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2013

FALL FOR THE ARTS

A S P E C I A L S U P P L E M E N T T O S N & R 


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MUSEUM

Clockwise from Left: 1) Autry National Center Now on View: Art of the West Bison chair (Detail), Scotland, 1842. Mahogany, rosewood, bison horns, glass. Museum Purchase, Autry National Center 2) GRAMMY Museum® at L.A. LIVE Now on View: Ringo: Peace & Love © www.johnwrightphoto.com 3) Japanese American National Museum. Now on View: Marvels & Monsters: Unmasking Asian Images in U.S. Comics, 1942-1986. Yellow Claw #1 (October 1956), Marjean Magazine Corp. [Atlas] 4) Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens Now on View: Junipero Serra and the Legacies of the California Missions. Mission San Gabriel, CA. 1832, by Ferdinand Deppe. Santa Barbara Mission Archive-Library.

FREE ADMISSION OR SPECIAL OFFERS AT THESE MUSEUMS Autry National Center

Hollywood Museum

Norton Simon Museum

CA African American Museum

Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

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CA Science Center Chinese American Museum

FIND WHAT MOVES YOU. SAVE UP TO $500 at LA’s world-class

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Craft & Folk Art Museum

Japanese American National Museum LA Museum of the Holocaust

Getty Center

MOCA

Getty Villa

Museum of Latin American Art

Hammer Museum Heritage Square Museum

Paley Center for Media Pasadena Museum of CA Art

LACMA

Fowler Museum at UCLA

GRAMMY Museum® at L.A. LIVE

Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits

Petersen Automotive Museum Santa Monica Museum of Art

Museum of Tolerance Natural History Museum of LA County

Skirball Cultural Center USS IOWA

PRESENTED BY

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TAbLE OF CONTENTS

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ARTS

Still lifes and saddles, artist battles and genetic genius. Check out just a sampling of October’s art offerings.

13 14 EVENTS

31 days of artober

Art isn’t just something you watch or see on a wall—find it on the dance floor, in a wine glass and on the marathon path.

ON STAGE

Indulge your dramatic side with some choice dance, theater and music selections.

17 19 MUSIC

It’s music’s harvest season, from up-and-comers to big-name acts.

IT’S OCTObER , which means that in Sacramento, it’s also Artober. The leaves are turning golden brown, the air’s imbued with a lovely crisp chill and creativity is on display everywhere. As part of the National Arts and Humanities Month, the Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission has teamed up with dozens of local artists—painters, actors, musicians, writers, etc.—to shine a harvest light on the city’s best, most inspired offerings. Throughout the month, Sacramento’s calendar will be rich with events and exhibits. Take a trip to the Crocker

Art Museum to check out how live jazz can be incorporated into a seemingly static visual exhibition. Or drive down Del Paso Boulevard to witness what happens when poets pair with painters. There’s also local storytelling sessions and live music, as well as myriad festivals and even an all-star Halloween-themed punk bill. It’s not all paintings and poets and songs, however. Artober also boasts zombie trains, corn mazes and, for the adults, plenty of beer and wine celebrations. Art isn’t just a medium, after all, it’s anything you want it to be—limited only by your imagination.

Artober is A collAborAtion between sn&r And the regionAl Arts community. ART DIRECTOR: Hayley Doshay

HALLOWEEN Dress up, tune in and freak out.

DIRECTOR Of ADVERTISING AND SALES:

Rick Brown SALES TEAM: Teri Gorman, Dusty Hamilton, Brian Jones, Rosemarie Messina, Dave Nettles, Lee Roberts, Julie Sherry, Olla Ubay, Joy Webber, Kelsi White, Gary Winterholler

EDITOR: Rachel Leibrock WRITERS: Julianna Boggs, Cody

ADVERTISING OpERATIONS MANAGER:

Drabble, Deena Drewis, Becky Grunewald, Lovelle Harris, Rachel Leibrock, Jessica Rine, Jonathan Mendick, Shoka

ADVERTISING SERVICES COORDINATOR:

COpy EDITORS: Kimberly Brown, Deena

Drewis, Jessica Rine, Shoka Shafiee CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Priscilla Garcia WEb pUbLISHING: John Bisignano,

Will Niespodzinski Melissa Bernard SpECIAL kUDOS TO: The Sacramento

Metropolitan Arts Commission and SN&R owners Deborah Redmond and Jeff vonKaenel. On the cover and on this page (above): Julie Heffernan’s “Self-portrait as Animal Skirt.”

