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MARCH 25-31, 2020

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Township adjusts during pandemic

Sealed with a kiss

Amid closures, community works together By MADELEINE MACCAR The Sun

PAULINO APISTAR/Special to The Sun

Alexa Therien and Katie Fricker of Cherokee High School girls basketball kiss the trophy as their teammates watch during the postgame celebration following the Chiefs’ sectional championship victory over Shawnee. Although the season ended in heartbreak, Cherokee went 30-1 in 2019-20 and earned South Jersey Sports Weekly Girls Winter Team of the Year honors. See their story inside SJSW.

Evesham Township’s first case of COVID-19 was confirmed March 17. A day later, the township announced its newest initiative: a dedicated phone number and email that lets those in need find others looking to help. “In difficult times of the past, the Evesham community has always been willing to come together and give back to those who need it most,” said Mayor Jaclyn Veasy. “It’s extremely comforting to know that even as we face an unprecedented challenge, the Evesham community remains ready and willing to step up once more.” please see PANDEMIC, page 4

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Taking the LEAD Local officer recognized for anti-drug efforts. Page 2

Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11 Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6


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THE MARLTON SUN — MARCH 25-31, 2020

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ETPD’s Kinner named NJ LEAD Officer of the Year Award recognizes those who warn students about dangers of drugs By MADELEINE MACCAR

NM-00423601

The Sun Before Evesham Township Police Officer William Kinner taught the township’s current generation of students about the dangers of drugs as their LEAD o f f i c e r, h e was doing the same a generation ago as their parents’ DARE officer. Kinner, a Mullica Hill resident, KINNER briefly retired in the mid-2000s, but otherwise has been a police officer in town since 1985. He has been involved with the Evesham Township School District since 1993, first with the DARE (or Drug Abuse Resistance Education) program and then as its LEAD — an acronym for Law Enforcement Against Drugs — instructor since 2013. “I’m currently teaching kids whose parents I taught in the DARE program, who are in their 30s now,” Kinner says. “I’ll see the parents and I’ll recognize them — I’m not great with their names but I’ll recognize the parents when they come up and say they remember me.” During his lengthy tenure protecting some of the township’s youngest members by arming them with information and encouraging them to cultivate self-respect to make good decisions, Kinner has been honored numerous times for the enthusiasm and warmth he brings to a role he feels is “the best job in the whole police department.” And now he’s fresh off an-

other honor: being named New Jersey LEAD Officer of the Year during the program’s annual convention and training conference in Atlantic City earlier this year. “It’s nice to be recognized for doing something good in the community,” Kinner notes. “I was extremely honored because I know how many officers are instructing this curriculum. There’s probably hundreds of us instructing in New Jersey alone, and I got selected. It’s a big honor.” Kinner’s passion for his work is largely inspired by his brother’s untimely passing, fueled by wanting to protect his own six children and sustained by seeing the impact he can have on impressionable students about to face the more grown-up dilemmas of adolescence. “I lost a brother who got wrapped up in it,” Kinner explains. “He got killed in a car accident, and I believe he was under the influence at the time. I’ve got six kids who I love, and it scares me. These kids in Marlton, I love these kids. They make me feel special and I hope I do the same back with them.” The feeling is clearly mutual, and not just evidenced by the parade of DARE graduates with fond memories of the officer. When Kinner attended the LEAD conference, he was accompanied by two buses filled with students from Van Zant Elementary School who were there to sing two songs arranged by their music teacher. “It was like 101 students from Van Zant; they sang a couple different songs down there and they got a standing ovation,” please see KINNER, page 6


MARCH 25-31, 2020 — THE MARLTON SUN

3

LRHSD discusses novel coronavirus pandemic response Superintendent recognizes performance of county, district employees By KRYSTAL NURSE The Sun

Staff, employees and students of the Lenape Regional High School District have been recognized by the superintendent as the coronavirus pandemic continues to require virtual education. Superintendent Carol Birnbohm recognized the Burlington -County Health Department’s coordination with county superintendents and the state Department of Education to order schools closed. I “I’ve been well informed eleading up to a potential close,” eBirnbohm shared. “We were prepared for the closure and made decisions every step of the yway, moving up to the close with the guidance of the Burlington County Health Department.” k Tempering her emotions, the -

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superintendent thanked district administrators and central office staff for relaying information to students, teachers and the public — describing the district as “prepared.” “That is the word I would say for our district,” Birnbohm said. “That is because of the incredible people that work in our school district.” Birnbohm also asked that all teachers separated by department collaborate on how virtual instruction should proceed. Students were kept in the loop, she added, about possible closures during the week of March 13. Teachers reminded students to gather everything from their lockers to take home as a closure date was considered. “Please give any senior a safe, virtual hug because this is not the senior year they signed up for,” Birnbohm mentioned. “Be 2611 U.S. 206 Eastampton, NJ 08060

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very empathetic for our seniors. Be caring for them and send them extra love.” As a slide show about home instruction was shown on a large screen – and with the board spread out safely – Birnbohm reminded members that students will be more prepared for future careers as they experience remote learning. A cancellation of Scholastic Assessment Tests (SAT) appeared moot for those applying to colleges as the tests will not “measure the resiliency these kids are going to get from this,” Birnbohm insisted. Colleges will gain first-year students who have prior knowledge on adapting to emergency situations like the pandemic, she added. “I wanted to put some things out there, and I could go on and on about how incredible our

teachers, counselors, nurses, bus drivers delivering meals, custodians, secretaries — everybody in our organization has really gone above and beyond to find some sense of normalcy in a situation that nobody has ever experienced,” Birnbohm concluded. In unrelated news, the board approved sending the district’s proposed 2020-2021 budget to the county superintendent for review. The $155,389,085 budget calls for a net increase of 2 percent to the tax levy, given a $1,155,936 reduction in state funding. Debts have decreased by $116,413. In a press release submitted shortly after the board’s approval, it was stated the budget does not require reductions in student programs or staff for the next school year. “This is due to operational

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reductions and cost-saving measures proposed by the administration, and subject to approval by the Executive County Superintendent,” the release read. Regional school district tax impact for the eight sending districts is as follows: • Property owners in Evesham Township could see a 0.95-cent tax rate increase. For a home at an assessed average value of $271,600, that means a $17.80 annual increase. • Property owners in Medford Township could see a 1.17-cent tax rate increase. For a home at an assessed average value of $326,393, taxpayers could see a $37.43 annual increase. • Property owners in the Medford Lakes Borough could see a 1.05-cent tax rate decrease. For a home at an assessed average

please see LRHSD, page 5

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4

THE MARLTON SUN — MARCH 25-31, 2020

Pandemic: Evesham Township reacts to virus repercussions

continued from page 1 The outreach program was inspired by the community itself, as, according to its accompanying press release, “many of Evesham’s residents, nonprofit groups, religious institutions and members of the business community have already begun reaching out to the municipality on their own accord, asking for ways they can safely help those most in need during this difficult time.” COVID-19 — the illness caused by the coronavirus — is at the heart of an unprecedented global health crisis that has people worldwide isolating themselves to help slow the spread of disease. The unintended consequence of businesses, schools and a growing number of non-essential services closing for an indefinite but long-term stretch of time is that some of the most vulnerable residents’ lives are thoroughly upended by an abrupt change in routine.

