Issuu on Google+

No net flaws

Wahl on the water

Tennis team finishes 16-0

Ski champ is still winning

Page 9

Page 15

PRIOR LAKE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2011

$1

www.plamerican.com

AMERICAN CR 21 extension: Smooth ride, but is it dangerous? BY SHANNON FIECKE sfiecke@swpub.com

Crossing the new non-signalized intersection near her home in Shakopee’s Southbridge area “freaks out” Lanae Paaverud. A couple of days after she posted her concerns on Facebook, her fears were realized by another driver. A Savage woman’s vehicle was T-boned while attempting to cross the new four-lane County Road 21 at Southbridge Parkway. The woman’s side air bags deployed, but neither she nor her child was seriously injured. “It’s nerve-racking,” said Paaverud,

who lives on Oxford Road and crosses the county road regularly to get to Savage. “Part of it’s because [21] is so wide and there is no speed limit. If there are four lanes going 55 miles per hour and two lanes of turning traffic, that’s really difficult to get across.” Safety at the 21 and Southbridge Parkway intersection is just one of the complaints residents have lodged since County Road 21 opened to traffic three weeks ago.

DANGER? Savage resident Lisa Alland was attempting to cross County Road 21 from southbound Southbridge Parkway on

“We don’t just open the road up and walk away. We are watching it all the time. We know it takes tweaking to get it as close to perfect as we can.” Mitch Rasmussen County Engineer Sept. 21 when she was hit by a work van driven by a Prior Lake man. Alland said she would like to comment but has been advised by an attorney to not speak about the incident. Shakopee Police Chief Jeff Tate

said he hasn’t reviewed the accident report yet but has had extra patrols monitoring the speed in the area since the road opened.

County Road 21 to page 14 ®

Issues raised by drivers Safety of motorists attempting to cross County Road 21 at Southbridge Parkway/Pike Lake Road Longer backups near Highway 169 Proximity of road to Red Oak Elementary School in Shakopee No speed limit set yet for the new road

Welcome back, Lakers Next week is Prior Lake High School’s annual homecoming celebration. The week is full of events for current, former and future Lakers. Check out this list of homecoming festivities: Coronation, 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 2 Royalty bus tour, followed by middle-school pepfests, 12:56 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5 for Hidden Oaks Middle School students and 1:41 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5 for Twin Oaks Middle School students. Both pepfests will be held in the gold gym at Twin Oaks, 15860 Fish Point Road, Prior Lake Powder Puff game, 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5 Laker Capers pepfest, 2 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7 Football game against Eagan, 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7 Hula Hoop World Record attempt, immediately following football game, Friday, Oct. 7 Dance, 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8 Unless otherwise noted, these events will take place at Prior Lake High School, 7575 150th St., Savage.

PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

At left – Senior Matt Arends and the Lakers will play Eagan at 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7 at PLHS.

School Board approves 2.3-percent levy decrease BY MERYN FLUKER mfluker@swpub.com

The Prior Lake -Savage A rea School Board has approved the maximum tax levy amount of $25.36 million for 2012, but it still represents a 2.3-percent drop from last year’s $25.95 million levy, a year in which the board did not levy the maximum amount. “I made that recommendation because the overall levy was declining, so I thought it was important that the district receive the amount that was calculated on the levy certification,” said Julie Cink, director of business affairs. “Since our levy is not increasing, it’s decreasing, I felt that we could levy the max knowing that it was declining and it will further decline based on that refunding.” The refunding Cink referenced is a move the board approved at its Sept. 12 meeting to refund two building bonds and take advantage of current low interest rates. Those savings – which could be as high as $926,000, according to Gary

Olsen of Ehlers and Associates, the fi nancial advisory company working with the district – likely will come back to residents in the form of reductions on the school district portion of their property taxes. Bids for the refinancing are scheduled to come in on Oct. 3 with the board approving them at its Oct. 10 regular meeting. Until then, the amount of additional savings to the taxpayers is not yet known. Cink, who took over for Margo Nash in November 2010, speculated that the School Board opted not to levy the maximum amount last year in order to not raise that portion of residents’ tax bills. Other reasons for the almost $ 600,000 levy decrease include a 5.6-percent decrease in adjusted net tax capacity, a 3.9-percent decrease in referendum market value as well as a reduction in debt service due to bond refi nancing last year. “Anytime we go over that bond payment, we see a reduction in our levy,” Cink said. “We are refunding that excess back to our taxpayers.” This marks the second year that

JOIN THE CHAT HOW DO YOU FEEL ABOUT THE PRIOR LAKESAVAGE AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT’S LEVY PLAN? WEIGH IN AT

www.plamerican.com

District 719 has been able to levy for its $11 million Other Post Employment Benefits (OPEB) liability, and the board gave a green light to levying the maximum allowed by the state – though last year, the board refrained. The district will levy $732,935 for OPEB, almost $48,000 more than the district levied for OPEB last year. “By being able to levy for this, the district can be able to fund that liability because we have a responsibility to pay that,” Cink said. “We’re working towards it. Every year, were trying to put more money towards that.”

Levy to page 7 ®

PHOTO BY MERYN FLUKER

Grant and Isabella Rubietta attend MTS Minnesota Connections Academy, an online school based in St. Paul. Grant, 9, just started seventh grade. Isabella, 7, is in fourth grade.

‘Accelerated’ siblings excel with online education BY MERYN FLUKER mfluker@swpub.com

Anyone meeting Grant and Isabella Rubietta would be forgiven for seeing them as typical kids at first glance. The Prior Lake siblings are enthusiastic and energetic. Grant, 9, is planning to go as a train conductor for Halloween this year; Isabella, 7, will wear wings to go as Tinker Bell. But Grant and Isabella are

INSIDE OPINION/4 OBITUARIES/6 SPORTS/9-11 AMERICAN SLICE/15 CALENDAR/19 CLASSIFIEDS/22-25 TO REACH US SUBSCRIBE: (952) 345-6682 EDITOR: (952) 345-6378 OR E-MAIL EDITOR@PLAMERICAN.COM.

anything but average when it comes to academic aptitude. The brother and sister are leaps ahead of their similarly aged peers in school. Bella is currently in fourth grade – while most 7-year-olds are in second grade – and will start fifth grade at the beginning of the 2012 calendar year. Grant is studying pre-algebra and the Incas as part of his seventhgrade coursework.

Rubiettas to page 3 ®

VOL. 52 ISSUE 1 © SOUTHWEST NEWSPAPERS


Page 2 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

WE WANT YOUR ‌ Outstanding photos of autumn leaves “Every leaf speaks bliss to me, fluttering from the autumn treeâ€? wrote English novelist and poet Emily Jane BrontĂŤ. Autumn is upon us, and we’re seeking your best fall color photos. We’re looking for those eye-popping reds, oranges, yellows and golds – whether they’re in landscape photos or pictures of your kids playing in the leaves.

2#46;2#%-# #)'

Share your best photo with Prior Lake American readers. Send your picture – in .jpg format, at least 3 MB in file size – to Editor Lori Carlson, editor@plamerican.com, before noon on Wednesday, Oct. 19. Include your name and city of residence. We’ll run some reader photos online at plamerican.com and some in the Oct. 29 American print edition.

7KHSDFNDJHFRVWLVDQGLQFOXGHV

E-MAIL: editor@plamerican.com

#FOKUUKQPVQ2NC[YQTMUHQTWRVQEJKNFTGP#FFKVKQPCNEJKNFTGPGCEJ

PHONE: (952) 345-6378

%WRECMGCPFCTECFGVQMGPUHQTGCEJEJKNF 6JGTGKUPQTGUGTXCVKQPPGGFGFCPFPQNKOKVQPJQYNQPI[QWECPUVC[ FWTKPI PQTOCNDWUKPGUUJQWTU ,WUVEJGEMKPCVQWTHTQPVFGUMCPFYGĹ?NNJCXGDKTVJFC[ RCTV[YTKUVDCPFUHQT[QWCVVJGJQUVUVCPF

Fifth-graders emcee Business Hall of Fame

#FWNVUCTGHTGG)WGUVUCTGYGNEQOGVQDTKPIRCTV[FGEQTCVKQPUCPFRTGUGPVU KPVQVJG#VTKWO0QQWVUKFGHQQFQTDGXGTCIGUCTGCNNQYGF

%CNN2.#;  0RUHLQIRUPDWLRQDWZZZSOD\ZRUNVIXQFRP 2SHQWRWKH3XEOLF 7UDLORI'UHDPV3ULRU/DNH01 214545

2ZQHGDQGRSHUDWHGE\WKH 6KDNRSHH0GHZDNDQWRQ6LRX[&RPPXQLW\

read.

register. remark.

(new stuff every day)

(once. you’re done!)

(comment. blog.)

Go to www.plamerican.com

Five Hawks Elementary School fi fthgraders Olivia and Alexis Jacobson, of Shakopee, served as student masters of ceremonies at the Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest’s sixth annual Business Hall of Fame event on Sept. 15. As part of their duties, Olivia and Alexis presented an award to Lynn Casey, chairwoman and CEO of Padilla Speer Beardsley. Casey was honored along with others as a 2011 Business Hall of Fame laureate. The banquet, held at the University of Minnesota’s McNamara Alumni Center, is expected to net more than $130,000 for Junior Achievement programs, which will serve students with over a million contact hours this school year. Through volunteers, Junior Achievement Worldwide provides in-school and after-school programs for students in grades K-12.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Olivia (left) and Alexis Jacobson pose with Five Hawks Elementary School Principal Tim Bell at the Junior Achievement of the Upper Midwest’s sixth annual Business Hall of Fame event on Sept. 15. Olivia and Alexis, both of Shakopee, presented an award to Padilla Speer Beardsley Chairwoman and CEO Lynn Casey.

We Started Together in 1986..... Now it¡s Our 25th Anniversary Together ~ Join

Us ~ October 6th 4-7pm Hors¡dourves and Refreshments Served (Drawings For) Maui Jim & Match Trunk Show 3-1 Year Supply of Contact Lenses Plano Sunglasses $100 Eyewear CertiÀcate Dairy Queen Cake

Teeth Whitening Orthodontic Records Electric Toothbrush $160 Towards Dental Care

Charles W. Puffer DDS at Prior Lake Dental

Crossroads Optometric Thank you for your loyalty and making it fun for all of us the last 25 years!

952-447-2020

visionsource-crossroadsvision.com

952-447-1080

www.priorlakedental.com

14120 Commerce Ave NE Prior Lake, MN

The

In an average issue, more than 100 individual local faces can be found in the Prior Lake American: Newsmakers, prep and youth sports athletes, government ofďŹ cials, entertainers and your friends and neighbors.

facesof your

community every week.

PRIOR LAKE

AMERICAN

952-447-6669 | www.plamerican.com

217554

The Prior Lake American is a part of you and your community. Please consider sending a $29 Voluntary Paid Subscription.

VOLUNTARY SUBSCRIP TION FORM Name__________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________ City, State, Zip ___________________________________________ Date ______________Phone Number _________________________ Email_________________________ Amount Enclosed $___________ Mail this payment to: Prior Lake American PO Box 538 Prior Lake, MN 55372


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 3

CORRECTION A story in the Sept. 24 Prior Lake American, “Edgewood second school in state to get ‘radical’ playground equipment,’” misstated Edgewood School’s rank in getting new

playground structures. Edgewood is the fi rst school in the state of Minnesota to receive a Snug Play USA playground set. When information is found

My heartfelt thanks goes out to

to be omitted, wrong or misleading, a correction or clarification may be published. Call (952) 345-6378 and talk to the editor for further information. Initial Assessment

99

only $

*

(Regularly $199)

*Mention this ad and receive $100 off the regular price of our cognitive skills test. Offer expires 12/31/11.

my amazing family for their love, support, long hours and hard work in organizing a benefit in my honor… my fiancé, Michael, for insisting I get a second opinion on my diagnosis, my dearest sons, my amazing sisters and brothers, Todd the D.J., nieces, nephews, coworkers and friends who all did an outstanding job in making this a day to remember. Thank you to all for their generous donations, for all the bikers that made the run a huge success and a special thanks to the Shakopee VFW for their wonderful accommodations. Love, Suzie (Kechely) Berger

I Finally Lost the Weight! Gather with family and friends at Fairview Southdale Hospital for a FREE seminar to learn more about your weight loss surgery options. Thursday, October 6, 6 p.m. Friday, October 14, 1 p.m. Thursday, October 20, 6 p.m.

Fairview Southdale Hospital Au Fait Room Reservations are required.

PHOTO BY MERYN FLUKER

Both Isabella and Grant are students at MTS Minnesota Connections Academy, a free online public school based in St. Paul. Instead of taking a bus and sitting down in a classroom each day, Isabella and Grant do school at home, courtesy of the Internet. But as their mom Tracy emphasizes, her children are not home-schooled. “People assume that they’re home-schooled,” she says. “They’re not. They’re virtualschooled.” “They go to public school at home,” adds father Tom Nissen. Tracy and Tom don’t write curriculum, nor do they assume the teacher role. Minnesota Connections Academy is staffed by teachers licensed by the state of Minnesota and held to the same standards as any other public school in the state. That means Grant, Isabella and their more than 1,000 peers take the Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments, just as they would if they went to traditional schools. “Virtual school goes by regular curriculum,” Tracy says. “They have the same books as everyone else.” Until recently, Tracy’s mom Linda served as the siblings’ learning coach, responsible for walking through lessons with the students, administering spelling tests and any other educational concerns that required an adult’s touch. Linda passed away from ovarian cancer last November, and Tom slid into her role as learning coach – a transition he’d done once before, also due to Linda’s illness. Though both parents work full-time, Tom was able to rearrange his schedule to be home during the weekdays. Anything that he doesn’t get to then goes to Tracy in the evening, and she also helps out with homework. Linda was the one who first brought the idea of virtual schooling to her daughter and son-in-law after they’d reached an impasse. Tracy took a then3-year-old Grant for readiness testing and discovered he’d scored “off the charts.” Tracy and Tom weren’t surprised. Grant was speaking in full sentences by age 1 and was painting by age 2. “He was reading and doing math at 3,” Tracy says. The parents had quite a quandary on their hands: How were they going to educate Grant and continue his progress? Public and private schools, like the ones Tracy and Tom attended, “really couldn’t accommodate Grant.” “They don’t do gifted programming until third grade,” Tom says. Isabella also exhibited the same accelerated progress. “By the time they were able to sit in the high chair, my mom was doing flash cards with them,” Tracy says. “They’re both tall, so people would always talk to them like they’re adults.”

“I feel that they’re truly getting a better education. They don’t have the distractions from other children. The teacher isn’t teaching to the middle. The lessons are tailored to Grant and Bella.” Tracy Rubietta Grant and Isabella’s mom

Linda planted the seeds of placing a high value on education, and she suggested virtual schooling for the young Grant. Pleased with his success at Connections, the Rubiettas enrolled Isabella when she was ready. Because they are both “accelerated,” as Tracy calls it – she prefers not to use terms like “genius” and “gifted” – Grant and Isabella were breezing through coursework. Lessons and assignments designed to take six hours would be completed in three. At that point, the Rubiettas realized Grant – and later Isabella – could do two grade levels in a year. Because Connections is held to state statutes, there are rules about how much time they must spend in class each day. Doubling up on assignments met those requirements as well as the Rubietta children’s aptitudes. “That was the advantage of virtual school,” Tracy says. When asked about what they like about Connections, both Grant and Isabella agree. “I think this is way better [than traditional school] because you don’t have to leave your home and you can work at your own pace,” Grant says. “There’s a lot of upsides: You don’t have kids interrupting you, and you can learn extra stuff.” “I like it because you can go at your own pace,” adds Isabella. As their learning coach, Tom sets his kids’ schedules at the beginning of the year – though there is room for flexibility. Each day, the students log in and see what they need to tackle for the day. The software is smart, and allows kids to skip around and do lessons out of order, but they must submit assignments and tests on time and in accordance with the teachers’ plans. Core classes have hour-long weekly live lessons, in which teachers do demonstrations and students log in to watch. They can discuss, ask questions and participate – all from home. Connections offers secure webmail, e-mail just for students, so they can contact and help each other. That Internet interaction is another bonus to Tracy, who was recently felled with a computer problem and lamented, “I wish Grant was awake right now,” to provide assistance. “These kids use the computer way more than other kids,” she says. “They’re much more tech-savvy than kids going to a regular school.” “They started doing Power Point presentations in

kindergarten,” Tom adds. But it isn’t all mouse clicks and video lessons. Connections hosts field trips to apple orchards, the zoo and even Target Field. The school has clubs, mixers and carnivals on site so the students have a chance to have the social interaction that is traditionally such a part of the school experience. “We’re doing everything that you’re doing at a regular brick-and-mortar school,” Tracy says. Instead of parent-teacher conferences, teachers and parents e-mail each other, and depending on the subject and age group, teachers call parents at home weekly or monthly to discuss progress. Teachers also are responsible for grading tests and papers. Grant and Isabella even take physical education and art classes. And when they aren’t in school – Tom and Tracy designated a downstairs area of their home for school, and Isabella even has a pink “study cubby” – the kids do many of the same things their traditionally schooled peers do. Isabella is on a competitive dance team, Grant swims and is in a club devoted to trains, and both are in Scouting. When asked if it’s hard for her to relate to kids her own age, ones who aren’t two grades ahead in school, Isabella replies, “No, not really.” Grant has slowed to taking one grade a year and is on track to graduate from high school at age 15. Connections offers college-level courses, but the Rubiettas haven’t decided what they’ll do when it comes time for Grant to don his cap and gown. “I think college is going to be a shock for them,” Tom says, smiling. In the meantime, the family is relishing the educational opportunities. “I feel that they’re truly getting a better education,” Tracy says. “They don’t have the distractions from other children. The teacher isn’t teaching to the middle. The lessons are tailored to Grant and Bella.” Both Grant and Isabella have seen success at Connections. They are both “A” students and have been on the honor roll for their grade levels, not their ages. Even though they’re young, both Grant and Isabella already have professional dreams. “I want to own a railway and be a paleontologist,” Grant says. “Maybe a perfume chemist or a Barbie designer,” says Isabella. “Maybe a fashionista.”

For the entire month of OCTOBER, when you PURCHASE any salon product, you receive a second identical product for

HALF PRICE! *excludes equipment/*returns must be made within 90 days

Sale through Monday Oct.

31st

colessalon.com

209732

 continued from page 1

Call 952-915-8626. fairview.org/weightloss

217646

RUBIETTAS

201507

Grant Rubietta, 9, goes over some coursework with his father, Tom Nissen. Tom is a learning coach for Grant and his sister Isabella, through MTS Minnesota Connections Academy. The family has designated a certain part of their house for schoolwork because the kids are students at the online school. “When you come in here, you know it’s school,” says Tom.

Apple Valley

Burnsville

Eagan

Eagan

Savage

Southport Centre 952 891 / 4112

Cobblestone Court 952 435 / 8585

Cedar Cliff 651 454 / 1390

Eagan Station 651 456 / 9454

Marketplace at 42 952 226 / 5310


Page 4 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

opinion Contributions welcome to editor@plamerican.com, (952) 345-6378

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR COUNTY ROAD 21 DECISION

A simple solution

Change directions or change leadership

I noticed with interest that a recent letter to the editor stated that the new bypass was “progress,” and it would go through and your grandchildren and mine would really appreciate it. As a person who lives next to this area, I can assure you that neit her I or my g r a ndch i ld r en will thank anyone for the extreme noise, smell of fresh exhaust in the morning and the chronic wail of police and fire sirens. I am amazed that anyone could call a $23 million extravagant expenditure like this progress. What your grandchildren will inherit is the ongoing tax increases from a series of spending ventures including the Taj Mahal fire station, the new City Hall, etc. Many of these projects did not involve a common-sense approach to providing a useful area, but rather a free-for-all approach to the use of taxpayer dollars. It should be understood that the local taxpayer is not a private equity fund to those who like to spend, spend, spend. What is truly ridiculous is the fact that the project calls for the removal of 34 homes, in itself a truly excessive expenditure. If you look up the figures for a road project by the mile, you will fi nd that the average cost is about $1 million per mile. With this extravaganza, the powers that be are discussing terms of $23 million for less than half a mile. Is this practical or even common sense? It is time that those in charge of such matters leave behind the “visionary” types including expensive consultants and realize that perhaps we should address the years 2011 and 2012 instead of 2030. Anyone who believes and moves on decisions based on projections needs to wake up and smell the coffee. As for due process in this whole affair, it is not uncommon for the ordinary resident to not have any say whatsoever in projects that impact them or their neighborhoods. Meetings are merely an obligatory function in which no one acts on the opinions of the citizens in attendance, but in this case, actually leave such meetings. Perhaps it is time to fi nd some new representation and perhaps it would be more timely to recall than wait for an election year. At this rate, we may well be taxed out of our homes by the next election.

On Sept. 6, the city held a workshop on the rerouting of County Road 21, which I attended. The Prior Lake American headline accurately reported, “Realignment would increase crash risks and taxes.” Not covered in the article was the city officials’ plan to borrow $17.2 million to fi nance the realignment. [Information from the workshop] also said taxes from this debt would start in 2013 and would increase as additional debt was raised to 2045. Only after 2045 would the development start to pay back the $17 million. During the next 35 years, the taxpayers would pay the interest on this money. According to their schedule, the full $17.2 million will be borrowed by 2021, which means the taxpayers will be stuck for the full amount of the interest for 25 years. This would continue into the future until the taxes from the project paid it down. This project is symptomatic of a style that includes borrowing without a referendum; initially reacting to the county’s offer to sell taxdefaulted properties; hiring an economic development person; accepting traffic studies as gospel; increasing taxes when 2010 ended with a milliondollar surplus; most recently offering TIF financing to a firm that says their increase in business needs more room and presumably it’s increasing its profits; as well as other previous similar moves by the city. Our current administration’s actions imply that they believe our city needs to be significantly changed and made more modern, which drives activities like the bypass. Many of us prefer that the city be maintained in a class style but essentially as it is today. That would probably include waiting to see if the early years of the actual traffic develop before modestly making adjustments. It excludes participation in major building developments. It would question the need for a business-development staff but if needed, would not be restarted during a stressed economic period. Year-end surpluses would reduce the following year’s tax. Zerobased budgeting would be installed. A referendum is required to borrow the money for major projects. The bypass project must be driven by the city manager. It’s inarguable he exerts great inf luence on the council, with a bias toward significantly changing our city from what it is today. The majority of the council’s and the city manager’s past actions have given every indication they plan to proceed on the bypass; in my mind, it is a style of past and future direction of their activities. I would like to leave the city largely as it is, giving stability to those with older properties while encouraging them to maintain them in a quality manner. It appears others share my view. When a majority of the populace wants one thing and the council and the city manager want another, you fi re the management. Only time will tell if they are going to stop the study, the bypass project or others of its kind. If not, we should work to change them.

Grace Swanson Prior Lake

Robert Peterson Prior Lake

Sometimes complex solutions can be simplified. The County Road 21 and Main Avenue problem can be solved with minimum cost and disruption. Replace the stop signs at 21 and Main with a semaphore. Then, time the lights to closely match those on Highway 13 and County Road 21. This will work. To see it in action, visit downtown Minneapolis.

Jim Marchessault Prior Lake

Time to stop ‘visionary’ leaders

Prior Lake City Council contacts MAYOR Mike Myser Phone: (952) 341-5932 E-mail: mmyser@cityofpriorlake.com COUNCIL MEMBERS Warren Erickson Phone: (952) 440-2171 E-mail: werickson@cityofpriorlake.com Kenneth Hedberg Phone: (612) 382-6143 E-mail: khedberg@cityofpriorlake.com

Richard Keeney Phone: (612) 889-7114 E-mail: rkeeney@cityofpriorlake.com Vanessa Soukup Phone: (612) 385-3686 E-mail: vsoukup@cityofpriorlake.com CITY MANAGER Frank Boyles Phone: (952) 447-9801 E-mail: fboyles@cityofpriorlake.com

PRIOR LAKE

Newspaper rates: Single copy, $1; oneyear subscriptions, $29 voluntary in Prior Lake, $33 in Scott and Carver counties, $45 elsewhere in Minnesota, $50 outside (USPS 004-696) Minnesota, and $4 per month for partial subscription. Subscriptions are non-refundable.

AMERICAN

About us: The Prior Lake American, founded in 1960, is published by Southwest Newspapers, a division of Red Wing Publishing Company. We are an active member of the Minnesota Newspaper Association and the official newspaper for the City of Prior Lake and School District 719. Published weekly on Saturdays; periodicals postage paid at Prior Lake, MN. POSTMASTER: Send change of address notice to Prior Lake American, P.O. Box 8, Shakopee, MN 55379. Location: The Prior Lake American is located at 14093 Commerce Ave. in Prior Lake. Its mailing address is Prior Lake American, P.O. Box 538, Prior Lake, MN 55372. For general information call (952) 447-6669; send faxes to (952) 447-6671.

GUEST COMMENTARY

Recognize domestic violence signs, act to stop this pervasive crime BY SUSAN MCCORMICK HADLEY

Are we ever going to say “no more” to domestic violence? It seems that nearly daily we read about another incident of domestic violence. By now, researchers, clinicians and advocates have established that family violence is a serious public health problem in the United States and around the world. From infants to the elderly, this homegrown crime affects people in all stages of life. We now know that one in four women across the United States and Europe will experience domestic violence over their lifetime. It is a violation of human rights, global in reach, cutting across every age, gender, cultural, political, socio-economic, ethnic, religious and educational boundary. Simply put, domestic violence is the physical or mental abuse of one partner by another, within a current or former, intimate or family relationship. This within-the-home violence happens in all kinds of relationships: heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual and transgender. It is repeated, random and relentless, the habitual use of threats and intimidation to control a partner. The abuse can be physical, emotional, psychological, fi nancial or sexual. All kinds of women have suddenly found themselves trapped in situations that came about gradually, but left them feeling powerless. Domestic violence is a scary sort of cancer in our society, perpetuated, in part, by lack of awareness and knowledge. To give you an idea of the scope of domestic violence in our state alone, the Minnesota Coalition for Battered Women, St. Paul, annually gathers the following information. In cases of women murdered, the suspected, alleged, or convicted perpetrator was a current or former husband, boyfriend, intimate partner, household member, or family member. In cases of children murdered, the suspected, alleged, or convicted perpetrator was the father, mother, guardian, babysitter, child care provider or other family member of the child. In more than a few cases, the perpetrator of child abuse was the parent’s spouse, intimate partner or former boyfriend. In 2009 in Minnesota, at least 12 women died from domestic violence, 10 children died from child abuse and two family members, friends or interveners were murdered. The impact on families is significant: At least eight children were left motherless due to their mothers’ domestic violence murders. In 2010, at least 15 women died from domestic violence, seven children died from child abuse, four family members or friends were murdered and two men died from domestic violence. Note that the number of violent deaths tells only a fraction of the story. Many more victims survive the physical violence but are left with permanent physical, psychological and emotional scars. Many will attest to the psychological and emotional trauma; this abuse is often denied or minimized, yet it can leave deep and lasting scars across the lifespan. What is the foundation of domestic violence? It’s all about power and con-

trol, fear and terror, and insecurity. The control the perpetrator has over the victim/survivor creates isolation and fear, limiting the victim’s contact. Repeated verbal and emotional abuse act to break down a victim’s sense of self, contributing to a victim’s seclusion and reducing the likelihood of escape or of even thinking about ways to get out. In reality, many victims do not want their marriage or relationship to end; they just want the abuse and violence to stop. A number of red f lags, subtle signs and hidden behaviors may be evident in an abusive relationship. The following could describe a typical evening at home: “He would isolate her from her family, set her up to lose jobs by withdrawing child care, deprive her of sleep and starve her for days, stripping her naked and tossing her out of the house into the snow, when she refused to have sex.” This description may seem outrageous, and it is, but it also describes realistic and well-documented behaviors by an abuser against a victim. Those of us who work in this field realize that an abuser often tries to isolate the victim from any support system, including family and friends. The abuser soon fi nds that it is easier to control another person when she/he does not have a reality check and has no one to talk with, other than her partner. Many of these same issues and dynamics take place in the rapidly increasing problem of adolescent and youth dating violence; The National Dating Abuse Helpline is the direct service provider behind loveisrespect.org, The Helpline (originally known as loveisrespect. org, National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline) was launched in February 2007 with help from founding sponsor Liz Claiborne Inc. It is a national, 24-hour resource specifically designed for teens and young adults, by phone, text and chats. The Helpline offers real-time, one-on-one support from peer advocates. And if the preceding doesn’t encourage you to get involved, the extreme financial cost puts forward another compelling argument. The cost of domestic violence to the U.S. economy is more than $8.3 billion. This includes medical care, mental health services and lost productivity (i.e. time away from work). A study conducted at a large health plan in Minneapolis and St. Paul in 1994 found that an annual difference of $1,775 more was spent on abused women who utilized hospital services, than on a random sample of general enrollees. The study concluded that early identification and treatment of victims and potential victims are most likely to benefit health care systems in the long run. How can we help? Identifying someone affected by family violence is the first step in putting a support system in place that can be available if needed. No one should live in fear of the person they love. The task for us as community members is to raise our level of awareness so that each of us can take action and respond to this crime; it is all around us. Every one of us must be alert to the signs and symptoms of abuse and violence. We should

Guest columns and letters to the editor: Letters to the editor and guest commentaries stating positions on issues facing the local community are especially welcome but are reviewed by the editor prior to publication. The newspaper reserves the right to edit letters for length, grammar and clarity. We will not print letters of a libelous nature. Letters should be 500 or fewer words in length. Exceptions are at the editor’s discretion. Deadline for letters is noon Wednesday before the Saturday publication date. Letters must contain the address and daytime phone number of the author, as well as a signature (except on e-mails). We prefer letters that are e-mailed to editor@plamerican.com. Editorials that appear on this page represent the institutional voice of the newspaper. Any questions or comments should be directed to the editor. Deadlines News: noon Wednesday Advertising: 4 p.m. Tuesday Imarketplace (Classifieds): 3 p.m. Thursday for paid ads; noon Thursday for Thrift ads Legal notices: Noon Tuesday

be ready to speak with someone who appears to be troubled by conflicts or concerns, whether woman, man or child, with the goal of offering support, assistance or resources. If you suspect that someone you know is being abused, speak up! If you’re hesitating, telling yourself it’s none of your business, that just doesn’t fly anymore. It is your business, and it is our business. Domestic violence affects every one of us, every day in our homes, our communities and in our workplaces. Keep in mind that expressing your concern will let the person know that you care and may even save her or his life. You may want to consider getting yourself informed, validate the victim’s experiences, don’t judge and follow her lead. The following from Sarah Buel, 1994, includes more words you can use if you suspect abuse or violence: “Ask if something is wrong. Express concern. Listen and validate. Offer help. Support her or his decisions. I’m afraid for your safety. I’m afraid for the safety of your children. You don’t deserve to be treated this way. You didn’t cause it. You can’t fi x it. I’m here for you when you are ready or are able to leave. Let’s figure out a safety plan for you.” Consider encouraging your neighborhood watch associations to become as concerned with watching out for domestic violence, as with burglaries and other crimes. You may think about reaching out to support someone, a neighbor, a co-worker, a friend or a family member, whom you believe might be a victim or an abuser. There are several toll-free numbers you can call for local resources, including shelter in Minnesota. Call the Day One Minnesota Domestic Violence Crisis Line at 1-866-223-1111. The line offers a safe place to talk, as well as information and resources. You can also call the National Domestic Violence Hotline, which is a free service anyone can call 24/7 for information, assistance and resources in your area. With the advent of social media, The National Network to End Domestic Violence has specific information regarding Internet, cell phone and social networking safety. Again, the website is www.loveisrespect. org. The National Domestic Violence Helpline for Men and Women is at 1-888-7HELPLINE (1-888-743-5754). You don’t have to face domestic violence alone. It does take a village for support and safety. Prior Lake resident Susan McCormick Hadley has won a 2011 Ann Bancroft Award for her support of girls and women. In 1986, she created WomanKind, a program based in heath care that provides support and information, and helps ensure safety for thousands of battered and abused women. Today, the WomanKind concept has become national model of 24-hour health response to domestic violence.

Publisher: Laurie Hartmann (952) 345-6878; lhartmann@swpub.com Editor: Lori Carlson (952) 345-6378; editor@plamerican.com Staff Writer: Meryn Fluker (952) 345-6375; mfluker@swpub.com Sports Editor: Tom Schardin (952) 345-6379; tschardin@swpub.com Advertising Sales: Lance Barker (952) 345-6371; lbarker@swpub.com Advertising Sales: Pat Vickerman (952) 345-6373; pvickerman@swpub.com Advertising Sales: Daniel Boike (952) 345-6372; dboike@swpub.com Circulation: Ruby Winings (952) 345-6682; circulation@swpub.com Imarketplace (Classified) Advertising: (952) 345-3003; self-serve at www.imarketplace.mn Composition: Traci Zellmann Ad Design: Renee Fette For breaking news and news updates, go to www.plamerican.com or follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Find sports scores online at www.scoreboard.mn. Leave news tips at (952) 345-6378. © 2011 Southwest Newspapers (www.swnewspapers.com)


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 5

HALFTIME PERFORMANCE

er Saturday, Octob th

15

SAVE THE DATE

ation Day Customer Appreci 0 p.m. 10 :00 a.m. – 2 :0 h Look in the Oct. 8t tails paper for all the de

PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

The Prior Lake High School dance team performs at halftime in the Lakers’ home football game with Rosemount Sept. 16. The Laker dancers’ performance season begins Nov. 22, when the team competes in a high-kick South Suburban Conference meet at Lakeville South.

Still many questions as CR21 decision nears I began writing this column over a year ago as a monthly piece on local history. I’m a writer and a historian, not a politician, and knew nothing of the city’s economic development study and the County Road 21 bypass proposal until I attended a neighborhood meeting last April and learned that the city’s consultants were recommending the rerouting of 21 south of its current alignment, taking with it 34 homes and one business. I was relieved to hear that my home wasn’t among the 34, but the plan would wipe out the homes of my neighbors on Pleasant Street and destroy the only historic neighborhood in Prior Lake. That’s when I got upset and decided to take up the cause. The City Council will make its decision on Oct. 17. On investigation, what concerned me the most was that city staff gave no direction to its consultant to share any of this with residents whose homes would be lost, much less involve them in the process through focus groups and the like. Nor had they directed the consultants to study a range of options and alternatives, not just the three that were presented. Why? Mainly, I suspect, because the consultants weren’t selected in an open bid, or request for proposal process, where the scope of work is defined as a matter of public record. They simply did whatever they were hired, and told, to do by city staff. State statute currently permits local government administrators to retain consultants and enter into professional

John

DIERS COMMUNITY COLUMNIST

service contracts with no public process, as long as the contract amount is less than $100,000. That’s something our legislators need to look at, and fix. The mayor and council were, originally, going to take up the bypass in September, but things started unraveling as new information from the consultants became public at a Sept. 6 workshop. There, it was learned that the curvature of the proposed bypass would increase accident rates by 33 percent, and that it wouldn’t pass environmental muster, because it required the taking of wetlands. It was also affirmed that the $23 million cost of the project would fall on homeowners if tax-increment financing were used. Moreover, it became clear that the bypass would run afoul of the state of Minnesota’s new eminent domain statute, which prohibits governments from taking private property for economic development. That, of course, raises the possibility of litigation and more expense for taxpayers, who have already paid upwards of $50,000 for the

consultants. If they have any judgment at all, the mayor and council will say “no” to the bypass on Oct. 17. It’s a flawed plan. The question then becomes, what happens next? First, the mayor and council should direct city staff to revisit all options. There are several. One, and the most sensible, is to do nothing and make no decisions until general economic conditions improve. Governments at all levels are broke, and there is no public support for increasing taxes to pay for new projects or services, nor is there evidence that area growth will return to prerecession levels. We are living in changing times. Others include building an underpass beneath 21 to improve pedestrian and bike access to downtown, or installing synchronized traffic signals at Duluth, Arcadia and Main. The latter, I understand, was summarily dismissed by local traffic engineers, which is a little perplexing. I regularly drive through downtown Minneapolis during rush hours. The signals are a block apart and move thousands of cars every day. Why not here? Haven’t these engineers driven along Hennepin Avenue, or Second Avenue, or Marquette? Or, as I suspect, are they among the suburban fraternity that believes moving automobiles must take precedence over everything else, and that traffic traveling unimpeded at less than 40 miles per hour is somehow, congested? Maybe the council should hire the traffic-engineering department of the city of Minneapolis as its consultant and direct it to develop a plan? Sometimes,

congestion is a good thing. Finally, the mayor and council should ask some probing questions of the staff who managed this project, such as, who defined the scope of work and what specific directions were given to the consultants? How were they selected? Why were outdated numbers from 2005-06 used to project traffic volumes, and an impending traffic crisis, when growth rates have slowed? Why wasn’t it disclosed earlier that the bypass option would increase accident rates by 33 percent, or that there would be environmental and eminent-domain issues? Why weren’t the consultant’s recommendations more carefully scrutinized and questions asked before presentation to the council? Was the bypass a preferred recommendation that the consultants were directed to deliver and defend, and, if so, where did it come from, and who promoted it? Unless these questions are asked and good answers given, I fear we’ll be going through issues like this over and over again. I would much prefer to write about local history, but it may take some big changes and a lot more accountability and transparency at City Hall for that to happen. Elected officials and city staff work for us. They should never be allowed to forget it. John Diers is a Prior Lake resident who spent 40 years working in the transit industry and author of “Twin Cities by Trolley: The Streetcar Era in Minneapolis and St. Paul.” To submit questions or topics for Diers, e-mail Prior Lake American editor Lori Carlson at editor@plamerican.com.

