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UCD’s sUmmer of sCanDal

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K.J.’s seCret emails—at last

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Religious freedom, immigration, reproductive rights, race AND MORE: What to expect when The Donald takes office

Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

Joey GarCia’s GUiDe to love anD toleranCe

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Volume 28, iSSue 14

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thurSday, July

21, 2016

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newSreView.com


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EditoR’S NotE

July 21, 2016 | Vol. 28, iSSuE 14

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20 Our Mission: To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Editor Rachel Leibrock Associate Editor Raheem F. Hosseini Arts & Culture Editor Janelle Bitker Assistant Editor Anthony Siino Editorial Services Coordinator Karlos Rene Ayala Contributors Daniel Barnes, Ngaio Bealum, Alastair Bland, Rob Brezsny, Aaron Carnes, Jim Carnes, Willie Clark, Deena Drewis, Joey Garcia, Cosmo Garvin, Blake Gillespie, Lovelle Harris, Jeff Hudson, Jim Lane, Kel Munger, Kate Paloy, Patti Roberts, Ann Martin Rolke, Shoka, Bev Sykes, Graham Womack Editorial Interns Whitney Davis, Kris Hooks, Jeremy Winslow

26 Design Manager Lindsay Trop Art Directors Brian Breneman, Margaret Larkin Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Designer Kyle Shine Marketing/Publications Design Manager Serene Lusano Marketing/Publications Designer Sarah Hansel Contributing Photographers Lisa Baetz, Darin Bradford, Kevin Cortopassi, Evan Duran, Luke Fitz, Jon Hermison, Shoka, Lauran Fayne Worthy Director of Sales and Advertising Corey Gerhard Sales Coordinator Joanna Graves Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Olla Swanson, Joy Webber, Kelsi White Advertising Consultants Angel De La O, Stephanie Johnson, Matt Kjar, Paul McGuinness, Wendy Russell, Manushi Weerasinghe Director of First Impressions David Lindsay Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Kimberly Bordenkircher, Daniel Bowen, Heather Brinkley, Allen Brown, Mike Cleary, Jack Clifford, Lydia Comer, Rob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Garry Foster, Joanna Gonzalez-Brown, Greg Meyers, Aswad Morland,

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32 Kenneth Powell, Gilbert Quilatan, Lloyd Rongley, Lolu Sholotan, Jonathan Taea N&R Publications Editor Michelle Carl N&R Publications Writers Kate Gonzales, Anne Stokes, Natasha vonKaenel Senior N&R Publications Consultant Dave Nettles N&R Publications Consultants Elena Ruiz, Julie Sherry President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Director of Nuts & Bolts Deborah Redmond Director of People & Culture David Stogner Marketing/Promotions/Facilities Manager Will Niespodzinski Executive Coordinator Jessica Takehara Director of Dollars & Sense Nicole Jackson Payroll/AP Wizard Miranda Dargitz Accounts Receivable Specialist Kortnee Angel Sweetdeals Specialist/HR Coordinator Courtney DeShields Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins 1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Fax (916) 498-7910 Website www.newsreview.com

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Got a News Tip? sactonewstips@newsreview.com Calendar Events www.newsreview.com/calendar Want to Advertise? Fax (916) 498-7910 or snradinfo@newsreview.com Classifieds (916) 498-1234, ext. 5 or classifieds@newsreview.com Job Opportunities jobs@newsreview.com Want to Subscribe to SN&R? sactosubs@newsreview.com Editorial Policies: opinions expressed in Sn&R are those of the authors and not of chico community Publishing, inc. contact the editor for permissions to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. Sn&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or review materials. Email letters to snrletters@newsreview.com. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies: All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes the responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. Sn&R is printed at Bay Area news Group on recycled newsprint. circulation of Sn&R is verified by the circulation verification council. Sn&R is a member of Sacramento Metro chamber of commerce, cnPA, AAn and AWn.

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I’m writing this on the morning of  the second day of the Republican  National Convention. Rudy Guilani has  already stoked fear. Patricia Smith  has already demonized Hillary Clinton.  Melania Trump has already appeared,  reading from a plagiarized Michelle  Obama speech. Donald Trump has  even briefly surfaced, preening to  Queen’s “We Are the Champions.” There are those who didn’t believe  this moment would actually arrive.  Delegates would revolt. GOP leaders  would discover a backbone. Trump  himself would reject the nomination. “It will never happen,” they said,  trying to reassure themselves about  a racist, sexist, xenophobic narcissist.  Oh, it’s happening. Save a miraculous last-minute ditch, Donald Trump  will be the Republican candidate for  president. So, now what? This week’s feature  story “The United States of Trump”  (see page 12) examines what life could  be like if Trump is elected.  It started out as something of a  joke—ha ha, what if?—but good oldfashioned reporting quickly sobered  us up. Foreign policy and guns. Race and  immigration. Abortion, healthcare  and LGBTQ rights. Here, SN&R writers  take Trump’s statements and report  how they could play out if blowhard  bombast becomes policy. Turns out it’s not funny at all. It’s  downright frightening. And it’s a  reminder to stop looking for that lastminute miracle. Whether you’re a Democrat or  Republican, a staunch Bernie supporter or a Jill Stein convert, now  is not the time to give into Trump’s  brand of fear.  Doing so could prove to be a brutal  blow—not just to democracy, but to  humanity as a whole.

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“I always eat anythIng new and anythIng frIed.”

asked at tHe CaliforNia state fair:

What is your favorite thing to do at the fair?

Howard NielseN retired

I love the food. One of my favorites in the morning is the cinnamon rolls. They are warm. I love watching my 9-year-old grandaughter have fun. She loves the carnival side. Usually we come every year; this year my wife had knee surgery. They are doing a good job here, but I miss the old fairgrounds, over off of Broadway.

aliCia roBerts medical receptionist

My favorite thing at the fair is the rides. I love the food and the interaction with other people. I love the whole community feel. We like to interact with all of the people. Deep fried Oreos are the best thing to eat. [My cousin and I] did the ride called the “Crazy Train.”

Natalie Vargas administrative coordinator

We are here to see Sebastian Maniscalco, the comedian. He is current and clean compared to some of the comedians out there. He is kind of an old-world Italian guy. I enjoyed the rides when I was younger. Funnel cake is my favorite food here.

ColleeN lowry nurse

I like to come every year and one of my favorite things to do is to ride the Ferris wheel. I also like to look at the exhibits, in particular the art. Fine art— I like the paintings. We see the livestock. We sit and have a lunch here. We like everything about the fair.

tom lowry finance

My favorite things about the fair are the exhibits: from the arts to the animal barns and so on. I like the fact that the 4H kids put so much time and energy into it. It is great to see. I don’t so much chat with them because they all look busy, but my wife and I like to go through and admire their work.

k ale Br adeN community college dean

Coming and watching the shows is my favorite thing to do at the state fair. I am actually here to see the cloggers. I look forward to the fair every year. The weather doesn’t hurt this year. I always eat anything new and anything fried.

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A fix, but no solution Re “Black Monday” by Kris Hooks (SN&R News, July 14): Here is a simple idea to help protect targeted groups from  life-or-death situations in traffic stops: When you get in a car, put  your ID and registration on the dash. Get into the habit of doing  this. This prevents having to reach into any pocket for anything.  This is much safer for both the driver and the officer, who doesn’t  know if you are going to pull a gun. The antiquated system of pulling a piece of paper out of a pocket for an officer is really dangerous for both parties and needs to be changed. We need digitally  scannable IDs/registration that can be held up to a window or  scanned through the windshield. If the ID matches the car owner,  no one needs to open a pocket or glove box or open a window.  Hands can be in plain sight at all times. This doesn’t address the  inherent racism in all of this, but this a very practical way to  protect people right now.   

PhiliP SummerS Davis

Re “After Dallas” by Dave Kempa (SN&R Essay, July 14): I very much appreciated Dave Kempa’s essay. It was a thoughtful piece and much needed in this violence/revengeis-the-first-resort age. Violent protests are a lose-lose proposition for everyone. Thank you and thank you to your paper for continually keeping our local politicians’ feet to the fire—particularly your efforts in the Kevin Johnson situation. I admire you. Good investigative journalism is hard to come by (and not easy) nowadays. Barb Rohrer Roseville

Hello, anarchy Re “Fighting Words” by Ngaio Bealum (SN&R Essay, July 7): Ngaio Bealum’s invective relating to the clash between neo-Nazis and anti-fascists

needs to be reined in. The CHP issued a permit after making the presumably tough call that the gathering would not stoop to the level of terrorism. Correct or not, such decisions do not give citizens the right to be violent. Bealum does not get to decide who is the terrorist here. Terrorism is defined in the courts and should be acted on by the responsible authorities. We must also take care not to sweep up as terrorists all those who have had a blemished record of racial justice. In fact, many groups which today work courageously for racial justice have come out of a sad history of intolerance. Bealum notes that people get fired for saying stupid, racist things. But such firings result from due process, and not from the decisions of individuals. In a democracy, citizens help guide policy. When individuals make ad hoc policy, we have an anarchy. Evan Jones Sacramento

ONLINE BUZZ

On tHe lOcAl prOtests in respOnse tO tHe deAtHs Of AltOn sterling And pHilAndO cAstile: I hope people give them water  so they can hang out not matter  what the temperature. Protesting  is a citizens right.

Autumn Sky hAll v ia Fa c e b o o k

the juDge’S ruling in FAvor oF Sn&r in the lAwSuit with mAyor kevin johnSon: Congrats to @SacNewsReview  on your victory. Shame on you @ KJ_MayorJohnson #shady

@wwlinAreS

@SacNewsReview

Facebook.com/ SacNewsReview

@SacNewsReview

online Buzz contributions are not edited for grammar, spelling or clarity.

07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   5


UC Davis administrative issues are putting the school’s reputation through the grinder.

Summer of scandal How will ongoing leadership turmoil affect the UC Davis brand? by Kris HooKs

An extended version of this story is available at www.newsreview.com/ sacramento

The fifth floor of UC Davis’ Mrak Hall has experienced some changes in recent months. What was once filled with student protesters and covered wall-to-wall with signs calling for Chancellor Linda Katehi’s termination is no longer. Instead, the chancellor’s office is essentially locked off to the public. Visitors wishing to take the elevator to the floor are met with an inoperable fifth-floor button and greeted with a “For media questions, call …” sign on the stairwell door. It’s the perfect metaphor for the leadership troubles at UC Davis, caused by a scandal-driven administrative carousel that has already chewed through a

6   |   SN&R   |   07.21.16

longtime chancellor and her chief financial officer, and cast a shadow on the current office-holder. “This has been Exhibit A through Z with a morally bankrupt administration under chancellor Katehi,” said Assemblyman Kevin McCarty, on of the first lawmakers to call for the chancellor’s resignation. As UC officials try to stabilize one of the nation’s top universities, is it only a matter of time before the embarrassing public chaos taints the lucrative UCD brand? First, a refresher: In April, after a series of controversial missteps, University of California President Janet Napolitano put

k r ish @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

Katehi on investigative leave, temporarily replacing her with provost and Executive Vice Chancellor Ralph Hexter. Katehi has been accused of nepotism, misspending student funds and misstating her role in an online propaganda strategy to drown out negative news reports about the campus. A month after Katehi’s suspension, UC Davis Chief Financial Officer Dave Lawlor abruptly resigned after 18 months. Neither Lawlor nor UC Davis officials have given an explanation regarding his exit. The Sacramento Bee first reported in March that Katehi stepped down from her paid position as board member of the DeVry Education Group, a for-profit

ILLUSTRATION BY MEG LARKIN

company being investigated by the Federal Trade Commission for participating in predatory lending practices, before she was paid. Aside from the $70,000 she would’ve made with DeVry had she not stepped down, Katehi did receive $420,000 for her role serving as a board member of the textbook publishing company John Wiley & Sons from 2012-14. But despite agreeing that some of Katehi’s moonlighting practices were against university policy, Napolitano backed her. And she backed Katehi again when UC Davis students occupied the chancellor’s office for five weeks. Katehi spokesman Larry Kamer argued that some of the accusations his client is facing are “regularly done by other administrators in the UC system.” “What we want to know is, what was it that changed, in just a month’s time, for [Napolitano] to do a complete 180 and put Chancellor Katehi under investigation,” he told SN&R. The final straw, it seems, came two weeks before the suspension, when The Bee reported Katehi spent $175,000 to


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lAst of tHe k.J. files scrub the internet of negative images from the 2011 pepper-spray incident in which UC Davis police officers dosed peaceful protesters in the campus quad. The protest, part of the larger Occupy movement, was one of several large demonstrations across the UC system over steep tuition increases. Later, it was learned that the UC system mounted its own $158,000 online campaign to counter a disparaging state audit that claimed its admissions policies targeted nonresident students because of the higher tuition. But those allegations come as little surprise to students like Emily Breuninger, an elected officer of the Davis chapter of the UC Student-Workers Union and one of the students who staged the weekslong occupation in Mrak Hall. “Hubris is the name of the game with university administration,” Breuninger said. “I wouldn’t put it past Napolitano to do shady things. I trust her about as much as I do Katehi.” Last week, Napolitano recommended modest changes to the UC Regents that would allow administrators only two outside paid jobs instead of the previous three. Katehi, her lawyers and her media team have been busy since the start of the investigation. As part of the process, Katehi and former U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag, who is leading the investigation, met in Sacramento for a combined 12 hours on June 29 and July 1, Kamer told SN&R. Following the meeting, Kamer said his client is “feeling confident” about the investigation, despite having previously claimed it was compromised because of Napolitano’s role in it. Barring any setbacks, Haag’s investigation is expected to wrap up by August 1. even as uc Davis’ past chancellor haunts the campus, questions are simmering about the man poised to take her place. Napolitano appointed Hexter the acting chancellor while the increasingly bitter uncoupling with Katehi unfolds. But Hexter, who resigned as president of Hampshire College amid a storm of similar controversy in 2010, comes with his own baggage. “[Hexter] was forced out of Hampshire College by students for the same sort of shit—misuse of funds,” Breuninger contended, referring to his abrupt exit as president of the Massachusetts liberal arts school. Although it isn’t certain that Hexter was pushed out by the Hampshire College community, his August 2010 resignation after five years as president was preceded by Katehi-like decisions.

In 2010, Hexter had plans of spendstill, the above drama has yet to affect ing upward of $350,000 to construct an two of the university’s biggest markers of admissions office in the Adele Simmons success. Hall, a building located in the center of the UC Davis is still U.S. News & World Massachusetts campus. With it would’ve Report’s No. 1 ranked school for veterinary been an adjoining parking structure, accordmedicine and agriculture, and Forbes’ No. 1 ing to articles from the local newspaper, the college for women in STEM fields. Daily Hampshire Gazette. Admissions are still soaring, too. The problem, as Hampshire College Numbers announced by the UC’s Office alumnus Michael Meo remembered, was of the President show a big increase in that faculty and students only learned about Davis’ freshman admissions. The school the project weeks before it was set to begin. admitted a total of 4,301 new students for At the time, the college was facing an the upcoming fall semester—a 17.4 percent economic crisis and was cutting back. There increase from the previous year. was also the issue of college tuition, which, And, according to U.S. News’ chief according to Hampshire College records, data strategist Robert Morse, the current increased $1,114 for the 2010-11 school year problems won’t likely shroud the college’s to $51,279. status as a top university, either. Students and faculty wanted to know “It’s rare to see major year-over-year why the project had been kept secret. changes in a school’s ranking due to move“There was lots of confusion, because ments in one or two areas,” Morse said in we only had about three weeks left of an email. “Acceptance rate, for example, school when we found out,” Meo said. “We accounts for 1.25 percent of a school’s created a platform for discussion for adminranking, so it would take a major drop in istration to tell us what was happening, but applications to have a noteworthy effect. Hexter didn’t show up or respond.” Academic reputation is also very stable and Instead, Meo said Hexter holed up in his typically changes very little year to year.” office when he was confronted Nevertheless, despite the administraby students staging a sit-in tion’s everything-will-be-fine to demand answers. message, lawmakers like “That was a rallyMcCarty haven’t let up. “I wouldn’t put ing point,” Meo McCarty, who sits it past Napolitano to said. “People used on the state’s Assembly it as a launch Budget Subcommittee do shady things. I trust pad to express on Education and her about as much as I do their dissatisfacFinance, wants more Katehi.” tion with the legislative oversight of administration the university system. Emily Breuninger and Hexter.” At next month’s meeting officer, Davis chapter of the UC In response of the Joint Legislative Student-Workers Union to the lack of Audit Committee, he said he transparency, students will request an audit into the issued a list of demands, spending of the UC president and and called for the project to the system’s individual chancellors. be halted. Ultimately, Hexter responded “The system can’t just be content and to students by email, announcing that the say, ‘Linda Katehi’s issues are in the past’ project was put on hold until “the campus and move on from it,” McCarty explained. could collectively engage in discussions “We have to find a system to prevent this about this issue with campus committees from happening again.” and in wider venues.” Current students still want to see Hexter resigned three months later, and change, too—not just at UC Davis, but the plan never came to fruition. He didn’t in the entire university system, which respond to an SN&R request for comment. Breuninger believes needs to dismantled Dianne Klein, a spokeswoman for and restructured. UCD’s Office of the President, says the “Katehi is just an hyperbolic example of administration is confident in Hexter’s abilwhat’s actually happening in all university ity to take over, even if just temporarily. systems,” Breuninger said. “Our fight isn’t “Clearly we had no concerns in placing over. We need to connect with other UCs to Hexter as the acting chancellor,” Klein said. fight against this privatization of our public “And if, hypothetically, there were to be a universities.” Ω new chancellor, we would hope he stays as interim until one is hired.”

