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MAY 11-17, 2022

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Palmyra welcomes new code enforcement officer New resident Billingiere has 30 years of experience The Sun Frank Billingiere, a veteran of the construction trades, has been named code enforcement officer for Palmyra. “I’ve taken on, as my responsibility, the appearance of this little borough,” he said. While the job entails managing small-scale violations like overgrown weeds or unkept property, Billingiere said he prioritizes and takes seriously the responsibility of monitoring dilapidated structures that may be a safety risk. “There’s several different hats that this office wears,” he maintained. Residents and business owners can best help Billingiere in his new role by paying attention to the city’s regulation and maintaining their own properties, he said. Billingiere comes to Palmyra with more than 30 years of experience, having risen through the ranks from young carpenter to general contractor specializing in high-end renovations and interior trim. He enjoys conceptualizing projects and verbally communicating his vision to project teams. Billingiere, who attended art school in Philadelphia and San Francisco, also spent 15 years as a building inspector for the former, where he took on as many as 20 buildings a day as the city’s Fishtown neighborhood gentrified with new buildings and restaurants. He believes his contracting experience gives him a unique perspective on construction. While some inspectors may come into a role

without practical, on-site construction experience, Billingiere explained that’s only half the job. “If you don’t know anything about construction, it’s kind of hard to talk to somebody,” he explained, then referred to the digital currency form for transactions. “That’d be like me trying to talk to somebody well versed in Crypto.” The code enforcement officer said he hopes to work directly with homeowners, contractors, and business owners to resolve infractions. “I’m hoping in my job that I will be able to solve any of these issues without any court appointments or stuff like that,” he noted. Billingiere started in his new role at the end of March, and recently moved to Palmyra with his wife. As a resident, he said he understands that appearances can attract buyers to neighborhoods and businesses to main streets. “I don’t think it’s quite fair when you have certain people that take extreme care of property, and then three houses down, you have someone that just doesn’t care about anything,” he observed. In his free time, Billingiere and his wife enjoy watching their two granddaughters’ LIttle League games. He calls himself a voracious reader who loves music and playing guitar. As for the job, Billingiere made the following promise. “I’m here for the residents if they have issues,” he said. “I don’t turn any phone calls away and I don’t turn any emails away. And that’s what I’m getting paid to do.” To get in touch with Frank Billingiere, contact borough hall at (856) 829-6100.

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Frank Billingiere is welcomed as Palmyra’s new code enforcement officer after moving to the borough with his wife.

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THE PALMYRA SUN — MAY 11-17, 2022

Rowan College at Burlington County hosts fashion show Student designs featured at the Mount Laurel campus By CHRISTINE HARKINSON The Sun

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Twenty-five fashion students at Rowan College at Burlington County showcased their designs at the college’s annual fashion show on May 4. “We thought we’d only have about 65 to 70 pieces, and then the next thing we know, we’re like, ‘Oh my God, we’re (like) at 78,’” said Lisa Steinberg, program coordinator of the Rowan fashion department. She described seeing her students bring their ideas to fruition. “It’s not so easy, because sometimes they come in (and) they’re like, ‘I know what I’m going to do,’ and I’m like, ‘That’s

good, but we (have) to get it out of your head and we (have) to get it on paper,’” Steinberg said. “ … When you see it on the runway, it’s like magic.” Fashion student Frankie Sanchez, who launched four pieces at the show, originally planned a collection focused on sensuality and explained the focus behind her sketches. “A lot of them, I never illustrated those types of fabrics before, like the snakeskin and the see-through sequins,” she said, “but once I see something and I’m committed, I have to do it.” Sanchez described the types of fabrics she works with. “It’s really what catches my please see FASHION, page 3

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Fashion: Student designs continued from page 2

Warren R. Heymann, MD Steven M. Manders, MD Justin J. Green, MD Lacy L. Sommer, MD Camille E. Introcaso, MD Donald J. Baker, MD Patrick J. McMahon, MD Julianna Jarvis, PA-C Christina Cammarata, PA-C Christina Ponzio, PA-C

“I used to have to pack my clothes all day for the whole day, so versatility is where I’m coming from,” she said. “To be able to dress down and throw on signature pieces to dress up in case I don’t have time to go home.” McGill noted how she works through the creative process. “What has been my holdup is the fact that I don’t draw well,” she acknowledged. “Within me, I have all of these visions that I cannot put on paper and it’s, ‘No I’m not there.’ But Lisa (Steinberg) had me just do the best (I) can.” “ … I was able to get my vision across in what I wanted to do and I would like to hone in on that.” Fashion student Atillahan Ozturk, who had three pieces featured in the show, described his collection, what he called “Biomorphed.”