Which is why towns like Marlton recognize the need to facilitate connection between those with compromised accessibility — whether immunocompromised, physically limited or unable to go far from home for any number of reasons — and individuals willing to help. By calling (856) 988-4425 or emailing covid19help@eveshamnj.gov, senior citizens, veterans, residents with disabilities and anyone whose quality of life is suffering can find a neighbor willing to help provide or deliver food, household essentials and necessary medications. The program is up and running, even though municipal facilities remain closed to the public, including the township building, The Gibson House, the Indian Springs Golf Course and all indoor sports facilities. As more businesses are ordered to close and events are postponed if not canceled to keep physical contact at a minimum, the township has also postponed

MADELEINE MACCAR/The Sun

The typically bustling Marlton Village shopping center off Route 73 was a mostly empty parking lot once non-essential businesses were ordered to close. municipal court sessions until March 27; regular township council meetings and any other public sessions are on hold until April. Days before COVID-19 was officially confirmed in Marlton, the council’s live-streamed emergen-

cy meeting on March 16 helped contextualize the township’s health precautions and provide general updates. During the emergency session, Veasy explained how “our township is facing an unprecedented

challenge.” “Overcoming this challenge is going to require that every member of our community work together to follow the guidelines issued by our leaders and health professionals on the local, county, state and national level,” she added. “It will require patience and a heightened level of responsibility from our residents, members of our business community and our township employees.” Chief Christopher Chew of the Evesham Township Police Department and Evesham Fire Rescue Chief Carl Bittenbender both discussed how their respective response units are serving the community by adapting to unusual times. Bittenbender reported that the Office of Emergency Management has been meeting with some of the township’s private partners and public entities to discuss how they would operate going forward during the panplease see TOWNSHIP, page 5


MARCH 25-31, 2020 — THE MARLTON SUN

Township: Responds to pandemic continued from page 4 demic, “for a unified approach to our social distancing measures in conjunction with what other municipalities in the state are doing.” That includes taking the necessary precautions no matter the circumstance. “People calling 911, we ask that if you’re sick or have flulike symptoms that you let the 911 center know,” Bittenbender said, “The 911 center will communicate that to our responses, and that will help us to wear the appropriate level of protection.” Bittenbender added that police officers, firefighters and EMS personnel may respond to emergency calls differently than in the past, “just to make sure that there’s no significant illness of other exposure concerns that we may have.” “That’s purely for your safety and ours,” he explained, clarifying that any life-threatening situation will still be handled with the utmost urgency. Meanwhile, the Evesham Township School District (ETSD) — using remote education until at least April 20 — quickly ensured that its educators and students alike were equipped for indefinite, long-term learning.

“The staff, students, students’ families — they’ve all risen to the occasion,” said district Director of Curriculum and Instruction Danielle Magulick, explaining that long-distance learning went into effect March 16. “They’re doing an outstanding job.” “We’re making sure that our at-home learning plans mirror those of the classroom,” she added. “It’s important for us to preserve that contact of students hearing their teacher’s voice and seeing their teacher’s face, so one of the things we did was have the teachers start every day with a class meeting.” Preparations focused especially on providing for households in need to ensure any family without internet access or with device limitations isn’t further compromised by accessibility restraints, which were addressed via district-wide surveys. Magulick said that free or affordable internet options and the district’s own efforts to provide Chromebooks for students who need them have been successful in bridging those gaps, especially since students in third grade and older have a 1:1 device-to-student ratio. Shutting cafeteria access also posed a problem for students

who rely on free and reduced-cost lunches. But those students will still have healthy bagged lunches that can be picked up at either Marlton Middle School or DeMasi Middle School. “All our families who qualify for no- or low-cost lunches have been contacted to explain how the program would work for them now,” Magulick confirmed. “Our distribution centers are our two middle schools, which will also serve the three elementary schools feeding into each school.” Parents and guardians are encouraged to stay in contact with their children’s schools for further updates and ongoing developments. All residents of Evesham Township can find a trove of COVID-19 and emergency information and updates at the township’s website, Evesham-nj.org.

value of $287,180, that would be a $25.35 annual decrease. • Property owners in Mount Laurel Township could see a 1.04-cent tax rate increase. For a home at an assessed average value of $237,500, that means a $23.89 annual increase. • Property owners in Shamong Township could see a 0.84-cent tax rate decrease. For a home at an assessed average value of $308,812, that amounts to a $23.36 annual decrease. • Property owners in Southampton Township could see a 3.02-cent tax rate increase. For a home at an assessed average value of $192,286, that will mean a $58.63 annual increase.

• Property owners in Tabernacle Township could see a 3.76-cent tax rate increase. For a home at an assessed average value of $265,357, that would be a $104.62 annual increase. • Property owners in Woodland Township could see a 3.81-cent tax rate decrease. For a home at an assessed average value of $256,400, that means taxpayers could see a $101.33 annual decrease. Public hearing on the budget and the board of education is April 29, 7:30 p.m., at 93 Willow Grove Road in Shamong. Editor’s note: Municipalities are highlighted in bold to provide easier access to readers who want to know a community-specific tax impact.

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THE MARLTON SUN — MARCH 25-31, 2020

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Kinner: Recognized as NJ LEAD Officer of the Year the audience, LEAD Officer of the Year award in hand. For the remainder of the meeting, Kinner’s colleagues and community figures alike praised his dedication and integrity. “I just can’t say enough about the work he’s done and what he brings to our police department and our community and, really, the state of New Jersey,” says Chief Christopher Chew, who was there when Kinner received his recent LEAD award. “It was pretty amazing to be down there with 700 police officers and see him up on stage. I’m very proud of him.” “You could spend a whole meeting and more on embarrassing Bill Kinner – he’s

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continued from page 2 says Kinner. “When they got off the bus, I saw my kids — my kids! — coming in to sing at the conference. Nobody’s else’s kids, just my kids. I really felt blessed.” Soon after, Evesham Township Council also celebrated one of its police department’s most recognizable figures, who’s no stranger to local accolades. On March 3, the new Power of One awards found another worthy recipient in Kinner, who was humbled by the gesture and took the opportunity to emphasize his dedication to keeping township youth safe and on the right path. “I told the kids at Marlton Middle School that I’d give this plaque back if it meant they never do drugs,” he told

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the platinum standard,” insists Councilman Robert DiEnna. “If you’ve attended one of the LEAD ceremonies, you can’t not watch Bill and see the love and sincerity that he exudes. If there was a higher award than the number-one guy, he would be eligible for it.” Kinner doesn’t do it for the accolades, but because he believes in it — and he believes in all of his students, too. “When you put your heart and soul into something, I think people recognize that,” he says. “The program means a lot to me, and when I was asked to do it, I accepted without hesitation. If we can prevent these young kids from doing dumb things, if I can save even one, it’s well worth it.”

Send us your Marlton news Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@marltonsun.com. Call the editor at (856) 779-3800.

The Sun is published weekly by Newspaper Media Group, 2 Executive Campus, Suite 135, Cherry Hill, NJ 08002. It is delivered weekly to select addresses in Marlton. If you are not on the mailing list, six-month subscriptions are available for $45, and a one-year subscription is available for $90. To submit a news release, please email news@marltonsun.com. For advertising information, call 856-779-3800 ext. 6837 or email sunadvertising@newspapermediagroup.com. The Sun welcomes suggestions and comments from readers – including any information about errors that may call for a correction to be printed.