Joe Kakacek, Jonathan Schultz A SPECIA L SUPPL EME NT T O S N& R  

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Sacramento

Yoga Center

TEACHER RECRUITMENT The Sacramento Yoga Center has openings for teachers of yoga and other spiritually-oriented discipines. Do you know of anyone (including yourself) who is looking for a wonderful teaching venue? Our teachers are private contractors (not employees) and must provide evidence of insurance. Contact Jeff at 916-996-5645 2791 24th St. at the Sierra 2 Community Center, Room 6 (916) 996–5645 • www.sacramentoyogacenter.com • Jeff12345@zoho.com

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UniversityArt.com

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Fa l l F O R T H E A RT S

www.artobersac.com Dear Sacramento community, October is “ARTober” a month long celebration of the arts. As part of National Arts and Humanities month, Mayor Kevin Johnson’s For Arts Sake initiative, the Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission, the Sacramento Convention and Visitors Bureau, Sacramento365.com, and dozens of local arts organizations are collaborating to spotlight 150 events in the Sacramento region in October. Throughout the month the public can experience and participate in arts events, performances and free activities including exhibitions, temporary public artworks, art festivals, concerts, musicals, live poetry, a street food and design market, and theater. ARTober will kick off with a performance by the Sacramento Opera at the Sacramento City Council meeting at 6 pm on October 1st. This will be followed by the unveiling of a major temporary public art project, titled, “Words and Walls,” on Del Paso Boulevard at 5 pm on October 12th. Five local poets have written poems for and about the boulevard and local graphic designers have turned this prose into monumental temporary works on the exteriors of the buildings on Del Paso Boulevard. Another ARTober highlight is the 3rd Annual Midtown Arts Festival, to be held on Oct. 19th from 12-5. A family friendly event, it will feature live music and performances from local arts organizations. Attendees will also have a chance to explore a variety of innovative art processes. On any given day, Sacramento will be alive with concerts, theater and dance performances, art shows and museum days. For details, log on to www.ARTobersac.com. The arts inspire us, provoke us, amuse us, enlighten us, and humanize us. Enrich yourself by experiencing Sacramento’s vibrant arts community and taking advantage of all that ARTober has to offer. John nicolauS Chair, Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission

cheryl holben Vice-Chair, Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission

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Photo courtesy of Jose di gregorio

courtesy of the crocker Art MuseuM

2013

Jose Di Gregorio, “Self-Portrait,” mixed media on wood.

Back on the horse

Lose yourseLf

When two nonprofits team up for a single fundraiser, it’s bound to be greater than just the sum of its parts. Such is the case with La Raza Galeria Posada and the Sacramento Police Mounted Association’s Saddle Up & Paint event on Saturday, October 5. It’ll offer Dia de los Muertos sugarskull and mask-painting workshops for the kids, the presentation of two new saddles to the SPMA, barbecue, and live music with the Josh Macrae Band and the College Fund Band. Have fun, help raise funds for Sacramento police horses and scholarships for children’s arts-education programs. Noon to 4 p.m.; $10 suggested donation, free for kids ages 12 and younger. La Raza Galeria Posada, 2700 Front Street; (916) 446-5133; www.lrgp.org. J.M.

Featured artist Birgitta FranzenMcCarthy, who signs her work under the name “Bittan,” works mostly from nature and scenes outdoors. Lose yourself in her “action paintings,” and feel the branches swaying in the wind. A new exhibit at the Axis Gallery, Loose Ends, highlights her work, including the abstract pieces that Franzen-McCarthy says were inspired by observing the fluid changes of her natural subjects. Loose Ends opens on Saturday, October 5, and runs through Sunday, October 27. The Second Saturday reception happens on October 12, from 6 to 9 p.m. 1517 19th Street, (916) 443-9900; www.axisgallery.org. C.D.

this is your art on acid

Following in their family’s acclaimed footsteps, Lucia Eames and Llisa Demetrios, daughter and granddaughter of legendary California designers Charles and Ray Eames, have forged their own path in the art community. Now The California Museum has honored them with an exhibition, the aptly titled Eames Generations: A Legacy of California Design, which runs through December 1. Staying true to their California roots, Eames, who created the 92-foot-tall “Wind Harp” in South San Francisco, designs functional indoor and outdoor pieces laser-cut in metal, and Demetrios, who creates large-scale sculptures out of bronze, hammers out her creations in their shared studio space in Sonoma County. Admission is $6-$8.50, free for children 5 and under. The California Museum, 1020 O Street; (916) 653-7524; www.californiamuseum.org. L.H.