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eye,” she explained. “I love working with stiffer fabrics and also with very lightweight silk or lace. I’m very good with those because I used to (design) evening wear and I work best twith them.” o “When it comes to very slippery fabrics that will leave holes in them, like leather and everything, I feel like it’s a nightmare,” Sanchez added. “Because once you see it, you can’t unsee it, and some people -have a specialty in that. I look up to them because that’s a lot to work with.” Fashion student Deborah -McGill, who showcased three epieces at the fashion event, explained how her lifestyle indspired her collection.

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Burlington County hosts first juried short film festival Parks Division organizers get help from state Council on the Arts The first-annual Burlington County Juried Short Film Festival will be held on May 12 and May 13 and will feature a fantastic line up of imaginative movies and documentaries. A total of 27 short films will be screened during the two-day festival at the Burlington County Library. Screenings will begin at 5 p.m. and will include a mix of narrative, documentary and animation films. “Burlington County is blessed with incredible natural beauty, history and culture and we’re excited to hold our very first short film festival to further cultivate the arts and filmmaking here,” said Burlington County Commissioner Allison Eckel, the Board’s liaison to the Department of Resource Conservation and Parks. “There’s an incredible mix of films, including narrative comedies, heart-warming documentaries and dramatic mysteries and adventure tales. The next Stephen Spielberg or Alfred Hitchcock could be here in Burlington County, so we want to encourage film lovers of all ages to come out and see these amazing short films.” Among the films that will screen is the uplifting tale “Dan

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the Man”, a documentary about a young man who doesn’t let Down Syndrome impede his huge passion for sports; the fantasy film “Prince and the Zs”, about a pair of friends attempting to survive a zombie apocalypse; and “Stand Off”, an imaginative and funny look at two children who imagine themselves to be fighting an Old West showdown. Some of the other films scheduled to be screened include: “Who Says”, a documentary about a New Jersey program for developmentally disabled teens and young adults; “Midnight Paper” about a student’s frantic attempt to meet a deadline; “Chatsworth”, about a mysterious disappearance in the Pine Barrens; “We are Suns”, a documentary about a college student’s quest to meet his biological father; and the animated film, “Dams: Pros and Cons.” The movies were created by filmmakers with different backgrounds, including students from Moorestown High School and a Burlington Township Media TV class. Submissions also came from hobbyists and

please see FILM, page 5


MAY 11-17, 2022 — THE PALMYRA SUN

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Film: Juried festival continued from page 4 professional filmmakers. All films are 30 minutes or less and were deemed family-friendly, though some movies shown on the second night feature more mature themes. Admission to the festival is free and both nights will conclude at around 8 p.m. following a discussion period with the participating filmmakers. In addition to screening each of the films, the parks division will announce 11 award winners for best animated film, best documentary, best narrative and best “Parks” film, a special category for films about nature or the Burlington County Parks. Movies filmed in Burlington County parks were also eligible for this category. Several other submissions were awarded special Judges Choice honors. A panel of three professional filmmakers and educators

judged the films. The Burlington County Parks Division organized the new festival with support from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. “With more than 1,000 acres of developed parkland and 50-miles plus of interconnecting hiking, biking and running trails and several fantastic museums and galleries, our Burlington County Parks System is clearly one of the best in the entire state and region, but what also sets us apart is the incredible events and programs our Parks staff help organize and run,” Eckel said. “Events like this film festival help enlighten and entertain residents of all ages and are a big part of why our county is such a great destination. You don’t want to miss it.” For more information on all of the films, visit https://www. co.burlington.nj.us.

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THE PALMYRA SUN — MAY 11-17, 2022

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n elderly South Jersey woman recently got a phone call that shook her to the core. A person claiming to be her daughter said she had been arrested for causing a car accident and needed her mother to pay bail of more than $3,000. When the woman began to suspect the call was not legitimate and requested a phone number where she could reach her daughter, the caller hung up. It was a scam, one of thousands perpetrated every year by criminals to extract money from unsuspecting people, especially vulnerable senior citizens. In a world where communication keeps us plugged in 24/7, the scammer thrives. It may seem quaint with Facebook, Twitter and other means of connection available to us that the phone line is a preferred means of ripping someone off. But it is often a scammer’s favored method. Based on the results of a March 2021 survey, the security app maker Truecaller estimates some 59 million Americans lost money to a phone scam in the 12 months prior to the survey. Data from the FTC (Federal Trade Commission)

