Page 1

SACTO GUTS AFFORDABLE HOUSING see News, page 7

‘OBAMACARE’ NEEDS LATINOS see News, page 9

REAL SEX TALK see Arts&Culture, page 18

Sacramento’s uncharted water shortage isn’t just a blip. This is the new reality. by Alastair Bland • Page 14

SAC’S NEW CABBIE see 15 Minutes, page 51

SACRAMENTO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 25, ISSUE 43

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 2014


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February 6, 2014 | Vol. 25, Issue 43

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Conflicts of interest A local radio personality texted me on Friday night: “Are you aware that documents show a $2,100 payment to SN&R? Can you shed light?” Having zero clue what this person was talking about, I took to Twitter. Turns out, Sacramento Taxpayers Opposed to Pork—the group aiming to put the city’s Kings-arena subsidy to a public vote—bought a couple grand worth of ads in SN&R this fall, and this had just appeared on the group’s campaign-finance reports. I explained to the radio personality that there is a separation between editorial and sales, the ol’ journalistic-integrity thing. (It’s also worth pointing out that the Sacramento Kings have bought ads with this paper over the years.) But this didn’t stop the proarena trolls on Twitter, who spent well-past midnight blasting me as a “fraud” and “phoney” who’s guilty of conflicts of interest. All right, let’s talk about conflicts of interest. Kunal Merchant, former mayoral chief of staff and head of Mayor Kevin Johnson’s Think Big Sacramento nonprofit, is considered by many the behind-the-scenes architect who saved the Kings and drove home the arena deal. When all that work was done, however, he left K.J.’s circle to go work for the Kings, where he still is employed today. Is that a conflict? Also last spring, Kings attorney Jeffrey Dorso, who advises the mayor, crafted a document outlining the economic benefits of the arena. He emailed this to the assistant city manager, and the document appeared nearly verbatim in the arena term sheet passed by city council. The city never conducted its own cost-benefit analysis of the project. Is that a conflict? SN&R’s editorial office can’t be bought. There is no revolving door. Can you say the same thing for City Hall? Will someone shed light on that?

04 05 07 11 14 18 21 24 25 29 31 32 34 41 51

STREETALK LETTERS NEWS + SCOREKEEPER OPINION FEATURE STORY ARTS&CULTURE SECOND SATURDAY NIGHT&DAY DISH ASK JOEY STAGE FILM MUSIC + SOUND ADVICE THE 420 15 MINUTES BITES IS ON VACATION THIS WEEK.

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33 Client Publications Writer/Copy Editor Mike Blount Client Publications Staff Writer Meredith Graham Executive Coordinator Jessica Takehara Directors of First Impressions Alicia Brimhall, Matt Kjar Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Daniel Bowen, Russell Brown, Nina Castro, Jack Clifford, Lydia Comer, John Cunningham, Lob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Joanna Gonzalez-Brown, Aaron Harvey, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Greg Meyers, Kenneth Powell, Wendell Powell, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Lolu Sholotan, Jack Thorne

Kel Munger, Kate Paloy, Jessica Rine, Patti Roberts, Ann Martin Rolke, Steph Rodriguez Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Junior Art Director Brian Breneman Designers Vivian Liu, Serene Lusano, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Contributing Photographers Lisa Baetz, Steven Chea, Wes Davis, Ryan Donahue, Taras Garcia, Lovelle Harris, Shoka

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Co-editors Rachel Leibrock, Nick Miller Staff Writers Janelle Bitker, Raheem F. Hosseini Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Entertainment Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Becca Costello Contributing Editor Cosmo Garvin Editor-at-large Melinda Welsh Contributors Ngaio Bealum, Daniel Barnes, Rob Brezsny, Cody Drabble, Joey Garcia, Blake Gillespie, Becky Grunewald, Mark Halverson, Jeff Hudson, Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Garrett McCord,

—Nick Miller

Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising Consultants Joseph Barcelon, Meghan Bingen, Teri Gorman, Dusty Hamilton, Dave Nettles, Lee Roberts, Julie Sherry, Stephen Swanson, Mark vanHudson, Kelsi White Senior Inside Sales Consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services Specialist Melissa Bernard Director of Et Cetera Will Niespodzinski Client Publications Editor Michelle Carl Client Publications Managing Editor Shannon Springmeyer

n ic kam@ n ews r ev i ew . com

COVER DESIGN BY BRIAN BRENEMAN

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Human Resources Intern Courtney DeShields Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialists Renee Briscoe, Tami Sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Business Intern Allison Hill Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek

Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins 1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Sales Fax (916) 498-7910 Editorial Fax (916) 498-7920 Website www.newsreview.com SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

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“Actually, I am enjoying the sunny weather.”

Asked at Alhambra and Folsom boulevards:

Is the drought affecting you?

John Doyle state worker

[My family is] cutting back on water. We are paying attention. We lived in San Jose back in the ’80s when we were in a drought condition. We had to ration and stuff. We haven’t gotten there yet. So we are trying to be careful. It makes sense to conserve water.

Marilynn Littlejohn

Eric Schmidt emergency-room scribe

I haven’t right now made changes to my everyday living. I have more awareness, though. Drinking water could become scarcer, and it will be a huge problem. We [at the hospital] use hand-sanitizer foam, so we don’t use water when we wash our hands. That conserves water.

day-care provider

It is affecting me because I am really thinking about how long I am washing my hands now due to the changing of the diapers. … My grass is starting to die, and the children play on the lawn, front and back. I am starting to serve fruit juices, and that will affect my cost every month.

Andrew Delionback

Tiffany Kelly

student

Rudy Meyers

hairdresser

Not yet. I don’t have a lawn or anything to water. There is the sunny weather! Actually, I am enjoying the sunny weather. I am worried for the future. What is going to happen to the farmers? For me, it is not personally affecting me.

I am using water all day long. I am more aware of the fact that I am using all of this water, and it is not being replenished the way it should be. That is a little concerning. I am from Michigan, so I am not used to this. I am not used to going days and days at a time without precipitation.

photographer

Not at this moment. I definitely see it down the line. It is going to affect everyone in this state … from how we water our lawns to how long we take showers. I mean, who knows? There is a serious shortage of water up there. It is going to affect tourism, which affects the economy.

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Email your letters to sactoletters@newsreview.com.

Scuzzy tricks to stop public arena vote

A few minutes with SN&R

Re “Kings behind the scenes” by Nick Miller (SN&R News, January 30): Key legal documents supposedly “lost” by the city clerk’s office, petitions signed by thousands of Sacramento citizens rejected on grounds called into LETTER OF question by the city’s THE WEEK own attorney—it’s pretty clear that the powers that be pushing for a taxpayer-funded arena will stoop to any scuzzy trick to prevent us taxpayers from having a say in the matter. And the reason for that is pretty clear, too: Similar proposals have been resoundingly defeated at the ballot box several times already, and there’s every reason to believe that the current hugely expensive, highly controversial proposal will suffer a similar fate if we citizens are given an opportunity to vote on it. So, this time around, the moneyed interests that stand to make enormous profits at taxpayers’ expense are determined to shove it down our throats without giving us any voice at all. But, hey—isn’t this supposed to be a democracy? David Urman

v i a em ai l

Re “Good trend, bad trend” (SN&R Feature Story, January 30): Please assure me that this is not an emerging trend: Andy Rooney-ish kvetching about trends. John Kwasnik Sacramento

we don’t need the funding. In the past, we have had to raise money for shows with car washes, bake sales and rely heavily on donations from the community. Sacramento prides itself on being diverse; it should be reflected in the way it funds its arts as well. Raquel Castillo Sacramento

Re “Mother superior” by Rachel Leibrock (SN&R Arts&Culture, January 30): Mother is just what Sacramento needs! Tasty food that happens not to feature meat. And the place has just the right vibe for the downtown audience (although I happily travel from Elk Grove). Looking forward to eating my way through the menu, and thinking up hashtags to put on their chalk wall! #waytovege #nowthatseatin. Kristi Garrett Sacramento

Diversify public-arts spending

WHAT’S THE DUMBEST TREND IN SACRAMENTO?

Driving a car @TinyHelmets Hipsters Jeremy Munoz

v ia Fa c e b o o k

Water advice from Davis

#SacLovesVeggies

ONLINE BUZZ

Calling everyone a hipster.

Re “Water ways” (SN&R Editorial, January 23): The first thing Sacramento should do if they want to conserve water is install water meters! If you don’t know how much you use, you cannot know if you’re conserving 10 percent or using 50 percent more, because you have a leaking toilet. In Davis, we live with water meters, and we know how much we use because we pay for it. Saying you’re going to save some percentage without a way to measure it means nothing. The best you can do reasonably ask is that residents use less, conserve water and restrict washing cars and irrigation days. Barbara Clowers Davis

Eric Sherman Baker

v ia Fa c e b o o k Being over 30 and caring about trends.

Online Buzz contributions are not edited for grammar, spelling, clarity— or anything, for that matter.

Casey Croxford

v ia Fa c e b o o k Beards. How did they become popular? @Dan_Deo

Read last week’s SN&R cover story on trends at http:// tinyurl.com/kk4vr42.

Watering lawns. @jenjens31 Building the Kings an arena. Angella Phillips

@SacNewsReview

v ia Fa c e b o o k Drought!

Re “Money and art” by Jeff vonKaenel (SN&R Greenlight, January 30): Just because minority artists can create wonderful works on a dime doesn’t mean

Tony Keithley

Facebook.com/ SacNewsReview

v ia Fa c e b o o k @SacNewsReview

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building a

HealtHy S a c r a m e n t o

Please Don’t Stop the Music by m i k e b lo u n t

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n a small classroom tucked away toward the back of the Language Academy of Sacramento, students gathered after school and sat quietly in anticipation. All eyes focused on a young man wearing headphones standing in front of a microphone, waiting for the signal. Once the record button was pressed, it was his turn to make magic. Nine years ago, Sol Collective began a youth apprenticeship program to train aspiring musicians and engineers in music production. The nonprofit offers a variety of programs run by community members who are dedicated to providing youth a positive outlet for creative expression in South Sacramento. Sol Collective is funded by the Building Healthy Communities grant of The California Endowment. Executive director and founder Estella Sanchez says the music production program has always been one of the more popular programs. “Each year, it was the one program that young people kept participating in and kept asking about,” Sanchez says. “We’ve had such a great response from the community. Anything that gets kids excited about being creative and expressing themselves is great.” Sol Collective began the program at their South Sacramento center in 2005, but has since partnered with a handful of schools to offer the music production program for free to any students who are interested. Sanchez says she is overjoyed at the response because she believes the program gives kids an after-school activity that keeps them off the streets. According to a study by the National Endowment for the Arts, youth who participate

in arts programs have better academic outcomes and are more civically engaged. “I’m trained as an educator and I worked as a teacher for a long time, and one of the things that I saw was a lot of the art programs in school were getting cut,” Sanchez says. “It gave us an opportunity to bring something like this back into a school. It gives students something positive in the community where they can be around their peers who are interested in the same things they are and gain mentorship from another adult.”

Bella Wing has also learned a lot in the program. Prior to her getting involved, the 14-year-old says she didn’t know much about writing and recording a hip-hop song. But the program has encouraged her to learn as much as she can about the process. “I really just enjoy being around people and finding that commonality collaborating with others,” Wing says. “The more you learn, the better you get and the more complex you can get.”

“IT gIvES STudEnTS SOmETHIng pOSITIvE In THE COmmunITy wHErE THEy Can BE arOund THEIr pEErS wHO arE InTErESTEd In THE SamE THIngS THEy arE.”

BuIldIng HEalTHy COmmunITIES In 2010, The California Endowment launched a 10-year, $1 billion plan to improve the health of 14 challenged communities across the state. Over the 10 years, residents, community-based organizations and public institutions will work together to address the socioeconomic and environmental challenges contributing to the poor health of their communities. yoey Knighton and Bella wing create music during an after-school music production program at the language academy of Sacramento. The program was started nine years ago by Sol Collective to give youth an outlet for expression. photo by louise mitchell

Estella Sanchez, executive director of Sol Collective Eighth-grader Yoey Knighton, 14, says he started coming to the program because he was inspired by his father, who is also a musician. “He is a huge influence on me and why I’m doing this,” Knighton says. He would like to pursue a career in music, although he admits he still has a lot to learn. “I didn’t know what any of this stuff was until I started doing this,” Knighton says. “But I’ve learned so many things, like how to use [recording software] to make beats and sample other songs. My teachers are great.”

your ZiP code shouldn’t predict how long you’ll live – but it does. Staying healthy requires much more than doctors and diets. Every day, our surroundings and activities affect how long – and how well – we’ll live. Health Happens in neighborhoods. Health Happens in Schools. Health Happens with prevention.

paid with a grant from the california endowment 6   |   SN&R   |   02.06.14

www.SacBHC.org


Sac State buzzer beater See SCOREKEEPER

If you don’t build it ... Developers put  region’s progressive  affordable-housing  laws in checkmate

Developers’ ripple effect But it won’t likely be the last hit for affordable-housing advocates and the people they represent. Last week’s vote continues an effective strategy by the building industry of gutting affordable-housing standards. It’s like a chess game: Developers went after lowincome laws in the suburbs to put pressure on Sacramento. “It absolutely has a ripple effect. It’s like a traveling road show,” chuckled Ken Cross, CEO of Sacramento Habitat for Humanity. In Placer County, builders can either carve out 10 percent of new residential projects aside for affordable units, or else pay a fee they independently negotiate with the planning director. El Dorado County has no affordable-housing requirements, just “incentives.” The city of Rancho Cordova negotiates requirements on a project-by-project basis, while the cities of Citrus Heights and Galt have no affordable-housing programs whatsoever. The cities of Sacramento and West Sacramento are both considering easing their respective inclusionary-housing standards, while the cities of Elk Grove and Folsom tweaked their fee-heavy programs in March 2013. “Generally speaking, a lot of the cities have pulled back on the way they were doing affordable housing,” reflected Joshua Wood, executive director of Region Builders, a lobbying organization for commercial builders. That message was hammered home in a January 10 letter from North State Building Industry Association, a big donor to local political campaigns. “Most communities within our region have converted to having a fee-only option, or in fact have no affordable housing requirement at all, which puts

See NEWS

9

prospective investment in Sacramento County at a severe disadvantage,” North State BIA government and affairs director John Costa wrote. The scare tactic put pressure on the county. Housing advocates appealed for more time to discuss options and reach out to stakeholders in the county. They got it, but at a cost. “They punished us for that. That’s what I felt like, anyway,” Dramer said. “[County executive] Brad [Hudson] told them to take the inclusionary-housing option off the table.” Which is what the county did, to Supervisor Don Nottoli’s chagrin. One of the ordinance’s original architects, he and housing advocates could read the writing on the wall last week. Expressing fatigue with the debate, board Chairman Jimmie Yee enacted a 30-minute public comment limit for each side at the January 28 meeting. Counting up the speaker cards, he gave two minutes apiece to builders and developers, but only a minute-and-a-half to advocates, since there were more of them. “Honestly, I’ve never felt so disrespected coming into these chambers until today,” one speaker told Yee. The fee ultimately was set at $2.50 per square foot with no cap, based on the disputed assumption that the average home in the unincorporated county is 2,250 square feet. Nottoli voted against it, because he thought it was too weak-tea, and Supervisor Susan Peters opposed it, because she thought it was too hard on developers.

Save the safe house See EDITORIAL

13

encompasses most of the city’s new affordable housing, thinks it would be a mistake to ignore what other communities are doing. “We’ve been victims of that in the past,” she said, referring to the city’s recently repealed big-box ordinance. “You don’t have to mirror what the other cities do, but you better take it into consideration.” For Ashby, this wonky policy debate hits close to home. A single mother at age 20, she lived in low-income housing and utilized both food stamps and subsidized child care while attending law school. “So I have some history with low-income housing,” she related. “Right now, the ordinance that we have in place, in my opinion, falls short of helping the people it’s supposed to help.” North Natomas, part of Ashby’s district, has 11 apartment complexes with a lowincome component, but few of the supports for the working class. There’s no light rail and only one bus line. There are parks, but no public pool or community center. “That’s just like the projects of the ’60s and ’70s that we tried to get away from,” she told SN&R. “We have to do better than this.” Housing advocates worry that tinkering with the ordinance will mean a reduction in affordable units. Ashby says it probably will. “I’m sure we’ll go down in quantity, and I’m sure the development community will have to pay more than they want,” she said. “It’s our job as the city to find that median point. “It’s not going to be controversyfree because it involves money and human life.” Ω

City in the crosshairs Meanwhile, housing advocates are turning their attention to the city of Sacramento, which is in the process of altering its own affordable-housing rules. The city is considering replacing its 15-percent threshold with a fee-only option that charges $3 per square foot of new construction. But now that the county underpriced them by 50 cents, that figure may not stay. Sacramento City Councilwoman Angelique Ashby, whose district

ILLUSTRATION BY SN&R STAFF

A decade-long campaign to undo Sacramento County’s landmark affordable-housing by policy culminated last week in a big win for Raheem developers. Now, local advocates for the F. Hosseini poor are scrambling to defend one of their last outposts for fair housing: the city of ra he emh@ newsreview.c om Sacramento. A January 28 vote by the county board of supervisors represented the biggest blow yet to those who view integrated housing as a panacea to an array of social ills—from the high rate of deaths among Sacramento’s black children and homeless residents, to the segregation of low-income and minority families. The county’s low-income-housing rules required developers to set aside 15 percent of project land for poorer residents. But shortly after the heralded policy was adopted in 2008, the development industry gummed up its implementation with lawsuits. Then, the housing bubble burst, and new construction halted. Now, the policy has been dismantled altogether. “The current affordable-housing ordinance really hasn’t had its day in the sun,” argued Christian Jensen, an organizer at Resources for Independent Living, which represents disabled people in Sacramento A longer version of and Yolo counties. this story can be Supervisors’ contentious 3-2 vote read online at replaces a 15 percent requirement with www.newsreview.com/ sacramento. a $2.50-per-square-foot fee for new development, which will be banked in an affordable-housing trust fund. The idea is that new, affordable units will be built when enough money accumulates in the till. But county planners acknowledged their projections were little more than artful guesses. “There’s lots of ways of slicing this,” said planning director Leighann Moffitt. Staff anticipates building a hundred new affordable units per year with the money, but that depends on a number of unproven assumptions. The county would need to both double current residential construction rates and also spend all fees on building new units. The latter is unlikely, as the county can spend up to 50 percent

of collected fees on refurbishing existing structures. All of which could put the number of new affordable units closer to 25 a year, if not lower. According to growth projections, more than 5,500 low-income units are needed over the next seven years. “The fee-only [option] is the worst possible outcome,” Sacramento Housing Alliance advocacy director Tamie A. Dramer told SN&R a day after the vote.

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Latinos and health care

Developer interests have outmaneuvered affordable-housing advocates by playing one jurisdiction’s economic fears against the other’s.

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EXOTIC

PLANTS

Be My Valentine

Orange Shandy is here.

by SN&R staff

SCORE KEEPER Sacramento’s winners and losers—with arbitrary points

The cupcakes are done

Branded for life The local Twitterati went nuts on  Monday brainstorming slogans for  branding Sacramento. Inspired  by the Sacramento chamber  of commerce’s group Metro  Edge’s plan to come up with a  new city motto, they tweeted  potential slogans during the entire  business day, with the hashtag  #sacbrandathon. The public will  vote on the slogans in March.  Scorekeeper has a submission:  “Sacramento: Hella annoying  sometimes.”

It was a well-known fact that  Restaurant Thir13en would close  its doors at the end of January. But  TreyBcakes, too? The Midtown spot  specialized in gourmet confections,  so it would be easy to blame its end  on the slow death of the cupcake  trend. The location has been looking  for someone to take over its lease  for months. But owner Trey Luzzi  posted in a farewell letter on the  business’s door that he wants to  return to government service. Sorry,  buttercream fans.

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Buzzer beater Mad props to Sacramento State University’s men’s basketball, who beat top-ranked Weber  State University in overtime with a 75-foot  heave (all net!) at the buzzer. The shot, made  by Dylan Garrity, made it to No. 1 on ESPN  SportsCenter’s top 10 plays this past Saturday.

+3

A streetcar named ‘almost’ Thank you, Sacramento Kings, for championing  your $500,000  contribution toward  the proposed West  Sacramento-Sacto  streetcar with all  kinds of press releases  and noise. Now, only  $129,500,000 to go to  build the damn thing!

- 500,000

Join us out here Med Investigations: 916.966.7452 8   |   SN&R   |   02.06.14

Please drink responsibly.

Village vs. village

Vacuum judges

A packed house, plus standing room,  converged in the Clunie Community  Center in East Sacramento this past  Monday to share with Councilman  Steve Cohn their displeasure for the  proposed McKinley Village project.  Residents submitted more than  600 pages of public comment on  the contentious project’s draft  environmental-impact report.  Expect continued incendiary  debate next month at the planning  commission.

Election-law experts told SN&R last  week that the judges who will be  hearing the arena-petition lawsuit work hard to live “in a vacuum”  and avoid prejudices on issues  the court might hear. So, it was  surprising when Judge Michael  Kenny announced on Tuesday  that he actually signed one of the  petitions to put the arena-subsidy  on the June ballot. Irony: Arena  supporters had told SN&R that he  was a “favorable” judge.