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inside THis issue FINAL WINTER SEASON POWER POLL ..........................S2 S2 GIRLS BASKETBALL POY ....S4 S4 WINTER TRACK HONORS................................. S6,7 FREE

MARCH 25-31, 2020

A championship season

Timber Creek’s Paynter earns POY honors

PAGE S2

www.southjerseysportsweekly.com

The end was heartbreaking for Cherokee Girls basketball, when their date with a state championship game was cancelled. But the greatness of the Girls Winter Team of the Year won't be forgotten. By RYAN LAWRENCE Sports Editor

PAULiNo APiSTAR/Special to South Jersey Sports Weekly

Cherokee girls basketball made program history by advancing to the state championship game (a game canceled because of the coronavirus pandemic). But the Chiefs still collected a championship, the South Jersey Group 4 title, and finished with an impressive 30-1 record in 2019-20.

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Two weeks ago, fewer than 24 hours from making school history by advancing to the Group 4 state championship game, Cherokee High School’s girls basketball team was dealt a season-ending defeat they couldn't have prepared for no matter how many hours they spent in the gym or how battled tested they were with one of the toughest schedules in the state. The NJSIAA announced that due to the coronavirus pandemic, all girls and boys basketball championship games were canceled.They would not be rescheduled. “I found out on Twitter, which is pretty heartbreaking ... I don’t even please see CHEROKEE, page S5


sOuTH JerseY sPOrTs WeeKlY

POWer

POll!

1. Cherry Hill East Boys Swimming

Staying atop the Power Poll for the duration of the winter season, the Cougars have won state titles in four of the last six seasons and will enter December of 2020 without a loss to a South Jersey foe in a dual meet in 95 months. (Last week: 1)

2. Cherokee Girls Basketball

Advanced to the first state championship game in program history with a convincing 43-27 win over Montgomery in the state semifinals only to have the chance at playing in the state finals ended by the coronavirus pandemic. The Chiefs went 30-1 this season. (3)

3. Camden Catholic Wrestling

The irish won their second straight Parochial B state title this winter and have won 11 team state championships in the last 17 seasons. Camden Catholic hasn’t lost to a South Jersey team in more than three years. (2)

4. Cherry Hill East Girls Swimming

The Cougars will miss Harvard University-bound Grace Yoon, the 2019 SJSW Girls Swimmer of the Year, karolyn Merch and the rest of the senior class, but they’re also returning enough talent to make a run at back-to-back state titles for the first time since 2000. (4)

5. Timber Creek Boys Basketball

Like Cherokee’s girls, the Chargers were devastated when the coronavirus pandemic prevented them from playing for a state championship. Timber Creek is losing a stellar senior class, but Austin Green leads a deep group back in 2021. (5)

6. Gloucester Catholic Ice Hockey

The Rams made it to the “New Jersey Frozen Four,” advancing to the semifinals of the NonPublic state championships and should be ready to advance just as far next year with perhaps the top group of underclassmen in the state. (6)

7. Washington Twp. Boys Bowling

The Minutemen took a big jump after finishing fourth at sectionals last year. They cruised to an olympic Conference Holiday Bowl win, triumphed in the state championship, and then earned the distinction as the best in the state by winning the T of C, too. (7)

8. Winslow Twp. Girls Track

SJSW Girls Winter Track Athlete of the Year Janeya Hammond and teammates Jaia James, Nylah Perry and Shevell Higgs led the Eagles to a state title, with an eye on making it eight straight outdoor crowns this spring. (8)

9. Paul VI Girls Basketball

Abaigeal Babore, who averaged 14.23 points and knocked down 69 three-pointers in 26 games, is graduating but Hannah Hidalgo, Eleanor Robinson and Nile Miller give the Eagles a strong core to win with in 2021. (9)

10. Haddonfield Girls Track

Senior Rachel Bonnett won the Group 2 state high jump title and juniors Sarah Naticchia, Allison Colflesh and Payton Weiner finished second through fourth in the 1600 meter finals with indoor PRs. (Not ranked) ■

S 2 SOUTH JERSEY SPORTS WEEKLY — MARCH 25-31, 2020

BOYs BasKeTBall PlaYer OF THe Year

Beast Mode Timber Creek big man Demetrius Paynter, the Boys Basketball Player of the Year, brought senior leadership and consistent play down the stretch to lead the Chargers to a championship By RYAN LAWRENCE Sports Editor

When he was a kid first learning the fundamentals of the game, as a 10-year-old in a Washington Township rec league, Demetrius Paynter benefited from having his dad as a coach. Although his son was always one of the biggest kids on the court, Jeff Paynter had him playing point guard. When he was a high schooler with dreams of carrying a trophy off the court, a teenager who had grown into his big frame, Demetrius Paynter would watch YouTube clips of Shaquille O’Neal dominating a game in the paint. It’s why he earned the monikers “Baby Shaq” and “The Beast.” Timber Creek High School’s center combined those traits —

RYAN LAWRENCE/South Jersey Sports Weekly

Timber Creek’s Demetrius Paynter was a double-double machine during his senior season. Timber Creek’s big-bodied center averaged 20.5 points and 16.5 rebounds in his final four games as the Chargers won the South Jersey Group 3 championship and became a state finalist, too, after a state semifinal victory. Paynter and the Chargers’ season ended abruptly when the coronavirus pandemic canceled all state championship games. the basketball IQ and handle of a point guard and the sheer strength and determination of a big man — to lead the Chargers to a championship season in 2020. Demetrius Paynter, a 6-6, 260-pound senior, was a double-double machine down the stretch as Timber Creek advanced to the Group 3 state championship. Paynter and the senior-laden Chargers never got to play that game, unfortunately. The coronavirus pandemic had terrible timing, shutting down New Jersey high school athletics with one game remaining in the basketball season.

But Paynter and the Chargers still collected a South Jersey sectional championship, the program’s first in 12 years. And Paynter is heading to graduation with another honor: he is South Jersey Sports Weekly’s Boys Basketball Player of the Year. “It’s amazing,” Timber Creek coach Rich Bolds said. “When you see a kid come in that size as a freshman you wonder what he’s going to turn out to be, because sometimes guys like that lose confidence because they’re big. But as he continued to play, he gained confidence, please see PAYNTER page S3


MARCH 25-31, 2020 – SOUTH JERSEY SPORTS WEEKLY

S3

PAYNTER

continued from page S2 which was great … He was a difference maker.” Paynter averaged 18.5 points, 16.4 rebounds and 2.2 blocks per game for Timber Creek (25-5), the South Jersey Group 3 champions. He also shot an impressive 88 percent from the free throw line, a stat that would even impress Shaq. In the closing seconds of a 60-57 state semifinal win over Wall, Paynter converted two free throws to ice the game. He went 6-for-6 from the line that night and finished with a gamehigh 20 points. “I don’t really look for (individual acclaim),” said the mild mannered Paynter, who was joined by fellow seniors Eric Benjamin, Jalen Bergen and Justin Bladen to form the core of Timber Creek’s championship team. “I tell my family all the time,” Paynter continued, “they’ll ask, ‘How many are you going to score tonight?’ and I’m like, I don’t look to put up a certain amount of points, I just want overall team success.” The Chargers enjoyed that from the get-go during the senior core's final high school season. But Timber Creek wasn’t able to go wire-to-wire with that success. Although they were matched up against some tougher teams, including Camden and Paul VI, the Chargers lost four of seven games during a three-week stretch in February. Instead of letting the losses get to them, beginning to question each other or starting to doubt their potential, they showed the resolve of a veteran team once the playoffs began. “It was definitely because of guys like Demetrius and the rest of the seniors, they held each other accountable,” Bolds said. “When they were in the locker room after a loss, you could genuinely feel the hurt, they really cared.” Those losses brought a bad but familiar taste back to Paynter. On March 2, 2019, he was one of the last players remaining in the visiting locker room at Moorestown High School,

