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Volume 25, iSSue 04

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thurSday, may 9, 2013


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SN&R   |  05.09.13


May 9, 2013 | vol. 25, issue 04

Happy Mother’s Day At 16, I ran away from home for reasons too stupid to mention. I only lasted two days—alternately holed up with my boyfriend at a friend’s house or roaming K Street Mall, trying to evade the truancy cops—before my mother tracked me down and practically locked me in my room for weeks. At the time, I was angry, but also more than a little relieved. Here was my single mother who, despite our differences, cared about me enough to call the police, interrogate my friends and literally search the streets until she found me. Never mind that she wasn’t my birth mother—I was her daughter, I was family, I was hers. After my parents divorced and my biological father (whom she’d married when I was 4) abandoned all things family, that became more important than ever. It’d be years before I’d meet my biological mother. That woman missed out on all that teenage turbulence: the running away, the shoplifting, the crappy grades. She missed out on the good stuff, too: college graduation, new jobs, weddings. I finally met her shortly before my 27th birthday, and, at the end of our visit, she took my hands in hers and said, “You turned out so lovely.” I give any credit for that to my “real” adoptive mother. She’s been there for every good thing, too, of course, but sometimes I feel like the only things I’ve given her in return are headaches and gray hair. Happy Mother’s Day to all the real mamas out there, blood relations or otherwise. You deserve nothing but the best. Flowers don’t seem like enough.

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STREETALK LETTERS NEWS + scorekeeper OPINION FEATuRE STORy ARTS&CuLTuRE SECOND SATuRDAy NIgHT&DAy DISH ASK JOEy STAgE FILM MuSIC + sound Advice 15 MINuTES COVER phOtO by wEs daVis COVER dEsign by haylEy dOshay

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35 Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Vivian Liu, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Contributing Photographers Steven Chea, Wes Davis, Ryan Donahue, Taras Garcia, William Leung, Shoka, Justin Short, Anne Stokes

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. Co-editors Rachel Leibrock, Nick Miller Staff Writers Raheem F. Hosseini, Dave Kempa Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Calendar Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Deena Drewis Contributing Editor Cosmo Garvin Editor-at-large Melinda Welsh Contributors Ngaio Bealum, Rob Brezsny, Joey Garcia, Becky Grunewald, Mark Halverson, Jeff Hudson, Jonathan Kiefer, Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Garrett McCord, Kel Munger, Kate Paloy, Patti Roberts, Ann Martin Rolke, Steph Rodriguez, Seth Sandronsky

—Rachel Leibrock

rac he ll@ n ews r ev i ew . com

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Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising Consultants Josh Burke, Teri Gorman, Dusty Hamilton, Brian Jones, Dave Nettles, Lee Roberts, Julie Sherry, Kelsi White, Gary Winterholler Senior Inside Sales Consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services Coordinators Melissa Bernard Operations Manager Will Niespodzinski Client Publications Editor Michelle Carl Client Publications Managing Editor Kendall Fields Client Publications Writer/Copy Editor Mike Blount Client Publications Writer Natasha vonKaenel Executive Coordinator Jessica Takehara Director of First Impressions Alicia Brimhall

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Street Team Jolynn Conrad, Charissa Isom, Matt Kjar, Anna Lovas, Ashley Ross, Colton Stadtmiller Distribution Manager Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Walt Best, Daniel Bowen, Nina Castro, Jack Clifford, Lydia Comer, Lob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Joanna Gonzalez-Brown, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Wendell Powell, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Lolu Sholotan, Jack Thorne President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist Accounting Specialists Renee Briscoe, Tami Sandoval Business Zahida Mehirdel Accounts Receivable Specialist Nicole Jackson Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support SpecialistMB John Bisignano

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1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Sales Fax (916) 498-7910 Editorial Fax (916) 498-7920 Website www.newsreview.com SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising Policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

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4   |   SN&R   |   05.09.13


“It is not a safe community anymore, where I live.”

Asked at 14th and E streets:

Why are you unhappy?

Mariana Ponce

Christopher Desmarais

janitor

barista

There is a lot of violence. There have been a lot of drive-bys past my house. It is not a safe community anymore, where I live. I am also unhappy because I am only working two or three days in the week.

