingly expressed by children. Show dates are Nov. 18 -2 0. Se up your audition at (763) 391-3754 or email mail@homewardboundtheatre.org. Visit homewardboundtheatre.org for more information. American Red Cross blood drive from 1:30 to 7:30 p.m. Sept. 29 at St. Johns Church, 210 Broadway, Jordan. Schedule an appointment at redcrossblood. org or call (800) RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Now you can post an unlimited number of ads to Thriftmart, our free-ads marketplace. Go to www.imarketplace.mn/thriftmart to place your ad, or call (952) 345-3003. (A telephone surcharge applies if you call.) And now businesses can use Thriftmart, too!

1 firestone wide oval. 235/50/17, like new. $125. b/o 952-217-2370 1.25hp belt-sander. Sears Roebuck. Motor needs rebuilt. $100. Pick-up. Text-to-952406-0285 100' grounded extension cord. Like new. $15. 952-240-1025. 18" tires on American racing rims. $500. 612810-9955 2 end tables, sofa table. Oak. Good condition, $75. 612-812-5576 2 rattan recessed glasstop end tables. $100. Must sell 952447-3959 2 Twins tickets, sec 132, row 4, 9-21-11, $56. 952-334-2593 30-06 ammo mostly 150 gr. $8. 952-388-8456 3pc bedroom set: queen headboard frame, dresser w/mirror, $325. 952-220-5051 4, Chevy S-10 rims, Aluminum 4wd. $75. 507329-3964 48” glasstop rattan table, 4chairs. Moving must sell $385. 952447-3959 6.3 gallon steel boat motor tank. Like new. $20. 952-445-1148 6x8 trailer, motorcycle, snowmobile. $400. 507329-3964 72 Goosebump books, good condition. $100. b/o. 952-486-1599 8 gallon Craftsman wet/dry vac. $10. 952445-1148 Adjustable queen bed, mattress. Used 3 months. $500. 952-4454522 Antique post drills, $200/ both, 952-4923089 Band instrument, Ludwig percussion/bell set. $200. 952-334-5584 Bedroom set, Drexel, very good condition, $290. 952-447-3576

Bedroom set in solid maple. Five pieces $250. e-mail BarbAlan2@aol.com Bergstroms jewelry $200 gift card for only $150. Steve 952-4450213 Bike trailer stroller. Schwinn. 2-seater. Like new. $20. 952-9466955. Bike, Girl's Trek 20 inch, purple, excellent condition, $100. 952-4039674 Bronco, post hole digger. 44". Exc. $12. 952 401-3786 Brussels Griffon Pup. Smooth coat, 06/25/11. $300. 612-247-6498 Bunk bed twin-over-twin with 2 drawers. $350 952-440-8905 Butcher Block, maple. 30"x25"x1.5" thick. $65. 952-448-3699 Chair & ottoman, fabric excellent condition. Must sell $275. 952448-9877 Chair dryer, gold washable covering. $35. 952873-2775 Chinchilla with lg. cage toys food. Cute, friendly. $100. 651-895-0625 Clarinet, LeBlanc with case. Great condition. $175. cash 612-9109164 EP Coffee table, good shape. $15. 952-2927886 Couch, sofa fabric, excellent condition. Must sell, $500. 952-4489877 Danby, winecooler, new. Holds 35 bottles, slideout shelves. $280. 612282-9450 Decoys, Loon and Bronze Duck $100. Steve 952-445-0213 Deer stand 7' tubular steel with platform. $10. 952-445-7207 Dell Latitude laptop. Works great. Needs battery. $125. 952-2401025.

Desk, Ikea, great for student, built-ins. $100, 952-937-2384 Dining room table, hutch, dark wood. Good condition. $300. 952442-8887

Garment travel bag. American Tourister, No wheels, $35. 952-4474961 German Shepherd Pup. 10 wks, vet shots. $395. 952-681-9100

Dining room table, oak, 4 chairs & hutch, $350. 612-812-5576 Dining table, six upholstered chairs, one leaf. $250. 612-965-0871 Dish set, Corelle by Corning; Cups, plates, saucers. $30. 952-2205051 Dish set, fresh flowers by Excel: plates, saucers. $30. 952-2205051 Dryer, 700 Kenmore. $150. 952-403-0771

German Shepherd Pup. 11 weeks. Vets, shots, $395. 952-681-9100

Dryer, Sears Kenmore 800. $75. 952-4483511 Duck boat, Carsten Pintail, like new. $450. 952-239-1496 Duck hunting jacket down liner 3XL. Excellent, $40. 952-445-1293 Entertainment center, gently used. $40. 612644-8377 Faribo stadium blanket, 100% acrylic, red/black plaid, new, $8. 952-4474961 Fiberglass, F150 topper. Prime shape, burgundy $200. 952-445-3556 File cabinet 4 drawer and 2 drawer $20. 952937-1681 Fisher Price carnival kick & whirl, $20. Great condition. 952-443-0186 Flute, Gemeinhardt 2SP, great condition. $150. 952-797-4959 Free to good home. 2yr, adult female cat. 612310-3156 Free, male cat, good with kids to good home. 952-484-0181 Free, twin mattress and boxspring with frame. Good condition. 952445-1293 New, 6.0 volt cordless drill. $25. 952-240-1025