Straight teeth… no braces!

GO

Wireless.... Go Dr. Jesse N. Veil, DDS, MS, PA Eden Prairie

Bloomington

Savage

952.903.9484 Visit us at: www.veilorthodontics.com

RANTS AND RAVES FROM STAFF

Not quite ready for coats Rave: As the season of pumpkins and descending leaves approaches, I’m excited for the fashion that fall brings. Say it with me: “Sweater weather.” Despite temperatures in the 60s, I’ve spent the last two weeks donning my favorite wool tops instead of going sans sleeves, in an attempt to wring out the last few days of summer. This is one of those rare times in Minnesota when the climate doesn’t require an additional covering, be it a coat or a jacket, so I’m deciding to embrace it before Mother Nature snatches my sweater weather away. – Meryn Fluker

Tea me, please Rave: I’m a lifelong tea drinker, but I’ve only recently discovered the joys of loose-leaf tea. The chemistry-class feel of figuring out your own ratio of tea to water and being able to see the spices, leaves and fruits that combine to create the beverage make drinking and brewing loose-leaf tea a really fun way to wake up or re-energize midday. Plus, if you have more than two types of loose-leaf tea, you can mix and match to create some wacky blends. I love my coffee, but frankly, loose-leaf tea is a much more fun and low-key way to stay warm. – Meryn Fluker

‘B’ a dear and go away Rant: OK, I’m just going to come right out and say it: I’m beyond sick of Beyoncè. It’s not so much her music I can’t stand (even I have “Single Ladies” and “Baby Boy” – perhaps even a

Destiny’s Child song or two – on my iPod). It’s more her overall personality. “B” seems to need a pat on the back for every accomplishment, from donating money to charity, to topping the singles charts, to (gasp!) carrying a baby. The entertainment media feeds her self-absorption, especially now that she’s pregnant. Beyoncè shows off her baby bump onstage! Beyoncè’s fluctuating hormones are making her hate Jay-Z’s scent! Beyoncè is just like every other mom-to-be, only much, much richer and more glamorous! But even before Beyoncè started taking us on a detailed journey of her life as a pregnant lady, I’d already reached my saturation point this spring, during a video tribute in her honor at the Billboard Music Awards. After several minutes of deadpan footage of her family and various celebrities slathering on the praise – if you didn’t know better, you’d think it was a Mother Teresa documentary – Beyoncè herself gushed about how “humbled” and “surprised” she was at the admiration. Yeah, B, stick to singing, because your acting is pretty weak. – Lori Carlson Do you have a rant or a rave? Send us your musings: E-mail: rantsandraves@swpub.com Address: Prior Lake American, Attn: Rants and Raves, P.O. Box 538, Prior Lake, MN, 55372 Guidelines: Reader rants and raves should be no more than 200 words. The deadline is noon each Wednesday. Rants and raves that are potentially libelous will not be printed or will be edited. Submissions will not be refused because staff disagrees with their content. Anonymous submissions are acceptable; however, including a contact name and/or phone number is helpful for staff, who may have questions about the submission. Rants and raves may be edited as space requires. All publication decisions will be made by the editor.

12651 Zenith Ave., Suite 107 Burnsville, MN 55337

952-345-0032

Receive up to $1,850 in Rebates* with the purchase of a qualifying Lennox® Home Comfort System

AND up to $500 in Federal Tax Credits** OR

Special Financing Available***

Offer expires 12/2/2011. *Rebate offer is valid only with the purchase of qualifying Lennox® products. **See dealer for details and visit www.energystar.gov for more information. ***See dealer for details or visit Lennox.com. © 2011 Lennox Industries Inc. See your participating Lennox dealer for details. Lennox dealers include independently owned and operated businesses. 214826


Page 6 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

Project Community Connect arrives Oct. 28 Heading Home Scott-Carver will host the second annual Project Community Connect on Friday, Oct. 28 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Minnesota School of Business in Shakopee. Project Community Connect is a one-day event where services and information are available for those who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. The event brings together citizens, nonprofits, government and businesses to address the needs of those in the local community who are economically challenged. Services include housing, employment, legal services, benefits,

community resources, haircuts, Minnesota identification, birth certificates, basic medical care, dentistry and more. Project Community Connect is part of a 10-year plan to end homelessness in the local community. To sponsor or donate for the event, contact scottcarverPCCdonations@gmail.com. To volunteer contact scottcarverPCCvolunteer@gmail. com. The organization’s website is at www.scottcarverPCC.org.

Job Opportunities with these great companies and others are advertised in CLASSIFIEDS located in the back of this newspaper

Excellence in Dentistry

Find more local JOB openings in the CLASSIFIEDS. To see your company listed here, or to place your employment ad, call 952-345-3003.

NEWS BRIEFS

Immunization clinics offered Scott County Public Health offers walk-in immunization clinics at the Scott County Public Health office, located in the Workforce Development Center, 792 Canterbury Road, Suite A-160, Shakopee, every Monday from 1 to 5 p.m. No clinics are held on holidays. For more information, call (952) 496-8555.

‘Practice Your English’ “Practice Your English” is being offered from 6 to 7:30 p.m. every Thursday at Eden Baptist

Church, 12540 Glenhurst Ave., Savage. A dinner will be provided to people age 18 and up. All levels of English are welcome. For more information, call (952) 890-5856.

CAP Agency WIC voucher pickup days T he CA P A gency W IC voucher pickup dates for residents of Scott County are the second Monday, third Thursday and fourth Tuesday of each month from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. at the CAP Agency, 712 Canterbury Road S., Shakopee. For more information about WIC, call the CAP Agency WIC Program at (952) 402-9869.

Melissa S. Zettler D.D.S.

Only YOU can support local businesses

14127 Vernon Ave. S. Savage, MN

952-345-3003

952-440-9303 www.cherrywooddental.com

for a list of businesses, visit www.priorlakechamber.com 174108

LIVESREMEMBERED Marie E. Knutson Marie E. Knutson, 85, of Prior Lake, died Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011 at her residence in Prior Lake. She was born in Lisbon, ND, Nov. 14, 1925 to Joseph and Anna (Bauer) Roth. Marie married John C. Knutson April 7, 1951, in Minneapolis. For over 25 years she worked as a window clerk for the Savage and Burnsville Post Offices. Marie is survived by sons, Rick (Gladys) of Apple Valley, Andy (Sheri) of Dawsonville, GA, Jay (Lynn) of Burnsville; daughters, Julie (Rick) Mollenhoff of Prior Lake, Kristy (Jeff) Ryan of Prior Lake; 10 grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by husband, John; parents; three brothers; two sisters. Visitation is Saturday, Oct. 1, from 8-10 a.m., followed by Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m., all at the Church of St. Michael, 16311 Duluth Av. SE, Prior Lake. Officiating at the funeral service is the Rev.Thomas Sieg. Pallbearers are Jayson Knutson, Neil Knutson, Bill Knutson, Jeff Knutson, Melissa Mollenhoff, Laura Mollenhoff. Interment St. John the Baptist Cemetery in Burnsville. Funeral arrangements through McNearney Funeral Home in Shakopee, 952-445-2755. www.mcnearneyfuneralhome.com

Richard Allen Ellingboe On July 28, 1933 in Benson, MN, Olaf and Helene (Thoren) Ellingboe proudly announced the birth of their son, Richard Allen. At a very young age, his father passed away and later on his mother became ill, leaving the four children being placed into foster care. Richard spent the rest of his years being raised on a farm in Sunburg, MN, with foster parents Albert and Hannah Kerkaboe. In 1951, Richard graduated from Kerkhoven High School in Kerkhoven, MN. He then proudly served in the United States Army. Stationed in Germany, Richard drove tank until being discharged in April of 1963. In June of 1965, Richard met the love his life, Eileen Reinke, while they were attendants in a wedding. On Aug. 27, 1966, Richard and Eileen exchanged wedding vows at St. Paul Lutheran Church in Jordan. Moving to Shakopee, they welcomed three sons into their family, Allen, Mark and Kevin. For over 35 years, Richard worked for Land O Lakes Feed Mill in Minneapolis, where he unloaded rail cars. For many years, he also worked at Freemont Industries in Shakopee at night. Upon retiring, Richard still continued to work part-time at Kmart Distribution Center in Shakopee. In his spare time, Richard loved spending time at his foster parent’s farm, which later was passed down to him. Meticulous about the lawn, he loved cutting lawn with his John Deere tractor. In earlier years, Richard enjoyed camping on Memorial Day weekends with his boys. In later years, he loved traveling to Branson, MO and out west with his wife, fishing with his children and hunting deer and pheasants. A man of strong faith, Richard and Eileen joined Mount Olive Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1977. His biggest passion in life was his grandchildren. Richard loved attending their sporting events, taking them to stores and sharing his candy jar with them. One of the biggest celebrations of the year fell on July 28, as Richard and Eileen shared the same birthday. A husband, father and grandfather of strong will, a good heart and hard working, Richard was always proud and a determine fighter. A resident of Shakopee and at the age of 78, Richard passed away peacefully surrounded by his family the early evening of Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011 at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis. Richard will always be loved and missed deeply by his wife of 45 years, Eileen; sons, Allen (Robin) Ellingboe, Mark (Leah) Ellingboe, Kevin (Tara) Ellingboe, all of Shakopee; grandchildren, Christopher, Meghan, Dylan, Brandon and Kylen; brother, Charles (Emilie) Ellingboe of New Port: sister, Margie Jorgenson of Starbuck; sister-in-law, Joanne Ellingboe of Minneapolis; mother-in-law, Stella Reinke of Jordan; sister and brother-in law, Joan and Norman Frey of Shakopee; nieces, nephews and friends. Richard is preceded in death by his parents; brother, Clarence Ellingboe; father-in-law, Charles Reinke; brother-in-law, LuVern Jorgenson. The visitation was Wednesday, Sept. 28 from 4-7 p.m. at Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Shakopee and also one hour prior to the service at church. The Christian Funeral Service was Thursday, Sept. 29 at 11 a.m. at Mount Olive Evangelical Lutheran Church, Shakopee. Pallbearers for Richard were Christopher Ellingboe, Dylan Ellingboe, Gregg Frey, Joleen Brandt, Tom Renneke and Rob Geis. The Rev. Mark Schwertfeger officiated. Richard will be laid to rest at Spirit Hill Cemetery in Jordan. The Ellingboe family is served with honor, care and compassion by Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Shakopee Chapel www.ballardsunderfuneral.com

— Thank You —

Betty Riley

Barbara R. Wolf

Betty Riley, 84, of Prior Lake, passed away Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011. Betty was born July 3, 1927. She grew up in Bird Island, MN. On Feb. 14, 1947 Betty married Duane Riley and for several years they farmed together in the Hector, MN area. They have resided in the Prior Lake/Savage area for 53 years. She was employed by Scott County for over 20 years. She retired in 1992 as the Supervisor for the Home Health Aide Department. After retirement Betty worked part time at the Scott County Community Action Program (CAP). Betty will be loved and deeply missed by her husband of 64 years, Duane; children, Darlene (Bruce) Russo, Lou Ann (Howard) Uhr, David Riley, Nancy (David) McCann; five grandchildren, Heather McNellis, Sarah Hansen, David Pumper, Riley and Danny McCann; three great-grandchildren, Nikki Davidson, John and Vanessa Pumper; two great-great-grandchildren, Jayden and Jameson Davidson. Preceded in death by daughter, Diana Pumper; grandson, Troy Pumper; parents, Carl and Bertha Chapin; brother, Carroll Chapin. Visitation was held Monday, Sept. 26 at Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home in Prior Lake. Funeral services were held Tuesday, Sept. 27, at Eden Baptist Church, 12540 Glenhurst Ave., Savage. Pastors Dan Miller and Doyal Van Gelder officiated. Soloist was Kris Nelson accompanied by Craig Wasner. Pallbearers included Jerry Birkholz, Gordan Leeman, John Lind, Todd Mullinax, Paul Scheunemann and Dave Singer. Interment was at Spirit Hill Cemetery, Jordan.

Barbara Ann Rieschl was born Jan. 29, 1933, in Passaic, NJ, to parents Martin and Emma (Beglinger) Rieschl. Growing up the youngest of three children in New Jersey, Barbara and her family enjoyed traveling and spending time at their cabin in Wisconsin. Graduating in 1950 from St. Nicholas High School in Patterson, NJ, Barbara attended and later graduated from St. Catherine’s University in St. Paul. Advancing her degree, she graduated as just one of two women to graduate from the University of Minnesota in 1957 with a Pharmaceutical Degree, placing at the top of her class. In October 1954, while spending a weekend away from college at her sister’s home, Barbara met a handsome man named Robert Wolf at the Corner Bar in Jordan. Dancing the night away in her black patent leather shoes, her love grew and she and Bob exchanged vows Aug. 25, 1956 at St. John the Baptist Church in Jordan. They were blessed with eight children: Kristin, Sheila, RJ, Patrick, Tom, Michael, Merrie and Paul. Together, Barbara and Bob owned and operated Jordan Drug. They took great pride in the store, serving the local community. Over the years, they treasured many special friendships formed while serving customers. A dedicated Jordan resident, Barbara was a member of the Knights of Columbus Ladies Auxiliary, Jordan Lioness Club and the V.F.W. Ladies Auxiliary. A devoted Catholic, Barbara attended daily mass and was proud of her children being baptized, confirmed and some even married at St. John’s Church. Barbara, Bob and the children treasured creating fond memories at the family cabin they owned in Gordon, WI. Barbara felt at home at the cabin, for this was the same lake on which she spent so much time as a young girl. After retirement, Barbara and Bob loved traveling abroad, visiting Italy, Spain, Germany, Portugal, Korea and Hawaii. One of her fondest memories was a special private audience with Pope John Paul in Rome. In her spare time, Barbara loved bowling, shopping for great bargains, buying furniture and going out to eat with friends. Spending time with her family was her biggest pride and joy. Holidays in general were all special times with the family, but Christmas was the top of her list. Every Sunday, the family would sit around the table enjoying a wonderful meal and each other’s company. A visionary and true pioneer, Barbara was a very generous woman who gave her all to everyone. Loyal to her family, affectionate as a wife, caring as a mother and a loving grandmother, she was very knowledgeable about life and had a great sense of humor. Barbara passed away peacefully at the age of 78, with her husband at her side the evening of Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011 at the Belle Plaine Lutheran Home in Belle Plaine. Barbara will always be loved and missed deeply by her husband of 55 years, Robert; children, Kristin (Brett) Storrar of Vadnais Heights, Sheila (Scott) Mitchell of Minneapolis, RJ (Susan) Wolf of Bloomington, Patrick (Dana) Wolf of Hermantown, Tom (Kellie) Wolf of Prior Lake, Michael (Margaret) Wolf of St. Paul, Merrie (Ken) Matson of Chanhassen, Paul Wolf of Jordan; grandchildren, Robert, Madeline, Daniel and Michael Storrar, Austin (Vince) Srejma, London Vale, Andrew and Kathryn Wolf, Jordan, Patrick, Jonathan and Julia Wolf, Thomas, Nolan, Evan and Mason Wolf, Alexander, Rachel, and Adam Wolf, Alexis Matson; brother-in-law, Dr. Paul Stahler of Jordan; sister-inlaw, Patricia Rieschl of Minong, WI; and many other relatives and friends. Barbara is preceded in death by parents; sister, Elizabeth Rieschl; brother, Martin Rieschl. The visitation was Friday, Sept. 30, from 4-8 p.m. at Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Jordan as well as one hour prior to the service at Mass. The Mass of Christian Burial will be Saturday, Oct. 1, at 11 a.m. at St. John the Baptist Church, 210 N. Broadway, Jordan. Father Timothy Yanta will officiate. Barbara will be laid to rest at Calvary Cemetery in Jordan. Memorials preferred and will be distributed in Barbara’s memory by the family. The Wolf family is served with honor, care and compassion by Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Jordan Chapel www.ballardsunderfuneral.com

Donna Mae Hallgren Born on June 30, 1936, in New Market, Donna Mae was the only child of Ben and Adale (Kroening) Schoenecker. Donna moved to Shakopee with her family and attended Shakopee Area Catholic Schools through eighth grade. Donna worked part time at the local theater and Bridgeman’s Ice Cream Shop. She enjoyed scooping ice cream and was known to make the best malts in town – a skill she never lost. She was her senior class secretary and graduated from Shakopee Senior High in 1954. Donna lost her father at age 11 and her mother at 22. While working as a legal secretary for city attorney, Julius Coller, Donna made a bet with another secretary that she could get a date with the young dentist, Dr. Warren Hallgren, who worked in the same building. The date took place and the rest is history. They were married Oct. 14, 1961, at St. Mark’s Catholic Church in Shakopee. They welcomed daughter Carol in 1962. She agreed to Warren’s insistence that she get her driver’s license, at which point he agreed to her request to buy a new home. They moved into their Main Street home in 1963 and welcomed daughter Janet in 1965. Donna and Warren belonged to a travel club, which allowed them to visit places including Rome, Switzerland, Paris, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Donna was also an active volunteer in the Shakopee Public Schools; she led band trip fundraisers, offered her garage space on two occasions for the making of the high school homecoming floats, and served on the all-night graduation party committees. After losing her husband in 1998, the relationships that Donna maintained with her friends were very important and of great comfort to her. In particular, her close friend, Carol Schmidt, was a frequent dinner, movie, travel, and shopping companion. She loved the trips she took with her daughters, including Hawaii and a Walt Disney cruise. Donna enjoyed talking politics and brushing up on current affairs – and she had many strong opinions (all Democratic!). Loving traditions and being very family oriented, Donna loved Christmas, celebrating birthdays, and insisted on feeding anyone who stopped by to visit. The freezer and refrigerator were always filled with great treats and delicious meals. A lifelong animal lover, Donna never met a dog she didn’t love – and her daughters provided her with many to spoil over the years! A charter member of the Shakopee Lioness Club, Donna was also very interested and knowledgeable about family history and the history of Shakopee. She even typed the original Shakopee Story, written by Julius Coller. After moving to Northridge Court, Donna enjoyed socializing with the neighbors and new friends. She also enjoyed dropping a few nickels in the slot machines and eating a good steak at Mystic Lake. Donna’s greatest passion was her family. She was extremely proud of her daughters, felt blessed with her wonderful sons-in-law, and adored her grandchildren. At the age of 75, Donna passed away unexpectedly Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011, at her home. Donna will always be loved and missed deeply by her daughters, Carol (Ed) Aikey of Shakopee, Janet (Dan) Silversmith of St. Paul; grandchildren, Kristen and Brian Aikey, Joey and Ellie Silversmith. Donna is preceded in death by her parents and her husband, Dr. C. Warren Hallgren. The Celebration of Life Service was Friday, Sept. 30 at 6 p.m., with visitation two hours prior, at Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Shakopee. Pastor A. Paul Olson officiated. The Hallgren family is served with honor, care, and compassion by Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Shakopee Chapel www.ballardsunderfuneral.com

Lives of great men all remind us we can make our lives sublime. And departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sand of time -Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

For current information on visitation and funeral arrangements, visit our website: PLAmerican. com/news/ obituaries This information is updated daily.


Page 6 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

Project Community Connect arrives Oct. 28 Heading Home Scott-Carver will host the second annual Project Community Connect on Friday, Oct. 28 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Minnesota School of Business in Shakopee. Project Community Connect is a one-day event where services and information are available for those who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. The event brings together citizens, nonprofits, government and businesses to address the needs of those in the local community who are economically challenged. Services include housing, employment, legal services, benefits,

community resources, haircuts, Minnesota identification, birth certificates, basic medical care, dentistry and more. Project Community Connect is part of a 10-year plan to end homelessness in the local community. To sponsor or donate for the event, contact scottcarverPCCdonations@gmail.com. To volunteer contact scottcarverPCCvolunteer@gmail. com. The organization’s website is at www.scottcarverPCC.org.

Job Opportunities with these great companies and others are advertised in CLASSIFIEDS located in the back of this newspaper

Excellence in Dentistry

NEWS BRIEFS

Immunization clinics offered Scott County Public Health offers walk-in immunization clinics at the Scott County Public Health office, located in the Workforce Development Center, 792 Canterbury Road, Suite A-160, Shakopee, every Monday from 1 to 5 p.m. No clinics are held on holidays. For more information, call (952) 496-8555.

‘Practice Your English’ “Practice Your English” is being offered from 6 to 7:30 p.m. every Thursday at Eden Baptist

Find more local JOB openings in the CLASSIFIEDS. To see your company listed here, or to place your employment ad, call 952-345-3003.

Church, 12540 Glenhurst Ave., Savage. A dinner will be provided to people age 18 and up. All levels of English are welcome. For more information, call (952) 890-5856.

CAP Agency WIC voucher pickup days T he CA P A gency W IC voucher pickup dates for residents of Scott County are the second Monday, third Thursday and fourth Tuesday of each month from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m. at the CAP Agency, 712 Canterbury Road S., Shakopee. For more information about WIC, call the CAP Agency WIC Program at (952) 402-9869.

Melissa S. Zettler D.D.S.

Only YOU can support local businesses

14127 Vernon Ave. S. Savage, MN

952-345-3003

952-440-9303 www.cherrywooddental.com

for a list of businesses, visit www.priorlakechamber.com 174108

LIVESREMEMBERED Marie E. Knutson Marie E. Knutson, 85, of Prior Lake, died Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011 at her residence in Prior Lake. She was born in Lisbon, ND, Nov. 14, 1925 to Joseph and Anna (Bauer) Roth. Marie married John C. Knutson April 7, 1951, in Minneapolis. For over 25 years she worked as a window clerk for the Savage and Burnsville Post Offices. Marie is survived by sons, Rick (Gladys) of Apple Valley, Andy (Sheri) of Dawsonville, GA, Jay (Lynn) of Burnsville; daughters, Julie (Rick) Mollenhoff of Prior Lake, Kristy (Jeff) Ryan of Prior Lake; 10 grandchildren; 16 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by husband, John; parents; three brothers; two sisters. Visitation is Saturday, Oct. 1, from 8-10 a.m., followed by Mass of Christian Burial at 10 a.m., all at the Church of St. Michael, 16311 Duluth Av. SE, Prior Lake. Officiating at the funeral service is the Rev.Thomas Sieg. Pallbearers are Jayson Knutson, Neil Knutson, Bill Knutson, Jeff Knutson, Melissa Mollenhoff, Laura Mollenhoff. Interment St. John the Baptist Cemetery in Burnsville. Funeral arrangements through McNearney Funeral Home in Shakopee, 952-445-2755. www.mcnearneyfuneralhome.com

Richard Allen Ellingboe On July 28, 1933 in Benson, MN, Olaf and Helene (Thoren) Ellingboe proudly announced the birth of their son, Richard Allen. At a very young age, his father passed away and later on his mother became ill, leaving the four children being placed into foster care. Richard spent the rest of his years being raised on a farm in Sunburg, MN, with foster parents Albert and Hannah Kerkaboe. In 1951, Richard graduated from Kerkhoven High School in Kerkhoven, MN. He then proudly served in the United States Army. Stationed in Germany, Richard drove tank until being discharged in April of 1963. In June of 1965, Richard met the love his life, Eileen Reinke, while they were attendants in a wedding. On Aug. 27, 1966, Richard and Eileen exchanged wedding vows at St. Paul Lutheran Church in Jordan. Moving to Shakopee, they welcomed three sons into their family, Allen, Mark and Kevin. For over 35 years, Richard worked for Land O Lakes Feed Mill in Minneapolis, where he unloaded rail cars. For many years, he also worked at Freemont Industries in Shakopee at night. Upon retiring, Richard still continued to work part-time at Kmart Distribution Center in Shakopee. In his spare time, Richard loved spending time at his foster parent’s farm, which later was passed down to him. Meticulous about the lawn, he loved cutting lawn with his John Deere tractor. In earlier years, Richard enjoyed camping on Memorial Day weekends with his boys. In later years, he loved traveling to Branson, MO and out west with his wife, fishing with his children and hunting deer and pheasants. A man of strong faith, Richard and Eileen joined Mount Olive Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1977. His biggest passion in life was his grandchildren. Richard loved attending their sporting events, taking them to stores and sharing his candy jar with them. One of the biggest celebrations of the year fell on July 28, as Richard and Eileen shared the same birthday. A husband, father and grandfather of strong will, a good heart and hard working, Richard was always proud and a determine fighter. A resident of Shakopee and at the age of 78, Richard passed away peacefully surrounded by his family the early evening of Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011 at Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis. Richard will always be loved and missed deeply by his wife of 45 years, Eileen; sons, Allen (Robin) Ellingboe, Mark (Leah) Ellingboe, Kevin (Tara) Ellingboe, all of Shakopee; grandchildren, Christopher, Meghan, Dylan, Brandon and Kylen; brother, Charles (Emilie) Ellingboe of New Port: sister, Margie Jorgenson of Starbuck; sister-in-law, Joanne Ellingboe of Minneapolis; mother-in-law, Stella Reinke of Jordan; sister and brother-in law, Joan and Norman Frey of Shakopee; nieces, nephews and friends. Richard is preceded in death by his parents; brother, Clarence Ellingboe; father-in-law, Charles Reinke; brother-in-law, LuVern Jorgenson. The visitation was Wednesday, Sept. 28 from 4-7 p.m. at Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Shakopee and also one hour prior to the service at church. The Christian Funeral Service was Thursday, Sept. 29 at 11 a.m. at Mount Olive Evangelical Lutheran Church, Shakopee. Pallbearers for Richard were Christopher Ellingboe, Dylan Ellingboe, Gregg Frey, Joleen Brandt, Tom Renneke and Rob Geis. The Rev. Mark Schwertfeger officiated. Richard will be laid to rest at Spirit Hill Cemetery in Jordan. The Ellingboe family is served with honor, care and compassion by Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Shakopee Chapel www.ballardsunderfuneral.com

— Thank You —

Betty Riley

Barbara R. Wolf

Betty Riley, 84, of Prior Lake, passed away Thursday, Sept. 22, 2011. Betty was born July 3, 1927. She grew up in Bird Island, MN. On Feb. 14, 1947 Betty married Duane Riley and for several years they farmed together in the Hector, MN area. They have resided in the Prior Lake/Savage area for 53 years. She was employed by Scott County for over 20 years. She retired in 1992 as the Supervisor for the Home Health Aide Department. After retirement Betty worked part time at the Scott County Community Action Program (CAP). Betty will be loved and deeply missed by her husband of 64 years, Duane; children, Darlene (Bruce) Russo, Lou Ann (Howard) Uhr, David Riley, Nancy (David) McCann; five grandchildren, Heather McNellis, Sarah Hansen, David Pumper, Riley and Danny McCann; three great-grandchildren, Nikki Davidson, John and Vanessa Pumper; two great-great-grandchildren, Jayden and Jameson Davidson. Preceded in death by daughter, Diana Pumper; grandson, Troy Pumper; parents, Carl and Bertha Chapin; brother, Carroll Chapin. Visitation was held Monday, Sept. 26 at Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home in Prior Lake. Funeral services were held Tuesday, Sept. 27, at Eden Baptist Church, 12540 Glenhurst Ave., Savage. Pastors Dan Miller and Doyal Van Gelder officiated. Soloist was Kris Nelson accompanied by Craig Wasner. Pallbearers included Jerry Birkholz, Gordan Leeman, John Lind, Todd Mullinax, Paul Scheunemann and Dave Singer. Interment was at Spirit Hill Cemetery, Jordan.

Barbara Ann Rieschl was born Jan. 29, 1933, in Passaic, NJ, to parents Martin and Emma (Beglinger) Rieschl. Growing up the youngest of three children in New Jersey, Barbara and her family enjoyed traveling and spending time at their cabin in Wisconsin. Graduating in 1950 from St. Nicholas High School in Patterson, NJ, Barbara attended and later graduated from St. Catherine’s University in St. Paul. Advancing her degree, she graduated as just one of two women to graduate from the University of Minnesota in 1957 with a Pharmaceutical Degree, placing at the top of her class. In October 1954, while spending a weekend away from college at her sister’s home, Barbara met a handsome man named Robert Wolf at the Corner Bar in Jordan. Dancing the night away in her black patent leather shoes, her love grew and she and Bob exchanged vows Aug. 25, 1956 at St. John the Baptist Church in Jordan. They were blessed with eight children: Kristin, Sheila, RJ, Patrick, Tom, Michael, Merrie and Paul. Together, Barbara and Bob owned and operated Jordan Drug. They took great pride in the store, serving the local community. Over the years, they treasured many special friendships formed while serving customers. A dedicated Jordan resident, Barbara was a member of the Knights of Columbus Ladies Auxiliary, Jordan Lioness Club and the V.F.W. Ladies Auxiliary. A devoted Catholic, Barbara attended daily mass and was proud of her children being baptized, confirmed and some even married at St. John’s Church. Barbara, Bob and the children treasured creating fond memories at the family cabin they owned in Gordon, WI. Barbara felt at home at the cabin, for this was the same lake on which she spent so much time as a young girl. After retirement, Barbara and Bob loved traveling abroad, visiting Italy, Spain, Germany, Portugal, Korea and Hawaii. One of her fondest memories was a special private audience with Pope John Paul in Rome. In her spare time, Barbara loved bowling, shopping for great bargains, buying furniture and going out to eat with friends. Spending time with her family was her biggest pride and joy. Holidays in general were all special times with the family, but Christmas was the top of her list. Every Sunday, the family would sit around the table enjoying a wonderful meal and each other’s company. A visionary and true pioneer, Barbara was a very generous woman who gave her all to everyone. Loyal to her family, affectionate as a wife, caring as a mother and a loving grandmother, she was very knowledgeable about life and had a great sense of humor. Barbara passed away peacefully at the age of 78, with her husband at her side the evening of Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011 at the Belle Plaine Lutheran Home in Belle Plaine. Barbara will always be loved and missed deeply by her husband of 55 years, Robert; children, Kristin (Brett) Storrar of Vadnais Heights, Sheila (Scott) Mitchell of Minneapolis, RJ (Susan) Wolf of Bloomington, Patrick (Dana) Wolf of Hermantown, Tom (Kellie) Wolf of Prior Lake, Michael (Margaret) Wolf of St. Paul, Merrie (Ken) Matson of Chanhassen, Paul Wolf of Jordan; grandchildren, Robert, Madeline, Daniel and Michael Storrar, Austin (Vince) Srejma, London Vale, Andrew and Kathryn Wolf, Jordan, Patrick, Jonathan and Julia Wolf, Thomas, Nolan, Evan and Mason Wolf, Alexander, Rachel, and Adam Wolf, Alexis Matson; brother-in-law, Dr. Paul Stahler of Jordan; sister-inlaw, Patricia Rieschl of Minong, WI; and many other relatives and friends. Barbara is preceded in death by parents; sister, Elizabeth Rieschl; brother, Martin Rieschl. The visitation was Friday, Sept. 30, from 4-8 p.m. at Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Jordan as well as one hour prior to the service at Mass. The Mass of Christian Burial will be Saturday, Oct. 1, at 11 a.m. at St. John the Baptist Church, 210 N. Broadway, Jordan. Father Timothy Yanta will officiate. Barbara will be laid to rest at Calvary Cemetery in Jordan. Memorials preferred and will be distributed in Barbara’s memory by the family. The Wolf family is served with honor, care and compassion by Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Jordan Chapel www.ballardsunderfuneral.com

Donna Mae Hallgren Born on June 30, 1936, in New Market, Donna Mae was the only child of Ben and Adale (Kroening) Schoenecker. Donna moved to Shakopee with her family and attended Shakopee Area Catholic Schools through eighth grade. Donna worked part time at the local theater and Bridgeman’s Ice Cream Shop. She enjoyed scooping ice cream and was known to make the best malts in town – a skill she never lost. She was her senior class secretary and graduated from Shakopee Senior High in 1954. Donna lost her father at age 11 and her mother at 22. While working as a legal secretary for city attorney, Julius Coller, Donna made a bet with another secretary that she could get a date with the young dentist, Dr. Warren Hallgren, who worked in the same building. The date took place and the rest is history. They were married Oct. 14, 1961, at St. Mark’s Catholic Church in Shakopee. They welcomed daughter Carol in 1962. She agreed to Warren’s insistence that she get her driver’s license, at which point he agreed to her request to buy a new home. They moved into their Main Street home in 1963 and welcomed daughter Janet in 1965. Donna and Warren belonged to a travel club, which allowed them to visit places including Rome, Switzerland, Paris, Mexico, and the Caribbean. Donna was also an active volunteer in the Shakopee Public Schools; she led band trip fundraisers, offered her garage space on two occasions for the making of the high school homecoming floats, and served on the all-night graduation party committees. After losing her husband in 1998, the relationships that Donna maintained with her friends were very important and of great comfort to her. In particular, her close friend, Carol Schmidt, was a frequent dinner, movie, travel, and shopping companion. She loved the trips she took with her daughters, including Hawaii and a Walt Disney cruise. Donna enjoyed talking politics and brushing up on current affairs – and she had many strong opinions (all Democratic!). Loving traditions and being very family oriented, Donna loved Christmas, celebrating birthdays, and insisted on feeding anyone who stopped by to visit. The freezer and refrigerator were always filled with great treats and delicious meals. A lifelong animal lover, Donna never met a dog she didn’t love – and her daughters provided her with many to spoil over the years! A charter member of the Shakopee Lioness Club, Donna was also very interested and knowledgeable about family history and the history of Shakopee. She even typed the original Shakopee Story, written by Julius Coller. After moving to Northridge Court, Donna enjoyed socializing with the neighbors and new friends. She also enjoyed dropping a few nickels in the slot machines and eating a good steak at Mystic Lake. Donna’s greatest passion was her family. She was extremely proud of her daughters, felt blessed with her wonderful sons-in-law, and adored her grandchildren. At the age of 75, Donna passed away unexpectedly Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2011, at her home. Donna will always be loved and missed deeply by her daughters, Carol (Ed) Aikey of Shakopee, Janet (Dan) Silversmith of St. Paul; grandchildren, Kristen and Brian Aikey, Joey and Ellie Silversmith. Donna is preceded in death by her parents and her husband, Dr. C. Warren Hallgren. The Celebration of Life Service was Friday, Sept. 30 at 6 p.m., with visitation two hours prior, at Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Shakopee. Pastor A. Paul Olson officiated. The Hallgren family is served with honor, care, and compassion by Ballard-Sunder Funeral Home, Shakopee Chapel www.ballardsunderfuneral.com

Lives of great men all remind us we can make our lives sublime. And departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sand of time -Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

For current information on visitation and funeral arrangements, visit our website: PLAmerican. com/news/ obituaries This information is updated daily.


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 7

DISTRICT 719 NEWS

Lydia / Zion United Methodist Church

Ceremony set for 253 School Board Honor Students

Public invited to help Education Foundation break world record

The Prior Lake-Savage Area School Board will honor 253 Prior Lake High School students for their academic achievement, naming them the 2011 School Board Honor Students. A ceremony is planned for 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 3 at the high school, 7575 150th St., Savage. School Board Honor Students must have cumulative grade-point averages of 3.8 or higher as verified at the end of the third trimester of the previous school year.

The Prior Lake-Savage Area Education Foundation is teaming up with the Prior Lake High School Student Council to break the current world record for largest group of individuals hula hooping at once. The event will be held at 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7 at Dan Patch Stadium, 7575 150th St., Savage immediately following the homecoming football game. The organizations need at least 638 hip shakers to break the current record. The cost to participate is $10 per person and $35 per household in advance. Walk-in individuals will be charged $15 per person. All The event is open to kindergarten through 12th-grade students as well as adults. Each participant will receive a hula hoop, an official T-shirt, a glow wristband and refreshments with admission. For more information, or to register, visit www.plsaef.org.

