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SN&R’s advice columnist celebrates 20 years of advice, heartaches and life lessons

Sex crac kdown — or juSt polit ic S?

Sacramento’ S t ranSit f ut ure

a bet t er barbecue

By Joey Garcia • Page 14 Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

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Volume 28, iSSue 27

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thurSday, octoBer 20, 2016

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newSreView.com


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EditoR’S NotE

oCtoBER 20, 2016 | Vol. 28, iSSuE 27

34 25 Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Rachel Leibrock Associate Editor Raheem F. Hosseini Arts & Culture Editor Janelle Bitker Assistant Editor Anthony Siino Editorial Services Coordinator Karlos Rene Ayala Staff Reporter Scott Thomas Anderson Contributors Daniel Barnes, Ngaio Bealum, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Aaron Carnes, Jim Carnes, Willie Clark, Deena Drewis, Joey Garcia, Cosmo Garvin, Blake Gillespie, Lovelle Harris, Jeff Hudson, Dave Kempa, Jim Lane, Kel Munger, Kate Paloy, Patti Roberts, Ann Martin Rolke, Shoka, Bev Sykes

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30 Design Manager Lindsay Trop Art Directors Brian Breneman, Margaret Larkin Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Designer Kyle Shine Marketing/Publications Design Manager Serene Lusano Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Contributing Photographers Lisa Baetz, Darin Bradford, Kevin Cortopassi, Evan Duran, Luke Fitz, Jon Hermison, Shoka, Lauran Fayne Worthy Director of Sales and Advertising Corey Gerhard Sales Coordinator Joanna Graves Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Olla Swanson, Joy Webber, Kelsi White Advertising Consultants Angel De La O, Stephanie Johnson, Matt Kjar, Paul McGuinness, Wendy Russell, Manushi Weerasinghe Lead Director of First Impressions & Sales Assistant David Lindsay Director of First Impressions Hannah Williams Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Kimberly Bordenkircher, Daniel Bowen, Heather Brinkley,

Allen Brown, Mike Cleary, Jack Clifford, Lydia Comer, Rob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Joanna Gonzalez-Brown, Greg Meyers, Aswad Morland, Kenneth Powell, Gilbert Quilatan, Lloyd Rongley, Lolu Sholotan, Jonathan Taea, Lori Lovell N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Associate Editor Kate Gonzales N&R Publications Writers Anne Stokes Senior N&R Publications Consultant Dave Nettles N&R Publications Consultant Julie Sherry President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Project Coordinator Natasha vonKaenel Director of Dollars & Sense Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Dargitz Accounts Receivable Specialist Kortnee Angel Sweetdeals Specialist/HR Coordinator Courtney DeShields Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano, Jonathan Schultz System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins

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STREETALK LETTERS NEwS + beaTS ScoREKEEpER FEATuRE SToRy ARTS&cuLTuRE NighT&dAy diSh + off MeNu cooLhuNTiNg STAgE FiLm muSic + SouNd adVice ASK joEy ThE 420 15 miNuTES

coVER dESigN By BRiAN BRENEmAN coVER phoTo By hopE hARRiS

1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Fax (916) 498-7910 Website www.newsreview.com Got a News Tip? sactonewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Want to Advertise? Fax (916) 498-7910 or snradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (916) 498-1234, ext. 5 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to SN&R? sactosubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of chico community Publishing, inc. contact the editor for permissions to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. email letters to snrletters@newsreview.com. all letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: all advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. SN&R is printed at bay area News Group on recycled newsprint. circulation of SN&R is verified by the circulation Verification council. SN&R is a member of Sacramento Metro chamber of commerce, cNPa, aaN and aWN.

Joey, revealed Confession: I’m not an advice column  kind of person. Problems? Sure, I have them, but  I don’t necessarily want to share  them with a stranger in the pages of a  publication. I read them as a nerdy kid, actually.  But, eventually, the advice all started  to sound the same: Sterile and patronizing at best, condescending and  judgmental at worst. Ann Landers? Oh, please, no. Dear  Abby? Hard pass.  Then I met Joey Garcia.  I first came across her in the pages  of SN&R: She’s been our Ask Joey  advice columnist for 20 years. Initially  I read out of mild curiosity—what kind  of viewpoint would someone have in  the pages of an alternative weekly? Quickly, I learned, Garcia is no Dear  Abby or Ann Landers.  Unlike so many other such columnists, Garcia’s guidance isn’t pedantic,  banal or egotistic. Rather, her advice  is rooted in life smarts, spirituality,  love and, always, a push to go deeper. Over the years I’ve had the chance  to meet Garcia in person and, I can tell  you, the person behind the column is  just as smart, just as willing to push  deeper. Find out for yourself. This week’s  feature story reveals Garcia in her  own words (See “Meet Joey Garcia,”  page 14) and here she chronicles her  column’s origins. It’s a must-read, one filled with  lessons, insight and, perhaps unintentionally, a little life advice for the  rest of us. Want to meet her as well? This  Thursday, October 20, you’ll get that  chance with a special anniversary  party at SN&R’s office from 6 p.m. to 8  p.m. Learn more and RSVP at SN&R’s  Facebook page, www.facebook.com/ SacNewsReview.

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“Don’t play with guns.”

asked at 21 street and Broadway:

Best advice you’ve ever been given?

Marilyn Medlock unemployed

My mother said not to give up. I keep this with me every day. From the time I wake up in the morning until I go to bed at night I think of the last thing my mom said to me: “Don’t worry. It’s all going to work out. Keep looking ahead.” She passed Thanksgiving of 2004.

sallyann castro

shelle y cousine au director of client services

To be proud in your beliefs and stand strong. In today’s political environment I think things get kind of weird. It is good to respect other people for their beliefs. It is not necessary to push your belief on somebody else but feel strong enough about your belief to know it is right for you.

manager

Family should always come first. My daughter has followed me here and my son just moved here in July. I hold true to that and it is what I teach my children. I love Sacramento because it is family-oriented. I moved here five years ago and I fell in love with it because it is very peaceful.

Roots & Grooves.

Maceo Parker with The Jones Family Singers > OCT 28 mondaviarts.org 4   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

Joy Beireis-Molnar manager

To be true to yourself, be honest and work hard. The rewards will come in the future. You have to look at where you come from sometimes. You look at what your parents taught you. You learn to follow your own morals and use your discipline and be true to yourself and your beliefs.

John aguil ar landscaper

Treat others as you want to be treated. It is hard to do sometimes. You can be busy and then you see somebody out there asking for change. Some folks fall on hard times and I try to be as nice as possible to them. That is someone’s child. You never know what Jesus looks like.

andrew Prychoe zko business owner

The best advice I have been given is this: (1) Obey the laws. (2) Pay your taxes. (3) Don’t play with guns. (4) Save your money for retirement. When you come to be 70 years old, your knees will have given out. I still run my business and I have loyal customers.


Email lEttErs to sactolEttErs@nEwsrEviEw.com.

On tHe assault Of tHe man BeHinD @snarkramentO:

Blowin’ in the wind

Hypocrisy and fantasy Re “Trump vs. conscience” by Brian Steele (SN&R Letters,   October 13): Last spring, all polls showed that Bernie Sanders was, by far,  the stronger candidate against Trump. We told them we would  not vote for Hillary, ever. But as Clinton, the DNC, and their  mainstream media minions colluded to steal the nomination  from Bernie, none of them were concerned if Trump won over the  weaker Hillary. Now they whine that we are not going to vote for  Hillary. Yes, Trump spews racist, sexist, anti-Muslim bile. But Hillary’s record is far worse than Trump’s fantasies. Hillary has killed  people. Trump wants to exclude Muslims from the U.S., Hillary sent  U.S. troops to their countries and killed them by the tens of thousands! And now Hillary whines about Russia allegedly interfering in  our internal politics. Such hypocrisy! I’ll bet all those dead Iraqis,  Libyans, Yemenis and Syrians (and Hondurans) would have some  choice words for her if they could speak from the grave. We were  brought to where we are now by the two-party system. In stealing  the nomination, Hillary and the DNC showed they don’t give a rat’s  ass about democracy! 

Jan Bergeron S acr am e nt o

Re “The war on bugs” by Alastair Bland (SN&R Feature Story, October 13): If the continued, decadeslong chemical war against the mosquitoes in Sacramento kill some, more just blow in on the next wind. However, in aerial spraying, the poison hits all of the nontarget objects around us. The poison does not kill the fleas, but renders them more resistant to the pesticides. When a highly lethal vector transmitted disease comes along the fleas may no longer die. Just as overuse of antibiotics has robbed our doctors of their medical weapons against disease, so is the day after day after day after day spraying in the Sacramento area, robbing our medical establishment of pesticides for use in serious disease outbreaks. And it continues to poison everything in the ecosystem. Jessica Denning Carmichael

Don’t blow it Re “Monsters Inc.” by Rachel Leibrock (SN&R Editor’s Note, October 13): We have the opportunity to finally elect a woman for president, one whose credentials are impeccable. The possibility that we could desecrate our country’s reputation by electing a buffoon is appalling. Ron Lowe Nevada City

Correction Re “The war on bugs” by Alastair Bland (SN&R Feature Story, October 13): Due to a production error, Julie Ostoich was incorrectly identified as Jessica Denning in a photograph. SN&R regrets the error.

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ONLINE BUZZ

Internet keyboard warrior gets  attacked and im supposed to catch  a case of feelings from the story?  Learn to box or keep your trap shut.

Tony Sofia v ia fa c e b o o k

on wheTher a whiTe Singer kneeling during The naTional anThem aT a kingS game waS appropriaTion or SolidariTy: Bad publicity is still publicity. So I  think it was only a stunt to make  something out of nothing.

STeven daviS v ia fa c e b o o k Just another opportunist?

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Backpage operators are in court for allegedly getting rich from commercial sexual exploitation, but the website company’s defenders say it protects sex workers. ILLUSTRATION BY SERENE LUSANO

Vice fraud California criminal prosecution of Backpage represents latest  flashpoint in century-old prostitution debate by Raheem F. hosseini

An extended version of this story is available at www.newsreview. com/sacramento.

Dressed in matching orange jumpsuits and anxious expressions, three graying entrepreneurs squeezed into a holding cage inside of a Sacramento County courtroom last week to hear a list of charges befitting the most successful prostitution wholesalers in recorded history. Carl Ferrer, 55; Michael Gerard Lacey, 68; and James Anthony Larkin, 67, each share a felony count of conspiring to commit the crime of pimping for operating the online classified portal Backpage.com, which the California attorney general’s office claims is a poorly disguised virtual brothel that turns a blind eye to sexual

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exploitation. Ferrer, the company’s CEO, received nine additional charges—four apiece for pimping and pimping of a minor. Six of Ferrer’s charges are alleged to have occurred in Sacramento County. Like The Review Board, Rentboy and myRedBook before it, authorities say Backpage and its operators knowingly profited from coded prostitution ads posted by its customers, including ones featuring underage victims. (Disclosure: Backpage provides classified ad services to SN&R.) “Raking in millions of dollars from the trafficking and exploitation of vulnerable victims is outrageous, despicable and

r a h e e mh @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

illegal,” Attorney General Kamala Harris said in a release announcing the arrest of Ferrer and criminal charges against his business partners. The Texas-based company dismissed the incarceration of its senior corporate officers as an “election year stunt,” perpetrated by an attorney general running for higher office against a fellow Democrat who has accused her of being soft on human trafficking. Meanwhile, the sex workers whose interests are ostensibly represented by the state say raiding the websites they use to book and screen clients does little to

change their circumstances or catch violent predators. “The CEO or shareholders of Backpage are not the ones who [exploit sex workers]. Plain and simple,” said Kristen DiAngelo, a former escort who leads the Sacramento branch of the Sex Workers Outreach Project. “The predators are the ones who violated them and the ones who did it. And this takes the focus off them.” It’s a debate almost as old as the profession it surrounds. Well before the internet, there was the “bawdy house.” In 1913, former California Gov. Hiram Johnson signed the California Red-Light Abatement Act, outlawing bordellos and other houses of prostitution. Voters in the state were given the opportunity to bless or reject the new law in the form of a veto referendum the following year. Advocates promised the law would stymie the “scattering of the evil throughout the residence district,” while opponents predicted it would only blemish the poor property owner, while the “prostitute will go merrily on, plying


Folsom’s dark campaign money see neWs

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Taking a knee her trade as she has plied it from the beginning,” according to the offical ballot argments. Voters approved the measure by a 53.3 percent majority. Neglected by each campaign were the interests of the sex workers themselves, whose jobs became more treacherous, harm-reduction activists say. That’s because the Abatement Act didn’t create any public health or social services program to uplift these workers out of a life of prostitution. It just made it so they could no longer operate indoors without breaking the law. And, as bad as some bordellos were before the act passed, the streets only magnified their perils. A century later, it’s a different era but a similar strategy: cut off workers’ access to the marketplaces where they ply their trade. The combined effect pushes the most vulnerable workers to the streets, activists say, where the rates of violence, homelessness and disease threaten to overtake them. “What happens is you see a huge escalation of rapes, of murders, of girls talking about, ‘Yeah, my friend got in this car and we haven’t seen her since,’” DiAngelo said. And yet, federal and state authorities have shown an increased appetite for raiding escort-friendly websites on the grounds that they enable human trafficking. Earlier this year, Seattle authorities and the FBI seized The Review Board website on the grounds that it promoted prostitution. Last summer, the Department of Homeland Security targeted the male escort website Rentboy.com, a move criticized by the New York Times editorial board. In 2014, the FBI and IRS successfully closed myRedBook.com. In all instances, law enforcement trumpeted their investigations as crippling blows to those who profited from sexual exploitation, even as myRedBook and Rentboy operators pleaded to lesser charges months later. Meanwhile, groups calling for the decriminalization of prostitution, including Amnesty International, have questioned both law enforcement’s motives and results. “I really think Kamala Harris has better things to do than prosecute Backpage,” Danny Cruz, a member of the Los Angeles branch of SWOP, said in a release. “Like prosecute the cops in Celeste Guap’s ongoing case.” Cruz’s statement refers to the Oakland sex worker who was allegedly trafficked last year by numerous police officers employed in the Bay Area, starting when she was a minor. While the Alameda County District Attorney’s Office has filed charges against seven officers from three

different agencies, Guap’s attorneys want Harris to take over the investigation into the widening scandal. Though her office hasn’t taken action in that matter, it has marshaled significant resources against Backpage. The October 12 arraignment of the defendants followed a three-year investigation into Backpage’s business operations by California and Texas authorities. The state alleges that Backpage generated at least $16 million in adult-section advertisements during an eight-month period ending May 2015, including from escort ads posted in Sacramento County during this time. Several allegedly featured a 16-year-old girl the state identified as “A.C.,” who reportedly told Special Agent Brian Fichtner of the California Department of Justice that she was forced into prostitution at the age of 12 or 13 years old. According to Fichtner’s affidavit, A.C. says she knew she was restricted from posting adult ads on the website because she was a minor, but was able to do so anyway, telling the agent, “[H]ow are they supposed to know I’m underage?” Critics of the Backpage operation acknowledge that exploitation can occur on its website, but say that prosecuting the company would be like prosecuting Blackberry because pimps and traffickers use cellphones. “You don’t see anything in that declaration about going after anyone who forced them into prostitution,” said Jerald Mosley, a retired supervising deputy attorney general who used to work civil cases in Harris’ office. “Why aren’t these resources spent on going after the person who forced a child into prostitution? We don’t know.” last year, sWop sacramento surveyed 44 local sex workers, shortly after the FBI and IRS raided myRedBook and its related imprints. The sites had allowed willing escorts and those compelled by their circumstances to post ads and screen potential customers against a “bad-client” database free of charge. Its collapse, SWOP argued, removed a critical safety tool, especially for the most vulnerable sex workers. Eight of those surveyed said they had been displaced to the streets after authorities shuttered myRedBook. SWOP Sacramento was born in the aftermath of that operation, and DiAngelo believes those numbers have quickly escalated since the group’s inaugural survey. Today, she and her partners are juggling numerous clients in varying states of crisis. Many are homeless, some are scraping by

enough to keep a motel room, others are trying to get clean but encountering one obstacle after another. “It’s a problem without a real solution, because we’re not really trying to solve it,” DiAngelo said. “There’s lots of agencies, but no solutions.” SN&R asked Harris’ office what services, if any, it or other partner organizations provided to the nine victims the state cited in its criminal complaint against Backpage. A DOJ spokeswoman declined comment. Meanwhile, Backpage’s attorneys expressed confidence that they’ll fend off the latest legal barrage, as they’ve done in three other cases. In March, the First Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court ruling dismissing a lawsuit filed by several women who say they were trafficked through the website. The ruling said that while the appellants made “a persuasive case” that Backpage “tailored its website to make sex trafficking easier,” the company was protected by the federal Communications Decency Act. “If the evils that the appellants have identified are deemed to outweigh the First Amendment values that drive the CDA, the remedy is through legislation, not through litigation,” the ruling stated. At the tail end of last week’s arraignment, defense attorney Cristina Arguedas indicated her team’s intent to dismiss the state’s criminal charges on similar grounds, through a demurrer motion. “It’s essentially a motion to dismiss the complaint,” defense attorney Jim Grant explained after the hearing. “Federal law stops them from bringing this complaint.” Calling the CDA a “very important legal doctrine,” Mosely says the law insulates publishers of user-generated information—like YouTube, Facebook and Twitter—from being held legally liable for what their users post. “That’s not some little technicality that Backpage is trying to hide behind,” Mosely said. “That is one of the fundamental issues in this case.” He said the fact that Harris filed charges in spite of the act “gives rise to the deep suspicion that this about her Senate race.” Grant, whose firm represents all three defendants, acknowledged the criminal prosecution represented an escalation in tactics, however. Sacramento Superior Court Judge Michael G. Brown set a November 16 hearing to consider the demurrer motion. That’s eight days after the election. Ω

