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One badass blOOdy mary, please see Dish, page 25

Natomas’ builD or baN Debate see News, page 7

sN&r’s

endorsements! see opinion, page 11

Do electioN lawN sigNs work? see News, page 9

Forget long duk dong

see arts&culture, page 20

Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

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Volume 26, iSSue 06

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thurSday, may 29, 2014


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SN&R   |  05.29.14


May 29, 2014 | vol. 26, issue 06

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Class acts It’s that time again for SN&R’s annual College Essay Contest. Every year, the editorial staff combs through a daunting pile of submissions in an effort to find the region’s best and brightest voices—and reward the top three winners with some nice cash prizes. Every year, however, I feel a little guilty reading through those essays. I mean, who am I to judge? For starters, I never even wrote a college-application essay. I took the SAT and ACT, but I can’t recall, for the life of me, what my scores were. Truth is, I really didn’t care about any of that as a teen. I knew I wanted to be a writer, but for various reasons, college felt abstract—something unattainable, out of reach. When I was 17, I was barely equipped to deal with day-to-day life, much less get my act together to craft a thoughtful, insightful essay. Post-high school, I attended community college; it’d take me another three years to make it to a university. Once there, I doubled down and made up for lost time, but still. And so these students impress. They labor over college applications, they pick—with meticulous care—a major, a life path, a destination. Of course, life has a funny way of upending even the best-laid plans—but I certainly don’t need to tell them that. Because, reading their essays, sifting through stories of loss and heartbreak, physical injury, emotional trauma, learning, and changed perceptions, it’s clear they already know all this—this essay, this particular step toward college, it’s all just the beginning in a life sure to be filled with wins and defeats, sadness and joy. The class of 2014? It’s gonna be all right. They got this.

04 05 07 11 13 20 23 25 29 30 32 34 40 55

STREETALK LETTERS NEWS + SCOREKEEPER OPINION FEATuRE STORy ARTS&CuLTuRE NIgHT&DAy DISH ASK JOEy STAgE FILM MuSIC + SOund AdviCE THE 420 15 MINuTES COVER dEsign BY HAYLEY dOsHAY COVER pHOtO BY sEREnE LUsAnO

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34 Custom Publications Writer/Copy Editor Mike Blount Executive Coordinator Jessica Takehara Directors of First Impressions Courtney DeShields, Matt Kjar Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Daniel Bowen, Russell Brown, Nina Castro, Jack Clifford, Lydia Comer, John Cunningham, Lob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Joanna Gonzalez-Brown, Aaron Harvey, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Greg Meyers, Kenneth Powell, Wendell Powell, Lloyd Rongley, Lolu Sholotan, Jack Thorne

Kate Paloy, Jessica Rine, Patti Roberts, Ann Martin Rolke, Steph Rodriguez Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Designers Melissa Bernard, Brad Coates, Serene Lusano, Kyle Shine, Skyler Smith Contributing Photographers Lisa Baetz, Steven Chea, Wes Davis, Ryan Donahue, Taras Garcia, Lovelle Harris, Shoka

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising Consultants Joseph Barcelon, Meghan Bingen, Teri Gorman, Dusty Hamilton, Dave Nettles, Lee Roberts, Julie Sherry, Kelsi White Senior Inside Sales Consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services Specialist Jovi Radtke Director of Et Cetera Will Niespodzinski Custom Publications Editor Michelle Carl Custom Publications Managing Editor Shannon Springmeyer

Co-editors Rachel Leibrock, Nick Miller Staff Writers Janelle Bitker, Raheem F. Hosseini Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Entertainment Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Becca Costello Contributing Editor Cosmo Garvin Editor-at-large Melinda Welsh Contributors Ngaio Bealum, Daniel Barnes, Rob Brezsny, Jim Carnes, Cody Drabble, Deena Drewis, Joey Garcia, Blake Gillespie, Becky Grunewald, Jeff Hudson, Jim Lane, Garrett McCord, Kel Munger,

—Rachel Leibrock

rac hell@ n ews r ev i ew . com

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialist Tami Sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Sweetdeals Coordinator Alicia Brimhall Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins

1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Sales Fax (916) 498-7910 Editorial Fax (916) 498-7920 Website www.newsreview.com SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

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“My friends were making fun of me, saying it was a minivan when it wasn’t.”

Asked at Arden Fair mall:

When did you feel buyer’s remorse?

Jeff Taluvan student

Lindsay Shepherd restaurant manager

With me, it only lasts like a day or two. I buy fishing stuff, generally. Some of it can be 30 to 70 bucks. … Lures can be five to 80 bucks. I use it, and then I find out it isn’t what they say it is.

I bought a [San Francisco 49ers] jersey, $170, and [Alex Smith] ended up switching out to a different team! I got pretty mad. I switched for a [Patrick] Willis. ... I [also] bought a dress for a New Year’s party, and I ended up not wearing it. I haven’t worn it. The tags are still on it!

Steve Trop compliance analyst

I usually get it right before the big purchase. I say to myself, “Aw, I can’t do this! I shouldn’t do this!” I go ahead and purchase it anyway. We are in the process of buying a house, so I have four months of buyer’s remorse. It is a new house. How long will it take to shake it off? Thirty years!

Ninfa Gurrola

Maurice Robinson marketing director

student

I bought a brand-new Jaguar, and it was a lemon. Within a month, I was disappointed. It was a 2007, and I bought it in 2008. The brakes went bad, … needed a new engine. It seemed everything was bad. I ended up selling it.

I recently bought a TV. I thought, “I shouldn’t have made this investment. I shouldn’t have spent this kind of money.” At the same time, I know I am going to use it. I am going to get the full use of it. I have kind of mixed feelings.

Jennifer Dimas receptionist

I absolutely have had buyer’s remorse. I got talked into buying a car that I did not want. I had it for maybe two years and then got something better. ... My friends were making fun of me, saying it was a minivan when it wasn’t. It was Dodge Journey in 2012. I have a 2014 Toyota Camry, and I love it!

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Escape to the Coast

That quiz sucks

and discover new art

Re “QuizUp for the Sacramento primary” by Nick Miller (SN&R Feature Story, May 22): I found your primary-election quiz and scoring system to be fundamentally flawed. Sixteen of the 20 questions involve races in which I cannot vote because I am not in that district. Thus, it is mathematiletter of cally possible for me to have perfect knowledge of all balthe week lot items on which I can legally vote and still get a rating which you deem should invalidate me from voting. Clearly, this is an absurd result. Maybe you think that your quiz is funny, but I think it is appalling.

16th Annual

Ken Wilcox

via email

BEFORE

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NEWS

Saturday & Sunday 11am–5pm

Arenas really bring change

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F E AT U R E

STORY

by Lida Penkova

NCOS Participating Artist #87 Open Weekend 1 & Weekend 2 in Eureka

Email your letters to sactoletters@ newsreview.com.

For complete artist listings and maps, visit @SacNewsReview

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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05.29.14

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Elephant Dream

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Re “Not OK on K Street” by Cosmo Garvin (SN&R Bites, May 22): As someone who just moved from Indianapolis, I can say that Indy’s downtown stadiums are pretty great (and I really don’t care for professional sports). Sure, the traffic gets a little backed up during Pacer’s games, but it’s been managed well, and I could walk to a Colt’s game from my affordable apartment (not that I would spend a week’s paycheck to see a ball being thrown around). I drove my husband to the airport here in Sacramento last week, and when he saw the sign for the arena, he said, “That is where they stadium is?! It’s so far away!” I’ve heard Indy and Sacto compared by urban planners, and one thing Indy has that we don’t is a great downtown. There’s a nice mall, walking and biking paths that go out to developing neighborhoods, three sports arenas, and it doesn’t look rundown. (OK, Indy’s dining scene has nothing on Mother.) It’s starting to see the benefit of not just being a city by definition, but actually giving its residents things to do and reasons for people to visit. I was determined to move out of Indiana, but I’m starting to think I took Indianapolis for granted. I don’t know the whole story, but I really want an arena downtown. I just hope the city does it right. Katie Goad Sacramento

Free event z z More than 100 artists z Tour art studios

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Re “Union revenge” (SN&R Letters, May 22): Let’s get some things straight here: The Sacramento City Teachers Association has endorsed Ali Cooper, but has not given him any money. Many teachers are volunteering and working for Cooper because we believe in him and his message. I am a classroom teacher at a low-socioeconomic school. I believe in his commitment to increase services to neighborhoods, which in turn will help the families and children in our schools. Research has shown over and over again that the No. 1 problem with student achievement is poverty. In California, one out of four children live in poverty. Cooper believes in reinvesting in our communities. He understands that Sacramento needs to work for everyone, not just big developers and billionaires. Just look at how

May 31 M 31–June J 1 & June J 7–8 7 8

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Cooper’s for kids

Humboldt County, Calif.

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Re “Guide to Roseville, Rocklin & Granite Bay” (SN&R Best of the Burbs, May 22): My husband and I are Hispanic, and we have lived in Granite Bay for over 20 years. People of every race and ethnicity live in the Roseville, Rocklin and Granite Bay area. Only a racist, ignorant, leftist idiot would proclaim that the way to identify a local from Roseville, Rocklin and Granite Bay would be that their skin tone is a “JohnBoehner-spray-tan orange.” What the hell is the matter with you people? Sylvia Martinez Granite Bay

Councilman Jay Schenirer voted on the big-box ordinance and now the huge independent expenditure by Wal-Mart. It doesn’t get any clearer that as to whom Schenirer is beholding. Carlos Rico Sacramento

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SN&R = racist, ignorant, leftist idiots

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Do election lawn signs work? See NEWS

See SCOREKEEPER

10

SN&R’s endorsements! See OPINION

11

Levee, brakes Congress finally  approved repairs to  Natomas’ levees, but  experts argue to   keep building   moratorium despite  new protections As climate-change predictions make low-lying areas increasingly vulnerable to flooding, some by say many Sacramento residents are living Alastair Bland on borrowed time. But the clock is soon going to be reset in the community of Natomas, where a longstanding development moratorium will likely be lifted as a levee-improvement project underway since 2007 advances toward the finish line. Already, 18 of the 42 miles of levees surrounding the Natomas Basin have been replaced by the Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency. Now, a bill passed by Congress last week would authorize the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to use federal money to finish repairing the remainder of the levees, which keep river water from swamping the homes of 100,000 people and roughly $7 billion in infrastructure. The president still must sign the Water Resources Reform and Development Act for it to take effect. The goal, according to local officials, is to make the levee system protecting Natomas capable of withstanding the largest flood likely to strike the area in the next 200 years. Once the project begins in earnest, the Federal Emergency Management Agency would lift the building ban. While most city officials and community advocates have cheered the progress, others remain skeptical. Jeffrey F. Mount, a professor emeritus of geology at UC Davis, questions the wisdom of continuing to build in flood-prone regions at all. “Is it a good idea to build on a floodplain? That’s hard to say,” Mount said. “For anyone living there now, it’s a great idea to protect the area with new levees.” But the area is likely to be flooded again, Mount said, in spite of planned fortification efforts. He says climate models are predicting greater frequency and magnitude of winter storms in the coming decades. “It’s hard to say if it makes economic sense to improve levees if it spurs development,” he said. “Because when the levees do eventually fail, the economic damage is very, very high.” The Natomas levees lost their certification in 2006 after national safety standards were increased following the Hurricane Katrina disaster in New Orleans. Here, and BEFORE

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PHOTO BY BRIAN BRENEMAN

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Winners and losers

City leaders can’t wait to start building again in Natomas, where Congress recently approved fixes to its levees (shown here near Northgate Boulevard and San Juan Road). Academics warn that new flood protections may not be sufficient.

in Sutter County in 1997, levees failed due to water seeping under the barriers, creating cavities, and leading to their collapse. “The Corps withdrew its previous certification of Natomas’ levees based on a better understanding of how vulnerable those levees are to seepage, under-seepage and stability problems,” explained Chris Gray-Garcia, a spokesman with the Army Corps of Engineers, in an email.

“There’s a one-in-fourchance that in the next 25 years every home [in Natomas] will be flooded.” Jeffrey F. Mount geology professor, UC Davis The development moratorium followed the decertification when FEMA required any new projects to be elevated above the levees. It wasn’t exactly a ban, but construction projects have been on hold ever since. Now, 18 miles of levees have been rebuilt. They are significantly wider than before and with a key defense feature of a 3-foot-wide cement barrier, called a slurry wall, that plunges about 100 feet down and prevents incursion of water from below. The repair work has been expensive. The project has so far cost $410 million, funded by the state and by local propertyassessment fees, and the remaining 24 miles will probably cost more than $600 million in federal money and take until 2020 to complete. In addition, 25 miles of levees along the American River have also been fortified with slurry walls in recent years, according to Rick Johnson, the executive director of the Sacramento Area Flood Control Agency. The Sutter Butte Flood STORY

Control Agency is also fortifying its own 41-mile levee system. Another reason that levees need to be repaired is for insurance reasons. Basically, homeowners in any region buffered by levees rated at a 100-year-flood protection level and deemed at low or moderate risk of inundation do not need to buy flood insurance. Mount believes this standard is too lax. “Imagine you have a 100-sided [die], and you throw it once per year,” he said. “Eventually, that bad number is going to come up. The 100-year standard isn’t enough. There’s a one-in-four chance that in the next 25 years every home [in Natomas] will be flooded. That’s a much, much higher risk than that of your house burning.” John Cain, a flood-management specialist with the group American Rivers, agrees that a 100-year insurance limit puts too many people at high risk. “Hypothetically, it only takes a 101-year event to breach the levee, and then you’re 20 feet underwater,” he said. Building a stronger, or just taller, levee can also have the unintended consequence of increasing the likelihood of a levee breach somewhere else. Cain said if only one community bolsters its levees, floodwaters may be pushed over the levee tops of an adjacent community. This concept was the underlying current beneath the so-called levee wars of last century, in which adjacent communities found themselves at odds with one another as they built up their levees independently of the other. Today, levee-improvement projects are generally conducted through a larger systemwide approach that has no negative impacts on other nearby communities. Mike Inamine, the executive director of the Sutter Butte Flood Control Agency, said his district is currently pouring slurry walls into 41 miles of levees protecting Yuba City

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and agricultural lands to the south. The plan is to meet both the 100-year-flood insurance standard and the 200-year-flood protection rating required by the Army Corps of Engineers for urban areas. But UC Davis’ Mount doesn’t quite trust the national levee-rating system to begin with. It is based on historical norms for storm and flood occurrence. In theory, a levee with a 200-year rating will survive the biggest flood event statistically feasible in a two-century period. The levees in Tacoma, Wash.; St. Louis; and Kansas City, Mo., are much stronger, rated to withstand a 500-year event. But the problem with this system, he explained, is that climate patterns are changing, making it harder, even for computer programs, to make accurate storm predictions. “Experts think the frequency and magnitude of storms will increase, so the rating system doesn’t work, because the past is no longer a predictor of the future,” he said. Sea-level rise will not significantly affect most of the Sacramento area upstream of the Delta, Mount said. But flooding caused by heavy rains in the Sacramento Valley almost certainly will. Since 1950, the American River has set five flood records. In other words, floods have been getting more severe for 60 years, and many experts expect this trend to accelerate. Mount feels that the city and state have essentially consigned themselves forever to protecting areas like Natomas. “The state took a gamble to build a city on a floodplain they knew was prone to flooding,” Mount said. “Every new house out there increased the economic risk, and to this day, I don’t know why they allowed it. It would have made much more sense to leave Natomas a farming area, but we’re not going to move people out of there. The best we can do is protect it.” Ω

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California prisoners, parolees can’t vote, but should they? A pitifully small number of people are expected to cast ballots in next week’s primary election here in California. As the by Raheem Daily Breeze reported, Davis-based F. Hosseini political analyst Scott Lay, who publishes the website Around the ra h e e m h @ Capitol, predicted state voter turnout ne w s re v i e w . c o m could slum in the 25-35 percent pits this June 3. With participation sliding in the political off-season, it’s helpful to remember there’s one segment of the population that should—but can’t—make their voices heard: prison inmates. In California, an adult is ineligible to vote while incarcerated in a state penitentiary or on parole for a felony offense. In 2011, Secretary of State Debra Bowen broadened that policy to thousands of felons who were transitioning from state parole to local probation and community oversight.

Only two states—Maine and Vermont—place no voting restrictions on convicts.

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Locking up the vote

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Earlier this month, an Alameda County superior court judge concluded Bowen was wrong to disenfranchise the children of Gov. Jerry Brown’s prison realignment plan, which shunted the responsibility for certain low-level felons to local counties. But the ruling, which Bowen can appeal, didn’t leave enough time for the 42,000 offenders in question to register for the upcoming election, the Los Angeles Times and KQED reported. According to a handy interactive map produced by the American Civil Liberties Union, California is one of 24 states that prohibits felons from voting while in prison or on parole (and sometimes probation). Other states go further. Iowa, Kentucky and Florida impose lifetime voting bans on anyone with a felony conviction, while seven states block people with certain felony convictions from ever voting. Eight states, including Kentucky again, prohibit misdemeanor-offenders in prison from voting, says ProCon.org. Only two states—Maine and Vermont—place no voting restrictions on convicts. The side that supports the removal of lawbreakers’ voting rights say this is the price one pays for committing crimes. But convicts pay their debts in numerous ways, from surrendering

their freedom to paying thousands in restitution and administrative fees. So what’s the real reason for blocking the vote? You can’t have an honest debate about this without acknowledging the overrepresentation of black, Latino and poor people in the criminaljustice system, and a nationwide voting-rights crackdown that targets these very groups. A 2010 study in Daedalus, the journal of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, argued that prisoners are “drawn from the lowest rungs in society,� and that penal confinement extended by generations the social and economic inequities that inmates bring with them into the system. According to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, black people and Latinos combined to make up 70.7 percent of the state prison population last year. The state’s Department of Juvenile Justice oversaw a population that was 86.4 percent black and Latino as of December 2013. If criminal-justice research is to be believed, these young people will become tomorrow’s prison population, whether they try to or not. “Most of the growth in incarceration rates [between 1980 and 2008] is concentrated at the very bottom, among young men with very low levels of education,� wrote sociology professors Bruce Western and Becky Pettit, authors of the Daedalus study. In Sacramento County, school district and probation officials are just beginning to explore ways to address the racial disparities that expel more black and Latino kids out of school and into the juvenile-justice system, part of a national project. But scores of the downtrodden have already tuned out. At Rio Cosumnes Correctional Center in Elk Grove, recreation supervisor Andrew Fields has collected at most 20 voteby-mail ballots from the jail’s roughly 2,000 inmates. This is a population that can vote, but doesn’t. “Because they’re in jail, they think they’ve lost the right to vote,� said Fields, who’s struggled to convey the opposite for years. Eugene Alexander Dey, a former third-strike inmate who lobbies for prison reform, says letting inmates vote could combat “power brokers� who build fortunes off a bloated, increasingly privatized prison system. That’s why it’ll never happen. Ί


Dollars, signs

BEATS

Do campaign signs influence Sacramentans? Plus,   who’s got the most bucks to make a bang on June 3. You know it’s election season in Sacramento when your neighborhood becomes by ground zero for the latest campaign Nick Miller lawn-sign wars. This year’s battle for frontni c kam@ yard real estate heading into next newsreview.c om Tuesday’s primary election is a doozy, especially in East Sacramento, where seven candidates vie to succeed Councilman Steve Cohn, who’s running for Assembly after 20 years in office. A drive down H Street in East Sac is like a who’s who of local political electioneering. Candidate Cyril Shah has raised the most dollars in the District 3 race, so it’s no surprise then that he appears to boast the most lawn signs in the neighborhood. He’s spent more than $5,000 in the past couple months on them, according to finance reports.

