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FireFighters under attack see news, page 11

ArenA

referendum options see Bites, page 13

ultra loungeS Still Suck see Midtown&down, page 12

StudS who make Soap see 15 Minutes, page 55

Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

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Volume 25, iSSue 08

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thurSday, June 06, 2013


July 12–28 BigFun.org

Send us your favorite State Fair memory and it could be in our TV commercial. After 160 years of the State Fair, everyone has a favorite memory. From giant funnel cakes to milking a cow to the first time on a roller coaster. We want to use your best State Fair photo in our 2013 advertising campaign. Scan the QR code to the right or visit BigFun.org/memories and upload your photo. Who knows, it may end up in a commercial…and wouldn’t that make a great memory!

Upload your favorite State Fair photo now at BigFun.org/memories. 2 

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Sticker shock Recently, I received an invoice in the mail for $179—money owed for routine medical tests, even though I have employer-subsidized health insurance. Annoying, sure, but the check I’ll end up writing to make it square represents just a razor-thin sliver of the tests’ actual cost. I thought about that bill earlier this week after a distant family member took to Facebook to link to an article from the conservative news organization CNSNews.com with the headline “IRS: Cheapest Obamacare Plan Will Be $20,000 Per Family.” Talk about sticker shock—well, it would be if that number was accurate. According to FactCheck.org, a nonpartisan project run by the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania, the $20,000 figure is actually an estimate of what a family of five would pay in tax penalties if it didn’t purchase any coverage at all. Here are some real numbers: A May 22 report from California officials shows that the average currently uninsured 40-year-old will only pay $276 monthly for the midrange cost “Silver plan,” which covers 70 percent of medical fees. That’s $3,312 annually. The average 21-year-old would pay $2,592 yearly. Those who are eligible for federal subsidies—an estimated 2.6 million Californians—will pay much less. Many will pay nothing at all. And yet, to be fair, according to Covered California, the group operating the exchange, those already insured by employers will see an estimated 13 percent rate. That number stings, but much less so than previous predictions that put the hike at 30 percent. The new health-care-exchange program is not without concern—for starters, currently only 13 insurance companies have signed on as providers—but those who want to criticize it should first get the numbers right.

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STREETALK LETTERS NEWS OPINION + BITES FEATuRE STORy ARTS&CuLTuRE SECOND SATuRDAy NIgHT&DAy DISH ASK JOEy STAgE FILM MuSIC + Sound AdvIcE 15 MINuTES

Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising Consultants Josh Burke, Teri Gorman, Dusty Hamilton, Brian Jones, Dave Nettles, Lee Roberts, Julie Sherry, Kelsi White, Gary Winterholler Senior Inside Sales Consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services Coordinators Melissa Bernard Operations Manager Will Niespodzinski Client Publications Editor Michelle Carl Client Publications Writer/Copy Editor Mike Blount Client Publications Writer Natasha vonKaenel

Co-editors Rachel Leibrock, Nick Miller Staff Writers Raheem F. Hosseini, Dave Kempa Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Calendar Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Deena Drewis Contributing Editor Cosmo Garvin Editor-at-large Melinda Welsh Contributors Ngaio Bealum, Rob Brezsny, Joey Garcia, Becky Grunewald, Mark Halverson, Jeff Hudson, Jonathan Kiefer, Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Garrett McCord, Kel Munger, Kate Paloy, Patti Roberts, Ann Martin Rolke, Steph Rodriguez, Seth Sandronsky

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Acting Production Manager Deborah Redmond Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Contributing Photographers Lisa Baetz, Steven Chea, Wes Davis, Ryan Donahue, Taras Garcia, William Leung, Kayleigh McCollum, Shoka, Justin Short, Anne Stokes

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rac he ll@ n ews r ev i ew . com

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COVER illustRatiOn by jasOn CROsby

—Rachel Leibrock

BEFORE

June 6, 2013 | vol. 25, Issue 08

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Executive Coordinator Jessica Takehara Director of First Impressions Alicia Brimhall Street Team Jolynn Conrad, Charissa Isom, Matt Kjar, Anna Lovas, Ashley Ross, Colton Stadtmiller Distribution Manager Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Walt Best, Daniel Bowen, Nina Castro, Jack Clifford, Lydia Comer, Lob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Joanna Gonzalez-Brown, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Greg Meyers, Wendell Powell, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Lolu Sholotan, Jack Thorne President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialists Renee Briscoe, Tami Sandoval Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano

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1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Sales Fax (916) 498-7910 Editorial Fax (916) 498-7920 Website www.newsreview.com SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

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“We opened up all of the doors and threw all of the sheets in the house over the cars.”

Asked at 20th and L streets:

What is the craziest thing you’ve done in a car?

Shelby Griffiths

tech-support agent

One summer, my cousins and I decided we were going to take all the cars parked in the yard and make a giant fort out of all the cars. We opened up all of the doors and threw all of the sheets in the house over the cars. … We plugged the TV in and played Super Nintendo in there for three days.

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Sydney Hall

Kyle Baker

theater technician

We decided to make a mobile bar in the trunk of the car so we could just party. We had a place for our mixing spoons, a place for our shakers. We even put a juice press [in there] for squeezing lemons and limes for our cocktails. It was the best car ever.

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student

It was a pickup truck, and we decided it would be fun to try and fly a kite. We drove the truck and somebody stayed in the back, and we attempted to fly this kite. It did not work our very well. It was a backcountry road.

Taryn Tynan

Michael St. Morior

real-estate worker

I ended up in the passenger side while driving. I was [trying] out my four-wheel drive for the first time in the mountains. I was going straight down a hill and took a turn a little too sharp, and without even knowing what happened, I was on the other side.

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Ryan LaCasse

shift supervisor

I was heading down Highway 50 and I flicked my cigarette, and the cherry came back inside the car and landed in my lap. I didn’t notice it until there was smoke filling the car. ... I spread my legs, and my entire inner pant [leg] on one side was burnt. My inner thighs had second-degree burns.

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lighting salesman

Once, I picked up some hitchhikers near Nevada City. They didn’t have on any shoes, and they were going to work. We sang along to Queen the whole ride. They worked in one of those hippie shops. It was the only time I picked up hitchhikers.

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Email your letters to sactoletters@newsreview.com.

Real reggae

online buzz

Re “One love, one heart” by Jonathan Mendick (SN&R Arts&Culture, May 23): As a local Midtown reggae deejay, I would like to first say thanks for the article. The reggae scene in Sacramento has been thriving for well over 30 years here, and it’s nice to see our local paper givin’ the genre some love. However, I was disappointed that you didn’t look into the “roots” of playing reggae while white, and that you didn’t interview any of the people who have been active in the scene for more than just a few years. One of the longest-working promotletteR of ers for reggae in Sac the week was Jeff Woodworth of Bigga Promotions, workin’ since the ’70s, holdin’ it down through the ’80s, [at] the Courtyard in Old Sac back in the early ’90s, as well as Reggae by the Pool; [he] kept promoting until his death in 2010. Papa Wheelie has been hosting his weekly radio show Sundays on KDVS 90.3 FM for 13 years and has a support base of over 5,000 listeners, and I have been holdin’ down weeklies here since I moved here in 2000, not to mention DJ Esef, Selekta Lou. There is a lot more to our scene than bands from the burbs playin’ reggae.

On whether SacramentO ShOuld ban plaStic bagS:

If you go anywhere else in the world you would find that we are one of the handful of countries that use disposable bags. We are a throw away, disposable culture. It is not a “right”. It’s just simply wasteful. Sheila Istvanick

Some people can’t grasp the concept; amazing. If plastic bags aren’t around, you WILL be able to find something (Hopefully) more sustainable and environmentally conscious to use in their place. The government or BIG BROTHER has nothing to do with this decision. Use your grey matter, make an intelligent decision, and get off the soapbox of “The government’s taking my rights!!!.” Do something greater than yourself and calm your ego down Sacramentians! David Churchill

v i a F a c e b oo k

via Facebook So instead of reusing grocery bags to dispose of trash, recycling, and kitty litter, I need to buy plastic bags that will only be used once? Karen Campbell

via Facebook Let’s just give up our choices and freedoms and BAN EVERYTHING under the guise of protecting the environment and “saving the wittle childwen.” The world will be a better place!!!!!!

I reuse my plastic grocery bags for everything... Lunch bags, trash bags, fruit guts from my juicer, storage (grab a permanent marker as they are perfect to label, and other stuff. They don’t leak (paper bags do) and they are more sanitary then the reusable bags. It’s easy to find a place to recycle them when they need to be retired. Additionally, I’d like to keep the government out my preference for food carrying during my shopping trips! Verna Sulpizio

Rick Piccirilli

v i a F a c e b oo k

Moved from sactown to here in Corvallis....this town passed a bag ban last year and ya know what? It’s workin alright. Serenity Collier

v ia Fa c e b o o k

On whether lOcal cOpS care abOut jaywalking: no and they apparently have less interest in enforcing the laws on folks who ride bicycles. Barbara Brown

v ia Fa c e b o o k

Yuppers to jaywalking!!! just be aware!!! Funny thing in NYC if the traffic is at a complete standstill you weave-walk through it or if the car is far enough enough away you dash for it Janice Marie Foote

via Facebook

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Facebook.com/ SacNewsReview

v ia Fa c e b o o k

Wok Star

S acr am en t o

@SacNewsReview

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YOUR $40 PURCHASE In store only. No double discounts through June.

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BUILDING A

HEALTHY S A C R A M E N T O

Navigating The Law BY KENDALL FIELDS

W

hen a natural gas facility needs to be sited or a transportation route needs to be cut, low-income neighborhoods are often targeted first. Amy Williams at Legal Services of Northern California (LSNC) says this is because traditionally impoverished people are categorized as a group that won’t stand up for themselves — maybe because of uncertainty about what to do or lack of knowledge about their legal rights. Williams, who is the regional counsel for health in Sacramento, works with a team of attorneys at LSNC to empower these people to navigate the law so they can not only understand their legal rights, but also act as their own advocates.

“BE YOUR OWN ADVOCATE. IT’S ALWAYS UP TO A PERSON TO ASSERT [HIS] RIGHTS.” -Amy Williams The nonprofit receives funding for 1.5 attorney positions through The California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities (BHC) grant, but actually has a team of five attorneys working on BHC-related projects, Williams explains. “Health is broader than just going to the doctor,” Williams explains. “We view health much like The California Endowment does — it’s the ability to not only get

medical treatment, but to have access to transportation, get to school safely, to grow a garden and eat nutritious foods, feel secure in your environment.” LSNC is the only legal services agency in Sacramento aiming to combat poverty through education, with the belief that a knowledge of the law and legal rights will level the playing field for low-income individuals. There are legal protections for so many things that low-income community members are facing, such as unlawful evictions and access to assistance, Williams says. But the problem is enforcement. LSNC gives people the tools to solve their own issues and become leaders. “Be your own advocate,” Williams advises. “It’s always up to a person to assert [his] rights.” LSNC provided legal guidance to citizens of Oak Park when McDonald’s tried to put in a restaurant with a double drive-thru in 2012 at Stockton Boulevard and 2nd Avenue. The citizens were concerned that the design not only was unsafe for pedestrians and cyclists, it also posed a threat to public health. The activists formed The Healthy Development for Oak Park (HDOP) and collected more than 1,700 signatures. After hearing 30 members speak, Williams says the city Planning Commission ruled against the installation of the restaurant.

come in with an idea of what we’d like to do, then listen to what the community has to say and realize we are totally wrong and need to adjust how we can help.” The LSNC team is working with local health clinics to create a medicallegal partnership so they can help individuals with everything from insurance coverage and medical bills to preventing illness. LSNC has even started a community engagement effort to get community members talking about how they can improve their neighborhoods.

The concept of community lawyering is prevalent at LSNC. “We learn as much from the community as we can ever hope to teach,” Williams says. “We may

By educating clients on their legal rights, LSNC fosters self-sufficiency and what Williams likes to call “resident power.” “I don’t think you could argue that helping people with their basic needs is ever going to be a negative thing,” Williams says, explaining how her job is her civic duty and a way for her to give back to the community in which she lives.

BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES In 2010, The California Endowment launched a 10-year, $1 billion plan to improve the health of 14 challenged communities across the state. Over the 10 years, residents, community-based organizations and public institutions will work together to address the socioeconomic and environmental challenges contributing to the poor health of their communities.

Amy Williams serves as the regional counsel for health at Legal Services of Northern California. She and her team work to help residents navigate the law and advocate for themselves. Photo by Anne Stokes

www.SacBHC.org

PAID WITH A GRANT FROM THE CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT 8 

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Drama at Loaves See News

See News

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Referendums and recalls See Bites

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Adults in the room

PhOTO by laRRy DalTON

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Firemen under attack

Darrell Steinberg  breaks down  California’s budget For the first time during his tenure as state Senate president pro tem, Darrell Steinberg’s by working with a budget surplus. On the Jeff vonKaenel eve of meetings with fellow legislators and Gov. Jerry Brown to hash out a deal, j effv@ newsr evie w.c om SN&R sat down with the senator to discuss worthwhile expenditures and the real adults in the room. State Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (top right) meets at the Capitol on Monday. The next couple weeks will be replete with budget negotiations; the deadline is June 15.

We finally have a surplus in California. Tell me your ideas. First of all, I think it’s important to say I don’t see us far apart from the governor. We have the same basic goals. None of us want to go back to 2009 or 2011. The era of massive deficits. … [But] there is another part of what has occurred over the last five years that must be addressed: the impact of some of the cuts on the most vulnerable in California.

What are your priorities? Three main priorities. No. 1 is dental care for the poor, and many of whom are working poor. ... I’ve told this story many times ... about my experience in October 2012 in one of those regular Saturday-morning coffee klatches at the California Dental Association volunteer fair at Cal Expo. [I] went up there not knowing what to expect, but saw something that had a profound effect on me. … You literally had thousands of people waiting in line, not to get their teeth cleaned or get a dental checkup, but instead to take advantage of one Saturday in the Sacramento area to have major dental surgery—to deal with abscessed teeth, to deal with untreated root canals, people who actually had teeth replaced because they had lost all of their teeth because of the lack of dental preventative care. It shocked me and upset me. ... I decided that I was going to make this a priority.

JeffvonKaenel is the CEO of News & Review.

Read SN&R’s interview with State Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg in its entirety online at www.newsreview.com.

Mental health must also be one of your priorities? Prop. 63 is generating a billion dollars a year, a little more. During that same period, the billion dollars has grown and continued. … We have lost $700 million a year in preexisting funding. If you remember, Prop. 63 was supposed to be on top of an insufficient level of funding. Instead, we’ve lost about $750 million at the bottom. BEFORE

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What does that mean? It means that people [with mental-health issues] are showing up in emergency rooms, they are showing up at jails, they’re on the streets, they’re showing up at social-service facilities. There is not capacity within the system to help people who are in the midst of a severe mental-health or mental-illness episode to ... get stable, then … be linked to the right level of long-term services. [My] proposal ... calls for a one-time expenditure of general-fund dollars of $142 million, to build capacity for 2,000 crisis residential and crisis stabilization beds in California. ... Places outside of emergency rooms, outside of hospitals, outside of jails. Places that have 24-hour care, where people in the midst of an intense psychotic episode or a severe mental-health episode ... can get the care they need, can get stable. ... The second part of the proposal is to provide the capacity of what I call 600 triage personnel. What are “triage personnel”? People with the training and the expertise to be able to asses somebody that comes into contact with the police, that comes into contact with the emergency room, that comes into contact in the jail setting, that comes into contact at Loaves & Fishes or other similar places. ... I want 200 people that are stationed at emergency rooms throughout California, 200 people that are stationed at jails and 200 people that are at large social-service facilities throughout the state. ... We believe with [in] this proposal, which only requires a one-time generalfund investment.

STORY

You said that there were three things. What is the third? The third is on the educational side, to bring back vocational education or careertechnical education to California high schools. The dropout rate has dropped, but it is still unacceptable, especially for Latinos and African-Americans. … In a state with the technology and expertise like California, there’s no reason why algebra, geometry, sciences, English and history cannot be taught in multiple applied ways that relate to the leading and emerging industries where the job potential for young people is the greatest. … [T]oo many kids are not engaged, because they don’t see the relationship between what is being taught and what they might actually do with their lives.

So, the total price tag of these three initiatives, in terms of your budget and comparing it to Brown’s budget—how many dollars are we talking about? Well, we also have some offsets. There are some savings that we use that the governor doesn’t have embedded in. But it would be about $300 million to $400 million a year, [that] is what we’re talking about above the governor’s budget.

This debate has been characterized as Brown as the adult in the room. How do you want to respond to that?

And we have made cuts that would be unimaginable in any other period of time in California. I never shied away with my politics and why I was motivated to run for public office in the first place. My colleagues and I never shied from making the hardest of hard cuts because we had to. When it comes to arguing for modest reinvestments or modest investments into crucial areas, I feel just fine about where we stand.

Put the $400 million in context of the whole state budget. What percentage of it is it? The general-fund budget under our proposal would be about $98 billion.

So we’re talking about a half-a-percent. If we have a difference with the governor at this stage, I think we can work all this it out. He projected revenues that were much more conservative than the legislative analyst. The legislative analyst does not have a reputation for being wild and crazy when it comes to state spending. They’re very conservative themselves. But they said that the Department of Finance is too conservative.

Your term ends in 19 months. What happens in 19 months and one day?

I don’t know. It’s all up in the air at this point. I’m beginning to think about what I’m might do next in my life. It’ll be hard You know, I’ve been around long enough to match this experience. I’ve no doubt that to know that governors act like governors. I’ll do something that is interesting, that Jerry Brown is the major adult in the contributes and that keeps me involved in room, but not the only one. I was here in the stuff I care about. There may be another 2009. I was here in 2010. I’ve been here political office in the future. I just don’t during Gov. Brown’s first two years. know yet. Ω   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |    06.06.13     |   SN&R     |   9


Hidden in plain sight Longtime Loaves & Fishes volunteer turns out to be a stranger, alleged felon After living under an assumed name for years, a homeless volunteer at Loaves & Fishes is in court this week for by Raheem a decade-old sexual-battery case F. Hosseini involving a minor. His former workplace and resira h e e m h @ dence, meanwhile, is reeling from the ne w s re v i e w . c o m news and questions surrounding its and vetting policies. Dave Kempa Sacramento police booked Roy davek@ Ruben Sanchez—who was known at ne w s re v i e w . c o m Loaves as Anthony Gonzalez—into county jail following a warrant arrest on April 24, online jail records show. According to Sacramento Superior Court data, the 62-year-old Sanchez was arraigned on two felony counts of committing lewd and lascivious acts upon a girl who was under 18 years old.

“These are children that we care deeply about. We’ll do our best to keep them safe.� Joan Burke director of advocacy, Loaves & Fishes

Summer Events Wine Walks–June 29, July 27, August 31 Beerfest & Bluegrass Festival–July 6 Tough Mudder–July 13-14 Tahoe Trail 100–July 20 Autum Food & Wine–September 6-8 Tough Mudder–September 28-29 On-Going Events: Mountain Bike Race Series— Downhill and Cross-Country, Mountain Bike Clinics and Camps, Tahoe Star Tours, STRIDER Adventure Zone, Retro Skate Night and Live Music on the Village Stage       

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Dave Kempa’s independent reporting for this story is funded by a grant from Sacramento Emergency Foodlink.

The incident allegedly occurred in September 2003, when Sacramento County sheriff’s deputies and child-welfare officers checked in on some children living at a home in an unincorporated area of the county. During the course of that call, a 14-year-old girl claimed Sanchez touched her breast over her clothing, explained sheriff’s spokesman Sgt. Jason Ramos. “Sanchez was a friend of the girl’s father and acting as somewhat of a ‘caretaker’ for her and other children at the time,� Ramos told SN&R. A warrant was ultimately issued for Sanchez, though it would be 10 years before his arrest. Sanchez evaded apprehension by living under the “Anthony Gonzalez� pseudonym for at least the last eight years. In that time, he volunteered as the full-time head groundskeeper for Sacramento Loaves & Fishes, living in one of the nonprofit’s on-site cabins. Earlier this year, the Mercy Foundation website ran a “beneficiary story� on Sanchez, then known as Gonzalez. The article painted a portrait of a man who found peace at Loaves after years of inner turmoil and drug addiction. Loaves executive

director Sister Libby Fernandez is quoted as calling Sanchez “not an employee, but a critical volunteer who helps beautify the campus for our many guests.� It was perhaps that “volunteer� status that spared Sanchez from filing paperwork that could have brought to light the felony charges against him. Loaves & Fishes has a handful of cabins, located adjacent to the Mustard Seed School for homeless children, which the organization often provides to homeless volunteers for shelter. It is in one of these cabins that Sanchez resided. Fernandez declined to comment, but director of advocacy Joan Burke defended the organization’s policies. She said Loaves & Fishes performs stringent fingerprint and background checks on all Mustard Seed School volunteers, but did not know the policy for the people living in the nearby cabins. “These are children that we care deeply about,� she said. “We’ll do our best to keep them safe.� Employees and fellow volunteers knew Sanchez well. As head groundskeeper, he was often seen driving throughout the premises in a golf cart. But in April, employees came to work one day to find that “Anthony� no longer volunteered for them. Assistant public defender Rich Berson is representing Sanchez. He told SN&R he doesn’t expect any sort of resolution to the case at a hearing scheduled on Thursday, both because of the nature of the charges and the lengthy interim between the alleged offenses and Sanchez’s arrest. “It’s difficult after 10 years to get an accurate sense of people’s memories, especially when we’re talking about witnesses who were younger,� he said. Ramos said a detective notified the victim, who would now be in her 20s, of Sanchez’s arrest. Sanchez spent 15 days on a sheriff’s work-project detail in December 1994. Eleven years later, a park ranger dropped Sanchez off at Loaves & Fishes, where he initially refused to give his name, the Mercy Foundation article states. If convicted of the crimes he faces, Sanchez would be required to register as a sex offender. Ί


Firefighter fighters Shotguns, hatchets and strange incidents   part of Sacramento’s early fire season When it comes to Sacramento’s sketchy urban jungle, sometimes a drunk with a gun is the toughest fire to put out. by In recent weeks, city fire personnel Raheem F. Hosseini encountered a conflagration of aggro behavior from the very folks they rahe emh@ were often trying to help. newsre view.c om A shotgun was pointed, punches were landed and at least one hatchet was waved atop a fire engine, sending otherwise burly firefighters back a few steps, Sacramento fire officials report. The violent confrontations are worrisome at a time when there’s seemingly more encounters between first-responders and unpredictable individuals in unpredictable situations. Sacramento police officers have themselves been responding to more medical-aid calls involving erratic, sometimes violent behavior, police records show. Nationally, 37 firefighters died while on duty this year, according to the U.S. Fire Administration. While tragic, fire fatalities are at least an acknowledged risk for the profession. But being a firefighter

First-responder firefighters have been the target of bizarre aggression lately.