Pam Fillin stay-at-home mom

The Boston Marathon bombing makes you think about what kind of people are around in the world, ... about people’s goodwill. I’m originally from Minnesota, so it also makes me unhappy when I can’t be back with my family and my friends when certain things happen. My friend is having a baby … I am missing weddings and things.

More people who live in my neighborhood aren’t able to own [homes] in my neighborhood. Most of the houses and properties are priced too high for people who live here. The main income around here is about $30,000 a year, and the average home price is about $300,000, which is more than people can afford or even hope to afford.

Richard Chavez

April Hullaby

full-time parent

Sine Soltani

in-home care worker

They are closing down Washington Elementary School. When you evict somebody, you get six-months notice. They only gave [the school] five weeks. After this year, it’s done. Now I can’t even afford to take [the kids] out to where they have to go ... Southside Park by [Highway] 99.

I do have a background. I have a felony from years and years ago. I know I am a changed person. How are we [ex-felons] supposed to be successful if we can’t find a job? I am an ex-felon, and I cannot find a job. I will apply myself if a place is offered that does accept people [who were] felons.

thrift-store owner

Having family members or friends from our little community come in [my store] looking for family members who have relapsed or got kicked out of a recovery home. What makes me unhappy is I can’t help them until they want help. I am a recovering addict, alcoholic.

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Re “Housing Bubble 2” by Raheem F. Hosseini (SN&R Feature Story, May 2): The problem with investor purchases of single-family homes isn’t another bubble, but the concentration of ownership of rental housing (a far more important determinant of rent levels than supply and demand), letter of and what might happen if the return on investment isn’t the week what the investors expect. It’s possible that the early entrants will make a very large return (the California State Teachers’ Retirement System expects 15 percent on its investment), but later entrants are paying too much for the properties to come close to that. And a side-note irritation is that many of the banks that caused the crisis in the first place—Citi, Goldman Sachs, Deutsche Bank—are now expecting to make money on these investments as well. Alison Brennan

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Wall Street plays Monopoly

When will I get to stay in my permanent supportive housing? Is this a 10-year plan or a 10-year plot—a plot to receive millions from the government to fix up the neighborhoods of our city. I believe that I’m about to go through the revolving door [and on] to the end of the homeless line. Laura Ashley Sacramento

Re “Housing Bubble 2” by Raheem F. Hosseini (SN&R Feature Story, May 2): Suggested alternate headline: “How to steal houses and win at Monopoly.” Between 2003-2008: Wall Street banks pump housing market full of subprime loans and second mortgages. The housing bubble forms. Wall Street makes billions. In 2008: The housing bubble Ace of Spades still king bursts, and Americans lose homes and jobs. Pension funds take a big hit from Re “If you build it, they will come” by Deena Drewis (SN&R Sound investments in toxic mortgage derivaAdvice, April 25): tives. Credit market freezes up. Totally agree with you, Deena. Between 2008-2012: Taxpayers Although Assembly is a very “hip” bail out banks. Banks recover and pay venue, unfortunately, it’s still not record bonuses. large enough, and I don’t know any Recently, in 2012-2013: Wall rock ’n’ rollers who want to be assoStreet uses its billions to buy up ciated with anything “hip.” Ace of homes at bargain prices. Wall Street Spades is still the best venue in town cash buyers push local buyers out of for rock shows. the market, ... rent the same houses back to former homeowners. Wall Lisa Walters Street walks off with billions more Sacramento and most of the Monopoly board. ... Owning a home was the American  online buzz Dream. The Dream was killed to feed the greed. Wall Street owns the On the nBA Owners’ cOmmittee nest eggs and the houses. Pretty slick recOmmending the Kings stAy in transfer of wealth, eh? sAcrAmentO: Yeah—and Sacramento residents can’t buy local houses. CHA CHING. Hey seattle Jim Forbes go cry in your latte. Rancho Cordova William Call

Email your letters to sactoletters@ newsreview.com.