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Got it covered

BEATS

Sacramentans flock to sign up for health-care reform, but Latinos are slow to enroll Twenty-seven-thousand people in the Sacramento area selected healthinsurance plans through Covered by Alastair Bland California in the first three months of the marketplace’s opening, according to numbers released last week. This total, says the Department of Health Care Services, equals about 95 percent of the region’s people that officials have guessed will enroll during the application period from October 2013 through March. Although Latino participation remains disproportionately low, the state’s new health exchange is leading the nation in applications for health insurance under the guidelines of the Affordable Care Act. In fact, enrollment rates skyrocketed in December, and the program’s launch has rebounded into what analysts are calling a success. “No one realized how strong the pent-up desire for this was,” said Suzie Shupe, the executive director of California Coverage & Health Initiatives in Sacramento. Compared to the 15 other states Some 27,000 Sacramentans signed and the District of up for President Columbia that Barack Obama’s similarly Affordable Care Act launched reforms so far. their own health-care exchanges, California has seen

some of the greatest public interest in the program. “California is doing really well, especially if you’re grading on a curve,” said Anthony Wright, the executive director of Health Access California, a group in Sacramento that lobbied for the Affordable Care Act and has supported the rollout of Covered California. Though home to just one-eighth of the population of the United States, California has accounted for more than a quarter of health-care sign-ups under the Affordable Care Act, which took full effect on January 1. By late mid-January, 625,000 Californians had selected a health-care plan, while another 1.2 million were assessed and directed to Medi-Cal, the state’s assisted health-care program for the poor. In total, about 1.5 million Californians are now receiving assistance for health coverage that was not available previously. The exchange will not close for 2014 until the end of March, and Wright expects a spike in applications in the coming weeks. “At the end of the day, this is deadline driven,” he said. “It’s human nature—lots of people don’t sign up until the last minute.” But as the deadline for enroll enrollment approaches, many analysts are questioning why so few Latinos have signed up. The ethnic group report reportedly represents more than half of the state’s uninsured population. As of the year’s end, however, only 19 percent of Covered California’s applicants were Latino. A language barrier is likely one of the main causes for the no-shows: The Spanish-language website did not launch until late-November, Wright said, while the non-English-language paper applications weren’t available until late-Decem late-December. Currently, the website has been translated into more than a dozen languages. Xavier Morales, executive director of the Latino Coalition for a Healthy California, said the media campaign for Covered California was effective for many groups but

Drought killing salmon Drought conditions are likely to devastate Central Valley salmon numbers, lobbyists and environmentalists warn. Decreasing flows in both the Sacramento and the American rivers have already exposed thousands of nests of fertilized fall-run chinook salmon eggs, and environmental laws intended to protect the fish aren’t working, critics say. Mike Healey, a biologist with the Department of Fish and Wildlife, said at least 11 percent of the fall-run salmon nests—also called “redds”—were left high and dry. Others that remained submerged under only an inch or two of water may have stagnated in warm water and fared no better, he says. “Those eggs need a lot of cold water flowing over them to move debris and nutrients away,” he said. “We might have lost more [nests] than we think.” Endangered fish species are supposed to be protected by the Endangered Species Act. Additionally, a 1992 law called the Central Valley Project Improvement Act requires that 800,000 acre feet of water be reserved every year for the benefit of fish and wildlife. The intent of that law was to protect chinook salmon and, in fact, double their population. But the law has, so far, failed. Zeke Grader, executive director of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Associations, explains that the Bureau of Reclamation regularly “games the system” by releasing water from Folsom, Oroville or Shasta lakes and officially logging the releases as part of the required 800,000 acre feet intended to support wildlife and migrating fish. “But then, when the water reaches the Delta, they pump it south,” Grader said. “They’re double accounting with the same water.” John McManus, executive director of the Golden Gate Salmon Association, said water intended to benefit fish in the Delta must be allowed to flow into San Francisco Bay for the effort to have effect. This doesn’t always happen, though. “[The Bureau of Reclamation and water users] have found ways to get that water into the pumps,” McManus said. (Alastair Bland)

perhaps failed to reach the Latino community. “The on-the-ground, personaltouch outreach has been lacking,” he said. “People who haven’t had access to health insurance in the past might be reluctant to sign up without that kind of contact.” He believes information booths at churches, marketplaces, health clinics, schools and community centers would have influenced a greater number of Latinos to apply with Covered California. Morales also speculates that some Latinos with family members who are living in the country without legal permission in their households may have been distrustful of applying for government-assisted health care. “These people need to see other families like theirs who have successfully gone through the process,” he said. Such fears, though, may be unfounded. Covered California has posted on its website a letter from the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency assuring skeptics that information about “undocumented” family members provided by health-care applicants would not be used to enforce immigration laws. Thirty-four states—mostly Republican led—opted not to participate in the Affordable Care Act, which required federal agencies to assist with launching their health-care programs, as the act required. This, says Wright, hindered the federal government’s capacity to oversee and facilitate exchange launches in states like California that chose to lead the process. “You can very much trace many of the problems that Covered California experienced back to the Republican opposition to the Affordable Care Act,” Wright said. He said that no matter how frustrating the experience of enrolling may have been for some Californians, the fact that all citizens are now eligible for coverage is a big step up. “We should remember that a year ago, people had to fill out a 25-page medical-history questionnaire with the possibility that they could be denied for a pre-existing condition,” he said. “We can’t forget how awful the individual health-care system was before.” Ω

Truck off They scrape parked cars, rattle bedroom windows and literally crush the pavement. Now, trucks are under fire from Citrus Heights residents and officials who want large commercial vehicles off their roads. In response to years of complaints from residents and business owners, city officials drafted an ordinance that would prohibit large commercial vehicles from utilizing most residential and small streets. The city council is expected to take a final vote on February 13. The ordinance proposes to restrict truck traffic to several main arteries and allow use of nondesignated roads only when vehicles are making local deliveries. Stuart Hodgkins, the city’s principle civil engineer, said complaints about commercial vehicles using city streets—taking wide turns at sharp corners, damaging the roadways and generally disturbing the peace—have been heard since the late 1990s. He added that some trucks have even used city streets to avoid freeway weigh stations

and inspection stops. The ordinance will not likely be made law before April. If implemented, the truck ban would involve penalties as large as $250. Because moving violations can seriously impair a truck driver’s professional record, Hodgkins said that clearly visible and legible road signs will need to be placed, and information about the ban made available online before any law takes effect. “We need to do due diligence in making sure that truckers know about this,” he said. (A.B.)

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Budget boomer Gov. Jerry Brown opts for savings instead of tearing through the checkbook—will it last? King Arthur and a bunch of his knights are whooping it up after a big victory that unites the Britons. There’s a lot of celebratory sword-clashing, armor-clattering and carrying on— until Merlin commands them to zip it and harken unto him. “Look upon this moment. Savor it!” says Merlin, as portrayed by Nicol Williamson in Excalibur. “For it is the doom of men that they forget.” S CA by GREG LU How many times since King Artie, or even the release caplowdown@newsreview.com of Excalibur in 1981, have folks forgotten where they came from, where they meant to go, what led to disaster in the past, who to trust and how to avoid being scammed by sleazoids? How many times has flood, fire, famine, pestilence, temblor, typhoon, tornado, tyranny and war wiped out cities, countries, civilizations and then, after a collective “Wow, major bummer,” the victims go back to the same behavior that guarantees they’re going to receive yet another all-world ass-kicking.

Paraphrasing the Nazi officer investigating George C. Scott in Patton: The secret to Brown is the past.

Greg Lucas’ state-politics column Capitol Lowdown will appear every-other week in SN&R. He also blogs at www.californias capitol.com.

BEFORE

So, when Gov. Jerry Brown said in his recent State of Disbelief speech that he’s going to learn from history and not piss away the big mound of cash California has in hand on a bunch of stuff that keeps costing money after the state’s flushness fizzles, it elicited a few titters, some polite chuckles. There isn’t a single governor, Democrat or Republican, since 1850 that hasn’t bitched about how the state could do a better job managing its money—and then, in most cases, promptly followed that up by tearing through the checkbook. Except Brown, however, legitimately appreciates history. Paraphrasing the Nazi officer investigating George C. Scott in Patton: The secret to Brown is the past. A tip-off might be that he was a classics major in college. Second, at three-quarters-of-a-century, he qualifies as a historical figure himself. Buildings of lesser vintage have been |

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placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The budget Brown presented in January clearly demonstrates he’s trying to avoid mistakes by previous corner-office occupants. His spending plan is short on spending and big on saving. To avoid the cause of several previous budget meltdowns, Brown advocates a rainy-day fund of $1.7 billion to cushion the state against the whipsaw of capital-gains cash-outs by the monied folks whose tax payments comprise the state’s principal revenue source. Brown needn’t go back to the time of Govs. Peter Burnett or Romualdo Pacheco to find a spot-on example of the consequences of using temporary money to pay for permanent expenses. Brown’s former chief of staff, Gray Davis, used a windfall of more than $12 billion in tax revenue from shareholders cashing out the dot-com run-ups to pay for ongoing programs, helping create a record $35 billion gap between revenues and spending commitments, and getting himself recalled for his trouble. Nor does Brown have to dust off some pithy oration by Cicero to know, from the recent past, that talking tough on thriftiness—creating at least an appearance of parsimony—wins praise from the parasitic entities that rate the risk of investing in California’s debt. Their praise, in turn, boosts investment, which then helps the spending plan’s professed solvency become even more solvent. And finally, Brown knows from the last time he was governor, back when ABBA and Barry Manilow were big, that politicians running for re-election who can show at least some scintilla of evidence they kept or tried to keep their previous campaign pledges—have a far stronger chance of getting re-elected. But there’s a big difference between learning from the past and living in it. On page 152 of his budget, Brown riffs on the crowd of California baby boomers 65 and older growing by more than 1,000 persons a day, each day for the next 15 years. They “reshape society as they begin to leave the labor force,” Brown says matter-of-factly. And that’s it. The budget says nothing more about this far-reaching demographic shift. We can’t have forgotten about it already? Ω

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What would Jesus say about poverty? Quite a bit, actually. I am not a biblical expert, but I think Jesus would have had more to say about helping the poor than about gay marriage. He would have had more to say about income inequality than sex education. In Luke 14:12-14, Jesus said, “When you give a luncheon or a dinner, do not invite your friends or your brothers or your relatives or rich neighbors, lest they also invite you in return, and repayment come to you. But when you give a reception, invite the poor, the crippled, the lame, the blind, L and you will be blessed, since they do not have the by JEFF VONKAENE means to repay you; for you will be repaid at the j e ffv @ne wsr e v ie w.c o m resurrection of the righteous.� There is a power in these words. Like many others, I have been impressed by the new pope. I never thought I would hear the head of the Roman Catholic Church say, “If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has a good will, who am I to judge?� By putting a greater emphasis on poverty, Pope Francis has electrified the Catholic Church: “A way has to be found to enable everyone to benefit This new focus from the fruits of the earth, on poverty is also and not simply to close the gap between the affluent and apparent in the those who must be satisfied the crumbs falling from conservative with the table, but above all to fundamentalist satisfy the demands of justice, fairness and respect for every churches here in human being.� They are not just words. Sacramento. According to local church officials that I have talked to, the interior changes have been even greater. Pruning administrative deadwood. Asking for more input. Giving more power to officials in economically developing nations. This new focus on poverty is also apparent in the conservative fundamentalist churches here in Sacramento. Bayside Church, Capital Christian Center and The Rock Church, to name just a few, all have a greater focus on poverty and service now than they did just a few years ago. At a Bayside of South Sacramento sermon I attended a few months before Pastor Sherwood Carthen’s passing, his voice boomed through the auditorium. He told us that it was time to stop judging our Jeff vonKaenel gay brothers and sisters. It was time to love all of God’s is the president, CEO and children. It was time to give back. This same powerful message is being repeated at relimajority owner of the News & Review gious services throughout Sacramento. I am very excited newspapers in about this new focus in the pews. But I would be even Sacramento, more excited to see religious organizations supporting Chico and Reno. government entities to combat poverty. I believe Jesus would help at the food bank and support food-stamp programs. I believe Jesus would help build Habitat for Humanity homes and support low-income housing. I believe Jesus would give at the collection plate and demand that the rich pay their fair share of taxes. What do you think? Ί


THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

Save the safe house If you’ve ever thought about making a charitable contribution but worried that you didn’t have enough money to really make a difference, consider making a donation to the Sacramento Senior Safe House. The Arden Arcade-area facility, which shelters abused and neglected seniors, will close on February 14, unless $200,000 in private support can be raised. And every little bit helps. Established by Volunteers of America in 2009, the unique facility has provided a safe haven to about 245 clients, most of whom were referred by Adult Protective Services. It offers a homelike environment where seniors can take shelter, enjoy meals and visitors, and receive medical assistance and other aid. In many cases, it’s been a lifesaver for seniors who otherwise would have been referred to low-income hotels or homeless shelters. Until recently, the Senior Safe House has been funded largely by a single, anonymous donor who recently died, and the VOA is scrambling to come up with funds to keep the facility in operation. Your support can help keep the doors open. Please call the VOA at (916) 442-3691 if you can help. Ω

Ganging up It is sad—but not surprising—that the government’s rush to identify and profile “gang activity” has gotten to the point where fan groups and self-identified cultural “tribes” such as Juggalos, the followers of rap group Insane Clown Posse, are profiled as potential criminals. But, as detailed in the recent story by Raheem F. Hosseini (“Insane criminal prosecution” SN&R Feature Story, January 23), that’s exactly the case. We’re tempted to dive into the absurd by asking, “Who’s next?” Will middle-aged Deadheads find themselves stopped and frisked because of tie-dye T-shirts and rainbow teddy bear bumper stickers? Will Lady Gaga’s Little Monsters be accused of conspiring to commit violent crimes against fashion? Can those few remaining Beliebers expect to be searched for eggs on suburban streets? If there’s any sanity to be found in this, it’s that the lawsuit by self-identified Juggalos reveals the true nature of the so-called profiling engaged in by some arms of law enforcement, which is, unfortunately, all too often an excuse to enshrine biases against members of subcultures. It really doesn’t matter who the group is, the point of profiling is to institutionalize stereotypes. And once those groups are authenticated as “gangs,” all it takes is a random member to do something illegal. The bias is already in place to brand an entire subculture as criminal. This is once again the sort of broad-brush attack on individual liberty that is repugnant in a multicultural democracy. Perhaps it’s time for all of us to paint our faces—at least until this sort of profiling is washed up. Ω

A Grimm tale of inconsistent justice Michael Grimm is lucky he’s a politician. The Republican Here in California, Penal Code section 422 congressman from New York became an says that willfully threatening to commit a by instant YouTube star and late-night punch line crime is a “strikeable” offense worthy of a fourScott Thomas following President Barack Obama’s State year prison term. Anderson of the Union address last week when Grimm Of course, we all know that won’t happen physically threatened a television reporter who to Grimm. Why? Because he’s a white, wealthy mentioned a campaign-finance investigation politician. the Staten Island representative clearly didn’t Grimm’s defenders are quick to point out want to discuss. With the cameras still rolling, that he apologized. Interesting. no less. I wonder what would happen if tomorrow, What Grimm didn’t California’s unconstitutionally become, however, was a overcrowded prisons released Class and criminal suspect. every inmate doing time for So far, the discourse consequence making criminal threats—as has focused on whether long as he or she apologized. are so intertwined Grimm is a thin-skinned I recently interviewed attorthey’ve become bully who understands ney Bryan Stevenson of the Equal Justice Initiative. Based An online version of this how live cameras work. invisible. in Alabama, Stevenson had the essay can be found at What’s missing from that www.newsreview.com/ conversation is acknowlguts to file a motion officially sacramento/ edgment that this same episode would have asking a judge to treat his poor, 14-year-old pageburner/blogs. played out much differently if you replaced black client as if he were a 75-year-old white Grimm with, oh say, any member of America’s corporate executive. “Not talking about poverty working poor. when you’re talking about crime is simply I’m a journalist. If I was standing in the misguided,” Stevenson told me. “And so is not Scott Thomas Anderson is a journalist residing Capitol building, as that NY1 cable reporter talking about a justice system that treats people in Folsom. was, and a homeless military veteran or a better if they’re already wealthy or well-off.” struggling fast-food worker walked up to me It may be fun to dissect Grimm’s boorish and snarled, “I’ll throw you off this fucking behavior, but what that blooper reel news tape balcony,” as Grimm did, that person would truly revealed is a justice system where class almost certainly be charged with a felony count and consequence are so intertwined they’ve of making criminal threats. become entirely invisible. Ω BEFORE

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BEYOND A REASONABLE

DROUGHT Sacramento’s Sacramento’s uncharted uncharted water water shortage shortage isn’t just a blip. This is the new isn’t just a blip. This is the new reality. reality. by by Alastair Alastair Bland Bland

The dusty brown

shoreline surrounding Folsom Lake descends steeply into the greenish water. Overhead, shoreline surrounding Folsom Lake descends steeply into the greenish water. Overhead, the sky is an unseasonal blue, and the exposed lake bed is parched and cracked. Boat the sky is an unseasonal blue, and the exposed lake bed is parched and cracked. Boat ramps, which have delivered countless water skiers and fishermen to the reservoir’s edge, ramps, which have delivered countless water skiers and fishermen to the reservoir’s edge, no longer reach the shore. The lake’s tributaries have turned to trickles, and the towering no longer reach the shore. The lake’s tributaries have turned to trickles, and the towering concrete wall of Folsom Dam has been rising out of the lake, which has been shrinking concrete wall of Folsom Dam has been rising out of the lake, which has been shrinking for months. Just as steadily, another structure also seems to be rising: a submerged, 7-footfor months. Just as steadily, another structure also seems to be rising: a submerged, 7-footwide tube that hasn’t broken the surface for decades. It is Folsom Lake’s municipal-water wide tube that hasn’t broken the surface for decades. It is Folsom Lake’s municipal-water intake, and should this pipe begin gulping air instead of lake water, hundreds of thousands intake, and should this pipe begin gulping air instead of lake water, hundreds of thousands of people will be shifted onto an emergency life-support pumping system—a setup that of people will be shifted onto an emergency life-support pumping system—a setup that federal lake managers have never had to use before. federal lake managers have never had to use before. Indeed, all of California is more than a year into the worst drought in state history— Indeed, all of California is more than a year into the worst drought in state history— and with little chance left of relief this winter. and with little chance left of relief this winter. “This situation is entirely unprecedented,” said Robert Roscoe, the general manager “This situation is entirely unprecedented,” said Robert Roscoe, the general manager of district operations at the Sacramento Suburban Water District. “The American River is of district operations at the Sacramento Suburban Water District. “The American River is a trickle. Folsom Lake is drying up. We have never seen anything like this. This is a dry a trickle. Folsom Lake is drying up. We have never seen anything like this. This is a dry year unlike any dry year we’ve ever seen before. On top of that, this extra-dry year comes year unlike any dry year we’ve ever seen before. On top of that, this extra-dry year comes on the heels of two drier-than-normal years.” on the heels of two drier-than-normal years.”

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On January 17, Gov. Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency, asking state residents to reduce their water use by 20 percent. About the same time, the city of Sacramento likewise initiated emergency actions by mandating a 20 percent water-use cutback by all residents, and none too soon. The state’s reservoirs have been dropping for months and are now dreadfully low. Folsom Lake is at less than 17 percent of its capacity. Shasta Lake is just 36 percent full and San Luis Reservoir—a major agricultural supplier—just 30 percent. Streams and rivers that usually become wintertime torrents of mud-brown water have dwindled into quietly trickling brooks. Sierra Nevada snowpack— relied upon for late-summer irrigation water— is almost absent. California is a drought-prone land. Yet history has nothing on 2014. The previous worst drought in California came in the late 1970s—but only 22 million people lived in the state at the time. Today, dry times have struck a very different, and perhaps especially vulnerable, landscape. Almost 40 million people now populate California, and more farmland than ever before is under intensive cultivation. Salmon and steelhead numbers are dropping as their spawning streams are increasingly diverted for human use. The governor even wants to build a pair of giant tunnels that could divert most of the already overused Sacramento River to the San Joaquin Valley—a project that critics argue will not solve the state’s water deficit. This spring, lawns will certainly turn brown throughout the capital and its suburbs. Gardens may not produce fruit this summer. Anyone seen washing their cars will be scorned—if not fined a thousand dollars. Indoors, water consumption will be curtailed by almost-inevitable increases in rates as the region’s 21 water districts scramble in disarray to coordinate their cutback advisories. Just how draconian enforcement becomes will depend on what rain falls in the weeks left of winter. But already, city inspectors are slowly driving the streets, patrolling for illegal outdoor use of water. Forecasters expect a dry winter, and with no historical precedent to the current drought, no one knows how California will cope should a second year pass with almost no rain. “We’ve never been here before,” said Shauna Lorance, the general manager of the San Juan Water District. “This is uncharted territory. It’s exceedingly nerve-wracking.”

Puddles, pipes and conservation plans Lorance is hoping for a “miracle March.” Her district supplies water to 265,000 people in Citrus Heights, Orangevale, Fair Oaks, Folsom, Roseville and Granite Bay. Most of its customers rely entirely on the vanishing reserves of Folsom Lake, and she says mandatory 40-percent restrictions may soon need to be initiated. “We’re not there yet, and we still have a chance for some real rain,” Lorance said.

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But after a year with virtually none, Lorance and other water-agency heads are growing nervous. In late December 2013, the San Juan district made a firm request of its customers: Stop all outdoor watering. The encouragement seemed to work. The Folsom Lake water intake, which was reading 89 cubic feet per second in early January had dipped by January 16, to 64 (though later it climbed back above 70). “People could see Folsom Lake drying up,” said Lorance—a realization, she explains, that spurred a voluntary sense of responsibility and action. On January 14, the city announced a stage 2 drought emergency, mandating 20 percent water reduction and strictly limiting outdoor water use to just one day per week, and only on the weekend. Anyone caught illegally watering their lawns faces a warning for the first violation and a $50 fine for the next. The fifth and subsequent violations could produce $1,000 penalties. Other districts were making similar requests to their customers to cut back on their water use. Still, Lorance said many residents in her district have continued running their yard sprinklers at night. Indeed, the only sure means of curbing water use may be to raise rates—and if February remains dry, that’s what the San Juan

Regional Water Authority. This amount is higher than the state average, and about two thirds of it can be attributed to outdoor water use, especially lawns and gardens. While enforcing outdoor water use is relatively easy, indoor use by Sacramento-area residents is less easily monitored. Moreover, there may be little room to improve. Lorance said many customers in the San Juan Water District have already installed low-volume toilets and low-flow showerheads. Amy Talbot, the water-efficiency manager with the Regional Water Authority, said that taking a five-minute shower rather than 10 can save roughly 12 gallons of water. Turning off the water while shaving and brushing teeth can also produce significant savings, and she said reducing per-person consumption by 20 percent “is pretty easy.” Cutting back by 50 percent, though, may not be. But there may truly be no choice, as the winter proceeds under summer-blue skies. The main fear in eastern Sacramento and the suburbs is that Folsom Lake’s water-intake pipe will begin drawing in air. The pipe’s opening lies at 317 feet of elevation—150 feet under the surface when the reservoir is full. On the day that the governor declared a drought emergency, the lake’s surface was at 359 feet. It is now at 357 feet. Lorance says that once the lake’s surface reaches about 20 feet above the intake, the downward draw

“We’ve never been here before. This is uncharted territory. It’s exceedingly nerve-wracking.” Shauna Lorance San Juan Water District district plans to do. However, state law prevents water suppliers from increasing prices without 45-day advance notice, and Lorance said drought rates won’t take effect before April. Numerous agencies and cities in the area are trying to coordinate their rationing advisories. Still, local water-conservation efforts are as confusing as the Sacramento region is big. The population is served by 21 water suppliers. These districts rely on a number of different water sources. Some have healthy underground reserves—like the Sacramento Suburban Water District, which serves more than 170,000 connections in the eastern edge of Sacramento and the region between the American River and the Placer County line. Most use at least some surface water, including the Cosumnes, American and Sacramento rivers. A half-million people or so receive water from the almostempty Folsom Lake. Thus, the level of concern varies from place to place, and each district implements water-conservation guidelines independently. For instance, even two weeks after Gov. Brown declared a drought emergency, several districts had not issued requests at all for their customers to reduce consumption, while most had asked for 20 percent cutbacks and one—the Placer County Water Agency—a 25 percent reduction. Sacramentans use lots of water—about 380 gallons per day per household, according to the

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of water will create a whirlpool effect. Such a vortex would draw air into the pumps, stalling the system. At this point, emergency pumps would be deployed via a barge in the lake—a measure never taken before. Even 37 years ago, when Folsom Lake fell to 15 percent of capacity by October, the municipal intake was still functioning. But at this time in 1977, the lake was fuller than it is today. With many more people now using the lake’s water, and the reservoir dropping by a foot per week, it is easy to foresee—at the current rate—that one of Northern California’s most important drinking-water sources is likely to be a puddle by late summer, with a giant gurgling whirlpool spinning at its western edge.