Senior Lock-In committee to meet Oct. 10 Parents planning the 2012 Prior Lake High School Senior Lock-In will hold their next committee meeting at 6 p.m. Monday, Oct. 10 in room 124 at the high school, 7575 150th St., Savage.

Jordan, MN

Invites You to our 13th Annual

Home Style Turkey Dinner

Engaged? Just Married?

Saturday, October 8, 2011 4-7:30 PM DINNER INCLUDES: Turkey, Dressing, Mashed Potatoes, Pie & All The Trimmings Adults $8 • Kids (3-12) $4 Family $25 • Carry-Out $8.50

Share your good news with our readers. For more information, call 447-6669

PRIOR LAKE

AMERICAN

Visit our Country Store: baked goods, canned items, craft items, holiday decor & more!

Lydia is located 6 miles south of Prior Lake and 8 miles east of Jordan at the intersection of Hwy 13 & County Rd 10 at 1026 E 205th St. Church office phone 952-492-2249

NEWS BRIEFS

Attend snow and ice workshop A workshop on winter salt management for parking lots and sidewalks is set for 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13 McColl Pond Environmental Learning Center, 13550 Dakota Ave., Savage. The workshop is for professiona l snow and ice maintenance contractors, public works and parks departments, school district grounds staff and property managers who routinely maintain parking lots and sidewalks in the winter. Learn new techniques on how to protect our water resources while saving money and time spent on the job. Other topics include equipment calibration, proper application rates, how winter salt management affects lakes and rivers, and best practices for snow and

ice control. An optional test will be given at the end of the workshop for those interested in becoming certified in snowand ice-control best practices. The cost is $ 20, which includes a workshop manual, morning refreshments and lunch. To register, contact Theresa Sowards at (651) 480-7715 or sowar006@umn.edu.

Help available for veterans The Veterans Administration has created and staffed two sites with medically trained personnel to help with soldiers who are having trouble adjusting back into society after coming home from active duty. The staff assists veterans and all active duty military and their family members 24 hours a day through a hotline number, 1-800-273-8255, and website, www.veteranscrisisline.net.

LEVY  continued from page 1

Cink and her staff only had about a week to come up with the recommendation she presented at Monday’s meeting due to the state shutdown earlier this summer, which therefore delayed state data reporting. “We usually have a month,” she said. Due in part to wrangling over losing the homestead credit and the new market-value exclusions in place, Cink said she couldn’t place a value on the impact of the school district’s 2.3-percent levy decrease.

Veterans also can contact their local VFWs. September is Military Suicide Awareness Month.

Adopt a cat from Rainbow Rescue Rainbow Animal Rescue of Prior Lake will have a cat and kitten adoption day from noon to 3 p.m. every Saturday at Pet Supplies Plus, at the corner of County Road 42 and Highway 5 in Burnsville. A wide selection of cats and kittens will be available. All pets have been vet-checked, are feline leukemia/FIV negative, have required vaccinations and are spayed or neutered (kittens come with a certificate for free spay/neuter), services that are included in the adoption fee. For more information, call (952) 440-3824 or visit www. petfi nder.com (enter zip code 55372).

“With that new exclusion and the calculation, it really depends on the value of their home and the improvements,” she said. “It really depends on the assessed value.” The levy approved on Monday is subject to change, though state statute dictates that school boards can only lower the fi nal levy and cannot increase it from the preliminary amount set. “I don’t really see it changing, but I always want people to know there’s the opportunity for it to change,” Cink said. “We’ll defi nitely keep an eye on it.” The board is set to vote on the fi nal levy at its Monday, Dec. 12 regular meeting, following the annual truth-in-taxation hearing.

We are pleased to introduce you to Dr. Tara Barth – the newest member of our team! Dr. Barth specializes in primary care optometric services, including eye health exams, contact lens fittings, pre- and post-surgery care and urgent-care services. Dr. Barth will be seeing patients in our New Prague and Gaylord locations beginning November 2011.

181407

Selling your home out of season? A great deck makes a difference

I

n a perfect world, no one would ever have to face the challenge of trying to sell a house when there’s snow on the ground and the trees are bare. In reality, people have to sell and buy homes throughout the year. While winter may not be the optimum season to showcase your landscaping, there is one improvement you can make that will help you boost your home’s outdoor appeal no matter what the season: a deck. When potential buyers visit your home in winter, they might not be able to envision how green and lovely your backyard will look come spring. But they will be able to see with their own eyes the square footage that a deck adds to the home’s living space. Decks, patios, sunrooms and porches

have always been popular with home buyers, but real estate agents say that too often those spaces are neglected or not used to their best advantage. Yet outdoor improvements like a deck can significantly enhance your home’s value and appeal. In fact, at the time of resale, a deck will recoup, on average, about 73 percent of the original cost of building it, according to Remodeling Magazine’s Cost vs. Value report. The cooler temperatures of fall and early winter make the season a great time to add a deck to your home. Or, if you already have a deck, you can enhance its appeal by adding simple touches and accessories. A bonus space—for example, a tiny deck or rarely used balcony off a master bedroom—can be transformed into a romantic getaway by staging it with cozy, cushioned seating and a raised firepit. You

can safeguard your deck and add designer style with Latitudes deck stones, 16-inch interlocking square tiles made of natural slate or granite. Deck stones can provide an effective fi re barrier that’s an asset under firepits or grills, or when used to create an outdoor kitchen. Lighting is another way to boost appeal. LED deck lighting kits, like those offered by Deckorators, are both practical and visually appealing. Adding lighting to a deck can be an important safety feature, and also helps create a warm, welcoming mood for evening entertaining. Another improvement that speaks to both safety and visual appeal are deck railings. Decorative railings with ornate balusters, post cap and post covers can give virtually any wood or composite lumber deck a distinctive look for a modest investment.

REAL ESTATE SHOWCASE BELLE PLAINE OPEN SUNDAY 1–4 PM

EDEN PRAIRIE

PRIOR LAKE

OPEN SUN. 10/2 12–3 PM

WACONIA R E CA G 5 RA A G

NEW LISTING!

1040 Creekview Lane Lovely 4 Bd, plus main floor office, private master bath w/ Jacuzzi tub, walk-in closet, vaulted ceiling, gas fireplace, main floor laundry. All appliances included. 3 car insulated garage. Porch and stone patio. Over 3,000 sq. ft. finished. Many new updates, located in cul de sac. Fast closing possible. $234,000

Marion Hommerding MarketLink Realty

612-791-6576

13215 Spencer Sweet Pea Lane Beautiful turn key living in a great location. Close to shopping and walk to Staring lake. Vaulted celings, roomy sun porch, clean unit. Open and bright. French doors to sunroom and walkout private patio with southern exposure. Walking and biking trails. $214,900.

Kelley Regan

651-335-6515 klregan@cbburnet.com

LAKEFRONT RARE FIND! 4322 Bass Street

½ acre lot on Prior Lake w/115' of sandy beach lakefront. 2 BR w/loft, 2 BA, twostory. Surrounded by mature trees for your privacy. Updates include: gas fireplace, new landscaping, gorgeous cedar deck. Great for relaxing or entertaining. Available at $399,900.

TOMMY ANDERSON Realty House 952-292-1039

QUIET PRIVATE ACREAGE

Pristine 2 story, 4BD, 3BA, luxury owner suite with fireplace, wood floors, granite, ss appliances. Deck, gazebo, patio, 3 car garage + separate 2 + boat or storage garage, new roof, pave driveway. Compare to new, call home tour. 2+ acres.

JEANNE MILLET Bjorklund Realty Inc. 952-944-0025 MLS: 4018321

AGENTS – Call today to advertise your listings here

952-445-3333


Page 8 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

Ham Lake man lost, found, arrested BY FORREST ADAMS fadams@swpub.com

A 35-year-old Ham Lake man is accused of f leeing a Prior Lake police officer in his van as the officer exited his squad car, after a traffic stop on Sept. 25. Richard Hegquist is now in the Scott County Jail. He was arrested on suspicion that he was the same man pulled over at approximately 5 a.m. that morning, who had sped away when the officer making the traffic stop had started to get out of his squad car. Hegquist was pulled over for speeding and swerving on County Road 83. The officer reported that when Hegquist sped away, he drove through two stop signs and then down Dakotah Parkway until the officer lost sight of the brake lights on Hegquist’s van. The officer later located the van in a marsh area down a 150-foot embankment. The officer reported to dispatch that he saw Hegquist fleeing on foot. A state patrol helicopter was called to the scene to assist in the search for

Hegquist. At 9:41 a . m ., p ol ic e responded to a call of a suspiciou s p er son at Sioux Trail near Prairiegrass Drive. The officer who reRichard sponded to the Hegquist area reported seeing a man, later identified as Hegquist, walking along Sioux Trail. The officer says he addressed Hegquist by name and then asked to talk with Hegquist about his van, which had earlier fled from the police. Hegquist, whom the officer determined was “wet from his chest to his feet,” then claimed that he drove a truck, not a van. He was taken into custody. Hegquist also was arrested on an outstanding theft warrant from Ramsey County. F u r t her i nvest i gat ion showed Hegquist at Mystic Lake Casino wearing clothing that matched what he was wearing when arrested, according to the charges.

DISTRICT COURT The following are Scott County District Court felony and gross-misdemeanor dispositions. Defendants either pleaded guilty or were found guilty by the court unless otherwise indicated. Joey Dwight Brunner, 56, Belle Plaine, domestic assault, a gross misdemeanor. Adjudication stayed: One year probation, one day in jail, abstain from alcohol, follow recommendations of evaluation, no possession of firearms or dangerous weapons. Disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor. One year probation, one day in jail, same condition as previous sentence (concurrent), $210 in fines. Michael Wayne Malz, 38, Jordan, driving while intoxicated (DWI) (refusal to submit to test), a gross misdemeanor. One year probation, two days in jail, follow recommendation of evaluation, $435 in fines. Thaddeus Leonard Watson, 50, Minneapolis, false name to police officer, a gross misdemeanor. Six months in jail, $85 in fines. Thomas James Ross, 23, Prior Lake, fifth-degree possession of controlled

substance, a felony. Serve 15 months imprison, provide DNA sample, $85 in fines. James Tong Xiong, 41, Minneapolis, fifth-degree possession of controlled substance, a felony. Adjudication stayed: Five years probation, 10 days in jail, random tests, $200 in fines. David William Bollig, 26, Spring Park, first-degree criminal damage to property, a felony. Four years probation, five days in jail, 20 days under electronic home-monitoring, no contact with victim(s), abstain from alcohol, random tests, provide DNA sample, write letter of apology, restitution, $185 in fines. Obstruction of the legal process, a gross misdemeanor. Same sentence, serve concurrently. Anthony Scott Hooker, 37, Faribault, first-degree criminal damage to property, a felony. Serve 17 months in prison (concurrent with previous sentence), $85 in fines. Sara Kathryn Pacholke, 41, Shakopee, DWI, a gross misdemeanor. Two years probation, 30 days in jail, $410 in fines.

at the Wells Fargo Family Farm

October 1–2 | Country Fest October 8–9 | Bluegrass Fest October 15–16 | Oktober Fest October 22–23 | Oktober Fest

Fall activities Kids hay maze Tractor simulator Apple press demonstrations Live music Animal-themed scarecrows

Become a member of the Minnesota Zoo for the Best Family Value in town. You’ll experience year-round fun – all at a great price! Supported by:


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 9

scoreboard Breaking news at Scoreboard.mn. Contribute sports news to tschardin@swpub.com or call (952) 345-6379

GIRLS TENNIS

GIRLS SOCCER

SPORTS EXTRA

Zero net flaws

Fall Sports State Polls FOOTBALL CLASS AAAAA 1. Eden Prairie 2. Wayzata 3. Cretin-Derham Hall 4. Lakeville South 5. Minnetonka 6. Lakeville North 7. Mounds View 8. Anoka 9. Shakopee 10. Osseo

VOLLEYBALL CLASS AAA 1. Blaine 2. Lakeville North 3. Bloomington Jefferson 4. Lakeville South 5. Shakopee 6. Eagan 7. Wayzata 8. Eden Prairie 9. Chanhassen 10. Centennial

Lakers finish regular season perfect, 16-0 BY TOM SCHARDIN tschardin@swpub.com

Perfection is attainable. The Prior Lake girls tennis team earned that Sept. 28, along with the South Suburban Conference title. The Lakers didn’t lose a set in a 7-0 home win over Bloomington Kennedy in their regular season fi nale. Prior Lake will take a 16-0 record (9-0 in the conference) into the Section 3AA tournament. The Lakers will be the No. 1 seed and, with that, a target on their back. “We are very fired up going i nt o s e c t ion s a nd we k now we w i l l h ave to play ou r best,” said Lakers coach Kris Rosborough. “We know that teams like Eagan and Rosemount will be gunning for us and also changi n g u p t h ei r lineups to try to beat us, so we have to be ready. “I’m very PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN p r o u d o f t h e Prior Lake eighth-grader girls for going Chloe Hall won at No. 1 1 6 - 0 ,” a d d e d singles in the Lakers’ 6-1 Rosborough. win over South St. Paul “I’m also very Sept. 23. proud that we finished off with a full team effort. All 13 of the girls on the varsity team have worked so hard both in the offseason and all this season, so we sat three of our regular starters. It was very important to me that we could say that everyone earned a point for this conference championship. “This is a special group of girls and they all deserved to play in a conference match.” The last Prior Lake team to qualify for state was in 1991. That squad went 15-3, so the Lakers have already set the school record for wins in a season.

Tennis to page 10 ®

BOYS SOCCER CLASS AA 1. Eastview 2. North St. Paul 3. Stillwater 4. Minneapolis South 5. Edina 6. Bloomington Jefferson 7. Minneapolis Southwest 8. Eden Prairie 9. Eagan 10. St. Paul Central

GIRLS SOCCER CLASS AA

PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

Prior Lake senior Molly Simpkins tries to control the ball in the Lakers’ 2-1 conference win at Bloomington Jefferson Sept. 22.

Losing momentum Lakers earn first SSC win, then drop next two games BY TOM SCHARDIN tschardin@swpub.com

The Prior Lake girls soccer team was hoping to build some momentum after winning its first South Suburban Conference game. But instead, it was more of the same for the Lakers on offense. Prior Lake dropped to 1-5-1 in the conference with a 1-0 loss at Lakeville South Sept. 27. The Lakers went into the game on the heels of a 3-1 setback at home to Northfield a day earlier in a non-league game. Prior Lake (5-7-1 overall) went into the Northfield contest on the heels of a 2-1 conference win at Bloomington Jefferson Sept. 22. “It was the same old story against Lakeville South,” said Lakers coach David Graham. “It was a fairly even game. We just didn’t generate enough

offense and we couldn’t capitalize on our few chances.” Prior Lake has just three goals in its seven conference games and 11 total in 13 contests. Ninth-grader Emily Peterson was leading the team with three goals entering Prior Lake’s non-league home game with Holy Family Thursday (results not available at press time). Peterson had an assist in the loss to Northfield with sophomore Anne Ruelle scoring the Lakers’ goal, her fi rst of the year. Prior Lake’s final two regular season games before the Section 2AA playoffs start Oct. 13 are: versus Bloomington Kennedy Tuesday, Oct. 4 at 5 p.m. and at No. 8-ranked Eastview, Thursday Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. The top-three seeds in the section have already been determined for the most part, but not yet in order

with No. 3 Eden Prairie (8-2-3), No. 5 Burnsville (9-3) and Edina (6-2-3) in the mix for the No. 1 spot. It looks like Prior Lake is battling Shakopee (7-3-2) for the No. 4 seed. Prior Lake has the advantage in strength of schedule. Chanhassen (4- 6 -1), Jefferson (3-8-2) and Kennedy (2-8-1) are also in the field. Sophomore Lauren Thormodsgard has started all 13 games for the Lakers in goal, recording four shutouts. Prior Lake has been shutout six times this fall. In the win over Jefferson, the Jaguars tied the game at 1-1 with a goal on a penalty kick with about 12 minutes left to play. The Lakers got called for what Graham said was a questionable handball violation.

1. Lakeville North 2. Mahtomedi 3. Eden Prairie 4. Wayzata 5. Burnsville 6. Woodbury 7. Eagan 8. Eastview 9. East Ridge 10. Centennial

BOYS CROSS COUNTRY CLASS AA 1. Stillwater 2. Rosemount 3. Wayzata 4. Edina 5. Eden Prairie 6. Moorhead 7. Andover 8. White Bear Lake 9. Eastview 9. Hopkins 11. Centennial 12. Sartell-St. Stephen

GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY CLASS AA 1. Monticello 2. Lakeville South 3. Eden Prairie 4. Eagan 5. Wayzata 6. East Ridge 7. Edina 8. Alexandria 9. Moorhead 10. Shakopee 11. Andover 12. Chanhassen

Soccer to page 11 ®

GIRLS SWIMMING CLASS AA

FOOTBALL

CROSS COUNTRY

Trophy stays with Lakers

Trails finder PL girls drop from rankings

PL edges newest rival, 13-10 BY TOM SCHARDIN tschardin@swpub.com

The Dan Patch Trophy is staying at Prior Lake – but barely. In the second-ever “Battle of Savage,” the Prior Lake football team was able to hang on to the traveling trophy with a 13-10 win at Burnsville Sept. 23 in a South Suburban Conference game. Prior Lake senior Topher Rose scored on two quarterback sneaks, including one on fourth-and-1 from the Blaze’s 2-yard line early in the fourth quarter to give the Lakers a 13-3 lead. The extra point was blocked and Burnsville followed with a 77-yard scoring drive with 3:44 to play to trim the margin to 13-10. With two timeouts remaining Burnsville went for the onside kick, but Prior Lake recovered on its own 46-yard line. On fourth-and-inches, Rose converted another quar-

MORE ONLINE

BY TOM SCHARDIN tschardin@swpub.com

FOLLOW THE LAKERS ON THE GRIDIRON AT

it the traveling trophy. Prior Lake and Burnsville share students from the City of Savage at about a 50 -50 ratio. Meanwhile, Lakers’ senior Jack Kaiser had 117 yards on the ground in the win. Junior fullback Jack Johnson’s 50-yard run set up Prior Lake’s second touchdown. He fi nished with 86 yards. Prior Lake’s first touchdown was set up by a blocked punt by senior Mason Lytle in

When is the last time the Prior Lake girls cross country team hasn’t been ranked? It’s been a long time. You’d have to go all way back to the Oct. 21, 2008 poll to find the Lakers missing from the state rankings. Prior Lake dropped out of the latest Class AA poll Sept. 27 after holding the No. 10 spot the previous week. Shakopee now owns No. 10, despite the fact the Lakers have fi nished ahead of the Sabers in their two common invites. Apparently, the pollsters didn’t seem to care the Lakers went into the Milaca Mega Meet Sept. 24 without one of their top runners in Taylor Scholl, who sat out to rest. The Lakers were still able to fi nish third out of 20 teams with 150 points, competing in

Lakers to page 10 ®

Run to page 10 ®

www.scoreboard.mn

terback sneak for a fi rst down and the Lakers were able to run out the clock. Prior Lake climbed back to the .500 mark (2-2 overall), improving to 2-1 in the conference. The Lakers were back on the field Friday (results not available at press time) at Bloomington Kennedy (1-3) in a conference game. Prior Lake went into the Burnsville game on the heels of a tough 13-6 home loss to Rosemount Sept. 9. Lakers coach Matt Gegenheimer said the defeat was an emotional one for his team, so he was pleased to escape Burnsville with a victory. “We knew Burnsville was getting better every week,”

PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

Prior Lake junior Elijah Patrick makes a tackle in the Lakers’ 13-10 win at Burnsville Sept. 23. said Gegenheimer. “We knew they’d play us hard. As the game went on, our run blocking got better. We were able to go on some drives and get some big fi rst downs.” Last year, the Lakers won a 34-33 thriller over the Blaze, stopping Burnsville on a twopoint conversion try with 18 seconds left in the game. When Prior Lake moved out of the Missota Conference last year and into the SSC with Burnsville and eight former Lake Conference schools, the “Battle of Savage” was born and with

1. Edina 2. Stillwater 3. Minnetonka 4. Wayzata 5. Eden Prairie 6. Rosemount 7. Rochester John Marshall 8. Prior Lake 9. Maple Grove 10. Woodbury

Scoreboard.MN You can also follow Prior Lake High School sports online at www.scoreboard. mn. Catch all of the breaking news, browse photo galleries and keep up with your favorite Laker teams, plus more via the Web.

Facebook & Twitter Did you know Prior Lake High School sports are also available on two popular social networking sites, Facebook and Twitter.

Contact us To contact Prior Lake American sports editor Tom Schardin send an email to sports@swpub. com or call (952) 345-6379.


Page 10 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

scoreboard GIRLS SWIMMING

SPORTS BRIEFS

Recovering fairly quick PL wins invite two days after losing first conference dual BY TOM SCHARDIN tschardin@swpub.com

The Prior Lake girls swimming team was able to recover quickly. The No. 8-ranked Lakers headed west Sept. 24 to compete in the 11-team University of North Dakota Invitational just two days after suffering their fi rst loss in a South Suburban Conference dual meet. The Irish topped the Lakers 101-85, dropping Prior Lake to 3-1 in league duals. Rosemount also leaped over the Lakers in the state rankings, climbing from No. 9 to No. 6. At the invite, the Lakers didn’t get any wins. It dominated with superior depth. Prior Lake fi nished with 346 points, well ahead of runner-up Bismarck Century (278). Marshall was third (266), followed by Minot (240), Farmington (222), Eagan (218), Grand Forks Central (175), Jamestown (151), Bismarck High (1320, Mandan (118) and Grand Forks Red River (88). Ju nior A lex Yaeger f i nished second in two events, the 100-yard butterfly (58.47 seconds) and the 500 freestyle (5:11.20). Yaeger was also part of two relays that were top three. She was part of the 400 freestyle relay with sophomores Kendra Lair and Elizabeth Cunningham and eighth-grader Lauren Harris (3:45.86). Yaeger, senior Melanie O’Neil, junior Elizabeth Hartell and sophomore Monica Banasikowski was third in the

RUN  continued from page 9

the Class AAAA race. That was well back of No. 6 East Ridge’s winning total (80), while No. 11 Andover was second (126) and Bismarck was fourth (165). Scholl also skipped the Lakers’ own invite Thursday (results not available at press time). She’s expected back Tuesday, Oct. 4 at the Victoria Lion’s Invitational at the Chaska Par 30 Golf Course starting at 3:30 p.m. Lakers coach Dan Saad was a little surprised his team dropped from the rankings, but he’s not going to dwell on it. He was happy with the team’s performance at Milaca. “I was happy to get third,” he said. “We ran well as a group for most of the race. The girls were running hard and chal-

www.scoreboard.mn

JUMP

Laker Athletic Booster Club meetings The Laker Athletic Booster Club will have its monthly meeting on the third Monday of every month (except July and December) in the lecture hall next to the auditorium at Prior Lake High School, 7575 W. 150th St., Savage, starting at 7 p.m.

Northern pike regulations to change

PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

Prior Lake ninth-grader Grace Halpenny took ninth in the 100 butterfly at the University of North Dakota Invitational Sept. 24. the 200 individual medley (14th, 2:30.39) and the 100 butterfly (15th, 1:09.45), Dessler in the 50 freestyle (13th, 27.39), sophomore Natasha Lemke in the 50 freestyle (14th, 27.63), Hartell in the 100 backstroke (12th, 1:06.88), junior Brooke Anderson in the 100 backstroke (16th, 1:08.98) and junior Rachel Wangler in diving (15th, 280.20). Prior Lake also had three other relays score points – the 200 medley team of Heskin, Dessler, Hei and Lemke (7th, 2:02.81), the 200 freestyle team of Dessler,

Halpenny, Lemke and junior Erin Swenson (10th, 1:50.25) and the 400 freestyle team of Halpenny, Hartell, Heskin and Swenson (8th, 4:00.95). Prior Lake was back in the pool Thursday (results not available at press time) at Burnsville in a conference dual. Individual results from the Rosemount dual were not made available. Prior Lake will swim at Bloomington Jefferson in a conference dual Thursday, Oct. 6 at 6 p.m.

ners deep, which is nice. “We’ll continue to work on bringing our times down,” added Saad. “As long as we are in the low-to-sub 16s, we’ll be OK.” Top-ranked Monticello competed in the Class AAA race at Milaca, winning the title by 72 points over runner-up SartellSt. Stephen.

Junior Jimmy W hite led the Lakers again. He’s done so in all four races this fall. He finished 25th out of 116 runners with a time of 17:19.2 on the 5,000-meter course. Senior Paul Evans was the L a kers’ next-best f i nisher in 39th (17:50.0), followed by senior Jackson Homstad in 48th (17:54.0), sophomore Cole Nielsen in 63rd (18:16.8) and senior Mason Gracia in 66th (18:19.2). “The boys did a great job to fi nish eighth in a good field,” said Saad. “Jimmy’s finish was fantastic. He’s still learning, but he’s getting better. I’m very happy with how the boys are doing. They keep dropping time.” Other finishes for the Lakers was senior Sayed Rahmani in 74th (18:30.7) and junior Josiah Torvik in 93rd (19:01.7).

LAKER BOYS Meanwhile, the Prior Lake boys cross country team was stuck in the middle of the pack at Milaca. C omp eti ng i n t he Cl ass AAAA division, the Lakers ended up eighth out of 17 teams with 241 points. That was well back of No. 1-ranked Stillwater’s winning total (24). No. 11 Centennial was second (69), followed by No. 7 Andover (80) and West Fargo (125).

LAKERS’ FALL SCHEDULES

 continued from page 9

the second quarter, which was recovered by junior Dylan Jackson who took the ball to the Blaze’s 1-yard line. Two plays later, Rose scored for a 7-0 lead. Burnsville got on the board with 35 seconds left before halftime. A Lakers’ turnover led to a 31-yard Blaze field goal. Burnsville had a 13-yard touchdown run called back for holding two plays before the kick. The Blaze also had a 60-yard touchdown run called back in the first quarter on an illegal shift penalty. So one can only wonder how the game could have been different if just one of those scores were not called back. One can also wonder how the game could have been different if not for the hustle of Prior Lake sophomore offensive lineman Drew Trabing. Prior Lake took its fi rst possession of the second half and marched down the field looking to score. However, Blaze senior Brian Callanan picked off sophomore Nick Rooney’s pass near the end zone, broke one tackle and raced down the sideline. It looked like Callanan was going to score and give the Blaze the lead. But Trabing came out of nowhere to track Callahan down near midfield, pushing him out of bounds. The Blaze ended up getting no points off the turnover, despite moving inside the Lakers’ 25-yard line. Prior Lake converted four times on fourth-and-1 in the second half, including twice on its second scoring drive.

Donny Reuvers (Super Late Models), Doug Brown of Prior Lake (Big 8’s) and Brent Kane (Thunder Cars) all defended their season point championships Sept. 24 at Elko Speedway, while Devin Schmidt (Power Stocks) doubled his pleasure with a championship and Rookie of the Year honors. Feature winners in the season-ending championships included: Chad Walen of Prior Lake in Super Late Models, Jon Lemke of Shakopee in Big 8’s, Jeff Partington of Farmington in Thunder Cars, Matt Ryan of New Market in Power Stocks, Kyle Hansen in Legends, Jack Purcell of Bloomington in Mini Stocks. For more, go to www.elkospeedway.com.

FOLLOW THE LAKERS IN THE POOL AT

lenging to get in good positions. Some were able to stay with it. Some fell back.” Senior Samantha Anderson led the Lakers for the second straight race taking 16th out of 142 runners. She fi nished with a time of 15 minutes. 32.2 seconds on the 4,000-meter course at Stones Throw Golf Course. Senior Madison Lesmeister was close behind in 21st (15:43.7), followed by junior Amber Tieman in 33rd (16:02.1), senior Kirsten Anderson in 35th (16:07.3) and senior Lauren Bruha in 45th (16:10.9). Also running for the Lakers was sophomore Mackenzie Schell in 51st (16:21.5) and junior Madeline Schulze in 59th (16:31.1). “Lauren and Amber both had good races,” said Saad. “Both have the talent to be in our top five. We are seven to eight run-

Football Date Sept. 1 Sept. 9 Sept. 16 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14 Oct. 19

Opponent Result/Time vs. Wayzata L, 47-20 at Bloomington Jefferson W, 43-7 vs. Rosemount L, 13-6 at Burnsville W, 13-10 at Bloomington Kennedy 7 p.m. vs. Eagan 7 p.m. at Lakeville South 7 p.m. vs. Lakeville North 7 p.m.

Volleyball

PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

Prior Lake senior Will Mcphearson leaps high to break up a pass in the end zone in the Lakers’ 13-10 win Sept. 23. The Lakers only attempted five passes with Rooney completing two, both to senior Matt Arends for 20 yards. “Burnsville has big-play capabilities, but we were able to keep them in front of us and we tackled well,” said Gegenheimer. “They had a couple key third-down conversions that hurt us. We knew down the stretch we needed to keep their offense off the field. We converted some big fourth downs.” Senior Jake Deavers led the Lakers with 11 tackles, while seniors Karmichael Dunbar and Will Mcphearson each had nine and senior Ted Choudek and Lytle both had six. Choudek and junior Elijah Patrick each had one sack. Prior Lake will return home Friday, Oct. 7 to take on Eagan in a conference game at 7 p.m.

The Prior Lake Soccer Club has set evaluations for its U9/ U10 traveling programs. They will be held Nov. 1-2 at the Soccer Blast in Burnsville. Evaluation times for U9 players for both days are 5-6 p.m., followed by U10 players from 6-7 p.m. For more, go to www.priorlakesoccer.org.

Elko Speedway crowns season champs

MORE ONLINE

200 medley relay (1:57.32). Prior Lake’s 200 freestyle relay team of Banasikowski, Cunningham, Harris and Lair fi nished second (1:43.10). Cunningham led the Lakers in the 200 freestyle taking third (2:00.62), along with taking fifth in the 100 freestyle (56.94). Harris was third in the 100 freestyle (56.41) and sixth in the 50 freestyle (26.09). Banasikowski was fourth in the 50 freestyle (25.94) and seventh in the 100 breaststroke (1:15.45). Lair was seventh in both the 200 individual medley (2:24.55) and the 100 freestyle (57.83). Ju nior Sa ra h Heski n took fourth in the 100 backstroke (1:03.85), while sophomore Taylor Dessler was fourth in the 100 breaststroke (1:13.88). Senior Sydney Notermann ended up fi fth in diving with 329.30 points. Other top-10 finishes for the Lakers: Hartell in the 50 freestyle (8th, 26.58), ninthgrader Grace Halpenny in the 100 butterfly (9th, 1:07.56) and senior Taylor Kitzke in the 100 breaststroke (10th, 1:16.96). Finishing in the top 16 for Prior Lake: O’Neil in the 200 individual medley (11th, 2:27.99) and the 100 butterf ly (12th, 1:08.35), junior Lanie Hei in

Prior Lake Soccer Club sets evaluations

Date Aug. 25 April 27 Sept. 1 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 13 Sept. 15 Sept. 17 Sept. 17

Opponent vs. Owatonna vs. Chaska at Chanhassen at Faribault vs. Edina vs. Lakeville North at Apple Valley New Ulm Jordan

Result/Time W, 3-0 W, 3-0 L, 3-1 L, 3-2 L, 3-2 L, 3-0 L, 3-0 W, 2-0 L, 2-0

Sept. 17 Le Sueur-Henderson Sept. 17 Brainerd Sept. 20 vs. Rosemount Sept. 22 at Bloomington Jefferson Sept. 27 at Lakeville South Oct. 4 vs. Bloomington Kennedy Oct. 6 at Eastview Oct. 7-8 Lakeville North Invite Oct. 11 vs. Eagan Oct. 14-15 Eastview Invite Oct. 18 at Burnsville

L, 2-0 W, 2-0 W, 3-0 L, 3-0 L, 3-0 7 p.m. 7 p.m. TBD 7 p.m. TBD 7 p.m.

Boys Soccer Date Aug. 27 Aug. 30 Sept. 3 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 10 Sept. 13 Sept. 15 Sept. 17 Sept. 20 Sept. 22 Sept. 24 Sept. 27 Oct. 1 Oct. 4 Oct. 6

Opponent vs. Chaska at Edina at East Ridge vs. Eagan at Burnsville vs. Wayzata vs. Lakeville North at Apple Valley vs. Hopkins vs. Rosemount at Jefferson vs. Rochester Mayo at Lakeville South vs. White Bear Lake vs. Kennedy at Eastview

Result/Time W, 1-0 L, 4-1 W, 2-1 W, 2-1 W, 1-0 L, 1-0 L, 2-1 L, 1-0 W, 1-0 W, 2-0 L, 3-1 W, 1-0 W, 4-1 1 p.m. 7 p.m. 5 p.m.

Girls Soccer Date Aug. 26 Aug. 27 Aug. 30 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 10 Sept. 13

Opponent vs. Byron vs. Farmington at Eden Prairie vs. Eagan at Burnsville at Chanhassen vs. Lakeville North

Result/Time W, 3-0 W, 2-1 L, 1-0 L, 1-0 L, 3-1 W, 1-0 L, 4-0

Sept. 15 Sept. 17 Sept. 20 Sept. 22 Sept. 26 Sept. 27 Sept. 29 Oct. 4 Oct. 6

at Apple Valley vs. Hopkins vs. Rosemount at Jefferson vs. Northfield at Lakeville South vs. Holy Family vs. Kennedy at Eastview

T, 0-0 W, 1-0 L, 1-0 W, 2-1 L, 3-1 L, 1-0 6 p.m. 5 p.m. 7 p.m.

Girls Tennis Date Aug. 24 Aug. 25 Aug. 26 Aug. 26 Aug. 31 Sept. 1 Sept. 6 Sept. 8 Sept. 14 Sept. 15 Sept. 16 Sept. 20 Sept. 22 Sept. 23 Sept. 26 Sept. 28 Oct. 4

Opponent at Henry Sibley at Burnsville vs. Owatonna at Chanhassen vs. Eagan at Eastview vs. Holy Angels vs. Lakeville North at Lakeville South at Apple Valley at Visitation vs. Rosemount at Jefferson vs. South St. Paul vs. Eden Prairie vs. Kennedy Section playoffs

Result W, 7-0 W, 7-0 W, 6-1 W, 4-3 W, 6-1 W, 5-2 W, 6-1 W, 4-3 W, 5-2 W, 6-1 W, 6-1 W, 4-3 W, 7-0 W, 6-1 W, 4-3 W, 7-0 TBD

Cross Country Date Sept. 2 Sept. 8 Sept. 16 Sept. 24 Sept. 29 Oct. 4 Oct. 8 Oct. 14 Oct. 18 Oct. 26 Nov. 5

Opponent Result/Time Rosemount Invite Girls, 1st; Boys, 9th Redbird Invite Girls, 1st; Boys 5th Lakeville Invite Girls, 4th; Boys, 9th Milaca Mega Meet Girls 3rd; Boys, 8th Prior Lake Invite 3:30 p.m. Victoria Lion’s Invite 3 p.m. Lion’s Invite 10 a.m. SSC Championships 4 p.m. Dundee Invite 3:30 p.m. Section 3AA Meet 4 p.m. Class AA state meet 11 a.m.

Girls Swimming Date Sept. 1 Sept. 6 Sept. 10 Sept. 15 Sept. 17 Sept. 22 Sept. 24 Sept. 29 Oct. 6 Oct. 11 Oct. 15 Oct. 18 Oct. 20 Oct. 27 Nov. 9 Nov. 11 Nov. 17-19

Opponent at Apple Valley vs. Lakeville North Minnetonka Invite vs. Kennedy Prior Lake Invite at Rosemount UND Invitational at Burnsville at Jefferson vs. Eastview Section True Team at Lakeville South True Team State vs. Eagan Section 2AA prelims Section 2AA finals Class AA state meet

Result/Time W, 99-76 W, 99-86 5th W, 94-30 1st L, 101-85 1st 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 1 p.m. 6 p.m. 7 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m. 6 p.m.