More than 16 months after SN&R filed a public records request and just over a year after mayor kevin Johnson sued sn&r and the city of sacramento to block their release, 70 emails and documents were finally released to this paper on Monday. The move came 10 days after a judge ruled the documents were not protected by attorney-client privilege and must be released. The emails between Johnson, city staff and others detail the mayor’s attempt to force out leaders of the National Conference of Black Mayors and date as far back as June 2013. Some of the information remains redacted, pursuant to the court order. Many of the emails were sent using Johnson’s OMKJ (for “Office of Kevin Johnson”) Gmail account. They connect the dots on the mayor’s attempt to take over the ncbm and include some messages and documents directly from the NCBM. One document, dated July 8, 2013, for example, was sent to the judge in a dispute between the NCBM and Johnson. The letter, on NCBM letterhead, represented “the majority of the Board of Directors for the National Conference of Black Mayors” and contested Johnson’s claim that he had been properly elected as president of that organization: “Despite failing to meet certain requirements such as the proper formation of a Nominating Committee, holding a secret vote, and ensuring that all voting parties were members in good standing, mayor Johnson claimed he was properly elected. this is not true.” Meanwhile, a September 13 email from Johnson to the email address “ncbmlitigation@gmail.com” detailed the mayor’s attempt to oust NCBM Executive Director Vanessa Williams. “We are cautiously optimistic that there will be an agreed upon settlement in the near future,” Johnson wrote, in regards to William’s “possible … resignation.” Read the entirety of the emails and documents at SN&R’s Page Burner blog, www.newsreview.com/pageburner. (Rachel Leibrock)

Joint pAss Rancho Cordova is still saying no to marijuana dispensaries—and the tax dollars generated by their sales. At the July 5 city council meeting, City Attorney Adam Lindgren submitted a report detailing “significant tax revenue” to elected officials who listened politely then decided to uphold their current prohibition, citing concerns with violating federal law and the drug’s increased potency in recent years. The issue arose anew because of the Adult use of marijuana Act, which will come before California voters in November. If approved, the initiative would allow adults to possess up to 28.5 grams of marijuana for recreational use, and would place a 15 percent tax on the gross receipts of any retail sale, in addition to any other taxes levied by city and county governments. Sacramento City Councilman Jay Schenirer has proposed tacking on a 3 to 4 percent tax that the council would decide how to spend. A similar proposal fell short on the June ballot. In Rancho Cordova, medical users must keep grow spaces smaller than 25 square feet. Aside from that, private, indoor cultivation is allowed. Potential growers do have to file a permit, which costs a whopping $600 per square foot, in comparison to—say— Long Beach, which only charges between $15 and $50 per square foot. Maria Kniestedt, a spokeswoman for the city, said there are no permits on file. (John Flynn)

07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   7


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Grace Loescher is the program director for Tubman House, a transitional living community for homeless, parenting youth and their children; and director of the Creation District, a creative studio space bringing together youth from all social divides.

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Sacramento prides itself on taking the compassionate “housing first” approach to tackling our city’s ever-increasing problem of homelessness. But I fear that the definition has shifted from a liberal concept, representing the belief that all individuals deserve no-barrier housing, to code speak for a narrowly defined program could perpetuate the cycle of homelessness. Under the housing-first model, prioritization is determined by a survey that assigns each individual a score corresponding to his or her level of vulnerability. Those with the highest vulnerability scores are placed in “permanent supportive housing,” long-term community-based housing that provides comprehensive support services. Those lacking enough factors to deem them highly vulnerable are moved into “rapid re-housing,” a short-term assistance program that usually offers a few months of financial rent assistance and minimal support services. This is a great plan in theory, but when we prioritize housing needs strictly by federally defined criteria and a survey that aims to quantify vulnerability, we end up leaving our homeless youth out of the picture. Most homeless youth do not have lifelong disabling conditions. They are simply young, lacking support, and too often bear the trauma of abuse. They don’t fit the definition of chronic homelessness, but need far more support than a few months of rent relief to achieve self-sufficiency. I recently reconnected with a youth I worked with nearly two years ago back when she was first homeless. Through the housing-first model—and here I mean the specific federal implementation and not the root philosophy—she was deemed highly vulnerable and transitioned into permanent supportive housing. After a few months, she was evicted from her unit because her partner assaulted her, causing fear and uproar in her supportive housing community. She is now back at square one, homeless and further traumatized. How can this be “housing first” if there are no “services second”? I don’t blame Sacramento for taking this approach—it’s where the federal dollars are—but I do challenge us to be the city that thinks more critically about the problem of homelessness. The youth that I referenced will be painted as a success story when it comes to the “data” we are collecting—after all, she got into housing, right? Who cares what happens next? Sacramento needs to be the city that doesn’t turn a blind eye to the gaping holes in this system. That would be an approach I could put my faith in. Ω

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A Turkish witch hunt I hope democracy rather than  dictatorship prevails in Turkey by jeff vonkaenel

Last week, there was an attempted coup in Turkey that left hundreds dead, thousands jailed and a troubled world even more troubled. In the aftermath of this failed coup, Turkey’s President Recep Erdogan is going on a witch hunt. He’s dismissed 2,500 judges and is threatening life sentences for those soldiers who participated in the coup attempt. Blaming the coup on on his former ally, Muslim cleric Fethullah Gülen, who has lived in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania since the late 1990s, Erdogan has asked the United States to arrest Gülen and send him back to Turkey for trial. He has also officially designated Gülen’s organization as a terror organization. Gülen himself has denied any involvement in the coup, telling reporters, “Through military intervention, democracy cannot be achieved.” The Gülen organization has created more than 100 charter schools in the United States and schools for both boys and girls worldwide. It promotes a peace-loving form of Islam, and has backed study missions for thousands of Americans to Turkey. Along with dozens of other American Leadership Forum members from Sacramento, I visited Turkey with the Gülen Pacifica Institute in 2008. I thoroughly enjoyed my 10-day study mission. We were constantly on the move, visiting Turkish schools and media outlets, spending a night with a Turkish family, attending services at the mosques, seeing the sights and drinking a lot of tea. Our guides, who were generous and knowledgeable, gave us a nonstop education about all things Turkey. When I spoke with Turkish journalists who were worried about being jailed for writing stories critical of the military, or when I saw the joy of parents watching their elementary school children dancing in a festival, I saw a complexity

je ffv @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

of Turkish history and culture that I had not previously been aware of. When I returned to Sacramento I attended the Natomas Charter School One Voice event. Natomas Charter School students connected up with a Gülen movement high school in Turkey. Working together, students from these two schools produced a wonderful performance focusing on the concept that the students’ similarities as humans were so much greater than their differences. These experiences have given me a profound appreciation for both the Turkish people and their history. The Gülen movement supported education and media, they sought out interfaith activities and dialogue and they called for a peaceful interpretation of Islam. The followers of Gülen played a major role in Erdogan’s original rise to power and supported his efforts to curb the military. But in 2013, they were critical of corruption in the president’s office. The Gülen newspapers and television stations which revealed those corruption scandals have been shut down. Erdogan has designated the Gülen organization as a terror organization, and now has called for Fethullah Gülen’s extradition from the United States, claiming that he instigated this coup. And Erdogan has dismissed 2,500 judges, putting himself in a position to control the judicial system in Turkey. My hope is that the schools and newspapers and TV stations that I visited in Turkey will be allowed to reopen or continue to function and that democracy will prevail in Turkey. My fear is that Erdogan’s response to this coup could lead Turkey closer to dictatorship than democracy. Ω

Jeff vonKaenel is the president, CEO and majority owner of the News & Review.


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A failed floor mutiny. a suspiciously familiar first lady speech. Scott Baio, Rudy Giuliani and Newt Gingrich. And that was just the first day of the Republican National Convention! We’ll give the GOP this, they know how to go down with a bang.

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11


SN&R takes ‘The Donald’ at his word and imagines a nation rebuilt in his image. The horror.

by JaNelle biTkeR, FabiaN GaRcia, blake GilleSpie, kRiS HookS, RaHeem F. HoSSeiNi, Dave kempa, kel muNGeR aND GRaHam Womack illuSTRaTioNS by SeReNe luSaNo

12   |   SN&R   |   07.21.16


We owe Donald Trump an apology. That is to say, the media underestimated the business-mogul-turned-presidential-threat, who, this week in  Cleveland, cemented the Republican nomination for our nation’s highest office. As he rises from the pulverized  ashes of the Grand Old Party to face Hillary Clinton in a distressingly close race, SN&R has a confession: We didn’t see this coming. We did not anticipate that a 70-year-old trust-fund brat, who implies Saddam Hussein is a ninja but President  Barack Obama is a terrorist, who responds to violent tragedies by claiming props, who was born rich and bailed  out by his daddy (and the taxpayers) but retains a poverty of speech and heart, could get this close to being the  leader of the free world. Well, we were dead wrong. But we’ve learned our lesson. No more doubting “The Donald.” He may seem like a fictional creation—Weird  Scienced together when someone spilled orange Crush on a Fox News message board—but Trump has proved he’s  all too real. So in this issue, we imagine the world in his honey-baked image. Every notable campaign promise, every brash claim, every 140-character vow—we’re taking them apart and  extrapolating them to their (il)logical conclusions. We’re not examining whether Trump’s promises are plausible, mind you. There are plenty of responsible media  outlets doing that kind of journalism. We here at SN&R believe in taking this radioactive bag of Slim Jims at his  literal word. Deporting 11 million undocumented. Cracking down on Muslims. Overturning abortion rights and gay  marriage. Tax-battling into World War III. This is our next president’s. Best. Case. Scenario. Scream accordingly. —RFH

President trumP

will build his wall It’s Sunday, January 20, 2019, in Sacramento. Donald Trump has been president of the United States for exactly two years—and he’s silenced the doubters by achieving his tackiest architectural achievement: He’s turned America into a gated community.

will get tough on islam The 8-year-old boy says the worst thing about residing in the Walerga Assembly Center in Sacramento is that he no longer sees his friends. Seated on the bottom bunk inside one of the Muslim detention center’s male dormitories, the

continued on page 14

President trumP

“THE U NITED STATES OF TR UMP”

Despite PolitiFact upholding former Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s assertion that the project “will take literally years” to build, Trump’s wall is completely erect, with Mexico footing the bill. The wall covers about 1,000 miles of a 1,954-mile stretch from Brownsville, Texas, to California’s Imperial Beach and stands at a towering … oh, I don’t know, let’s just go with 40 feet. So what has the Trump administration gotten from achieving the politically (and physically) impossible? “More deaths,” posits Kevin Johnson, dean of UC Davis’ School of Law. “People are coming for work, and some of them are desperate. They’re already dying in the desert, and it’s hard to imagine that a wall—even a formidable wall—is going to halt all undocumented immigration.” Johnson concedes the wall would likely slow migration patterns into the country, even though more Mexican immigrants have been leaving the United States than coming in since 2009, according to a 2014 study by the Mexican National Survey of Demographic Dynamics. As for the undocumented immigrants already here? A reallife nightmare. Johnson says there’s only one way to deport 11 million people on such a quick timetable as Trump promised: ongoing military-style raids. And we’re not talking the Operation Wetback raids from the Eisenhower days either, when Gen. Joseph Swing helped deport a little more than a million undocumented immigrants in its first

year of implementation. This effort would need to at least be quadrupled for Trump to meet his twoyear pledge, especially in California, where nearly a quarter of the nation’s undocumented currently reside. (According to the Public Policy Institute of California’s last estimate in 2013, about 56,500 of them live in Sacramento County.) Aside from the fact that the rest of the world now views America much like it did East Germany and its Berlin Wall all those years ago—territorial, exclusive, standoffish—Johnson says this would undoubtedly lead to countless civil rights violations, wrongful deportations and an abrupt breakdown of our communities as we know them. And let’s not forget the erasure of 9 percent of California’s total workforce, 14 percent of the state’s construction industry, 38 percent of the state’s agriculture industry and about $130 billion of California’s gross domestic product, as confirmed through a study done by the University of Southern California and the California Immigrant Policy Center in 2014. What would day-to-day life look like here in Sacramento, though? “I could see raids at Southside Park on the weekends,” Johnson says, adding that anyone “viewed by other people as different and foreign” would be afraid to go out in public. “If Donald Trump is serious about a mass deportation campaign, and is really trying to deport 11 to 12 million people, it’s going to affect just about every aspect of American social life.” —F.G.

youth picks at the star and crescent woven into his baggy jumpsuit, issued to him by the nation’s revived Wartime Civil Control Administration. Six months ago, he was playing soccer and pretending to be one of the Avengers with his pals. Then the latest bad thing happened, he can’t say what. All he knows is that he doesn’t see those friends anymore, his parents look tired all the time and he misses his dog and computer. Way back in November 2015, during a rally in Birmingham, Ala., candidate Trump called for “surveillance of certain mosques.” Soon after, he called for a “total and complete shutdown” of Muslims coming into the country until our representatives could “figure out what is going on.” He’s also said he’d “strongly consider” shutting down American mosques and wouldn’t rule out the prospect of creating a database tracking Muslims in the United States. While he flirted with the idea of internment camps, he later ruled that out as something he wouldn’t do. But times change—and The Donald is a scared man. As president, he wants to write that paranoia into the law. And history has already shown us how that goes. Law enforcement has surveilled mosques in the past. As the American Civil Liberties Union points out, the New York City Police Department began peeping and profiling Muslim houses of worship in 2002. A Trump America will take the NYPD’s template to a national scale. Trump’s enforcers will map out American Muslim communities across the country based on dominant national backgrounds, including “American Black Muslims.” They’ll then hold stakeouts outside mosques to gather photo and video “evidence,” recruit so-called “mosque crawlers” to go in and try to spark talk of jihad or terrorism and even send officers inside dressed as mosquegoers to keep a closer eye on worshipers. The ACLU reports the NYPD’s surveillance created an atmosphere of fear and mistrust within mosques and the Muslim community. Congregants approached newcomers with anxiety, unsure if they were “crawlers” or plainclothes officers. This chilled discourse within mosque walls and deeply damaged relationships between law enforcement and New York Muslims. Imagine this nightmare for all our nation’s 3.3 million Muslims. American Muslims will also see severed bonds with family and friends abroad. No Muslim outside our borders—be they from England, Iran or Brazil— will be allowed to enter the United States. That is, at least, until we “figure out what is going on.” A Trump America will never “figure out what is going on,” of course, and international travel— both to and from the U.S.—will plummet. As Trump’s hateful rhetoric echoes through 2016, America has seen a rise in violence against worshipers of Islam. From the doctor shot outside his Houston mosque to the teens beaten outside their Brooklyn house of worship, watchdog

07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   13


“THE UNITED STATES OF TRUMP” continued FroM page 13

nonprofits are taking note of a nation reaching its boiling point. Even the kids are scared. The Southern Poverty Law Center reports that teachers are increasingly hearing their Muslim students called names like “terrorist,” “ISIS” or “bomber.” Some students believe a President Trump will order microchips implanted under their skin. But an internment camp? Trump told ABC’s This Week in March he ruled out the idea. “But I would—I would say you have to be extremely strong,” he added. “You have to keep your eyes open.” Expect this sort of rhetoric and fear to reach a fever pitch under President Trump. —D.K.

President trumP will outlaw abortion Thousands of cars snarl across the bridge over the Colorado River and all the way up to Yucca in Arizona, just east of the Interstate 40 border 14   |   SN&R   |   07.21.16

crossing into California, one of the few safeharbor states left for women. At the front of the checkpoint, a fatigued officer with the Arizona Department of Fetal Rights guides his wand over a woman’s stomach and gets a hit. She’s concealing a contraband pregnancy, about nine weeks in, judging by the ultrasound readings on his portable monitor. “Interstate travel while pregnant is a felony here in Arizona,” he tells the woman. “For the health of your unborn child, I’m placing you under arrest.” Another pregnant fugitive stopped at the border. The year is 2020, three years into President Trump’s first term. Though he once spoke in favor of reproductive rights as a mere mortal businessman, tricky Trump refashioned himself a hard-line pro-lifer, albeit one that was often contradicted by his own handlers. During a March 30, 2016, town hall interview with MSNBC’s Chris Matthews, for instance, the

candidate suggested women who obtain abortions in his America deserved “some form of punishment.” His campaign later issued a corrective, but then he selected as his running mate Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, whose state jailed at least two women for “feticide,” including one who was sentenced to 30 years in prison for attempting a self-abortion. “There are people who have just miscarried and they’re gone after for criminal charges,” said Eileen Schnitger, director of public policy for Women’s Health Specialists in Sacramento. “Women are being criminalized.” As president, Trump vowed to appoint U.S. Supreme Court justices who will overturn Roe v. Wade and allow states to independently regulate

a woman’s uterus. Despite overwhelming public support for a woman’s right to choose, anti-choice forces have seized the political momentum at the statehouse level. Twelve states already have plans to ban abortion the minute Roe is overturned, according to


the Guttmacher Institute, a research and policy organization that supports sexual and reproductive health. Another 11 states have kept pre-Roe abortion bans on their legislative books, and are just waiting to enforce them. What happens when nearly half the country cuts off access to comprehensive reproductive health care? The same thing that always does: Self-induced abortions skyrocket, as they did in Texas, where as many as 240,000 women attempted to terminate their pregnancies after lawmakers began sharply reducing the number of clinics across the populous state. Women are imprisoned for unlawful abortions, as they were in Indiana, Utah, Georgia and other states where onerous restrictions criminalize desperation. And the most zealous states go even further, conjuring new ways to constrict a woman’s autonomy. “A Trump presidency would be a disaster for women,” said Rebecca Griffin, assistant director of programs for NARAL Pro-Choice California. “Many states have already shown an irrepressible appetite for attacking women’s right to choose, whether they’re mandating long waiting periods or appointing lawyers to defend fetuses against pregnant women. Without the protections of Roe, those states would be eager to block access. We know that when abortion is inaccessible, women still seek abortion care; they just have procedures that are far less safe.” That’s happening today, not in a distant, alternate future. But a few years from now? Police states regulating the movements of childbearingage women may not be far off. —RFH

President trumP will take on China

answer,” Trump told the New York Times on March 25. “We need unpredictability.” Trump won’t rule it out. In fact, the potential for war is his strategy—for war. And he’s ready to pounce on China’s ally, North Korea. “I would get China to make [Kim Jong Un] disappear in one form or another very quickly,” Trump said on CBS This Morning on February 10. He didn’t explicitly say he meant assassinating the North Korean dictator, but added, “Well, I’ve heard of worse things.” With language like that, Trump could very well lead us into World War III. —J.B.