One veteran local politician running for office this year told SN&R they think signs are more about “stroking a candidate’s ego.” You’re driving home after a long day of work and see the signs and, this candidate says, it motivates—but it doesn’t influence voters all that much. Other experts say signs do have an impact. Andrew Acosta, a political consultant who’s managing Shah’s campaign, among others, says signs help build the perception of momentum and connectivity. “I think campaign signs are great to help engage your supporters and get a sense of real grassroots support,” he said. Not all signs are created equal, however.

Councilman Jay Schenirer took in $33,249 and challenger Ali Cooper $26,849. In District 7, Jennings raked in $65,337 and Cherry $42,555. All of these candidates, except Cooper, spent more than $5,000 on signs. Cherry leads the charge with a little more than $6,500 on campaign paraphernalia. Cherry printed his signs locally, too, while Jennings, Schenirer and Cooper printed theirs with Bay Area companies. Donors paying for these signs, and more, are a mix of the usual suspects and a few new players. Shah in District 3 has accepted money from givers including the Paragary Restaurant Group, AT&T and the Building Industry Association’s PACs, various union groups, Region Builders and McKinley Village landowner Angelo Tsakopoulos. In District 5, Cooper is funded primary by large AFL-CIO union donations, plus money for the Los Rios Community College teachers PAC and anti-arena group Sacramento Taxpayers Opposed to Pork.

“I think campaign signs are great to help engage your supporters and get a sense of real grassroots support.” Andrew Acosta political consultant Experts say campaign signs in empty lots generate little influence with voters, whereas signs on home lawns provide a sense of grassroots momentum.

BEFORE

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“Signs just scattered in vacant lots The look is sharp, and the design is Schenirer has accepted money straightforward: His last name in large are not really the best use of campaign resources,” he said. from the plumbers, pipefitters, lettering and “city council” in smaller And, at least in District 3—which electrical and sheet-metal-worker font. Nothing too flashy. includes East Sac, south Natomas and unions, plus Region Builders, the BIA, These signs are by no means downtown’ River District—resources AT&T, local firefighters, and more. alone, of course. And the sign wars are an issue. Cherry in District 7 has most of are not exclusive to the east side, According to campaign-finance the union, teachers’ and firefighters’ either. reports filed last week, only two of money, while Jennings received fundRick Jennings and Julius Cherry’s the seven candidates raised more ing from the police and sheriffs; credit sign feud in District 7’s Pocketthan $10,000 between March 18 and unions; AT&T; the BIA and other Greenhaven neighborhoods are May 17 (Shah and Ellen Cochrane, developers; Sacramento Kings owners Waterloo-esque. And if you leave the former raising $48,830 and the and developers Mark Friedman Sacramento’s city limits for Yolo latter $15,961). Candidate Rosalyn van and Phil Oates; and Sierra Health and Placer counties, all sorts of lawn Buren reported taking in a mere $100. Foundation CEO Chet Hewitt. signs abound (see photo: an intersecShah, in fact, raised more than Councilman Allen Warren is the tion just across the I Street Bridge every other District 3 candidate only sitting elected official to give to in West Sacramento’s Broderick combined. And he’s spent more than multiple candidates: $500 to Jennings neighborhood). $5,000 on campaign paraphernalia, and $250 to his opponent Cherry. Competitive candidates might including signs (he spent this money That oughta buy a few lawn individually end up spending locally). signs. Ω upward of $15,000 on lawn signs It’s a different story elsewhere in during an election cycle. But do they the city. District 5’s city council race make a difference in how people saw tighter treasure chests: Incumbent actually vote?   N E W S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R

Name recognition UC Davis joined a small group of higher-education institutions that allow students to pick a different first name than the ones they entered school with. It’s all part of an effort to help transgender students express themselves and international students fit in. As part of the still-new preferred-name service program, the university lets students designate what they want to be called instead of their legal first names on official school documents and ID cards. The university began letting students set their preferred first names through an online directory on March 27. The genesis for the service began two years ago, said Amy Kautzman, associate university librarian and director of access services at UC Davis. That’s when students with the LGBT resource center approached her with a mundane dilemma: trans students couldn’t find a gender-neutral bathroom in the library. “We started working on [switching the bathroom signs] immediately, because it was fairly easy for us to wrap our arms around it,” Kautzman told SN&R. With the help of students, Kautzman reclassified all the bathrooms as gender-neutral in the Carlson Health Sciences Library, the Physical Sciences & Engineering Library, and one in the Peter J. Shields Library. Out of that, a trickier problem arose. Trans students were frustrated that school ID cards with their legal names made it difficult to express their preferred gender identity. The first attempt at addressing the students’ issue—setting preferred names only in the library computer system—failed because the university database overrode any changes. Kautzman coordinated a major overhaul of the UC Davis student database. To her delight, she said every department on campus supported the change, including administrators, housing, registrar’s office and the UC Davis Police Department. Trans students using the service have done so quietly, except for Alek Ortega, who was featured on a local TV news story. “We’ll probably never know the people whose lives we’ve changed,” Kautzman said. The service has also been tapped by international students who want to adopt more English-sounding names. UC Davis hosts north of 1,800 international students from more than 100 countries. To date, 11 UC Davis students have chosen a preferred first name. (Cody Drabble)

Quick change, eventual arrest A quick haircut and change of clothes didn’t keep an alleged fugitive from arrest Monday afternoon in a north Sacramento neighborhood. Officers with the Sacramento Police Department found Justin Shawn Berger, 18, hiding in a trash can near the 900 block of Frienza Avenue after an extended search by patrol cars, helicopters and police dogs swarmed a threeblock grid and evacuated several homes, according to the department’s daily activity log. Officers first tried to make contact with Berger and a 33-year-old woman later identified as Lisa Lester in a parking lot on the 2500 block of Del Paso Boulevard. Police say Berger took off running and chucked a gun into a home’s backyard while hopping fences to escape. Berger reportedly sought shelter inside the home of 32-year-old Valente Ortega, who police say is acquainted with the suspect. When Berger exited the back of the home, he was in different clothes and had cut his hair, police say. An Air1 helicopter spotted the suspect near the side of the house. Police arrested all three—Ortega for assisting Berger, and Lester on two outstanding felony warrants. According to online Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department records, Berger was in the main jail on Monday on three felony firearm charges and one misdemeanor charge of evasion. He was due in court May 28. (Raheem F. Hosseini)

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MMA upset!

Four-way

Mixed-martial arts fighter  T.J. Dillashaw, who trains in  Midtown Sacramento with Urijah  Faber’s Team Alpha Male, upset  champion Renan Barão to claim  the bantamweight belt. UFC  commentator Joe Rogan on the  match: “That was the greatest  performance I have ever seen in  my life.” Wow.

After years of awkward intersection  tango—and worse—last week, the  city implemented a four-way traffic  stop at it’s most popular centralcity crossroad: K and 20th streets.  Pedestrians, rejoice—almost: The city  police crime log reports a pedestrian  accident at this spot on Saturday  night just after 7 p.m. Let’s hope the  stop signs end these sort of incidents.

+ 2,014

+ 20

Ooh, that Lady As everyone and their White Linensipping mom reported last week,  Esquire magazine tagged Shady Lady Saloon as one of the top 25 bars in the  entire country. Scorekeeper will drink  to that.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHADY LADY SALOOn

+ 25

Stop, STOP Scorekeeper supported  the citizenry’s right to  vote on the $350 millionplus Sacramento Kings  arena public subsidy, but  a judge told Sacramento  Taxpayers Opposed to Pork  earlier this year that their  petitions were wack. Last  week, STOP doubled down  with a ridiculous lawsuit,  even criticizing the arena  because of the possibility  that “conditions where  post-game crowds riot into  streets … requiring teargas”  might occur if the Kings  win a championship. C’mon,  STOP. The Kings won’t ever  win it! 

- 22,000 Rest in peace Activist and more Brooks Truitt died last week at age  89 after a car accident.  Truitt was admired at  City Hall and, after last  Tuesday’s arena vote,  officials dedicated the  meeting to him. A nice  touch—although it’s worth  noting that he wasn’t a fan  of the arena public subsidy.

+ 89


Our editorial board recommends these candidates for the upcoming primary election Sacramento County Board of Supervisors, District 2 Patrick Kennedy

U.S. representative, District 4 Jeffrey D. Gerlach

Governor Jerry Brown Lieutenant governor Gavin Newsom

U.S. representative, District 6 Doris Matsui

Secretary of state Derek Cressman or Alex Padilla

Sacramento County district attorney Maggy Krell or Todd Leras

U.S. representative, District 7 Ami Bera

Controller John A. Pérez or Betty T. Yee

Sacramento City Council, District 3 Jeff Harris

U.S. representative, District 9 Jerry McNerney

Treasurer John Chiang

Sacramento City Council, District 5 Jay Schenirer

State Senate, District 6 Roger Dickinson

Attorney general Kamala D. Harris Insurance commissioner Dave Jones Board of Equalization, District 1 Chris Parker U.S. representative, District 3 John Garamendi

Sacramento City Council, District 7 Julius Cherry

State Assembly, District 7 Kevin McCarty State Assembly, District 9 Darrell Fong or Diana Rodriguez-Suruki

Proposition 41 Yes Proposition 42 Yes Measure B Yes

State superintendent of public instruction Tom Torlakson

DON’T FORGET TO VOTE ON TUESDAY, JUNE 3! BEFORE

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I’m not an entrepreneur groupie Making things easier for   entrepreneurs will not solve   all of America’s problems I am an entrepreneur. Starting with a $15,000 loan in 1980, my wife and I took over a bankrupt weekly newspaper in Chico, with annual revenues of around a quarter-of-amillion dollars and built it up to a $6 million company— with three newspapers and a $3.5 million payroll. We are entrepreneurs! But, unlike some members of the Republican Party and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, I do not believe that making things easier for entrepreneurs will solve all of America’s problems. I am not an entrepreneur l groupie. by Jeff Vonkaene Please don’t get me wrong: I think entrepreneurs play an important role in America. But so do j e ffv @n e wsr e v ie w.c o m third-grade teachers. So do police chiefs and nurses. I would struggle to teach junior-high students, or run a church, a nonprofit, or a government agency. The difficulties of meeting a payroll can certainly can be challenging, but this does not compare to the stress of having a sick child, or not knowing if your family can make rent. America is having a national debate on income America’s inequality, with Rep. Paul on one side and President increasing income Ryan Barack Obama on the other. inequality is hurting Should we address income inequality with incentives for our economy. business owners, or should our attention be directed toward those living in poverty? “Lower the corporate tax rate!” is the solution proposed by some. But as a business owner, the corporate tax rate will rarely influence my decision about whether or not to move forward with a business investment. Just as an employee would not turn down a raise because it would mean an increase in their income tax, I would not turn down a profitable investment because of a higher corporate tax. Google “national And the problem with our economy is not the lack of debate on income entrepreneurs. For instance, let’s say a cool new restaurant inequality” opens up, employing dozens of people. Entrepreneur groupto read more than 18 million other ies will rave about the jobs created by this new establishopinions on the ment. But what’s not been created is more money to be subject. spent eating out. These new restaurant sales are coming at the expense of sales elsewhere—perhaps at restaurants that are going out of business or cutting back their workforce. It is only when we have a bit more cash in our pockets that we can eat out more. This is how to truly increase Jeff vonkaenel is the president, restaurant jobs and build the economy. America’s increasing income inequality is not only a CEO and majority owner of fairness issue. It is also hurting our economy. I support an the News & Review increase in the minimum wage, which would transfer wealth newspapers in to the most needy, who would then support the economy by Sacramento, Chico and Reno. spending their increased cash. I’d like to build the economy from a solid foundation. I’d like to build the economy from the bottom up. Ω


NE XT

ThE wiNNErs of sN&r’s 2014 CollEgE Essay CoNTEsT spEak up, aCT ouT aNd makE ChaNgE pHotoS by SereNe lUSaNo

s

ometimes it seems impossible to escape discussions about millennials. There are constant national conversations about their job prospects, their digital tendencies, their dating styles. and complaints that today’s youth are spoiled, lazy and entitled are all too common. ies But after reading through this year’s entr beg we test, Con to SN&R’s 2014 College Essay e hav ys essa to differ. The teens who submitted ain rem faced enormous challenges, and yet they passionate and incredibly ambitious.

firsT plaCE Name: Connor Nelson Now attending: C.K. McClatchy High School

College he’ll attend: University of San Francisco

plans to study: International business

personal motto: “If there is a will, there is a way.”

We read stories about death, abuse and stpoverty. We also read about cultural adju ts. den acci ging ments, disabilities and life-chan t, men iron And about love for art, music, the env also we public service and activism. Of course, read about their stress. dIt was a tough decision, but, using a blin our ose cho to aged man judging process, we The first-, second- and third-place essays. college ay defr help winners will receive cash to for 0 $75 e, expenses—$2,014 for first plac from second place and $250 for third place, rWest Inte SN&R and our long-running sponsor, Insurance Services Inc. y Read on for SN&R’s 2014 College Essa orhon our from rpts exce Contest winners and your for on irati insp aps, able mentions. And, perh next millennial discussion.

‘I started to realize my sexual orientation’

i

didn’t start thinking about myself and who I was until fall of 2012. During this season, I was used to hearing the rustling of leaves, yet nowhere close to suspecting the expression of nature inside of me finally bursting out. I was contemplating actions I would make in the near future that would have a major effect on my life. I was officially starting to identify myself as a gay individual, and

simultaneously completing my Eagle Scout project. I was conflicted by one major decision I needed to make: stay hidden in the closet—pretend I was straight—while completing my final steps in achieving the highest rank a Boy Scout can attain, or finally come out as gay and support the gay community in its desperate struggle for equality.

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Jeff Dye

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MARIEL HEMINGWAY

ED BAUER

DR. DOUG LISLE

BROOKE PRESTON


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I started to realize my sexual orientation in late middle school and early high school. I swept these feelings aside, ashamed I could be anything deemed so horrible by society. But as time progressed, the feelings started to feel much stronger and prominent. I realized I was gay. Still, too terrified of the reaction my family and friends would have if I were to come out as gay, I began to form the idea that I could pretend I was a straight man my whole life; marry a wife, have kids, and it would all go away. As time progressed and I continued to work on my Eagle Scout project, it became evident to me how prejudiced the Scouting community was. A petition on Change.org with over 400,000 signatures pressing to remove the Scouts’ anti-gay policy proved ineffective to changing the Scout leaders’ opinion. I was hopeless, if that many people couldn’t change the policy, I would be forced to stay in the closet or come out as gay and be kicked out of the Boy Scouts; something my family and I would be very disappointed of. I’ve been involved in the Boy Scout community since I was 6 years old. This was something my parents and I were very excited about; it was a family tradition, and many of my family members had been in Boy Scouts and had become Eagle Scouts. Naturally, as I grew up, my family expected me to become an Eagle Scout. The one thing I feared most was that this developing self-identity would restrict my capability to complete this monumental accomplishment, something I had been practically working for my whole life. The first time I had the courage to do anything toward fully accepting myself was when I met my first boyfriend, Eddie. He gave me the courage to come out, not only from his support, but also from the time I spent around him. I realized that he was well-loved by many people. He had lots of friends and was very successful in what I thought was a very “prejudiced” society, eliminating my main fear, that of not being accepted. As time slowly drew closer to the completion of my Eagle Scout rank, I grew more conflicted by the different decisions I could make. Being a significant part of the Boy Scout community was a childhood goal and meant so much to me, but being truly myself seemed that it would impact my life in a stronger way. I wanted to embrace who I truly was and didn’t want to cover it up with a facade. I’m proud that I learned from this experience to finally accept myself for who I am, and I have become such a happier person because of it. I was able to become an Eagle Scout on November 18, and successfully came out as a gay man the day after, something that I had always dreamed of doing shortly after embracing my true self. I learned from this event to always believe in myself no matter how hard the struggle is. BEFORE

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Second place Name: Margarita

‘I started speaking up for what I believed in during class discussions’

N

o. I’m not talking about the drink. Yes. I’m referring to my name. I’ve had plenty of teasing about it, to say the least. I was raised in a family of immigrants from the USSR. Coming into school, my English was broken, and I struggled making friends with the other children: They talked too fast and laughed at things I didn’t think were funny. Soon enough,

College she’ll attend:

Sacramento State University

Plans to study: Engineering Dream job: Ms. President of the United States of America

a few kids realized that my name was plastered on bottles in their parents’ liquor cabinet. “Was your mom drunk when she named you?” “Did your dad name you after his favorite drink?” They taunted. I talked my teachers into calling me by the anglicized derivative:

Margaret. Whenever substitutes read out the roster however, a handful of students ended up snickering. I cried to my mother: “Why is my name Margarita? It’s the name of alcohol!” She sat me down and explained it to me. I learned that the word “margarita” means “pearl” in Greek, one of the original languages of the Gospel of Matthew. One of my parents’ favorite verses likened people who cherished their faith to a “merchant seeking beautiful pearls, who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and sold all that he had and bought it.” My parents grew up Christian under an atheist Soviet regime. Though my mother was at the top of her class, she was given

Name: Elizabeth Robinson Now attending: C.K. McClatchy High School

College she’ll attend: Bryn Mawr

M

y mom had always told me to live day by day when I would complain about my busy schedule for the following week. I never thought I would be that kid. That kid who everyone cranes their neck to see amongst the ambulance and fire truck. I had made it this far. Why now? My anxiety attack hit me like a slap in the face. Chills, sweats, tingling sensations and heart-attacklike symptoms snuck up from behind and took me as victim before I had any time to protest. As the symptoms began in fifth-period Spanish, so did my mind in its direction down the slippery slope. STORY

High School

Third place

‘My anxiety attack hit me like a slap in the face’

  F E AT U R E

Kovalchuk

Now attending: West Campus

an “unsatisfactory” citizenship mark at graduation for abstaining from the Young Communist League. No university would have a Christian taint its ranks. Both she and my father had acutely felt the cost of their faith. In turn, they chose to name me “Margarita” in honor of the “pearl of great price.” As soon as I understood how precious the name “Margarita” was to my parents, I began to embrace it myself. That understanding gave me confidence in everything. I stopped caring about the fact that I sometimes roll R’s midsentence because Russian is my first language. I started speaking up for what I believed in during class discussions. After all, my practice came from politely disagreeing with adults! (Please, call me “Margarita” instead of “Marguerite.”) My name isn’t standard. Neither am I. I’ve won the Distinguished Young Women of California talent award by performing a melodic right-hand-only piano piece because I broke my left hand two weeks before the show and didn’t want to back out. I’m a mathlete who adores wearing glitter ballet flats and sequined sweaters to meets. I’m a calligrapher who uses paper quilling techniques from the 16th century to make my friends’ birthday cards. I do not turn on the radio while driving because my thoughts keep me occupied. I’ll become the first female president of the United States, solve Fermat’s last [theorem] without using the modularity theorem, or maybe discover a completely renewable energy source though my work in engineering. My plans aren’t finalized, but I realize college is the stepping-stone toward all of them.