The Games Must Go On. We're living in a strange time,

RYAN LAWRENCE/South Jersey Sports Weekly

Demetrius Paynter, posing for a photo with head coach Rich Bolds and his family on Senior Night, averaged 18.5 points, 16.4 rebounds and 2.2 blocks per game for Timber Creek (25-5), the South Jersey Group 3 champions. He also shot an impressive 88 percent from the free throw line. still in uniform wiping tears away from his face, after Timber Creek’s season ended in the sectional semifinals for a second straight year. “I know having a lot of seniors helped. We had a lot of leadership since we’ve been through this the last three years,” Paynter said. “So you don’t hang your head. Losing those games (in February) actually helped us a lot. They were all good, playoff-caliber teams that helped us get ready for the playoffs.” When the playoffs began, Paynter unleashed “The Beast.” Paynter, who credited his dad, Bolds, and Glen Landing Middle School coach Frank Lotierzo for his development, averaged 20.5 points and 16.5 rebounds, with clutch free throws and timely blocks, too, in Timber Creek’s final four

playoff games. “He’s the reason that we won, him and Jalen,” Bolds said. “(Other teams) began focusing on Eric and Justin and he just stepped up like, ‘OK, get on my back, I’ll take you where you need to go.’” Paynter will hang up his sneakers after graduation. He’s headed to Mount San Antonio College in California to begin studying for an eventual career as an air traffic controller, following in the footsteps of his dad and older brother. While he wishes he could have had the chance to play in a state title game, Paynter is content with the end of his career. “I went out, in my mind,” he said, “a champion.” ■

with the weather warming and longer hours of sunlight, but also with empty baseball and softball fields in South Jersey and beyond. Sports, at every level, has been suspended as we take measures to fight off the coronavirus pandemic. The opening of the spring high school season has been postponed indefinitely. But that doesn't mean South Jersey Sports Weekly will shut down, too. Sure, with no games there is less happening, but there are still sports stories to tell and we'll try our best during this period to deliver you the quality sports journalism you've come to expect from us. Stay in. Stay safe. And stay tuned for your weekly dose of local sports here each week. ■


S4

SOUTH JERSEY SPORTS WEEKLY — MARCH 25-31, 2020

GIRLS BASKETBALL PLAYER OF THE YEAR

Topping the leaderboards Bella Runyan finished her career as Moorestown Friends' career leader in assists and steals and second all-time in points. She also lifted the Foxes to a program-record 21 wins in three of her four seasons.

Mike Monostra/South Jersey Sports Weekly

Bella Runyan leaves Moorestown Friends as one of the greatest players in the history of the girls basketball program.

By MIKE MONOSTRA Sports Editor

When Bella Runyan stepped on the basketball court for her first practice with Moorestown Friends’ high school team, she never thought she would become one of the greatest players in school history. “I didn’t see myself being this huge standout player,” Runyan said. “Once I had people telling me, ‘You can be a great player, you can be a Division-1 player,’ I didn’t really believe it until I started doing it.” Runyan didn’t just become an elite player, she transformed into one of the best allaround players in the entire state. In 20192020, Runyan led Moorestown Friends in nearly every major statistical category, including rebounds (219), steals (152), assists

(123) and blocks (35). Runyan also scored 444 points, second most on the team, to boost her career total to 1,741, the second-most in school history. She leaves the program as the all-time leader in assists with 410 and steals with 524. Runyan’s outstanding career and 2019-2020 season earns her South Jersey Sports Weekly Girls Basketball Player of the Year honors. “When I was a 14-year-old, I didn’t think I’d be where I am now, obviously winning player of the year,” Runyan said. “It would have been a crazy dream of mine.” For head coach Mike Brunswick, there’s no better player to receive the honor than Runyan, whose impact on the program, he believes, will be felt for years to come. “The mark that she is leaving is of excellence,” Brunswick said. “She’s basically leading in every major category except for

rebounding and scoring, and the scoring is because we don’t run the score up on people.” Runyan’s 1,741 career points trails only 1995 graduate Jessica MacNeil’s 2,073 for the most in program history. But it wasn’t Runyan’s scoring that impressed Brunswick the most about her game. “She loves playing defense and stealing the ball and making teams look bad on the defensive end,” he said. “She can just feel the atmosphere and feel the way the ball is going. You don’t come across these types of athletes too often.” Runyan played basketball with a rabid intensity most opponents couldn’t match. She credits her dad, former NFL offensive lineman Jon Runyan, for instilling intensity into her and her two older siblings, Jon Jr. and Alyssa.

“Whether it’s sports or not, we’re competitive in everything,” Bella said. “When I was little and my brother would beat me one-on-one, I would start crying. That’s helped me keep that competitiveness. And obviously my dad doing what he did in the NFL, always wanting to pancake that person he was going against. That competitiveness and that aggressiveness comes from how much we want to win.” Runyan helped the Foxes win a lot of games during her time at the school. This season, Moorestown Friends went 21-6, matching the school’s single-season wins record, set during Runyan’s freshman and junior seasons. The Foxes won 82 games during her four years. “She took many of the players under her wing,” Brunswick said of Runyan’s leadership. “She would never really yell at her teammates. She was really really positive.” Runyan didn’t just make history with her career rankings at Moorestown Friends, she also made history in the South Jersey Interscholastic Basketball Tournament. In Moorestown Friends’ SJIBT semifinal game against Eastern on Feb. 14, Runyan broke the tournament’s alltime scoring record previously held by Gloucester Catholic’s Mary Gedaka. She would finish the tournament with 339 career points and won the MVP Award as the Foxes took down Clearview for their first SJIBT title on Feb. 16. “(The SJIBT title) was a huge step toward building our program even more,” said Runyan, who also made three SJIBT alltournament teams in her career and won the SJIBT three-point contest in 2018. “People are going to see that we have a banner in our gym and we’re a legit South Jersey team.” That banner was hanging behind the scorer’s table when Runyan took the court at her school’s Mel and Diane Baiada Field House for the final time on March 5 in a second-round South Non-Public B playoff matchup with Gloucester Catholic. Runyan put on a dominant please see BELLA page S8


sOuTH JerseY sPOrTs WeeKlY

aWards With the winter season coming to a close, South Jersey Sports Weekly is naming Athletes of the Year in 11 winter sports, as well as boys’ and girls’ teams of team of the year, over the course of three issues in the month of March. The teams and players are selected from the 30 high schools within SJSW’s coverage area. GIRLS WRESTLING:

Emma Matera, Delran BOYS WRESTLING:

Martin Cosgrove, Camden Catholic ICE HOCKEY:

Jake Grace, Gloucester Catholic GIRLS BOWLING:

Megan Prettyman, GCIT BOYS BOWLING:

Tommy Burns, Eastern GIRLS SWIMMING:

Annie Behm, Cherry Hill East

BOYS SWIMMING:

Jackson Brookover, Cherry Hill East GIRLS WINTER TRACK:

Janeya Hammond, Winslow Township

BOYS WINTER TRACK:

Floyd Whitaker, Highland GIRLS BASKETBALL:

Bella Runyan, Moorestown Friends BOYS BASKETBALL:

Demetrius Paynter, Timber Creek

GIRLS TEAM OF THE YEAR:

Cherokee Girls Basketball

BOYS TEAM OF THE YEAR:

Cherry Hill East Boys Swimming

MARCH 25-31, 2020 – SOUTH JERSEY SPORTS WEEKLY

S5

CHEROKEE

continued from page S1 think my coach knew yet,” Cherokee junior Alexa Therien said. “I’m not even exaggerating; my heart dropped. I automatically burst into tears.” “The team group chat was just going crazy,” added senior Kennedy Wilburn. “We started a FaceTime and had like 16 of us … ranting at the same time, talking over one another. We were all angry, sad and surprised. I was sad, but surprised the most. The games, between the semifinals and finals, were three days apart. I didn’t think all of this could happen in three days let alone one day.” The week had begun with the upperclassmen finally getting over the hump and triumphing in the sectional championship game, a contest they had lost in each of the two previous years. Two days later, they won in the state semifinals. And then, it was over. “It was really, really devastating,” Therien said. “I think about it every morning when I wake up kind of with a pit in my stomach. It’s just so heartbreaking. Not only for me but for all the girls and the coaches who work so hard and put in just as much effort as the players, to have that all just go away because of a virus is a very, very hard pill to swallow.” With the week that’s gone by has come some perspective; Therien, Kennedy, and everyone else in Cherokee’s program understands the bigger picture, the severity of the virus and the importance of keeping people safe. While not being able to complete their dream season with one more game is still difficult to accept, it also shouldn’t define the Chiefs’ season. Cherokee, with a 30-1 record, was South Jersey’s most consistent girls team from start to finish. Entering the season determined to get a trophy after back-to-back years of heartbreak, Cherokee came out of the gate like a team on a mission, winning 22 straight to open the season. In the season’s first month, from Dec. 21 to Jan. 21, Cherokee won its first 13 games by a combined 300 points (winning each game by an average of 23 points).

PAULiNo APiSTAR/Special to South Jersey Sports Weekly

Cherokee head coach Ron Powell hands the South Jersey Group 4 championship trophy to his players following a 45-34 victory over Shawnee. The Chiefs won their next game, too, in the state semifinals, before the season was abruptly ended by the coronavirus pandemic. Cherokee went on to collect that coveted trophy, knocking off district-rival Shawnee in the South Jersey Group 4 title game. They’re also receiving another honor: They are South Jersey Sports Weekly’s Girls Winter Team of the Year. “I’m really happy for the kids,” Cherokee coach Ron Powell said of the honor. “Any recognition that anybody gives them is well deserved. They were together from the time we lost to Lenape in the South Jersey Group 4 championship game (last March). When they were home (this offseason), at AAU tournaments together, and in the fall, they were working out together. They put time in. “My message to them all the time is, you only get what you put into it. Basketball is a game of repetition. The more you practice at your skills the better you’re going to get. For them to play the way they did together, unselfishly, the way they played defense, it’s gratifying to a coach.” Despite fielding a starting five with three underclassmen, Cherokee played like an unflappable veteran team for three plus months. And they did it against a schedule that included the likes of state finalist Ocean City, Moorestown Friends, Montgomery (twice), St. Rose, and regular league play in arguably the toughest division in the state, two games a piece with Lenape, Washington Township, Eastern and company. When the playoffs rolled around, Cherokee’s work throughout the season and a tough schedule paid dividends: The Chiefs won their five playoff games by an average of 21 points. The main ingredient in their nearly regular domination: dependable defense. The Chiefs’ stingy defense kept the opposition to 20 or fewer points five times and held them under 30 in 16 games (more than of their schedule). “I think our whole team can agree that it’s our defense,” said Wilburn, who scored 15 points and collected six rebounds and three blocks in the South Jersey Group 4 championship win over

Shawnee. “Because everyone can score. The game of basketball is made for people to score; that’s the point of the game. But another point a lot of people don’t focus on is stopping another team from scoring. And that’s what we had to do, whether it was Moorestown Friends or St. Rose, and even Washington Township the second time we played them, it really came down to preventing them from scoring.” A commitment to playing a suffocating team defense often has as much to do with having the right attitude as it does having talent. Cherokee brought that from the time they began practicing late last fall. “We came up short twice in the South Jersey Group 4 final and I just think this year we came in with a different mindset,” said Therien, an AllSouth Jersey performer who averaged 14.4 points per game. “From Day One of practice, we knew our goal was to get to South Jersey Group 4, win that and then hopefully win the state. We knew what we had to do. We came into practice every day pumped and ready to go.” Cherokee put in the work and took care of business throughout the season. Recency bias forces us to focus on how it ended, with the Chiefs failing to get the opportunity to play in the one game they all dreamed of, the Group 4 state championship. But in looking back at the season in its entirety, Cherokee’s greatness and place in school history won’t be denied. “It’s a huge compliment,” Therien said of Cherokee earning Team of the Year. “We’re honored. We just work so hard, to get these accolades is really cool.” “It means a lot,” added Wilburn. “Hopefully we do get a banner for South Jersey Group 4 or, who knows? But I think we will be remembered. This is an experience none of the girls on the team or the coaches will ever forget.” ■


S6

SOUTH JERSEY SPORTS WEEKLY — MARCH 25-31, 2020

Your Hammond steps up for Winslow Township Towns. Your At the Group 3 Championships, Teams. Janeya Hammond GIRLS WINTER TRACK ATHLETE OF THE YEAR

earned two first-place medals and a pair of third-place finishes to lead the Eagles to a third straight indoor state title By MIKE MONOSTRA Sports Editor

The 55-meter hurdles is not Janeya Hammond’s favorite event. The Winslow Township senior spent most of the winter track season running the 55-meter dash and the 400-meter dash. But when Eagles’ head coach Shawnnika Brown needed Hammond to run the hurdles in both the South Jersey Group 3 sectional meet and NJSIAA Group 3 Championships, Hammond stepped up to the plate. “We didn’t know what to expect (with hurdles),” Brown admitted. “We knew the 55 was there, we knew the 400 was there.” Hammond rose to the occasion, winning the 55 hurdles at sectionals with a time of 8.56 seconds, then finishing third at states with a personal-best time of 8.45 seconds. In addition, Hammond won the 55-meter dash at both sectionals and states and took third place in the 400-meter dash in both meets. Her outstanding performance boosted Winslow to sectional and state titles and also earned Hammond South Jersey Sports

RYAN LAWRENCE/South Jersey Sports Weekly

Janeya Hammond added more medals to her collection at the NJSIAA Group 3 Championships in February, placing first in the 55-meter dash and helped Winslow Township to a win in the 4x400-meter relay. Weekly Girls Winter Track Athlete of the Year honors. “When I first heard it, I didn’t believe I got it,” Hammond said of receiving the honor. “I was so excited.” “Janeya was the glue that held it together during sectionals and states,” Brown said. “She really doesn’t like short hurdles, but we discussed early on the need for her to do them this year.” This year was the first time Hammond had run the 55 hurdles at indoor sectionals and states in her high school career. But Brown was confident Hammond had the speed and athletic ability to excel in the event. “I just had to really work at

building her confidence,” Brown said. “She always had it.” Hammond’s performance at the Group 3 Championships was arguably the best in her four years at Winslow. In addition to placing in the top three in the 55-meter dash, 400-meter dash and 55-meter hurdles, Hammond was part of the Eagles’ first-place 4x400-meter relay team. Winslow won the state title with 56 points, 17 points more than second-place Colts Neck. “Just stay focused, stay hydrated,” Hammond said of running four races in one meet. “Run my race. I take it one event at a time.” Off the track, Brown believes

