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raMer •

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2   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17


EditoR’S NotE

FEBRUARY 16, 2017 | Vol. 28, iSSUE 44

27 35 Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Interim Editor Robert Speer Associate Editor Raheem F. Hosseini Arts & Culture Editor Rebecca Huval Assistant Editor Anthony Siino Editorial Services Coordinator Karlos Rene Ayala Staff Reporter Scott Thomas Anderson Contributing Editor Rachel Leibrock Contributors Daniel Barnes, Ngaio Bealum, Janelle Bitker, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Aaron Carnes, Jim Carnes, Willie Clark, Deena Drewis, John Flynn, Joey Garcia, Lovelle Harris, Jeff Hudson, Dave Kempa, Matt Kramer, Jim Lane, Kel Munger, Kate Paloy, Patti Roberts, Ann Martin Rolke, Shoka, Bev Sykes, Mozes Zarate

36 Design Manager Lindsay Trop Creative Director Serene Lusano Art Directors Brian Breneman, Margaret Larkin Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Designer Kyle Shine Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Contributing Photographers Lisa Baetz, Darin Bradford, Kevin Cortopassi, Evan Duran, Lucas Fitzgerald, Jon Hermison, Shoka, Lauran Fayne Worthy Sales Coordinator Joanna Graves Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Olla Swanson, Joy Webber, Kelsi White Advertising Consultants Matt Kjar, Paul McGuinness, Wendy Russell, Manushi Weerasinghe Lead Director of First Impressions & Sales Assistant David Lindsay Director of First Impressions Hannah Williams Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Andy Barker, Kimberly Bordenkircher, Daniel Bowen, Heather Brinkley, Allen Brown, Mike Cleary, Jack Clifford, Lydia Comer, Rob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Joanna Gonzalez-Brown, Lori Lovell, Greg Meyers,

38 Sam Niver, Gilbert Quilatan, Lloyd Rongley, Lolu Sholotan, Zang Yang N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Kate Gonzales N&R Publications Writer Anne Stokes Senior N&R Publications Consultant Dave Nettles Marketing & Publications Consultant Dan Howells, Steve Caruso President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Executive Coordinator Carlyn Asuncion Director of People & Culture David Stogner Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Director of Dollars & Sense Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Dargitz Accounts Receivable Specialist Analie Foland Sweetdeals Specialist/HR Coordinator Courtney DeShields Developer John Bisignano, Jonathan Schultz System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins

05 07 08 13 14 22 25 27 35 36 38 46 51 63

STREETALK LETTERS NEwS + beAtS ScoREKEEpER FEATuRE SToRy ARTS&cuLTuRE NighT&dAy diSh STAgE FiLm muSic ASK joEy ThE 420 15 miNuTES

coVER dESigN By mARgARET LARKiN ANd SERENE LuSANo

1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Fax (916) 498-7910 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? sactonewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Want to Advertise? Fax (916) 498-7910 or snradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (916) 498-1234, ext. 5 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to SN&R? sactosubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permissions to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. email letters to snrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. the advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. SN&R is printed at bay Area News Group on recycled newsprint. Circulation of SN&R is verified by the Circulation Verification Council. SN&R is a member of Sacramento Metro Chamber of Commerce, CNpA, AAN and AWN.

A sleeping giant Dams are scary things. People who  live downstream from them suffer a  subconscious dread that never lets  up. I suspect this is especially true in  Oroville, where the huge dam looms  over the city like a hostile sleeping giant that could awaken at any moment. I was thinking about this as I left  my home in Chico Monday morning on  my way to work. Highways 99 and 70  were closed, so I had to drive west to  Orland and I-5 to get to Sacramento,  adding 45 minutes to my commute. Then I thought of the 188,000  evacuees forced from their homes for  an unknown period of time and felt  ashamed of my piddling complaint. I  used the extra time to think about the  dam, about its history and uses and  the lake behind it. As one of the two largest reservoirs  in California, Lake Oroville is a vital  part of the state’s elaborate watertransfer system, as well as a major  source of hydropower. But it was built  at great cost, to the Feather River and  its salmon runs, especially. I also remembered the report  three environmental groups filed  in 2005, during the dam’s federal  relicensing process. It pointed out  that the emergency spillway—whose  imminent collapse Sunday night  prompted the evacuation order—was  at risk of erosion and failure during  heavy rains. It recommended that the  spillway be covered in concrete. State  and federal agencies insisted such a  response was “too expensive.” And I thought of the public  response to the dam disaster, how  so many people—church members,  public safety employees, fairgrounds  managers, media folk—stepped forward unselfishly to help the evacuees  get to safety. The giant awoke, briefly,  but thanks to them went right back  to sleep.

—RobeRt SpeeR b o b s@ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |  3


BUILDING A

HEALTHY S A C R A M E N T O

Sowing the Seeds of Healthy Living BY A N N E S TO K E S

S

acramento City Unified School District wants to hear from you.

The district is seeking community input on its School Wellness Policy, which fosters healthy living habits in students through nutrition, health and physical education. Schools — where students spend a majority of their day — are in a prime position to influence healthy habits, providing up to two meals daily and most of students’ daily physical activity through P.E., recess and sports. In 2010, the district created the Healthy Food Task Force to help draft key aspects of the School Wellness Policy as well as to implement many of the policy’s programs. With funding assistance from The California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities initiative, the task force includes the district’s nutrition services department, school board, faculty members, parents, the Sacramento County Department of Health and Human Services and several nonprofits. “The focus was changing the culture around food in the school district, getting healthier food into cafeterias, increasing the number of school gardens and increasing the use of gardens in the curriculum and food education,” says Robyn Krock, project manager with Valley Vision, a regional stewardship nonprofit that works with the district and The California Endowment to facilitate the task force and its mission.

Valley Vision and others on the task force have been working to update the policy to increase healthy opportunities for students. Some of the proposed changes include: • Not offering food as an incentive or reward in school; • Food offered at classroom celebrations will meet state and federal guidelines; • Non-food fundraisers will be strongly encouraged, and fundraisers that do sell food have to comply with new state and federal regulations; • Students cannot be punished by taking away recess and physical activity; • All schools will meet or exceed the PE requirement for each grade level.

“WE REALLY WANT TO HEAR FROM PARENTS, WHETHER THEY AGREE OR THEY DISAGREE.”

Victoria Flores SCUSD director of student support and health services

Some of the updates are intended to meet new state and federal guidelines, but the impetus for many of the proposed changes were advocated for by community partners and parents.

Sacramento City Unified School District’s School Wellness Policy institutes policies to help students make healthy life choices, including “Go Green. Eat Fresh” salad bars at every school site. Photo courtesy of Sacramento City Unified School District

“We have a massive increase in our students with diabetes. We have a lot of parents wanting — and needing — help in being able to control what their children are exposed to. That was one of the driving forces,” says Victoria Flores, SCUSD director of student support and health services. “We really want to hear from parents, whether they agree or they disagree. We want to hear what their concerns are so that we can make sure we address them.”

Your ZIP code shouldn’t predict how long you’ll live – but it does. Staying healthy requires much more than doctors and diets. Every day, our surroundings and activities affect how long – and how well – we’ll live. Health Happens in Neighborhoods. Health Happens in Schools. Health Happens with Prevention.

In 2010, The California Endowment launched a 10-year, $1 billion plan to improve the health of 14 challenged communities across the state. Over the 10 years, residents, communitybased organizations and public institutions will work together to address the socioeconomic and environmental challenges contributing to the poor health of their communities.

Read the wellness policy and take an online survery at www.scusd.edu/post/proposedchanges-our-school-wellness-policy

PAID WITH A GRANT FROM THE CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT 4   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

www.SacBHC.org


“I knoW I Won’t be good at It.”

asked ouTside of CosTCo on auburn boulevard:

What hobby would you like to take up?

T yler Chapman musician

Ice hockey. I played street hockey as a kid. I lived in Montana for seven years, and they had pond hockey tournaments there. I went to see them play, and it was amazing. I’m a sports guy, but I can’t skate. I’m a big San Jose Sharks fan. I just want to play for fun.

isa aC Tapia

paTrisha Thomas

mechanic

business owner

Airplane flying is a good hobby. I’d fly a cheap Cessna. It’d just be nice to cut through traffic and go to the beaches I want to go to and then fly back to Sacramento where I live. It’s about as light as a Civic, and I could take a passenger along but we’d be squished.

soukie manivonT counselor

It’d be cool to learn ballroom dancing. My uncle used to dance with me, so I want to learn to waltz. It has a place in my heart. I just saw there are $7 ballroom dances. It looks so elegant.

“He cultivates an atmosphere of deep and unapologetic reflection.” —NPR on Swedish singer-songwriter José González

José González & The Göteborg String Theory > MAR 3 mondaviarts.org

I always wanted to play guitar or piano. I know I won’t be good at it, but I want to try it. I admire anyone who plays an instrument. People in my family sing and go to karaoke bars and sing. It’s fun, but I want to play piano.

ryan moone y

ya zmin riblon

golf course assistant superintendent

Play more golf. When I was younger, I played a lot. I like being out on the course. I work at a golf course, so I don’t play as much, but I want to. I like to swing the club but practiced more when I was younger. It is expensive to play. I play for free at my job.

housekeeper

I don’t have a hobby now, but I like cooking. If I was to have a hobby, I think I would like hiking. I would like to hike as a hobby because I like being outside. I love nature. I am active. I’ve been to China Peak, Yosemite, Monterey and a lot of different places.

What would you do with an extra $6,000?

Tell your friends and family about CA and federal Earned Income Tax Credits! If you make $14,161 or less, you may be eligible for CalEITC. If you make $53,504 or less, you may be eligible for the federal EITC. You may qualify for free tax return preparation help at: Grant Union High School 1400 Grand Ave. Sacramento, CA 95838 To make an appointment, call 2-1-1 or 916-498-1000 For more Volunteer Income Tax Assistance sites, visit CalEITC4Me.org 02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   5


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Honk if you want it both ways Re “Pipe(line) dream” by Karlos Rene Ayala (SN&R News,   February 9): “Cars honked their support”? These drivers are missing the  key connection between their driving and these pipeline projects:  fossil fuels. If it had been bicyclists and pedestrians waving their  support as they went by, that would be great, but instead we have  hypocritical drivers honking their support.

Dan allison s acr am e nt o

Bernie is for feminists, too Re “Thanks, Bernie” by Christine Craft (SN&R Letters, February 9): Ms. Craft appears to be saying that women feminists who criticized Hillary Clinton during the election and supported Bernie Sanders instead are

misogynists and responsible for Clinton’s loss. Ms. Craft is saying that feminist women should have supported Clinton just because she is a woman. That was the same nonsense espoused by Madeleine Albright and Gloria Steinem. These three women demonstrate their prejudice, arrogance and ignorance by this ridiculous contention. A

GARY ALLAN Saturday, March 4

woman legislator or executive is no more capable of supporting women’s rights than a man. Anyone who states that women should support women candidates based on their female gender insults the intelligence of women and is sexist. Janet Mercurio Sacramento

Fixing homelessness starts with support Re “Out, numbered” by Dave Kempa (SN&R News, February 2): This was a very informative and well-written article. I appreciate the detailed and fair reporting. It is sad to see others on the streets or struggling, especially people with kids. I was driving down Third and V streets earlier today and saw a middle-aged man with his little boy who looked to be about 5 years old. They were definitely homeless.

GEORGE THOROGOOD & THE DESTROYERS Friday, March 10

The father was hugging the kid so tight, and the boy had no clue to their horrible situation. To the kid, it was all an adventure. How does this happen? I have no idea. What we don’t realize is that there are already programs out there to serve the needy and homeless. But, for whatever reasons, the programs are either not getting to the people in need or the same people are not needing the programs. Thus, it’s a tough solution to a horrible situation. The question to ask is: What do we do? Seriously. And it has nothing to do with money. Period. Hieu Tran Sacramento

On SacramentO cOunty allOwing tHe Sale OF HOmegrOwn FruitS and veggieS: City of Sac passed a similar  ordinance about one year ago! Get  those seeds the ground and start  farming...

RanDy stannaRD v ia Fa c e b o o k I am actually going for a food forest in my backyard this year.

Ma Vue v ia Fa c e b o o k And the code changed for having  chickens if someone lives on a  parcel under 10,000 sq feet.

Johnny FloRes v ia Fa c e b o o k  A great win win solution

@SacNewsReview

Facebook.com/ SacNewsReview

@SacNewsReview

online Buzz contributions are not edited for grammar, spelling or clarity.

Joyce haRt v ia Fa c e b o o k

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE Thursday, March 16

Friday, April 21

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illustration by serene lusano

Vandals in the night Spike in Sacramento-area hate incidents  coincides with Trump travel ban by Karlos rene ayala, raheem F. hosseini and mozes zarate

an extended version of this story is available online at www .newsreview.com/ sacramento.

It was two hours before closing, and every item at MoMo’s Meat Market, minus the sodas, was sold out. A line of customers curled beyond a boarded-up broken window decorated with signs depicting messages of support scribbled in felt marker and emblazoned with hearts. “We’ve never been this busy,” owner Glenn Miller said as he watched the line from behind three massive grills emitting colossal plumes of smoke. Ironic, considering the popular barbecue joint was snared by a criminal act meant to terrorize, not inspire.

8   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

Two days earlier, on January 31, MoMo’s front window was smashed during the course of a burglary next door at the adjoining Supreme Barber Lounge. As best as police can figure, a suspect or suspects broke in and slashed the shop’s chairs, stole equipment and spray painted the walls with a racial slur and a backward swastika. “Everything was in the middle of the floor; everything was broken; things were gone,” recalled Sharon Miller, Glenn Miller’s wife and business partner. “It was horrific, it was shocking, and nobody

was ready for that. Everyone was in shock looking back into the shop.” The barbershop and restaurant were just two victims in a recent spate of hate incidents that has ignited both grief and resolve in the Sacramento-area communities that surround these no-longer-safe spaces in the age of President Donald Trump. Most of the intimidation has targeted Muslims and coincides with Trump’s efforts to keep a campaign promise to block their entry into America. Yet, while Trump’s executive order banning entry to

legal immigrants and refugees from seven predominantly Muslim nations has faced numerous legal setbacks since its January 27 signing, its intent has anticipated—if not informed—a reported surge in local Islamophobia. It started January 22 at the Islamic Center of Davis, where an assailant smashed six windows, destroyed two bikes on the property and wrapped the mosque’s door handles—leading into the area where the congregation receives services and prays—with uncooked bacon. (Pork is forbidden in the Islamic faith.) Ten days later, a vandal spray-painted “obscene and hateful graffiti directed at Muslims” on the outside walls of a Roseville mosque, police reported. And a couple of days after that, on February 3 or 4, someone left a package of pork tenderloins on the doorstep of a Davis apartment occupied by Muslims. The anti-Islamic fervor continues an uptick in identity terrorism since Trump’s November election. The Southern Poverty Law Center aggregated and reported the occurrence of 1,064 hate crimes and incidents in the


StOpping graBBy cOpS See newS

10

the health care Fix See greenlight

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calperS’ pipeline cOntrOverSy See ScOreKeeper

13

beatS

BipOlar weather first month after Trump’s election. That that he was wholly accepting of. She pace died down in the weeks leading to said that Brownell, an Army veteran who last month’s inauguration, but picked up served in Afghanistan, likely suffered from locally around the time Trump inked his undiagnosed post-traumatic stress disorder. controversial travel ban. The restrictions Brownell’s attorney alleged that the were chaotically enforced at airports around 25-year-old was defending himself and his the country against visa holders, green card friend from the group. holders and vetted refugees who aided U.S. Last February, the judge declared a military forces until a federal judge stopped mistrial after jurors couldn’t determine it with an emergency injunction. whether Brownell attacked the musicians On February 9, the Ninth Circuit as a hate crime. A retrial was avoided after Court of Appeals rejected the Trump Brownell accepted a plea deal, maintaining administration’s attempts to overturn one assault-with-a-deadly-weapon the injunction, setting up charge and dropping the an expected showdown remaining two assault before the U.S. charges, one allegation Supreme Court. of inflicting great Still, hate crimes bodily injury and “I wish that she came were relatively rare the three hate in Sacramento crime allegations. and asked questions, if she before Trump He was released had any misconceptions about entered the politiJune 21, 2016, Islam.” cal scene. from North Kern In 2015, State Prison Imam Ammar Shahin most hate crimes and placed on Islamic Center of Davis recorded by the county probation, Sacramento Police according to the Department involved California Department assaults in and around of Corrections. In July, the city’s businesses and Brownell was ordered to downtown public spaces and pay around $55,000 to Richmond displayed a diverse identity parade of and $7,000 to Lyman in restitution fines. suspects, according to information obtained Classifying hate crimes requires that through a Public Records Act request. investigators make a subjective determinaOf the eight hate crimes the department tion on the suspect’s motive, and police will reported that year to the FBI for the federal initially err on the side of classifying if the agency’s 2015 Uniform Crime Report, five victim alleges it, said Officer Matt McPhail, were classified as being motivated by an a department spokesman. But, as the June anti-homosexual and/or anti-transgender incident shows, those determinations can bias. Suspect IDs varied in the eight crimes, change, if not within the investigation, from young to middle-aged, male and during the prosecution. The toughest call female, Asian, white, Hispanic and black. rests on jurors, he said. All except two crimes resulted in arrests. “We have the benefit of not having to One incident, from June 21, 2015, prove something beyond a reasonable doubt garnered national coverage and shook the when we’re making an arrest,” McPhail downtown music community—an assault said. “Whereas, when you go through the near the Alley Katz sports bar on O and 21st criminal process downstream of that, from streets that allegedly started over skinny the arraignment to actually securing a jeans and involved the members of two conviction, the threshold becomes greater local rock bands. and greater.” The suspect, Timothy Brownell, stabbed Most reported hate crimes were personBlake Abbey, the lead singer of Musical to-person attacks that happened out in the Charis, and two members of Hardcore open, including at a Valero gas station at Slaves, Weston Richmond and Alex the corner of Broadway and Alhambra Lyman, in an altercation that allegedly Boulevard, Miller Park and around Mango’s ensued after Brownell heckled the group, nightclub on K Street, and at all hours of the calling them “faggots” and taunting them day. One incident, classified as child abuse, over the skinny jeans they were wearing, targeted a 15-year-old girl at a residence SN&R previously reported. near Mack Road. Brownell’s mother spoke out in the Some communities may be more likely to aftermath and during court proceedings, suffer—and more empowered to report— claiming that her son was not homophobic, the abuse than others. and that she was in a same-sex relationship