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College

Plans to study: Biology, pre-med One goal for her freshman year: Eat the

best Philly cheesesteak.

I have the gross habit of biting my nails. I am known as a worrywart. However, when senior year started, I wanted to make a conscious decision to ease off of the gas. I was afraid of burning out from going full-steam ahead with community service, cross-country practice, jobs, AP classes, college and scholarship applications—all while maintaining A RT S & C U LT U R E  

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relationships with my family and peers. Sleep was frequently sacrificed. Whenever my schedule was especially hectic, I told myself, “It’s all worth it in the end.” It must be, right? This mentality carried me through my last month of high school. My mind had proven stronger than my body, which had made its limits known. The medics summoned by the school administration took my blood pressure, heart rate and blood-oxygen levels and concluded that my vitals were functioning normally. Thus, this physical reaction was due to something mental. This left me feeling

powerless and confused. I couldn’t understand how something that felt so physical was due to anxiety. And, even more oddly, due to worrying about wanting to perform well. I felt weak. I didn’t understand where this weakness was coming from. I had always prided myself on being able to be tough and get through things. In the weeks that followed the panic attack, I searched for reasons why this physical toll occurred. I am grateful for the way I was raised. My parents always supported my education and aspirations. I was given all of the tools I needed. The panic attack made me feel guilty because it showed that I buckled

under the desire to do well, not because I didn’t have enough food to eat. The week of the panic attack entailed two interviews, track practice, community service, and two major senior presentations, amongst the knowledge that the following week was the beginning of AP testing. The month before graduation was said to be the most stressful, but this schedule redefined stressful into meaning unmanageable. I always believed myself to be a busy person with a self-imposed busy schedule. I just never thought my body would react the way it did in response.

HONORAblE mENTION Name: Kassandra Paredes

Now attending: Visions

in Education Charter School

College she’ll attend: Cosumnes River College

Plans to study: International business or writing

Favorite thing about Sacramento: All the history.

‘I lasted 30 minutes on that floor’ The initiation process to ingress this primitive tribe is quite excruciating. I had to let them beat me senseless without defending myself in any way. They do this to examine how strong you can be. Their definition of strength is how long you can go without collapsing while they kick you, punch you, and even spit at you. I lasted 30 minutes on that floor. That cold, hard, concrete floor. In eighth grade, I had enough. I realized that I wanted to be someone in life, someone that can make a difference. Not just another gravestone filled with unaccomplished dreams. I contemplated the idea of quitting hard before unearthing the courage to actually do it. I knew that freedom would come with a cost. But I decided that it was worth all the pain. I realized that my body could heal, unlike my pride. 16   |   SN&R   |   05.29.14

My desire to perform in all aspects of my life stems from my knowledge of my potential as a person. This led me to feel compelled to take advantage of every opportunity in high school, both academic and social. Pressure came from external sources, but truly developed internally. I only made my problems worse when I spent time thinking about them. As time went on and the panic-attack symptoms lingered, I was given advice from just about everyone. I was told, “Don’t stress,” and “You’ve had so much on your plate.” While these words are

HONORAblE mENTION Name: Allison Pepper Now attending: Vista del Lago High School

College she’ll attend: Azusa

Pacific University

Plans to study: International business and athletic coaching

Personal motto: “Never let

fear or setbacks keep you from pursuing your dreams.”

‘My dream fell, crashing around me’ As the weekend progressed, my team advanced to the quarterfinals, where I scored the only goal, sending my team through to the semifinal game. It was during the semifinal game when I was passed the ball and I cut back to get it. Just as I planted my foot, my knee popped. I fell, screaming, and my dream fell, crashing around me. I tore my ACL again. Thoughts began flooding my head as my leg started to shake uncontrollably. My goal of playing college soccer vanished, as I knew there was a chance I might never be able to play again. Yet I was not going to let doctors, coaches, statistics or even myself proclaim my dreams were unattainable. They were. All I needed was a little hard work, sweat, determination and perseverance. So on October 1, 2012, I had my second ACL reconstruction surgery. I rehabbed, I pushed, I persevered and I trained.

comforting, they only temporarily alleviate internal pain. What I really needed to hear was advice only I could produce. I began writing in a journal and reading nightly, even pushing homework aside to prioritize creating the perfect entrance into a circadian rhythm of sleep. I feel better, not because I get better grades, but because I make the effort to calm my life down. I am determined not to make Xanax my best friend. My body will appreciate it, and I am confident that by avoiding the “succeed or fail” mindset, my mind will appreciate it, too.


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FATHER’S DAY

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name: Sophie Osborn now attending: C.K. McClatchy High School College she’ll attend: UC San Diego Plans to study: East Asian studies and music Fun summer plans: Traveling to Sweden and Japan.

WALK-INS & KIDS WELCOME!

critical theory

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As I sat in the sitting room wearing someone else’s shoes, it dawned on me that this was what cohousing was. It was friends, shared memories and shared hopes. It was a sense of community. It’s difficult for me to talk about how cohousing has affected me because I’ve never known life without it. I didn’t choose to live here. I didn’t look at the studies or think about the impact. All I knew was that I had friends that I could always call on, that I had an entire group of people who supported me and each other. In a country that values individualism above all else, it’s important to have people who still value fellowship and helping others.

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“Generation neXt”

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Performing and Fine Arts Academy

College she’ll attend: Occidental College Plans to study: Sociology, social justice or patriarchy dismantler.

I don’t perceive my reliance on a notebook for coherence as a weakness. Rather, I take an odd pleasure in it. My notebook’s lack of expectations frees me up to explore the swarm in my head. I can revel in my chaos. Rantings twist with song lyrics, reminders and rhetorical questions flash with urgency, memories and temptations hover in front of my train of thought. They build in speed, pressure, moving too fast to capture: I must release them onto paper. Once I’ve released my thoughts, I feel powerful.

name: Shea Backes now attending: Natomas Charter School

Dream job: Dr. Who companion and

‘I can revel in my chaos’

BEFORE

S H AV E H I M SO M E M ON EY

Honorable mention

Honorable mention

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“Generation neXt” c o n t i n u e d  F R o M  pag e

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Honorable mention name: Andrew Carducci now attending: Placer High School College he’ll attend: Seattle University

Plans to study: Mechanical engineering

one goal for freshman year: Get an

internship at Boeing.

‘I slowly went unconscious’ My senses were numb. I was lost in a world engulfed with pure whiteness and a constant ringing. It was a terrifying, surreal feeling of being lost, unable to think, unable to open my eyes. Finally, a man carefully lifted me onto a stretcher. I opened my eyes to see rotor blades of a helicopter spinning vigorously. The blades put me in a trance, and I slowly went unconscious. I was a junior, an excellent student and avid tennis player. That day was supposed to be routine, a typical walk to lunch with my best friend. However, en route my friend received a phone call—a change of plans and, unfortunately, a changed life.

phoTo CouRTESy of RilEy GRiESENbECk

Honorable mention name: Sahira Rizvi now attending: Laguna

Creek High School

College she’ll attend: Cosumnes River College

Plans to study: Computer science

Fun summer plans: Coding her own website.

‘Get girls around the world excited about technology’ I expect my college career to be filled with term papers and midterms and finals, but my ultimate goal in college and once I graduate would be to get girls around the world excited about technology. And not only introduce them to it, but also inspire them to pursue other areas of study that have been dominated by men.

Honorable mention name: Riley Griesenbeck now attending: C.K. McClatchy High School

College he’ll attend: UCLA Plans to study: Biology or

environmental science

Favorite thing about Sacramento: The trees.

‘A chance to lose myself’ Being outside gives me a chance to lose myself for a little bit, to stop worrying about the term paper that’s due in twelve days, my work schedule the upcoming week, and to think only about what I’m seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting and feeling around me. This love of nature has turned into a desire to understand it. Ω The honorable-mention essays have been edited for space. Read SN&R’s 2014 College Essay Contest winning entries in their entirety online at www.newsreview.com/sacramento.

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STORYTELLERS AND STEREOTYPE SMASHERS BY JONATHAN MENDICK JONATHANM @NEWSREVIEW.COM

U

ntil fairly recently, AsianAmerican men were rarely portrayed in a positive light in Hollywood films. Perhaps this was best epitomized by the Long Duk Dong character in the 1984 coming-of-age comedy Sixteen Candles—a stupid, antisex symbol played by Gedde Watanabe—which led to highschoolers across the country taunting Asian-American teens with the nickname “Donger.”

The Sacramento-born Jeff Adachi decided to confront those stereotypes, and in 2006, the city of San Francisco’s public defender wrote, directed and produced The Slanted Screen, a documentary about Asian men and their long history of limited and typecast roles in film and on TV. “I came to know quite a few actors, and what was astonishing to me was that they were sort of in this Catch-22. They had very few roles to go for, but then they had stereotypical roles,” said Adachi. “Then they were criticized by the [Asian] community for playing those roles. What I tried to do in this film is give somebody from the outside 20   |   SN&R   |   05.29.14

THE SACRAMENTO ASIAN PACIFIC FILM FESTIVAL AIMS TO GET ASIANS IN FRONT OF—AND BEHIND—THE CAMERA

“What I trIed to do WIth thIs fIlm Is gIve somebody from the oUtsIde [a look at] What It Was lIke beIng an asIan-amerIcan male actor.” Jeff Adachi documentary filmmaker [a look at] what it was like being an AsianAmerican male actor.” On Saturday, May 31, the organizers of the forthcoming Sacramento Asian Pacific Film Festival will show The Slanted Screen at The Guild Theater. The screening, part of an event dubbed Slate 1.0, will also feature short films and a panel discussion. It’s the first in a series of several events leading up to the weeklong SAPFF scheduled for May 2015 during Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month. Festival organizers say

they hope the Slate events will raise interest among the community and the funds needed for the festival. These days, things look a lot better for Asian-American characters, especially on television. There’s Fox’s The Mindy Project starring Mindy Kaling and TBS’ Sullivan & Son—a sitcom starring Steve Byrne (who’s of Irish and Korean descent)—which will both return for third seasons. Later this year, ABC will adapt chef Eddie Huang’s memoir Fresh Off the Boat into a sitcom of the same name. Meanwhile, film directors such as Ang Lee (Life of Pi, Brokeback Mountain) and Justin Lin (Fast & Furious 6) have also earned mainstream success. There are many notable Asian-American indie filmmakers and actors, too, says SAPFF executive producer Jason Jong. He and his team have been working for the past two years planning the festival. The idea to create such an event first came in 2012, when Jong attended a reunion for John F. Kennedy High School’s class of 1992. “I connected with a buddy of mine— Jason [Michael] Fong, an actor [from] Hawaii Five-O—and we started talking about what we could do for the Asian and Pacific Islander community,” said Jong. “We talked about a lot of different options … and the one that stuck was a film festival.”

Jong grew up in Sacramento but lived in the Bay Area for 18 years, during which he spent time working and volunteering at the Oakland Asian Cultural Center, and the city of Oakland’s Cultural Arts & Marketing division. He moved back to Sacramento in 2012, where he now works as culture officer at the co-working spot Capsity, and he still serves on the board of a few Bay Area arts organizations. He says he felt conflicted coming back to Sacramento knowing that here his kids wouldn’t have as many arts events geared toward Asian-Americans compared to the Bay Area. “[There’s] a lack of connection between the Asian communities [in Sacramento],” Jong said. “I would like to see Sacramentans having a regionally relevant cultural-arts venue for traditional and contemporary Asian and Pacific Islander arts.” With the eventual goal in mind to create an Asian-American arts venue, he’s been working on the smaller task of organizing the film festival with Capsity founder Jeffrey Louie and a few dozen other people. Aaron Leong, festival program director and the panel moderator for Slate 1.0, is helping program the films. A film director and cinematographer, Leong said better film roles are becoming increasingly available for


Coachella lite See NIGHT&DAY

23

Tasty, bro See DISH

25

Sorry, out-oftowners See SOUND ADVICE

35

My Dear Americans, a short film directed by Arpita Kumar—about a Sikh couple’s experience with racism—will be screened at Slate 1.0.

55

The write-in stuff See 15 MINUTES

SCENE& HEARD Twenty-four-hour happy people

PHOTO COURTESY Of THE SACRAMENTO ASIAN PACIfIC fILM fESTIVAL

Asian-Americans, and as a result, so are more opportunities. “There’s literally thousands of AsianAmerican actors to choose from with all kinds of talent,” he said. “I think just that alone—just having [more] AsianAmerican actors—helps change things.” And by screening films and having filmmaking workshops throughout the year, SAPFF aims to activate Sacramento’s Asian-American community to create their own films and tell their own stories. That’s exactly what Adachi has been doing for years. Even though he’s enjoyed a successful career in law—he was elected San Francisco’s public defender in 2002, 2006 and 2010, and is running again in 2014— he’s also been writing and directing films about the Asian-American experience for a long time. In addition to The Slanted Screen, he directed another documentary, 2009’s You Don’t Know Jack: The Jack Soo Story. It traces the career path of actor BEFORE

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Slanted Screen, it’s also he also first met Jong—Jong’s drum group Zanshin Taiko performed at an AAAF event. Now, Adachi points to two things that need to happen for Asian-Americans to succeed in film and television: “We have to have more Asians in front of the camera, and in order to do that, you have to have parents who support and encourage [kids] seeking a career in the arts,” he said. “And as a community, we need to support works that feature Asian-Americans.” Sometimes, he added, that means approaching film and TV with a more open mind. PHOTO COURTESY Of JEff ADACHI

PHOTO COURTESY Of JEff ADACHI

Comedian Bobby Lee tells director Jeff Adachi about his experience in Hollywood in The Slanted Screen.

and comedian Goro Suzuki, who changed his name in the post-World War II era to “perform without fear of retaliation,” according to the film’s website. But the first storytelling he ever did was about his experience in Sacramento. Adachi said he lived an idyllic childhood, despite growing up in a lowermiddle-class family. His parents were also directly affected by World War II; they and his grandparents were interned in camps in Arizona and Arkansas during the war. Just one generation later, Adachi enjoyed the kinds of freedom his parents and grandparents were once denied, including dining in Japantown, going to the Buddhist Church of Sacramento and playing basketball. He graduated from C.K. McClatchy High School before attending Sacramento City College and majoring in Asian-American studies at UC Berkeley. He chose Sacramento as the setting for Yancha!, a novella he wrote in his early 20s. “The Japanese community has always been strong in Sacramento,” he said. “I think that’s really where my sense of community came from. Maybe we should make a movie about that.” After college, Adachi worked for a short while in Southern California as a social worker, and then went back to Berkeley where he earned a Juris Doctor degree from the UC Hastings College of the Law. He says he learned about the limited way in which Asian-Americans were portrayed on screen while he was the former chairman of the Asian American Arts Foundation in San Francisco. Not only did that inspire him to make The

Actor Dustin Nguyen (21 Jump Street, Heaven & Earth) cracks a smile during his interview in The Slanted Screen.

“If there’s a series that comes out, and our first reaction is, ‘We hate it, we don’t want to see it,’ we get nothing. We shouldn’t accept a subpar or racist sitcom, but we shouldn’t be overreactive.” Ω Check out Slate 1.0 on Saturday, May 31, with a film-panel discussion at 3 p.m., a short-film screening at 5 p.m. and a showing of The Slanted Screen at 6 p.m. It takes place at The Guild Theater, located at 2828 35th Street. Tickets are $8-$15; details are at www.sapff.org.

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When a friend asks you if you want to spend 24 hours straight at Disneyland, the answer should naturally be a  resounding “yes”—especially if you’re already an avid fan  of “The Happiest Place on Earth.” And so on May 23, I attended the park’s 24-hour Rock Your Disney Side event and had the most incredible experience of  my life. As my traveling companion and I walked through the  security checkpoint at exactly 4:02 a.m., we were handed  one of the coveted exclusive lanyards given to the first 2,000  attendants. We’d later learn from another early riser that,  by 5 a.m., the lanyards were already gone. This was all before the park even opened; we waited in  the Esplanade—that stretch located between Disneyland  and Disney California Adventure; it was filled with die-hard  attendees who slept, sat or danced to the music being piped  through the early morning air. We filled our gullets with energy drinks as we waited for the gates to open. Finally,  at 6 a.m., a small display of fireworks lit up the sky, and  we entered the park. Most of the day would be spent just  like any other here: Early on, we practically walked onto  the big rides, but by 11 a.m., the average wait time grew to  about 20 to 30 minutes. We also stuffed our faces with  We even spent exclusive event treats, such  as Sweet and Spicy Hot Dogs  time in the parts and Black and White Ice Cream  of the park Sandwiches. The real fun, however, startwe’d normally ed after dark. At 9:30 p.m., the  skip, such “Magical” fireworks spectacular kicked off the beginning of  as the Great a night filled with bright lights  Moments With and big sounds. We made our  way to the rooftop of Space Mr. Lincoln Mountain as the night sky lit  attraction— up. From our vantage point,  we could see the crowd below.  highly Mouse-ear-capped heads filled  recommended, every inch of space on Main  Street, U.S.A., as thousands  by the way. poured into the various lands.  The average wait time grew to  more than an hour. By 10 p.m., dance music filled the park  as the deejay played family-friendly pop songs in front  of Sleeping Beauty’s castle. We danced our way from one  land to another all night in order to keep our energy up.  At 11 p.m., we lined up for street tacos and then headed  to Main Street for a very special engagement of Mickey’s  Soundsational Parade, which was scheduled to start  at 12:30 a.m. The park burst at the seams with late-night  revelers until about 3 a.m., when many attendees finally  threw in the towel. But we were still raring to go—and on our third energy  drink of the day—so my companion and I pushed forward,  riding nearly every single ride in the park. In fact, we  packed as much as we could into the entire day, visiting all  the major attractions and events we could fit in. We even  spent time in the parts of the park we’d normally skip,  such as the Great Moments With Mr. Lincoln attraction— highly recommended, by the way. As the sun came up at 6 a.m., the second time in our  one-day visit to Disneyland, we headed to the last ride with  sore feet and sleep-deprived brains. The only think I could  think as I sped down the track of Space Mountain was: “We  did it.” I cried real tears throughout the entire three-minute ride. We did it.

  AFTER

—Lory Gil

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Vanishing Affair The Rudy Parris Band

The Alex Vincent Band

Play It Forward

Saturday, June 7, 5:30 p.m. Rancho Cordova, Over 21 Food Trucks & No Host Drinks

Get Your Tickets: PlayItForwardBenefit.com

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For the week of May 29

wEEkLy PICkS

If 

you got superjealous of the  bourgie Coachella Valley  Music and Arts Festival attendees, or perhaps even annoyed  at all the Coachella coverage on  the Internet, then turn the page  now. The following is a preview of  the BottleRock festival in Napa  Valley (www.bottlerock  napavalley.com), basically the Coachella of NorCal—but  with even fancier food, an arguably better lineup and,  of course, wine. It happens on Friday, May 30, through  Sunday, June 1, and features more than 60 bands performing on four stages at the Napa Valley Expo (575 Third  Street in Napa). Musically, it’s hard to look past Saturday’s lineup:  OutKast, Heart, Weezer, Third Eye Blind, Blues Traveler  and De La Soul will all take the stage that day. Other artists from both  Friday and Sunday that might be worth seeing include Matisyahu,   LL Cool J, Camper Van Beethoven and maybe even  Ed Kowalczyk (of ’90s-rock fame with the band  Live). Obviously, the Cure (headlining on Friday)  has a few amazingly timeless and classic hits  (“Lovesong,” “Friday I’m in Love”). Nashville artist Eric Church headlines on  Sunday. Most songs on the country chart sound  the same and retread old themes and material,  but Church has a unique sound that blends in  metal and indie rock at times. Sublime with Rome  (Friday) isn’t really Sublime, but might be cool to  check out just to hear some old hits. For sheer  musicianship, Ben Sollee and Karl Denson’s Tiny  Universe (both Friday) have been creating some  good buzz. Sacto bands to watch out for include the Bell Boys  (Sunday) and Autumn Sky (Saturday).  For food, there’s a wide range of stuff, including bites from  Sacramento’s Drewski’s Hot Rod Kitchen, the uber-fancy  Morimoto Napa and something called the Whole Foods Market  Coconut Lounge—serving up fresh young coconuts and chilled  Blue Bottle Coffee (hipster alert!). There will also be 23 wineries, including Rombauer Vineyards, Gia By Coppola and Layer  Cake Wines (highly recommended). In the end, it’ll be hard to  go wrong: Pairing music, food and wine is kind of a great combination, no matter what.