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is proving dangerous business for reasons having little to do with fire. Heart attacks and strokes accounted for 49 percent of last year’s on-duty deaths, while six New York firefighters were fatally shot in Webster last year. Fire staff often get called out to the same scenes that draw law enforcement, said Lloyd Ogan, deputy chief of operations at the Sacramento Fire Department. There isn’t always a lot of information from reporting parties to prepare first responders for what they’re walking into.

where an intoxicated driver accelerated through a red light, struck a taxi van, sideswiped another car and then slammed into the back of a parked fire engine. The engine was there responding to a medical-aid call, Ogan said, and positioned so as to protect the ambulance nearby, which is standard procedure. After bashing into all those vehicles, the driver reportedly exited the car and struggled with personnel at the scene. Vehicular collisions accounted for 18 firefighter deaths nationally in 2012, representing a four-fold A man with a hatchet increase over the previous year, the USFA states. entered the garage, The May 25 crash-and-grab wasn’t climbed atop of one as weird as what happened the same day at a nearby fire house, where a of the engines and man with a hatchet entered the garage, started swinging. climbed atop of one of the engines and started swinging. Police detained On May 26, this double-blind the man after he left the fire house, involved four local firefighters Ogan said. showing up to a neighbor’s house to There were also two separate follow up on a minor illegal-burning incidents on May 19, in which firecomplaint. department employees, responding Upon arriving to the 1400 block of to medical calls, were greeted with Birchwood Lane in south Sacramento closed fists by those they were trying that Sunday night, an intoxicated to assist. 61-year-old man exited his house with One scuffle occurred at the actual a shotgun, shouting that he had “the scene of the call, while the other took right to defend his property or someplace in a hospital, when department thing,” Ogan recalled. “Which was paramedics waited to transfer their unrelated to us, because we weren’t patient into hospital care. One paraon his property.” medic suffered a minor injury to his Ogan said one of his firefighters face, police logs state. tried to defuse the situation with the “It’s not unusual for us to have agitated subject, identified by police as some minor skirmish just because Richard Stevenson, who allegedly put of the nature of the business we’re down the firearm and went into his involved in,” Ogan shared. “I’ve been home, but reappeared. The firefighter doing this 30 years, and that’s the way tackled Stevenson when he turned and they come, in little bursts.” started walking toward the weapon. It is something he hopes doesn’t Officers cited and released start happening more often on the job. Stevenson after taking him to “Time is just going to have to bear the hospital for minor injuries that out,” he said. “It’s something sustained in the fall, police we’re going to pay attention to.” logs state. Ogan said his people are trained to He has yet to be offihave good situational awareness. The cially charged by the firefighter who talked the shotgun out Sacramento County of an agitated homeowner’s hands was District Attorney’s a good example of that. office. Spokeswoman “We work with law enforcement Shelly Orio said the to protect our people as best we can,” arrest reports hadn’t he added. “But at the same time, I been submitted to her have a duty to help the people, too, so office yet. it’s a fine line that we walk.” One arrest that The USFA tallied 83 on-duty firedid stick occurred fighter deaths in both 2012 and 2011. a day earlier on the Five firefighters died in California 2100 block of J Street, last year. Ω   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R

BEATS

Walmart’s win An 11-1 super-duper-majority of the Sacramento Planning Commission was more concerned with seeming anti-business than with sparing an ordinance that makes Walmart and its big-box ilk account for their economic impacts. The ordinance functionally kept the huge outlets out of central Sacramento since 2005. On May 23, the commission decided that was long enough. City planning staff says the ordinance has pushed big-box stores and their big-fat sales-tax hauls into outlying areas with few to no restrictions, putting Sacramento at a “competitive disadvantage.” There are 14 Walmarts surrounding the city, but none in Sacramento proper. Not every commissioner thought this was a bad thing. “They hire consultants to ‘teach’ local residents how to ‘compete’ with them with the pure goal of running them out of business,” said chairman Philip Harvey. “So let’s not kid ourselves.” But Harvey voted with the rest of his colleagues. Only Commissioner Alan LoFaso tried to rework the doomed ordinance into something more palatable. “This is an exercise of drafting a whole new ordinance on a blank page at a late hour,” he said. “This is a losing battle, I can tell.” If the city council upholds the commission’s recommendation, LoFaso will be right. (Raheem F. Hosseini)

Exposed on the grid Thank you, downtown Samaritan who reported seeing that which cannot be unseen. A man was arrested in the north end of the central-city grid after a witness called in an indecent-exposure complaint last week. According to police logs, the caller watched Troy Charles, 28, expose himself to a woman on F and 18th streets a little after 9 a.m. last Thursday. The woman reportedly crossed the street to avoid the situation, while the witness confronted Charles. Unfortunately, the young man wasn’t finished. He continued north on 18th until he passed another woman, who “ignored his attempt to say something to her.” That’s when he grabbed her behind. The same witness was soon able to flag down a nearby officer, who caught Charles after a brief chase. He was booked for misdemeanor battery and violation of parole. (Dave Kempa)

Realignment realigned Two years and roughly $50 million later, a Sacramento County partnership with the word “community” in its name is finally asking for community input. The Community Corrections Partnership, charged with steering local realignment efforts and lowering recidivism, has come under increased scrutiny for pouring too much state money into old-world incarceration policies and not enough into community programs with better recidivism results. Since an SN&R investigation published in April (see “Prisons, realignment and the California rehab racket,” SN&R Feature Story, April 4) the CCP began changing its modus operandi. It surrendered final budget authority to the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors and released a breakdown identifying needed service gaps for its re-entering offender population. And on June 6, in the board of supervisors chambers, the CCP was scheduled to invite Sacramento community groups and nonprofits to weigh in as it considers how to spend the roughly $35 million coming its way from the state. While the CCP has allowed for public comment in previous meetings, this is the first time it’s actively soliciting such input. (R.F.H.)

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License# OE86569

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Spank the swank It appears Sacramento will get its new  arena—but no ultra lounges, please

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Just when you thought ultra lounges were done, Sacramento-arena proponents want to bring them back. But before I spend the next some-odd words deconstructing Sacramento’s love affair with leather, house music and $20 cover charges, it’s worth noting that an antisubsidy group still hopes to gather enough signatures to put the proposed Kings project to a vote, via special R E L by NiCK MiL election. This seems highly unlikely, this corralling of ni c k a m @ne w s re v i e w . c o m some 33,000 sigs. But most people said the same thing about the Kings staying. (See Cosmo Garvin’s Bites column this week, on the next page, for more on the initiative effort.) Anyway, about those ultra lounges: The latest Sactown Magazine features a story by its co-editor called “#HereWeBuild�; The Sacramento Bee also ran a version of this story in its Sunday opinion section. I have a lot of respect for the team of journalists at both outlets, but some of these ideas for what the arena needs are starryeyed and stale.

If you want rooftop martinis, go to the Palms.

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Some of this week’s column previously appeared on SN&R’s new blog, Page Burner: www.newsreview.com/ pageburner.

Follow Nick Miller on Twitter at @NickMiller916. ÂŽ

12   |   SN&R   |   06.06.13

Or maybe I just need Google Glass, because my Think Big vision isn’t working. One popular idea—not exclusive to Sactown—is that the new arena needs a tower with an ultra lounge at the top. Sactown co-editor Rob Turner envisions a structure that rises 100 feet above street level, so that the entire cityscape can be soaked in. It’s not far-fetched; as he noted, there is a “stylishâ€? One80 Grey Goose rooftop ultra lounge at the recently opened Amway Center basketball arena in Orlando. Apparently, this idea has legs. Activist group Here We Stay, who was instrumental in keeping the Kings in Sacto during the past three years, wrote a letter to new Kings owner Vivek RanadivĂŠ last month also asking for a skyline ultra lounge to hang out in after games. Perhaps I no longer have my pulse on what gets a Sacramentan’s jones going, but I can assure you this: Grid dwellers eat ultra lounges for breakfast, whether in Midtown or on top of a damn skyscraper.

Remember Lounge on 20? That ultra lounge couldn’t survive on the busy K and 20th street corner. Yet its successor, German bierhall LowBrau, is one of the more popular hot spots on the grid. And former Lounge on 20 chef Pajo Bruich sells out reservations at his new spot, Enotria Restaurant Wine Bar, to much fanfare (including an SN&R cover story last week). The take home: It’s not about “pizzazz.� High-rise, five-star hotels for 1 percenters; multimillion-dollar public artworks by Claes Oldenburg (i.e., the guy who sculpts 50-foot-tall paintbrushes); bright lights; luxury condos—what’s up with glitz and ritz fascination? I think people’s hearts are in the right place. The arena shouldn’t be a “black hole,� and it should have things we can enjoy 365 days a year. Plus, housing and public-art investments are crucial. It’s just all those ideas are havesand-have-nots visions. And the new arena should be something everyone can enjoy, not a 916-baller-status fantasy dropped into the middle of Downtown Plaza. I did like many of the Here We Stay arena ideas on Sactown Royalty’s website. Building an arena with local contractors, engineers and sound designers is essential, especially because of the public subsidy. Solar panels, bike valet and eco-friendly features—yes, please. But if you want rooftop martinis, go to the Palms. A quick word on this year’s Friday Night Concerts in the Park: Wow! The Downtown Sacramento Partnership has injected new juju into the summertime concert series, and the team over there deserves massive kudos. Last week, they somehow persuaded one of the city’s most beloved bands, indie dance-funk darlings Chk Chk Chk to headline a free show for their hometown. This gives CITP big-time gravitas and name ID. Also, DSP’s team has transformed the park. No longer do a smattering of sweaty, possibly creepy shadow dancers decorate the stage front while beer drinkers are behind fences. Now, throngs of people elbow up to see the bands, some dancing, some even with kids sitting atop their shoulders. CITP is once again a must-do Friday-after-work event. Ί


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Lots of ways Sacramentans can nix the Kings arena deal, none of them easy Of course Sacramento citizens ought to vote on the $260 million-plus proposed NBA basketballarena subsidy. The question is, what sort of vote? And how many votes should they have? You already know that a group called Sacramento Taxpayers Opposed to Pork

intends to soon circulate an initiative petition that would require a public vote on this and arvin G any future arena schemes. O SM CO by The proposed initiative reads thus: cos mog@ newsrev iew.c om “The City of Sacramento shall not use or redirect, undertake an obligation to pay, or bond or borrow against monies intended for or from the City General Fund for the development and/or construction of a professional sports arena, without the approval of a simple majority of voters.” It’s a lot better than the language STOP was shopping around last year. That measure was so broad it would have forced a public vote for just about any project involving any public money for any kind of “sports and entertainment facility.” (See “Full STOP,” SN&R Bites; March 29, 2012.) Of course, the Maloofs blew up last year’s deal, so no harm, no foul. Bites generally isn’t crazy about the idea of having voters make complex policy decisions at the ballot box. That’s what we hired the city council to do. Does every bit of financial assistance for any professional sports arena, no matter how small, really require a public vote? Why should those subsidies require a public vote, while subsidies to other private enterprise do not? What if you don’t like subsidies to the arts? How about subsidies for mermaid bars? Should we vote on those as well? The initiative is unwieldy in other ways. If STOP gathers enough signatures, we’ll get to have a vote on whether we should have a vote on sports subsidies. If that vote is successful, then, several months later, we’ll vote on the actual subsidies. Don’t get confused and think you’re voting no on the arena when you’re really voting no on voting. Or vice versa. There’s a better way. California’s progressive movement gave us the initiative, the referendum and the recall. But the referendum never gets much attention, compared to its pushy cousins. The referendum would allow citizens, in one step, to scotch this particular arena deal if they feel like it’s a bad one. The beauty of the referendum is that it works as a citizen veto. That way, policy makers make policy, and we can correct them, if necessary. The referendum would be be more elegant. But perversely, it’s a lot harder to use, notes Mark Paul, co-author of California Crackup. “It’s a general problem that California’s system is tipped in favor of the initiative instead of the referendum,” he told Bites. BEFORE

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In his book, he calls California’s initiative system powerful but “inflexible” compared to other modern direct democracies. “It is isn’t very direct. And is surely isn’t democratic.” (Paul, by the way, is a former Sacramento Bee editorial writer. He calls Sacramento’s arena shakedown, “As direct an extortion as we’ve ever seen by the NBA.” Apparently, Sac Bee editorial writers used to be made of more skeptical stuff.) Here’s the problem. Both the initiative and the referendum require signatures from 10 percent of registered voters in the city. But an initiative effort is allowed six months for signature gathering, where a referendum is only allowed 30 days to circulate.

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The timing for a referendum is made more difficult because signature gatherers can’t start their work until the council officially approves an arena deal. As it moves forward through multiple votes, there may be disagreement about what counts as a final “referendable” action. “It all makes the referendum nearly impossible to do,” says one of the proponents of the STOP initiative, James Cathcart. Things are further complicated by the fact that STOP is hoping to get the city to call a special election sometime this year. That requires signatures of 15 percent of registered voters. And the city is now saying that to meet deadlines for a special election, the activists would only have about a month to gather approximately 35,000 signatures. Otherwise, the measure would get kicked back to the June 2014 primary election. If the initiative effort comes up short, voters have one more shot. California law also allows for a special referendum on the issuance of any revenue bonds—which would likely be involved in the financing of an arena. Those rules require a number of signatures equal to 10 percent of the last vote for governor. That’s a considerably lower bar, just about 12,000 signatures, though the deadlines would still be tight. If voters nix the bonds, they would effectively stop the project. Lots of ways citizens can veto this arena deal, if they choose. But none of them are easy. Ω

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Speared by common sense Sacramento County’s regional-parks department put out a reminder that  spearguns are verboten at parks, to which even Ahab might say, “No duh.”  But, apparently, spearfishing is a big enough pastime, so the common-sense  announcement was made. Here are some other ones we hope you already  know: Don’t drive a tank on the sidewalk. Make sure to breathe in and out. And  don’t believe everything you read.

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That’s comedy Whose eyes didn’t roll when the Maloof  family took out an ad in Sunday’s  Sacramento Bee thanking Kings fans for  all the good times? Anyway, mad props to  the Sacramento Comedy Spot in Midtown for  its marquee message this past Monday  morning (see photo).

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CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDR A city committee was  scheduled to recommend  AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED changing zoning rules for  APPROVED BY: medical-pot clubs in Sacramento  this past Tuesday. The new  rules would make it harder for  dispensaries to open (the only  spots now are in industrial  areas in the north and east) or  relocate—as if the feds weren’t  hassling them enough.

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14   |   SN&R   |   06.06.13

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This Modern World

by tom tomorrow

SN&R’s new voices In this week’s issue, you will find an eight-page Sac Pride News. You may ask, “What is this doing in SN&R?” And even if you are not asking, I’ve got an answer for you. The Sac Pride News, and the radio show Sac Pride Live on Talk 650 KSTE (Saturday nights at 10 p.m.), are the creations of Tyler Edwards, Kevin Manz and Todd Lohse, along with Jovi Radtke. This energetic, dedicated group is putting their heart, soul and a significant amount of money into bringing a voice to the Sacramento LGBTQQIA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex, ally) community. And we at SN&R are a part of this project. They have rented space in our building. We are helping them produce They are putting their publication. We also distribute it in nearly 80,000 copies of SN&R. their heart, soul We hope that by taking advantage of SN&R’s established distribution, and a significant their paper has a better chance to amount of money thrive in these challenging times. We like having new voices in into bringing the paper. We do not control their content. But we believe many of our a voice to the current readers will like it. And we Sacramento hope some new readers will start picking up SN&R because of this LGBTQQIA expanded coverage. community. What if Sac Pride News writes a story that I disagree with? I’m prepared for that. Our reporters and editors regularly write stories that I disagree with. I would not have it any other way. The point of the paper, in my view, is not to have a narrow position, but rather to have a wide-ranging listen to podcasts community dialogue, where different points of view of sac Pride live at and different voices are heard. http://tinyurl.com/ This has been one of our major goals since the sacpridelive. read the very beginning. We wanted to broaden the community first issue of sac Pride news at http://tinyurl. dialogue. We wanted to let a greater number of voices com/sacpridenews. be heard, particularly voices that have been excluded from or ignored by traditional media. This is why I let the conservative Sacramento Union weekly newspaper insert into our paper. It would have never inserted SN&R into its paper. I didn’t agree with most of its positions, but it added another voice to the mix that our readers heard from in the pages of the weekly SN&R. For similar reasons, we are building a new publications division at the News & Review. This new division helps nonprofits, government agencies and some businesses tell their story with an eight- or 12-page mininewspaper. We use our core competency Jeff vonKaenel of taking a complicated and often confusing message is the president, Ceo and majority and presenting it in simplified stories that help people owner of the news gain real understanding. We have produced more than & review newspapers a hundred of these publications for very happy clients. in sacramento, This work is aligned with our mission. It is another Chico and reno. way to add additional voices to the conversation. We hope you enjoy Sac Pride News. And even if you don’t, we hope you enjoy living in a town that continues to involve a greater number of people in a community dialogue. Ω

The slumlord situation The ink wasn’t even dry on reporter Dave Kempa’s story in dire conditions. Exposed conductors, defecon slummy residential motels last week, but it tive flooring, unventilated heat—the bugs, by was already affecting policy. His inquiries into cockroaches and rodents that some folks share Raheem why downtown’s “single-room occupancy” their rooms with have it better. F. Hosseini hotels were underoccupied in a city with Kempa was able to question Councilman r ahe emh@ marked low-income housing needs set the tone Steve Hansen at length about these issues in newsre view.c om during a recent city council meeting. a phone interview. It’s in Hansen’s district Through his digging, Kempa found that that many of these motels are located. And many of these hotels ran high vacancies while he declined to go on the record with because of deplorable living conditions SN&R, Hansen did have some questions of that even poor people his own during the May 28 can’t abide. council meeting. Sacto’s rentalIn response to one of Watch out for inspection program was his queries, the Community those bedbugs. supposed to courseDevelopment Department’s correct some of these Ron O’Connor said the A version of this essay issues. In 2008, at the central-city residential motels originally appeared on program’s inception, the city noted code are indeed inspected to the same degree that sn&r’s new blog, other rental structures are. “We do inspect Page Burner, at and safety violations in 69 percent of the www.newsreview.com/ 2,932 parcels it inspected. Read that again: them every year,” O’Connor said. pageburner. 69 percent. “To same standard that you would Last year, the city inspected a bunch more inspect other rental housing?” Hansen followed up. read “Why so parcels—4,876 to be exact—and tallied violamany vacancies at tions in 30 percent of them. When you do the O’Connor cleared his throat and paused. sacramento’s downtown math, it amounts to roughly the same number “Well, yes, we should,” he started. “And resident hotels?” sometimes the inspectors get in there and, (sn&r news, May 30), of violations at 56 fewer parcels. Anyway, city officials and rental-housing you know, feel sorry for a tenant here, a dave Kempa’s story on resident hotels advocates say the program is working. But it’s tenant there, but we’re working on that right in sacramento, not yet helping everyone. now. But I will get back to you on that.” at http://tinyurl.com/ As Kempa’s story relates, impoverished In the meantime, watch out for those sactohotels. residents of cheap residential motels like the bedbugs. Ω Marshall, Capitol Park and Congress often live BEFORE

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illustrations by jason crosby

16   |   SN&R   |   06.06.13


L

ike a Bad RoBot mega production from J.J. abrams, the story of geoengineering—wherein scientists propose using large-scale technologies to manipulate the earth’s temperature as a way to avert global warming—seems straight out of science fiction’s playbook. One scenario has a fleet of high-altitude planes spraying sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere, so as to block the sun and cool the planet. Others proposals involve:

The collective failure of the world’s governments to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions is widely acknowledged; extreme weather events that were once modeled by scientists as early “potential” warming scenarios have become reality, beaming into our living rooms on CNN with regularity. And just a few weeks back, the Earth’s CO2 level reached an average daily level of 400 parts per million, a milestone that has not been registered in 3 million years, before humans existed. Scientists agree that the number portends badly for humankind, especially for coastal populations and countries like India, China and Africa, where human-caused global warming is predicted—possibly by the last half of this decade—to cause the sea to rise up to 6 feet, severe heat waves, drought, flood and famine. This harsh reality opens the argument for those who believe humankind may need a stay of execution.

Plus, it doesn’t take an atmospheric scientist to recognize that a global tech fix could go wrong very badly. The world’s climate is complicated, with natural systems indelibly interwoven. An attempt to dim the sun above Canada could result in droughts in Asia or Africa. An effort to fertilize the ocean in one place could worsen ocean acidification, create marine-animal die-offs and cause toxic tides in another. The endeavor by a famine-plagued tropical nation to seed the clouds could damage the ozone layer and interrupt the Indian monsoon, causing massive drought in that country. Let’s not forget: India is a nucleararmed nation. Cue nightmare geopolitical scenarios. “There’s a gut reaction to the hubris—you might call it ‘playing God’—of all this,” said professor Lin. “The deployment of geoengineering on a global scale is ethically troubling, to say the least.” photo by steven chea

Launching trillions of tiny mirrors into space to form a “sunshade” for Earth. Manufacturing automated sea vessels that roam the ocean, sucking up water to spray, through miles-long hoses, into the lower atmosphere to “brighten” clouds and dim the sun. Dispersing hundreds of tons of iron sulfate particles in an “ocean fertilization” attempt to grow phytoplankton, so as to capture carbon and sequester it in deepest reaches of the sea. Are these preposterous-sounding schemes really being put forward by legitimate scientists as possible “last chance” fixes for a world that hasn’t yet solved its warming problem? The answer is yes. Though most Americans haven’t heard much about it, climate scientists and others are increasingly abuzz about the once-taboo subject of geoengineering. Billionaires such as Bill Gates, Richard Branson and N. Murray Edwards (the Canadian tar-sands billionaire) are funding controversial research into various methods. Boeing, oil companies (ExxonMobil Corp., Shell Oil Co., BP) and other corporations are forming working groups. The National Academy of Sciences has launched a study, and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is due out soon, with a collection of existing literature on the topic. And though the U.S. government has so far spent little ($1.9 million in 2009-2010 on extreme geoengineering methods), other counties—such as China, Europe, India, Russia and Canada—have already invested many millions to research these last-resort climate mends. So, why is this topic moving from the margins to the mainstream? Because the planet keeps getting warmer. “There isn’t a whole lot of progress being made in terms of mitigating greenhouse-gas emissions,” said UC Davis law professor Albert Lin, a national leader in the call for global governance of geoengineering practices. “There’s no doubt more radical alternatives are getting increased attention,” he said. “Some see [geoeingeering] as the magic bullet to solve our problems without doing it the more difficult way.” BEFORE

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UC Davis law professor Albert Lin is an early leader in the call for global governance of geoengineering.

“ the de p l oyme nt of g eoe ngine e ring on a gl obal sC al e is ethiCally troubling, to say t he l e ast .” Albert Lin uc davis law professor

But Lin, who worked for the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice before the move to his Davis job, is not alone in wondering whether a “quick” climate fix might create a cure more perilous than the disease. As he notes, none of the extreme measures being thrashed about provide a permanent solution for what’s ailing the planet. Even proponents of research in this field say their imagined fixes would only buy time, leaving humans with the problem of figuring out how to drastically curb greenhouse-gas emissions.

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Conquer the skies?

A dozen or so graying baby boomers hold up handmade protest signs—“Our Sky Is Not Yours to Hack” and “Geoengineers Declare War on Nature”—outside the David Brower Center in Berkeley as geeky science majors and earth-toned environmentalists stream in for a recent debate on geoengineering. “Geoengineering is the corporate scientific takeover of our skies!” one protestor insisted. Inside the theater, atmospheric scientist Ken Caldeira from the Carnegie Institution for Science at Stanford University made the “pro” arguments, while Australian author Clive Hamilton (who has been making the rounds with his new book Earthmasters: The Dawn of the Age of Climate Engineering) articulated the “cons.” Caldeira, one of the world’s leading advocates for research in the controversial field, was seated onstage, looking like the diminutive actor Joel Gray, with short, wild hair and feet that seemed to barely touch the ground. Throughout the evening, the noted scientist was met with hisses and negative shout-outs from a mostly skeptical audience. (More than a few of the

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protesters outside were downright paranoid, suspicious of new climate fixes due to their certainty that the government has already been pouring chemicals—“chemtrails”—into the skies for decades.) Caldeira was particularly hazed for being given research funds from Microsoft billionaire Bill Gates. The scientist accepted the charge from Gates to allocate $4.6 million in geoengineering research funds; Caldeira and his four post-doctorate assistants receive about one-third of that for their lab work on solar radiation management techniques. “I am alarmed after decades of working to reduce emissions, that we haven’t done near enough to avoid catastrophic climate change,” Calderia asserted to the feisty crowd. “We can decide to stick our head in the sand, or we can go about research that needs to be done.” As Caldeira and others report, the array of proposed methods to engineer the Earth’s temperature system is ever growing (see “Top 10 climate technofixes” on page 21). But the approaches can generally be put into two camps: One attempts to remove carbon dioxide from the air to be stored in the ocean or underground, and the other attempts to cool the Earth by deflecting sunlight away from the planet and back into space. The strategies that fall in the latter category—cooling the Earth by redirecting sunlight—are called solar radiation management. Methods of SRM—either by creating fluffy “reflective” clouds or by pumping sulfur particles into the stratosphere—are seen as quickly achievable and relatively inexpensive compared to techniques that attempt to sequester carbon. In a previous interview with SN&R, Caldeira freely admitted that “planetary manipulation” of the atmosphere wouldn’t erase the root problem of global warming. “Emissions reductions is still what we need to do,” he said. But we may need to use geoengineering, he added, in a “last-ditch effort to reduce suffering” if, at some time down the road, humankind faces a runaway disaster due to climate change. “If necessary, SRM could be done by a small number of people fairly cheaply … Mount Pinatubo cooled the Earth rapidly, and society can do the same thing.” A word about Pinatubo: In 1991, a massive eruption occurred on this peak in the Philippines, sending 20 million tons of sulfur dioxide into the stratosphere. The event was followed by a striking period of global cooling, as ash swirled about on high, deflecting sunlight and cooling the planet. An 1815 volcanic eruption on Mount Tambora, in what is now Indonesia, was likewise followed by a massive cooling trend in Europe. Caldeira and other scientists believe it’s possible to develop large-scale recreations of this volcanic effect by launching sulfates into the atmosphere. Model simulations of this SRM method have proven effective, said Caldeira, at temporarily cooling the planet. “It works,” he shrugged. But at what cost? Many believe the injection of such particles into the stratosphere could increase the depletion of the ozone layer and possibly affect monsoon patterns, which would lead to droughts in Asia and Africa. Also, SRM would interfere with solar cells, with one study claiming solar-energy

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For example: Last August, a Northern California entrepreneur named Russ George, dumped 100 tons of iron sulfate off the stern of a rented fishing boat into the Pacific Ocean just off the west coast of Canada. Under the guise of bolstering the region’s salmon population, this man who describes himself as “the world’s leading champion of geoengineering,” was actually performing an experiment in ocean fertilization, i.e., creation of a phytoplankton bloom meant to move carbon into the deep recesses of the ocean.

on earth—with huge potential for unintended consequences,” she warned. But the thing is, George didn’t break any laws. He has still not been arrested or charged with any wrongdoing because, as of yet, there is virtually no regulation in the field of geoengineering. Here is where UCD’s Lin enters the picture. His office littered marvelously with papers and publications on every surface, Lin —in a navy Cal sweatshirt and spectacles—looked

The rogue experiment—which wasn’t discovered until months after the act using satellite imagery—was met with condemnation from all quarters. George was labeled an “eco-criminal” and “ocean rapist.” Scientists on both sides of the geoengineering dispute wrote public rebukes of George’s experiment, calling his unilateral action reckless, premature and lacking in scientific assessment. Author Naomi Klein weighed in with a widely read essay in The New York Times about George’s experiment: “[S]erious scientists, backed by far deeper pockets, appear poised to actively tamper with the complex and unpredictable natural systems that sustain life

every bit your average, overworked law professor. But this man, a graduate of UC Berkeley School of Law (Boalt Hall) by way of a publicpolicy master’s degree at Harvard University, is far from a run-of-the-mill academic, having found himself a notable player in the matter of how the world’s governments will agree—or not—to attempt a large-scale planetary tech fix for global warming. Lin believes George’s ocean-fertilization attempt should be viewed as “the leading edge of mounting efforts in geoengineering that demand international attention. … There’s currently no treaty governing research or deployment,” he said.

output after SRM could decrease by as much as 20 percent. Finally, there is an endgame concern with SRM that’s come to be known as “the termination effect.” If SRM techniques were deployed and then terminated for whatever reason, the computermodeling forecasts get scary fast. Unless carbon emissions had decreased by the time SRM was terminated, scientists agree that Earth would experience a massive “carbon pulse”—temperature increase—that could lead to far more severe consequences than a gradual rise to the same temperature. “The concern here is that once you start deploying some of these methods, you basically have to keep those in place over extremely long periods of time,” said UCD’s Lin. “You have to ask whether society has demonstrated the ability to maintain anything good over hundreds of years without failures.” Many climate-change activists—former Vice President Al Gore among them—believe that pursuit of a grand-scale “technofix” to global warming would serve as a huge distraction to humankind at the exact moment when all eyes need to be on the prize of developing a long-term, global-energy strategy that is not carbon based. “We are already involved in a massive unplanned planetary experiment,” Gore famously told The New Yorker. “We should not begin yet another planetary experiment in the hope that it will somehow magically cancel out the effects of the one we already have.” Still, Caldeira argues that society would be wise to begin the research now, so as to be ready if a future moment of crisis arises. “It’s a question of risk reduction in real social systems in an armed world,” he said. “We need funding, we need a concerted effort, a serious research program.” But who is “we”? And how would scientific research on these Ocean fertilization is a geoengineering technique in where tons of nanoparticles methods—as they moved from of iron sulfate are dumped in the ocean computer modeling to large-scale to create phytoplankton blooms that are experimentation on the Earth’s said to move carbon into the deep ocean. atmosphere—be overseen with safety watchguarded?