Fifteen lakes in Minnesota will be posted soon with signs that indicate the current northern pike special regulation will end Tuesday, Nov. 1. This change is the result of a new state law that limits the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) to no more than 100 northern pike special or experimental regulation lakes and only allows for length-based rules. “Currently, we are at 115 lakes with length-based regulations,” said Al Stevens, fi shing regulations coordinator for the DNR. “To comply with the new law, we are dropping regulations on 15 lakes where fisheries biologists believe the regulation is least likely to achieve its management goal or is a smaller lake connected to a larger lake that also has a special northern pike regulation.” The 15 lakes with special length-based regulations that will be dropped are Campbell in Beltrami County; Cotton and Big Floyd in Becker County; Louise in Cass County; Latoka in Douglas County; Caribou in St. Louis County; Scrapper, Haskell, Rice and Schoolhouse in Itasca County; North Branch Kawishiwi River, which is part of the Garden Lake chain, in Lake County; Ogechie in Mille Lacs County; Long and Crooked in Stearns County; and Little Sauk in Todd County. These lakes will revert to the standard statewide northern pike regulation – a three-fi sh limit with no more than one greater than 30 inches in possession. These changes are being done temporarily through an expedited rulemaking process to get them in effect by Nov. 1, as the law requires. Stevens said the DNR will also post the lakes this fall and hold local informational meetings in January 2012 before making the changes permanent. Meeting times and locations will be announced in early January.

TENNIS  continued from page 9

The 15-team section tourney starts Tuesday, Oct. 4. The Lakers will get a bye in the fi rst round and begin quarterfinal play at home Thursday, Oct. 6. The semifi nals are set for Oct. 11 with the title match Oct. 13. both are held at Lifetime Fitness in Lakeville. Seeds come out Monday, Oct. 3. Prior Lake went into the Kennedy match with an impressive 4-3 home win over Eden Prairie Sept. 26, along with a 7-0 conference win at Bloomington Jefferson Sept. 22 and a 6-1 victory versus South St. Paul the next day. Meanwhile, against Kennedy, eighth-grader Chloe Hall sat out at No. 1 singles and seniors Caitlyn Gengler and Alex Fasking sat out at their regular No. 2 doubles spot. Seventh-grader Savanna Crowell played No. 1 singles and rolled (6 - 0, 6 -1), while ni nt h-g rader Da ni Kel ler won at No. 2 (6 - 0, 6 -1) and sophomore Sarah Henderson cruised at No. 3 (6 -1, 6 - 0). Sophomore Hannah Lund won at No. 4 (6-0, 6-1). In doubles, junior Savanna Petersen and eighth-grader Grayce Petersen won at No. 1 (6-1, 6-0), while eighth-grader Sydney Soeffker and sophomore Nikki Henderson moved up spot to play at No. 2 and won easily (6-1, 6-1). Sophomores Abby Broadwell and Emily Gulstad won at No. 3 (6-0, 6-1). Against Eden Prairie, the Lakers won two of three in doubles and split the four singles matches. “This was a huge win as Eden Prairie got ranked No. 5 in the last state rankings and has had some really good wins this year,” said Rosborough. “The wind was tough, but the girls really did a great job battling through.” The Petersen sisters rolled 6-0, 6-3 at No. 1 doubles, while Soeffker and Nikki Henderson won at the third spot (6-2, 6-2). Winning in singles was Crowell at No. 2 (7-5, 6-2) and Keller at No. 3 (6-1, 6-4). “Savanna and Dani really stepped against two really good players,” said Rosborough. Hall lost at No. 1 singles (6-1, 6-2) and Sarah Henderson fell at No. 4 (6-4, 6-4). “Chloe lost to one of the top players in the state and Sarah lost a really close one,” said

PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

Prior Lake eighth-grader Sydney Soeffker won at No. 3 doubles in the Lakers’ 4-3 win over Eden Prairie Sept. 26. Rosborough. “Our No. 2 doubles (Gengler and Fasking) lost to a good team. I was really proud of the way the girls competed.” In beating South St. Paul, the Lakers swept all three doubles matches. “South St. Paul has had a good season, so this was another good win,” said Rosborough. The Petersen sisters rolled at No. 1 (6-1, 6-2), while Gengler and Fasking cr uised at No. 2 (6-3, 6-2) and Nikki Henderson and Soeffker dominated at No. 3 (6-1, 6-1). In singles, Hall won at No. 1 (6-2, 6-2), Keller at No. 3 (6-1, 7-6) and Sarah Henderson at No. 4 (6-0, 6-0). Crowell lost at second spot (7-6, 7-5). “Savanna had a really tough match against a very consistent player,” said Rosborough. Against Jefferson, winning for the Lakers were: Hall at No. 1 (6-1, 6-0), Crowell at No. 2 (6-0, 6-1), Keller at No. 3 (6-1, 6-2) and Sarah Henderson and No. 4 (6-0, 6-0). In doubles winning were the Petersen sisters at No. 1 (6-2, 6-2), Fasking and Gengler at No. 2 (6-0, 6-2) and Soeffker and Nikki Henderson at No. 3 (6-0, 6-2). Heading into sections, Eagan is the defending champion, while Rosemount was the runner-up last year. Prior Lake beat Eagan 6-1 in conference play and won 4-3 over Rosemount. Other teams in the field include: Apple Valley, Burnsville, Eastview, Holy Angels, South St. Paul, Simley, Visitation, Park of Cottage Grove, Bloomington Jefferson, Kennedy, Richfield and Henry Sibley.


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 11

scoreboard VOLLEYBALL

Spikers blocked Lakers fall to pair of highly ranked teams

presents:

Challenging Children Why do they struggle? What can I do? Is your child more: PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

Prior Lake sophomore Jacque Luth goes up for a spike in the Lakers’ loss at Bloomington Jefferson Sept. 22.

MORE ONLINE FOLLOW THE LAKERS AT

www.scoreboard.mn

tough teams, but is not overly deep. The two teams to beat appear to be No. 5 Shakopee (14-2) and Chanhassen (11-2), while Hutchinson (11-3) and Waconia (11-7), the defending champ, are also strong programs. Delano (11-2) may be team to watch out for, although the Tigers don’t have a great strength of schedule. Other teams include: Chaska (7-6) Buffalo (6-5), Mankato East (1-9), Mankato West (2-10-1), New Prague (5-8) and Willmar (4-6). In the loss to Lakeville South, senior Jayme Lubansky led the Lakers with nine kills, adding three blocks. Senior Melissa VanBenthuysen had eight kills and eight digs.

Ninth-grader Brittany Luethmers fi nished with 10 digs, while senior Tori Beckel had five. Senior Alex McGraw had 11 set assists, while junior Emily Veldman fi nished with two blocks. Against Jefferson, Lubansky led the Lakers with seven kills, while VanBenthuysen had five, along with two ace serves. Luethmers had 18 digs, while Beckel had eight. McGraw had nine set assists, while sophomore Libby McGraw had seven. Through 13 matches, VanBenthuysen leads the team kills with 121, while Lubansky has 108, along with 40 blocks. I n set t i n g a ssi st s, A lex McGraw leads with 171. In digs, ninth-grader Brittany Luethmers has 211, while Veldman has 10 ace serves. Fol low i n g t he Ken ne dy match, the Lakers return to the road Thursday, Oct. 6 at Eastview at 7 p.m.

BOYS SOCCER

Looking to make a push

Thursday, October 13th, 2011 • 7:00 – 8:30 p.m.

LearningRx 8160 County Rd 42 West, Suite 800 Savage MN 55378 Please call LearningRx to register: 952-226-1115 Cost is $10/person or $15/couple, and proceeds will be donated directly to Connected Families. www.connectedfamilies.com

BY TOM SCHARDIN tschardin@swpub.com

952-447-6669

 continued from page 11

But Peterson put the Lakers back on top with about nine minutes left in regulation on

Associated Realtors & Associated Lenders Roy Clay

For advertising in this directory call Lance, Pat or Dan at

SOCCER

REAL ESTATE

Professional Services Directory

Lakers eyeing section tourney It’s been a while since the Prior Lake boys soccer team had a 3-0 lead at halftime. The Lakers are usually embroiled in low-scoring, tight games, so the early lead must have been nice to play with for coach Mike Shebuski’s team. It’s the first time the Lakers have scored three or more times in a game this season and the first time in 11 games dating back to last year. “We came out and did really well,” Shebuski said of his team’s 4-1 South Suburban Conference win at Lakeville South Sept. 27. “We took it to them right from the start. We continue to improve. “Heading into sections, we want to be playing our best,” added Shebuski. Prior Lake improved to 8-5 overall (4-3 in the conference) with three games to play before the Section 2AA tourney. The Lakers went into the Lakeville South game on the heels of a 1-0 home win over Rochester Mayo Sept. 24 and a 3-1 loss at No. 6 Bloomington Jefferson Sept. 22. The Lakers are playing host to White Bear Lake today (Saturday, Oct. 1) in a non-league game. Prior Lake has a huge conference game at home versus Bloomington Kennedy Tuesday, Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. and will close out the regular season at

Active Expressive Emotional Strong-willed than other children?

About 1 in every 5 children (especially anxious, defiant, or distractible kits) has a sensory processing disorder. These kids over- or under-react to everyday sensory experiences. Sights, sounds, movement, and things touching their skin are often confusing, overwhelming, and even irritating. Find out if this problem is at the root of your challenges with your child. Lynne Jackson, a therapist specializing in these issues, will equip you with insights and strategies to help your child be successful. Help them tame their intensity and tap their potential. You will learn a framework for parenting that will help you maintain an affectionate, proactive relationship with your challenging child. Lynne Jackson is a licensed Occupational Therapist with 20 years experience working with children with sensory processing disorder, ADHD (including her own kids!), OCD, ODD and autism spectrum disorders. She has lectured extensively on sensory processing disorder, as well as general parenting education. She and her husband have written How to Grow a Connected Family with Contagious Love and Faith which has helped thousands of parents thrive in the challenging journey of parenting.

202819

The Prior Lake volleyball team can’t seem to fi nd a big win. The Lakers are 0-6 against ranked or previously ranked teams this season, including getting swept at No. 4 Lakeville South (25-17, 25-12, 25-22) in a South Suburban Conference match Sept. 27. The Lakers went into the match losing in three games (25 -23, 25 -16, 25 -16) at No. 3 Bloomington Jefferson Sept. 22. Prior Lake is 5 -8 overall (1-4 in the conference). The team will look to get back on track Tuesday, Oct. 4 when it plays home to Bloomington Kennedy in a league match at 7 p.m. “It has been a tough start to the conference season, but it’s the world we play in,” said Lakers coach Mike Dean. “Lakeville South is a tough balanced team and they did a nice job controlling the ball against us and staying in system. We started slow and it took some time for us to reach our best level of play. “In the third set we made some changes to the lineup that seemed to work better for our team,” added Dean. “As our ball control and defense go, so goes our results and we struggled with that throughout the match. When we controlled the ball good things happened for us as we were able to run our offense.” The Lakers’ other four losses to ranked foes are to No. 9 Chanhassen (3-1) and No. 2 Lakeville North (3-0) and to a pair Class 2A programs, No. 6 LeSueur-Henderson (2-0) and No. 5 Jordan (2-1). The 12-team Section 2AAA tourney is not far off, starting with fi rst-round play Oct. 26. T he f ield i ncludes some

209717

BY TOM SCHARDIN tschardin@swpub.com

No. 1 Eastview Thursday, Oct. 6 at 5 p.m. The game with Kennedy may very well determine if the Lakers play at home in the section quarterfi nals. “Right now, it really looks like that game could be for the No. 4 and 5 seeds,” said Shebuski. “The Eastview game will also be a good challenge for us right before sections.” The top-three seeds seem pretty certain – No. 8 Eden Prairie (7-2-3), No. 5 Edina (10-1-1) and Jefferson (7-2-4). Sha kopee ( 6 - 4 -2 ) is a lso vying for the No. 4 seed, but doesn’t have the strength of schedule the Lakers and Eagles do. Although the Sabers do play at Jefferson Oct. 1, so a win there would really enhance Shakopee’s stock. Chanhassen (4-7) and Minnetonka (3-7-2) are also in the field. Section quarterfi nal play begins Oct. 13. Meanwhile, in the win over Lakeville South, seniors Connor Anderson and Zack Fennessy each had a goal and an assist. Junior Logan Bunbury and senior Ben Clements also scored. Sophomore Erik Fenske and junior Dylan Lehrer each had one assist. Senior Andy Rieckoff started his 13th straight game in goal. Against Rochester Mayo, Rieckoff earned his fi fth shutout, making five saves. Bunbury tallied the game-winning goal with just under 10 minutes

to play, scoring on a free kick. Against Jefferson, Clements scored for the Lakers in the second half to cut Jefferson’s lead to 2-1. “We came out pretty timid in the fi rst half and gave them a little too much time and space to operate,” said Shebuski. “We had moments where we were played well in the fi rst half, but our defensive effort as a team and our organization gave us some trouble. They were able to fi nish two of their chances in the first half and it seemed to get us a little frustrated.” “Second half was much better and we defi nitely stepped it up a notch,” added Shebuski. “We defended better as a team and started sorting out the issues from the first half. That on top of playing a little quicker and talking a little more allowed us to be able to get control of the game a little more. Ben did well to fi nish an opportunity to bring us within a goal and we had chances to tie it up, but couldn’t quite pull even.”

a goal from about 20 yards out. Ruelle got the assist. Prior Lake dominated the fi rst half, getting a goal from ninth-grader Kaija Orness. Senior Gabbi Norman booted a ball off the crossbar from

about 20 yards out. Ruelle got a foot on the ball near the goal, before Orness banged it into an open net. “ We p o s s e s s e d t he b a l l ver y wel l a l l g a me ,” s a id Graham.

John Clay

“One Stop Shop” 447-6066 105048

PHOTO BY TOM SCHARDIN

Prior Lake senior Jack Peterson heads the ball in the Lakers’ 3-1 loss at Bloomington Jefferson Sept. 22.

FINANCIAL

REAL ESTATE 134734

Fax 447-6051

HELPING SECURE YOUR FINANCIAL FUTURE • Insurance • IRAs • Fee Based Planning • Bonds • Mutual Funds • Stocks • 401K Rollovers “Do you have a loan with another financial institution? You could save money by bringing your loan to South Metro FCU. Ask me how!”

SUE JACOBS 952-746-2033

SueJacobsSells.com

952-445-0888 Ext #19 • 2573 Credit Union Dr. • Prior Lake

www.southmet.com Investment Product and Services offered through CUSO Financial Services, L.P. (CFS) are not NCUA/NCUSIF, not credit union guaranteed, and may lose value. Financial Representatives are employed by South Metro Federal Credit Union and registered through CFS. South Metro FCU is affiliated with CFS. (Member NASD/SIPC) 157266

MORTGAGE

ADVERTISING

For Advertising in this Directory Call Lance, Pat or Dan at the PRIOR LAKE

AMERICAN 952-447-6669


Page 12 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

Complete Dental Care

DOWNHOME CRAFTS BOUTIQUE

for your entire family

Special, unique one of a kind gifts

ZOOM® Whitening ■ White Fillings ■ Total Dental Care ■ New Patients Welcome ■

Diane Hentges 40+ Vendors Shakopee Feed Mill 126 Scott Street

Adelmann Family Dentistry

152353

Oct. 6-9, 13-16, 20-23, 27-30 Nov. 3-6, 10-13, 17-20

New Patients Welcome www.adelmanndds.com 14247 O’Connell Ct. • Savage

Store Hours: Thursday & Friday 9 – 6 Saturday 9 – 4, Sunday 10 – 4

Just south of Cty. Rd. 42 & O’Connell Rd.

952-226-3560

Jordan ECFE

Expect another warm-up in coming week This week started quite cool, but warmed to almost average by Su nday and was above average for the rest of the period. For the Jonathan week, temperCohen atures were b elow aver age again, but by less than 1 degree. Despite a little rain, precipitation was well below average, as it has been for the last two months. This will be my driest September and the driest in the area since at least 1952. In fact, the official precipitation at the Minne-

apolis-St. Paul International Airport may be an all-time September record. The outlook is for a brief cooldown heading into the weekend, before it turns warm again by next week, with highs returning to the 70s, though the average high slips into the low 60s. It should continue

Date Sept. 22 Sept. 23 Sept. 24 Sept. 25 Sept. 26 Sept. 27 Sept. 28

Precip. .1 0 0 0 Trace .01 0

High 52 54 58 62 67 63 74

much drier than average, with only a small chance of showers with the arrival of the cool air before the weekend and the arrival of the warmer air afterward. By Jonathan Cohen, Prior Lake observer for the Scott County Soil and Water Conservation District

Low 44 42 40 44 51 56 52

Dew pt. midnight 41 40 41 49 46 55 53

4” soil temp 61 60 60 62 64 66 67

EARLY BIRD

Craft & Gift Show Spe cial (Early Childhood Family Education) 7th Annual

10% OFF Winterizing,

October 8, 2011 Jordan High School 600 Sunset Drive

9am-3pm www.jordancraftfair.com jordancraftshow@yahoo.com (952) 492-3233 Join us for your holiday shopping. There will be over 70 vendors, a silent auction, and a food booth

Shrinkwrap & Service Offer Expires 11/30/11.

JTS Marine & Motor Sports 952-440-2628

8003 124th St. • Savage Off Hwy 13 & Hwy 101

Our Clients Say It Best “An accident is never a good experience, but American National was there when I needed them most.” - Frank T., ANPAC client For all your Insurance and related Financial Service needs, call

Haugen Agency, LTD (952) 440-8200

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Those interested in water flow and quality recently took a tour of the Prior Lake outlet.

Today’s Learners... Tomorrow’s Leaders.

14093 Commerce Ave. Prior Lake

Kyle & Jack Haugen

• Small Class Sizes • Individual Attention

American National Property And Casualty Company (ANPAC®), Springfield, Missouri is a subsidiary of American National Insurance Company.

5634 Luther Rd. SE Prior Lake 952-447-2117 www.spls-pl.org

Get Medicare answers right in your neighborhood Attend a Prepare for Medicare meeting to learn about Medicare. You’ll find out more about what’s covered, when you’re eligible and how to enroll. As a licensed agent, I can answer your questions and help you learn about the wide range of plans from Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, including Cost, Medicare supplement, Part D and PPO plans. The meeting is free, and there is no obligation. Contact me today to let me know if you‘ll be attending.* Authorized independent agent/agency for

Monday, Oct. 3, 2:00pm Edina Senior Center, 5280 Grandview Square, Edina Tues., Oct. 4, 9:30am Eden Prairie Community Center, 16700 Valley View Rd., Eden Prairie Tues. Oct 4, 2:00pm Minnesota Valley YMCA, 13850 Portland Ave. S., Burnsville Tues. Oct. 4, 6:30pm Richfield American Legion Post, 6501 Portland Ave. So, Richfield Wed. Oct. 5, 1:30pm Creekside Community Center, 9801 Penn Ave. So., Bloomington Thurs. Oct. 6, 10:00am Veteran’s Memorial Community Center, 8055 Barbara Ave., Inver Grove Heights Thurs. Oct. 6, 1:30pm Dan Patch American Legion Post, 12375 Princeton Ave., Savage Thurs. Oct 6, 2:00pm Eagan Community Center, 1501 Central Pkwy., Eagan Thurs. Oct 6, 2:00pm Lakeville Senior Center, 20732 Holt Ave., Lakeville Mon., Oct 10, 2:00pm Edina Senior Center, 5280 Grandview Square, Edina

Roxann Nelson Twin Cities Underwriters 651-488-0172 1-800-507-6778 TTY 1-800-627-3529

Plans are available to residents of the service area. A Medicareapproved Part D sponsor and a health plan with Medicare contracts. A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodations of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call 651-488-0172; TTY users call 1-800-627-3529. *You can also call Blue Cross for plan information or to enroll. Call 1-877-6622583, TTY users call 1-866-582-1158, 8 a.m.– 8 p.m., daily. Service representatives and licensed sales representatives are available when you call this number. H2461_071410_F03 CMS Approved 08/16/2010 Y0052_071410_H06 CMS Approved 08/25/2010

Man-made outlet prevents flooding FROM THE PRIOR LAKE ASSOCIATION

What is the Prior Lake outlet? What does it do? The Prior Lake outlet is a man-made structure that releases water from the lake when the lake levels become too high. “It’s similar to a bathtub drain,” said Mike Kinney of the Prior Lake-Spring Lake Watershed District. When the lake level reaches 902.5 feet, water from the lake overflows into a pipeline as it begins a 7-mile passage from Prior Lake to Shakopee, where it drains into the Minnesota River. Since the natural drainage outlet on Prior Lake is higher than the water level, lake levels had continued to rise, flooding lake homes and cabins until a manmade structure was built in the 1980s. The latest outlet structure, a maintenance-free,

Prior Lake

ASSOCIATION LAKESMARTS

nonmechanical structure, replacing the 1980s structure, was recently completed in April 2010; just in time to harness the 2011 rain events. “Without the man-made outlet, lake levels may have risen to heights that could have flooded Highway 13 near Target, where the lake’s natural outlet is,” said Kinney. A tour of the outlet, hosted by the Watershed District

and Minnesota Waters, also included two points of interests along the channel: The YMCA camp and Pike Lake Park. Through the wooded trails, we were able to see how flow from the lake as well as flow from storm water was designed and controlled according to the natural terrain they sat in. For those of you interested in a self-guided tour, download a map from the watershed district’s website at www. plslwd.org and take in the fall colors while the leaves near their peak. The estimated water temperature of Prior Lake this week was 55 degrees, and the water elevation was 902 feet on Sept. 22. Watch for the Prior Lake Association’s annual meeting coming up in October. Check out the Prior Lake Association online at www. priorlakeassociation.org.

Former news editor to author book on Savage Local author and former Savage Pacer newspaper editor Nancy Huddleston recently signed a contract with national publisher Arcadia Publishing to author a pictorial history book about Savage. The book, which will be a part of Arcadia’s “Images of America” series, will feature well-known historical fi gures such as the famous race horse Dan Patch and his owner, as well as lesser-known stories about the city’s history. Vintage photographs, which Huddleston is collecting and rese a rchi ng, a nd det ai led

captions will educate readers as well as evoke nostalgia and pride in those with connections to Savage. “In my time as editor of the Savage Pacer, I Nancy came to really Huddleston appreciate the rich and diverse history of the city,” Huddleston said. “Documenting this history seemed like a great way to contribute to the community and share my

enthusiasm for its history.” To provide a more complete glimpse into historic Savage, Huddleston would like to include photographs from community family photo collections. Those who have family photographs from the late-1800s to mid-1960s that they’d like to have considered for the book can contact Huddleston via email at hud59@q.com or phone at (952) 894-8733. “Savage” is scheduled for publication in 2012 and will be available for purchase at area bookstores, as well as independent and online retailers.

with a $40 family maximum. For more information, e-mail corrinen@friendship-church. org or call (952) 447-8282.

older and are $25 for individuals not covered by Medicare Part B. Bring your Medicare card if you have one. Sponsored by Scott County Public Health. Call (952) 496-8555 for more information. New Life Keys Class: Join others on a seven-week journey of discovering what it means to be created in God’s image. The next Life Keys course begins Tuesday, Oct. 4 and runs through Nov. 15. The class will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. Advance registration is required; sign up at www.sollc.org.

CHURCH NEWS

Sign up for Awana program Friendship Church, 17741 Fairlawn Ave., Prior Lake will offer the Awana program from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays from September through May. Activities i nclude ga me time, interactive lessons and Bible memorization. Awana is an international, nondenominational program in which children earn awards for their achievements. The cost is $ 20 per child,

Shepherd of the Lake events set The following events are planned at Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church, 3611 North Berens Road, Prior Lake: Flu shot clinic: Set for Sunday, Oct. 16 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the Foundation Room. Flu shots are for ages 9 and


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 13

Student wins $1,000 for college plans

STRONG. LOCAL.

Children’s Dental Care

LENDING.

Marc Kurtenbach of Prior Lake was selected as a winner in this summer’s “Destination College Savings Sweepstakes,” sponsored by the Minnesota College Savings Plan. His parents, Mariette and Ken Kurtenbach, will be awarded a $1,000 cash prize that can be invested in the Minnesota College Savings Plan for the benefit of Marc. Sweepstakes forms were available at the Scott County Libraries this summer during the Summer Reading Program. Marc participated in the Scott County summer reading program at the Prior Lake Library and, as a result, the library also won $ 500 for future summer reading programs. Marc was one of 15 winners throughout the state.

• SBA Loans • Mortgages • Equity Loans • Auto Loans • Business Loans • Refinancing

Dr. George Hankerson Dr. Brent Kvittem • Dr. Amy Kebriaei Three locations in Prior Lake 952-447-2101 www.priorlakestatebank.com Member FDIC

Pain-free and shot-free laser technology

Member FDIC

Check out the cartoon on our website for laser details!

Lakeville 17510 Dodd Blvd 952.997.7100 203306

Savage 7629 Egan Drive 952.440.5100

www.childrensdentalc.com

At right – Marc Kurtenbach with his oversized check; the money can be invested in a college savings plan. SUBMITTED PHOTO

JOY!

Yes, the Road is OPEN to Minnesota Harvest

Fall Hours: Tues.–Sun. 10am–6pm • Pick Your Own Apples • Pony Rides • Wagon Rides • LIVE! Cactus Willie & Jolly WoodChopper • Kid’s Hay Mountain • Goofy Corn Maze

952-492-2785 or 952-492-7753

co ve rc ha rg e!

Take 169 south past Jordan exit. Left on Cty 59 (OK Corral) right at top of hill (Cty 66).

181355

www.minnesotaharvest.net for directions and apple varieties.

VFW Post 6208 Prior Lake presents its

Pull Tabs always available during business hours!

N ev er

a

l C a o u m n m n A unity h t6

g n i t a br ars e l e C + ye e 60 ervic of s the y to unit m com

Sat., Oct. 15th, 2011

Old Time Music from

German Pig Roast 4 – 7 p.m.

The Dale Pexa Band

Food Tickets - $7 in advance, $8 at the door Serving: Roast Pig, Kraut, Brats, German Potato Salad

Friday Night

Saturday Night

Monday Night

The Friday night dinner features a full dinner menu with a different special every week, a 24-item salad bar PLUS a Senior Citizen menu.

There’s a Steak Fry PLUS Live Entertainment on the 2nd and 4th Saturday of the month.

It’s Burger Night, home of the Locally famous $1.50 burger From 5 – 7 p.m. Meat raffle every Monday night.

Sunday

Tuesday Night

The Club open from noon until 9 p.m. with $12 buckets, $2 taps, and $1 off Pizzas – PLUS Bloody Mary Bar on Sat & Sun Noon – 5PM

Enjoy FREE Taco Bar with a drink purchase From 5 – 7 p.m.

Wednesday Night

2:30 - 6:30 p.m.

50s-80s Variety

American Flyer 7:30 – 11:30 p.m.

Bingo Night with big prizes – Game 6 - $425 prize and Game 12 - $700 prize. Bar menu available.

Prior Lake VFW Post 6208

Don’t Forget – we’re a full service banquet facility; We can handle up to 350 people at a time!

16306 Main Ave. S.E., Prior Lake (952) 226-6208 Lic. No. A00295

Hours: Monday – Friday 2 p.m. – 1 a.m. | Saturday Noon – 1 a.m. Sunday Noon – 9 p.m.

www.vfwpost6208.com

209683


Page 14 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

COUNTY ROAD 21  continued from page 1

“We haven’t noticed a significant speeding problem yet,” he said. The median lacks ample room for vehicles and pedestrians to wait for passing traffic, so people must be confident that both directions of 21 are clear. A bend in the section of 21 south of the intersection makes it more difficult to gauge traffic, said Paaverud. Anticipated traffic volumes didn’t warrant a signal at the intersection when the road was built, engineers said, although the county anticipates one will be needed in the future. “People have raised that concern of accidents once County Road 21 opens up,” said Bruce Loney, public works director for the city of Shakopee. “The county has the jurisdiction of the intersection, so any changes would need to be approved by Scott County. We will monitor the intersection along with the county to see what modifications are needed.” The county has standards and thresholds it considers when determining whether traffic signals are needed. County Engineer Mitch Rasmussen said engineers are watching the intersection, and the Sept. 21 accident will become part of the county’s record. “We don’t just open the road up and walk away. We are watching it all the time,” he said. “We know it takes tweaking to get it as close to perfect as we can.” A four-way stop at the intersection would cause accidents, because motorists don’t expect one on a major thoroughfare like 21, Rasmussen said. “You don’t see stop signs on 42,” he said. Rasmussen encourages drivers who are turning left from southbound Southbridge Parkway onto northbound County Road 21 to instead take Southbridge north, which is a safer movement. Rasmussen noted that 21 is a major roadway and he wouldn’t advise children to cross there. A pedestrian underpass is available nearby to navigate between Southbridge’s neighborhoods. Paaverud would like solar warning lights attached to the stop signs at Southbridge Parkway, which is the only non-signalized intersection along the new road. She also believes a lower speed on 21 would make the crossing a little safer. No speed limit has been established for the road, which requires a state analysis. Until then, the limit is the maximum 55 mph. The road has no speed-limit signs, although a 40 mph sign

left from construction is still up near the 21/County Road 18 intersection. The county has asked the state to determine the appropriate speed for the county road, but the study couldn’t be done until vehicles began using the road, according to Rasmussen. Only the state has the authority to set the speed. Engineers consider traffic and speed patterns and tend to set the speed limit at the 85th percentile of what motorists are driving, Rasmussen said. Also still to be completed is the Eagle Creek Transit Station lot at the intersection of 21 and 16. The park-and-ride lot, anticipated to open in May, will replace the BlueXpress stop at Safe Haven for Youth in Prior Lake.

CONGESTION Drivers have noticed longer waits at the realigned intersection of Southbridge Parkway/County Road 18 since County Road 21 opened. However, it’s likely much of the excess traffic is due to vehicles trying to avoid the interchange construction at County Road 101 and Highway 13 in Savage, said Rasmussen. During a recent weekday morning, county traffic engineer Tony Winiecki observed the heaviest wait times between 7 and 7:30 a.m. After a half hour, all waiting north- and east-bound traffic could make it through when the green light turned. However, westbound traffic was still heavy, with a backup nearly to Crossings Boulevard, at 7:45 a.m. “Both people on County Road 18 and Southbridge Parkway are having to wait fairly equally,” Rasmussen noted. “We’re getting a backup on 18 even though it’s given more of a free movement.” As the novelty of using the new 21 wears off and once the 13/101 interchange is complete, Rasmussen expects traffic to disperse more evenly throughout the area. “It will take some time for traffic to sort itself out,” he said. “We are also watching and adjusting the timing of the signal at 18 and 21,” he said. Rasmussen said the 21 extension is an important northsouth connector for the county road network. The clogged Bloomington Ferry Bridge will continue to be a problem, he said, but the county can only control the roads within its border. “I empathize with people,” said Rasmussen. “I don’t like sitting in traffic, either. But it’s not our road. We don’t control when it gets expanded or how. We are at the table, though, talking with the Minnesota Department of Transportation.” MnDOT estimates it would cost $44 million to widen the bridge and its approaches. It can’t simply make the temporary restriping of lanes used during spring flooding permanent, because it doesn’t meet federal highway standards.

RIVER CROSSING STUDY

Chaska, Scott County favor 101 BY SHANNON FIECKE AND MOLLEE FRANCISCO sfiecke@swpub.com mfrancisco@swpub.com

Support is lining up on both sides of the Minnesota River for raising the County Road 101 crossing in Shakopee instead of Highway 41 in Chaska. The Scott County Board on Tuesday voted to recommend the state construct a 3,080-foot land bridge on 101 that would provide 100-year flood protection. It is estimated to cost $31 million — more dollars than the state has left for flood mitigation; however, turn-back dollars could become available if the state relinquishes control of its portion of the crossing to Carver County. The Chaska City Council voiced support for an upgrade to the 101 crossing last week. That support will be included in a letter to the Minnesota Department of Transportation, which is studying lower cost, shorterterm ways to improve mobility during seasonal floods. Existing funding for river crossing improvements can only fund work on either County Road 101 or Highway 41. But given the option, the Chaska City Council would prefer to see 101 improved over 41 — largely because improvements made to 41 could not withstand the majority of seasonal flooding events. “The benefits to 41 would be to shorten the closure,” said Chaska City Engineer Bill Monk. “That’s it.” Monk noted that due to struc-

First Time Homebuyer Webinar Every Thursday at 12 noon simply go to: www.GoToMeeting.com and Log in using ID #143487598 This is an anonymous webinar to answer any questions you have about qualifying for, and buying your first home. Sit at your desk over the lunch hour and check this out. Questions before the webinar? Call Chris Grimes (612-750-0035) or Andrew Paul (763-443-7903)

Coldwell Banker Burnet To view more Scott County listings, go to

cbburnet.com or call (952) 445-7272

ADVANTAGE PLUS

If You Live, Work or Worship In Scott County You Can Become A Member Today!

Coldwell Banker Burnet

DISCOVER THE CREDIT UNION DIFFERENCE Prior Lake 2573 Credit Union Drive 952-445-0888

cbburnet.com OPEN SAT 1:00-2:30

OPEN SAT 11:00-12:30

OPEN SUN 1:00-5:00

tural limitations on the river bridge, the proposed corridor improvements to 41 would only have been able to avoid half of the flood events that have occurred since 1993. The County Road 101 crossing could be raised to a point that would be able to stay open for all but floods reaching the level of the record 1965 flood. Unlike the 41 crossing — which could carry four lanes of traffic during a flood — the 101 crossing would only have two lanes, under the current proposal. The project timing is yet to be determined, but would be sometime between 2013 and 2108. The state’s flood-mitigation study also looked at improvements to the Bloomington Ferry Bridge. Temporary capacity improvements, such as the restriping implemented during the 2011 spring flood, were identified along with additional improvements to reduce pavement damage and fix the constrictions at Old Shakopee Road. The state can’t simply make the temporary capacity improvements permanent be cause they wouldn’t meet the federal government standards for highways. (The state was required to remove the restriping after the spring flood.) A more permanent capacity improvement is also identified in the study. It would add a full lane of capacity to the bridge in both directions for an estimated cost of $44 million. The work would involve widening the two main spans of the bridge, the approaches and nine smaller bridges in the vicinity. Although the cost is outside of available f lood mitigation bonding dollars, the county hopes the state will consider permanently widening the bridge in the future. But officials say even the temporary restriping of the ferry bridge would still be helpful for floods or during the anticipated reconstruction of the Highway 35W Minnesota River Bridge within the next decade.

Where the Wilds and Wonderful Homes Are!

Home Underwater?

Shakopee 574 So. Marschall Road Smart Branch - Open 24 hours

Shakopee/Savage Striking 5BR (4 on 1-lvl) home on cul-de-sac in The POINTE! Granite KIT walks out to enormous deck! Private MSTR w/new tile flrs & whirlpl tub. Finished BSMT / fireplace. Solid 6-panel drs, 9’ ceilings, extended garage. InGround Sprinkler! Newer roof! 24 Hour Recorded Message 1-800-605-6994 Ext. 237

Impressive Woodhill 2-Stry! Elaborate woodwork, coffered ceilings, builtins galore. Granite/SS KIT w/pantry, Sunroom, Mud Rm w/Lockers. Fin LL w/ Fplc, Wet Bar, Workshop. Vaulted screen porch & 2 Decks! Almost ½ Acre lot on pond w/shed. 24 Hour Recorded Message 1-800-605-6994 ext 225

Modern Prior Lakeshore masterpiece by architect Charles Stinson! Visually stimulating design features artistic angles. Spacious, yet intimate. Loaded w/lighted soffits. 8’ drs, windows to the ceiling. 52’ of beach. Relaxing terraces! 24 Hour Recorded Message 1-800-605-6994 ext 222

8040 Old Carriage Court Smart Branch - Open 24 hours Sun-fi lled “Wilds South” 5 BR, 4 Bath home on private half acre! Every amenity and more…! Move-in condition! Three car side load garage! $382,900. Call for private showing.

COLDWELL BANKER WATERFRONT TOUR THIS SUNDAY

Chad & Sara Huebener

JIM GRUVER

952-212-3597

612-720-3587 www.JimGruver.com HomesInTheWilds.com

www.ChadandSara.com www.LivingInSavage.com www.WestSavageBlog.com

LOTS AND LAND

.3 AC lot in Prior Lake, public utilities in, use any builder. MLS#4011908. $49,000. 1.5 AC lot south of New Prague, tar road, shared well. Use any builder. MLS#4077706. $65,000. 3.9 AC lot south of New Prague, lakeview. Use any builder. MLS#4043596. $75,000.

www.edinarealty.com

Gorgeous views of The Wild’s 14th fairway plus much more! Sun-filled former model with many upgrades! Cherry cabinets, center island, walk-in pantry, four season porch with heated tile floor! Quality throughout! Shows beautifully!

MARK ANNEXSTAD REFERRALS ARE MY BUSINESS SINCE 1981

612-590-6318

PAUL KRUEGER 612-328-4506

Photos, details and tours at www.markannexstad.edinarealty.com Showcased on REALTOR.COM

paulkrueger@edinareatly.com

Call 952-445-0888 www.southmet.com

5901 CARDINAL RIDGE TRAIL NEW LISTING

5BR, 4BA home with a big backyard. Beautifully restored and ready to move into. Open main floor with family room and den. Much more. $279,900.