Flow Charts for Success Friday, May 30 As the director of the Milk Gallery, artist Melanie  Bown loved having conversations with people about  how one finds value in art and, say, why artwork  ART made of cardboard is priced at $400. Her  current solo show, an installation piece  called Flow Charts for Success, dissects her own  ideas about making art, with string that connects  words and images in classic flow-chart form.   Free, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Beatnik Studios, 723 S Street;  (916) 400-4281; www.beatnik-studios.com.

Snakes: Fact & Fiction

—Shoka

Saturday, May 31 Is Snakes on a Plane based on a true story? Ask  the question at this class about the truths and  ANIMALS legends of the slithery creatures if you’re cheeky enough,  although it’s highly discouraged. Learn some real  facts about these amazing animals instead, and  leave Samuel L. Jackson out of it. $5, 1:30 p.m. at  Wildlife Care Assocation & Education Center,   5211 Patrol Road in McClellan; (916) 965-9453;  www.wildlifecareassociation.com.

—Shoka

Pups in the Park Saturday, May 31

The opportunity has arrived once again to mingle  with a bunch of fellow dog owners while secretly  reassuring yourself that your pooch is still the  cutest. In addition to the 1k Pup Promenade and  PETS costume contest, there will be sustenance from SactoMoFo food trucks,  photo booths, a raffle and carnival-stye games.  Free admission, $20 for dog registration;   10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at McKinley Park, 601 Alhambra  Boulevard; http://pupsinthepark.weebly.com.

—Deena Drewis

—Jonathan Mendick

Promenade of Mermaids Saturday, May 31 Last year, Animal Planet aired a fake documentary  about mermaids that had a lot of people fooled—I  mean, I did Google it, but just to, uh, see how many  suckers were out there. Celebrate humanity’s  persistent and longstanding fascination with Ariel’s  PARADE ilk by parading your fin around Old  Sacramento. Free, 1 p.m., promenade  begins at 1000 Front Street, http://sacramento  mermaids.com.

—Deena Drewis

Rocklin Ramble Sunday, June 1 The city of Rocklin’s department of Parks &  Recreation knows how to have fun. Make that  “crazy fun.” It’s hosting the Rocklin Ramble, which  it describes as a 5k crazy-fun obstacle course with  mud, slides and mazes. Also, there’s live music, a  kids’ festival and SactoMoFo food trucks. $45 for the  OBSTACLE obstacle course, free admission  for the festival; 8:45 a.m. to 4 p.m.  at Johnson-Springview Park, 5460 Fifth Street in  Rocklin; www.rocklin.ca.us/rocklinramble.

—Jonathan Mendick BEFORE

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Field House American Sports Pub 1310 Fulton Avenue, (916) 487-1045, www.fieldhousesac.com I’ll admit that I’m not one to fit in at a sports bar. I arrived at this one, dressed in a salmoncolored sailing shirt, chinos and boat shoes—an by Garrett McCord outfit that doesn’t generally mesh with any crowd watching a basketball match screaming “Bro!” when the team gets a field goal or whatever. Still, when I hear a place has good wings, then I’ll muster up and yell with the rest of ’em. Field House American Sports Pub recently opened in the Arden Arcade area, a space where few grid devotees dare to rating: tread. Launched by the same team that raised HHH 1/2 Shady Lady Saloon, it brings a bit more culinary hope to an often forgotten part of Sacramento—not that Casablanca Moroccan Restaurant (3516 Fair Oaks Boulevard) and Plan B Restaurant (555 La Sierra Drive) dinner for one: haven’t also done well in the area. $15 - $25 The Vietnamese wings here glisten in an ocher sauce made with a brazen amount of fish sauce. Topped with serrano peppers, mint and roasted slivers of garlic, these wings tingle with flavor. The Carolina BBQ wings H FlAwed are painted with a thick but vinegary sauce that delights for days. HH hAs moments The al pastor wings, tossed with oregano and pineapple, have appeal, but taste bland. HHH Similarly, if ennui had a flavor, then the AppeAling pepperoni-chicken sandwich made with crispy HHHH pepperoni is—somehow—it. AuthoritAtive On the other side of things, the whiskey HHHHH burger is a mighty sammich of perfection. epic The smoked Gouda cheese and bacon are excellent counterpoints to the achingly sweet maple-bourbon glazed red onions. In addition, the burger we had was perfectly cooked: a skill that most restaurants in Sac seem to have trouble with. Onion rings and the fish from a fish-andchips plate tasted close to perfection in that they were expertly cooked. I say “close” as the fry batter lacked salt, and so the dish sagged more Still hungry? than my grandmother’s eyelid that stopped search sn&r’s working after her stroke. Still, once they soaked “dining directory” up tartar sauce and malt vinegar, these transto find local restaurants by name gressions were forgiven (just not forgotten). Fries-slash-chips arrived pencil-thin and or by type of food. sushi, mexican, indian, fiercely crispy. Huzzah for that. italian—discover it During Sunday brunch, a tender chickenall in the “dining” fried steak, slathered in a perky fennel-andsection at www.news sausage gravy, massaged the week’s troubles review.com. away. (Though the biscuit, while buttery, featured the density of a hockey puck. Perhaps to go with the sports-bar theme?) Eggs Benedict here are served with a hollandaise that reinvigorates the brunch staple. The addition of sliced tomato and wilted spinach transformed my dining companion and me into zealous acolytes of the Church of Benedict. Of course, if you’re at brunch, you’re likely there for the signature bloody mary. The trend

Happy Hour

of bloody marys being garnished with not just pickled veggies but anything and everything including nachos, fries, burgers and eggs over easy has spread like wildfire through major cities. It’s like getting some ostentatious dessert at Farrell’s Ice Cream Parlour Restaurants, but with booze instead of ice cream. And Field House delivers: A 32-ounce bloody mary that doesn’t skimp on the horseradish is served with skewers of beet-pickled egg, sausage and bacon, tiger prawn, pickled veggies, and the most amazing slider I have ever eaten. While normally I tend to roll my eyes at gimmicky food, this one I get.

Monday – Friday 3–6pm

The word cappuccino actually comes from the Capuchin friars in Italy, and refers to the color of the habits that they traditionally wore.

If ennui had a flavor, then the pepperonichicken sandwich made with crispy pepperoni is— somehow—it. Field House is an excellent sports bar with an excellent vibe, keen staff and a solid menu that, with time, will fix its flaws. My one concern is for its location, but I urge those living on the grid: Go to Field House, order a beer and some wings, and watch a game. Maybe drown yourself in a pitcher of bloody mary. It’s worth the trip. Ω

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votE for us: Best Coffeehouse

Edwin’s Coffee & Tea

2600 Sunset Blvd | Rocklin, CA | (916) 632-9753

New

Happy Hour Now StartiNg at 3pm

$5 select cocktails • $4 wines by the glass ($18 for the bottle) • $3 bottled beers

Uplifting kitty porn

Chances are, you’re probably spending an hour or two every week checking out kitty porn on the Internet. You know, Cute Overload-type pictures of cats, dogs, rabbits, capybaras—even a capybara cuddling with a cat. Dedicate a few of those critter-tastic moments to reading the profiles of the animals at Harvest Home Animal Sanctuary (www.harvest homesanctuary.org). If tears do not well when reading the story of Dexter, “The abandoned dog who rescued himself,” you might be broken. The sanctuary, based an hour-and-a-half away from Sacramento in the San Joaquin Valley, has adorables available to adopt, too. Visit the sanctuary in person, or check out its booth at Animal Place’s 25th annual Music in the Meadows benefit in Grass Valley on Saturday, June 7, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Details are at www.musicinthemeadow.org.

menu: cheese or chocolate fondue for only $7.50 per person salads for $4

Happy hour is available Monday thru Friday, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. in our bar area; seating is on a first come, first serve basis.

—Shoka

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1315 21st Street, Sacramento 916.441.7100

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814 15th Street • 916.443.2347 • meltingpot.com |

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Downtown Blackbird Kitchen & Beer Gallery 

Where to eat?

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Janelle Bitker, Ann Martin Rolke, Garrett McCord, Jonathan Mendick and Shoka updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

Blackbird is back with chefowner Carina Lampkin again  at the helm. It’s located in its  original space with a similar  aesthetic, though with more  focus on beer and bar food to  better complement the seafood-inspired dinner menu.  A burger served with house  pickles, seven-day housecured bacon, cheddar and  sweet ’n’ chivey “awesome  sauce” make for one of the  city’s best burgers, no question. Chowder fries, however,  are nifty in theory—fries  covered in bay shrimp, bacon  and parsley, then doused  with chowder. It’s a play on  poutine, but a lack of acid and  serious sogginess issues mar  it from being a landmark dish.  Better yet? Fish tacos featuring fried pollock served with  pickled cabbage and chipotle  crema. These and a beer will  remedy any bad day you’re  having. American. 1015 Ninth St.,  (916) 498-9224. Dinner for one:  $10-$30. HHH1/2 G.M.

Mother It’s no secret that  Mother is a vegetarian-vegan  restaurant, but this is not  just a place that replaces  the meat in a meal. Instead,  Mother celebrates an endless  array of fresh vegetables and  grains. The chile verde here  comprises chunky potatoes,  pinto beans and hominy for  a “meaty” texture. Try it  topped with a soft-poached  egg, and stir the yolk into the  zingy chile sauce. Kale has  been done almost to death, 

but Mother’s version is a take  on the Waldorf salad that  makes eating your greens  easy. Lots of golden raisins,  celery, walnuts and balls  of apple with a bit of skin  attached join dilled yogurt  and baby kale. Dessert  includes the now-legendary  brown-butter and sea-salt  cookies. Do yourself a favor  and get some. Vegetarian.   1023 K St., (916) 594-9812.  Dinner for one: $10-$15.  HHHH1/2 AMR

Midtown The Coconut Midtown The food  here travels a path between  standard and inventive.  Cream-cheese wontons, for  example, aren’t the epitome  of culinary Southeast Asian  traditions, but damn it if they  aren’t delightful. Soft cream  cheese and chives in a crispy  wrapper and served with a  sweet chili sauce? Nothing  wrong with that. The chicken  larb—a spicy minced-meat  salad—is fragrant and  intense. Mint, chilies, basil  and iceberg lettuce are  drenched in a spicy lime  dressing punctuated with  a heavy hand of fish sauce.  The Coconut has warnings in  its menu about which dishes  are spicy, but unless you’re  a newborn kitten, trembling  and mewling, you might not  even be aware of the chilies  in your food.  Thai. 2502 J St.,   (916) 447-1855. Dinner for one:  $10-$15. HHH1/2 G.M.

Der Biergarten This spot is a  slightly quirky, low-key place  with only nine food items on  the menu: four appetizerstyle options, four sandwichtype offerings and a sausage  platter, plus about 30 cold  ones on tap. Patrons order  from a building that was  built from a couple of cargo  containers and dine outdoors  on communal benches, traditional German  biergarten  style. The Derfinater Dog is  a gussied-up hot dog, and  despite its seemingly excessive number of toppings,  everything served a tasteful purpose. The mayo and  garlic sauce helped moisten  a somewhat dry roll, and the  bacon added saltiness, which  balanced the sweetness of  cream cheese and barbecue  sauce. The pretzel disappointed by being a bit on the  flaky and brittle side. The  sausage platter was the best  item on the menu: a pork sausage, chicken sausage, and  a veal-and-pork sausage— much more plump, juicy and  flavorful than the frankfurters—served alongside piles  of sauerkraut and German  potato salad.  German. 2332   K St., (916) 346-4572. Dinner  for one: $5-$10. HHH J.M.  Thai Basil SN&R readers   consistently vote this place  among the city’s top Thai  restaurants for this paper’s  annual Best of Sacramento  issue. And for good reason.  The restaurant’s tom yum  soup may be one of the  best foods served in the  City of Trees. It features an 

incredibly savory broth with  layers of flavor. Likewise,  the tom kha gai—a coconutbroth soup—is a veritable  panacea against Delta winds.  Salads make up a large part  of Thai cuisine and should  not be overlooked. Larb gai  consists of simple shredded chicken over mixed  greens, cucumber and  tomatoes. Fresh mint and a  chili-laden dressing heavy  with fish sauce and vigorous  squeezes of lime juice pull it  all together for an addictive  and satisfying lunch. One of  Thai Basil’s true highlights is  its homemade curry pastes.  These balanced constructions  of basil, lemongrass, shallots, chilies, kaffir lime leaves  and other ingredients, when  roasted, have been known to  drive hungry Sacramentans  into a berserk craze. Service  here is impeccable. Thai Basil  has earned its reputation. Thai. 2431 J St., (916) 442-7690.  Dinner for one: $10-$20.  HHHH G.M.

Tidbit Catering & Gelateria Chef  Eric Lee has crafted an  eclectic, bargain-friendly  menu. Fried calamari are  lightly seasoned with a crispy  exterior and served with a  marinara-ish bland sauce.  A carrot-and-ginger soup  possesses a slow burn, and  a chicken-lettuce wrap is  sophisticated: a modest portion of food of moderate size  that’s highlighted with slivers  of cucumber and a shaking  of vinegar. The frozen bits,  however are the real winners.  Gelato and sorbet are both 

available in astounding offthe-cuff flavors that mostly  draw inspiration from Asian  cuisines. A vanilla-and-adzuki-bean gelato tastes sweet  and earthy, with a flavor  reminiscent to Chinese moon  cakes. A nutty soy-based  black-sesame-seed gelato  is as rustic and charming as  your favorite Instagram filter.  American. 1907 Capitol Ave.,  (916) 442-7369. Dinner for one:  $5-$10. HHH1/2  G.M.

Land Park/ Curtis Park Spice Kitchen The menu here  has a few tangential dishes  like pad thai, but it’s mostly  focused on Japanese cuisine,  with a side menu of ChineseAmerican favorites. Tasty  options include the vegetable  tempura, lightly fried with  slices of Japanese sweet  potato and yams. If you want  ramen, the hot soup dish these  days, try the red tonkotsu  version: It’s served with lots of  nicely chewy noodles, spinach  and the requisite soft-boiled  egg. Spice Kitchen also serves  bento boxes in lunch and dinner portions for a good price.  Here, diners get soup, rice,  salad and tempura, as well as  a meat of choice. Japanese.  1724 Broadway, (916) 492-2250.  Dinner for one: $10-$15.   HHH AMR

South Sac Bodhi Bowl This Vietnamese  eatery’s menu is all vegetarian 

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Est. 1984

and mostly vegan, with plenty  of high notes. The Heavenly  Noodle is a can’t-go-wrong  salad comprising snow-white  vermicelli noodles with cooling mint, cucumber slices,  house-roasted peanuts  and jagged pieces of faux  beef. The “beef” actually is  slightly sweet, plenty umami  and pleasantly inoffensive,  as far as fake meat goes.  Nearly everything here has  a faux-meat product or tofu  element. So, sorry diners with  soy allergies—it can’t even be  escaped in the papaya salad.  Not an issue? Soldier on  with the Hot & Sour soup, a  not-too spicy sunset-orange  broth that teems with a  tomatoey and citrus flavor,  chunks of pineapple, semicircles of trumpet mushrooms,  cubes of fried tofu and slices  of faux crab. Or, try the  stir-fried Eight Fold Path. It  features al dente celery, red  bell pepper and triangles of  the most savory, salty, dense  tofu perhaps ever.  Vietnamese.   6511 Savings Place, Ste. 100;  (916) 428-4160. Dinner for one:  $10-$15. HHHH S.

Kansai Ramen & Sushi House This  place serves its own take on  ramen and sushi, with varying degrees of success. The  kakuni ramen, which features  three thick slices of braised  pork belly in lieu of the house  ramen’s thin slices of chashu,  boasts a nice, sweet marinade; tender consistency;  and copious flavor. Be sure to  order noodles al dente, and  it’ll make for a good option,  even with its run-of-the-mill 


Yang’s Noodles This is perhaps the only place in town that serves niu rou jian bing (sliced beef rolls)—a specialty of northern China—and the ones at Yang’s hit the spot. This is basically the Chinese version of a burrito: meat (thinly sliced beef marinated in soy sauce) plus veggies (diced green onion, cucumber and cilantro) wrapped in a large, flat carbohydrate crepe. Elsewhere on the menu, Yang’s eponymous noodles are homemade, alkaline and chewy. Chinese. 5860 Stockton Blvd., (916) 392-9988. Dinner for one: $10-$15. HHHH J.M.

Arden/ Carmichael The Kitchen Diners here don’t receive a menu: They receive a program, divided into seven acts, and, yes, there’s an intermission. Guests all eat together, like a reservationsonly giant dinner party, dining on seasonal dishes such as

chilled, minty pea soup, served with creamy pea pudding, cured scallops and Sterling Caviar. The offerings, which include the likes of lamb, steak and pasta, change monthly, but the highlights are the chefs’ tasters— small bites scattered throughout the dining area. A recent visit included oyster, faux lasagna bites, citrusy duck, and “kettle corn” cones of puffed wild rice, amaranth and corn with black-truffle caramel, which tasted sweet, salty and positively deadly. American. 2225 Hurley Way, Ste. 101; (916) 568-7171. Dinner for one: $100-$300. HHHH J.B.

Roma’s Pizza & Pasta This eatery claims to serve “authentic Italian-style” food, but that’s only partially true when it comes to its pizza. That’s because it actually serves two types: one with the kind of thick, doughy crust usually found on an American-styled pizza, and another with a thinner crust, resembling a pie one might actually have in Italy. The thicker crust is chewy, but ultimately lacking in flavor. However, the tomato sauce makes up for the dough with a nice, spicy kick, and Roma’s doesn’t skimp on the toppings. The thin-crust pizza impresses: It’s light and crispy like a cracker and clearly is the superior option. Italian. 6530 Fair Oaks Blvd. in Carmichael, (916) 488-9800. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH J.M.

Stirling Bridges Restaurant and Pub This British- and Scottishthemed gastropub offers an adequate beer selection and an extensive menu that goes beyond standard deep-fried pub fare. Try the Irish onion soup, a French onion-styled soup kicked up with Irish whiskey and Guinness beer. Or order the house-made veggie burger—it’s one of the tastiest black-bean patties around. The most unusual dish on the menu is the Scottish Mafia Pizza. Topped with turkey pastrami, potatoes, cabbage and Swiss cheese, it falls short with its too many flat flavors to actually benefit from their unusual pairing. Thankfully, there’s Tabasco sauce on the table. Pub. 5220 Manzanita Ave. in Carmichael, (916) 331-2337. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH1/2 J.M.