Unintended conseqUences Two giant pearl-white eggheads, smooth and ridiculous, sit perched on a grassy knoll outside the entrance to the UC Davis School of Law’s King Hall. The famous Robert Arneson sculptures feature a nose, mouth, eyes … but no ears. A recent visit to the face-lifted school and the upstairs office of professor Albert Lin, the aforementioned authority in the realm of geoengineering, made the missing ears uncomfortably relevant. When it comes to the subject of this topic, key players seem to be hearing impaired.

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Some official bodies—such as the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity— are on record as of 2010 urging a moratorium on geoengineering, he said, “But we need a system of oversight that is comprehensive, global and backed by sanctions.” In an article he wrote last year for a “Law of the Future” series for the Hague Institute for the Internationalisation of Law, he reasoned that since “geoengineering deployment could have potentially disastrous effects for millions,” the issue must be addressed as a global concern, not one where choices can be arrived at nation by nation. “I think we need to involve a broader range of stakeholders and governments in this process,” said Lin. “There’s a perceived need for other than just the scientists to be involved … in exploring some sort of mechanisms that would give researches the green light or not.” Today, a moderately sized country—or an individual corporation or billionaire with a knightin-shining-armor complex—could decide to unilaterally engage in geoengineering, he said, without breaking any laws. Lin suggests using “the existing architecture” to accomplish this. The U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, he believes, might be the appropriate body to address governance issues for geoengineering. He acknowledged, however, that the Framework process has not been a terribly successful one thus far. Indeed, reasonable approaches at emissions reductions—like the 1997 Kyoto Protocol—fell on deaf ears (eggheads notwithstanding), and even the United States failed to sign that treaty. Nevertheless, Lin thinks we have no choice but to rely on the international political structure. But Caldeira, who debated Lin directly on the topic at the San Francisco Commonwealth Club back in 2010, disagrees. “I don’t see a need for a new bureaucracy at this time,” Caldeira told SN&R in response to Lin’s appeal for oversight. “Instead of creating solutions for imagined problems, we should focus on solving real ones.” Whether real or imagined, Lin’s cause and the movement to regulate geoengineering research gained unexpected momentum just last month when two leading researchers in the field—Harvard’s David Keith (also funded by Gates) and UCLA’s Edward Parson—wrote an article for the journal Science arguing for the first time that governments need to step into the fray, “govern this thing” and begin coordination of, at least, small-scale “climate fix” research.

science fiction (or not) Earth Day 2013 at UC Davis—dubbed “America’s Coolest School” last year by the

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The world’s climaTe is complicaTed, wiTh naTural sysTems indelibly inTerwoven. an aTTempT To dim The sun above canada could resulT in droughTs in asia or africa. Sierra Club—was a fairly sedate affair with “sustainability tours,” T-shirt giveaways and a few tree plantings. Still, in one lab in the Earth and Physical Sciences Building, a dozen or so grad students gathered to talk about the Earth’s warming after a noon screening of the climate documentary Thin Ice. UC Davis’ Howard Spero, the professor and paleo-oceanographer who served as a moderator at the event, has been pleasantly surprised to find himself near the front lines of the climate and geoengineering debate. His work concerns the chemical signals in tiny fossil seashells from a type of plankton living between 10,000 and 20,000 years ago. His goal is to understand the order of events that occurred when Earth shifted out of the last ice age, so as to “help us model what might happen if the Earth continues to warm into the future,” he said. One question Spero seeks to answer: How quickly do carbon-rich ocean waters cycle CO2 between the ocean and the atmosphere? The only way fertilization works is if CO2 gets to the deep ocean, he said, but “there is evidence that phytoplankton never makes it to the sea floor.” “As particles drop and critters in the ocean eat them, they use up oxygen at the mid-depth range,” so CO2 from the surface ocean gets recycled, he said. “In the end, we’ve not gotten rid of the CO2 from the atmosphere.” Like others, Spero believes the pursuit of geoengineering strategies are a distraction from the real problem. “We have to slowly wean ourselves off of carbon,” he said. “It will take decades and decades to design necessary replacements. This has to be something that starts now.” BEFORE

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The local geologist is one of a crowded field of scientists whose work may hold answers to questions posed by geoengineering. Just two months ago, British meteorologists reported in the journal Nature Climate Change that their computer modeling suggested that use of SRM could cause calamitous drought in the Sahel region of Western Africa. Another recent study published in Nature Geoscience found that increased CO2 by itself, without any accompanying warming, could still cause extreme changes in the Earth’s atmosphere and seriously alter rainfall patterns. And earlier computer simulations of extensive cloud brightening conducted by the Met Office Hadley Centre in England resulted in a dramatic prediction. Scientists found that the technique would cause rainfall decreases in South America, and a subsequent “dieback” of the Amazon rain forest, one of the world’s largest natural carbon stores. Indeed, while some environmentalists are dead-set against further study related to geoengineering, a few contend that research may be needed just to prove that the extreme methods won’t work. “I think researching geoengineering, and almost anything else, is fine,” well-known author and climate activist Bill McKibben responded in an email to SN&R. “But so far the data seems to show large predictable side effects, large unpredictable side effects, and absolutely no effect on cases like ocean acidification. So I would be against deploying it.” Meanwhile, politics has also entered the picture. Though most elected Democrats seek to avoid the subject by any means necessary, conservative politicians like Newt Gingrich came on board the geoengineering bandwagon years ago. In the aforementioned Earthmasters, Hamilton reports that ultra-conservative think tanks, such as the Heartland Institute, the Cato Institute and the Hudson Institute, have come out in support of a quick terra fix, too. So, the very people and organizations that have spent decades repudiating climate science seem to be gathering in support of a solution to a problem they used to deny exists. Why would they do this? At the Berkeley debate, Hamilton wondered aloud if members of the far-right faction in America might see geoengineering as a way to avoid the socialpolitical transformation otherwise required and “preserve the existing political and economic system” as Earth’s population heads into uncertain times. Meanwhile in California, a state known around the globe as iconic in its leadership on the climate issue, the subject of geoengineering has not yet attracted much in the way of legislation, attention or state research dollars. “We don’t have an official position on geoengineering,” said Dave Clegern, spokesman for the California Air Resources Board, the state’s lead agency when it comes to global-warming mitigation and emissions reductions. “It’s not something we are into at this point. But we are aware of it, and we are monitoring it.” Since its inception, the human species has demonstrated a largely uninterrupted hubris toward the natural world. The view that some matters should remain beyond human influence has not prevailed, to say the least.

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But when asked if he believes human beings will inevitably deploy geoengineering methods, professor Lin said no. “I wouldn’t use the word ‘inevitable,’” he said. “I think there would have to be a dramatic reason to use them,” he continued. “If we can make enough progress in moving to renewable energy, we might just be able to muddle through … and that might be the best we can do.”

Still, questions remain. Will humankind do what is necessary— despite the odds—to reduce emissions and transform its fossil-fuel-based energy system to prevent the worst outcomes of global warming? Or will the distraction of a large-scale technofix win the day? In the end, either answer comes replete with challenges and dangers for which nature offers no apology. Ω

Another method of geoengineering photo caption would have a fleet of sea vessels or airplanes spraying sulfate aerosols in to the stratosphere, so as to mimic an erupting volcano’s cooling effect on the planet.

Top 10 climaTe Technofixes There’s no shortage of ideas from scientists and entrepreneurs about  how to deliberately manipulate the atmosphere to postpone the worst  impacts of global warming. The following are 10 sci-fi-sounding methods  that have actually been discussed or received research funding.

1

Imitate the planet-cooling effect of a  volcanic explosion by pumping sulfur  particles into the upper atmosphere. 

2  3 

Place mirrors or sunshade disks— “space mirrors”—between the Earth  and the sun or in orbit around the Earth.

Use a fleet of sea vessels that continuously suck seawater from the ocean  (hundreds of gallons per minute) to  spray into the lower atmosphere. Updrafts  would carry the particles higher and create  “brightened” clouds.

4  5 

“Plant” vast fields and deserts with  artificial trees that remove CO2  from the air.

Bury biochar (charcoal created from  biomass) underground to affect carbon  sequestration. 

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Fertilize the ocean with nanoparticles (iron, nitrogen or phosphorus) to  increase the growth of phytoplankton and  increase the absorption of CO2, which would  then allegedly be carried to the deep ocean.

7  8  9   10  

Paint cities and roads white or cover the  desert with white plastic to reflect more  sunlight back to space. Flood Death Valley National Park with  water to address sea-level rise and  prevent flooding of populated areas.

Increase the ocean’s “albedo”   (reflectivity) by deploying floating  reflectors (“ocean whitening”) or   by creating “microbubbles.” Genetically engineer crops to grow  pale in color, reflecting sunlight  back into space.

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B

efore they decided to jump into the fray themselves, Junior Bruce and Leo Zuniga would watch comedians performing finely tuned 15-minute sets.

Comedy

central by aarOn carneS

photos by SteVen cHea

Sacramento comedians Junior Bruce and Leo Zuniga’s podcast explores what it means to make people laugh 22   |   SN&R   |   06.06.13

Leo Zuniga (left) and Junior Bruce have recorded nearly 100 episodes since they first launched their podcast, The Junior & Leo Show, in 2012.

Both wondered the same thing: How did those performers take something notoriously hard and make it look so easy? That’s not the sort of information typically revealed during a comedian’s interview on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno, after all. Many stand-up comics, of course, spend years developing their craft, oftentimes utilizing very specific techniques— something Bruce and Zuniga explore in detail on their comedy podcast, The Junior & Leo Show. The podcast launched in 2012, intended as a means to demystify the creative process a bit—not just because the pair finds it interesting, but because they believe it can serve as an educational tool for listeners. “What we do is let people know how things work, so they feel like they can go out and do it themselves,” Bruce said. “We’re trying to help them by exposing the processes. We’re in love with the process—I’m a process junkie.” Bruce, 33, and Zuniga, 47, both got their start as comedians only a couple years ago and first met in 2011 at a Sacramento Comedy Spot open-mic. Now, nearly 100 episodes later—it’ll hit that milestone in July—the podcast represents something of a full-circle journey, at least for Zuniga, who finally decided to give comedy a try after listening to a podcast in which a successful stand-up talked about the difficulties of launching a career. “[He] did [his] first five minutes, and it was just awful. That just made it seem more doable to me,” Zuniga said. “We find a lot of people in everyday lives that have some creative juices in them but are scared.” Zuniga knew from an early age that he wanted to do comedy, but lacked the discipline. “I went through a number of years through my 20s, just running amok through Sacramento. Then, I got clean. I met my wife, had kids and at 45 years old, all [of a] sudden, I realize that those things were still untapped from all those years ago,” he said. Bruce’s path to comedy started with the life-changing moment when his daughter was born—an event that succeeded in finally pushing him over a hump that had stopped him many times before. “I took a long, hard look in the mirror, and I realized that I want her to be somebody that doesn’t suffer from a lack


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Pig out ... See FOOD STUFF

… and puppy up See COOLHUNTING

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Bret Michaels’ bandana See EIGHT GIGS

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Cleanliness is next to studliness See 15 MINUTES

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SCENE& HEARD Citizenship hustle

Zuniga and Bruce tell stories, interview comedians and suffer bodily injury on their podcast.

of self-confidence like I do. She inspired me to be a better person,” Bruce said. The podcast now airs twice weekly and usually features an in-depth interview with at least one guest. And since its launch, it has evolved. In the beginning, rather than interview guests, the two friends sat around and talked about their wives, families and other and random everyday happenings. In other words, it was pretty boring. “We realized about five episodes in that that was a show format that not even we wanted to listen to,” Bruce said. The pair quickly decided to not only bring in guests, but to also keep the podcast focused. Instead of sporting a “let’s drink beers and BS about whatever pops into our heads” vibe, each episode now focuses on the creative process. Bruce does most of the interviewing, while Zuniga handles the technical side of things. And, because both are involved in the local comedy scene, most of their guests, naturally, are comedians. But there are also other creative types featured, including musicians, artists, filmmakers and writers. Regardless of the craft, the goal remains the same: Get to the root of how and why they create their art. “We’re finding different things that are similar with [all] creators,” Bruce said. “Comedians tend to do a lot of similar things to create their act [just like] singer-songwriters tend to do a lot of similar things to create theirs. Our hope with the show is to motivate people to do more.” BEFORE

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“We let people know how things work, so they feel like they can go out and do it themselves—we’re trying to help them by exposing the processes. … I’m a process junkie.” Junior Bruce The Junior & Leo Show

And, if the conversation allows it, Bruce and Zuniga dig deep into their guests’ private lives. “We try and expose the real life that happens to our guest that I think people could possibly relate to,” Bruce said. “We [once] had a local comedian talking about how he was in the midst of going through a separation with his wife. I went through that. My wife and I separated twice.” Which is not to say that the show is serious—far from it. Bruce and Zuniga are comedians, after all. Once, for example, they played host to two wrestlers, Jacc Movez and Christian Black. Bruce thought it would be funny if he “picked a fight” with Movez on-air, who would then repay Bruce by demonstrating some of his wrestling chops. Instead, Movez and his “rival” Black took turns seeing who could chop the hardest moves against Bruce. The result, Bruce said, was intensely painful. F E AT U R E

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“There was a 24-hour period where it felt like my whole body had been in a car accident. I’m a fat dude, so I got breasts. My breasts were just black,” he says. “Even the nipple had turned black. I will never do that again, [but] it’s all captured on the podcast, so it’s a good story now.” Currently, most of the show’s guests are local, but Bruce and Zuniga hope to expand their roster to include more national artists. One of their first big gets was Bobby Slayton— well, sort of. They met Slayton at the Punch Line Comedy Club in Sacramento to tape an interview—only once they started talking, Zuniga forgot to press the record button on the machine. Disaster? Perhaps, but sticking to their policy of showing their listeners exactly how the creative process works, Bruce and Zuniga instead recorded a new episode in which they tried to recount the interview—and how they’d missed out on capturing it. “[During the interview] Bobby [asked], ‘Is this going to sound good, guys?’” Bruce said. “I happen to say, ‘Yeah, as long as he remembered to hit record, it’ll sound great.’ We completely own the mistakes that we make.” These days, the pair ends each episode with Bruce asking Zuniga if he’s actually recording. Zuniga, of course, now always remembers to hit the button. Ω The Junior & Leo Show is available via iTunes, or visit http://twomenandapod.podbean.com.

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There are few places more American than a baseball stadium on a cool spring morning. Pack that stadium with 888 newly naturalized U.S. citizens—shifting impatiently and using pocket-sized versions of the Declaration of Independence to shade the sun—and it gets even Americanier. This was the scene in May at Raley Field in West Sacramento. Once a month, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services gather the region’s not-so-poor, not-so-huddled masses yearning to be free of visa red tape, and swear them in en masse. The mood is both festive and slightly anti-climactic. Like, “That’s it? I’m an American now? Where’s my free gun and Happy Meal?” While naturalized citizens don’t get gats or grease, they do get a ton of paperwork. After a ceremony featuring multiple speakers and colorful, cultural dance troupes, new Americans representing 79 countries are herded to get their lifetime-citizenship papers and Social Security forms. Streaming toward the parking lot, disoriented citizens were handed River Cats programs and voter-registration pamphlets. Facing a crush of dueling Democratic and Republican Party volunteers shilling their product, one Hispanic-American man escalated his declaration of “Not today” from polite dismissal to exclamatory battle cry. But it’s not all political gamesmanship and bureaucratic shuffle. A bashful Filipino-American woman, who became a citizen after three long years, unwrapped a congratulatory shot glass from her friends. An Indian-American man with missing front teeth grinned widely as his friend snapped photos of him in every line. And an older Mexican-American man in a cowboy hat appeared touched by a stranger’s congratulations. My mother’s naturalization ceremony a decade ago featured less pageantry and pomp, but just as much circumstance. This was back before the days of ballpark cattle calls and political groups looking to cash in on the confusion. USCIS spokeswoman Sharon Rummery said the reason for turning naturalization ceremonies into big events “is to enhance the solemnity and importance of becoming a United States citizen,” but my mom wasn’t into all that noise. I was the only person she told, and only because she needed a ride. (Mom doesn’t do freeways.) A German to the core, she begrudgingly switched teams after decades stateside because updated visa laws made renewing hers even more of a hassle. DMV employees have nothing on slow, surly immigration officials. I’ve never liked jingoistic patriotism, but looking at all those unique faces stirred something. That oft-quoted plaque at the base of Lady Liberty often makes it like we’re the ones doing immigrants a favor. And maybe that’s true to an extent, but it’s not the whole truth and nothing but. On that day, the judge struck a humbler tone. He thanked the diverse crowd before him for choosing us, for making this country better just by virtue of coming here. It was America at her most gracious. Recalling this story during a Mother’s Day brunch, my mom reached out and clasped my hand. For her, at the time, the ceremony was just an errand, and a bittersweet one at that. But now she reconsidered. “I never knew it meant so much to you,” she said, her blue-green eyes crystallizing. And then, as only a mother can, she teased, “Are you crying?” Maybe a little, Mom. Maybe a little. —Raheem F. Hosseini

r a h e e mh @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

Check out the next U.S. Customs and Immigration Services naturalization ceremony at 9 a.m., Wednesday, June 12, at Raley Field, 400 Ballpark Drive in West Sacramento.

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“Beautiful Face” Art Theme Live Music by Gideon’s Army Free Refreshments Original works of art displayed for purchase

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

Open 12-4pm, Sat June 8th 3431 4th Ave, Sac, 95817 (Behind B&B Beauty Salon)

For info call 916.201.1404

WE’RE OPEN NOW @ 48th & Folsom

summer guide ON STANDS NExT wEEk

T ? R A E E M M H U S S E I H H T T

THIS PAPER.

LOCALLY OWNED LOCALLY ROASTED SEASONALLY SOURCED

CA

Second Saturday Afternoon Art!

D N A T S N YOU

RECYCLE

www.ChocolateFishCoffee.com • 4749 Folsom Blvd, East Sac

Father’s Day Weekend | Saturday June 15 12–6 | Folsom, California | Palladio at Broadstone 6 %DQGV 2 6WDJHV Curtis Salgado Chris Cain David Landon Against the Grain Mumbo Gumbo Buck Ford

The love story that changed the artistic vision of a generation... Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle Artist Jess Collins, known simply as Jess, and his partner, the poet Robert Duncan, were one of the most brave, bold, and fascinating couples of the 20th century. Featuring more than 140 individual and collaborative works of art by Jess, Robert Duncan and 33 members of their circle, the exhibition, An Opening of the Field looks at the visionary couple who influenced the creative focus of an intriguing group of artists and writers.

25+ &UDIW%UHZHUV 7DVWLQJ12P – 5P

Your Craft Beer Tasting Kit folsomrhythmandbrews.com Order Only 18 (save 7) through June 3 online ($25 thereafter) a Carrera Productions project

Carrera Productions is proud to introduce Folsom Rhythm & Brews, an annual family-friendly event with world-class musical talent, the best craft breweries, fantastic food choices, and more!

-XVWIRUKLP | 'DG=2QH

Harley Davidson Motorcycles, Massage, Cigars, & More

)DPLO\)ULHQGO\_.LG=2QH Games & Prizes, Face Painting, Music & Dance

Free Admission | Tasting Kits 18

Advance price of 18 online through June 3, 2013 after which the regular price is 25.

A portion of proceeds benefits the Folsom Chamber of Commerce, their partner local service club(s), and Young Life.

An Opening of the Field: Jess, Robert Duncan, and Their Circle

JUNE 9 – SEPTEMBER 1, 2013 This exhibition is supported, in part, by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

www.folsomrhythmandbrews.com w ww

E X H I B I T I O N S U P P O R T A L S O P R OV I D E D BY

Ron Casentini David Gibson and William Ishmael Jess, The Enamord Mage: Translation #6, (detail), 1965. Oil on canvas over wood, 241/2 x 30 in. Collection of The M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

216 O Street Downtown Sacramento crockerartmuseum.org

A portion of proceeds benefits the Folsom Chamber of Commerce, their partner local service club(s), and Young Life. Tasting kit includes 16-ounce pint glass with logo and seven (7) tasting tickets; additional tasting tickets available at event: 4 tickets 5, 9 tickets 10, 20 tickets 20. Must be 21 or over for tasting kit and tickets. Event is rain or shine. No refunds or exchanges. Artists subject to change. No outside alcohol allowed in event. © 2013 Carrera Productions, llc. All rights reserved. SHING SHIN S HIN HING HI HIN NG GL LE E SPR SPRIN SPRI SP S PR P PRIN RIN R RI NGS GS SUB SUBA S SUBAR UBA UBAR UB UB BAR AR A RU SHOP DINE PLAY

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June picks by SHOKA

“Cripes!” by Jim Adams, graphite and watercolor, 2011.

Creatures of great disproportions The tips of Jim Adams’ graphite pencils give birth to the strangest, twiggy-limbed, gargantuan-headed, tiny-footed and— at least on one occasion—fanny-pack-wearing humanoid creatures. Adams, a longtime resident of Corvallis, Oregon, has been exhibiting artwork since the ’80s. Because of the delicate shading and restrained use of saturated hues in his watercolor, he gives an intriguing beauty to the narratives and the players within them from this odd yet familiar world he’s generated,

“Untitled Vessel” by Larry Love, ceramic with enamel paint, 2013.

which allows the viewer to see these somewhat grotesque, wrinkly faced beings as lovely, actually. Eddie Bisese and Liz Ingebretsen’s work will also be on display.

Where: Shimo Center for the Arts, 2117 28th Street; (916) 706-1162; www.shimogallery.com. Second Saturday reception: June 8, 6 to 9 p.m. Through July 10. Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 1 to 5 p.m.

Urban sculpture outfitter The black-and-white geometric shapes and patterns on Larry Love’s ceramic sculptures are fetching eye candy. Their busyness may remind the fashion-conscious of the contemporary trend with this similar aesthetic. And, hey, if you can afford the $180 Shakuhachi Asymmetrical Stripe Maxi Dress from Urban Outfitters that bears resemblance to Love’s creations, you probably can afford to take home one of his pieces—and enjoy it long after you’ve sold the dress to Freestyle Clothing Exchange.

Where: E Street Gallery & Studios, 1115 E Street; (916) 475-7443. Second Saturday reception: June 8, 6 to 9 p.m. Through June 29. Hours: Saturday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Can’t look away Zoom in on the third panel from Hieronymus Bosch’s “The Garden of Earthly Delights” triptych, where he’s depicted people enduring hell after being sinful in the second panel. Dip the chaotic and dark scene in a steely blue aura, add a scorpion or vicious fish or two, and you get an idea of what South Sacramento artist John Wotipka’s paintings are like. In Wotipka’s work, seemingly feckless souls—undressed (mostly) male figures—exist in a gray, barren land, nightmarishly being affected by strange beasts. Or sometimes are themselves partly strange beasts. His paintings are surreal and full of torment, but in the “Unleashed” by John Wotipka, oil on canvas, 2012. BEFORE

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same fascinating way that Bosch’s are, so that the viewer doesn’t want to look away. Wotipka developed his skill without the aid of a formal art education. In fact, he dropped out of high school. “Whether [or] not being accredited with an art degree has been a disadvantage to attaining monetary success it is hard to say, since it is a difficult field to find success in and doubly hard for one with a surrealist inclination,” he said. He’s not worried about it, though: “At this stage of my life I am not [too] concerned with financial reward.”

Where: Gallery 14, 3960 60th Street; (916) 456-1058; www.gallery14.net. Second Saturday reception: June 8, 6 to 11 p.m. Hours: Monday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m.; and by appointment.

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2nd saturday at the brickhouse 33

18TH ST.

17TH ST.

14TH ST.

13TH ST.

12TH ST.

11TH ST.

zapotec weavings

25 2

by Sergio Martinez

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Opening receptiOn: 2nd Saturday, June 8th | 2pm to 5pm art talk and Weaving demO: Saturday, June 22nd | 2pm to 5pm clOsing receptiOn: Saturday, June 29th | 6pm to 8pm

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secOnd saturday Open mic pOetry night

A one man show incorporating song, story, spoken word & sound effects. Saturday, June 15 | 8pm | Advanced tix $10 | Door $15

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5

kevin sandblOOm – sOul trOubadOur

THIRD ST.