The LGBTQ community has traditionally shown the highest count of bias-related crimes categorized by sexuality in the FBI’s statistics. Members of that group may be more likely to recognize when they’re being targeted because of bias, McPhail said. Another explanation could be that Sacramento’s sizable and active LGBTQ population makes a convenient target, he said. McPhail pointed out the Lavender Heights district, a neighborhood that the gay community openly thrives in. “It’s easy—if you had hate in your heart and wanted to seek these people out—to know where to find them,” McPhail said. McPhail acknowledged underreporting and said that crime data aren’t an ideal source. “We have roughly 20,000 crimes per year, so when you talk about the raw number of crimes, and how many of those have any bias component, it’s a fraction of a fraction of 1 percent,” McPhail said. “You either have to conclude that there really isn’t that much hate going on, or that there’s dramatic underreporting, or that it’s simply not a good way to get a pulse.” Recent vandalism episodes have been more public, and community members have responded with donations and around-theblock business. Imam Ammar Shahin, of the Islamic Center of Davis, managed to find that silver lining. “We consider it minor damage compared to mosques that have been burned and destroyed,” Shahin told SN&R. “To us, this was easy. The worry to us was how are we going to fix it because six doors cost $10,000 or so.” A crowdsourced campaign immediately scuttled that concern, to the tune of a little more than $20,000, a sum that went to replacing the doors and heightened security measures. On Tuesday, Davis police arrested Lauren Kirk-Coehlo, 30, after a young woman was caught on surveillance video committing the vandalism. “I wish that she came and asked questions, if she had any misconceptions about Islam,” Shahin said. “I’m sure what led her was a lack of knowledge.” As it turned from day to dusk inside MoMo’s on February 1, Sharon Miller announced that all the food was sold and thanked the remaining customers who were hoping to eat. Tears gathered at the curves of her eyelids, she hugged the remaining customers, who didn’t gripe about not being served. Next door, the barbershop remained closed. Owner Nick Fink has yet to reopen. Ω

The heavy rains that fattened Lake Oroville and punched a hole through an eroded auxiliary spillway, displacing more than 180,000 Butte County residents due to flooding risks—yeah, that may just be Mother Nature’s opening act. With another storm brewing this week, California is experiencing the type of rainfall that hasn’t been seen since its record drought began in 2011. And according to John Lundgren, Sacramento County’s senior planner, these wild pendulum swings between extreme weather patterns may be the standard going forward. In the second round of an ongoing series of community meetings to develop a countywide climate action plan, local environmental officials convened at the Arden-Dimick Library on February 6, one day before the Oroville Dam spillway that acts as a release valve ruptured into a geyser shooting 100,000 cubic feet of water per second toward the towns below. Flooding and evacuation notices were reported as far as southern Sacramento County, primarily the towns of Point Pleasant, Wilton and Walnut Grove. Jails in Elk Grove and Oroville were also affected by flooding. A workshop in the fall focused on the effects of extreme heat— temperatures in excess of 102 degrees Fahrenheit—during the dry summers. (See “Living with the change,” News, November 24, 2016.) Now, local officials are preparing for the flooding that comes with changing precipitation patterns outlined in a vulnerability assessment prepared by Ascent Environmental Inc. The assessment cited “less-frequent but more extreme storm events” including a higher volume of rain falling within a shorter period of time, as well as more destructive wind patterns. This, according to Lundgren, is likely to be typical. “The storms we’re seeing in this weather pattern is indicative of climate variability,” Lundrgen said. “We expect that variability to get more severe with climate change.” Although a search for “climate change” on the Trump administration’s government website brings up only three noncontextual results (none of which relate to climate change), Lundgren said the state of California, not the federal government, will dictate local climate policy. “Our general plan has mitigation measures that say we need to embark upon this climate action plan,” Lundgren said. “So that’s what we’re doing. Regardless of what the current national political scene is.” Adaptive efforts presented at the workshop include countywide levee improvements to mitigate extreme flooding. According to an official with the Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency, SAFCA will begin installing seepage cutoff walls within the next two years along six miles of the Sacramento River levee around the Pocket area, and four miles of the river in North Sacramento primarily along Arcade Creek. Additionally, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to buffer local river walls with additional erosion protection, though no date for these efforts has been set. The Corps is already at work on a new auxiliary spillway at Folsom Dam, with financial and engineering support from the state. Along with the spillway, the dam will be raised three and a half feet and improvements will be made to the surrounding dikes. Completion is scheduled for later this year. Revelations emerged this week that environmentalists warned officials to strengthen the Oroville Dam’s spillway more than a decade ago because of concerns about its vulnerability. Lundgren said Sacramento County is serious about its preparations. “We’re taking a very contemplative, thoughtful [approach to] this,” he told SN&R. “We don’t want to just haphazardly apply climate change measures to the community without thinking how that might impact all the sectors of the community.” A third round of public workshops are tentatively slated for spring, though no specific date has yet been chosen. (Matt Kramer) This story was made possible by a grant from Tower Cafe.

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   9


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Guilt by appropriation Asset forfeiture law may restrict Sacramento  police’s ability to seize and spend by Scott thomaS anderSon

sc o tta @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

Sacramento defense attorney Mark Reichel has What do the right-leaning Heritage Foundation handled several cases of people who mistakenly and progressive ACLU have in common? Both thought they’d get a better price at a car dealership say the practice of civil asset forfeiture is a growif they showed up with cash, only to have law ing threat to the public’s constitutional rights. enforcement pull them over and accuse them of Asset forfeiture is shorthand for police seizing dealing drugs before seizing all of their money. property and cash for themselves, even when the “It was crazy,” Reichel said. “We’re talking owner isn’t charged with an offense. about instances when people had maybe $8,000 California recently passed a bill to rein in to $12,000 on their way to car lot. … It became asset forfeiture, but plenty of law enforcement a major revenue source for law enforcement, and agencies still rely on confiscating houses, vehicles also a powerful way for individual officers to and money clips to nab extra revenue for their advance. When they interviewed for a promotion, budgetary wish lists. And the Sacramento Police it was no longer a question of, ‘Did you capture Department is no exception, announcing last the bad guys?’ but, ‘What was your total net for week it’s planning more than $600,000 in asset seizures last year?’” forfeiture spending. Concerns about asset forfeiture have reached The department also acknowledged, however, Washington, D.C., with Sens. Charles Grassley that the state’s new law and a bipartisan congresand Patrick Leahy co-authoring the Due sional movement against forfeiture could Process Act, which establishes a more mean it will be getting less of the rigorous burden of proof for federal embattled funds down the road. law enforcement to seize a The city’s Budget and suspect’s property. Additionally, Audit Committee received “It is hard to say what it would reimburse legal fees a February 7 update on its the impact will be.” for individuals who haven’t asset forfeiture account from been convicted of a crime but interim police Chief Brian Sgt. Bryce Heinlein have had their money and Louie, who was seeking spokesman, Sacramento Police items taken. approval to spend $417,000 Department Nevertheless, even if toward purchasing a new the Due Process Act dies, helicopter. Louie said his California’s SB 443 will affect department has $677,000 in asset revenue flows. forfeiture money available, and “It is hard to say what the impact would also allocate $122,000 of it to will be,” Sacramento police Sgt. Bryce anti- gang and drug programs and $104,000 on Heinlein, a department spokesman, told SN&R in technology and equipment needs. an email. “The amounts vary year to year, based Council members will take a final vote on on the size and number of seizures. The laws very Louie’s proposal later this month. Whether the well could have an impact, but it would be impospolice department will enjoy that level of surplus sible for us to provide an estimate.” spending in the future is in question. Councilwoman Angelique Ashby said that, Last year, Gov. Jerry Brown signed Senate Bill while she thinks the city is careful about its use 443, which requires that someone be convicted of asset forfeiture funds, there is no question of a crime in most cases before California law the money stirs discomfort with some in the enforcement can seize their assets. Local police community. chiefs and sheriffs also get a large amount of asset “The council has raised a lot questions about forfeiture funds from a federal “equitable sharing it over the years,” Ashby told SN&R. “It has been program,” and SB 443 limited local agencies from controversial here in Sacramento, too. As far as accessing that money in instances where a person the future, these are funds we never use for ongohasn’t been convicted of a crime. ing programs.” Ω A Washington Post investigation found that federal authorities collected $5 billion in cash and property in 2014 alone—a figure that included An extended version of this story is available at numerous instances where owners were never www.newsreview.com/sacramento. charged with a crime, let alone convicted of one.


Travis Dunn of Sacramento rallied with hundreds of other Second Amendment advocates on the steps of the state Capitol on Sunday, February 12.

Photo by bert Johnson

Paper guns, real politics Second Amendment advocates march on the Capitol  to support Trump and oppose new state laws by Bert Johnson

A crowd of more than 200 gathered near the Tower Bridge and marched to the state Capitol in support of gun ownership on Sunday. The February 12 march, organized by William Andrew Edson of Stockton, drew supporters from various Second Amendment advocacy groups and right-wing organizations such as the California Valley Patriots, Californians Opposing Gun Restrictions, the California Three Percenters and American Civil Defense. Participants in the rally brought an array of conservative paraphernalia, from the Gadsden flag with its iconic coiled rattlesnake to “Make America Great Again” hats and shirts decorated with the silhouettes of rifles. Some

wore olive combat gear, and one marcher cheekily carried a banana in his hip holster. None of the participants carried actual firearms, however, due to California’s open carry ban—an absence that immediately set the rally apart from similar events in other states. Individual marchers demanded less strict gun legislation and expressed a broad-ranging sense of unease with contemporary American culture. Some, like Joe Vsetula of Modesto, felt they had been passed over in favor of other groups: women, undocumented immigrants or the wealthy friends of elected officials. “Why is it illegal aliens seem to have more rights than I do?” he asked. Some demonstrators joked with each other about how liberal

“snowflakes” should take notes on how to protest peacefully, a reference to recent anti-Trump rallies where agitators committed vandalism and isolated incidents of assault. Katrina Fox, who is from Nebraska but now lives in Sacramento, said that she joined the march to “show we have a voice, too”—even though she doesn’t own a gun herself. James Mcgriff of Modesto, who is black, quoted Malcolm X when asked why he attended the march: “A man who will stand for nothing will fall for anything.” Edson himself doesn’t claim membership in any particular group. Rather, he said he’s just a shooting enthusiast who organized the rally on Facebook in an attempt to involve people in supporting the Second Amendment.

Sunday’s march came on the heels of a raft of new gun laws in California, including Proposition 63, which requires criminal background checks for ammunition sales, and Senate Bill 880, which expanded the definition of an assault weapon. It did this, in part, by eliminating the “bullet button” loophole, which had allowed certain semiautomatic rifles to be easily equipped with high-capacity magazines. One of the bill’s co-authors, Sen. Steve Glazer, was quoted in East County Today saying, “It’s about a mechanism on assault-style rifles whose sole purpose is to allow someone to kill a lot of people quickly.” For Edson and his fellow marchers, however, the ban on assault weapons is a red herring. “None of that stuff makes your gun any more deadly,” he contended. Some protesters, including Edson, even carried black cardboard cutouts of assault rifles to represent a class of weapons that they believe has been unfairly singled out. Politically, Edson, who says he didn’t vote for Donald Trump, views the right to bear arms through a populist lens. “It’s the average American’s insurance policy,” he explained. “You don’t have to rely on the government to protect you.” But Bill Durston, president of the Sacramento chapter of Physicians for Social Responsibility as well as Americans Against Gun Violence, says those arguments don’t hold water. “There’s no net protective value from owning or carrying a gun,” he countered in a phone interview. “There’s no legitimate civilian use for a rapid-fire semi-automatic with interchangeable magazines.” On Monday, Assemblyman Kevin McCarty introduced a bill that would close another gun loophole in California, which currently allows school districts to authorize civilians with concealed-carry weapon permits to bring their firearms on campus. Guns are prohibited in schools by state law, but the existing loophole has been exploited by some districts, including Folsom Cordova Unified, and threatens student safety, according to McCarty. Marco Gutierrez, the Mexican-born Trump supporter who gained notoriety for his comments about “taco trucks on every corner,” was also in attendance. He explained that, although he recently purchased a gun after receiving anonymous threats related to his incendiary statements, he came to the rally mainly to show his support for the organizers. “To take that away is to change the history of the United States,” he said of the Second Amendment. “It’s like taking tacos away from us.” Ω

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   11


The affordable health care fix by jeff vonkaenel

Do you believe that people in this country should have universal, affordable health care? Something similar to what most people in industrialized countries have? If so, this column is for you. If you don’t care that millions of your fellow citizens do not have health care or that 18 million Americans will lose their health care if the Affordable Care Act is repealed, please go see your doctor. Clearly, you are having some heart problems. With the Senate confirmation of ACA and Medicare critic Rep. Tom Price, of Georgia, as the next Health and Human Services secretary, the battle lines are being drawn for another epic fight about health care. What should progressives do? First, we need to protect the positive achievements of the ACA, such as the 18 million previously uninsured people who now have health care; the ability of people with preexisting conditions to get health care; the increased availability of mental health and birth control coverage. But, the ACA was a compromise bill. While we were able to expand coverage, we were unable, due largely to Republican obstructionism, to rein in health care costs. The stupidity of the United States health care system is unbelievable. We are the only first-world country without a publicly financed universal healthcare system. Even prior to the ACA, we paid 17.1 percent of our gross domestic product on health care. This is roughly 50 percent more than France, the second highest spender. Despite the high costs, millions of Americans still do not have health care. At the same time that we fight to save the positive aspects of the ACA, we also need to address the faults in the health care system. Progressives need to take on the vested interests that are getting rich off our screwed-up system.

12   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

je ffv @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

Let’s start with Price and his fellow orthopedic surgeons. In America, the average orthopedic surgeon makes $500,000 a year. This is two or three times more than what a similar surgeon makes in Europe. Physicians’ salaries, and especially medical specialists’ salaries, are way out of control. A bigger problem: One out of every four dollars Americans spend on health care goes to administrative costs. This is far greater than what European countries, Canada and Japan spend on administration. Our insurance companies, while inefficient administrators, are efficient at applying political pressure. If these for-profit insurance companies cannot compete on price and service, then we need to move to a government-run system. Our prescription drug prices are the highest among industrialized countries. The fact that our government can’t negotiate with pharmaceutical companies to reduce prices is absurd. We need to change this. If the drug companies hadn’t helped to write our laws, this hold-up would be illegal. We need to change our thinking about end-of-life decisions. Much of the care that people receive in their final months of life is unnecessary, inhumane and expensive. With education and extended palliative care, we can change that. In the upcoming health care battle, we need to address universal health access as well as out-of-control costs. A more efficient system with lower physician and administrative costs, pharmaceutical drug cost controls and a more humane and less costly end-of-life care can be embraced by Americans who care for their fellow citizens as well as Americans who care about their pocketbooks. Ω

Jeff vonKaenel is the president, CEO and majority owner of the News & Review.


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The The Sacramento Public Library wants  you to know it’s not mad about that  you copy of The Phantom Tollbooth you  copy borrowed in fourth grade. From  borrowed Valentine’s Day to March 15, pop into  Valentine’s any of the library’s 28 locations and  any have your overborrowing fines pardoned.  Library Director Rivkah K. Sass wants  Library to reconnect with “long-lost patrons”  to kept up nights for fear that burly  kept collectors will be coming for that $3.50. collectors

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Dam, you serious?

Dirty moNey

On February 12, ruptured spillways flanking the oroville Dam threatened 180,000 residents of  Oroville, Marysville and other communities  along the Feather River. With both the  emergency and main spillways damaged,  water poured uncontrollably out of the state’s  second-largest reservoir, flooding towns.  The main dam is not damaged, but so far, the  best idea is plugging the hole with a big bag of  rocks. Who wants to go halfsies on an ark?

CalPERS would prefer to keep its stocks with companies, including wells Fargo, that stand to benefit from the Dakota access Pipeline, recently approved  by the Trump administration despite months of  protests. A CalPERS report justifies the decision  by saying the divestment could “jeopardize” $4  billion in assets and limit its ability to influence  these companies in positive ways.  Board members  softened their stance on Monday, but really, when  did the public pension system plan on starting?

- 100,000

- 4 billion

New Number, who’s this?

smoke sessioNs

In 1947, 916 got added as one of the three  original area codes in California. By 2018,  it will run out of potential numbers. So the  California Public Utilities Commission will be  doling out digits preceded by 279 starting  September 2017. As a result, callers will have to dial 1 plus the 10-digit number starting in  February 2018 before calling a 916 or 279  number—which would be a problem if people  still dialed phone numbers.

+ 279

On February 9, sen. Jeff sessions became the u.s. attorney General—despite getting previously blocked  from a judgeship for being too racist … in Alabama  … in the ’80s. Beyond his indifference to the rights  of all groups besides straight, white Christian  (preferably Southern) males, Sessions has also said  “good people don’t smoke marijuana.” Actually,  to paraphrase Coretta Scott King’s letter against  Sessions, good people don’t intimidate elderly, black  voters, you puckered, apple-cheeked gremlin.

- 80 02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   13


tthe $100,000

F

rom the steps of

Bad luck put him on the streets. City Hall kept him there. b y J o h n F l y n n a n d M a t t K r a M e r | photos by Jon Hermison

the state Capitol, Russell Bartholow told a crowd what it was like to live under a bridge in

Oak Park for 15 years. During that period,

he said, police cited him dozens of times for “soliciting, panhandling [and] sleeping,” all illegal activities in the city of Sacramento. To feed himself, Bartholow started growing his own food— another illegal act.

14   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

“I had a beautiful garden, spent two-and-a-half years growing it,” Bartholow told the gathering. “They came in and poisoned it with herbicide. Destroyed it. We ate it, scraped it clean, which gave me cancer … which put me in the hospital.” Bartholow, then 54, was speaking at a February 2015 press conference organized to pressure state lawmakers to adopt the Right to Rest Act, legislation that would have decriminalized activities associated with homelessness. Within two years, Bartholow died and two iterations of the bill failed in different Senate committees. Despite acknowledging that there aren’t enough emergency resources for those without shelter, area politicians have resisted repeated calls to rescind local ordinances against sleeping outdoors and possessing life-saving equipment. During overnight storms last month, two homeless people died on City Hall property, elevating Sacramento’s humanitarian debate to a national level. Bartholow didn’t start out homeless. But, like thousands of others in Sacramento County, once he

found himself on the streets, he entered an alternate reality where the government couldn’t hear him; where those supposed to help instead focused on erasing his existence; and where the only permanent home the county offered him was in jail. According to Sacramento Superior Court records, police papered Bartholow with 190 citations, infractions that, because of his inability to pay fines or make court dates, cost him 104 days in jail and exposed him to more than $104,000 in fines. His story isn’t unique. According to booking logs examined by SN&R, approximately 30 unlawful camping citations have been issued across the county since late October. It’s a system that feeds on absurdity, in which homelessness can cost more than a Midtown loft and survival is a crime. Bartholow spent the last part of his life as a fugitive, trying to outrun the forces that were coming for him. Where did it get him? Where does it get anyone?