IllustratIon by Mark stIvers

broth. Or amp it up with the spicy tan tan men, which uses a beefy and seafood-tinted soup base that teems with flavor. The sushi rolls here are Western style—a.k.a. loaded with toppings. Try the Mufasa roll. With crab and avocado on the inside and salmon and sauce outside, it’s particularly tasty, seasoned in sesame oil and baked—a somewhat unusual technique for sushi. Japanese. 2992 65th St., Ste. 288; (916) 455-0288. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH J.M.

more of that savoriness that make Asian noodle dishes uber-comforting. Service is friendly, even when it’s busy, and nearly every order is big enough for two meals. Expect leftovers. Thai. 2598 Alta Arden Expy., (916) 977-3534. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHHH J.M.

Elk Grove 1st Choice Pizza & Curry This place serves a surprising mash-up of traditions that includes American and Indian pizzas on standard pizza dough in five different sizes. The pizza crust is not quite deep-dish, but relatively thick; different options include butter chicken, chicken curry and malai paneer. All feature generous amounts of toppings, with moist chunks of chicken or paneer and vegetables—primarily bell peppers and onions. What really makes this place stand out, however, is its other Indian-food options, including a well-executed selection of chaat and entrees. Try the samosa chaat, comprising two fried pastries filled with spiced potatoes and peas, then smothered in a tomatoey sauce of chickpeas, red onions and cilantro. It’s finger-lickin’ good for sure. Indian. 9308 Elk Grove Blvd., Ste. 100 in Elk Grove; (916) 478-4444. Dinner for one: $10-$15. HHH AMR

Tasty Thai It’s hard to find a better lunch deal than the one offered here: Each one includes rice and a salad with an entree—and costs $11 or less. There are 23 options, plus daily specials. (The dinner menu is similar—only bigger). Choose from four categories— wok, rice and noodles, soup, or curry—and add a protein. The Thai basil, served with green beans, onion, bell pepper and basil in a spicy garlic sauce, is cooked in a wok and has a nice smoky flavor with veggies cooked slightly al dente. In the rice and noodles category, the pad Thai and the pad see ew both impress, but the latter has just a bit

Delicious delivery

I just discovered a very dangerous way to get a bunch of those trendy food items that often are featured on websites such as BuzzFeed and Eater. It’s called Goldbely, and last week, the site had Keizo Shimamoto’s famous Ramen Burger available for purchase for two days only. Here’s how it works (it’s pretty simple, actually): Find a food item on www.goldbely.com, order it, and then it gets shipped right to your door. The good part is that you can get regional delicacies without having to rack up the expensive airline miles. For example, you can get a Philadelphia cheesesteak from Jim’s Steaks (I’ve been there and can personally vouch for these, even reheated), Crack Pie (a “buttery, rich concoction”) from Momofuku Milk Bar in New York City and even biscuits from Callie’s Charleston Biscuits in South Carolina. Basically, it’s everything you’ll ever need to gift to your foodie friends and family. —Jonathan Mendick

best. damn.

happy hour.

we

tap’d that

best patio. come See the new 3 FireS tapS in the heart oF midtown

1801 l street suite 50

midtown sacr amento, ca • 916.443.1010 • capitaldime.com BEFORE

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1501 L Street | Sacramento, ca | 916.443.0500 | www.3FireSLounge.com

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FIND OF THE WEEK

A new king Frankie Moreno

Wild at heart an UntaMed State Roxane Gay, a regular contributor to Salon and author  of short fiction and essays, has written a debut novel  BOOK simply stunning in its violence and in its  response to that violence. Although it starts  like a fairy tale, Mireille’s life quickly goes seriously  off the tracks on a trip to Haiti with her well-to-do  émigré family and her American husband when she  is kidnapped and held for ransom. Graphic as her  torment is, her wealthy father’s unwillingness to pay  ransom prolongs her travail; he knows that if he does,  the rest of his family—including those still in Haiti—will  be targets. Then there’s the constant, overwhelming  pressure of poverty and privilege colliding in a small  place. An amazing first novel, An Untamed State (Grove  Atlantic, Black Cat; $16) is both hard to read and hard  to put down. —Kel Munger

Real talk doll talk tiMe Rebecca Cherkoss has been writing politically themed  plays since she was in the third grade. These days, the  actress-writer-activist produces Doll Talk Time, a Web  series featuring a diverse cast of plastic ladies—i.e.,  Barbies and other toy dolls—tackling gender, racism  and class. Each episode features Cherkoss voicing  various characters including Miss Havisham, a publicschool teacher; LeTigre, a deejay; and her best friend  Bunny, an actress. Episode topics include Facebook,  texting and Beyoncé’s decree  WEB SERIES to ban the word “bossy.” On  the latter, LeTigre’s not having it: “‘Bossy’ really just  means you just know what you want, and you’re good  at communicating it.” www.dolltalktime.com. —Rachel Leibrock

Cue up the eight tracks rocki Many people have at least one old sound system  lying around the house (boom box, anyone?). Yet  most people today store music on laptops, iPods or  smartphones. Rocki provides  TECHNOLOGY a bridge between the two. This  tiny $49 music-streaming device connects wirelessly  to any system and is controllable via smartphone. Cart  around all your favorite albums on your phone, drop  the Rocki next to whichever stereo you want to blare  your tunes, download the related app, and voilà: good  music and good sound. www.myrocki.com. —Aaron Carnes

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Singer-songwriter Frankie  Moreno is a Las Vegas favorite:  He’s been voted “Best Strip  Headliner” and “Best All-Around  Performer” by locals—no mean  feat in a city that boasts residencies from the likes of Elton  John and Britney Spears. Moreno’s a child prodigy who  did time in a pre-American Idol  world on Star Search. The Santa  Cruz native’s been recording  FUNDRAISER albums  since he  was a teen, and his music is a  hybrid of classic ’50s and ’60s  rock, pop and country, but with a  modern polish. Moreno is something of an  unknown off the Vegas Strip— this despite being crowned the  “second coming of the King” (as  in Elvis Presley) by one music  critic, and despite a best-selling  collaboration with violinist  Joshua Bell. That’s set to change,  however, with a new record, an  upcoming tour and his very own  TV special, Frankie Moreno in  Concert.  The 30-minute show airs at  7:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 31, as  part of a pledge drive for the local PBS affiliate, KVIE. And, in an  effort to sweeten the fundraising deal, Moreno will appear live  on-air to give audiences a tease  of his charismatic style and  vintage-modern sound.  The special is also part of  PBS’ new music series, Music  Gone Public: Curated Concerts  for Public Television. For additional show times and channel  information, visit www.kvie.org. —Rachel Leibrock


ZERO

Change it up My four-year relationship has had its good and bad moments, and maybe that’s what is so confusing. I keep a stable job and make more money than my boyfriend. I take care of all the bills. He works part time at the moment. Financially, it’s hurting us and putting a strain on our relationship. We love each other, but he has lots of emotional baggage, including two kids that live with their by Joey ga respective moms. Should I rcia stick around and see if he changes or move on? a skj oey @ ne wsreview.c om That depends on the kind of life you want. If you stay, you will always have someone Joey is riding her bike to blame for not providing the again. Thanks, financial stability you desire. This Mike’s Bikes! discontent will continue to feed the ongoing stress in your relationship. That tension will eventually explode into an argument. Shortly after the yelling and threats subside, the fear of loss kicks in to motivate one of you to reach out to the other and smooth everything over. Maybe he promises to find a full-time job. Or you convince yourself the love you share is

If he is avoiding responsibility for his children, he needs therapy. worth the financial and emotional challenges of your commitment to him. For a while, everything looks rosy. But at some point, the tension-building-argumentsoothing cycle begins anew and occurs more often. On the other hand, if you end the relationship, you might be lonely. There could be unexpected bouts of crying and the heavy weight of longing. You might suffer through moments of nostalgia, remembering all the sweet things about the relationship. The past difficulties will appear to shrink as you focus on what you miss about your man. You could become depressed and regretful that you chose to move on. You might even manipulate yourself into believing that you will never find love again. Between these two scenarios is another possibility: You could change. Accept the current monetary constraints and strive to live below your income. Be the primary provider without a second thought. Require your boyfriend

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

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to contribute significantly to the household in other ways. If he brings in part-time income, he is available for full-time care of household chores (grocery shopping, cooking, cleaning, etc.). If you don’t trust him to handle this workload or if he refuses, be glad. It’s evidence that the problem between you is not financial. The real problem, then, is a lack of honesty. And that brings me to this: Does working part time protect him from being fully financially responsible for his two children? It’s an ugly question but one you must confront. If he is avoiding responsibility for his children, he needs therapy. If he won’t go, he won’t change. And that’s probably the answer you knew was true all along. My roommate’s brother is staying with us for a few weeks. I agreed, because I thought it would be fun. But he’s a pig. My roommate thinks it’s funny, but I’m over it. How can I get him to pay me for the food he’s taken or to clean up after himself? You can’t. His sister validates and encourages his inconsiderate behavior by labeling it funny. Try talking to your roommate when her brother is not around. Provide evidence (grocery-store receipt, photos of his messes), and ask for her help. If you have house rules, create a contract for the brother to sign that includes the rules and consequences for failing to honor them. Include the date he is scheduled to leave. Check your apartment lease for stipulations on houseguests, too. And in the future, get these details in writing before a houseguest appears. Dear readers: Have you ever fallen for someone you met online but never met in person? Let’s talk about it. Call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@newsreview.com. Ω

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Never missing a beat Hedda Gabler The Art Theater of Davis avoids most of the “sophomore slump” in its second production, a new translation of Henrik Ibsen’s classic Hedda Gabler by Kel Munger by Adam Siegel and Timothy Nutter. The language is streamlined and contemporized a bit, but the gist of the classic play remains intact, with all the elements that make it a staple of modern realist theater. As Hedda, Tatiana Ray exhibits a cool disinterest in the world that, in the first act, suggests sociopathy. By the end of the play, though, it is clear that her trapped circumstances and lack of options are at least as much to blame for her behavior as any personal failings. As her husband Tesman, Tyler Shaffo is lovable but obtuse, while John McLean’s Judge Brack is suitably smarmy.

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Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

We all have them: terrible, horrible, no good, very bad days. We just forget the slights and injustices that plagued us as kids are just miniature crises we go through as adults. Metaphorically, we still get gum in our hair, don’t always get the cereal prize, get rebuffed by friends and do wish we could just escape to Australia. The B Street Theatre Family Series’ 90-minute version of Judith Viorst’s 1972 book Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day follows the story of Alexander, a young boy who is having a particularly sucky day from the moment he wakes up until he finally gets tucked into bed that night. Seems everyone and everything is going against Alexander this particular day—from bossy brothers to inattentive parents, from buddy snubs to teacher nags. He’s not a perpetual victim, just a kid who stumbles through endless brambles, some his own making. B Street’s production makes the most of Alexander’s sadday saga, which is supplemented by funny, appropriate songs, and shines with a charismatic cast who endears themselves to kids and adults alike. And that’s exactly why B Street’s productions for kids end up being a fun excursion for adults as well—they’re entertaining, enlivening and engaging for all ages. Director Lyndsay Burch deftly keeps the action rolling along, Armando Luis Rivera as Alexander leads the talented cast with his plucky charm, and set designer Samantha Reno wonderfully recreates all the indoor and outdoor aspects of Alexander’s terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. PHOTO cOurTeSy OF THe ArT THeATer OF DAViS

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Hedda Gabler, 7 p.m. Thursday, Friday, Saturday; and 3:30 p.m. Sunday; $15. The Art Theater of Davis in Third Space, 946 Olive Drive in Davis; (530) 902-5589; http://arttheater. brownpaper tickets.com. Through June 1.

Nutter, who also directed, plays Eilert Lovborg as a more damaged and less charismatic man than is usually seen in the role. This leads to some question as to why both Hedda and Thea Elvsted (Tess Chism) would find him so fascinating, but the power of the play’s language and pacing quickly eliminate any doubts. The production, in the converted warehouse that houses the Third Space, a multipurpose community-arts center, has high values in a realistic set and detailed costuming, a veritable feast of eye candy. However, the recent heat caused a few problems at a recent show, as the makeshift cooling system of fans caused a blown fuse. Here’s where the promise of the Art Theater of Davis became clear: The performers did not stumble, continuing without lighting and not missing a beat during the repair of the difficulty. In fact, that can-do attitude—as well as the sort of attention to serious theater evidenced in both the choice of material and the quality of the translation and adaptation—offers a great deal of promise for the future contributions of this new company. Ω

—Patti Roberts

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; $15-$20. B Street Theatre, 2727 B Street; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. Through June 1.


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A Steady Rain

Dave Pierini and Kurt Johnson star in Keith Huff’s dark drama about the complex relationship between two lifelong friends— Chicago cops—when violence, affairs and a killer cannibal muck things up.

Tu, W, Th, F 7pm; Th 2pm; Sa 8pm; Su 1pm. Through 6/15. $23-$35. B Street

Theatre, 2727 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreetheatre.org. J.C.

4

The Bluest Eye

Celebration Arts mounts an extremely well-done version of Toni Morrison’s first novel, adapted by Lydia Diamond and directed by James Wheatley. On a spare stage, the tragedy of the Breedlove family (Carol Jefferson, KT Masala and Zarati Depaz) is narrated by the young Claudia (Brooklynn Solomon) and her sister, Frieda (Eliza Hendrix). Although the serious subject matter is handled compassionately, this is probably not suitable for younger children. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 6/14. $8-$15. Celebration Arts, 4469 D St.; (916) 455-2787; www.celebrationarts.net. K.M.

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Good People

In David Lindsay-Abaire’s searing story of South Boston’s working-class neighborhood, two Southies whose paths drastically diverged after high school find out they have radically different views on self-determination. Director Stephanie Gularte deftly directs this talented cast, careful not to teeter into stereotypes or overplayed accents or attitudes. Rebecca Dines (in an achingly honest, memorable performance) shines as a wounded Margaret—so much so that, in a moment when her character breaks down, the audience lets out a collec-

tive moan of painful recognition. W 7pm; Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 6/1. $22-36. Capital Stage, 2215 J St.; (916) 995-5464; www.capstage.org. P.R.

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Though this political and social satire by French playwright Jean Giraudoux was written in 1943, notably during World War II, it’s fascinating to pick out the modern parallels that Ovation Stage director Penny Kline refers to as a “parable for our times.” Unfortunately, there tend to be so many swirling, buzzing characters—such as singers, musicians, a fortune-teller, a juggler, a mime and a flower girl—constantly milling about, that they become distractions to a main storyline that’s puzzling to begin with. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 6/1. $15-$18. Ovation Stage at the California Stage, 2509 R St.; (916) 606-5050; www.ovationstage.com. P.R.

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B Street Theatre’s regional premiere of Christopher Durang’s Tony Award-winning satire is based on—and pokes fun at—the works of Chekhov. While there are laughs aplenty, the production does veer from satire to farce. It’s directed by Buck Busfield, and stars B Street company members Greg Alexander, Jamie Jones, Stephanie McVay and Jason Kuykendall. Tu 6:30pm; W 2pm

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Short reviews by Jim Carnes, Kel Munger and Patti Roberts.

PhOTO COURTESy OF D-TRIx

D-Trix does what appears to be “the robot.”

SUMMER HOURS

Break it down now Rooted in the old-school New York City hip-hop scene, breaking (a.k.a. B-boying or break-dancing) is now an internationally popular dance style, and Sacramento’s a hotbed of breaking talent. This weekend, the Sacramento area hosts a three-day breaking event called Sactown Underground 3. It kicks off on Friday, May 30, with a workshop by B-Boy Gravity and an open dance session ($5, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Sacramento State University’s Yosemite Hall, Room 187 at 6000 J Street). Day two offers dance battles, graffiti demonstrations, a performance by Sacramento emcee Mahtie Bush, and beats from DJ BzBeats and DJ Quantum HH ($15, 5 p.m. on Saturday, May 31; at the California Automobile Museum, 2200 Front Street). Day three features a choreography competition and guest host—and Roseville native—Dominic Sandoval, who goes by D-Trix (pictured) and was part of a winning team on America’s Best Dance Crew ($20, 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, June 1; at Cosumnes Oaks High School Performing Arts Center, 8350 Lotz Parkway in Elk Grove). Get more info at www.freshandflyproductions.com.

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Past imperfect X-Men: Days of Future Past As a world society of moviegoers, we have reached the point where the United Nations is morally obligated to form an oversight organization to by Daniel Barnes ensure truth in end-credits sequence advertising. Billion-dollar Hollywood franchises such as the X-Men movies rake in twice as much overseas as they do in America, and if the citizens of planet Earth are expected to continue plunking down money to watch holograms fight each other in 3-D, the least the studios could do is not end each film on a lie.

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At the close of X-Men: First Class, the 2011 film that recast the franchise’s key players as young, turtleneck-clad hepcats, Michael Fassbender’s Magneto frees January Jones’ imprisoned supermutant. In the midcredits sequence for last year’s franchise sidebar The Wolverine, the older versions of Magneto (Ian McKellen) and Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) warn Hugh Jackman’s Wolverine of a new threat to the mutant race, one that will presumably fold the two arms of the X-Men franchise together. Given all of that fastidious setup, it would be reasonable to assume that January Jones and/or a present-day threat to mutants would figure into X-Men: Days of Future Past. Nope! January Jones is literally nowhere to be found in Bryan Singer’s sloppy and stupid franchise crossover (thank God, she’s terrible, but still), and the ominous threat conveyed to Wolverine in the present-day now exists several decades in the future. If none of that setup mattered, why was it there in the first place? Probably because nothing matters in the superhero-franchise-movie universe except the next picture, including whatever movie we’re watching right now. After sporadic box-office successes in the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s, the superhero-movie boom really started in the 2000s with the releases of Bryan Singer’s original X-Men and Sam Raimi’s CGI-supersoaked Spider-Man. Since those films and their slightly superior follow-ups, every subsequent release under the

Marvel banner has been an increasingly paler version of its predecessors, as they developed an inane house formula immune to auteurs. The only auteurs guiding the creation of Days of Future Past are the talent agencies that put together the deal. There are energizing moments to cherry-pick from the film’s 131 minutes of slipshod storytelling, mostly involving the same history-fantasy hybrid story beats that made the franchise overmaintenance of Matthew Vaughn’s X-Men: First Class palatable. Still, the overstuffed and undercooked Days of Future Past is a film made for people who couldn’t care less whether or not it’s any good. Like most other superhero franchises, the Marvel X-Men films have proved irresistible to audiences of all ages, races and cultures, and that presold quality has inspired a depressing malaise. Children can’t be blamed for their predilections, but overgrown children can, and the inability of comic-book-loving adults to critically assess this dreck outside the scope of nostalgia, self-indulgence and brand loyalty has inspired low standards for these films. It probably won’t even matter to most Marvel fans that McKellen and Stewart are reduced to glorified cameos here, spending most of their screen time quietly waiting to be rescued. Halle Berry’s weather-manipulating Storm is on the Days of Future Past poster, but she shows up just long enough to remind us that black people exist in this version of the X-Men universe before she gets hideously slaughtered.