June 8 | Doors open at 6pm | Sign ups at 6:30pm | Show starts at 8pm Afterparty 10pm to closing featuring POET I. Hosted by Brother Hypnotic

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the incredible guitar sOunds Of nOrman mcdaniel Saturday, June 22nd, 7:30pm- 9:30pm, $5 at the door

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the brickhouse

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19TH ST.

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fundraisers | book signings | parties | weddings | business meetings | receptions | workshops

15TH ST.

RENT THE BRICKHOUSE

10TH ST.

NINTH ST.

2837 36th street, sacramento, ca

916.475.1240 | www.thebrickhousegalleryoakpark.com

50 BROADWAY

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sunday, june 9th

ART MAP 7 BOWS & ARROWS 1815 19th St.,

MIDTOWN 1 ALEX BULT GALLERY 1114 21st St., (916) 476-5540, www.alexbultgallery.com

2 ART STUDIOS 1727 I St., behind Michaelangelo’s; (916) 444-2233

us yOu’LL FInde FReeWay!” “undeR th

3 ARTFOX GALLERY 2213 N St., Ste. B; (916) 835-1718; www.artfox.us

4 AXIS GALLERY 1517 19th St., (916) 443-9900, www.axisgallery.org

5 B. SAKATA GARO 923 20th St., (916) 447-4276, www.bsakatagaro.com

6 BLUE LAMP 1400 Alhambra Blvd., (916) 455-3400, www.bluelamp.com

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(916) 822-5668, www.bowscollective.com

8 CAPITAL ARTWORKS 1215 21st St., Ste. B; (916) 207-3787; www.capital-artworks.com

9 CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, SACRAMENTO 1519 19th St., (916) 498-9811, www.ccasac.org

10 CUFFS 2523 J St., (916) 443-2881, www.shopcuffs.com

11 ELLIOTT FOUTS GALLERY 1831 P St., (916) 446-1786, www.efgallery.com

12 GALLERY 2110 2110 K St., (916) 476-5500, www.gallery2110.com

13 INTEGRATE SACRAMENTO 2220 J St., (916) 541-4294, http://integrateservices sacramento.blogspot.com

14 KENNEDY GALLERY 1931 L St., (916) 716-7050, www.kennedygallerysac.com

15 LITTLE RELICS 908 21st St., (916) 716-2319, www.littlerelics.com

16 MIDTOWN FRAMING & GALLERY 1005 22nd St., (916) 447-7558, www.midtownframing.com

17 OLD SOUL CO. 1716 L St., (916) 443-7685, www.oldsoulco.com

18 RED DOT GALLERY 2231 J St., Ste. 101; www.reddotgalleryonj.com

19 SACRAMENTO ART COMPLEX 2110 K St., Ste. 4; (916) 476-5500; www.sacramentoartcomplex.com

20 SACRAMENTO GAY & LESBIAN CENTER 1927 L St., (916) 442-0185, http://saccenter.org

21 SHIMO CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2117 28th St., (916) 706-1162, www.shimogallery.com

22 TIM COLLOM GALLERY 915 20th St., (916) 247-8048, www.timcollomgallery.com

23 UNION HALL GALLERY 2126 K St., (916) 448-2452

24 UNIVERSITY ART 2601 J St., (916) 443-5721, www.universityart.com


DON’T MISS E ST.

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23RD ST.

22ND ST.

H ST. 18 16 13 1 19 12 23 8

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CAPITOL AVE. 3

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30% OFF ONE ITEM!

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25 THE URBAN HIVE 1931 H St.,

35 SMITH GALLERY 1020 11th St.,

(916) 585-4483, www.theurbanhive.com

26 VIEWPOINT PHOTOGRAPHIC ART CENTER

III THE BRICKHOUSE ART GALLERY 2837 36th St., (916) 457-1240, www.thebrickhousegalleryoakpark.com

Ste. 100; (916) 446-4444; www.smithgallery.com

2015 J St., (916) 441-2341, www.viewpointgallery.org

36 TEMPLE COFFEE 1010 Ninth St.,

27 ZANZIBAR GALLERY 1731 L St.,

37 VOX SACRAMENTO 1818 11th St.,

IV DEL PASO WORKS BUILDING GALLERIES

(916) 443-5601, www.zanzibartrading.com

V EVOLVE THE GALLERY 2907 35th St.,

(916) 572-5123, www.evolvethegallery.com

www.voxsac.com

VI KNOWLTON GALLERY 115 S. School St.,

DOWNTOWN/OLD SAC EAST SAC 28 ADAMSON GALLERY 1021 R St., (916)

492-2207, www.theadamsongallery.com

29 APPEL GALLERY 931 T St., (916) 442-6014, www.appelgallery.com

30 ARTHOUSE UPSTAIRS 1021 R St., second floor; (916) 672-1098; www.arthouse-sacramento.com

31 ARTISTS’ COLLABORATIVE GALLERY 129 K St., (916) 444-7125, www.artcollab.com

32 CROCKER ART MUSEUM 216 O St., (916) 808-7000, www.crockerartmuseum.org

33 E STREET GALLERY AND STUDIOS 1115 E St., (916) 505-7264

38 ARCHIVAL FRAMING 3223 Folsom Blvd., 39 FE GALLERY & IRON ART STUDIO 1100 65th St., (916) 456-4455, www.fegallery.com

(916) 456-1058, www.gallery14.net

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Custom Framing

Photo Frames

Office Supplies

Creative Gifts Galore!

IX SACRAMENTO TEMPORARY CONTEMPORARY 1616 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 921-1224, http://stcgallery.webs.com

2601 J Street 916-443-5721 Palo Alto San Jose Sacramento UniversityArt.com

705 Sutter St. in Folsom, (916) 351-1623, www.avartgallery.com

XI GALLERY 1855 820 Pole Line Rd. in Davis,

* Valid on regular priced items only. Excludes custom framing. Not valid on special orders, sale or clearance items, or previous purchases. No rain checks. May not be combined with any other offer. One coupon per customer per visit. Exp. 6/13/2013.

(530) 756-7807, www.daviscemetery.org

XII YOUR ALLEY ART GALLERY 3431 Fourth

Ste. 100 in Roseville; (916) 783-4117; http://bluelinegallery.blogspot.com

NEWS

Stationery & Journals

2737 Riverside Blvd., (916) 760-7461, www.reclamareart.com

X AMERICAN VISIONS ART GALLERY

I ARTISTIC EDGE 1880 Fulton Ave., (916)

Canvas and Brushes

VIII RECLAMARE GALLERY & CUSTOM TATTOO

(916) 453-2999, www.jayjayart.com

OFF MAP

Art Supplies

3460 Second Ave., (916) 397-8958, http://artist-patris.com

40 GALLERY 14 3960 60th St., 41 JAYJAY 5520 Elvas Ave.,

Fine Writing Instruments

VII PATRIS STUDIO AND ART GALLERY

(916) 923-6204, www.archivalframe.com

II BLUE LINE GALLERY 405 Vernon St.,

2700 Front St., (916) 446-5133, www.larazagaleriaposada.org

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Ste. 14 in Lodi; (209) 368-5123; www.knowltongallery.com

482-2787; http://artisticedgeframing.com

34 LA RAZA GALERÍA POSADA

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1001 Del Paso Blvd.

(916) 443-4960, www.templecoffee.com

STORY

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NIGHT&DAY 06THURS

List your event!

DON’T MISS! LATIN MUSIC SHOW: The

transglobal rhythms of Yolo Mambo will transport you to Brazil, Cuba, Peru, Cape Verde, France, Spain, New Zealand, and the United States. Yolo Mambo blends cha-cha, jazz, bossa nova, samba, salsa, and folk with the dynamic vocals of Catherine LeBlanc in several languages. Th, 6/6, 7:30-8:30pm. Free. Odd Fellows Hall, 415 Second St. in Davis; (503) 574-4172; www.mondaviarts.org/ events/event.cfm?event_id =1384&season=2012.

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Special Events BEYOND THE ZIONIST PARADIGM: Join a talk led by Miko Peled, author of The General’s Son. Peled debunks myths that Jews around the world hold certain values with blind loyalty. Th, 6/6, 7pm. $10. Doubletree Hotel, 2001 Point West Way; (916) 448-7157.

LODI FARMERS MARKET: Shop from 50 vendors selling local produce, cheeses and other specialty foods. There will be a food area where visitors can grab a bite. There will also be two music stages, wine and beer. Th, 5-8:30pm through 8/29. Opens 6/6. Free. School St. in

Lodi; (209) 367-7840, ext. 102; www.lodichamber.com.

LOOMIS THURSDAY NIGHT FAMILYFEST: This street fair and market will include dozens of arts, crafts and business vendors; a kids fun zone; classic car show; a beer, wine and food court; and weekly entertainment. Th, 6/6, 6-9pm. Free. Loomis Train Depot, 5755 Horseshoe Bar Rd. in Loomis; (916) 835-0989; www.loomisfamilyfest.com.

TEMP TALK: Temp Talk is an artist interview hosted by the Sacramento Temporary Contemporary Gallery for each show opening. This particular show features members of the Sacramento Temporary Contemporary staff—including Molly Knorr, Raphael Delgado, and Derek Thomas. Th, 6/6, 6pm. Free. Sacramento Temporary Contemporary, 1616 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 923-6204.

TWILIGHT GLAMP-OUT: According to Urban Dictionary, “glamping” is shorthand for glamorous or luxury camping. Join glamping supporters and like-minded people to the first Sacramento Valley Conservancy glamping fundraiser. Find out about flyfishing techniques, learn about birding, see the night sky through a telescope, partake in a game of horseshoes and roast marshmallows. Th, 6/6, 5:30pm. $50. Camp Pollock, 1501 Northgate Blvd.; (916)

425-5879; www.sacramento valleyconservancy.org/calendar -detail.asp?event_id=505.

Kids’ Stuff THE SURFING MAGICIAN MAGIC SHOW: Doug Hofkins, a.k.a. the Surfing Magician, will entertain children and families with his comedic magic show. See his tricks, sleight of hand, and illusions—all performed from a surfboard table. This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Library. Th, 6/6, 3:30-4:35pm. Free. Rio Linda Library, 902 Oak Ln. in Rio Linda; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

07FRI

Concerts DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS & RUSTY BUCKETS: Northern California favorites Dead Winter Carpenters bring a funky and fun combination of bluegrass, rock and swamp rock. They’ll be joined by fellow Sierra band, the Rusty Buckets. F, 6/7, 7pm. $10-$15. Auburn Event Center, 145 Elm Ave. in Auburn; (530) 906-7441; www.keepsmilinpromotions.com.

FISHNET FRIDAY WITH THE SIZZLING SIRENS: Jay Siren and DJ Larry present a sexy and sizzling dance party. Jay’s Sirens are off duty this night, but will all be on hand to party and tear it up on the dance floor with the public. Wear fishnets and get half-price cover before 11 p.m.

First F of every month, 9pm-2am through 6/7. $10. The MoMo

Meetings & Groups

Lounge, 2708 J St. behind Harlow’s; (916) 441-4693; http://harlows.com/ the-momo-lounge.

MARKETING WITH A FACEBOOK BUSINESS PAGE: California Writers Club, Sacramento Branch hosts Harry Leman in a presentation called “Marketing with a Facebook Business Page” at the Writers Network breakfast meeting. Leman handles the social media and networking for the Market Place in Folsom. F, 6/7, 9-11am. Free. IHOP, 2216 Sunrise Blvd. in Rancho Cordova; (916) 213-0798; www.cwc sacramentowriters.org.

THE RIGHTEOUS BROTHERS’ BILL MEDLEY: The Righteous Brothers can claim to have fathered blue-eyed soul. And singer Bill Medley’s voice is a virtual trademark in popular music. A fixture on radio (“You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin,” “Unchained Melody,” etc.), the Righteous Brothers were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2003. F, 6/7, 8pm. $39-$55. Three Stages Peforming Arts Center, 10 College Pkwy. in Folsom; (916) 608-6888; www.threestages.net.

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08SAT

Special Events THE BIG SHOW: Enjoy entertainment by singer Samara Brandon, saxophonist Eugene Peebles, and poets Deserae Lyons and Frank Graham. Rounding out the evening are a fashion show by Tailand Designs and dancer Sonic Boom. The event is hosted by comedian Fly Diva Cavanaugh and Kimberly Marie Bolton Sa, 6/8, 7-9:15pm. $10. Guild Theater, 2828 35th St.; (916) 208-7638.

DON’T MISS! DOGGY DASH: An estimated 5,000 animal enthusiasts will gather with and without their canine companions to raise funds for animals sheltered at the Sacramento SPCA. Make sure to stay after the Doggy Dash for the Bark at the Park Festival, featuring contests, races and information booths. Sa, 6/8, 9am. $25. William Land Park, 1950 Sutterville Rd.; (916) 504-2868; http://sspca.convio.net.

BOOK-TO-ACTION SERIES: Go beyond the book club with Spring Warren’s The Quarter Acre Farm. Get some tips from Soil Born Farms experts. There will be a hands-on component, so bring your gloves. Book-toAction programs build on the traditional book club model. Instead of just reading and discussing a book, with this program series, you’ll get a chance to put some of the ideas in the book into practice. Sa, 6/8, 10:30-midnight. Free. Colonial Heights Library, 4799 Stockton Blvd.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary,org.

DON’T MISS! ALES ON THE RAILS:

California State Parks and the California State Railroad Museum celebrate summer in rail-related style with an “Ales on the Rails” brew sampling event. Adult passengers will have the opportunity to sit back, relax, enjoy views of the Sacramento River, and sample tasty appetizers and brews. Sa, 6/8. $40. California State Railroad Museum, 111 I St.; (916) 445-5995; www.californiastaterailroad museum.org.

R E X

CELEBRATING 30 YEARS OF SYRCL AUCTION: Join the South Yuba River Citizens League (SYRCL) for an evening of music, food and auctions. The organization celebrates its 30th anniversary and will party with music from Beaucoup Chapeaux and Achilles Wheel, and food by Smiley Guys BBQ. Bring chairs or a blanket to help enjoy an

R I D E

This 60-mile ride, sponsored by local bicycle builder Steve Rex and wife Peggy, happens annually and benefits the American River Parkway Foundation. The ride kicks off at William Pond Recreation Area before heading west to Discovery Park, then heading east all the way to the Hazel Avenue entrance to the Jedediah Smith Memorial Trail, and then returning to the William Pond Recreation Area. There will be a meal and live music at the finish line. Advance registration is required, and it costs $75. The ride begins at 8:30 a.m. on Sunday, June 9, at 5700 Arden Way. For more information, visit http://arpf.org/rex.shtml.

S A C R A M E N T O C Y C L E F E S T B I C Y C L E S H O W If you’re more of a fan of tweed jackets and fixies than spandex and aerobars, check out this two-day festival happening in Midtown and Curtis Park. On Saturday, June 8, at 4 p.m. participate in a free bike cruise through Sacramento, which starts at Suzie Burger (2820 P Street) and ends with a bike show and barbecue. Participants are encouraged to bring a toy for charity. On Sunday, June 9, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Cyclefest continues with a swap meet at The Hideaway Bar & Grill (2565 Franklin Boulevard), where there will be music by Sacramento SwingTime. Visit http://tinyurl.com/saccyclefest for more information. May is Bike Month officially came to an end last week. More than 1.7 million miles were logged, many calories were burned, and—for those who cycled quite a bit—intense suntans were etched onto scrawny forearms. But for those who are not quite ready to shun their bikes back into the garage whence it came, don’t fret: A few cool bike rides are schedule for this month. Grab a helmet, slip that spandex back on and slather yourself in sunscreen for the following events.

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L I V E S T R O N G C H A L L E N G E D A V I S Regardless of how you feel about Lance Armstrong’s cycling career, no one can argue that he hasn’t provided support for people affected by cancer. The Livestrong Challenge visits Davis on Sunday, June 23, for a ride that raises funds and awareness for the Armstrong-founded Livestrong Foundation as well as local cancer-related organizations. The ride will start and end at Davis Central Park (401 C Street in Davis), and cyclists can opt to tackle anywhere from zero to 100 miles. Registration costs $50, and riders are required to raise at least $250 to ride. Find out more at http://laf.livestrong.org/davischallenge2013. —Jonathan Mendick


early summer evening. Sa, 6/8, 5-10pm. $10-$20. North Star House, 10275 Old Auburn Rd. in Grass Valley; (530) 265-5961, ext. 215; www.yubariver.org.

FISH FAMILY FEST: Enjoy a day full of Christian music from Brandon Heath, the Afters, for King and Country, Plumb, the Reel, Transparent and more. There’s also food, a play area for kids and artist booths. Sa, 6/8, 11am-6pm. $10. Gibson Ranch, Elverta Rd. in Elverta; (916) 924-0710; www.1039the fish.com/LocalContent/ fishfamilyfest.

MIDTOWN FARMERS MARKET: Hosted by the Midtown Business Association, this free, family-friendly market will take place weekly on Saturdays. The Midtown Farmers Market will showcase local agriculture, prepared foods, artisans and crafters, while providing an opportunity for Midtown residents and business owners to discover regionally grown foods.

Sa, 8am-1pm through 12/28.

Free. Parking lot, 2020 J St.; (916) 442-1500; www.midtown farmersmarketsac.com.

OKLAHOMA BENEFIT CONCERT: Help provide medical care and funds to rebuild Oklahoma neighborhoods affected by the recent tornado while hearing selections from Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! Sa, 6/8, 8:30am-1pm. Donations accepted. Davis Farmers Market, 401 C St. in Davis; (916) 261-6532.

REDUCING GUN VIOLENCE: Join a presentation by Nick and Amanda Wilcox—Legislation and Policy Chairs for the California Chapter of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence—to learn about current State and federal legislation, the politics driving the discussion, changing public attitudes and actions you can take to promote sensible reform. Sa, 6/8, 10am-noon. Free. 2791 24th St., (916) 304-6180.

RIVER WALK BIRD COUNT: Join wellknown Audubon Society member, Jim Rowoth, as he ventures out on the Cosumnes River Preserve River Walk. The walk takes you through wetlands, riparian forest, grasslands, and to the Cosumnes River. The walk covers about four miles and— at a leisurely pace—should take approximately four hours, so be sure to bring a lunch and liquids. Sa, 6/8, 5:15am. Free. Cosumnes River Preserve Visitor Center, 13501 Franklin Blvd. in Galt; (916) 870-4317; www.cosumnes.org.

ARTISAN EXPO: Fusion International Arts Center’s monthly Artisan Expo features gifts, handmade items, and crafts. Browse from 40 local vendors, hear live music and participate in art workshops.

Second Sa of every month, 11am-6pm through 12/31. Free.

Fusion International Arts Center, 501 Arden Way; (916) 538-4008; www.fusioniac.com.

WAGON TRAIN & BBQ COOK-OFF: Placerville’s Main Street will welcome the Highway 50 Association’s 64th annual Wagon Train with a barbecue cookoff, wheelbarrow demos, gold-panning, kids’ games, country music, Western-style shootouts, gold panning, historical displays and a beer garden. Sa, 6/8, noon-6pm.

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some questions. Your answers and your ideas fuel the performance. Sa, 9:15pm through 12/28. $7. Blacktop Comedy, 7311 Galilee Rd. 150 in Roseville; (916) 749-3100; www.blacktop comedy.com/shows/thecolony.

Free. 409 Main St. in Placerville; (530) 672-3436; www.placerville-downtown.org.

Art Galleries ALEX BULT GALLERY: Inextinguishable: The Spirit of Place, a solo exhibition by Colleen Maloney. Sa, 6/8, 6-9pm. Free. 1114 21st St., Ste. B; (916) 476-5540.

Classes FUN ON THE FARM: Kids can meet farm animals, plant seedlings and create something to take home while exploring Soil Born Farms’ American River Ranch. Sa, 6/8, 9-11am. $10-$15. Soil Born Farms American River Ranch, 2140 Chase Dr. in Rancho Cordova; (916) 868-6399; www.sacfoodcoop.com.

CORNERSTONE CAFE & BAR: Art From the HeArt, a fundraiser for the Gender Health Center featuring art by Jon Gutierrez, Jose Ramirez, Brian Thomas and Esteban Villa. Sa, 6/8, 4-11pm. Free. 2326 J St., (916) 441-0948.

DEL PASO WORKS BUILDING: Second Saturday, enjoy a handbuilt ceramic sclupture gallery and ceramic artist studio featuring member art. Join a clay studio group, which meets weekly on Wednesday. Second Sa of every month, 6-9pm through 10/12. Free. 1001 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 333-4833.

LITTLE RELICS BOUTIQUE & GALLERIA: Fire Fire Fire by Metalphoria, sculpture Artists Kristen Hoard and Jessie Brooks bring fire fire and steel to this exhibition. Sa, 6/8, 6-10pm. Free. 908 21st St., (916) 716-2319.

Dance tale presented by the Lodi Youth Ballet under the direction of Judy Pittman, with music composed by celebrated composer Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Sa, 6/8, 2 & 7pm. $11-$16. Hutchins Street Square, 125 S. Hutchins St. in Lodi; (209) 333-5550; www.hutchinsstreetsquare.com.

Film THE WIZARD OF OZ OUTDOOR MOVIE NIGHT: Calvine Storage Kings in Elk Grove is offering another summer of free outdoor movies. There will be food trucks on hand courtesy of Foodmob, as well as free popcorn. Come early to set up your own chairs and enjoy pre-show food. Sa, 6/8, 8:30-10:30pm. Free. Storage Kings, 8740 Calvine Rd. in Elk Grove; (916) 525-7181.

2nd Saturday Art Walk and Art in Action, draw, paint or sculpt from a live model from 3pm to 6pm or observe artists in action. Enjoy live music and an artist reception from 6pm to 10pm. Second Sa of every month, 3-10pm through 12/14. Free. 3460 Second Ave., (916) 397-8958; http://patrisstudio gallery.blogspot.com.

Kids’ Stuff LIVING HISTORY DAY: Step back in time with historic re-enactors dressed in period clothing as they demonstrate different aspects of life during the California Gold Rush. Young visitors can enjoy hands-on activities like candle dipping, doll making, and rope making. Second

SACRAMENTO GAY AND LESBIAN CENTER: THEshow, see (and purchase) art in a variety of mediums created by members of the LGBT community. Second

Sa of every month, 1-9pm through 12/12. Opens 6/8. Free. 1927 L St.,

Sa of every month, 10am-3pm through 8/10. Free. Marshall Gold

(916) 442-0185.

Discovery State Historic Park, 310 Back St. in Coloma; (530) 622-3470; www.marshallgold.org.

SMITH GALLERY: Illuminated Cathedral Impressions, an exhibition by local artist Steve Memerings, whose paintings capture the expanse and beauty of the roiling ocean on large canvases. Sa, 6/8, 6-9pm. Free. 1020 11th St., Ste. 100; (916) 446-4444.

CALIFORNIA STATE INDIAN MUSEUM: Gathering of Honored Elders, The State Indian Museum is hosting a special community event to celebrate and honor California’s Native Elders. Along with Native American dancers, guest speakers, community services organizations and arts and crafts vendors who will all be on-site, museum guests will also have the opportunity to meet the esteemed elders and explore the museum. Sa, 6/8. Free. 2618 K St., (916) 324-0971, www.parks.ca.gov/indian museum.

TEMPLE COFFEE: Premiere Lumiere, the photographic works of Raffa. Sa, 6/8, 6-9pm. Free. 1010 Ninth St., (916) 443-4960.

UNION HALL GALLERY: Contemporary Fantasy Realism, abstract and fantasy realism paintings in acrylic and canvas prints by Steve Memering; a wood carving demonstration by Douglas Adam Bradley. Sa, 6/8, 6-9pm. Free. 2126 K St., (916) 448-2452.

YOUR ALLEY ART GALLERY: Second

Concerts FRANK VIGNOLA & VINNIE RANIOLO: Recognized primarily as a world-class jazz guitarist, but well versed in every genre, Frank Vignola’s resume includes work with a range of artists from Ringo Starr to Wynton Marsalis. He’ll be joined by Vinnie Raniolo. Sa, 6/8, 8pm. $19-$21. Sutter Creek Theatre, 44 Main St. in Sutter Creek; (916) 425-0077; www.sutter creektheatre.com.

Saturday, see or purchase original art works by some of the finest local artists in Sacramento. Hear music and enjoy refreshments. Second Sa of every month, 4-9pm. Free. 3431 Fourth Ave., (916) 201-1404.

Comedy THE COLONY: This is a show more creative than its name. A team of improv veterans and friends build something with your suggestions. The team takes the stage every week to ask you

NEWS

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POPS IN THE PARK: Pops in the Park

FEATURE

is a series of free evening concerts that raises money for under-funded neighborhood

STORY

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STREET FAIR: This fair in downtown

PARTY-COOKING TIPS: Prepare your patio for warm weather entertaining, because when you leave this class, you’ll be ready to host a delicious summer party. Gigi Warsh-awsky will show you how to make Brie with New Orleans praline topping, Southwestern chop pasta salad, shrimp cakes, cheesy bread bites, |and Southern lace cookies. M, 6/10, 6:30-8:30pm. $35-$45. Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op Community Learning Center & Cooking School, 1914 Alhambra Blvd., (916) 868-6399; www.sacfoodcoop.com.

09SUN

DON’T MISS! Author and founder of the global White Lion Protection Trust, Linda Tucker will be presenting in Sacramento with her new book. Accompanied by dramatic photographs, Saving the White Lions shares how a life-threatening encounter with a pride of lions during a vacation in South Africa became a life-changing experience. Su, 6/9, 3-5pm. $40. Ancient Future Urban Sanctuary, 2331 K St.; (916) 910-5167; www.ancientfuturenow.com.