Hammond’s development as a leader has been a crucial part of the team’s success. Brown described Hammond as a quiet, leadby-example type of athlete who has used her voice more this season, along with fellow standout senior Nylah Perry. “This was her year to be the voice of the team, to monitor the younger athletes,” Brown said. “(Hammond and Perry) have done excellent as far as trying to keep the kids focused and motivated,” Brown later added. Hammond still has goals to accomplish this season. She was hoping to break the 56-second mark in the 400-meter dash and came up short in the indoor season, with a best time of 57.61 seconds at the Eastern State Championship on Feb. 18. Though the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has delayed the start of the spring sports season, Hammond remains hopeful she’ll get another opportunity to run for Winslow again and is working out daily at home to prepare for the spring season, regardless of when it starts. “We’re always trying to stay in shape,” Hammond said. “We have to run three miles (a day) to stay in shape.” After high school, Hammond will run at University of North CarolinaCharlotte, a school she was impressed with from the moment she stepped on campus. “When I took a visit there, everything just felt like home, like I was meant to be there,” Hammond said. “The coach was welcoming, the team was welcoming. “It was like a family.” ■

In your hands, every week. Whether you're in Haddonfield or Mullica Hill, Deptford or Medford, or any of the other towns with Sun Newspapers in South Jersey, a scope that includes more than two dozen high schools, South Jersey Sports Weekly has you covered. Feature stories, full-page photo spreads and program power rankings; Players of the Week; Athletes of the Year; insight from coaches; and games to watch. Baseball, softball, and football; basketball, golf, and lacrosse; swimming, field hockey, wrestling, tennis and every other varsity sport. It's everything you'd want in a local newspaper sports section. Free with The Sun each week and online every day at South JerseySportsWeekly.com and @SJSportsWeekly (Twitter).


MARCH 25-31, 2020 – SOUTH JERSEY SPORTS WEEKLY

S7

BOYS WINTER TRACK ATHLETE OF THE YEAR

RYAN LAWRENCE/South Jersey Sports Weekly

Highland Regional High School junior Floyd Whitaker has Olympic aspirations, and why not? Earlier this month Whitaker became just the second South Jersey athlete in history to win two different events at the Meet of Champions, joining Edgewood (now Winslow Township) graduate and former U.S. Olympian Dennis Mitchell in 1983.

Jumping into the record books Highland junior Floyd Whitaker, the Boys Winter Track Athlete of the Year, joined former U.S. Olympian Dennis Mitchell as the only two South Jersey athletes to win two MOC titles in the same season By RYAN LAWRENCE Sports Editor

The track and field coaches at Highland Regional High School had known about Floyd Whitaker since he was a pre-teen running at Glen Landing Middle School in Gloucester Township. Known for their cross-country teams, the Highland coaches

raved about the way the kid ran the mile and saw a possible long distance career for the gifted athlete. But Whitaker saw his true calling 21 months ago. Competing at the New Balance Outdoor National Championships at North Carolina A&T State University in June 2018, fresh off his first high school track season, Whitaker won the triple jump in the freshman divi-

sion with a 45-10.75 jump. He wasn’t satisfied. “To me that wasn’t enough, I wanted to go against everybody,” Whitaker said. “So I just worked harder. I knew there were people better than me, but I knew that if I worked hard enough, that sooner or later I’d be better than them.” Whitaker’s work has paid off. A winter that began on Highland’s basketball court ended with him taking home two Meet of Champions indoor track medals. Whitaker jumped to first-place finishes in the triple jump and long jump at the Meet of Champions at Ocean Breeze Athletic Complex in Staten Island, New York, on March 8, making history in the process. Whitaker joined former U.S. Olympian and Edgewood High School (now Winslow Township) grad Dennis Mitchell as the only two South Jersey athletes to win two MOC events in the same season.

“That’s definitely something different,” the 16-year-old Whitaker said. “(But) I believe I can go to the Olympics and win some gold medals. So I’m almost following his footsteps and hoping to go even further. It’s definitely something to go after.” Perhaps the most gifted athlete in South Jersey, Whitaker collected one more honor before the indoor season was complete: He is South Jersey Sports Weekly’s Boys Winter Track Athlete of the Year. “It’s amazing,” the Highland junior said. “There aren’t too many words. I never achieved something like this.” Although the spring season is currently in limbo due to the coronavirus pandemic, it’s likely Whitaker isn’t finished receiving medals and personal accolades in his prep career. The kid who entered high school as a talented basketball player with serious track skills has grown into one of the best triple jumpers in the country. While they may have pegged him early as a distance runner, the Highland coaches are hardly surprised at Whitaker’s success. “He’s a really rare talent,” said Highland coach Josh Krowicki. “I don’t think I’ve ever seen an athlete like this come through the school. And I have him in (physical education) class. When he’s in the gym and he gets excited about something or wants to win something, the kids kind of stare at him in awe and shrug their shoulders because they can’t keep up with that. “We’re playing tennis and the kid is beating kids on the tennis team because he can cover the whole court in one step,” Krowicki added. “And they’re just looking at me like ‘I don’t know what to do’ and I’m like, ‘Yeah I don’t know, either. I can’t help you.’” It probably wouldn’t sound surprising, then, to learn that Whitaker — who became Highland’s first-ever Meet of Champions winner in the triple jump last spring — averaged 12.64 points, 6.72 rebounds, 1.08 blocks and 1.04 steals per game please see FLOYD page S8


SOUTH JERSEY SPORTS WEEKLY — MARCH 25-31, 2020

as a sophomore on the Tartans basketball team last year. He collected a double-double in the first game of his junior year in a win over Hammonton a week before Christmas and was averaging 13.7 points through his first seven games. But then Whitaker decided it was time to switch sports midseason. “It was tough … it was really hard,” Whitaker said. “(Track) was a bigger opportunity and I wasn’t doing what I thought I could with the (basketball) team, not doing as good, or it wasn’t what I expected. I’m happy with the decision because winning at Meet of Champions was big. With spring track and all of the issues going on, I’m glad I got some jumps in and got to compete with everybody.” Whenever the high school sports schedule resumes, you can bet Whitaker will make a run at more history now that he’s solely concentrating on track and field. He already competes nationally with the prestigious Project Triple Jump and could eye an opportunity to collect a MOC medal in another event, the high jump, before his high school career is over. “We’re kind of in uncharted territory,” Krowicki said. “I don’t know what the ceiling is, because the kid keeps getting better every day. We’ve come to expect the unexpected.” A state record in the triple jump seems like an attainable goal. Whitaker’s 50-2 jump last year set a sophomore record and, with two high school seasons left, he is surely in striking distance of the 50-9.25 state record (set by Delsea’s Khaliel Burnett two years ago). But Whitaker runs the 400 hurdles, too. And he just established himself as the state’s current top long jumper. “We keep setting our sights higher for him, and he likes that,” Krowicki said. “When he started triple jumping, we knew he really had a talent for it. And then he started long jumping and it’s like, ‘What’s next?’ And the kid came out this year from basketball and he high jumped

BELLA

continued from page S4 performance one last time in front of the home crowd, registering 29 points, 13 rebounds, five assists and seven steals in a 68-51 Moorestown Friends win. “I was super focused going into that game, probably the most focused I was going into any game all season, because I knew this could be our last game,” Runyan recalled. “I wanted my last home game to be a win.” Runyan, who will continue

ball court. “He actually qualified for the state meet in the high jump as her basketball career at Villanova University next year, got her wish to experience a win in her final home game at Moorestown Friends. She wouldn’t have wanted it any other way, having attended the school since she was 3. Runyan believes the education and values she learned at the school made a difference in molding her into the person she is today. “It set a great example for me as an athlete and a person for me going ahead,” Runyan said about the school. “I know what’s right in sports and in life and it just set a great example for my life.” ■

well, so he could have done all three and he probably could have qualified for MOC in that,

too, not that he would have won. But, gosh, if you tell him he can’t win, he might surprise you.” ■

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MARCH 25-31, 2020 — THE MARLTON SUN

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CLEANING BY STEPHANIE House & OfďŹ ce Cleaning Weekly, bi-weekly, Monthly Linen Changes, Beds Made, Low Rates 20 years experience Call for appt.