Despite occurring within the newly minted Golden 1 Center, last week’s debut preseason game for the Sacramento Kings wasn’t national news until leah Tysse knelt on the court. The Bay area recording artist and breast cancer survivor was invited to sing the national anthem for a Breast Cancer Awareness night. But Tysse dedicated her performance to a different issue when she took a knee while singing the lyrics “for the land of the free and the home of the brave.” A white woman with cropped blond hair, Tysse’s impromptu gesture—borrowed from the playbook of San Francisco 49ers quarterback colin kaepernick, who continues to sit during the national anthem of NFL games—caught attendees off guard as few photos of her kneel materialized. The game was not televised, but instead available for viewing via a live stream. KCRA’s Dana Griffith was among the first to document the moment on Twitter. Kings guard garrett Temple was only a few feet away from Tysse when it happened. “I wish I could’ve shaken her hand and told her thanks for standing up for that,” Temple said. Tysse’s gesture effectively benched the publicity-seeking efforts of a pro-palestine activist group, which protested outside. Digital media outlets like Complex Sports and Bleacher Report picked it up the next morning. Not long after, Tysse released a statement on her Facebook artist page. It read, “I cannot idly stand by as black people are unlawfully profiled, harassed and killed by our law enforcement over and over and without a drop of accountability.” It took Tysse nearly 17 hours to comment on her display. But Temple says he doesn’t doubt her intent, though he and a trainer expressed surprise. Before taking a knee, Tysse had fewer than 700 followers on Twitter. At press time, she had amassed more than 2,700. (Blake Gillespie)

slurred reach Late on the night of September 26, Keith “K.C.” Kimber, 36, a Harvard undergrad and self-described prominent member of the Sacramento LGBTQ community, says he was assaulted outside r15 amid a slew of homophobic slurs. But it’s what happened after that got him really upset. As Kimber tells it, his assailant was ushered into the bar and out a back door with help from R15’s doorman. When police arrived, he says they declined to take a police report at the scene or review surveillance footage of the alleged attack. R15’s management declined comment on the incident. A Sacramento Police Department spokeswoman confirmed the call and defended the officers’ actions as standard protocol. “Basically, there’s not a lot legally that a police officer can do,” said Officer Traci Trapani. “We respond to a lot of these. When these calls come in we just have to kind of triage it. When a suspect is not on scene anymore, those officers have to make themselves available for a higher priority call. That is our standard procedure. It really falls on the victim to follow up with court procedures.” Kimber suspected different reasons for his treatment. “This is something that’s not new in terms of cops ignoring the plight of gay or bisexual people,” Kimber said. “I think that we’re not safe; it makes me think that they simply don’t care. It really makes me think that calling the police is worthless.” Kimber wrote about his encounter on his Facebook wall, and also contacted Councilman Steve Hansen, who represents the downtown area. Hansen replied to Kimber’s email by saying he copied it to a police lieutenant and captain for follow-up. Kimber says he is also considering his legal options. (Matt Kramer)

10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   7


BUILDING A

HEALTHY S A C R A M E N T O

Getting Youth to Vote Starts Years Before Age 18 BY N ATA S H A VO N K A E N E L

V

oting is learned behavior, and changing voting patterns in communities with traditionally low voter participation doesn’t happen overnight. A number of organizations supported by The California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities initiative have been working to spur voter engagement in south Sacramento, a neighborhood predominately made up of people of color, where at least a third of residents live below the poverty line. Lower registration rates in south Sacramento follow a trend found across the country, where populations of color with higher levels of poverty are less likely to vote or be engaged politically. “We have to change that by starting to ignite that interest in the youth, to bring them to the table,” Nakeya Bell says. “Youth are our future.” Bell, the youth and community program manager for PRO Youth and Families, helped coordinate a kick-off event on Sept. 25 along with staff from Sacramento ACT, Hmong Innovating Politics (HIP), La Familia Counseling Center and others. The event brought together over 40 young people to engage in an open discussion about how to vote and the many propositions on the ballot this coming election. The majority of the youth who attended are still in high school and ineligible to vote. “Especially when we are talking to a lot of youth of color or they’re children of immigrants, a lot of folks may not be as familiar with the voting

process,” explains Tere Flores, voter integration lead for Sacramento ACT. “We can start to create an awareness for them now about how important voting is, so that when they do become eligible, they will register and will vote.”

“IT’S IMPORTANT TO GET OUT AND VOTE FOR WHAT WE WANT WHEN WE GROW UP. IT’S THE WORLD BEING LEFT TO US, WE’VE GOT TO TAKE CARE OF IT.” Araiye Thomas-Haysbert, member of the Building Healthy Communities Youth Leadership Team

Araiye Thomas-Haysbert, a senior at Hiram W. Johnson High School, won’t be eligible to vote until the election in 2018, but she attended the event anyway, and plans to participate in upcoming voter drives and a phone bank on election day. “We have to be concerned for our communities and our environment,” she says. “It’s important to get out and vote for what we want when we grow up. It’s the world being left to us, we’ve got to take care of it.”

Nakeya Bell, youth and community program manager for PRO Youth and Families, and Araiye Thomas-Haysbert, member of the BHC Youth Leadership Team, hope to increase voter registration in south Sacramento, an area with below average voter registration rates. Photo by Natasha vonKaenel

would increase the tax on tobacco products by an additional $2. After the discussion, even though she can’t actually vote, Thomas-Haysbert decided she was in favor of Proposition 56, knowing the money would be put to good use. “[This money] can go to a greater fund,” she says. “A lot of people smoke and it should be taxed.”

Thomas-Haysbert specifically remembers their discussion about Proposition 56, which

Your ZIP code shouldn’t predict how long you’ll live – but it does. Staying healthy requires much more than doctors and diets. Every day, our surroundings and activities affect how long – and how well – we’ll live. Health Happens in Neighborhoods. Health Happens in Schools. Health Happens with Prevention.

In 2010, The California Endowment launched a 10-year, $1 billion plan to improve the health of 14 challenged communities across the state. Over the 10 years, residents, community-based organizations and public institutions will work together to address the socioeconomic and environmental challenges contributing to the poor health of their communities.

Look out for upcoming voter drives organized by Sacramento ACT and HIP. More information can be found online at www.sacact.org or www.facebook.com/HIPSacramento.

PAID WITH A GRANT FROM THE CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT 8   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES

www.SacBHC.org


Folsom annexation blues Suburban council incumbents exhibit the influence of  dark money campaign contributions by Scott thomaS anderSon

Showered by developer cash camouflaged through a political action committee, the Folsom City Council has quietly led an aggressive annexation campaign that could impact traffic, air quality and wildlife in northeast Sacramento County for decades to come. An SN&R analysis of campaign finance disclosures determined that landowners and developers tied to one of the most controversial plans in Folsom’s history—popularly known as the “South of 50” project—gave more than $20,000 to the Folsom Chamber of Commerce’s political action committee in the last three years, which in turn spent nearly three times that amount helping city council incumbents Kerri Howell, Steve Miklos, Andy Morin and Jeff Starsky win reelection. Folsom’s election rules allowed its chamber to use the money in a way that’s mostly invisible on individual campaign records. Additionally, according to campaign disclosure documents, Howell accepted $5,500 in direct contributions from donors tied to the South of 50 project during her failed supervisorial bid. The South of 50 project is a series of different development agreements within the Folsom Plan Area Specific Plan, which was made possible by the city annexing nearly 3,600 acres of open space in 2012. The projects will collectively build on thousands of acres of grasslands and cattle ranges skirting Folsom’s border and the edges of El Dorado Hills, stretching toward Rancho Cordova. It will add roughly 11,000 homes and an estimated 23,000 more residents. The Environmental Council of Sacramento has raised concerns about the plan, including the impacts on smog and traffic, the effects on hawks and migratory birds and—most prominently—its seeming reliance on a nonexistent stable source of water: The city council voted in 2013 to supply thousands of future residents of the development with surplus water from conservation efforts within Folsom’s perilous local supply. “They overallocated their water,” said Matt Baker, land use and conservation policy director at ECOS. “They’ve really not provided any kind of plan for an event that could drastically reduce their supply in an extremely dry year.” Howell, a professional civil engineer, disagrees with that assessment. Despite opposition from ECOS and a significant number of Folsom residents, Howell, Miklos, Morin and Starsky have now voted for numerous

s c o t t a @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

resolutions moving the project forward. But voters combing through Folsom’s election documents in search of a monetary link between council members and developers tied to South of 50 may have trouble spotting it. That’s because a majority of the contributions—some $20,326 worth of them—were made to the city chamber’s PAC, the leadership of which then spent well in excess of that amount to support the four incumbents in the last three at-large elections. Further muddying the picture, $48,339 of the $54,639 spent by the chamber PAC on the candidates was used in a way that doesn’t show up on individual California 460 forms. That’s because Folsom has an ordinance capping direct contributions at $150 per year. Marko Mlikotin, chairman of the chamber PAC’s board of directors, defends his group’s contributions by referencing a public vote on Measure W in 2004. The measure called for Folsom taking general control of the land South of 50 and gained steam after rumors spread that Rancho Cordova was planning the same. “Measure W passed by 69 percent of the vote. … Development south of 50 is a reflection of what Folsom voters want,” Mlikotin said. Howell, Miklos, Starsky and Morin have all previously been questioned about the influence big developers have on them. Each has said contributions don’t play a role in their decision-making. But for Roger Gaylord, a security consultant currently running against Starsky for city council, the dismissive attitude he sees Folsom’s incumbents show toward anyone raising concerns about the South of 50 project should trouble voters. “When I can see the president of [a home building company] who’s building in South of 50 giving donations to them, and then showing up a couple weeks later to make a presentation in front of the same council members, I call bullshit,” he said. Howell countered that while $20,000 given to the chamber’s PAC may sound like a lot, it’s not in the context of what elections actually cost. “The successful Folsom City Council races in recent years are ones where each candidate’s raised about $15,000,” Howell pointed out. “If you talk to some of those South of 50 developers ... I’m as tough on them as anyone.” Ω

An extended version of this story is available at www.news.review.com/sacramento.

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10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   9


ATU president Ralph Niz (left) and Regional Transit CEO Henry Li met to discuss the future of public transit in the Sacramento region. Photo by Natasha voNKaeNel

Ride along Regional Transit’s new CEO and the transit company’s union president  talk improved services, Measure B and arena parking by Jeff vonKaenel

Nestled among the American and Sacramento rivers, Sacramento came into being because of transit. And our future depends on transit. Those with or without cars—now or in the future— depend on Sacramento developing a more effective public transportation system. Nearly two months ago, I met with new CEO of Regional Transit Henry Li who talked of plans to fix RT. Knowing that union and RT management have often been in conflict, I asked Li what the union thought of this change. He told me that he had very good discussions with Ralph Niz, the president and business agent of Amalgamated Transit Union. But I wanted to hear from Niz 10   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

directly. Niz said he liked some of the changes at RT, but also had more of a wait-and-see attitude. He was not even sure that his union was going to support Measure B, which is supposed to bring significantly more money to transit. So I proposed that Li and Niz do a joint question-and-answer interview. That finally happened late last month at SN&R’s offices. During the interview, both Li and Niz appeared to be committed to work together to create a great transit system for Sacramento. Oh, and Niz is now on board for Measure B. I want to look at RT from a broader perspective. Henry, one of the things that we talked about earlier was when you came in, RT had a fiscal imbalance …

Li: When I came here we [had virtually] exhausted all of our remaining operating materials, which is $3.1 million. We expect we’re going to exhaust that at the end of the fiscal year and then since I came on board, we pulled support from all different partners, especially Ralph. … We [started] looking for all different types of opportunities to reduce cost and generate additional operating revenues. What kind of deficit was it annually? Li: In March we expected we were to have a $3.1 million deficit. At that time we expected about $155 million revenue, but the expenditures were $158 million. Right after that we started many different initiatives; by the end

je ffv @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

of June, based on the latest information and audit information, we actually will have [had] $3.2 million operating return—where instead of using up [the] entire $3.1 million, we [will] have $3.2 million in our bank. What changes have happened over the last several months? Li: First we had to create a culture of “customers first;” every business decision we had to make we had to look at how we could serve our customers better, and then more and more customers, potential customers who would try to ride with us. Then we grow the ridership, and then we can make a bigger contribution to the region because more people riding with you means you’re


Photo caption

providing more value to the region. We expanded our customer service center hours and then we tried to operate RT like a corporate business. We reduced about 10 percent of our management positions, and increased 6 to 7 percent of our customer service front-line positions. We planned to increase our transit agent positions again [and] hired 25 transit agents. Ralph, if the fairy godmother of fate all the sudden made you RT’s general manager, what would you like to see? Niz: Since the Sacramento board leaders and some council people have come to talk to the union along with Henry, improvements have been made. Both are working for the same thing, securing the jobs, betterment of the transit. That’s the bottom line. … We sat down and we took a step forward with the transit agents. Security was extremely important, not only for the public but for the operators. … The trains have been worked on—the public, I think they’re seeing a change that’s long overdue and that’s a good thing. Whereas before there was a lack of communication between the union and the company, there isn’t now. If I have something to say I’ll pick up the phone directly and call Henry. What other things would you recommend? Niz: Continue the progress and the changes. … Do not let it go back to what it was. Do not neglect areas, namely the public, security, the system itself, the trains they need to be upgraded; if they do, then buy them. Henry, this fairy godmother has also made you the head of the union. Li: I would do the same thing, continue to do the same thing Ralph is doing now. Because you know, I see this gentleman is a fair but also a very aggressive dealer, and he tries to protect his membership, that’s his duty and obligation.

to go—transportation, improvements, security, jobs. Why should voters approve Measure B? Niz: Because there are major improvements being made in the system.

would be extended; in San Francisco you can go out and catch a bus or a train at 2 in the morning. I’m not saying RT will do that, I’m just saying those things matter, security matters, cleanliness matters. The operators’ attitude at taking care of the public, that’s what I see.

Li: We will try to use this money to improve our service. We need to bring back more routes, more schedules, extend our service to the late hours, so our potential riders can use that for their job, whatever.

Li: I cannot agree with Ralph any more because we want to make sure we take care of customers—first take care of our own employees, then … they can really serve our customers better. Within 10 years I hope we can expand our service [and have] the light rail extend to Elk Grove. Let’s talk about the role of transit in If Measure B passes we will be able to terms of community development do that, right now we still [have and how Measure B fits into funds] allocated [for the] that. airport extension, and Niz: Increasing after we get the federal the service; there are match we will be able “More people riding people that work late, to finish that project with you means you’re and increasing the in 10 or 11 years. By service and routes providing more value to doing that ….we’re and increasing going to spend the region.” the efficiency is lots of effort on extremely important. Henry Li the transit-oriented CEO, Regional Transit development to get the communities built I did a focus group with around light rail stations, bus drivers once, and one so major bus hubs. In 10 thing that was cool was learning about the connection years this is my hope: we can they made with so many passengers. get our ridership up … We may want to Niz: Every operator out there, being do the free transfer throughout the entire light rail or being a bus driver, we are the system so you don’t have to pay transfers PR people for regional transit. We take within 90 minutes … that we will have a your children to school, we care for your huge impact. children when they’re on the bus, we try to take you from point A to point B in a safe In terms of the vision, how much more manner, so when you get on the bus and extensive will the bus service be? we open that door in the morning we greet Li: The next major project is to look you, say hi to your children, I used to, at the entire system, not just our transit when I drove in the first of the month or at system [but] also the suburban area transit the time when the children had to buy their systems; we’ll work with them and work stickers—knew that it took two or three with the [Sacramento Area Council of days for the parents to get the stickers, and Governments] to wipe out the current I would see children walking down the service design … then work with all transtreet because they didn’t have the sticker, sit systems to say what the ideal, optimal I would pull the bus over and I would new structure, new route structure, should open the door and I would say, “Get on the look like. bus.” We are the front-line people.

Ralph, we talked several weeks ago about Measure B; you were lukewarm. Niz: I was noncommittal.

How do you see RT in the future? Niz: I would expect them, within a very short time, hypothetically lets just say 10 years, to be a top-notch transit system.