This is a film made for people who couldn’t care less whether or not it’s any good. Indeed, one of the strangest things about Days of Future Past is how much Singer revels in murdering his “beloved” mutant protagonists in the most disgusting and dehumanizing manners possible, including numerous beheadings and disembowelments, only to immediately respawn them in alternate timelines. It’s bad enough that all of that sick violence plus one F-bomb equals a PG-13 rating, but the more debilitating effect on the film is that we know no one can ever get hurt, which dramatically lowers the stakes of a story that literally concerns the survival of the entire planet. Be sure to stick around for the end-credits sequence, which teases the planned 2016 release of X-Men: Apocalypse. It’s a thoroughly inane bit of filmmaking, and makes no sense whatsoever unless you’re a comic-book nerd—but at least it will never come up again. Ω


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by daniel barnes & JiM lane

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The Amazing Spider-Man 2

Peter Parker/Spider-Man returns in the person of Andrew Garfield, and he’s as miscast as he was the first time around, again slouching and mumbling like a James Dean wannabe. Four writers are credited, but there’s no real story beyond what’s left over from the previous movie. There’s plenty of CGI action, blasted at us at high velocity, but as so often happens, there’s little weight or sense of real danger. It’s just so much visual noise. As Spidey’s squeeze Gwen Stacy, Emma Stone still has little chemistry with Garfield, but she’s always welcome. Also welcome, and also wasted, are Jamie Foxx, Sally Field, Chris Cooper and Paul Giamatti (the latter apparently being set up to be the next movie’s villain). Fans may convince themselves they’ve gotten their money’s worth, but the movie doesn’t make it easy. J.L.

4

Chef

The chef at a high-end Los Angeles restaurant (writer-director Jon Favreau) melts down under a barrage of problems—a bad review from a critic (Oliver Platt), frustration with his pompous boss (Dustin Hoffman), issues with his ex-wife (Sofia Vergara) and son (Emjay Anthony)—and impulsively quits his job. Trying to rebuild his career, he takes on operating a broken-down food truck, bonding with his son and a colleague (John Leguizamo) while driving the truck back from Florida, serving as they go. Favreau’s movie is looselimbed, even a tad aimless, but it’s appetizing in more ways than one (you’ll probably be famished by the time you leave the theater), and it may prove to be the feel-good movie of the summer. Big-name cameos provide seasoning: Scarlett Johansson, Robert Downey Jr., Bobby Cannavale and Amy Sedaris. J.L.

2

Godzilla

Although strapped with an exponentially larger budget, director Gareth Edwards gives his Godzilla recharge the same lo-fi Spielbergian treatment as his debut feature film Monsters. In that low-budget 2010 business card, Edwards kept the creatures and their destruction largely out of frame, instead focusing on a squabbling couple wandering through the aftermath. It’s an admirable strategy, and a potentially profound one, but it only works if the characters are well-rounded and the story is worth a damn. Unfortunately, Edwards lacks Spielberg’s storytelling zest and deep reservoir of humanity, and the execution in both films is humorless and dull. There are moments of spectacle and mystery in Godzilla, and the San Francisco-set “big finish” is impressive, but it takes 90-plus minutes of one-dimensional characters, ancient clichés, and idiotically awestruck gazes (there are more here than in Spielberg’s entire oeuvre) to get there. Giant, radioactive lizards deserve better. D.B.

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Belle

Almost every “costume drama” deals with the inequities of privilege, with the focus usually falling on class and gender divides. Amma Asante’s Belle adds racial inequality into the mix, and the wrinkle is almost compelling enough to forgive the superficial treatment it receives. Newcomer Gugu Mbatha-Raw is all big, pleading eyes as Belle, a biracial orphan left with wealthy white relatives and forced to live under a set of dehumanizing guidelines. This is where Belle should burrow into the intersecting and often contradictory concepts of power and privilege, but the film is content to skim the surface. Draco Malfoy himself (Tom Felton) is cast in the role of an invective-spewing rich bigot, just to prove that racism is bad. The courtroom drama subplot, which invokes a real-life case instrumental in dismantling the British slave industry, feels tacked on for the sake of a quasi-inspirational finish. D.B.

From the Rough

A women’s swim coach at Tennessee State University (Taraji P. Henson) gets the chance to coach the men’s golf team, a dream assignment for her—but obstacles include a hostile athletic director (Henry Simmons) who has little confidence in her team of international misfits. The movie is inspired by the career of Catana Starks, but we can only hope that Starks’ real life has not been so riddled with clichés as the script by Mike Critelli and director Pierre Bagley. Every go-for-the-gold sports-movie trope is recycled here, while Bagley’s slack pacing and awkward compositions fail to make golf an interesting spectator sport (an uphill battle anyway). Earnest performances all around (including former Harry Potter nemesis Tom Felton and the late Michael Clark Duncan), but the material defeats them. J.L.

2

“Is this how you check your privilege?”

Heaven Is for Real

A 4-year-old (Connor Corum) comes through emergency surgery saying he visited heaven, where he met the great-grandfather he never knew, an unborn sister whom his mother miscarried before he was born and Jesus. His minister father (Greg Kinnear) finds his faith tested when he doesn’t know what to make of the boy’s story. Unbelievers will scoff, as they do at the book by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent on which Chris Parker and director Randall Wallace’s script is based. Truthfully, the movie gives them reason: Its vision of heaven and angels is pretty white-bread and borderline cheesy. Still, it does tug the heartstrings, thanks to sincere performances, especially from young Corum. Good work too from Kelly Reilly as Kinnear’s wife and Thomas Haden Church and Margo Martindale as friends and neighbors. J.L.

BEFORE

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NEWS

4

Jodorowsky’s Dune

In 1975, empowered by two very profitable cult films, Chilean director Alejandro Jodorowsky (El Topo, The Holy Mountain) attempted to mount a massive, acid-laced production of Frank Herbert’s sci-fi epic Dune. He worked on the film for more than two years, but failed to secure the final funding (he caught Hollywood in a pre-Star Wars phase of rare fiscal restraint and fantasy aversion), despite assembling a group of “spiritual warrior” collaborators (including Moebius, H.R. Giger and Dan O’Bannon), who would go on to shape Hollywood’s future. This affectionate documentary from director Frank Pavich tells the story of that lost film, offering copious storyboards and conceptual art, and yet it wisely makes the lively 80-something Jodorowsky the centerpiece. Jodorowsky claims that he was “searching for the light of genius” in his Dune collaborators, and after four decades, that light has finally been allowed to shine. D.B.

1

Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return

1

Million Dollar Arm

Dorothy (voice by Lea Michele) is drawn back to Oz on a rainbow to save her old friends (and some new ones) from the Jester (Martin Short), evil brother of the Wicked Witch of the West. Meanwhile, back in Kansas, a shady real-estate appraiser (Short again) is trying to steal Uncle Henry and Aunt Em’s farm after a tornado. Adapted from a book by Roger S. Baum, great-grandson of Oz’s creator, there’s sadly nothing about this candy-colored animated feature that isn’t hopelessly dreary, from the textureless animation (outsourced to India) to the forgettable-as-you-listen-to-them songs that bring the story to a screeching halt. J.L.

One of the businessmen in Craig Gillespie’s Million Dollar Arm refers to India as “the last untapped market.” It is intended to be a dig at global capitalists who worship money and treat humans like assets, but it’s more evocative of the mercenary-missionary strategy at the heart of this dog-eared Disney sports film. Jon Hamm plays struggling sports agent J.B. Bernstein, and although this emotionally withdrawn huckster is right in his Don Draper wheelhouse, the film’s dewy-eyed sentiment is a bad look on Hamm. J.B. launches the “Million Dollar Arm” talent competition throughout India, hoping to convert hard-throwing cricket players into pitchers. Once the film flies to Mumbai, we are treated to a half-hour of racial stereotypes, before returning to America for another hour of fish-out-of-water stereotypes. At one point, J.B. calls India “a study in extremes,” but Million Dollar Arm is a study in squishy middles. D.B.

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F E AT U R E

STORY

2

Moms’ Night Out

C

A harried housewife (Sarah Drew) plansM a night out with her best friend (Andrea Logan White), who is almost as stressed out Y over her twin toddlers, and their pastor’s wife (Patricia Heaton), who has issues of her own CM with a rebellious teenager (Sammi Hanratty). Of course, Murphy’s Law kicks in big-time. ThereMY are worthy intentions in this frantic, noisy farce directed by Andrew and Jon Erwin (which the CY latter co-wrote with Andrea Gyertson Nasfell), CMY and the preaching stays low-key. But the comedy is shoveled on with clumsy hands—also, Drew’s character is a compulsive, neurotic K whiner, and she doesn’t have the comic chops to engage our sympathy. The effect is more obnoxious than amusing; everybody would have done well to take a cue from Sean Astin, restrained and low-key as Drew’s supportive husband. J.L.

3

Neighbors

2

The Other Woman

SUNDAY JULY 20

THE FIXX

W/ CRAZY FAMOUS

ON SALE TODAY!

A middle-class couple (Seth Rogen, Rose Byrne) try to stay cool when a partyhearty fraternity (led by Zac Efron) moves in next door, but hard feelings sprout and escalate into an all-out war. This one goes straight onto the guilty-pleasures list. The script by firsttimers Andrew J. Cohen and Brendan O’Brien is short on logic, with important scenes apparently never written, never filmed or left on the cutting-room floor. Director Nicholas Stoller keeps the joke parade rolling but can’t iron out the script’s wrinkles. Rogen’s comic-schlub shtick is well-deployed, and Byrne shows a nice flair for comedy, while Efron’s earnest performance feels piped in from a different movie. Still, enough of the jokes land to make the movie pretty funny, even with enough misfires to put the “guilt” in guilty pleasure. J.L.

In Nick Cassavetes’ imbalanced and unfunny The Other Woman, Cameron Diaz plays a successful lawyer and voracious maneater who finds out that her “boyfriend” already has an unsuspecting wife (Leslie Mann). The two women form a weird bond, and after discovering the existence of a second mistress (Kate Upton, mostly acting in slow motion), they bring her into the fold and start to plot their revenge. Diaz and Mann rehash their respective personas at full volume throughout, but the comedic bar is set excessively low (revenge montage set to “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun,” anyone?), and the long leash on Mann’s high-strung idiot shtick is especially unbearable. The Other Woman is virulently misogynistic (even our female “heroes” refer to Upton’s character as “the boobs”), and the mix of low comedy and trite sisterhood clichés becomes borderline schizophrenic. D.B.

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

FRIDAY AUGUST 22

THE DAN BAND

FRIDAY JULY 25

LOS LONELY BOYS

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AFTER

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05.29.14

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SN&R

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33


Get happy The members of Joy and Madness break free from the  past to forge a new bond with classic soul and funk 

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When Joy and Madness formed in late 2012, it was the best of times and the most difficult of times for everyone involved. Even before that first practice, its by Aaron Carnes members shared a long history. Six of them had played in the Nibblers from 2009 until early 2012 when the band decided to kick out lead singer Hans Eberbach over personality conflicts. Not everyone in the Nibblers supported that decision, however, and six months later, most of the band’s remaining members reunited with Eberbach to form Joy and Madness.

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HUCKLEBUCKS JUNE 14

TIJUANA WEEKEND Catch Joy and Madness on Friday, May 30, at Concerts in the Park in Cesar Chavez Plaza, located at 910 I Street. The show starts at 5 p.m., and there is no cover. Visit www.joyand madness.com for more on the band.

J RAS

TRIVIA MONDAYS @ 6:30PM TACO TUESDAYS $1 TACOS, $2 CORONAS OPEN MIC WEDNESDAYS SIGN-UPS @ 7:30PM KARAOKE THURSDAYS @ 7:30PM O P E N 7 D AY S A W E E K F O R L U N C H & D I N N E R

34   |   SN&R   |   05.29.14

From that first show, Joy and Madness brought an even higher level of energy than it had when its members performed as the Nibblers. The band credits that to Eberbach’s presence. “When Hans left the band, it was like this black hole. All of us were like, ‘What do we do to fill it?’” Springer says. “It was interesting getting back with Hans after that exodus … [because] the rest of the band had to step up to fill that hole.” The members of Joy and Madness didn’t want to just perform all the old Nibblers tunes. So, initially, they decided to play only really obscure classic soul and funk songs. Yes, that made them a cover band, but not really in a sense because the majority of the audiences were likely hearing these songs for the first time. “It’s a no-brainer. It’s [the kind of] music that everyone loves,” Springer says of the choice. Since reuniting, the band has pushed doing its own material as well, and later this summer will release Down, an EP of originals. The collection reflects myriad influences: Springer is a longtime fan of old soul music, whereas Eberbach’s background is more Beatles oriented. As such, the band’s own songs marry the classic soul grooves and upbeat funk licks with infectious pop hooks.

“There was all this tension. We were butting heads. I saw the attention for the band growing exponentially,” Eberbach says now of the split. For the record, Eberbach knows he played a part in the breakup. “I’m a big personality, [and] I was becoming very vocal,” he says. At the same time, some of the band members were getting upset at the attention Eberbach received—due in large part to his charismatic presence as the frontman. “I was the person that people were seeing as, ‘Oh, this is Hans’ band, the Nibblers.’” These days, the former Nibblers look back on the transformation with a philosophical bent. “Joy and Madness is a really good name to have,” says keyboardist Jeremy Springer. “Of the two emotions that we were feeling, that was exactly it. We were incredibly overjoyed to be back together … knowing we were meant to be, and totally feeling insane by everything that had gone down. “I came to this realization that I am meant to be in this band with Hans,” he adds. Joy and Madness played its first show in February 2013, with the band adding longtime local musician Miss Nyxi on bass, and guitarist Bobby G., whose résumé includes stints with Earth, Wind & Fire; Lionel Richie; and Sheila E. “Everyone’s a partner now. Everyone is like, ‘This is my deal,’” Eberbach says.

“JoyandMadnessisa reallygoodnametohave. Ofthetwoemotions thatwewerefeeling, thatwasexactlyit.” Jeremy Springer Joy and Madness “After everything went down, this creative spark in me went crazy. I was writing tons. I didn’t even know where it was all coming from,” Springer says. Since then, Joy and Madness has also started experimenting more, mixing live instrumentation, sampling and writing down-tempo soul ballads. And, as they continue to play live, instead of polishing their act into a perfect entertainment machine, the members say they’d rather focus on making shows a fun and lively experience. “When I play ... I am on that stage to absolutely lose myself into the communal experience,” Eberbach says. Ω


2 014

—Janelle Bitker

jane lleb@ n ew s r ev i ew . com

—Rachel Leibrock

SCANDALIZING NEWSSTANDS 06.12.14

SUMMER GUIDe

SUMMER GUIDe

That retro feeling, made fresh again: Fans of old-school Sacto pop, take note: Brent Bourgeois is set to self-release a new album on June 2. Bourgeois, of course, was part of the 1980s-era pop group Bourgeois Tagg (with Larry Tagg). That band’s 1987 album Yoyo birthed two big hits, “Waiting for the Worm to Turn” and “I Don’ Mind at All”—both tracks highlighted the duo’s knack for smart, catchy Beatles-esque pop. Now, fast-forward 27 years, and Bourgeois’ first album in nearly 20 years, Don’t Look Back, hearkens back to that era (despite its title), with a batch of songs that, yes, show a knack for smart, catchy Beatles-esque pop. The proof is in the credits: The record features a duet with Julian Lennon on “The High Road” as well as collaborations with Todd Rundgren, Charlie Peacock and his old buddy, Tagg. Impressive cameos aside, the musician says the record’s greatest accomplishment is, in a way, its very existence. “To me the best part of the story is Brent Bourgeois’ first new the idea [that record in 20 years is—for now—only available via I last made] Kick-Finisher. a record in 1994 when the music business was completely different,” Bourgeois wrote in an email. “The Internet was in its infancy, record companies were still king, budgets were huge, CDs were the thing, record stores were still where you bought music. ... Now, in 2014, I am Chief Cook and Bottle Washer; everything is done on the Internet, there are few record stores; I am my own company. And I made this record for around $5,000.” Bourgeois funded the record via Kick-Finisher, an “upside down” alternative to Kickstarter that, Bourgeois explains, pays fans to sell records via incentives (instead of the other way around). For the project, Bourgeois partnered with Lennon’s White Feather Foundation, which distributes safe drinking water to those in need in Africa. For every album sale, KickFinisher contributors may choose to take a commission or, instead, donate to the foundation. Visit www.brentbourgeois.com for more details.

2 014

Ugh: I would like to issue a formal apology to Seattle’s Western Haunts on behalf of all of Sacramento. Seriously. Sorry. Since exactly three other people were at the show last Thursday, allow me to tell you about Western Haunts. The four-piece plays alt-country that’s shoegazey and psychedelic, with lots of reverb, airy vocals, lush keys and sad stories. It’s the kind of noise-Americana you’d expect and want out of the Pacific Northwest. And sure enough, Western Haunts gets frequent nods from Seattle’s taste-making public-radio station KEXP 90.3 FM. Its new self-titled album, due out this fall, is a collection of dreamy, mature tracks that would probably please fans of Grizzly Bear, Beach House or Fleet Foxes. I was expecting a lovely night. I got to the Blue Lamp just before the second band, the Echoics, took the stage. The poor Auburn kids had to wait outside the barvenue all night before and after their set because they were only 20 years old. With skinny jeans, vintage shoes and cool hair, they have the makings to be alt-rock teenage heartthrobs in a few years. Unfortunately, their audience that evening consisted of their family members, an SN&R music writer, her housemate, the other musicians and the bartender. Mid-set, a ridiculously drunk woman marched over to us, seated on barstools. She put her hands on our legs with surprising force. “Your hands,” I said, not sure what else to say. She gripped tighter. “I’m the mom,” she said. “Oh. Congratulations,” I said. Her hazy eyes said she wanted to dance. My friend got up, grabbed her hand and attempted to spin her around a bit. She fell. It was sad. When the Echoics stopped playing and were forced to flee the building, half the audience left, too. That left just the SN&R music writer, her friend, a couple musicians and the bartender. It was midnight. Oddly, Western Haunts ended up being a great soundtrack to Kung Fu Hustle, which lit up the flat screens. “So, there are four of you here,” frontman Jake Witt said after about 20 minutes. “It’s late. We could just play our last song now. What do you say?” Sorry, again.

SCANDALIZING NEWSSTANDS 06.12.14

C’mon Sac, represent

r achell @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

BEFORE

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  F E AT U R E

STORY

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

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  |    05.29.14    

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  35


30FRI

Black Flag

Radiohead Tribute Pt. 2

Ace of Spades, 7 p.m., $18

phoTo by Kyle MonK

30FRI

Marilyn’s on K, 9:30 p.m., $5

Even beyond its distinctively clamorous and  abrasive punk sound, Black Flag is legendary.  The group’s trailblazing DIY tours laid the  PUNK groundwork for every underground act to follow, and guitarist Greg Ginn’s seminal label SST Records  housed American punk pioneers such as Bad  Brains, Hüsker Dü and Sonic Youth. Black  Flag’s decade-long run included an 18-month  stretch where it released five hugely influential albums. Ginn recently resurrected  the band with a former singer (since fired,  leaving Ginn the sole original member). Last  year, it released What the..., its first album  in 27 years. Now it’s competing with another  reunion band also featuring four former  Black Flag members and known as Flag.   1417 R Street, www.blackflagofficial.com.