Saddle Up & Paint

THe CuLT of seLfie by Jessica Rine

Sky IS FallIng: PaIntIngS by JulIe HeFFernan

Julie HeffeRnan is obsessed witH HeRself. Not in a bad way. Rather, the artist creates fantastical paintings full of darkness and light, life and death. Heffernan—whose works go on display beginning on Sunday, October 20, at the Crocker Art Museum in an exhibit titled Sky Is Falling: Paintings by Julie Heffernan—also embeds contemporary messages in rich palettes of muted colors and intricate detail, reminiscent of Baroque and Renaissance art, but with a more modern, surrealist feel. Sensual and provocative, she invites the viewer to examine larger worldly messages through her constant self-examination. In her “Self-Portrait as Animal Skirt,” a pale, nude female dons a headdress of multicolored flowers, and her

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Julie Heffernan, “Self Portrait With Falling Sky,” oil on canvas, 2011.

arms rest on a large flowing skirt of animal carcasses. The figure’s pose is graceful and elegant, like that of European royalty, but the bright blue background and nature-infused coverings suggest an otherworldly setting. Heffernan employs classic technique to create vast, dreamlike stories with incredible detail. She draws viewers in with strange occurrences in naturalistic settings, or realistic still lifes in invented backgrounds. The eye may focus on the beautiful woman draped on stones in the forest in the foreground of a painting, but an explosion in the background of the painting pulls the eye and lures the viewer into Heffernan’s grand, twisted worlds. Though she now lives and creates art in Brooklyn, New York, Heffernan remains tied to her Northern California roots. She earned her bachelor’s degree in fine arts from UC Santa Cruz and is currently represented by the Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco as well as the Mark Moore Gallery in Culver City. The Crocker exhibit will feature some of Heffernan’s self-portraits along with other modern surrealistic oil paintings. The exhibit is organized by the Palo Alto Art Center, the paintings borrowed from various Northern California collections. Sunday, October 20, through Sunday, January 26, 2014; $5-$10. Crocker Art Museum, 216 O Street; (916) 808-7000; www.crockerartmuseum.org. Ω

a sP ecia l suPPl eM ent t o sn& R

Night

Get ready to feel like you’re on psychedelics when you peep this show, because Jose Di Gregorio and Jared Tharp aim to stimulate your visual system and trip you out. With Night on display this month at Bows & Arrows, Di Gregorio (whose work is pictured above, top right) continues his Sacred Geometry series of rainbow-hued combos of outer space and precise line work. Tharp also works the optical-geometry vein, but takes inspiration from more Earthbound sources: 1980s skate graphics and animation. Tharp says that he and Di Gregorio are aiming for an “overall hypnotic and visceral effect.” The opening reception is on Friday, October 4, from 6 to 9 p.m.; show ends Thursday, October 31. 1815 19th Street, (916) 822-5668, www.bowscollective.com. B.G.

Loose Ends

a L L i n t h e fa m i Ly

Eames Generations: A Legacy of California Design


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Laura Edmisten-Matranga and poet Danny Romero teamed up for this work, part of the Del Paso Words & Walls Project, that is at 2138 Del Paso Boulevard.

2013

Beat steady

ARtfuL neigHBoRs by RAChEL LEIbROCk

Del Paso WorDs & Walls Projects DeDication ceremony

ART IN PUbLIC PLACES. The concept seems really simple: A graceful metaland-wood sculpture placed squarely in a library. A vibrant mural painted on the side of a shop’s wall. A bronze statue looming over travelers at an airport. But that’s not all public art can be, and that’s something that Shelly Willis, director for the Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission considered when her organization teamed with the Del Paso Boulevard Partnership in an effort to bring more visual art to the north Sacramento neighborhood. The idea, Willis knew, had to go beyond simply tacking up some pictures around the boulevard.

Photo courtesy of the sacramento metroPolitan arts commission

Davis Jazz and Beat Festival

Cheers to that

Hit the road, and saunter across the Yolo Causeway for the seventh annual Davis Jazz and Beat Festival, October 4-5, at the John Natsoulas Center for the Arts. The free event, a celebration honoring the freewheeling ideals of the Beat Generation, promises two days of poetry readings and painting demonstrations set to rhapsodic live jazz performances. There’ll also be a Jack Kerouac poetry contest, as well as music and spoken word. This is a chance to delve into the artistic world that celebrated nonconformity and impetuous creativity. A concurrent exhibition, Beat Generation and Beyond; Lyrical Vision: the Figure, will feature works by notable artists of the era. Beret and sunglasses not required. 521 First Street in Davis, (530) 756-3938, www.natsoulas.com. L.H.