What’s the change? Niz: The change is communication, I want … to make sure that if there is any money coming in here, that it is going where it’s supposed

So then we’re saying by 2026, people will be saying they moved here because it’s so easy to get around? Niz: Let’s just say there would be a lot more jobs brought into the area, the service

entertainment, all those types of stuff changed. Economic patterns changed. How the system will change accordingly … we hope we will make sure we get this done in a way that’s smooth, but successful. Let’s talk about arena parking. Downtown, we have 100,000 state workers, or people who come down every day. There are 15,000 spaces—which are going to be used primarily in times when there are no workers around. Li: The question is during the right before and right after the event, if you have 10,000 cars moving around, that is huge congestion, so maybe it’s … So is it materially that much different? Li: If they come at 5 p.m. If we have 100,000 workers, almost all driving alone—then with the arena there’s 15,000 people, almost more of them coming together … Li: I don’t know if that’s the right assumption. When you say 100,000 people come downtown to work, I don’t know if it’s [really] 100,000 who come to downtown because state offices are scattered in different places. There may be just 20,000 state workers come to downtown to work. For example, the [Department of Motor Vehicles] is on … Broadway. For me, getting the community college students to take transit is a bigger concern than people going to a Kings game. Niz: Reaching out to the communities making a better system for everyone, not just centering on the arena. I know Henry goes out to the community organizations, so do I, we have alliances with all the communities because we are concerned about their children and them getting to work. It all plays into improving the system all over. Ω

So is what we’re talking about here bringing in Roseville and Elk Grove, etc.—then rethinking the whole regional pattern? Li: Yes, for example, Citrus Heights [and] Roseville [have had] huge growth in the past couple decades, but our system never really changed much. We needed to design our system according to the job growth, the employment center will change, the travel pattern, the

10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   11


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10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   13


Meet Joey Garcia

SN& R’s advice columnist celebrates 20 years with the paper—and shares the heartaches and lessons that led her here by Joey Garcia • askjoey@newsreview.com

I

14   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

Photo BY hoPE hARRIS

Joey Garcia initially turned down SN&R’s offer to write an advice column. She said no a few times, actually.

was minding my own business when I was interrupted by a phone call inviting me to mind yours. It was autumn 1996. I was on a sabbatical, studying the healing practices and spiritual beliefs of my Mayan, African, Welsh-Scottish and Honduran ancestors when Melinda Welsh, theneditor of SN&R, called to say she wanted to add a new column to the paper. “I could write about city politics,” I said. Melinda and I had met briefly nearly a decade earlier while working on a county supervisor’s campaign, although we hadn’t kept in touch. “No, an advice column like Dear Abby,” she said. Initially, I balked at the idea. I didn’t want to give anyone advice, especially not about relationships, and told her so. SN&R had recently published my essay about being raped while attending community college. The essay had been well-received, and inspired community conversations about the prevalence of sexual assault, but the next week when Melinda called again, I still said no to the column. Eventually I would say yes and write Ask Joey— an endeavor that’s taken me on a decades-long journey (so far) of questions, answers and lessons learned. A journey I celebrate this month with a 20-year milestone. But, a few weeks later when she called for a third time, I said no again and explained that I didn’t think I was very good at relationships. I didn’t say why—the reasons were deeply personal.


I was a bright and creative child, deeply connected to the natural world. The summer after second grade I attended an entomology course for high school students at a Catholic school in Oakland. And, yes, I thought I might grow up to be an entomologist. But by age 8, I also had a thriving neighborhood business, hiring myself out as a priestess. Years earlier, when I was in kindergarten, my maternal grandmother visited from Belize. In the evening, she would lift me into a bathtub filled with Mr. Bubble and tell stories about women who came before her in our family, women who had been healers, herbalists, midwives and bush doctors in Belize. “Recuerda, JoCarol,” she would say, calling me by my given name, “Remember you are a Mayan priestess.” When I told my dad, he laughed and said, “She probably meant Mayan princess.” But I was smart and had read fairy tales. Princesses didn’t heal people or do rituals beneath a full moon. I trusted my grandmother. I also knew from experience that a priest’s job was to serve the community. When we first arrived in the Bay Area from Belize, my parents worked at St. Bede Catholic Church in Hayward. My dad was the maintenance man, my mom cooked and cleaned for the priests. My dad soon found a job in construction and quit working at the parish. But my mother, a Catholic, continued, so I was able to observe how priests really lived, worked and prayed. I had no doubt I could also celebrate baptisms and weddings, and I liked the idea of following in the footsteps of my great-grandmothers. I knew priests earned income for their work and so did my grandmothers, so I posted fliers around the neighborhood advertising baptism parties for cats, dogs, rabbits and frogs. For 75 cents per party, I provided one Polaroid photo, plus snacks: Kool-Aid and a Jiffy cake for kids and a small cake made from a can of cat food for our pets. My parties became so popular I hired an altar boy to help me. One Saturday, my assistant left home wearing vestments. No Mass was scheduled. Suspicious, his mother, a Roman Catholic, followed him into my backyard and saw me baptizing a yowling kitten, surrounded by neighborhood kids. “Witch! Blasphemer! You’re going to hell!” she yelled. Kids and pets spilled in every direction.

Secretly, I took a third job and opened a second bank account. I hid cash in an old coat, ripping the lining open like a scab and re-sewing it closed every payday. I didn’t know what a “blasphemer” was, but it sounded bad. I did know hell was for sinners because that’s what my religion teacher taught my second grade class the previous school year. She walked between our desks holding a picture depicting hell—people writhing helterskelter, their eyes bulging, mouths sucking air and, in one corner, a blood-drenched Satan. The picture scared me, but I wasn’t scared of the altar boy’s mother because she was often annoyed about something in our neighborhood. Plus, my parents knew about my enterprise and didn’t care. They had seen much stranger things in Belize, where people still believed in shape-shifters, trolls, La Llorona and in blending Christianity with practices from Mayan or African religions. To my parents, a little girl blessing her friend’s pets was acceptable. But that evening a priest visited my parents to insist I stop performing the rituals. “Your neighbor says Jo is a bad influence on the other children. Jo must stop. You never know where this kind of pagan thing might lead.” “She’s not hurting anything by praying with the moon,” my dad said. “Daddy, I’m not—“ “The moon?” The priest swiveled to stare at me. “What are you doing?” “Nothing,” I said. My voice scraped against my throat like it was caught in a trap. “I don’t pray to the moon. I pray to God. I set a magical circle with pumpkin seeds. I dance and make wishes and say ‘thank you.’” “Who taught you to do this?” I didn’t want to get my grandmother in trouble, so I took responsibility. “No one,” I said. “You must promise to never perform a priest’s sacred rites again and never, never to worship the moon,” he said. Devastated, I said nothing.

T he sou l vs. T he body Over the following months, my body spoke my mind through a 2-inch growth spurt. Already tall for my age, I wondered whether my soul was trying to hurl me to adult height so I could literally stand up for myself. Instead, my spine curved: scoliosis. For the next six years, I wore a neck-to-thigh brace, 23 hours a day. The brace chafed and etched welts across my torso. By my sophomore year of high school, I only had to wear the brace at night. On Thanksgiving Day, I was celebrating with family members when a relative asked why I hadn’t raked the front yard. “I forgot,” I said. It was true, but he didn’t believe me. He punched me until my jaw, lips and tongue were so swollen, I couldn’t eat. No one stepped in to stop him. Blood streaking my face, I was sent outside to rake leaves. A neighbor who saw me turned away, saying she didn’t want to get involved. It wasn’t the first time this person had lost his temper and hit someone. He had punched me previously, too. After Thanksgiving break, I reported the incident to a nun at my Catholic high school. She told me if I had raked the leaves, what happened to me would not have happened. In despair, longing for a rescue that appeared impossible, I swallowed an oversized bottle of generic aspirin. When I puked it out, I figured I was so screwed up I couldn’t even kill myself. I was 15 years old. After high school graduation, I worked two jobs, trying to earn enough

“MEET JOEY GARCIA” continued on page 16

Insight & advice

Joey Garcia’s Guide to survival Love, marriage, honesty and heretics. Some quick-hit wisdom gleaned from 20 years’ worth of questions and answers.

1. reality is the least popular

kid in the school of life.

The popular kids are denial, blaming, mind-reading, victimization and all-or-nothing thinking. But if we befriend reality instead of these troublemakers, we heal faster and gain wisdom that initiates real change.

2. Marriage is a journey, not a destination.

Getting married isn’t the end of loneliness, childhood wounds or financial woes. Marriage is the trip of a lifetime. Our problems— and our partner’s troubles—travel with us.

3. Being “nice” is too often an

excuse to avoid being honest. Withholding the truth is lying, and that’s not nice.

4. if more of us were at home

in ourselves we’d have fewer homeless on the street.

The people living on our streets are struggling with mental illness, addictions and poverty. A lack of affordable housing isn’t the underlying problem. This is: the trauma evicted them from their bodies. They’re homeless because they’re not at home in themselves. And, if we nonstreet dwellers were at home in ourselves, we could see that truth. We must house people living on the street because residential stability allows us to more easily deliver the healthcare they need to return home to themselves.

5. When someone is

suffering, compassion is more important than curiosity. Kick questions to the curb if you want to help someone who is heartbroken. Instead, listen to what he or she needs to say.

“Insight & advice”

continued on page 16

10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   15


“Insight & advice”

continued from page 15

6. Adults lie to kids about life, but shouldn’t.

Here’s the lie: Good grades grant admission to a good university and a university degree guarantees a good job, the perfect spouse and a happy life. Why pressure kids to squeeze into a formulaic life that subverts their native genius? Let’s value good grades as a measure of learning, but start admitting that there are many paths to personal, social and financial success.

7. Heartbreak is a national epidemic.

A citizen who kneels during the national anthem does so because he is heartbroken by how he and others have been mistreated. Heartbreak isn’t just an emotional wound suffered in romantic situations; it’s a national epidemic.

8. Our bodies speak our minds.

If we deny emotional or spiritual pain, loss, or deep longing, stress roots in our bodies and contributes to chronic illness.

say “Hell, yes!” to, you’ll miss your call to adventure. The thing we don’t want to do is often the life-transforming, soul-defining, heart-opening, mind-expanding act that vaults us into the next level of our lives. Ask any hero.

10. Everything is personal

but very little should be taken personally.

It’s not about us, except when it is. So instead of getting offended, let’s get curious about why we’re triggered so we can discover a way to be free.

11. Solitude and silence are powerful organic nutrients.

The soul is nourished when we are alone and quiet. Solitude and silence are vitamins that keep us woke.

12. Real listening aligns

our mind, body and soul. When we’re really listening to someone talk, it feels like sitting in silent meditation. We become witnesses to reality and channels for the Divine.

13. When we force ourselves to fit

in, we lose what makes us stand out. The trick is to live in the world and enjoy it, but not be completely of the world so we retain our uniqueness. It’s difficult, but worth it.

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continued from page 15

money to move out. No one in my immigrant family ever left home except to be married or to join the military, so my parents were against my plans. My dad started charging me for rent, utilities and car insurance, intent on giving me a taste of how expensive life on my own would be. I couldn’t save enough to leave or keep up with classes, work and the circle of friends I so desperately needed. When a boyfriend raped me, I only told my best friend because I knew my parents would blame me. I flamed out of community college. That fall I was accepted into California State University, Hayward. I wanted to major in English literature. My parents insisted on nursing or business, practical majors that they believed assured me a steady income. They enlisted relatives from across the globe to talk sense into me. An aunt who had moved to Korea for work cajoled me long-distance. An uncle living in Martinez chastised me. A cousin in Belize called to tell me to obey my parents. But I loved books and wanted to spend my life in their pages. Inwardly, I imagined I might become a novelist but was too scared to admit to that dream. On the day of the deadline, I dropped my business classes and registered for the ones I wanted: the Negritude Poets, Dante’s Inferno, Milton and the American Short Story. I didn’t tell my parents. Secretly, I took a third job and opened a second bank account. I hid cash in an old coat, ripping the lining open like a scab and re-sewing it closed every payday. When an internship at a radio station turned into a job offer, I dropped out of college. The day I left home, my father yelled, “You’ll come back on your hands and knees, begging for forgiveness.” Instead, I became a reporter and anchor at a radio station in Livermore. I was not quite 20. Then, in 1984, I moved to Sacramento to complete my bachelor’s degree. There, I ran for office and was elected vice-president of Associated Students Inc. Financially, I was scraping by with barely enough money for living expenses. Most months I didn’t save enough from my various part-time jobs and freelance work to cover tuition and books, so I’d charge them on my credit cards. I couldn’t apply for loans because my parents didn’t like the idea

Garcia’s childhood interest in witchcraft and healing practices got her labeled a “blasphemer” by one angry neighborhood mother.

and wouldn’t provide the necessary paperwork. I lived alone in Midtown and when there was more month left than money, I would throw a potluck, save the leftovers and eat well for at least another week. Despite the financial challenges, I was having the kind of college experience I’d seen in movies and read about in novels: fraternity formals, dating the quarterback and enjoying all-night conversations with good friends. On campus I hung out with professor Joe Serna during his office hours, and organized anti-nuke rallies. But after serving my ASI term, I dropped out again, this time to run a community relations campaign for a client of the public relations firm where I worked part-time. The campaign ended with a job offer to be the company’s general manager of public relations. I accepted and moved to their New Jersey headquarters. Successful by society’s standards, I struggled privately, convinced I would fail. At the time, I didn’t connect these fears to my childhood trauma or my father’s curse.

Photo CoURtESY oF JoEY GARCIA

9. If you only do things you’d

“MEET JOEY GARCIA”

When I returned to Sacramento, I married and settled into a suburban life. Watching television with my husband, I would suddenly black out—inexplicably triggered by something I had seen or heard—and come to on the floor, sobbing. I was back at Sac State to finish my degree and one night in class, I blacked out. After that, I sought help from a therapist who recognized my nightmares, irritability, anger, blacking out and other symptoms, and diagnosed me with post-traumatic stress disorder. It was the early 1990s, and there was little public information about PTSD. Frightened, I told no one, not even my husband. Perhaps not surprisingly, in my wounded state, I felt compelled to help people I believed were suffering. After volunteering for various homeless programs, I was drawn to the Women’s Wisdom Project, a unique program that offered homeless women free classes in art and women’s spirituality. I was soon hired as an associate director, responsible for editing grants, fundraising, managing in-kind donations and co-teaching classes.


14. Religion is not the moon;

it points toward the moon.

Religious people may not realize it, but at times they worship their religion instead of worshipping their God.

15. Spirituality is not

parapsychology’s twin. One morning in 1993, a poem about a goddess awakening startled me from sleep. Still in bed, I reached for my journal and copied it down. Intrigued, I began writing poetry. Susan Kelly DeWitt, an accomplished poet, was assistant director at Women’s Wisdom. I asked her for guidance. She directed me to the Sacramento Poetry Center’s Tuesday night workshop where I heard about Sacramento State professor Dennis Schmitz. I had already graduated but I went to his office anyway, poems in hand. For the next few years, he critiqued my poems, recommended books and anointed me with the words every writer wishes to hear: “You have the gift.” What I didn’t know then was where this writing would eventually lead me.

an anoint ment Many of my poems explored the complicated experience of being a biracial immigrant from Belize raised in violence but also with yoga, natural healing practices like herbal and energy medicine, and the creative arts. Poetry helped me piece together the tattered edges of my heart. Schmitz found my family stories fascinating and urged me to learn more about my ancestors. I did attempt some genealogical research but Belize is such a tiny country, and my family’s immigration was so recent, there was no information at that time related to me. A radical idea followed: quit my job and begin a sabbatical to learn the spiritual traditions and healing practices of my ancestors. My great-grandmother had been a well-known herbalist in Belize, so I decided to follow her and learn to use plants as medicine. After a ninemonth apprenticeship at an herb farm in Auburn, my home medicine cabinet was filled with salves, teas, essential oils and extracts. I knew I was on the right path, even though I didn’t know where my path might lead. More than anything, I wanted to heal myself. When I was first diagnosed with scoliosis and before a brace was prescribed, my father enrolled me in a hatha yoga class, hoping to reverse my spine’s curve. I renewed my yoga

practice, eventually becoming one of three yoga teachers in the Sacramento area at the time. Then, another unexpected call to adventure—my greatuncle in Belize invited me to visit so he and his best friend, Mayan healer Don Elijio Panti, could pass on Mayan energy techniques. I returned to Sacramento, taught workshops and took classes in other forms of energy medicine, eventually becoming a certified Reiki master. I immersed myself in the West African religion of Ifa, spending weekends in East Oakland learning how to read a person’s ori (head) and how to sing and dance for the orishas (deities). I studied with a druid, read runes and memorized ancient Celtic poems. Searching for more opportunities to heal, I drove to San Francisco to take women’s spirituality classes from Starhawk and Luisah Teish at the California Institute for Integral Studies and courses in shamanism from anthropologist Michael Harner. I studied Zen Buddhism in the Bay Area and sat in meditation for five hours a day. I also began to see a spiritual director for guidance so I could weave each strand of my new narrative into a holistic sense of myself. My spiritual director introduced me to a mystic named Byron Katie who specialized in weekend retreats that cleansed the body and mind. There was an immediate connection and Katie invited me to work for her. I began driving from Sacramento to her home in Barstow each month to work in the retreat center kitchen juicing piles of veggies for the seemingly endless stream of retreat guests at her center. In exchange for room and board, I sat in on the retreats for free and received one-to-one training. I also worked at her other retreats in the Bay Area and hosted her at my Sacramento home, watching as her small gatherings grew until she filled auditoriums. When she appeared at the Crest Theatre on a book tour, I was invited to introduce her. During the questionand-answer period, a man in the audience asked her for assistance with his struggles. “Work with Joey,” Katie said. “She’s a laser.” I was floored—another anointing by someone I admired. In 1997, I completed my spiritual genealogy project. With my director’s encouragement, I began the three-year

spiritual director training and began to accompany seekers on their paths. I opened a healing center in downtown Sacramento and taught others. Every path transformed my trauma, restoring my sense of wholeness, belonging, individuality and clarity. Whatever I gained, I offered to others. I was still writing poetry, had received some awards and publication as well as fellowships in Paris and Spoleto, Italy. Traveling solo suited me. So two years later, in 1999, I completed my marriage. My husband missed the woman he proposed to—an ambitious corporate executive. My desire was just as simple: I wanted to continue to follow my call into spirituality, healing and poetry. We filed for separation, sold our El Dorado Hills home and moved back to Sacramento. My soon-to-be ex suggested we rent homes around the corner from one another. We did. He borrowed my car, came by for herbal remedies and frequently requested dating advice. I tried, and failed, to convince him to let me have more of the art I had collected during our marriage, A year or so later, his residence, and then mine, were sold. We moved on and are no longer in touch. I never found the right time to talk about my PTSD during our marriage, although I had confided in plenty of friends, therapists and healers. By the time I could explain it all to the man I had married, I was divorced, and it no longer mattered. The fourth time Melinda Welsh called, she invited me to lunch. When she pitched the column, I accepted. “I had a dream you were the person to write it,” she told me later. I realized then she had unknowingly answered my childhood prayer for rescue. Prayers, once spoken, exist outside of human time, so are not always answered in the order received. By saying yes to Melinda, I ended up with more than a weekly column. Her invitation allowed my suffering and healing to serve a higher purpose: to ensure you know you are not alone. And because of the column, I know I am not alone. I have you. Ω

Spirituality is not about psychic powers or near-death experiences or reincarnation. Spirituality is not a synonym for religion, either. Spirituality is the experience of union with God.