Farm razed Farmer Joe Del Bosque grows mostly almonds and melons on 2,000 acres in the Westlands Water District, an arid region in the western San Joaquin Valley. He has no groundwater reserves, and—like other growers in the region—relies almost entirely on Sacramento River water, delivered by a federal canal from the Delta. Much of this water is stored in San Luis

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Reservoir, several hundred feet above the Valley in the mountains east of San Jose. “I’ve got enough water there to get me through the summer with my almonds,” Del Bosque said. “But other people have no water. Lots of row crops will be fallowed this year, and there will be some people cutting down their trees.” Westlands Water District covers 600,000 acres—about 940 square miles—of land and produces several million pounds of almonds every year, among many other crops. But the region also receives just 6 or 7 inches of rain per year, and, as Del Bosque and others know, farming can be a gambling endeavor in such a dry-climate zone. This year, the water many growers need is simply unavailable, and farmers here are expecting a severe shortage. “We’re bracing our farmers for possibly no allocation this year,” said Jason Peltier, Westlands’ chief deputy general manager. “If that happens, farmers will let their fields go dry and use what water they get to keep their orchards alive.” Peltier says his region’s 600 farmers may need to fallow as much as 200,000 acres. Farmers on the east side of the San Joaquin Valley, though more water secure than Westlands growers, will also face hardships if Delta pumping is severely curtailed. But many environmentalists and water-policy analysts feel that farmers are partially to blame for the hit they will likely take this year. Across Westlands, first heavily cultivated in the 1960s after massive pumps were installed in the Delta, growers have been shifting en masse from annual field crops to fruit trees. Annual crops—like cantaloupes and cotton—can be fallowed for a season and replanted in the next with minimal loss to the farmer. Trees and grapevines, however, need water every year. If that water doesn’t come, entire orchards can die, costing growers several additional years without a crop as the new trees mature toward producing age. “This is creating a constant demand for water in a state without a constant supply of water. It takes away all flexibility in management,” said Mike Hudson, a water activist and commercial salmon fisherman in Oakland. The almond industry, especially, is exploding. The crop is one of the most lucrative in California, and growers are planting so many new trees that nurseries can hardly meet the demand. Bearing acreage has boomed from about 500,000 statewide in 2002 to more than 800,000 today—enough trees to guzzle up almost all of Shasta Lake’s capacity. The San Joaquin Valley’s pomegranate, peach, pistachio and walnut orchards are also growing. But Peltier said that planting such tree crops is not so much a risky endeavor in a waterstrapped environment as it is a “coping strategy.”

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Folsom Lake—shown here on February 4, at less than 17 percent of its capacity—has become a popular destination for sightseers. Experts say its low level could be a new reality that will change how we live in the Sacramento region.

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“If you plant more almonds, that gives you the cash you need to buy more expensive water the next year,” he explained. Westlands Water District is one of several large buyers in the San Joaquin Valley that receives Delta water. However, an agreement signed years ago between Westlands and the Bureau of Reclamation warns the water district that its water supply can never be guaranteed in a given year due to unforeseeable conditions, including drought. The contract also says that environmental laws that safeguard Delta water conditions must be met before Westlands’ full water supply can be delivered. “Westlands is the last in line to get water, and they should be the first in line to get cut during shortages,” said Patricia Schifferle, director of Pacific Advocates, a water-focused environmental consultant. In fact, Westlands’ water supply is cut most years, as the contract requires. Still, what water is delivered to Westlands often comes at great cost to fish species that live in the Delta, according to Bill Jennings, a water-law specialist and director of the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance in Stockton. Jennings said the Bureau of Reclamation manages to deliver at least 300,000 acre-feet of Delta water to Westlands in dry years by frequently violating state and federal environmental laws that protect the Delta ecosystem. David Zetland, author of the forthcoming book Living With Water Scarcity, believes California’s crop production has burgeoned far beyond the sustainable level. “Agriculture needs to be using half the water it is now,” said Zetland, who calls the San Joaquin Valley “the No. 1 hot spot of unsustainable agriculture.” Water use isn’t the only issue he has with Westlands. The region’s soil has in places become contaminated by toxic deposits of salt, selenium and boron, which are leeched from the ground and left there after evaporation—a result 16   |   SN&R   |   02.06.14

PHOTO BY TARAS GARCIA

of the area’s poor drainage. The once-fertile Tigris-Euphrates river valley was ruined by a similar process. Zetland believes one way to curb farm growth and sustainably manage the industry would be to prohibit agricultural districts from importing water from other drainages, as farms in the San Joaquin and the Imperial valleys do. Zetland says the perception that Northern California has a surplus of freshwater is false. “The ecosystem evolved with the natural water supply,” he said. Jerry Cadagan, a longtime water activist in Sonora, feels Westlands Water District has dug itself into a hard, dry spot. In an email he wrote: “I believe it is the ultimate in hypocrisy to sign a contract that essentially says you are the last in line and the first to be cut off [when water runs out], and then plant permanent crops that

A new, dry normal The drought has heated up the ongoing debate surrounding the Bay Delta Conservation Plan, the state’s proposed water-conveyance project that would divert much of the Sacramento River via two giant tunnels into the San Joaquin Valley. Westlands’ Peltier, like many in the agriculture industry, supports the plan. He feels the proposed 35-mile-long twin tubes would increase reliability for farmers by allowing sufficient transfer of water, even in dry years, without compromising the health of the Delta and its fisheries. But opponents of the Bay Delta Conservation Plan, including salmon fishermen and environmental groups, say the project would likely destroy struggling fish populations by simply removing too much water from the river too

“But if we don’t get rain this winter, and if next fall is dry, too, we’re going to see people leaving the state.” Jerry Cadagan water activist

need water every year, and then when your allocation is reduced, you blame it on … everyone but yourself.” Del Bosque, who said his melons are as important to him financially as are his almonds, recognizes that he and his neighbors are in dire straits, whoever is to blame. “We’re the last ones to get water, and we understand that,” Del Bosque said. “Most of us here on the west side have pretty much resigned ourselves to getting no water this year, no matter how much it rains. If we don’t get rain, some of us may be history by next year.”

consistently. One of the plan’s main drawbacks, they say, is that the twin tunnels would not produce any new water, as desalination and water-recycling systems would do. In fact, more water—not just ways to handle it—may be direly needed in the coming decades. Some climatologists believe that California could be entering a period of increasingly frequent, increasingly severe droughts. A paleoclimatologist named Scott Stine has theorized that the past 150 years of recorded history chanced to have been exceptionally wet and that California is likely to cycle back into

drier conditions, which Stine believes have been the norm through California’s geologic history. He has said that the agricultural and industrial economies of California have been built on expectations of abundant rainfall and that the carrying capacity of the region is actually deceptively lower than what modern Californians have come to believe. In other words, drought could be the norm for California, and there may be a long dry spell ahead. The culprit for the ongoing drought is a massive ridge of high pressure that remains anchored over the North Pacific Ocean. It has hardly shifted for 14 months and is creating a massive atmospheric rain shadow on the West Coast. Storms that would normally float eastward over California with the jet stream are being deflected northward by the ridge, which is roughly the size of the Andes Mountains. When this devastating barrier will dissipate is unclear. Randall Osterhuber, the lead researcher at the Central Sierra Snow Laboratory near Donner Pass, said if this ridge breaks down, a large storm or two could still swoop in over California, soaking the valleys and cloaking the mountains. “But every day that it’s clear and dry,” he said, “the statistical chances that we’ll have an average or almost-average water year decline significantly.”

Expensive food and an exodus On January 29, Northern Californians were reminded what it feels like when water falls from the sky. Umbrellas came out, and clusters of people assembled under awnings and bus shelters. The roads grew slick, and spray erupted from passing cars in the streets. It was pouring. But it wasn’t nearly enough.


“This January will still end up being one of the driest ever,” said Roscoe, at the Sacramento Suburban Water District. Others also felt the relief but knew the rain would only dampen the surface of the earth for a few days, and unprecedented droughtresponse measures are still likely. The city of Roseville has asked its residents to reduce water use by 20 percent, says its governmentrelations analyst Sean Bigley. “But we’re looking at mandatory cutbacks by midmonth,” he said. If little rain has fallen by March, restrictions could be ramped up to include no watering of lawns. Trees, shrubs and drought-tolerant plants will be exceptions.

150 feet from the intake pipe to the surface when the reservoir is full

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“Food is going to be really expensive.” farmer

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percent capacity of Folsom Lake

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gallons of water saved by taking a five-minute shower instead of a 10-minute one number of regional water districts, each with their own water-conservation strategy

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percent by which the governor and city of Sacramento are asking to reduce water consumption

high-end fine for watering your lawn in the city

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estimated number of acres that Central Valley farmers will have to fallow this year

to the surface on January 17

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Ed George

If the Pacific high-pressure ridge has still not broken down by late-February and allowed a rainstorm or two to drench the state, the San Juan District plans to enact a required 40-percent cutback on water use on the 26th day of the month. This action would entirely prohibit lawn irrigation—trees would be allowed some water—and would be accompanied by a mailer notice of a boost in user rates. Never before, Lorance said, have rates been increased as a response to drought. Other districts are similarly planning usagerate hikes, and while each city has its own system of staged drought cutbacks, most are cooperating to align their rationing advisories— and increase them to full force if necessary, which could mean mandatory 50 percent reductions. If rain doesn’t fall by May, the chances of any precipitation coming before September are virtually zero, and by then, most Sacramentoarea residents can expect a full-fledged state of water rationing and heavy-handed fines for washing cars, spraying the sidewalk, feeding dying tomato vines or wasting precious water in any way. Ed George, a farmer near Winters, believes he may survive the year. He uses water from wells, which he suspects to be part of a subterranean water system fed and recharged by the perennial supply of Lake Berryessa—rather than the drainage of the dwindling Cache Creek—and George believes his water supply will hold out. He hopes so, anyway. Other growers, he is certain, will produce little to nothing in 2014. “Food is going to be really expensive,” he predicted. “If I can get a crop this year going, I’ll do really well, with great prices.” George expects that ranchers will have to cull their herds of cattle when the dry spring provides no ample pasture. “Beef will be really cheap for a while, and then prices will jump way up,” he said. Jerry Cadagan, who has lived through at least two severe droughts in California, said this one takes things to a new level. He is confident the state’s residential water supplies will last the rest of 2014. “But if we don’t get rain this winter, and if next fall is dry, too, we’re going to see people leaving the state.” Ω

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average amount of gallons of water used each day by a Sacramento household

number of people who rely exclusively on Folsom Lake for water

Folsom Lake intake tube

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Laci Green sounds just as perky when she answers the phone as she does when hosting her YouTube videos. She also says “hi” so that it sounds like she spells it on her blog: “Ohai!” In short, the young sexuality educator, famous for explaining sex in no-nonsense terms for people who might actually like to have sex, is exactly what she seems to be. Green’s the host of her own YouTube channel, Sex+. She’s also one of the hosts for DNews, a Discovery Channel Web series and YouTube channel that explores science in everyday life, and she works as a sex educator for Planned Parenthood. Green, who grew up in the Sacramento area and now lives in the Bay Area, is also the featured speaker at Sex + City, a four-day series at Sacramento City College that’s billed as “Sex-Positive Fun and Education.” Green will speak as part of the Thursday Night Threesome panel, which also includes Darrel

Master of

SEX BY KEL MUNGER

Sacramento native Laci Green, the millennial  generation’s answer to Dr. Ruth, dishes on   sex ed, body image and slut-shaming 

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Sac + Black History Month See NIGHT&DAY

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Reliving prom night See COOLHUNTING

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Two guys, one confused girl See ASK JOEY

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The cabbie chronicles See 15 MINUTES

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SCENE& HEARD Ray, author of Sex & God: How Religion Distorts Sexuality, and Jaye Cee Whitehead, author of The Nuptial Deal: Same-Sex Marriage and Neo-Liberal Governance. Certainly, Green’s schedule is packed, but it doesn’t seem to wear her down. Whether she’s discussing why women should avoid douching (“[Vaginas are] like a little ecosystem. It maintains and cleans itself”) or how a female can’t actually pop her cherry (“Moving into the world of reality, the hymen doesn’t completely cover the vagina at all”), the 24-year-old is upbeat and down-to-earth at the same time.

focuses on reproduction, pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. As Green’s videos make clear, there’s so much more involved in a healthy sex life. “My formal [sex] education, when I went to high school, was very minimal, abstinence based,” she said. “Very little talk about birth control, really only talked about reproductive anatomy as it relates to making babies rather than about all of the parts that are down there.” “I was 18 or 19 and didn’t know what a clitoris was, and that’s sad, to me,” she said. She’s out to make sure everyone else knows what their body’s got and how it

“I’ve always felt that people could benefit from being straightforward about things, and that includes sex education.” Laci Green sex educator That translates to a lot of viewers who, hopefully, come away educated and on the road to satisfaction. More than 1.3 million viewers have watched Green’s “You Can’t Pop Your Cherry! (Hymen 101)” video—and her YouTube channel also features dozens of videos, covering subjects as varied as foreskins and “freaky” labia. She didn’t set out to become a sex educator. In fact, the video series that launched Green’s career was initially just a hobby. “I was always interested in gender studies, and so in college, I got involved in this group that was interested in sex education specifically,” Green explained. “I started the [YouTube] channel as a hobby, but it has turned into a much bigger thing.” Green started making the videos in 2010, while still a student at UC Berkeley, where she’d also begun working as a peer sex educator in area schools. “It’s my job now.” She just might be the millennial generation’s answer to Dr. Ruth Westheimer, the frank sex therapistturned-talk-show host. “I don’t like to skirt around issues,” Green said. “I’ve always felt that people could benefit from being straightforward about things, and that includes sex education.” “There’s a real problem with the way we talk about sexuality and the way we educate people.” That problem isn’t just with the way we teach sex education—which, even in those schools that offer it, is taught as part of a health curriculum that mainly

works—hence Sex+ episodes with titles such as “Clit-ical Thinking!” and “Vag!na Truth” and “The Sticky on Semen!” The videos are long on facts and don’t short the humor, either. It’s a far cry from where Green started out in her understanding of sex and sexuality. “I was brought up Mormon, so I was brought up in a household that really shamed and stigmatized sex,” she said. “I think that my entry into understanding my own sexuality and understanding other people’s sexuality was very painful. It just made me feel rotten inside, anything having to do with sexuality.” And, while her parents weren’t too keen on her videos at first, they’ve reached an understanding. It helps, Green said, that she’s now able to support herself with her work—and that she’s “gotten a little better at articulating” her positions. Her ultimate goal is to ensure access to “sex positive” education, an approach to human sexuality that assumes sex is a normal part of our experience that we need neither fear nor feel shame over. “The big emphasis is on not being afraid,” she said. “It means not being afraid to get information, it means not being afraid to protect yourself, not being afraid of your body; a whole bunch of things.” Fear, she said, “perpetuates a lot of really unhealthy attitudes in our society, starting with simple misinformation and going all the way to a culture that basically condones sexual violence, at least by being tolerant of it.” As such, Green said her goal is to move sexual education and discussion

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of sexuality out of the shadows, cutting through any lingering embarrassment, and banishing fear. “That’s the heartbeat of a lot of what I do and what I hope to convey,” she said. Green’s focus isn’t limited to talking about genitals and what people can do with those parts. In her view, sex is about a whole lot more than bodies. In addition to a nuts-and-bolts approach to the physical side of sex, she’s also done videos that deal with relationships, consent, body image and social attitudes, like “slut-shaming.” In fact, about half of Green’s videos— so far—deal with the negative attitudes many people have about their bodies, desires and identities. So, where’s all that shame coming from? “I think it’s a combination of forces,” she said. “Obviously, my perspective was that it was heavily tied up in religion. It doesn’t have to be that way, but it is. It’s also prevalent in every form of media. It’s a cycle that we’re kind of stuck in.” The sort of frank discussion she’s engaged in is the first move toward what Green calls “getting out of the shame box.” “It’s surprising how quickly you can shed that shame and realize, ‘Wow, that was putting a dark cloud over me, and I didn’t even realize how much it was affecting me,’” she said. Mariah Kolbe, a Sacramento City College student and member of the Sac City Feminists club—which, along with the Sociology Club, the Queer-Straight Alliance and Sac City Freethinkers, is sponsoring the college’s Sex + City events—said the club selected Green as a speaker because of the approach she takes. “It felt like a good fit to round out … other serious topics with this sexeducation vlogger who is really funny and who a lot of people are going to come to see it are already familiar with her,” Kolbe said. It’s a fitting time for such discussion, Kolbe added. Valentine’s Day brings a huge focus on relationships, she said. “But there’s no explanation about how to have a healthy one or what some of the dangers are in relationships. You never have people talk about abuse or consent or anything vital like that.” Unless, of course, Laci Green’s in the house. Ω Sex + City, a four-day series of sex-positive education, runs from Monday, February 10, through Thursday, February 13. The Thursday Night Threesome, a discussion with Laci Green, Darrel Ray and Jaye Cee Whitehead, starts at 6 p.m. on February 13. Tickets are $10 for general admission, and $5 for students. For more information and a complete list of events, visit http://sexpositivecity.com.

A Bows & Arrows farewell Midway through the band’s set, Matt Leonardo of Boats! commanded everyone to do the wave. The crowd looked only slightly amused—this was a punk show, not a baseball game. “As in, wave goodbye to Bows & Arrows.” Oh. Right. So we all joined in on the silly tradition—twice—just hours before Bows & Arrows closed its doors forever last Friday night. (OK, not really forever: There was a less official last day of business on Saturday—a 10-hour Nerd Night extravaganza.) Nonetheless, it seemed like a strange combo: four punk bands putting on the farewell party for a collective known for vintage clothing, fine art, and its lush, peaceful patio. The sound didn’t quite match the visuals. And the mosh pit that broke out during Charles Albright’s set seemed extra unnecessary, what with all the framed photos and water glasses around. But maybe the whole night felt strange because it was so hard to believe Bows & Arrows was really closing. The woman who served my Berryessa Brewing Co.’s saison looked sad, and indeed, I saw few smiles behind the bar all evening. It probably didn’t help that most

young adults in attendance purchased cans of Miller High Life instead of helping the

venue get rid of its finer bottles. Duchesse de Bourgogne, for example, was discounted from $9 to $6. opening in May. The line for beer stayed steady, as the garden remained full throughout the evening. Conversations in the bathroom line usually went like this: “Do you know why they’re closing?” “Do you know what could possible take over this giant space?” “Did you ever actually buy anything here?” It may not be too late to support the venue: the Bows website (www.bowscollective.com) hints at a new shop opening in May, though we don’t know if it’ll be just a shop or another shop-cafe-bar-venue. Let’s talk about the music instead. Boats! blasted through its set of two-minute loud-and-fast songs, as expected, and with plenty of comedy. “This is a song about smoking, which you should never, ever do,” Leonardo stated, leading into a song titled “Smoking Is Cool.” Boats! drummer Adam Jennings switched to a glittery guitar for a couple of songs with his new band Shoju Kitten, a cutesy, anime-inspired punk outfit. For the miniset, members assumed ridiculous names like Soda Pop and Cream Puff, and the singer played a keytar with a lavender, faux-fur strap. There were light-pink go-go boots with fluffy, white pom-poms; uneven pony tails; and mismatched tights. Definitely a band to keep in mind, if only for the fashion inspiration. Charles Albright continued the momentum with a speedy set of post-punk, and the Four Eyes closed out the show with nerdy songs about RoboCop, salt, and rock ’n’ roll martians. They played slow, drawn-out covers of Beatles songs, and talked about teaching a seminar on “how to clear a room” just as the room did, indeed, begin to clear. Ultimately, it was a strange, anticlimactic end to what could have been a glorious send-off. Awkward jokes ended in silence, such as this one: “Hey, thank you for supporting this place all these years and keeping it open.” Too soon, Four Eyes. Too soon. —Janelle Bitker

For more on Laci Green, including links to her YouTube channel and Tumblr page, visit www.lacigreen.tv.

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Every Friday 7:00 - 8:30 pm ¡ Free admission Sacramento Yoga Center @ Sierra 2 Community Center, Room 6 2791 24th Street, Sacramento Parking in back For more information please see www.SacVRG.org

COLOR IS LIGHT ON FIRE SAM FRANCIS

Five Decades of Abstract Expressionism from California Collections

ON VI EW TH ROUGH APRI L 20, 2014 04USFFUt%PXOUPXO4BDSBNFOUP tcrockerartmuseum.org 4BN'SBODJT Untitled EFUBJM "DSZMJDPODBOWBT YJO5IF%PSJTBOE%POBME'JTIFS $PMMFDUJPO"SUXPSLÂŞ4BN'SBODJT'PVOEBUJPO $BMJGPSOJB"SUJTUT3JHIUT4PDJFUZ "34 /FX:PSL

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The whole world is your own. — Sri Sarada Devi

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

Sacramento Vedanta Reading Group


February picks by Shoka

Cadaver color palette It’s not much of a surprise to read on Alex Reisfar’s website that he was  a would-be tattoo-artist apprentice and played viola in a symphony,  because that mixed background perfectly describes his paintings: a  surreal counterculture feel executed with clasSURREALISM sical skill. His penchant for painting figures from  vintage photographs and animals in a cool, cadaver color palette makes  for eye-pleasing, well-balanced results amid imaginative narratives.    Where: John Natsoulas Center for the Arts, 521 First Street in Davis; (530) 756-3938; www.natsoulas.com. Second Saturday reception: February 8, 7-9 p.m. Hours: Wednesday through Thursday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Saturday through Sunday, noon-5 p.m. Through March 1.

“Pillars of Power” by Alex Reisfar, acrylic on wood panel, 2013. “Dissipate” by Ali Cavanaugh, modern fresco, 2013.

Four decades or less There’s a stonelike quietness to Ali Cavanaugh’s paintings of beautiful  young women, often wearing patterned knee-high socks on their spindly  arms, bent into odd angles and obscuring their face. But the intensity  of stillness makes sense when the viewer learns of how important body  language is to Cavanaugh, who lost much of her  GROUP SHOW hearing as a child. And her delicate, remarkably  realistic watercolor-on-clay paintings—called “modern frescoes”— along with the sparse landscapes of Megan Aline, impressionistic florals  of Angie Renfro, plus several other artists, are part of Elliott Fouts   Gallery’s 40 & Under group show. Where: Elliott Fouts Gallery, 1831 P Street; (916) 736-1429; www.efgallery.com. Second Saturday reception: February 8, 6-9 p.m. Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Saturday through Sunday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; or by appointment. Through February 28.

All around the world Susan Tonkin Riegel has long been a part of the Sacramento-area  fine-art scene, which has included teaching in the Los Rios Community  MIXED MEDA College District. In the past few years, however, the artist has extended her reach more  globally: She’s exhibited in Canada, China, Mexico, Switzerland, and last  year, she had a residency in Sweden. Expect to see work from her Sweden series in her solo show at Shimo Center for the Arts this month.  Where: Shimo Center for the Arts, 2117 28th Street; (916) 706-1162; http://shimogallery.com. Second Saturday reception: February 8, 6-9 p.m. Hours: Wednesday through Saturday, 1-5 p.m.; or by appointment. Through March 5. “Centered” by Susan Tonkin Riegel, mixed media, 2013.