In YOUR opinion Let us know your thoughts by sending a letter to the editor to the email address at the right. shows the average financial loss from scams that start with a phone call is $1,200, more than any other form of contact. The AARP estimates half of all mobile calls are fraudulent, and the problem is getting worse. And while fraudulent landline calls have declined because of cell phones, they still serve the scammer’s purpose. Criminals are not above using COVID as a ploy either, according to the U.S. Treasury Department. A scammer may claim to be from the federal government so he or she can offer the victim pandemic-related grants or stimulus payments in exchange for personal financial information. Don’t buy it. Don’t buy these either: A caller asks you to claim a prize you’ve won by turning over gift card information. Or you are asked to pay in advance for a service

or product to help out a friend or colleague in need. People have lost their life savings in these scenarios. What can you do to stop a scammer? The FTC has advice on how to recognize what is fraud and what isn’t. If you are asked to pay money to get a sweepstakes prize, then it isn’t a prize. You can’t be arrested, as some callers threaten by pretending to be law-enforcement sources or representatives of federal agencies; neither of those would call and make threats. And legitimate government agencies – including the IRS and Social Security – will not make a phone call to confirm personal information. The FTC says the best way to avoid being scammed is to hang up before a robo caller asks you to press any numbers. If you don’t recognize a number, end the call. But be advised that scammers can make any name or number look like a real ID. Bottom line: If a call doesn’t have the ring of truth, it could be a fake. Learn to recognize and prevent phone scams by visiting the FTC website at ftc. gov/calls.

Burlington County farmer’s market ends a hit Crafters and artists sell their crops, artwork and goods The Burlington County Farmers Market’s record-setting season ended on a high note with unprecedented attendance at the first of the two holiday markets around the Thanksgiving holiday. The first holiday market on Nov. 20 set a new record with more than 2,000 vehicles counted at the event, surpassing the 1,449 counted during the July 17 market. The final Dec. 4 market drew in even more shoppers. “Word has spread about the amazing varieties of crafts, foods, and produce that’s available at our market and the relaxing fun of shopping outdoors at what remains a working farm,” said Commissioner Director Felicia Hopson. “We’re thrilled by

the market’s popularity and the boost it’s providing to famers and small business owners.” The final holiday market was held at the Burlington County Agricultural Center on Centerton Road in Moorestown. A dozen farmers and 34 crafters and artists sold, artwork and goods and there were 21 food vendors and a holiday cookie decorating class at the Agricultural Center’s Farmhouse Kitchen. The Old Man Garage Band will also performed live music. “Fresh cut flowers, holiday wreaths, craft beer, gifts, decorations and incredible foods can all be found at the market. Shoppers can check off an entire holiday

list with one trip,” said Commissioner Linda Hynes. “It’s a family-friendly event that helps support our county’s farmers and small business vendors. It’s not to be missed.” Hynes, who is the Board’s liaison to the Department of Resource Conservation and Parks, said the popular holiday markets often draw newcomers to the Agricultural Center, which was previously a 68-acre dairy farm before the County preserved the land in 2005. A portion of the property continues to be leased for farming and the site also has community gardens and field plots please see MARKET, page 7

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The Sun is published weekly by Newspaper Media Group, 130 Twinbridge Drive, Pennsauken, NJ 08110. It is delivered weekly to select addresses in Palmyra. If you are not on the mailing list, six-month subscriptions are available for $55, and a one-year subscription is available for $110. . To submit a news release, please email news@palmyrasun.com. For advertising information, call 856-779-3800 ext. 6920 or email sunadvertising@newspapermediagroup.com. The Sun welcomes suggestions and comments from readers – including any information about errors that may call for a correction to be printed.

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Market: Record season continued from page 6

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The Burlington County Farmers Market celebrated its opening day this year on May 7 at the county Agricultural Center. Last year was the most successful season in the market’s history. maintained by the Rutgers Cooperative Extension. There is also a commercial kitchen used for County-sponsored cooking classes and other events. “The Agricultural Center is one of the real jewels of our parks system. The farmers market may be its main attraction but there’s

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plenty else to see and experience,” said Hynes. “It’s a fantastic place and events like our holiday markets allow more people to discover it.”

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THE PALMYRA SUN — MAY 11-17, 2022

Fashion: Student designs continued from page 3

CHRISTINE HARKINSON/The Sun

Rowan College at Burlington County fashion student Frankie Sanchez showcased two original pieces (above) in the college’s annual fashion show on May 4.