When the bottom falls out After riveting during World War II, then canning soup for Campbell’s, Gertrude Bartholow took in more than 60 children as a foster mother. The last one was a slight, shy boy named Russell, whom she fell in love with and adopted. “He was the moody teenager down at the end of the hallway who had a collection of comic books and fluorescent posters on the wall,”


HOMELESS MAN recalled Jessica Bartholow, Russell’s niece. “He would play Pink Floyd, and [my sister and I] would sing outside his door to him.” Through high school, Jessica remembered Russell as “beyond normally brilliant” in science and math. But on the cusp of graduation, Russell said he got “kicked in the head” by white students for being Native American, leaving him with a brain injury that Jessica says was never treated. After a few years on his own, Russell married a woman and had a child. He moved back in with his adopted mother, taking care of her and her husband as they aged. But in 2000 he was arrested for a drug-related offense. In the 30 days Russell was incarcerated, his parents died, his relatives sold the house, and his wife and son moved on with their lives. Let out of jail, with no place else to go, Russell moved under a bridge in Oak Park. He lost contact with Jessica, whose family was also struggling with homelessness. His years on the streets would not be kind. At the 2015 Capitol rally, Russell told the audience that the police visited him daily, calling him over by his first name and having a ticket already filled out before he arrived. Sometimes he was cited twice a day, court records show. Though a full 132 of Russell’s cases were either dismissed or had their fines waived, there were other costs. Being in jail caused Russell to miss appointments to obtain government assistance, as part of eight attempts over 13 years to get money for which he qualified due to the lingering effects of the brain injury, which he believed contributed to paranoia and drug addiction. To pay for living expenses and fines, Russell turned to panhandling or selling flowers—which only led to more arrests. The police, he told those assembled, harassed him like “it was a game.” It’s a vicious cycle experienced by many. According to the most recent baseline estimates, at least 5,200 people experience homelessness in Sacramento County in a given year, a number that is expected to notch upward following the most recent point-in-time homeless count last month. Advocates for the homeless believe the city and county of Sacramento are misusing roughly half the funds dedicated to addressing this crisis. Of the $13.6 million spent on homelessness by the city during the 2014-15 fiscal year, $7 million was spent on “mitigating

the impacts of homelessness”—and 75 percent of that goes to the police and fire departments. The city has 11 municipal codes criminalizing activities like panhandling, resting or camping in public places. The county spends about $40 million on homelessness annually, $6 million of which comes from the general fund, according to the Sacramento Regional Coalition to End Homelessness, a nonprofit advocacy group. Of that $6 million, about half is dedicated to “mitigating” its impacts. Here’s what that looks like: Between March 2014 and October 2016, county park rangers shut down 2,611 homeless camps and issued 2,395 citations, yet made only 104 referrals to the Department of Human Assistance, according to county park ranger activity reports. “I see it every day,” said Deni Blakney, a homeless woman who lives in her car with her husband and two dogs. “Cops come by and tell them to take their tents down. And if they don’t do it, then they come right back around again and they take their stuff and destroy it. It’s terrible. It’s awful. That’s their stuff. That’s their life right there. That’s their home. That’s all they have.” From September 2014 to October 2015, SRCEH surveyed 297 people experiencing homelessness, 74.8 percent of whom reported being discriminated against by law enforcement. Sacramento Steps Forward, the county’s lead agency tasked with ending homelessness, surveyed 1,228 homeless people from January to October

2015 and found that 80 percent had spent time in county jail. Not only do anti-camping laws cost millions to enforce, said Bob Erlenbusch, executive director of SRCEH, but they make it more difficult for a person to exit homelessness. Citing his organization’s “Access Denied” study, Erlenbusch said that a majority of the 17 local service providers that responded to his survey felt criminalization hurt the homeless’ “ability across the board to get employment, benefits, a job, etc.” Blakney recognizes that law enforcement and neighborhood residents don’t like the mess that can occasionally accumulate around a person who lives on the streets. However, she notes that it can be hard to keep clean when public access to bathrooms and dumpsters is severely limited, especially at nighttime. She keeps bags and buckets in her car in case of emergency, but she feels there could be a more humane approach. “If they just come by and say, ‘If you pick up your trash, I’m not going to tell you to take your tent down,’ it’ll show the homeless people that they’re getting a little more respect,” she said. “Because they look at us like we’re scum. And it’s cold and it’s wrong. Because we’re all human. We all have a story. We’re all out here for a reason.”

“THE $100,000 HOMELESS MAN” continued on page 16 02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   15


“tHE $100,000 HoMElESS Man” continued from page 15

Down anD out by law For now, officials seem reluctant to change course. On February 1, the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department, Steps Forward and Sacramento State— through its auxiliary nonprofit, University Enterprises Inc.—entered into a three-way partnership aimed at reducing “homeless-related crime,” a concept that makes Jessica Bartholow wary because of how it’s been implemented up until now. “We need to stop treating someone like a criminal because they can’t afford a place to live,” said Jessica, who now works as a legislative advocate for the Western

Center on Law & Poverty. “The more that we establish laws that make a person without a home a criminal, the less able we are to gain their trust.” Funded for three years by a $700,000 Smart Policing Initiative grant, the pilot program aims to “research and deploy collaborative, data-driven solutions” to policing the homeless population, according to a staff report. Sheriff’s Lt. Steve Dutra, assistant commander of the North Patrol Division, said the program’s real impetus is to reduce service calls—not necessarily crime—to the unincorporated county north of the American River. A majority of those calls involve complaints of panhandling, suspicious persons, drug dealing, loitering and other activities directly or indirectly associated with homelessness. At the same time, Dutra said, the “twofold” approach will try to “find services for people to help them get off the street.”

According to Dutra, some aspects are still “being worked out.” The project’s actual implementation is purposely vague, he added, so it can be flexible and ever evolving, allowing the county to “tweak things here and there.” But Erlenbusch criticized the program for spending resources to “research” an already answered question. “Of course those [crimes] are going to go down if you’re in stable housing and have an income,” Erlenbusch said. “To spend that amount of money researching what seems to be in some cases fairly obvious … I don’t see anything that seems to be very innovative.” Erlenbusch also questioned the program’s focus, saying that the county should direct resources toward erasing barriers to housing, such as anti-camping ordinances, which he said perpetuate the cycle of homelessness.

Need housing? Enter purgatory Six reaSonS why Sacramento’S coordinated entry SyStem iS a good idea poorly executed by Grace Loescher

At

Because the system is so complicated, local affordable housing slots are being given away to Bay Area residents. 16   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

7 p.m. on a recent Tuesday, I logged onto Facebook to find personal messages from five frantic teenagers all pleading for help. “I have nowhere to go, have you heard back from Sacramento Steps Forward about housing?” one asked. “Grace I’m desperate, please help me find somewhere to go TONIGHT!” wrote another. As a direct service provider and advocate for homeless youth, I know these anxious requests are not atypical. What is uncommon is not having the answers to respond to these questions. I still haven’t found the right way to tell a young person sleeping outside in the rain that I have no idea whether or when housing will come through. I still don’t know how to tell them that the people whom they are supposed to trust the most—case managers, advocates, program directors, executive directors, even myself—are just as lost as they are in this process. Not too long ago, our city had a vision of streamlining people experiencing homelessness into one coordinated system. Instead of calling every program in town separately, a person could walk into one center, complete one intake evaluation and be immediately placed on every housing list for which they were eligible. This was and still is an indefectible dream, but our reality today looks nothing like this picture. Today, Sacramento attempts to manage a centralized intake system through a process called “coordinated entry,” recommended for use by the Department of Housing and

Urban Development. It’s a widely used method across America, though HUD gives each community quite a bit of autonomy in deciding how it runs this system. As a front-line observer, I can attest to the fact that Sacramento’s implementation, well-intentioned as it may be, is flat-out not working. Here are six reasons why:

1

Sacramento lacks the necessary resources.

Through the coordinated entry process, an individual experiencing homelessness must meet with a navigator from Sacramento Steps Forward, the county’s lead agency combating homelessness, to be assessed and entered onto a massive waitlist for housing called the “community queue.” Almost every local housing program mandates that a person be referred through the community queue. But, as of now, there is no way to get onto it. There’s no hotline to call or office to walk into. Even if a homeless person stumbles into a navigator by luck, the navigators are so strapped for resources that most have stopped adding any more persons to the list.


Steps Forward CEO Ryan Loofbourrow defended the partnership’s small-scale focus, as it will formally analyze housing barriers for people without shelter, then work toward solutions to overcome them. But success will be measured by a reduction in complaints received by law enforcement, which raises another problematic aspect of the partnership—having cops and service providers work hand in hand. According to Loofbourrow, though the sheriff’s department is overseeing the program, Steps Forward-employed “navigators” will be the primary point of contact with homeless individuals. Alongside officers, they will work on a “very personal” level to keep the homeless safe and healthy while assisting those with mental health issues, Loofbourrow said. But Erlenbusch sees potential problems if homeless people associate the helpers with cops who enforce anticamping policies.

2

The wait is interminible.

For those lucky enough to get on the list, the result is often a one-way ticket to purgatory where they never seem to progress. One of the most disturbing things about Sacramento’s coordinated entry system is its lack of transparency. Nobody outside of Steps Forward has access to the queue. This means that, as a provider, when someone asks me what their wait for housing looks like, I have no idea whether they are number 5 on the list or number 205. Furthermore, your position isn’t based on how long you’ve been homeless, but the date of your most recent incident of homelessness. This means that, if one has been homeless for three years, then crashes on a friend’s couch for a week, the clock starts all over again.

3

The system is too complicated.

As a result, local affordable housing slots are being given away to Bay Area residents. Most affordable housing programs that use coordinated entry apply what’s called a “scattered site” housing model, meaning that assistance agencies will partner with local apartment complexes to reserve units for individuals in their programs. Due to the slow-moving nature of our coordinated entry process, some

“The navigator program is built on trust,” Erlenbusch said. “If somehow homeless people sense that they’re working in cooperation with law enforcement, they’re not going to trust them. I hope that that’s not the case. But that could be one of the really sad, unintended consequences of a not very well thought-out project.” As for lifting the camping ban, North Sacramento Councilman Allen Warren recently proposed doing so at the city level, an idea that received a chilly reception from fellow council members and pushback from Mayor Darrell Steinberg, who prefers longer-term solutions. In response to two recent homeless deaths on City Hall property during overnight storms, officials last month opened a facility for overnight use with health assessments, service referrals and supplies for dogs.

local property managers report that they have begun accepting persons from San Francisco’s community queue because it’s faster and more efficient than Sacramento’s process.

4

The coordinated entry program is strangled by red tape.

Even agencies willing and able to accommodate a homeless person can be stymied in their efforts. Let me give an example: For six weeks, I have been working with a young couple sleeping on the streets. The day we met, I had an open unit for them in our program. I requested a referral from the coordinated entry specialist and was told that the couple would be referred immediately. After three follow-up emails and a month of waiting, I was informed that they were not, in fact, going to be referred after all. Now it is my job to tell them that the city moved the goal posts and, as a result, they will remain homeless for an indefinite period of time.

5

People are slipping through the cracks.

Unlike agencies that independently manage their own waitlists—that have relationships with people on the list and continue to stay in close contact—Steps Forward’s

navigator position is not designed to be a case manager role. Navigators and their contacts often do not see each other between the initial meeting and the time their names come up, which can be well over a year. We’re talking about people who are forced to live a transient lifestyle outdoors, with no permanent address and limited access to cellphones and email. This means that if your name does come up on the queue, navigators are left looking for a polar bear in a snowstorm.

6

Nobody will talk about it.

All of the above shortfalls could be mitigated if coordinated entry leads acknowledged the current system’s shortcomings and were actively engaged in working to create a better system. Maybe somewhere, someone is sitting in a cubicle working on this system, but homeless advocates, providers and the homeless themselves are left out of the conversation. One of my colleagues recently issued a “call to arms” with an email to providers and Steps Forward staff exclaiming, “Let’s harness our collective strength and tackle this list. … I am happy to coordinate a fierce and impactful effort.” Providers and advocates responded with an enthusiastic willingness to do this, but Steps Forward never acknowledged this email in any way. But there are some early signs that Steps Forward might be hearing this

feedback. And that’s way better than the potential alternative of turning this process over to the Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Agency—starting yet another disorienting attempt to house exclusively chronically homeless individuals—which experts fear could result from the mayor’s plan to reprioritize housing vouchers. Despite its shortfalls, coordinated entry is only a year old and can be fixed. If not, or if we start from scratch with SHRA, this game of pingpong that we call “coordinated entry” will continue to corrode our homeless population’s faith in the system and in those working with it. As a service provider, it’s hard enough to gain trust from individuals with a lifetime of experience being let down. I grimace to think of how many more days are to come where I am tasked with admitting this uncertainty to an 18-year-old still desperately clinging to the hope that Sacramento has a safety net ready to catch her. Ω

Grace Loescher is the program director for Tubman House, a transitional living community for homeless, parenting youth and their children.

“THE $100,000 HOMELESS MAN” continued on page 19

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2/10/17 2:15 PM


Jessica Bartholow, a legislative advocate at the Western Center on Law & Poverty, tried to help her uncle clear myriad infractions related to his homelessness after they reconnected in 2013

“We need to stop treating someone like a criminal because they can’t afford a place to live.” Jessica Bartholow legislative advocate, Western Center on Law & Poverty

“tHe $100,000 Homeless maN”

continued from page 17

But the seasonal facility was opened with the understanding that homeless people would no longer be allowed to rest on City Hall property, which has been fenced off. Meanwhile, activists have complained that police are frisking homeless people for illegal drugs and weapons before allowing them entry into two cityoperated weather shelters. Courtney Collins, the daughter of one of the dead homeless men, David Collins, flew from Chapel Hill, North Carolina, to testify before the city council on February 7. “My father died right outside, in only his clothes, with only a couple dollars in his pocket,” she told council members. “I was terrified to find out about the very legal confiscation of blankets, sleeping bags and other sources of warmth and shelter for those living on the streets by the police. … I have been unraveling truths so ugly, it feels impossible to go up against such a monstrous system.” In response, Steinberg informed her that the city recently opened five shelters. “That’s not enough,” Collins said over her shoulder as she walked back to her seat.

“I know,” Steinberg answered. In a meeting last week, Steinberg told activists he wants to ensure police aren’t confiscating survival gear when enforcing the camping ban, said the mayor’s spokeswoman, Kelly Rivas.

Hope from a Hospital bed After eating from his poisoned garden and falling ill, Russell Bartholow was admitted to the UC Davis Medical Center in October 2013. It was there that he spotted the name of his long-lost niece in the pages of an SN&R article and reached out to her. When Jessica went to see him, Russell bore the marks of many years on the streets. “All his teeth were gone,” Jessica said. “He’d been set on fire and spent months in the burn unit. He had been beat to a pulp several times. He had scars all over his body. And not just like little scars. Big scars.” Russell recalled that day more positively.

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20   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17


“the $100,000 hOMeLess Man” continued from page 19 “I met my niece through an act of God,” he said in February 2015. Jessica had to overturn official government records declaring Russell deceased. She then got to work securing Russell a birth certificate, an identification card, a cellphone, Supplemental Security Income, health insurance and a spot at a methadone clinic. There, he met an old friend who needed a roommate, giving Russell a place to live after shelters and hotels had turned him down due to lack of space and/or Russell’s lack of paperwork. He made friends on Facebook and reconnected with his son, Kieran. “It was a couple months of advocacy, just a couple of hours at a time,” Jessica said of that period. “It didn’t take that much to find somebody a home and dignity and safety.” But a laundry list of unresolved citations related to his homelessness, totaling up to more than $100,000, weighed on Russell. As he biked to the methadone clinic each day, he feared that police officers would stop and arrest him for his many outstanding warrants, issued for having failed to appear at least once in some 170 different cases. “Here’s a man who’s really no threat,” Jessica said. “For the most part, his warrants were related to sleeping and camping. He wanted them cleared up. But there was really no feasible way for him to accomplish that.” Based on Russell’s experience, Jessica became a major advocate for California’s Right to Rest Act legislation. The proposal got held in committee twice in the state Senate, never making it to a vote due to bipartisan opposition. The city and county of Sacramento officially opposed it, too.

“They look at us like we’re scum. And it’s cold and it’s wrong. Because we’re all human. We all have a story. We’re all out here for a reason.” Deni Blakney homeless mother

Death anD warrants In the absence of legal protections, there are few safe harbors open to the homeless. One is at the newly opened Friendship Park, where assistant director Hannah Ozanian says Loaves & Fishes takes a “love first and questions later” approach. The new facility features gazebos that offer shade in the summer and heat in the winter. Guests can get a free breakfast and lunch and access the myriad services offered by the charity to help people survive on the streets and move off them. But, according to Blakney, the best part is something far simpler. “Going to the bathroom and getting a shower is the most important thing here,” she said. “When you get a shower, it makes you feel good about yourself. You feel human.” As far as housing goes, there’s a pittance. A recent Metrostudy report found that production of homes costing under $200,000 had ceased. The 150-room Mercy Housing complex at Seventh and H streets offers half its space to the formerly homeless and the other half to those earning 40-50 percent of the area median income. The complex also offers a health clinic run by The Effort, easy access to public transit and a coordinated entry system that tailors services to residents’ needs. But Mercy Housing President Doug Shoemaker acknowledges that even this is insufficient. “The problem in Sacramento, and everywhere else, is scarcity,” he said. “When we open new buildings, there are 10, 20, 30 times as many applicants as there are apartments available.” Erlenbusch hasn’t been encouraged by the wave of gentrification sweeping through downtown that’s already turned one single-resident-occupancy motel for

extremely low-income people into the gleaming Kimpton hotel next to the Golden 1 Center. With only a 2 to 4 percent vacancy rate in the city, real estate can grow expensive as developers seek to take full advantage of the marketplace. Erlenbusch and Shoemaker recognize that no neighborhood wants the entire burden of housing the destitute, but as long as it’s insufficient, the millions spent on “mitigating” homelessness rather than preventing it will continue indefinitely. “The cost of doing nothing is exorbitant,” Erlenbusch said. Steinberg is working to give homeless people access to 200 public housing units and 1,600 federal rent vouchers, but most of this is controlled by the county Board of Supervisors, which demurred on this proposal during the February 1 joint session, promising to investigate it and return with an analysis in March. One other idea: San Francisco Assemblyman David Chiu proposed to eliminate a tax break that allows mortgage deductions on second homes—a measure that he says cost the state $300 million last year—and use that money to pay for affordable housing through tax credits.