—Chris Parker

This show is probably going to be one the best  of the year for numerous reasons. First off,  it’s a bunch of local artists (including Lindsey  Pavao, Autumn Sky and James Cavern) covering Radiohead. Maybe you haven’t heard  Radiohead covered at open-mic nights by  singer-songwriters, but I certainly have, and  their stripped-down versions often offer  new revelations previously unheard in the  extremely orchestral original arrangements.  Plus, atmospheric indie-rock group Life in 24  Frames opens the show. The best part is that  RADIOHEAD it’s the afterparty for  Concerts in the Park (with  Cavern, pictured, as the headliner), so admission is free for those with a wristband from  the show. Bam: back-to-back free shows.   908 K Street, www.marilynsonk.com.

—Jonathan Mendick

31SAT

31SAT

Tech N9ne

Miss Lonely Hearts

Ace of Spades, 6:30 p.m., $35

Sophia’s Thai Kitchen, 9:30 p.m., $6

An ability to spit quickly—like the TEC-9  semi-automatic handgun which inspired  his name—is just one weapon rapper Tech  N9ne packs. During the course of his 20-plus  year career in the music industry, he’s collaborated with artists like E-40, Lil Wayne,  HIP-HOP Snoop Dogg and Busta Rhymes.  Supporters of the Missouriborn rapper include fans of the Rock the  Bells Festival and the die-hard ninjas and  clowns at the Gathering of the Juggalos  Festival, where he’s previously performed.  No stranger to Sacramento, N9ne returns  with the rest of his Strange Music record  label’s crew for the Independent Grind Tour  2014, which also features rappers Krizz  Kaliko, Jarren Benton and Freddie Gibbs.   1417 R Street, www.strangemusicinc.com.

Somehow, Miss Lonely Hearts manages to perform sad, drunken, dark songs about heartbreak in a lively, danceable way. The Santa  Cruz-based honky-tonk band creates an oldtimey party amid its depression, and the world  is better for it. Its five members play a slew of  instruments—suitcase drum kit, harmonica,  lever lap steel, mandolin, commodium, upright  bass, guitar—and keep the sound rootsy  and rock ’n’ roll. They’ve opened for bands  such esteemed as the Devil Makes Three and  Brothers Comatose, but they’re pushing for  bigger things with a new album due later this  summer. Details aren’t totally clear, but it’s  expected to feature  HONKY-TONK some serious California  country talent. 125 E Street, Suite E in Davis;  www.misslonelyheartsband.com.

—Steph Rodriguez

—Janelle Bitker

Father’s Day Weekend | Saturday June 14 12–6 | Folsom, California | Palladio

Come to the 2nd annual Folsom Rhythm & Brews, a free family-friendly event with great musical talent, the best craft breweries, fantastic food choices, and more! 6 Bands 2 Stages Tommy Castro & The Painkillers Dennis Jones Band Val Starr & The Blues Rocket Jim Lauderdale Roy Rogers & The Delta Rhythm Kings Danny Click & The Hell Yeahs

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Activities for kids even better than last year!

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36   |   SN&R   |   05.29.14

www.follssomrhythmandbrews.com A portion of proceeds benefits the Folsom Chamber of Commerce, their partner local service club(s), and Young Life. Tasting kit includes 16-ounce pint glass with logo and seven (7) tasting tickets; additional tasting tickets available at event: 4 tickets 5, 9 tickets 10, 20 tickets 20. Must be 21 or over for tasting kit and tickets. Event is rain or shine. No refunds or exchanges. Artists subject to change. No outside alcohol allowed in event. © 2014 Carrera Productions, LLC. All rights reserved. SHIN SHING S HING HING HIN HI IN NGLE NG LE SPR SPRI SPRIN SPR SP PR PRIN RIN IN NG GS S S UBA SUB SUBAR SUBA UBAR UB BAR ARU


31SAT

03TUES

04WED

05THURS

Reggae Vibes with DJ Hype

Merle Haggard

Old Man Markley

Shoujo Kitten

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 10 p.m., $10

Harris Center for the Arts, 7:30 p.m., $49-$79

If it doesn’t quite feel like summer yet, then  let DJ Hype take care of that. The reggae and  dancehall deejay—real name Winston Shim— was born and raised in Kingston, Jamaica,  before moving to Sacramento a little more  than 10 years ago. In addition to reggae and  dancehall, he’ll be bringing African and soca  beats, too. “I am always happy that reggae  music itself is going to the four corners of  the world,” he told me last year for a story I  wrote on Sacramento’s reggae-rock scene.  REGGAE Also noteworthy in the world  of reggae, last season’s The  Voice winner Tessanne Chin (also Jamaican)  is dropping her major-label debut this  summer. Feel the vibes, y’all. 2708 J Street,  www.facebook.com/deejayhype1.

—Jonathan Mendick

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 8:30 p.m., $10-$12

Given the fact that Merle Haggard turned  77 this year, one might expect him to retire  and stop touring. With a catalog that spans  COUNTRY back to 1965, Hag (as he  is commonly referred to)  has positioned himself as one of the most  consistent and prolific songwriters in the  country genre and has been quite the road  dog. And while he has dabbled in bluegrass,  gospel and the occasional Christmas fare,  he has long been credited with helping create the Bakersfield sound. Many have tried  to copy his gruff vocal style, but never  successfully. Catch a living legend who still  tours because he wants to, not because he  needs to. A second show is on Wednesday,  June 4, also at 7:30 p.m. 10 College Parkway  in Folsom, www.merlehaggard.com. 

If mixing punk with bluegrass seems a bit  strange, it won’t when Old Man Markley  plays its original works and interpretations of the best in both genres. Its May 6  release of a single called “Stupid Today”  also includes a cover of NOFX’s “Reeko.” It’s  difficult to say whether OMM infuses bluegrass with punk sensibilities or punk with  bluegrass instruments, but since its debut  album, Guts n’ Teeth, released by Fat Wreck  PUNK/BLUEGRASS Chords in  2011, OMM  has been making waves on the bluegrass  charts. Its sophomore album, 2013’s Down  Side Up, hit No. 1 on Billboard’s Bluegrass  Albums chart. Opening the show will be  Oregon psychedelic-folk band Water Tower.  2708 J Street, www.oldmanmarkley.com.

—Eddie Jorgensen

—Trina L. Drotar

Starlite Lounge, 9 p.m., $7 First, let’s get this out of the way off the  bat: Shoujo Kitten rocks a mean keytar.  This is a good thing, especially since it’s a  garage-punk band drenched in so much  cuteness. The group’s members even have  GARAGE-PUNK adorable monikers like Cream  Puff, Angel Cake and Soda Pop. Seems like  there’s a bit of irony with the band’s whole  bubblegum-pop image—especially considering that it consists of both girls and guys  donning cutesy schoolgirl outfits, and they  cite Josie and the Pussycats as a musical  influence. Really, though, the Kittens’ style  more closely resembles Shonen Knife, Helen  Love and the Queers. 1517 21st Street,   www.facebook.com/shoujokitten.

—Aaron Carnes

THURSDAY MAY 29 RESTAURANT ss BAR BAR CLUB ss RESTAURANT COMEDY COMEDY CLUB

VOTED BEST COMEDY CLUB BY THE SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW!

FRI 05/30 // 9PM

THURSDAY 5/29 - SUNDAY 6/1 LIVE CD RECORDING!

RADIOHEAD TRIBUTE

GENE POMPA

SHAUN LATHAM, JOE GORMAN WEDNESDAY 6/4

SAT 05/31 // 9PM

SACRAMENTO COMEDY SHOWCASE

OLD SCREEN DOOR & SOUL SCRATCH

LANCE WOODS & FRIENDS WEDNESDAY 6/11 FREDDIE RAINBOW PRESENTS:

SUN 06/01

MY HERO, RAY MOLINA

EVERY FRI ~ $10 AFTER 10PM!

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, OPEN MIC SHOWCASE SUNDAY 6-8PM COMEDY 7-9PM // TALENT & 8-12AM // FREE

FRIDAY 6/13 - SUNDAY 6/15 FROM LAST COMIC STANDING!

JOSH BLUE

BRENDAN LYNCH, PACO ROMANE

MON 06/02 // 8PM // $10

THE DARLING CLEMENTINES

WEDNESDAY 6/18 ONE NIGHT ONLY! AS SEEN ON FX’S LOUIE!

BURLESQUE

DOUG STANHOPE TUESDAY 6/17 THURSDAY 6/19 - FRIDAY 6/20 FROM LAST COMIC STANDING!

Dj Supe in the mix playing top 40 hits and interactive videos

PINT+ DAY 1- 5pm

TUE 06/03

EVER TOLD ST STORIES GREATEDEAD, BOB DYLAN REVUE // 8PM

RUSSELL PETERS

GRATEFUL

ANOTHER BRICK

SAT 5/31 ~ 9PM ~ $10

PINK FLOYD TRIBUTE

THURSDAY 6/26 - SATURDAY 6/29 FROM TOM RHODES RADIO PODCAST!

WED 06/04 // 9PM

V 103 PRESENTS

TOM RHODES

EMMETT SHORT, CHERYL ANDERSON

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER!

UPCOMING SHOWS:

;>0;;,9*647<5*/305,:(*‹-(*,)662*6473:(*

WWW.PUNCHLINESAC.COM

LASER LIGHT SHOW $10 • 9pm

916.652.4007

06/07 CITY CATS, MOON MANTIS

CALL CLUB FOR SHOWTIMES: (916) 925-5500

908 K STREET • SAC 916.446.4361 wwwMarilynsOnK.com

2100 ARDEN WAY sIN THE HOWE ‘BOUT ARDEN SHOPPING CENTER

2 DRINK MINIMUM. 18 & OVER. I.D. REQUIRED.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CLUB BOX OFFICE WITH NO SERVICE CHARGE. BEFORE   |   NEWS  

8PM • $5 FRIDAY MAY 30

|

  F E AT U R E

STORY

S i e r ra C o l l e g e E x i t o f f 8 0 4 0 0 7 Tay l o r R d w w w . c o u n t r yc l u b s a l o o n . n e t

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

| 

CLEAN SLATE

Recycled Fashion

Old School R&B Review

Voted Best Midtown Vintage & ReSale 2013 & 2014

3443 LAGUNA BLVD • ELK GROVE FACEBOOK.COM/PINSNSTRIKES PINSNSTRIKES.COM • 916.226.2695

  AFTER

  |    05.29.14    

|

  SN&R    

|

  37


NIGHTBEAT

THURSDAY 5/29

ASSEMBLY MUSIC HALL 1000 K St., (916) 832-4751

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

BADLANDS

SUNDAY 6/1

AWOKEN SHADOWS, CHERRI BOMB, OH! THE HORROR; 6:30pm, $10

DJ Gio, 10pm, $12 Sin Sunday, 8pm, call for cover

Tipsy Thursdays, Top 40 deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Fabulous and Gay Fridays, 9pm, call for cover

Saturday Boom, 9pm, call for cover

BAR 101

Karaoke, 7:30pm, no cover

J*RAS & SOULIFTED, MASSIVE DELICIOUS; 9:30pm, $5

OH! THE BAND, 9:30pm, call for cover

BLUE LAMP

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

MRS HOWL, 6 BEERS DEEP, THE SAD JUICEES; 8pm, $5

THESE PILGRIMS, ISLAND OF BLACK & WHITE, SMIRKER; 8pm, $7

THE BOARDWALK

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 UNITED, VANISHING AFFAIR; 8pm

THE ALEX VINCENT BAND, LOST DOG

THE BOYS OF SUMMER, STONEBERRY, PRIME D, BLACKSHEEP; 8pm

GOLDEN YOUTH, THE STAND OUT STATE, CARDBOARD KIDS; 8pm

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

LORRAINE GERVAIS, 8pm, $22-$25

LORRAINE GERVAIS, 8pm, $22-$25

101 Main St., Roseville; (916) 774-0505

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

MERRYGOLD, THE LITTLE FULLER BAND; 8pm, $10

DISTRICT 30

STARKILLERS, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Elements, 9pm, call for cover

DIVE BAR

Deuling Pianos, 9pm, no cover

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

1022 K St., (916) 737-5999

FACES

FOX & GOOSE

CHICKEN & DUMPLING, 8pm, no cover

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

WHISKEY AND STITCHES, 50-WATT HEAVY; 8pm, call for cover

HALFTIME BAR & GRILL

LEFT OF CENTRE, 9pm-midnight, $5

5681 Lonetree Blvd., Rocklin; (916) 626-6366 2708 J St., (916) 441-4693

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931

MARILYN’S ON K

908 K St., (916) 446-4361

MIDTOWN BARFLY

Panik: deejay dancing w/ Angels of Kaos, 9pm-2am, $5

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN

MADI SIPES, JOE KYE, ROB BRUNDAGE; 8:30pm, call for cover

1119 21st St., (916) 549-2779 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME, JELLY BREAD; 9pm, $15-$17

ANCIENT ASTRONAUT, NICE MONSTER; 6pm, $7; DJ Hype, 10pm, $10

RACHEL GARDINER, GABE ELERT, THIS GIRAFFE HEART; 8:30pm, $5

DAVID HOUSTON & STRING THEORY, KRISTEN MERIEDITH; 8:30pm, $6

LINDSEY PAVAO, AUTUMN SKY, JAMES CAVERN, EDDIE UNDERWOOD; 9pm, $5

BULLETPROOF TIGER, 9pm, call for cover

Acoustic open mic, 8pm M, no cover; Naughty Trivia, 8pm W, no cover

END OF EVER, BILLY BENSING WITH KELLIE GARMIRE; 7pm, no cover

CAKED UP, 10pm W, call for cover CITY OF TREES BRASS BAND, 9pm, no cover

THE ROYAL JELLY, 9pm Tu, no cover; DLRN, 9pm W, no cover

Dragalicious, 9pm, $5

Queer Idol, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, $5; DJ Alazzawi, 9pm W, $3

MIKE BLANCHARD & THE CALIFORNIOS, THE SLIPPERY SLOPE, DAISY SPOT; 9pm, $5 9pm, $5

228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

Mad Mondays, 9pm M, call for cover Trivia, 6:30pm M, no cover; Open-mic, 7:30pm W, no cover

Get Down to the Champion Sound reggae night, 9pm-2am, $3

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

G STREET WUNDERBAR

HARLOW’S

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/2-6/4

DJ Luigi and DJ Benji, 10pm, call for cover

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798

Hey local bands!

SATURDAY 5/31

NICKI BLUHM & THE GRAMBLERS, DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS; 8pm, $20

2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

FRIDAY 5/30

Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; Northern Soul, 8pm W, no cover

Trivia night, 7:30-9pm Tu, no cover

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6 Marilyn’s Talent Showcase, 6pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm M, no cover; Greatest Stories Ever Told, 8pm Tu, no cover

TRANSIT, FOREVER CAME CALLING, KNUCKLE PUCK; 6:30pm, $10-$12

Swing dancing lessons, 7:30pm Tu, $6; Salsa lessons, 7:30pm-midnight W, $5

BRITTANY VANESSA, JULIET COMPANY, SWAHILI PASSION; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz, 8pm M; BRAVE SEASON, GHOST PARADE, STREETLIGHT FIRE; 8:30pm W

1000 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

FOR TICKETS TO ALL SHOWS VISIT AssemblyMusicHall.com

For Rentals or Private Parties please contact AssemblyMusicHall@gmail.com DANCE GAVIN DANCE AFTER PARTY

FRI MAY 30 @ 8PM

SAT MAY 31 @ 6:30PM

FRI JUNE 6 @ 7PM

GEOGRAPHER

38

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THURS JUNE 12 @ 8PM SN&R | 05.29.14

LIFE IN 24 FRAMES FRI JUNE 13 @ 6:30PM

SAT JUNE 7 @ 8PM

UPCOMING SHOWS

FIELD SAT JUNE 14 @ 8PM

JUN 17 JUNE 20 JUNE 21 JUNE 26 JUNE 28 JULY 1 JULY 2 JUNE 15 JULY 17 JULY 18 JULY 19 JULY 29 AUG 2 AUG 10 AUG 16 AUG 17 SEP 20 OCT 12

DOG FASHION DISCO SLAVES THE SIREN SHOW CULTURA PROFETICA ASHER ROTH TOUCHE AMORE AXE MURDER BOYZ OK GO FOREIGN EXCHANGE BLEEDING THROUGH THE SIREN SHOW KEVIN GATES FOXY SHAZAM ISRAEL VIBRATION & THE ROOTS RADIC THE SIREN SHOW THE REAL MCKENZIES THE SIREN SHOW TURQUOISE JEEP


THURSDAY 5/29

FRIDAY 5/30

SATURDAY 5/31

SUNDAY 6/1

OLD IRONSIDES

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504

THE LONELY HEARTS STRING BAND, FISH & BIRD; 8:30pm, $5

JOHNNY TAYLOR, 8pm, $10

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

ICON OF PHOBOS, BLOODFOG, ROTTEN HATEFX, LAST LUCY, DARKEL, AWAITING FUNERAL, KILLGASM, XENOTAPH; 8pm, $7 THE APOCALYPSE; 8pm, call for cover

670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

BASTARD SONS OF JOHNNY CASH, 8:30pm, $20

PINE COVE TAVERN

JAM RADIO, 6-9pm, no cover

502 29th St., (916) 446-3624

BRUBAKER, SICFUS, SEX RAT; 9pm, $6

PJ’S ROADHOUSE

5461 Mother Lode, Placerville; (530) 626-0336 LEFT OF CENTRE, 10pm, call for cover

THE PRESS CLUB

2030 P St., (916) 444-7914

SHADY LADY SALOON

TYSON GRAF TRIO, 9pm, no cover

SOPHIA’S THAI KITCHEN

THE FAMILY CREST, 9pm, $6

STARLITE LOUNGE

STORYTELLERS, ATOM BOMB; 9pm, call for cover

1409 R St., (916) 231-9121

129 E St., Davis; (530) 758-4333 1517 21st St., (916) 706-0052

5871 Garden Hwy, (916) 920-8088

Battle of the Musicians, 9:30pm-1am Tu; Open-mic, 10pm-1am Tu, no cover

J*Ras & Soulifted with Massive Delicious 9:30pm Friday, $5. Bar 101 Reggae and hip-hop

Ballroom dancing with Jim Truesdale, 6:30pm W, no cover

RANDOM STRANGERS, 9pm, $5

REBEL PUNK, 9pm, $5

LOVE FOOL, 10pm, call for cover

ARDEN PARK ROOTS, 10pm, call for cover

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

Sunday Night Soul Party, 9pm, $5

THE MEATMEN, KNIFETHRUHEAD, SSYNDROM, FALSE FREEDOM; 8pm Tu, $10

LITTLE MUDDY, 9pm, no cover

HUMBLE WOLF, 9pm, no cover

ALEX JENKINS, 9pm, no cover

HARLEY WHITE JR., 9pm W, no cover

GO NATIONAL, 8pm W, $5

BERILIUM, JONNY KEEN, HEAD SOAR; 9pm, call for cover

Reggae Festival, 6pm, call for cover

CARAVANSERAI, 6-10pm, call for cover

BLUE COLLAR MEN, LONG TIME; 4-10pm, $8

THE SPAZMATICS, TRES HOMBRES; 3-7pm, $8

MERCY ME!, 9pm, $12

Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; DIPPIN’ SAUCE, 8pm, $6

TORCH CLUB

PETER PETTY & THE DOUBLE P REVIEW, PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm, 9pm-1am, $6; X TRIO, 5pm, no cover no cover; MR. DECEMBER, 9pm, $7