(609) 845-5922

LET THE SUNS WORK FOR YOU!


MARCH 25-31, 2020 — THE MARLTON SUN

9

GENERAL SERVICES

DIB CLEANING SERVICE • Housekeeping & Laundry • Honest, Hardworking • 25 Years Of Experience • FREE ESTIMATES • REFERENCES • BONDED • INSURED

We Exceed Expectations!!

dibcleaning215@gmail.com

Handyman

Landscaping

TONY’S

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Landscaping & Irrigation Needs

856-753-7007 856-627-5510

856-304-3916

ASK FOR DORA

Lic# 13VH00991700 Landscaping

Handyman

Electrician

GIBSON

Quality Service at a Price that Won’t Shock You

ELECTRICAL & GENERAL CONTRACTORS INC.

Residential & Commercial • Service Upgrades Attic & Ceiling Fans • Recessed Lighting • Backup Generators & Installs

856-346-3388 FREE ESTIMATES NO JOB TOO SMALL!

“Let An Ace Fence In Your Place�

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • INDUSTRIAL

SNOW REMOVAL

Vinyl • All Wood • Chain Link Aluminum PVC/Alm Railing Pressure Washing • Staining • All Repair Work

www.acefencing.net Licensed • Fully Insured

856-227-9477 856-784-2039 customerservice@acefencing.net • NJ Lic# 13VH01983000

Handyman

Eric’sHandymanService.com Your list is our list

856-983-5325 Featured “A� rating on Angie’s List NM-00424162

856-334-8477

(856) 810-2182

609.654.1121

LIC#13VH08823900

10% OFF New Customer Discount Cannot be combined with other offers. Must present at time of estimate. Expires 3/31/20.

24/7 TREE EXPERTS • 856-796-3536 HOME IMPROVEMENT Oil Tanks

NEIGHBORHOOD PRIDE Quality Landscaping & Design Call for Your Free Professional Evaluation.

• Fully Insured • Free Estimates 24 Hour Emergency Services

SPRING CLEANUPS!

OVER 100 yrs. combined experience in • Paperhanging • Wallscraping • Painting Free Estimates “Our price May Be Matched, But Our Workmanship Will Never Be Equaledâ€?

FULLY INSURED LICENSE 25593A NM-00425598

NM-00425119

NO JOB TOO SMALL

Need a Handyman?

TO PLACE AN AD CALL:

856-779-3800 x6837

       

John Tocco

Home Improvement 3rd Generation Builders

No Job too Small or Large Roofing • Siding • Window • Carpentry Concrete • Masonry • Cleanouts Call (856) 979-6090

Insurance

MEDICARE SUPPLEMENT RX ASSISTANCE CALL 609-238-2911 Landscaping

LARKIN LANDSCAPING OVER 30 YEARS

Trees, Shrubs, Pruning, Clean-ups, Mulch, Topsoil, Sod, Grading, Paver, Patios, Walks, Walls, Stone, RR Ties, Underground Drainage

CALL MIKE 856-234-6424 larkinlandscaping.net

Painting

W. F. MCDEVITT & FAMILY

WE ARE NOW SCHEDULING

OUR 35TH YEAR IN BUSINESS Remodeling, Carpentry & Handyman Services

Insured & Bonded NJ LIC #4546

Top Quality / Family Owned Lowest Prices Guaranteed

steveshomerepairplus.com

Complete Tree Care • Lot Clearing • Stump Removal

Open & Working 7 Days A Week

856-783-9128

10% OFF

PROVIDING SERVICE FOR OVER 10 YRS

Siding • Capping • Painting Gutters • Carpentry & More

Neighborhood-Pride.com

All Electrical Repairs 100-200 Amp Services      

With this coupon or mention this ad

KEOSEYAN LANDSCAPING Lawn Cutting, Landscaping 3 FREE CUTS with Seasonal Agreement     

Serving the area for over 30 years

DON HAHN ELECTRIC Since 1972

Fencing

  

Natural Bluestone Walkways and Patios are our specialties!

Fully Insured & Bonded • Lic. #14718

NM-00422733

For all your

������ � ���� ������ ������ � ������ � ������� � ������ ������ ����� � �������� �������� � ����� ������� � ������ ������ ������� � �������� � ������� ��� ����

267-970-7203

NM-00422782

Tree Service

LET THE SUNS WORK FOR

NM-00423016

General Cleaning

856¡667-6231

Painting

YOU!

A1CUSTOMPAINTING Neatness Counts Interior/Exterior • Wallpaper Removal • Install Vinyl Plank Flooring • Skim Coat • Power Wash

TO PLACE AN AD CALL:

856-779-3800 x6837

Fully Insured/Free Estimates

NJ HIC. # 13VH00102300

Painting

DAVINCI PAINTING Quality Work Reasonable Price Licensed & Insured

856-341-4861

#13VH04329600

10% OFF ANY COMPLETE JOB

609.914.0517

Painting

Coastal Painting Interior, Exterior Power washing

QUALITY WORK SINCE 1994

Call 609.801.2655


THE MARLTON SUN — MARCH 25-31, 2020

Painting

Printing

“THE HAPPY PAINTER�

Int / Ext / Res / Comm Prof. Spray Aluminum Siding, Stucco, Shingle Powerwash Deck Clean

856-456-8232 856-384-8734 thehappypainteronline.com

JUDY’S WALLPAPER

REMOVAL + PAINTING FREE ESTIMATES

NM-00424978

Schedule Now Professional & Clean Service

Wallpaper & Painting Resid. & Comm. • Int. & Ext. Neatness Guaranteed

No Job Too Small

FREE Estimates • FREE Sizing

WALLPAPER REMOVAL

856-582-2459 Lic#13VH08937100 Pets Service

Too pooped to scoop?

We provide weekly scooper service starting at

GET $15.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!

609-714-6878 609-471-3082

Locally owned and operated

856-665-6769

www.alldogspoop.com

Power Washing

American

Power Washing

GET YOUR HOUSE WASHED Get a FREE Window Cleaning SOFT WASHING SPECIALIST We Wash Anything! FULLY INSURED

609-217-3424 AmericanPowerWashingSJ.com

$15/week

NM-00425347

saving our planet, one pile at a time

Roofing

TO PLACE AN AD CALL:

 DIAMOND  ROOFING               

(609) 268-9200 Lic.# 13VH01716900

B:7.875� T:7.875� S:7.375�

856-779-3800 x6837

Power Washing

Power Washing

AUTOS FOR SALE

Wanted to Buy

Junk Cars

$BUYING$

*GUITARS *OLD TOYS *TOOLS *FURNITURE *JEWELRY *WATCHES *MILITARY *POTTERY *VINTAGE ITEMS *BIKES & MOTORCYCLES CHECK YOUR GARAGES, ATTICS, BASEMENTS & CLOSETS

Call Jack 609-217-6188

FULLY INSURED BUYING!

1 ITEM OR THE ENTIRE ESTATE

BUYING!

BUYING!

BUYING!

(Expert in coins, toys, slot cars, and old razors) Dr. Sonnheim worked with Lark Mason of “Antiques Road Showâ€? Questions on coins and collectibles call 856.981.3397 • 7 Days/Week

BUYING!