“It has a take on biomimicry … being inspired by nature or design or a specific system,” he said. “Also, I really wanted mine to focus on sustainability … I don’t believe it’s just a trend. I think it’s something we have to really pay attention (to) now as it gets worse and worse.” “My collection is made out of all natural materials, so cotton or wool and silk,” Ozturk added. “Each (piece) is inspired by a different climate.” The student loves to experiment with different fabrics, but he emphasized how the design process can be difficult. “You gather research about what you want in your pieces and that takes at least a week,” he said. “And then the second week, you look over your research and then you start sketching down. But that’s not your actual sketches.” “Towards the end of the sec-

ond or third week, that’s when you start really making pieces on (your) own,” Ozturk added. “So that part is the longest part.” Ozturk described what he looked forward to most about the show. “ … Seeing the models come out one by one with the clothes on,” he offered. “Because … I feel like every person that works on crafts, if it’s making a bench or constructing a building, it’s like when you see the final piece, you’re like, ‘That came out of me.’” CHRISTINE HARKINSON/The Sun

An original design by Rowan College at Burlington County fashion student Atillahan Ozturk was this piece, included in his collection “Biomorphed.” His work was featured in the college’s annual fashion show on May 4.


MAY 11-17, 2022 — THE PALMYRA SUN

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MAY 11-17, 2022

BURLINGTON COUNTY

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Versatile Violet: Moorestown’s Marta leads team at plate and on mound Sophomore continues to build on an impressive freshman season By MATTHEW SHINKLE Sports Editor

It was in the middle of gym class last year when Moorestown softball head coach Bill Mulvihill was first introduced to the freshman he would rely on heavily throughout the 2020’21 season. Violet Marta, a softball player for much of her life before reaching Moorestown High School, was eager to make the team and help however she could. Fortunately for the Quakers, all Marta did was pitch 64 of 82 innings last season, striking out 63 opposing batters while allowing just 17 earned runs. She also recorded the thirdmost hits on the team and thirdmost RBIs while hitting in the heart of the lineup, a tremendous amount of responsibility for a freshman. But according to Mulvihill, she didn’t play like one. “She came in and didn’t throw like you’d expect a freshman to,” Mulvihill said. “She had a lot of control of her pitches and was really poised on the mound despite her age. Whether the other team was hitting her or not in a

MATTHEW SHINKLE/South Jersey Sports Weekly

Moorestown sophomore Violet Marta leads the Quakers in most offensive and pitching categories this season, a major reason for her team's recent eight-game winning streak.

given game, nothing ever really got to her, she never changed her demeanor.” So Mulvihill and his assistant coaches were understandably excited to see what Marta would do as she got older and more comfortable at the highschool level. Now in her sophomore year, Marta has continued to grow and take on even more responsibility, both in the lineup and on the mound for Moorestown. Through the first 14 games this season, the Quakers are 9-5, in large part due to Marta’s presence both in the lineup and

on the mound. Having pitched 83 innings so far, she recently reached her 100th strikeout on the year, while also leading the team with 21 hits, 11 runs scored, 21 RBIs and four home runs. Adjusting from travel to highschool softball last year was slightly challenging at first due to the age gap, according to Marta. In preparing for her freshman season last year, she expected to battle for the starting pitching job, but after the first practice, Marta realized what was best for the team would be evident before the first game of the season, and she looked

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forward to helping however she could. “I immediately thought that the one senior that I knew pitched was going to be my enemy going into the season, because I wanted that job,” Marta said. “I kept telling myself that I had to get ready and try to impress the coaches to show I should pitch. But she actually wanted to play first base over pitching anyway, so after that, I was able to relax a lot more than I expected.” Marta didn’t stray too far from throwing strictly fastballs and changeups last year, but

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looked forward to adding more pitches to her repertoire as a sophomore. She added three new pitches to her arsenal this season. In terms of her value to the team, Mulvihill said it’s not hard to describe. “Since day one this season, she’s been the complete player,” he said. “She’s leading the team in hits and RBIs while pitching almost every game. She’s doing everything for us. “She’s having a great year.” Having excelled at such a young age with the program, Marta has the opportunity to break a few records before her time with the Quakers is up. According to Mulvihill, Moorestown has only two softball players who have recorded at least 100 hits: Caroline Muccifori with 112 (2014-’17) and Erika Heffernen with 106 (2017-’19). Regardless of individual accomplishments, Marta is focused on the team of mostly sophomores growing together. After a 13-10 record last year, Moorestown has a good opportunity to surpass last season’s final record. “I definitely thought we were going to do better this season than we were last year,” Marta said. “Last year, it felt like a lot of us younger girls on the team were still getting comfortable out there because we were freshmen. “We had the chance to learn from a few seniors last year and we’re putting to use what they taught us.”