Frosty cold and carb-loaded, amateur pollsters say beer is what the body craves after doing something it doesn’t want to do—namely, running. That’s what makes the Oktobrewfest run such an appealing idea. It combines both. Lace up those lederhosen, pick either the 5k or 10k option and get rewarded with a free “recovery” beer at the finish line. There’s also a half-mile kids run—but we’re guessing the little ones are served apple juice, not brews. The event benefits the A Change of Pace Foundation, a Davisbased nonprofit that aims to promote community education, family-oriented events, youth exercise programs, triathlons and camps. The run, scheduled to start at 6 p.m., October 12, at Davis Community Park, will lead runners through the city streets and bike paths of Davis. The $25-$45 registration fee includes a bib number, custom bottle opener finisher’s medal, race shirt and post-race libation. Prost! http://changeofpace.com/ oktobrewfest. J.B.

dress you up

“I’m interested in finding ways that artists in other disciplines can bring their work into the public realm,” she says. And so, the Del Paso Words & Walls Project was born, and in January, SMAC and the DPBP invited Sacramento poets to submit works for consideration on the subject of Del Paso Boulevard—poems inspired by their perspectives, impressions and memories of the street. The chosen poems would then, in turn, be translated by graphic artists into visual pieces. The resulting exhibit, the Del Paso Words & Walls Project, will feature five “monumental and site-specific” public artworks on buildings located along Del Paso Boulevard, between Arden Way and El Camino Avenue. The project’s participating poets are Susan Kelly-DeWitt, Danny Romero, Paco Marquez, Tim Kahl and Catherine French. The graphic designers are Laura Edmisten-Matranga, Benjamin DellaRosa, Hans Bennewitz, William Leung and Barb Hennelly. The project, currently still in its final stages of completion, will be unveiled Saturday, October 12, at the Sacramento Temporary Contemporary gallery, and while it’s currently planned as a temporary installation, Willis says that ideally it will evolve into a permanent collection. “I hope the Del Paso businesses like [the art] so much that they’ll keep them up,” she says. Reception is on Saturday, October 12, from 5 to 7 p.m. 1616 Del Paso Boulevard, www.sacmetro arts.org/poetwall.html Ω

Carnivale Black Tie Masquerade Ball

Among the myriad costume balls during the Halloween season, the 32nd annual Carnivale Black Tie Masquerade Ball, which takes place Saturday, October 19, at the Elks Tower, offers a chance to dress in black-tie attire, don a glittery mask and play casino games such as blackjack and roulette—all for charity. The event is hosted by the Active 20-30 Club of Greater Sacramento, a group of women that volunteers its time to various local children’s charities. The masquerade ball will benefit KidsFirst, Gravity and Next Move. In addition to the casino hijinks, the evening will also include the Virginia Lights Band’s sultry vocal stylings, food, drinks and overall merriment. 7 to 11 p.m.; $45 advance tickets, $55 at the door. 921 11th Street, (916) 658-9830, www.sacwomens2030.org. J.R.

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Oktobrewfest run

sunday funday Delta Wine & Art Faire

It’s Sunday, right? You just want to chill—maybe have a drink. Or two. Anything to help you forget that Monday’s just around the corner. But you’re also not some rube—you demand culture, sophistication, class. It’s time, then, for the Delta Wine & Art Faire, which takes place Sunday, October 6, at the Old Sugar Mill. The event promises the key essentials to a relaxing yet not completely throwaway weekend afternoon. In addition to works by local artists, there’ll be live music, food vendors and a silent auction that will raise funds for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. See, you already feel better about that bottle of pinot you’re planning to put away, don’t you? 1 to 7 p.m.; $20 in advance, $25 at the door. 35265 Willow Avenue in Clarksburg, www.carvalho familywinery.com/ourEvents_ winery.shtml. R.L.  

   

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HARRIS CENTER AT FOLSOM LAKE COLLEGE PRESENTS

Alonzo King LINES Ballet FRI 9/27

Cultural traditions and collaborative artistry imbue classical ballet with new expressive potential. 8 pm

This Is The ’70s

Capitol Steps

SAT 9/28 – SUN 9/29 Live

WED 10/2 Hilarious come-

music, film and dance combine in a tribute to the “Me Decade” with faithful tributes to Led Zeppelin, Fleetwood Mac, Heart and more. SAT: 8 pm; SUN: 2 & 7 pm

dic songs and political satire from inside-the-beltway direct to your funny bone. 7:30 pm ALSO: 10/3 Vinicius Cantuária Quartet 10/4 Pacífico Dance Company 10/5 Gamelan Sekar Jaya

www.HarrisCenter.net 916-608-6888 14

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The New York-based Ballet Hispanico merges ballet and contemporary dance: The result is a highly accessible, pop-culture-friendly show.