13812 NEVADA AVE., SAVAGE $424,200

Beautifully cared for 5BR 2 story on gorgeous lot! Main flr office, walk-out to LL with waterfall, firepit and wetlands. 4-season porch, kitchenette on LL and room for a pool table.

14185 Shady Beach Trail

100’ of lakefront on Prior Lake.

3BR, 2BA W/O rambler twinhome on private lot backing to walking path. The kitchen is very nice with stainless range and is open to the greatroom. Nice deck overlooking the wooded backyard. No dues!

LOCATED ON THE OUTLOT WITH GREAT LAKEVIEWS! $350,000 5154 Hope St.

Looking for a project? This house has a wonderful location! Needs work and TLC. 3BR. 2BA.

5322 CANDY COVE TRAIL $595,000

The house that was built for lakeside entertaining and living! Two kitchens, screened porch & beautiful views!

RICHFIELD $199,900

16168 JOPLIN WAY, LAKEVILLE $99,000

D L O S

LI JUS ST T ED

Experience Matters!

National Association of Realtors Certified

Both Open Houses hosted by Steve Conner 952-261-5328.

YOU’LL LOVE IT HERE! $549,900

Walkout rambler with fantastic lake views. 5BRs, 3BAs and totally remodeled with the highest quality! Spectacular yard with fish pond. Open by appt. this weekend. Call 612-716-4036.

612-940-7277

Beautiful 2 story on private wooded cul-de-sac. Over 100 feet of level sandy lakeshore on Prior. Gorgeous kitchen, open and spacious. Now $729,000.

MarkGores@EdinaRealty.com MaryGores@EdinaRealty.com

Our Office Sold 300+ Homes in 2011...

Open 24 Hours

www.Key2Move.com

3211 BUTTERNUT CIRCLE PRICE REDUCED

MARK & MARY GORES 5636 150TH ST., PRIOR LAKE $339,000

A Short Sale might be the Answer. Call the Experts! JEFF & SHANNON HANSEN

County Road 42 & O’Connell

AC LA CE KE SS

14198 Commerce Avenue N.E.

3124 WOOD DUCK DRIVE NW $449,000!

Celebrating My 30th Year with Edina Realty

28 AC parcel south of New Prague. Lake access. MLS#4043642. $160,000. 130 AC central Scott Co. 124.8 tillable, buildable. MLS#3991541. $850,000.

Prior Lake/Savage Office

Savage

2913 BOBCAT TRAIL NW PRIOR LAKE

KAREN STILES

612-716.4036

612-749-1615

www.PriorLakeHomesOnline.com

www.karenstiles.edinarealty.com

Know of someone who needs to live across the river? Here’s a superb choice in a very convenient neighborhood. Located close to Southdale & all the area has to offer! Very nicely updated with new windows, beautiful hardwood floors and staged to perfection! 3BR, double gar.

18706 FAIRLAWN AVE $334,900

A little piece of heaven on 6 acres! 4BR home with lovely finishes. Peace & quiet... all blacktop roads & conveniently located just south of Prior Lake.

157949

PRIOR LAKESHORE

O 1:3 PEN 0-3 SUN :00

WOODHILL

11 OPEN :30 SU -1: N 00

THE POINTE


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 15

americanslice Contributions welcome to editor@plamerican.com, (952) 345-6378

COMMUNITY HAPPENINGS

Dance instructors light up the stage

Support area troops

Team iLuminate places third on ‘America’s Got Talent’

Beyond the Yellow Ribbon South of the River will meet from 7 to 9 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 4 in the lower level of the Prior Lake VFW, 16306 Main Ave. The meeting and all of the group’s events are open to the public. The organization focuses on ways to give back to the military personnel supporting the nation. For more information, call (952) 440-5011 or visit btyrsouthoftheriver.org.

BY MERYN FLUKER mfluker@swpub.com

S

‘Payoff Principle’ is Rotary topic Alan Zimmerman will be the guest speaker at the Prior Lake Rotary Club’s meeting at 7 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 5 at The Wilds, 3151 Wilds Ridge, Prior Lake. Zimmerman, Founder of Zimmerman Community Care Network, will share aspects of “The Payoff Principle.” The meeting is open to the public; breakfast cost is $12.50. PL Rotary next Wednesday, Oct. 5. The club meets at The Wilds, beginning at 7 a.m. This meeting will be open to the public. Breakfast cost is $12.50.

Donate during food drive The Prior Lake Lions Club, along with the Prior Lake-Savage Girl Scouts, Cub Scout Pack 331, Boy Scout Troop 331 and Village Market, will have a food drive to benefit the CAP Agency from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8 at Village Market, 16731 Highway 13. Flyers will be distributed the week beforehand. Members of the Lions Club will take donations, and Scouts will help to load donations onto a CAP Agency food truck. For more information, e-mail Angie Fischer at amofischer@ gmail.com.

Senior driving course available The Minnesota Highway Safety Center will offer a 55-plus driver improvement refresher course on Tuesday, Oct. 11, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the District Services Center, 4540 Tower St., Prior Lake. The course is open to the public; advance registration is requested. The fee is $20. For more information or to register, visit www.mnsafetycenter.org or call toll-free 1-(888)-234-1294.

Free Internet classes offered A free two-hour, hands-on introduction to the Internet class will be from 8 to 10 a.m. the second Wednesday of each month at the Prior Lake Library, 16210 Eagle Creek Ave. Dates are Oct. 12, Nov. 9 and Dec. 14. The class, taught by volunteers with the Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging, will cover how to type Web addresses, how to navigate from one Web page to the next, how to conduct searches using common search engines, and how to be a savvy Internet user. To register, call the library at (952-447-3375). A volunteer computer aide is also available from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesdays at the Prior Lake Library. No registration is required for this one-on-one assistance.

Enter VFW contests by Nov. 1 The Prior Lake VFW is sponsoring the Voice of Democracy contest for students in grades nine through 12 with a first-place award of $300, and the Patriot’s Pen essay contest for students in grades six through eight with a first-place award of $200. Details and applications can be found at www.VFW.org (look for “community” and “programs”). The deadline to apply at the Prior Lake VFW, 16306 Main Ave., is Nov. 1. For information, call Denise Schmidt at (952) 994-2588.

Deadline The deadline for community happenings items for this section is noon Wednesdays. For more information, e-mail editor@plamerican.com.

PHOTO BY MERYN FLUKER

Dancers Dario Mejia and Caitlin Fitzpatrick stand outside Premiere Dance Academy in Prior Lake. Caitlin took over at Premiere for Dario, her fiancé, while he was competing as part of Team iLuminate this summer on the NBC show “America’s Got Talent.”

ibling rivalries have plagued some of pop culture’s greatest artists, including acts from The Kinks, the Beach Boys and Oasis. But for brother and sister dancers Dario and Giselle Mejia, their bond has propelled them to the heights of reality TV. “It’s been the case all our lives,” says Giselle. “We’re the team within the team.” The siblings most recently danced together as part of Team iLuminate, earning third Giselle place on NBC’s Mejia summer hit series “America’s Got Talent.” The reality competition’s mission is to seek out the country’s best undiscovered performers and reward the most gifted with $1 million, as well as providing a national platform for them to showcase their skills. Though Giselle hasn’t seen many of the TV performances, she’s noticed an impact from appearing on the show. “My friends, they’re extremely proud of me,” she says. “People in the dance community in Minnesota are recognizing me and my brother more and our efforts. That’s pretty cool.” The Mejias grew up in Rogers, Minn. Dario found dance the way many younger siblings discover their passions: by imitating their big brothers and sisters. “I saw my older sister dancing in a community education program and I immediately said I wanted to do that,” he says.

Dancers to page 17 ®

FACES IN THE CROWD | A WEEKLY PROFILE OF PEOPLE IN THE COMMUNITY

Ski champ still going strong on the water BY LORI CARLSON editor@plamerican.com

“I don’t want to just sit around in a rocking chair, I can tell you that,” says Roger Wahl, a 77-year-old water skier who just won his third straight national championship. For most of the year – whether it’s on Upper Prior Lake or in Fort Myers, Fla., where he also has a home – Wahl is on the water, practicing his moves. “If you’re really going to be competitive at the national level, you can’t just ski a couple of months a year – especially as you get older,” he says. Wahl stays in shape between daily water skiing sessions by working out every day at Dakotah! Sport and Fitness, where he takes part in spinning classes and hits the weights. In August, Wahl achieved a three-peat in the Water Ski National Championships in Wilmington, Ill., winning the overall championship in his age group for the third consecutive year. He placed first in the trick skiing competition and first in the overall competition. In 2002, he was inducted into the Minnesota Water Skiing Hall of Fame. Having lived on Prior Lake for the last 50 years, combined with his Florida trips, Wahl has had plenty of time to practice. In 1967, he and his wife, JoAnne, tore down the lake cabin they owned and built a house. Even now, he spends every day out on the water and uses a submersible slalom course just around the corner from his home. While in the Army in 1954, Wahl learned how to water ski for $2 while stationed in Detroit. In 1965, he married JoAnne, a schoolmate Roosevelt High School in Minneapolis. JoAnne has her own set of athletic achievements. She was a professional figure skater and performed with the Ice Follies and Holiday on Ice in the late 1950s and early 1960s. For 30 years, Wahl starred in shows put on by the Prior Lake Water Ski Association (now known as the Shockwaves Shakopee-Prior

Lake Water Ski Team). He passed along his skiing skills to all three of the couple’s children. One daughter is captain of the water skiing team at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Another daughter, a flight attendant, also is an expert skier, and his son twice has won national water skiing trick championships. Even his 12-year-old grandson, Max Bulver, has gotten the bug and is already winning state competitions. The couple has three other grandchildren. Wahl also is known for the many years he coached hockey at Prior Lake High School and for his volunteerism with the Prior Lake-Spring Lake Watershed District Board, on which he served for 10 years. After earning a business administration degree from the University of Minnesota in 1960, Wahl worked for 30 years as director of procurement for a Minneapolisbased jet engine-testing company. The job took him all over the world (he estimates he’s been to Europe about 28 times). Now in retirement, Wahl shows no signs of slowing down – and his skiing expertise doesn’t stop when he emerges from the water. A former snow ski racer, he also teaches snow skiing at Buck Hill.

Q AND A WITH ROGER WAHL What are some of your other hobbies? I like to go hunting – grouse in Canada, deer in Thief River Falls and pheasant in South Dakota. If you could meet someone famous or from history, who would it be? Ronald Reagan. What was your best vacation? Probably when we went to Europe about 20 years ago. We drove a car through Belgium, France, Germany and Switzerland. What would be your ideal vacation? There are a few places I haven’t been, like Hawaii and Alaska. I could also take an around-the-world trip, maybe.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Roger Wahl, 77, is still winning national water skiing championships. Here, Wahl compares a 1950s-style slalom water ski (at left) and a modern slalom ski (right).

Do you know someone who would make a good Faces in the Crowd candidate? Call the editor at (952) 345-6378 or e-mail editor@plamerican.com.


Page 16 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

americanslice COMMUNITY HELP AND SUPPORT (Editor’s note: Listings of organizational meetings and events are free but are not guaranteed in the Prior Lake American. Send information that includes the organization’s name and meeting times/locations and a contact’s name and telephone number. Deadline is Wednesday at noon. E-mail information to editor@plamerican.com, mail to Prior Lake American, P.O. Box 578, Prior Lake, MN 55372, or fax to (952) 447-6671.)

WEEKLY

Young Life Scott County Young Life is part of a worldwide, nondenominational Christian organization for high school students that offers fun, adventure, friendship and a sense of significance. The club meets from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. Mondays at the Young Life Office, 13845 Highway 13, Savage. For more information, call Ben Dodds at (952) 402-9123 or visit www.scottcountymn. younglife.org.

Co-Dependents Anonymous Co-Dependents Anonymous group support meets at 16150 Arcadia Ave., Prior Lake. Men’s C o - D ep endent s Anonymous meets at 6:30 p.m. every Monday. Co -Dependents Anonymous (for men and women) meets at 8 p.m. every Tuesday.

Overeaters Anonymous The group Overeaters Anonymous meets from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesdays at Christ Lutheran Church, 1053 Jef ferson St., Shakopee. There are no dues, fees or weigh-ins. Everyone is welcome. The group has a step format with a monthly open topic. For more information, call Nancy at (612) 250-0075 or Steve at (612) 845-2672.

Emotions Anonymous A 12-step program called Emotions Anonymous meets 7 p.m. Thursdays at St. Anne’s parish center, 411 N. Fourth St., LeSueur, in the south end of St. Anne’s parking lot. For more information, call Kathleen at (507) 665-2644.

Gamblers Anonymous Gamblers Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who

share their experience, strength and hope with each other. The g roups meet weekly on Saturdays at 6:30 p.m. at Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church, 3611 North Berens Road, Prior Lake. For more information, call Charlie at (952) 884-9417 or Michael at (952) 607-8619.

Moms in Touch International Moms in Touch International (MITI) is a prayer group that meets weekly to pray for children and schools. Moms pray one hour each week for their children, their individual schools, administration, PTA/PTC groups, staff, students and every aspect of the school. For information on your child’s individual school, visit momsintouch.org and click on “group locator.”

T.O.P.S. T.O.P.S., Take off Pounds Sensibly, meets at 5:30 p.m. each Wednesday in the community room at Prior Lake State Bank, 16677 Duluth Ave. For more information, call June at (952) 454-6579 or Mikki at (952) 457-1306.

PowerNet business Savage PowerNet, a business referral group, meets every Thursday from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Davanni’s, at County Road 42 and Highway 13 in Savage. For more information, call Kelly at (612) 861-8300.

MONTHLY/ SEMIMONTHLY

MOMS Club MOMS Club of Prior Lake (Moms Offering Moms Support) will have its monthly membership meeting the third Wednesday of the month at 10 a.m. at Harbor Community Church, 5995 Timber Trail, Prior Lake. To join the group or find out more information, contact Mandy Reinert Nash at (952) 226-2410 or Sharlene Czajkowski at (952) 447-1780, e-mail momsclubofpriorlake@yahoo.com or visit www.momsclub.org.

WyldLife Scott County WyldLife is part of a worldwide, nondenominational Christian organization for middle school students. The club meets every other Friday and offers a high-energy, interactive evening fi lled with games, fun and music. For more information on the schedule and location, call Jennifer Schroeder at (952) 402-9123 or visit the website at www.scott countymn.wyldlife.org.

Savage Unity AA A handicapped-accessible Alcoholics Anonymous meeting open to men and women takes place Mondays at 6:30 p.m. at Bridgewood Church, 6201 W. 135th St., Savage. For more information, call (952) 297-4777.

Winner’s Circle The Winner’s Circle Chapter of Business Network International meets from 7:30 to 9 a.m. Thursdays at 1101 Adams St., Shakopee. F o r m o r e i n fo r m at io n , call Darren Kurilko at (952) 947-0323.

Beyond the Yellow Ribbon Gamblers Anonymous Beyond the Yellow Ribbon South of the River, an organization that supports military personnel and their families, meets the first Tuesday of every month in the lower level of the Prior Lake VFW, 16306 Main Ave. The group can be reached by calling (952) 440-5011, or emailing btyrsouthoftheriver@ gmail.com.

American Legion The Prior Lake American Legion meets the third Monday of each month at 8 p.m. at the Prior Lake VFW, 16306 Main Ave., Prior Lake. For more information, call Bob Roe at (952) 447-5811.

Gamblers Anonymous, a support group for those struggling with addiction to gambling, meets at 7 p.m. Tuesdays at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 5634 Luther Road, Prior Lake.

Alanon Alanon meetings with the “Island of Serenity” group will take place at 7 p.m. Mondays at 16150 Arcadia Ave., Prior Lake. Other meetings take place at Lakers Alanon, 4646 Colorado St. on the following days: Thursdays: AA meets at 6:30 and 8 p.m. Fridays: AA meets at 6:30 and 8 p.m. Saturdays: On the first Saturday of each month, the meeting is open to all recovery groups, with the potluck at 6:30 p.m. and the call-up format

meeting at 8 p.m. On the third Saturday of each month, there will be a 6:30 p.m. potluck followed by the 8 p.m. speaker meeting. Sundays: AA meets at 10:30 a.m., the AA Big Book Study meets at 6 : 30 p.m., and A A meets at 8 p.m. All people in recovery are welcome to attend.

Domestic violence Southern Valley Alliance for Battered Women offers ongoing weeknight and weekday support groups for women who are currently experiencing or have experienced domestic violence. On-site childcare is provided. For location and more information, call (952) 873-4214.

National Alliance for Mental Illness The Scott County chapter of the National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI) will meet from 6:30 to 8 p.m. the fi rst and third Wednesdays of the month at the Valley Green Workforce Center, 752 Canterbury Road, Shakopee. The meetings are open to all who are interested (including those living with the illness). For more information, call Janet Williams at (952) 890-1669 or Kevin Wineman at (952) 496-8513, or visit www.nami. org/namimn.

Marine Corps League The Marine Corps League meets the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Dan Patch American Legion, 12375 Princeton Ave., Savage. F o r m o r e i n fo r m at io n , call Pete Williams at (612) 730-0999.

Suicide grief support A suicide grief support group meets from 7 to 8:30 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month at Queen of Peace Hospital, 301 Second St., New Prague. The meeting location is the Jameen Mape Room. Enter through the emergency room doors; use the southeast elevators to the lower level. For more information, call Sally at (952) 758-4735.

Mothers of Multiples Minnesota Valley Mothers of Multiples will meet at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Apple Valley Community Center, 14601 Hayes Road, Apple Valley. For more information, email info@mvmom.org.

HOMESITES AVAILABLE FOREST PARK HEIGHTS: Burnsville. Premier wooded neighborhood. .7–2.5 acre lots that back up to Murphy Hanrehan Park. Open to all builders. Priced from $109,900. Only 16 lots remain.

If you’re happy and you know it,

CUSTOM HOMES AVAILABLE: 4 bedroom, 3 baths, 3 car garage, open two story plan starting at $250k.

Shop Local

Acreage Lots Available: 2.5–10 acres. Lakeville Schools. Plenty of room to fit your lifestyle. Others available from $50,000.

— Thank You —

JB Woodfitter & Associates, LLC 952-447-0850 www.jbwoodfitter.com 210736

174109

Lic. #20032109

The Minnesota River Valley Toastmasters will meet on the second, third and fourth Mondays of each month from 7 to 8 p.m. The group now meets at the Prior Lake fi re station, 16776 Fish Point Road. All visitors are welcome. For more information, call Shirley at (952) 447-4621 or visit www. mnrv.freetoasthost.org.

Widows and widowers Widows’ and Widowers’ Circle of Friends is a social group for those who have lost a spouse. The group meets at 5 p.m. the second Saturday of the month. For more information, call Ethel at (952) 888-1035.

St. Francis support The following support groups meet regularly at St. Francis Regional Medical Center, 1455 St. Francis Ave., Shakopee: Infant Loss Support: Group meets the first Tuesday of every month from 7 to 8 p.m. Call (952) 428-2002 Diabetes Support: Group meets the fi rst Monday of each month from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Call (952) 428-3324. Diabetes Prevention: Offered monthly. Designed for anyone who has been diagnosed with pre-diabetes or those with a family history of diabetes. Call (952) 428-3324. Hea r t Suppor t : Group meets the first Tuesday of every month from 7 to 8 p.m. Call (952) 428-2080. Low Vision Support: Group meets the second Thursday of every month from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Call (952) 428-2002. Women’s Connection, support for women with cancer: Meets the fourth Monday of each month from 7 to 8 p.m. Call (952) 428-2700. American Cancer Society’s Look Good … Feel Better meets the fourth Monday of each month from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Call 1-800-ACS-2345.

Sexual assault/abuse Survivors of Sexual Assault/ Abuse is a confidential, 10-week support group for survivors of sexual assault or abuse that meets from 6 to 8 p.m. on varying days in the Sexual Violence Center, 510 Chestnut St., Suite 204, Chaska. For more information, call Kristi at (952) 448-5425.

Support for parents TABLE, a small group at Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church created to offer support and information for parents, meets the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month from 7:15 to 8:45 p.m. Parents whose children have special behavioral, learning or emotional challenges are welcome. There is no cost to attend. The church is at 3611 North Berens Road, Prior Lake. For more information, call Mary Wangerin at (952) 447-1884 or visit www.sollc.org.

MOPS classes Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS), a national Christian nondemoninational program, wi l l star t meeting twice a month from September through May at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in Burnsville. MOPS moms need not be members of the church to join. The group offers participants a way to connect with other moms, form friendships, seek parenting advice and learn more about Christian life. Registration is being accepted and on-site day care is provided for a small fee on a fi rst-come, fi rst-served basis. Information/registration: (952) 898-9356 or e-mail MOPS@ princeofpeaceonline.org.

Take Your Hometown Newspaper to College

1. Leave immediately on foot! Do not use electric switches, telephones (including cell phones), start a car nearby or do anything else that could cause a spark.

$

2. Go to a safe location in a nearby home or building and call our Emergency Service/Gas Leak Hotline and dial 911 immediately. Never assume that someone else has reported the gas leak. Remember, CenterPoint Energy checks suspected gas leaks at no cost to you.

for 9 months

33

Call 952-345-6682 or: E-mail: circulation@swpub.com or: mail this form to the Prior Lake American Attn: Ruby, P.O. Box 8, Shakopee, MN 55379

3. Never try to repair a gas leak yourself. Leave all repairs to a trained technician. CenterPoint Energy 24-hour Emergency Service/Gas Leak Hotline: Twin Cities metro area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 612-372-5050 Toll free . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-800-296-9815

Name _____________________ Phone _____________ Mailing Address________________________________ ______________________ Rm. or Apt. # ___________

PRIOR LAKE SAFETY OPEN HOUSE Saturday, Oct. 8 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

City __________________ State ______ Zip __________

Prior Lake Fire Department 16776 Fish Point Rd.

PRIOR LAKE

201983

©2011 CenterPoint Energy 112560

La Leche League offers support and encouragement to mothers who wish to breastfeed their babies. Join the group for a meeting on the second Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m., and bring your nursing baby. Pregnant women are encouraged to attend before the birth of their babies. For more information on the meeting or breastfeeding questions, call April at (952) 440-6320, Michele at (952) 447-6182 or Traci at (952) 226-2052.

Only

If you smell natural gas, you should:

201434

River Valley Toastmasters

La Leche League

A Great Gift Idea!

IF YOU SMELL NATURAL GAS, LEAVE IMMEDIATELY

We are OPEN during road construction with access from Co. Rd. 42

A support group for anyone affected by Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome/Complex Regional Pain Syndrome meets from 10 a.m. to noon the fourth Saturday of each month at the Savage Public Library, 13090 Alabama Ave., Savage. T he g roup encou rages a positive, caring group and has a variety of topics. The group is facilitated by Bonnie Scherer, but all members decide on all aspects of the meetings. For more information, call (952) 457-7586.

Joint Care group meets every other Wednesday from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Designed for people scheduled for total knee or hip replacement. Call (952) 428-2565. Smoking Cessation: If you are ready to stop smoking, call 888-354-PLAN (7526).

News from home is nice and the hometown newspaper is a great way to stay in touch.

CALL TODAY!

for a list of businesses, visit www.priorlakechamber.com

Support for RSD/CRPS

AMERICAN 213765


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 17

americanslice DANCERS  continued from page 15

Dario’s talent eventually led him to the prestigious Juilliard School for performing arts. While in New York, he met fellow dancer Miral Kotb. The two danced and choreographed together, and she would eventually play a crucial role in their success. One day in 2008, Kotb called Dario with an idea: combining light and dance. Together they created the light suits that would become Team iLuminate’s signature. It was a huge undertaking, involving choreography, programming and sewing – not to mention the actual performing. But when all the kinks were worked out, Dario saw the value in the synchronicity. “It really makes you feel like you’re controlling the elements around you,” he says. “We’re trying to add another element with dance … trying to optimize the ability for the body to entertain by making the body the tool.” Through auditions, Team iLuminate eventually grew to include 11 dancers, including a seamstress and a software programmer. Kotb allowed the Mejias to have suits at discounted rates in order to wear them and perform as a duo, with Dario’s fiancée Caitlin Fitzpatrick controlling the lights. “It was nerve wracking,” she says. “I was sweating and shaking. It was like I was performing.” Fitzpatrick still had fun being the light master and said her own dance experience helped significantly. Dario and Giselle performed at Epic, a nightclub in Minneapolis, on New Year’s Eve. They also danced at the Drop the Mic event at the Guthrie Theater earlier this year. It was there that scouts from “America’s Got Talent” first saw the duo in action and encouraged them to audition. “I thought, ‘Oh no,’ now there’s a lot more work to do,’” Dario says. “I knew that

Giselle and I would not be enough.” They recruited the best dancers they knew for the act and eventually Team iLuminate sailed through its auditions and wound up making it onto the show this summer. That meant pulling Giselle and Dario away from Premiere Dance Academy, where they both taught dance. That also meant that Giselle would have to leave her 2-yearold son, Theodore, and Dario would have to leave his fiancée Fitzpatrick. Despite the separation, Dario and Giselle both knew they had a great opportunity and could go far with the team. “Not to be arrogant, but I kind of knew that what we had was really special and America needed to see it,” Giselle says. “I thought with the right people in the suits, we could go really far.” “I knew that from the beginning,” says Dario, echoing his sister. “I thought, ‘The whole world needs to see this.’” Long nights practicing in Los Angeles meant little time for contact with the outside world. “It’s hard,” Fitzpatrick says. “He’s gone.” The couple exchanged handwritten letters, daily calls and text messages to stay in touch. Giselle’s family members sent daily texts with pictures of Theodore and “a little blurb” about his day for the three weeks they were apart. “Because he’s so young it’s hard to be away,” she says. In the meantime, Fitzpatrick took over much of Dario’s and Giselle’s teaching loads at Premiere. When the winner was announced last week, Team iLuminate fell to the soulful crooning of Landau Eugene Murphy, Jr., who won the contest and that $1 million prize. Cheering them on through all of it were the dancers at Premiere. The academy’s staff, students and families launched campaigns to encourage viewers to vote

JOIN THE CHAT ARE YOU A FORMER STUDENT OF DARIO OR GISELLE MEJIA? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCES AT

www.plamerican.com

“I never thought that being in the arts would have such a large impact on the American public. We’re usually the halftime show but this time we got to be the main event.” Dario Mejia

PHOTO BY MERYN FLUKER

Dario Mejia and Caitlin Fitzpatrick receive warm welcomes from their students at Premiere Dance Academy. Mejia returned to the Prior Lake dance studio on Monday after a long absence to compete on “America’s Got Talent.” for Team iLuminate and hosted a huge finale viewing event at Buffalo Wild Wings in Savage. The dancers brought homemade signs and wore glowing accessories all in solidarity with Dario and Giselle. “I think that is amazing,” Giselle said of the turnout. “They’re an amazing dance

studio and they’re incredibly supportive ... They really engage in their teachers’ lives.” While the siblings were disappointed at the outcome, they still took away a lot from the experience. “It was a very cool experience at the end of our performance when the lights

were turned on and the crowd gave us so much energy,” Giselle says. “It makes you want to cry every time out of joy ... It was a very unique experience.” “I never thought that being in the arts would have such a large impact on the American public,” Dario says. “We’re usually the halftime show but

this time we got to be the main event … We were trending worldwide and I don’t think that’ll ever happen to me again.” Now that the siblings are back home – Dario in Mahtomedi and Giselle in St. Paul – they are both still focused on continuing to dance. They just need to take a break first. They will continue to dance with Team iLuminate and tour at some point in the future while still being active in the Minnesota dance community, Giselle says. They’re sorting out those details right now, but the company will perform a three-night stand in Las Vegas in the end of October. “We want to keep advancing the technology, making better suits and hopefully developing a show that could be seen in Vegas,” she adds. “That’s what the ultimate goal is.” As for Dario and Fitzpatrick, they’re planning a May 26, 2012 wedding in Illinois with a reception in Minnesota to follow on June 2. Dario sums up his experience on “America’s Got Talent” with six words: “It turned my world upside down.”

CAP AGENCY VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES The CAP Agency, a private, nonprofit organization providing human services to families and individuals in Scott, Carver and Dakota counties, has the following volunteer opportunities available. For more information about volunteering with the CAP Agency, or information about group volunteering, call Linda Shelton at (952) 402-9856 or visit www.capagency.org. Volunteers must be at least 16 years old or supervised by an adult.

Crisis Nursery Shakopee

Fare for All Express

Licensed child care and foster care providers can provide short-term care for children whose families are working through a crisis. Experienced social workers/crisis response workers can help to answer calls from families. Training and supervision is provided. Flexible weekdays, evenings and weekends. Call Jen at (952) 960-9711.

Assist this popular discount grocery program at St. Mark’s Church in Shakopee. Assist customers in choosing packages and fi lling orders. Call Jody at (952) 402-9831.

CHORE Services

Food shelf driver

Help with indoor and outdoor home maintenance for older adults so they can live independently in their own homes for as long as possible. Seasonal and ongoing opportunities available. Great for community and youth groups. Call Terry at (952) 402-9835.

Pick up donated food items from local grocery stores in Scott County one or two mornings per week. Must be able to lift up to 50 pounds and have a clean driving record. Call Linda at (952) 402-9856.

program. Help with field trips and classroom activities, share a story about your family heritage or teach children about your job or hobby. Flexible mornings and afternoons during the school year. Call Deb at (651) 322-3504.

Senior nutrition

Food support outreach Help individuals complete applications for county-run federal program that helps low-income families get the food they need for sound nutrition and well-balanced meals. Or, attend local events to educate the public about the food support program. Training is provided. Call Terry at (952) 402-9835.

Head Start Share your time and skills with this preschool

Help to provide hot meals to seniors by volunteering as a Meals on Wheels driver or at a congregate dining site. Weekday mornings, flexible commitment. Call Denise at (952) 402-9855.

Thrift shop Accept, sort and display donations in the store. Monday through Saturday; call for available times. Must be at least 16. Call Linda at (952) 402-9856.

PRIOR LAKE CHURCH DIRECTORY Online Church Directory — place your newspaper worship ad on our online worship directory www.plamerican.com. For more information call 952-447-6669

Prior Lake Baptist Church Loving God, Exalting Christ, Revering God’s Word, Building Christ’s Church - together

Pastor Ron Groschel 952-447-2824 SUNDAY SERVICES

Morning Worship 9:00 a.m. Sunday School/ Adult Bible Fellowship 10:40 a.m. Evening Service 6:00 p.m. WEDNESDAY SERVICES

Bible Study Awana Club (Oct. - Apr.)

7:00 p.m. 6:45 p.m.

Home of Prior Lake Christian School (Preschool - 12th grade) visit us at: www.priorlakebaptist.org

Join us for Worship Sunday at 8:45 & 10:45 a.m.

Growing in Faith, Living to Serve

952.230.2988

www.sollc.org

One block West of Cty. Rd. 21 on Cty. Rd. 42

1026 E 205th St, Jordan (952) 492-2249 www.lydiazionchurch.com

Join us for Family Worship Sunday Worship .................................... 9:00AM Sunday School ..................................... 10:15AM Youth Group Meets Sunday 5:00PM - 7:00pm

13TH ANNUAL TURKEY SUPPER Saturday, Oct. 8th 4:30 to 7pm L.O.R.D. Love Others Rejoice Daily Pastor Larry G. Kasten 952.217.1113 lzumc.pastor@frontiernet.net

The People of the United Methodist Church Welcome You

All-day Preschool & Childcare Year Round Openings Available 33 months & up

HOLY TRINITY UNITED METHODIST

5995 Timber Trail SE Prior Lake

952-447-6191 harborcc.net

www.htumc.org 16150 Arcadia Ave SE 952-447-2990 (2 blocks W. of Hwy. 13 on Dakota)

Pastor Rance Settle 14085 Pike Lake Trail Prior Lake, MN 55372 (952) 445-1779 Sunday Worship 9:00 AM Sunday School & Adult Bible Class 10:20 AM

Weekend Mass Times: Saturday 5:00 p.m. Sunday 8:30 & 10:30 a.m.

16311 Duluth Avenue SE Prior Lake, MN 55372 952-447-2491 www.stmichael-pl.org

Nursery available during 8:30 & 10:30 a.m. Mass St. Michael Catholic School Grades PreK-8 952-447-2124

160130

103753

St. Michael Catholic Church

www.holycross-pl.org

Casual Family Worship Sundays at 10:30

Childcare available during service

Sunday Worship 8:30 and 10:30 a.m Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sept.-May

Holy Cross Lutheran Church LCMS

County Rd. 42 & Pike Lake Trail

Join us as we navigate life together!

Faith Evangelical Lutheran Church Worship Service | 9:00 a.m. Bi-Lingual Preschool Coming for 2011-12 School Year ✝ Bi-lingual English and Spanish ✝ Christ centered program ✝ Fun environment

16840 Highway 13 S, Prior Lake, MN

952-447-6955 faithlutheranpriorlake@yahoo.com


Page 18 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

let'sgo! Have

Discover Minnesota music, art, theater & family fun at www.letsgo.mn

Mercy!

Kids go hog wild over CTC’s ‘Mercy Watson to the Rescue’ BY BARBARA TIEBEN btieben@swpub.com

A

s a grandmother of home-schooled children, I love to dive into their world of children’s literature. The past several years we’ve immersed ourselves in the world of read-aloud, and now, as my grandsons get older, they are becoming young readers. And what a perfect fit for the new reader is Kate DiCamillo’s Mercy Watson series. The title character, “porcine wonder” Mercy Watson, is wellloved by Mr. and Mrs. Watson, who’ve welcomed this sweet piggy into their home and hearts. They spoil her with treats, most especially toast “with a great deal of butter.” But Mercy is far from a passive pig. She has adventures! Granted, her adventures are usually the result of her constant search for toast and butter cookies, but somehow, over and over, Mercy finds herself the accidental hero. So it was a treat to take my grandsons, ages 4 and 6, to see their friend Mercy on the stage at Children’s Theatre. They were anxious to see their hero save the day. And they were not disappointed. As delightful as the drawings in DiCamillo’s books, the set was cartoony and colorful, the perfect backdrop for the antics the characters. Silliness and suspense reigned as Mercy, played by Sara Richardson, saved Mr. and Mrs. Watson when their second-floor bedroom collapsed into the kitchen. The audience rocked with laughter as the Watson’s cranky neighbor Eugenia Lincoln, played by veteran Twin Cities actress Wendy Lehr, chased Mercy around the yard. There was even a little Minnesota State Fair humor. Can you guess what was carved in the butter head? Mr. and Mrs. Watson, played by Mo Perry and Gerald Drake, were delightfully supportive of their

‘Mercy Watson to the Rescue’ Based on the bestselling books by Kate DiCamillo. Mr. and Mrs. Watson think that 54 Deckawoo Drive will be the perfect home for their family, especially their beloved Mercy. But when Eugenia Lincoln gets wind that her new neighbor is a P-I-G, Eugenia stirs up trouble of the most hilarious sort. Time: Evening and matinee showtimes through Oct. 23 Cost: Adults $33.50-$43.50; children/teens/students/seniors $23.50-$33.50 Location: Children’s Theatre Company, 2400 Third Ave. S., Minneapolis Info: childrenstheatre.org or (612) 874-0400

“Mr. and Mrs. Watson … were delightfully supportive of their piglet and full of angst when they had to discipline her for eating the neighbor’s petunias.” piglet and full of angst when they had to discipline her for eating the neighbor’s petunias. Reed Sigmund was the height of silliness as Francine Poulet, the animal control officer. And in a fun Children’s Theatre twist, my grandsons and I were more than happy to join the audience in rescuing Mercy from Francine. The boys were delighted from the minute we saw the “toasty” stage until the closing moments when, as 4-year-old Lucas said, “Toast fell from the sky!” And of course, we all went home for a bedtime treat of toast “with a great deal of butter.”

PHOTOS BY DAN NORMAN

Above – Jason Ballweber and Sara Richardson in “Mercy Watson to the Rescue!” The show will be performed at the Children’s Theatre Company through Oct. 23. At left – Reed Sigmund, Sara Richardson, Mo Perry and Gerald Drake perform in “Mercy Watson to the Rescue.”