President trumP will turn his baCk on ‘the gays’

President trumP will promote the seCond amendment

Second Amendment? Pshaw. Under President Trump, the right to bear arms comes first. Exhibit A: His statements following last month’s gun massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, in which 49 people were killed and another 53 wounded. Trump imagined a nightclub filled with people armed to the hip, ankle and teeth with hardware engaged in a shootout with gunman Omar Mateen as a “beautiful, beautiful sight.” Even the National Rifle Association distanced itself. “No one thinks that people should go into a nightclub drinking and carrying firearms,” Chris Cox, executive director of the NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action, told ABC’s This Week. “That defies common sense. It also defies the law. It’s not what we’re talking about here.” Well, it is what Trump’s talking about. His website sends a clear message—against background checks and gun magazine bans, and for a national right to carry law that allows good, honest, presumably white Americans to walk around concealing guns on their persons. (After all, it’s the “gang members and drug dealers” that Trump said he will target.) Sacramento County knows all about that. Here, one out of every 135 adults has a conceal-carry permit, thanks to Sheriff Scott Jones’ permissive policy. Jones, a first-time congressional candidate, has endorsed Trump. Yet, ironically, a Trump presidency may actually be bad for gun sales. “It would be disastrous for the industry,” said Duke University Professor Philip Cook, co-author of The Gun Debate. “The industry has thrived under the Democrats. It’s a joke that Obama is the best gun salesman the industry has.”

Continued on page 17

Most voters have probably seen the video clip of Donald Trump claiming to be a friend to “the gays.” If that were true, you’d think someone would have fixed his hair and makeup by now. Still, even if he’s not best buds with “the gays,” no one has suggested that Trump has any overt animus toward LGBTQ people, and high-profile celebrity trans woman Caitlyn Jenner has asserted her support for him. But the same Trump who congratulated Elton John on his civil union to David Furnish in 2005 now has “do ask, better tell” Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate. So now, in order to get his base on (no Republican has won without the religious right’s vote since 1972), he officially supports “traditional” marriage. Brandon Lorenz, a staffer at the Human Rights Campaign, has no doubt about what a Trump presidency would mean for LGBTQ Americans. “It would be devastating,” he said. He pointed to Trump’s recent support for North Carolina’s noxious House Bill 2, the “show us what’s in your pants before you pee” legislation that makes it illegal to use a public restroom that doesn’t match the person’s gender assigned at birth, and at his support for the so-called First Amendment Defense Act, which would make it legal for businesses that serve the public to deny service to LGBTQ people. “If you put the anti-gay representatives in Congress together with Donald Trump, it would be a disaster,” Lorenz said. George Raya, a veteran gay rights activist and a board member at the Sacramento LGBT Community Center, doesn’t trust Trump with his rights, particularly given the people he’s counting on to win the election. “He can’t have it both ways,” Raya said. “He can’t say, ‘Oh, I’m your best friend’ in one room and then go into the other room and agree with

people who think homosexuality deserves the death penalty. If he’s hanging out with groups that the [Southern Poverty Law Center] says are hate groups now, why would it be any different once he’s elected?” Trump might intend benign neglect where LGBTQ rights are concerned. But, as Tracy Baim, CEO of Chicago’s Windy City Media Group and author of Obama and the Gays: A Political Marriage, points out, the president has longer-term power. “Trump’s biggest impact would be on the U.S. Supreme Court and other federal judicial appointments, because those picks would last many years beyond his own time in office,” she said. “That impact could be devastating for LGBTQ and other rights.” —K.M.

“TH E UN ITED STATES OF TRU MP”

At a fundraising event in New Jersey on May 19, Trump laid it all out: “Who the hell cares about a trade war?” In other words, Trump is down. Specifically, he proposes a 45 percent tariff on all goods from China. His idea is that it would compel companies to manufacture stateside, create jobs and also kick China’s ass. It would kick China’s ass. But, assuming China responds with a 45 percent tariff on all goods from the United States, it would kick just about everyone’s ass, too. According to an economic model prepared by Moody’s Analytics, China and the United States would both fall into a recession in this scenario. The study estimates as many as 4 million Americans would lose their jobs. For comparison, think back to 2008, when 2.6 million jobs were lost. Suddenly that cute fixer-upper you snagged in Oak Park no longer seems like such a safe investment, huh? A recession would kill Sacramento’s economic progress, the dream of Sacramento 3.0. Never mind the trade war and its brutal effects on the economy—after all, Trump doesn’t care

about a trade war. What about a real war with China? “There’s a question I wouldn’t want to

07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   15


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7/15/16 4:01 PM


“TH E UNIT ED STATE S OF TRUMP ” continued From pAge 15

So is Trump more of a gun nut than the NRA? Well, at press time, he was hedging on a petition, signed by more than 41,000 people, “who want the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland to allow guns to be openly carried during the convention,” Newsweek reported. Trump reportedly told ABC News he needed to “study the fine print.” Trump in 2017—fewer sales, more vigilantes? —B.G.

President trumP

will divide AmericA—AgAin

—K.H.

President trumPP

will eliminAte wAste ste Republicans regularly cite the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Education as two agencies primed for budget cuts. But President Trump would slash them altogether. “The Environmental Protection Agency is the laughingstock of the world,” Trump said in a January 11 interview with the Wall Street Journal. Uh huh. Without the EPA, basic air and water protections would be gone. The water crisis in Flint, Mich., could become the new normal. The American Lung Association recently ranked Sacramento the No. 17 most polluted city in the U.S. Without the EPA? Our seemingly clear skies would welcome a sheath of gray smog, one day turning into the thick, agriculture industry air of Bakersfield, the country’s No. 1 most polluted city. Bakersfield, people. The EPA also bans chemicals, like dangerous pesticides. Sacramento’s small farmers would become more important—and more endangered—in a country run by Monsanto, which would absolutely take advantage of the EPA’s demise to make its crops grow bigger, faster and cheaper without a thought to climate change or consumer health. But in Trump’s world, even fewer folks would have the expendable income to prioritize their farm-to-fork ethos. And without the Department of Education, there would be no more federal grants for low-income students. College will continue its trajectory toward becoming a nearly impossible destination for all but the wealthy. It’ll be like The Hunger Games if the tributes were fighting for Miss America scholarships, redeemable only at Trump University. Shudder. Today, the estimated cost for a freshman at UC Davis comes to $34,323, with the potential for it to rise again every year. The school-to-prison pipeline? Stronger than ever. According to the California Homeless Youth Project, nearly 270,000 students experienced homelessness in California during the 2012-13 school year. Without the efforts behind the Every Student Succeeds Act to advance equity for disadvantaged students, there will be more youth on the streets. And they’ll be coughing. —J.B.

continued on pAge 19

DONAlD Donald Trump has arrived—and  he’s brought hell with him. It’s sweltering inside the  cavernous main hangar at  the Sacramento Jet Center,  where a couple thousand  people braved the risk of heat  stroke and waited hours for  their political godhead to park  his monogrammed plane and  extract his daily dose of psychic  Viagra. The Donald didn’t disappoint.  He rambled to a theme—bashing the PGA Tour for pulling up  golf tees from his Miami course  and moving to Mexico City, hit Nabisco for shipping jobs to  Mexico and blamed New Hampshire’s heroin epidemic on—ding,  ding, ding—Mexico. “Do walls work? Just ask Israel,” he said at  one point, to both cheers and confusion. Then: “If Donald Trump becomes your president, this is all  going to stop.” Oh, yes, please make it stop. I was not assigned to cover Trump’s June 1 campaign visit to  Sacramento. I had no discernible reason to go. But I needed to  witness the carnival. It’s not that I don’t know what Trump is about. He’s been  selling his brand of preppy white rage since he demanded  President Barack Obama show his papers and flirted with taking  him on in 2012. No one then took him seriously and Trump ended  up calling his own bluff. He was a laughingstock (which is about  the only stock this self-styled mogul has benefited), with  his verbal finger-painting act looking an absolute mess  in black and white newsprint. But times have changed. We’ve changed. Same old  Donald, more receptive electorate. Last month in the jet hangar, so many questions  pierced the foggy heat: Has Trump just worn us down? Does crazy verbal  abuse become normalized when it hangs around? Is this  a domestic-violence situation writ national? And, most of all, what is this thin-skinned,  bankruptcy-prone demagogue’s appeal? That’s what brought me to the rally. And, after  four hours in the scrum and more than a month of  reflection, I still don’t have an answer. At best, I have a  police sketch of an idea. A persistent notion that Trump  is a fun-house mirror that reflects the viewer’s own  distorted fears. A tabula rasa to be interpreted and  translated as his supporters need.

tHe repuBlicAn presidentiAl cAndidAte reFlects AmericA’s Belligerent now

continued on page 19

“ THE UN I TE D S TATE S OF TRUMP ”

DECONSTRUCTING

“deconstructing donAld”

Standing atop the west steps of the California State Capitol are 88 of Sacramento County’s most renowned white supremacists from the Traditionalist Worker Party and Golden State Skinheads. Three years ago to the day, in 2016, after trying to hold a rally in support of then-presidential candidate Trump, nearly a dozen of these men were punched, stomped and forced out of downtown. Now, they’re hoisting the Confederate Flag on the Capitol’s flag pole. Trump saw this coming. In March 21, 2016, years before he bought out the Washington Post and burned down its building, Trump told the paper’s editorial board that the country was “as divided as I’ve ever seen it.” So what exactly did Trump do to fix the county’s race relations? According to the NAACP’s California President Alice Huffman, Trump embraced the haters. Among his supporters, Trump counted the likes of David Duke, a former Ku Klux Klan leader who fully endorsed the candidate, and TWP leader Matthew Heimbach, who was caught on video shoving a black female protester at a Trump rally in Kentucky on March 1, 2016. “I think we have gotten a taste of the racial divide during Obama’s tenure, when people were upset that he was elected,” Huffman said. “Given Trump’s support base—the KKK, David Duke and other white supremacist organizations—we’d see a much stronger divide.” It’s no wonder white supremacist groups support Trump, Huffman said. His anti-politically correct rhetoric—blaming Obama and Black Lives Matter for dividing the country and Mexico for everything else (they stole the PGA tournament!)—and calls to give police even more power help push an agenda that white nationalists love. As for Trump, he told the Post he would heal the racial divide by bringing jobs to troubled communities. He described a plan to incentivize big business owners to move into inner cities, which would create jobs for the “58 to 59 percent” of black people he claimed were unemployed. (Actual statistics from the U.S. Department of Labor report less than 10 percent of black people are unemployed in 2016.) However, the plan isn’t a cure-all for the racial disparities in the country, Huffman said, and could lead to gentrification if not executed properly.

“We’d be glad to get the jobs if he could bring them in,” Huffman said. “But we see it all the time— businesses come in, and they bring employees with them instead of hiring from within the community.”

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“TH E UNIT ED STATE S OF TRUMP ”

will SlAPP the mediA When candidate Trump said in February he’d “open up” libel law if elected president, it seemed like yet another half-baked claim from the GOP frontrunner. After all, the press has enjoyed ironclad libel protection since 1964, when the Supreme Court ruled unanimously in New York Times Co. v. Sullivan that writers must demonstrate actual malice or reckless disregard for the truth to be guilty of libeling public officials. “It’s a great protector and truly the bedrock of libel law,” said Robert Humphrey, a professor of media law at Sacramento State University. Changing the standard would have to come from the Supreme Court. And that’s unlikely, said Ash Bhagwat, a professor of First Amendment law at UC Davis. Even conservative justices like John Roberts and Clarence Thomas are “just as strong on free speech as anyone else,” Bhagwat said. That said, Trump could hurt media a few ways as president. While it’s unlikely the U.S. would rapidly devolve into a state-run media, given America’s system of checks and balances, there’s plenty with a Trump presidency to concern First Amendment advocates. Famously litigious, Trump could up the number of fruitless, but costly, lawsuits meant to chill media. Known as “SLAPP” cases, for “strategic lawsuit against public participation,” they’re no stranger to SN&R, which just this month prevailed against Mayor Kevin Johnson after a year of litigation over a trove of secret emails. In addition, President Trump might extend his campaign practice of banning outlets from events, like he most recently did to the Washington Post. That would make for an awful lot of empty seats at his White House press briefings. —G.W.

President trumP

will run AmericA like hiS buSineSS emPire Let’s face it, President Obama was a loser when it came to creating jobs. Our Kenyan in chief inherited a Humpty Dumpty economy, smashed against the rocks by Wall Street corruption, and only managed to glue it back together while congressional Republicans

President Trump would go nuclear on the economy.

“One of the things I am most proud about is that I create jobs,” the man, the myth, the legend says in a video on his campaign website. “I will tell you this, and I can say it with certainty, I will be the greatest jobs-producing president that God ever created.” Got that? That God ever created. Except God apparently forgot to tell Trump’s business partners. The morally and financially bankrupt casino mogul famously filed for Chapter 11 four times, most recently in 2009. It’s, like, Trump’s favorite chapter. While there are a lot of bad cooks in a Chapter 11 restructuring kitchen, Trump gets extra demerits for personally profiting while his businesses and the cities that banked on them suffered the consequences. “Atlantic City fueled a lot of growth for me,” he told the New York Times in a May interview. “The money I took out of there was incredible.” Yet Atlantic City—as well as New York, Indiana and other cities graced by The Donald’s Midas touch—were virtually ruined in the aftermath, with A.C.’s Trump Taj Mahal casino leaving a $3 billion crater in its wake. (No wonder New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie was begging for that veep job.) But not everyone crapped out, the Times investigation found. While Trump’s casino escapades were “a protracted failure,” the Times reported, “Mr. Trump did well. He put up little of his own money, shifted personal debts to the casinos and collected millions of dollars in salary, bonuses and other payments. The burden of his failures fell on investors and others who had bet on his business acumen.” He’s like the Pied Piper if the Pied Piper only had the power to bring more rats, but then tried to convince the townspeople that’s what they actually wanted all along: “I have the best rats. I have so many rats, they’re all over the place. I get such good deals on rats, let me tell you. They only eat the finest garbage. That pizza rat is a fat slob.” Candidate Trump is running this same grift on his supporters. After clowning his rivals for needing campaign donations, he’s got his tiny hands out, sending out fundraising emails last month. So yeah, President Trump will run America like one of his businesses—into the ground. Hide your 401(k)s. —RFH

“deconStructing donAld”

President trumP

slapped the pieces out of his hands. Nine million jobs and a 5 percent unemployment rate? That kind of slow-and-steady progress is pathetic.

Take Cole Bartiromo, a self-styled media entrepreneur with an online tabloid called NewsBall. (I kid you  not.) He’s been following Trump like a groupie, and has  the scars to prove it. Bartiromo was attacked leaving  a Costa Mesa rally a month earlier. He proudly carried  around a nipple-high poster board showing bloodspattered images of himself, and hoped Trump would  sign an actual gold nugget he had tucked in his wallet. He’s a showman, like Trump, and hopes to become  rich, like Trump. What Bartiromo is not is someone  who knows history or politics. Hell, he voted for  Obama in 2008 because of the “Crush on Obama”  YouTube video that went viral. “A lot of people don’t care about politicians and  policies. And that’s true with me and Trump. I don’t  care,” he said. “He’s not a robot. He’s not scripted.  That’s what totally makes him different.” The handful of Trump supporters I spoke to had  this same uncanny ability, to take the one or two  elements they liked and disregard the rest. For troubadour Kraig Moss, 57, of Oswego, N.Y., who says  he’s followed Trump to 33 rallies with his guitar and songbook of  original Trump tunes, his support was borne from tragedy. His son  died from a fentanyl overdose in 2014. So, to him, Trump’s promise  to build a southern border wall to keep drugs out makes sense. For Sacramento’s Willie Worthy, Trump reminds her of her  husband, outspoken Sacramento City Council attendee Mac  Worthy. “Because they think so much alike,” she said, standing  beside her hubby in the hot hangar. “He has more money,” she  said of Trump, but her hubby Mac, “He’s the first Trump.” For Tom Summers, a self-described “drifter” from  Sacramento, Trump is the next political fashion. Summers says  he used to belong to Occupy Sacramento (“infiltrated” it, actually), but then migrated to a very different movement with polar  opposite values. “Money is the root of all evil,” he told me while watching two  guys argue outside. I looked at his baggy T-shirt, depicting Trump  cutting his puppet strings while a marionette Hillary Clinton  dangled. “But you’re a Trump supporter?” I asked. His eyes lit up under a brow pin-pricked with sweat. “Oh,  yeah.” It occurs to me that guys like Bartiromo and Summers  represent a not-insignificant subsection of Trump supporters. There are the Republican anarchists who talk excitedly of  blowing the party up, the bully brigade who attend the rallies  because they might get to hit someone, the wannabe entrepreneurs who think they’ll be able to steal some special rich-guy  tips, and a large swath of struggling Americans left behind by the  dream and resorting to Trump out of desperation and well-earned  political frustration. Like any Venn diagram, there’s overlap. Bartiromo definitely  belongs to the wannabe rich-guy category. But what he and  Summers really are, are zeitgeist chasers. They just want to be part of the trending moment, like surfers  who want to be on top of the wave, not crushed on the bottom.  They have no principles of their own; they freely admit this.  Republican and Democrat are labels for people with agendas  and plans. They have no plans. They’re like addicts hooked on  catharsis. Their attention spans have been chiseled and honed  into two-dimensional flat surfaces by Snapchat and Vine and their  extrapolating ilk. There is no past, no record to consult. There is  only the loud, belligerent now. And that now wears a willow-thin animal pelt and a pinched  expression of disdainful mass destruction. “Listen, he’s not presidential,” Bartiromo acknowledged.  “Obama, Bush—they’ve been presidential. What has it gotten us?  Seventeen trillion in debt, wars, 9/11, right? OK, so Trump’s not  presidential. He doesn’t have those traits. Maybe that’s not a bad  thing.” There are an awful lot of people placing that same wild bet.           — RFH

continued from page 17

continued From PAge 17

07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   19


Photo courtesy of Bleecker street

From left to right: Annalise Basso, Viggo Mortensen and Shree Crooks star in Captain Fantastic.