Concerts DAVIS MADRIGALS BENEFIT CONCERT: Davis High School’s chamber choir will perform under the direction of Madrigal Director Dr. Karen Gardias in a prelude to their historic and educational choral tour of Italy next month to Rome and Sorrento, Italy, where concerts are planned in the Sistine Chapel, at St. Peter’s Cathedral and in a Cistercian Abbey. M, 6/10, 7pm. Free. Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, 1017 11th St.; (916) 444-3071; www.davismadrigals.com.

Special Events FOOD AND WINE TASTING: Wineries, breweries and restaurants will serve up a feast in the California Museum. Proceeds from the event will help fund community service projects for two local Rotary Clubs. Su, 6/9, 3-6pm. $35-$40. The California Museum, 1020 O St.; (916) 653-7524; www.citycrush.eventbrite.com.

11TUES

Art Galleries

SPARK: A BURNING MAN STORY: Spark is an engaging

On the Divide Gallery is celebrating its third year with food, drinks, and musical entertainment. Su, 6/9, 3-6pm. Free. 6295 Main St. in Georgetown, (530) 333-2787.

MCCONNELL ESTATES WINERY: Art at the Vineyard, an afternoon of art and wine tasting. Su, 6/9, noon-4pm. Free. 10686 West Stockton Blvd., Ste. A in Elk Grove.

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ACTIVELY LISTENING: Erik James, part of the Bell Boys, presents an acoustic singer-songwriter showcase at Old Soul. It features five or six songwriters showcasing original music every week. W, 6pm. Free. Old Soul Co., 1716 L St.; (916) 443-7685; http://facebook.com/ activelylistening.

Art Galleries DOWNTOWN PLACERVILLE: Banners on Parade, a community art project that will feature more 30 artistically decorated banners on light poles along Main Street in Placerville. Through 10/12, 8am-8pm. 409 Main St. in Placerville; (530) 672-3436; www.placerville-downtown.org.

PENCE GALLERY: Edge of Extinction,

great way to learn about how a community works. Learn what it takes for a garden to thrive and then create your own art garden pot to take home. Seeds are provided so your ideas can sprout. Or, you can fill it with chocolate mud and shovel in a tasty dessert. Tu, 6/11, 4pm. Free.

Bicycles and Practical Cycle for a celebration honoring the new elMundo BionX cargo bike. Discover the ease of car-free family mobility with this special bike. Take demo rides, eat

Concerts

$10-$15. Old Sacramento, 1002 Second St.; (916) 808-7059; www.historicoldsac.org.

SEEDS OF CHANGE: A garden is a

BIKE LAUNCH PARTY: Join Yuba

Stricken by cancer and close to death, Judi Bari—a leader of the movement to save California’s old growth redwoods—gives her testimony about the attempt on her life and her lawsuit against the FBI for trying to frame her and Darryl Cherney. W, 6/12, 7pm. $5-20. Sol Collective, 2574 21st St.; (916) 832-0916; www.solcollective.org.

M-Su, 10:30am-3pm through 12/1.

Dr. Richard Pan, who represents Elk Grove and the surrounding area, will be the main speaker at the June 11th meeting. He will discuss legislation he has introduced so far this year, and then open the floor up for questions and answers. Tu, 6/11, 6:30-8pm. Free. Elk Grove Library, 8900 Elk Grove Blvd. in Elk Grove; (916) 479-2244.

Kids’ Stuff

WHO BOMBED JUDI BARI?:

for nearly 150 years, Old Sacramento’s underground has long been the capital’s bestkept secret. Now in its fourth season, visitors have the opportunity to uncover the facts behind the legends that lie below historic buildings and sidewalks.

ELK GROVE-SOUTH COUNTY DEMOCRATIC CLUB: Assemblyman

open to anyone who would like to acquire fundamental knowledge of the photographic process. The two-hour class covers the essentials of technique, basic aesthetics, composition and lighting. Students are encouraged to use photography as a way to express themselves and communicate ideas. Su, 6/9, 2-4pm. $59. Caverna 57, 836 57th St; (415) 583-9079; www.mapurunga.com.

DON’T MISS!

Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

OLD SACRAMENTO UNDERGROUND TOURS: Hidden beneath the city

Special Events

BEGINNING DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP: This workshop is

12WED

Wait, there’s more!

Special Events

behind-the-scenes documentary about the dreams and challenges of Burning Man and its unique culture of participatory art. Each year 60,000 people from around the globe gather in a dusty windswept Nevada desert to build a temporary city, collaborating on largescale art and partying for a week before burning a giant effigy in a ritual frenzy. Tu, 6/11, 7-10pm. $14.50. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (916) 442-7378; www.tugg.com/events/4236.

by Michael Radin. Su, 6/9, 1-4pm. Free. 820 Pole Line Rd. in Davis, (530) 756-7807, www.daviscemetery.org.

Roseville featuires live bands, a farmers market, a children’s zone, a food court and a classic car show. Tu, 5-9pm through 7/30. Free. Roseville Downtown Tuesday Nights, 311 Vernon St. in Roseville; (916) 787-0101; http://dowtowntuesday nights.com.

ONGOING

DON’T MISS!

ART ON THE DIVIDE COOPERATIVE GALLERY: Garden Party, Art

A RT S & C U LT U R E

Kids’ Stuff

Classes

GALLERY 1855: Street Seen, photos

Museums

Martin Luther King, Jr. Library, 7240 24th St. Bypass; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary,org.

10MON

SAVING THE WHITE LIONS:

SLEEPING BEAUTY: See a timeless

PATRIS STUDIO AND ART GALLERY:

snacks and drink juice. Su, 6/9, noon-6pm. Free. Practical Cycle, 114 J St., (916) 706-0077; http://yubabikes.com.

parks. Sponsorship and advertising dollars, as well as proceeds from the sale of food and beverages at the events, have been used since 1995 to fund the events, enhance neighborhood parks and bring improvements to the neighborhood and provide youth athletic scholarships. Sa, 6pm through 6/22. Free. East Portal Park, 1120 Rodeo Way; (916) 808-7235; http://eastsac popsinthepark.com.

Lisa Reinertson, known both for her large scale figurative ceramic sculptures and for her significant public memorials in bronze—including Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on the UC Davis campus and Cesar Chavez in Sacramento’s Cesar Chavez Plaza—has returned to working primarily in clay to produce a new body of work. Second F of

every month, 6-9pm through 6/14; Tu-Su, 11:30am-5pm through 6/14. Free. 212 D St. in Davis; (530) 758-3370; www.pencegallery.org.

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FAVORITEE R U O Y R O VOTE FR ENTRIES ONLIN POSTE

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VOTE &

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FATHER’S DAY June 16: Give dad a break from the grill. Regular menu plus BBQ specials on the patio all day. Come to Eat, Drink, Relax! TAP INTO SUMMER June 15: Sac-On-Tap and Ten22 presents Tap into Summer from 12 – 4 pm. Enjoy beers from Track 7 Brewing Co., an all-you-can-eat taco bar and live music from the Diva Kings for an all-inclusive price.

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1022 Second Street, Sacramento 916.441.2211 Ten22oldsac.com valet & validated parking Like us on Facebook and we’ll like you back with special offers!

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5/7/13 8:28 AM


HALF OFF

Choices, chivalry, churros and chimichangas

With the purchase of one meal & 2 drinks receive the 2nd meal of equal or lesser value at 50% off. Must present ad. Expires 06.20.13

Don Quixote’s Mexican Grill 2648 Watt Avenue, Suite 115; (916) 481-3000; www.thedon.net Although its tagline boasts it’s “Authentic Mexican cuisine served fresh [and] fast,� the food Don by Quixote’s Mexican Grill creates actually Jonathan tastes more like a combination of traditional Mendick Mexican food, Mexican-American cooking and j o nathan m@ Southwest cuisine. And despite being named newsreview.c om after the classic 17th-century novel by Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha, the restaurant doesn’t offer any Spanish food. Nevertheless, the eatery, nestled in a corner of rating: a shopping center on Watt Avenue in the Arden HHH 1/ 2 Arcade area of Sacramento, serves up a cheap meal that’s both quick and flavorful. dinner for one: The restaurant shares a few similarities $8 - $15 with Chipotle, the international burrito chain: Here, an employee waits behind a glass pane and assembles large burritos according to each customer’s preference. A tortilla is warmed up with a tortilla press, and then filled with a choice of meat, beans, rice, lettuce, onions, cilantro, salsa, guacamole, sour cream, etc. And, just like at Chipotle, customers can also H order this same set of ingredients in taco shells flAWed or in a burrito bowl. HH But that’s just about where any resemhAS momentS blance ends. HHH Chipotle’s limited menu and flavors are AppeAling totally eclipsed by this local chain that first HHHH opened in 2006 (there’s another location at AuthoritAtive 2164 Sunset Boulevard in Rocklin). Don HHHHH Quixote’s also makes chimichangas, salads, epic soups, enchiladas, nachos, quesadillas, tamales, tortas and “chili� rellenos—in other words, way too much to order in just a handful of visits. Accordingly, I attempt to diversify my selection: an adobada torta, steak quesadilla, a salad, Still hungry? Search Sn&r’s “chili� verde chimichangas and several different “dining directory� types of burritos. After a half-dozen visits, I to find local have yet to to sample the tacos, chili relleno, restaurants by name enchiladas, nachos, soup and tamales. or by type of food. Just shy of trying “one of everything,� I Sushi, mexican, indian, italian—discover it nonetheless conclude that adobada is the best all in the “dining� meat option. It’s a slow-cooked pulled-porklike section at dish marinated in a guajillo chili sauce, which www.news review.com. adds copious spice and saltiness. The steak and chicken, however—despite featuring a hint of lime—fall flat, requiring tons of extra salsa (thankfully, there’s a full salsa bar here offering salsa verde, salsa roja, pico de gallo and chipotle salsa, plus complimentary chips). The chimichangas are also not worth worth reordering. Despite being filled with tasty and moist chile verde pork, the tortilla shells are submerged in the deep fryer for far too long. The best burrito is the Chipotle Ranch, which includes a choice of meat (I wisely chose adobada), plus beans, rice, lettuce, cheese and a chipotle-ranch dressing. The Rocinate’s salad—named after Don Quixote’s horse in the BEFORE

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NEWS

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F E AT U R E

Cervantes novel—also features this dressing, and both are highly recommended. Another standout dish is the torta, a Mexican sandwich with meat, cheese, sour cream, lettuce, tomato and mayonnaise, all served on a roll of telera bread, which resembles a round, flat brioche.

★★★★ –SN&R ★★★★ –YELP

The adobada is a slowcooked pulled-porklike dish marinated in a guajillo chili sauce, which adds copious spice and saltiness. Dessert options include churros or flan. There’s also a narrow selection of beer, which could use a lot of expansion, and a house margarita. A couple aguas frescas, including a Mexican hibiscus tea, or jamaica, and the cinnamon-rice flavored horchata, add a nice flair of authenticity (the jamaica in particular hits a nice balance of tart and sweet). After a handful of visits, it’s clear that while the majority of dishes at Don Quixote’s are enjoyable, none really stand out above the others. Still, most are consistently impressive. Don Quixote’s staff is always friendly, offers good suggestions and waits patiently for customers (including myself) who try—often in vain—to decide what they want. Ί

☛ S p ec i a l i z i n g i n po r k B e l ly D i S h e S ☛

4261 TruxeL rd, STe A7 | SAcrAmenTO 9 1 6 . 2 8 5 . 6 1 0 0 | w w w. p b g ru b s h a c k . c o m

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It’s Summertime. Eat Good Food.

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Father’s Day

JUNE 16

JACK DANIELS DINNER

Brunch

every saturday & sunday

9am - 3pm

at The Porch

Road trip desperation

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School’s out. Time to hit the road. But there’s never enough granola to last the entire way to Grandma’s house or the duration of your band’s tour, is there? A little preparation for the traveling vegan will prevent constant hunger. Locate vegan-friendly eateries and stores along the way via HappyCow’s international database (www.happycow.net), such as the all-vegan and almost entirely organic New World Cafe in Des Moines, Iowa. But if chain restaurants are the only option, use the list—much of it is information gathered from contacting customer-relations departments—at http://tinyurl.com/vegrest to help suss out the slim (if any) herbivore offerings, such as the Wish Burger on In-N-Out Burger’s secret menu. So, yeah, pack lots of snacks.

STORY

th

BEER DINNER

June 16th

Father’s Day

Brunch

PAJAMA BRUNCH

every saturday & sunday

8am - 3pm

$7.95 Unlimited Mimosas

—Shoka

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Downtown Estelle’s Patisserie With its marble 

Where to eat?

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Becky Grunewald, Greg Lucas, Ann Martin Rolke, Garrett McCord and Jonathan Mendick, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

tables and light wooden chairs,  there’s an airy atmosphere,  casual and cozy. Estelle’s  offers an espresso bar and  a wide assortment of teas  and muffins and rolls for  the breakfast crowd as well  as sweets, including DayGlo  macarons. For the lunchinclined, there are soups,  salads, sandwiches and meat  or meatless quiche. One of the  authentic touches is the spare  use of condiments. The smoked  salmon is enlivened by dill and  the flavor of its croissant. Its  tomato bisque is thick and  richly flavored, and, in a nice  touch, a puff pastry floats in  the tureen as accompaniment.  There’s a lot to like about  Estelle’s—except dinner. Doors  close at 6pm. French. 901 K St.,  (916) 551-1500. Meal for one:  $5-$10. HHH1⁄2 G.L.

Grange Restaurant & Bar You  won’t find any “challenging”  dishes on this menu—just  delicious local and seasonal  food such as the Green Curry  & Pumpkin Soup, which has a  Southeast Asian flair. A spinach salad features ingredients  that could be considered  boring elsewhere: blue-cheese  dressing, bacon, onion. But  here, the sharply cheesy  buttermilk dressing and the  woodsy pine nuts make it a  salad to remember. Grange’s  brunch puts other local offerings to shame. The home fries  are like marvelously crispy  Spanish patatas bravas. A  grilled-ham-and-Gruyere 

5 OFF

$

sandwich is just buttery  enough, and an egg-white  frittata is more than a bone  thrown to the cholesterolchallenged; it’s a worthy dish   in its own right. American.   926 J St., (916) 492-4450.  Dinner for one: $40-$60.   HHHH B.G.

Zia’s Delicatessen Zia’s  Delicatessen isn’t really  about trying every sandwich:  It’s about finding  your sandwich. In addition to a large  selection of salumi, there’s  the worthy eponymous offering, served with a wedge  of zucchini frittata, a slice  of provolone, romaine lettuce, grainy tomato, and a  simple dash of vinegar and  oil that adds tang. Order it  hot, so that the provolone  melts into the bread. Also  tasty: the hot meatball sub  with small-grained, tender  meatballs bathed in a thin,  oregano-flecked tomato  sauce that soaks into the  bread. A tuna sandwich is  sturdy, if not exciting. It is  just mayonnaisey enough,  with tiny, diced bits of celery.  A rosemary panino cotto  with mozzarella could benefit  from a more flavorful cheese.  For a meatier option, try the  Milano: mortadella, salami,  Muenster; all three flavors in  balance. The turkey Viareggio  has a thin spread of pesto  mayo, and the smoked mozzarella accents rather than  overpowers.  American.   1401 O St., Ste. A; (916)   441-3354. $5-$10. HHHH B.G.

Midtown

Madame, a ham-and-Gruyere  sandwich usually battered with  egg. This one had a fried egg  and béchamel, with a generous  smear of mustard inside. The  mountain of potato hash alongside tasted flavorful and not too  greasy. The menu also features  pizzas and house-made pastas,  but one of its highlights includes  an excellent smoked-eggplant  baba ganoush, which is smoky  and garlicky and served with  warm flatbread wedges and  oil-cured olives. The bananas  foster bread pudding is equally  transcendent, accompanied  by very salty caramel gelato,  pecans and slivers of brûléed  bananas. American. 1630 S St.,  (916) 442-4885. Dinner for one:  $20-$40. HHH1/2 A.M.R. 

24K Chocolat Cafe This cafe serves  a solid, if very limited, brunch  and lunch menu. One offering is  a firm wedge of frittata with a  strong tang of sharp cheddar  that almost but doesn’t quite  jibe with the slightly spicy mole  sauce on the plate.The spinach  curry, made creamy by coconut milk rather than dairy,  comes topped with cubes of  tofu and tiny diced scallion and  red bell pepper and rests atop  a smooth potato cake. A side of  garbanzo-bean salad is wellflavored with the surprising  combination of mint and apricot. The place, located inside  Ancient Future, has “chocolat”  in the name, and chocolate is  in many of the menu offerings,  including a tiny cup of hot  Mexican drinking chocolate,  and chocolate-cherry scones  served crisp and hot, studded  with big chunks of bittersweet  chocolate and tart dried cherries. American. $10-$15. 2331 K  St., (916) 476-3754. HHH B.G.

LowBrau This place specializes in 

Hook & Ladder Manufacturing Co. The restaurant, by the  same owners as Midtown’s  The Golden Bear, sports a  firefighting theme (a ladder  on the ceiling duct work, shiny  silver wallpaper with a ratand-hydrant motif, et al) and  a bar setup that encourages  patrons to talk to each other.  An interesting wine list includes  entries from Spain and Israel;  there are also draft cocktails  and numerous beers on tap.  The brunch menu is heavy on  the eggs, prepared in lots of  ways. One option is the Croque 

Great Food, Great Fun

Live Music

dinner orders over $20

EvEry Saturday & Sunday

beer and bratwursts. Both are  done smashingly. The sausage  is wrapped in a tight, snappy  skin like a gimp suit, which gets  nicely charred by the chefs.  Within it lies a beguilingly spicy  and juicy piece of meat. Get it  with a pretzel roll for a truly  exciting experience. There are  vegan options, too: The Italian,  an eggplant-based brat, has  a surprisingly sausagelike  texture that no self-respecting  carnivore will turn it down for  lack of flavor. Toppings include  sauerkraut, a “Bier Cheese”  sauce and caramelized onions.  The idea behind Duck Fat Fries  is a glorious one, yet somehow  still falls short. You just expect  something more when you see  the words “duck fat.” The beer  selection is epic. If you’re lost  and confused, the staff will  help guide you to the right 

brew via questionings and  encouraged tastings.  German.  1050 20th St., (916) 706-2636.  $10-$15. HHHH G.M.

East Sac Istanbul Bistro Turkish chef Murat  Bozkurt and brother Ekrem  co-own this paean to their  homeland, with Ekrem usually at  the front of the house, infusing  the space with cheer. Turkish  cuisine features aspects of  Greek, Moroccan and Middle  Eastern flavors. The appetizer  combo plate offers an impressive sampling. Acili ezme is a  chopped, slightly spicy mixture  of tomatoes, cucumber and  walnuts that’s delicious paired  with accompanying flatbread  wedges. For entrees, try the  borani, a lamb stew with garbanzos, carrots, potatoes and  currants. The meat is very tender, while the veggies arrived  nicely al dente. Also good is the  chicken shish plate (souvlaki),  which features two skewers of  marinated grilled chicken that’s  moist and succulent. There are  also quite a few choices for  vegetarians, including flatbread  topped like pizza, with spinach  and feta or mozzarella and egg.  Turkish. $15-$20. 3260-B J St.,   (916) 449-8810. HHH1/2 A.M.R.

North Sac Asian Café Asian Café serves both  Thai and Lao food, but go for  the Lao specialties, which rely  on flavoring staples such as fish  sauce, lime juice, galangal and  lemongrass, lots of herbs, and  chilies. One of the most common 

dishes in Lao cuisine is larb,  a dish of chopped meat laced  with herbs, chilies and lime. At  Asian Café, it adds optional offal  add-ons—various organ meats,  entrails, et al—to three versions of the dish: beef with tripe,  chicken with gizzards, or pork  with pork skin. The beef salad  offers a gentle respite from  aggressive flavors, consisting  of medium-thick chewy slices of  eye of round with red bell pepper, chopped iceberg and hot  raw jalapeño. The single best  dish here is the nam kao tod, a  crispy entree with ground pork  that’s baked on the bottom of  the pan with rice, then stirred  and fried up fresh the next day  with dried Thai chilies and scallions. Thai and Lao. 2827 Norwood  Ave., (916) 641-5890. Dinner for  one: $10-$15. HHHH B.G.

South Sac Blue Moon Cafe and Karaoke In Sac,  most people equate Hong Kongstyle cuisine with dim sum, but  this restaurant, which also features private karaoke rooms,  serves up tasty, familiar food by  way of rice plates, sandwiches,  noodle bowls, soups and stirfries. A few random Japanese  (ramen, fried udon), French  (sweet or savory crepes),  Russian (borscht), Korean (beef  and kimchi hot pot) and Italian  (various pastas) foods add to  the feeling that whatever your  cultural background, you’ll  find a comfort dish from your  childhood to wrap its arms  around you and give you a hug.  Cultural diversity aside, one of  Blue Moon’s best dishes is the 

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Arden/ Carmichael El Chilango Taqueria The restaurant’s proprietors hail from Mexico’s Distrito Federal, and, accordingly, the menu offers perfectly simple regional cuisine, such as gorditas and a torta chilanga. The latter contains melty white cheese, spicy chorizo, sliced hot dogs, lightly fried ham, crunchy onions and avocado—all sandwiched within a charred, crispy bolillo moistened with a schmear of refried beans and mayo. The gordita is served steaming hot, stuffed with abundant chopped cilantro and onion, melted cheese and caramelized bits of chicharrón. The masa is crisped and oily on the outside and cooked all the way through with not a hint of the gumminess that can sometimes plague similar dishes, such as pupusas. Mexican. $5-$10. 3397 Watt Ave., (916) 971-9898 HHH1/2 B.G.

Ice Cream, side salads and fried chicken, but here, it’s breakfast pizza for the win. American. 2600 21st St., (916) 451-6555. $10-$20. HHH1/2 J.M.

The Hideaway Bar & Grill This bar fills a niche Sacramento might not have known it lacked with its vague rockabilly vibe, lots of greased hair on the men, brightly dyed hair in retro styles and cat-eye glasses on the ladies, and an abundance of black clothes and tattoo sleeves for all. The liquor selection is basic (no craft cocktails here). The menu’s heavy on fried appetizers, salads, sandwiches and burgers, the latter of which are architectural, towering assemblages. Happily, the fluffy charred buns are sturdy enough to hold up when the tower is squeezed to a more realistic height. A meaty veggie burger (one of three veggie sandwich options) gets crunch from fried pickles and sweet heat from barbecue sauce. Overall, the Hideaway offers cheap beer, adequate bar food and a comfortable place to hang with out friends. American. 2565 Franklin Blvd., (916) 455-1331. Dinner for one: $10-$15. HHH1/2 B.G.

Land Park/ Curtis Park Buffalo Pizza & Ice Cream Co. The

Skip’s Kitchen You know you’re at an American restaurant when a cheeseburger is one of the healthiest items on the menu. Sure enough, Skip’s Kitchen features a lot of calorie-rich items, such as fried macaroniand-cheese balls, ravioli, chicken

eatery, which offers take-out only, keeps the menu simple. Customers can choose from two types of pies: breakfast or lunch. Breakfast pizzas consist of standard pizza dough, on top of which rests a thin layer of egg, cheese and toppings (read: no sauce). One pepperoniand-jalapeños morning pie starts off well, but then the dough disappoints. It doesn’t quite fit in either the “thick” or “thin” category; it’s not yeasty enough and too chewy and firm. A mushroom-and-spinach pie offers better texture. Lunch pizzas here are less unique, but still hit a nice mark via a few standout ingredients. The garlic pizza reaches a nice balance of sweet and salty with a creamy white sauce, mushrooms, onions, pepperoni and sausage. Buffalo also offers Gunther’s

Pangaea Two Brews Cafe Not to put too fine a point on it: Pangaea’s offerings are not beers that will be found at a Save Mart Supermarket or even Nugget. They are nuanced. Brewed with artisanship. In some cases, for hundreds of years. There’s the usual panoply of French dip, hot pastrami, Reuben and so on. Among the signature

IllustratIon by Mark stIvers

strips, chicken wings and shrimp, plus creamy Oreo milkshakes. There are salads, too, but the best dish on the menu is the burger. All five styles (original, mushroom and Swiss, bacon and cheddar, three-cheese, and Western) are served on a brioche bun and cooked “medium,” unless otherwise specified. The kitchen offers a house-made veggie burger as well. If there’s such a thing as a “gourmet” burger that can rightfully sell for $10, this is probably it. American. 4717 El Camino Ave. in Carmichael, (916) 514-0830. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH1/2 J.M.

braised pig ear with soy sauce and peanuts. Asian. 5000 Freeport Blvd., Ste. A; (916) 706-2995. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH J.M.

offerings is The Gobbler. Turkey, natch. Cranberry sauce, natch. Then red onion, several roma tomato slices, a thicket of green leaf and pepper jack cheese, all shoehorned into a big baguette. Brewpub. 2743 Franklin Blvd., (916) 454-4942. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH1⁄2 G.L.

Winters Preserve Practically every restaurant worth its handgathered fleur de sel is “farm-to-fork” these days. Here, that’s interpreted with an all-day menu of bar snacks, salads, sides, pizzas and sandwiches. Current favorites include a platter of cured meats and cheeses, with überlocal Mariani dried fruit and nuts, olives, and Grandma Ogando’s jalapeño jelly. Salads include house-cured salmon with blood oranges and avocado, and beets with farmer cheese and red-onion jam. Individual-sized pizzas arrive with a flavorful fresh tomato sauce and plenty of Parmesan cheese. The slowsmoked brisket sandwich with garlic aioli is deliciously tender and not too fatty. There’s also an unusual vegetarian option with shredded carrots, slivered almonds and Gouda on rye bread. It has an oddly sweet flavor reminiscent of raisins. Some of Grandma O’s jelly would be a better fit. American. 200 Railroad Ave. in Winters, (530) 795-9963. $10-$20. HHH A.M.R.