“I would dare somebody to explain to me why that’s not better public policy than the current situation,” Shoemaker said. Jessica has another idea. Similar to a program for foster children, she wants to create a registry of homeless people so they can potentially connect with long-lost relatives who would be willing to take them in. It’s an idea based on personal experience. After their reunion, Jessica stayed in close contact with Russell, texting him daily as he adjusted to living indoors again. He became a major signature gatherer for the Right to Rest Act. But before the proposal was denied a vote last year, doctors informed Jessica that cancer had spread throughout Russell’s body. There was nothing they could do for him. Jessica informed Kieran of the news and he traveled to see his father. They asked Russell what he wanted to do. He said, “I’d like to just fall asleep and not wake up,” Jessica remembered. So the doctors gave him liquid pain medication and allowed him to administer the dosage himself. Two days later, on October 5, 2016, surrounded by loved ones and in a warm bed, Russell Bartholow fell asleep for the final time. According to court records, there are still 37 active warrants for his arrest. Ω

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   21


Against a backdrop of travel bans, local museums highlight the 75th anniversary of Japanese internment by Vanessa RichaRdson

Children practice calisthenics at the California internment camp Manzanar in this Ansel Adams photograph on display at the Crocker Art Museum.

22   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17


BLACK HISTORY EVENTS See NIGHT&DAY

25

BATTLE-WORN BURGER See OFF MENU

It’s

more than a little ironic that, in these xenophobic times, with serious talks about travel bans and building a wall across the southern border, we’re marking the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066. That law forced American citizens to leave their homes and move to concentration camps here in California and other parts of the American West. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the government deemed any person of Japanese ancestry a threat to the nation. On February 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the order, designating much of the West Coast as military zones. He called for the War Department to round up 120,000 Japanese-Americans and ship them to inland camps guarded by armed soldiers and fenced with barbed wire. Here in Sacramento, 8,649 Japanese-Americans were sent away to camps, according to Stacey Shelnut-Hendrick, director of education at the Crocker Art Museum. Now, that tragedy is being marked in a contemplative setting: the museum. Along with three exhibits that have some connection to Japanese art and culture, the Crocker will host a Day of Remembrance on February 19, including a tea ceremony and tours. And the California Museum just introduced Kokoro: The Story of Sacramento’s Lost Japantown, a photo exhibit showing the rise, boom and literal wrecking-ball destruction of a part of downtown close to where both museums sit today.

DREADING DÉJÀ VU

PhOTO BY AnSeL ADAMS

This year, it’s high time people focused on a part of U.S. history that’s not often in the spotlight, Shelnut-Hendrick says. “It’s a story people don’t know as well as other parts of U.S. history,” she says. “I think when people look at the photos and participate in the day’s activities, they’ll really be touched by that moment in time, and how we don’t want to go back to that point in time.” On the day of the event, a 10-minute meditation and a taiko drum performance will lead into the daylong reading of the names of 8,649 Sacramento residents who were moved to the camps. Located on the eastern flank of the Sierra, Manzanar became one of the most infamous of those camps because of photographer Ansel Adams. Primarily known for his landscapes, Adams decided to focus on people instead when he visited Manzanar. The images show prisoners’ daily lives in a camp of paper-walled frame buildings, where they were forced to live for up to three years. The Crocker will show 40 of those iconic works in the exhibition Two Views: Photographs by Ansel Adams and Leonard Frank. At the exhibit, camp survivors will share their personal stories throughout the day. One of them is Kiyo Sato, who was 18 when her family was forced to leave its 20-acre strawberry farm near Mather Field. They were eventually moved to Poston War Relocation Center near Yuma, Ariz., where up to 17,000 people lived in barracks during summer days that reached 130 degrees. Sato, a spry 95-year-old living in Folsom who wrote about her experiences in the memoir Kiko’s Story: A Japanese-American Family’s Quest for the American Dream, regularly speaks to grade-schoolers, using giant photos of the camps to prompt their questions. “They always like the photo of the dog who tried to get into the back of an army truck to go with his owner,” she

27

ART BY THE SCOOBY DOODLER See COOLHUNTING

says. “I tell them about the dogs we had to leave behind, how we put them in the barn with food and water, and the door cracked open. I was told four years later that they died shortly after we left. There were 120,000 people like my family who had to leave their pets behind.” Film will be the afternoon’s focus, when the Crocker, in conjunction with the Sacramento Japanese Film Festival, will show the animated film Grave of the Fireflies. Made in 1988, it follows a brother and sister who are orphaned during World War II when the U.S. military firebombs their home in Kobe, Japan.

“ We th r eW out th e Constitution an d We r eg r et ted it b eCause We e x ag g er ated th e fe ars .” Kevin Wildie • Author

As the last names are read out, local songwriter Haruko Sakakibara will close out the Day of Remembrance with her composition, “We Had to Go,” written to recognize the Japanese-American experience. The Crocker actually sits in the middle of what used to be the fourth-largest Japantown in the nation, but most Sacramentans don’t know that because there’s no trace of it left.

THE GHOST OF A NEIGHBORHOOD The California Museum’s Kokoro exhibit, which opened February 12, shows the once-thriving community of Sacramento’s Japantown, six square blocks bordered by L and O streets and Third and Fifth streets, which was first hit by Executive Order 9066, then the relentless march of

33

HEAVY-HITTING RELEASES See MUSIC

39

urban redevelopment a decade later. With the bulk of the 700 photos coming from former Japantown residents, Kokoro represents a grassroots effort at exhibition design, says Executive Director Amanda Meeker. “They came together as a community to dig through their attics and basements and pull out amazing wonderful family photos, home movies and other items devoted to that place and time,” Meeker says. “You’re seeing a very personal side of that history. You really feel almost transported almost back in time to a place that is just a few blocks away. The buildings on Capitol Mall replaced a very vibrant community.” The exhibit was inspired by Kevin Wildie’s 2013 book, Sacramento’s Historic Japantown: Legacy of a Lost Neighborhood. After its publication, Wildie got a call from Bob Matsumoto, a Los Angeles-based art director who was so inspired by the book that he suggested that it be turned into a photo exhibit. The duo spent two years reaching out to the community and asking for photos, but Wildie says credit is due primarily to five Japanese-American women who knew how to network effectively. “They were on the phone, calling everyone they know, asking them for photos, so their efforts are the reason behind what you see today,” he says. Music from local jazz singer Betty Inada plays in the background of the exhibit, while black-and-white photos show a bustling neighborhood that got its start in the late 1890s, when Japanese immigrants came across the Pacific to work in Sacramento’s fields and on its train tracks. By 1940, the community had grown to 500 families and 170 Japanese-American owned or operated businesses, social clubs and churches. Nearby, video reels show those buildings getting destroyed and blocks razed by Sacramento’s post-World War II redevelopment project. A decade after being uprooted, Japantown’s residents spoke out forcefully about the project that called for a complete demolition of Japantown, Wildie says. Activists’ efforts to incorporate a new Japantown were blocked, and by 1960 most Japantown residents had moved to South Sacramento. As with Roosevelt’s order, Sacramento’s racial rezoning was shrouded in the darkness of bad historic decisions no one wanted to call attention to. When Wildie started working on Kokoro, election year 2016 wasn’t yet an issue. He just wanted to let people know about the contributions Japanese-Americans have made to Sacramento. But now, with the old adage “history repeats itself” rearing its head in an all-too-real way, his new goal is to make sure people see why the past shouldn’t return to the present. “With the racial and nationalistic hysteria occurring during World War II, there were judgments made that, even back then, an overwhelming majority of legal scholars and politicians said were unconstitutional,” Wildie says. “We threw out the Constitution and we regretted it because we exaggerated the fears. This exhibit is a reminder for us to be cognizant of overreaction and the overwhelming damage done to Japanese-Americans—and that we are possibly on the verge of doing to Muslim-Americans. It’s a reminder that we should not overreact.” See the Two Views exhibit from February 19 to May 14, and attend the Day of Remembrance from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. February 19, at the Crocker Art Museum (216 O Street). Visit Kokoro: The Story of Sacramento’s Lost Japantown from February 12 to May 28 at the California Museum (1020 O Street).

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   23


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FOR tHe weeK OF FeBRUARY 16

Cupid’s Revenge Pub Crawl Saturday, February 18

A

t a breakfast in celebration  of Black History Month a  few weeks ago, President  Trump gave us this gem: “I  am very proud now that we have a  museum on the National Mall where  people can learn about Reverend  King, so many other things. Frederick  Douglass is an example of somebody  who’s done an amazing job and is  being recognized more and more, I  notice.” While Mr. Douglass is celebrating his newfound fame from the  grave, check out these other events  where you can celebrate and learn  about Black history: On Thursday, February 16, the  Oak Park Community Center (3425  Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard)  and Sacramento Juneteenth Inc.  join forces for Celebrating Black History Month from 5:30 p.m. to 8  p.m. Admission is free, and there will  be guest speakers, live music from  Flyism Uncensored Band, and various  vendors pushing food and drinks; visit  www.sacramento365.com/event/ black-history-month-celebration-2  for more information.  Civil rights activist and journalist  Shaun King makes a stop at University  of the Pacific in Stockton (3601  Pacific Avenue). An outspoken critic  of police brutality, King has been a  prominent champion of the Black  Lives Matter movement, though his  incendiary journalism career has  been a controversial one, criticized  by media across the political spectrum. Considering today’s political 

What better way to get revenge on a manufactured,  single-person-shaming holiday than to drink your  sorrows away in the city’s pubs? The  DRINKING full itinerary of the seven stops will  be released with the purchase of your ticket, and  exclusive drink specials will be offered at each bar.  Curmudgeons are especially encouraged to wear  their best anti-Cupid costume for a chance to win a  prize. $10-$15; 3 p.m. at Cornerstone Cafe, 2326   J Street; https://nightout.com/events/cupidcrawl3.

climate, attendees to this freeof-charge talk at Faye Spanos  Concert Hall at 7 p.m. will no  doubt be in for an impassioned speech. On Wednesday, February  22, the Sacramento African  American Nonprofit  Coalition hosts its second  annual Black History Month Luncheon, emceed by  Good Day Sacramento’s  Courtney Dempsey.  President and CEO of  the California Wellness  Foundation Judy Belk will  be giving the keynote. The  luncheon goes from 11 a.m.  to 1:30 p.m. at the Scottish  Rite Masonic Center (6151  H Street); tickets are $45  and can be purchased at  https://www.eventbrite. com/e/saancs-2nd-annualblack-history-monthluncheon-tickets-30343581469. Also kicking off Wednesday,  February 22: Catch Sacramento/ Black Art of Dance in its 25th  year of celebrating AfricanAmerican concert dance. Directed  by Linda Goodrich, various pieces  of modern dance choreographed by  Sacramento State University faculty  will be performed. Performances run  through Sunday, February 26; tickets  are $5-$12 and show times vary. Visit  www.csus.edu/dram for more info.

—eddie JorgenSen

Sacred City Derby Girls Home Season Opener Saturday, February 18 The Sacred City Derby Girls are here to drink milk  and kick ass. Their first home event of the season is  a doubleheader featuring the Sacrificers (ranked in  the top 40 teams from around the world)  SPORtS and the Disciples. Stop by for some beer,  nachos and a slammin‘ good time. Kids under 12 are  free. $15-$18; 6 p.m. at Sacred City Headquarters,  1501 North C Street; http://sacredcityderbygirls.com.

—Lory giL

Mardi Gras Masked Ball Saturday, February 18 A real Mardi Gras party needs a bit of voodoo.  That’s what makes this Mardi Gras Masked Ball  so special: In the spooky lairs of Old Sacramento’s  underground catacombs, expect vampires, ghosts,  psychics, fire dancers, burlesque and  PARtY music. $15-$20; 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. at  Graciano’s Deep Dish Pizza & Speakeasy, 1023 Front  Street; www.shannonmccabe.com.

—aaron CarneS

2017 Oscar-Nominated Short Films Monday, February 20 Crest Theatre continues its annual tradition of   showcasing Oscar-nominated animated shorts.  Check out Borrowed Time, Pearl, Piper, Blind Vaysha  and Pear Cider and Cigarettes, and decide  FILM which one deserves the Academy Award.  Stick around for a screening of the year’s Oscar  nominated live-action short films. $14; 4 p.m. at Crest  Theatre, 1013 K Street; www.crestsacramento.com.

—deena drewiS

—dave KeMpa

Do the Dance Launch Party tueSday, February 21 In 1969, a Sacramento strip club went to trial over  charges of indecency. The judge ordered the dancer  to perform to determine if her full-nude routine was,  in fact, indecent. (Cue fist shaking at the patriarchy.)  The 60-minute documentary explores that  FILM precedent-defining moment. $50; 7 p.m. at E.  Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts, 1425  24th Street; www.perpetualf.com/dothedance.

—deena drewiS

IllustratIon by sarah hansel

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   25


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Jidori for ramen glory Hot rAMen, kru ConteMporAry JApAneSe Sacramento does not want for ramen options, so it  might seem odd to seek the dish from a restaurant  known for its sushi. To that I say:  Phooey. At Kru, the hot ramen  with pork belly ($18) offers  generous squares of meat,  lightly crisped with garlic  and ginger. They rest atop  thin noodles and bamboo  shoots. In the middle, a  slow-poached Jidori egg   jiggles with a thin film of  egg white and a gooey, deeporange yolk. Bite it for a gush of  bliss. 3135 Folsom Boulevard, http://krurestaurant.com. 

—reBeCCA HuvAl

Stiff stout iMperiAl Hot CHoColAte, Fieldwork Brewing Co.

IllustratIon by Mark stIvers

Battle burger By John Flynn

Duel-icious: During the beginning of the Civil War, the namesake of Broderick Roadhouse, David C. Broderick, challenged his good friend, David Terry, former chief justice of the California Supreme Court, to a duel. The reason: Terry had advocated for slavery in California. They met at Lake Merced with a couple of hair-trigger pistols. Broderick lifted to aim, but his gun misfired into the ground. Taking his time, Terry lined up his shot and plugged Broderick in the right lung. He died three days later. In honor of this singular man’s birthday on February 4, Broderick Roadhouse (1820 L Street in

Midtown and 319 Sixth Street in West Sacramento) unveiled its first double burger ($18.93). Beyond the two 7-ounce patties of ground chuck, the D.C. Broderick burger also has two slices of aged white cheddar, applewood-smoked bacon and housemade pickles, onion crisps, garlic aioli and spicy steak sauce. Slinging ’za: By the end of February, Device Brewing Co. (8166 14th Avenue) should be serving thin-crust pizza pies (roughly $10) with its beers. Owner Ken Anthony recently purchased an oven from Hot City Pizza and plans to spend the next couple of weeks trying out pairings.

For starters, he might suggest spicy sausage with IPAs, and margheritas with lagers. Ultimately, he’ll let the customers decide how they want to mix-and-match. Anthony regrets severing ties with his food trucks, but noted that “hot, tasty food” will always be available, as opposed to about half the time under the current arrangement. And in the future he wants to release new beers alongside a tailored pizza of the week or month. He’s primarily adding the pies for the customers, but he’s also being a bit selfish. “I love pizza,” he said. “There’s no limit to how much and how often I would eat it. And it’s my brewery, so …” Bridge party: The little-used Fifth Street Bridge will be this year’s site for the Capitol Beer Fest on March 12. The event got pushed from its usual spot on Capitol Mall due to new policies banning events there after 4 p.m. (Thanks, Golden 1 Center.) The fest will run from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and feature 125 brewers, 15 food trucks, live music and a bike valet. Tickets start at $40, if you plan to drink. Ω

If you can squeeze into a spot at this perpetually  crowded taproom, you’ll earn a shot at soothing  yourself with one of the more devastating spiced beers  around, the Imperial Hot Chocolate ($5 for a half-pour).  Fieldwork brings this one in and out of rotation for  occasional tweaking, and the current iteration has a  higher alcohol content than before, weighing in at a  boozy-as-hell 11.5 percent. An imperial cocoa stout  sculpted by nitro infusion and laced with a bright hit of  nutmeg and chili peppers that smolders on the palate,  you may want to sit down for this one (if you can find an  open seat). 1805 Capitol Avenue,   http://fieldworkbrewing.com/sacramento.

—AntHony Siino

A fennel bulb a day Fennel There’s increasing evidence that we need to eat produce  to stay healthy. Perhaps you know the saying, “An apple  a day keeps the doctor away.” As it  turns out, that may be true— although you need more than  apples. Fennel is an excellent example of a delicious  vegetable that’s packed  with nutrients. Thinly slice  the bulb to add a gentle  sweetness and significant  fiber to a salad. It also contains an anti-inflammatory  phytonutrient thought to combat  cancer. Feeling nauseous? Nibble on the leafy fronds. So,  eat your apples, but make room for fennel, too.