More family-friendly theater options

adolescent overachievers vying for the spelling championship of a lifetime. The show’s Tony Award-winning creative team has crafted the unlikeliest of hit musicals about the unlikeliest of heroes: a quirky yet charming cast of outsiders for whom a spelling bee is the one place on earth where they can both stand out and fit in. Presented by Theater Latté Da. Time: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 6-8, 12-15, 19-22, 26-29; 2 p.m. Oct. 9, 16, 23, 30 Cost: $29-$35 Location: Ordway Center for the Performing Arts, 345 Washington St., St. Paul Info: ordway.org or (651) 224-4222

‘POCAHONTAS’ Commissioned for the 400th anniversary of Jamestown, Virginia, this musical drama recounts the life of Pocahontas, the Algonquian princess. The opera is a work of imagination that celebrates her life, debunking the popular myths and half-truths that surround her name. The 90-minute music-theater piece was composed by Burnsville resident Linda Tutas Haugen and will be performed by the Duluth Festival Opera. The cast also includes Native American musicians and dancers. The production will be in English. Time: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 Cost: Orchestra seating – Adults $27; students and seniors $24; balcony seating – adults $20; students and seniors $17 Location: Burnsville Performing Arts Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville Info: (952) 895-4680 or ticketmaster. com

‘PLAID TIDINGS’

‘OLIVER TWIST’ A young orphan in London escapes the workhouse only to fall in with a band of pickpockets. This theatrical adventure is told by a chameleon cast of 13, who combine Dickens’ original text with Victorian music hall tunes Time: Evening and matinee showtimes Oct. 2-Nov. 6 Cost: $20-$60 Location: Park Square Theater, Historic Hamm Building, 20 W. 7th Place, St. Paul Info: parksquaretheater.org or (651) 291-7005

‘FAIRY TALE ADVENTURES’ “Fairy Tale Adventures” is a collection of fairy tale stories including “Hansel and Gretel” and “Cinderella and the Seven Dwarfs: A Fairy Tale Mash-Up.”

PHOTO BY PETRONELLA YTSMA

“Oliver Twist” is showing Oct. 2 through Nov. 6 at Park Square Theater in St. Paul. Pictured are Steve Hendrickson as Fagin and Noah Coon as Oliver.

“Plaid Tidings,” the holiday edition of “Forever Plaid,” is a holiday musical suitable for the entire family. The Plaid Boys (Sparky, Smudge, Frankie and Jinx) have returned to Earth and are overtaken with the Christmas spirit. The audience will enjoy their version of “The Ed Sullivan Show” featuring the Rockettes, the Chipmunks and The Vienna Boys Choir. Time: Evening and matinee showtimes Nov. 4-Dec. 31 Cost: $47-$52 Location: Chanhassen Dinner Theatres, 501 W. 78th St., Chanhassen Info: chanhassentheatres.com or (952) 934-1525

‘THE WIZARD OF OZ’ The production will be co-directed by Justin Dekker and Kay Dunning. Time: 7 p.m. Oct. 7-8, 14-15; 2 p.m. Oct. 9 Cost: Adults $12; seniors 65+ and students $10; children 12 and younger $8; tickets will be available at the door Location: Twin Oaks Middle School, 15860 Fish Point Road S.E., Prior Lake Info: plplayers.org

‘BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA’ Jesse doesn’t fit in. He likes to draw and use his imagination, unlike his family and schoolmates. Enter Leslie, a new girl and potential rival. They become friends and together they create Terabithia, a

magical kingdom where they exercise their imaginations free from the pressure of family and peers. When the unexpected occurs, Jesse must use his newfound strength and confidence to move forward in his life. Based on the Newbery award-winning novel. Time: Evening and matinee showtimes Oct. 14-Nov. 6 Cost: Adults $15; children 2-7 and seniors 60 and older $12 Location: Stages Theatre Company, 1111Mainstreet, Hopkins Info: (952) 979-1111 or stagestheatre.org

‘MISS NELSON IS MISSING’ “Where is Miss Nelson?” ask the students of

Room 207. Their new teacher is Miss Viola Swamp and the kids can see she is a real witch. Will Miss Nelson ever return? Time: Evening and matinee showtimes through Oct. 23 Cost: Adults $15; children 2-7 and seniors 60 and older $12 Location: Stages Theatre Company, 1111Mainstreet, Hopkins Info: (952) 979-1111 or stagestheatre.org

‘THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE’ “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” is a hilarious interactive musical comedy that chronicles the experience of six

Lions and tigers and bears, oh my! Just in time for the holidays, the Children’s Theatre brings back one of its single-most-requested productions. True to the 1939 MGM film, the newest production of “The Wizard of Oz” is a wonderland of munchkins and flying monkeys, wicked witches and ruby slippers, a trio of true friends and Toto, too. Time: Evening and matinee showtimes Nov. 8-Jan. 8 Cost: Adults $33.50-$57.50; children $23.50-$31.50; seniors $23.50-$57.50 Location: Children’s Theatre Company, 2400 Third Ave. S., Minneapolis Info: childrenstheatre.org or (612) 874-0400


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 19

let'sGo!Calendar collection of two short plays: “Hansel and Gretel” and “Cinderella and the Seven Dwarfs: A Fairy Tale Mash-Up.” Time: 7 p.m. Oct. 7-8 and Oct. 14-15; 2 p.m. Oct. 9 Cost: $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and students, $8 for ages 12 and under Location: Twin Oaks Middle School, 15860 Fish Point Road, Prior Lake Info: plplayers.org

WE WANT YOUR LISTINGS! Listings are printed free but not guaranteed, although we do our best to include them. Submit your events through our www.LetsGo.mn website, where you can find many more local and regional fun things to do. You can also send an e-mail to editor@plamerican. com. Deadline is noon on the Tuesday prior to publication. For information call (952) 345-6378.

Upcoming FIRE DEPARTMENT OPEN HOUSE

OCT. 1 SCOTT COUNTY ART CRAWL The annual event brings visitors to artists’ studios throughout Prior Lake, Savage and greater Scott County. Maps and more are available at the art crawl’s website. Time: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 Location: Artist studios throughout Scott County Info: scottcountyartcrawl.org or e-mail SavageArtsCouncil@gmail.com

UNITED FOR AUTISM FALL FESTIVAL Food, hayrides, a bounce house, games, face painting and more are part of this second annual fundraiser for families in the autism community. Time: Noon-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 Cost: Games and food for purchase Location: Prior Lake High School, 7575 150th St., Savage

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS WALK The second annual event will benefit Southern Valley Alliance for Battered Women, which serves Scott and Carver counties. Time: Noon Saturday, Oct. 1 Cost: Free (donations taken) Location: Lakefront Park, 5000 Kop Parkway, Prior Lake Info: southernvalleyalliance.org

AUTUMN GATHERING The city of Prior Lake hosts the community’s annual autumn gathering, with crafts, horse-drawn wagon rides, kettle corn, cider, hot chocolate, music, pony rides, inflatables and more. Time: 2-4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 Cost: Free Location: Lakefront Park, 5000 Kop Parkway, Prior Lake Info: cityofpriorlake.com

DIXIELAND BAND CONCERT Join the boys in The Barbary Coast Dixieland Band for an evening of music for the whole family. Time: 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 Cost: $10 (ages 13-64); $5 (65 and up); free (ages 12 and under) Location: Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church, 3611 North Berens Road, Prior Lake Info: sollc.org

MINNESOTA RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL The 41st annual Minnesota Renaissance Festival features 16 stages of live entertainment, live armored jousting, food, drink and artisan booths. The theme Oct. 1-2 is Shamrocks and Shenanigans featuring harvest market, Irish vendors, Irish dancers and music, free Guinness beer tasting and kilt competition. Time: Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 1-2 Cost: Adults $20.95; seniors $18.95; children 5-12 $11.95; age 4 and younger free; dogs $10 with registration; free parking Location: Three miles south of Shakopee on Hwy. 169 Info: (952) 445-7361 or renaissancefest.com/MRF

APPLEFEST

CONCERTINA FESTIVAL AND DANCE The Czech Area Concertina Club will sponsor this event. Time: 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16 Cost: $5 for adults; free for 18 and under Location: New Prague Park Ballroom, 300 Lexington Ave. S., New Prague Info: theparkballroom.com

SOUTH OF THE RIVER ROUNDUP The River Valley YMCA hosts this second annual event, with a buffet dinner, a silent auction and music by the Tuxedo Band. Time: 5:30-11:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 28 Cost: $50 per person Location: The Wilds Golf Club, 3151 Wilds Ridge Court, Prior Lake Info: (952) 230-6665 or renee. matejcek@ymcampls.org

PRAIRIE SEED COLLECTION Help restore more than 800 acres of prairie in Three Rivers Park District by collecting native wildflower seed. Volunteers are needed to gather hundreds of pounds of seeds for future restoration and enhancement projects. Seed collection allows volunteers to learn about the prairie’s storied history and to identify many plant varieties common to the prairie. This program is for ages 8 and older. Register online; reference activity #471401-03 for the morning session and #471401-04 for the afternoon session. Time: 10 a.m.-noon and 12:30-2:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1 Cost: Free Location: Murphy-Hanrehan Park Reserve, 15501 Murphy Lake Rd., Savage Info: Call (763) 559-6700 or register by visiting threeriversparkdistrict.org and clicking on keyword “prairie seed collection”

LEAVES ON THE LAKE FILE PHOTO

The movie poster for “Potpourri,” a film starring three Prior Lake natives and produced by Minneapolis filmmaker Brandon Van Vliet.

‘POTPOURRI’: A ZOMBIE FLICK

T

Vliet’s comedy/zombie fi lm “Potpour-

OCT. 2

ri.” The world premiere is Thursday,

at Cost is $ 5.00. For more a 6:30 p.m. p

Oct. 6 at the Riverview Theater, 3800

information, nformation, visit restrainingholly-

SPAGHETTI DINNER FUNDRAISER

42nd Ave. S., Minneapolis. Doors open

wood.com. d

A dinner, silent auction, raffle and bake sale will be held to benefit Dee Meiere-Anderson, who was recently diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. Time: 12-5 p.m. Sunday Oct. 2 Cost: $10 Location: American Legion, 12375 Princeton Ave., Savage Info: (952) 607-8832

The Halloween Haunt at ValleySCARE is a world of terrifying mazes and scare zones that will bring fears and phobias to life. Guests will experience nine haunted attractions, creepy live entertainment and signature thrill rides. Daytimes Saturdays and Sundays, the all new Planet Spooky is open for all ages to join Snoopy and the PEANUTS gang for non-scary Halloween activities and attractions, including a hay-bale maze, trick or treat trail, storytelling and a variety of family and children’s rides.

Colleen Raye, Debbie O’Keefe and Katie Gearty bring their talents to the stage to perform classic ’60s tunes from the female artists of the era. The show celebrates the vocal prowess of performers like Tammy Wynette, Cass Elliot of the Mamas and the Papas, Marilyn McCoo of the 5th Dimension and such hits as Dionne Warwick’s “Walk on By,” Lesley Gore’s “It’s My Party,” Barbra Streisand’s “People,” and more. Time: 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 2 Cost: $19 Location: Burnsville Performing Arts

hree Prior Lake natives (Mike Borka, Pete Duffy and Brock Dombrovski) star in Minneapolis fi lmmaker Brandon Van

Center, 12600 Nicollet Ave., Burnsville the opportunity to explore ways to feel good and stay in shape. Attendees will Info: (952) 895-4680 or also have the opportunity to see the ticketmaster.com 50+ Strut Your Stuff Talent Contest. Time: 9 a.m.-3 p.m. TuesdayWednesday, Oct. 4-5 Cost: $12 or visit 101expos.com for half-price tickets Location: Mystic Lake Casino Hotel, BOOK CLUB FOR SENIORS 2400 Mystic Lake Blvd., Prior Lake Info: 101expos.com or Join a book club for seniors the first (612) 798-7256 Tuesday of each month. Date: Tuesday, Oct. 4 (“The Tenderness of Wolves” by Stef Penney) Time: 10 a.m. Cost: Free Location: Club Prior, in the Prior Lake Library, 16210 Eagle Creek Ave. FREE SWING DANCE Info: (952) 447-9783 Minnesota’s hottest jazz violinist and 50+ PRIMETIME EXPO “Prairie Home Companion” veteran, The Spring 50+ PrimeTime Living Expo Gary Schulte, leads an ensemble of some of the nation’s top swing provides attendees with a selection musicians. Bill and Shannon Butler of services and products, ideas for are well-known swing dancers and things to do and places to go, and

Tuesday

OCT. 4

Thursday

OCT. 6

PRIOR LAKE VFW

Friday

OCT. 7 ‘FAIRY TALE ADVENTURES!’ The Prior Lake Players’ fall play “Fairy Tale Adventures!” is a family-friendly

Fishers4Christ will host this dinner, featuring pork chops, choice of potato, choice of vegetable, applesauce, pie, ice cream and a beverage. Time: 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30 Cost: $10 adults, $9 seniors, $6 children 12 and under, free for children under 3 Location: Immanuel Fish Lake Lutheran Church, 20200 Fairlawn Ave., Prior Lake Info: (952) 492-6010 or immanuel-fishlake.org

Ongoing PRIOR LAKE FARMERS MARKET The Prior Lake Farmers Market, in downtown Prior Lake, features locally grown, seasonal farm-fresh food. Many of the products are organic, chemicalfree and naturally grown. The market also offers meats, fish, baked goods, handcrafted beverages, gourmet confections, assorted landscaping stock, fine crafts, music and more. Time: 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays Cost: Free to attend; items for purchase Location: Main Avenue, downtown Prior Lake Info: priorlakefarmersmarket.com

New to the area? We’ll help make the move easier.

We make service calls

Lic. #A00295

• packet of helpful information including maps, civic and county resources • hundreds of $$$ in local merchant gift certificates • answers to your new-to-the-area questions

• Full service marine repair for all I/Os and O/Bs

The Prior Lake VFW

THANKS

• 20 plus years experience in the marine industry

$

We appreciated and enjoyed hosting your class reunions and look forward to hosting more in 2012

40 OFF

Boat Winterizing and Storage 210493

Downtown Prior Lake www.vfwpost6208.com 226-6208

The annual craft boutique and bake sale will feature the work of local artisans and crafters. Other highlights include coffee and cider in the morning and lunch at noon, served by the VFW Auxiliary. Prize drawings will take place every hour from 1 to 5 p.m. Funds go to scholarships and to support youth activities. Time: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29 Cost: Items for purchase Location: Prior Lake VFW, 16306 Main Ave. Info: Barb Prindle (952) 447-5984

PORK CHOP DINNER

instructors in the metro. Dancers of all ages and levels of experience are invited to enjoy this swing dance event. The program is part of Scott County Library’s “First Thursdays Danceteria,” free monthly dances with live bands and instructors. It’s co-sponsored by the city of Prior Lake and Club Prior, and funded in part with money from Minnesota’s Arts and Cultural Heritage (Legacy) Fund. Time: 7-9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6 Cost: Free Location: Club Prior, in the Prior Lake Library, 16210 Eagle Creek Ave. Info: (952) 447-3375

South Metro Marine and Motorsports

the Prior Lake High School reunions of 1966, 1971, 1986 and 2006.

www.priorlakeinsurance.com emily@priorlakeinsurance.com

Spotlight

EVENT

Sunday

HALLOWEEN HAUNT AND PLANET SPOOKY

Give us a call – 952-447-8350

DANCE FOR DIABETES Calvin’s Cure Club will host this fundraiser for the American Diabetes Association. Jack Diddley will provide music; other highlights include a silent auction, a taco bar, drinks and chances to win prizes. Time: 3-7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16 Cost: $5 donation (under 18); $10 donation (18 and up) Location: Neisen’s Sports Bar and Grill, 4851 W. 123rd St., Savage Info: tamaralammers@hotmail.com or (612) 877-0051

Hear how the first pioneers established a winter-hardy apple and turned it into a major horticultural crop. Apples will be cooked, dried, canned, jellied and cidered during the day’s activities. Nineteenth century apple recipes will be provided. Observe and visit with artisans demonstrating their skills and see how lives in early Minnesota were sustained by the tools of the trade. Play games and enjoy a ride on a trolley pulled by Percheron draft horses. Gift shop open and food available for purchase. For all ages Time: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 1; noon-5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 2 Cost: Ages 18-64 $5; ages 2-17 and seniors $3; children younger than 2 free Location: The Landing - Minnesota River Heritage Park, 2187 E. Hwy. 101, Shakopee Info: (763) 559-9000 or threeriversparkdistrict.org

GIRLS SINGERS OF THE HIT PARADE: SIRENS OF THE SIXTIES

PRIOR LAKE STATE AGENCY INSURANCE

This event will include tours, fire truck and ambulance displays, a North Air helicopter, fire hose sprays, smokehouse survival demonstrations, extinguishers for sale, treats and more. The open house is part of Fire Prevention Week, Oct. 9-15. Time: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8 Cost: Free Location: Fire Station No. 1, 16776 Fish Point Road, Prior Lake Info: (952) 447-9800 or cityofpriorlake.org

Time: Halloween Haunt is open 7 p.m.-midnight Thursdays and Fridays, noon-midnight Saturdays, noon-7 p.m. Sundays, Oct. 1, 7-8, 14-15, 20-22 and 27-29; Planet Spooky is open noon-7 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays only. Cost: All-day regular admission for ages 3-61 $41.99; starlight admission (after 7 p.m. Thursday and Fridays; after 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sunday, Oct. 30) $31.99; juniors/ seniors 3 years and less than 48” tall and 62 years and older $9.99 Location: Valleyfair, One Valleyfair Drive, Shakopee Info: ValleySCARE.com or (952) 445-6500

over $200

Welcome Neighbor! has helped new residents learn about their new community for over 20 years.

• We also service Snowmobiles, ATVs and Small Engines

EMAIL US TODAY FOR YOUR FREE PACKET.

895 E. 260th Street, New Prague

www.welcomeneighbormn.com welcome@welcomeneighbormn.com

Located in the S.E. corner of Hwy 13 and Co. Rd. 2

952-758-3863 • 612-720-2639

Carol Local Greeter

Call 952-442-9000 or

Call today to schedule an appointment

186275

Saturday

SERVING: CARVER, MCLEOD, SCOTT, WRIGHT & WESTERN HENNEPIN COUNTIES. Business owners interested in building your customer base – call us for more information.


Page 20 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

MOVIN’ AT THE HANGAR business slow?

TIME to

ADVERTISE

call lance, pat or dan today at 447-6669 PRIOR LAKE

AMERICAN

A sincere “Thank You” to our Prior Lake Association members, as well as our local businesses and organizations that have contributed to the Prior Lake Association sponsored events during 2011. Without their support, these events would not be possible. They helped make this a GREAT Prior Lake summer!

2011 FIREWORKS CONTRIBUTORS PLATINUM City of Prior Lake GOLD Integra Telephone JTS Motorsports Norex, Inc. Prior Lake State Bank SILVER Knotty Oar Marina Prior Creative Images Pearson Prior Lake Auto Body Prior Lake Rental Center Prior Lake VFW Viking Liquor Barrel Village Liquor Village Market & Customers BRONZE Dr. Michael Babcock Pamela Bakken Foundation Bolton & Menk Carlson’s Hardware Dan Enger Insurance Agency Dellert Construction Edina Realty Haugen Insurance Julie Muelken Agency Prior Lake Optimist River Valley Vet Clinic The SMARTE Group Todd Spratt Chiropractic Dr. Jesse Veil Viking Auto Salvage CONTRIBUTOR Above All Hardwood Floors Advanced Waterproofing Advanced Sandjacking Dehmlow Auto Flowers Naturally of Prior Lake Healthsource of Prior Lake Little Lakers Montessori Performance Construction Prior Lake Pet Hospital Speiker & Company Voyageur Financial Willow Beach Association

2011 4TH OF JULY BOAT PARADE Knotty Oar Marina • T J Hooligan’s • Viking Liquor Captain Jack’s • Domino’s Pizza • Pizza N Pasta Prior Lake State Bank

2011 LAKE CLEAN UP AND SCUBA DIVE T-Shirts & More • Reinhart Food Service Buckingham Disposal • Captain Jack’s Donna Mankowski – Edina Realty Smears Concept and Design • SeeYa Diving – Shakopee Air Down There Scuba • A Diver’s World – Lakeville

2011 FAMILY FISHING TOURNAMENT Prior Lake Bait & Tackle • Mills Fleet Farm Gander Mountain • Captain Jack’s eXtream Bass

PHOTO BY SHANNON FIECKE

Arms flailed and toes tapped to the tunes of the 19-piece Roseville Big Band on Sept. 24 at Flying Cloud Airport. The Bees Knees Hangar Dance fundraiser benefited the Scott County Historical Society and included a 1920s costume contest and silent and live auctions. Husband-and-wife team Mathew and Sharon Meyer of Shakopee (above) won the Charleston dance competition.

Clinics to offer flu vaccinations Scott County Public Health will provide seasonal flu vaccination clinics at senior sites around the county this flu season. Clinics at senior sites will be for adults only. Seasonal f lu vaccine for adults and children older than 6 months will be available at any of the regularly scheduled immunizations clinics. A public vaccination clinic is offered every Monday from 1 to 5 p.m. Scott County Public Health is located in the Workforce Development Center, 792 Canterbury Road. Enter by the door

at the west end of the parking lot facing Canterbury Road. The cost of a seasonal flu shot at any of the Scott County Public Health clinics is $25. There is no charge for those on Medicare Part B, but participants must bring a Medicare card to the clinic. Children that are uninsured or who have insurance that does not cover vaccines can also receive a seasonal flu vaccination at no charge through the MnVFC program only at the Monday clinics. Adults and families that have vaccine coverage are encouraged to see their local

Free writing classes planned at area libraries Six free writing classes will be offered in October and November at the Prior Lake, Savage and Shakopee libraries. Class sizes are limited; registration is required beginning Sept. 29. To register, call or visit your local library. Classes are: The Writing Life for Teens (grades six-12), Monday, Oct. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Savage Library, 13090 Alabama Ave. Teens will learn how and where to start a narrative and how to best capture life’s defi ning moments. Class time will be divided between discussion and writing exercises. Instructor Kate St. Vincent Vogel is the author of “Lost & Found: A Memoir of Mothers” and

teaches creative writing at the Loft and elsewhere. Beginning Memoir: Findi ng You r Stor y, T hu rsday, Oct. 27, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Shakopee Library, 235 Lewis St. Do you have a memory that shimmers in your mind? Using prompts and free-writing, the class will get them on paper. Instructor Angela Foster, a poet and memoirist, will discuss the basics of memoirs and details that bring them to life. Participants will leave the class with at least three works in progress and ideas for more. Making It Real, Wednesday, Nov. 2, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Prior Lake Library, 16210 Eagle Creek Ave. Analyze techniques used by great writers in developing prose, whether memoir

or fiction, long form or short. Harness these storytelling mechanisms, no matter what your medium. The class contains lecture, discussion and writing exercises. Instructor is Kate St. Vincent Vogl. T he Creative P rocess, Wednesday, Nov. 16, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Savage Library. Getting words on the page is essential, but there’s a lot more to writing. Find out what the six stages in the creative process are and what you need to do to complete these steps. The class includes writing exercises. Rosanne Bane is a creativity coach and teaching artist. Getting Started, Thursday, Nov. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Shakopee Library. Do you have great ideas for stories, articles

or maybe even a book? Learn techniques to get those ideas out of your head and onto the page. The class will practice ways of kick-starting the writing process, and participants will complete an interest inventory and learn habits that will sustain their writing. The class includes writing exercises. Instructor is Rosanne Bane. Why is it So Hard to Write Even When I Want To? Tuesday, Nov. 29, 6:30-8:30 p.m. at the Prior Lake Library. Learn what’s going on in your brain when you want to write, but can’t or don’t. Learn what you can do to move through resistance and into the writing you want to do. The class includes writing exercises. Instructor is Rosanne Bane.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Information provided here is offered as a service through this paper in cooperation with the Scott-Carver Association for Volunteer Involvement. SAVI works to increase the effective use of volunteers to meet community needs throughout the area. Participation is open to individuals and organizations working in the volunteer sector in both counties.

Big Brothers Big Sisters The Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Greater Twin Cities announces its newest program, Big Families, which engages a mentor in a relationship with a young person with a defined supplemental role for the mentor’s family. Contact: (651) 789-2490.

Scott County Historical Society Administrative assistant: Complete administrative tasks such as mailings,

answering phones, greeting visitors and more. Assist visitors in the research library and with public tours, as well as assist with maintenance of museum collections and collections records. Training provided, flexible schedule. Event helper: Assist staff with hands-on activities at Kids Kraft programs, the last Saturday of each month. Training provided. Volunteer one, two or more dates. Contact: Kathy at (952) 445-0378 or info@ scottcountyhistory.org.

training available; call to sign up. Contact: Kathy or Emily at (952) 448-5425.

Sexual Violence Center

Auburn Village

Sexual assault advocate: Looking for the most rewarding volunteer experience of your life? Become a sexual assault advocate and providing these services: 24-hour crisis line, medical, law enforcement or legal advocacy, community and education presentations, one-to-one counseling and support group facilitation. Volunteer

General call for volunteers for activities, Bridge, cards, reading and gardening. Auburn Village includes the communities of Auburn Courts, Auburn Manor, the Courtyard at Auburn and Talheim Apartments. Sunday worship assistants also are needed. Contact: Sarah at (952) 448-9303.

Fall Fall Craft Craft Show Fair ANNUAL MEETING NOTICE Prior Lake Association Annual Meeting Thursday, October 13, 2011

.

Ho Waste Teca (New Good Voice) Parish, is having a Fall Craft Show on October 14th & 15th, in Prior Lake, MN. To reserve a space, please contact Sonya Zapata at 952-403-0723. Table space proceeds will benefit the fund raising efforts of Ho Waste Teca Parish.

St. Gertrude’s Health and Rehab Center Heart to Heart visitor: Make a special friend with a senior resident by visiting with them weekly. Flexible times. Training provided. Contact: Cathy at (952) 233-4484.

Where good food, fun & friends come together...

CRAFTERS WANTED!

Coldest Beer in Town!! Try Our Beer Sampler Six 4oz. Tap Beers for $5.50

HAPPY HOUR

Catch all the Vikings action

Monday – Thursday 3 – 6 PM $2 Domestic Taps, Complimentary Popcorn Bottles & Well Drinks Popcorn & Peanuts Monday – Saturday 3 – 6 PM during games $1 OFF All Cocktails $ Late Night 3.00 20 oz. Tap Beer Sunday–Thursday $ Bucket of Wings 5.95 10:00 PM – Close

FREE

Monday & Thursday Tues., Fri. & Sat.

Friday, October 14 10 AM–6 PM Saturday, October 15 9 AM–4 PM

Prior Lake VFW – Main Street – Lower Level meeting room 6:30 Social 7:00 – 2011 Year-end Review 7:15 – Business Meeting/Board Elections 7:30 – Speakers with updates on lake quality, Zebra mussels and lots more.

Open Mic Night

Karaoke 9:30 pm

Saturday

Sunday

BARGO Texas Hold’em 9pm 2-5pm

Free Admission & Parking • Door Prize Drawing Breakfast and Lunch Available iin nP Prior i Lake L k

Tiowakan Spiritual Center 14625 Prairiegrass Dr., Prior Lake

All interested persons invited. 209578

provider for a yearly seasonal flu shot. Clinic dates are: Oct. 4, 1:30-3 p.m., Philipp Square, 116 First Ave., New Prague Oct. 7, 9:30-11 a.m., Lynn Court, 4350 W. 124th St., Savage Oct. 11, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., McKenna Crossing, 13760 McKenna Road, Prior Lake Oct. 12, 9-11 a.m., Northridge Court, 101 Fuller St., Shakopee Oct. 16, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Shepherd of the Lake Lutheran Church, 3611 North Berens Road, Prior Lake

215003

209282

tjhooligans.com 16731 Hwy 13 S., Prior Lake • 952-447-6668


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 21

CLASSY COURT These 22 Prior Lake High School students were named to the school’s homecoming court at a pepfest on Wednesday morning. Freshmen are Skylar Bantley and Luok Shot; sophomores are Sabrina Hille and Jason Faul. Junior royalty includes Madison Peterson, Kyle Sperle, Rico Taing, Marisa Magnuson, Madi Valek, Jack Johnson, Jamie Willer and Mikey Peterson. Competing for homecoming king and queen are seniors Zach Boegeman, Tay Case, Drew Rectenwal, Hannah Frimanslund, Nola Johnson, Mary Kate Rivisto, Alyssa Eschrich, Sam Kortes, Lindsey Lovik and Chris Sticha. The winners will be revealed at coronation, set for 7 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 2 at the high school, 7575 150th St., Savage. PHOTO BY MERYN FLUKER

Congratulations Week 3 Winners! Dallas G. $75 Gift card to Paradise Belle Plaine, MN Car Wash & Detail Center

Doug W. $50 Gift Card to Arizona’s Chaska, MN

Restaurant & Lounge

Jeff P.

2 Movie Passes

Savage, MN

Enter Today! Weekly Prizes

to Five Star Cinemas

& from

REGISTER FREE AT WWW.PROPICKS.MN Weekly Pro Football Contest

Brought to you by

publicnotices NOTICE OF PUBLIC ASSESSMENT HEARING 2011 PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT PROJECT (BOUDIN’S NEIGHBORHOOD, PHASE I) UTILITY IMPROVEMENTS, AND APPURTENANT WORK IN THE CITY OF PRIOR LAKE, SCOTT COUNTY, MINNESOTA Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Prior Lake, Minnesota will meet in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 4646 Dakota Street SE, on Monday, the 17th of October, 2011 at 7:00 P.M. to consider the assessment of the following street: PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Reconstruction of Grayling Circle NE, Rutgers Street NE, and Watersedge Trail NE, including constructing sanitary sewer, storm sewer, streets and appurtentant work. The area proposed to be assessed consists of every lot, piece or parcel of land benefitted by said improvement, which has been ordered made and is as follows: Grayling Circle, NE, Rutgers Street NE, and Watersedge Trail NE in the City of Prior Lake, Minnesota. The area proposed to be assessed is every lot, piece, and parcel benefitting from said improvements, whether abutting or not, within the following described areas: Portions of the North half of Section 30, Township 115, Range 21 East, Scott County, Minnesota. Specify property descriptions included in the above described area, but not inclusive, are as follows: Property abutting including: Boudin’s Manor Boudin’s Manor 2nd Addition Boudin’s Manor 4th Addition The Harbor S 30, T 115, R 21 part of Gov’t Lot 2 S 30, T 115, R 21 part of Gov’t Lot 3 Part of S 30, T 115, R 21 The estimated total of the assessment roll is $734,834,40. The Council proposes to proceed under the authority granted by Chapter 429 M.S.A. The proposed assessment roll is on file in the City Manager’s office and any written or oral objections will be considered at the public hearing. No appeal may be taken as to the amount of any assessment unless a signed, written objections is filed with the City Manger prior to the hearing or presented to the presiding officer at the hearing. An appeal to district court may be made by serving notice upon the Mayor or City Manger within 30 days after adoptiong of the assessment roll and filing such notice with district court within 10 days after service upon the Mayor or City Manager. The City also has adopted a deferred assessment ordinance whereby the City Council may defer the payment

of special assessments for those individuals who are permanently disabled or have attained the age of 65 or older. Guideline criteria and applications are available at City Hall. Applications must be made within 30 days following the adoption of the assessment roll by the City Council. Dated: September 19, 2011 By Order of the City Council Frank Boyles City Manager (Published in the Prior Lake American on Saturday, September 24 and October 1 and 8, 2011; No. 7583) STATE OF MINNESOTA COUNTY OF SCOTT DISTRICT COURT FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case Type: Other/Civil Court File No.: 70-CV-11-19617 Judge: ________ U.S. Bank, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Lawrence H. Wasz, Mary K. Wasz, First Residential Mortgage Corporation, and Wings Financial fka NWA Federal Credit Union, SUMMONS Defendants. THIS SUMMONS IS DIRECTED TO DEFENDANTS LAWRENCE H. WASZ, MARY K. WASZ, FIRST RESIDENTIAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION, AND WINGS FINANCIAL FKA NWA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION. 1. YOU ARE BEING SUED. The Plaintiff has started a lawsuit against you. The Plaintiff ’s Complaint against you has been filed with the Scott County District Court Administrator and may be attached to this Summons. Do not throw these papers away. They are official papers that affect your rights. You must respond to this lawsuit even though there may be no court file number on this summons. 2. Y O U M U S T R E P LY WITHIN 20 DAYS TO PROTECT YOUR RIGHTS. You must give or mail to the person who signed this summons a written response called an Answer within 20 days of the date on which you received this Summons. You must send a copy of your Answer to the person who signed this summons located at: Patrick B. Steinhoff Mackall, Crounse & Moore, PLC 1400 AT&T Tower 901 Marquette Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55402 3. YOU MUST RESPOND TO EACH CLAIM. The Answer is your written response to the Plaintiff ’s Complaint. In your Answer you must state whether you agree or disagree with each paragraph of the Complaint. If you believe the Plaintiff should not be given everything asked for in the Complaint,

you must say so in your Answer. 4. YOU WILL LOSE YOUR CASE IF YOU DO NOT FILE A WRITTEN RESPONSE TO THE COMPLAINT AND IF APPLICABLE SEND A WRITTEN RESPONSE TO THE COMPLAINT TO THE PERSON WHO SIGNED THIS SUMMONS. If you do not Answer within 20 days, you will lose this case. You will not get to tell your side of the story, and the Court may decide against you and award the Plaintiff everything asked for in the Complaint. If you do not want to contest the claims stated in the Complaint, you do not need to respond. A default judgment can then be entered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint. 5. LEGAL ASSISTANCE. You may wish to get legal help from a lawyer. If you do not have a lawyer, the Court Administrator may have information about places where you can get legal assistance. Even if you cannot get legal help, you must still provide a written Answer to protect your rights or you may lose the case. 6. A LT E R NAT I V E D I S PUTE RESOLUTION. The parties may agree to or be ordered to participate in an alternative dispute resolution process under Rule 114 of the Minnesota General Rules of Practice. You must still send your written response to the Complaint even if you expect to use alternative means of resolving this dispute. 7. THIS LAWSUIT MAY AFFECT OR BRING INTO QUESTION TITLE TO REAL PROPERTY located in Scott County, State of Minnesota, generally known as 21250 Texas Avenue, Prior Lake, Minnesota and legally described as follows: The South ½ of the South ½ of the Northwest ¼ of the Northeast ¼ of Section 31, Township 114, Range 21, Scott County, Minnesota, according to the recorded plat thereof. In particular, you are hereby notified that the purpose of this lawsuit is to reform the mortgage recorded as Scott County Recorder Document No. A573987 so that it contains a correct legal description of said real property and to obtain judgment declaring that said mortgage is prior and superior to the mortgage recorded as Scott County Recorder Document No. A600217. Dated: September 8, 2011 MACKALL, CROUNSE & MOORE, PLC Matthew A. Anderson, #284257 Patrick B. Steinhoff, #340352 1400 AT&T Tower 901 Marquette Avenue Minneapolis, MN 55402 Telephone: 612-305-1400 Fax: 612-305-1414 Attorneys for Plaintiff ACKNOWLEDGMENT The Plaintiff, by its attorney, Patrick B. Steinhoff, hereby ac-

knowledges Minn. Stat. §549.211, providing that litigants in civil matters may be liable to an opposing party for an award of costs, disbursements and attorney and witness fees in the event that the Court may determine that such an award is warranted pursuant to the provisions of said statute. MACKALL, CROUNSE & MOORE, PLC Patrick B. Steinhoff, #340352 Dated: September 8, 2011 (Published in the Prior Lake American on Saturday, September 24, and October 1 and 8, 2011; No. 7584) NOTICE OF PUBLIC ASSESSMENT HEARING 2011 UNPAID SPECIAL CHARGES INCURRED BY THE CITY FOR SNOW REMOVAL AND MOWING OF NUISANCE PROPERTIES, FALSE ALARMS AND DELINQUENT UTILITYCHARGES. IN THE CITY OF PRIOR LAKE, SCOTT COUNTY, MINNESOTA Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Prior Lake, Minnesota will meet in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 4646 Dakota Street SE, on Monday, the 17th of October, 2011 at 7:00 P.M. to consider the assessment of the following: SPECIAL CHARGES PROPOSED TO BE ASSESSED Special Charges Unpaid Amount Snow Removal $350.00 Weed Abatement 887.07 Delinquent Utility Charges 6,223.07 False Alarms 700.00 Total 8,160.14 The estimated total of the assessment roll is $8,160.14 Assessments for Snow Removal, Weed Abatement, Delinquent Utility Charges and False Alarms shall be payable pursuant to Minnesota Statute 429.101 and Sections 704.1003 and 806.301 of the City code in one (1) single installment payable in 2011. The single installment shall include the annual principal, a delinquent assessment administration charge of $30 plus interest calculated from the date of the adoption of the assessment resolution to the end of 2011 plus twelve (12) months of the next year and shall bear interest at the rate of four and six one hundredths (4.06%) per annum. The proposed assessment roll is on file in the City Manager’s office and any written or oral objections will be considered at the public hearing. No appeal may be taken as to the amount of any assessment unless a signed, written objection is filed with the City Manager prior to the hearing or presented to the presiding officer at the hearing. An appeal to district court may be made

by serving notice upon the Mayor or City Manager within 30 days after adoption of the assessment roll and filing such notice with district court within 10 days after service upon the Mayor or City Manager. The City also has adopted a deferred assessment ordinance whereby the City Council may defer the payment of special assessments for those individuals who are permanently disabled or have attained the age of 65 or older. Guideline criteria and applications are available at City Hall. Applications must be made within 30 days following the adoption of the assessment roll by the City Council. Dated: September 16, 2011 By Order of the City Council Frank Boyles City Manager (Published in the Prior Lake American on Saturday, October 1, 2011; No. 7586) Prior Lake-Spring Lake Watershed District Request for Letters of Interest The Prior Lake-Spring Lake Watershed District (PLSLWD) hereby gives notice of its intent to solicit Letters of Interest from firms desiring to provide engineering, administrative, ecological, legal, easement/land acquisition, accounting and audit services for 2012-2013. The PLSLWD Board of Managers intends to select primary service providers for the above-named disciplines, and also to establish a pool of eligible service providers that the PLSLWD may draw on for special projects and services during 2012 and 2013. Firms interested in serving the PLSLWD are encouraged to submit a Letter of Interest. Letters should be 6 pages or less (including attachments) and should briefly describe the firm’s experience, identify and describe the qualifications of the Project Manager and include the 2012-2013 billing rates. Firms interested in providing engineering or legal services should emphasize experience with watershed districts organized under Minnesota Statues, Chapter 103D. Firms interested in providing ecological services should emphasize experience with aquatic plant management, limnology, bioengineering/natural stream technologies and fisheries management. Letters must be received by the PLSLWD Office (14070 Commerce Ave NE, Suite 300, Prior Lake, MN 55372) by 4:00 p.m. on Friday, October 28, 2011. Inquiries may be directed to Mike Kinney at 952-4474166 or mkinney@plslwd.org. The Prior Lake-Spring Lake Watershed District Board of Managers. (Published in the Prior Lake American on Saturday, October 1 and 8, 2011; No. 7587)

Credit River Township Board Meeting Monday, October 3, 2011, 6pm Agenda Call Meeting to Order, Pledge of Allegiance 1 Approve or Amend Agenda 2 Consent Agenda 1) September 6, 2011 Board Meeting Notes 2) August 2011 Treasurer’s Report 3) September 2011 Developer’s Escrow Statements 3 Open Forum 4 Old Business 1) Scott Co. Road 8 Corridor Study 2) Territory work agreement 3) Cress View Estates cul-desacs 4) Snowplowing update 5) 210th Street lot split 5 New Business 1) Green Acres assessment deferment 2) Treasurer six month review 3) Appointment of Clerk 4) Overweight load permit 5) SCTA Meeting recap 6) SCALE report 7) IT update 6 Road Report 1) Boone/Highpoint update 2) 167th Street E. update 7 Engineer’s Report 1) Lynn/Monterey road repair 2) Sign Reflectivity 3) 2012-2016 Capital Improvement Plan 4) Thoroughbred Acres Warranty update 5) Scottview Acres Warranty update 6) 18871 Edgewood Lane 8 Treasurer’s Report 1) Transfer Funds 2) Levy Resolution 3) Fund Transfers Resolution 4) CSTS Certifications 9 Clerk’s Report 1) Scott Co. SCENE article 2) Town Hall 10 Review and Pay Bills 11 Adjourn (Published in the Prior Lake American on Saturday, October 1, 2011; No. 7588)

The Public Notice deadline for the Prior Lake American is at Noon on Tuesday, for the Saturday edition. Faxes are not accepted.