16. We are never alone.

We have God, each other and every living thing. We all get lonely. Some of us even fear living alone or dying alone. But on a planet that’s home to more than 7 billion people and more than 8 million species, we’re only alone if we persist in feeling disconnected from all of creation.

17. Everyone struggles in relationships.

Our partner brings us joy but we can’t hit the sweet spot with co-workers. We have a more loving connection with neighbors than with family. Or we get along perfectly with everyone because all of our relationships are superficial. The relationship struggle is real, and it always encourages personal growth.

18. The world is our soul mate.

Instead of trying to find the world in one person, why not let the world be our true love?

19. Wanting love to be

unconditional is a condition. It’s popular to write marriage vows promising to give and receive unconditional love. But without spiritual maturity, the attempt to love someone unconditionally inspires codependency, or worse.

20. Awakened people speak the

truth, take a stand for others and do what they love. They don’t do what they are told to do.

Let’s celebrate heretics, whistleblowers and radical thinkers. It takes courage to speak truth to power with love, so we should stand for the rights of those who do it.

—J.G.

Meet Joey Garcia!

Celebrate 20 years of “Ask Joey” with an anniversary party from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, October 20, at SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Boulevard. RSVP at www.facebook.com/events/1654851421495716.

10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   17


TRICK OR TREAT AND ENJOY FESTIVE FUN THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE ZOO!

11 am – 5 pm Early Bird Tickets $10 (through October 23) General Tickets $12 (October 24 – event day) Sacramento Zoo members save $3 per ticket and get in an hour early! This is a ticketed event. Membership cards, discount passes or any other coupons are not valid for Boo at the Zoo admission.

18   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16


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A

With his new album, Los Angeles rapper Jason Chu brings an all-American voice to the forefront

20   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

PHOTO BY SOMLIT INTHALANGSY

BY JANELLE BITKER

lot of stereotypes plague Asian-Americans, but none bother Jason Chu as much as the perpetual foreigner myth. It regularly manifests in the following situation: someone asks Chu where he is from; Chu will say he’s from Delaware; and then he’ll hear, “No, where are you really from?” To the Los Angeles rapper, that common interaction implies he, as a Chinese-American, can’t claim the United States as a homeland. “The immigrant narrative is the American narrative,” he says. “For us to act like immigrants are second-class citizens or like immigration is a controversial thing, I think that is not just harmful to minorities in America but that’s incredibly anti-American.” Chu’s love for the promise of America is what informs his critiques of it, and he acknowledges that it’s his uniquely Asian-American experience—raised in a state with far more African-American culture than Asian—that makes his new album, Arrivals, possible. “The American dream is not stay in your lane and do what’s been done. The American lane is learn and grow from diversity and create something that’s never been created before,” he says, smiling. “I’m just trying to do America right here.” Chu brings his Arrivals tour to Sacramento on Saturday, October 22, with former Sacramentan Joe Kye. The pair met while studying at Yale University, and in a sense, Arrivals is an accumulation of 10 years of their conversations about hip-hop, life, spirituality and Asian-American issues. “I was very interested in hip-hop,” says Kye, who is best known in Sacramento for his indie-pop songs on violin. “There are very few movements and art forms that very directly call out the injustices that exist in America.” On Arrivals, Chu balances the serious—mental health, exoticism, media portrayals of women—with stories of love and family. He raps with heart over a dynamic mix of electronic and organic sounds, which sometimes lean toward pop and R&B. Other soundscapes are left sparse to make room for Chu’s powerful spoken word. Arrivals marks Kye’s first time producing a record, but it doesn’t sound like it. And for the live show, he has assembled a crew of artists across disciplines to help express Arrivals in new ways. Capital Dance Project will perform. Visual artists Gioia Fonda, Jiayi Young, Raphael Delgado, Ryan Beltjens and Sarah Marie Hawkins will all provide works. It contributes to Chu’s idea that Arrivals isn’t just about Chu or Kye or even Asian-Americans—it’s about voices, storytelling and listening. As such, audience members will be encouraged to share their own tales, and Chu and Kye will create songs on-the-spot inspired by them. It’s all laid out in the first lines of the album’s opener: “I don’t tell the Asian-American story / I tell our American stories / In hopes that one day our people will see glory.” “I think my music, if it truly empowers the Asian community, that has to be good for the American community as a whole,” Chu says. But achieving mass empowerment is a collective effort. Chu calls out Asians in the entertainment business for not speaking on important issues—like racism on Fox News—on his song “Sound & Fury.” Or, in the case of actors Ken Jeong and Bobby Lee, for actively perpetuating demeaning stereotypes.


metal mania See COOlHUntinG

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PirateS! See StaGe

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reUnited, and it feelS SO PixieS See mUSiC

34

“ Th e AmericA n dre Am i s noT sTA y i n y o u r lAne And do whA T’s been done. T h e AmericAn lA ne i s leA rn A nd grow f r o m divers iT y And c reA Te someT hi ng T h AT ’s never been c reA Ted before.” -J As o n chu, rAPPer

PhOTO OF JOE KYE bY JASON SINN/ PhOTO OF JASON ChU bY SOMLIT INThALANGSY

Joe Kye (left) and Jason Chu met 10 years ago as college students, completely unaware they’d one day collaborate as full-time artists.

He does give a shoutout to celebrities like Aziz Ansari and Constance Wu who are fighting the lack of Asian representation in Hollywood. Still, Chu takes the battle further. “The narrative is, ‘The media is so bad, they’re whitewashing our stories,’” he says. “But for some reason, we don’t talk about what we’re doing to ourselves.” That’s a statement loaded with potential meanings, but Chu is specifically referring to plastic surgery, the subject of his song “New Eyes.” Korean- and Chinese-language magazines are usually stocked with ads for cosmetic surgery, touting the benefits of more Caucasian-looking noses, reduced cheek bones and, most commonly, eyelid lifts. “We don’t talk about the insecurities. We don’t talk about the pressure from magazine covers, Asian mothers and men,” he says. “Nobody is talking about why it is so common for 15-year-old Korean girls to fly to Korea for the summer and come back with new eyes.” Why the silence? “As immigrants who voluntarily moved here, there is definitely a pressure to assimilate, a pressure to put your head down and do the work,” Kye says. “To be a rebel means to make the sacrifices of your parents for naught.”

Maybe that’s why Chu can be that voice of dissent, the Asian-American who openly talks about Black Lives Matter and Donald Trump. He never truly felt accepted into a group until he found a hip-hop crew while studying abroad in Beijing. After graduation, he moved back to work at the Beijing International Christian Fellowship, splitting his time between leading Bible studies and hanging out with rappers, skaters, deejays and pot dealers. “I was not a normal Chinese kid, but in hip-hop I found an expression of that outsider experience and I found people who welcomed me,” he says. His experiences there inspired him to move to Los Angeles at 26 to pursue a music career. Four years later— putting out his best record to date, working with the White House to prevent bullying in Asian-American communities, hosting a new NBC Asian-American miniseries on Asian artists and religion—he’s understandably in a reflective mode. “At 30, I think I sit here wiser, more cynical but also more hopeful than ever,” he says. “The culmination of those experiences have helped me arrive at the man I am today.” Ω Catch Jason Chu and Joe Kye at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, October 22, at E. Claire Raley Studios for the Performing Arts, 2420 N Street. Tickets cost $20-$25. More at www.jasonchumusic.com.

revenGe tHeraPy See aSK JOey

41

An awards bellwether  the mill valley film festival got off to a splashy, star-heavy start this year, holding West Coast premieres of Arrival  and La La Land that were attended by their respective  stars Amy Adams and Emma Stone. Both films hold serious awards ambitions, and the festival, now in its 39th year,  has become a significant bellwether for the Academy  Awards. The most recent Best Picture winner Spotlight,  for example, kicked off last year’s festival, and three of  the four acting Oscar winners also came from films that  played the festival. And so the stars were beckoned once again to this small  town 20 minutes north of the Golden Gate Bridge. Besides  Adams and Stone, the list of actors and directors who  attended the festival to hawk their respective awards  contenders included Annette Bening (20th Century  Women), Ewan McGregor (American Pastoral), Joel Edgerton (Loving), Barry Jenkins (Moonlight), Kelly Reichardt  (Certain Women), Nicole Kidman (Lion) and Aaron Eckhart  (Bleed for This).   Beyond its predilection for spotlighting eventual  major awards winners, the Mill Valley Film Festival also  features a wide array of foreign films, including many of  this year’s Best Foreign Language Film Oscar submissions  (the Academy allows each country to submit one film a  year). Among my favorites screened during the festival:  the Italian submission Fire at Sea, a strikingly beautiful neorealist documentary from director Gianfranco Rosi that  contrasts the devastating African immigrant crisis on the  island of Lampedusa with the relatively sleepy day-to-day  lives of the residents. Asghar Farhadi’s Iranian submission, The Salesman, is  even better. This is another brutally ephemeral moral tale  from the director of A Separation and The Past. Farhadi  constructs each moment with warm empathy and cold  precision, culminating in a long, emotionally devastating  final sequence where every word and gesture is so tightly  wound around a sense of world-crumbling dread that I  could barely breathe. It was the best film I saw during the  festival.  Hard-working director Pablo Larraín, who showed  The Club at last year’s festival, traveled to the Bay Area  to debut two new movies this year—the Chilean Oscar  submission Neruda, an ambitious but baffling story about  the great poet and politician’s escape from his own  government; and Jackie, an English-language biopic about  Jackie Kennedy set in the immediate aftermath of the 1963  assassination; the latter film is generating Oscar buzz for  star Natalie Portman. I screened 24 films over the course of the festival, largely avoiding awards bait and other films scheduled for a 2016  local release, concentrating instead on the under-the-radar independents, documentaries and foreign fare. Some of my  favorites included Brazilian director Kleber Mendonça  Filho’s Aquarius, a dark horse awards contender for Sonia  Braga’s magnetic performance; Craig Atkinson’s Do Not  Resist, a disturbing documentary about police militarization;  the gorgeously animated Studio Ghibli co-production The  Red Turtle; South Korean director Je-yong Lee’s alternately  rambunctious and bleak The Bacchus Lady; and Terence  Davies’ austere Emily Dickinson biopic A Quiet Passion, featuring a possessed lead performance from Cynthia Nixon.

—Daniel Barnes

10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   21


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FOR THE WEEK OF OCTOBER 20

Chris Erickson Calling! THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20 The first thing you’ll ask yourself when you see  Chris “Whitey” Erickson perform is “Is this guy for  real?” Ignore the question in favor  LITERATURE of just taking in the raucous, brilliantly absurd writer and UC Davis creative writing  program alum do his thing (but if you must know,  the answer is “yes”). A must-see for anyone who’s  wondered what Garrison Keillor would be like on  meth. Free; 8 to 9 p.m. at Third Space, 946 Olive Drive  in Davis; www.thirdspacedavis.com.

Decorative gourd season, etc.

—DEEnA DREwiS

Perfect Pie Workshop SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22 Besides Halloween and the red and orange leaves  falling, what is there to look forward during  autumn? Pies, duh. There are so many great choices: apple, sweet potato, pumpkin, nuts. Learn how to  make one of these pies, and a perfect one  COOKING at that with this class at the Sacramento  Natural Foods Co-Op. $70-$80; 1 p.m. at Co-op  Cooking School and Community Learning Center,  2820 R Street; (916) 455-2667; www.sacfood.coop.

—AAROn CARnES

Sacramento Halloween Psychic Festival SUnDAY, OCTOBER 23 New Earth hosts this festival in which you can stock  up on everything you need for healing, relaxation,  wellness and more. The daylong fair feaCULTURE tures dozens of clairvoyants, mediums,  and other professionals. Spend an afternoon learning  about how to get in touch with your spirit guide. Free  with registration; 10 a.m. at the Crowne Plaza Hotel,  5321 Date Avenue; http://newearthevents.com.

I

t’s officially been fall for about  a month now, but that’s hardly  enough time to have gotten your  fill of pumpkin spice everything and  sufficiently lose your mind over  the colors of the changing leaves.  (I mean that nonsarcastically—it’s  freaking beautiful.) This week, the  city is offering up a multitude of  activities to really get in there  with the local foliage and produce  before stupid winter arrives and it  turns to cruddy sludge.  Bone up on your decorative gourd  dominance with the Gifts from the Garden: A Fall Decorating Workshop  on Saturday, October 22, from 8  a.m. to noon at the UC Cooperative  Extension Auditorium (4145 Branch  Center Road). This workshop will  focus on personalizing your pumpkin centerpiece with succulents (I  know, I know, it’s almost too much  Instagram-worthy goodness), plus 

hankie sachets with lavender and  lemon verbena. Admission is $25;  visit http://sacmg.ucanr.edu for  more information. Alternatively, on Saturday from 9  a.m. to 1 p.m., the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale is going down, wherein the  public will have a crack at making  their yards more regionally appropriate and easy to take care of.  Stock up on plants (including picks  from the “Arboretum All-Star” collection!) that will survive the cooler  weather to come and be more  drought-friendly while you’re at  it. Visit http://arboretum.ucdavis. edu or call (530) 752-4880 for more  information. On Saturday, October 22, Sunday,  October 23, and Saturday, October  29, hop on the West Sacramento Pumpkin Express Train and travel  along the riverfront as you make  your way to a pumpkin patch and 

carnival. Passengers will get to  pick out a pumpkin, get their faces  painted, hang out with a friendly  scarecrow and play carnival games.  Tickets are $32 for children and $42  for adults. The trip lasts from 10  a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and boards at 400  North Harbor Boulevard in West  Sacramento. Visit www.sacramentorivertrain.com for more information and to book your fare. Lastly, take the driving hazard out  of your tree admiring by joining  in on the McKinley Park Tree Tour  on Thursday, October 27. Master  Gardener Anne Fenkner will lead  the way, dropping knowledge on  the park’s diverse and historic  trees presently in prime colorchange mode. The tour is free,  but registration is required; go to  http://sactree.com to do so. 

—DEEnA DREwiS

—LORY GiL

Metal Yoga SUnDAY, OCTOBER 23 If your aversion to yoga has always been that it’s  just not metal enough, now you have no excuses: This  vinyasa yoga class will pair a rigorous flow with some  heavy bangers; soothe your body and soul  FITNESS while assaulting your ears, in other words.  All levels welcome. Probably, you should wear black.  $15; 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Yoga Seed Collective,   1400 E Street; www.theyogaseed.org.

—DEEnA DREwiS

NO H8 Open Photo Shoot SUnDAY, OCTOBER 23 Picture this: your cute face, a white T-shirt, and  maybe duct tape over your mouth to support marriage equality efforts. The NO H8 campaign, launched  in response to California’s 2008 discriminatory (and  now defunct) anti-gay-marriage  ACTIVISM legislation, Proposition 8, comes  to Sacramento this Sunday for a fundraising photoshoot. $40 solo shoot; 2 to 5 p.m. at Sheraton Grand  Sacramento, 1230 J Street; www.noh8campaign.com.

—DAvE KEmpA

10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   23


THE

Thai Food & gluten free options

Dontown on T: 1 1 0 0 T S T R E E T • 9 1 6 - 8 8 2 - 4 6 6 5 Midtown: 2 5 0 2 J S T R E E T • 9 1 6 - 4 4 7 - 1 8 5 5

MENU 1. FRESH ROLL (V-GF) $5.95

HAPPY HOUR 4:30-6PM $3 APPS, HOUSE WINE & DRAFT BEERS

2. CHEESE WONTON $5.95

ENTREE

3. VEGAN CHEESE WONTON (V) $6.95

CHICKEN OR ORGANIC TOFU $8.95

4. POT STICKER $5.95

BEEF OR ORGANIC CHICKEN $10.95

5. SA-TAY CHICKEN OR TOFU (V) $6.95

CALAMARI, SHRIMP, TILAPIA FILET $10.95

6. SWEET POTATO FRIES (V) $4.95

ALL 3 SEAFOOD $15.95

7. FRIED CALAMARI $6.95

SERVED W/ CHOICE OF WHITE or BROWN RICE

Please let your server know: V – VEGAN OPTION AVAILABLE GF – GLUTEN FREE OPTION AVAILABLE APPETIZERS

TWATIOONS!