Survival mode by Da n i e l b a r n e s

Director Matt Ross shares grueling stories about Captain Fantastic, child labor laws and Viggo Mortensen

Matt Ross is probably best known for his role as conniving weasel Gavin Belson on the HBO comedy Silicon Valley, or his turn as conniving weasel Alby Grant on Big Love, or for the many conniving weasels he’s played in films like American Psycho and Face/ Off. Written and directed by Ross, the family drama Captain Fantastic is something else altogether—an empathetic meditation on parenting styles starring Viggo Mortensen as the patriarch of a Swiss Family Robinson-esque brood of survivalists getting its first taste of the grid. The Berkeley-based Ross recently talked to SN&R about winning the Best Director Un Certain Regard award at Cannes, the challenges of directing children and his roots as a juvenile auteur.

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Congratulations on winning the award at Cannes. What was that experience like? It’s strange and intense; it’s very formal, everyone’s in tuxedos and gowns, but objectively Cannes is also a pretty incredible place, because I feel like it’s a high temple of world art cinema. Everyone is dressed very formally but they’re all rushing to see these auteur films. Winning the award was sort of out of a bad romantic comedy. Once the screenings happen, everyone leaves. … I took my wife and my two kids, and we went to Paris. We had just walked into the Picasso museum, and we got a call saying, “Hey, we think you should come back, we think you’re up for something.” But they don’t tell you what award. They just said, “We asked Viggo to come back, and we’re asking you to come back.” I really thought if we had a chance to win something, it would be for Viggo.

And then we had three hours to catch the flight. We raced to get a cab and then the cab went to the wrong airport. The traffic was so bad on the Croisette, the cars could not move, so we jumped out. We’re dodging through people and traffic, sweating. … We get to the ceremony and when they called my name, I think I started to cry. It was without a doubt the greatest honor of my life.

If people only know you from your acting roles, they might not expect you to make a film this empathetic. What inspired the script? Of course, an actor is not the roles he or she plays, but I do understand your comment. I would say it’s the most personal thing I’ve ever written. The genesis was that I was thinking about being a father, and trying to be the best father I could be. I was really trying to


Sacramento, So preciouS See niGHt&DaY

25

Beer SluSHie! See DrinK me

figure out what my core values were, what I wanted to pass on to my children, the things I wanted to teach them about the world. I had a lot of questions about what might be the best way to do that, and I put it into a story that I suppose is partially aspirational. You’ve basically been making films your entire life. what were some of those first childhood films like? There were such fantastic opuses as Attack of the Killer Chairs—I don’t know if you saw that one. I was 12 years old, so at that point I didn’t even write things down. It was more like I had pictures in my head. I think there was one about some kind of ninja assassin who broke into our house and opened the safe and had to fight some people, and then escape through the roof, stuff like that. I would say they were universally terrible. Your first feature 28 Hotel rooms was very minimalist and interior, and captain Fantastic is very expansive with a lot of exteriors. How did you adjust to the larger scale? Poorly, very poorly. Every film has its challenges; Captain Fantastic is a film with six children in every scene, seven including Viggo. With child labor laws, the youngest ones have very truncated hours, so you have to shoot around them. Just covering seven people in every scene was a logistical challenge. We had two musical scenes and two stunt scenes, both of which involved children, we had a live animal and we shot in two states. The truth is that I was partly protected by my own inexperience, because if I had been more experienced, I may have known how daunting it would be.

26

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Screw Your patriarcHY See SounD aDVice

there are some physically demanding scenes in the movie. How did you prepare the actors? The children and Viggo were all brought for a preproduction boot camp in Washington. They were all rock-climbing every single day. When George MacKay was first cast, he started doing yoga three to four hours a day. The two teenage girls were taking Esperanto. They butchered a sheep, because they have some knife skills in the film. Everyone was doing musical rehearsals every day. We sent them on a wilderness skills and survival camp where they learned to make a fire and build a shelter and identify edible plants. They learned some basic hunting and tracking skills and slept under the stars. It’s a long process where you’re not expecting them to become an expert in anything. … What you’re really hoping is that they get to know each other, and look at Viggo as a mentor and a leader and a father.

Captain Fantastic opens Friday, July 22, at Century Roseville 14. Learn more at www.bleeckerstreetmedia.com/captainfantastic.

Charlie Shotwell (left) discusses a scene with Captain Fantastic writerdirector Matt Ross.

Photo CouRtesy oF BLeeCkeR stReet

Matt Ross on writing and directing Captain Fantastic

See 15 minuteS

Our Pokémon, ourselves 

the role of Ben seems tailor-made for Viggo mortensen. what was he like to direct? I didn’t have anyone in mind when I was writing it, but when it came time to cast and they asked me who I wanted, Viggo was my first choice. I think he’s a really amazing artist and one of the great American actors. In terms of working with him, he’s very specific, very hard-working and extremely dedicated. In the beginning, we had an email exchange that went on for months, where he sent me pages and pages of questions about almost every line, every moment. He was asking a lot of factual questions, wanting to make sure that things were authentic and credible. He was a central collaborator during production. Ω

“I was really tryIng to fIgure out what my core values were, what I wanted to pass on to my chIldren, the thIngs I wanted to teach them about the world.”

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SHaGGer’S paraDiSe

Cyborgism is here, and it’s the future. It’s hard to pinpoint when exactly it all started: humans  embedding technology into their bodies, becoming something that’s not totally human but also not exactly mechanical. Consider hearing aids, Google Glass.  We took a dramatic step forward a couple of weeks ago  when pokémon Go debuted. In less than a week, Pokémon  Go’s number of daily users beat Tinder and rivaled Twitter.  It’s one of the most talked about and popular smartphone  apps ever.  By now, it’s a familiar sight: packs of people, noses  tucked into devices, wandering the streets in search of  wild Pokémon. They aren’t just using their phones, though;  the phones have become an extension of their reality. That’s because Pokémon Go takes place in the real  world, sort of. Gamers are Pokémon trainers, traversing  the world to catch new Pokémon, which are pretty much  everywhere. i’ve found Growlithes at the midtown Farmers market, Ponytas in Southside Park and, fittingly, a bunch  of Rattatas in City Hall. It’s augmented reality. And never  before have so many people been unwittingly on the cusp  of transforming mankind.  Will our future robot overlords look like Pikachu?  The Sacramento Kings invited gamers to Sleep Train  Arena last week with the promise of rare Pokémon  stalking the grounds. Hundreds showed up—every single  person glued to technology, silently enslaving pokémon with a flick of a finger.  Some sat in the stadium seats, waiting for Pokémon to  come to them. Others fruitlessly searched for an elusive  Magmar, allegedly hiding out somewhere in the parking  lot.  But my real peek into our new selves took place later  that night, when I met up with one of my hardcore  Pokémon Go-loving friends who was hellbent on finding  rare psychic Pokémon. Our hunt took us to an Elk Grove  park swarming with players, their faces illuminated in the  darkness by their screens.  What I expected to be a light, 30-minute stroll turned  into two hours of pacing around the park. “catch and walk,” my friend instructed, as I paused to  line up a shot. “Catch and walk.” At one point, three gamers started sprinting across the  street, crossing four lanes of traffic, not even taking note  of the accelerating cars nearby. My friend pointed. “We need to follow them,” she said urgently, nearly  flying through the thoroughfare before I pointed out the  cop nearby. A few feet away, a massive pack of people were yelling,  celebrating. It was a Magmar, an unusual find that kind of  looks like a duck on fire. I pivoted my phone around. Why  was I not seeing it? And there it was, in all its red and orange glory. A few  Poké Ball tosses later, I caught it. I couldn’t believe I  caught it. As I pumped my fist into the air, I visualized my  surroundings change into a static blue background, with  triumphant horns blasting: the technology became an  extension of myself, of my new reality. this is just the beginning, my cyborg friends. 

—Janelle Bitker ja ne lle b @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   21


Food & Drink Best spot for happy hour

Bar 101 Blackbird. Block Butcher Bar Bottle & Barlow Cask & Barrel Coin-Op Game Room Country Club Saloon Doyle’s Pub and Taproom Ella Dining Room & Bar The Firehouse Restaurant Grange Restaurant & Bar INK Eats and Drinks K Bar Kasbah Lounge Lucca Restaurant and Bar R15 The Red Rabbit Kitchen & Bar Riverside Clubhouse Shady Lady Saloon Sutter Street Steakhouse Thai Canteen Tres Hermanas

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Best spot for sandwiches Adamo’s Baguettes Beach Hut Deli Bon Air Market & Deli The Bread Store Broderick Roadhouse Bud’s Buffet Corti Brothers Dad’s Sandwiches Deli Delicious Duc Huong Sandwiches Italian Importing Company Juno’s Kitchen and Deli La Bonne Soupe Cafe Magpie Cafe Mr. Pickle’s Sandwich Shop-  Muntean’s Sandwiches & Soups Roxie Deli  Sam’s Hof Brau Sampino’s Towne Foods The Sandwich Spot Super Tortas Chilangas “El Abuelo” Thanh Huong Food to Go Tony’s Delicatessen & Catering Zia’s Delicatessen

Best tacos Chando’s Tacos Jimboy’s Tacos La Favorita Taqueria  La Fiesta Taqueria La Rosa Meat Market La Soga Taqueria La Venadita Nixtaco Swabbies Taco Fresco Tako Korean BBQ Taqueria & Pupuseria Isabel Taqueria Espinoza Taqueria Garibaldi Taqueria Jalisco Taqueria Maya’s Taqueria Rincon Alteno

Best new restaurant Binchoyaki Coconut’s Fish Cafe El Bramido Mexican Restaurant & Bar Empress Tavern Fish Face Poke Bar Hawks Public House  Iron Horse Tavern

La Venadita Localis Metro Kitchen + Drinkery Milestone Naruto Show Me the Sushi Nixtaco Noodles to Thai For OBO’ Italian Table & Bar Railbridge Cellars & Co. Sail Inn Grotto & Bar Skool on K TableVine Taqueria La Bamba Veg

Shopping & Services Best Boutique

Article Consignment Boutique The Clothing Hang Up Boutique Cuffs Denim Spot Heart Clothing Boutique


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Identity Boutique Krazy Mary’s Boutique Ladybuggz Boutique Old Gold Quality Boutique and Brew Racks Boutique  Rire Sei Bella Serendipity Boutique Sugar Shack Boutique Swanberg’s

Best place to Buy vintage 57th Street Antique Row Cuffs Freestyle Mark Vintage Midway Antique Mall Old Gold Racks Boutique Sacramento Antique Faire Scout Living Thrift Town YSJ Trading Co.

Best place to get a Bike Addison’s Bicycle Repairium The Bicycle Business City Bicycle Works College Cyclery East Sac Bike Shop Edible Pedal  Ikon Cycles Midtown Cruzer Shop Mike’s Bikes Pedal Hard Practical Cycle Sacramento Bicycle Kitchen Sutterville Bicycle Shop Velo Trap

Sports & Recreation Best place to kick some Butt

Broadway Boxing Courage Martial Arts & Gym Joslin’s Martial Arts Center Kovar’s Satori Academy Moore’s Martial Arts Prime Time Boxing Club Robinson Taekwondo Self Defense & Personal     Safety Academy Warrior MMA

Best place for a pick-up game 28th and B Street Skate Park California Middle School McKinley Park Roosevelt Park Southside Park Sutter Middle School

Arts & Entertainment

Best casino/ cardroom Cache Creek Casino Resort Capitol Casino  Cordova Casino Jackson Rancheria Casino     & Hotel Limelight Lotus Casino Red Hawk Casino Stones Gambling Hall Thunder Valley Casino Resort

Best gay cluB Badlands The Bolt The Depot Video Bar Faces Mercantile Saloon Sidetrax

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pleaSe vote e availabl for s banquet

Best Steakhouse

351–9100 • 604 Sutter Street Downtown Historic Folsom www.sutterstreetsteakhouse.com

PLEASE VOTE

- BEST SPOT FOR SANDWICHES -

Best place to stock your Bookshelves The Avid Reader at the Tower The Avid Reader, Davis Beers Books The Book Collector Dimple Books Time Tested Books Underground Books

8351 Elk Grove Blvd #100 • Elk Grove, CA • 916.685.4587

Best all-ages music venue

Ace of Spades The Boardwalk Cafe Colonial Club Retro Country Club Saloon The Cozmic Café Naked Lounge Downtown Red Museum Shine Sol Collective

Vote!

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com All AgeS Welcome! thursday, July 21

Find additional categories and nominees at

p-lo

tuesday, July 26

Sunday, July 24

friday, July 29

bestofsac.com vote at Bestofsac.com 07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   23


    UPCOMING EVENTS

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TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE THUNDER VALLEY BOX OFFICE, TICKETMASTER.COM, OR WORLDONEPRESENTS.COM


FOR ThE WEEK OF JULy 21

Grand Re-Opening Celebration FRIDAY, JULY 22, AND SATURDAY, JULY 23 Experience the fruits of Revolution Wines’ major  kitchen revamp with a family-style dinner on the  patio Friday night and unlimited wine tasting and  small bites on Saturday. Recent innovations mark  the expansion of Revolution’s farm-to-fork  WINE food program. $25-$95; 6:30 on Friday and 5  p.m. on Saturday at Revolution Wines, 2831 S Street;  (916) 444-7711; http://rev.wine.

—DeeNA DRewIS

Movies in the Park: Inside Out FRIDAY, JULY 22

H

ow much hip is too hip? Are you  tired yet of potted succulents in  white rooms, vintage Levis and  earthy-looking sodas? (They’re called  shrubs, you guys; get with it.) To be  fair, it’s hard to feel even remotely  cool when all your extra time and  energy right now is dedicated to not  running out of Poké Balls; who would  have thought that watching baristas  compete in a latte-art competition  would signal a slight return to reality?  But you can do that and more with  various au courant events around the  city this week: On Saturday, July 23, and Sunday,  July 24, the Semi-Annual Dollar Sale  will be going down at Old Gold at the  Warehouse Artist Lofts (1104 R Street)  from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday and  6 p.m. on Sunday. Vintage clothing and 

CSA Farm Box class at Soil Born Farms 

handmade clothing, home goods and  shoes will be up for grabs on tables  marked $1, $5 and two for $5. Check  out http://shopoldgold.com to get a  preview of the kind of goods you can  expect, or call (916) 329-8569 to find  out more. Also Saturday: the Can Do! Tomatoes  preservation class at the Sacramento  Natural Foods Co-Op (1914 Alhambra  Boulevard) at 10 a.m. ’Tis the season,  and you can bottle up that goodness  by learning to can tomatoes and also  make salsa and tomatillo-chili marmalade (which can then be canned).  Take your passion for produce one  step further with the Cooking Out of the

(2140 Chase Drive in Rancho Cordova)  on Wednesday, July 27, from 6 p.m.  to 7 p.m. Attendees will learn simple  vegetarian recipes based on seasonal  produce. Class admission is $10; head  over to http://soilborn.org or call   (916) 363-9685 to find out more.  Top it all off with the aforementioned foam-art intake at the second  round of the Sacramento Public Latte Art Tournament (a.k.a. SPLAT) at Old Soul  Co. (1716 L Street) on Thursday, July 28,  at 7 p.m. The areas artsiest baristas  will go toe-to-toe to see who can create the best tulip (barista’s choice  isn’t until round 4, so don’t count on  seeing a Pikachu this time). Find out  more at www.splatsac.com.

—DeeNA DRewIS

Short on funds but big on family? Looking to get out  of the house and see a film on the big screen without taking out a second mortgage? As luck  FILM would have it, the Carmichael Recreation  and Park District have the perfect remedy: Disney’s  Inside Out. Free popcorn and shaved iced. C’mon,  now. Free; 8:30 p.m. at Carmichael Park, 5750 Grant  Avenue in Carmichael; http://carmichaelpark.com. 

—eDDIe JoRgeNSeN

Pokémon GO Pub Crawl: Gotta Drink ’Em All! SATURDAY, JULY 23 What began as a grassroots call to catch  Pokémon and explore the central city’s bars has  turned into a mass nerd exodus. Join  DRINKING 1,300 of your closest friends to kick off  an evening of booze and Bulbasaurs. This massive  crawl has 23 bars slated through some 10 hours of  drinks, ending with a dance party at Press Club.  Free; 3:30 p.m. at Sutter’s Fort, 2701 L Street;  www.facebook.com/sacsocialclub.

—DAve KempA

Trance Dance: Experiential Movement SATURDAY, JULY 23 If you’re of the philosophy that zoning out on  the dance floor is the best medicine, talk to Toni,  the facilitator of Trance Dance: Experiential  Movement. Toni will guide you into the initial  therapy of dance and the shamanistic  DANCE healing power of breath and movement. $10; 6 p.m. at Hot Pot Studios, 1614 K Street; (916)  308-9753; www.hotpotstudios.com.

—AARoN CARNeS

Spirited Away SATURDAY, JULY 23 Celebrate the 15-year anniversary of animatedfilm master Hayao Miyazaki’s Spirited Away with  a special screening on 35 mm. Whether you are  reliving your childhood or seeing this film about a  young girl learning to not be afraid for  CULTURE the first time, don’t miss it. $8-$10; 7:30  p.m. at the Crest Theatre, 1013 K Street; (916) 4763356; www.crestsacramento.com. ILLUSTRATION BY BRIAN BRENEMAN

—LoRY gIL

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IllustratIons by serene lusano

Blissful salad Capitol Cobb, Mother In summertime less is more when it comes to dinner. Give me a fresh salad and a chilled glass of Real Housewives-worthy white wine and I’m blissed out. One favorite salad of late is Mother’s Capitol Cobb ($9). Here you get a few wedges of iceburg lettuce served with a meaty avocado wedge, egg and falafel. There are other seasonal veggies, too, plus an earthy carrot hummus, arugula pesto and a fair smattering of satisfyingly salty feta cheese. Simple, refreshing and surprisingly filling. #Blissed. 1023 K Street, http://mothersacramento.com.