Page 22 | October 1, 2011

Place an ad

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

Deadlines

Ads are posted promptly to the imarketplace.mn website. Print deadlines for Thursday editions are 3 p.m. Tuesday for the Chanhassen Villager, Chaska Herald, Eden Prairie News, Jordan Independent, Shakopee Valley News. Deadlines for Saturday editions are 3 p.m. Thursday for the Prior Lake American, Savage Pacer, and Southwest Saturday editions in Chaska, Jordan-Belle Plaine and Shakopee.

Go to imarketplace.mn/PlaceAnAd to place your ad, or call imarketplace.mn at 952-345-3003 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday for help.

Costs

Thriftmart ads are free; Thriftmart PLUS ads start at just $15. Ads start as low as $22 for announcements, farm / garden / animals, transportation, services, rentals, real estate and recruitment. Call 952-3453003 for pricing, or place your ad online at imarketplace.mn/PlaceAnAd

Locations

Reach more than 150,000 readers every week. Our offices are located in the communities below.

Recruitment

Looking for work? Find local job ads here. Need a new employee? Get great response with imarketplace. mn recruitment ads.

HENNEPIN COUNTY

CARVER Chaska COUNTY

ThriftMart

Now you can post an unlimited number of ads to Thriftmart, our free-ads marketplace. Go to imarketplace.mn/SellMyStuff to place your ad, or call 952-345-3003. (A telephone surcharge applies if you call.) And now businesses can use Thriftmart, too!

Chanhassen Eden Prairie

Shakopee

Savage

Jordan Prior Lake

N

Rentals

Find your new rental home – whether it’s an apartment, condo, townhouse or singlefamily home – in our print listings or at imarketplace.mn/homes.

SCOTT COUNTY

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Chaska Rentals

Chaska Rentals

COME HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS! Welcome to Highland Shores

Schools/Lessons

Health Supplies

Piano Lessons: In my Prior Lake home. All ages & levels. 15 yrs experience. Call Mary, 952-440-3205

Diabetic test strips wanted. Most brands. Will pay cash. Local pick up. Call Ted at 612-216-6266

SERVICES

Musical Instruments

Child Care

Spinet piano and bench. Maple finish. $300. 952-975-0971

25 yrs. Loving, licensed childcare. All ages welcome. Cindy, 952-4451932

RENTALS

Becky's Daycare: 3 openings, Shakopee. Food program, licensed. 10 years experience. 952-445-2908

Office/Commercial

Elementary teacher with licensed home daycare has before/after school openings. Call Sonny, 952-445-0441

LIGHT INDUSTRIAL Drive-In's & Docks Available Immediately Intersections of 41/ 169. 952-484-9675

Licensed Prior Lake daycare, ages 2+. Carrie, 612-770-5011

Shop/ warehouse space Jordan, 3,450 s.f. $5.00/ s.f. 952-492-6960

Belle Plaine Rental

to the Classifieds! 952-345-3003

2 BR, 2 BA, apt., $650/ month+ utilities/ garage. 2 BR duplex, $800/ mo. utilities included. 952292-3247

We have a few luxury apartments remaining. Trendy upscale apartment suites with spacious floorplans and spectacular views, just blocks from the golf course 952-836-8550 OR 1-800-892-2091 Highlandshoresapts.com $1195, 2BR, 2BA, 2 story. All appliances, huge bedrooms. Available immediately. No pets. Nancy @ CHR Realty 612-701-7404 $875, includes heat, + washer/dryer. 2BR, 1BA, frplc. Overlooking pond, fast possession. Nancy @ CHR Realty 612-701-7404 1/2 mth FREE w/Lease Boutique Apt. Bldg 2 BR Elevator, Heat paid, Heated parking included. Cats Welcome. Available 11/1. 952-914-0357 2 BR apartment, Jonathan near Chaska Commons. Fireplace, detached garage. Utilities paid, $875/ month. 952-448-3210.

2 BR apartment from $795 1 BR from $695 Heat & water paid 1 cat OK. Garage/Storage inc. 952-361-6864

2/ 3 BR townhomes, garage included, $795 & $950. 952-448-6549

1 BR $595 **Heat Paid** 612-874-8183 952-368-9360 Nice Duplex, 3BD, 2BA, W/D, A/C, deck. $1050. 952-955-1889

Cologne Rentals 1 BR Apartment, HUD/ Section 8, Elderly/ Disabled housing. EHO. 612-702-1472

Jordan Rentals 1 & 2 BR apartments, (heat, hot/cold water, garbage included) $575$675, no pets. 612-5996245 1BR $550., 2BR $650. Downtown Jordan. Available immediately. 612-708-1154 1BR & 1BR+ $635. to $650. Hardwood floors. No dogs, Immediate. 952-201-1991

Jordan Rentals

Prior Lake Rentals

Shakopee Rentals

Jordan Center Apartments

55+ community. 1 BR, 1 BA condo. W/D, dishwasher in unit. Balcony, heated underground parking. Storage units. Library/ community room. Available immediately. To schedule a showing, 763-238-8975

3 BR in 4-plex, 1-car garage, $850/ month+ utilities. Immediate. No dogs. 952-448-2333

Large 2 BR, 2 bath, W/D dishwasher, elevator, security system. $800+ utilities. Available now. 952-492-2800 Jordan Family Rambler This 4BR/1.5Bath home is located just off the Hwy 169 & CR9 interchange in downtown Jordan, MN! Recent renovations, a secluded parcel, and a large yard make this a great place for families! $1,000 per month. Call Steve at (612) 695-1054

Prior Lake Rentals

Lg 2BR, 1BA, Kit & more Basement apt. walkout on Prior Lake. Gar/Doc space av. Great views, $795/mo. 952-412-7160 Prior Lake- Lg 1 BR, $575/ mo. 2 BR. $735/ mo. Available now. Patio/ balcony, cats OK, please call 952-6532105, 952-594-1791, or 651-470-4017

Savage Rentals

1 BR, office, full kitchen, no animals. Lakeshore, off-street parking. $650. 952-440-4673/ 612-2983263

1BR $635, 2BR $735. Pets ok. 952-356-0611

1 BR. Large apartment in secured N/S 4-plex. $685. 763-478-8715

1 & 2 BR apartments, garage. Nice condition. Reasonable. Available now. 952-445-2739

2 Bedroom Home. Single car garage. Dogs o.k. $1200/ month. Available Now. 612618-0644 2 BR condo, garage. Pet OK. Includes water, sewer, $925. Avail 11/1 952-440-4112 3 BR 1 BA apartment. Detached garage. $895. Randy 952-270-9221

Shakopee Rentals

1 BR APARTMENT Section 8 project Low income rent to qualifying persons. Age 62 or older. 30% of income Smoke-free units available

Shakopee Housing 952-403-1086

321 S Harrison. Great 2BR, $795. Laundry on site, off street parking, AC unit included. Available asap. For more information please call Deparis with Detailed Mgmt 763-807-0148 3BR/1BA $800. Apt. Remodel! Safe,cln,brght,quiet,Priv deck,plygrnd 1yr lse NrCub/Marshall 722Garden Ln 612-325-7954 Arlington Ridge Apts 2 BR Apts. For Rent Updated unit-Ready for move in! Starting at $805 CALL 952-496-3281 1219 S. Taylor St. #103 Hillview Motel Micro/ Refrig. Weekly $175 & Up. Daily, $35 & Up. 952-445-7111 Large 1 BR apartment, available 10/1. $650 utilities paid, no pets. 952445-3062 (lve msg) Sandalwood Studiosfull kitchenettes, nightly/ weekly/ monthly rates available. 952-277-0100

Waconia Rentals 2BR, private entrance, porch, $700. + utilities, garage available. 612867-4829

SW Metro Rentals Other Areas 1BR, apartment $425. Bay window, private entrance. Norwood/YA. 612-750-7436

REAL ESTATE

Houses House for sale: 9875 Spring Rd, EP $327,400 952-240-8940

Lots/Acreage 70 tillable acres. Owner/ Agent, 612-756-1899 Farmland for Sale & Wanted. Randy Kubes, Realtor... 612-599-7440

Real Estate Bargains 3286 sq ft commercial bldg, $109,900. New home, 3 car garage, $154,900. 24 acres of farmland, $109,900. 2-1/2 acre lots, $39,900-$69,900. Cabin on Spring Lake, $239,900. Randy Kubes Realtor 612-599-7440

To learn more about these businesses, go to www.imarketplace.mn Call (952) 345-3003 to place an ad

BUILDING

BUILDING

MAGNUM CONSTRUCTION CO.

Over 19 Years Experience Licensed and Insured

Basements • Room Additions Complete Home Remodeling Decks/Porches

Big Enough To Help~Small Enough To Care

952-461-4540 www.magnumconstructioncomp.com

Residential, Commercial, Homeowner Associations, and Property Managers

We specialize in all of your Repair Needs! www.mrhandyman.com Member of the SouthWest Metro Chamber of Commerce

Highland Home Services Inc. Remodeling ...Repair ... Design www.highlandhomeservices.com

Steve Jenness

cell 612-418-2277 sjenness@integraonline.com

30 years experience fax 952-447-1211 lic#20628802

~ PARAMOUNT REMODELING, INC. ~ Where Your Dreams Are Paramount *Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling *Distinctive Hardwood Flooring

CLEANING

CONCRETE/MASONRY

952-454-7591, Melanie. Home and Office Cleaning. Experienced, reliable, reasonable rates.

Over 17 yrs in decks & porches. For deck do-it-yourselfers: framing & footings. www.newimage decks.com

Mike 952-442-1308 Lic#20219985 Ins

BUILDING Builder's Edge Remodeling, Windows, Basements, Additions, Cabinets. Licensed. 952-492-3170

New

CONCRETE/MASONRY

Free Estimates Licensed Insured

Lowell Russell Concrete

Remodel Chimney Repairs

Lebens Masonry

DCI Inc. We are a very diverse company that has expertise inDriveways Patios Foundation repair Chimney restoration Stone fronts Outdoor fireplaces Floor staining, etc....

www.staincrete.com

952-461-3710 info@staincrete.com

References- Fully insured

Feel free to text, call or Email andydciinc@gmail.com Andy, 612-221-1849

BUILDING JC's Remodeling Co. Remodeling, basements, kitchen, bathrooms, decks, drywall/painting Gerald Fugate, 18 yrs exp. lic#20636523CR Ins.

• Block Foundations • New Additions, Repairs • Driveways • Patios • Steps • Garages • Pool Decks • Tear-out, Remove, Replace/New • Decorative • Colored, Stamped, Exposed Aggregate Free Estimates

952-758-7742

www.chconcretemn.com

952-681-8013 www.jcsremodeling.com

CABINETRY KB Custom Cabinets Kitchens, Entertainment Centers, Bars, Built-ins Vanities, Counter Tops. 952-445-7790

CLEANING ! 952-239-4110 Bumble Bee Services Housecleaning. Insured ! Country Touch Clean. Several years in business. Reliable/Trusting 612-483-1092

Free Estimates

Call Joe: 952-492-3671 MonConServ.com

DRAPERIES

FLOORING

Drapes, Blinds, Fabrics, Upholstery, Bedspreads. Lakes Interiors. 38 yrs. 952-447-4655.

DRIVEWAYS

Radloff & Weber Blacktopping Inc.

LANDSCAPING

ABOVE ALL HARDWOOD FLOORS & CARPET Floor Installation Sanding & Refinishing Carpet, Tile & Vinyl Installation Exceptional Quality Great Service

Duffy’s •Floor refinishing & sanding •Real wood floors •Dustless refinishing •Water damage specialists •Board patching •Custom staining •Best quality •Best pricing •Most experience in your area •Family owned, 28 years • Free Estimates

952-469-5713 952-426-2790 www.duffyshardwoodfloors.com

6 Miles S. of Shakopee on 169 Pulverized Dirt $12.50/ yd. Colored Mulch $26.50/ yd. Cypress, Cedar, Hardwood

www.HermansLandscape.com

LAWNS ARE US C r e a t e s D i s t i n c t i v e O u td o o r L i v i n g X Complete

Landscape & Irrigation Services Block Walls, Paver Driveway, Patios X Drainage Correction X Lakeshore Restoration X Complete Irrigation Winterization X Aeration & Over Seeding X Dethatch & Fall Clean-Up X Boulder,

952-492-3160

Caola

Landscape Services 952 445-0663 X

Complete Landscaping Design, Build, Maintain

Free estimates/Insured

952-447-5733

Carpet & Vinyl Shop-At-Home Save $$

952-445-4056 www.fonderscarpet.com

Water Problems resolved XSprinkler Systems XRock/Mulch/Edger XTrees & Shrubs XBrick Pavers XRetainingWalls Over 30 yrs of quality workmanship Visit our website: www.caolalandscaping.com Credit Cards Accepted

ELECTRICAL

HEATING/AIR COND R.D. & Associates

#Priority Electric Inc. Licensed- Bonded- Insured. No job too small. 952-403-9200

To reach Classifieds: iMarketplace.mn or 952-345-3003

Heating, plumbing, remodel and repair, and replacement, new construction. 952-492-2440

A Licensed Master Electrician at your service Scheffler Electric, Inc. 952-758-3561

IRRIGATION

POWERTECH Electric. Local. Owner operated. Licensed, insured, clean. Rich: 952-292-8683

Sprinkler Blow-outs $50. Residential & Commercial, Simply Green Inc. 952-484-6512

Flagstone, Steppers Decorative Rock Edging/ Poly/ Fabric Retaining Walls, Pavers

Call for Hours Wever i l 952-492-2783 De

X

Driveways, Parking Lots

LANDSCAPING Rock Engraving at Hermans

952-440-WOOD (9663)

HARDWOOD FLOORS

~Since 1971~ Free Estimates

DON WHERLEY MASONRY INC

952-448-7037

16 years in business Driveways, Sidewalks, Patios, Floors, Steps, Block Foundations, Brick Repairs, Footings

612-221-2181 Decorative stamped concrete, Driveways, Concrete Firepits, Tear-out & replacement, Steps, Floating garage slabs, Swimming pool decks, Poured Wall Foundations & Flat work www.mnvalleyconcrete.com

Decorative Concrete Additions - Patios Garage Floors Steps - Sidewalks Aprons - Driveways Stamped, Colored Exposed Aggregate

Monyok Masonry

952-233-1099

From the Unique to the Ordinary... Specializing in drives, patios and imprinted, colored and stained concrete. Interior acid stained floors and counter tops.

*Lower Level Finishing *Decks & Exteriors

www.bumblebeeservices.com

Decks, porches, additions, remodeling. Great ideas/ prices. Fred Hartgerink, 952-4473733

Stone Work

A Clean House= Big smiles. Experienced, Responsible, References. 952-361-6237

NO JOB TOO SMALL *** Mention this ad for a 10% discount. Call today for a free consultation (952) 607-6726 MN Lic. 20483289, Fully Insured

DECKS DECKS DECKS New Image

Brick Work

CONCRETE/MASONRY

Specialized Services Inc. • Tree Removal • Stump Grinding • Brush Chipping • Overgrown Areas Mowed • Excavating • Sand & Gravel • Crushed Limestone

952-445-7302 www.rdandassociates.com

Retaining Walls, Concrete & Paver Drives, Patio & Walks, Boulder walls, & much more!

952-292-2261 Premiere One Landscapes #1 Schieber Outdoor Services LawncareLandscaping. Commercial Residential. Senior Discount. Joe: 952-2924445 612-275-2574. AJ's Tree & Lawn Service LLC. Trimming & removal. Licensed, insured. 952-445-1812 Paul Bunyan Tree Service. Tree Removal and Trimming. www.paulbunyantree serviceinc.com AA Tree Removal/ trimming/ firewood/ brush hauling, stump grinding. Steve, 952-445-5239


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 23

Full-Time

Full-Time

Full-Time

Part-Time

ASSEMBLY 1st & 2nd shift We are looking for a large number of people to work in a cold room environment packaging food items. Excellent opportunity for extra money over the next four Holiday months. Apply ASAP for immediate placement!!! Team Personnel Services Shakopee 952-746-3346

Assistant Finance Director - City of Savage For information and application materials visit our website at: www.cityofsavage.com APPLY BY: Monday, October 17, 2011, 4:00pm EOE

Laborer wanted. Call Nieman Roofing 952758-4791

30 hr/wk Office Admin/ Bookkeeping at 1st Presbyterian ChurchShakopee. Require MS Office proficiency, phone skills, bookkeeping exp. Send resume: sfpcpastor@gmail.com

Part-Time

Part-Time

Part-Time

Human Service Technician Divine House, Inc. Is currently accepting applications for our Chaska area site. This site has four male residents living in a residential home. A Part position available including every other weekend, afternoon/evenings and overnight shifts are available. Experience working with people with disabilities or background in medical field experience helpful but not necessary. Apply online at divinehouse.org or Divine House Inc 328 5thSt. SW Willmar, MN 56201 EOE

NOW HIRING SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS

EMPLOYMENT Full-Time WORK FROM HOME! Put your faith first, Family second with an Opportunity to earn a Great income! 952-270-6190 Allure Salon looking for motivated, enthusiastic hair designer and nail technician to join our talented staff. 952-4963331, Bonnie www.escapetoallure.com Drivers: Medical transport. Exp'd. Days. 612747-3022.

www.teampersonnel.com

ASSOCIATE TRAINEE Real Estate Career Excellent Potential Fast Growth

Coldwell Banker Burnet Eden Prairie Irene: 952-949-4759 Rolland: 952-949-4724 EOE

Finish carpenters wanted with 2-5 years of experience. Position is full time and benefits eligible. Must have valid D/L, reliable transportation and be able to pass background check, drug screen and physical. Call our job line at 952-380-3720 or send resume to jobs@carpentrycontractors.com

Truck Driver/ Mechanic Ditch Witch of Minnesota, Inc. is currently seeking a full-time truck driver/mechanic. Qualified applicants will have 5+ years experience with formal training. Class A license is required. Benefits include: medical, dental, 401k & uniforms. Fax resume to: 952-4450035 or mail to: 12826 Emery Way, Shakopee, MN 55379 or come in to fill out an application.

Store Management & Crew Members Opportunities Available Now hiring for a full time Store Manager Position. Stores are located in the Shakopee and Bloomington areas. Please call Michelle at 952.653.2192 for interested inquiries. WE OFFER: Flexible scheduling Opportunity to run your own store Competitive pay Pleasant atmosphere Multi-store opportunities

Executive Assistant/ Accountant needed for Family Office. Resume: Amanda@lhhendrickson.com

Framing, Siding and Window carpenters wanted with all levels of experience. Positions are full time and benefits eligible. Must have valid D/L, reliable transportation and be able to pass background check, drug screen and physical. Call our job line at 952-380-3720 or send resume to: jobs@carpentry contractors.com

Tax Preparer Seasonal Chaska CPA firm seeking an experienced, fulltime seasonal tax preparer. Pay based on experience. Flexible hours. Send Resume to: cpa@dha-cpa.com or fax 952-448-2705. THE 9 HAIRSYLISTS AT THE HAIR MATE Invite you to join them if you are an experienced beautician/ barber/ hair stylist & manicurist/ pedicurist. Call Gina Tupy 612616-5550 or Harry Tupy 612-720-6201.

Full time Bookkeeper Duties inc. A/P, A/R, job costing, Reconciling bank recs, and financials. Accounting background a must. Please send resumes to: lori.horkey@ keylandhomes.com

Catering Food Service at Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Looking for reliable people with a flexible schedule, preferrable to have previous food service experience, but not required. Competitive pay. Email payne189@umn.edu to apply. Part time. Custodial / Maint. Ice Rink P.T. Seasonal $9.00/hr weekday evening and weekend hours avail. Includes ice resurfacing, run skate shop, general maint. Apply at Chaska Community Center Front Desk, 1661 Park Ridge Dr, Chaska MN 55318

Full-Time

Front Desk/ Night Auditimmediate opening. Hotel experience required. Apply in person: Best Western Hotel, 511 S. Marschall Rd., Shakopee. Help needed for errands, shopping, cleaning, computer work. Good pay. Bill: 952-4472835 Immediate PT Openings Excellent Pay Flexible FT/PT Customer sales/svc No exp needed will train All ages 17+ Conditions apply Call Now: 952-746-8999 Local Bookstore hiring FT/PT positions. See www.BooksMN.com for more information. Newspaper Route: Weekday/Weekend Routes now avail. Bloomington area. Must be 18 yrs. & have own vehicle. (952) 451-8188

Full-Time

JOIN OUR TEAM!

Full-Time

Director Secondary Ed. Shakopee Schools. Resp. for leadership for all sec. instruction; curric/instruct; staff devel; prof devel/eval of all sec. Admin; data/ assessment/ district technology. Requires: Admin licensure, MA, exp w/data and assessment, extensive knowledge of technology. For more info go to: www.shakopee.k12.mn.us/ and apply to posting number 1311. Come see us at the APEX JOB FAIR! 124 Columbia Court, Chaska, MN 55318 Date: Wed, October 5th, 2011 Time: 10:00 a.m. Individuals should have: Production & assembly experience Ability to pass a basic skills evaluation High school diploma or GED equivalent required Overtime is Available! 3rd, 2nd and 1st shifts Available: $10+/hr o Production/assembly o Sanitizing o Compounding CALL 952-915-2000 WITH QUESTIONS

Fulltime position consists of selling used automotive parts with unlimited earning potential We're looking for someone to join our team that has self motivational skills, nice and courteous to customers, both on the phone and in person. Good computer skills and has the ability of selling. Hours will be 7:45am to 5pm Monday thru Friday. Benefits include: Paid holidays and vacation, uniforms and a health plan. Starting pay is $13 per hour and up depending upon experience, and switching to commission. E-mail resume to; rick.metro@integraonline.com Or apply in person at: Metro Auto Salvage Inc, 11710 E 263 rd St. Lakeville, MN 952-461-8285

4 Day Work Week! FSI International, located in Chaska, a global supplier of surface conditioning equipment and technology, currently has Technician opportunities available for candidates with strong electrical and/or mechanical troubleshooting experience.

To view additional opportunities and to apply online, please go to www.fsi-intl.com

TOP JOB 4 Day Work Week!

Welders

FSI International, located in Chaska, a global supplier of surface conditioning equipment and technology, currently has Technician opportunities available for candidates with strong electrical and/or mechanical troubleshooting experience. To view additional opportunities and to apply online, please go to www.fsi-intl.com See this & other employment ads in this week’s Classifieds

Chart Inc. is a leading global manufacturer of standard and custom engineered products and systems for a wide variety of cryogenic and heat transfer applications. Chart's New Prague MN manufacturing campus is a 27-acre site with over 275,000-sq. ft. of heavy manufacturing space. Presently, Chart has immediate openings for Welders on our night shift. Primary job responsibilities will include performing complex and critical welding operations on various metals using Flux-core, TIG, MIG and Sub-arc Welding. The ideal candidate shall have a high school diploma, vocational welding program certificate or equivalent welding experience and the ability to read and interpret drawings and weld symbols. Chart's fast track to a rewarding career includes a competitive compensation and benefits program. If you are interested in the challenge please apply in person, call or send your resume and/or application to:

Chart Inc.

Maintenance

The Lutheran Home: Belle Plaine is also accepting applications for the following positions:

Nursing Assistants LPN/RN

Starting wage $13.25 per hour DOE No DUI's, must have Class D license at least 3 years And be 21 years of age Positive Connections 460 N Hickory Street Chaska, MN 55318 952-361-0899

Program Counselor (Shakopee) Thomas Allen Inc. 1 yr Exp working with developmental disabilities preferred, Driver's lic, insur., clean record required. Week 1: Wed 49pm, Fri 4-10pm, Sat 10am-4pm. Week 2: Wed 4-9pm, Sat 8:30am-4:30pm. Contact: Deebaas@thomasalleninc.com

.7 fte – all shifts 5 p.m – 9 p.m. Please apply online at: www.stgertrudes shakopee.org EEOC

Rug Binder/Sewer. Chaska rug manufacturer has an immediate opening for a rug binder/ sewer. Qualified candidates must have sewing experience, attention to detail and be able to lift light rugs. Competitive pay. Please contact Susan @952-448-9602.

Fax: 952-233-4112

Snow Removal We want you! Sub-contractors & operators of our own equipment. Plow operators, Bobcat operators, Shovelers and Snowblowers. We pay for exp., quick cash, paid immed. Flex. hours. Could lead to FT. 952-393-PLOW (7569) MoveSnowNow@ gmail.com

LearningRx in Savage continues to grow! If you have a passion to help students excel, consider joining the LearningRx team of cognitive trainers! LearningRx uses clinically proven techniques to get to the root cause of learning struggles and help students excel academically. 10-25 hours/week. Great pay plus bonus! To learn more visit www.learningrx.com Interested parties send cover letter and resume torich@learningrx.net

SCHEELS SCHEELS is hiring Part Time sales and cashiers at our Eden Prairie Store. SCHEELS is the leader in athletic and fashion shoes and clothing. Applicants must enjoy working with people and providing outstanding customer service. We offer a flexible schedule, competitive wages, and the best employee discount program in the industry. Hours consist of evenings and weekends. Strong communication skills and light to moderate lifting is required. SCHEELS is located in the Eden Prairie Center. Stop by our customer service counter to fill out an application or call Amy at 952-826-0067.

The Lutheran Home Campus is seeking a full-time Maintenance worker. Must have a special boilers license and a valid driver’s license. Experience in long term care is preferred.

For additional information or to apply online, visit The Lutheran Home Association website at www.tlha.org or call (952) 873-2164. An Equal Opportunity Employer

407 7th Street NW New Prague, MN 56071 EOE

NAR's

2011-2012 SCHOOL YEAR No experience Necessary will train

TEEN CENTER SUPERVISOR The City of Shakopee seeks to fill a part-time position supervising daily activities and DJ/Band events at Enigma Teen Center. Late afternoon, evening and weekend hours; 4 to 15 hrs per week. Requires good communication and customer service skills. Live sound/music experience a plus, but not required. Must be at least 18 yrs old. Starting Wage: $9.80 - $10.38 per hr. Position open until filled. For more information and an application, visit www.ci.shakopee.mn.us/employment.cfm or call (952)233- 9320. TTY/TDD: (952) 233-3837. EOE.

To learn more about these businesses, go to www.imarketplace.mn Call (952) 345-3003 to place an ad

LANDSCAPING

ODD JOBS

ODD JOBS

PAINT/WALLPAPER

Core Aeration $59

Quality Remodeling and Home Repairs

Ken's HANDYMAN SERVICE Repairs, Installations & Home Improvements. Call Ken: 952-445-1836

Greg Anderson Painting 4 generations experience. Painting, staining, enameling. Taping repairs. 952-445-6816

Residential/Commercial

952-440-1131 Turfboys.com Schmidt and Son Lawn Care Aerating Leaf clean-up Mowing for 2012 Contracts

Free estimates

952-496-1365

A Minnesota Greenstar Qualified contractor

References, Lic & Ins Mn Lic. 20632058 Kevin Hayes

(612)867-8287 kevin@hmwhome.com www.hmwhome.com

MOVING? Completely Enclosed Truck Very Reasonable Rates

952-758-2552 We Haul Moving New Prague

NEED HANDYMAN? Little Job Expert! For all the odd jobs needing Attention!!! Painting: • Interior & Exterior Finish Carpentry: • Basements • Bathrooms • Ceramic Tile • Sheet Rock & Taping Dennis 952-334-1755 952-445-9034

ODD JOBS

Handyman Ser vices PROFESSIONAL, PROMPT, COURTEOUS SERVICE 28 YEARS OF TRADE EXPERIENCE Bob Wagner (952) 686-4833 www.bobshandymanservices.com for available services and rates. Fully Insured LOW HOURLY RATES, TELL ME WHAT YOU CAN AFFORD AND WE WILL MAKE A DEAL!

ODD JOBS

Cla s 952 sified s -345 -300 3

Bruce Mackenthun Does It All! WindowDoor- Deck specialist! Professional services. 952-270-9166. Lic #20452534 Ins. www.brucedoesitall.com

PLASTER/DRYWALL

ROOFING

ROOFING

651-480-3400 sundanceexteriors.com Family owned since 1979

Free wind & hail damage inspections... We can handle all of your insurance claims. Roofing, Siding, Windows & all home improvement needs. We do it all!

Let us know how we can earn your business. (952)873-6078

Drive a real bargain!

Roofing Windows OSiding ORemodeling O

*A and K PAINTING*

O

Schedule your Fall painting now!

Locally Owned & Operated Licensed & Insured #20631439

Ext/Int Paint/ Stain ~Carpentry/ Repair~ Free Estimates Ins/ Bonded

MOVING/STORAGE You Call - We Haul

PAINT/WALLPAPER

ROOFING

952-474-6258 Major credit cards accepted

S.R. PAINTING: 18 yrs. exp. Insured. Commercial/Residential. Interior/Exterior. Wood finishing, Enameling, Custom Texturing, Water Damage, Wallpaper Removal. Deck Refinishing. Quality conscious perfectionist! Estimates/Consultation

Steve Ries, 612-481-8529 “Bill's Painting” Exterior/ Interior/ Decks. 29 yrs/ guaranteed work. 10% scheduling discount. 952-448-6633/ 952-220-1090

Best Drywall LLC Serving SW Metro 18 yrs. Small crew/no subs/ painting. New Const/ Basements/ Repair. BBB Reg/Ins/Free Est. All work guaranteed Mic 612-685-0476

PLUMBING/SEPTIC Father/ son plumbing company. Licensed, bonded, insured. Working for you! R&D Plumbing952-237-0115

bestdrywallminnesota.com

Plumbing, heating, remodel and repair, new construction. 952-4922440

952-448-3761

MJ Painting Interior/ Exterior painting & staining. 952-445-2904 Marvin Jeurissen

Offering best extended manufacturers warranty! Tear-offs, Re-roofs, Siding & Gutters, New Construction Insurance Specialist Over 18 years experience FREE ESTIMATES Rodney Oldenburg Cell # 612-210-5267 952-443-9957 Lic. ID-20156835

KREUSER ROOFING, INC.

No wall too small

952-492-3842 952-412-4718(cell)

ROOFING

ROOFING

Breimhorst Painting. Interior/ Exterior. Insured. Albie: 952-261-2234 Ext. painting Honest fair pricing. 25 yr. exp. 952913-7808

Why Wait Roofing LLC

Storm damage repairs Defective shingle claims Family owned & operated Thousands of satisfied customers Professional and Courteous Lic# 20632183

•Roofing •Siding •Windows

952-882-8888 Call today for your Free Inspection! Family Owned & Operated www.capstonebros.com Lic# 20609967

BUY IT SELL IT FIND IT

Regal Enterprises, Inc. Roofing, siding, windows, gutters. Insurance work. Since 1980. regalenterprisesinc.net 952-201-4817

UPHOLSTERY Discounted fabrics... drapes, bedspreads, residential/ commercial. 38 years' experience. 952-447-4655

WINDOWS EGRESS WINDOW & WELLS Free Estimates

952-492-3160

in se s... i t r d ! ve fie ! Ad ssi ks! 3 r a l o 00 C w -3 5 It 34 295

Looking for a hot deal on some wheels? Look no further than the classifieds! You’ll find many cars, trucks, vans and SUVs, also motorcycles, boats, trailers, campers & RVs. To place an ad, call 952-345-3003


Page 24 | October 1, 2011

Part-Time

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

All-Terrain Vehicles

Southwest Eye Care is seeking a PT scribe/receptionist for our growing Chaska office. Duties include assisting doctors with data entry/charting, scheduling appointments, checking in patients, answering phones, insurance billing. Hours include evenings and 1 Saturday/month. Previous experience in a medical setting preferred. E-mail resume to: info@southwesteyecare.net or Fax to 952-466-3936.