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PURCHASE GIFT CARDS FOR UP TO 50% OFF Sawasdee Thai Cuisine: $25 for $12.50 New Helvetia Brewing Co.: $20 for $10 Clark’s Corner: $30 for $15 Vallejo’s: $10 for $5 Big Bowl Noodles: $20 for $12 Bistro Michel: $50 for $25 Sal’s Tacos: $10 for $5 3 Fires Lounge: $25 for $12.50 The Union Bar & Restauraunt: $25 for $12.50 Country Club Saloon: $20 for $10 Centro Cocina Mexicana: $25 for $18.75 Ten 22: $25 for $15

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TRINITY EPISCOPAL CATHEDRAL

2620 Capitol Ave. tvrbaker@trinitycathedral.org trinitycathedral.org

18TH ST.

17TH ST.

(Behind B&B Beauty Salon)

For info call 916.201.1404

14TH ST.

Second Saturday, February 8th Open 4:30–8:30pm 3431 4th Ave, Sac, 95817

SUNDAY SERVICES: 7:30am Classical Language 9:00am Contemporary Organ & Piano 11:15am Classical Music

13TH ST.

Artist Lila Solarano and her colorful painting portraits. Also, Soul Servant Arts featuring the Abstract Phenom Live Band & Free Refreshments!

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SATURDAY SERVICE: 5:10pm Casual Yet Sacred

12TH ST.

Featuring

Encounter God & Come Alive Spiritually 11TH ST.

Your Alley Art Gallery

17 OLD SOUL CO. 1716 L St., (916) 443-7685, www.oldsoulco.com

18 RED DOT GALLERY CONTACT ETC.) 2231 J St., Ste. 101; 7 BLUE LAMP 1400 Alhambra INFO Blvd., (PHONE, ADDRESSES, www.reddotgalleryonj.com (916) 455-3400, ADwww.bluelamp.com APPEARS AS REQUESTED 19 SACRAMENTO ART COMPLEX 8 CAPITAL ARTWORKS 1215 21stBY: St., APPROVED Ste. B; (916) 207-3787; www.capital-artworks.com

9 CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, SACRAMENTO 1519 19th St., (916) 498-9811, www.ccasac.org

10 CUFFS 2523 J St., (916) 443-2881, www.shopcuffs.com

11 ELLIOTT FOUTS GALLERY 1831 P St., (916) 446-1786, www.efgallery.com

12 GALLERY 21TEN 2110 K St., (916) 476-5500, www.gallery2110.com

2110 K St., Ste. 4; (916) 476-5500; www.sacramentoartcomplex.com

20 SACRAMENTO GAY & LESBIAN CENTER 1927 L St., (916) 442-0185, http://saccenter.org

21 SHIMO CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2117 28th St., (916) 706-1162, www.shimogallery.com

22 TIM COLLOM GALLERY 915 20th St., (916) 247-8048, www.timcollomgallery.com

23 UNION HALL GALLERY 2126 K St., (916) 448-2452


Happy Hour

DON’T MISS E ST.

3 appetizers | $3 beers on tap | $2 bottle beer

$

23RD ST.

22ND ST.

ALL DAY SPECIAL: $1 BEEr

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(see Yelp page for daily selection)

*Gluten free & vegan available upon request Organic tofu - non GMO - cooked in rice bran oil See what our customers 128 Reviews are saying! as of 01/31/14

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2502 J St • Sacramento, CA • 916.447.1855 www.Coconutmidtown.com The Coconut Midtown

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35 SMITH GALLERY 1020 11th St.,

(916) 443-5721, www.universityart.com

25 THE URBAN HIVE 1931 H St., (916) 585-4483, www.theurbanhive.com

26 VIEWPOINT PHOTOGRAPHIC ART CENTER 2015 J St., (916) 441-2341, www.viewpointgallery.org (916) 443-5601, www.zanzibartrading.com

DOWNTOWN/OLD SAC 28 ADAMSON GALLERY 1021 R St., (916) 492-2207, www.theadamsongallery.com

29 ARTHOUSE UPSTAIRS 1021 R St., second floor; (916) 672-1098; www.arthouse-sacramento.com

30 ARTISTS’ COLLABORATIVE GALLERY 129 K St., (916) 444-7125, www.artcollab.com

31 CROCKER ART MUSEUM 216 O St., (916) 808-7000, www.crockerartmuseum.org

32 E STREET GALLERY AND STUDIOS 1115 E St., (916) 505-7264

33 EXHIBIT S 547 L St., (203) 500-8679, www.exhibitsstudios.com

2837 36th St., (916) 457-1240, www.thebrickhousegalleryoakpark.com

36 TEMPLE COFFEE 1010 Ninth St.,

IV DEL PASO WORKS BUILDING GALLERIES

(916) 443-4960, www.templecoffee.com

37 VOX SACRAMENTO 1818 11th St.,

1001 Del Paso Blvd.

V DELTA WORKSHOP 2598 21st St., (916) 455-1125, www.deltaworkshopsac.com

VI EVOLVE THE GALLERY 3428 Third Ave.,

EAST SAC

(916) 572-5123, www.evolvethegallery.com

VII GALLERY 1855 820 Pole Line Rd. in Davis,

38 ARCHIVAL FRAMING 3223 Folsom Blvd., (916) 923-6204, www.archivalframe.com

39 FE GALLERY & IRON ART STUDIO 1100 65th St., (916) 456-4455, www.fegallery.com

(530) 756-7807, www.daviscemetery.org

VIII KNOWLTON GALLERY 115 S. School St., Ste. 14 in Lodi; (209) 368-5123; www.knowltongallery.com

University Art

IX PATRIS STUDIO AND ART GALLERY

40 GALLERY 14 3960 60th St.,

3460 Second Ave., (916) 397-8958, http://artist-patris.com

(916) 456-1058, www.gallery14.net

41 JAYJAY 5520 Elvas Ave.,

(916) 453-2999, www.jayjayart.com

OFF MAP

X RECLAMARE GALLERY & CUSTOM TATTOO 2737 Riverside Blvd., (916) 760-7461, www.reclamareart.com

XI SACRAMENTO TEMPORARY CONTEMPORARY 1616 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 921-1224, www.tempartgallery.com

I BLUE LINE GALLERY 405 Vernon St., Ste. 100 in Roseville; (916) 783-4117; http://bluelinegallery.blogspot.com

II BLUE MOON GALLERY 2353 Albatross Way,

34 LA RAZA GALERÍA POSADA 2700 Front St., (916) 446-5133, www.larazagaleriaposada.org

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III THE BRICKHOUSE ART GALLERY

Ste. 100; (916) 446-4444; www.smithgallery.com

www.voxsac.com

27 ZANZIBAR GALLERY 1731 L St.,

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Ready-Made & Photo Frames

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24 UNIVERSITY ART 2601 J St.,

BEFORE

4 - 6pm daily

NEWS

(916) 920-2444, www.bluemoongallery sacto.com

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Palo Alto

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For the week of February 6

WEEKLY PICKS

Poetry reading SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8 Poets make art with the written word, but some  poets also make visual art. Get a taste of both at  this Sable & Quill Anthology v.1 reading and art  show by contributors Frank Andrick, Bethanie  POETRY Humphreys, Jennifer O’Neill  Pickering, Ann Privateer, Sandy  Thomas, Kimberly White and others. There will also  be music by George Sheldon and Proxy Moon. Free,  6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Sacramento Poetry Center,  1719 25th Street; (916) 240-1897; www.sacramento  poetrycenter.com.

HELLA

—Shoka

HISTORY

Tet festival SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, THROUGH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9 Sacramento’s Vietnamese community celebrates  Tet, the Vietnamese lunar New Year, this weekend  with a festival featuring food, retail vendors,  resource booths and community performances.  A parade at 9 a.m. down Stockton Boulevard from  Fruitridge Road to Florin Road  FESTIVAL kicks off the celebration. 11 a.m.  to 8 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, at  7660 Stockton Boulevard, www.vacos.org.

F

ebruary is Black History  Month. As actor and Black  History Month critic  Morgan Freeman put it,  “Black history is American  history.” In other words,  it’s not just a book or a lecture  or a film. History’s a messy,  complicated, infinite and  ever-fluctuating look at the  many perspectives and realities of the world. Thankfully,  Sacramento seems to have  its pulse on some interesting topics for Black History  Month. Here are some unique  events that pay homage to the  annual government-sponsored  observance.   Sacramento State University  hosts a whole slew of Black  History Month events, highlighted by a lecture by Terry McMillan,  author of Waiting to Exhale,   on Thursday, February 6, at   7:30 p.m. In her presentation,  she’ll read past and present  works and engage the audience  in dialogue. The free event happens at the University Union  Ballroom on campus, located at  6000 J Street. For more of the  school’s planned events, visit  www.csus.edu/bsfa/  events.html.

—Jonathan Mendick

Sacramento Darwin Day SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 9

From 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on  Saturday, February 8, Instituto  Mazatlan Bellas Artes de  Sacramento hosts an educational talk and presentation called 

Afro-Mexican Dances and Culture: From La Bamba to Danza de los Diablos. It’ll include discussion led  by IMBA’s Roberto Lopez, a guest  musical group and dancers from  the IMBA troupe. A $3 donation  is suggested for admission. At  the same time the following  week, on Saturday, February 15,  IMBA will screen The Forgotten Roots, a film by Rafael Rebollar  Corona about the African roots  of Mexico, with an introduction  by Fred Dobb. IMBA is located at  1300 Stockton Boulevard. A $3  donation is suggested for admission to this event as well. Visit 

http://imbasac.com for more  information. An annual fundraiser for the  Sacramento Valley Section of  the National Council of Negro  Women Inc., the Sweet Potato Festival takes place on Saturday,  February 8, from 10 a.m. to   4 p.m. at the Samuel Pannell  Meadowview Community Center  at 2450 Meadowview Road.  Attendees can enjoy games,  sweet-potato pie, live music  and educational resources that  “promote positive and healthy  behaviors,” according to organizers. Admission is free. More  information can be found at   www.svsncnw.org. Jewish Voice for Peace and  Friends of Sabeel-Sacramento  sponsor the screening of a new 

documentary called Al Helm: Martin Luther King in Palestine.  It follows an African-American  gospel choir who travels to  perform a play about Dr. Martin  Luther King Jr. at the Palestinian  National Theatre. It happens on  Sunday, February 9, at 2:30 p.m.  at The Guild Theater, located  at 2828 35th Street. There’s no  admission fee, but donations  are requested and go to the  African Heritage Delegations to  Palestine/Israel. Lastly, the Sacramento Public Library offers dozens of programs at many of its libraries.  They include drum performances, jewelry-making displays,  storytelling, history talks and  more. To see the schedule, visit  www.saclibrary.org.

—Jonathan Mendick

Celebrate the 205th birthday of naturalist and  geologist Charles Darwin with a lecture, snacks  and a birthday cake. Lynn Rothschild, an evolutionary biologist and astrobiologist at NASA’s Ames  Research Center, will present a lecture titled  “Darwin 101 (Enhanced): From  SCIENCE Earth to Space.” $5-$10, 2:30 p.m.  at La Sierra Community Center, 5325 Engle Road in  Carmichael; www.sacdarwinday.info.

—Jonathan Mendick

Book Club at Van Kleef’s THROUGH MARCH 9 For the past nine years, a group of artists has met  at Cafe Van Kleef, an Oakland bar, every Thursday  to discuss politics, life and art. These meetings  spawned multiple exhibitions, and these  ART book-club members continue to inspire  each other and the art world. Free, Harris Center  for the Arts at Folsom Lake College, 10 College  Parkway in Folsom; www.flc.losrios.edu.

—Jessica Rine

The Land and the People THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6 The Land and the People – Contemporary Korean  Prints reveals large-scale works representing different printmaking techniques used by South Korean  ART artists. From traditional woodblock to  modern digital processes, the exhibit shows  their art progressing toward the future, while staying rooted in their customs. Free, reception is 5 p.m.  to 8 p.m. at Sacramento State University Library  Gallery, 6000 J Street; (916) 278-4189; www.csus.edu.

—Jessica Rine

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A barbecue oasis Kim Son Mongolian BBQ Vietnamese & Chinese Food 4980 Watt Avenue in North Highlands, (916) 331-8188, www.kimsonmongolianbbq.weebly.com Kim Son Mongolian BBQ Vietnamese & Chinese Food isn’t just located in a rundown area known for its low median income and high crime—its by Jonathan Mendick North Highlands neighborhood is also a food desert. Besides Waffle Shop and El Parian j o nathanm@ Taqueria, almost all of the other eateries newsreview.c om on Watt Avenue between Kim Son and the Highway 80 exit are fast-food joints. And although the food is similarly priced, all are horrible options compared to Kim Son. The restaurant serves great Mongolian barbecue, despite actually serving neither Mongolian food nor barbecue. The dish in rating: question is said to be of Taiwanese origin HHH 1/2 and invented in the 20th century, although there’s no authoritative written record of its dinner for one: history. Nevertheless, “Mongolian barbecue” $7 - $10 has become synonymous with a stir-fried noodle dish cooked on a hot, circular griddle. And that’s what you’ll get at Kim Son, in addition to a selection of Chinese food and Vietnamese pho. Here’s how Mongolian barbecue works at most places, including here: A server takes H flAWed drink orders, and diners choose between Chinese food from a menu or the buffet-style HH HAs momeNts Mongolian barbecue, where diners can grab a bowl to fill with raw ingredients. Once the dish HHH is full, it’s up to the diner to season the food AppeAliNg and then hand it over to a chef, who cooks it all HHHH and gives it back in a different bowl. AutHoritAtive It’s a bit difficult to rate Mongolian barbeHHHHH cue by regular reviewing standards, because epic it’s the diner who chooses the ingredients and seasoning. But here’s what Kim Son does well: It stocks plenty of fresh veggies (carrots, spinach, mushrooms, yellow onion, green onion and broccoli went into mine); thin slices of meat (what appears to be chicken, pork, beef and lamb—they aren’t labeled); thick, chewy, alkaline chow mein noodles; a bunch of sauces (about a dozen, including cooking wine, a ginger sauce and a teriyaki sauce); and additional toppings (sesame seeds, minced garlic, Sriracha). My dish came out piping hot, tasty and smelled like the smoky essence of the hot griddle. But it was also much too salty—an Still hungry? error in my attempt at seasoning. Chang’s search sN&r’s Mongolian Grill in Folsom posts seasoning “dining directory” suggestions, and it’d be nice if Kim Son did, to find local restaurants by name too. I ended up adding Sriracha, hot chili oil, or by type of food. and sweet-and-sour sauce (originally dipping sushi, mexican, indian, sauce for complimentary egg rolls) to balance italian—discover it the saltiness with acid and sweetness. all in the “dining” On a different day, I grabbed a bunch of section at www.news Chinese dishes for takeout: garlic shrimp, review.com. spicy tofu (one of the few vegetarian options), chicken wings and Kim Son Spicy Beef. It’s, unfortunately, the only flavorful, non-Americanized Chinese offering. The beef dish is seasoned with sha cha jiang, a sauce popular in Fujian, Teochew and Taiwanese cooking that is usually composed of minced BEFORE

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garlic, chili, shrimp and a few other seasonings. In some Asian cuisine, it’s rubbed onto barbecue and called satay, but here, it’s just the best dish from an otherwise lackluster menu of Chinese food.

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Kim Son Mongolian BBQ Vietnamese & Chinese Food serves great Mongolian barbecue, despite actually serving neither Mongolian food nor barbecue.

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But even if the Chinese offerings here aren’t my favorite, the Mongolian barbecue is superb and highly recommended. The process challenges every diner to become the chef for one meal, figure out the most umami flavor combination and season the dish properly. A few other positives: Despite being located in an old building in North Highlands, Kim Son is nicely renovated. Above the griddle is a large vent hood that keeps the diners from smelling like food, a common problem in other open-grill restaurants, but not here. And unlike some other Mongolian barbecue places, there’s no charge for takeout if you don’t finish your dish—which is highly probable, because the bowls are huge. In other words, it’s the perfect healthy, cheap and tasty alternative to fast food in North Highlands. Ω

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5644 J Street

Phone orders welcome!: 916. 451.4000

09 Sun-Wed 10:30am - 9:00pm, Thurs - Sat 10:30am -9:30pm

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www.EatAtOpa.com

upComing eventS: Valentines Day Pre-Fixe 3-course $ 55 Dinner For two. look forward to our coming Beer week events:

Advanced-level spiciness

Fri 2/28: sat 3/1: sun 3/2: Mon 3/4: tue 3/4: weD 3/5: thu 3/6: Fri 3/7: sat 3/8: sun 3/9:

One little peanut, coated, fried and spiced, just might kick your ass. This is Mirch Masala’s peanut bhujia, an Indian snack food. At first, it’s jarringly sour, then, immediately, the sensation is followed with a bold, scathingly spicy heat that lingers. It’s like licking the wall next to the stove at an Indian restaurant, but not in an unpleasant way, actually. The unique sourness comes from asafetida powder, which is made from the roots of fennel-like plants, and is purported to aid in solving colon and digestion problems. For those who aren’t ready for Mirch’s advanced-level spiciness, Halidram’s Nut Crackers are colorfully flavored, but miles more mellow. Suggestion: Mix both up in a bowl, you hungry hippo. India Bazar at 404 E. Bidwell Street in Folsom has both bags of peanuts, plus dozens of other adventures in vegan snacking.

STORY

Drakes Beer Release Dust Bowl Beer Dinner Band of Gypsies Beer Collaboration Track 7 Feature Night Ninkasi / Soil Born Farms Pint Night Fundraiser Tap It Brewery and Paired Tapas Speakeasy Small Plates Rocky Mountain Region Pint Night Device Brewing Release Party Spring Cleaning Sunday – blowout on all our beer week beers Guest local brewer is doing a hands on brewing session

1217 21st Street Sacramento, CA www.kuprosbistro.com

916.440.0401

—Shoka |

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Downtown Darna This Palestinian restaurant 

Where to eat?

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Becky Grunewald, Ann Martin Rolke, Garrett McCord and Jonathan Mendick, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

serves an excellent baba  ghanoush that, instead of being  blended into a smooth paste, is  served chunky and studded with  eggplant seeds. Its smoky, deep  flavor is balanced out by a lemony brightness, and it’s good on  the somewhat flabby pita bread  with which it’s served, but it’s  even better on the house-made  za’atar bread. Chicken-breast  kebabs are not particularly  flavorful but have some char  from the grill, while the falafel  and chicken shawarma are  underwhelming. Do order a side  of tabbouleh salad, however. It’s  pretty to look at—bright-green  chopped parsley studded with  white grains of bulgur—and  tastes refreshing. Palestinian.  925 K St., (916) 447-7500. Dinner  for one: $15-$25. HHH B.G.

Downtown & Vine This tasting room  and wine bar spotlights the  local farm-to-glass movement.  Here, diners can order 2-ounce  tasting flights of wine. Choose  three from the same vintner  to compare styles, or mix and  match to contrast similar wines  from regional wineries. Wines  are also available in larger  pours and by the bottle. Wine is  meant to be enjoyed with food,  of course: The menu offers a  wide selection of tidbits and  hearty dishes. Worth sampling:  the goat-cheese stuffed peppers, chilled Spanish-spiced  shrimp, and a cheddar-andapple melt. Or try the ambrosial  Wine Country sandwich, with  salty prosciutto, sweet fig jam,  oozy mozzarella and peppery 

arugula on grilled bread. There  are also a variety of flatbreads  loaded with topping combos like  capicola, three cheeses, piquillo  peppers and green onions. The  bread for these comes across  as more than a pizza trying to  be fancy. American. 1200 K St.,  Ste. 8; (916) 228-4518. Dinner for  one: $10-$15. HHHH AMR

damn it if they aren’t delightful. Soft cream cheese and  chives in a crispy wrapper and  served with a sweet chili sauce?  Nothing wrong with that. The  chicken larb—a spicy mincedmeat salad—is fragrant and  intense. Mint, chilies, basil and  iceberg lettuce are drenched in  a spicy lime dressing punctuated with a heavy hand of fish  sauce. The Coconut has warnings in its menu about which  dishes are spicy, but unless  you’re a newborn kitten, trembling and mewling, you might not  even be aware of the chilies in  your food. Thai. 2502 J St.,   (916) 447-1855. Dinner for one:  $10-$15. HHH1/2 G.M.

Zia’s Delicatessen Zia’s Delicatessen isn’t really about trying  every sandwich: It’s about finding your sandwich. In addition  to a large selection of salumi,  there’s the worthy eponymous  offering, served with a wedge of  zucchini frittata, a slice of provolone, romaine lettuce, grainy  tomato, and a simple dash of  vinegar and oil that adds tang.  Order it hot, so that the provolone melts into the bread. Also  tasty: the hot meatball sub with  small-grained, tender meatballs  bathed in a thin, oregano-flecked tomato sauce that soaks  into the bread. A tuna sandwich  is sturdy, if not exciting. A  rosemary panino cotto with  mozzarella could benefit from  a more flavorful cheese. For a  meatier option, try the Milano:  mortadella, salami, Muenster;  all three flavors in balance.  American. 1401 O St., Ste. A;   (916) 441-3354. Meal for one:  $5-$10. HHHH B.G.

Hook & Ladder Manufacturing Co. The restaurant, by the  same owners as Midtown’s  The Golden Bear, sports a  firefighting theme (a ladder  on the ceiling duct work, shiny  silver wallpaper with a ratand-hydrant motif) and a bar  setup that encourages patrons  to talk to each other. An  interesting wine list includes  entries from Spain and Israel;  there are also draft cocktails  and numerous beers on tap.  The brunch menu is heavy on  the eggs, prepared in lots of  ways. One option is the Croque  Madame, a ham-and-Gruyere  sandwich usually battered  with egg. This one had a fried  egg and béchamel, with a  generous smear of mustard  inside. The mountain of potato  hash alongside tasted flavorful and not too greasy. The  menu also features pizzas  and house-made pastas, but  one of its highlights includes 

Midtown The Coconut Midtown The food  here travels a path between  standard and inventive. Creamcheese wontons, for example,  aren’t the epitome of culinary  Southeast Asian traditions, but 

an excellent smoked-eggplant  baba ghanoush, which is smoky  and garlicky. The bananas  foster bread pudding is equally  transcendent. American. 1630 S St., (916) 442-4885.  Dinner for one: $20-$40.  HHH1/2 AMR 

Tako Korean BBQ The food here is  a fusion of Mexican culinary  practice and Korean ingredients. Tacos filled with galbi,  a Korean-style marinated  short rib, are sweet and salty.  They’re served with shredded  slaw and an indigo blueberryyogurt sauce that, at first,  seems out  of place, but  ultimately  provides a  light fruitiness  that compliments the  galbi. Bulgogi sliders, Koreanmarinated steak stuffed into  light bread, are the true hit  of the menu. Served with  cabbage, cheese and a tangy  house sauce, the only complaint is that the cheese isn’t  melted—such a touch would  give the dish a bit more oomph.  Korean-Mexican. 3030 T St.,  (916) 346-4933. Less than $10.  HHH G.M. 