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SOUTH JERSEY SPORTS WEEKLY

Brown, Cheeseman make the most of opportunities at Cherokee The Chiefs defeated Delran 9-5 in the opening round of the Diamond Classic By MATTHEW SHINKLE Sports Editor

Coming into the 2021-’22 baseball season, both junior Evan Brown and senior Jeremy Cheeseman looked forward to getting back on the diamond for Cherokee, after injuries kept the pair from playing where they felt most comfortable. Following a strong start on the year – which at one point included a six-game winning streak – the Chiefs defeated Delran 9-5 in the first round of the 48th annual Joe Hartmann Diamond Classic, with Brown and Cheeseman being two of the leading reasons for Cherokee’s opening-round win. Brown hit a leadoff home run in the bottom of the first inning to set the offensive tone early on, giving Cherokee a lead it would not relinquish. The junior would end the day with two hits, three RBIs and a stolen base, while also playing stellar defense at second. After a freshman season lost to the pandemic, Brown played just a handful of games last year before suffering a hip fracture midway through the spring. It would limit him to just 21 atbats his sophomore season. “I just try to enjoy every moment I can,” he said. “I know firsthand that it can be taken away from me just like that. I just take it one game at a time. I’d been looking forward to playing for Cherokee ever since I was a kid, and I went to all the games when I was younger. “So I don’t take this for granted at all.” Through Cherokee’s first 15 games of the season, Brown leads the Chiefs in hits, home runs and runs scored, all from the leadoff spot. Coach Marc Petragnani – in his 14th season at the helm for Cherokee – said

MATTHEW SHINKLE/South Jersey Sports Weekly

Cherokee senior Jeremy Cheeseman pitched 5.1 innings for the Chiefs in a 9-5 win over Delran in the opening round of the Diamond Classic.

watching Brown come back this season and play even better than he did last year while moving to the top of the lineup has been something special to watch. “He’s a catalyst for this team; we moved him to the leadoff spot at the start of the year, and he’s just produced,” Petragnani said. “It was very upsetting to see him get hurt last year, but we moved him to the leadoff

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hole this season and he’s produced, just like a future Division 1 baseball player should produce in the leadoff hole.” Cheeseman started on the mound for Cherokee in the opening round of the Diamond Classic, against Delran, going 5.1 innings with two earned runs on five hits while striking out eight batters and walking two. After just 23 total pitches on the

South Jersey Sports Weekly

mound last season, Cheeseman made his return to pitching this season after having stepped away from the position years ago following a broken shoulder. In recovery, doctors recommended that the then-eighth grader not try pitching again until he was fully grown, so as not to reaggravate the injury. Coming into his senior year, Cheeseman was ready to get

back on the rubber. “I’d been itching to get back to pitching again really since my sophomore year, and I’m loving getting to do this again,” he said. “I couldn’t wait to get to do this again. I feel most confident when I’m on the mound.” Despite the coach’s worry coming into the season, Cherokee has had great luck finding reliable and capable arms this spring, following the 2021 graduation of three seniors who threw a combined 108.1 innings. Seniors Shane Sax and Blake Weinstein have stepped into larger roles on the mound this season than they did last year. The addition of Cheeseman to the staff, as well as those other arms, has Cherokee off to a 11-4 start. “We knew we had a lot of offensive talent and that our pitching might be a question mark, because we didn’t have a lot of innings returning,” Petragnani said. “But early on, our pitching showed to be a strength. And it’s just kept up that way.” Last season, Cherokee jumped out to a 13-3 start before losing six of its last eight, something both the coach and returning players remember very well. As June gets closer, the team agrees that it can’t afford to get comfortable or complacent. “I think we’re a good team that needs to keep getting better, because the competition we play will also just keep getting better,” Petragnani said. “I like the potential of this team, but we still have a whole lot of work to do.” “We didn’t get as much done last year as we should have,” Brown acknowledged. “Coming into this year, we said we were going to be all in. That’s our motto. So we need to keep playing like a team and take it one game at a time – and see how far that takes us.”

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THE PALMYRA SUN — MAY 11-17, 2022

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Now that spring has sprung lets get the new moldings hung! • Decorative Trims • Crown Moldings • Bookcases • Custom Mantles • Built-Ins • Kitchens & More! FREE ESTIMATES - REFERENCES - LICENSED & INSURED

CALL TODAY! (609) 561-7751 Licensed # 13VH03033600

NM-00493003

www.jhstraincarpentry.com

Cement Work

THOMPSON

&ALL PHASES SONS OF CONCRETE & MASONRY WORK • Brick •Block • Stone • Stucco • Foundations & Chimney • Repairs Of All Types FREE ESTIMATES Fully Insured

Owner Supervised Work • 40 Years Experience • References With All Estimates

856-236-5805

Cement Work

Richard’s Concrete & Masonry Family Owned & Operated Since 1983 All Aspects of Concrete, Masonry, Demos, Haul-Aways, Hardscapes.