LOC

’16

ADDITIONAL: SOUP

VEGGIES $1

CHICKEN OR TOFU $5.95

CHICKEN OR TOFU $2.00

SHRIMP $7.95

BEEF, SHRIMP, CALAMARI, TALAPIA $3.00

8. TOM YUM (V-GF)

16. BASIL (V-GF)

9. TOM KHA (V-GF)

17. EGGPLANT (V-GF) 18. CASHEW NUT (V-GF)

SALAD 10. GREEN SALAD (V-GF) $5.00 11. PAPAYA SALAD (SOM TUM) (V-GF) $7.00 12. LARB / CHICKEN (GF) $9.00 13. SPICY THAI SALAD (GF) $9.00 CHOICE OF SHRIMP, CALAMARI OR BEEF SPECIAL BURGER 14. SPICY THAI BURGER W/ FRIES $8.95 15. SPICY THAI BURGER W/ GREEN SALAD $10.95

19. PRARAM CHICKEN (GF) 20. GREEN OR RED CURRY (V-GF) 21. YELLOW CURRY (V-GF) 22. PANANG CURRY (V-GF) 23. THAI FRIED RICE (V-GF) 24. SPICY FRIED RICE (V-GF) 25. MIXED VEGETABLES (V-GF) 26. GARLIC PEPPER (V-GF) 27. SWEET AND SOUR (V-GF) 28. BBQ CHICKEN (V-GF) NOODLES

SPECIAL DISHES

29. PAD THAI (V-GF)

CHOICE OF CHICKEN OR TOFU

30. DRUNKEN NOODLE (V-GF)

PUMPKIN RED CURRY $10.95

31. SE EW (V-GF)

PINEAPPLE RED CURRY $10.95

32. NOODLE SOUP (GF) T

AVOCADO YELLOW or GREEN CURRY $10.95 DESSERTS SIDES

MANGO SWEET STICKY RICE W/ COCONUT ICE

PEANUT SAUCE (V-GF) $1.00

CREAM $6.00

RICE OR BROWN RICE (V-GF) $1.50

FRIED BANANA W/ ICE CREAM $5.00

STICKY RICE (V-GF) $2.00

COCONUT ICE CREAM $3.00

Ye l p . c o m / b i z / t h e - c o c o n u t - o n - t - s a c r a m e n t o 24   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

|

www.coconutmidtown.com


IllustratIons by serene lusano

Mix it up HAlo-HAlo, SAvory Fried CHiCken In Tagalog, halo-halo means “mix-mix.” Indeed, the  Filipino dessert—layers of crushed ice, sweetened  of crushed ice, sweetened beans, neon jellies, tapioca pearls  tapioca pearls and evaporated milk—benefits  milk—benefits from a vigorous stir before  before consumption. Don’t be  tempted to first eat the  violet-colored ube ice  cream, jackfruit ice cream  cream or smooth cube of flan that  that rests on top—that all gets  gets mixed in, too. The blending of  blending of seemingly disparate ingredients  ingredients signifies the melting pot of cultures—Chinese, Malay,  of cultures—Chinese, Malay, Indian, American—that influence the Philippines. But  don’t think too hard. Just try the $5.35 version at Elk  Grove’s best Filipino spot. 9174 Franklin Boulevard,   Suite C, in Elk Grove; (916) 395-3905. 

—JAnelle bitker

A gentler IPA yoJo 33 1/3, MoonrAker brewing Co. IllustratIon by Mark stIvers

More to sip by Janelle Bitker

Community cafe: The owners of Fluid Espresso Bar (1230 N Street) expanded into south Land Park with Barrio (1188 35th Avenue). Barrio, which used to be a Brick Oven Pizza and now houses the bakery for both cafes—a much larger space that will ultimately allow for more offerings. Already, Fluid and Barrio offer creative pastries, including matcha custard croissants, maple bacon scones, samosa empanadas and the popular Best Thing Ever, a croissant-cinnamon roll hybrid. Beverages, like cardamom lattes and horchata with espresso, follow suit. Barrio currently shuts its doors at 4 p.m., but an A-frame outside suggests wine, beer and live music in the future.

jan el l e b @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

Boba and treats: Sacramento’s pearl tea scene keeps growing, with the most action bubbling up in south Sacramento and Natomas. The first local i-Tea (6461 Stockton Boulevard, Suite 4), a Taiwanese chain with a bunch of Bay Area locations, opened in Little Saigon. It offers a huge variety of teas—and a very notable mango sago drink ($4.95)—as well as an unusually large food menu. There are six types of ramen ($9.99$11.99) and many snacks for $5.50, such as spicy chicken feet, takoyaki, basil popcorn chicken and okonomiyaki on a stick. Popular Taiwanese chain ShareTea entered the Sacramento region last year with a spot in downtown Davis. Now, there’s another

one in Natomas (3581 Truxel Road, Suite 1). In addition to the usual assortment of teas and creamas, this location offers ShareTea’s new TorDas, hockey puck-sized pastries with one of three fillings for $4.95. There’s black tea custard with tapioca pearls, custard with red beans and a mix of tuna, cheese and mustard. For something decidedly more sweet, D-Cup Tea House (3000 Freeport Boulevard, Suite 4) recently opened in Curtis Park. Unlike most boba tea shops, D-Cup offers just a few tea options in a traditional, foam-topped or “cake milk” style. For the latter, tea sits on top of a layer of crust-less cheesecake. There are also a few desserts to enjoy in the bright pink, adorable space, stocked with a rainbow of funky furniture and Chinese games. In addition to shaved snow, there’s crème brûlée, ginger milk pudding and the showstopper sure to plague Instagram for months: the green tea mille crepe ($5.95). The classic French dessert consists of 20 stacked crepes layered with cream, and in this case, flavored with bright green matcha. Ω

Are you so committed to IPAs that only the most  hopped-up monsters grace your lips? Or can you hack  a smidgen of fruit at the back end? If you like the sound  of citrus, switch coasts and try one of Moonraker  Brewing Co.’s cracks at the New England IPA style. All  cloudy pine taste up front, but as the haze clears, a  bright bit of orange emerges. I found Yojo 33 1/3 on tap  at Hawks Public House for $8, but it’s a couple bucks  less at the brewery. Moonraker also just released the  original Yojo in cans. 12970 Earhart Avenue, Suite 100;  www.moonrakerbrewing.com.

—AntHony Siino

Fall for apples Cider Johnny Appleseed didn’t just plant apples, he also sowed  cider apples. In those days, you drank cider or beer  days, you drank cider or beer instead of the questionable water  questionable water nearby. Now we often ignore  ignore cider until fall, although  it’s a great year-round  quencher. Fresh-pressed  Fresh-pressed apple juice often masquermasquerades as cider. For the real,  real, slightly alcoholic deal, seek  seek out artisanal producers  at farmers’ markets and  and Apple Hill. You’ll find barely fizzy  barely fizzy blends, single-varietal ciders and  ciders and even higher-alcohol versions. Sacramento’s own Two  Rivers Cider Co. makes seasonal and dry ciders.

—Ann MArtin rolke

10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   25


Farm-to-Face Farm-to - -Face

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*While supplies last. Call for delivery area. Free delivery is within the Central City.

by Janelle Bitker

Blue House

HHH 1030 Howe Avenue, (916) 646-2004 www.bluehouseusa.com ROSEVILLE

1132 Galleria Blvd #120 · Roseville, CA 956748 · 916-774-0707

Dinner for one: $13 - $34 Good for: more traditional all-you-can-eat Korean barbecue Notable dishes: galbi, bulgogi, short-arm octopus

NATOMAS

3620 N Freeway Blvd #310 · Sacramento, CA 95834 · 916-246-9049

ARDEN

1310 Howe Ave #D · Sacramento, CA 95825 · 916-246-9443

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China Buffet

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We’ve got soul

Come get sticky

• BBQ / Fried Chicken / Catfish • Good Old Fashioned Comfort Cooking

2322 K Street, Sac • 916-382-9178 • StickyGatorBBQ.com Monday - Friday 11am - 9pm Saturday - Sunday 12pm - 9pm 26   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

I could begin many ways: the modern stone fountain that greets you as you enter the restaurant, reminiscent of a Las Vegas hotel lobby; how a mini octopus seems to breathe when its thrown on a hot grill; or the simultaneously gross and glorious feelings that always ensue after a successful night of all-you-can-eat Korean barbecue. But I know your first question, so let’s get it out of the way. Is it better than Oz Korean BBQ? In a word, yes. With two locations, Oz has enjoyed a nearly unrivaled position at the top of Sacramento’s Korean barbecue chain for years. In turn, the wait times can be long and you’re hustled out the door within two hours of ordering to make room for the next group. Those who will continue to prefer Oz will point to its lower prices—$22.99 on peak days and $18.99 for weekday lunch—and, perhaps, its delicious but Americanized appetizers like fried chicken, fried pot stickers and fries. Blue House’s all-you-can-eat barbecue costs $25, or $32 if you want access to additional, top-of-the-line cuts like rib-eye steak. Even with just the $25 option, though, Blue House’s selection is more varied and interesting, and the cuts and presentations are far more impressive. You won’t find pork cheeks, short-arm octopus, brisket or ox intestines at Oz. You won’t get traditional appetizers, like steamed egg in a stone pot, spicy tofu soup, soy bean stew or japchae, to start your meal. You also probably won’t experience the same high level of service.

ja ne lle b @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

At Blue House, the standouts are the nicely marbled galbi short rib and the paper-thin bulgogi—but that’s the same verdict at most places. The octopus takes on the flavor of a smoky-sweet scallop as long as you let it cook long enough. The spicy pork belly tastes almost exclusively of gochujang, which can be good or bad depending on your taste. Thin, wispy curls of brisket benefit from a dip in sesame oil. Shrimp arrive as they should, with the heads intact. As with most all-you-can-eat places, there are some rules. You will get charged if you order a round of meat and then leave too much of it uneaten. You can only order three meats at a time. Still, the pervading vibe remains relaxed, celebratory and aesthetically pleasing. If you don’t feel like stuffing yourself—or cooking your own meal—Blue House also offers an impressive à la carte menu. I tried a beautiful, enormous pile of vegetables and squid bathed in gochujang, all inside a sizzling stone pot. It needed a touch more salt—and some pieces of squid were too chewy—but it felt like a deal at $17. The mool-naengmyeon ($13) featured a precarious stack of boiled egg, beef, radish and jicama balancing atop a ball of gray noodles, all seeming to battle for the title of thinnest food. They rested in cold beef broth that tasted light and clean with a slight tang, while ice cubes kept everything to the proper temperature. Among lunch’s many well-priced specials, the bento boxes seem to win the crowds over. Tender chicken bulgogi, salad, dumplings, fresh fruit and a sloppy-but-tasty California roll all came out to just $10. The banchan—the little free side dishes that come before your meal—were the only element that didn’t measure up. Across three visits, the selection changed slightly each time, but most items underwhelmed. There were some gems though, including sweet slices of fish cake and pungent, crisp kimchi. Regardless, any disappointment can easily be remedied by another round of bulgogi. Ω

Shrimp arrive as they should, with the heads intact.


—Janelle Bitker

Paul McCartney’s meat-free Sacramento By Shoka Paul McCartney is still in Sacra-

animals and the treatment of these  9 billion annually slaughtered birds,  pigs and cattle. Michael Tuohy, the  arena’s executive chef, slipped in  between student statements for  damage control, saying the meat  at Golden 1 isn’t feedlot-produced.  McCartney’s also influenced this  month’s Sacramento Vegan Chef Challenge, which encouraged participating restaurants to name its vegan  menus after the musician’s work:  Gabriel Aiello at Old Ironsides wins  with Live and Let’s Dine. 

lunch $11.99 *dinner $21.00 Everything made fresh to order!

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Fresh Oysters & Mussels (Dinner Only) • Banquet Room available for max 80 people

You Can’t be Serious!

buy 1 gyro get 1 free w/ purchase of 2 regular drinks, until 11/30/16!

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on stands oct 27

mento—in tribute and influence,  anyway. He christened the Golden 1  Center on October 4, and his legacy  remains because the Sacramento City Council passed a resolution on  September 27 in joining the Meat Free Monday movement. McCartney,  longtime vegetarian and animalrights advocate, began the Meat  Free Monday nonprofit campaign  in 2009. At the council meeting, high  school students recited health and  environmental problems brought  on by consuming factory-farmed 

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election endorsements

In 1915, Armenians were systematically killed by the Ottoman government in  Turkey. But Armenian culture—and food—lives on, including in Sacramento.  According to organizers of the 69th annual Sacramento Armenian Food Festival, Armenians first arrived in Sacramento in 1919  and now there are roughly 15,000 ArmenianArmenianAmericans in the region. Celebrating with  with eating, dancing and singing on Saturday,  Saturday, October 22, at Trinity Cathedral (2620  Capitol Avenue). Entrance is free from  from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and $5 from 5 p.m. to  8 p.m., which is when the circle dancing will ensue. While there, feast on  pizza, kebabs, lamb shanks, Armenian pizza,  and stuffed grape leaves, tabbouleh salad and  will show a variety of desserts. Some dishes will show  the influence of where Armenian communities  resettled, such as Persia and Lebanon. And with  most items costing less than $10, you can bet on tasting an assortment. Learn  more at www.stjamessacramento.org/armenian-food-festival-2016.

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10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   27


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28   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16


FIND OF THE WEEK

PHOTO CORTESY OF AFTERSHOCK

Rock on

String theater

Aftershock festivAl

the Motion of PuPPets As in his earlier novels (The Boy Who Drew  Monsters), Keith Donohue blends horror, suspense  and a touch of magical realism in The Motion of  Puppets: A Novel (Picador/Macmillan, $26).  Book Kay and her husband Theo are temporarily  living in Quebec; Kay is working for a cirque when  she becomes enamored of a complex marionette in  a shop window. One night, fleeing the sexual harassment of a colleague, she stumbles into the unlocked  toy store and disappears. Told alternately by Kay,  who is trapped in a dreamlike world of puppets,  and Theo, who is desperately searching for his wife,  the story falls into the category of literary-minded  page-turners, a rare and pleasant thing. 

—kel Munger

World-class, indeed inside sAcrAMento Whether you’re new to Sacramento or a 916 veteran,  this new Inside Sacramento (Inside Publications,  $34.95) book makes for a handy coffee table guide to  the city’s myriad charms. Cecily Hasting’s tome, which  bills itself as a primer on “the most interesting neighborhoods in America’s farm-to-fork capital,” focuses  on much more than just food and drink. With  GuIdE full-color photography, it’s divided into neighborhoods such as East Sacramento, Old Sacramento,  Oak Park and The Handle. Throughout it covers  restaurants, retail and culture with quick-hit capsule  takes on dining (South, Fish Face Poke Bar, Esquire  Grill, etc.), artistic touch points (Crocker Art Museum,  the Warehouse Artist Lofts and, even, a section on  public art) as well as the kinds of places any true blue  Sacramentan would know and recommend (East Sac  Hardware, Corti Bros., etc). Sure, it’s all very Chamber  of Commerce-ready but it also makes for an eyepleasing argument as to why Sacramento is already  pretty damn world-class, thank you very much.

—rAchel leiBrock

Sacramento’s biggest, most successful music festival returns to  Discovery Park for its fifth edition— and we are so relieved. Of course, we are happy  Aftershock, the state’s largest  hard rock marathon, is back in  general on Saturday, October 22,  and Sunday, October 23. More  importantly, though, festival  organizers wisely decided to bring  it back to its original  FESTIVAL location—centrally  located and easy to bike to from  much of town—and not that traffic  hellhole Gibson Ranch.  Even better, the lineup is insane,  perhaps Aftershock’s best ever.  Anticipate a metalhead’s paradise  with epic bookings like thrash band  Slayer and Ghost, the Swedish  heavy metal act with a creepily  mesmerizing spectacle.  In addition to Slayer, Saturday’s  headliners are three-time  Grammy-winning ’90s band Tool  (pictured) and experimental rock  act Primus. On Sunday, the major  draws are Avenged Sevenfold, and  nu metal pioneer Korn.  Unlike today’s most popular music  festivals such as Coachella or  Outside Lands, Aftershock doesn’t  bother with art installations, a  Ferris wheel or celebrity chef demonstrations. That’s a good thing.  Aftershock fans don’t need the  distractions—though the addition  of a wine garden this year probably  won’t hurt.  Grab two-day passes for  $199.50-$214.50 or single-day  tickets for $94.50 at http:// aftershockconcert.com.

—JAnelle Bitker

Come See the Legendary ISley BrotherS per forming for the last time in Sacramento Tickets available at Eventbrite & Dimple Records 10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   29


SACRAMENTO POTTERS GROUP

ART by FIre

ReviewS

Sparkle and speed by Bev SykeS

HOLIDAY SHOW • OCTOBER 29 • 10A-4P CHOICE SELECTION OF BEAUTIFUL HANDMADE POTTERY, GLASS, SCULPTURES AND OTHER WORKS OF ART FOR SALE. THROWING DEMONSTRATIONS. It’s Sing Like a Pirate day!

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FOR MORE INFO VISIT WWW.ARTBYFIRE.ORG OR CALL 916.428.7174, LEAVE A MESSAGE

Pirates of Penzance

SHEPARD GARDEN AND ARTS CENTER 3330 MCKINLEY BLVD. • SACRAMENTO

8 p.m. friday and saturday, 2 p.m. saturday and sunday; $15-$20; sierra 2 center, 2791 24th street; (916) 258-5687; www.lots.company. through october 23.