—Ann MArtin rolke

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   27


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fluffy, crispy, delicious crepes & burgers 8000 auburn blvd • citrus heights, ca • www.crepesandburgers.com 28   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

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Chili-lover’s outing by Rebecca Huval

Hunan bar & Retaurant

HHH 207 D Street in Davis, (530) 753-5174 Dinner for one: $5.95 - $15.95 Good for: Traditional Hunanese dishes that don’t kid about spiciness

Notable dishes: Mapo tofu with fish fillet; hot and chili

chicken; dan dan noodles

For the first time in our six-year dining history, a waiter gave my fiancé a fork, while I got chopsticks. An important detail: He’s ChineseAmerican, and I’m white(ish). At this meal, I had ordered the twice-cooked pork ($10.95), a Szechuan-style dish from the traditional Chinese menu at Hunan Bar & Restaurant in Davis. He had ordered zucchini shrimp in hot garlic sauce ($11) from the Americanized menu at the same restaurant. Last spring, Mike Yang purchased the restaurant and revamped it to accommodate the growing Chinese student population at UC Davis. Initially a source of not-too-spicy grub like mild kung pao chicken, the restaurant has added dishes from Szechuan and Hunan, with a few pan-Asian, Cantonese- and Shanghainese-inspired dishes thrown into the mix. It offers distinct menus for cheaper Americanized food, and Hunanese food that’s a few dollars more to pay for its specialized ingredients. The menu uses “Szechuan” to describe the style of many of its dishes, though Hunan doesn’t even border that region in China. Americans tend to understand that “Szechuan” means “daringly spicy,” so this translates better. Szechuan dishes feature a distinct style of spiciness, made from a mix of Szechuan peppercorns and chilies, and the resulting hot-and-numb mouth feel even has its own name: mala. You’ll find plenty of that at Hunan Bar & Restaurant.

re b e c c a h @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

For example, the clay pot of red tofu in spicy soup ($14.95) does not kid about that spiciness. In a sea of blood-red soup, tender bits of pig intestine and beef tripe offer an adventure of texture and gamy flavor in each bite. The herbaceous peppercorn spice shimmers with numbness on your tongue. Slippery and translucent jelly noodles add to the fun. I must admit, this dish is not for everyone. (Later, when reviewing the menu with my fiancé’s father, he said, “You ate that?”) For those who love spice but crave familiarity, the hot and chili chicken ($12.95) features the nuggets we all know and love, but with juicy and flavorful chicken surrounded by a salt-and-chilipacked, fine layer of fried crisp. Chunks of chili, garlic and green onions are nestled among the small, meaty firecrackers. Just as fiery, but perhaps more healthful, is the mapo tofu with fish fillet ($13.95). The angelically soft mound of white tofu has been slicked with chili oil, carrying a spiciness that rips through your mouth with painful pleasure. Coarsely chopped garlic, green onions and ginger deepen the complexity. The dan dan noodles ($5.95) offered a pleasantly simple mashup of noodles and bok choy drenched with chili oil. The spicy nest was sprinkled with peanuts, fried shallots and garlic. Now, back to that twice-cooked pork: I wished it had been spicier, if anything. The cabbage was infused with pork flavor, but the fatty bits of meat could have used a zap of chili oil. The worst dish we tried? That zucchini shrimp off the Americanized menu. Gelatinous and sweet, it registered as Panda Express-style food, but elevated. The restaurant has joined the ranks of the burgeoning Chinese culinary scene in Davis, along with the proliferation of milk tea spots. For Taiwanese meals, Hometown Chinese Restaurant also serves traditional dishes. But when you’re craving the merciless kick-in-the-mouth of mala, consider a trip to Hunan Bar & Restaurant. Order from the Chinese menu, and you might even get a pair of chopsticks. Ω

The resulting hot-and-numb mouth feel even has its own name: mala.

Grapes of graphs If you’ve had visions of yourself sipping a robust wine with a worldly smirk  of understanding, but don’t know where to start, consider dropping $30 for  “Wine 101: How to Truly Enjoy & Taste Wine.” This marks the first of three Wine  101 classes at the Old Sugar Mill (35265 Willow  Avenue in Clarksburg), hosted by Three Wine  Co. All the sessions will be led by sommelier Norma Poole, who holds degrees  in viticulture and social work. (That  psychological training could come in  handy for those pupils intimidated by  wine.) Attendees will sip six vinos and  discern their characteristics using  a sensory analysis chart and aroma  wheels to pinpoint the type of wine and  oak. Ideally, you’ll even learn to identify  acids and tannins and how they contribute to  the flavors—or rather, since we’re getting all  fancy, the notes. Find tickets and information at   http://threewinecompany.com/page57.html.

—Rebecca Huval

Will drive far for doughnuts by SHoka The drive from Sacramento to  Modesto is more than an hour,  but once local vegans learn about  Vegan Donut Gelato, it may become an  out-of-town detour. The trend of  doughnut shops in the Sacramento  region a couple of years ago left a big  hole—no pun intended—for plantbased versions, since Doughbot  shut its doors in 2014. VDG, which  opened in December 2016 (at 330  Needham Street in Modesto, www. vegandonutgelato.com), specializes 

in the classics: glazed, jelly, holes,  bars, apple fritters, bear claws and  even cinnamon rolls. The texture on  the old-fashioned doughnut was  fantastic—cakey, decadent, yet not  greasy—but I have yet to sample  the less orthodox gelato-doughnut sandwich. The shop currently offers  12 gelato flavors, says VDG co-owner  and longtime vegan Sam Kang. Will  vegans carpool to Modesto to bring  home a dozen or two doughnuts?  Sounds plausible. Load up the Prius.

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   29


a paid advertising supplement

SN&R’s

TAP MAP

Where to find the region’s best craft breWs

spotlight taps

3 7

Track 7 Brewing Co.

AUBURN

65 49

18

99 ROSEVILLE

4

CITRUS HEIGHTS

20 10

5

WOODLAND

15

80

5

DAVIS

13

11

19

FOLSOM

6

• Lagunitas High West-ified Barrel-aged coffee stout • Northcoast Old Rasputin Barrel Aged XIX Bourbon barrel-aged imperial stout • Ballast Point Red Velvet on Nitro Golden oatmeal stout with beets and chocolate

12

8

RANCHO CORDOVA

9

80

Kupros Craft House

50

1

16

17

99

5

• Tolliver’s Revenge Scotch ale aged in oak • Steam Engine IPA New England-style IPA • Neck Thumper Imperial Stout Russian imperial stout

16

TAP ROOMS Pitch and Fiddle

2222 Fair Oaks Blvd., Sacramento 916-922-1745, www.capitolbeer.com Mon-Thurs 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri-Sat 11 a.m.-midnight Sun 11 a.m.-9 p.m.

6

Curtis Park Market

8704 La Riviera Drive, Sacramento 916-573-4782, www.pitchandfiddle.com

Doyle’s Pub and Taproom 312 E. Bidwell St., Folsom 916-983-8277, www.doylespubandtap.com Tue-Thurs 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m., Fri-Sat 11:30 a.m.-midnight Sun 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m.

FInalGravityAuburn

4

FG Roseville

FinalGravityRoseville

FinalGravityCA

7

5

1217 21st St., Sacramento 916-440-0401, www.kuproscrafthouse.com Mon-Thurs 11 a.m.-midnight, Friday 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Saturday 10 a.m.-2 a.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-midnight KuprosCraftHouse

KuprosSacto

30   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

536 Grass Valley Hwy., Auburn 530-878-5232, www.crookedlanebrewing.com Mon/Wed/Thu 3-9 p.m., Fri 3-10 p.m., Sat noon-10 p.m. Sun 10 a.m.-9 p.m. CrookedLaneBrewing

CrookedLaneBrew

8

3514 Broadway, Sacramento 916-660-2723, www.opbrewco.com Tue-Fri 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat-Sun 11 a.m.-10 p.m. OakParkBrewingCompany

OakParkBrewCo

Track 7 Brewing Co. 9

3747 W. Pacific Ave., Ste. F, Sacramento (Curtis Park) 826 Professor Lane, Ste. 100, Sacramento (Natomas) 916-520-4677(HOPS), www.track7brewing.com Mon-Thurs 3-9 p.m.; Fri-Sun noon-9 p.m. Track7Brewing

9331 La Riviera Drive, Sacramento 916-364-8701

Nugget Markets 13 14 15

Oak Park Brewing Co.

10

Kupros Craft House

12

Crooked Lane Brewing Co.

FinalGravityCA

9205 Sierra College Blvd., Ste. 100, Roseville 916-782-1166 Mon-Wed noon-11 p.m., Thurs-Sat noon-midnight Sun noon-8 p.m.

La Riviera Market & Spirits

BREWERIES

Final Gravity Taproom & Bottleshop

FinalGravity2.AuburnCA

2703 24th St., Sacramento 916-456-6488 Sun-Mon 8 a.m.-11 p.m. CurtisParkMarket

DoylesPubandTap

1850 Grass Valley Hwy., Ste. C-300, Auburn 530-889-2175, www.finalgravitybeer.com Tue-Fri 3-10 p.m., Sat noon-10 p.m., Sun noon-8 p.m.

11

PitchandFiddle

CapitolBeer

3

• Steamphunk Saison Farmhouse saison • Citra IPA American IPA

BOTTLE SHOPS

Capitol Beer and Tap Room

2

• Founders Frootwood Cherry ale aged in maple and bourbon barrels • Sudwerk Bourbonator Bourbon barrel-aged doppelbock • Deschutes The Abyss Bourbon, oak and pinot barrel-aged imperial stout

Oak Park Brewing Company

ELK GROVE

1

• Richard Buttock’s Tropical Paradise* Kettle sour IPA with pineapple and apricot • Magnetic* Northeast-inspired IPA collaboration with Device Brewing Co. • Berrylicious Kettle sour ale with black currant and raspberry • Venus Venom Imperial chocolate cherry stout *Available on tap and in 16-ounce four-packs to go

2

SACRAMENTO 14

• Mo’Sucka* Northeast-inspired double IPA • Hill Country Murk* Northeast-inspired IPA • Cultural Appropriation* Imperial maple pecan brown ale • Rule G* Northeast-inspired double IPA collaboration with Final Gravity • Everything Wrong (And Right)* Fruited Northeast-inspired IPA with lactose, vanilla and fruit

16 17 18 19 20

1414 E. Covell Blvd., Davis 530-750-3800, Sun-Sat 6 a.m.-11 p.m. 409 Mace Blvd., Davis 530-753-6690, Sun-Sat 7 a.m.-10 p.m. 4500 Post St., El Dorado Hills 916-933-1433, Sun-Sat 6 a.m.-11 p.m. 7101 Elk Grove Blvd., Elk Grove 916-226-2626, Sun-Sat 6 a.m.-10 p.m. 1040 Florin Road., Sacramento 916-395-2875, Sun-Sat 6 a.m.-10 p.m. 771 Pleasant Grove Blvd., Roseville 916-746-7799, Sun-Sat 6 a.m.-11 p.m. 2000 Town Center Plaza, West Sacramento 916-375-8700, Sun-Sat 6 a.m.-11 p.m. 157 Main St., Woodland 530-662-5479, Sun-Sat 6 a.m.-10 p.m.


a paid advertising supplement

SN&R’s

TAP MAP craft happenings F ri day, F e b. 17 • Free Live Music — kamikaze 9:30 p.m.-midnight Kupros Craft House, 1217 21st St., Sacramento

Saturday, Feb. 18 • Free Live Music — Annie Jay & Reggie Graham 9:30 p.m.-midnight Kupros Craft House, 1217 21st St. Sacramento • Berryessa Brewing special Beer Release, noon-midnight Final Gravity, 9205 Sierra College Blvd., Ste. 100, Roseville

Sun day, F e b. 19 • track 7 trivia, 5-7 p.m. Track 7, 826 Professor Lane, Ste. 100 Sacramento (Natomas)

Sun day, F e b. 26 • track 7 trivia, 5-7 p.m. Track 7, 3747 W. Pacific Ave., Ste. F Sacramento (Curtis Park) stock photo

th urSday, Ma rc h 2

Beer Me BAsics Questions to ask your bartender when exploring new brews by Thea Marie rood

W

e all know craft beer, microbreweries and rotating taps are popping up across the region. if you’re a novice, how do you dive into this scene and find pours you’ll love? Or if you’re already a beer drinker, how do you find new favorites? “don’t be afraid to ask your bartender questions,” says matt Oehlke, general manager of midtown’s university of Beer, which has 100 beers on tap and is staffed with Cicerone-certified beer servers. “there’s always the right beer out there for you — something that will make you say, ‘i didn’t know you could combine grain, hops, water and yeast and get this kind of flavor,’” he says.

I’m not really a beer drinker — what should I try? surprisingly, your bartender will have a follow-up question: what else do you like? “let’s say you tell me, ‘i really like coffee,’” says Oehlke. “i can do a lot with that.” He suggests many coffee drinkers love a beer like lagunitas Cappuccino stout or a milk stout.

if you’re a wine drinker, this can also clue in your bartender. “they’re aging more and more beer in wine barrels,” he says, which wine drinkers tend to like. “and if you’re a chardonnay drinker, you’ll probably like a pilsner or a blond beer, and won’t be seeking a lot of hops flavor.” Finally, your bartender might ask if you like sour candy. if you do, you might be ready for the more adventurous flavor experience of a sour ale.

I want to expand my experience — what’s your advice? Oehlke suggests a good place to start is with a taste flight — generally 5-ounce glasses of four beers. Or sit down with your favorite bartender and have him pour samples two at a time for what Oehlke calls his “eye doctor” routine: “One, or two?” He also recommends trying local microbreweries — track 7 Brewing Co. and sactown union Brewery make his list — because you’re getting fresher flavor and supporting the sacramento economy.

“There’salways therightbeerout thereforyou.” Matt Oehlke General manager, University of Beer in Midtown

“see what exists — don’t be afraid to try something different,” he says.

How do I pair food with beer? Is there an “in-season” component? “spicy foods always pair well with an ipa,” says Oehlke. “red meat goes well with an amber or brown beer, and a light salad will go with a lighter beer, like a pilsner.” He also says beers are served seasonally, so lager is best in summertime, and ale, which includes stouts and porters, is what to drink right now.

• Release party for tolliver’s Revenge, 4-10 p.m. Oak Park Brewing Co. 3514 Broadway, Sacramento

F ri day, Ma rc h 3 • Barrel Aged Bonanza, 6 p.m.-close Kupros Craft House, 1217 21st St. Sacramento • Fall River Brewing & Altamont Beer Works tap takeover Noon-midnight Final Gravity, 9205 Sierra College Blvd., Ste. 100, Roseville

Saturday, Ma rc h 4 • Barrel Aged Bonanza, 6 p.m.-close Kupros Craft House, 1217 21st St. Sacramento

Sun day, Ma rc h 5 • second Annual Brewery Invitational + competition, 1-5 p.m. Purchase tickets at brownpapertickets.com/ event/2771489 826 Professor Lane, Ste. 100 Sacramento (Natomas)

O n gOin g eve n tS • trivia Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m. Final Gravity, 9205 Sierra College Blvd., Ste. 100, Roseville • IpA Wednesdays $5/glass of Hoppy beers on draft Final Gravity, 1850 Grass Valley Hwy. Ste. C-300, Auburn • thirsty thursdays Select $4 draft beers Final Gravity, 1850 Grass Valley Hwy. Ste. C-300, Auburn

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   31


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32   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17


FIND OF THE WEEK

Roses are red and stuff the love Jones: Best love Poem ComPetition You’re a real Casanova—but can you write the best  love poem in all of Sacramento? You can earn a little  extra money. It costs $10 to enter The Love Jones:  Best Love Poem Competition and the top cash prize  comes to $300. If that’s not enough to lure  PoETRy you, a lot of eligible singles in the audience  will be watching. 9 p.m. Friday, February 17, at Double  Nickel Smokehouse, 3443 Laguna Boulevard in Elk  Grove; www.smokehouse55.com.

—aaron Carnes

bargain hunting old Gold’s $5 sale You’ve probably strutted into Old Gold to marvel at the  cool stuff crafted by local makers or the sweet vintage  apparel, but maybe you’ve grimaced at the  Fashion not-always-friendly price tags. Well, now is  the time to return: The semi-annual sale kicks off at 11  a.m. Saturday, February 18, and runs through Monday,  February 20. More than 500 items will be marked down  to an immensely affordable $5. 1104 R Street, Suite 110;  www.shopoldgold.com.

—Janelle Bitker

how rape culture works tainted witness: why we douBt what women say aBout their lives Multiple women who accused the president of sexual  harassment seemed to simply disappear. In Tainted  Witness: Why We Doubt What Women Say About Their  Lives (Columbia University Press, $30), Leigh  book Gilmore examines the recent history of such  women who found their testimony about sexual harassment, assault and rape disbelieved unless it was  accompanied by an overwhelming amount of corroborating evidence—or a man’s eyewitness testimony.  Gilmore explains exactly how rape culture works.

—kel munGer

The man who made your childhood Beatles Cartoon art show Anyone who has watched a children’s cartoon in the last 50 years  has probably seen the work of Ron  Campbell. The animator, director,  storyboard artist and writer has  had a hand in must-see TV shows— The Beatles; Scooby-Doo, Where Are  You!; and The Flintstones,  ExhibiT is a very abridged list— and his cartoon-based artwork  is showing at Beatnik Studios on  Thursday, February 16. He’ll also be  making paintings on the spot. Campbell, originally from Australia  and now in Arizona, worked on  children’s animation programs for  “50 years and one month” of his  77 years on Earth. To combat the  waiting-to-die feeling of retirement,  he picked up his paintbrush and  began touring the United States,  meeting his multigenerational  audience.  How did he get involved with the  most famous rock ’n’ roll band in  the world? In 1964, he got a call in  the middle of the night to be the  director of a new animated show,  but when he was told it was The  Beatles, Campbell responded,  “Insects make terrible characters!”  “Stupid me, I wasn’t paying that  much attention to popular music,”  Campbell says now. 11:30 a.m. to  7 p.m. Thursday, February 16, at  Beatnik Studios, 723 S Street;   www.beatlescartoonartshow.com.

—shoka

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02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   33


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34   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17


ReviewS

Now playiNg

3

Sex With Strangers

Watch your steps By Jim CarneS

“i promise i’m not too drunk to catch you.”

Beer & Ballet

5

7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday; $53. Sacramento Ballet at cLARA, 2420 N Street; (916) 552-5800; www.sacballet.org. Through February 19.