—raChel leibroCk

Sudsy slush Frozen beer, Der biergarten

IllustratIon by Mark stIvers

Farm life by Janelle Bitker

It’s coming: More details are coming into focus for the fourth annual Sacramento Farm-to-Fork Celebration, which will return September 8-25 with its usual beloved events as well as some new twists. If you do manage to snag tickets to the elite Tower Bridge Dinner, you’ll be greeted by nationallyrecognized chef Rick Moonen. Moonen, who competed on Top Chef Masters, is perhaps best known for being an early champion for sustainable seafood practices. “We have an appreciation and respect for chefs across the country, not just Sacramento,” said Molly Hawks (Hawks Restaurant). She and Allyson Harvie (the Patriot) are leading the chef team for the Tower Bridge Dinner—they are also the first

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two women selected to cook for the event—which includes Billy Ngo (Kru), Kelly McCown (the Kitchen), Ramon Perez (Puur Chocolat) and Mike Fagnoni (Hawks Restaurant). Also for the first time, chefs are pairing up with local farmers for each course. The big Farm-to-Fork Festival, which takes place September 24 on Capitol Mall, is adding two more blocks, making it a half-mile long. Moonen will also be at the free festival along with a national, to-beannounced headliner on the music stage. Take two: Smokey Oaks Tavern opened in the former Mighty Tavern space in Fair Oaks (9634 Fair Oaks Boulevard) earlier this month. It was originally going to be called Fair

07.21.16

Oaks Tavern & Grill, but owners opted to rebrand because the name sounded a bit too similar to Fair Oaks Brew Pub. Smokey Oaks offers casual, American fare that leans slightly Southern. There are appetizers, salads and sandwiches, like a Cuban ($11) or shrimp po’boy ($12), along with a selection of smoked meat-based entrees, including beef ribs ($15), brisket ($16) and crispy chicken ($14). Tacos over umbrellas: Tiki bar

Rum Rok (805 15th Street) quietly and abruptly closed recently, lasting about six months. The Sacramento Bee reported last week that Chando’s Tacos will take the space over with a slightly more upscale version of its popular concept. Most exciting? It’ll stay open until 3 a.m. on weekends. Fry no more: As first reported by FOX40, JJ’s Fish and Chicken (3916 Fruitridge Road) burned down in a fire last week. We’ll miss that reliably greasy, bright spot of soul food in south Sacramento. If you’re really desperate for JJ’s specific fry, a location recently opened in Fairfield (1791 N. Texas Street). Ω

Ever dump a beer into a corner-store slushie because the alcohol content was just too low? Der Biergarten’s doing something like that with their new frozen beer ($5.99 for a small, $11.75 for a large), except it’s both more socially acceptable and actually made to be enjoyed like that. It’s a simple concept: They’ve got little swirlers in the back slushing up two different flavors of frozen beer, which they dollop on top of draft beer. No straw, though, so you’ll be sticking your beak into an ice heap for the first few sips. So much better than my usual blueberryraspberry-Bud-Light-Lime blend of slushie, though. 2332 K Street, http://beergardensacramento.com.

—anthony siino

A different tuna CaCtus Some foods make you wonder why people eat them. Stinging nettles come to mind, as does fugu. So, too, do spiky cactus pads (nopales) and their magenta fruit (tuna), with their needle-sharp spikes all over. Carefully slice them off to get to the edible portion. The succulent leaves feature a flavor reminiscent of green beans when cooked—but do it quickly to avoid sliminess. Make a stir-fry or salad for the freshest flavor. The fruit, also known as prickly pears, need straining to remove the hard seeds. Your reward is a melony pulp perfect for aguas frescas.

—ann Martin rolke


The seafood trade By Ann MArtIn rolke

Sail Inn Grotto & Bar

HHH 1522 Jefferson Boulevard in West Sacramento, (916) 272-2733 Dinner for one: $15 - $25 Good for: mid-level seafood and high-level drinks Notable dishes: calamari, Lucky Dog burger

Even though we’re not seaside here in the Central Valley, we are close to rivers and lakes. You’d expect to find quality seafood fairly easily, but it hasn’t always been so. That’s certainly becoming more the case with the expansion of Sunh Fish market. Look to the recent poke trend bringing ultrafresh fish to our plates, or newcomers like Coconut’s Fish Cafe and Green Fish Co. & Juice. Three months ago, Sail Inn Grotto & Bar resurfaced from the dark days of dive bardom to become a possible contender in the seafood trade. Thanks to a massive overhaul by Shady Lady Saloon owners Garrett Van Vleck, Jason Boggs and Alex Origoni, West Sacramento’s burgeoning populace has a new port of call. Wooden pilings and rope signal the seafaring theme in the parking lot, while boat cleats for door handles and ship paintings carry it inside. It doesn’t come off as hokey, though, just nautical. Sail Inn benefits from the Shady Lady team’s vast experience in the bar scene, specializing in tropical rum drinks without seeming too tikified. Executive Chef Kevin Ritchie’s seafood-focused menu tries to strike a balance between fried bar food and more varied fish dishes. The casual food matches the ocean-themed décor well, although not all of the dishes hit the mark on execution. One of the best results is the calamari ($10). While squid often becomes rubbery when fried, these rings and tentacles came out crunchy and tender, nicely salted and enhanced by a side of cocktail sauce spiked with Preservation Co. Bloody

Mary mix. A small, lightly dressed side salad adds freshness to the plate. The beer-battered rock cod sandwich ($14) also shows the kitchen’s skill with frying. It’s lighter than expected, with a flavor lift from coleslaw and pickled onions. Thin french fries rival McDonald’s version. A bit less successful are the fish tacos ($10), but not for lack of good ingredients. Doubled corn tortillas barely contain a colorful mixture of seared cod, diced peppers and onions, pineapple and sliced jalapeno. Griddled, rather than steamed, tortillas would add more authentic flavor. The filling, too, needed some oomph, though it can be quickly remedied with the side of fiery pineapple pico de gallo and a ready selection of hot sauces. On the other hand, the Sail Inn burger ($10) surprised us with its complexity. We feared the worst when the rather thin patty arrived cooked through, but the local Lucky Dog beef held up well to lots of toppings and cheese. It turned our longheld burger criterion on its ear. The optional sweet potato fries ($1.50 extra), however, seemed to be coated with something that leaves an odd aftertaste. The Sail Inn website mentions vegetarian options, but the only one we saw was a mixed salad ($5 for a small). Built of baby greens with pickled onions, croutons and seasonal vegetables, it suffered from too much dressing. You can’t skip the cocktail menu at Sail Inn, with its emphasis on seafaring rum. Perfect for the searing summer months, the slushified pina colada ($10) wasn’t too sweet and boasted notes of nutty coconut and fresh pineapple. Another worthy cocktail is the Hemingway daiquiri ($8), in which fresh grapefruit and lime juice make a refreshing mixer for the rum, rather than the too-syrupy versions you find at some places. There’s no dessert, but Whitey’s milkshakes are just down the street, or finish with an old-school slushee. It’s a fitting finish for a meal that pairs comfort food staples with slightly upscale drinks. Ω

Yes, tomatoes are in season We are in the middle of the third annual Sacratomato Festival, which means  Midtown restaurant pantries are packed with tomatoes. Through Saturday,  July 23, find tomato-based specials all around Midtown’s Sutter District. For  example, Ink Eats and Drinks has a fried green  tomato BLT on ciabatta. On the cocktail end of  things, Red Rabbit Kitchen and Bar is mixing tomato, watermelon, strawberry and  lemon juices with serrano pepper and gin  or vodka. Lots of dishes at Biba already  use tomatoes, but one intriguing special  features lamb-ricotta crepes cooked in  tomato sauce. For dessert, Paragary’s is  serving tomatoes and stone fruit with olive  oil gelato. The deliciousness concludes with  a family-friendly festival on Sunday on the  grounds of Sutter’s Fort (2701 L Street), including  a salsa competition, chef demos, tomato tasting,  bloody marys and activities for kids. More at http://exploremidtown.org.

—Janelle Bitker

Thin french fries rival McDonald’s version.

Monthly meetups, vegan style By Shoka Thursday, July 21, is pizza night—that  is, vegan pizza night with the Cool Cuisine meetup group at Blaze Pizza  (212 F Street in Davis). Cool Cuisine  picks a different Davis restaurant  with plant-based options on the  menu every third Thursday of the  month and invites everyone to join.  It begins at 6:30 p.m., with custom  11-inch veggie pizzas sprinkled with  Daiya ($7.95). Cool Cuisine founder  Anya McCann started these dinners—which average two-dozen  diners—in January as a way to sup-

port restaurants that are welcoming to vegans, and she encourages  other area restaurant owners to  diversify their offerings and clearly mark their menus and educate the  staff what “vegan” is, because  McCann said that it’s not just the  herbivores that they’re missing out  on as customers, but their omnivore  friends who eat out with them.  RSVP at https://coolcuisinedavis. wordpress.com, bring cash and  wield your plant-eating “purchasing  power” on third Thursdays. 

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“You’re left dazzled – and devastated.” —NEW YORK POST

The 27th Annual

Sierra BrewFest

An epic afternoon of sun, suds and fun A unique, unlimited microbrew tasting experience with more than 100+ microbrews Delicious food from some of the best local food trucks and restaurants

Saturday, August 27 3:00 pm to 6:30 pm, Nevada County Fairgrounds, Grass Valley

A benefit for

Music in the Mountains Produced by the MIM Alliance

Tickets and Info: www.MusicintheMountains.org or call (530) 265-6124 Additional ticket outlets at SPD Markets and BriarPatch

Unlimited Tastings $35 in advance $40 at the door $10 non-tasters Kids Free

Sponsored by:

. /7 0,! 9) . ') .

BEGINS TUESDAY! JULY 26-31 Welcome to Berlin’s infamous Kit Kat Klub, where the Emcee, Sally Bowles and a raucous ensemble take the stage nightly to tantalize the crowd into leaving their troubles outside. But as life in pre-WWII Germany grows more and more troubled, how long can the show and the decadence surrounding it go on? This Tony-winning Kander and Ebb classic has some of the most memorable songs in theatre history, including “Cabaret” and “Willkommen.”

2%3%26%3%!43!4 )-!8#/-3!#2!-%.4/

SEASON SPONSORED BY:

SACRAMENTO’S SUMMER TRADITION SINCE 1951 (916) 557-1999 | SacramentoMusicCircus.com

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! AT THE

WELLS FARGO PAVILION

W E L L S FA R G O P AV I L I O N B O X O F F I C E : 1419 H S T . R E Q U E S T A G R O U P O F 12 O R M O R E , C A L L (916) 557-1198

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IMAX-STB-SNR-4.9x5.16.indd 1

2016-07-13 11:01 AM


Now playiNg

ReviewS

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Bells are Ringing

Sexy Shakespeare by Jeff Hudson

Photo courtesy of Lake tahoe shakesPeare

This jaunty, oldschool 1956 musical  comedy is a charming  keepsake of that bygone  era. The show has a lovely  score, and performers Gia  Battista and Ian Hopps  breathe freshness into  the boy-meets-girl plot. 

Th 8 pm, Sa 8pm, Su 2pm. Through 7/31. $15-$25. Davis  Shakespeare Festival at  Veterans Memorial Theatre,  203 E 14th Street in Davis;  (530) 802-0998; www.shakespearedavis.org. J.H.

more than a cerebral Shakespeare staging. This is a glossier “big box” mounting than you’ll see at other outdoor Shakespeare fests in the Bay Area, and much larger than Shakespeare shows in Sacramento. (There’s also blatant cross-marketing for Tahoe Shakespeare’s other summer show—the four guys in white tuxedos from Forever Plaid pop up singing the 1940s standard “Perfidia,” a scene not found in Shakespeare’s script, but in the context of this “anything goes” production, it works.) The steamy sambas notwithstanding, attendees are well advised to bring a hooded sweatshirt— the mountain air at lakeside cools quickly after sundown. Ω

Comedy of Errors

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the comedy of errors, 7:30 p.m. friday and saturday. $27-$99. outdoors at sand harbor, Lake tahoe Nevada state Park, 2005 highway 28, in Incline Village, Nevada; (800) 747-4697; http://laketahoeshakespeare.com. through august 21.

Just in time for the upcoming Summer Olympics, the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival offers this lively modern take on The Comedy of Errors, set in Rio de Janeiro during Carnival. This cheeky romp is set to a Brazilian samba beat, with scantily clad masked revelers drinking and dancing throughout. This giddy approach actually complements Shakespeare’s freewheeling farce about longseparated identical twins who turn up in the same exotic city (unbeknownst to each other), setting off a chain reaction of mistaken identity incidents involving money, jewelry and arrests, resulting in comedic chaos (and a happy ending). Tahoe Shakespeare has been beefing up its productions—this elaborate show features a generous 17 professional actors (mostly from the Midwest and East Coast), plus a few Tahoe locals. With abundant music and sound cues, stylish choreography and sexy costumes, this Comedy resembles one of Sacramento’s Music Circus extravaganzas

Playwright Nick  Payne presents a  poignant, powerful and  playful play using theoretical physics, where there  are different outcomes  occurring at the same  moment, maybe in different  universes. Th 2pm & 7pm,

F 8pm, Sa 2pm and 9pm, Su 2pm, Tu, W 6:30pm. Through 7/30. $26-$38. B Street 

Theatre, 2711 B Street; (916)  443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. P.R.

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A Midsummer   4 Night’s Dream Where’s your hooded sweatshirt?

4

Constellations

fouL

The Sacramento Shakespeare Festival’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream was a bit of a nightmare for Jonathan Plon, who plays Theseus, the Duke of Athens, in the comedy. He learned on Tuesday before the show’s Friday opening that he was stepping into the role. (He also plays the King of Navarre in Love’s Labour’s Lost). He was on-book (reading from the script) the first weekend, but even then made a strong impression. The story concerns events surrounding the marriage of Theseus to Hippolyta (Stephanie Marsh-Ballard) and includes several interlocking plots involving young lovers: Hermia (Katie Peters), Lysander (Daniel Conover), Helena (Fiona Nies) and Demetrius (Tony Brisson) and fairy intervention in the lives of mortals. Brisson and Conover shine in scenes where a fairy’s mistake makes them pine for the “wrong” woman. Robin “Puck” Goodfellow is the sprite responsible for the magical dusting, and impish Alexander Quinonez is a delight in the role. Bill Gilbert as Bottom makes for another comically gifted actor whose character gets turned into an ass by way of Puck’s misunderstanding. —Jim Carnes

a Midsummer Night’s Dream; 8 p.m. friday, 6 p.m. sunday and 8 p.m. July 29 and 6 p.m. July 31; $15-$18. sacramento shakespeare festival, William a. carroll amphitheatre in William Land Park; www. sacramentoshakespeare.net. through July 31.

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Cyrano de Bergerac

Is it a comedy? A  period costume drama? A  swashbuckling adventure?  A story of courtship and  unrequited love? This  take on the classic is all of  these—above all, it’s a lot  of fun to watch. F 8pm., Sa 2 pm. Through 7/31. $15-$25.  Davis Shakespeare Festival  at Veterans Memorial  Theatre, 203 E 14th Street in  Davis; (530) 802-0998; www. shakespearedavis.org. J.H.

5

Higgins in Harlem

George Bernard  Shaw’s story of  Pygmalion is moved to  New York’s Harlem in the  late 1930s in this African  American reimagining by  Lawrence Thelen. Exceptional performances by Tory  Scroggins as Henry Higgins  and Missira Ross as Eliza  Doolittle are given solid  support by the talented  cast under the direction of  James Wheatley. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 8/7.  $8-$15. Celebration Arts  Theatre, 4469 D Street; (916)  455-2787; www.celebrationarts.net. J.C.

4

Love’s Labour’s Lost

Director Luther  Hanson sets this production  in an Ivy League school  where the King of Navarre  (Jonathan Plon) and a  trio of friends swear to  isolate themselves from  the world and study and  remain celibate for three  years. How do you think  that works out? The minute  the Princess of France  (Shenadoah Kehoe) arrives  with her lovely entourage,  the vows go out the window  and the scheming begins. Sa 8pm. Through 7/31. $15-$18.  Sacramento Shakespeare  Festival, William A. Carroll  Amphitheatre in William  Land Park; www.sacramentoshakespeare.net. J.C.

short reviews by Jim carnes, Jeff hudson and Patti roberts.

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WeLL-DoNe

5 suBLIMe– DoN’t MIss

Two shows, one funny woman. Photo courtesy of katIe ruBIN

Politics of funny Katie Rubin, one of the busiest, most talented and funniest  actresses in the Sacramento theater community, is currently  at work rehearsing two different shows that are scheduled to  take place over the next two weeks. This weekend, Rubin will  stage her stand-up routine at Big Idea Theater. Next week,  she shifts focus slightly at Capital Stage with her one-woman  show Why I Died: A Comedy. The show features Rubin playing  numerous characters across a spectrum of political topics.  $15; 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. Saturday; Big Idea Theatre, 1616 Del  Paso Boulevard; (916) 960-3036; http://bigideatheatre.org.  Why I Died: A Comedy; $25; 8 p.m. July 30; Capital Stage, 2215 J  Street; (916) 995-5464; http://capstage.org.

—bev sykes

07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   29


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It seems every third movie these days is either a remake or a reboot. Ghostbusters is both, better at being the former than the latter. It effectively reshapes the material to the talent on hand, but it’s freighted with references and hat-tips to the 1984 original. Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, Ernie Hudson, Sigourney Weaver and Annie Potts all make cameo appearances (only Rick Moranis took a pass); even original director and costar Harold Ramis, who died in 2014, is paid sweet tribute. It’s an open question if this is just a one-off success, or if it can sustain the franchise the producers have in mind. The first act assembles the team. We meet Erin Gilbert (Kristen Wiig), a university lecturer who is appalled to learn that an impulsive book from her youth is back in print. The book, co-written with her estranged pal Abby Yates (Melissa McCarthy), loudly proclaimed the existence of ghosts, and Erin goes to Abby to beg her to withdraw the book before she gets fired as a crackpot. Abby—already an academic outcast, along with her lab mate Jillian Holtzmann (Kate McKinnon), a slightly spacey anti-ghost weapons developer— agrees, but it’s too late. Erin is found out and dismissed, and she has no choice but to join Abby and Jillian—especially after a mid-Manhattan haunted mansion rekindles her paranormal obsession. The fourth teammate is Patty Tolan (Leslie Jones), a transit worker whose own encounter with

the ghost that escaped from that mansion prompts her to join the newly formed “Conductors of the Metaphysical Examination.” Finally, there’s the hunky receptionist Kevin (Chris Hemsworth, showing hilarious and unsuspected comic chops), a male bimbo who can’t handle the company name, so he answers the phone, “Ghostbusters.” From there our heroines embark on a crusade to battle a supernatural infestation that increasingly plagues the city. The script by Katie Dippold and director Paul Feig divides itself pretty evenly between scares and laughs; only in the climax do the CGI ectoplasms threaten to get out of hand and upstage the stars. The original movie’s fans are a possessive bunch, and they’ve railed sight-unseen at the effrontery of a remake—with women, no less. They should get off their high horses. Only a hopeless sexist could object to McCarthy and Wiig tagging in. As for the others, Jones (with more to do than the first movie gave Ernie Hudson) shines, while McKinnon, in a star-making turn, flat out steals the picture, giving every word she says an unexpected comic twist. Besides, the plain truth is (with all due respect) the first Ghostbusters was popular beyond its merits. (The 1989 sequel was, for once, a distinct improvement.) This new one is every bit as funny, and as spooky, with a more engaging and amusing story. Whether it can shake off the homages and in-jokes and find its own way is the question now. Ω

The first Ghostbusters was popular beyond its merits.