All Types of Repairs. No Job Too Small!

Prompt Personal Response • Free Est. • Fully Insured • Senior Discounts NJ Lic.# 13VH01635900

(856) 931-1276

Steps Foundations

FAST FREE ESTIMATES ammasonryandconcrete.com

Stone & Brick Pointing Bluestone & Limestone

856-786-5229

A-List Concrete

• Highest Quality Concrete Work • Stamped & Traditional • #1 in Service & Customer Satisfaction

(856) 840-3058 Lic. # 13VH05511100

General Cleaning

General Cleaning

Need Your Home Cleaned? Reliable results. Excellent references.

HOMES OFFICES Life is too short. Enjoy your free time!

Anne’s Cleaning 856-482-1327

POST QUARANTINE

DISINFECTION & HOUSE CLEANING SERVICE EXCELLENT QUALITY OF WORK

28YEARS OF PROUDLY SERVING MAIN LINE AREA AND SOUTH JERSEY! YOU WILL LOVE OUR SERVICE -

VERY RELIABLE AND HONEST FULLY INSURED AND EXPERIENCED!

CLEANING & LAUNDRY SAME PRICE

100% GUARANTEE! BONDED & INSURED

PLEASE CALL:

(856) 216-7400

NEW CLIENTS ONLY. MENTION THIS WEEKS AD FOR DISCOUNT

HOUSE WASHING HOUSEPRESSURE PRESSURE WASHING

CALL OR TEXT TOM

EST. 1985

856-429-4882 AMERICAN SERVICES

GUTTER CLEANING GUTTER GUARDS INSTALLED

HANDYMAN SERVICES What’s on your list? Fencing

General Cleaning

Linda Marie’s Home Cleaning Home, Offices & Rental Properties FREE ESTIMATES & FULL SERVICE CLEANING

Linda Marie’s Owner Text 609-670-4637 Call 856-742-1862

House & Office Cleaning • Weekly, bi-weekly, monthly Linen Changes, Beds Made, Low Rates 20 years experience Call for appt. (609) 845-5922

10% OFF

Top Quality / Family Owned Lowest Prices Guaranteed

“Let An Ace Fence In Your Place”

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • INDUSTRIAL

SNOW REMOVAL

Vinyl • All Wood • Chain Link Aluminum PVC/Alm Railing Pressure Washing • Staining • All Repair Work

www.acefencing.net Licensed • Fully Insured

856-227-9477 856-784-2039

customerservice@acefencing.net • NJ Lic# 13VH01983000

A-Z

DECKS, DECKS, DECKS!!! Deck restoration services. Sanding, Staining, washing, repair. Removal/Rebuild Vinyl, Composite, Wood.

FREE ESTIMATES

With this coupon or mention this ad

Flooring

Decks

609-367-5176

CLEANING BY STEPHANIE

$25 OFF

WE CLEAN WINDOWS WINDOWS

NM-00422733

Carpentry

LIC./INSURED.

LET THE SUN WORK FOR YOU!

FLOOR SANDING.COM • STAINING • REPAIRS • INSTALLATIONS SAND & 3 COATS $1.50 SQ. FT.

866-890-9292 Special Rate for Builders, Contractors & Investors All Work Guaranteed

NM-00489410

Lic #41576H


MAY 11-17, 2022 — THE PALMYRA SUN Oil Tanks

Painting

Painting

TONY’S

Insured Reg. #13VH00966900

www.gentili-painting.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Int / Ext / Res / Comm

856-228-2723

Prof. Spray Aluminum Siding, Stucco, Shingle Powerwash Deck Clean

Roofing • Soffit • Siding • Gutters Fascia Boards • Tiles • Laminate Flooring • Fences Painting • Drywall • Chimney & Chimney Repair Concrete Work • Stocko and More

Free Estimates Full Insured Reg. #13VH01299900

thehappypainteronline.com • 856-456-8232 • 856-384-8734

BRITMAR

856-304-3916

Wallpaper & Painting Resid. & Comm. • Int. & Ext. Neatness Guaranteed

judy’s wallpaper

removal + painting Free estimates

No Job Too Small

FREE Estimates • FREE Sizing

WALLPAPER REMOVAL

856-582-2459 Lic#13VH08937100 Painting NJ HIC. # 13VH00102300

Open & Working 7 Days A Week

OUR 35TH YEAR IN BUSINESS Remodeling, Carpentry & Handyman Services NO JOB TOO SMALL

Need a Handyman?