2013

The l ady has Three faces

BeTTer Than a chick flick

My Own Stranger, directed by Kelley Ogden, is a site-specific performance that tells a semichronological story of the Pulitzer Prizewinning poet Anne Sexton, using her poems, letters and quotes from interviews. This KOLT Run Creations production stars Kellie Yvonne Raines, Ruby Sketchley and Lisa Thew, each depicting a different aspect of Sexton’s personality—Ichi, the child who needs to fit in; Dvah, the self-loathing adult; and Mercy, the one who self-medicates. Adapted by Marilyn Campbell and Linda Laundra, performances are scheduled to take place at various locations, and each venue will distinctly inform the play’s vibe. Scheduled venues include the Alex Bult Gallery; Gallery 2110; Sol Collective; Crocker Art Museum; and, on Monday, October 7, the Sacramento Poetry Center. $20, www.koltruncreations.com. t.d.

Jane Austen’s timeless tale of miscommunication gets adapted for the Sacramento Theatre Company’s main stage in a production that runs October 2-27. Pride and Prejudice revolves around the story of Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet, one of literature’s most beloved couples, as they endure a rocky start to bicker and banter their way to eventual love and matrimony. Think of it as the original rom-com. But it’s more than just lighthearted fun; this classic romance explores expectations of marriage in the early 19th century, especially for women, and whether matrimonial unions should be made for love or money. Skip the dinner-and-a-movie date, and watch these characters stumble their way to true love. 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays; 12:30 and 6:30 p.m Thursdays; 8 p.m. Fridays; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays; $12-$37. 1419 H Street, (916) 443-6722, www.sactheatre.org. J.r.

My Own Stranger

Nobody puts bebé iN a corNer by DEENA DREWIS

Ballet Hispanico

IT’S A ROUgh TIME Of yEAR fOR SO yOU ThINk yOU CAN DANCE fANS.

The show is over until next summer, and the tour is only coming as close as San Francisco and San Jose, which means Sacramento fans will be in a serious drought of gnarly Nappytabs or depression-inducing (in a good way!) Mia Michaels routines for a while. Luckily, New York-based Ballet Hispanico is set to come through Davis on Friday, October 11, as part of its 2013 North American tour. The company’s style is pretty much

exactly what it sounds like: classical ballet and contemporary dance, melded with traditional and modern Latino forms. As you might imagine, this makes for a diverse repertoire—tangolaced pas de deux; pirouettes in a paso doble; slow, controlled développés followed by some serious hip work. Formed in 1970 by Tina Ramirez, the troupe, now directed by Eduardo Vilaro, aims to preserve culture and promote education with pieces like “A Vueltas con los Ochenta,” which evokes the post-Franco, 1980s Madrid when culture in Spain was experiencing new freedom in the wake of its former dictator; and “Mad’Moiselle,” a contemporary piece that is both playful and somber, and serves as a dialogue-in-motion about gender identity within Latino culture. The show is highly accessible and aimed at fostering a vital art form that is increasingly underfunded nowadays. The way I’d recommend it to friends that aren’t into dance: It’s kind of like the Sharks’ routines from West Side Story plus Black Swan, with a little bit of Dirty Dancing thrown in the mix. Who wouldn’t want to see that? 8 p.m., $25-$49. Mondavi Center, 9399 Old Davis Road in Davis; (530) 754-5000; www.mondaviarts.org. Ω

from riTe To rioT

o u T, d a m n s p o T !

Paris 1913

When Igor Stravinsky premiered his new ballet The Rite of Spring on May 29, 1913, the flamboyant, avant-garde performance choreographed by Vaslav Nijinsky so shocked the Paris elite in attendance that they broke out into a frenzy that ultimately spilled from the stage at the Champs-Elysées Theatre and onto the streets. Indeed, something as seemingly refined as ballet caused a near riot. Now, a century later on Saturday, October 12, the Sacramento Ballet’s artistic director Ron Cunningham will reinterpret Stravinsky’s showy, influential production with a show that will also include a preview of sorts of two other upcoming Sac Ballet presentations, The Firebird and Rubies. 7 p.m., $25. Sacramento Ballet, 1631 K Street; (916) 552-5800; www.sacballet.org. L.H.