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sacramento readers! for voting us #1 place to knock down pins

• bar & lounge • 2 arcades • cafe • private events

country club lanes Family EntErtainmEnt CEntEr

www.countryclublanes.com • 2600 watt ave, 95821 • 916-483-5105 30   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

Light Opera Theatre of Sacramento just opened a sparkling new production of Gilbert & Sullivan’s Pirates of Penzance, directed by Robert Vann. The sets are modest, but the talent more than makes up for this. A full 12-piece orchestra under the baton of Troy Turpen offers a perfect accompaniment to the cast. It is sometimes difficult to find a robust male chorus in community theater, but that’s not the case with this Light Opera production. The women here are flirtatious, twirling pastel parasols while doing intricate choreography in the opening scene. Their “How Beautifully Blue the Sky,” a choral patter song, is spot on with vocal direction by Anne-Marie Endres. With 60 years of performing Gilbert & Sullivan patter songs, Mike Baad has pretty much perfected them by now, as his Major General Stanley shows. His “Modern Major General” is sung at top speed, which makes the double-speed last verse, flawless and articulate, that much more amazing. Carley Neill is also outstanding as Mabel, Stanley’s young ward in love with the former pirate, Frederic. Her powerful voice soars over the audience. Anthony Tavianini’s Frederic might not have quite the vocal oomph, but he’s still wonderful as the pirate torn between his love for Mabel and his “sense of duty.” The Pirate King is always an audience favorite and Charlie Baad, returning to Light Opera after a 15-year hiatus, is no disappointment. He’s big and

Photo courtesy of Light oPera theatre of sacramento

bold and funny and easily earned the cheers at the curtain call. With everything blending together so perfectly, this is a production that will satisfy the most critical of Gilbert & Sullivan fans.

Simple Gifts The Cashore Marionettes return to the Mondavi Center with Simple Gifts, a show for family audiences which incorporates classical music (Vivaldi, Strauss, Beethoven, Copland) with specially built, carefully engineered marionettes that are capable of lifelike movement (an elephant that picks up a tree trunk, a boy who climbs the puppeteer’s leg, an electric guitarist whose fingers press chords as they move up and down the instrument’s neck, etc.). The Cashore Marionettes were founded by master puppeteer Joseph Cashore, who has been touring with the company for 30-plus years. Simple Gifts has been performed in Europe, East Asia and across North America. The production has become the company’s signature production, returning to the Mondavi Center every four years or so because of the show’s continuing popularity, and because a new generation of children has yet to experience it. Advance ticket purchase is strongly recommended for this one—the shows tend to sell out quickly. —Jeff Hudson

simple gifts, 4 p.m. sunday, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. monday through thursday; $10-$40; mondavi center, 1 shields avenue in Davis; (866) 754-2787; www.mondaviarts.org. through october 30.


5

Speed-the-Plow

and 9pm, Su 2 pm. Tu 6:30pm, W 2pm and 6:30pm. Through 11/6. $26-$38. B Street 

Theatre, 2711 B Street, (916)  443-5300, www.bstreet  theatre.org. B.S.

5

Trevor

This farcical story  of a performing  chimpanzee in the waning  days of his career, is a  winning production in both  concept and execution.  Playwright Nick Jones’ plot  sounds incredibly ludicrous—Trevor is a showbiz  chimp with a couple of bit  parts under his belt who  bitterly bemoans his stalled  career while his human  caretaker tries to deal with  his angry outbursts—but  the writing is clever and the  cast gifted. Director Joelle  Robertson masterfully 

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juggles many balls—keeping  the ironic tone and storyline in place with a cast  that not only has an actor  realistically portraying a  chimp, but also with actors  who talk over and around  each other without really  communicating. Th, F, Sa 8pm. Through 10/29. $10-$20.  Big Idea Theatre, 1616 Del  Paso Boulevard; (916) 9603036; www.bigideatheatre  .org. P.R.

2pm, W 6:30pm. Through 10/30. $15-$38. Sacramento  Theatre Company, 1419  H Street. (916) 443-6722,  www.sactheatre.org. J.H.

Short reviews by Bev Sykes, Patti Roberts and Jeff Hudson

4

To Kill a Mockingbird

This revival of the  American classic features  a small innovation: actors  Sam Misner (Atticus Finch)  and Megan Pearl Smith  (the older Scout) mix in a  few songs in the Americana  vein, a nice addition.  Otherwise, this is a sturdy,  sincere remounting,  with good performances  from lanky Atim Udoffia  (Calpurnia); Sean Morenau  (a shifty, suspicious Bob  Ewell), Tarig Elsiddig  (the falsely accused Tom  Robinson), and resourceful  Georganne Wallace (gossipy neighbor Stephanie  Crawford). Th 6:30 pm, F

8pm, Sa 2 pm and 8pm, Su

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FAIR

GOOD

WELL-DONE

5 SUBLIME– DON’T MISS

“Funny, you don’t look 300-something years old.” PHOTO cOURTESy OF THE ART THEATER OF DAvIS

Old, funny and sad The Art Theater of Davis—which likes to stage plays that  are at least 100 years old—reaches all the way back to  1663 for Molière’s The Impromptu at Versailles, a one-act  satire about actors and acting styles, both comedic and  tragic. The show takes place in the theater’s main gallery,  which will also feature an art exhibit of painters from the  Mt. Shasta region. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday; $10-$15.  Pence Gallery, 212 D Street in Davis; http://arttheater.org.

on stands oct 27

—Jeff Hudson

election endorsements

This contemporary  classic is a biting  satire on the movie industry, how negotiations really  get made, and the effect  that ambition can have on  it all. The show, directed by  Jerry Montoya, features  electric performances by  all three B Street regulars  in its cast. Th, F 8pm, Sa 5pm

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The accountant “Wait, did i actually sign up for a movie about Ben affleck doing peoples’ taxes?”

3

by Jim Lane

Meanwhile, a Deptartment of the Treasury bigwig (J.K. Simmons) assigns a midlevel analyst (Cynthia Addai-Robinson) to unravel Wolff’s other activities “uncooking” the books An old actor once told me about a time at the end of of drug cartels, arms dealers and various other World War II when he and some army buddies saw a dangerous people. And a glib, mysterious burlesque show headlined by the famous entertainer enforcer (Jon Bernthal) follows his own path Gypsy Rose Lee. It was the sexiest thing he ever saw; from victim to victim, on what we sense is a he and his pals sat there panting and salivating, and collision course with Wolff. when Gypsy made her final exit they leapt to their As if that weren’t enough, we get flashbacks feet cheering and whistling. Then they looked at each to Wolff’s adolescence, where he struggles to other in amazed confusion: The dancer never disrobed channel his autism under the influence of a father completely. (Robert C. Treveiler) who takes tough love way What does that have to do with the new Ben over the top, and to his time in prison, mentored Affleck movie The Accountant? The by a former mob accountant (Jeffrey Accountant is the movie-thriller equivalent Tambor) in the subtleties of money of a beautiful striptease: it keeps us laundering. entertained, even spellbound, without Writer Bill Dubuque (The ever making us pause to quibble Judge) and director Gavin over how little it is showing or O’Connor (Warrior) mesh all We enjoy how the telling us about the main characthese threads with confident pieces fit, even if we ter, where he comes from or the craftsmanship; in this case, situation he’s in right now. can’t see the picture “slick” is a compliment. It all Affleck plays Christian comes together so satisfyingly they make. Wolff, but that’s only one of his that we even welcome the many names. Among the movie’s prospect of an Accountant franteases: One of the drawers in the chise. These characters—those Airstream trailer he keeps for quick who survive—still have secrets getaways bulges with passports; others we’d like to hear. are crammed with various national currencies. In one flashback, the adolescent Wolff—impassive, obsessive, on the high-functioning Wolff works a jigsaw puzzle face down. The end of the autism spectrum—is a superhuman Accountant is that kind of puzzle: We enjoy how number-cruncher, and is hired to investigate a $60 the pieces fit, even if we can’t see the picture million shortage in the books of a high-tech company. they make. Ω The probe makes both Wolff and nerdy-cute Dana Cummings (Anna Kendrick), the bookkeeper who discovered the shortfall, targets of a squad of assassins. The goons are overmatched: Wolff is just as expert with weapons, including his fists and feet, as he is with math. After deftly disposing of the first squad, this asocial loner finds himself driven to Poor Fair Good Very excellent protect the unsuspecting Dana. Good

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fiLm CLiPS

Just terrible. In the world where  narcissistic conviction and awardsbait mummification count for everything,  co-writer-director-star Nate Parker’s The  Birth of a Nation is an all-time masterpiece; in  the real world, it’s complete shit. After winning  multiple awards and receiving critical raves  at Sundance, Parker’s film got bought by Fox  Searchlight for a record sum, only to have its  carefully calculated awards season rollout  hijacked by reemerging allegations that Parker  and co-screenwriter Jean McGianni Celestin  raped a female college student in 1999. (Parker  was acquitted; Celestin was found guilty but  had his sentence overturned on appeal; the  accuser committed suicide in 2012.) No matter  what, The Birth of a Nation was always amateurish and incompetent, a glorified student  film that turns the life of slave revolt leader Nat  Turner into a bluntly linear, Braveheart-tinged  act of self-aggrandizement; the only difference  is that now you can read rape apologia into the  subtext of every scene. D.B. 

2

Denial

How flatulently didactic is Mick  Jackson’s courtroom drama-cumbiopic Denial? The opening scene features the  protagonist literally teaching a class on the  theme of the film. Denial covers the 1999 trial  in which writer and historian Deborah Lipstadt  (Rachel Weisz) defended the veracity of the  Holocaust in court after egomaniacal denier  David Irving (Timothy Spall) sued her for libel.  Yes, it’s yet another proudly bland quasi-indie  drama piously intent on teaching you a lesson  that you should already know. Spall makes for  a mesmerizing human monster as Irving, equal  parts Sean Hannity and Nosferatu, but his  cartoon villainy only underlines the complete  lack of complexity on hand in Denial. We’re on  Lipstadt’s team no matter what, because the  only alternative is an anti-Semitic scumbag  with awful teeth. Meanwhile, the audience gets  abandoned without any nourishment but moldy  courtroom drama trappings and a snuggly  shared sensation of righteous superiority over  an obvious evil. D.B. 

3

Ixcanul

Kevin Hart: What Now?

Hart’s August 30, 2015, comedy concert  before an audience of 53,000 in his home  town of Philadelphia forms the bulk of this  movie. Hart is usually more effective in smaller  doses than this, and his raunchy, profanityriddled humor is not for the prudish or easily  offended; at least one member of his audience  is seen shaking her head in unsmiling dismay  and looking like she wishes she were anywhere  else but here. But there’s no getting around  the fact that he’s pretty damn funny. Even  better than the concert footage is a framing  prologue and epilogue (written by Hart and  Brian Buccelatto, directed by Tim Story) in  the form of a hilarious spoof of James Bond  pictures—in which Hart is marvelously abetted  by Halle Berry, Don Cheadle, Ed Helms and 

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5

American Honey

This guy saves you money.

At nearly three hours of nonstop braggadocio, bleakness, bravura  camera moves and angry hip-hop, Andrea Arnold’s American Honey  was always destined to be a great cinematic polarizer. Personally, I was drunk  on this crazy thing from the opening frames, mesmerized by its attitude of  endless possibility amid utter despair, addicted to the almost filterless sense  of cinema. American Honey is dizzying and alive, like a documentary about a  dream, a color-saturated road trip to nowhere imbued with a shocking sort  of hope. Sasha Lane dominates the screen as Star (although Shia LeBeouf and  Riley Keough are excellent in supporting roles), a poor teenager who escapes  an abusive relationship to join a vagabond group selling magazine subscriptions across America’s asshole. There is a constant tension between the  hypnotic pulse of the party and the desperate imperatives of poverty, such as  the scene where country line dancers grudgingly shuffle through their steps  like political prisoners. D.B.

David Meunier. Now that’s the movie I really  wanted to see! J.L. 

3

The Magnificent Seven

A hired gun (Denzel Washington, all  steely authority) recruits a band of  cohorts to help rescue a town from the murderous robber baron who runs it (Peter Sarsgaard, making Snidely Whiplash look subtle).  Little but the title remains of John Sturges’  classic 1960 western, and even less of Akira Kurosawa’s great Seven Samurai that inspired it.  But there’s fun to be had, despite a ridiculous  script (by Richard Wenk and Nic Pizzolatto)  that wallows in self-parody. Director Antoine  Fuqua and a good cast (Chris Pratt, Ethan  Hawke, Vincent D’Onofrio, Haley Bennett) make  the most of things, with a grimy frontier look  and cheerfully over-the-top gunplay. It works  best as a deadpan spoof, probably the most we  can expect from a generation of filmmakers  who seem incapable of making a Western with a  straight face. J.L. 

3

Masterminds

A band of dimwits (Zach Galifianakis,  Owen Wilson, Kristen Wiig) steal $17  million from the Loomis Fargo armored car  company. It takes the cops about 45 seconds  to zero in on them, and they begin falling out  among themselves; one of them (Galifianakis)  skips off to Mexico, while another (Wilson)  sends a hired killer (Jason Sudeikis) to get rid  of him. Based on a real 1997 robbery whose  culprits were almost this dumb, the movie  is coarsely amusing, even as it leaves the  impression that the people who made it (writers Chris Bowman, Hubbel Palmer and Emily  Spivey; director Jared Hess) aren’t all that  much smarter than the people it’s about. Hess  deploys the same sneering derision he brought  to Napoleon Dynamite; only Wiig eludes his  heavy hand long enough to turn in a sensitive  and sympathetic performance. J.L. 

1

Max Steel

Unassuming teenager Max (Ben  Winchell) and his widowed mother (Maria Bello) move back to the town where he was 

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born, and where his scientist father died under  strange circumstances; soon our boy finds  “liquid energy” flowing from his fingers, and  acquires a hovering silicon-based-life-form  sidekick named Steel, who somehow lives on  and enhances his latent powers while muttering cornball wisecracks. Or something like that.  Mattel Toys makes a feeble stab at creating  a Transformers-style franchise, with—as  impossible as it sounds—even worse results.  Written by Christopher L. Yost and directed  by Stewart Hendler, this I Was a Teenage Iron  Man wannabe is inept at every level. It sat on  the shelf for two years before finally getting  shoveled into theaters—a sentence that should  never have been commuted. J.L. 

2

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children

An American teenager (Asa Butterfield) visits the ruins of his grandfather’s old  boarding school in Wales, destroyed in 1943 by  German bombs. That’s when he learns that he  can traverse a time loop created by the headmistress (Eva Green) to keep the school’s unusual students alive on the same day forever.  Ransom Riggs’ novel, obviously inspired by the  Harry Potter books, is a complicated challenge  to film, and director Tim Burton and writer  Jane Goldman grapple with it fairly well for a  while, especially in a sweetly romantic thread  between our hero and grandpa’s still-youthful  sweetheart (Ella Purnell). But a book built  around found photographs becomes a movie  built around a visual effects wish list, and the  story becomes even more involved and confusing on the screen than it was on the page. J.L. 

ACUPUNCTU ITY

IC CLIN RE

Newcomer María Mercedes Coroy  stars in this austere Guatemalan film  as María, teenage daughter to a laborer on a  coffee plantation, arranged to be married to  the westernized boss while secretly canoodling  with a migrant worker. María and her family  observe their indigenous tribal customs, and  yet the coldness and manipulation of the  modern world intrude into their lives on a daily  basis. The family resides in a hut at the foot of  an active volcano, a black rock seething with  fire, central in their religious ceremonies as  well as an all-purpose metaphor for the passion churning beneath María’s placid surface. A  frank depiction of sexuality is one of the film’s  strongest assets, but the attempts to force  melodrama fall flat, and the protagonist is  such a moon-faced cipher that it feels almost  insultingly respectful. There’s nothing glaringly wrong with Ixcanul, it’s just hard to get  whipped up for stoicism. D.B. 

3

10/22 • 8:00 PM •

The Birth of a Nation

COMM UN

1

BY DANIEL BARNES & JIM LANE

Oak Park Healing Arts Center and Everyone's Place Acupuncture & Wellness are excited to announce the opening of our Community Acupuncture Clinic. We aim to make acupuncture affordable for diverse Sacramento residents. Our fee is based on a sliding-scale ranging from $20-$40, with an additional one-time paperwork processing charge of $10 for the first visit.

CHECK THE WEBSITE FOR NEW CLASSES 10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   33


CELEBRATING 20 YEARS OF JOEY GARCIA’S R & ’s SN K J O E Y WISE ADVICE! S A

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016 • 6 P.M.-8 P.M. HORS D’OEUVRES & DRINKS Party will be held at: Sacramento News & Review 1124 Del Paso Boulevard Sacramento, CA 95815

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executive coordinator For more inFormation and to apply, go to www.newsreview.com/jobs. SN&R is an Equal Opportunity Employer that actively seeks diversity in the workplace.