Gift/certificate for 2mo rental at Scott Co. MiniStorage. $50. 952-4471369 Girl's Heely's $25. Size 13 email for pictures. sdt1974@yahoo.com Golden Tee arcade game. $500. b/o 612723-1484 Awesome fun Golf clubs, men's RH. 15 woods 3- S.W $60. 952-233-3322 Goodnite girls, pullups quantity 74. S-M $15. sdt1974@yahoo.com Graco, "Ashford travel system", baby stroller, carrier carseat. $80. 952-882-4919 Graco, "Pooh" baby stroller. Excellent condition. $45. pick up. 952882-4919 Hedge trimmer, 22" Black & Decker electric. $25. 952- 401-3786 HP Scanner 3300 Series, 2 installation, instruction disks. $25. 952-403-7733 Kennel 14' x 8' 3 sided minor repairs, FREE 952-412-8585 Kennel, wire, large dog, foldable. $25. 952-4925596 Kitten 8 weeks old. Free to good home. 612-3103156 Kitten, litter box trained. Adoption fee, $20. Call 507-964-5899 Kitten, Ragdoll, male 8weeks. Parents on premesis. $450. 612-4182834 Lazy Boy, swivel, rocker recliner. Like new, w/tags, $475. 952-7365478 Stroller, Free. 952-4470112

Mary Kay, satin hands pampering set. $20. 952-564-1161 Mary Kay, Timewise, visibly fit body lotion. $12. 952-564-1161 Mens black leather jacket. Size S. Like new. $50. 952-240-1025 Mens golf clubs. RH golf bag, golf cart. $75. 952447-4578 Mens western suit. 3 pc. like new. $40. 952-4474578 Miniature Horse! Mare, cute & gentle, great starter. $400. 952-4432327 Mixed Blood theater, 2 tickets. $20. 2010-2011 season. Steve 952-4450213 New, T-mobile Blackberry, 8520. $200. 952292-7886 Nokia, 6010 barphone, charger. $25. unlockable. 952-443-2518 Office desk 30"x5', Free! You pick up. 952934-1219 One pair 205/65r15 primewell tires, new. $100. for pair 952-9443866 Pearl baths whirlpool tub. Cs63ns, new. 65 galllon. $450. 952-2004023 Percussion bells and practice pad set. $130 952-906-2975 Ping pong table, green, winter fun! $50. Pick up 952-492-5596 Pitchback rebound net. 66" high, $25. 952-2214828 Playset wooden, Great condition. $150. 952401-0843 Pool table, American Classic, 8', Biscayne, you move, $475. 952736-5478 Power washer, 3.75hp. 1800psi, 2.0gpm. Good condition, $170. Eric 952-934-9924 Precious Moments anniversary clock. Excellent condition. $25. 952540-7070

Quickie Sports lightweight wheelchair $200. Steve 952-4450213 Refrigerator white, good condition. 22Wx31LX 57H. $75. 952-898-2692 Registered male, Yorkie. 5 months, kennel trained, shots. $400. 320-491-4734 Sectional, 3pc., LIKE NEW! From Hom Furniture. $1200. 952-7365478 Sewing machine, White, walnut with side drawers, $50, 952-828-0833 Small "Antique looking" desk, $30. 952-4430186

Sleeper sofa, queen size. Hunter green, good condition. $39. 952-937-1681 Small animal Aquarium 12"by 20" $5. call 952233-1968 Small animal Aquarium: 17" by 36" $20. call 952233-1968 Sport Card Collection All Sports 20,000+ Cards $450. Call 952-3035562 Stainless steel trash can. $20. 952-2927886 Starter camping gear. Tent, chairs sleeping bags. Hammock, $150. 763-257-2585

T.V. 46" Mitsubishi-rear projection. Excellent picture, $125. 952-9371548 Twin oak captain bed. Storage underneath $100. or b/o. 612-7593823 Washer, Frigidaire front loader. $150. 952-4030771 Weiderclub 4870 weight system. 8 stations, upper/lower body. $250. 952-200-4023 Wheelchair cushion Jay 2 $100. Steve 952-4450213 X-Box 360, 250 gig $200. 612-644-8377

CLEAR THE CLUTTER Advertise Your Garage Sale in the Classified Section email: classifieds@ iMarketplace.mn or Call

952-345-3003


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