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Pride and Prejudice

Macbeth

Capital Stage performs mostly cutting-edge plays or premieres locally written works, but its take on the oft-performed Shakespeare classic Macbeth, being staged from Wednesday, October 23 to Sunday, November 24, promises to be no less interesting. The theater company will present an original adaption of this tragedy, condensing its usual five acts into two. There are some radical departures: According to director Stephanie Gularte, this adaptation is set “in a not-too-distant post-apocalyptic future … where guerrilla warfare rules the land.” There will even be some gender-bending involved. This particular interpretation centers on the “perverse” marital bond between Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. The timeless play is as dark as any horror movie and makes for the a perfect night out in the lead up to Halloween. There will be blood. Visit Cap Stage’s website for showtimes. $18-$36. 2215 J Street, (916) 995-5464, www.capstage.org. b.G.     09.26.13    

   

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Tapas

SNEAK PEEK 10/12/13 10AM-8:30PM

Orange Shandy is here.

for the Soul

F o o d t o t e m p t t h e p a l a t e C o n v e r s a t i o n t o F e e d t h e s o u l �

Bread of life Celebrates 15 Years

tuesday october 1st, 2013 from 6pm–8pm at society for the Blind, 1238 s street (13th & s street) � �

Enjoy a conversation with renowned spiritual director, Brother Don Bisson

Silent Auction features inspirational artist, Mary Dignan’s mosaic “Dragonfly Spirit”

C O F F E E • PA S T R I E S • A R T 1029 DEL PASO BOULEVARD, SACRAMENTO, CA

REno’s

comEs to RosEVillE

For tiCkets or more inFo:

go to Breadoflife.org Spirit in the Arts October Offerings: Contact us for dates & times! Writing from the Spirit ~ Creative Halloween Crafts Octoberfest! Gathering & Celebrating Our Stories Loving Your Brain as a Spiritual Practice

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650 El Camino Ave • Sacramento, CA www.BreadofLife.org • 916.648.1803

2003 to 2013

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V o t E D

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BEST BREAKFAST yEAR AftER yEAR!

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o P E n 6 : 3130 A m - 2 P m 13D A i ly

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PORK

BELLY

a You Gott Superior Quality Food! try it!Gourmet Burgers, Sandwiches, Salads, Rice,

Grand OpeninG 13

Sunday, September 29 • 2pm to 6pm Absinthe Tasting • Free Appetizers • Live Music

Outdoor 13 dining Courtyard 13 on Firehouse alley. Unique “Underground” Sacramento dining and full bar.

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Tacos, and much more.

Free Fries

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With the purchase of 2 entrees and 2 beverages get 1 order of pork belly fries free! Cannot be combined with any other discounts or offers. One coupon per table/order. Expires 10/12/13

Gift Cards & Catering available ★★★★ – SN&R ★★★★ –YELP Del Paso Rd

Gateway Park Blvd

Truxel Rd Arena Blvd

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4261 TRUXEL RD, STE A7 | SACRAMENTO

Sun – Mon: 11am-8pm | Fri – Sat: 11am-10pm | Happy Hour 3-6pm 916.285.6100 | www.pbgrubshack.com 4 tvs | Beer & Wine | Follow Us

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A S P E CIA L SUPPL EMENT T O SN& R 

Casual French • Lunch & Dinner • Cocktails • Private Events absinthe is legal now, but we still serve undergroit und

1023a Front Street • Old Sacramento 9 1 6 . 2 8 7 . 9 8 0 0 • w w w. S a c a b s i n t h e . c o m

Join us out here Please drink responsibly.