Pork, booze and Skrillex Should there be another local pigcentric event in addition to Sacramento Bacon Fest? Do you order veggie burgers and then add bacon to them? If you answered yes to either of these questions, you should probably get your cholesterol levels checked—or just throw caution to the wind and head to Saturday’s Pig-A-Palooza. Hosted by NeighborWorks Sacramento, the event is headlined by a cook-off in which local chefs will compete for the title of “Primo Porker.” Attendees will sample dishes made by the chefs and choose the winner. There’s also a hog-calling contest, which—as a quick Google search will reveal—sounds sort of like a pig singing a Skrillex song. Plus: beer, wine and food from Feeding Crane Farms and Bledsoe Meats. It happens June 8, at McClatchy Park, from 2 to 6 p.m., and tickets cost $25 for adults and $12.50 for children 12 and younger. Visit www.pig-a-palooza.eventbrite.com for more details. —Jonathan Mendick

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CHANGE is GOOD FIND OF THE WEEK

AS SE S EC IA LI ZE D CL ✔ G RO U P SP SE SS G U ES S. W E AS ✔ W E DO N ’T TR AI N IN G AL TY IN TE RV SI N TE N -I H IG ✔H IN G + CO N DI TI O N ✔ ST RE N G TH

SACRAMENTO’S NEWEST TRAINING STUDIO W W W. FI T SO MS TUD IOS . COM ( 9 1 6 ) 4 7 3 - 3 7 45 2 5 1 2 FR A N K LIN BLV D , S ACTO C H A N G E Y O U R A T T I T U D E , C H A N G E Y O U R B O D Y, O B T A I N A F I T S T A T E O F M I N D

No pugs, no problem

Kids create

20th annual Doggy Dash

I Can Do that! CommunIty arts show Vox Sacramento hosts the I Can Do That! Community  Arts Show in association with the I Can Do That! Art  ART for All Abilities nonprofit. Each year, ICDT  provides area schools with artists-inschool residencies designed to give hands-on education to kids, many of whom have physical, emotional  and mental-developmental disabilities. The ICDT  festival takes place from 5 to 9 p.m. on Saturday,  June 8, and will feature works from Luther Burbank  High School students who, during the course of the  past school year, worked with area artists such as  Greg Polo, Ingrid Royal and UnChu Littlefield.   1818 11th Street, www.facebook.com/voxsac. —Rachel Leibrock

Goodbye, everyone sCatter, aDapt, anD remember Annalee Newitz, a science journalist and maven of the  popular science and tech website io9, examines the  patterns of mass extinctions through a lens that will  make us pay attention: humanity’s impending demise.  In Scatter, Adapt, and Remember: How Humans Will  Survive a Mass Extinction (Doubleday; $25.95), Newitz  reviews previous mass-extinction events and the  ways in which humans have “dodged the bullet” at  previous points when extinction might have occurred,  and finally, examines some technological advances,  which, when combined with prior strategies (the scatter, adapt, remember of the title), might be enough to  keep our species from disappearing for  BOOK good. Newitz also doesn’t forget to include  some purely speculative options: living without bodies  or spreading out across the solar system. —Kel Munger

Wordplay Ifontmaker Font aficianados, take note: Here’s a font-making app  that’s easy to use and customize. Designed for the  iPad, iFontMaker ($6.99) is a hands-on, touchscreendesign tool equipped with an intuitive freehand editor.  It’s easy to create a font that mimics your  APP handwriting or even uses emoticon-style  images to build a new alphabet of sorts. Use your font  to create a phrase or word that can be emailed or  saved for later use in compatible programs. Whether  you’re a sensible Helvetica kind of font nerd or more  adventurous (Webdings, maybe?), it’s easy to find just  your type. http://2ttf.com. —Rachel Leibrock

34   |   SN&R   |   06.06.13

It’s Hell Week for my 2-year-old  pug, Bernie. First, we did laps around Capitol  Park—and even ran the stairs at  the parking garage near the Crest  Theatre. Twice. But I’m not a slave  driver. After that, it was massages,  rawhides and some Arrested Development on Netflix. But too much leisure is for  the weak, so the next day, we hit  the dog park for wind sprints.  PETS Twenty-yard dashes,  back and forth. You’ve  never seen such explosiveness. What a beast, my Lil B. (That’s  his nickname. I also call him Burn,  Burner, BeeBee, Chooch, Little Buds,  Berner Herzog, etc.) It’s all in the name of training. Unfortunately, the 2013 Pug  Races at this weekend’s Doggy Dash  were canceled (too much heat for  brachycephalics, I guess).  But that’s OK, because there’s  still a 5,000-dog 5K walk (and a 2K  for the short-legged ones), doggydisk catching and pet-friendly  businesses selling wares.  Bernie was pumped for these  don’t-miss moments: the seventh  annual Pug Races and the Running  of the Pugs. Because, when he’s not  smelling other dogs’ butts, he smells  victory. Sadly, it wasn’t meant to be in  2013. Still there’s a silver lining: It’s  rumored that California’s first dog,  one Sutter Brown, will make an appearance at Saturday’s Dash. And  Bernie may get some one-on-one  time with the famous corgi. Maybe they can balance the  state budget on time? SPCA’s 2013 Doggy Dash,  Saturday, June 8, at William Land  Park, 3800 South Land Park Drive.  Some events are free, some require  registration; find out more at   http://sspca.convio.net. —Nick Miller


A Clinical Research Opportunity for People with GOUT FLARES

The transition position I met a woman in an online bereavement forum who lost her husband of 30 years. She insisted she would never be interested in another man, so we became friends. When we finally met in person, we held hands all day and slept in the same hotel bed at night. We kissed and cuddled but did not have sex, because she said it was cheating on her husband. I unintentionally made her by Joey ga cry by describing him as rcia dead. She prefers “transitioned.” Her spirituality is a s kj oe y @ ne wsreview.c om one of the things I love. She wants me to consider moving near her Long Island home. I feel Joey that when a man loves a woman, he needs to make love to her. This wishes you employed completes the relationship and your inside voice for cellphone chats. is very beautiful. She won’t be intimate, yet declares her love for me daily. I love her too much to pressure her. I am too young to spend the rest of my life in a sexless relationship. How will I know when it is time to move on? Friendship is defined as a relationship of nonsexual affection, actions that express care for the other and mutual disclosure of thoughts, feelings and experiences. That’s what you and this woman share: friendship. She has been clear from

If you choose to withdraw from this relationship, it will be like kicking nicotine. the start that her interest in you (and every other man) is platonic. Why do you resist hearing her honest words? Why believe that her explicit boundary is malleable? A night or more of cuddling and kissing is not evidence that she might alter her values. Hugging and kissing could represent the physical comfort she has missed since the death of her husband. You can gamble on the possibility that her belief system will invert itself. Or you can believe that she is capable of telling you the truth when she says, “I will not let myself love another man.” Oh, yes, I know she tells you that she loves you. And she does love you, but as a pal, not as a partner.

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

If you choose to withdraw from this relationship, it will be like kicking nicotine. You will decide to take a break from each other. You will promise yourself that you will not call her. You will imagine that this gives her time to miss you and to appreciate all that you could offer her. Three days later, you will convince yourself of the need to make just one call to check on her. This will resuscitate the old cycle: talking to each other daily and professing your love; meeting occasionally for a few days of fun; hoping she will change her mind, knowing that means she has compromised her values. The cycle of quitting cold turkey, talking yourself into reconnecting with her and then feeling hopeful, just postpones the inevitable pain of loss. Expect an echo from your past. Profound loss in the present reverberates through every other unresolved loss in a person’s life. If old wounds hurt again, it’s not a sign your friend was “the one.” It is a sign that you are carrying unresolved grief, and it’s an invitation to heal from that pain. Begin by appreciating solitude, practicing meditation and seeing a counselor. Let me be clear: I am not advocating this woman’s belief system, nor am I criticizing it. I am pointing out that she is convinced that there is only one man for her for in this lifetime and for eternity. That belief is central to her spirituality. Where does all of this leave you? With a fresh, reality-based perspective on love! So, yes, forget who you hope she will become—the woman she is now, that is who she truly is. Knowing this, how will you choose to tend your heart? Ω

My

GOUT SYMPTOMS just won’t go away.

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Midsummer’s stage dream One season, four stages and six Shakespeare classics Outdoor Shakespeare is a summer tradition, and this year, there are shows stretching from mid-June into August. The following is a quick guide to the by Jeff Hudson season’s most promising options. The Davis Shakespeare Ensemble will offer the pastoral comedy As You Like It. The story includes an extended rustic campout in the Forest of Arden; this production moves the setting to Appalachia. Rob Salas will direct—he was assistant director of The Taming of the Shrew at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland this season. As You Like It plays in the gazebo at the UC Davis Arboretum at 1 Shields Avenue in Davis from June 13, to June 30; Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m., and Sunday at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for general admission and $12 for students and seniors. Contact (530) 802-0998 for more info, or visit www.shakespearedavis.com.

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The Sacramento Shakespeare Festival will alternate the comedy Twelfth Night and the tragedy Julius Caesar in the William A. Carroll Amphitheatre in William Land Park at 3901 Land Park Drive. Director Matt K. Miller sets Twelfth Night, which brims with late-night partying, in a 1970s disco. Performances are scheduled on select dates Friday, June 28, through Saturday, July 27. For Julius Caesar, director Luther Hanson shifts the era from ancient Rome to opera-crazed Italy in the 1870s. Performances begin on Friday, July 5, through Sunday, July 28. On Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, the box office opens at 6 p.m., gates open at 6:30 p.m., and the show starts at 8 p.m. On Sundays, the box office opens at 4 p.m., gates open at 4:30 p.m., and the curtain is at 6 p.m. General admission is $18, and students and seniors get in for $15. Call (916) 558-2228 for details, or visit www.sacramentoshakespeare.net. To the east, the Lake Tahoe Shakespeare Festival has the perennial comedy A Midsummer

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FOUL

FAIR

GOOD

WELL-DONE

SUBLIME-DON’T MISS

Night’s Dream, which director Charles Fee locates in the psychedelic 1960s. The show runs Friday, July 12, through Sunday, August 25, outdoors in Sand Harbor State Park (2005 Highway 28 in Incline Village in Nevada). Show times are Tuesday through Sunday, 7:30 p.m., and tickets are $15 to $85. For details, call (800) 747-4697, or visit www.laketahoeshakespeare.com. To the west, the California Shakespeare Theater (located outdoors at the Bruns Amphitheater at 100 California Shakespeare Theater Way in the sometimes foggy Orinda) will stage the tragedy Romeo and Juliet from Wednesday, July 3, to Sunday, July 28, and the romance The Winter’s Tale Wednesday, September 25, through Sunday, October 20. Tickets range from $35 to $48; call (510) 548-9666 or check out www.calshakes.org for details. Ω

5

Miserable yet magnificent Les Misérables

Logically and emotionally, there’s every reason for Les Misérables to fall flat: It’s based on a 19th-century French novel, the plot is dark and unnerving, and it’s becoming trite (a 25thanniversary tour of the stage production is underway, following the 2012 film version). Nevertheless, the current cast of the touring musical performs the well-worn story with power, urgency and conviction, closing out California Musical Theatre’s Broadway Sacramento season with a bang. For its 25th anniversary, Les Mis (as it’s known colloquially) has been revamped with— but not inundated by—new technology. With a new digital backdrop featuring art inspired by the paintings of Les Mis author Victor Hugo, a simple sauntering through a sewer becomes one man’s journey to help save the youth of France from extreme class segregation, a mission to bring justice to a woman suffering from the wrath of a sexist society, and a devotion to defend love amid a lethal firefight. Everyone in this production sings the music of Claude-Michel Schönberg and lyrics by Herbert Kretzmer with great enthusiasm. This cast collectively makes most of the actors in the 2012 film version sound pitifully amateurish (with the exception of Hugh Jackman, Amanda Seyfried and Samantha Barks). With this inspired production, a 19th-century struggle becomes relevant again, and the audience is left to ponder the dramatic ethical dilemmas facing modern society and politics. —Jonathan Mendick

Les Misérables, 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday, Saturday; 2 p.m. Thursday, Saturday, Sunday; $24-$91. Community Center Theater, 1301 L Street; (916) 557-1999; www.broadwaysacramento.com. Through June 9.


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Preview sale for Friends members: Friday, June 7th from 5–8pm. Memberships available at the door for $15

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In this adaptation of Pearl Cleage’s 1990s-era drama, memories of the civil rights movement of the 1960s are still fresh for May (Brooklynn Solomon) and Charlie (Andre Ramey). Through friendship and camaraderie, they and their friends must come to terms with some awful truths, including decisions that hearken back to a past filled with horror. Cameron Johnson takes the cake as wily friend Tyrone. His timing is pitch-perfect, and he works seamlessly with the language and tone of the play. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 6/30. $8-$15, Celebration Arts, 4469 D St.; (916) 455-2787; www.celebrationarts.net. M.M.

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HEDDA GABLER

Janis Stevens directs Stephanie Gularte in Capital Stage’s production of Henrik Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler, an adaptation that presents central character Hedda in a whole new light. Here, she’s an enigmatic woman whose actions and motives are questionable: She’s presented a complex woman—depending on the moment, she’s a victim, a villain, a tragic heroine or a mentally unstable woman. Capital Stage has masterfully layered in a sinister undertone to the play and most its characters, painting Hedda as pistol-packing psychopath. Th, F 8pm; 2pm Su; 7pm W. Through 6/16. $24-$35. Capital Stage, 2215 J St.; (916) 995-5464; www.capstage.org. P.R.

sn&r

summer guide ON STANDS NExT wEEk

How We Got On: Buck Busfield directs this B Street Theatre production about 1980s hip-hop culture.

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HOW WE GOT ON

Idris Goodwin’s play about 1980s-era aspiring urban rappers doesn’t depict a hardedged scene but rather a peaceable saga. Directed here by Buck Busfield, it works nicely as a slice of life that illuminates a particular place and time, with some appealing young characters in the process of finding themselves. Th, F 8pm; Sa 5 & 9pm; Su 2pm; T 6:30pm; W 2 & 6:30pm. Through 6/23. $5-$35. B Street Theatre, 2711 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. J.H.

Short reviews by Jeff Hudson, Maxwell McKee and Patti Roberts.

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Secrets and whys

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Stories We Tell

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Still not even 35, the perceptive Canadian actor-director Sarah Polley packs a lot of humane wisdom into the films she makes, previously including the by Jonathan Kiefer intimate dramas Away From Her and Take This Waltz. Polley’s latest is a nervy departure—an intimate documentary, this time, about her own family and its most perplexing secrets. Stories We Tell is a memoir in movie form, and a sort of first-person-plural mystery as well. It’s the best and most generous creative thing Polley’s ever done, not least because she’s the only person in the world who could have done it.

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4 Very Good

Where fact-fiction hybrid documentaries are concerned, the game of wondering what’s really “true” can too easily degenerate into mere indulgence, leaving behind little more than just those quotation marks. Alternatively, more rarely, it can be a blessed riddle, as in the exemplary case of Stories We Tell. Polley’s project was to gather her extended family for a collective remembrance of her late mother, Diane, who in retrospect, seemed all too comfortable at the center of so much attention. On the other hand, Diane died still guarding at least one whopper of a family secret, which Sarah rather politely but ardently wants to get to the bottom of. Or maybe that’s not the right way to put it. Stories We Tell, as its title suggests, is not quite a getting-to-the-bottom type of undertaking. By design, it’s less an expedition for some onceand-for-all answers than a deliberately openended process of discovery. As to the secret in question, that’s best left in question, making the movie a challenge to describe and probably a frustration to read about. Just know that it’s very much worth seeing and ingeniously done. Neither overplaying nor underserving her own grief, Polley seems most keen to reveal how the fact of Diane’s goneness promotes certain family fictions. This proves an insightful and elevating approach, by which the personal becomes universal. In ostensibly standard-issue talking-head interviews, she asks her siblings,

and others, to explain the family history. Using vintage-looking Super 8 film, she also annotates it. Eventually, and movingly, it dawns on us that documentary itself is innately selective— that indeed there is some game-playing going on here, intended not as obfuscation, but rather as a more nuanced and proper tribute, and not just to Diane, but also to the ancestral pleasures of storytelling itself. Meanwhile, it is precisely the elasticity of memory and the common propensity toward mythology that keeps us willing to rummage through any one heretofore unknown family’s arcana at all. Full of reversals and reveals both big and small, Stories We Tell is a meta puzzle, yes, but with real ethics, and human priorities. It won’t be a spoiler to say that on matter of Diane’s inner life, the rest of the family is both a great help and no help at all. Arguably, they incriminate themselves, but Sarah’s plan isn’t to corner anyone; her heart is much too huge for that. Deep within the cozy nostalgic enclaves of bohemian Montreal and Toronto, some thorny questions do come up for Diane’s most significant suitors: Sarah’s sweetly reticent father Michael, himself also an actor and a writer (at Sarah’s command, he overlays the film with his own beautifully literate narration of family lore), and Harry Gulkin, a gregarious film producer. Genially, young Ms. Polley presses on, recognizing that what’s really at stake is her own origin story, and that sharing it is the best way to validate it.

Full of reversals and reveals both big and small, Stories We Tell is a meta puzzle, yes, but with real ethics and human priorities. That Stories We Tell doesn’t seem selfserving to its maker is practically a miracle. But Polley knows her craft, and what might have looked at first like just a scrapbook turns out to be very rigorously structured and tempered; as the film accumulates complexity, it maintains a just-right ratio of wistfulness to playfulness. Another thing about the title: Without being too presumptuous, that “we” seems to mean not just the Polleys, including those no longer alive, but all of us. In the end, everybody inherits the privilege to be an author of the Polley family story, including this movie’s audience. Ω


by JONATHAN KIeFeR & JIM LANe

3

After Earth

A millennium in the future, two space rangers, a father (Will Smith) and son (Jaden Smith), crash-land on Earth, and the boy must trek 60 miles to dispatch a distress signal. The latest “hostile Earth” sci-fi epic is an OK boy’s adventure—or would be if director M. Night Shyamalan and co-writer Gary Whitta (from a story concocted by the senior Smith as a star vehicle for his son) didn’t present it with such an air of lugubrious solemnity. It’s handsomely mounted, well-designed and suspenseful, but not a lot of fun, more ordeal than adventure. Dad Will takes a backseat to son Jaden, who discharges his heroic duties, well, dutifully. Sophie Okonedo appears as wife and mother (respectively) to the two, with Zoe Isabella Kravitz showing up in flashbacks as the sister whose death haunts both father and son. J.L.

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2 5 0 8 L A N D PA R K D R I V E L A N D PA R K & B R O A D WAY F R E E PA R K I N G A D J A C E N T T O T H E AT R E “PROBING.” - Mary Corliss, TIME MAGAZINE

4

YOU NEED

WED-TUES: 11:05AM, 1:10, 3:20, 5:25, 7:35, 9:45PM

KON TIKI - Ian Buckwalter, NPR

WED/THUR: 11:00AM, 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10:00PM FRI-TUES: 3:25, 5:35, 7:45PM NO SUN 3:25PM • NO TUES 5:35, 7:45PM

scenes that blithely break every law of traffic and physics, interspersed with the growling repartee that passes for comic relief in this testosterone-drenched franchise (the biggest laugh, though, comes at the end, with a prim, don’t-try-this-at-home disclaimer). Fans will not be disappointed. And God help us, No. 7 is on the way. J.L.

3

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Kon-Tiki

In 1947, Norwegian ethnographer Thor Heyerdahl pulled off one of the most spectacular stunts of the 20th century by sailing a primitive raft from Peru to Polynesia to support his theory that the South Pacific was colonized by ancient South Americans. His theory remains widely discounted, but his exploit fascinated the world, giving him a bestselling book, a 1951 documentary Oscar, and a long life of similar adventures. Directors Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg have dramatized Heyerdahl’s voyage in a gleaming production (shot simultaneously in Norwegian and English). Characters are sketchily drawn except for Heyerdahl himself (well-played by Pål Sverre Hagen), but the men-against-thesea story, gorgeous photography (by Geir Hartly Andreassen), and knowing it’s all true make the movie a real pleasure. J.L.

Fast & Furious 6

Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) and his crew of outlaw street racers (Paul Walker, Tyrese Gibson, Chris “Ludacris” Bridges, et al.) are recruited by a government agent (Dwayne Johnson) to bring down a mastermind specializing in vehicular crime (Luke Evans). Has there ever been a sequel with “6” in the title that was any good? Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country maybe, but besides that? Director Justin Lin jam-packs the screen with blatantly implausible car chases and fight

NEWS

Iron Man 3

Billionaire superhero Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) contends with two villains: a terrorist called The Mandarin (Ben Kingsley) and an urbane think-tank tycoon (Guy Pearce), who may be working with the terrorist. Director and co-writer (with Drew Pearce) Shane Black takes over from Jon Favreau (now playing Stark’s head of security), and his movie, while less memorable than the first Iron Man, is at least less instantly forgettable than its sequel. The action set pieces become enervating after a while, so patently CGI that nothing’s really ever at stake. The movie works mainly due to its acting: Downey, of course; Gwyneth Paltrow as gal Friday/sweetheart Pepper Potts; Don Cheadle as Stark’s military pal; and Kingsley. The most pleasant (and only) surprise is a sprightly youngster, Ty Simpkins, as a whiz kid who helps Stark. J.L.

Epic

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DENIED SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS?

Frances Ha

Noah Baumbach’s ebullient film shows what it’s like to be alive and in one’s 20s and living in New York—or, briefly, Sacramento—and aware of one’s potential slipping away. Greta Gerwig stars as an aspiring dancer, whose signature move might be flightiness, and whose slow drift toward true adulthood might also be away from her best friend, played by Mickey Sumner. Shot in sumptuous black-and-white, this subtly romanticized slice of life amounts to a minimal assembly of improbably resonant nonevents, almost unthinkable as a film without the specific virtue of Gerwig’s daffy, guileless poise. Otherwise, Baumbach’s style could be called homage-happy; it’s French New Wave meets vintage Woody Allen meets Girls. What’s key is how playfully at ease Baumbach seems among his many tasteful influences, including obvious muse Gerwig, his co-writer and vital spark. Inspired by her spontaneity, and scripted to cultivate it, the movie does turn up some occasional stilted line readings here and there, but periodic awkwardness also is shrewdly elemental to its charm. J.K.

Disconnect

BEFORE

“THOROUGHLY ENJOYABLE.”

- David Edelstein, NEW YORK MAGAZINE

F O R A D V A N C E T I C K E T S C A L L FA N D A N G O @ 1 - 8 0 0 - F A N D A N G O # 2 7 2 1

A teenage girl (voice by Amanda Seyfried) goes to live in the woods with her eccentric father (Dan Green), who believes that tiny people protect the forest. When she magically shrinks to insect size, she finds out Dad was right, and joins forces with two “Leaf Men” (Colin Farrell, Josh Hutcherson) to defeat Mandrake (Christoph Waltz), king of a creeping rot that threatens the forest. It’s a bland knockoff of A Bug’s Life without the humor, suspense or vivid characters, but somehow it took five writers to concoct (including William Joyce, whose kids’ book The Leaf Men and the Brave Good Bugs provided a loose inspiration). Director Chris Wedge executes the thin story studiously but flatly; the animation is inspired, but the story isn’t, and lackluster voice work doesn’t help. It’s in 3-D, which adds little. J.L.

2

“A LOVELY LITTLE LARK.”- Betsy Sharkey, LOS ANGELES TIMES

WED/THUR: 11:10AM, 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40PM FRI-TUES: 10:40AM, 1:00, 9:50PM NO SUN 1:00PM • NO TUE 9:50PM

At Any Price

Director Henry Alex Rubin has only helmed documentaries before Disconnect, so it seems fair to cut him some slack for dramatic creakiness. Some. Rather late to the table with its hand-wringing about the way we live now, Rubin’s film, from a didactic script by Andrew Stern, wrangles Facebook bullying, credit fraud and underage porn into an issue-driven patchwork of lives at once frayed and braided. A distracted dad (Jason Bateman) strikes up a yearning instantmessage rapport with the stealth tormentor (Colin Ford) of his loner son (Jonah Bobo); a young husband and wife (Paula Patton, Alexander Skarsgard) fail to cope with losing both their child and their financial security; a TV reporter (Andrea Riseborough) gets too deep into her story about an online rent boy (Max Thieriot). Too diluted by its fussy, phony comprehensiveness, the case being made here just doesn’t seem credible: How can a movie about what the Internet does to us be so devoid of spontaneity? J.K.

3

Frances Ha

LOVE IS ALL

In what might seem from the outset like a Hollywood-lite look at the Bowman v. Monsanto case recently heard by the Supreme Court, director Ramin Bahrani’s awkward but at least absorbing drama gives Dennis Quaid some good scenery to chew as a heartland seed salesman losing control of both his family and his farm. His grounded wife (Kim Dickens), plainly aware of his harpy ex-cheerleader mistress (Heather Graham), understandably wonders why this man can’t be happy with what he has. But then, his rebellious son (Zac Efron) would rather drive race cars than inherit the family business, which, under dad’s dubious stewardship, already has run afoul of a litigious genetically modified organism company. It is safe to say the situation deteriorates. Coscripting with Hallie Newton, Bahrani reaches beyond the intimate simplicity of his previous feature, Goodbye Solo, and seems to be grasping for grand American tragedy. Solemnity prevails, but subplots don’t fully cohere, and the filmmaker’s ambition ultimately gets the best of him. J.K.

2

STORIES WE TELL

STARTS FRI., 6/7 FRI-TUES: 11:30AM, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30PM

Dance like no one is watching?