       

Eric’s Handyman Service Your list is our list

856-889-6235

Landscaping

Shrub Removal * Design * Planting * Topsoil * Grading * Mulching * Stone Beds * Lands Ties * In-ground Drainage * Lighting * Paver & Stone Walls * Patios * Walks * Sodding * Evergreen Screening

ROOFING MAN

Roofing -Gutters -Sofits Siding -Roofing Repairs -Skylight Repairs -Chimney Repair Aluminum coat -Power washing

856-465-6823 Steve’s Home Repair

Siding • Capping • Painting Gutters • Carpentry & More

(856) 810-2182

steveshomerepairplus.com

Tim’s Nailed It Construction

-Flooring -Gutters/Cleaning -Power Washing -Handyman Free Estimates

609-678-6971 609-509-9577

Quality Work Reasonable Price Licensed & Insured

856-341-4861

Landscaping & Irrigation Needs

856-753-7007 856-627-5510 Lic# 13VH00991700

SHOP LOCAL! Support the Businesses in Your Community!!

LET THE SUN WORK FOR YOU! TO ADVERTISE, CALL 856-779-3800 EXT. 6920

609-714-6878 609-471-3082

Too pooped to scoop?

We provide weekly scooper Weservice provide weekly scooper starting at

service! $15/week

GET $15.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE! Affordable Rates & No Contracts! Locally owned and operated

856-665-6769

www.alldogspoop.com

Landscaping

For all your

schedule Now Professional & Clean service

Pets Service

OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE LARKIN LANDSCAPING.NET • 856-234-6424

Featured “A” rating on Angie’s List

JACK’S

DAVINCI PAINTING

GENTILI PAINTING & POWER WASHING LLC

Handyman

13

NM-00491552

saving our planet, one pile at a time

Power Washing

POWER WASHING SPRING SPECIALS

HOUSE WASHING WITH FREE WINDOW WASHING • Soft Washing• •House House••Townhouse Townhouse • Condo • Vinyl Soft Washing Vinyl • Aluminum• •Stucco Stucco••Concrete Concrete • Pavers Pavers ••Fences • Aluminum Fences• •Roofs Roofs

Soft Washing Specialist Fully Insured • Free Estimates

609-217-3424

Americanpowerwashingsj.com Power Washing

Power Washing Houses...Decks...Patios Low Pressure Power Washing Specialist

HANDS ON DECK LLC

CALL TO ADVERTISE!

856-428-9797

Free Est. • NJ#13VH0325100


14

THE PALMYRA SUN — MAY 11-17, 2022

Roofing

Tree Service

Worry Free Roofing

TREE SERVICES

ROOF INSTALLATION ROOF REPAIR SEAMLESS GUTTERS WINDOWS & SIDING

NO TREE TOO TALL... NO JOB TOO SMALL!

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

AUTOS FOR SALE

Income Tax / Accounting

Junk Cars

NEED HELP FILING FORMS? Example: PTR 1 or 2. Small Fee Charged for seniors and disabled. (856) 931-3147

TOP $$$ PAID FOR JUNK CARS Free Pick Up 24 Hour Service

Open 24/7 to Get the Job Done! FREE CONSULTATIONS

Any New Roof Installation Not to be combined with any other offers. Must be presented at time of sale.

Schedule your FREE estimate today!

Expires 05/31/22

Fully Licensed & Insured

Financing Available

Call (856) 288-1793

4312 Cove Rd. Pennsauken, NJ 08109

www.warnerexteriors.com Roofing

Visit www.bigtimertreeservicellc.com Tree Service

Tree Service

DIAMOND ROOFING (609) 268-9200 Lic.# 13VH01716900

SHOP LOCAL! Support the Businesses in Your Community!!

Tree Service

HECK’S

TREE SERVICE

www.treemastrnj.com • ajrtreemasters1@verizon.net

856-495-7076

NO JOB IS TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL!

R&L TREE SERVICE Best Price Guaranteed!

Tree Removal Tree Pruning Stump Removal

FREE ESTImaTES Fully Insured

Firewood for sale!

Call for a FREE Estimate

Tree Removal, Chipping,Stump Grinding For Mulch,Top Soil and Firewood PICKUP OR DELIVERY

24 Hr. Emergency Service

856 222-0676

TREE & LAND MASTERSLLC 856-753-5513 NJ Tree Experts LTCO# 855 License NJTC928396 • NJ State Lic 13VH07980400

NM-00492054

• Tree Removal • Tree Trimming • Stump Removal SPECIAL • Storm Damage SPRING • Land Clearing/Excavation SAVINGS

10% OFF wITh ThIS ad

6.625% OFF

for work over $500 We will pay the sales tax

CALL NOW

24 Hour For AL! L Emergencies and Insurance Claims

If You Schedule NOW!