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Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie

Those boozy, self-absorbed women  Edina and Patsy (Jennifer Saunders,  Joanna Lumley) are back, along with Edina’s  long-suffering daughter Saffron (Julia Sawalha)—and all that’s changed is that they’re  24 years older and Saffron has a teenage  daughter (Indeyarna Donaldson-Holness). Back  in 1961, a lot of people tut-tutted that Bob Hope  and Bing Crosby had made one too many Road  pictures, and the same dynamic is at work  here—except that Saunders and Lumley have  stretched things out even longer than Hope  and Crosby did. The BBC sitcom’s happy-camper fan base will probably be pleased, and there  are celebrity cameos by everyone from Kate  Moss and Lulu to Jon Hamm and Dame Edna  Everage, but the hilarity is labored and dreary.  Director Mandie Fletcher is powerless to strike  sparks; the fire has gone cold. J.L.

2

Captain Fantastic

A man raising his six kids in a rigorous  existence in the wilds of the Pacific  Northwest (Viggo Mortensen) ventures down  to Arizona for the funeral of his wife, where  his in-laws (Frank Langella, Ann Dowd) express  their determination to sue for custody of  the kids and raise them with the benefits of  “civilization.” Writer-director Matt Ross draws  good performances from all concerned (including George MacKay and Nicholas Hamilton as  Mortensen’s two oldest sons), and he treats  his story evenly without setting up cardboard  heroes and villains. But the pacing is a little too  even—plodding, in fact, and the movie peaks  two or three times before the closing credits  finally roll. In the final analysis, Ross gives  us little reason to care what happens to this  smug hippie and his half-savage, know-it-all  brood. J.L. 

4

Hunt for the Wilderpeople

A problem boy in New Zealand’s foster  child system (Julian Dennison) goes to  live on a remote, hardscrabble farm with an  older couple (Sam Neill, Rima Te Wiata). When  the woman dies unexpectedly, the boy and  his new “uncle” go for an extended trek in the  dense bushlands, where they become unwitting  fugitives from justice and the objects of an  intense and thoroughly misguided “manhunt.”  Writer-director Taika Waititi adapts the late  Barry Crump’s novel Wild Pork and Watercress, and the result (besides the improved  title) is a quirky delight, filled with rough  charm, surprising adventures, disarming  humor and near-impenetrable New Zealand  accents. Neill and Dennison form a solid bond of  screen chemistry, and the supporting players  are well cast, especially Rhys Darby as a character aptly named “Psycho Sam.” J.L.

3

Independence Day: Resurgence

The alien invaders who were narrowly  defeated 20 years ago return for a  second assault, and once again the people of  Earth rise to the occasion against seemingly  impossible odds. The cast is a mix of returnees  (Bill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum, Brent Spiner, Judd  Hirsch) and newbies (Liam Hemsworth, Jessie  T. Usher, Maika Monroe, Charlotte Gainsbourg,  William Fichtner), and somehow it took director  Roland Emmerich and four other writers to  concoct the script (which has many twists but  few surprises). The result feels just as long  as the original (though, in fact, it’s 25 minutes  shorter), and the visual effects are surprisingly cheesy in spots, but the movie delivers  the goods as a decent, undemanding summer  popcorn epic. It all ends with the promise  (threat?) that it won’t be 20 years till the next  sequel. J.L.

2

BY DANIEL BARNES & JIM LANE

Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates

Abandon hope of wit, all ye who enter  here. Adam Devine and Zac Efron star as bachelor brothers Mike and Dave, “lovable” sociopaths infamous for their out-of-control party 

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The Infiltrator

Undercover customs agent Robert Mazur (Bryan Cranston) helps bring  down some of the banks that are laundering money for Colombian drug  cartels. The movie is well acted (including by John Leguizamo, Diane Kruger and  Amy Ryan as Cranston’s fellow agents; Juliet Aubrey as his wife; and Benjamin  Bratt as a drug trafficker) and director Brad Furman gives a gritty sense of  time and place (the 1980s in New York and Florida). But it’s all so familiar from  other movies that it comes as a bit of a surprise to find that the story it tells is  pretty close to what actually happened to Mazur and his cohorts. Writer Ellen  Brown Furman (the director’s mother) barely hints at the true size and length  of the investigation, and her script steps gingerly from one cliché to the next.  Interesting story—but been here, seen this. J.L.

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3620 N Freeway Blvd #310 · Sacramento, CA 95834 · 916-246-9049 antics. Their family lays down an ultimatum:  show up to their sister’s Hawaiian wedding  with respectable dates, or don’t show up at  all. The brothers post a Craigslist ad that goes  viral, attracting a couple of hot-mess sake  bomb slingers played by Aubrey Plaza and Anna  Kendrick. It’s a shame that the behind-thecamera team couldn’t make more of an effort,  because everyone in front of the camera has  their dial turned up to 11. In fact, the entire film  feels designed to disprove the idea that bad  material gets funnier the longer and louder you  scream it. The entire cast works their butts  off in service of a script that seems like it was  written during a junior high school detention  period. D.B.

4

Now You See Me 2

The Robin Hood-like magicians of Now  You See Me (Jesse Eisenberg, Woody  Harrelson, Mark Ruffalo and Dave Franco,  joined by newcomer Lizzy Caplan) reunite  for another sting—which goes sour, landing  them in the clutches of a tech genius (Daniel  Radcliffe) who dragoons them into his own  shadowy scheme. Like its precursor, this  sequel is very much a magic act itself, filled  with misdirection and sleight of hand—and like  that first movie, it’s great fun, with a delightful  surprise almost every five minutes. Michael  Caine and Morgan Freeman return too, and  director Jon M. Chu navigates the convolutions  of Ed Solomon and Pete Chiarelli’s script with  an unaccustomed sprightly touch. Here’s that  rare sequel that improves on the original— though you do have to have seen the original to  be able to follow it. J.L.

3

Our Kind of Traitor

While vacationing in Morocco, a British  university lecturer (Ewan McGregor)  is befriended by a money launderer for the  Russian Mafia who wants to defect (Stellan  Skarsgård); reluctantly, the lecturer and his  wife (Naomie Harris) are recruited to act as  go-betweens for the Russian and an agent for  British Intelligence (Damian Lewis). Adapted by  Hossein Amini from the novel by John le Carré,  the movie follows the same old line le Carré has  been peddling for 50 years: The bad guys will  always win, and the little guy will be lucky to  escape with his life. Still, within that standard  formula it’s expertly made—well-acted by all,  with director Susanna White ratcheting up 

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A loyal and affectionate dog (voiced by  Louis C.K.) finds his universe turned  upside-down when his human brings home  a pound rescue (Eric Stonestreet) whom he  instantly dislikes. Once again, what might have  made a perfectly enjoyable seven-minute  cartoon is padded out far beyond the limits of  its paper-thin story, this time by writers Cinco  Paul, Ken Daurio and Brian Lynch, and directors Yarrow Cheney and Chris Renaud. Moments of clever humor here and there become  swamped in frenetic, extended action scenes  and eruptions of genuine unpleasantness  (typified by a demented human-hating rabbit  played by Kevin Hart). Characters and their  celebrity voices are too numerous and fleeting  to register strongly; two standout exceptions  are Jenny Slate as a sweetly fuzzy lapdog and  Albert Brooks as a predatory hawk. J.L.

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Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert make  their feature directing debut with  this strange, surreal, wholly original and  surprisingly emotional existentialist black  comedy. Paul Dano stars as Hank, a suicidal  castaway who gets a new lease on life when  he befriends Manny (Daniel Radcliffe), a  flatulent corpse who washes up on the beach.  Manny possesses inexplicable powers—his  powerful farts allow Hank to ride him off  the island like a Jet Ski, and his rotting body  serves as a water purifier—and the two men  form an intense bond that might only exist  in Hank’s malnourished and deteriorating  brain. Dano was born and bred for this sort  of cuddly dementia, while Radcliffe has never  been better, and the two actors forge a great  onscreen rapport. Kwan and Scheinert can’t  quite sustain the invention and energy all the  way to the end, but most of Swiss Army Man is  dazzlingly warped stuff. D.B.

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ballads and moshers that feels like home for fans of Deftones and Taproot. Its sophomore album, 2015’s To Live and Die, showcases a bigger sound ready for national airplay. The album opens rough and sentimental with “Tell Me When You Want It To Stop.” Salatino lights a match with a less-is-more, overdriven guitar hook cooled by a softer bass line leading the verse, played by Carrasco. Giguiere’s voice echoes overhead, commanding but with a subtle, some Fear None, minus the sum. soothing rasp. The arrangement is held together by Weisker’s tight, dynamic drum work. It’s heavy, sincere and soulful, and it’s easily imagined filling arenas. Some Fear None’s brand of hard rock hasn’t lured That’s not to say they were trying to write accordmuch local coverage over the past six years, but ing to what could sell. Authenticity means everything that’s never stopped droves of Sacramento music to “the Sum.” lovers from tuning in anyway. “We prefer to have massive exposure, but not Fans who have been following the four-piece at the cost of abandoning why we do what we do,” since its garage band days have an eventful 2016 Giguiere said. to look proudly upon. Some milestones: a Sammie Putting on the best show possible is win for Artist of the Year; a headlining gig tantamount for the group, and surprisat Concerts in the Park on Friday, July ing the audience with guest artists 22; a Thunder Valley Casino Resort is one way. At Concerts in the show with Papa Roach on Saturday, We prefer to have Park in 2014, Gabriel Cheng, July 30; and an opening slot at son of the late Deftones bassist massive exposure, Aftershock Festival in October. Chi Cheng, joined Some Fear Aftershock is a nice payoff but not at the cost of None to play his father’s bass for a band that has stuck around abandoning why we do guitar for an in memoriam and paid its dues, but its members cover of the Sacramento what we do. aren’t the only ones who can bask legends’ song “Be Quiet and Nathan Giguiere in the glory. The fans, nicknamed Drive.” The band is tight-lipped singer, Some Fear None the “Sum” of Some Fear None, can about another local surprise revel as well. this year, and if history indicates “What are [the fans] going to be anything, fans will want be there. proud of? Us going and playing in their To Giguiere, Some Fear None has garage? Not necessarily,” singer Nathan Giguiere become an independent entity, and with it the said. “Playing Aftershock? They’re going to be proud obligation to serve the people who’ve cared about its of that. Because they earned that, too, and we’re musical journey. representing them.” “It’s a little bit of a responsibility,” Giguiere said. That fan-focused attitude has remained since “We started off doing something, and we’re still the band formed its current lineup in 2011. Jason doing that same something, and now we have people Weisker (drums) and Chuck Carrasco (guitar, bass) that have invested in us. ... Now, doesn’t that translate formed Some Fear None after performing together in to some sort of responsibility to follow through with Sacramento bands throughout the 2000s. After some putting on what they’ve believed in?” Ω lineup changes, they recruited Giguiere and Gina Salatino, his sister-in-law, to share guitar and bass duties. out Some Fear None at 5 p.m. Friday, July 22, for Concerts in The band released its first EP in 2013, Break Hold Check the Park at Cesar Chavez Plaza, 910 I Street. there is no cover. More at and Elevate, an eight-song sampler of alternative www.somefearnone.com.

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Summertime return: With tight vocal harmonies and sleigh bells, Sacramento’s Sunmonks perked up a Sunday night crowd inside the spacious and stark Red Museum. The Delta breeze snuck in from an open back door, cooling off the audience as a few danced in sporty sandals. Pink light washed over the band, casting a dynamic silhouette of the drummer’s bouncy ponytail. After touring the length of the West Coast this past winter, the poprock band of soaring melodies and uplifting beats had their first hometown performance since all those travels. The show was more stripped down than their baroque recordings. Bit by bit, the band is previewing its full-length debut album to its subscriber list, which you probably want to join. On Sunday, they played the title track off their latest two-track EP, Summertime Hi, which dropped in May, with a mysterious and winding intro and a heartwarming chorus. The minimal instrumentation made it clear: This band knows how to write songs with strong backbones. Local pride swelled in the room, and despite how on-point all the instrumentalists were, they didn’t steal the show from Geoffrey CK and Alexandra Steele. CK bellowed with the rich oakiness of Robin Pecknold, while Steele’s upper registers are crisp and emotionally cutting, like Johanna Söderberg of First Aid Kit. Their harmonies swirled around each other in complex rhythms and melodic twists. When CK forgot lyrics, he motioned for Steele to come closer. Singing inches apart, the world-class performers were just being themselves in their own backyard.

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out, going to Pride and the Orlando massacre. Keyko Torres, who hosted the fest, warmly reminded everyone that she and the staff were there if they needed anything. Ladyfest was a defiant celebration of open spaces. If you were there, you saw a large community not only undeterred by mass shooters and intolerance, but moving forward instead. What better way to overcome the sexists than moshing to bands like Destroy Boys?

happy hour guide

Hey, ladies: “Diversity” is definitely a word that defined Sacramento Ladyfest’s second year. The fest returned for two nights at Cafe Colonial, with 18 artists dishing all manner of sounds, including prog rock, indie, rap, ’80s new wave and, of course, feminist punk. Lots of feminist punk. Bands showed up from as far as Australia, Miami, the Bay Area and Los Angeles to join in the annual dissing of the patriarchy. And people came. Cafe Colonial saw sizable crowds Friday and near capacity numbers on Saturday, somewhere in the avenue of 60 to 70 people filling every conceivable corner of the place. Both onstage and off, faces representing an array of skin colors, genders, sexualities and ages made the place feel vibrant and welcoming. Local rapper and deejay duo, Katmonkeys, opened the show with a sound they describe as stream-ofconsciousness propaganda. Some takeaways from their set: live free and fuck Donald Trump. Talks of Spacewalker’s Friday set were heard at the bar the next day. The one-woman-band’s musical monologue required both eyes and ears, her sound a combination of soulful vocal tones over electric jams produced live on her iPad and keys. While night one’s audience was mostly chilled out, night two’s crowd encouraged friendly violence. Singer Camilamaria Alvarez gave the nonverbal cue during her band Period Bomb’s set, thrashing through the crowd seconds into the first song and opening a large pit. L.A.’s Trap Girl showed off some of the rudest punk I’ve ever seen, fronted by a brash trans diva who made the stage belong to her and wooed the audience with her poise. Night two closed with the proggy harmonies of Oakland band Queen Crescent, where delightful doom riffs and dueling flute and guitar solos ensued. Folks looking for a break from the music weren’t short of options. Attendees could get crafty with a button station outside, learn about empathy through the fest’s locally curated zine or make some new friends over Mario Kart. While Cafe Colonial became a conduit for sick music, Ladyfest also transformed the venue into a safe space. Artists talked about coming

SN&R’s

Thrash against the patriarchy

Music - Games - Beer Over 40,000 Chicken Wings! Live music by Takeout & La Noche Oskura

BUY YOUR TICKETS ONLINE! GENERAL ADMISSION: $10 IN ADVANCE / $15 AT THE DOOR VIP WING JUDGE: $45 IN ADVANCE, N/A DAY OF EVENT KIDS 5 AND UNDER ARE FREE! • NO PETS • SACTOWNWINGS.COM

on stands august 11

—rebecca Huval

07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   33


23 SAT

23 SAT

The Joy Formidable

Failure Machine

Grex

Harlow’s restaurant & nigHtclub, 9 p.m., $16-$59.50 The Joy Formidable went back to its Welsh  homeland to build a studio in the hills of its  youth and record its newest album, Hitch.  What came out were highly catchy yet baleful songs that “musically and emotionally  put them through the wringer,” according  to their bio. Although the album was crafted  in familiar surroundings, its emotional  thread weaves itself between the urge to  run away into the night, never to  IndIE be found again, and an understated  homesickness with a craving to belong. With  energetic, punchy drums, melodious guitar  and sweetly sour, emotive vocals, this is altrock at its moody, self-reflective best. 2708 J  Street, www.thejoyformidable.com.

—amy bee

naked lounge, 8:30 p.m., $5

Photo by katerina evangelista

22 FRI

26 T UE

Savages

sopHia’s tHai kitcHen, 9 p.m., $5

Bands are normally pretty terrible at  describing their own sound to other people.  Reno’s Failure Machine, on the other hand,  nails it; they describe themselves as “the  world’s grossest soul band.” I can think of  no better description. Five  GARAGE SoUl scraggily-haired, bearded  dudes from the filthiest little big city in the  world, churning out grungy garage-soul  tunes. If any of this sounds like an insult,  it’s by no means. The quintet creates an  explosive sound that has the thrill of rock  ’n’ roll, the danceability of soul and the  nihilism of alternative rock. What a combo.  1111 H Street, www.failuremachine.com.

—aaron carnes

ace of spades, 8 p.m., $25-$28

Grex claims influences as seemingly normal yet disparate as Jimi Hendrix, Sonic  Youth and John Coltrane. Yet, the Bay Area  band doesn’t sound like any of them. At  all. Deliberately unpretty and wonderfully  strange, Grex’s brand of art rock  noISE strongly veers into free-form jazz  and gritty noise. But just when you think  you’ve got Grex pegged down, its style  warps into sweet, melodic almost-pop.  Catch what used to be a duo as a trio, with  guitar, keys, drums and mayhem. Two  Davis acts open up: dream-pop band Pastel  Dream and one-man band the Lurk. 129 E  Street, Suite E, in Davis; www.grexsounds. com. 