“BEAUTIFUL AND SURPRISING.”

3

Love Is All You Need

A Copenhagen hairdresser (Trine Dyrholm), freshly done with chemo for breast cancer, catches her husband cheating just as she’s about to leave for her daughter’s wedding in Italy. Stressed and distraught, she

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Star Trek Into Darkness

Captain Kirk (Chris Pine), Spock (Zachary Quinto), Dr. McCoy (Karl Urban) and the Enterprise crew are on a secret mission on the Klingon home planet to kill a Starfleet renegade (Benedict Cumberbatch)—but it’s a trap, and this renegade is no ordinary criminal. Director J.J. Abrams proves that his 2009 reboot of the venerable franchise was no fluke. The spot-on cast is back (Simon Pegg, Zoe Saldana, John Cho, Anton Yelchin) with some welcome new additions—Cumberbatch (a classic villain), Alice Eve, Peter Weller. Written by Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman and Damon Lindelof, this is about as good as space opera gets: It revives our affection for the original series with a rejuvenating new spin. It’s fast, fun, dramatically sound and emotionally right, making the old and familiar new and surprising again. J.L.

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

ED

Law Office of Steven H. Berniker, APC 2424 Arden Way #360, Sacramento, CA 95825 (Behind the Social Security Office on Arden Way) www.SACFAMILYLAWFIRM.com

Four small-time illusionists—a card trickster (Jesse Eisenberg), an escape artist (Isla Fisher), a mentalist (Woody Harrelson) and a pickpocket (Dave Franco)—hit the big time in Vegas, somehow robbing banks during their act and dispensing the money to the audience. Meanwhile, an FBI agent (Mark Ruffalo), an Interpol detective (Mélanie Laurent) and a professional debunker (Morgan Freeman) all try to figure out how it’s done, and how to stop the next heist. Directed by Louis Leterrier and written by Ed Solomon, Boaz Yakin and Edward Ricourt, the movie is a bit of a fast shuffle itself. Like many magic acts, it’s a lot of smoke and mirrors, and not always on the square. Still, the tricks are tricky enough to be fun; the plot may be just a series of diversions, but at least the diversions are diverting. J.L.

5

ROV

FREE CONSULATION AND WALK-INS WELCOME

gets off on the wrong foot with the groom’s curmudgeonly father (Pierce Brosnan). Director and co-writer (with Anders Thomas Jensen) Susanne Bier sets a steady pace for her romantic dramedy of family dysfunction, but she lays on the melodrama a few coats too thick, and a plot turn at the 90-minute mark (which we see coming at least an hour earlier) is perhaps one crisis too many. Still, performances are appealing (especially Dyrholm’s), the cast (except for Brosnan) hops with effortless charm from Danish to English and back again, and the Mediterranean locations are beautifully photographed by Morten Søborg. J.L.

3

APP

Find out at sacrecycle.org or call 311 |

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New York’s Parquet Courts talks buzz bands,   faking it and why college is pointless Finals will wrap up, summer vacations shall ensue (see also: seasonal jobs), and Parquet Courts is set to land in Davis to wound the spirits of by Blake Gillespie undergrads with a dose of reality rock. The are no road-cone-dispensing jobs or summer lifeguard jobs awaiting them, however. Rather, Parquet Courts arrive with the comforting words, “There are still careers in combat, my son.”

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Photo By Ben rayner

“I feel like we allow ourselves the freedom to make the music we want to make,” Brown said. “That’s what got us whatever spotlight we may have for the moment, so I think to consider [changing] would be detrimental to our craft. That’s the last thing anybody wants.” Sonically, Light Up Gold is enriched with the immediacy of a three-day tear of live recording. It’s noisy when it needs to be, sprawling when the narrator is disillusioned and stoned, and wound together like a set performed tirelessly by the perpetual opening band no one bothered to see. The New York-based label What’s Your Rupture? pressed a rerelease of the originally limited-run of vinyl in January. Brown said despite the original pressing on his bandmate’s indie, Dull Tools, Parquet Courts’ buzz is not a second wind, but a steady climb since its formation. “There’s very few bands that make it past their initial buzz,” Brown said. “What that actually has to do with the music, I don’t know. I’ll tell you a year from now.” Lyrically, Parquet Courts exists under the guidance of Brown and Andrew Savage, two Texas-raised New York transplants who met in college and write songs like graduates of campus radio. Take the Guided By Voices-like fantasy of “Caster of Worthless Spells,” or the inverted Rockwellian vision of North Dakota as a vast expanse of “train death paintings and anti-meth murals.”

This is the face you get after seeing your student-loan bill.

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40   |   SN&R   |   06.06.13

Check out Parquet Courts on Monday, June 10, at the Davis Bike Collective, 1221 1/2 Fourth Street in Davis at 8 p.m. Cover is $5; see http://parquet courts.wordpress.com for more info.

Those lyrics from the Parquet Courts track “Careers in Combat” are telling of the intelligence, wit and painstaking truth the New York four-piece poured into its album Light Up Gold. UC Davis holds its commencement for undergrads throughout June, but the unofficial keynote speakers arrive June 10, at the Davis Bike Collective to share stories from alumni life beyond the career-center pamphlets. Light Up Gold is heavily influenced by meandering post-collegiate life that anoints dull as the new cool. If there was one concept songwriter and guitarist Austin Brown could cast out of the social ideology, he’d choose the institutional necessity of college. “Going to college, for me, was a huge mistake in some ways,” he said. “I think everyone is told in school they have to go to college and get a degree to get a good job. Obviously, that is total bullshit. I had a great time in college and enjoyed the classes I actually attended, but I’d be in a lot less debt and more self-made had I skipped that whole portion of my life.” Take it from him, kids; Brown’s in a successful rock band. Or listen to the anthemic album opener, “Master of My Craft,” for career advice. The song stands in defiance of material wealth, making concessions to the quiet reward of mastered craftsmanship. In recognizing the one skill, musicianship, they cultivated at college, Parquet Court’s success isn’t temp work, but rather a résumé builder.

“Goingtocollege,forme, wasahugemistakein someways.” Austin Brown Parquet Courts While Brown minces few words on the hazard of higher learning, he briefly conceded that it led to meeting Savage. Sort of, anyways. “We were there at the same time, but I don’t think we were brought together by our studies.” The band spent April writing new songs, which is good news for the tour. Brown said the band views it as an opportunity to try the material. “We’ve added a lot of new songs to our set,” he said. “If there’s a song that doesn’t feel exciting anymore, we won’t play it for a while. It sucks because sometimes those are more popular songs that people want to hear, but if we’re not feeling it when we’re playing, there’s no reason to fake it.” Ω


WELCOME BACK

★ TO THE NEW ★

#SEMF

A LL COUNTRY A LL THE TIME

Cool nights, setting sights: I’m in awe of the Sacramento Electronic Music Festival. In four years, it’s gone from subjecting Daedelus to the dangers of heat exhaustion in the packed upstairs room of the TownHouse Lounge to hosting shows over the course of four air-conditioned nights in the best locations Sacramento has to offer. In my smarmier days, I’d have placed air quotes around the “F” of SEMF. This year, I left Saturday’s secretlocation party, a vacant store in Downtown Plaza, knowing that the SEMF is now the best yearly music festival in the city. I’m in awe of the SEMF presentation. The debut of an SEMF flyer always stirs an anxiousness in me for lineup announcements. It consistently looks as if it will be the best event of the year. A superimposed astronaut appeared on the 2011 flyer, with those special four letters on the sleeve of his spacesuit. The image announced itself as an event of exploration, whether intentional or not. That astronaut set the tone for every year to follow. This year’s design reached great expanses of presentation: a sleek website, stargazing posters aligned with the festival’s exploratory origins and projections unique to each night that transfixed the eye in kaleidoscopic wonder.

I’m in awe of the consistent affordability of attending the SEMF. It cost $5 a night for the original SEMF. Three-day passes ran $10. Last year, a three-day pass jumped to $30, while single-night tickets went for $13. This year, the hike was rectified when SEMF unveiled a presale cost of $9 for those who bought passes prior to the lineup announcement. Post-lineup prices remained at an economical $12 per night.

|

NEWS

CALIFORNIA COWBOYS SATURDAY, JUNE 8

JOHN EMERY AND DRY COUNTY DRINKERS

Hashtag this: I’m in awe of Sacramento’s indifference to the SEMF. Pardon the lurking of this portion. I saw everyone I expected. The Grimey contingent, Shaun Slaughter, DJ Roger of Record Club, that couple that publishes Submerge Magazine, Dusty Brown, and photographers, such as Buff $lut. But when I scour the hashtag resources of Twitter and Instagram, the SEMF absence is alarming. Only three photos from the first night were tagged #SEMF, one of which was mine. It picked up throughout the week, but given the number of cameras and phone shots I saw flying around, why did people bother to document an event they didn’t intend to share on social media? Isn’t the point of taking a show photo to prove you were there? #SEMF.

And music, too: I’m in awe of the SEMF lineups. Tycho headlined the inaugural year to reconnect with 916 Junglists and Command Collective comrades. Daedelus joined Tycho for the second installment, possibly eating up the booking funds—worth it. Year three shipped in artists from Minneapolis, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Milwaukee for three nights at the Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub building, with sets on the main stage, upstairs at Momo Lounge, and deejays on the back patio. It was not just about bringing in national acts though, and the same can be said for this year’s installment. SEMF is quickly building a reputation for booking electronic musicians, such as Shlohmo, Eprom, Adult., Pictureplane and Remix Artist Collective, who are at the forefront of EDM. Whether it was the turning over of curatorial honors to Mophono’s (a.k.a. DJ Centipede) Change the Beat weekly in San Francisco this year, or last year’s emphasis on the Frite Nite collective, SEMF brings the best in the EDM spectrum to our otherwise overlooked city. BEFORE

FRIDAY, JUNE 7

EVERY WEDNESDAY

COUNTRY KARAOKE

HAPPY HOUR

EVERYDAY 4:00 – 7:00PM

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VOTED BEST COMEDY CLUB BY THE SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW!

THURSDAY 6/6 - SATURDAY 6/8 FROM WHITNEY AND WORKAHOLICS!

CHRIS D’ELIA

Isn’t the point of taking a show photo to prove you were there?

thursdays

rOck On lIve bAnd kAr AOke

SUNDAY 6/9 FROM NBC’S THE OFFICE BLACK HAT PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS:

RoCk-n-Roll // 9pM // FRee

MIKE E. WINFIELD

Fri 6/7

Awk wArd lemOn SeAn FlemIng XOchItl

SPECIAL EVENT, NO PASSES

THURSDAY 6/13 - SUNDAY 6/16 NOTORIOUS 2013 WORLD TOUR

Finally, I’m in awe of the SEMF because if it carries on—as it should—it must do so with an unflinching bravery. For two straight years, the SEMF challenged Sacramento to spend one weekend at an event that cities such as Los Angeles and San Francisco book on a monthly basis. It asked us to step up to the cultural standard of festivals and hashtag the ever-loving hell out of our wild nights. On Saturday, the inevitable conversation found me: “Sacramento just isn’t ready for cool shit like this,” and I cringed, because as I looked around at the solid, but far from jam-packed crowd and I had to agree with that old excuse. I’m in awe, and if you felt it, too, then it’s up to you to tell your friends.

RUSSELL PETERS THURSDAY 6/20 - SATURDAY 6/23 FROM MADTV!

PABLO FRANCISCO BIG AL GONZALES

FEATURE

STORY

5pM // FRee

FeatuRing vinnie guiDeRa // 8pM // tuesdays

gre AteSt StOrIeS ever tOld

REGGIE STEELE, CORY ROBINSON

SPECIAL EVENT, NO PASSES

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JO KOY FOLLOW US ON TWITTER! ;>0;;,9*647<5*/305,:(*‹-(*,)662*6473:(*

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CALL CLUB FOR SHOWTIMES: (916) 925-5500 2100 ARDEN WAY sIN THE HOWE ‘BOUT ARDEN SHOPPING CENTER

2 DRINK MINIMUM. 18 & OVER. I.D. REQUIRED.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CLUB BOX OFFICE WITH NO SERVICE CHARGE. ARTS&CULTURE

rOOtS muSIc SerIeS S ShOwcASe mOndAY FRee

JAY PHAROAH

|

sundays

mondays

THURSDAY 6/27 - SATURDAY 6/29 FROM SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE!

—Blake Gillespie |

pop // RoCk // Folk // 9pM// $5

|

sat 6/8

In the SIlence (CD Re-Release show)

Once An empIre plus speCial guests

pRogRessive // Metal // RoCk // 9pM // $7

908 K Street • sac 916.446.4361 • wwwMarilynsOnK.com AFTER

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06.06.13

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SN&R

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41


07FRI

07FRI

08SAT

08SAT

Desert Noises

Richard March

Bret Michaels

Rachel Steele & Road 88

Sophia’s Thai Kitchen, 9 p.m., $5 Desert Noises may not be blazing trails with  its indie-pop rock, but that’s part of what  makes the four-piece from Provo, Utah,  endearing. It’s unpretentious stuff—hookladen and “jangle-rich,” as the band’s bio  puts it. The most obvious comparison is  to Band of Horses, but it takes frequent  steps back into the ’60s and ’70s, evoking  the Zombies and the Turtles to good effect.  Currently on tour with the Parson Red Heads  and Said the Whale, Desert Noises is poised  INDIE ROCK to blow up after playing  some of the hippest venues across the West. We’re lucky the band is  playing Sophia’s Thai Kitchen; catch ’em at  a small venue while you can. 129 E. Street in  Davis, www.desertnoisesmusic.com.

—Deena Drewis

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 10 p.m., $12 On Friday night, Richard March—2007 Sammies  Critics’ Choice winner for Outstanding Male  AMERICANA/FOLK Vocalist—will  play one of his  last local shows for two years. Shortly after  the night of music (dubbed the Americana  Ramble) at Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub,  he’ll leave for a two-year commitment to the  Peace Corps in Ethiopia that starts July 1.  Joining him at this going-away show of sorts  are Scotty & Sasha and Friends (featuring  members of the Alkali Flats and the Poplollys)  and the Americans. March’s Americanainflected folk songwriting recently got political  on his latest EP Kings & Thieves, which was   a duo project with Tyler Ragle. Stop by and   wish him luck. 2708 J Street, www.richard  march.com. 

—Jonathan Mendick

Featuring: John Prine �Angelique Kidjo �Taj Mahal

Marianne Faithfull �Greg Brown �Iris Dement Irma Thomas �Madeleine Peyroux �Dave Alvin

Rebirth Brass Band �Paul Thorn Band �Brothers Comatose Perla Batalla �Red Molly � Poor Man’s Whiskey Rani Arbo � Alice Stuart & The Formerlys � Alice Di Micele Elephant Revival � Achilles Wheel � Wavy Gravy � and many more…

AT BEAUTIFUL BLACK OAK RANCH • LAYTONVILLE Tickets & Info. 415-256-8499 (Inticketing) www.katewolfmusicfestival.com 42   |   SN&R   |   06.06.13

Ace of Spades, 7 p.m., $50 I’m not sure what’s worse: A. I once obsessively followed Rock of Love With Bret  Michaels, B. Michaels’ publicist couldn’t  get me a phone interview with the Poison  frontman in time for our print deadline, or  C. his show will set you back $50. Despite  all this, I’m intrigued. Sure, Poison is bestknown for its late ’80s, early ’90s reign  (“Every Rose Has its Thorn,”  ROCK for the eternal win) but  Michaels made for a compelling bandanawearing protagonist on his heavily scripted  VH1 dating “reality show.” For every floozy  who crossed his path with a made-for-TV  catchphrase (“Don’t threaten me with   a good time!”), Michaels managed to  remain coolly humorous and self-aware.   1417 R Street, www.bretmichaels.com.

—Rachel Leibrock

Bogle Vineyards, 6 p.m., $40-$50 Five years ago, Rachel Steele & Road 88’s  first album No Speed Bumps got its name  because, according to guitarist and vocalist  Scott Prentice, “having a band means you  are going to encounter lots of speed bumps.”  In spite of any bumps,  COUNTRY Rachel Steele & Road 88  opened for Big & Rich, Gretchen Wilson and  the Marshall Tucker Band. Steele’s voice is  just the right amount of sultry on “Tractor  Ride (The Cougar Song).” The group’s new EP  is appropriately titled Rachel Steele & Road  88 Live. But no recording can ever match the  energy that this band offers in a live performance. 37783 County Road 144 in Clarksburg,  www.road88music.com.

—Trina L. Drotar


09SUN

11TUES

Secret Lives of Squirrels

Ryan Bingham

Girl in a Coma

Fox & Goose, 9 p.m., $5

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 8 p.m., $25

So what do squirrels do in their private  lives? Don’t ask the members of the Secret  Lives of Squirrels—they don’t  ROCK actually know anything about  the animals. Then why did they pick such an  odd name to describe what is actually quite  a straightforward rock trio? Who knows,  and the band rocks, so who cares? Its breed  of rock is heavily roots-oriented, kind of  like a down-and-dirty country-bluesrock band, usually maintaining itself at a  grimy midtempo beat. It’s perfect drinking  music—and quite well-written, too. This  Friday the SLS celebrates the release of a  debut album, Fight My Wars. 1001 R Street,  www.facebook.com/squirrelrock.

—Aaron Carnes

PHOTO BY JOSH HUSKIN

08SAT

Inner Circle

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 7 p.m., $12

West Texas-bred country rocker Ryan  Bingham’s ranch and rodeo background lend  authenticity to his rustic paeans. Mixing bits  of Woody Guthrie, Bruce Springsteen and the  Flatlanders, Bingham delivers gruff, nomadic  COUNTRY ROCK roots music with a  touch of rock swagger. He won an Academy Award and a Grammy  Award for “The Weary Kind (Theme from Crazy  Heart),” from the movie Crazy Heart, setting  the stage for his 2010 breakthrough album,  Junky Star. Bingham ditched his backing band  and label, releasing the angry, more politically  oriented Tomorrowland in September 2012. It  gets particularly adventurous on the 8-minute  “Rising of the Ghetto,” which closes with a  Bacharach-ian pop swell. 2708 J Street,   www.binghammusic.com.

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 9 p.m., $15

Nina Diaz’s shapely vocals could stop  traffic. The Girl in a Coma frontwoman’s  sultry croon is like a summer breeze—hot  and sticky, brash and unrepentant. Diaz’s  arresting presence was apparent early to  older sister Phanie Diaz and bassist Jenn  Alva, who recruited her at age 12 to lead  their band. Her passionate catlike alto leaps  from moody folk-blues evocations reminiscent of Jolie Holland to aggressive rock  bluster and willowy dream-pop somnambulism. Championed by Joan Jett and signed  INDIE ROCK to her label, Blackheart  Records, Girl in a Coma  has released an album of covers and three  of originals showcasing the group’s broad  tastes and stylistic facility. 2708 J Street,  www.girlinacoma.com.

—Chris Parker

13THURS

Even if your knowledge of reggae only goes  as far as Bob Marley, you know at least one  Inner Circle song. I’m talking about “Bad  REGGAE Boys,” the famous Cops  theme song. In the late  1980s, Inner Circle also penned the hugely  successful “Sweat (A La La La La Long)”  which, trust me, you’ve heard before, too.  Actually, Inner Circle is a legit Jamaican  reggae band. It formed in the late 1960s and  made some amazing music in the 1970s that  melded reggae, pop, rock and soul. The 1979  hit “Stop Breaking My Heart” is badass. But  Inner Circle’s musical legacy will forever be  associated with cops arresting people.   2708 J Street, www.badboysofreggae.com. 

—Aaron Carnes

—Chris Parker

ACE OF SPADES

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

ALL AGES WELCOME!

SATURDAY, JUNE 9

FRIDAY, JUNE 21

A ROCKET TO THE MOON THIS CENTURY - BRIGHTEN

DREW DEEZY - FINN

FIJI

THE MAINE

SATURDAY, JUNE 22

TUESDAY, JUNE 11

ZAVALAZ

NEKROMANTIX

FEATURING CEDRIC BIXLER-ZAVALA OF AT THE DRIVE-IN AND MARS VOLTA PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

THE COMMUNITY

MONDAY, JUNE 17

SATURDAY, JULY 13

LIKE MOTHS TO FLAMES - UPON A BURNING BODY - CROWN THE EMPIRE ICE NINE KILLS - SET IT OFF

LIL BIT - SUAVE DEBONAIRE BABNIT - WHO RIDE

TOO $HORT

WE CAME AS ROMANS TUESDAY, JUNE 18

FRIDAY, JULY 19

MEMPHIS MAY FIRE

ARDEN PARK ROOTS

I SEE STARS - ATTILA STICK TO YOUR GUNS HANDGUNS - MERCHANTS

THRIVE - SIMPLE CREATION ISLAND OF BLACK & WHITE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19

KRIZZ KALIKO STEVIE STONE !MAYDAY!

PERFORMING POISON’S GREATEST HITS WITH FORCE OF HABIT & MAXXX

BEFORE

|

  NEWS

|

  F E AT U R E

MONDAY, JULY 22 PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

420 DARKSIDE BOYZ - DYLAN PHILLIPS RICHARD THE ROCKSTAR - COOL NUTZ

GOOD FOR YOU

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202

STORY

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

| 

  AFTER

  |    06.06.13    

|

  SN&R    

|

  43


NIGHTBEAT ASSEMBLY

1000 K St., (916) 832-4751

THURSDAY 6/6

FRIDAY 6/7

SATURDAY 6/8

SUNDAY 6/9

B Street: Live!, 7pm, $15

B Street: Live!, 7pm, $15; PLASTIC PLATES, 9pm, $8-$10

B Street: Live!, 7pm, $15; MOONSHINER, AUTUMN SKY; 9pm, $10

ROBERT EARL KEEN, 7pm, $25

BLUE LAMP

List your event!

MARK GROWDEN TRIO, JUSTIN FARREN, WHITE MINORITIES, A SINGLE SECOND, ADRIAN BELLUE; 8:30pm, call for cover TALLBOY, 30 PACK STONE; 8pm, $6

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

THE BOARDWALK

THE JET STOLE HOME, DEAD BY

BOWS & ARROWS

BEISBOL, DOE EYE, DEBBIE NEIGHER; 8pm, $5

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 NIGHTFALL, TRULY TERRIFYING; 8pm 1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

GARY BUSEY AMBER ALERT, ELIPSIS, NEKROCYST, DIRE PERIL; 7:45pm

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

BONE MACDONALD, 8pm, call for cover

DISTRICT 30

DISFUNKTION, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Billy Lane, 9pm, call for cover

MARTY COHEN AND THE SIDEKICKS, 8pm, no cover

SACTO SOUL REBELS, HANS & THE HOT THE SECRET LIVES OF SQUIRRELS, NICE MESS, MIDWAY MARVELS; 9pm, $5 MONSTER, SEA OF SOUND; 9pm, $5

FOX & GOOSE

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

G STREET WUNDERBAR

PI JACOBS, SIV & MADDIE, SHERMAN BAKER; 8pm Tu, $5

DJ Smilez, 9pm, call for cover

ZUHG, 9pm W, call for cover Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; Northern Soul, 8pm W, no cover

TOTAL RECALL, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

HARLOW’S

RICHARD MARCH, THE AMERICANS, JULIET COMPANY, SWAHILI PASSION, SCOTTY & SASHA & FRIENDS; 10pm, $12 VVOMEN; 6:30pm

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693

Hey local bands!