BUYING!

BUYING!

WANTED TO BUY $ $ $ CASH - CASH - CASH

Paid For Unwanted COSTUME JEWELRY Old - Vintage or Antique Watches - Furs - Coins CHINA OR POTTERY DINNERWARE Crystal - Stemware Old Glass - Old Linens Sterling - Silverplate PAINTINGS - PRINTS OLD -OR- MODERN FURNITURE OLD TOYS VINTAGE ITEMS Attic-Garage-Bsmt-Items CLEAN OUT & BUY OUT

“CALL GINA� 609-471-8391 ALL FIREARMS Military, Antique, Hunting Guns, Swords & Bayonets. We pay CASH on the spot. Call John & Stephanie! 610-716-5353 antiqueandrareguns@ gmail.com Federal Firearms Licensee

HANDS ON DECK LLC

856-428-9797

Free Est. • NJ#13VH0325100 B:10.5�

S:10�

T:10.5�

LET THE SUNS WORK FOR YOU! TO PLACE AN AD CALL: IWitnessBullying.org

BUYING!

WANTED: COINS • CURRENCY • SLOT CARS • OLD RAZORS

Houses...Decks...Patios Low Pressure Power Washing Specialist

LET THE SUN WORK FOR YOU!

BUYING!

NM-00423622

856-779-3800 x6837

BUYING!

BUYING!

BUYING!

$$$$$$$$$$$$

Free Estimates Full Insured Reg. # 13VH01299900 Call Mike

BRITMAR

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

NM-00426169

HOME IMPROVEMENT

$$$$$$$$$$$$

10

TOP $$$ PAID FOR JUNK CARS Free Pick Up 24 Hour Service    PA 215-730-0900 NM-00422766

TO PLACE AN AD CALL:

856-779-3800 x6837


MARCH 25-31, 2020 — THE MARLTON SUN

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

EMPLOYMENT WEEKLY

EVERY NEIGHBORHOOD HAS A

Naturehood

facebook.com/employmentweeklymagazine broadstreetclassifieds.com TO PLACE A RECRUITMENT DISPLAY AD CALL 856-779-3873 EMPLOYMENT General Employment

WE ARE HIRING DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS New starting rate $12.00 p/hr.

Assist people with daily living activities, including personal goals, recreation and daily household living. Facilitate proper medical care and meet the physical, emotional and personal needs of the people we serve. Position provides direct care and support in life skills, transportation and integration into the community for residents.

QMA is hiring in Burlington, Camden and Cumberland Counties

• Compensation structures that are based on a pay-for-performance philosophy • Vacation pay • A comprehensive benefit plans including medical, vision and prescription coverage with minimal employee contribution • A 401K savings program and life insurance • Performance based bonuses and an employee referral program

Requirements for Direct Support Professionals:

• A minimum HS diploma or GED • 21 YRS of age or older • A valid driver’s license • The ability to communicate and provide physical care to the people we serve • A clear criminal history • A clean driving record Interested • Basic computer skills • A flexible work schedule in joining our team? Multiple Or know somebody who Work Locations Send your resume would be? Check out our Available jpera@qmainc.com current openings listed Employee Referral at qmainc.com. Program Contact Danielle Hollis 856-735-1015 700 Cinnaminson Avenue, Building B, Palmyra NJ 08065

General Employment PAID RESEARCH SUBJECT SPACE MISSION SIMULATION 8 day study of resilience at U. of PA. Must be healthy, about 27-55 yr. old with STEM educ. MS or BS+ equiv. exp or military exp. Compensated time & travel. Call 215-573-5855 General Employment LAYOFF JITTERS? Put yourself in charge! Build an exciting career with Primerica, where you're the boss. You determine your own hours, territory, even your compensation potential! Ask me how! Call (856)910-1100 primerica.com/ellis

Apply Online at qmainc.com/careers

Your Success Starts Here:

Don’t Miss Our Job Listings New Every Week!

DiscoverTheForest.org

11


THE MARLTON SUN — MARCH 25-31, 2020

12

IT’S TIME TO START GARDENING FRUIT TREES 5 OR 7 GALLON POTS

IT’S TIME TO START YOUR COOL CROPS

SMALL FRUITS

PANSIES

Apples, Cherries, Peaches, Nectarines, Plums, Pears, Apricot, Figs, Persimmons,

Choose from Cabbage, Lettuce, Broccoli, Peas and Many More.

Blueberries, Blackberries, Raspberries, Grapes, Kiwis & Paw Paws

The Flower That Says Spring is Here! 32 plant Flats 4 Packs

299ea.

4499

$

Starting At

Plant Flats

1699/at

$

2

1199

$ 99

$

Starting At

Your lawn care solution for Early Spring, Spring, Summer, and Fall. Each bag is applied separately in each season delivering the proper nutrients.

5 bags 5,000 sq. ft.

5 Bags For

54

$

Total Value

$

104

99

99*

7 bags 15,000 sq. ft.

All 5 bags will cover your lawn care needs for Early Spring, Spring Summer and Fall. Each bag is applied separately in each season delivering the proper slow release nutrients and microbes.

$

+

Colored Mulch

Root Mulch

$

Up to $60 Savings Just on Complete Insect Purchase Greenview 5M 4-Step Program Receive a 5M bag of Bayer Complete Insect Control

3 Yards.....$139 5 Yards.....$199 10 Yards...$349 15 Yards...$470

3 Yards ....$139 5 Yards ....$199 10 Yards ..$349 15 Yards ..$470

(3 bag limit of Bayer Complete Insect Control)

We Deliver 7 Days A Week! • Prices Below Include Local Delivery Charges • Pick-Up & SAVE!! (Discount for Pick-Up!)

3 Yards ....$139 5 Yards ....$199 10 Yards ..$349

 Playground Mulch

Hardwood Mulch

3 Yards ....$139 5 Yards ....$199 10 Yards ..$349 15 Yards ..$470

3 Yards ....$139 5 Yards ....$199 10 Yards ..$349 15 Yards ..$470

No Recycled Wood

Super Compost

3 Yards ....$169 5 Yards ....$249 8 Yards ....$369

Bulk Wood Chips

3 Yards ....$139 5 Yards ....$199 10 Yards ..$349 15 Yards ..$470

PROPANE 20lb Tank ReďŹ ll

1299

$

We ďŹ ll all size tanks and RV’s

No Recycled Wood

Sale Ends April 9th, 2020

856-767-6883 51 West Factory Rd., Berlin, NJ

Damblys.com

NM-00424268

Purchase Greenview 15M 4-STEP Program Receive (3) 5M bags of Bayer Complete Insect Control

After $35.00 Mail-In Rebate

Screened Organic Top Soil

14499*

Up to 3 bags FREE

5499 $ 14499

5,000 Sq. Ft. Program

15,000 Sq. Ft. Program

BULK SPECIALS*

274

99

Complete Insect Control

After $15.00 Mail-In Rebate

Cannot combine with ith other he offers. offe

$

Total Value

7 Bags For

*After Dambly’s Instant Discount and Scotts Mail in Rebates. No substitutions. Cannot combine with other offers.

4-Step Lawn Program

BLACK BROWN

1699/at

$

5 bags covers 5,000 sq. ft and 7 bags cover 15,000 sq. ft.

+

RED

ea.

SCOTTS 4-STEP LAWN PROGRAM PLUS GRUB-EX

DAMBLY

GOOD DEAL

4 $ Packs

HOURS: Mon-Sat 8-7 Sun 9-6

NOW OFFERING

Curbside Pick Up or Home Delivery

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