Straight outta tulSa

2013

Leon RusseLL by jONAThAN MENdICk

EvEN ThOUgh hE’S PRObAbLy OLdER ThAN ThE AvERAgE SN&R REAdER, LEON RUSSELL ISN’T ONE Of ThOSE AgINg ROCk ’N’ ROLL hALL Of fAMERS wE ShOULd ALL jUST fORgET AbOUT ALREAdy. First of all, he looks like a friggin’ wizard—Gandalf, to be exact. And musically, the bearded Oklahoma-born pianist and songwriter, who moved to Los Angeles in the early ’60s, has penned such classics as “A Song for You,” “Tight Rope” and “Lady Blue.” Over the course of a nearly 60-year musical career, Russell (pictured, right), who performs on Friday, October 20, at Assembly, has also explored and blended blues, country, rock and soul to create a signature sound that’s often now called the “Tulsa Sound.” But Russell’s finest moment just may have been his energetic performance in the George Harrison-organized Concert for Bangladesh at Madison Square Garden in 1971. Though he shared the stage with two Beatles, Eric Clapton and Bob Dylan, Russell managed to steal the show with a spirited rendition of the Rolling Stones’ “Jumpin’ Jack Flash.” Afterward, he retreated into the shadows—literally—switching to bass guitar and backup vocals on a few folk songs as the spotlight turned to Dylan. Fast-forward to more recent times. Two significant events happened in 2010 for Russell: First, he spent some time in the hospital recovering from a brain-fluid leak, pneumonia and heart failure. And shortly after that, he recorded an album with Elton John called The Union, his most commercially successful record in 30 years. Clearly, the wizard of the Tulsa Sound is still taking advantage of the time given to him by continuing to play awesome music. Sunday, October 20, 7 p.m.; $40. 1000 K Street, Suite 100; (916) 341-0176; www.leonrussellrecords.com. Ω

InspIratIon meets ImprovIsatIon Ross Hammond’s The Humanity Suite

Ross Hammond, founder of the In the Flow Festival and the weekly Nebraska Mondays series at Luna’s Café & Juice Bar, often works with musicians and poets, but for his latest project, he takes the concept of collaboration even further. A new Crocker Art Museum exhibit, Emancipating the Past: Kara Walker’s Tales of Slavery and Power, features the African-American artist’s striking black silhouettes which explore both historical

and modern issues of race. As part of the exhibit, Hammond composed The Humanity Suite, a set inspired by three of Walker’s silhouettes. And just as Walker tells stories through art, Hammond tells stories through jazz, some of it improvised. For the project, Hammond will perform live on Thursday, October 3, with Vinny Golia (saxophone, bass clarinet), Catherine Sikora (saxophone), Clifford Childers (trombone, bass trumpet, euphonium), Kerry Kashiwagi (bass) and Dax Compise (drums). 7 p.m., $6-$12. 216 O Street, (916) 808-7000, http://crocker artmuseum.org. t.D.

Boo, yeah

trIp out Cave

The Chicago-based Cave visits Bows & Arrows on Tuesday, October 15, for a night of minimalist jazz-funk-noise whatever. And by “whatever,” we mean whatever fantastic sounds this ensemble coaxes out of its guitars, keyboards, etc. The quartet will also release its third album, Threace, that same day. Like its live sets, the music here drones, heavy on the grooves with meandering, psychedelic and trip-inducing melodies, no drugs needed. 8 p.m., $6. 1815 19th Street, www.dragcity.com/artists/ cave. r.l.

A SPECIA L SUPPL EME NT T O S N& R  

Halloween Hootenanny Festival Mark your calendars for the 10th annual Halloween Hootenanny Festival. The music event takes place this year at Old Ironsides from October 24-26, and features way too many punk, Americana and rockabilly bands to list here. Some highlights: the Rocketz, the Nickel Slots, the Vintage Vandals and Rebel Punk. There’ll also be food trucks, a zombie-pinup contest and something billed as, um, a “bloody wet tee shirt contest.” Scary, indeed. 8 p.m. Thursday, 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday; $12-$15. 1901 10th Street, http://tinyurl.com/ hootenannyfestival. r.l.

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Orange Shandy is here. Saturday November 9th 4:30 - 8:30pm Downtown Sutter Creek Stroll Main Street Sutter Creek Taste Amador County Wines Enjoy Music, Local Cuisine, Silent Auction, Art & More Tickets $25 in Advance or $30 at the Door For Tickets and Information: www.amadorarts.org or 209 267 9038 Go to www.touramador.com to build your custom Winefest Weekend

Join us out here Please drink responsibly. 18

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THE GHOSTS ARE REAL

2013

RiDe with the unDeaD by JULIANNA bOggS

Zombie Train AMTRAk NEEdS TO STEP UP ITS gAME.