AUTHORITY ZERO, BALLYHOO!, VERSUS THE WORLD; 7:30pm, $15-$17

LED KAAPANA, MIKE KAAWA; 8pm, $18-$20

THE COZMIC CAFÉ 1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

S.W.I.M., VAGUE INTENTIONS, HAZEL RAGE, BRI, THE BIG DADDIES; 8pm JOSIAH LEMING, 8pm, $10-$12

BOCA DO RIO, 8pm, $12-$15

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384 594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

RYAN BINGHAM, WILD FEATHERS; 8pm, $25

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

MARILYN’S ON K

“Rock On” Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

JULIET COMPANY, ANCIENT ASTRONAUT, SWAHILI PASSION; 8:30pm, $5

ISLAND OF BLACK & WHITE, MELVIN THE RICHARD MARCH TRIO, DOO, VENTER’S STAG MOTEL; 8:30pm, $5 TYLER RAGLE; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz, 8pm M; THE O’MULLIGANS, CREEPY LITTLE LEGS; 8:30pm W, $5

OLD IRONSIDES

JENN ROGAR, 5pm, no cover

WILLIAM MYLAR, 5pm, no cover; John Hughes tribute show, 9pm, $5

Fascination: ’80s new-wave deejay dancing, 9:30pm, $5

Karaoke w/ Sac City Entertainment, 9pm Tu, no cover; Open-mic, 9pm W, no cover

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

TRIAL BY COMBAT, 9pm, $5

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

PATTY LARKIN, 8pm, $20

DAVID LINDLEY, 8pm, $25

1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931 908 K St., (916) 446-4361

670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731 13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

PALI KAYDA, DINOSAUR KALE, NAKED NATE; 10pm, $6

1116 15th St., (916) 442-7222

PINE COVE TAVERN

502 29th St., (916) 446-3624

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

RICKY BERGER, ANDREW HOTZ, ADAM BALBO, DEVIN FARREN; 8:30pm, $6

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

IN THE SILENCE, ZERO CLIENT, ONCE AN EMPIRE; 8pm-midnight, call for cover

THE PARK ULTRA LOUNGE Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

Open-mic comedy, 9pm, no cover

- June 7 -

DJ Politik, DJ Peeti V, 9pm-2am, $15

Asylum Downtown: Gothic, industrial, EBM dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

ANDREW CASTRO, 8pm, no cover

- June 13 -

inner circle

AmericAnA rAmble with richArd mArch bAnd, the AmericAns, And sAshA & scotty 9:30pm • $12 adv

8:30pm • $15 adv

- June 8 -

juliet compAny VVomen, swAhili compAny – All Ages dinner show 5:30pm • $5 adv

- June 9 -

ryAn binghAm

deAn-oholics

6pm • $12 adv SN&R

|

06.06.13

Coming Soon June 15

Ann Kelly

June 15

The Fonkie Planetarians w/ Raphael Saadiq & Mike Philips

June 16

Shannon Curtis

June 20 Sizzling Sirens June 21

Zion Roots

June 29 Pointdexter

rAt pAck tribute – dinner show

5:30pm • $12 adv

- June 14 -

pinAtA protest – All Ages show

miner

June 28 Samba Da

wild FeAthers

girl in A comA

– July 2 • 7pm • 10adv –

June 26 Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown

- June 14 -

indigenous 9pm • $15 adv

Open-mic, 10pm-1am Tu, no cover; Trivia, 9-10pm W, no cover

just announced

June 23 Step Jayne

7pm • $25 adv - June 11 -

SANGRE, KRIPPLER; 9pm M, $5; ENTRAILS ERADICATED, VOMIT GOD; W, $6 FRANK VIGNOLA, VINNY RANIOLO; 7:30pm Tu, $20

2708 J Street Sacramento, CA 916.441.4693 www.harlows.com

|

GIRL IN A COMA, PINATA PROTEST; 7pm Tu, $12-$15

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504

44

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/10-6/12

July 06

Martin Luther

July 08

Chris Pureka

July 17

Pickwich

July 19

Tainted Love

July 20

Diego’s Umbrella

follow us hARLowSniTeCLUB hARLowSnighTCLUB hARLowSnighTCLUB


THURSDAY 6/6 PINS N STRIKES

3443 Laguna Blvd., Elk Grove; (916) 226-2625

FRIDAY 6/7

SATURDAY 6/8

NEXT, MIDNIGHT PLAYERS; 9pm, $25-$30

LEONARD BAILEY, 9pm, $10

SUNDAY 6/9

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 6/10-6/12

PJ’S ROADHOUSE

DJ Michael Johnson, 9pm, no cover

XSAMPLE, 9pm, $5

A-TRAIN, 9pm, $5

POWERHOUSE PUB

JASON MICHAEL CARROLL, SANDY NUYTS; 7pm, $20

TAINTED LOVE, 10pm, $15

TAKE OUT, 10pm, $10

RICKY V, 3pm, call for cover

Karaoke, M; DJs Alazzawi, Rigatony, Tu; DOGFOOD, LONELY KINGS; 9pm W, $5

THE PRESS CLUB

RACE TO THE BOTTOM, LIFT, BROKENOTE UNDERTONE; 8pm, $5

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

Sunday Night Soul Party, 9pm, $5

THE O’MULLIGANS, CREEPY LITTLE LEGS; 8pm M, $5; DJ Meek Da Kat, Tu

TAKE OUT BAND, 9:30pm, $10

TEMPEST, 9:30pm, call for cover

THRIFTWORKS, 5TH BAR DROP; 9pm-2am, $5-$10

XSAMPLE, RED VELVET KISS; 9pm, $35-$50 The Sol Mercado and Kid’s Day, 1pm, no cover

Microphone Mondays, 6pm M, $1-$2; Film night, 7pm W, $5-20

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Bluebird Lounge open-mic, 5pm Tu, no cover

5461 Mother Lode, Placerville; (530) 626-0336 614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586 2030 P St., (916) 444-7914

SAMMY’S ROCKIN’ ISLAND

238 Vernon St., Roseville; (916) 773-7625

SHENANIGANS

705 J St., (916) 442-1268

Comedy Night and DJ Selekta Lou, 9pm, $5

SOL COLLECTIVE

Skratch Pad, 9pm, call for cover

2574 21st St., (916) 832-0916

SOPHIA’S THAI KITCHEN

Authority Zero with Ballyhoo, Versus the World and Yankee Brutal 7:30pm Sunday, $15-$17. The Boardwalk Reggae rock

PARSON RED HEADS, SAID THE WHALE, DESERT NOISES; 9:30pm, $5

129 E St., Davis; (530) 758-4333

STONEY INN/ROCKIN’ RODEO

JOSHUA PAIGE, 10pm, $5

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023

SWABBIES

5871 Garden Hwy, (916) 920-8088

TORCH CLUB

X TRIO, 5pm, no cover; DIPPIN’ SAUCE, 9pm, $5

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

JOE GETTY & THE DEAD FLOWERS, 6:30-9:30pm, $5

THE CHILL, 4:30-8:30pm, $5

LIFE IN THE FAST LANE, 3-7pm, call for cover

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30pm; STEREO FIDELICS, OLD SCREEN DOOR; 9pm, $7

JOHNNY KNOX, 5pm, no cover; RON HACKER, 9pm, $7

Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; COLONEL JIMMY & THE BLACKFISH, 8pm, $5

EMMIE JONES, 9pm Tu; Open-mic, 5:30pm W; DOWN NORTH, 9pm W, $5

THE MAINE, A ROCKET TO THE MOON, THIS CENTURY, BRIGHTEN; 6pm, $20

NEKROMANTIX, THE COMMUNITY; 6:30pm Tu, $13

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

BRET MICHAELS, FORCE OF HABIT, MAXXX; 7pm, $50

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300

CLUB RETRO

LORD CHRISTIAN, TOMMY NORTON’S TRAVELING BAND; 6:30pm, $8-$10

1529 Eureka Rd., Roseville; (916) 988-6606

LATOYA LONDON, JASON BROCK, LIZ HILL, LORD CHRISTIAN, KASS; 6pm, $15

DOWNTOWN PLAZA (LOWER LEVEL) KEN KOENIG, 6pm, no cover

THERE IS NO MOUNTAIN, 1pm, no cover

547 L St., (916) 822-5185

LUIGI’S SLICE AND FUN GARDEN 1050 20th St., (916) 552-0317

KEPI GHOULIE, DOG PARTY, PETS; 8pm, call for cover

SHINE

Shticks, a comedy night, 8pm, $5

1400 E St., (916) 551-1400

INSTAGON, LUCKY LASKOWSKI, LP SESSIONS; 8pm, $5

ZUHG LIFE STORE

Patty Larkin 8pm Thursday, $20. The Palms Playhouse Folk

Jazz w/ Jason Galbraith, 8pm Tu; Poetry With Legs with Bill Gainer, 7pm W

NORTH BOUND TRAIN, 8pm, $5 MISS MADDY’S F STREET STOMPERS, DEMOLITION DANCE KREW; 1pm

545 Downtown Plaza, Ste. 2090, (916) 822-5185

BUDDY GUY

AUGUST 24TH đ 7:30PM RED LION HOTEL

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SUNDAY JUNE 9 6PM LAUNCH PARTY 9PM FRIDAY JUNE 14TH

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DELIVER US FROM CHEMICALS RELEASE

NEW WAVE ICONS

PAPER PISTOLS

MONDAY JULY 29TH

JOYOUS FUNK AND SOUL

+ TRAVIS SCOTT

WEDNESDAY JUNE 26TH

MARSHALL TUCKER BAND JUNE 20TH đ 8PM COLONIAL THEATRE

FOR ALL TICKETS VISIT SBLENTERTAINMENT.COM

THE FIXX

SATURDAY JUNE 15TH

JOY AND MADNESS IRIS DEMENT

GREAT SINGER SONGWRITER

EVERY THU • FRI • SAT @7PM

CASEY VEGGIS SUNDAY AUGUST 4TH

EVERYBODY WANG CHUN TONIGHT

MONDAY JULY 1ST

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SMOOTH AMERICAN JAZZ

FEATURING RECKLESS KELLY

LARRY CARLTON

B STREET: LIVE!

LIVERS OF STEEL TOUR

twitter.com/SBLConcerts đ facebook.com/SBLEntertainment BEFORE

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NEWS

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FEATURE STORY

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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AFTER

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06.06.13

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SN&R

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WHAT’S ON YOUR

HORIZON? Join Horizon Non-Profit today for safe access to a wide variety of high quality medical cannabis. Whether you prefer flowers, extracts, edibles or topicals, indica or sativa, we have the right medicine for you. Whatever your medical condition or employment situation, you can come to Horizon knowing that we respect and hold your

HEALTH, WELL–BEING & PRIVACY AS OUR HIGHEST PRIORITY. OPEN TO ANYONE 18 OR OLDER WITH VALID CA I.D. AND DR’S RECOMMENDATION FOR MEDICAL CANNABIS

HORIZON NON-PROFIT COLLECTIVE Mon-Thur 10am - 7pm | Fri-Sat 10am - 9pm | Sun 12pm - 7pm 46   |   SN&R   |   06.06.13

3600 Power Inn Rd Suite 1A Sacramento, CA 95826 916.455.1931


Law and order

Bring in any competitor’s coupon and we’ll beat it by $5 Must present competitor’s ad. Some restrictions apply.

When is Colorado gonna have legal pot stores? —Irma the Impatient Hold your horses. While it is true that Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper signed a bill legalizing and regulating recre recreational-cannabis stores, none are expected to open until at least January 2014. Medical-cannabis clubs have first dibs on applying for recreational-weed club permits. They can start applying this October. Cities and counties can still decide whether or not to ban clubs, so Colorado may BEALUM end up with “dry” counties and “green” counties. by NGAIO There are still a few problems: The new law bans the display of cannabis magazines in stores. You heard me: Cannabis-themed magazines now have to be a s k420 @ ne wsreview.c om kept in the back, like porn magazines. High Times magazine and a few other cannacentric publications have already mounted a court challenge. The new law also contains a troublesome DUI provision that mandates an automatic conviction for having 5 millileters of THC in the bloodstream. Weed isn’t like booze. THC can stay in your bloodstream for weeks after you’ve used marijuana. In fact, there are other states, like Arizona and Utah, that also have “de facto DUI” laws on the books. There is also a looming problem with the Internal Revenue Service and banking. As it is now, medical-cannabis clubs aren’t allowed to take credit cards or have bank accounts, because selling marijuana is illegal under federal law. The IRS also uses a law left over from the 1980s to keep legitimate cannabis clubs from deducting normal You heard me: business expenses, like paying employees or the cost Cannabis-themed of medicine. We will see what magazines now have happens. The Department of Justice has yet to make to be kept in the back, a move. It may be because like porn magazines. Attorney General Eric Holder has bigger problems right now, what with snooping on reporters, or they could just be biding their time before attempting a crackdown. Plus, Washington state’s regulations are proceeding smoothly, and other states like Oregon and Rhode Island are looking at passing tax-andregulate legislation. The DOJ and the Drug Enforcement Administration are in a sticky spot. All in all, though: This is awesome! It’s about time. Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@ newsreview.com.

BEFORE

High! I try to talk to some of my “square” friends and relatives about cannabis legalization, but it always ends in a big argument. Are there ways to keep this from happening? —Brad Right? It happens all the time. You patiently explain how cannabis legalization would cut court costs, alleviate prison overcrowding, help the economy by providing jobs and tax revenue, help sick people get well, and all that other good stuff, and people still want to call you names and troll you on your Facebook page. Gah! The first thing to do is to stay calm. Don’t let them kill your buzz. Plus, staying calm while another person is ranting is hella fun in a healthy, passive-aggressive kind of way. Be patient. Most people will not suddenly change their minds and be all, “OMG! You are so right! How could I have been so misguided?” It takes time. They will come around, slowly but surely. Ω  

|

  NEWS

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  F E AT U R E

STORY

VOted 2nd best 420 physician in sac!

Sacramento

420 Doc MeDiCaL Marijuana evaLuations

suMMer CoMPassion sPeCiaL

34 44

$

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reneWaLs

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Must bring ad. Limit one per patient. Some restrictions apply.

Must bring ad. Limit one per patient. Some restrictions apply.

916.480.9000 2 Convenient LoCations to serve You

2100 Watt Ave, Unit 190 | Sacramento, CA 95825 | Mon–Sat 11am–7pm 2633 Telegraph Ave. 109 | Oakland, CA 94612 | 510-832-5000 | Mon–Sat 10am–5pm recommendations are valid for 1 year for qualifying patients Walk-ins Welcome all day everyday

Your information is 100% private and confidential Visit our website to book your appointment online 24/7 at

www.sac420Doc.com   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

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  AFTER

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  SN&R    

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35 CAP FREE* % 10 off

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5711 FLORIN PERKINS RD | SACRAMENTO, 95828 916.387.8605 | OPEN 10AM – 8PM 7 DAYS A WEEK BEFORE

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  NEWS

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  FEATURE

STORY

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R

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  SN&R    

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  49


MASSAGE THERAPISTS REDDING & SACRAMENTO

m review.co s w e n . w ww

All massage advertisers are required to provide News & Review a current valid business license or somatic establishment permit issued by either the city or county in which they are operating in in order to run a printed advertisement.

Must Present Ad • Expires 06/20/13 • ID Cards Available

WE’VE MOVED

BEWA

RE O IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ADVERTISINGAvenue WITH US, IMITATIO F • 2614 El Camino NS! Corner of Fulton & El Sacramento PLEASE CONTACT CLASSIFIEDS ATCamino, 916-498-1234 EXT. 1338.

Now open Saturdays 11am – 3pm Monday thru Friday • 916.973.1766 • 877.563.4156

1647 Hartnell Ave Ste 13, Redding 96002

MASSAGE THERAPISTS

All massage advertisers are required to provide News & Review a current valid business license or somatic establishment permit issued by either the city or county in which they are operating in in order to run a printed advertisement.

Good Massage Grand Opening

A1 Feeling • Swedish Massage • Deep Tissue Massage • Pain Relief • Backwalking • Chinese Therapies • Shower Available • Walk-ins Welcome

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Showers Available 916.429.7270 Walk-ins Welcome 1355 Florin Rd, Ste.13 massage advertisers are required to provide

Sacramento, CA 95822 Gift Certificates Available ws & Review a current valid business license somatic establishment permit issued by either city or county in which they are operating in in er to run a printed advertisement.

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Massage Therapy Combination Massage Open Daily 10am - 10:30pm Walk-Ins & Couples Welcome

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All massage advertisers are required to provide News & Review a

Flamingo Massage 2264 Fair Oaks Blvd #102 Sacramento 95825 (916) 646-1888

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NEWS

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San Juan Ave.

3210 Fulton Ave

Winding Wy.

Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (916) 498-1234 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Vernon’s Computers Sales & Service. Repairs, upgrades, virus removal, etc. 24/7, low prices. 916-339-3738

Online ads are

STILL

FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

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Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Pay up to $2,000. 916-966-1900

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Special Price: $39.99/hr 6910 65th st. #103 Sacramento 10:30am-10pm daily. Private room, body oil massage

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APT FOR RENT Large 1 & 2 bdrm at Timbers Garden Apts $695 - $895. Excellent Southport location, 15 miles to Davis and 4 miles to downtown Sacramento. Close to Town Center Plaza, shops, restaurants, Community Center and trails. With balcony or yard, gated parking, swimming pool open in summer. No pets. To view, please call 916-396-8416 or 916-371-6351.

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STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

AFTER

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London & Heidi’s Rise & Shine Warm up with us for an unforgettable massage. Attractive staff. Beautiful, conservative, quiet massage. From Lake Tahoe & Bay Area. Smooth as silk. Call now for your appointment. 916-236-7602 Personal Touch.

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STORY

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R

  |    06.06.13    

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  SN&R    

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  53


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we’re cranking it up with this year’s summer guide on stands next week 54

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SN&R

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06.06.13


by Dave Kempa

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The longest

natural arch in the world is the Fairy Bridge in Guangxi Province, China. Made of limestone, this 400-feet-wide span crosses over the Buliu River. No one outside of China knew about it until 2009, when an American explorer spied it on Google Earth. Let’s make the Fairy Bridge your metaphor of the month, Aries. Judging by the astrological omens, I suspect there’s a good chance you will soon find something like a natural, previously hidden bridge. In other words, be alert for a link between things you didn’t know were connected.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I hope

that in recent weeks you’ve made yourself a master of sticky and intricate details. I trust you’ve been working harder and smarter than you have in a long time. Have you, Taurus? Have you been grunting and sweating a lot, exerting yourself in behalf of good causes? Please tell me you have. And please say you’re willing to continue for a while longer. The way I see it, your demanding tasks aren’t quite finished. In fact, the full reward for your efforts may not become available unless you keep pushing beyond the point that you consider to be your fair share.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): How

free do you want to be, Gemini? A tiny bit free, hemmed in by comfortable complications that require you to rely on white lies? Or would you rather be moderately free in ways that aren’t too demanding—politely, sensibly free? Maybe you feel brave and strong enough to flirt with a breathtaking version of liberation—a pure, naked freedom that brings you close to the edge of wild abandon and asks you to exercise more responsibility than you’re used to. I’m not telling you which kind you should opt for, but I am suggesting that it’s best if you do make a conscious choice.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In August

1961, the Communist government of East Germany built the Berlin Wall. It was a thick concrete barrier designed to prevent the oppressed citizens of East Berlin from escaping to freedom in West Berlin. The barrier was eventually policed by armed guards. Traffic between the two Berlins became virtually impossible for the next 28 years. Then, a miracle occurred: East German authorities relinquished their stranglehold. They tentatively allowed East Berliners to travel to West Berlin. Soon, the Mauerspechte, or “wall woodpeckers,” showed up. Armed with hammers and chisels, these people began chipping away at the wall. Two years later, most of it had been demolished. I hereby assign you to be a wall woodpecker in your own sphere, Cancer. The time is right to demolish a barricade. It may take a while, but you’re ready to start.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The following

slogan captures the spirit I bring to composing my horoscopes: “I live in the future so that you don’t have to.” But right now, this slogan doesn’t apply to you. From what I can tell, you are currently visiting the future as much as I do. Here’s what I wonder, though: Are you time-traveling simply to run away from the dilemmas that face you in the present? Or are you taking advantage of your jaunts to acquire revelations that will help you solve those dilemmas once you return?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You know

that there are different kinds of stress, right? Some varieties wear you out and demoralize you, while other kinds of stress excite and motivate you. Some lead you away from your long-term goals, and others propel you closer. The coming weeks would be an excellent time for you to fine-tune your ability to distinguish between them. I suspect that the more you cultivate and seek out the good kind, the less susceptible you’ll be to the bad kind.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Studies

show that people spend 87 percent of their time inside buildings and 6 percent in enclosed vehicles. In other words, they are roaming around outside enjoying the wind and sky and weather for only 7 percent of their lives. I think

BEFORE

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NEWS

PHOTO BY liSA BAETz

by bob brezsny

For the week of June 6, 2013

you’re going to have to do better than that in the coming week, Libra. To ensure your mental hygiene stays robust, you should try to expose yourself to the natural elements at least 9 percent of the time. If you manage to hike that rate up to 10 percent or higher, you stand a good chance of achieving a spiritual epiphany that will fuel you for months.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Resur-

rection is the Scorpionic specialty. Better than any other sign of the zodiac, you can summon the power to be reborn. It is your birthright to reanimate dreams and feelings and experiences that have expired, and make them live again in new forms. Your sacred totem is the mythical phoenix, which burns itself in a fire of its own creation and then regenerates itself from the ashes. Now here’s the big news headline, Scorpio: I have rarely seen you in possession of more skill to perform these rites than you have right now.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Octavio Paz spoke to a lover in his poem “Counterparts”: “In my body you search the mountain / for the sun buried in its forest. / In your body I search for the boat / adrift in the middle of the night.” What have you searched for in the bodies of your lovers, Sagittarius? What mysteries and riddles have you explored while immersed in their depths? How has making love helped you to better understand the meaning of life? I invite you to ruminate on these uncanny joys. Remember the breakthroughs that have come your way thanks to sex. Exult in the spiritual education you have received through your dealings with lust and sensuality. And then go out and stir up some fresh epiphanies.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Do

you know what minced oaths are? They’re rarely used anymore. If you went back a hundred years, though, you’d hear them regularly. They were sanitized swear words, basically; peculiar exclamations that would allow people the emotional release of profanities without causing a ruckus among those who were listening. “Bejabbers!” was one. So were “thunderation” and “dad-blasted” and “consarn.” Here’s one of my favorite minced oaths: “By St. Boogar and the saints at the backside door of purgatory!” I bring this up, Capricorn, because I suspect it’ll be a minced-oath kind of week for you. What I mean is: You’ll have every right to get riled up, and you should express your feelings, but not in ways that create problems for you.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): There’s

only one correct way to spell the English word “beauty.” But that wasn’t true centuries ago. Before the advent of the printing press, orthographic anarchy prevailed for many words. Some of beauty’s variations included “bewte,” “beaute,” “beuaute,” “bealte,” “buute,” “bewtee” and “beaultye.” I bring this up, Aquarius, because I think it would be fun and healthy for you to take a respite from having to slavishly obey standardized rules. I’m talking about not just those that apply to spelling, but others, too. See what you can get away with.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the

last chapter of Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s novel The Brothers Karamazov, the lead character says the following: “[T]here is nothing nobler, stronger, healthier, and more helpful in life than a good remembrance, particularly a remembrance from our childhood. … [A] beautiful, holy memory preserved from childhood can be the single most important thing in our development.” I bring this up, Pisces, so as to get you in the right frame of mind for this week’s featured activity: remembrance. One of the greatest gifts you can give yourself is to reminisce about the old days and the old ways. To do so will enhance your physical health and purify your emotional hygiene.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com. |

F E AT U R E

STORY

Tyler robinson (left) and preston Tillotson.

Cleaning agents Tyler Robinson and Preston Tillotson each bring something special to their soap business, Sudz by Studz. Robinson, with a long history in music (you might recognize him from the first season of The Voice), infuses a mean streak of creativity to each batch that he makes, while Tillotson, with a philosophy and chemistry background, navigates much of the company’s business. But don’t take that the wrong way: Both of these guys wear the gloves and goggles in this endeavor, which the 22- and 24-year-old run out of their Midtown apartment. Recently, the partners took a break from their work to talk shop with SN&R about the ethics, chemistry, colors and smells behind running their own soap business.

You run this entire operation out of your kitchen. Do you cook anymore? Preston Tillotson: We’re lucky to cook in the oven, but most of the time we’re supporting local businesses by eating their food. Tyler Robinson: Or just dealing with the fact that we have to live with cereal.

What do you mean when you say you’re buying a pound of “monkey farts”? Robinson: Well, monkey farts is actually a scent. It’s a fragrance, which is supposed to smell like a big ol’ fruity explosion. Kind of like a monkey fart would smell, I guess. Tillotson: Bananas, guava, papaya, pineapple— Robinson: And a little bit of bubble gum.

How many different kinds of soaps do you have? Tillotson: Probably around 20 different varieties. We’ve made a litany of them, about 50 different brands you could buy, but as far as core fragrances—about 20. |

A RT S & C U LT U R E

Soapmaking seems to be this complex amalgamation of art and science. How do you know what you know so early in the game? Tillotson: I learned it from Tyler. Tyler is kind of a sponge. He got in front of YouTube and used the wealth of tutorials available online. I have a chemistry background, so that helps me with the more data-relevant features of soapmaking, which is the chemistry aspect. Then, there is the art, which is what Tyler does. He finds how the colors blend with the oils right, and how that’s going to look once it’s actually in the soap. A fragrance can change the color. Different heats can change the color. Robinson: A color can change its own color. You will throw a color in there, and say, “That’s gonna turn out blue,” and when it dries, it comes out green or brown or— Tillotson: They’re temperamental. One thing we learned was to get into the right carrier, which is typically castor oil in this case. Or add moisture to our soaps with castor oil. We take the added luxury of just adding color to it, and it’s worked really well. Our soapmaster can’t get other people to use color chips like we do, so a lot of people buy their color premade. We make our color here.

You have a Fight Club bar—you’re not making your soaps with human fat, are you? Tillotson: No, and not even animal fat. A lot of our friends are vegans or vegetarians, and a lot of the skin care that’s out there is as well. We don’t think it’s a hard shoot to get to that standard. It’s just the fair-trade part that’s difficult. All of our soaps have not harmed anyone in the making. Our products are nearly all vegan. The only vegetarian item that’s contained in some of the soaps is the beeswax from the local bee store, or goat’s milk from Lodi. |

AFTER

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Everything else is completely vegan, and even the vegetarian items are cruelty-free. We are pushing to make a vegan line, and it’s only an ingredient away, really.

Some of these bars look good enough to eat. Tillotson: And they have been bitten into every time we’ve had a major event thus far. The lemon biscotti’s been bitten twice and the plumeria once. Robinson: We also had an older gentleman at a wedding event [who took a bite out of a one]. … [He] had a bit of an excuse, because he didn’t have his hearing aid in. Tillotson: I was serving these platters of, you know, soap novelties. Little shapes. And I said, “Don’t eat this, sir.” So he pulls out a fish that smells like lemon biscotti, took the whole thing in his mouth, and his friend says, “Didn’t you hear him, stupid? He said don’t eat it.”

Now, you are not only business partners— Tillotson: We are partner partners.

How often are you at each other’s throats? Tillotson: At least once a week. I think that happens with regular partners, but the business-partner aspect requires a partitioning of who you are. I can’t hold him accountable as a business partner as I would as a lover, and I try not to bring a love or hate from one realm into the other. Robinson: The thing that we’re constantly fighting over is just expressing our ideas correctly. That goes along with balancing how you’re saying it depending upon when you’re saying it. Sometimes you’re in business mode. Tillotson: We don’t talk to each other about business in the first hour upon waking or the hour before going to bed, because you have to have partner time. Ω For more information on Suds by Studz, visit http://sudzbystudz.

06.06.13

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SN&R

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55


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