Campers Travel Trailers

Boats/Motors

Campers Travel Trailers

Motorcycles

Motorcycles

Storage/Vehicles INDOOR/ OUTDOORBoat, RV, etc. storage. Josh: 612-221-0275

Polaris Xplorer 300 4X4 1999 with plow, gun rack, tote box. Starts and runs great. Gently used. $2400 952-3888456

2001, 17ft. Starcraft, 90HP, Mercury. Excellent condition. $9,000 952-890-2630

1991 Fleetwood Southwind Motorhome, Class A, 33ft. Only 38k miles! Smooth runner, fully loaded, sleeps 6, hydraulic leveler, $10,500, 612-669-4172

2007 27' Colorardo RL 5th Wheel, 2 Slide $29,500 or best offer. 507-934-4834 M-F after 5:30

2004 Harley FXST Softail 24,000 miles. Extras too much to list. Call for details. $8,800. 952836-6773

Cars 2005 Kawasaki 1600 Vulcan Classic with Vance & Hines pipes. New tires. 10,895 miles. Mint condition. $5900 Call (952) 934-7358

$$ Paid for Junkers/ Repairables FREE TOW. Immediate pickup. Serving Carver/ Scott counties. 952-220-TOWS, 24/7

Boats/Motors

StarTribune Newspaper Carrier Needed immediately Shakopee & rural Waconia Weekend routes. For further information see our website at;

Sporting Goods

www.Chaskadelivery.com

Seasonal Positions Driver, paving experienced dump truck operator, class B+, clean driving & background records, immediate employment with 6 month term, 2 month full time-4 month weather dependent. Contact Craig 612369-5412 PT Seasonal snow plow operator, experienced with snow removal and operation of John Deere equipment. Will train the right person. Reliable transportation and self starter. Call 763-4288560, or fax resume to 763-428-8750

1973 14' Alumacraft boat/ trailer, 15 HP Johnson motor. Needs carb work. Trolling motor/ battery, steering console. $1,125/BO. 952-448-3128

1979 Mark Twain 17' Runabout, trailer, 115 HP Mercury. Power tilt, swim step, custom canvas seats/carpet. Registered 2013, $1,999. 612-590-1595

TRANSPORTATION

All-Terrain Vehicles

2000 Polaris Sportsman 500. Green, H.D. Winch Rear basket. Like new Tires Rides-Drives Perfect. Great condition $2,750. 952-215-5421

1992 Vibo 21' Hexagon pontoon. Low hrs. 2 motors. '96 Merc 90HP + 9.9. Marine radio. Trailer. Clean. $9,500. 612720-2262

1998, Bayliner Capri Fish & Ski boat, 19 ft. 135HP. Inboard, stored inside. Excellent condition $6900. 952-4126417

2002 Larson 19' FishNSki, SEI 190, 135 HP Outboard, stored indoors. $11,900.00 or BO, NADA guide suggested $13,945.00, Jon 612-730-8116

2006 Crestliner Lsi Angler 2285. Lots of extras. 60 HP Mercury 4 stroke and dual axle trailer. 763-360-6251

94 Starcraft, 17ft. Aluminum. Walleye, Bass ½ Console 75hp. Mariner & 8hp. Kicker. $6500. 612-554-6725 or bsehlers3242@gmail.com

Hydro Stream Vegas. 20'. 200 HP+++. Complete restoration. 5 passenger. A real head turner! $8,900 or all trades welcome. 952215-5421

1996 Itasca Suncruiser Motorhome. Class A, 39'. Excellent condition, shedded at all times/ winterized. Loaded! 29,300 actual miles. $35,000/BO. 507-6656019

27' 2007 Palomino Thoroughbred, 1 slide out, triple bunk, queen bed sleeps 7-8. $15,500. Call Mitch 612-325-7365

$$ Wanted $$ JUNK CARS Viking Auto Salvage 651-460-6166

2005 black Yamaha R6, 6,000 miles. Yoshimurd customized exhaust. With OEM cover & tank bra. $5,500. 952-3610142

CASH$$ We buy guns SPORTS STOP Shakopee 952-445-5282

Auto Accessories

Honda style 2007 JMST 250cc Scooter. 1329 miles, original owner, 80 mpg, 4 stroke 2 passenger, $2900.00, call Ray 952-402-9110

EZ-GO Gas Golf Cart with Rear Seat. White with White Top and Seats. $2195. 952-2390446

5'x10' enclosed utility trailer, $1100. 612-8592015

Motorcycles

1998 Holiday Rambler Vacationer 36' motorhome, great condition, sleeps 6, 60,000 miles, $31,900 or best offer. Call Gary at 952492-1129.

1994 Harley Heritage Softtail, 26300k, all service records avail, extra set of pipes. $7500. Call Mike @ 612-309-6737

2001 Camper, 32', 5th wheel 2 slideouts, golfcart, shed $14,500. Excellent condition. Parked on beautiful wooded lot in Zumbrota, 612-720-8683/ 612-5990184

2000 Harley Davidson 883 Sportster, wife's bike, never rode, must go. 1300 miles, Lots, lots of extras, mint! $7000. 952-890-0905

2004 41' SportsCoach Elite. Fully equipped. 23,000K. Well-maintained. 3 slides. $100,000. 952-797-6264

2003 Harley Softtail Deuce Anniversary model. 5500 miles. $13,000. 952-447-4280

Phone: 952-345-3003 Fax: 952-445-3335

you s!! e m d yti ssifie r e ev Cla G BI the e r in Sco rtise e adv

powered by Print/online package can be renewed until auto sells, all for the best deal price of $39. To place your ad, go to www.imarketplace.mn/autos or call (952) 345-3003.

Cars

Cars

Cars

1968 T-Bird, 429 automatic, new gas tank, tires, fuel pump, sending unit, brakes. Runs. Needs Restoration. Asking $1500. 952-448-2015

1976 Chevy Nova hatchback, 305 AT, new tires & exhaust. Runs/ drives great, fun car to drive! $3,000/BO. 952447-8169

1989 Volvo 240DL. 118K, AT, CD, New tires, battery, tabs, and more. 4 cyl, provides great gas mileage. $2500. 952-440-2469

Cars

2000 Jaguar XJR. Well maintained. $9700 Silver and black interior, 83,000 miles. Call 612655-6680

Trucks

1964 Chevy C20, 350 engine, 350 auto tranny, every bolt, nut, part replaced, or sandblasted and painted. 8K. REDUCED- $12,500. 952913-7808

Trucks

Sport Util Vehicles

Vans

2000 Chev ¾-ton ext. cab 4x4. Burgundy/silver, newer Boss V-plow. Rarely used. 140K. 6.0L. Excellent condition, all records. $15,500/BO. 612-8683768

2002 Ford Expedition, original owner, 4.6 liter, A/C, 6CD, third row seat, no accidents, runs, looks very good. $5,700. 952-270-8292

2000 Ford Windstar LX 7 Passenger Van, 133,349 Miles. $2,250. 6 Cyl Engine, Automatic Runs and drives great. Craig 952-368-9689

From Putters to Pontiacs, from Plows to Power Macs

Classified has it

1972 rare triple black 'Cuda, with high compression 340 HP. 727 slapstick tranny. Posirearend, PS, bucket seats, Recession reduced!! $42,500. 612804-4074

1976 Classic Cadillac Convertible. Low mileage. 8 cyl. 440 engine. Complete facts available by calling. 559-435-3751

1998 Dodge Stratus, 6 cyl, AT. 156K. $1,500. 952-445-6173

2003 Jetta TDI 5-Speed manual. Up to 57/mpg hwy. 125,000 plus miles 1 owner. Excellent condition $7300. 612-8400884

Jeep Wrangler 1990 5spd. manual. Black w/gray interior. AM/FM radio. Well maintained. 170,000 Runs great! $2500 612-799-5024

Variety

2004 Chevy Silverado Z71 Ext. Cab. 77,XXX perfect cond. Loaded, leather, Bose, 6Disc, Topper and many xtras. $15,700 B/O 612-2030804

952-345-3003

Place an ad! 25 words for $25 | online mapping Call (952) 345-3003

Auctions **SALE**

Auctions *10%-50% off*

POTTERS STORES CONSIGNMENTS, ANTIQUES & AUCTIONS. 590 Marschall Rd., Shakopee T-F 10-6, Sat 9-3 952-233-7323 POTTERS is in NO WAY affiliated with any other AUCTION HOUSE or CONSIGNMENT STORE in SHAKOPEE. Please call me with questions anytime. POTTERS UNDERSTANDS that we are ALL in a bad economy, that is the reason Potters Consignment is here to help. POTTERS does Consignment sales, Estate sales, COLLECTIBLES, ANTIQUES and Personal Property Appraisals. POTTERS opened 4/20/2011. THANK YOU and we look forward to working with you soon... Troy ZIESMER

Belle Plaine Sales

Chanhassen Sales

Thursday, Friday, Sept 29-30, Saturday, Oct. 1 9am-6pm 222 N. Ash St., Belle Plaine Estate sale. Many antiques Jewelry. Assorted tools. Cash only, no checks

Garage Sale- crystal glasses, carpets, metalframed pool, baby/ kids items, kids bikes, scooter, toys, tricycle, crib, costumes, Princess dresses. 9/30, 10/1, 9am-3pm. 8123 Marsh Dr.

Having a Boutique? Call ........

952-3345-33003

Place an ad for as low as $25.

MULTI FAMILY! Thursday 9/29, Friday 9/30 85pm. Saturday 10/1 8noon. Bikes, sporting goods, books, toys, games, clothing, HH items. Misc. 8123 Stone Creek Dr.

Chaska Sales

Eden Prairie Sales

Prior Lake Sales

Shakopee Sales

Shakopee Sales

CHASKA HUGE MOVING SALE, 848 Newberry Lane. Fri 9/30 8a-5p & Sat 10/1 9a-3p | HH, Women's petite (6-10), tools, antiques, furniture, LOTS of craft, knitting, crotchet & supplies, yarn galore!

Sat. Oct. 1, 2011 8am3pm. 17208 Duck Lk Tr. EP Yard sale. Children's toys. TV. Children's books. One day sale!

Fri/Sat, October 7th-8th, 9am-5pm. Multifamily sale. Baby boy/girl items/toys/clothes. Wii. Eliptical. Electronics. LOTS OF CHEAP ITEMS! DON'T MISS! 14415 Brookmere Blvd NW, Prior Lake

Downsizing Sale! Large and small appliances, electronics, TVs, power tools, lawn tools, furniture, clothing, books, HH. Home décor. Thurs.-Sat. 10/6-10/8, 84. 1256 Quincy Circle.

Thursday - Saturday 10/6, 10/7, 10/8. 8am5pm. House Hold Items, Clothes, Games, Cd's, XBox games, Xmas, A lot of misc. 1189 S. Monroe Street

HUGE Garage Sale: Thurs., 9/29, 12noon5pm. Fri., 9/30, 10am5pm. Sat., 10/1, 10am3pm. Furniture, antiques, collectibles, videos, books, clothes, HH, much more! 6160 W. 154th St.

Empty Nester Clean-out Fri. 9/30 8am-6pm, Sat10/1 8am-3pm. Dish/ glassware, movies (VHS), CDs, books, puzzles, paintings/pictures, figurines, golf, roller blades, toboggan, canoe paddles, sleeping bags, cot, trombone, saxophone, trumpet, luggage, printers, bench grinder, drill press, tools, file cabinet, wheelchair, lots more miscellaneous, priced to sell. 2012 Groveland Way. Cash only. No early birds

Multi-family sale. Sat. Oct. 1, 8:00– 4:00pm Furniture, Holiday decorations, Big & Tall Men's Clothing, lots of Misc. 2370 Schoolmaster Drive, Jonathan

Thurs, Fri. & Sat. 9/2910/1 9am-5pm 15480 CANYON RIDGE. MOVING! Lots of Furniture. Woodworking Tools/Supplies. Pianos/Music. Appliances. Computers. Office. Garden/Patio. Seasonal. A & C. Fabric, and more!

Thurs-Fri-Sat., 9/29-30, 10/1, 9am-5pm. MultiFamily Sale: toys, clothing, books, HH. Boat/ motor (1957) 5.5 HP Johnson & trailer. Decor. 1318 VALLEY ST.

Thurs/Fri/Sat Sept 29Oct 1, 8am to 5pm. 11801 Boulder Bay Rd, Eden Prairie. Multi-family sale. Clothing- infant to adult, Housewares, Books, Baby items.

Eden Prairie Sales

Jordan Sales

Friday/ Saturday 9-3010-1. MULTI FAMILY! (8-6pm) Sofa/loveseat, furniture, HH, clothes, (some women plus) Bikes, records, dishes, books, much more! 18830 Partridge Circle

Geneva's Daughter Occasional Sale. At the Hub of Jordan, 231 S. Broadway. Thurs, Oct 6th, 10am-5pm. Fri, Oct Sat, Oct 7th 10-8pm, 8th 8am-5pm.

Moving Sale 9/29,9/30, 10/1. 8-4pm. No previews. 45 years of collectibles, stuffed animals, antiques, tools, old electronics. Much more. 16211 Alpine Way

Thursday, Friday, Saturday Sept 29th to Oct 1st 9am-5pm. 625 Hooper Ct, Jordan. Garage sale. Drum set, Speakers. Washer. Tools Tools Tools. Sofa. Household items

Jack's BIG Garage/ Yard Sale: 10/1-2, 12noon-6pm. Golf cart, 16' trailer, 2000 Chev 4x4 Ext cab/ plow, antiques, tools, lots of stuff! 19700 JUDICIAL RD. No early birds. Pole Shed Sale! Thur,9/29, Fri,9/30, Sat 10/1 8am-5pm Floral supplies, HH, tvs, girls/adult clothing, much more! Come check us out! 17490 Mushtown Road (Next to Ryan's Park)

Shakopee Sales 503 Timber Court, Sat., 10/8, 8am-3pm. Moving: a little bit of everything, HH, clothes, “old” goodies.

Garage Sale: Clothes, craft items, many misc items. Thurs-Fri., 10/67, 9am-5pm. 910 S. Shumway St. Multi Family Garage Sales. Thursday, 10/6Saturday 10/8. 8-5pm. Saturday 8-noon. 965, 990 Westchester Ave. Furniture, antiques, kitchen electrics, Electronics, home decor, clothing, HH items. Must see, must sell. Cash only

SW Metro Sales Other Areas A Gathering of Friends Antiques Market Vintage, primitives, cottage, fall decor. Thurs-Fri. 10/6-7, 9am-8pm Sat., 10/8, 9am-6pm Sun, 10/9, 10am-3pm Bachman's Minneapolis 6010 Lyndale Ave. S. 651-247-9935 www.agathering offriends.net

Garage Sale Finder! For as little as....

$25

you can place your sale ad in all 10 papers and websites with online mapping.

Place your ad online: iMarketplace.mn or phone 952-345-3003 or email: Classifieds@iMarketplace.mn


Prior Lake American | www.plamerican.com

October 1, 2011 | Page 25

Last year tickets sold out weeks before the event!

JUNIOR PRINCESSES

Nationally Recognized LAURI GLENN, FIRST CHOICE PHOTOGRAPHY

Six girls recently competed for two Junior Miss MN Valley Princess positions at the Shakopee American Legion, which donated the crowns. Those selected were Sara Kim, 2011 Princess Aurora Borealis, and Madison Markgraf, 2011 Princess Aurora Australis. Sara is the daughter of Tom and YenHa Kim of Shakopee and Madison is the daughter of Tony and Marie Markgraf of Shakopee. The candidates were, from left: Ajaa Walker of Shakopee, sponsored by Pablo’s Mexican Restaurant; Breanna Andersen of Carver, sponsored by The Hair Studio and Carver Hair Salon; Sara Kim of Shakopee, sponsored by Eckart Dental Center; Rebecca Miller of Shakopee, sponsored by Pure Market Express; Bailey Gesswein of Shakopee, sponsored by Christensen Ceilings and Walls; and Madison Markgraf of Shakopee, sponsored by Outland Builders. Lauri Glenn of First Choice Photography took photos and All Occassion Cakes of Shakopee provided a cake.

& Holiday Vendor Show Get Your Tickets Today! Show Date: Sat., Nov. 5, 2011

Tickets are being sold at 2 local newspaper offices, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday General Admission: $17 VIP: $55

Take your car search for a spin.

Shakopee Valley News

Doors open: 11 a.m.

Prior Lake American

327 Marschall Road, 14093 Commerce Ave., Shakopee Prior Lake Phone orders accepted. Call (952) 445-3333 for assistance, or email LHartmann@swpub.com for ticket information

Show begins: 2 p.m. Location: Prior Lake High School

Strollers will not be permitted

Brought to you by: Southwest Newspapers and Prior Lake-Savage Area Schools Community Education Presenting Sponsor

Grocery Sponsor

St. Francis Regional Medical Center

Village Market

Best Seat in the House Sponsor

Furniture Mart

Stage Decor Sponsor

Iris Valley Boutique & Gifts

Home for the Holidays Decoration Sponsor

Cal’s Market

Auto Dealer Sponsor

Appliance Sponsor

Shakopee Chevrolet

Eden Prairie Appliance

powered by 221368

Now you can post an unlimited number of ads to Thriftmart, our free-ads marketplace. Go to www.imarketplace.mn/thriftmart to place your ad, or call (952) 345-3003. (A telephone surcharge applies if you call.) And now businesses can use Thriftmart, too!

1000 gallon LP tank. $1000. or best offer. 952-445-1713 1000+ Yu-gi-oh cards. good+ condition. $30. 612-386-1518 16" boys "Transformers" bike w/training wheels. New-in-box, $50. 952200-7460 16"x24" steel square and 24". Polycast level, $6. 952-447-4961 1930s, RCA console radio. Needs repair. $100 or b/o. 952-829-5795 1998 Cadillac Seville $500. b/o 612-385-4006 2 boxes, CCI Blazer 38 special ammo. $24. 952-240-1025 2 galllons, Behr's, lightoak, semi transparent deck stain, $10. 612419-3998 2 recliners, metal/ tile end/ cocktail tables, $250/ all, 952-423-5333 2-235-65-R17 Michelin ltx/as tires rims. Fits 2002 Jeep. $250. 612867-6979 3, tiered cement outdoor waterfalls fountain, with bears. $175. 507-3648849 75 gal. aquarium complete mixed african cichlids. $325. o/bo. 952215-2277 95-97 Honda Accord V6 alternator. Needs regulator, $25. 952-2927886 Air hockey table, $40. call 952-944-3155 Air hockey table. Works good. Asking $40. Chaska 612-865-3418 Allstar Converse womens size 8. New, $20. 952-201-9989 Antique tool chest. $100. 952-934-6846

Black Lab, 8 wks, female, shots, purebred, $200/BO, 952-445-4077

Cub Scout sz large youth shirt. Like new $15. 612-845-5234

Black plastic landscape pond, 50 gal. $10. 612730-4965 Bowflex Power Pro, great condition with several attachments. $300. 651-717-5538 Browning BPS 12 gauge shotgun. New. $450. 952-934-7587 Browning, automatic shotgun. A5 12 gage 2 3/4". $325. 612-2804091 Butcher block, maple. 30"x25"x1.5" thick. $65. 952-448-3699 Carrom Sports 6' Air powered hockey game table, $150. 612-7416870 Cat, Tuxedo, 5yrs.,litter trained, family cat, with supplies. Free. 952-9564704 Chaise lounge contemporary and comfortable. Great condition, $300. 612-275-8699 Cherrywood futon and table, upgraded mattress $400. 952-4433693 Chicco modo music & play table. Great condition, $40. 952-443-0186

Desk chair, green fabric, excellent condition. $25, cash, Call 952-4455446 Desk chair, w/arms, rolling base, fully adjustable, $40. 952-9750532 Desk, solid oak corner, 4 drawers, file, chair, $300. 612-708-7067

China, set of 8, Noritake, Blythe pattern $100. 612-382-4680 Coffee table, good shape, $20. 952-2927886 Couch 2 matching chairs, tuscan colors, excellent condition, $200, 952-233-5121 Couch, brown microsuede, excellent shape, $200. 952-467-3813

Bedroom set 3 piece in great shape. $150. 952807-2728 Bedroom set, headboard queen frame. Dresser w/mirror, $300. 952-220-5051

Craftsman 18in like new chain saw. $75. Call 952-949-1095 Craftsman workbench, back panels, pegboards. H-40" D-24" W60". $175. 952-2001996 Crossbow, all around exercise machine. Over 65 exercises. $85. 651208-2169 Cub Cadet tracktor, 42" mower, 36" snow blower. $400, 952-447-5355

Black Lab puppy looking for a loving home. $75. 952-334-5604

Cub Scout Bear and Wolf handbooks, new $20. 612-845-5324

Appliances, new Cusinart ice cream maker. Oster breadmaker. $60. 952-220-7645 Beautiful kitten for sale $10. 952-445-4976

Diamond plate aluminum toolbox, fits fullsize truck. $135. 612867-6979 Dining chairs, 4, oak, wood highback, studs $30. Cash/pickup 952882-4919 Dog hut, Igloo Playmate, nice/ clean, 30x24”, $45, 952-9062928 Door, new, 33.5". Six panel solid maple. Finished, $150. 952-4480574 Duck decoys, greenheads, drakes, hens, carrying bag. $60 952445-8545 Electronics: DVD player and VHS with remote, hookup. $30. 952-2207645 Elliptical Horizon Club series cse3.5. $200. 952-226-2808 EZ Up 8x8 shelter with tables. $75. 952-9069009 Fisher price carnival kick & whirl great condition. $20. 952-443-0186 Flambeau Pintail decoys, new, 9 hens, 9 drakes. $40. 612-7562965 Folding Chairs, Samsonite, (12), $35, 612803-1212 Foosball table good condition. $80. 952-9443155 FP loving family doll house, lots of accessories! $75. 952-4472584 Free blk lab/pitbull puppy, 612-360-3215 Free kitten to good home, contact hlazyheart@yahoo.com if you're interested. Free, indoor female cat. 3yrs spayed declawed blk/brn. Accessories 952-440-6094

Freezer, Sears, 6 cu ft, half-size, upright, $45. 952-443-2506 Garden trailor, $250. Call 952-949-1095

Large oak entertainment center, mission style $250. 952-443-3693 Lawn Sweeper 38” AgriFab, $40, 952-496-0231

Gas generator svp-5000 rated watts 6250 max 10hp, $425. 612-4325375 German pup, purebred akc 12 weeks. Vets shots, $400. 952-6819100 German shepherd puppy. $500. 952-873-2075

Leather sofa, love seat, gray, excellent, $125. 952-474-5028 Loveseat, recliner rocker, brown colors, good shape, $200. 952-4673813 Mary Kay, Timewise, Visibly Fit body lotion. $10. 952-564-1161 Mary Kay, Velocity perfum, new $15. cash 952-564-1161 Mercury, outboard motor 1950's, 5hp. $125. 952-934-6069 Microsoft Office Professional 2010, retail version. Brand new. $348.99 calhounbk@gmail.com Minnesota Vikings locker room gift card. $300. Value/sell $250. 952215-8707 Mirror, oval shape, 26H x18W, ornate gold frame. $30. 952-9750532 Montgomery Ward upright freezer, 10.0 cuft. Works good. $50. 952496-2493 Muffler & Sidestep. 1998 Ford F150 ext cab. $50. 612-877-1946 New, 7", ceramic Halloween pumpkin, with candle. $5. 952-2401025. New, infrared space heater. Warranty. 3in1 humidifier/air purifier. $329. 763-516-5594

Girls bike, 20 inch, pink. good condition. $25. 612-518-1836 Glock 20, 10mm, 2 mags, night sights, $500. 612-716-5952 Halloween crocodile over the head outfit, 1224 mos. $5. 952-2332121 Handcrafted deck chair, cedar and hardwood. $65. Call: 952-3615401 Handcrafted rocking chair, cedar and hardwood. $65. Call: 952361-5401 Heywood-Wakefield Victorian wicker rocker. Needs some restoration $100. 952-934-0532 Home gym by Weider $130. or b/o. Teresa 952-221-7924 Humble, wood burner 30x24x36 blower, glass, front loading. $350. 952426-8556 Ice maker, Scottsman cm500 large capacitylike new. $500. 952649-7936 IKEA corner desk in perfect condition, $50. 952-201-9989 Ipod nano, 6th generation, 8gb, never used, green. $120. 952-4408591 Keyboard, Yamaha and stand. New, huge song database. $125, 612386-0444 Kitchen island w/stainless steel top. Great condition, $100. b/o. 952-217-4068 Kitchen stove, 4 burner, white, free u-haul, 952474-4814 Kitten, free to a good family. 612-703-0630 Ladies golf clubs, full set w/bag and covers. $299. 612-382-4680

Nintendo ds lite red with case. Barely used, $75. 612-275-8699 Oak dining table 48" 68". Oval, four chairs. $500. 612-387-5549 Old Navy monkey costume, 2pc, 12-24 mos. $10. 952-233-2121 Piano grand needs service and tuning $500, can deliver 952-4454177 Piano, spinet with bench $200 or b/o. 612-8672361 Pier One Sante Fe armoire. Excellent condition, $200. 952-2262808 Pool table, nice. $250. 952-466-5880

Pilates Bench FREE. Works like new. 952270-3357 Poker table w/green felt, seats 8. Good condition $50. 952-200-7460 Pop/snack vending machine. Like new, must sell. $500. b/o 952-4797456 Portable bed, (folding), $30, 612-803-1212 PR4300 Buckhorn rifle 50 cal. new in box. $110, 952-447-5355 Propane tanks, 2 100 lbs. $40 952-445-3520 PS2, game. Smackdown vs raw, $5. 612730-4965 Puppy Mom YorkiPoo Dad CairnePoo 6weeks old. $250- $350. 952649-0888 Reclining lift chair, light green, $400, 952-4961372 Refrigerator freezer 18 cf, light yellow. Works great. $75. 952-6497936 Reptile tank 18"x17"x36 accessories included. U pickup, $10. 952-4700652 Savage, medium mutt, needs forever home, friendly, FREE. Call: (269)832-0372 Schumacher 6/12 volt battery charger. 1.3 amps, $15. 952-4013786 Sectional couch, 2 footrests. Excellent condition, like new. $250. 952-445-2801 Shotgun Remington 870 Express 16ga pump. Like new! $200. 952250-2083 Shotgun shell reloader, MEC 600 Jr., 20 ga. $50 952-445-8545 Small child's rocker 21"Hx11"W, red. Good condition, $12. 952-4474961 Small stool, $8. Call 952-237-2010 Snowblower, 2-stage, Toro 1028lxe PowerMax, $350. good condition. 612-749-2536 Sofa, french prov., 8 ft, good condition. $75. 952-474-5028 Spinning wheel, antique. Good condition $100. 612-242-2007

Sports cards all sports. Must go 20,000 + $450. 952-303-5562 Stroller, Graco. Excellent condition $35. cash, pickup. 952-882-4919 Subpanel loadcenter. New. Cutler-Hammer, main lug, 12 pole. $25. 952-448-0574 Sunbanker multi-gym, weight bench with resistance bands. $100. 952448-3455 Sunbeam gas grill with side burner. $25. 952448-3455 Table small, wood, white + 2 chairs, $50. 952-401-8976 Tickets, 2 Roger Daltrey 10/4 $270. Mainfl. Sold out. 612-237-3907 Toddler bed, excellent condition. Mattress and beddings included. $75 klevenjoel@gmail.com Treadmill, fold-up excellent condition $250. or b/o. 612-867-2361 Trombone, Holton good condition. $200 or best offer. 612-816-0356 Trombone-Bach for student. Gently used, good condition. $350. b/o. 952-484-3731

Twin captain bed, pale wood, excellent condition, $100. b/o. 612-5181836 VHS player + 12in monitor + VHS. $40. Larry 952-368-9670 Vintage cedar chest. Pick up. $200. or b/o. Sandy, 952-829-5795 White laundry tub with legs, 23x25x32. $24. includes hdwr 952-3689257 White wicker bedroom chair and nightstand. $100. 612-877-1946 WII console with rechargeable remotes, many attachments. $90. Larry 952-368-9670 Wilsons leather jacket. Like new, size M $25. 952-447-3952 Winchester M70 30.06, synthetic stock, sling, no scope. $350. 612716-5952 Windows 7 Home, retail version. Brand new, sealed, $145. calhounbk@gmail.com Womens Hilary Radley Alpaca winter coat. Sz 6. $50. 952-401-3786 Wooden shelf, 24x24 $15. 952-237-2010

Twin bed with box spring. Oak headboard. $25. 952-934-8050

Yakima cargo bin, for top of car, van, $60. 952-934-4983

Ty clubby 2 kit, $5. Call 952-237-2010

Yu-gi-oh duel disk card shooter, mint condition, $40. 612-386-1518

ThriftMart Discovery White laundry tub with legs, 23x25x32. $24. includes hardware. 952-368-9257


Page 26 | October 1, 2011

www.plamerican.com | Prior Lake American

Local potter to show work at Red Wing art festival A Prior Lake artist will be among those participating in the juried Fall Festival of the Arts next month in Red Wing. Potter Charles Deckas has created works since the 1960s. He earned a bachelor of fine arts degree from the University of Minnesota in 1969, taught art at St. Louis Park High School from 1969 to

AUTOMOTIVE

1983, and opened Whittier Works Gallery in 1975. He has been a full-time potter since 1983. The Fall Festival of the Arts is set for Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 8-9, on Bush and Third streets in downtown Red Wing. For more information, visit www.redwingartsassociation.org.

Visit our website for more Inventory www.DehmlowAuto.com AUTO SALES & SERVICE

HOME OF DEM•LOOOOW PRICES 11 Chevy Equinox

• LT Pkg • CD • Keyless • Bluetooth • iPod Port • Alloy Wheels

AWD

$

07 Subaru Impreza, AWD, Only 25M 07 VW Beetle, Loaded, Only 34M

23,990

08 Saab 9-3 Aero, Only 31M

• Pwr Sunroof • CD Changer • Keyless Entry • Side Airbags • Alloy Wheels

08 Mazda CX-7, AWD, Navigation

06 Mitsubishi Eclipse “GS”

Local Trade

NEW INVENTORY

$

08 Lexus RX350, AWD, Loaded 08 Mazda CX-9, AWD, Navigation 09 Honda Accord EX-L, V6, Loaded

9,990

08 Chrysler Town & Country • Touring Pkg • Rear Heat/Air • Pwr Doors/Liftgate • Stow N Go • Alloy Wheels

Only 38M

$

89 Mercedes-Benz 560 SL• Hardtop/ Convertible • Leather • Climate Control • CD Changer • Alloy Wheels • Must See!

Only 70M

16,990

$

14,990

LOW 3.49% FINANCING • OPEN MONDAY UNTIL 8 PM FALL SERVICE SPECIALS • Tune Up • Brakes • Oil Change Larry Master Tech

Rocky

Call Larry in our service department for an appointment.

Hwy. 13 @ Dakota St.

952-440-2277

Downtown Prior Lake

952-440-2277

209676

THE LEAVES ARE FALLING… SO ARE OUR PRICES!

Call today!

PETS OF THE WEEK Rainbow Animal Rescue has 20-plus kittens and cats ready for adoption. There’s a wide range of cats and kittens to choose from: Siamese, calico, white, Maine coon, tabby, tortoiseshell, orange, black and gray. Kittens have been socialized in homes. All cats and kittens live in foster homes and are socialized. They have been vet-checked, feline leukemia/FIV tested negative, and have required shots. All cats over 6 months of age have been spayed or neutered. All kittens under 6 months receive a certificate for a free spay/ neuter included in the adoption fee. All cats and kittens come with a welcome pack including free food, blanket, coupons, treats and discounts at Pet Supplies Plus. These pets are being fostered at Rainbow Animal Rescue in Prior Lake. If you can give a pet a home, call (952) 440-3824, e-mail rainbow.animal.

SEND US YOUR …

$

Autumn is upon us, and we’re seeking your best fall color photos. We’re looking for those eye-popping reds, oranges, yellows and golds – whether they’re in landscape photos or pictures of your kids playing in the leaves.

’08 Dodge Durango 4 Dr. 4x4 57,000 one owner $ miles, Loaded

12,995

SLT, 4x4, Loaded, Leather, Sunroof, One owner

$

14,995

’04 FFordd R Ranger St Stepside id XLT

’03 GMC Yukon Y k XL Suburban S b b

Fx4, 4x4, 4.0 V6, AT, AC, Loaded, $ 53,000 miles

13,995

12,995

VELISHEK AUTO SALES 16661 HWY. 13 S., PRIOR LAKE, MN 55372 • 952-447-2237 FULL SERVICE SPECIALS CALL FOR DETAILS 209743

CAR RENTAL

Car Rentals • Day • Week • Month

952-440-2400

THE BEST DEALS ARE IN CHASKA!

0 60 1 000 %

FOR

P L U S

FINANCING

$ , BONUS CASH

’12 12 CHEVY CAMARO

ON SELECT CHEVYS AND BUICKS

NEW ’11 CHEVY MALIBU #15843

#16200

Share your best photo with Prior Lake American readers. Send your picture – in .jpg format, at least 3 MB file size – to Editor Lori Carlson, editor@ plamerican.com, before noon on Wednesday, Oct. 19. Include your name and city of residence. We’ll run some reader photos online at plamerican.com and some PRIOR LAKE in the Oct. 29 American print edition.

AMERICAN

4WD Navi, DVD, Dark Cherry, Exceptionally Clean Vehicle. #16128A

29 * MPG

30,945

$

NEW ’12 BUICK LACROSSE

33 * MPG

19,499

$

NEW '12 BUICK ENCLAVE

#16053

SER#486

AWD

MSRP .................... $31,340 YOU SAVE ...............$1,362* SALE PRICE FROM

$

30 * MPG

29,978

NEW '11 CHEVY SILVERADO

MSRP .................... $43,050 YOU SAVE ...............$3,474* SALE PRICE FROM

$

26 * MPG

39,599

NEW '11 CHEVY TAHOE

#15963

REG CAB

09 CHEVY

06 CHEVY

04 BUICK

COLORADO

COBALT

PARK AVENUE

CREW CAB LT Deep Ruby, 31,016 Miles, #15985A

LT White, 51,498 Miles, #16120A

18,178

3.8 White, 71,144 Miles, #16100A

23,995 $9,995 $12,995

$

10 CHEVY

08 CHRYSLER

EQUINOX

TOWN & COUNTRY LTD Silver, 28,399 Miles, #15790A

08 CHEVY

TRAILBLAZER LT Silverstone, 34,946 Miles, #15302A

24,995 $26,995 $20,995 09 CHEVY

06 CHEVY

SUBURBAN

SILVERADO

MALIBU

LT 1500 4WD, DVD, Gray, 17,960 Miles, #5767

CREW LTZ Red, 46,632 Miles, #16168A

10 CHEVY

MAXX LT Green, 75,745 Miles, #15709A

38,995 $39,995 $9,995

$

01 FORD

06 DODGE

08 PONTIAC

RANGER

GRAND CARAVAN

G6 3.5

XLT

Black, 58,794 Miles, #15786D

SXT Blue, 75,737 Miles, #5850A

12,995 $11,495

$

Gray, 64,432 Miles, #15694B

$

12,995

08 PONTIAC

09 PONTIAC

02 OLDSMOBILE

GRAND PRIX

VIBE 1.8L

INTRIGUE

#15741 Mystic Blue, 37,330 Miles, #16160A

13,995 $13,995

$

An open house is planned to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Dennis and Linda Karow, from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8 at Lakefront Park’s pavilion, 5000 Kop Parkway. RSV P by ca l li ng (76 3) 972-3433 or e-mailing kvieau@ delano.k12.mn.us.

#16128A

$ 22 * MPG

Dennis and Linda Karow

31,177 miles

Gray, 93,972 Miles, #16019A

MSRP .................... $22,885 YOU SAVE ...............$4,707* SALE PRICE FROM

ANNIVERSARY

31,995

$

$ MSRP .................... $22,835 YOU SAVE ...............$3,336* SALE PRICE FROM

Dr. Wayne Hines, optometrist, and Dr. Charles Puffer, dentist, will have a joint 25th anniversary celebration from 4 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 6 at 14120 Commerce Ave., Prior Lake. The event will include food and beverages. Joining Hines’ practice as a partner is Dr. Lisa DawsonClausen, a Prior Lake resident who has practiced optometry for 12 years. Dr. Chad Legois also has joined Crossroads Optometric Clinic as an associate. He has extensive experience in Lasik pre- and post-operation procedures and has been practicing for six years.

’09 HONDA PILOT TOURING

LT Cyber Gray, 31,665 Miles, #5858

MSRP .................... $30,945 YOU SAVE ...............$1,200* SALE PRICE FROM

Dentists celebrate 25 years

Outstanding photographs of autumn’s color

to view a our complete inventory 41,000 miles, Auto, Loaded

rescue@gmail.com, or visit Pet Supplies Plus in Burnsville from noon to 3 p.m. every Saturday. Pets also can be viewed online at www.petfinder. com (enter zip code 55372).

BUSINESS NEWS

www.velishekautosales.com ’06 Ford Escape XLS 4 Dr. 4x4

A trio of kittens

MSRP .................... $43,945 YOU SAVE ...............$6,637* SALE PRICE FROM

$

22 * MPG

37,878

*R.T.D. 0% in lieu of all rebates on select models. A.O.C.

GL BLue, 113,127 Miles, #16206A

$

5,995

06 NISSAN

08 JEEP

07 PONTIAC

MURANO

GRAND CHEROKEE

G6 GT

S DVD Gold Mist, 85,780 Miles, #16161B

Laredo Blue, 38,003 Miles, #16038A

Convertible Ivory White, 60,962 Miles, #15611A

13,995 $19,995 $16,995

$

2860 Chaska Blvd. • Chaska

952-448-2850 www.lenzenchevbuick.com

used car finance

AS LOW AS

1.9%


PriorLake_100111