The Sacramento Ballet’s Beer & Ballet features 15 dances in a variety of styles that emphasize the classical training behind this emphatically contemporary company. It’s a program of surprisingly strong showings by dancers with little to no choreographic experience. Highlights include (but are not limited to): Laura Whitby’s duet to music by the Mamas and the Papas—on opening night, Kaori Higashiyama and Stefan Calka were charmingly flirtatious (Julia Feldman and Christopher Nachtrab sometimes perform); as well as “Above,” a moving tale of drug abuse and its aftermath, created by first-timer Anthony Cannarella to music by Mad Season. Through his dancers (Feldman and Rick Porter, alternating with Isabella Velasquez and Jaime Orrego), Cannarella conveys a range of emotions, the strongest of which is loss. Shania Rasmussen’s choreography in “Cell Block Tango” (from the musical Chicago) is smart and sexy—without even a suggestion of the traditional Bob Fosse aesthetic. Jonathan Harris’ ambitious “Dances at an Exhibition” excerpt, inspired by Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition,” replicates a trip through a museum with a stop at each of the 10 pictures in the composer’s piece. Harris has two scenes so far: “The Gnome,” danced by the delightful Dylan Keane (alternating with Cannarella), and “The Castle,” featuring Frances Chae and Porter, alternating with Higashiyama and Nachtrab. This popular series holds great potential that grows with each iteration. Ω

PHOTO cREDIT ALExANDER cAIN BIBER

Sex With Strangers  is a two-character  play that touches on  relevant issues including  generational and gender  divides, social media  challenges, and how we  battle personal versus  public images. The plot  centers around two people  unexpectedly meeting  up at a remote bed-andbreakfast that does not  have Wi-Fi. Olivia (Elise  Hodge, who is also the  director and producer)  is a once-successful  middle-aged author whose  B&B visit is interrupted by  Ethan (Tory Scroggins), a  young Internet sensation  who wants to be taken  more seriously. And since  there is no connection  to the outside world, the  two must go old school  in finding out about each  other. Playwright Laura  Eason is also a producer  for the TV drama House of  Cards, so plot twists and  surprise moments are her  forte. Th, F, Sa, 8pm; Su 2pm;

5 We Come From Greatness 1 This incredible show, written and directed by Lisa Tarrer Lacy with music by Charles Cooper, is the latest in an evolving body of work that addresses the African-American experience, starting with when they were kings in Africa and moving through slavery, emancipation, the Harlem Renaissance (with tributes to performers like Cab Calloway, Billie Holiday, Fats Waller and others), the civil rights movement, the inauguration of President Barack Obama and the Black Lives Matter movement. It is a powerful piece, with a talented 10-member cast, three dancers, and a three-piece band. Leading the group and often acting as narrator is the magnificent Bill Miller, whose “I’m a Man” was a highlight. On the evening of this review, there were some sound problems, so the moving performance of Elaine Douglas as “The Bones Keeper” that told the story of those tortured and killed on slave ships couldn’t really be made out word for word. Nonetheless, her performance was evocative. As the production progresses we see plantation life, emancipation, the Ku Klux Klan and the Jim Crow South. Naomi Powell plays the mother of Emmett Till, whose murder sparked the civil rights Movement, and Powell’s depiction of mourning her 14-year-old son is one you will not soon forget. Tribute is paid to Huey Newton and Malcolm X, and the show features a particularly moving performance by William Mininfield as Martin Luther King Jr.

—Bev sykes

We come From Greatness; 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday 3 p.m. on Sunday; $18-$22. Grant Union High School, 1400 Grand Avenue; (916) 428-1441; www.imagestheatre.org. Through February 19.

M, 7:30pm. $17-$20. Through 2/18. The Geery Theatre, 

FOUL

2130 L Street; (916) 214-6255,  http://emhpros.weebly  .com. P.R. 

4

Becoming Dr. Ruth

Dr. Ruth Westheimer  had a great run as  a pop culture icon 40 years  ago: a diminutive matron  (with a crazy accent)  enthusiastically dispensing  frank sex advice on the radio. But playwright Mark St.  Germain goes deeper, digging into her rich backstory:  She narrowly escaped  the Nazis as a child, then  became a Jewish sniper in  Jerusalem, a psychologist in  Paris, a single mom and sex  therapist in America, and  then belatedly, a celebrity.  And visiting actress Anne  O’Sullivan (who understudied the role during the  play’s 2013 Off Broadway  premiere) is thoroughly  enjoyable as a happy,  indefatigable survivor in  this breezy, feel-good solo  show. Th and F, 8pm; Sa, 5pm

and 9pm; Su, 2pm; Tu, 6:30pm; W, 2pm and 6:30pm. $26-$38. Through 2/26. B Street 

Theatre, 2711 B Street; (916)  443-5300; http://bstreet  theatre.org. J.H. 

4

Betrayal

Playwright Harold  Pinter’s Betrayal is  told in reverse chronology, starting in 1977 with a  couple’s reconnection in a  pub; it moves back  ward, ending in 1968 when  the couple first unites.  Pinter presents interesting  philosophical conundrums  of what constitutes  loyalty and betrayal in this  90-minute, no-intermission  play. A strong three-person  cast of Chad Deverman  as Jerry and Elena Wright  as Emma—the two main  characters who are having a seven-year affair  behind the back of Emma’s  husband Robert (Michael  Patrick Wiles)—is directed  by Janis Stevens. Th, 7pm; 

F, 8pm; Sa, 2pm and 8pm; W 7pm. $28-$40. Through 2/26. 

Captiol Stage, 2215 J Street;  (916) 995-5464;   www.capstage.org. P.R.

Short reviews by Patti Roberts and Jeff Hudson.

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Staring contest: Go! PHOTO By AMIR SHARAFEH

Great minds collide Celebration Arts marks Black History Month with The Meeting, a drama depicting a fictitious 1965 meeting between civil  rights icons Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. The two  are considered by many to be diametric opposites: King was  a Christian and a preacher of nonviolence, and Malcolm X  converted to Islam and espoused a by-any-means-necessary  approach in seeking racial equality. Romann Hodge plays Dr.  King, James R. Ellison plays Malcom X and Ray Garner plays  Rashad, Malcom X’s bodyguard, in this drama that has much  to say about our society, past and present. 7 p.m. Thursday,  Friday and Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday; $13-$15. Celebration Arts,  4469 D Street; (916) 455-2787; www.celebrationarts.net.

—Jim Carnes

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   35


for

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Life through death Sunday, February 26th

Please join My Thai Kitchen for a fundraising event that will be held to help our beloved coworker and friend, Salima Akbari, to help her ĚƵƌŝŶŐƚŚĞƟŵĞŽĨƌĞĐŽǀĞƌLJĨƌŽŵĂƌĞĐĞŶƚĂĐĐŝĚĞŶƚ͘ƉŽƌƟŽŶĨƌŽŵ the receipts that are generated will be donated to her and her three ĐŚŝůĚƌĞŶ͘DŽƌĞŝŶĨŽƌŵĂƟŽŶĂďŽƵƚƚŚŝƐĞǀĞŶƚǁŝůůďĞĂǀĂŝůŝďůĞƐŽŽŶ͘

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John Wick: Chapter 2 sequels: The no. 1 reason for assassins cutting their retirement short.

4

Director Chad Stahelski and writer Derek Kolstad reteam with star/whirling dervish of angst-ridden revenge Keanu Reeves for John Wick: Chapter 2, a surprisingly necessary sequel to their left-field 2014 action success John Wick. That first film began with a Straw Dogs-style setup—meek widower gets his car stolen and his puppy killed by snarling scumbags—but quickly transformed into a sleek, dark and funny revenge film with a fascinating mythology, as we find that Reeves’ terse and tortured Wick is actually a legendarily prolific hit man, part of a shadow society of assassins with a strict set of rules. It’s a tired and inappropriate cliché to assume that Reeves is simply a bad actor. In the mid-1990s, it became a widespread cultural punchline when Reeves played the role of Hamlet onstage in Canada, and it’s generally accepted that he’s at his best in roles that are more physical than verbal. The role of John Wick certainly sits in that silent but deadly wheelhouse, but Reeves deserves more credit for his performance than merely being right for the part. Good acting is good acting, however you get there, and Reeves is flat-out great in John Wick: Chapter 2. Every line of dialogue gets strangled in his throat, every life-loathing emotion scars his face, every gesture suggests a ghost who doesn’t realize he’s dead yet. Reeves acts in several scenes here opposite Ian McShane, a classically trained actor who reprises his role as the manager of The Continental, the neutral territory hotel where assassins congregate. Although ostensibly the superior actor, McShane couldn’t play the existential boogeyman part any more than Reeves could play the elegantly desiccated hotel manager.

by Daniel Barnes

John Wick: Chapter 2 picks up right where the first film ended, with Wick mowing down the final few sleazy gangsters (led by a scenerygnashing Peter Stormare, of course) who are holding on to his car. Wick proceeds to wield his precious automobile like a samurai sword, single-mindedly chopping through henchmen until he reaches the boss level, at which point he backs off in exchange for a life of peace. After that final kill-crazy bender of an opening scene, Wick buries his old life in the basement, but immediately an old contact comes carrying a marker, forcing Wick back into a life of ultraviolence. While the first John Wick leaned heavily on the theme of grief, with Wick’s corpse-strewn revenge mission serving as cathartic therapy, the sequel focuses more on the theme of addiction. Whether by blackmail or bloodlust, Wick can’t escape his old life, and he isn’t the only person in John Wick: Chapter 2 who feels trapped by this life of hired murder and unforgiving moral codes. A furious paranoia slowly accumulates, crescendoing in a spectacular final half-hour of audacious action, with a tremendous sequence set inside of an art installation. At a time of the year when Hollywood celebrates lifeaffirming films that are dead inside, it’s great to see a death-obsessed film that is so full of life. Ω

Keanu Reeves is flat-out great.

Sunday, March 5th, 12 noon

36   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

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A Cure for Wellness

An ambitious young Wall Street shark  (Dane De Haan) travels to the Swiss Alps  to extract one of his���company’s honchos from  a secluded health spa run by a mysterious,  vaguely sinister doctor (Jason Isaacs). When  a car crash makes the young man a patient  there, the sinister vibes he gets from everyone  become more threatening by the hour. Make  no mistake, the script by Justin Haythe and  director Gore Verbinski is a total crock and  doesn’t make sense even on its own wacky  terms; Haythe and Verbinski came up with  only half a story, finally resorting to visual  echoes of movies from Hitchcock’s Spellbound  to Last Year at Marienbad and Mystery of the  Wax Museum. And yet it’s almost hypnotically  beautiful and you can’t look away, right up to  the off-the-wall ending. Verbinski delivers the  goods on that score. J.L. 

3

A Dog’s Purpose

The soul of a dog (voiced by Josh Gad)  is reincarnated over and over, until  he winds up with the teenager he was once  devoted to (K.J. Apa), who has now grown up to  be Dennis Quaid. Through all these lives—male,  female, cuddly basenji, police German shepherd—Gad’s voice-over narration bounces  from butt-sniffing jokes to ruminations on  the meaning of life (as reflected in the movie’s  title); ultimately, it seems, this dog’s purpose  is to bring two high-school sweethearts back  together in their declining years (the girl  starts out as Britt Robertson and ends up as  Peggy Lipton). Directed by Lasse Halström and  adapted from W. Bruce Campbell’s novel by  more writers than I have space to name, the  movie is enjoyable enough, though how it came  to theaters instead of the Hallmark Channel is  a mystery. J.L. 

2

The Comedian

An aging, semiwashed-up insult comic  (Robert De Niro) roughs up a heckler in  a club and winds up doing community service,  where he meets and bonds with a woman  (Leslie Mann) with similar anger issues, having  similarly roughed up an ex. Director Taylor  Hackford deserves credit for casting De Niro  and Danny DeVito as brothers, for reuniting  De Niro with Harvey Keitel (as Mann’s father)  and for fostering an easy, cheerful chemistry  between De Niro and Mann. But De Niro’s  character isn’t as witty or funny as everybody  around him says he is, and the movie feels only  half-cooked. The four writers (Art Linson, Jeff  Ross, Richard LaGravanese and Lewis Friedman) seem to have spent more time rewriting  each other than working together—in every  sense, not on the same page—and the movie  overstays its welcome. J.L. 

2

Fist Fight

At the worst high school with the  rottenest student body in America, a  nice-but-wimpy teacher (Charlie Day) runs  afoul of the faculty badass (Ice Cube), who  challenges him to fight it out after school. Written by Van Robichaux, Evan Susser and Max  Greenfield and boorishly directed by Richie  Keen, the movie is coarse, crude and profane,  but a guilty pleasure with many good laughs  thanks to Day’s comic flair. But such movies  can’t help themselves; they have to cross the  line, and this one does it with a long F-bombing  rap by Day’s 10-year-old daughter (Alexa  Nisenson). This isn’t comedy, it’s child abuse,  and Nisenson’s parents should be ashamed  of themselves. Ice Cube shows himself once  again as one of the most underrated actors in  movies—but maybe that’s because he keeps  making movies like this. J.L.

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The practical problem of having a turtle as your BFF.

4

The Red Turtle

Studio Ghibli co-founder Isao Takahata (Only Yesterday; Grave of the  Fireflies) gets credited as artistic producer on this lovely, hand-drawn  marvel, a film that carries a rare seal-of-approval co-production credit from  the semi-defunct Japanese animation studio. Dutch director Michael Dudok de  Wit makes his feature film debut with this dialogue-free parable about a castaway who forms a special relationship with the titular creature, a large reptile  who transforms into a literal force-of-nature maiden. It’s about as beautifully  simple and lithe as an epic visual feast can get, with Ghibli-esque themes about  our spiritual connection to nature kept high in the mix, and an overarching  bittersweetness that keeps the fantasy grounded in human emotion. The only  Ghibli-esque narrative standby it sorely lacks: a strong and interesting female  character with some personality and agency—the only woman we see here is  more of a sexed-up force of nature than anything else. D.B.

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4

The Lego Batman Movie

The title pretty much tells you what to  expect. Batman/Bruce Wayne (voiced by  Will Arnett in a deadpan rasp) contends with  an army of bad guys (nearly all with celebrity  voices) led by the villain he loves to hate, the  Joker (Zach Galifianakis), while grappling with  the instant family represented by the youth  he inadvertently adopted (Michael Cera,  “animated” in every sense). Comic book movies used to be fun, and the idiot solemnity of  the Christopher Nolan/Christian Bale movies  are long overdue for ridicule. Director Chris  McKay and writers Seth Grahame-Smith, Chris  McKenna, Erik Sommers, Jared Stern and John  Whittington are happy to oblige. The result is  more fun than Batman’s been since Adam West  hung up his purple tights. Somewhere, surely,  Batman’s late creators Bob Kane and Bill Finger  are smiling. J.L.

4

Patriots Day

Another masculine tragedy from  director and co-writer Peter Berg, who  recreates the Boston Marathon bombing and  subsequent manhunt with the same visceral  accuracy that he brought to his recreation of  the BP oil rig explosion in last year’s Deepwater  Horizon. His Deepwater Horizon star Mark  Wahlberg also headlines here as Tommy Saunders, a fictional composite Boston cop who  tracks the bombers from ground zero to their  eventual captures or deaths. Patriots Day  forms a triple feature with Deepwater Horizon  and Michael Bay’s 13 Hours—they’re all ethically dubious enterprises, yet the filmmaking  is undeniably powerful and the moral lines are  hazier than you would think. Even if Patriots  Day is the bronze medalist of that trio, with  Wahlberg’s borderline self-parodic performance making for a mediocre centerpiece, it’s  still a gripping portrayal of an hour-by-hour  response to terror, with strong supporting  players and an effective score by Trent Reznor  and Atticus Ross. D.B. 

2

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter

Super-assassin Alice (Mila Jovovich)  climbs out of the rubble of Washington, D.C., and heads to Raccoon City for a  showdown with the Bible-quoting head of the  sinister Umbrella Corporation (Iain Glen).  This series is only marginally better than  most video game movies, but Jovovich gets  precious little help from writer-director Paul  W.S. Anderson. He clutters up the screen with  constant physics-defying CGI action, shot with  jittery cameras and assembled with assaultive  Cuisinart editing—all of which cancels out the  3-D you paid extra for. And by the way, in a  movie all about cloning, second lead Ali Larter  looks way too much like Jovovich; it looks like  one of them is playing both parts. Despite the  title, the door is left wide open for yet another  go. The Final Chapter? You wanna bet? J.L. 

3

xXx: Return of Xander Cage

The latest attempt to reignite a moribund franchise to tank at the domestic  box office, D.J. Caruso’s xXx: Return of Xander  Cage returns Vin Diesel to the role of Cage, a  sort of anti-establishment, extreme sports  James Bond. Hiding out in the Dominican  Republic and presumed dead, Cage is recruited  back into the spy game when a shadowy  government agent (Toni Collette) tells him a  team of rogue agents (including martial arts  superstars Tony Jaa and Donnie Yen and the  stunning Bollywood actress Deepika Padukone)  are behind the murder of his mentor Augustus  Gibbons (Samuel L. Jackson, reprising his role  and fulfilling his contractual obligation to appear in literally every film). Return of Xander  Cage distills the James Bond model to its base  elements—beautiful women, teeth-gnashing  villains, goofy gadgets and ridiculous stunts— and pumps it full of Mountain Dew Kickstart.  It’s sophomoric and occasionally slapdash, but  also quite entertaining. D.B.

SN&R’s

BEER ISSUE ON STANDS MARCH 2

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   37


Hard-hitting spectacle The nimble group behind Kill the Precedent   puts the ‘or’ in hardcore by Steph RodRiguez

Photo BY Carlos almanza

“We stick with certain heavy genres of music, but we’re not a metal band or a punk band, or anything hardcore; we mix everything together and whatever happens, happens,” guitarist Catastrofiend says. On the latest album, the song “Two Way Mirrors” not only sums up the band’s sound, but also showcases its growth. Technical guitar work is anchored with searing metal riffs and bolstered with lyrical aggressiveness from vocalists Twig the Exfoliator and The the only thing they’re scared of is smiling. Ugly American. The track keeps the ears busy while the mind tries to guess which direction the music will head next. Much like the new EP, KTP’s live shows As one of Sacramento’s most versatile bands, Kill are a high-energy and sometimes unpredictable the Precedent does not define itself by a specific spectacle. On one rare night, the band dressed up as genre. Nor does any label dictate which sound the Colombian drug lords and showered the venue with group will confront next—and they like it that way. bags of fake cocaine. The seven-member-strong crew attributes its “We want to put on a show,” The Ugly diverse sound to an abnormal writing process: American says. “Our music can stand on its own by It begins with one member named Tapeworm. itself, but if you’re going to go out and see a band, Members of the group also refer to the septic and you see all this shit going on, it’s just more invertebrate as the “man behind the curtain.” Like entertaining. It adds more character, and that’s some twisted Wizard of Oz, Tapeworm creates what I would want to see.” the skeletons of what will gradually evolve Still, with both vocalists using into music that’s both magnetic and every inch of their platform and complex. sometimes even colliding with “Nowadays, you After recording distorted guitar fellow band members, KTP’s riffs, electronic effects and even can’t just go up on dynamic performances are some experimental noise, he stage, you have to go always heightened by a stream emails the bare-bones track off of lo-fi visual effects projected fucking crazy.” to drummer Sgt. Pepper, who behind drummer Sgt. Pepper. then adds a layer of hard-hitting Catastrofiend The succinctly timed clips percussion. This method continues guitarist feature abstract ’20s cartoons and until two guitarists, one bassist and obscure cult films, which adds a two vocalists finish the song before little mystique to the chaotic dance the band even steps into the same room party that erupts on stage. together. This has been their process for 10 “We’re going to come out with no years—and it works. apologies and do whatever the fuck we can to get “There’s just so much going on in all the music your attention,” Catastrofiend says. “Nowadays, you parts and the vocals,” co-vocalist The Ugly American can’t just go up on stage, you have to go fucking says. “It gives us a really big open area to do pretty crazy. We want to have fun. We want to entertain much whatever the hell we want.” everybody. We’re going to keep doing it more On February 17, the band celebrates the release to wake people up, because you don’t have to be of its new EP Some Version of the Truth, released on pigeonholed into one thing.” Ω Minus Head Records, the follow-up to the band’s full-length album Dialogues with the Dead. The EP combines elements of metal, punk and hardcore, Kill the Precedent releases some Version of the truth at harlow’s cloaked in electronic effects. It even makes room for restaurant & nightclub, 2708 J street, with horseneck and Peace Killers. Doors open at 9 p.m., and tickets cost $10-$12. buoyant moments that invite audiences to dance. 38   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17


SouNd advice

Roaring releases Dark whispers: Local noise rockers So Stressed have come a long way the past couple of years. Not long ago, they were actively staying out of the spotlight. They even turned down an interview in 2014 because they didn’t want to be written about in SN&R. By 2015, they’d become a buzz band, and have since gotten press in Pitchfork, the AV Club and NPR. With the group’s third LP, Please Let Me Know, which comes out on February 17 on Ghost Ramp, who knows what’s next for them. One thing’s for sure: The group hasn’t toned down the intensity of their sound. Please Let Me Know hardly marks a departure from their two previous efforts. All three albums were recorded by Patrick Hills at Earth Tone Studios, and have the same brutal, ass-kicking energy. The dissonant chords, screaming vocals and head-bashing drumbeats sound like the musical embodiment of an anxiety attack. But there is a subtle shift in the sound on the new record: The guitar tones are thicker, more organic, the opposite of the mechanical-sounding The Unlawful Trade of Greco-Roman Art. It could be just a recording decision, but the dynamics are much more severe. It’s almost more menacing when the group lowers its volume to a near-whisper. So Stressed’s riffs are one of a kind. The noisy, dissonant jams are set to the impending heartbeat clock of death. The fuller recording quality and more extreme peaks and valleys have a huge affect on the music’s mood. Singer Morgan Fox’s constant shouting seems more like a plea for help than the style of yelling found in earlier So Stressed albums: as if from the top of a mountain and exorcising personal demons. Now, Morgan’s screams have more intimacy. The opening lyric on the record hits you right in the gut: “I see you in the corner of my eye / Please don’t die.” Please Let Me Know isn’t any more accessible than the group’s prior albums. But its visceral humanity will cut through to some listeners who normally tune out the second they hear someone screaming.