Thai Basil SN&R readers consistently vote this place among  the city’s top Thai restaurants  for this paper’s annual Best  of Sacramento issue. And for  good reason. The restaurant’s  tom yum soup may be one of  the best foods served in the  City of Trees. It features an  incredibly savory broth with  layers of flavor. Likewise, the 

tom kha gai—a coconut-broth  soup—is a veritable panacea  against Delta winds and the  morose rains that follow  them. Salads make up a large  part of Thai cuisine and should  not be overlooked. Larb gai  consists of simple shredded  chicken over mixed greens,  cucumber and tomatoes.  Fresh mint and a chili-laden  dressing heavy with fish sauce  and vigorous squeezes of lime  juice pull it all together for an  addictive and satisfying lunch.  One of Thai Basil’s true highlights is its homemade curry  pastes. These carefully balanced constructions of basil,  lemongrass, shallots, chilies,  kaffir lime leaves and other  ingredients come together to  form truly authentic pastes  that, when roasted, have  been known to drive hungry  Sacramentans into a berserk  craze. Service here is impeccable. Thai Basil has earned  its reputation and will likely  continue to keep it for years  to come. Thai. 2431 J St.,   (916) 442-7690. Dinner for one:  $10-$20. HHHH G.M.

East Sac Cielito Lindo Mexican Gastronomy  Instead of cheese-blanketed  entrees, diners here can order  upscale dishes such as enchiladas de mole: tortillas wrapped  around amazingly moist, flavorful chicken, bathed in a housemade mole poblano. The sauce  has a million wonderful flavors.  The portions here are quite generous. A green salad with fruits  and nuts was big enough for a 

meal, even without the optional  meat or seafood topping. The  restaurant’s empanaditas de  salpicon con papas are little  turnovers standing up amid  a drizzle of ancho sauce. The  crust features a bit of leavening  that makes it both crunchy and  fluffy. The filling of beef, potatoes and vegetables tastes wellflavored and a bit spicy. Or try  the tacos de arrachera—three  soft tortillas enclose marinated  strips of meltingly good steak,  topped with roasted poblano  chilies, lots of fresh cilantro  and crema. They’re drippy, but  worth every napkin. The menu is  meatcentric, but the kitchen is  vegetarian friendly as well. The  crema de rajas poblanas, fully  vegan and similar to a Mexican  minestrone, is full of chickpeas,  poblanos and onions in a rich  broth uniquely flavored with  vanilla and epazote. A bowlful  would be a great meal on a   chilly day. Mexican. 3672 J St.,   (916) 736-2506. Dinner for one:   $20-$25. HHHH AMR

Istanbul Bistro Turkish cuisine  features aspects of Greek,  Moroccan and Middle Eastern  flavors, and the appetizer  combo plate offers an impressive sampling. Acili ezme is a  chopped, slightly spicy mixture  of tomatoes, cucumber and  walnuts that’s delicious paired  with accompanying flatbread  wedges. For entrees, try the  borani, a lamb stew with garbanzos, carrots, potatoes and  currants. The meat is very tender, while the veggies arrived  nicely al dente. Also good is the  chicken shish plate (souvlaki),  which features two skewers of 

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South Sac Yang’s Noodles This is perhaps the only place in town that serves niu rou jian bing (sliced beef rolls)—a specialty of northern China—and the ones at Yang’s hit the spot. This is basically the Chinese version of a burrito: meat (thinly sliced beef marinated in soy sauce) plus veggies (diced green onion, cucumber and cilantro) wrapped in a large, flat and circular carbohydrate crepe (a thin Chinese pancake made out of flour, water and green onion). Elsewhere on the menu, Yang’s eponymous noodles, featured in various dishes, are homemade, alkaline and chewy. Chinese. 5860 Stockton Blvd., (916) 392-9988. Dinner for one: $10-$15. HHHH J.M.

York style, the pizzas are tasty but quite filling. Choose from house-made sauces and fresh toppings, or pick from one of the inventively named presets. The Old Lady is especially good, with pesto, potatoes, spinach, lots of veggies and a zingy balsamic drizzle. The biggest secret here, though, is the barbecue. Wicked West delivers with shredded, tender meat that’s lightly smoky and tossed with a vinegar-based sauce. The pork ribs are dryrubbed and toothsome, while the tri-tip is well cooked but leans toward a dry texture. Pizza/Barbecue. 3160 Jefferson Blvd. in West Sacramento, (916) 572-0572. Dinner for one: $5-$10. HHH AMR

a tortilla—which, surprisingly, isn’t even the fattiest-sounding dish on the menu. That distinction most likely belongs to the hangover-curing Super Breakfast burrito, with bacon, chorizo, ham, fries, eggs and cheese—all wrapped in a tortilla. Mexican. 5116 Fair Oaks Blvd. in Carmichael, (916) 488-1416. Dinner for one: $5-$10. HHH1/2 J.M.

FreshMed Mediterranean Cuisine

Arden/ Carmichael El Forastero Mexican Food The

This restaurant broadens the definition of “Mediterranean.” In addition to the usual options— gyros, hummus, falafel, etc.—it also serves dishes from a wide range of cultures. For example, FreshMed offers a $6 Indian and Pakistani lunch buffet. Selections include stir-fried eggplant; curried chickpeas, lentils; and a creamy, spicy and hearty chicken tikka masala. Regular menu items include baba ghanoush, which tasted a bit bitter, and chicken kebab. The Mediterranean Nacho and chicken panini are examples of what the restaurant does well: culinary mashups that aren’t derivative, but instead rely heavily on flavor and innovation. The paninis are standouts: The bread is sweet, thicker than one might expect, and pressed nicely on a grill, with char marks on both sides. Mediterranean. 1120 Fulton Ave., Ste. I; (916) 486-1140. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH1/2 J.M.

menu here resembles the type of Mexican food found in Southern California: a blend of American fast food, Tex-Mex and traditional Mexican dishes. There’s menudo on weekends, but also french fries hiding inside burritos and buried underneath steaming piles of carne asada. For a taco or torta filling, try the adobada, a pork marinated in a red chili sauce. Or, try two of the most famous San DiegoWicked West Pizza & BBQ This popustyle Mexican dishes, both lar destination for kids’ sports delicious but full of calories: the teams and birthday parties also California burrito and carne caters to adult diners with good asada fries. The latter consists food and healthy options, such Stirling Bridges Restaurant and of a plate of fries topped with as organic whole-wheat crusts. Pub This British- and Scottishcarne asada, cheese, sour cream Gluten-free and vegan choices themed gastropub offers an and guacamole. A California are also available. With a texture adequate beer selection and burrito is basically an order of Ten22_SNR-QtrPg_1-27-14.pdf 1 1/28/14 2:01 PM closer to Chicago style than New an extensive menu that goes carne asada fries wrapped in

West Sacramento

IllustratIon by Mark stIvers

marinated grilled chicken that’s moist and succulent. There are also quite a few choices for vegetarians, including flatbread topped like pizza, with spinach and feta or mozzarella and egg. Turkish. 3260-B J St., (916) 449-8810. Dinner for one: $15-$20. HHH1/2 AMR

beyond standard deep-fried pub fare. Try the Irish onion soup, a French onion-styled soup kicked up with Irish whiskey and Guinness beer. Or order the house-made veggie burger—it’s one of the tastiest black-bean patties around. The most unusual dish on the menu is the Scottish Mafia Pizza. Topped with turkey pastrami, potatoes, cabbage and Swiss cheese, it falls short with its too many flat flavors to actually benefit from their unusual pairing. Pub. 5220 Manzanita Ave. in Carmichael, (916) 331-2337. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH1/2 J.M.

Auburn Carpe Vino This quaint wine shop

Fresh take on a food show

and restaurant boasts excellent service and food. Try the musque de Provence pumpkin soup—it’s lighter than your wallet will be when you leave, but one bite and wallet be damned. The flavor is exquisite with whispers of vanilla and pops of pumpkin seed. A ciderbrined pork chop, bejeweled in bacon and prune and sitting atop a bed of savoy cabbage, defies expectations. A quartet of lamb meatballs corseted in harissa, mint sauce and yogurt is surely the dish to convert anyone who (confusedly) refuses lamb. The restaurant— being primarily a wine bar— does not serve anyone under the age of 21. American. 1568 Lincoln Way in Auburn, (530) 823-0320. Dinner for one: $50-$75. HHHHH G.M.

I’m a big fan of food television, and Iron Chef, Top Chef and Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations are some favorites. But those shows get repetitive after a while. So recently, I started watching Fresh Off the Boat with New York-based chef and restauranteur Eddie Huang, and it’s like Bourdain’s show, but even crazier. In Vice’s typically high-shock-value style, Huang goes rabbit hunting in Oakland, tries to get high on betel nuts in Taiwan, and takes a porn star out to dinner in Miami. But that stuff’s not what’s good about the show. Now in its second season, FOB excels because the 31-year-old host relates to young people, talks about food intelligently (although largely in a hip-hop-inflected lexicon), and gets himself into unusual and sometimes humorous situations. A few of his best journalistic moments in past episodes include exploring the Middle Eastern food scene in Dearborn, Michigan, and the Kyrgyz cuisine of Moscow. Check it out at www.vice.com/fresh-off-the-boat. —Jonathan Mendick

Midtown

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Bird the “Surfin’

photo courtesy of crocker art museum

Give ‘em the

Bird”

in Midtown!

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a sweet resolution

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Quizup The latest crack for app addicts is QuizUp, which launched in November 2013 and is essentially a APP mobile version of Trivial Pursuit. You can play against strangers or Facebook friends, and the hundreds of categories vary from textbook (science, literature) to pop-culture hell (Taylor Swift, the Boston Red Sox). I dig the app because when my girlfriend and I eat dinner, we can stare at our phones like a normal couple, play the game and still have something in common. QuizUp is the new Dr. Phil. www.quizup.com.

now vegan ! friendly

6821 Stockton Blvd #110 Follow Vampire Penguin’s story at Facebook.com/VampirePenguin916

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Hardly cheesy LittLe FAiLure: A MeMoir

h a n d c r a f t e d

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Our handmade pastries & bread are baked fresh daily!

Estelle’s Patisserie is a charming, warmly lit French-style bakery and espresso bar in the heart of Sacramento, dedicated to quality and our community. Using fresh, local ingredients to make our pastries and desserts from scratch every day, Estelle’s also offers breakfast and lunch items.

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#estellespatisserie Contact us at 551-5100 or via email at info@estellespatisserie.com 28

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The author of the hilarious, honest and heartbreaking Super Sad True Love Story tells the story of his life in Little Failure: A Memoir ($27, Random House), which is no less hilarious, honest and heartbreaking. Gary Shteyngart was named Igor and born in Leningrad, Russia, where he wrote a novel called Lenin and His Magical Goose for which he was paid in cheese. That fact may or may not explain everything that he’s written since. He details his family’s emigration to the United States as part of the deal that President Jimmy Carter struck with BOOK Soviet General Secretary Leonid Brezhnev to allow Russian Jews to leave, and how he was so unwilling to fulfill his parents’ dreams that his mother coined a new term for him: Failurchka, the “little failure” of the title. One part Yakov Smirnoff and one part Philip Roth, Shteyngart is anything but. —Kel Munger

The artist’s way Art reveALed Show If you’re always too busy for Second Saturday but really enjoy art, then there’s a relatively new video series to check out. SacWEB SERIES ramento artist Gayle Rappaport-Weiland launched Art Revealed Show in July 2013. Each month, a new clip features interviews with local artists and heads of art organizations. Each video is only a few minutes long, which makes it incredibly easy to keep up with the art scene without even looking away from your smartphone. www.artrevealedshow.com. —Jonathan Mendick

Awkward dancing nostalgia Art Mix proM

Ah, prom night. I don’t know about you, but mine was full of awkward dancing. It could have been fun. Fancy clothes and glitter and music usually make for CULTURE a pretty good party. But it wasn’t. Because high school was embarrassing. Time for redemption: Art Mix Prom at the Crocker Art Museum. It seems it’s never too late to ask a special someone to go to some event in some elaborate, mortifying way. For the uninitiated, Art Mix takes over the Crocker monthly with a fresh, themed social gathering for the creatively minded. It’s tough to deny any party surrounded by epic pieces of modern art, but prom night takes the program to an unprecedented level of nostalgia and silliness. Expect crafting stations to make boutonnieres and corsages; a candy bar, courtesy of Andy’s Apothecary; makeup stations with local stylists; and 10-minute, gown-related Art Talks. Plus, a photobooth, live band and deejay. And booze—appropriately, spiked punch—because we aren’t 17. Happy hour lasts all night with drink specials less than $5 and accompanying bites. If you somehow still fit into your high-school prom attire, you just might get crowned king or queen of your decade—’70s, ’80s or ’90s. Of course, there’s always Thrift Town to get you outfitted. In the meantime, work on perfecting the signature prom-dance move: slow swaying, arms-length apart. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday, February 13; free for members, $10 nonmembers, $2 discount for college students; Crocker Art Museum, 216 O Street; (916) 808-1182; www.crockerartmuseum.org. —Janelle Bitker


d r i

Carve out time in your personal schedule to be alone and really consider what you desire. Ask yourself if the relationship brings out the best in you. convinced you had to get him back. Then one day, you discovered a new experience: boredom. You were bored with feeling blue. You let go of being a victim by accepting that most relationships change, often in ways we don’t expect. Yes, this means that although we never want to inflict pain on purpose, suffering can lead us to mature in ways we have been avoiding. Bachelor No. 2 arrives. His attention and affection are signs that you should fall for him. Or, at least, that’s what you tell yourself in order to smack down doubts. But when doubts arise in a situation like yours, don’t overpower those concerns. Slow down. Carve out time in your personal schedule to be alone and really consider what you desire. Ask yourself if the relationship brings out the best in you. Shake out the usual

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

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The post-breakup smackdown Two guys are in love with me, and I don’t know how to deal with it. One is my exboyfriend. I love him, always have and always will. He broke up with me, and it took a long time to get over it. The other guy and I have been dating for four months. He is a really good person, and if I wasn’t in love with my ex-boyfriend, I know I could love him, but my heart just won’t go there. I need to tell the guy that I am by JOEY GA seeing that I don’t love him, RCIA but I don’t want to hurt his feelings. a s kj o ey @ ne wsreview.c om When Bachelor No. 1 broke up with you, did it hurt your feelings? I bet it did. I bet you cried, stalked him on Joey Instagram, watched The Notebook loved her deep-tissue too many times and wasted countless massage at Mellow Me daylight hours sleeping. Or maybe Out Day Spa. you couldn’t sleep and lay awake obsessing over what went wrong and how to fix it. I bet you ate too much or not enough. Like most people after a bad breakup, you probably swung between the extremes, bouncing between anger and deep sadness,

n

relationship fears that arise from insecurity. Dig deep to determine the message your mind and heart are sending you. You didn’t share an important part of your story: Why your ex-boyfriend broke up with you. And, while it doesn’t sound like you were on a rebound with the new guy, your ex might be on that cycle. Consider it this way: You’re with someone new who is into you, and now your ex wants you back. My final two words: Go slow. My parents died leaving a substantial inheritance for my siblings and me. My brother invested his share, my younger sister used hers to pay off her college loans and purchase a home. I paid off my home and bought rental property. My oldest sister, a writer, lived fancy, and all of her money was gone within a year. Now she is asking each one of us to help her out financially. She never went to college, never saved money, never got a decent job and has supported a succession of unemployed boyfriends. None of us want to give her money. Isn’t it better for her to learn the hard way that she has to take care of herself? Your sister can’t take care of herself until she learns how to handle finances. It’s a humbling lesson to sit and shift through bills and income to get a realistic picture of the bottom line. If you or a sibling is unwilling to educate her, another handout is not the solution. Offer to pay tuition so she can take a personal-finance class at a community college or online. A healthy relationship with money can empower her toward smarter choices in every area of her life, including love. Ω

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Meditation of the Week “Whenever anger comes, take out a mirror and look at yourself. When you are angry, you are not very beautiful,” says Thich Nhat Hanh, a Mahayana Buddhist monk and author. Just thinking of this simple truth makes me laugh. How do you tame your temper?

F E AT U R E

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1900 4th St • 916.443.8488 • 1100 O ST • 916.498.1744 STORY

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Heart and soles

NOW PLAYING

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Closer Than Ever

Sacramento Ballet offers Valentine’s performances How about some Wild Sweet Love for your valentine? Maybe a sexy visit to Wunderland? Or something completely new and exciting that neither by Jim Carnes of you have experienced before? That’s what the Sacramento Ballet has in store from Thrusday, February 13, through Sunday, February 16, at the Community Center Theater, with its triple bill of variations on the theme of love. Choreographer Trey McIntyre (inspired by then-Sacramento Ballet company member Ilana Goldman) created Wild Sweet Love for the company. It premiered in March 2007 and has been repeated only once until now. The dance depicts the odyssey of one woman through the experience of love: from loneliness, to longing, to puppy love, to the final, full experience. Set to contemporary music from the likes of Lou Reed and Roberta Flack, the dance exploits both the athleticism and artistry of the company.

An engaging and talented quartet of singers (Nicholas Adorno, Kristen Heitman, Jerry Lee and Andrea St. Clair) perform this “bookless” musical— all singing, no dialogue—by Richard Maltby Jr. and David Shire. At its best, it’s a collection of musical short stories, character studies and memory pieces. Even at its weakest, it’s entertaining and perfectly enjoyable. Robert Marra directs, and pianist Samuel Clein and bassist Rod Verette provide impeccable musical support.

As a bonus, at 7 p.m. on Saturday, February 8, the ballet will present Red Hot Valentine!, featuring excerpts from Wild Sweet Love, in an in-studio event at the Ballet’s rehearsal space at 1631 K Street. Wine, cheese and dessert will be served. Tickets are $25. Ω

W 12:30 & 6:30pm, Th 6:30pm, F 8pm, Sa 2 & 8pm, Su 2 & 7pm. Through 2/16. $12-$35. Pollock Stage at

Around the World in 80 Days Next week, the B Street Theatre revives the most popular production in the company’s history: an action-packed, five-actor adaptation of Jules Verne’s Around the World in 80 Days. There will be five performances, then the show departs for a two-week tour of India. The play is a cavalcade of costumes, sound cues (howling storms, raging elephants) and rapid entrances and exits, as the formal, chivalrous Phileas Fogg attempts to circle the globe in record time, on a gentlemanly wager. It’s not your typical B Street fare. Usually, B Street favors new scripts tinged with a smidge of moral ambiguity and innuendo; but 80 Days is a decidedly 19th-century fairy tale. Fogg’s heroic determination to uphold honor and duty (and the broad slapstick comedy that results) are more akin to B Street’s Family Series shows than to the sexier, financially vulnerable, stressed-out moderns found in most B Street Mainstage shows. The original cast of B Street’s 2004 production returns: Michael Stevenson, Amy Resnick, Greg Alexander, Elisabeth Nunziato and David Pierini—all 10 years older and wiser (80 Days was also revived in 2008). The previews (February 11, 12 and 13, at 7 p.m.) cost $40 to attend. A Valentine’s Day performance at 7 p.m. and the February 15 “bon voyage” performance at 8 p.m. both cost $80 and include a cast reception, catered treats, champagne, chocolates and a presentation by producing artistic director Buck Busfield, who’ll likely mention the company’s long-planned new Midtown venue; the groundbreaking could be this fall. Call (916) 443-5300 or visit www.bstreettheatre.org for more information.

Theatre, 2711 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. P.R.

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5

This B Street Theatre Family Series play about slavery is geared toward kids, but doesn’t ignore the reality that black children were sold and parted from their parents, or the considerable risks that abolitionists faced when helping escaped slaves find their way north. Lanky actress Atim Udoffia shines as Tubman: cool under pressure, determined to bring her “passengers” to freedom. Sa, Su 1 & 4pm. Through 2/23. $15-$20. B Street Theatre, 2711 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. J.H.

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Elemeno Pea

In playwright Molly Smith Metzler’s Elemeno Pea, the help is busy keeping an

1 FOUL

2 FAIR

3 GOOD

Th, F 8pm; Sa 5 & 9pm; Su 2pm. Through 2/23. $23-$25. B Street

Wells Fargo Pavilion, 1419 H St.; (916) 443-6722; www.sac theatre.org. J.C.

The Conductor: Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad

PHOTO BY KEITH SUTTER

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The Real Thing

WELL-DONE

Capital Stage’s production of Tom Stoppard’s The Real Thing is a perfect pairing of an engaging play with top-notch performances. The talented cast members, who seamlessly work together as a cohesive and tight unit, include newcomers to the company: John Pasha and Jamie Kale, along with returnees Megan Pearl Smith and Michael Wiles. Director Janis Stevens not only keeps the action flowing, she keeps the timing on mark, a challenge in a play full of fast-paced repartees and subtle interactions. W 7pm; Th, F, Sa, 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 2/23. $22-$45. Capital Stage, 2215 J St.; (916) 995-5464; www.capstage.org. P.R.

5 SUBLIME–DON’T MISS

Short reviews by Jim Carnes, Jeff Hudson and Patti Roberts.

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE MONDAVI CENTER

Wunderland, an erotic examination of a couple’s inability to connect, was choreographed by Edwaard Liang. Liang was born in Taiwan but raised in Marin County and became artistic director of BalletMet Columbus in Ohio in July 2013. The piece is among the company dancers’ favorites. Also, Ma Cong, one of today’s hottest dance makers, recently spent two weeks with the local dancers creating a yet-to-be-titled new work that will have its world premiere here. It’s a precise and physical piece that emphasizes openness to life, energy and spirit. Performances of the Valentine’s weekend program will be at 7:30 p.m. on February 13-15, and 2 p.m. on February 16, at the Community Center Theater, located at 1301 L Street. Tickets are $19-$70. For more information, call (916) 552-5800, or visit www.sacballet.org.

This dance move’s called “falling in love.”

expansive Martha’s Vineyard family compound neat, tidy and ready for whoever or whatever may drop on by. The grounds and buildings are so sprawling that when the sister of the family’s personal assistant comes to visit, she gets to stay in the family’s huge beachside guest house that she mistakes for the family’s main mansion. It’s not exactly an East Coast-modern Downton Abbey, but Elemeno Pea does explore the discrepancies of family fortunes vs. working for a living, new money vs. old, and the attitudes and expectations that come with both. Tu 6:30pm; W 2 & 6:30pm;

These lifelong friends barely stop talking to each other—even in New York City traffic.

Good conversation It’s Johannesburg, South Africa, 1974. A teacher asks a class of 12-year-olds to turn to the person next to them and tell them a story. Paul Browde and Murray Nossel turn to each other. These days, they barely stop talking to each other. Two Men Talking is a live, unscripted storytelling performance, where Nossel and Browde weave together their life stories to create a tale of two men with similar backgrounds and separate paths. They met as youngsters, and they come together later in life to create a friendship based on their experiences as children and as adults. Browde and Nossel take the audience along with them, allowing them to experience their lives as they are relived through words. They talk about personal identity and acceptance. They share their pain, suffering and the good times in hopes that audiences are inspired to tell their own stories and accept their own lives. Two Men Talking, Wednesday, February 5, through Saturday, February 8, at 8 p.m.; $10-$30; at the Mondavi Center, 9399 Old Davis Road in Davis; (866) 754-2787; www.narativ.com.