WITCH ROOM

CHASMS, ALL YOUR SISTERS, VANDALAZE; 8pm, $5

1815 19th St., www.witchroomsac.com

WOLFHOUSE, 9-11pm, no cover

MISS LONELY HEARTS, KAY MARIE; 9:30pm, $6

SWABBIES

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

CLEAN SLATE, 9pm, $10

3443 Laguna Blvd., Elk Grove; (916) 226-2625

614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586

Open-mic comedy, 9pm, no cover; DAX RIGGS, IN THE SILENCE; 9pm, $10

SAPO GUAPO, 8:30pm, $17

PINS N STRIKES

POWERHOUSE PUB

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/2-6/4 Karaoke w/ Sac City Entertainment, 9pm Tu, no cover; Open-mic, 9pm W, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm W, call for cover

LEW FRATIS, 9pm Tu, $5; Open-mic, 5:30pm W; BRIAN ROGERS, 9pm W, $5

Miss Mouthpeace 8pm Thursday, $7. Shine R&B and soul

WILD ONES, MONSTER TREASURE; 8pm, $6

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

BLACK FLAG, CINEMA CINEMA, COMMUNITY, CHARLES ALBRIGHT; 7pm, $18

CLUB RETRO

THE LONGEST MILE, VITALITY, BAD TIMES CREW; 7pm, $5

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300 1529 Eureka Rd., Roseville; (916) 988-6606

SHINE

JOKERS & JACKS, HEATHER LUTTRELL; 8pm, $5; MISS MOUTHPEACE, 8pm, $7

1400 E St., (916) 551-1400

TECH N9NE, KRIZZ KALIKO, FREDDIE GIBBS; 6:30pm, $35

BACK ALLEY BUZZARDS, THE POLYMERS, THE UNCOVERED; 8pm, $5

Jazz, 8pm Tu, no cover; Open-mic poetry and performance, 7:30-10pm W

earThquake

2708 J Street Sacramento, CA 916.441.4693 www.harlows.com

beT’s cOmic view may 30-june 1 fri: 7:30/9:45 saT: 7/9:45 sun: 7:00

michael mancini wOrlD’s funniesT cOp june 5-8 Th:7:30 fri: 7:30/9:45 saT: 7/9:45 sun: 7:00

KARAOKE NIGHTLY IN OUR FRONT BAR PLUS AWESOME FOOD SPECIALS

WEDNESDAY MAY 28

sheryl unDerwOOD

KNCI 18 & OVER COLLEGE WEDNESDAYS $2, $3, $4 DRINK SPECIALS

frOm “The Talk” june 13-14 fri: 7:30/9:45 saT: 7/9:30/11:45

TOmmy DaviDsOn june 21-22 saT: 7/9:45 sun: 7:00

Dl. hughley

101.9 THE WOLF PRESENTS

mark curry july 11-13 fri: 7:30/9:45 saT: 7/9:45 sun: 7:00

FAMILIAR LOOKING STRANGERS @ STONEYS FRONT BAR COUNTRY DANCING IN THE BACK 8PM - 9PM • $2 PBR & $3 LONG ISLANDS $5 COVER

SATURDAY MAY 31 9PM - 10PM $4 JACK & $3 COORS LIGHT

SUNDAY JUNE 1 for ! 2 for 1 special shows only ed ct le se

916-608-2233 www.tommyts.com 12401 folsom blvd rancho cordova ca 95742

BEFORE

|

NEWS

PIMPS OF JOYTIME JELLY BREAD •

8PM • $15 ADV

- June 4 -

OLD MAN MARKLEY

WATER TOWER • 7:30PM • $10

THURSDAY MAY 29 18 & OVER COUNTRY DANCE NIGHT 9-10PM • $1 WELL AND PBR

FRIDAY MAY 30

june 27-29 fri 7:30/ 9:45 saT 7/ 9:45 sun 7:00

- May 30 -

- June 7 -

THE TUBES

- June 1 -

STEVIE JO ROSENBALM

8PM • $30

MADI SITES 6PM • $8 ALL AGES

- June 12 -

- June 3 -

NICE PETER THE JACKPOT GOLDEN BOYS

BROWNOUT PRESENTS

BROWN SABBATH

6:30PM • $18 ALL AGES

7PM • $15

18 & OVER FREE DANCE LESSONS

1320 DEL PASO BLVD

STONEYINN.COM | 916.927.6023

F E AT U R E S T O RY

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

AFTER

|

05.29.14

COMING SOON 5/31 Ancient Astronaut 5/31 Reggae Vibes 6/6 Emily Kollars Band / Jahari Sai 6/8 Comedy in Momo 6/8 Walking Spanish 6/11 Ages and Ages 6/13 Hillstomp / Good Luck Thrift Store Outfit 6/14 Global Guitar Greats 6/14 Prezident Brown 6/15 Average White Band 6/16 Robin Zander 6/21 Tainted Love 6/25 Southern Culture on the Skids 6/27 The Brothers Comatose 6/28 SambaDa / The Nibblers |

SN&R

|

39


what’s on your

horizon?

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SN&R   |  05.29.14

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Bake ’em if you got ’em

Bring in any competitor’s coupon and we’ll beat it by $5 Must present competitor’s ad. Some restrictions apply.

Where are edibles made? I’m asking specifically about chocolate bars, cookies, brownies, et al. that are sold at medicalcannabis dispensaries. Are they made in commercially licensed kitchens? Do local health departments approve? What’s the law? What assurances do we have that medical-cannabis food products are prepared with attention to food-safety standards? —Alkali Hank Good question. Most edibles are made in someone’s home, although Bhang Chocolate bars are made BEALUM by NGAIO in a commercial kitchen. Many makers of edibles don’t produce enough product to justify renting a ’13 commercial spot, and many commercial kitchens a sk420 @ n ewsreview.c om refuse to rent to medical-edible makers because of cannaphobia. My homey Mickey Martin, who has just relaunched his Tainted Inc. line of cannabis-infused edibles, says he uses a superclean home kitchen, and he follows the guidelines posted by the San Francisco Department of Public Health (http://tinyurl.com/sfregulationedibles). These guidelines are pretty good. They allow the use of a home kitchen and state that if someone wants to provide edibles to more than one dispensary, they need to have a state-issued food-handler’s certificate. There have been no I also talked to some known instances of local homeys at All About and the Northstar somone getting food Wellness Holistic Collective, and they poisoning from an edible said pretty much the same bought at a dispensary. thing. There have been no known instances of someone getting food poisoning from an edible bought at a dispensary, although I am sure some people have gotten uncomfortably high. If you’re going to make cannabis-infused foods to sell, remember: You aren’t making a batch of cookies for friends. You’re making food for people with a variety of illnesses, and some people may have weakened immune systems, so you need to be as clean as you can possibly be. The biggest challenge is making sure the product is consistent. Some of my friends say that smoking weed before working out puts you more in touch with your body without decreasing energy. One guy tells me he runs 20 miles while high, and “the miles just drift by.” Any truth to this? Does weed slow down, say, long-distance runners, or could the opposite be true? What strains would you recommend for (nonprofessional) athletes? —Jay Strapped If weed slowed you down, the NBA would not exist, and Michael Phelps wouldn’t have a kajillion Olympic gold medals. Weed may make you a little less motivated to work out, but it shouldn’t impair you too much. I would recommend a sativa if you are trying to get fired up, like for basketball or running, and an indica if you need smooth slow focus, like on the golf course. I have also heard that marijuana is great after a workout, you know, because it’s a natural anti-inflammatory, and it helps with aches and pains. So, toke up and enjoy your “runner’s high.” Ω

Ngaio Bealum

is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@ newsreview.com.

BEFORE BEFORE

   

| |

  NEWS     NEWS  

| |

VOted 3rd best ’13 420 physician in sac! ’13

’13

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Your information is 100% private and confidential Visit our website to book your appointment online 24/7 at

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  F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |  A RT S & C U LT U R E     F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

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45 Cap!

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SN&R   |  05.29.14

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BEFORE

|

  NEWS

Norwood

Northgate

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Main Ave

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135 Main Avenue • Sacramento CA, 95838 Open Mon thru Sat 10AM–7PM // Closed Sun

  F E AT U R E

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BEFORE

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EL DORADO’S ORIGINAL COLLECTIVE

SIMPLY THE BEST Winner 3 years in a row! ’13

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CANNABIS EXPERTS

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Photo by Laura Marie Anthony

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SN&R   |  05.29.14

“I use [medical marijuana] because I don’t like the way pain pills make me feel.” Ruby Ring medical marijuana patient

Ruby Ring — who got teased for her name but grew to love it — has led an eventful life. She tended bar and then, after giving birth to her youngest son, worked for the state as a Capitol tour guide. She had to retire after eight years, at age 38, for medical reasons, but late in life she began working at cannabis dispensaries. She now helps housebound patients get their medicine. “If people knew who used medical marijuana,” she says, “they’d be shocked.”


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SN&R READERS SAVE ON EVENT TICKETS UPCOMING EVENTS JUN 13

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R E M M U S e D I GU 4 1 0 2

S D N A T S S W E N G N I Z I L A D SCAN 4 1 . 2 1 06.


by Raheem F. hOsseini

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “When I was

young,” wrote French author Albert Camus, “I expected people to give me more than they could—continuous friendship, permanent emotion.” That didn’t work out so well for him. Over and over, he was awash in disappointment. “Now I have learned to expect less of them than they can give,” he concluded. “[T]heir emotions, their friendship, and noble gestures keep their full miraculous value in my eyes; wholly the fruit of grace.” I’d love to see you make an adjustment like this in the coming months, Aries. If you do, the astrological omens suggest you will experience a blessing like Camus’.

earthquakes happen in slow motion. These rare events occur 22-34 miles down, where tectonic plates are hotter and gooier. Unlike the sudden, shocking jolts of typical temblors, this gradual variety can take many days to uncoil and never send dishes flying off shelves up here on the Earth’s surface. I suspect your destiny will have a resemblance to this phenomenon in the coming months, Taurus. Your foundations will be rustling and rumbling, but they will do so slowly and gently. The release of energy will ultimately be quite massive. The realignment of deep structures will be epic. But there will be no big disturbances or damages.

physicist Arnold Sommerfeld, the good news was that he was nominated for the Nobel Prize 81 times. The bad news is that he never actually won. Actor Richard Burton had a similar fate. He was nominated for an Academy Award seven times, but never took home an Oscar. If there is anything that even vaguely resembles that pattern in your own life, Libra, the next 12 months will be the most favorable time ever to break the spell. In the next few weeks, you may get a glimpse of how it will unfold.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I should

have kissed you longer.” I hope you won’t be replaying that thought over and over again in your imagination three weeks from now. I hope you won’t be obsessing on similar mantras, either, like: “I should have treated you better,” or “I wish I would have listened to you deeper,” or “I should have tried harder to be my best self with you.” Please don’t let any of that happen, Scorpio. I am begging you to act now to make any necessary changes in yourself so that you will be fully ready to give the important people in your life the care they deserve. If you do so, you will be free of regrets later.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

“Longing, what is that? Desire, what is that?” Those are questions Louise Glück asks in her poem “Prism.” Does she really not know? Has she somehow become innocent again, free from all her memories of what longing and desire have meant to her in the past? That’s what I wish for you right now, Sagittarius. Can you do it? Can you enter into a beginner’s mind and feel your longing and desire as if they were brand-new, just born, as fresh and primal as they were at the moment you fell in love for the first time? If you can manage it, you will bestow upon yourself a big blessing.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I suspect

that some night soon you will have a dream of being naked as you stand onstage in front of a big audience. Or maybe not completely naked. There’s a strong possibility you will be wearing pink-andgreen striped socks and a gold crown. And it gets worse. In your dream, I bet you will forget what you were going to say to the expectant crowd. Your mouth will be moving, but no words will come out. So that’s the bad news, Gemini. The good news is that since I have forewarned you, you can now do whatever is necessary to prevent anything resembling this dream from actually occurring in your waking life. So when you are called on to show what you’ve got and make a splashy impression, you will be well-prepared.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You

could really benefit from engaging with a compassionate critic—someone who would gently and lovingly invite you to curb your excesses, heal your ignorance and correct your mistakes. Would you consider going out in search of a kickass guide like that? Ideally, this person would also motivate you to build up your strengths and inspire you to take better care of your body. One way or another, Capricorn, curative feedback will be coming your way. The question is: Will you have a hand in choosing it, or will you wait around passively for fate to deliver it? I highly recommend the former.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): When I slip

into a meditative state and seek insight about your future, I have a reverie about a hearty sapling growing out of a fallen tree that’s rotting on the forest floor. I see exuberant mushrooms sprouting from a cow pie in a pasture. I imagine compost nourishing a watermelon patch. So, what do my visions mean? I’m guessing you’re going through a phase of metaphorical death and decay. You are shedding and purging and flushing. In the process, you are preparing some top-notch fertilizer. It won’t be ready for a while, but when it is, a growth spurt will begin.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Now

would be an excellent time for you to dream up five new ways to have fun. I’m not suggesting there’s anything wrong with your existing methods. It’s just that in the next few weeks, life will conspire to help you drop some of your inhibitions and play around more than usual and experience greater pleasure. The best way to cooperate with that conspiracy is to be an explorer on the frontiers of amusement and enchantment. What’s the most exciting thing you have always wondered about but never done? What interesting experiment have you denied yourself for no good reason? What excursion or adventure would light up your spontaneity?

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Diary:

Almost everything that was possible to change has changed these past 12 months. I am not kidding, and I am not exaggerating. Getting just one of my certainties destroyed would have been acceptable; I long ago became accustomed to the gradual chip, chip, chipping away of my secure foundations. But this most recent phase, when even my pretty illusions of stability got smashed, truly set a record. So then why am I still standing strong and proud? Why is it I’m not cowering in the corner muttering to the spiders? Have I somehow found some new source of power that was never available to me until my defenses were totally stripped away? I think I’ll go with that theory.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Now is an

excellent time to transform your relationship with your past. Are you up for a concentrated burst of psychospiritual work? To get the party started, meditate your ass off as you ponder this question: “What fossilized fixations, ancient insults, impossible dreams and parasitic ghosts am I ready to let go of?” Next, move on to this inquiry: “What can I do to ensure that relaxed, amused acceptance will rule my encounters with the old ways forever after?” Here’s a third query: “What will I do with all the energy I free up by releasing the deadweight I had been clinging to?”

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): About 32,000

years ago, squirrels in northeast Siberia buried the fruits of a flowering plant deep in their burrows, below the level of the permafrost. Then, a flood swept through the area. The water froze and permanently sealed the fruits in a layer of ice. They remained preserved there until 2007, when they were excavated. A team of scientists got a hold of them and coaxed them to grow into viable plants. Their success has a metaphorical resemblance to a project you will be capable of pulling off during the next 12 months, Virgo. I’m not sure what exact form it will take. A resuscitation? A resurrection? A recovery? The revival of a dormant dream? The thawing of a frozen asset, or the return of a lost resource?

BEFORE

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NEWS

bRezsny

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): For German

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Some

you can call rob brezsny for your expanded Weekly horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. must be 18+. touchtone phone required. customer service (612) 373-9785. and don’t forget to check out rob’s website at www.realastrology.com. |

F E AT U R E

photo by alec moreno

by ROb

For the week of May 29, 2014

STORY

The running man When Rancho Cordova’s David Hyatt received his sample ballot in the mail for the upcoming June 3 primary election and saw that three of his locally elected representatives were cruising to unopposed re-elections, he got an idea: In the spirit of democracy, why not oppose them? “They need competition,” he said. “If, for nothing else, so they feel slightly obligated to say where they stand.” In particular, it bothered the soft-spoken Hyatt that Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones and Assessor Kathleen E. Kelleher didn’t submit candidate statements for their automatic bids. But Hyatt is also eyeing Supervisor Don Nottoli’s unchallenged seat and hoping his unlikely bid as a write-in candidate inspires daughter Shahera Hyatt, the 28-year-old director of the California Youth Homeless Project, to also enter politics. “I’ve always wanted [her] to run for public office,” he said. “I think she’d be great for it.” Asked if this is his way of leading by example, Hyatt laughed. “Well,” he said, “[as it] turns out.”

Do you have any campaign strategy in mind? In terms of getting more votes? Well, to tell you the truth, this all started about three days ago. (Laughs.) So I know it’s way late now to get started, but I’ve already learned quite a bit about what it takes to go about doing this, and, like I said, maybe give my daughter a little incentive to look toward the future. It’s actually illegal to run for more than one office.

So you’re the renegade candidate then? (Laughs.) Well, I’m not qualified for sheriff. Between the other two, Don Nottoli was elected in 1994. Surprisingly enough, three of his races since then, he’s been unopposed. He’s only been opposed in 1998 and 2010.

He’s had an easy run. Yeah. You got to think, what keeps him motivated? That paycheck must be pretty good. (Laughs.)

I think it’s almost $100,000 for county supervisor. Plus all the benefits after being there for 20 years. I’m not saying he’s a dishonest man.

The county assessor makes $150,000. And then the sheriff makes a little more than $200,000. Which office would you prefer? Now that you mention salary (laughs). Another thing that kind of tweaked me about these three is Don Nottoli, in the sample ballot, he put a statement in there. Neither [Jones nor Kelleher] did. They didn’t even bother. So that’s kind of irksome, you know? |

A RT S & C U LT U R E

What makes you the best candidate?

Do you think you might write in a name?

I’m a thoughtful candidate who cares. My opponent Don Nottoli said he was willing to fund all these different programs that over the years have had their problems. I’m not sure he really is looking toward the future or is just settling for his own comfort. Twenty years is a long time to work in one spot, although the occasional election helps your ego a little bit, I imagine (laughs). Especially if you’re unopposed.

I do think I might write in a name. I think it’d be more effective to vote for someone already on the ballot, just in the fact that at least they’re going to get a few votes.

It sounds like you’ve watched his choices pretty closely. Sure. I think a lot of people don’t realize how much voting actually affects their daily lives. They think it’s some faraway thing. It’s not.

With these three, if you weren’t running, who would you write in as a candidate? That’s a good question. I do know people who would be qualified for that sort of thing. A guy I used to work for in the [audio-visual] business, … he owned an [audio-visual] company and had a good head on his shoulders, as far as business.

And then I guess your daughter would be one? I should have said that right off the bat. I always think of her in a higher office, though (laughs). I guess you got to start off somewhere. She doesn’t seem to be so interested in it right yet. But she’s a great person, has a great personality.

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AFTER

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Does that keep politicians honest? Well, I hope so. I think that’s the whole point of opposition. Sometimes you hear about a politician like [Sen.] Ted Cruz or the skinny guy out of Illinois talking about these lopsided things, these tea-party things. They’re so right-wing, but not everybody in their district is right wing.

And there’s nobody pulling them the other direction. There’s nobody pulling the other side of it, right. I think that’s why there should be compromise in politics, because no one ever wins with 100 percent [of the vote].

Would that be your campaign slogan— you’re “the compromise candidate”? That’s not too bad.

Would you recommend that other people start campaigning as write-in candidates? Yes. Certainly. If nothing else, failure is one step toward success, right? Ω

05.29.14

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SN&R

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