Metal mashup: When you think of metal or hardcore, the first associations that come to mind might be hard-hitting guitar riffs and raspy vocals—yet Sacramento band Horseneck breaks away from those expectations with its debut selfreleased album Heavy Trip. A four-piece band composed of current and former members of Chelsea Wolfe and Will Haven, the lineup features Anthony Paganelli and Lance Jackman on guitar as well as vocals, Lennon Hudson on bass and drummer Jess Gowrie. As the name promises, the record takes listeners through a musical journey of heavy sounds mixed with a variety of blues, electronic and ’80s hair metal music for an underlining layer of trippy sounds. The 10-song album kicks off with “Bird Worried,” which combines all of the aforementioned musical categories with both raspy and clean, soulful vocals—say, something between modern bands such as Deafheaven and Every Time I Die with a mix of old-school Black Sabbath. The song is catchy, complex and offers a strong introduction to the musical variety on the new release. Songs like “Michael Caine” have more of a punk-rock feel with catchy drums, sultry bass lines, disgruntled time signatures and instrumental sound breaks. Despite the mashup of genres, songs like “P.A.G” do offer a traditional take on metal. Other notable tracks include “Hangman,” a bittersweet song with a slow start and a burst of harsher notes—a pleasant contrast to the faster, high-energy songs. On the other hand, during “Lester Vitalis,” the band comes unhinged and takes listeners through a quick, gritty ride. The album creatively ties together its disparate sounds into a constant flow. Overall, it mixes psychedelic notes, catchy punk tunes, a jazz-like vibe and, of course, heavy riffs. This weekend, you can pick up Heavy Trip at Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub (2708 J Street) for Horseneck and Kill The Precedent’s double record release party (9 p.m. February 17, $10-$12). Or, visit https://horseneck.bandcamp .com/releases for a digital copy on February 17.

—AAron CArnes

—estefAny GonzAlez

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02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   39


17 FRI

17 FRI

18 SAT

18 SAT

Ross Hammond

(Waning)

The Growlers

Ganglians

Downtown & Vine, 6 p.m., no coVer

StArlite lounge, 8 p.m., $7

Local jazz guitarist Ross Hammond has been  channeling his Appalachian roots on his last  couple of records. His newest, Follow Your  Heart, out on February 17, is no exception.  This time around, the music brings to mind  long, dusty drives in rural America. It’s contemplative—mournful, even. The record is a  response to his daughter asking  AcouSTIc him if they would continue to be  best friends after they died, so maybe that’s  why the album sinks right into your gut. It’s  not exactly sad, but it’ll pull you out of your  world for a while. 1200 K Street,   www.rosshammond.com.

—Amy Bee

Ace of SpADeS, 6 p.m., $25

What else is there to say about (Waning), the  local atmospheric metal band that formed  a whopping decade ago? The group consistently stretches preconceived notions about  metal, stitching in elements of  MeTAl shoegaze and doom into its muddy,  psychedelic and spacious experiments. Fans  that have been playing 2014’s The Funeral  Mountains on repeat should clear their  schedules now for (Waning)’s brand new  album Still Hours, a doozy of eight tracks  recorded at Earth Tone Studios. Hear some  of it live at the release show alongside  Pacifica sludge punkers SQUALUS and  Sacramento’s Ghostplay. 1517 21st Street,  www.facebook.com/waningband.

—JAnelle Bitker

JOIN THE

TEAM

StArlite lounge, 8 p.m., $7

Southern California band the Growlers  combine surf and garage rock with elements of pop and psych to create its unique  sound dubbed “beach goth,” a label that  encompasses all the aforementioned genres  under one colorful umbrella. This weekend,  the Growlers will trade surf and sand for  cool, river-city vibes during its current U.S.  tour, much of which is already sold out. The  band’s latest, City Club, was released on  Julian Casablancas’ record  BeAcH GoTH label Cult Records and  includes tracks like the hypnotic and catchy  tune “Red Tide” that’s anchored in true  SoCal ’60s psych-rock. 1417 R Street,   www.thegrowlers.com.

In 2009, San Francisco’s psych-rock scene  was garnering national attention, and those  good vibrations reverberated inland to possess four musicians in Midtown. Ganglians’  humble beginnings quickly blossomed  into European tours and  IndIe Rock records on en vogue labels  like Woodsist and Lefse. By its third album  Still Living, it morphed from yipping, Beach  Boy mutants into power-pop vets capable  of heartbreaking songs. Then it broke up in  2012. Five years later, Ganglians return as a  six-piece. With two additional members, this  won’t be your typical reunion show. 1517 21st  Street, www.facebook.com/ganglians.

—Steph roDriguez

• EDITOR • MARKETING & PUBLICATIONS CONSULTANT • DISTRIBUTION DRIVER FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO APPLY, GO TO WWW.NEWSREVIEW.COM/JOBS. SN&R is an Equal Opportunity Employer that actively seeks diversity in the workplace.

40   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

—BlAke gilleSpie


gUTTURal, DRagon-in-a-TUnnEl voCal STylE.

19 SUn

22 WED

22 WED

23 THU

Jessica Malone

Experience Hendrix

Uli Jon Roth

PHOTO COURTESY OF LOnE WOLF PROdUCTiOnS

Raptor Starlite lounge, 8:30 p.m., $10

torch club, 9 p.m., $5

Portland, Ore.-based Raptor has been  around since 2011, but from the way it  sounds, you’d think it  THRaSH METal time traveled straight  from 1984. Singer Marco Destructor has the  same type of guttural, dragon-in-a-tunnel  vocal style as Possessed, while the ripping  guitars shred with an early-era Slayer-esque  fervor. If you remember banging your head  to bands like Dark Angel and Exodus, you’re  going to love Raptor. Don’t mistake homage  for knockoff, though; Raptor may be heavily  influenced by early ’80s thrash metal, but  it adds its own 21st-century spin. 1517 21st  Street, https://raptor4.bandcamp.com.

—lory gil

mondavi center, 8 p.m., $42-$100.50

Catch local singer-songwriter Jessica  Malone for the release of her debut album  Miles Left to Walk. The album name immediately evokes a sense of wanderlust and  self-discovery, which fits the music to a T.  Listening to it, you can imagine sitting at  a sidewalk in Anytown USA, pondering the  meaning of everything while simultaneously  wondering how you’re going to buy your  next meal (though you’re not really worried  about it). The power  SingER-SongWRiTER of her voice is her  subtlety; she can belt evocative stanzas, but  she saves that for the opportune moment  to hit you when you least expect it. 904 15th  Street, www.jessicamalonemusic.com.

Jimi Hendrix left the earth much too soon,  but his stamp on rock music was undeniable. On this special night, a handful of  notable guitarists, includClaSSiC RoCK ing Zakk Wylde, Kenny  Wayne Shepherd and Dweezil Zappa, will  gather to pay tribute to his immensely  popular catalog of music. Hendrix’s own  bassist Billy Cox will round out the rhythm  section with interpretations of the nowclassic songs that are sure to raise hairs  on the audience’s skin. For diehard collectors, a free live CD will accompany every  pair of tickets. 1 Shields Avenue in Davis,  www.experiencehendrixtour.com.

goldfield trading poSt, 7 p.m., $18 Most classic rock fans know the Scorpions  from their massive ’80s hits like “Rock  You Like a Hurricane” and its rock ballads.  Former guitarist Uli Jon Roth, however,  took a left turn musically many years  ago, and with him, a loyal legion of followers. His current run of shows this year is  dubbed “The Tokyo Tapes  ClaSSiC RoCK Revisited Tour” and will  find him and his band playing songs from  the Scorpions’ now-classic Tokyo Tapes  live record from 1978. Fans of classic rock  and jam-based guitarists should catch this  rare show while they can. 1630 J Street,  www.ulijonroth.com.

—eddie JorgenSen

—eddie JorgenSen

—aaron carneS

ALL AGES WELCOME!

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95811 • www.aceofspadessac.com SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25

BORN OF OSIRIS

VOLUMES - OCEANS ATE ALASKA - WITHIN THE RUINS - FIRE FROM THE GODS

THURSDAY, MARCH 2

HIPPIE SABOTAGE THURSDAY, MARCH 9

COMMON KINGS

¡MAYDAY! - MAKUA ROTHMAN WITH TRIBAL THEORY

SATURDAY, MARCH 11

WHITECHAPEL

CATTLE DECAPITATION – GOATWHORE - ALLEGAEON

FRIDAY, MARCH 17

THE CADILLAC THREE

COMING

SATURDAY, MARCH 18

KEYS N KRATES SUNDAY, MARCH 19

DANCE GAVIN DANCE EIDOLA - VASUDEVA

TUESDAY, MARCH 21

CHRONIXX

MAX GLAZER (FEDERATION SOUND) - JAH-9

FRIDAY, MARCH 24

CHELSEA GRIN

ICE NINE KILLS – GIDEON - ENTERPRISE EARTH UP IN SMOKE

THURSDAY, MARCH 28

THE ORWELLS THE WALTERS

SOON

02/17 02/18 02/19 02/26 03/08 03/14 03/29 03/31 04/05 04/06 04/08 04/09 04/11 04/12 04/13 04/14 04/18 04/19 04/20 04/21 04/22 04/24 04/25 05/04 05/11 05/16 05/27 08/26

Louis The Child SOLD OUT! The Growlers SOLD OUT! J Boog SOLD OUT! William Singe SOLD OUT! Skillet SOLD OUT! Social Distortion SOLD OUT! STRFKR Pink Floyd Laser Spectacular NF Rebel Souljahz Yuridia Mayday Parade Modern Baseball The Damned Tech N9ne Beats Antique Oh Wonder Jai Wolf Granger Smith Katchafire Jimmy Eat World LANY Kehlani SOLD OUT! D.R.I. Real Friends Blue October Jack Russell’s Great White Y&T

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL DIMPLE RECORDS LOCATIONS AND WWW.ACEOFSPADESSAC.COM

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   41


thURSdaY 2/16 BADLANDS

2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

List your event! post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Hey local bands! Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to: calendar editor, Sn&R 1124 del Paso blvd., Sacramento, ca 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@newsreview.com. be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

#turnup Thursday, 9pm, no cover

BAr 101

1400 alhaMbRa, (916) 455-3400

SatURdaY 2/18

SUndaY 2/19

MondaY-WedneSdaY 2/20-2/22

Fabulous & gay, 9pm, call for cover

Spectacular Saturdays, 9pm, call for cover

Tea dance & beer bust, 4pm-8pm, no cover; Industry Sundays, 8pm, no cover

Big Mondays happy hour all night, M; Karaoke, Tu; Trapicana W Trivia, 6:30pm M; Open mic, 7:30pm W, no cover

TODD MORGAN, call for time and cover

101 Main St., RoSeville; (916) 774-0505

BLue LAmp

fRidaY 2/17

DRAB MAJESTY, PREGNANT WOMEN, COLOR OF CLOSURE; 9pm, $10

MoxieCrush burlesque comedy show, 8pm, call for cover

The BoArDwALk

9426 gReenbacK ln., oRangebale (916) 988-9247

ceNTer for The ArTS

ALO, RABBIT WILDE; 8pm, $24

314 Main St., gRaSS valleY; (530) 274-8384

cooper’S ALe workS

235 coMMeRcial St., nevada citY; (530) 265-0116

Karaoke, call for time and cover

ELEVATION, J SILK; call for time, $5

LIFELIKE, DUDE SERIOUSLY, BLACKWEED, call for time, $5

couNTry cLuB SALooN

SIMPLE CREATION, call for time and cover

DISTrIcT 30

DJ OASIS, call for time and cover

JESPINOSA, call for time and cover

2007 taYloR Rd., looMiS; (916) 652-4007 1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

fAceS

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798

Everything happens dancing and karaoke, 9pm, call for cover

Absolute Fridays dance party, 9pm, $5-$10

Party Time with Sequin Saturdays drag show, 9:30pm, $5-$12

foX & GooSe

CHICKEN & DUMPLING, 8pm, no cover

THE REMAINDERS, ACCORDING TO BAZOOKA; 9pm, $5

THE STORYTELLERS, MASSIVE DELICIOUS DUO; 9pm, $5

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

GoLDfIeLD TrADING poST GrAcIANo’S SpeAkeASy

Poker tournament, 6:30pm, call for cover Old school r&b and hip-hop, 9pm, $10

hALfTIme BAr & GrILL

Karaoke, 7pm, no cover

AGENT, 9pm, $5

POP FICTION, 9pm, $10

THE INFAMOUS STRINGDUSTERS, 8pm, $10-$12

KILL THE PRECEDENT, HORSENECK; 9pm, $10-$12

THE GREG GOLDEN BAND, ROGUE; 9pm, $10-$12

5681 lonetRee blvd., RocKlin; (916) 626-6366

hArLow’S

2708 j St., (916) 441-4693

The hIDeAwAy BAr & GrILL 2565 fRanKlin blvd., (916) 455-1331

hIGhwATer

1910 q St., (916) 706-2465

Sunday Mass, 2pm, no cover

EDM & karaoke, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, no cover open mic, 7:30pm M, no cover; Pub quiz, 7pm Tu, no cover;

THE HOLD UP, KATASTRO; 7pm, $12

1603 j St., (916) 476-5076

1023 fRont St., (916) 321-9480

HOT TUNA, 7:30pm M, $52-$62

On the low, 10pm, no cover; loveless, 10pm, no cover

movementl, 10pm, no cover; WELL DRESSED MANNEQUINS, 10pm, no cover

Salty saturday, 10pm, no cover; Eric & Juan, 10pm, no cover

Jazz jam with Reggie Graham, 5pm, no cover

Open jazz jam and spoken word, call for time and cover

ALO, RABBIT WILDE; 8pm, $20-$25.