—Jeff Hudson

—Jessica Rine

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GGOLDEN GLOBE AWARD CRITICS’ CHOICE AWARDS ®

NOMINEE

NOMINEE

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

©HFPA

“ONE OF THE BEST PICTURES OF THE YEAR!” Owen Gleiberman, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY Stephen Holden, THE NEW YORK TIMES

Doomed to repeat

Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES Kevin Lally, FILM JOURNAL

T H E PA S T A FILM BY ASGHAR FARHADI

BY THE DIRECTOR OF “A SEPARATION”

STARTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7

The Past

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WED-TUES: 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:25PM

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Although The Past is set in France instead of his native Iran, writer-director Asghar Farhadi’s follow-up to his highly acclaimed 2011 film A Separation by Daniel Barnes deals with many of the same themes, most notably the seismic ripple effects of a dissolved marriage. The Past also employs the same elegantly mystical editing as A Separation, where key moments are strategically left offscreen, only for the audience to be stunned and unsettled by their aftermath.

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Rated R. Theatre is overbooked to ensure a full house. Passes received through this promotion do not guarantee admission and must be surrendered upon demand. Seating is on a first come, first served basis EXCEPT FOR MEMBERS OF THE REVIEWING PRESS. No one will be admitted without a ticket or after the screening begins. All federal, state and local regulations apply. A recipient of tickets assumes any and all risks related to use of ticket and accepts any restrictions required by ticket provider. Sony Pictures Entertainment, Screen Gems, Sacramento News & Review, Allied-THA, Gofobo.com and their affiliates accept no responsibility or liability in connection with any loss or accident incurred in connection with use of a prize. Tickets cannot be exchanged, transferred or redeemed for cash, in whole or in part. We are not responsible if, for any reason, winner is unable to use his/her ticket in whole or in part. Not responsible for lost, delayed or misdirected entries. All federal and local taxes are the responsibility of the winner. Void where prohibited by law. No purchase necessary. Participating sponsors their employees and family members and their agencies are not eligible. NO PHONE CALLS!

IN THEATERS VALENTINE’S DAY!

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1 POOR

2 FAIR

3 GOOD

4 VERY GOOD

5 EXCELLENT

However, The Past is an even slower starter and maintains a lower flame than A Separation, and at times, the film is so unfocused on narrative immediacy that it evolves into an existential mystery before the viewer can even comprehend it. Therefore, the impact of The Past may not be immediate as with its predecessor, but it could prove to have the longer emotional reach. As the film opens, the sweet but taciturn Ahmad (played by the wonderful Ali Mosaffa, aching with emotional reserve) is returning to France for the first time in years. He is picked up at the airport by—and goes to stay with—his estranged wife Marie (a brilliant Bérénice Bejo, flat-out robbed of an Oscar nomination), and true to Farhadi’s style, the epic awkwardness of this living situation is slyly revealed through the interaction of the characters. It turns out that Marie is already involved with another man with a small child of his own, and Ahmad’s unexpected presence in the house is more disruptive than he originally thought. Ahmad has come back to France to officially divorce Marie, who he abandoned years before, along with her two children. He has striking similarities to the husband character in A Separation, especially his romantic passivity and an unwillingness to choose expatriate domestic life over the cultural familiarity of his homeland. However, Ahmad is mournful and compassionate instead of blustery and combative, proving such a wise and sympathetic father figure to his ex-stepchildren that we begin to wonder what drove him away in the first place. Eventually, it becomes apparent that Ahmad’s reserve masks years of regret for abandoning Marie and her kids, and for his own emotional inertia. At one

point, he even attempts to dismiss himself from the action by saying, “I’m nobody in this story.” There is something chaining each one of these characters to a past they can never reclaim, even as they appeal to bureaucratic systems to fill their emptiness and define their existences. Marie signs a legal document to prove that her marriage to Ahmad has ended, but she still can’t let him go, and we see that her new relationship with another Iranian man named Samir (Tahar Rahim from A Prophet) is just an attempt to reclaim an extinct past. Samir initially seems like a minor character in The Past, but he has the most troubling and tangible connection to a lingering past of anyone in the film, and gradually drifts to the center of the story. We learn that Samir is still married to a woman in a coma, and that her suicide attempt may have been the result—either directly or indirectly—of his extramarital affair with Marie. For all of the sophistication in Farhadi’s cinematic style, his script is a little less nuanced, the dialogue too often bonking characters on the nose with key themes like CliffsNotes. It is much more thrilling to discover the hushed intricacies of The Past through subtle shifts in relationships and via Farhadi’s observational style—for example, an attempt by Ahmad to give his stepchildren a present becomes a power struggle of parental styles.

There is something chaining each one of these characters to a past they can never reclaim, even as they appeal to bureaucratic systems to fill their emptiness and define their existences. The Past slowly develops into a moral whodunit—Samir’s wife’s suicide attempt is never shown on-screen, but the characters obsessively circle around the event, trying to divine their varying levels of moral culpability. A little more (and less) is understood about the suicide as everyone reveals their role in it, and blame is subtly shifted, and guilt gets reassigned with each new version. It all leads to a heartbreaking final scene in which a clean break from the past is offered and rejected. Ω


by DANIEL BARNES & JIM LANE

5

get your tax refund now!

12 Years a Slave

Director Steve McQueen and writer John Ridley tell the true story of Solomon Northrup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a free man of color in 1841 New York who was kidnapped into slavery, finally freed in 1853, and wrote a book about his years of bondage. Ridley and McQueen take only minor dramatic license with Northrup’s extraordinary narrative—such abductions were all too common in pre-Civil War America; what’s extraordinary is that Northrup got free again— and the movie is searing and indelible. Even the most despicable characters are given their full dimension with no trace of 21st-century hindsight. The movie’s centerpiece is Ejiofor’s remarkable performance, giving it a core of unquenchable humanity. Newcomer Lupita Nyong’o shines as a tormented slave woman, as does Alfre Woodard in a striking cameo. J.L.

4

• • • •

American Hustle

4

August: Osage County

1

Gimme Shelter

2

The mopey romantic that Joaquin Phoenix plays in Her is the direct opposite of his Freddie Quell from The Master, yet this is no less of a tour-de-force performance. Spike Jonze’s graceful Her offers up a near-future metropolis where humans have fully integrated with their personal technology, living lives seemingly ruled by creature comforts, yet still mired in human fears and frailties. In an attempt to fill the void from a recent separation, Phoenix’s Theodore Twombly purchases a brand-new OS1, the world’s first artificially intelligent operating system. Voiced by Scarlett Johansson, OS1 promptly sets about organizing Theodore’s life, but his disorganization is largely emotional, and she evolves to meet his needs so efficiently that they begin to fall in love. Ultimately, Her develops into a kinky and affecting meditation on love’s limitless potential, and the human limitations which keep that potential out of reach. D.B.

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NEWS

I, Frankenstein

Labor Day

While often enslaved to their less shallow influences, the films of Jason Reitman (Juno, Up in the Air, etc.) have at least displayed a certain ambition up to this point. That may be why his mundane Labor Day was snuck into theaters after a fruitless Oscar campaign—it feels more like the first Sundance Film Festival submission of a self-serious novice than the product of an established director. Labor Day attempts to fold in larger themes about mental illness and sexual awakening, but at heart, this is domestic porn for lonely single mothers. Kate Winslet plays a depressed mom in 1987 who is forced to shelter a mysterious runaway convict played without interest by Josh Brolin. He promptly starts fixing floorboards, mending tires, baking pies, recharging her sexual batteries and otherwise establishing himself as the perfect man. That’s not peach pie you smell cooking—it’s hogwash. D.B.

Her

BEFORE

3838 Watt Ave. Suite E-510 • 916-993-6495 • 916-717-8801 (Cell)

The Lego Movie

The premise of director Stuart Beattie and Kevin Grevioux’s script is dopey enough to send the comic-book crowd over the moon: Frankenstein’s creature (Aaron Eckhart) is enlisted in a war between good gargoyles (led by Miranda Otto) and evil demons (under Bill Nighy). The creature (now named Adam) refuses and goes his own way for 200 years. Then he gets involved again when the battle breaks out in the 21st century—chief demon Nighy wants Frankenstein’s secret of creating life so he can bring his demon soldiers back from hell—and, of course, he tricks a sexy female scientist (Yvonne Strahovski) into helping him. What can you say about a movie where gargoyles are the good guys? It’s the usual storm of CGI fire and brimstone; if it had been called I, Fred no studio would have given it a second glance. J.L.

A pregnant teen (an earnest Vanessa Hudgens) runs away from her abusive druggie mother (Rosario Dawson, a bit over the top); she seeks help first from the biological father she’s never known (Brendan Fraser, equally earnest), then tries her luck on the street before finally landing at a shelter run by a compassionate housemother (Ann Dowd). Good intentions abound in this melodrama, and sincerity makes it watchable, but director Ron Krauss’ script drips with loose ends and seems to be missing major scenes in its dramatic arc (after early setbacks, Hudgens’ character cleans up her act with unconvincing ease), and his uncertain direction moves the action along in lurching fits and starts. James Earl Jones lends grave support as a kindly old priest, but other characters are too sketchy to stay in the memory. J.L.

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Se habla español

Given the many cinematic atrocities that have been produced by Hasbro in recent years, it is completely understandable to approach The Lego Movie with a certain amount of suspicion and dread. However, this is as wildly imaginative and fun as any film you’re likely to see this year, even if it is based entirely on corporate synergy. Written and directed by Phil Lord and Christopher Miller (Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs), The Lego Movie concerns a lonely conformist (Chris Pratt, extremely personable) mistaken for a prophecy-fulfilling rebel savior. The film never takes its mumbo-jumbo seriously, opting instead to focus on giddily anarchic comedy, a childlike sense of visual invention, and a copyright-protected wet dream of supporting players. The only missteps are made in the third act, as that childlike wonder is literalized, and madness is sacrificed at the altar of lesson-learning. D.B.

Tracy Letts’ dark comedy of an Oklahoma family’s secrets comes to the screen severely trimmed (by Letts himself), but with a stellar cast. Some of the original’s depth and texture is sacrificed; what remains focuses on Meryl Streep as the drug-addled matriarch and Julia Roberts as her eldest daughter. Others are flawlessly cast—Ewan McGregor as Roberts’ estranged husband, Abigail Breslin as their daughter, Margo Martindale as Streep’s sister, Chris Cooper as her husband, Benedict Cumberbatch as their son, Juliette Lewis and Julianne Nicholson as Streep’s other daughters—but without the prominence they had on stage. Those familiar with the play will be able to fill in the blanks; others may wonder why this soapy diva bitch-match won a Pulitzer Prize. Director John Wells imparts the air of a TV drama. J.L.

2

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There is no greater misery than a Lego separated from his kind.

David O. Russell’s ecstatically cinematic American Hustle tells a hypergroovy version of the late 1970s Abscam operation, in which the FBI enlisted con artists to help them catch corrupt politicians. Right from the opening shots of Christian Bale pasting and swirling an elaborate comb-over onto his bald forehead, this is a film all about false fronts and reinvention, the latter a subject Russell knows very well. Everyone in the overwigged ensemble is good, but Bradley Cooper is a revelation as a nakedly ambitious FBI agent. Buried under a dirtbag beard and a hideous nest of curls, Cooper is deprettied enough to let us fully see what an honest and forceful actor he has become. American Hustle might have even been great had Russell not tried to pull a hustle of his own, reaching a facile conclusion that hinges on emotional relationships we never knew existed. D.B..

3

Don’t wait...

2

Lone Survivor

In 2005, a team of Navy SEALs (Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch, Emile Hirsch, Ben Foster) drops into the Afghan mountains to ambush a high-level Taliban warlord—but are ambushed themselves, unable to call in air support or rescue. Based on a real operation, the movie has grueling scenes of combat, some of the most realistic and harrowing ever seen. But writer-director Peter Berg and writer Patrick Robinson (adapting the memoir by Marcus Luttrell, the “lone survivor” of the title) never get around to establishing the characters as individuals. This makes the closing array of names rather confusing. Besides, the title is the ultimate spoiler, so there’s little suspense. We know only one will survive, and since only Wahlberg is billed above the title … J.L.

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Ride Along

A motor-mouthed security guard and cop wannabe (Kevin Hart) wants to prove to his girlfriend’s cop brother (Ice Cube) that he’s worthy of both the girl and the force, so he rides along with him on patrol. Your reaction to this semilame action comedy will depend on your tolerance for Hart’s line of profanely caffeinated patter; for some of us, a little goes a long way. When the story is as predictable as this one with nothing to take your mind of Hart’s constant yapping, it’s enough to set your teeth on edge. Ice Cube’s character strikes an attitude of angry exasperation toward his unwanted partner, leading one to wonder if the actor may have felt the same way on the set. It would be hard to blame him if he did. John Leguizamo, Bruce McGill and Laurence Fishburne lend reliable (albeit autopilot) support. J.L.

2

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That Awkward Moment

Two single dudes (Zac Efron, Miles Teller) and their divorce-bound pal (Michael B. Jordan) swear off serious relationships with women—but each of them quickly backslides into what might develop into a real romance. This flimsy update of Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour’s Lost was written and directed by Tom Gormican, whose experience consists of only two pictures, including this one. Gormican shows aptitude, but apparently it’s more from paying attention in screenwriting class than from observing people in real life: His script is so arch and self-consciously clever that the jokes sound stale even as we hear them for the first time. Efron and Teller do what they can (Jordan is underused), but the women make a stronger impression: Imogen Poots as Efron’s match and (especially) Mackenzie Davis as Teller’s. J.L.

2

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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The Wolf of Wall Street

tell

Director Martin Scorsese and writer Terence Winter go careening through the life of stock-market huckster Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio), from his small-time beginning through his drug-addled reign as an amoral master of the universe to his downfall at the hands of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the FBI. The obvious model is Scorsese’s masterpiece Goodfellas (1990), but it lacks the narrative drive—besides, stockbrokers don’t have the same vicarious charge as gangsters, no matter how crooked they are. It’s a movie of great bits and pieces—Jonah Hill as Belfort’s slimy partner, DiCaprio’s surprising flair for physical comedy—but the whole is less than the sum of its parts: The early energy dissipates almost completely over a seemingly endless three hours. This wolf huffs and puffs, but he doesn’t blow the house down. J.L.

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BEER AFICIONADOS

monday

trivia @ 6:30pm

Folk implosion Peggy Sue moves past its early sound   to craft music that’s creepy-beautiful 

tuesday

taco tues $1 tacos, $2 coronas, 2–8pm wednesday

open mic sign-ups at 7:30pm

AWARD WINNING LOCAL CRAFT BEERS ON TAP

thursday

KaraoKe @ 7:30pm open for lunch & dinner 7 days a weeK doors open at 11:30

live music feb 07 bad behavior blues band dread lullabies feb 08 mondo deco feb 09 vagabond brothers “unplugged” feb 14 mood mantis feb 15 island of black & white feb 21 bp & praduh *cd release* feb 22 j ras & soulifted feb 28 stellar & thunder cover

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PROM Thursday, February 13 5 — 9 PM

Peggy Sue, a band that sounds as dreamy as it looks.

Art Mix teams up with Unseen Heroes to bring you a night of spiked punch and arms-length-apart dancing with special guest DJs and live music. Make your own corsages and boutonnieres with featured artists and designers, and replace those embarrassing prom photos from years past in a fun photobooth. Prizes will be awarded for the best 70s, 80s, and 90s prom ensembles, so dig up that old dress or tuxedo and come dressed to impress!

#artmix

crockerartmuseum.org 34   |   SN&R   |   02.06.14

and we felt as though the vocals had taken a backseat.” And thematically, she explained, Choir of Echoes explores self-expression. “It’s been a cathartic experience,” Young said of making the record. “It’s about the way you assert yourself—or a certain version of yourself.” The album also builds on the sweeping arrangements from the band’s 2012 album Peggy Sue Plays the Songs of Scorpio Rising, a songby-song remake of the soundtrack to Kenneth Anger’s cult 1964 film about gay Nazi bikers. With covers of pop classics such as “Fools Rush In” and “My Boyfriend’s Back,” the album highlights Peggy Sue’s haunting appeal. The band initially performed the soundtrack as part of a friend’s live cinema project, and Young said she’d picked the soundtrack because she’d long been inspired by the way its music drove the film’s narrative. “I remember thinking it was so incredible the way [Anger] did the soundtrack,” she said. “There is no dialogue in the film, and a lot of the story, the way you take meaning from it, is through the music.” Both Choir of Echoes and Scorpio Rising were made with the Wales-based producer Jimmy Robertson, whom Young credits for helping shape Peggy Sue’s evolving sound. PHOTO BY MIKE MASSARO

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New folk. Post folk. Anti-folk. Peggy Sue singer-guitarist Katy Young has heard the descriptions endlessly. They fit, she by Rachel Leibrock said, talking on the phone from Bristol, England, a few hours before the band was set to launch its ra c h e l l @ latest tour. ne w s re v i e w . c o m Then again, they’re not quite right either. “There are elements of folk in our music, but where they were maybe more at the forefront in the past, they’re really buried now,” Young said. “But that’s the ... English press—they have to tell a narrative: ‘This is what [the band] is doing now; this is what we did then.’”

Catch Peggy Sue on Friday, February 7, at 8 p.m. at Third Space, 946 Olive Drive in Davis. The cover is $10, and Mandolin Orange is also on the bill. Peggy Sue’s website is http://peggywho.com.

It’s not just the British critics, however. Stateside, The New York Times praised the band’s “folky modal tunes” as “bristling” and “insistent.” “We have loads of folk inspiration,” Young conceded. “But none of those labels really mean anything—there’s more to us than that.” Truth is, it’s difficult to label Peggy Sue, which performs on Friday, February 7, at Third Space in Davis. While the band’s early music followed a folkier path, its fourth and latest album Choir of Echoes defies simple categorization. Brooding and ethereal with tinges of gospel, twee ’90s indie rock, droning ’80s goth, and dreamy ’50s pop, the songs here sound as though they were unearthed from a long-lost Blue Velvet soundtrack—the aural equivalent of finding a disembodied ear in a field. The album’s first single, “Idle” embodies a beautifully creepy David Lynch vibe as lyrics such as “let the devil find a place for these restless bones” float upon a swell of ghostly vocals from Young and bandmate Rosa Slade. Ultimately, Young said, Choir of Echoes is about voice, both literally and figuratively. “We [explored] different ways of singing harmonies and backing vocals and using our voices as central instruments,” she said. “We’ve always done that, but on [recent records], we’d really been getting more into the guitar playing,

The songs sound as though they were unearthed from a long-lost Blue Velvet soundtrack—the aural equivalent of finding a disembodied ear in a field. “He has really good ideas, but the most important thing is to have that guiding voice to tell if you’re on the right track, to [say things like], ‘You’ve maybe taken a slightly weird turn. Carry on, but then let’s come back.’” The band, which formed in Brighton, England, when Young met Slade at university, has long played as a three-piece with drummer Olly Joyce. Recently, the duo expanded with the addition of bassist Ben Rubinstein. The new lineup has already shifted the band’s dynamic, onstage and off, Young said. “[Previously], Rosa and I used our guitars in a bass sort of way,” she explained. “This just gives us freedom for the guitar parts to be more experimental and to explore a different musical direction.” Perhaps even one that will force the press to abandon that folk narrative for good. Ω


Orange Shandy is here.

Spitting rhymes and a Pete Seeger postscript Guerrilla rap: There’s a new open-mic in town, and no, I can’t tell you where it is. That’s because the organizers move it every week to a new business, unbeknownst to the folks working there. First it was at Slice of Broadway. Then Jimmy’s Barber Garage. Then La Garnacha. Then Hot Italian. Every week it got bigger, drawing rappers, hip-hop singers, spoken-word poets and musicians at approximately 8:08 p.m. on Monday nights. The location is supposed to be spread by word-of-mouth only—no Facebook statuses, no newspaper previews, no written words at all. Until after the fact, then social media is awash with #TheMostOpenMicInTheCity hashtag. A couple weeks ago at Midtown’s La Garnacha on 16th Street, about 150 people flooded the taqueria and parking lot. Andru Defeye (full disclosure: He’s a freelance writer for SN&R under the name Andrew Bell) stood up on a chair to address the buzzing space. “Some of you guys know what’s going on right now. Some of you have no idea,” the organizer said. “You have now entered the performance-arts dojo of Sacramento.” And he proceeded to spit rhymes, people proceeded to cheer, and then someone else proceeded to take over. It was shockingly seamless, the way one artist would end and another would begin with no organization, no list and no moderator. It was anarchy, and it worked. That’s what makes it so open. Anything could happen. Rapper Task1ne could be spitting, and then an anonymous guitarist could start strumming, and then Element Brass Band could magically show up and turn the parking lot into a party. And the band really dug it, so much so that it invited #TheMostOpenMicInTheCity to join Element Brass Band’s new residency at The Press Club. Starting on Sunday, February 16, featured artists will perform over the band’s New Orleans second-line style of jazz every third Sunday of the month. This will be in addition to a more conventional home at The Brickhouse Art Gallery in Oak Park (2837 36th Street). Starting the first Monday in March, participants will congregate there every other week, and take over other business spaces the rest of the time. For updates on the next #TheMostOpenMicInTheCity, head to www.zfgpromotions.com. jan elleb@ n ew s r ev i ew . com | NEWS

thu 02/06

Thursday ThirsTy Mix show hosted By dJ KatZ

VOTED BEST COMEDY CLUB BY THE SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW!

THURSDAY 2/6 - SUNDAY 2/9 ALL AGES WITH PARENTAL SUPERVISION FROM MTV’S TEEN WOLF!

dJ / Band 9pM // $5

ORNY ADAMS

LEO FLOWERS, DANIEL HUMBARGER WEDNESDAY 2/12

Fri 02/07

you fronT d The ban // 9pM // Free

RETROCRUSH COMEDY BOOMBOX

live KaraoKe

Jam on: Sometimes timing is everything. In August 2013, Sacramento musician and music lover Kim Alexander sent a letter to one of her musical heroes, Pete Seeger, the iconic folksinger and activist known for songs such as “If I had a Hammer” and “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?” Alexander, also president of the nonprofit California Voter Foundation, hosts a monthly open-mic blues and folk jam at Old Ironsides downtown. She wrote to Seeger as part of a long-standing tradition. “[Each year] I try to write a letter to someone who matters to me on my dad’s birthday,” she said. “This year I wrote to Pete.” In the letter, Alexander asked for advice on the best ways to “spread the message of making music” and included a printout of her list, “‘Learn to Jam!’: 20 Tips for Making Music with Friends.” The rules of “jamiquette” include tips such as “Put together a binder of your songs and start building your repertoire,” and “Wait your turn. Jamming is a ‘small d’ democratic pastime.” Then Seeger died on January 27, at the age of 94. “I was sorry I had never heard back from him, but glad I had shared with him the impact he had on my life,” she said. Then Alexander learned that the folk singer did write her back. In a letter dated “January 2014” and postmarked two days before his death, Seeger praised Alexander’s efforts with a handwritten note in the margins of her original letter: “Dear Kim, I’ve read this article several times. I think your article on jamming is wonderful and should be printed … and issued as a lovely pamphlet, on good paper with good drawings on the cover.” He also lamented his inability to help: “My health is not good. ... You stay well, keep on.” For Alexander, the letter exemplifies her love for—and philosophy on—music. “I really believe in the power of music to bring people together and feel a special honor, as well as obligation to carry out his wishes and carry on the spirit of making music and singing together,” she said. For more on Alexander’s correspondence with Seeger visit http://kimalex.blog spot.com.