34   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

With a new album and tour, the Pixies   embrace history but reject nostalgia by Rachel leibRock

rac hell@ n ew sreview .c om

a little new, listening to records and asking for recommendations before finally settling on British producer Tom Dalgety (Ghost, Killing Joke). Dalgety’s role, Lovering says, was crucial. “A producer [has] to have tact, they have to be able to manage and get the band in line,” he says. “Tom was able to do that, he was able to tell us when something wasn’t working, ” Lovering says. The resulting album, Head college rock’s touch of gray. Carrier, released September 30, sounds like vintage Pixies. It’s darkly catchy, and rife with tension and Lenchantin’s voice, girlish and plaintive, They could have been just another reunion band echoes Deal’s. Somehow, though, it never feels on the nostalgia circuit. And, maybe for a moment indulgent or sentimental. Maybe that’s thanks to the they were. current ’90s revival; maybe it’s because the Pixies’ But something changed for the Pixies in 2011, sound was so sharp and singular to start. says David Lovering. One track in particular deftly walks the line It had been 25 years since they’d formed in between past and present: “All I Think About Now,” Boston in 1986 and eight years since the legendary co-written by Lenchantin and Thompson, started as a alternative rock band—drummer Lovering, guitarist mistake and ended up as a tribute to Deal. Joey Santiago, bassist Kim Deal and singer“It was a miscommunication on a songwriter Charles Thompson, a.k.a. Black bass line—Paz first played it in a Francis—had reunited following its different key, then [liked] how the 2003 break-up. Now they were finish“We’re like the song was going,” he says. ing another tour. The song is an homage to During the run, Lovering says Grateful Dead of Deal but also a nod to how well the band had been playing all the alternative rock.” Lenchantin fits. favorites, of course, but Thompson “It’s very classic Pixies—and had been writing new material, too, David Lovering she came up with that,” he says. and onstage it all just clicked. drummer, the Pixies Now the band is set to play a “It got us thinking,” Lovering says. limited series of warmup club gigs, “We could be going out, resting on our including a sold-out October 26 date at laurels, doing reunion shows—but at that Ace of Spades. From there the Pixies will point we felt like a band.” tour Europe and then eventually return to the studio. They started working on their fifth record with There’s already talk of a new record. veteran Pixies producer Gil Norton—the first since The Pixies have no intentions of calling it quits 1991’s Trompe le Monde—but because band life is anytime soon, Lovering says. They love playing nothing if not unpredictable, Deal quit before they live, watching as the audiences evolve—all those were done. So, the Pixies finished Indie Cindy with old-school fans joined by an ever-swelling sea of a session player and then tapped the Muffs’ Kim younger faces. Shattuck to play live. “There are kids who know every word and every Shattuck toured with the Pixies for a while, then song; that’s been big for us,” he says. “We’re like the the band decided to bring in Santiago’s longtime Grateful Dead of alternative rock.” Ω friend Paz Lenchantin. The band toured, released Indie Cindy in 2014 and then toured again. Eventually, they returned to the studio. the Pixies perform at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, october 26, at ace of Spades, The Pixies weren’t looking to shake things up too 1417 R Street. the show is sold out. Learn more at www.pixiesmusic.com. much, Lovering says. Still, they wanted something Photo coURtESY oF tRaviS Shinn

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a sense of solidarity, against both the elements and the festival organizers. But far more fled early for various reasons, including needing to catch the last BART trains home. The festival was supposed to end by 11 p.m. or earlier both nights but instead went until midnight. Treasure Island used to be known as one of the best boutique festivals in California for both its wellcurated lineup and reliable organization. It’s too bad its last edition will surely taint nine otherwise lovely years of memories. —Janelle Bitker jan el l e b @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

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ponds formed in the concrete. The pier and silent disco area closed early after an ATM blew over, injuring one woman. After two-and-a-half-hours of waiting around, Young Thug

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finally arrived. Too bad he put on a bummer of a performance. The mantra of Treasure Island became a tweet: “Revised schedule coming.” Attendees took to social media to complain in droves, demanding refunds and calling it the worst festival ever. They said that rain or shine events meant the acts actually performed regardless of weather and that the festival was ill-prepared for a storm that had been forecast for weeks. In response, the festival organizers somewhat apologized but emphasized no refunds would be issued. Still, there were bright spots. Sigur Ros, Purity Ring, Ice Cube, Glass Animals and Christine and the Queens all played memorable sets despite the clear challenges. Glass Animals, in particular, received a welcome most characterized by helpless relief. The English indie band was the first act many had seen in hours. And the locals deserve endless praise for being called upon to entertain the angry masses. Oakland rapper Kamaiyah performed twice on Saturday—the second time to calm people down during the Young Thug debacle, which also happened to be the worst weather of the weekend. Even though her mic kept cutting in and out, Kamaiyah brought the energy, cloaked in a lime green poncho. The Polish Ambassador played twice as long as scheduled, also when folks were waiting for Young Thug. And on Sunday, Tycho took the stage a second time for an impromptu deejay set when James Blake canceled.

on stands oct 27

Rained out: Sigur Ros nearly hypnotized Treasure Island Music Festival into an other-worldly state—but you only had to take a step back to remember the disaster of a weekend. The two-day event’s main draw was playing to what must be a record-small crowd for a festival headliner. Easily fewer than 500 people clustered around the giant stage, ankles lost in the mud. The 10th annual festival was supposed to be the best edition yet. As the last time Treasure Island would actually be held on the island—and maybe ever held at all—everyone expected extra cause for celebration. The lineup held such promise: old-school hip-hop via Ice Cube, sweet electronica from the likes of James Blake, Duke Dumont and Flight Facilities; and of course, the Icelandic forest sounds of Sigur Ros. But James Blake, Duke Dumont and Flight Facilities all canceled their sets. Festival organizers blamed flight delays or the artists themselves for not performing in the harsh weather conditions, but Duke Dumont took to Twitter to say otherwise, that the flooded stage posed a safety hazard. How to Dress Well performed only three songs, with just six out of 32 sound channels functioning. The stripped-down set lacked the artist’s usual entrancing qualities, but singer-songwriter Tom Krell charmed everyone just for braving the storm. At that point on Saturday, festivalgoers had been standing around for nearly four hours in a paralyzed state of confusion. “Thank you for dealing with that,” he said. “We honestly have no idea how we sound right now.” Sideways rain and heavy winds sent the festival into mayhem at about 4 p.m. Saturday. Young Thug was delayed in transit, and Treasure Island opted to stall instead of go on with the show—but most in attendance didn’t understand what was going on. They were hiding under

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20 T HU

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21 FRI

21 FRI

Black Marble

Trash Talk

Rebel Radio

Garble

Red MuseuM, 8 p.M., $8

Midtown BaRfly, 8 p.M., $15

Four years feels like a lifetime since the last  Black Marble record. Formerly a duo, the  moniker is now the sole ownership of producer Chris Stewart after he moved from  Brooklyn to Los Angeles. The move also  marks a record label jump  DaRk Wave from Hardly Art to Ghostly  International, home of Com Truise and  Tycho. Black Marble’s recently released It’s  Immaterial rekindles the brooding synths  set to pulsating bass lines that made early  recordings anguishing, yet danceable. Along  for the tour is Ritual Howls, who swap out  the anguish for menacing riffs. It’s still fit  for movement, though. 212 15th Street,  http://blackmarble.bandcamp.com.

Cafe Colonial, 8 p.M., $8

The only batch of artists to have released  music on Odd Future Records that isn’t making hip-hop are Sacramento’s  HaRDcoRe own Trash Talk. That’s how  rad its old-school hardcore revival is—it  makes believers out of everyone and anyone.  Underground hip-hop phenom Antwon opens  for what should be an insane show. The band  doesn’t come back to town too often, so it  would be wise to hop aboard this one before  tickets run out. 1119 21st Street,   www.facebook.com/Trash-Talk-64704193922.

—anthony siino

old iRonsides, 9 p.M., $6

Sacramento’s Rebel Radio combines driving  bass lines and off-the-cuff percussion with  steady guitar rhythms to create a unique  blend of punk and ska. Tracks like “Keep it to  Yourself” and “Asphyxiation” incorporate  a much faster pace with enough punk-rock  grit to get the pit moving. Rebel Radio started out as band with deep roots  Ska PUnk in reggae and ska, but since  drummer Jerred Whitbey joined the ranks,  the band switched gears and sped toward a  more aggressive, punk-rock sound. Still, the  band doesn’t lose sight of its ska foundation.  3520 Stockton Boulevard, www.facebook  .com/rebelradioband.

—steph RodRiGuez

Garble has a garage-grunge sound that is  dosed with tight guitar jams and heavy drum  beats that could rival a seasoned hard-rock  outfit. Angst-ridden lyrics are dispatched by  almost bored, prosaic voices, until the music  gets thrumming and hypnotic.  alT Rock Suddenly, things get emotive.  Dark melodies chant in a high-pitched,  wheedling, pained tone that induces the urge  to both indulge in a grunge rock slouch-nod  and play kick-ass air drums. Garble hits that  special place where skill, finesse and a touch  of wounded affectation work together to  create a safe space to revel and release all  the noxious feels. 1901 10th Street,   www.garbletheband.com.

—Blake Gillespie

—aMy Bee

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36   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16

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27 T HU

Allyson Seconds

Damien Jurado

Dressy Bessy

Eisley

Shine, 8 p.m., $7

Sophia’S thai kitchen, 9 p.m., $15-$20

In 2009, local singer Allyson Seconds released  her first solo record, Bag of Kittens, written and produced by Sacramento expat  Anton Barbeau. Now, they’re back with the  groovy, pop-folk Little World. The album radiates positive energy, hitting environmental  themes in between fuzzy, psychedelic guitar  solos. Historically, Seconds was one to harmonize with others, such as her husband  Kevin Seconds of hardcore band 7  PoP Seconds, versus taking the mic solo.  Little World cements her role at the front of  the stage. Kevin and Barbeau will both be at  Shine to celebrate her album release. 1400 E  Street, www.facebook.com/allyson.seconds.

—Janelle Bitker

preSS cluB, 5 p.m., $8

Visions of Us on the Land is the 12th album  by Seattle indie-folk singer-songwriter  Damien Jurado. It’s also the third installment of a trilogy that explores a character’s  journey to disappear from  AlTErNATivE society “in order to discover  universal truths,” according to the album’s  press release. That may sound like a vague  description of every single indie-folk album  ever written, but make no mistake about it,  this is a massively detailed project. It zeros  in on a single character through the scope of  three albums, accented with dreamy sci-fi  imagery and a flair for psychedelic instrumentation. 129 E Street, Suite E, in Davis;  www.damienjurado.com.

harlow’S reStaurant & nightcluB, 8 p.m., $15-$18

In 2012, Dressy Bessy released two volumes  of “Summer Singles,” and it’s kind of a  surprise it didn’t release more. The band  is perfect for the format; each release has  two jangly, feel-good pop songs, exactly  the kind of bittersweet bubblegum tune you  want to sing to yourself on a summertime  drive along the California coastline. The  group got its start back in the ’90s, as part  of the Elephant 6 collective (Neutral Milk  Hotel, Of Montreal, Elf Power, etc).  iNDiE Part of how it has stayed active as  a band for so long is its uncanny ability to  mash together infectious ’60s-loving hooks  with raw garage-rock power. 2030 P Street,  www.dressybessy.com.

—aaron carneS

It’s all in the family with the three-sister,  one brother and one cousin five-piece Eisley,  who formed in Texas circa 1997. The dreamy  indie-pop band has made the  iNDiE rounds over the last few decades,  opening up for Coldplay and Ron Sexsmith  back in the early aughts, and weathering a  number of personal and professional ups  and downs chronicled most intimately in its  2011 release The Valley. The band is presently  on tour ahead of dropping a new album,  with the lead single “Defeatist” released in  September. Fans of Rilo Kiley, Daughter and  First Aid Kit will find much to love in the seasoned band. 2708 J Street, www.eisley.com.

—Deena DrewiS

—aaron carneS

ALL AGES WELCOME!

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95811 • www.aceofspadessac.com FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21

OPETH THE SWORD SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22

ZIGGY MARLEY ANTHONY D’AMATO SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23

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TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL DIMPLE RECORDS LOCATIONS AND WWW.ACEOFSPADESSAC.COM 10.20.16    |   SN&R   |   37


thUrsdaY 10/20 ace of spades

1417 r st., (916) 448-3300

List your event! post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Hey local bands! Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to: calendar editor, sn&r 1124 del Paso blvd., sacramento, ca 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@newsreview.com. be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

fridaY 10/21

satUrdaY 10/22

sUndaY 10/23

MondaY-WednesdaY 10/24-10/26

OPETH, THE SWORD; 7pm, $35-$40

ZIGGY MARLEY, ANTHONY D’AMATO; 7pm, $36-$40

YELLOWCARD, LIKE TORCHES; 6:30pm, $28.50-$33

PORTUGAL THE MAN, 6:30pm, Tu, $25; PIXIES, 6:30pm W, $42-$47

Spectacular Saturdays, 10pm, call for cover

Sunday Tea Dance and Beer Bust, 4pm, call for cover

Big Mondays happy hour all night, M; Karaoke, Tu; Trapicana W

BadLaNds

#turnup Thursday, 9pm, no cover

Bar 101

Comedy roast, 8pm, call for cover

BLAME THE BISHOP, call for time and cover

BLue Lamp

PAPA, 9pm, $10

MoxieCrush burlesque comedy, 8pm, $10 SAN QUINN, 8pm, call for cover

Good Vibes with DJ Nocturnal, 10pm, call for cover

LIL YEE, 9pm Tu, call for cover; LAZIE BONE, 9pm W, call for cover

HIRIE, RIOTMAKER, DOWN IN SMOKE; 7pm, $12-$14

YELLOWMAN, 7pm, $18-$20

AARON GILLESPIE, ACE ENDERS; 6:30pm, W, $15-$17

2003 K st., (916) 448-8790 101 Main st., roseville; (916) 774-0505 1400 alhaMbra, (916) 455-3400

The BoardwaLk

9426 greenbacK ln., orangebale (916) 988-9247

cafe coLoNiaL

3520 stocKton blvd., (916) 736-3520

ceNTer for The arTs

314 Main st., grass valleY; (530) 274-8384

Trivia, 6:30pm M; Open mic, 7:30pm W, no cover

ORION WALSH, call for time and cover

ANDRE NICKATINA, 7pm, $25-$30

IRON KINGDOM, ASD, URD-OM; 7pm W, $7

Open mic, 9pm, no cover DON FLEMONS, RATTLIN’ BONES; 7:30pm, $15-$18

Elect to laugh with Will Durst, 8pm, $22-$27

KIM SIMMONDS, SAVOY BROWN; 8pm, $27-$32

The coLoNy

3512 stocKton blvd., (916) 718-7055

cooper’s aLe works

235 coMMercial st., nevada citY; (530) 265-0116

CA RIOT ACT, THE HABITUALS, CHICK HABIT; call for time and cover

couNTry cLuB saLooN

MATT RAINEY, 5pm, no cover

THE MENACE, 9pm, call for cover

DYNASTY, LOUIE GIOVANNI, JULIAN PIERCE; call for time and cover

MILES MEDINA, DJDM; call for time and cover

2007 taYlor rd., looMis; (916) 652-4007

disTricT 30

1016 K st., (916) 737-5770

faces

2000 K st., (916) 448-7798

Everything happens dancing and karaoke, 9pm, call for cover

Absolute Fridays dance party, 9pm, $5-$10

Party Time with Sequin Saturdays drag show, 9:30pm, $5-$12

foX & Goose

THE MIKE JUSTIS BAND, 8pm, no cover

DEATH PARTY AT THE BEACH, THE DEPTHS; 9pm, $5

FEM DOM COM, 9pm, $5

GoLdfieLd TradiNG posT

TUCKER BEATHARD, 7pm, $10

GraciaNo’s speakeasy

Poker tournament, 6:30pm, call for cover Old school r&b and hip-hop, 9pm, $10

1001 r st., (916) 443-8825 1603 j st., (916) 476-5076

1023 front st., (916) 321-9480

haLfTime Bar & GriLL

5681 lonetree blvd., rocKlin; (916) 626-6366

EDM & karaoke, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, no cover

Sunday Mass, 2pm, no cover

open mic, 7:30pm M, no cover; Pub quiz, 7pm Tu, no cover REV. PEYTON’S BIG DAMN BAND, SUPERSUCKERS; 7:30pm, $20

ISLAND OF BLACK AND WHITE, 9pm, $5

Jazz jam with Reggie Graham, 5pm, no cover CLEAN SLATE, 9pm, $7

10/28

VINTAGE VANDALS COVER SONGS, ROCKABILLY STYLE

10/29

DJ MENACE COSTUME CATAGORIES & PRIZES FOR EACH NIGHT VISIT FOR MORE INFO

4007 Taylor Road • Loomis, CA {EXIT I-80 TO SIERRA COLLEGE} 916-652-4007 • countryclubsaloon.com

38   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16


harlow’s

2708 j st., (916) 441-4693

thursdaY 10/20

fridaY 10/21

saturdaY 10/22

sundaY 10/23

mondaY-WednesdaY 10/24-10/26

MAZ, 8pm, $17.50-$20

CHERYL WHEELER, 7pm, $25-$30; PLANET ASIA, 10pm, $15-$20

FOREVERLAND, 10pm, $15-$20

LAS MIGAS, 7pm, $20

TERRY BOZZIO, 7pm M, $25-$30; THE SHOW PONIES, 7pm W, $12-$14

80s new wave/post-punk, 10pm, no cover

WELL DRESSED MANNEQUINS, 10pm, no cover; MOVEMENT, 10pm, no cover

Top 40 dance, 10pm, no cover

Heavy, 10pm M, no cover; Tussle, 10pm Tu, no cover; Good stuff, 10pm W, no cover

Sac united poetry slam, 8pm, no cover

TRIO NO MAS TREE, 7pm, call for cover

Comix!, 8pm, call for cover

the hideaway bar & grill 2565 franklin blvd., (916) 455-1331

highwater

1910 q st., (916) 706-2465

luna’s cafe & juice bar 1414 16th st., (916) 441-3931

midtown barfly

Factor IX, 9pm, call for cover

1119 21st st., (916) 549-2779

naked lounge downtown 1111 h st., (916) 443-1927

DYLAN CRAWFORD, THE EMBRACISTS; 8:30pm, $5

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REAL PEOPLE, REAL DESIRE, REAL FUN.