THE BRAINS, 8pm M, $15; GIBBZ, 8pm, $10-$12

Open jam with Leo Bootes & Co, 4pm, no cover

Cactus Pete & his 78rpm record round up, 8pm Tu, no cover Heavy, 10pm M, no cover; Tussle, 10pm Tu, no cover; Good stuff, 10pm W, no cover

pLan the perfeCt date night & saVe! CheCk out these romantiC date night paCkages:

some other sweet options:

a gentleman’s guide to Love & murder + dinner @ Lucca restaurant

$400 gift certificates for just

2 Tickets to the show on 3/7 $50 gift certificate to Lucca $236.00 value for just

$165.20

the Bodyguard + dinner @ Lucca restaurant 2 Tickets to the show on 4/18 & 100 gift certificate to Lucca $186.00 value for

$130.20

42   |   SN&R   |   02.16.17

Capitol helicopters tour $200!

the pier Lounge, Bar & grill $25 gift certificates for just $12.50! Laughs unlimited in old sacramento $20 admission tickets for just $10! Velocab historical tours for two $75.00 gift certificates for just $37.50! Country Club Lanes $25.00 gift certificates for just

$15.00!


thursDaY 2/16 luna’s cafe & juice bar 1414 16th st., (916) 441-3931

frIDaY 2/17

saturDaY 2/18

Sacunited poetry slam, 8pm, call for cover

JOHN MALCOLM, JAZZBO PARADOX; 8pm, call for cover

sunDaY 2/19

monDaY-WeDnesDaY 2/20-2/22 Comedy, 8pm W, no cover

midtown barfly

Salsa Wednesday, 7:30pm W, $5

1119 21st st., (916) 549-2779

naked lounge downtown 1111 h st., (916) 443-1927

MASON HOFFMAN, DANIELLE DANIELSON; 8:30, $5

JASMINE BAILY, MANZANITA; 8:30pm, $5

FREE CANDY, TRIPLE SEVENS; 8:30pm, $5

TRIISM, THE KORTET; 8:30pm W, $5

old ironsides

Open acoustic jam, 7pm, no cover

RACE TO THE BOTTOM, SUPER MEGA EVERYTHING; 8pm, $6

Lipstick, 9pm, $5

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

Open mic stand-up comedy and karaoke, 8pm, no cover

Resonance: modern love edition, 9pm, $6

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm Tu; Dart & movie night, 7pm W, no cover

THUNDER COVER, 10pm, $10

RETRO METRO, 10pm, $10

1901 10th st., (916) 442-3504

on the y

670 fulton ave., (916) 487-3731

powerhouse pub

614 sutter st., folsom; (916) 355-8586

the press club

2030 P st., (916) 444-7914

BASTARDS OF YOUNG, WESTERN SETTINGS; 8pm, $8

shady lady saloon

HARLEY WHITE JR, 9pm, no cover

1409 r st., (916) 231-9121

starlite lounge

1517 21st st., (916) 704-0711

ALAN IGLESIS, 3pm, $10

Live band karaoke, 8pm M, call for cover

SWITCHBLADE TRIO, 9pm, no cover

CURRENT PERSONAE, 9pm, no cover

ALEX JENKINS, 9pm, no cover

WANING, SQUALUS; 8pm, call for cover

GANGLIANS, THE RIPPERS, ROSE ITALIC; 8pm, $7

NECROT, PHRENELITH, RAPTOR; 8pm, $8-$10

SPIRIT IN THE ROOM, VOWWS; 8pm M, call for cover

stoney’s rockin rodeo

Country dancing & live band karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Country dancing & live band karaoke, 8pm, $5-$7

Country dancing & live band karaoke, 8pm, $5

Country dancing & live band karaoke, 9pm, call for cover

Country dancing & live band karaoke, 8pm, $5-$7

torch club

X-TRIO, 5pm, no cover; MOTEL DRIVE, 9pm, $6

THE HUCKLEBUCKS, 5:30pm, no cover

GOLDEN CADILLACS, 5:30pm, no cover; THIS MACHINE KILLS FASCISTS; 9pm, $8

Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; Front the band, 8pm, no cover

RICHARD MARCH, 5:30pm Tu, no cover; MATT BRADFORD, 9pm W, $5

1320 Del Paso BlvD., (916) 927-6023 904 15th st., (916) 443-2797

Bastards of Young with Western Settings 8pm Thursday, $8 The Press Club Punk

Emo night, 9pm W, $5

All ages, all the time ace of spades

1417 r st., (916) 448-3300

cafe colonial

Art showcase, 6pm, no cover

3520 stockton BlvD., (916) 736-3520

Comedy open mic, 8pm W, no cover

with Phrenelith 8pm Friday, $8-$10 Starlite Lounge Metal

the colony

3512 stockton BlvD., (916) 718-7055

shine

SOUL JONES, 8pm, $15

1400 e st., (916) 551-1400

Necrot

THE PACIFIC, VINNIE GUIDERA & THE DEAD BIRDS; 8pm, $7

2708 J Street Sacramento, CA 916.441.4693 www.harlows.com COMING SOON

LIVE MUSIC

2/19 $20ADV 8PM

ALO

Feb 17 TODD MORGAN

RABBIT WILDE

Feb 18 SPARE PARTS Feb 24 ANDREW CASTRO Feb 25 LILLIE LEMON

2/16 $20ADV 7PM

THE INFAMOUS STRINGDUSTERS HORSESHOES AND HAND GRENADES

2/20 $15 7PM

Mar 03 ERICK TYLER

THE BRAINES, THE DELTA BOMBERS

Mar 04 TROPICALI FLAMES Mar 10 ZACH WATERS BAND Mar 18 THE INSIDE STORY Mar 31 MUD FOLK Apr 01 MATHEW FRANTZ

2/17 $10ADV 8PM

KILL THE PRECEDENT HORSENECK (DOUBLE ALBUM RELEASE)

Apr 14 JACOB WESTFALL

33 BEERS ON DRAFT

MONDAY PINT NIGHT 5-8 PM, TRIVIA @ 6:30 PM TACO TUESDAY $1.25 TACOS NOON - CLOSE WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC – SIGN-UPS @ 7:30 PM 101 MAIN STREET, ROSEVILLE 916-774-0505 · LUNCH/DINNER 7 DAYS A WEEK FRI & SAT 9:30PM - CLOSE 21+

/BAR101ROSEVILLE

2/22 $12ADV 7PM

GIBBZ

2/18 $10ADV 8PM

THE GREG GOLDEN BAND ROGUE

2/23 $18ADV $18ADV

ZEPPARELLA

02/24 Will Kimbrough & Brigitte Demeyer 02/24 Ideateam 02/25 Pink Floyd Experience 02/28 Rich the Kid 03/01 Chicano Batman 03/02 Don Carlos 03/03 Ian Ethan Case 03/03 Bash & Pop 03/04 Twista 03/05 Porter & Nickerson w/ Steve Poltz 03/06 Ghostface Killah 03/07 Mike Zito 03/09 John 5 & The Creatures 03/10 This Charming Band 03/11 Catie Curtis 03/11 Midnight Players 03/15 Pure Bathing Culture 03/17 Purple Ones 03/19 G Love 03/22 Clap Your Hands Say Yeah 03/24 Save Ferris

02.16.17    |   SN&R   |   43


IF YOU HAVE A BUSINESS AND WOULD LIKE TO CARRY THE PAPER FOR FREE, CALL GREG AT 916.498.1234, EXT. 1317 OR EMAIL GREGE@NEWSREVIEW.COM

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GETTING IT ONCE A WEEK. N E W S R E V I E W.C O M

Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (916) 498-1234 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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Self-love and self-harm

My girlfriend (we’re both 16) pinches herself hard when she’s upset or stressed. She has tiny bruises all over her stomach, thighs and arms. She lives with her aunt because her dad is in jail and no one knows where her mom is. Her aunt hasn’t noticed the bruises. I’ve begged my girlfriend to stop pinching herself, but she just laughs. I really care about this girl, but I don’t know how to help.

My 25-year-old daughter stopped speaking to me because I won’t tell her who her biological father is. The truth is, I don’t know. After my twin brother died in a car accident, I spun out of control. I drank, did drugs, slept around a lot. I don’t even know the names of most of those men. My daughter doesn’t know about this part of my life. What should I do?

Forgive yourself. You are no longer that A big, compassionate heart like yours grief-stricken young woman. Exchange means you will be drawn toward helping your shame for compassion. Here’s others. That’s a beautiful thing when you how: Visualize your daughter, ashamed maintain good boundaries. Always be clear and coming to you for advice after where you end and another person acting out. Would you judge her begins. That means you underas harshly as you are judging stand you can help others— yourself? Or listen to her encourage, inspire, motivate, with an open mind and confront, challenge or heart? Free your heart Be clear where give support. You cannot by giving the younger you end and save them. Love fuels our you the compassion another person commitment to staying and understanding you connected with the people deserve. After all, if begins. we care about, especially you can’t tell your adult when there is difficulty. But daughter about your bad transformation occurs only choices, how can she ever when people feel the self-worth share hers with you? Once you necessary to choose to save themselves. release the need to control how your So nothing you say or do can permanently daughter thinks about you, tell her the relieve your girlfriend’s pain or change her truth: You don’t know who her father behavior. She requires professional medical is. Then love her through her grief. Ω support, ideally from a psychiatrist. Your steadfast concern and affection will remind her that she is not alone on her journey to wellness, but she must walk that path with a MedITATIon of THe Week mental health professional as her guide. “I just don’t believe that when  Pinching, like cutting or hitting oneself, people are being unjustly  is called “maladaptive,” meaning that it oppressed that they should  is a response to suffering that ultimately let someone else set rules  increases suffering. So why do people do for them by which they can  it? For some, it’s a distraction from deprescome out from under that  sion, anxiety or anger. Others may feel it oppression,” Malcolm X said.  temporarily relieves stress or pressure or Who’s the boss of you? it’s a way to feel something when they feel Find Joey’s blog, podcasts and  numb. In therapy, your girlfriend will learn events at www.joeygarcia.com. healthful tools for handling her feelings. One last thing: Some researchers say self-injury has a contagious quality. Being Write, email or leave a message for around a self-injurer can normalize the Joey at the News & Review. Give behavior and compel imitation. Keep your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all yourself safe by regularly accessing correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. outlets for stress relief, like meditation, exercise and laughing, in addition to Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA having honest conversations with trusted 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 1360; or email friends or seeing a counselor. askjoey@newsreview.com.


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Let me get this straight: I can carry up to an ounce of weed anywhere in California. Anywhere. Is that correct? —Nat Geo Yes, but there are a few exceptions. You can’t carry cannabis on school grounds, because, duh. Also: No “open containers” of weed in your car. I am not quite sure if a plastic baggie counts as an “open container,” but I am sure there will be a court case about it sooner rather than later. I feel like the police are gonna want folks to carry little lockable stash bags, like they do in Colorado. I advise you to keep your weed in the trunk as a way to avoid unpleasant encounters with the police. You can’t possess weed on federal property. Cannabis is still federally illegal, and I am sure new U.S. Attorney General Jeff “Good people don’t smoke marijuana” Sessions would like to keep it that way. You can’t carry weed with you in national parks or in casinos, although I hear vapor pens are very discreet. Speaking of vapes and concentrates, you can carry around up to 8 grams of any sort of concentrated cannabis product like wax or shatter. Eight grams of hash is enough to stop a party dead in its tracks, and possession of hash used to be a felony, so I am all sure the dabheads are extremely happy with that particular rule. Have fun possessing weed while having no fear of arrest! Ω Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@newsreview.com.

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FRee will aStRology

by Enid Spitz

by ROb bREzSny

FOR THE WEEK OF FEBRUARY 16, 2017 ARIES (March 21-April 19): By my estimates,

72 percent of you Aries are in unusually good moods. The world seems friendlier, more cooperative. Fifty-six percent of you feel more in love with life than you have in a long time. You may even imagine that the birds and trees and stars are flirting with you. I’m also guessing that 14 percent of you are weaving in and out of being absurdly, deliriously happy, sometimes without any apparent explanation. As a result of your generosity of spirit, you may be the recipient of seemingly impossible rewards like free money or toasted ice cream or unconditional tenderness. And I bet that at least 10 percent of you are experiencing all of the above.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I am launching a

campaign to undo obsolete stereotypes about you Bulls. There are still backward astrologers out there who perpetrate the lie that many of you are stingy, stolid, stubborn slowpokes. As an antidote, I plan to heighten everyone’s awareness of your sensual, soulful sweetness, and your tastefully pragmatic sensitivity, and your diligent, dynamic productivity. That should be easy in the coming weeks, since you’ll be at the height of your ability to express those superpowers. Luckily, people will also have an enhanced capacity to appreciate you for who you really are. It will be a favorable time to clarify and strengthen your reputation.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Will Giovanni surrepti-

tiously replace Allesandra’s birth control pills with placebos? Will Camille take a hidden crowbar to her rendezvous with the blackmailer? Will Josie steal Jose’s diary and sell it on eBay? Given the current astrological omens, you may have an unconscious attraction to soap opera-type events like those. The glamour of melodrama is tempting you. But I’m hoping and predicting that you will express the cosmic currents in less toxic ways. Maybe you’ll hear a searing but healing confession after midnight in the pouring rain, for instance. Perhaps you’ll break an outworn taboo with ingenious grace, or forge a fertile link with a reformed rascal, or recover a lost memory in a dusty basement.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): All naturally occur-

ring matter on earth is composed of 92 basic elements arranged in various combinations. Since some of these appear in trace amounts, they took a long time for humans to discover. In the 18th and 19th centuries, chemists were exuberant when they tracked down seven of the 92 in a single location: an underground mine on the Swedish island of Ytterby. That small place was a mother lode. I’m predicting a metaphorically similar experience for you, Cancerian: new access to a concentrated source that will yield much illumination.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The next four weeks will be

an excellent time to upgrade your understanding of the important characters in your life. In fact, I suspect you will generate good fortune and meaningful synchronicities whenever you seek greater insight into anyone who affects you. Get to know people better, Leo! If there are intriguing acquaintances who pique your curiosity, find out more about them. Study the oddballs you’re allergic to with the intention to discern their hidden workings. In general, practice being objective as you improve your skill at reading human nature.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1787, English captain

Arthur Phillip led an eight-month naval expedition to the southeastern part of the continent now known as Australia. Upon arrival, he claimed the land for England, despite the fact that 250,000 Aboriginal people were living there, just as their ancestors had for 2,000 generations. Two hundred years later, an Aboriginal activist named Burnum Burnum planted the Aboriginal flag on the White Cliffs of Dover, claiming England for his people. I encourage you to make a comparably artful or symbolic act like Burnum’s sometime soon, Virgo—a ritual or gesture to assert your sovereignty or evoke a well-deserved reversal or express your unconquerable spirit.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The ancient Roman

rhetorician Quintilian authored a 12-volume textbook on the art of oratory. As ample as it was, it could have been longer. “Erasure is as important as writing,” he said. According to my reading of

the astrological omens, that counsel should be a rewarding and even exciting theme for you in the coming weeks. For the long-term health of your labor of love or your masterpiece, you should focus for a while on what to edit out of it. How could you improve it by making it shorter and more concise?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Do you know about

the long-running kids’ show Sesame Street? Are you familiar with Big Bird, the talking 8-foot-tall yellow canary who’s one of the main characters? I hope so, because your horoscope is built around them. In the Sesame Street episode called Don’t Eat the Pictures, Big Bird solves a riddle that frees a 4,000-year-old Egyptian prince from an ancient curse. I think this vignette can serve as a model for your own liberation. How? You can finally outwit and outmaneuver a very old problem with the help of some playful, even childlike energy. Don’t assume that you’ve got to be relentlessly serious and dour in order to shed the ancient burden. In fact, just the opposite is true. Trust blithe and rowdy spirits.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your lessons in communication are reaching a climax. Here are five tips to help you do well on your “final exam.” (1) Focus more on listening for what you need to know rather than on expressing what you already know. (2) Keep white lies and convenient deceptions to a bare minimum. (3) Tell the truth as strong and free as you dare, but always—if possible—with shrewd kindness. (4) You are more likely to help your cause if you spread bright, shiny gossip instead of the grubby kind. (5) Experiment with being unpredictable; try to infuse your transmissions with unexpected information and turns of phrase.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The meaning of

the Latin phrase crambe repetita is “cabbage reheated, twice-cooked.” I urge you to avoid partaking of such a dish in the coming weeks, both literally and figuratively. If you’re truly hungry for cooked cabbage, eat it fresh. Likewise, if you have a ravenous appetite for stories, revelations, entertainment, and information—which I suspect you will—don’t accept the warmed-over, recycled variety. Insist on the brisk, crisp stuff that excites your curiosity and appeals to your sense of wonder.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Here’s your

mantra for the next three weeks: “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Say this out loud 11 times right after you wake up each morning, and 11 more times before lunch, and 11 more times at bedtime. “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Whenever you do this little chant, summon an upflow of smiling confidence—a serene certainty that no matter how long the magic might take, it will ultimately work. “I know what I want, and I know how to glide it into my life.” Don’t let any little voice in your head undermine your link to this simple truth. Lift your heart to the highest source of vitality you can imagine.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “We cannot simply

sit and stare at our wounds forever,” writes Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. “We must stand up and move on to the next action.” That’s your slightly scolding but ultimately inspirational advice, Pisces. According to my astrological analysis, you have done heroic work to identify and investigate your suffering. You have summoned a tremendous amount of intelligence in order to understand it and further the healing. But right now it’s time to turn your focus to other matters. Like what? How about rebirth?

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

To the people “We the people” is a hot-button  phrase these days, to say the  least. Just before the November  election, local entrepreneur Zayn Silmi started selling plain black tees  emblazoned with “The People” across  the chest, a Wagnerian nod to the  current political maelstrom. But  “The People” Silmi means are the  people of Sacramento specifically. A  Sacramento native who looks more  like a Silicon Valley transplant, Silmi  opened his own coffee shop just after  graduating from Elk Grove High, but  he quickly realized that his love of  cafes is actually about the people  who inhabit them. Now 23, Silmi is on  a mission to put Sacramento on the  world’s radar by profiling its people  on his popular blog, The People of Sacramento, and slinging Sacramento  swag at his favorite coffee shops. 

What’s your history with Sacramento? I’ve been in Sacramento my entire life. Out of high school, I founded a coffee shop because I was really into coffee and into people. At 17, I graduated, founded the coffee shop in Elk Grove and then eventually transitioned my lifestyle into downtown and Midtown. That’s really where the heart of the city is. Downtown Plaza is where I used to hang out, and I started realizing that now it’s being transformed.

And that’s why you started writing? I was sitting at Temple Coffee with a couple of friends and just decided to start the blog. They were like, “What do you want to do with it?” And I thought: I just want to have a platform that spotlights Sacramento. I am tired of going to Chicago or New York or wherever and people are like, “What’s Sacramento?” Sacramento is the capital of California! People don’t realize all the amazing things that happen here, so I wanted to make that go international.

How do you find your subjects? I meet them at events or discover them on Instagram. I’ll follow them for a bit to make sure that they are genuine. I want people who are really doing what they love, and not for the wrong reasons. They are doing it because it is actually their passion.

Now that the blog is successful, has your mission changed? The mission is always to empower and inspire people. The slogan is: Do more of

PHOTO BY LUCAS FITZGERALD

what you love. I just rolled out Sacramento Proud apparel, like the 916 hat. Next, I’m collaborating with local businesses. In honor of my birthday, February 10, I’m launching products that will be in all Temple stores.

You have a thing for coffee shops?

going to change. Sacramento is building its culture, so you, me or anybody can be part of what the city is going to become. The development that’s happening is going to push us into a higher index level, to be a tourist destination.

What are the three biggest changes you’re excited for?

Coffee plays a big part in what I do. It was where I started the idea.

What are your favorite ones in Sacramento? In order: Temple, Old Soul at Weatherstone, Seasons Coffee. The Temple where you could walk in almost any given time and find me is the K Street location. I’m there maybe twice a day. It’s about the atmosphere; I vibe off it. I can get creative ideas for how to write things just from the people around me.

Has writing always been a goal? I don’t consider myself a writer. It’s just the way I curate the bios for these people. I write things in 22 characters because it has to fit on Instagram. That’s where people are going to read it. I know that writing is a craft, and I just consider myself a curator.

What are your thoughts on how the city is changing? Sacramento is developing its culture right now. You have LA; you have San Francisco; your have New York, those cities that have already developed their cultures and aren’t

The public has no idea what’s going to hit Sacramento. It’s mind blowing to know what is actually happening. One thing is the completion of the Downtown Commons. There are three parts to that that will be completed in the next year and a half: the hotel, the commons, and the segue from Old Sac that will have retail.

How vital are the Kings to Sacramento pride? They are the heart of it. I have a ton of NBA friends. Some that get traded off say they would never come to the Kings ever because they’re used to being out at Arco [Arena]. They’d just go there, the airport, and see Natomas. With the downtown now, it will bring free agents to the Kings, which will make the team better.

How would you finish the sentence, “Sacramento is ___”? Sacramento is about being authentic. Ω

Visit the blog at http://thepeopleofsacramento.com.

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