This London band’s name is fitting: Savages  execute a post-punk sound that’s seemingly  primordial. Singer Jehnny Beth (née Camille  Berthomier) doesn’t so much sing as she  does wail in tones that are alternately angry,  mournful and resolute.  PoST-PUnk On Savages’ latest album  Adore Life, Beth, along with guitarist Gemma  Thompson, bassist Ayse Hassan and drummer Fay Milton, channel a brutal energy that  recalls the likes of the Slits and PJ Harvey.  While the tracks here may nod to past influences, they’re never derivative, boring or  predictable. Rather, these songs exhibit  teeth, blood and broken bones. Savages. 1417  R Street, http://savagesband.com.

—Janelle bitker

40 beers on tap Thursday, 7/21: Whiskey Bomb Drop Thursday! Feat. Jim Beam Apple & Angry Orchard Apple Cider Friday, 7/22: $3 Blue Chair Rum Specials Lincoln Highway Boys (Classic Country), 5-8pm Roadside Flare (Current Country Covers), 9pm Saturday, 7/23: $4 Fireball shots Flat Busted (Current Country Covers), 9pm Sunday, 7/24: Happy Hour All Day! $5 Bloody Mary's / $5 Mimosa Monday, 7/25: Micro Brew Monday! $4 on all Craft Draft Beer Tuesday, 7/26: CornHole Tourney, 6pm Cash & Gift Card Prizes, $2 PBR, $2 Shooter Specials Wednesday, 7/27: Whiskey & Wine Wednesday! Whiskey Specials & 50% off Wine Bottles

21+ Venue

4007 Taylor Road • Loomis, CA {EXIT I-80 TO SIERRA COLLEGE} 916-652-4007 • countryclubsaloon.com

34   |   SN&R   |   07.21.16

—racHel leibrock


CALL HIm WHAT YOU WILL—COCKY BALBOA, TAT IN THE HAT, JESSE JAmES—THIS GUY IS AN ENTERTAINER.

26 T UE

27 W ED

28 T HU

28 T HU

Nacho Picasso

The Yardbirds

Peter Petty & The Double P Review Big Band

Ghostface Killah & Raekwon

Blue lamp, 8 p.m., $12-14

Crest theatre, 7:30 p.m., $30-$45

Seattle cult favorite Nacho Picasso continues his Scarred for Life tour with Avatar  Darko, descending upon Blue Lamp this  Tuesday. Five years removed from  RAP his sophomore mixtape For the Glory  reaching Pitchfork stardom, Nacho Picasso  continues to convert fans with absurdist  lyrics and profoundly unique vocals. Call  him what you will—Cocky Balboa, Tat in the  Hat, Jesse James—this guy is an entertainer. While track titles like “Money,” “Coke  Hyena” and “Mouth Full of Gold” read like  well-worn rap tropes, give Nacho Picasso  16 bars and you’ll see what the hype’s all  about. 1400 Alhambra Boulevard, www. nachopicasso.com.

English blues-rock band the Yardbirds are  best known for their song “For Your Love,”  which hit radio waves during the 1960s.  Now, the more than 50-year-old flock  will perform tunes that cemented their  reputation as one of the most influential  groups throughout music history. Famous  original members of the Yardbirds include:  Keith Relf, Eric Clapton,  BLUES ROCK Jimmy Page and Jeff Beck.  With the band’s latest tour, the only  original Yardbird on board is drummer Jim  McCarty, along with an otherwise entirely  American group of musicians who grew up  with the Yardbirds’ music. 1013 K Street,  www.theyardbirds.com.

—Dave Kempa

—steph roDriguez

the saCramento zoo, 5:30 p.m., $11.75 For the uninitiated, Peter Petty has been  making big-band music all over the Central  Valley and beyond in recent years. Petty is  a tour de force with a wicked  BIG BAND sense of melody and showmanship, and his act showcases some of the  most solid musicians around these parts.  This particular night will surely be the  most-talked about event of the Sacramento  Zoo’s Twilight Thursday series. The show  is included in admission to the zoo; kids’  tickets are cheaper and the young ones two  and under get in for free. 3930 W. Land Park  Drive, www.peterpetty.biz. 

—eDDie Jorgensen

aCe of spaDes, 7 p.m., $32 2015 was the 20th anniversary of the  illustrious purple tape, a.k.a the release of  Raekwon’s Only Built 4 Cuban Linx, guest  starring Ghostface Killah. Widely regarded  as one of the all-time best rap albums, the  Source eventually corrected its 4.5-mics  review from 1995 to make it an undisputed  five mics—indicating certified classic status.  A year later, Ghostface dropped his debut  Ironman, collaborating  RAP/HIP-HOP heavily with Raekwon yet  again, to similar fanfare. Between their  respective solo records and Wu-Tang Clan  albums, there are 23 years of collaboration  to play out. 1417 R Street, www.facebook. com/GhostfaceKillahOfficial.

—BlaKe gillespie

JULY 22 JULY 29 Voted Best Overall Gaming Resort & Hotel in Reno! o! (775) 789-2000 • GrandSierraResort.com 07.21.16    |   SN&R   |   35


THURSDAY 7/21

FRIDAY 7/22

SATURDAY 7/23

#TurntUp Thursday, 9pm, no cover

Bats & Balls River Cats Equality Night Afterparty, 10pm, call for cover

Spectacular Saturdays, 10pm, call for cover

Sunday Tea Dance and Beer Bust, 4pm, call for cover

Big Mondays happy hour all night, M; Karaoke, Tu; Trapicana, W

BAR 101

Thursday Comedy Open Mic, 7:30pm, call for cover

KEN KOENIG BAND, call for time and cover

ADRIAN BELLUE, call for time and cover

CHAD WILKINS, call for time and cover

Trivia, 6:30pm M; Open-mic, 7:30pm W, no cover

BLUE LAMP

MONE’T JEZEBELLE’S ARMY; 8pm, call for cover

BONEY-JAY, LEVI MOSES, YOUNG TAXX, SPARKS ACROSS DARKNESS; 8pm, $10

SLAP SHOT, FANG, COLD TRAP, BLACK SADDLE HOOKERS; 8pm, $15-$20

GREATNESS, JP THA HUSTLER, BRETT AS IS, BIG LEGION; 8pm, $5-$7

NACHO PICASSO, AVATAR DARKO, KURT HUSTLE, SCUMBAGZ; 8pm T, $12-$14

BADLANDS

2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

101 Main St., Roseville; (916) 774-0505 1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

THE BOARDWALK

SUNDAY 7/24

THE ACACIA STRAIN, OCEANO, KNOCKED LOOSE; 6pm, $14-$16

HUSALAH, 7pm, $15-$20

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

PAUL THORN BAND, 8pm, $27-$30

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

COUNTRY CLUB SALOON

4007 Taylor Rd., Loomis; (916) 652-4007

VAGABOND BROTHERS, 8pm, call for cover

ART MULACHY & ROADSIDE FLARE, 9pm, call for cover

DISTRICT 30

Jordan Suckley, 10pm, call for cover

DJ DM, call fortime and cover

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798

Everything Happens dancing and karaoke, 9pm, call for cover

Absolute Fridays dance party, 9pm, $5-$10

Party Time dance party with Sequin Sarudays drag show, 9:30pm, $5-$12

FOX & GOOSE

MIKE JUSTIS BAND, 8pm, no cover

YOURS TRULY, MICHELLE; JONEMERY; 9pm; $5

THE STUMMIES; 9pm, $5

1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

FACES

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

FLAT BUSTED, 9pm, call for cover

Corn Hole Tourney, 6pm Tu, no cover Fight Club, 8pm W, call for cover Sunday Mass with heated pool, drag show, 2pm, no cover

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to nightbeat@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

EDM and karaoke, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, $5 Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub quiz, 7pm Tu; All Vinyl Wednesdays, 6pm W, no cover

GOLDFIELD TRADING POST Hey local bands!

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 7/25-7/27

Open-mic night, M, call for cover

1603 J St., (916) 476-5076

HALFTIME BAR & GRILL

Karaoke happy hour, 7pm, no cover

RETRO METRO, 9pm, $5

SKID ROSES, 9pm, $5

HARLOW’S

CALICO THE BAND, THE ROYAL JELLY; 8pm, $8-$10

THE JOY FORMIDABLE, 7pm, $16-$59.50

GHOST OF THE ROBOT, PUNCHOUT RADIO HELMET; 6pm, $13-$18

THE HIDEAWAY BAR & GRILL

Punk and glam night with DJ Annimal, 9pm, no cover

LUNA’S CAFE & JUICE BAR

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

5681 Lonetree Blvd., Rocklin; (916) 626-6366 2708 J St., (916) 441-4693 2565 Franklin Blvd., (916) 455-1331 1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931

Trivia night, 7pm Tu; Bingo, 1pm W; Paint night, 6:30pm W, $25 DICK STUSSO, 8pm, $10-$12

THE JAMES HUNTER SIX, 7pm W, $27.50-$30 Cactus Pete’s 78 RPM Record Roundup, 8pm Tu; Twisted Trivia, W

Singer Songwriter Open Mic, 3pm, no cover

RICH DRIVER, JULIE MEYER, JAMES ISRAEL; 8pm, $5

MIDTOWN BARFLY

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $10; Open Mic Comedy, 8pm Tu, no cover Salsa Wednesday, 7:30pm W, $5

1119 21st St., (916) 549-2779

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN

NOSEDIVE; PERSPECTIVE, A LOVELY HAND TO HOLD; 8:30pm; $5

1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

THE BOTTOM FEEDERS, THE WHITE LIGHTERS; 8:30pm, $5

THUNDERCHIEF, FAILURE MACHINE; 8:30pm, $8

MASON HOFFMAN, LITTLE CHAMPION, SPEAK LOW; 8:30pm, $5

2708 J Street Sacramento, CA 916.441.4693 www.harlows.com Coming Soon

7/21 7pm $8adv

7/27 6pm $27.50

CaliCo The Band

The James hunTer six

The Royal Jelly

7/28 9pm $20adv

7/22 8pm $16adv

riChie spiCe and The elemenT Band

The Joy FormidaBle The new Regime

7/29 6pm $15adv

7/23 5pm $13adv

GhosT oF The roBoT

punchouT, Radio helmeT, meTal falcon

diCk sTusso

dirTy revival

foR sayle

36

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feaT. Tommy laRkins on The dRums

7/29 10pm $8adv

7/24 7pm $10adv

SN&R

JonaThan riChman

soul shine

|

07.21.16

07/30 07/31 08/01 08/02 08/03 08/05 08/06 08/12 08/13 08/13 08/18 08/19 8/21 08/27 08/27 08/28 09/01 09/02 09/15 09/16

albert lee Black milk with nat Turner BJ The chicago kid one drop moving units (perform Joy division) Blitzen Trapper The stone foxes The iguanas Ben solee saved By The 90’s B side players (curtis mayfield Tribute) fleetwood mask Beausoleil avec / michael doucet steelin’ dan dezarie Ruben paul charles Bradley Tracy cruz carl verheyen Band Tainted love

STONEYS GRAND REMODEL

COMING SOON

20 ON TAP CRAFT BEERS COMING SOON PLUS MANY CANS AND CRAFT BOTTLES NOW! GREAT DINNER SPECIALS NIGHTLY 6PM JUST $10 HAPPY HOUR 2-6PM DAILY

LIVE MUSIC SCHEDULE

LIVE MUSIC VOTED BEST BAR IN ROSEVILLE! 2015 -PRESS TRIBUNE

JULY 22 KEN KOENIG BAND JULY 23 ADRIAN BELLUE JULY 24 CHAD WILKINS* JULY 29 PSYKICKS JULY 30 INSIDE STORY

KNCI COLLEGE NIGHT WEDNESDAYS NIGHT $3/$4$5 DRINK SPECIALS TIL 11 THURSDAYS COUNTRY THUNDER 18 & OVER B 92.5 HOT COUNTRY FRIDAYS SATURDAY NIGHTS 21 & OVER AWESOME DANCING & KARAOKE SUNDAY FUNDAY 18 & OVER COLLEGE NIGHT KARAOKE WED - SUN FREE DANCE LESSONS NIGHTLY AMAZING FOOD AWESOME NIGHTLY DRINK SPECIALS FREE LATE NIGHT FOOD

MONDAY PINT NIGHT 5-8 PM, TRIVIA @ 6:30 PM WEDNESDAY OPEN MIC – SIGN-UPS @ 7:30 PM THURSDAY OPEN MIC COMEDY @ 7:30 PM

1320 DEL PASO BLVD

101 MAIN STREET, ROSEVILLE 916-774-0505 · LUNCH/DINNER 7 DAYS A WEEK

STONEYINN.COM | 916.927.6023

aug 19

NAAN STOP

aug 20

LILLIE LEMON

aug 26

SCOTTY VOX

27 BEERS ON DRAFT SUNDAY ACOUSTIC SESSIONS 2-5 PM

FRI & SAT 9:30PM - CLOSE 21+

/BAR101ROSEVILLE


OLD IRONSIDES

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504

ON THE Y

THURSDAY 7/21

FRIDAY 7/22

SATURDAY 7/23

Open acoustic jam, 8pm, no cover

THE MACHETES, EBB TIDE, BAILEY ZINDEL; 9pm, $6

CHUM, ASPHALT SOCIALITIES, AVALEYA, THE GLITTERHAWKS; 9pm, $6

Open-mic stand-up comedy and karaoke, 8pm, no cover

670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731

SUNDAY 7/24

Saturday night karaoke, 8pm, no cover

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 7/25-7/27 Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover; Open-mic, 9pm W, no cover

Open 8-ball pool tournament, 7:30pm, $5

Karaoke, 9pm Tu; Dart and movie night, 7pm W, no cover

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

PISTOL PETE’S

OSTRICH THEORY, NATIONAL LINES; 8pm, call for cover

140 Harrison Ave., Auburn; (530) 885-5093

POUR HOUSE

Heavy Mondays, 9pm, no cover

1910 Q St., (916) 706-2465

POWERHOUSE PUB

614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586

ART MULCAHY AND ROADSIDE FLARE, call for time and cover

THE PRESS CLUB

2030 P St., (916) 444-7914

SHADY LADY SALOON 1409 R St., (916) 231-9121

HARLEY WHITE JR. ORCHESTRA, 9pm, no cover

STARLITE LOUNGE

1517 21st St., (916) 704-0711

8 TRACK MASSACARE, 10pm, $10

LOST IN SUBURBIA, 10pm, call for cover

JERAMY NORRIS AND THE DANGEROUS MOOD, 3pm, $10

Press Club Fridays with DJ Rue, call for time and cover

Pop 40 with DJ Larry, 9pm, no cover before 10pm

Sunday Night Dance Party, 9pm, call for cover

ZORELLI, 9pm, no cover

THE HUCKLEBUCKS, 9PM, no cover

PETER PETTY, 9pm, no cover

ORYX, ISOTOPE; 8pm, $7

SAMA DAMS, DEEP POOLS, PRVLGS; 8pm, $8

UNDERGANG, SPECTRAL VOICE, ATRAMENT; 7pm, $10-$12

Carcass with Crowbar, Ghoul and Night Demon Friday 6:30pm, $20-$25. Ace of Spades Death Metal

Live band karaoke, 8pm Tu, call for cover

Musical mash up, 9pm W, no cover

STONEY’S ROCKIN RODEO

Country DJ dancing and live band karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Country DJ dancing and karaoke, 8pm, $5-$7

Country DJ dancing and karaoke, 8pm, $5

Country DJ dancing and karaoke, 9pm, call for cover

Country DJ dancing, 8:30pm W, $5-$10

TORCH CLUB

Acoustic open-mic X-TRIO, 5pm; MARSHALL HOUSE PROJECT, 9pm, $6

KEATON SIMONS, 5:30pm, $8; AKI KUMAR, 9pm, $8

RICH MCCULLEY, 5pm, no cover; MIKE ELDRED TRIO, 9pm, $7

TEAM TORCH, 2pm, $20 donation

RICHARD MARCH, 5:30pm Tu, no cover; MICHAEL RAY, 8pm W, no cover

JULIETA VENEGAS, 7pm, $40

DEJ LOAF, 7pm, $39-$44

SAVAGES, 7pm Tu, $25-28; BELANOVA 7pm W, $25-$30

PEACE KILLERS, GREENRIVER THRILLERS, KLAW; 8pm, $6-$10

SPANISH LOVE SONGS, DAYDREAM, REVERSE THE KNIFE; 8pm, call for cover

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023 904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

P-LO, 7pm, $17-$47

CAFE COLONIAL

Open-mic, 9pm, no cover

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300 3520 Stockton Blvd., (916) 736-3520

CARCASS, CROWBAR, GHOUL, NIGHT DEMON; 6:30pm, $20-25

THE COLONY

KING BLOOM, THE CHILI BANDITOS, EASE; 6 pm, $5

3512 Stockton Blvd., (916) 718-7055

SHINE

1400 E St., (916) 551-1400

Ghost of the Robot with Punchout and Radio Helmet Saturday 6pm, $13-$18. Harlow’s Alternative Rock

Open Jazz Jam, 8pm, no cover

PINE STREET RAMBLERS, SCRATCH DOG STRING BAND; 8PM, $8

GLASS HOUSE, LOVE MISCHIEF; 8pm, $7

Midtown Out Loud Open Mic, 8pm W, call for cover

ALL AGES WELCOME!