Vengeful victim My sister has been filing lawsuits against her ex-husband for over a decade. He’s guilty of shady business deals but they’re divorced. I don’t understand why she won’t let go. She’s angry that I don’t see her as fighting for justice. I think she’s a victim of her own need for revenge. But when I try to help she makes me feel like I’m the problem. Suggestions? Stop trying to help your sister. She’s convinced she’s a victim, and will put herself through hell to prove it. Pushing her to change could permanently disrupt your relationship. You don’t want a hand in that mess, do you? Despite the drama, I hope you’re celebrating yourself. You have a beautiful heart and your love for your sister is real. Reflection can encourage growth in understanding her. Start here: When your sister behaves like a victim, does it seem like she’s deliberately trying to piss someone off? Does she have a history of pointing out people who need punishment and then singling them out for months or years of accusations, cyberstalking and other kinds of abuse? Despite being the victim of someone close to her, does she also want to be seen as heroic for pursuing accusations, cyberstalking and other kinds of punishment? Is there an overarching ruthlessness in her attitude? Answers may reveal that your sister suffers from a mental health problem that demands professional treatment. She’s unlikely to see a psychologist, however, because she believes her ex-husband is the problem. If mental health issues, not revenge, feed her behavior, set boundaries. Avoid allowing her to trigger you. It’s challenging—she’ll sense your energy pulling away and dump more flaming trash at your feet. Let holding your ground become a spiritual practice. Above all, keep her in your heart but don’t expect her to change.

My husband of 40 years dropped a bomb: He’s gay. He said he has always been sexually attracted to men but buried it because of his religious upbringing. He said he loves me and treasures our life together, and our friendship is everything to him. I believe him but I’m also devastated. He’s the person I love most in the world. I don’t want to be without him. I don’t care about sex. I just want him in my life. Do you think I’m crazy? Would it be crazy to suggest that we stay together in the same house and share our lives, but not a bed? No, it’s not crazy to suggest that your friendship continue. It’s not crazy to propose a life as roommates, either. But will you feel crazy if he falls in love? Right now, you believe that your husband only wants sex with men. What if your husband wants a life with another man? Could you bow out gracefully? Your spiritual call is to prepare yourself to release your attachment to him as husband, even if he remains in your life. Let go of the friendship and erotic love of marriage. Expand into agape. Yes, that means disengaging from the man you love so he can fully love the man he is today. Ω

You don’t want a hand in that mess, do you?

MeDItatIon of tHe Week “Compassion is not religious  business, it is human business,  it is not luxury, it is essential  for our own peace and mental  stability, it is essential for  human survival,” said the Dalai  Lama. Do we have compassion  for our “enemies”?

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Where can I buy organically grown medical marijuana? —S.D. Um, at a dispensary? Kidding. Not kidding. You just have to ask around. Fortunately, you are in luck: Harvest season is happening as we speak. (Peace and respect to all the growers that had to bring in their crops a little early because of the giant storm last week. May your harvest be delicious and free of molds.) Most outdoor growers these days do their best to be as organic as possible. I have a friend who uses only organic chicken poop for his dirt. Really. Ask your budtender about the organic brands they carry and I’m sure they will be able to provide you with a few choice morsels. Also, the Emerald Cup Outdoor Organic Cannabis Competition is happening again in Santa Rosa this December; you should be able to find all sorts of super-organic, biodynamic, clean and green flowers, tinctures and concentrates there. By the way, growers and brands aren’t allowed to use the term “organic” because the government has a strict set of conditions that farmers must maintain to be able to use the “organic” appellation. Since cannabis is still illegal under federal law, marijuana can’t be labeled “organic,” no matter how clean and pristine the growing conditions are. There are a few companies (www.cleangreencert.org is one of them) that offer certifications programs based on federal organic guidelines. If you see some marijuana with the Clean Green certification, you know that it’s about as close to organic as you can get without growing it yourself. Have fun! What’s up with people taking 10 gram dabs? Competitive dabbing. So gross. —Piper Competitive I agree. Giant dabs are gross, and an expensive waste of perfectly good cannabis. A gram of good wax or shatter costs about 35 bucks retail. Ten grams is $350. Ten grams will also knock you out for the rest of the day, and probably most of the next week. Why would anyone want to pay $350 for a nap? Listen, Americans love gluttony and excess. It’s just how we are. We have competitive eating contests, for crying out loud. The internet is full of fools smoking giant dabs. Some are a bit impressive: Internet personality Mountain Man has a vid where he smokes 13.2 grams at once. It takes, like, 5 minutes. Wild. Others are not so cool. Some people may think it’s funny, watching folks puke and vomit and pass out after smoking giants globs of cannabis wax; I just think it’s kind of dumb. There is a limit to how much THC a person can ingest, and smoking giant dabs and globs every day will make your brain and body incredibly THC tolerant, which will cause you to smoke more weed to maintain the same high, which will cost you more money. Moderation in all things is the key to a healthy and happy and pleasantly stoned life. Ω

May your harvest be delicious and free of molds.

Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@newsreview.com.

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50   |   SN&R   |   10.20.16


Photo by Ken Magri

Simple tools you can use to dab.

by Ken Magri

W

hen I first discovered concentrates at a dispensary I impulsively bought some. This little jar of shimmering amber “crumble” looked so beautiful it mesmerized me. Not knowing how to smoke it, I scooped some out with a screwdriver tip, sprinkled it onto a bowlful of bud, and the flame from my lighter sent those amber crystals downward, melting into a rich brûlée of cannabis. Concentrates, or dabs, are cannabis plants extracted down to their essence. They bear little resemblance to their vintage cousin hashish because the THC content in new concentrates is 60 to 90 percent, about three times higher. Some are called “shatter.” Break off a piece and it shatters into dozens of smaller pieces. “Earwax” gets its name from its looks and “crumble” best describes how easily this sugary concentrate breaks apart. Then there is “the clear,” so pure, so sticky and so potent it approaches canna-nirvana. Concentrates should ideally be smoked through a “dab rig,” which delivers the purest hit possible with no waste. I wanted to try one, and the budtender at Safe Accessible Solutions was very helpful. But I lost focus the more he explained. “You heat this nail with a torch,” he said. “But it’s a glass nail, so you’ll want to replace it with a metal or ceramic one. Then you take this wand and scoop the dab, put it

on the heated nail, then take the dome and…” Afterwards I apologized for asking. Dabbing devices like rigs, electric nails and portable pens all work well, but they’re not essential for smoking concentrates. Many users improvise their own techniques for breaking concentrates into tiny bits that they blend together with bud. Crumbles work best. Likewise, most dispensaries still offer hash and kief, which you smoke in a simple pipe.

“The flame sent those amber crystals downward, melting into a rich brûlée of cannabis.” Another method called a “healthstone” is a circular pad made of toxic-free inert carbon. The healthstone heats up with a lighter and absorbs a pure dab of concentrate. Then drop it into a glass pipe and reheat it for several more hits. Finally, if you tell a budtender you want to try concentrates for making blends, they will give you some suggestions.

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FRee will aStRology

by Blake Gillespie

by ROB BRezsny

FOR THE WEEk OF OCTOBER 20, 2016 ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the 1980s, two

performance artists did a project entitled A Year Tied Together at the Waist. For 12 months, Linda Montano and Tehching Hsieh were never farther than eight feet away from each other, bound by a rope. Hsieh said he tried this experiment because he felt very comfortable doing solo work, but wanted to upgrade his abilities as a collaborator. Montano testified that the piece “dislodged a deep hiddenness” in her. It sharpened her intuition and gave her a “heightened passion for living and relating.” If you were ever going to engage in a comparable effort to deepen your intimacy skills, Aries, the coming weeks would be a favorable time to attempt it.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the coming

weeks would you prefer that we refer to you as “voracious”? Or do you like the word “ravenous” better? I have a feeling, based on the astrological omens, that you will be extra-super-eager to consume vast quantities of just about everything: food, information, beauty, sensory stimulation, novelty, pleasure and who knows what else. But please keep this in mind: Your hunger could be a torment or it could be a gift. Which way it goes may depend on your determination to actually enjoy what you devour. In other words, don’t get so enchanted by the hypnotic power of your longing that you neglect to exult in the gratification when your longing is satisfied.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When the wind blows

at 10 miles per hour, a windmill generates eight times more power than when the breeze is 5 miles per hour. Judging from the astrological omens, I suspect there will be a similar principle at work in your life during the coming weeks. A modest increase in effort and intensity will make a huge difference in the results you produce. Are you willing to push yourself a bit beyond your comfort level in order to harvest a wave of abundance?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cuthbert Collingwood (1748-1810) had a distinguished career as an admiral in the British navy, leading the sailors under his command to numerous wartime victories. He was also a good-natured softie whose men regarded him as generous and kind. Between battles, while enjoying his downtime, he hiked through the English countryside carrying acorns, which he planted here and there so the “Navy would never want for oaks to build the fighting ships upon which the country’s safety depended.” (Quoted in Life in Nelson’s Navy, by Dudley Pope.) I propose that we make him your role model for the coming weeks. May his example inspire you to be both an effective warrior and a tender soul who takes practical actions to plan for the future.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Eighteenth-century

musician Giuseppe Tartini has been called “the godfather of modern violin playing.” He was also an innovative composer who specialized in poignant and poetic melodies. One of his most famous works is the Sonata in G Minor, also known as the Devil’s Trill. Tartini said it was inspired by a dream in which he made a pact with the Devil to provide him with new material. The Infernal One picked up a violin and played the amazing piece that Tartini transcribed when he woke up. Here’s the lesson for you: He didn’t actually sell his soul to the Devil. Simply engaging in this rebellious, taboo act in the realm of fantasy had the alchemical effect of unleashing a burst of creative energy. Try it!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The planets have

aligned in a curious pattern. I interpret it as meaning that you have cosmic permission to indulge in more self-interest and self-seeking than usual. So it won’t be taboo for you to unabashedly say, “What exactly is in it for me?” or “Prove your love, my dear” or “Gimmeee gimmeee gimmee what I want.” If someone makes a big promise, you shouldn’t be shy about saying, “Will you put that in writing?” If you get a sudden urge to snag the biggest piece of the pie, obey that urge.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the course of her

long career, Libran actress Helen Hayes won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy and a Tony. Years before all that glory poured down on her, she met playwright Charles MacArthur at a party in

a posh Manhattan salon. Hayes was sitting shyly in a dark corner. MacArthur glided over to her and slipped a few salted peanuts into her hand. “I wish they were emeralds,” he told her. It was love at first sight. A few years after they got married, MacArthur bought Hayes an emerald necklace. I foresee a metaphorically comparable event in your near future, Libra: peanuts serving as a promise of emeralds.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Welcome to the

Painkiller Phase of your cycle. It’s time to relieve your twinges, dissolve your troubles and banish your torments. You can’t sweep away the whole mess in one quick heroic purge, of course. But I bet you can pare it down by at least 33 percent. (More is quite possible.) To get started, make the following declaration five times a day for the next three days: “I am grateful for all the fascinating revelations and indispensable lessons that my pain has taught me.” On each of the three days after that, affirm this truth five times: “I have learned all I can from my pain, and therefore no longer need its reminders. Goodbye, pain.” On the three days after that, say these words, even if you can’t bring yourself to mean them with complete sincerity: “I forgive everybody of everything.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For the

foreseeable future, you possess the following powers: to make sensible that which has been unintelligible … to find amusement in situations that had been tedious … to create fertile meaning where before there had been sterile chaos. Congratulations, Sagittarius! You are a first-class transformer. But that’s not all. I suspect you will also have the ability to distract people from concerns that aren’t important … to deepen any quest that has been too superficial or careless to succeed … and to ask the good questions that will render the bad questions irrelevant.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the past

11 months, did you ever withhold your love on purpose? Have there been times when you “punished” those you cared about by acting cold and aloof? Can you remember a few occasions when you could have been more generous or compassionate, but chose not to be? If you answered yes to any of those questions, the next three weeks will be an excellent time to atone. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you can reap maximum benefit from correcting stingy mistakes. I suggest that you make gleeful efforts to express your most charitable impulses. Be a tower of bountiful power.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1415, a smaller

English army defeated French forces at the Battle of Agincourt in northern France. Essential to England’s victory were its 7,000 longbowmen—archers who shot big arrows using bows that were six feet long. So fast and skilled were these warriors that they typically had three arrows flying through the air at any one time. That’s the kind of high-powered proficiency I recommend that you summon during your upcoming campaign. If you need more training to reach that level of effectiveness, get it immediately.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let’s imagine your

life as a novel. The most recent chapter, which you’ll soon be drawing to a close, might be called “The Redemption of Loneliness.” Other apt titles: “Intimacy with the Holy Darkness” or “The Superpower of Surrender” or “The End Is Secretly the Beginning.” Soon you will start a new chapter, which I’ve tentatively dubbed “Escape from Escapism,” or perhaps “Liberation from False Concepts of Freedom” or “Where the Wild Things Are.” And the expansive adventures of this next phase will have been made possible by the sweet-and-sour enigmas of the past four weeks.

you can call rob Brezsny for your expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. and don’t forget to check out rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

Beyond dress-up Entertainment isn’t Vincent Damyanovich’s endgame when it  comes to sculpting masks. He’s into  transformation and possibly even  shifting consciousness. His Vanguard FX Studio is a modest garage space  in Curtis Park. There, he’s made  prosthetic props like false limbs for  medical training, zombie hands for  a The Walking Dead event, and envisioned fantasy worlds for his growing interest in set design. Masks and  character creation have their place  in entertainment, and Damyanovich  respects that. For example, what  if masks could transform a white  20-something redhead into an  incarcerated Latino gang member?  Damyanovich did that.

One of your works turns a white woman into a tattooed Latino gang inmate. Why do this? I wanted to take somebody that’s feminine and change her form so drastically that she becomes hypermasculinized. People are going to treat this person very different than her. And yet the idea is, “What if they’re the same person?” A whole shared humanity.

What are some of society’s masks? It can just be the masks that we put on when we go to work. “Who are we?” We are constantly asking. People know your face and when you change that, they relate to you a little bit differently. They serve as a reminder that our egos aren’t so solid and that things aren’t so chiseled in stone. The challenge of being human is that we are creative beings. All the problems we have, we created them. To have this conversation is maybe a step to start viewing masks as intentionally used specifically for that social purpose.

Is there healing potential in masks? The power of the mask is not just to conceal but the art of revealing. In some instances, masks predate language by 3,500 years. It takes you into a realm of archetype. It connects you to something bigger than yourself but also has the power to transform consciousness. Everything that we’re facing today requires a shift in consciousness. To bring back that aspect of masks in our culture is a way to problem-solve what we’re up against.

Are you exploring mental health in your work? Doing transformational makeups on various people over the years, I have seen lasting personality changes for the better. A couple

PHOTO COurTesy Of VinCenT damyanOViCH

Has anyone ever requested a prototype of their genitalia?

individuals have gone from quiet or mildly depressed to having more confidence or feeling that they are beautiful. That has really moved me. It’s an element that gets lost in entertainment. I’m trying to come into contact with a more fulfilling and larger picture of who we are as humans.

No. Occasionally you get the Exorcist request and you realize it’s a bedroom role-play thing.

What’s subconsciously at play when people choose a Halloween costume? There’s a desire to change. In that, there’s a space that, if explored, could shift consciousness. Be mindful that it’s an opportunity. In the desire to be a different identity there’s a transformational aspect that could have a healing benefit.

How do you deal with people who think of your work as weird? I’ve been dealing with that element of “it’s weird and strange” probably since kindergarten. Truly. But I want to explore that fear, rather than shy away from that. Masks are a great way to examine one’s fears. A friend of mine once told me being called weird is like being called “limited edition.” You’re something people don’t see every day.

Have you ever fallen in love with your fantasy characters? I almost become a bit possessed by the idea and the pursuit. When it’s all done, I think it’s just a relief. When I’m gripped by an idea there’s not a lot of rest. Do I fall in love? No. I do feel a bit more complete with myself. There’s also post-project blues where it doesn’t live up to the inner critic.

You were one of the final students of Dick Smith, the godfather of makeup. I feel a little pressure. I’m one of the very last proteges of Dick Smith. I studied under him almost five years. He was relentless and very tough, but that’s how I learned to be a decent sculptor. We talked on the phone probably once a week for four years.

What was the best advice he gave? It’s not enough to be committed, you really have to be obsessed. You have to live and breathe it. He’d also nitpick and nitpick and what he wanted you to do is eventually stand up for yourself and say, “Dick, I think this wrinkle is good!” He wanted you to be good with it. And now he’s in my head, always there to ask, “Are you sure?”

What’s next? I’m in the process of moving more into themed environments and set design. I’m also interested in public art and larger-scale sculpture. As far as mask-making I’m getting interested in self-portraits. What other faces do I have that I can play with? Ω

Learn more at http://vanguardfxstudio.com.

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