ROBERT BERRY, ELOISA BRAVO & MORE! THURSDAY 2/13 - SUNDAY 2/16 FROM JOHN OLIVER’S NEW YORK STAND-UP SHOW!

sat 02/08

jukebox john//ny $5 all request covers // 9pM

SHENG WANG

SEAN KEANE, SHANTI CHARAN WEDNESDAY 2/19

sun 02/09

showcase sunday open mic 9-12aM // Free

FREDDIE RAINBOW PRESENTS:

GENDER NIGHT

coMedy 7-9pM // talent

THURDAY 2/20 - SATURDAY 2/22 FROM CHELSEA LATELY!

Mon 02/10

DOV DAVIDOFF

karaoke 8pM // Free

CHRIS GARCIA, KEON POLEE

THURSDAY 2/28 - SUNDAY 3/2 FROM COMEDY CENTRAL & DEF COMEDY JAM!

tues 02/11

greaTesT sTories ever Told dead // garcia

TONY WOODS CARLA CLAYY, CARLOS RODRIGUEZ

dylan revue // 8pM // Free

FRIDAY 3/14 - SATURDAY 3/15 FROM COMEDY CENTRAL PRESENTS AND VOICE OF SHEEN ESTEVEZ ON JIMMY NEUTRON!

wed 02/12

wild wednesday

hosTed by dj kaTz, feaT:

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER!

sHOWs: UPcOMINGs, the slippery slope,

WWW.PUNCHLINESAC.COM

2/14 sacto storyteller the old screen door

Join us out here

908 K Street • sac 916.446.4361 wwwMarilynsOnK.com

Please drink responsibly.

JEFF GARCIA

the sindicate, one leg chuck, marcello lopez alternative reggae // 9pM // $5

;>0;;,9*647<5*/305,:(*‹-(*,)662*6473:(*

CALL CLUB FOR SHOWTIMES: (916) 925-5500 2100 ARDEN WAY sIN THE HOWE ‘BOUT ARDEN SHOPPING CENTER

2 DRINK MINIMUM. 18 & OVER. I.D. REQUIRED.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CLUB BOX OFFICE WITH NO SERVICE CHARGE.

2708 J Street Sacramento, CA 916.441.4693 www.harlows.com - February 06 -

duncan sheik

feva in da funkhouse

quinn hedgeS bAnd 6pm • $27.50

8pm • $10

- February 07 -

james garner’s tribute to johnny cash

NEWSPAPER: PUBLISH DATE: ART DUE: CONTENT: SIZE: - February 10 ART PRODUCTION: secret NOTES: chiefs 3

5:30pm • $15adv

Coming Soon

- February 09 -

Feb 13 Denver J Band Feb 14 ALO

SAC NEWS & REVIEW Feb 15 Martin Luther Feb 16 The Duhks 2/6/2014 Feb 20 The Three Way 1/31 Feb 21 & 22 Tainted Love PUNCHLINE Feb 23 Man Man 1.87” X 5.67” Feb 24 The Thermals Feb 27 Jelly Bread SACHA PFEIFER (720) 239-3411 Feb 28 Diego’s Umbrella Mar 01 Zepparella

(members of Mr. Bungie)

Mar 02 The Wild Feathers

mirthkon 7pm • $15adv

Mar 04 Typhoon Mar 06 El Ten Eleven Mar 07 Lovefool

- February 08 -

steelin’ dan

- February 12 -

5:30pm • $15adv

bettye lavette

5:30pm • $40adv

—Rachel Leibrock

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F E AT U R E

STORY

follow us hArLOWsniTEcLUB hArLOWsnighTcLUB hArLOWsnighTcLUB

r achel l @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

—Janelle Bitker

BEFORE

RESTAURANT ss BAR BAR CLUB ss RESTAURANT COMEDY COMEDY CLUB

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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AFTER

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02.06.14

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SN&R

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35


07FRI

08SAT

09SUN

09SUN

Ghostplay

Common

Adrian Bourgeois

Duncan Sheik

Old Ironsides, 9 p.m., $6

Bob Hope Theatre, 7 p.m., $15-$40

The group played Davis Music Fest in June  2013 and nabbed a Sammies nomination for  Post-punk in the fall. Otherwise, for the past  five months, Ghostplay has been suspiciously  quiet. And it already sort of came out of  nowhere: Three friends formed the band in  2012 and put a few demos online. As a courtesy to their fans, they posted the following  Facebook status update in October: “Hi  world! Yes - we are still alive! :)” The hiatus  comes to an end at last, and folks can hear  Ghostplay’s dark indie rock on Friday with  INDIE ROCK All About Rockets and  Major Powers & the Lo-Fi  Symphony at Old Ironsides. 1901 10th Street,  www.ghostplaymusic.com.

—Janelle Bitker

Luigi’s Fun Garden, 7 p.m., $5-$7

Rapper, actor and poet Common will speak  and perform as part of the University of the  Pacific’s Black History Month celebration.  HIP-HOP He’s a Grammy Award winner,  but also respected by a lot of  underground hip-hop fans for his lyrics. His  breakout 1994 song “I Used to Love H.E.R.”  used an extended metaphor to compare the  commercialization of hip-hop to the disrespect and degradation of women. Common’s  prolific writing also resulted in a memoir  called One Day It’ll All Make Sense, and he  appeared at a poetry reading at the White  house—both in 2011. He’ll release a 10th  album, Nobody Smiling in the spring.   242 E. Main Street in Stockton, www.think  common.com.

For the last two-and-a-half years,  Sacramento ex-pat Adrian Bourgeois has  been working tirelessly on his double album  Pop/Art. The 24-track album is done, and  it’s his best work to date, both in terms  of songwriting and production value. The  POP/ROCK album is a light, feel-good  pop record highly influenced by the Beatles and Elliott Smith (but  not as glum). The instrumentation is lush,  and the harmonies are stunning. He’ll be  performing a good portion of the record  with a full band, done as faithful to the  album as possible. He’s also in a duo called  See How They Run with Paige Lewis, who  will join this show contributing vocals.   1050 20th Street, www.adrianbourgeois.com.

—Jonathan Mendick

TOO $HORT REIGN & PLAYAH K

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12

BREATHE CAROLINA KARL DENSON’S TINY UNIVERSE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15

THE ENGLISH BEAT

ALL AGES WELCOME!

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17

ATTILA

I SEE STARS - CAPTURE THE CROWN ICE NINE KILLS - MYKA RELOCATE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21

PHANTOGRAM SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22

THE GROUCH & ELIGH PIGEON JOHN - DJ FRESH - IANC

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26

DOM KENNEDY SKEME

LA NOCHE OSKURA

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16

ESCAPE THE FATE EVE TO ADAM - NEW YEARS DAY AWOKEN SHADOWS

—Kel Munger

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

MOD SUN - GHOST TOWN - LIONFIGHT

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13

Singer-songwriter Duncan Sheik is probably  still most famous for his 1996 hit “Barely  Breathing,” but he also has some serious  chops writing for the stage. He wrote the  music for the smash rock musical Spring  Awakening, as well as new music for the  recently opened A Man’s Man by Bertolt  Brecht. On top of all that, Sheik’s writing  music for the still-in-production musical version of American Psycho. So, yeah,  this guy’s versatile, which means  POP you’re likely to hear anything at this  show—and it’s guaranteed to be smart and  polished. Sacramento’s Quinn Hedges Band  will open this evening of music. 2708 J Street,  www.duncansheik.com.

—Aaron Carnes

ACE OF SPADES SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 7 p.m., $27.50

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27

JBOOG

LAS RAKAS - SIMPLE CREATION SQUAREFIELD MASSIVE

COMING

SOON

02/22 02/26 02/27 03/01 03/13 03/15 03/20 03/21 03/22 03/26 03/30 04/04 04/15 04/17 04/21 04/25 04/27 05/21

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202

36   |   SN&R   |   

02.06.14

The Grouch & Eligh Dom Kennedy J Boog Tierra Umphrey’s McGee The Expendables The Wailers Memphis May Fire Eoto Moonshine Bandits & The Lacs Reverend Horton Heat Yonder Mountain String Band All Time Low Mogwai The 1975 Drive-By Truckers Julieta Venegas Christina Perri


10MON

12WED

13THURS

13THURS

Secret Chiefs 3

Bettye LaVette

Hot Tuna

Jeannie Howell

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 8 p.m., $15-$18 Trey Spruance has been blowing minds since  the mid-1980s when he was the guitarist for  Mr. Bungle. Secret Chiefs 3, his endeavor  for the last 20 years, has helped expand his  horizons. The ever-evolving group employs a  wide variety of members and an even wider  variety of instruments. Within this mix,  Spruance has channeled a quest for traveling outside of the tonal systems of Western  music and exploring the sounds of the East.  He refers to the sound as a mix between “the  surf band and that sort of neo-folk/neoROCK Pythagorean band.” This instrumental music seems to explore the  relationship between geometric shapes in  mosques and musical scales. 2708 J Street,  www.facebook.com/secretchiefs3.

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 7 p.m., $40-$45 Bettye LaVette brings great emotional  intensity, claiming for her own songs by  Bob Dylan, Willie Nelson, Pink Floyd and  SOUL/R&B even the Black Keys. Her  gritty, volatile, soulful blues  vocals recall Tina Turner—only hardened by  years of struggle. LaVette scored her first  hit in ’62 when she was 16, and after some  singles, recorded a debut LP of Muscle Shoals  soul in ’72 for Atlantic only to have it shelved.  Frustrated, LaVette demanded out of her  contract and wound up in the wilderness for  three decades. She re-emerged with 2003’s  A Woman Like Me, and has followed with four  more discs with their own distinctive flavors.  2708 J Street, www.bettyelavette.com.

—Chris Parker

—Paul Piazza

Crest Theatre, 7:30 p.m., $33-$48

Old Ironsides, 9 p.m., no cover

“Classic” can be defined as a work of   excellence with staying power that  transcends generational divides, but it  also could include a photo of Hot Tuna.  Some fans will recall Rock and Roll Hall of  Famers Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady  from Jefferson Airplane; others may have  recently learned about these guys who  created controversy when Kaukonen mixed  his acoustic guitar with Casady’s electric  ROCK bass to play folk, blues and rock.  They might not play uninterrupted multihour sets like they did in the 1970s,  but doors open at 6:30 p.m. and close at  11. Joining Hot Tuna is David Lindley, who’s  performed with Jackson Browne, Curtis  Mayfield and Dolly Parton. 1013 K Street,  www.hottuna.com.

Old Ironsides has been doing this cool monthly  musical series lately called The Living Room  Session, where the venue literally makes its  stage look like a living room (with a couch and  a recliner) and singer-songwriters get up  INDIE and casually play some tunes and  chat about them. It’s a good time.  This month, the fifth session, Jeannie Howell  from shoegaze-style indie band Freeport  will be playing some tunes. She’ll play some  stripped-down acoustic versions of some of  her Freeport songs, as well as some tunes  from her old bands, Ahoy! and Chocolate Honey  Monkey (Al Maxwell will join her on the CHM  songs). 1901 10th Street, www.facebook.com/ freeportmusic.

—Aaron Carnes

—Trina L. Drotar

events calendar th u r sday febu ary 6

Dj bryan hawk – 80’s retro

fr iday febu ary 7 monDo Decco

satu r day febu ary 8

pushing the sun + 3 banDs

p lu s

happy hour monDay-friDay 5pm-7pm

1517 21st str eet 916.704.0711 www.startlightlounge.net

BEFORE

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  NEWS

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  F E AT U R E

STORY

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

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  AFTER

  |    02.06.14    

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  SN&R    

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  37


NIGHTBEAT

THURSDAY 2/6

ASSEMBLY MUSIC HALL 1000 K St., (916) 832-4751

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

BADLANDS

SUNDAY 2/9

Burlesque show benefiting the Burlesque Hall of Fame, 6:30pm, $25

THIS OR THE APOCALYPSE, SWORN IN, SHAI HULUD, ELIPSIS; 6pm, $12

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/10-2/12

Tipsy Thursdays, Top 40 deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Fabulous and Gay Fridays, 9pm, call for cover

Saturday Boom, 9pm, call for cover

Sin Sunday, 8pm, call for cover

Mad Mondays, 9pm M; Latin video flair and Wii bowling, 7pm Tu

BAR 101

Karaoke, 7:30pm, no cover

BAD BEHAVIOR BLUES BAND, 9:30pm, call for cover

MONDO DECO, 9:30pm, $5

VAGABOND BROTHERS, 2pm, no cover

Trivia, 6:30pm M, no cover; Open-mic, 7:30pm W, no cover

BLUE LAMP

Blues jam session, 4pm, no cover

Bob Marley Birthday Bash w/ DJ Vision, 8pm, $10

Radio Radio: ’80s Dance Club, 9pm, call for cover

Get Down to the Champion Sound reggae night, 9pm-2am, $3

Naughty Trivia, 8pm W, no cover

THE BOARDWALK

WHITE KNUCKLE RIOT, 6 BEERS DEEP,

MICHAEL SCHENKER, BAD BOY EDDY, SKIN OF SAINTS; 8pm, call for cover

LOST IN ATLANTIS, GRAVESHADOW, FUEL FOR ADDICTION; 8pm

101 Main St., Roseville; (916) 774-0505 1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 BLACKSHEEP; 8pm, call for cover

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

MAJOR POWERS AND THE LO-FI SYMPHONY, STEP JAYNE; 8pm, $8-$10

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481 1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

TEMPEST, 8pm, call for cover

DJs Aviator, 530, BPhree and Kronyak, 10pm, call for cover

DJ Peeti V, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Billy Lane, 9pm, call for cover

C PLUS, HEAVY METAL, CIRCA MMVIII, OFFICIAL; 9pm, call for cover

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

Dragalicious, 9pm, $5

CFR, BE BRAVE BOLD ROBOT, SUNMONKS; 9pm, $5

LOWER 48, LAUREN COLE NORTON, MISS MADDY’S F STREET STOMPERS; 9pm, $5

FOX & GOOSE

TOM HAITHCOCK & WOUNDED PICKUP, 8pm, no cover

G STREET WUNDERBAR 228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

THE WEST NILE RAMBLERS, BIG STICKY MESS; 9pm, no cover

THE GOLDEN BEAR

DJ Shaun Slaughter, 10pm, call for cover

DJ Whores, 10pm, no cover

DAVE RUSSELL, 9pm-midnight, $5

PLAYBACK, 9pm-midnight, $5

FEVA IN DA FUNKHOUSE, 9pm, $10

JAMES GARNER JOHNNY CASH TRIBUTE, 7pm, $15-$18

STEELIN’ DAN, 7pm, $15-$20; DYLAN PHILLIP, NICK RUSSO; 10pm, $15

LEVEL UP FOOD & LOUNGE

The Lick: A Different Kind of Ladies Night, 5pm, no cover

DJ Rock Bottom and The Mookie DJ, 9pm, no cover

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR 1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

MARILYN’S ON K

DJ Katz, 9pm, no cover

HALFTIME BAR & GRILL

5681 Lonetree Blvd., Rocklin; (916) 626-6366

HARLOW’S

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693 2431 J St., (916) 448-8768

908 K St., (916) 446-4361

MIDTOWN BARFLY

1119 21st St., (916) 549-2779

Queer Idol, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, $5; DJ Alazzawi, 9pm W, $3 Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; Northern Soul, 8pm W, no cover

CHRONIC VITALITY, LIFT; 9:30pm, no cover DJ Crook One, 10pm, call for cover

2326 K St., (916) 441-2252

MARC BROUSSARD TRIO, JENN GRINELS; 7:30pm, $25-$28

JONNY MOJO, THE MARK SEXTON TRIO; 8pm, $8

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798 1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

BARRIER, ADALIAH, SILENCE, PETRACOVICH; 7:30pm W, $12-$14

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

FACES

Hey local bands!

SATURDAY 2/8

ST. LUCIA, CON BRIO; 7pm, $13

2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

DISTRICT 30

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

FRIDAY 2/7

Industry Night, 9pm, call for cover

Trivia night, W, call for cover Trivia night, 7:30-9pm Tu, no cover; Karaoke, 8pm-midnight W, no cover

DUNCAN SHEIK, QUINN HEDGES BAND; 7pm, $27.50

SECRET CHIEFS 3, 8pm M, $15-$18; BETTYE LAVETTE, 7pm W, $40-$45 Hip-hop and R&B deejay dancing, 9:16pm Tu, no cover

MARIoN WALKER, CHRISTOPHER FAIRMAN, FERA; 8pm, $5

IRON HEARTS, EMILY O’NEIL; 9pm, $5

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

Live Band Karaoke,9pm, no cover

JUKEBOX JOHNNY, 9pm, $5

Comedy and talent showcase, 7pm, no cover

Greatest Stories Ever Told live music series, 8pm Tu; THE SINDICATE, 9pm W, $5

Get Down to the Champion Sound, reggae and dancehall deejays, 10pm, $5

The Drop: House music and ’90s hip-hop w/ DJ Jonathan, Funktion, 9pm, $3-$5

1000 K Street, Sacramento, CA 95814

FOR TICKETS TO ALL SHOWS VISIT AssemblyMusicHall.com

For Rentals or Private Parties please contact AssemblyMusicHall@gmail.com

fri feb 7 @ 7pm

Sat feb 8 @ 6:30pm

Sun feb 9 @ 6pm thiS Or the apOCaLYpSe

thurS feb 13 @ 7:30pm

BOBBY CALDWELL Upcoming ShowS

Sat feb 15 @ 8pm 38

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02.06.14

thu feb 20 @ 7pm

Sat feb 22 @ 6:30pm

Feb 26 Feb 28 mar 01 mar 02 mar 05 mar 08 mar 10 mar 11 mar 13 mar 14 mar 15 mar 17 mar 21 mar 22 mar 23 mar 24 mar 25 mar 26 mar 27 mar 29

paradise fears incredible’ me baeza we butter the bread with butter sunny ledfurd ghost of the robot cultura profetica we are the in crowd infected mushroom rachel barton pine the siren show protest the hero the Kin Kumande’s live experience alesana being as an ocean blacK lips carnifex animals as leaders autumn sKy / life in 24 frames


THURSDAY 2/6

FRIDAY 2/7

SATURDAY 2/8

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN

SEAN KILCOYNE, THOMAS HATCH; 8:30pm, $5

ONE BAND SHOW, RIVERBEND FOLK BAND; 8:30pm, $5

COLIN & JENNA, GRANT CHESIN, KARLEE AND CONNOR; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz session, 8pm M, no cover; ROYAL JELLY, FOR SAYLE; 8:30pm W, $5

OLD IRONSIDES

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504

Karaoke w/ Sac City Entertainment, 9pm, no cover

MAJOR POWERS & THE LO-FI SYMPHONY, ALL ABOUT ROCKETS; 9pm, $6

BEYOND THE CEMETERY, DEAD IN SECONDS, WHITE MINORITIES; 8pm, $10

Karaoke w/ Sac City Entertainment, 9pm Tu, no cover; Open-mic, 9pm W, no cover

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

BOMBS OVERHEAD, SOLITARY PRIAPISM, Karaoke, 9pm, no cover PURIFICATION BY FIRE; 8:30pm, $5

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SUNDAY 2/9

Open-mic comedy, 9pm, no cover

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

DRY BRANCH FIRE SQUAD, 8pm, $20

PETER CASE, 8:30pm, $20

THE PARK ULTRA LOUNGE

DJ Eddie Edul, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Scene, DJ Peeti V, 9pm-2am, $15

Top 40, Mashups, 9pm, no cover

DJ Club mixes, 10pm, no cover

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PARLARE EURO LOUNGE

Top 40, 9pm, no cover

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3443 Laguna Blvd., Elk Grove; (916) 226-2625

DJ Supe, 9pm, call for cover

SURFACE, 9pm, $25-$35

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

The Lower 48 with Lauren Cole Norton and Miss Maddy’s F Street Stompers 9pm Saturday, $5. Fox & Goose Pop

Asylum Downtown: Gothic, industrial, EBM dancing, 9pm, call for cover

PINE COVE TAVERN PINS N STRIKES

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 2/10-2/12

GUTI B., 9-11pm, no cover

Open-mic, 10pm-1am Tu, no cover

PJ’S ROADHOUSE

DJ Old Griff, 9pm, no cover

ROADHOUSE RATS, 9pm, $5

REBEL PUNK, 9pm, $5

POWERHOUSE PUB

JACKSON MICHELSON, 10pm, call for cover

URGENT, 10pm, call for cover

CHEESEBALLS, 10pm, call for cover

ROY ROGERS, 3pm, call for cover

Karaoke, M; DJs Alazzawi, Rigatony, Tu; DEFYANT CIRCLE, LEO BOOTES; 8pm W

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

Sunday Night Soul Party, 9pm, $5

BLACK MAJIK ACID, LORD DYING, CURA COCHINO, HORSENECK; 9pm W, $8

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover; $5 after 8pm

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover; $5 after 8pm

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Bluebird Lounge open-mic, 5pm Tu, no cover

Salsa with Mike Del Campo, 8:30pm, no cover; $5 after 9:30pm

Domingos Latinos with Mr. DJ Omar, 9pm, $5-$10

Blues jam session, 8:30pm Tu, no cover

THE STUFF, 5:30pm, no cover; HARLIS SWEETWATER, 9pm, $7

Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; TESS MARIE & THE POOR MAN BAND, 4pm, $4

MARK CHRISLER, 9pm Tu; Open-mic, 5:30pm W; KERI CARR BAND, 9pm W, $5

5461 Mother Lode, Placerville; (530) 626-0336 614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586

THE PRESS CLUB

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STONEY INN/ROCKIN’ RODEO

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Salsa w/ Mike Del Campo and Mr. DJ Omar, 8:30pm, no cover; $5 after 9:30pm

TORCH CLUB

GROOVESESSION, 9pm, $5; X TRIO, 5pm, no cover

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023

1100 Orlando Ave., Roseville; (916) 728-1166 904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm, no cover; CON BRIO, 9pm, $8

Too Short with Reign and Playah K 7pm Saturday, $27. Ace of Spades Hip-hop

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

THE DEVIL MAKES THREE, BROTHERS COMATOSE; 7:30pm, $20

TOO $HORT, REIGN, PLAYAH K; 7pm, $27

LUIGI’S SLICE AND FUN GARDEN

STICKUP KID, SECOND TO LAST, INDIAN TAKER, FOXHOUND; 7:30pm, $7

HAFNER, JANG, COBRA LIGHT; 8:30pm, $5

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SHINE

CHIKADING!, PRACTICE, BUNNY KISSES; 8pm, $5

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BREATHE CAROLINA, MOD SUN, GHOST TOWN, LIONFIGHT; 7pm W, $15 PAIGE LEWIS, RICKY BERGER, ADRIAN BOURGEOIS, BECAUSE; 6pm, $7

THE BROTHERS SMALL, NO WHERE BUT PINE STREET RAMBLERS; 8pm, call for UP, ABBY NORMAL; 8pm, $5 cover

Jazz jam, 8pm Tu; Poetry With Legs with Bill Gainer, 7pm W, call for cover

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|

NEWS

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FEATURE STORY

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AFTER

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02.06.14

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SN&R

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what’s on your

horizon? Join Horizon Non-Profit today for safe access to a wide variety of high quality medical cannabis. Whether you prefer flowers, extracts, edibles or topicals, indica or sativa, we have the right medicine for you. Whatever your medical condition or employment situation, you can come to Horizon knowing that we respect and hold your

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HORIZON NON-PROFIT COLLECTIVE 3600 Power inn rd suite 1a sacramento, Ca 95826 916.455.1931


Bring in any competitor’s coupon and we’ll beat it by $5

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Um, what do people mean when they talk about “curing” weed?