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 • www.aceofspadessac.com THURSDAY, JULY 21

P-LO

NOODLES - CALEBORATE

FRIDAY, JULY 22

CARCASS

CROWBAR – GHOUL - NIGHT DEMON

SATURDAY, JULY 23

JULIETA VENEGAS

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27

BELANOVA THURSDAY, JULY 28

GHOSTFACE KILLAH & RAEKWON FRIDAY, JULY 29 DECADES COLLIDE: 80’S VS 90’S

BIZ MARKIE DJ OASIS

SUNDAY, JULY 24

DEJ LOAF

TUESDAY, JULY 26

SAVAGES

SATURDAY, JULY 30

STEEL PULSE WEDNESDAYDAY, AUGUST 3

WAKA FLOCKA FLAME

COMING

SOON

08/04 08/05 08/06 08/09 08/12 08/13 08/16 08/17 08/18 08/19 08/20 08/22 08/23 08/24 08/30 09/10 09/14 09/16 09/17 09/18 09/27 09/28 10/01 10/05 10/06 10/09 10/10 10/11 10/15 10/21 10/23 10/24

Aaron Watson Jack Garratt Bear Hands/Atlas Genius Wavves Chase Rice David Allan Coe Matisyahu Scott Stapp: The Voice of Creed Fitz & The Tantrums Sold Out! Too Short The New Pornographers Digitour Summer 2016 Riff Raff I Prevail Explosions In The Sky Jake Bugg Josh Abbott Band Coheed And Cambria Sold Out! Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue Saint Motel Tech N9ne Echo & The Bunnymen Corey Smith Drive By Truckers Simple Plan Devin Townsend Project & Between The Buried & Me Beartooth Eric Hutchinson Halestorm Opeth Yellowcard Young The Giant

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL DIMPLE RECORDS LOCATIONS AND WWW.ACEOFSPADESSAC.COM 07.21.16

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SN&R

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37


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What are we creating? In 2000, I viewed Without Sanctuary at the New-York Historical Society, and felt sickened. It was an exhibition of lynching postcards and photographs, souvenirs of violence against mainly black, mainly Southern men. In some images, a crowd—men, yes, but also women and children—are all smiles, dressed for a church picnic. No masked Klansmen. Seeing the bodies of black men hanging from trees—strange fruit— was horrific enough, but the cheerful greetings on the back of the postcards were equally disturbing. One person penned, “This is the barbecue we had last night” on a photo of a man burned alive. Other messages contained pleasant updates about loved ones. More than 3,000 lynchings occurred from 1890 to 1930—in the South, yes, but also in California, Ohio, Indiana and Pennsylvania. Here, in the Golden State, Mexican men were lynched, too.

Come out and take a stand Change comes from within. We each need to confront our own prejudices and fears. Healing ourselves is the only way to change systems because systems are comprised of us and we sometimes act according to our lowest selves. Like this: If we are afraid to speak up for what’s right because we might lose our jobs or friends or risk public discomfort, we feed the hate. When we fail to confront ignorance in our workplaces, our families, our communities, we fail at our real work of becoming ethical, spiritual human beings. So if you deny that gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgender people are your family and deserve fully equal civil rights, do the inner work to wake yourself up so you can speak out in love when bigotry arises.

Do the inner work to wake yourself up.

Sights feed minds When I opened Facebook and saw a viral video of another tragedy, this time in Texas, I thought of the lynching exhibit. Those postcards and photographs were sold door to door and mailed to relatives all over the United States. Haven’t we learned yet that images of black men being brutalized only serves to desensitize people to images of black men being brutalized? Even research proves that viewing violence in video games, films and the news can make us less sensitive to the pain and suffering of others, inspire us to be more fearful of the world around us and encourage us to behave more aggressively or harmfully toward others. Posting images of cruelty, terror and violence does connect us to trending news. But it does nothing to change how we treat one another. Expressing outrage on social media offers emotional release but doesn’t ensure a different future. And that brings me to Orlando.

All or nothing Some religious teachings, new age philosophies and political agendas are stuck in what psychologists call all-or-nothing thinking. Like this: There is only heaven or hell, only good or evil, only love or fear. All-or-nothing thinking is a pattern prevalent in depression and is part of the fight-flight-or-freeze response. When we call a mass murderer evil, or when news media does so, we reveal our ignorance of mental health issues. We also deny the complexity within all humans. The middle path is reality. It keeps us present, open-minded, honest and able to creatively solve problems. That’s where I’m trying to walk. Will you join me? Ω

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@newsreview.com.


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Would my medical marijuana recommendation be legal in other states that also honor recommendations? —Dee Starr Generally, it depends on the state. Michigan and Maine will welcome anyone with a medical cannabis card to visit their dispensaries. However, states like Arizona will allow you to legally possess cannabis if you have an out-of-state letter, but they won’t let you buy cannabis. Nevada is supposed to honor your letter, but the cops that wrote me up in 2015 didn’t see my valid letter of recommendation as a legal defense allowing me to have marijuana in my possession. Here’s the thing, though: 2016 is gonna be awesome for adultuse cannabis law reform. Massachusetts, Arizona, Nevada (fingers crossed) and North Dakota (activists there submitted petition signatures just last week) are all expected to pass legalization laws. Oregon, Washington, Colorado, D.C. and Alaska already have legal adult-use cannabis laws in place. There are plenty of great vacation options in all of those legal states; plus, it’s always a good idea to spend your vacation money in places that support your right to be a responsible pot-using adult. Have fun planning your trip! How can you say you are on the AUMA bandwagon? Don’t you have concerns about corporations taking over your marijuana? I really hope you come to your senses and vote against this evil corporatist bill. —Tru B. Lieber Yada, yada. Listen: Corporations aren’t going to take over the weed game. They may try to create monopolies, but the Adult Use of Marijuana Act does a pretty good job of allowing for smaller, craft-style growers to have a share of the market. Also, just like how I hardly ever drink corporate beer, I am pretty sure I will support small-batch cannabis farms. If the new regulations lead to horrible commercial-grade pot, I am more than sure the black market will be willing to provide quality cannabis for a reasonable price. Let’s not forget that cannabis has been Corporations genetically modified, er, selectively bred for aren’t going to generations. How do you think high-CBD strains like Harlequin and Ringo’s Gift take over the weed were invented? Granted, crossbreeding for game. specific qualities is way different than splicing genes, but the concept is the same. And while I am pretty sure I wouldn’t want to smoke a Strawberry Cough that was created with the DNA of actual strawberries (although, maybe I would—I bet the flavor would be intense), I am pretty sure that cannabis can handle all kinds of crazy breeding programs. If you are so worried about evil scientists creating zombie GMO cannabis strains, now would be a good time for you and your doomsday-prepper friends to start an heirloom cannabis seed bank. In fact, you could start a business that specializes in non-GMO cannabis seeds. That way, you could make some money and “pure” cannabis will still have a place at the weed table. Win-win. Vote yes on Proposition 64. Ω

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nder a black light Jason Thiemann’s glass pipes are pretty cool, but flip off the lights completely and they glisten. After experimenting for two years, Thiemann came up with a glow-in-the-dark pipe that radiates brilliant color — indigo blues and mantis greens (check them out at www.boroglow.com). It’s easy to tell Thiemann has been around this material forever by watching him work in his South Sacramento studio — a converted garage he can pop open on hot afternoons. Originally taught by his parents, Thiemann became a part of that burgeoning 1990s glass pipe industry before he and others abruptly left it in 2003. “Operation Pipe Dreams happened,” Thiemann says, “and I got very scared.”

“I want to take the In-N-Out Burger approach — make some things, make them perfect and make many of them.” Jason Thiemann, glass artist Operation Pipe Dreams was U.S. Attorney General John Ashcroft’s attempt to end drug paraphernalia sales by raiding stores, shutting down websites and prosecuting pipe makers. Stores were returning shipments and

canceling orders. With kids and a decent life he had made so far, the ex-Marine decided to get out, too. Thiemann focused more on making glass jewelry, later sex toys, but the culture was different. “It wasn’t for me,” he says. Instead, he fired up his Mirage 4–stud torch to 3,000 degrees and began offering handblown pipes again, this time on his own site and through Etsy.com. The pipes blend Thiemann’s craftsmanship and old school styles with the absolute best materials. The borosilicate tubing comes from Germany and his colors from Northstar Glassworks. As for the blue and green glass powders that make such a stunning glow? That’s Thiemann’s own recipe, and for now he just wants to concentrate on it. “I want to take the In-N-Out Burger approach,” he tells Capital Cannabis Guide. “Make some things, make them perfect and make many of them.” When asked if he thought cannabis legalization would lead to more business opportunities, he said yes, but also expressed concern over poor quality pipes that he predicts will flood in, especially from China. “Nobody knows what’s really in it,” he says of glass from China. “They don’t have the regulations like we do.”

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Free will astrology

by Blake Gillespie

by ROB BRezsny

FOR THE WEEk OF JULy 21, 2016 ARIES (March 21-April 19): You now have more

luxuriant access to divine luck than you’ve had in a long time. For the foreseeable future, you could be able to induce semi-miraculous twists of fate that might normally be beyond your capacities. But here’s a caveat: The good fortune swirling in your vicinity may be odd or irregular or hard to understand. To harvest it, you will have to expand your ideas about what constitutes good fortune. It may bestow powers you didn’t even realize it was possible to have. For example, what if you temporarily have an acute talent for gravitating toward situations where smart love is in full play?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A directory

published by the U.S. Department of Labor says that my gig as an astrologer shares a category with jugglers, rodeo clowns, acrobats, carnival barkers, and stuntpersons. Am I, therefore, just a charming buffoon? An amusing goofball who provides diversion from life’s serious matters? I’m fine with that. I may prefer to regard myself as a sly oracle inflamed with holy madness, but the service I provide is probably more effective if my ego doesn’t get the specific glory it yearns for. In this way, I have certain resemblances to the Taurus tribe during the next four weeks. Is it OK if you achieve success without receiving all of the credit you think you deserve?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Over the course

of a 57-year career, Japanese movie director Akira Kurosawa won 78 major awards for his work, including a lifetime achievement award from the Oscars. Among the filmmakers who’ve named him as an inspirational influence are heavyweights like Ingmar Bergman, Werner Herzog, Bernardo Bertolucci, Robert Altman, Francis Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese. But Kurosawa wasn’t too haughty to create lighter fare. At age 86, he departed from his epic dramas to create a 30-second commercial for a yogurt drink. Did that compromise his artistic integrity? I say no. Even a genius can’t be expected to create nonstop masterpieces. Be inspired by Kurosawa, Gemini. In the coming weeks, give your best to even the most modest projects.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Capricorns may be

the hardest workers of the zodiac, and Tauruses the most dogged. But in the coming weeks, I suspect you Cancerians will be the smartest workers. You will efficiently surmise the precise nature of the tasks at hand, and do what’s necessary to accomplish them. There’ll be no false starts or reliance on iffy data or slapdash trial-and-error experiments. You’ll have a light touch as you find innovative shortcuts that produce better results than would be possible via the grind-it-out approach.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): My friend’s 12-year-old

daughter Brianna got a B on her summer school math test. She might have earned an A if it weren’t for a problem her teacher had with some of her work. “You got the right answer by making two mistakes that happened to cancel each other out,” he wrote on her paper next to question seven. I suspect you will soon have a similar experience. Leo. But the difference between you and Brianna is that I’m giving you an A. All that matters in the end is that you succeed. I don’t care if your strategy is a bit funky.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Have you ever

fantasized about being a different gender or race or astrological sign? Do you suspect it might be fun and liberating to completely change your wardrobe or your hairstyle or your body language? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to experiment with these variables, and with any others that would enable you to play with your identity. You have a cosmic exemption from imitating what you have done in the past. In this spirit, feel free to read all the other signs’ horoscopes, and act on the one you like best. Your word of power is “shapeshifter.”

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Golden Goose

Award is given annually to “scientists whose work may have been considered silly, odd, or obscure when first conducted,” but which ultimately produced dramatic advances. Entomologists Raymond Bushland and Edward Knipling were this year’s winners. More than 60

years ago, they started tinkering with the sex life of the screwworm fly in an effort to stop the pest from killing livestock and wildlife throughout the American South. At first their ideas were laughed at, even ridiculed. In time, they were lauded for their pioneering breakthroughs. I suspect you’ll be blessed with a vindication of your own in the coming weeks, Libra. It may not be as monumental as Bushland’s and Knipling’s, but I bet it’ll be deeply meaningful for you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I hope it doesn’t

sound too paradoxical when I urge you to intensify your commitment to relaxation. I will love it, and more importantly your guardian angel will love it, if you become a fierce devotee of slowing down and chilling out. Get looser and cozier and more spacious, damn it! Snuggle more. Cut back on overthinking and trying too hard. Vow to become a high master of the mystic art of I-don’tgive-a-fuck. It’s your sacred duty to steal more slack from the soul-anesthetizing grind.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I regularly

travel back through time from the year 2036 so as to be here with you. It’s tough to be away from the thrilling transformations that are underway there. But it’s in a good cause. The bedraggled era that you live in needs frequent doses of the vigorous optimism that’s so widespread in 2036, and I’m happy to disseminate it. Why am I confessing this? Because I suspect you now have an extra talent for gazing into the unknown and exploring undiscovered possibilities. You also have an unprecedented power to set definite intentions about the life you want to be living in the future. Who will you be five years from today? Ten years? Twenty years? Be brave. Be visionary. Be precise.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Here’s one

strategy you could pursue, I guess: You could spank the Devil with a feather duster as you try to coax him to promise that he will never again trick you with a bogus temptation. But I don’t think that would work, frankly. It may have minor shock value, in which case the Devil might leave you in peace for a short time. Here’s what I suggest instead: Work at raising your discernment so high that you can quickly identify, in the future, which temptations will deliver you unto evil confusion and which will feed and hone your most noble desires.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): After a cool, dry

period, you’ll soon be slipping into a hot, wet phase. The reasonable explanations that generated so much apathy are about to get turned inside-out. The seemingly good excuses that provided cover for your timidity will be exposed as impractical lies. Are you ready for your passion to roar back into fashion? Will you know what to do when suppressed yearnings erupt and the chemicals of love start rampaging through your soft, warm animal body? I hereby warn you about the oncoming surge of weird delight—and sing “Hallelujah!” for the revelatory fun it will bring.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m composing your

horoscope on my iPhone after midnight on a crowded bus that’s crammed with sweaty revelers. We’re being transported back to civilization from a rural hideaway where we spent the last 12 hours at a raging party. I still feel ecstatic from the recent bacchanal, but the ride is uncomfortable. I’m pinned against a window by a sleepy, drunken dude who’s not in full control of his body. But do I allow my predicament to interfere with my holy meditation on your destiny? I do not—just as I trust you will keep stoking the fires of your own inspiration in the face of comparable irritations. You have been on a hot streak, my dear. Don’t let anything tamp it down!

PHOTO BY EVAN DURAN

Dangerous drive No one shouts “fore” at a driving range—particularly if the ball shagger is out there. When Ryan Chua, part-owner-slash-ball-shagger at Leader Golf Complex in Natomas, revs up the tractor to go gather some balls, he’s an immediate target for the lineup of people armed with drivers. The shagger cart is makeshift, a mini tractor with a cage welded to the top and an unprotected side on its left that makes him even more tempting prey. Chua understands if you hit him or his tractor, though. It’s practically encouraged by the other targets, junked sedans placed on the range. “Who doesn’t want to hit a car with a golf ball?” he asks rhetorically.

Is it tough to get staff to do this job? At first, it’s the opposite. Whoever starts working here wants to go out. After a while, it gets old and you get the balls hitting you. When the balls hit the metal cages you think you’re safe, but there’s actually shards of metal that will give you a splinter in the back of the neck or the arm. You’re not really as safe as you think you are. There are times where we’ve actually run out of gas on the back of the range. You can’t really tell people to stop. So you’re out there and you’re dodging golf balls, literally.

What’s one of the worst-case scenarios being out on the range? You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

I remember two winters ago it had just rained. When it breaks, this place gets packed. We were out picking up balls and I started to notice there weren’t many balls out. I looked in the ground and you could see the balls were actually sinking. They sink after heavy rain. I stopped for a second and then the cart started to sink. After spinning

the wheels and getting it dug in even more, I couldn’t get out. We were literally a full house, so I’m dodging balls left and right to get back to the office.

Any name for your tractor?

Have you been hit?

Has this job changed your perspective about golf?

No. We could, though. It’s a pretty beat-up machine. It kind of looks like Mater from Cars. This would be our Mater.

I was hit in the leg, right near my crotch, like, right on my inner thigh. The crazy part is that I was in the cart when it happened. Balls will find their way through the cracks. It will take a bounce and come up underneath the bottom. One of our guys, Luciano, was wearing a hard hat and good thing he was. He got hit on the top of the head with a golf ball. It didn’t hurt too bad and he was OK, but he said it rang him pretty good.

Is it meditative, in a way? Yeah, because it’s repetitive. You’re going up and down lines. You have to be as efficient as possible so that you’re not using too much gas. So you’re going line to line to line. It’s kind of like mowing the grass. It’s somewhat meditative, but it’s easily broken. As soon as your golf cart goes out, you’re automatically a target. Immediately. If I were to drive this cart out there at least six or seven of the guys are aiming for me. It’s just fun to do. We actually contemplated putting a target on the side of this, just to let people know, “Hey, go ahead.”

Does the sound of a golf swing make you tense up? Immediately after, but you lose it after a while. Every time I come across this line (points to area nearest the tees), I’ve always got my head down, tucked in and just bracing for impact. Those are the ones that don’t sound too pleasant when it hits the cage. It’s a hazardous sport, I guess you could say.

It hasn’t ruined it for me. But you don’t realize how dangerous it actually is on a golf course. You don’t realize how fast those balls are actually coming at you unless you’ve actually been hit. Whenever I hear “fore,” I’m always the first to duck or dive down. It’s like a war scene. I hit the ground and I’m covering my head. When you’re in this car and you feel and hear the impact, you really feel the force of the ball. I’m kind of amazed at how fast it’s actually traveling. Depending on when it hits you, the ball travels up to 100 miles per hour. You have to imagine if you’re close it’s hitting you at a 100 miles per hour. Even if you’re in the very back and the drive is on the decrease, that ball is still traveling 70 to 80 miles per hour. These balls are coming in hot.

What goes through your mind out there? It’s actually kind of peaceful until you get the occasional ting. Other than that, you’re out there alone and you’re just doing your thing. I think a lot about—fishing. (Laughs.) I have no idea why, but I’m always thinking about fishing. Ω

Take a few drives at Ryan Chua’s shagger at Leader Golf Complex, 3060 El Centro Road.

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