Coupon must be redeemed at time of estimate.

Tree Service

TAYLOR TREE SERVICE, LLC Thomas Taylor. LTCO #657 (609) 287 - 2699 TaylorTreeServiceLLC@gmail.com

Tree Trimming • Pruning & Removal Stump Grinding Bush Pruning & Shaping

10% off when you mention this ad

FREE ESTIMATES! Fully Insured. NJTC Registration #NJTC836080

Complete Tree Care • Lot Clearing • Stump Removal

Pavers & Concrete Hardscaping Fully Insured • Free Estimates LIC#13VH08823900

10% OFF New Customer Discount Cannot be combined with other offers. Must present at time of estimate. Expires 6/15/22.

24/7 TREE EXPERTS • 856-796-3536

NJ 609-367-4437 • PA 215-730-0900 NM-00490248

CALL TO ADVERTISE!

CASH FOR JUNK OR UNWANTED CARS FREE PICKUP SAME DAY PICK UP LOCAL TOWING AVAILABLE MIKE @ 856-767-7005

Wanted to Buy

ESTATE CLEAN-OUTS & BUY-OUTS 1 Item or the ENTIRE ESTATE

Uptown Antiques & Collectibles 67 S Broadway, Pitman, NJ 609-217-6188 | Junkjax@hotmail.com Insured & Bonded

Wanted to Buy

$BUYING$

*GUITARS *OLD TOYS *TOOLS *FURNITURE *JEWELRY *WATCHES *MILITARY *POTTERY *VINTAGE ITEMS *BIKES & MOTORCYCLES *MCM FURNITURE check yOur GaraGes, attics, BaseMents & clOsets

Call Jack 609-217-6188

Fully insured

1 ITEM OR THE ENTIRE ESTATE


MAY 11-17, 2022 — THE PALMYRA SUN

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

EMPLOYMENT WEEKLY

facebook.com/employmentweeklymagazine | broadstreetclassifieds.com

TO PLACE A RECRUITMENT DISPLAY AD CALL MITCHELL SMITH AT 856-404-5406 EMPLOYMENT General Employment

General Employment

Medford Leas is Hiring! We are an equal opportunity employer

Full-Time Part-Time Per Diem

Housekeepers All Nursing Positions Dining Services To Apply Visit us at www.medfordleas.org We offer...Medical, Dental and Vision Coverage, Tuition Reimbursement, Life Insurance, Child Day Care Benefits, 401k, Employee Assistance Program

NM-00491914

WE ARE HIRING DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS

Pay Rate $17.25 per hour

QMA Hiring Policy Regarding COVID-19 QMA provides vital and innovative daily living services to people with developmental disabilities 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. We continue to remain open during the COVID-19 pandemic and are HIRING continuously. The people we serve need staff who are compassionate and supportive like YOU! Thank you for your interest in joining our team! QMA is hiring in Burlington, Camden and Cumberland Counties

Requirements for Direct Support Professionals:

A minimum HS diploma or GED • 21 YRS of age or older • A valid driver’s license • The ability to communicate and provide physical care to the people we serve • Basic computer skills Interested A flexible work schedule in joining our team? Send your resume jpera@qmainc.com Or know somebody Equal Opportunity Employer who would be? Check Multiple Work out our current Locations Available openings listed Employee Referral at qmainc.com. Program

Contact Danielle Hollis 856-735-1015 700 Cinnaminson Avenue, Building B, Palmyra NJ 08065

Apply Online at qmainc.com/careers

M-00492947

We are only looking for Professional/consultants who will stand as our regional representative to run logistics on behalf of ODUSTECH. Good pay is certain. If interested contact (fdnemploymentdpt@gmail.com) for more details. NM-00493128

Flagger Traffic Plan seeks Flaggers to protect our clients and the motoring public by setting up work zones and controlling traffic. A valid driver’s license is a must. Good pay and benefits offered. If interested, please fill out an application online at www.trafficplan.com

Naturehood

HVAC INSTALLER, EXP. Immediate Opening. F/T Full Benifits. Great local company. Medford Heating 609-654-2188 or info@medfordheating.com

Visit our facebook page at facebook.com/ employment weekly for up-to-date information on local job fairs and more! Don’t Miss Our Job Listings New Every Week!

To Place a Recruitment Display Ad Call 856-404-5406

NM-00469471

EVERY NEIGHBORHOOD HAS A

DiscoverTheForest.org

15


16

THE PALMYRA SUN — MAY 11-17, 2022