VOted 3rd best ’13 420 physician in sac!

—Noelle Newhigh Good question. Folks don’t often talk about how to properly cure marijuana. This is a shame, because badly cured weed tastes terrible, and a good cure can take a plant from good to great. When you harvest marijuana, it is still full of moisture and sugars and starches and all the stuff that gives plants life. You have to dry it out. You BEALUM can’t dry it too fast, ’cause then the smoke will by NGAIO be all harsh and unpleasant and taste like (gr)ass. You can’t dry it too slow, because that’s how you end up with fungi and a weird wet ’13 taste in a sk420 @ n ewsreview.c om your mouth. A good cure takes time, and everyone has a different method. Some folks like to use a mostly closed paper bag and shake the bag once a day or so. Some like to hang their buds in a closet or dark room with a fan blowing to circulate the air. Some people like to put their buds in a glass jar but not close the lid all the way. Every grower will tell you that their method is best, and they are all right. Most of them have used the trial-and-error method to find a way that works for them. But all techniques aside, curing weed generally depends on the humidity of your environment. If the climate is dry, you have to slow A good cure takes the process down. If the climate is wet, you have to time, and everyone speed it up a little. But what about the has a different novice grower? Is there a method. way for noobs to achieve a desirable cure with less guesswork? Yes, there is! The people over at CVault (www.thecvault.com) have come up with a pretty good and dang-near foolproof way to cure weed. The CVault is a big metal container that has a space for one of those Boveda humidifier packs. These packs keep buds at a steady 62 percent humidity. Super nice.

’13

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34 44

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California’s medical pot is well-known throughout the world and considered some of the best. Where does Colorado bud rank?

is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@ newsreview.com.

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—Painklls2 Let me first say that it’s not just the medical pot. All the pot grown in California is awesome. OK, I am exaggerating a little, but you get my drift. I haven’t been to Colorado in about a year, but last time I was there, the weed was really good, but not yet great. All of the buds seemed a little fluffy to me, and I felt like they had maybe picked it a little early, because the high didn’t last long. My current rankings of of marijuana in the Western states are: 1. Cali (duh), 2. Oregon, 3. Washington (don’t be mad, bro), 4. Colorado, 5. New Mexico, 6. Arizona, 7. Montana. Utah and Idaho don’t make the list. Oregon is a very close second, and I look for Washington and Colorado to catch up soon. Ω

$

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916.480.9000 2 COnvenient LOCAtiOnS tO Serve YOu

2100 Watt Ave, Unit 190 | Sacramento, CA 95825 | Mon–Sat 11am–7pm 2633 Telegraph Ave. 109 | Oakland, CA 94612 | 510-832-5000 | Mon–Sat 10am–5pm recommendations are valid for 1 year for qualifying patients Walk-ins Welcome all day everyday

Your information is 100% private and confidential Visit our website to book your appointment online 24/7 at

www.Sac420Doc.com BEFORE

|

NEWS

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F E AT U R E

STORY

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|

AFTER

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SN&R

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N e w Pa t i e N t s w e l c o m e

Sacto’s finest medical marijuana

collective

EE GRAMn FR th minimum donatio wi

ic N a G R o 100% FREE GRAM with donAtion Expires 02/12/14

Text RHOUSE to 71441 to receive a coupon for a house warming gift!

House of organics 8848 Fruitridge Rd. Sacramento | Open 7 days a week 9am-7p

916.381.3769

expires 02/20/14

THC

6666 fruitridge road, unit c sacramento, california, 95820 916.476.4431 • www.916thc.com open 9:00am to 8:00pm 7 days a week

expires 02/20/14

N B Street

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Richards Blvd t tree Sproul S e Ave h 12t

Text CloudNine to 71441 for a FREE GIFT when you become a member of our collective! ON a budgeT? We have $5 budget grams and $10 grams that fit every budget! COme iN aNd see why Our paTieNTs keep COmiNg baCk:

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1506 Sproule Ave, Sacto, CA 95811

5711 florin perkins rd | sacramento, 95828 | 916.387.8605 | open 10am – 8pm 7 daYs a Week 42   |   SN&R   |   02.06.14


W E L C O M E

B A C K

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Daily deals, knowledgeable staff, and rated #1 customer service by SNR

Northern California’s finest cannabis collective, carrying only the highest quality, tested flowers.

Now accepting patients 18+

Huge selection of fall harvest greenhouse, outdoor varieties, edibles, and concentrates.

new patient deals

BEFORE

|

  NEWS

|

last o harvesf markdo t wns big jar s ref a 10 of lect donati f on

  F E AT U R E

STORY

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R

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top shelf

check out our high cbd strains & sale shelf

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Orange delivery Shandy 9AM-11PM DAILY is here. We take your medicine seriously we have

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Honey Sticks variety of flavo

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purchase of $100 or more.

winter special

35 top shelf 1/8ths

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new patients receive a free half gram of hash or pre–roll with min donation

sunday special: 4g 1/8ths (one per patient)

Expires 02/28/14.

no fee for delivery *Minimum order $45

Roseville, Rocklin, Loomis, Folsom, N. Highlands, Citrus Heights, Orangevale, Carmichael, Fair Oaks, Rancho Cordova

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tinctures, hash, capsules, kief, edibles mention this ad & receive $5 off any of our wax concentrates

golden health & wellness 1030 Joellis way, sac

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44   |   SN&R   |   02.06.14

916.646.6340 monday–saturday 10am–7pm sunday 10am–6pm

/TWORIVERSSac

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21 ?

Don’t miss your opportunity to be seen in SN&R’s Sacramento Beer Week issue! SPACE RESERVATION DEADLINE: FEB. 19 ISSUE ON STANDS: FEB. 27

  NEWS

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  FEATURE

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STORY

- Mon-Sat 10am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm

w/ couPoN exP. 02/12/14 SNR

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Blvd om Fols

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Get Your Recommendation! North Of Hwy 50 @ Bradshaw & Folsom Blvd

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to

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  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R

- Cultivators Welcome 9719A Folsom Blvd. Sacramento, CA 916-822-5690 • www.cannmedical.org

  |    02.06.14    

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  SN&R    

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  45


Your Downtown Service Shop

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Our medicine is lab tested for cannabinoid levels & contaminants like mold, mildew, bugs & pesticides for your safety

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MASSAGE THERAPISTS

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All massage advertisers are required to provide News & Review a current valid business license or somatic establishment permit issued by either the city or county in which they are operating in in order to run a printed advertisement.

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING WITH US, PLEASE CONTACT CLASSIFIEDS AT 916-498-1234 EXT. 1338.

ANNA

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new Staff!

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Good day Spa

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46   |   SN&R   |   02.06.14

$

$3 addition for multi-grade oil Good at Fulton location only Most vehicles savings of $7

Contact Ad Services for advertising information in this special section (916) 498-1234 ext.1121

Our complimentary services include: yoga, reconnective healing acupressure, sound therapy, intuitive body work, Reiki, massage therapy, meditation & Qi Gong

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Rainbow Massage Therapy

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NEW YORK MASSAGE

9am - 9pm 7 days/week 1601 Fulton Ave #11, Sacramento, CA 95825 916-475-0096

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BEFORE

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DIRECTV is currently recruiting for the following position in Sacramento: Site Manager If you are not able to access our website, DIRECTV.com, mail your resume and salary requirements to: DIRECTV, Attn: Talent Acquisition, 161 Inverness Drive West, Englewood, CO 80112. To apply online, visit: www.directv.com/careers. EOE.

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Chinese full body massage. Natomas area (916-706-4890) appt only.

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  NEWS

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858-0444

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  FEATURE

STORY

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A Professional Corporation “Protecting Your Rights Is Our Commitment”

Call: 916-446-4692 www.mastagni.com

No one enjoys facing legal problems and yet we find ourselves in situations where professional legal assistance becomes a necessity. The editors of this Business Review would like to help. Mastagni, Holstedt, Amick, Miller and Johnsen are highly experienced in the practice of personal injury, civil litigation, workers compensation and class actions. Mastagni, Holstedt, Amick, Miller and Johnsen are constantly keeping up with the latest laws concerning their areas of expertise and can represent you at the bargaining table, in the courtroom or before a host of state and federal agencies, boards or commissions. Mastagni, Holstedt, Amick, Miller and Johnsen’s office is located at 1912 “I” Street, in Sacramento, across from the William Bath historical building in midtown, and invite you to call 916-446-4692 for a personal appointment. Mastagni, Holstedt, Amick, Miller and Johnsen has earned the respect and admiration of everyone they have represented. The reputation of Mastagni, Holstedt, Amick, Miller and Johnsen has been achieved through service, dedication and protecting their clients’ rights. The editors of this Consumer Business Review feel that you owe it to yourself to allow Mastagni, Holstedt, Amick, Miller and Johnsen to handle your personal injury, civil litigation case, workers compensation and class actions. You will be glad you have found such efficient and thorough law firm!

Best Chinese Food In Town! Lunch * Dinner * Open 7 Days Weekly

For “Take Out” Call (916) 782-8868 www.ChinaVillaInc.com China Villa at 6819 Lonetree Boulevard, Suite B101, in Blue Oak Market Place, in Rocklin, is one of the most original places in the entire area. When the owner opened the doors, it was with the idea that a Chinese restaurant should combine friendly service with the proper atmosphere. The popularity of China Villa has proven the value of his theory, offering unique gourmet dishes representing all four regional cooking styles. At China Villa the service is cordial and quick, and the decor is completely Oriental in every detail. Specializing in authentic Chinese foods prepared fresh daily, the menu features your standard favorites along with a selection of your favorite beverages. Dinners here will please the palates of the most particular. If you're in the mood for a trip to China and find you don't have quite enough cash for a cruise, take a "dinner vacation" instead to China Villa. You'll be greeted with the same warmth and enjoy the finest in cuisine. It’s like visiting the Orient without the expense! The editors of this Consumer Business Review pause not a moment on giving our complete endorsement to China Villa. We, for the 4th year, recommend China Villa to our readers for the best Chinese food in town!

50   |   SN&R   |   02.06.14

Dr. Jan’s Dentistry For Children Janice R. Work, D.D.S.- Certified Pediatric Dentist Hours: Mon-Thurs 6:30 AM TO 3:30 PM

For An Appointment Call: (916) 683-PEDO (7336) www.drjanwork.com

Does the thought of going to the dentist fill your children with fear and apprehension? Is this fear keeping you from taking care of their teeth properly? Dr. Jan’s Dentistry for Children in Elk Grove at 9045 Bruceville Road, Suite #180, wants you know they can make your visit a pleasant and relaxing experience, striving to make every visit to Dr. Jan’s office a FUN one!. Dr. Jan has taken a great deal of time and effort to make her office a friendly, fun and comfortable. Everyone on her kind and caring staff shares the goal of providing the best pediatric dental care, making it a relatively fun experience. They all know just how important your children's teeth are, not only for appearance but also for general good health. Dr. Jan’s emphasis is on your child. The best way to keep your children's teeth and gums healthy is to have regular check-ups and good, professional care, which starts by their 1st birthday. Dr. Jan can help your children keep their healthy, happy smiles. CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT! The editors of this Consumer Business Review for the 14th consecutive year highly recommend Dr. Janice R. Work, D.D.S., to our readers for competent, pediatric dentistry, since 1992!

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An automobile has become so vital to the American life style that when it malfunctions we are basically stranded. We want it fixed right now! There are so many auto repair shops it's extremely difficult to find one that will provide honest service with knowledge and experience to handle any problem your car may have. We have found such a firm, and we recommend Roger’s Automotive Repair for the 9th year, at 12215 Locksley Lane, Unit #5,in Auburn. From a tune up, to major repair work, Roger’s Automotive Repair has the tools and the knowledge to get you back on the road in the shortest possible time. They are the professionals with an impeccable reputation, and their prices are honest and reasonable. They provide something else that's extremely difficult to find these days...personal friendly attention to you and your needs. So, if you're new in the area, or haven't found a firm that meets up to your standards, the editors of this Consumer Business Review recommend you make an appointment with Walt Schmidt at Roger’s Automotive Repair...he'll take good care of you, at prices you can afford!


by NICK MILLER

BREZSNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “You know

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Food

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What is the

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

it’s Saturday when you are wiping off vodka stains from your face with a marshmallow,” testifies the woman who writes the Tumblr blog French Fries Absinthe Milkshakes. I really hope you don’t even come close to having an experience like that this week, Aries. But I’m worried that you will. I sense that you’re becoming allergic to caution. You may be subconsciously wishing to shed all decorum and renounce self-control. To be clear, there’s nothing inherently wrong with relaxing your guard. I hope you will indeed give up some of your high-stress vigilance and surrender a bit to life’s sweet chaos. Just please try to find a playful and safe and not-too-insane way to do so.

single best thing you could do to fulfill your No. 1 desire? Is there a skill you should attain? A subject you should study? A special kind of experience you should seek or a shift in perspective you should initiate? This is a big opportunity, Taurus. You have an excellent chance to identify the specific action you could take that will lead you to the next stage of your evolution. And if you do manage to figure out exactly what needs to be done, start doing it! songwriters make a “slant rhyme,” the words they use don’t really rhyme, but they sound close enough alike to mimic a rhyme. An example occurs in “The Bad Touch,” a tune by the Bloodhound Gang: “You and me baby ain’t nothing but mammals / So let’s do it like they do on the Discovery Channel.” Technically, “mammals” doesn’t rhyme with “channel.” I suspect that in the coming week you will have experiences with metaphorical resemblances to slant rhymes. But as long you don’t fuss and fret about the inexactness you encounter, as long as you don’t demand that everything be precise and cleaned up, you will be entertained and educated. Vow to see the so-called imperfections as soulful.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Almost,”

writes novelist Joan Bauer. “It’s a big word for me. I feel it everywhere. Almost home. Almost happy. Almost changed. Almost, but not quite. Not yet. Soon, maybe.” I’m sure you know about that feeing yourself, Cancerian. Sometimes it has seemed like your entire life is composed of thousands of small almosts that add up to one gigantic almost. But I have good news: There is an excellent chance that in the next 14 to 16 weeks you will graduate from the endless and omnipresent almost; you will rise up and snatch a bold measure of completeness from out of the ever-shifting flow. And it all kicks into high gear now.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): One of the chapter

titles in my most recent book is this: “Ever since I learned to see three sides to every story, I’m finding much better stories.” I’m recommending that you find a way to use this perspective as your own in the coming weeks, Leo. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it’s crucial that you not get stuck in an oppositional mode. It would be both wrong and debilitating to believe that you must choose between one of two conflicting options. With that in mind, I will introduce you to a word you may not know: “trilemma.” It transcends a mere dilemma because it contains a third alternative.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1984, Don

Henley’s song “The Boys of Summer” reached the top of the Billboard charts. “Out on the road today, I saw a Deadhead sticker on a Cadillac,” Henley sings wistfully near the end of the tune. He’s dismayed by the sight of the Grateful Dead’s logo, an ultimate hippie symbol, displayed on a luxury car driven by snooty rich kids. Almost 20 years later, the band the Ataris covered “The Boys of Summer,” but changed the lyric to “Out on the road today, I saw a Black Flag sticker on a Cadillac.” It conveyed the same mournful contempt, but this time invoking the iconic punk band Black Flag. I offer this tale to you, Virgo, as an encouragement to update the way you think about your life’s mythic quest—to modernize your old storylines, to refresh and refurbish the references you invoke to tell people about who you are.

BEFORE

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NEWS

PHOTO BY LOVELLE HARRIS

by ROB

For the week of February 6, 2014

aficionado Michael Pollan says that Americans “worry more about food and derive less pleasure from eating” than people in other countries. If you ask them what their association is with “chocolate cake,” they typically say “guilt.” By contrast, the French are likely to respond to the same question with “celebration.” From an astrological perspective, I think it’s appropriate for you to be more like the French than the Americans in the coming weeks—not just in your attitude toward delicious desserts, but in regards to every opportunity for pleasure. This is one of those times when you have a license to guiltlessly explore the heights and depths of bliss.

Inuktitut language spoken among the Eastern Canadian Inuit, the word for “simplicity” is katujjiqatigiittiarnirlu. This amusing fact reminds me of a certain situation in your life. Your quest to get back to basics and reconnect with your core sources is turning out to be rather complicated. If you hope to invoke all of the pure, humble clarity you need, you will have to call on some sophisticated and ingenious magic. “What is the purpose of the giant sequoia tree?” asked environmentalist Edward Abbey. His answer: “The purpose of the giant sequoia tree is to provide shade for the tiny titmouse.” I suggest you meditate on all the ways you can apply that wisdom as a metaphor to your own issues. For example: What monumental part of your own life might be of service to a small, fragile part? What major accomplishment of yours can provide strength and protection to a ripening potential that’s underappreciated by others?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “To

burn with desire and keep quiet about it is the greatest punishment we can bring on ourselves,” wrote the poet Federico García Lorca. I urge you to make sure you are not inflicting that abuse on yourself in the coming weeks, Capricorn. It’s always dangerous to be out of touch with or secretive about your holy passions, but it’s especially risky these days. I’m not necessarily saying you should rent a megaphone and shout news of your yearnings in the crowded streets. In fact, it’s better if you are discriminating about whom you tell. The most important thing is to not be hiding anything from yourself about what moves you the most.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Back

in 2002, three young men launched YouTube, in part motivated by a banal desire. They were frustrated because they couldn’t find online videos of the notorious incident that occurred during the Super Bowl halftime show, when Janet Jackson’s wardrobe malfunction exposed her breast. In response, they created the now-famous website that allows people to share videos. I foresee the possibility of a comparable sequence for you, Aquarius. A seemingly superficial wish or trivial interest could inspire you to come up with a fine new addition to your world. Pay attention to your whimsical notions.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I believe

more in the scissors than I do in the pencil.” That’s what 20th-century author Truman Capote said about his own writing process. Back in that primitive pre-computer era, he scrawled his words on paper with a pencil and later edited out the extraneous stuff by applying scissors to the manuscript. Judging from your current astrological omens, Pisces, I surmise you’re in a phase that needs the power of the scissors more than the power of the pencil. What you cut away will markedly enhance the long-term beauty and value of the creation you’re working on.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

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F E AT U R E

STORY

The new cabbie It’s difficult to remember my first Uber ride, probably because I was more than a few brews into the evening. But I do remember that Syed Hussain was my driver. And that you don’t have to tip Uber drivers or have cash to get a ride. For those not in the know: Uber is a mobiledevice-based car service. Open the app on a smartphone, request a car, one typically arrives in fewer than four minutes, and pay with a credit card on the app. It’s usually cheaper than a cab—much cheaper—and you don’t have to chase an Uber car down. Hussain’s boss, Jason Fiedler, said that Uber’s luxury car came to Sacramento in February of last year, and UberX (its blue-collar version; that’s how I ride) in September. Hussain is an X driver and was nice enough to chat about life on the cabbie-tech frontier.

What’s your craziest Uber experience?

Where is your favorite local spot to drive?

I have had many passengers who drive for the company Lyft. I think it is pretty crazy that people will ride with their competitors.

Old Sacramento, because it captures the beauty of Sacramento.

I don’t own a car, so I think any car is cool. But your car is truly sweet. What model is it?

I believe taxicabs run a monopoly on consumers, and no one could really do anything about it until companies like Uber, [which] have given their consumer more options. It is a better and more reliable option and has made the process easier. Almost every client I get has complained about how horrible and unreliable taxicabs are.

Ooh, thanks. It’s a 2007 BMW 328i. I think it’s time for an upgrade.

Already? If you could own any car, what would it be? Probably any Lambo. Aventador, to be precise.

I have no clue what that is, but I think you mean Lamborghini, right? Why that car? Because that’s not just a car, it’s a piece of art.

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

For sure. I guess I should stop reading The Sacramento Bee. What is your most memorable experience driving for Uber? I took my boss from Sacramento to San Francisco on my first trip. It was my longest and most informative trip.

After talking with him, do you think companies such as Uber and Lyft will replace taxis? Yes, I think so.

How? Tell me why taxis disappear.

Yeah, sometimes I even get tired of Taxi Dave. Speaking of which: What’s the best music to listen to while driving? For someone getting off from work or a couple going to dinner, I usually try to play soft and relaxing music like jazz. If it’s a young couple on a weekend night, I’ll play the local hip-hop station. ... Or I ask if they have any preference.

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AFTER

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Do people ever call for a ride just to get food? Is it proper etiquette to ask to go to a drive-thru? Yes. Definitely. The client is paying for the fare, so I feel it’s OK for them to ask to stop to pick up food.

I’ve been missing out. Sometimes people call just for that reason.

Does anyone ever have anything interesting to talk about? Most passengers usually talk about their day, like how it’s been or what they have planned. Every now and then, they will ask about my experience about driving, or I’ll ask about their experience with Uber. I like to know how clients feel about the company.

When you’re not working, do you make your wife drive? No, I don’t have to drive. My wife can drive, but I usually drive on long trips, because she’s better than I am at taking care of kids on long trips.

If you could drive anyone as your passenger, who would it be and why? I would love to ride with Jesus, because as a Muslim, I have a tremendous amount of respect for him. I would ask him if there is a way to stop Christians and Muslims from hating each other. Especially because the two religions are pretty similar. Ω

02.06.14

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SN&R

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*├Аi┬З├Аi}┬И├Г├Мi├А├К>├М├КV┬Е┬ИV┬Ь├Ыi┬П┬Ь┬░┬Ь├А}├К L├Ю├К┬У┬И`┬Ш┬И}┬Е├М├К/┬Е├Х├А├Г`>├Ю]├КiL├К├И├К ┬Ь├А├К├Аi}┬И├Г├Мi├А├К┬Ь┬Ш┬З├Г┬И├Мi├К>├М├К├М┬Еi├К ├Х├М├Мi├К County Fairgrounds in Gridley v├А┬Ь┬У├К├И\├О├д>┬Уqn\├О├д>┬У├К┬Ь┬Ш├К├А┬И`i├К day, Sunday February 9.

Chico WildямВower Century SUNDAY, APRIL 27

s-AKEITAWEEKEND3PENDSOMETIMEATOUR%VENT%XPO s2IDERCHECK IN3ATURDAY !PRIL RIDE3UNDAY !PRIL s(ILLY7ILDCATAND TRADITIONAL7ILDmOWERAND &LATmOWERAND s#HILDmOWERAND+IDS"IKE2ODEO s,IMITEDTORIDERS s2IDESSTARTlNISHATTHE3ILVER$OLLAR&AIRGROUNDSIN#HICO

Unknown Coast Weekend SEPTEMBER 20 AND 21

s2IDETHE5NKNOWN#OASTCENTURYINTWODAYS7ECARRYYOURGEAR s#AMPOUTORSTAYINACABIN,IMITEDTORIDERS s2IDESTARTlNISHIN&ERNDALE#!

Challenge Fondo

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12

s!RE9OU5PFORTHE#HALLENGE sANDMILEHILLYCHIP TIMED@CITIZENSRACES sANDMILEFUNRIDES s,IMITEDTORIDERS s2IDESSTARTlNISHIN$URHAM#! More info and registration at www.chicovelo.org

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S 2014 02 06  
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