Sacramento Horror Film Festival The Sacramento Horror Film Festival should get everyone’s heart racing—think of it as a warm-up to the scariest night of them all. This year’s fest, which takes place Friday, October 11, to Sunday, October 13, at the Colonial Theatre, includes a screening of the 2006 cult classic Behind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon and—bonus!—the film’s star Nathan Baesel will also be in attendance. Also on the bill: the 1976 timeless favorite, The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Yes, it’s time for fans and virgins to do the time warp yet again. Costumes, of course, strongly encouraged. There’ll also be short films and an awards ceremony. $30-$40 for a three-day pass, single day tickets are $15-$25. 3522 Stockton Boulevard, www.sachorrorfilmfest.com. C.D.

the ghosts oF sacramento past The Haunted Fort

It’s Sacramento’s oldest structure, so it’s not too surprising that there are a lot of ghost stories involving Sutter’s Fort. On October 25 and 26, tour docents dressed as the spirits of early Sacramento pioneers will lead The Haunted Fort evening tour program, sharing

Behind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon screens this year at the Sacramento Horror Film Festival.

stories of their lives—and deaths. It’s a great chance to explore the fort when it would otherwise be closed. Tours start every 10 minutes; ghost hunting with electromagnetic field probes and night-vision cameras optional. 6:30 to 9 p.m., $6-$8. 2701 L Street, (916) 445-4422, www.suttersfort.org. J.M.

american horror story live Callson Manor

Remember the 1979 film The Amityville Horror? You only wish these haunted houses were that cheery. Located in Roseville at the Placer County Fairgrounds, Callson Manor is freaking scary—better-bring-your-heart-meds scary. This year, get spooked every Friday through Sunday (and a few Thursdays, too) between October 4 and October 31. Owned and operated by a professional animatronicsprop designer, the Manor employs professional set designers and movieworthy special-effects and makeup artists. There are three haunted houses in all, as well as a courtyard featuring Zombie Paintball, a tarot card reader and some nightmare-inducing thing called “Chainsaw Alley.” Gulp. 7:30 to 10 p.m., $26-$60. 800 All America City Boulevard in Roseville, www.callsonmanor.com. R.L.

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

Fright nights

Need more excitement? Purchase a ticket upgrade in exchange for a laser rifle and membership in the Zombie Train Militia. Described as “one part passenger train, one part zombie killing machine,” the show lasts 75 minutes, leaving plenty of time to unwind and enjoy a victorious return ride home among the survivors. Various times on select dates, through November 1; $35-$50; www.sacramentorivertrain.com. Ω

photo courtesy of sacramento horror film festival

While the Sacramento RiverTrain can’t get you much farther than Woodland, its selection of services makes for an experience outside the norm when it comes to one of America’s oldest forms of mass transit. The RiverTrain coaches, representing a handful of eras in rail history, carry passengers over 16 miles of track, from West Sacramento to Woodland and back. The locomotive hosts a variety of offerings through the year, including brunch rides and sunset dining, but come October, it’s time for something more in step with the season: zombie killing and beer. Not at the same time, of course. That would be reckless. But no one’s saying you can’t try both. The Zombie Train bills itself as a two-hour ride and show during which passengers can relax and take in the sites of the undead, all while traveling on long wooden trestle bridges, past the Sacramento riverfront, and through miles of open valley farmland.

and so is the fun!

P r e Hs AtLoL OnW ECE NaHsAtUlNeT

OCTOBER 18, 19, 25 & 26 | 6 to 11pm $20 ADULTS • $10 YOUTH • $5 KIDS CARNIVAL (UNDER 8 YEARS) LIVE BANDS

FOOD

DJ’S

FREE EVENT PICTURES

9 0 0 PA L M D R I V E , I O N E , C A L I F O R N IA 9 5 6 4 0 WWW.PRESTONCASTLE.COM

A SPECIA L SUPPL EM E NT T O S N& R  

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Ace of SpAdeS Friday, September 27

Saturday, September 28

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

All Ages Welcome!

Tuesday, OcTOber 1

Thursday, OcTOber 3

TWIZTID

FRIGHTENED RABBIT

plus special guests

maDchilD - blaze ya DeaD homie aqualeo - brutha smith

plus special guests Friday, OctOber 4

senses fail for the fallen Dreams - expire being as an ocean

wednesday, OctOber 16

saturday, OctOber 5

Joshua Radin plus special guests

Friday, OctOber 18

Friday, OctOber 11

saturday, OctOber 12

andre nickatina & krazie bone

arden park roots

babnit

one Drop - street urchinz riotmaker (feat. Jeffry of shakeDown) - kayasun

saturday, OctOber 19

cOMiNg sOON

(of bone thugs-n-harmony)

09/26 10/17 10/20 10/22 10/25 10/26 11/05 11/11 11/12 11/14 11/16 11/17

The Used william control

11/23 11/30 12/08 12/11

Matt Nathanson Story Of The Year Attila Streelight Manifesto Parmalee Jonny Craig AB-Soul & Joey Badass Clutch Mayday Parade Misfits E-40 Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue Mellowhigh Great White Metalachi Blood On The Dance Floor

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202


Snr artober 092613