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Sn&r

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05.09.13

Homelessness revolving door? Re “Stake down and out” by Dave Kempa (SN&R News, April 25): I am in permanent supportive housing and have been since the beginning of the 10-year plan to end homelessness. The problem I have is that after being moved to new complexes three times, I am now being required to move a fourth time, only this time, I must move into a two-bedroom with a roommate because the director overspent our leasing money.

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911 = no joke See Beats

See Midtown&Down

10

Ban Walmart! See Editorial

13

Virtual reality

Photo by taRas gaRCIa

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NBA public-subsidy swindle

Online schools   continue to grow in  Sacramento. But a  new study points   out poor student   performance and   zero oversight. When Kelly Krug’s son Ben struggled academically, the Fair Oaks mom looked for options by that provided computerized instrucSeth Sandronsky tion. Called “virtual schools,” these new classrooms allow students to learn course work entirely via online methods. Krug enrolled Ben, and he thrived—but a new study on virtual schools says that his success story is an exception to the rule. An 80-page national report released last week on full-time virtual schools found problems with student performance and also a lack of oversight of public dollars spent on this brave new cyber world. Some private virtual-school companies operating here in Sacramento have grown enrollment by more than 20 percent annually over the past several years. This means that tens of millions of taxpayer dollars go toward these new online classrooms, which has some critics worried. “[There’s] lagging performance [and] lots of taxpayer money at stake, and very little solid evidence to justify the rapid expansion of virtual schools,” said University of Colorado at Boulder professor Alex Molnar, who edited the new National Education Policy Center study. Read the National His report shows that virtual schools Education Policy Center report on trail traditional brick-and-mortars in virtual schools at performance and graduation rates. http://nepc. “In the 2010-2011 school year, for colorado.edu/ publication/virtual- instance, 52 percent of brick-and-mortar schools-annual-2013. district and charter schools met AYP [Adequate Yearly Progress, the federal government’s measurement for student Learn more about K12 development based on standardized Inc.’s virtual schools at www.k12.com. tests], contrasted with 23.6 percent of virtual schools.” Despite the scathing study, some local parents give rave reviews to online schools. Kelly Smith of Elk Grove likes the pace at which Logan, her 8-year-old son, learns in the Elk Grove Unified School District’s Virtual Academy. This is his third year in the program. Miriam Lyons, with 25 years of classroom teaching experience, is one of three teachers at Elk Grove’s program, a hybrid model of online and BEFORE

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Miriam Lyons has 25 years of teaching experience and now works in a hybrid online and brickand-mortar-classroom program, part of the Elk Grove Unified School District Virtual Academy.

classroom education that opened three years ago. The Virtual Academy enrolls 66 students, grades K-8, who get in-person tutoring weekly in addition to online course work. “We just finished up an algebra workshop,” said Lyons, adding that “you can’t really learn that subject online.”

Virtual-school companies operating here in Sacramento have grown enrollment by more than 20 percent annually over the past several years. This Elk Grove classroom is part of the nation’s largest virtual-school outfit, K12 Inc., based out of Virginia. The publicly traded, for-profit firm operates in all 50 states and also 85 countries, according to a recent company statement. K12 gets the full dollar amount of public funding for each student enrolled, according to Gary Miron, STORY

an education professor at Western Michigan University and co-author of the new NEPC study. He says the problem is that K12 is accountable to shareholders, not taxpayers. Which is why his new study also recommends more research into and oversight of online schools. State agencies need more and better data, according to the report’s authors, especially when it comes to tracking public money that flows to private online schools. SN&R contacted the California Department of Education for data on virtual-school funding, but according to the CDE’s School Fiscal Services Division, it does not collect information on how virtual schools calculate student attendance or the amount of state tax dollars companies receive. In the meantime, ads for online schools continue to lure new students, as the NEPC study describes. A radio commercial on K12 Inc. is what caught the attention of Krug, as her eldest son struggled in fourth grade. “His reading and math skills were falling further and further behind level,” she said. The family had searched for a school to meet his specific needs. They observed and researched private and public charter and traditional options. “We wanted to ensure that he would catch up in his problem areas,” Krug said. Ben blossomed in the K12 learning environment, according to his mother.

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The key to K12’s online-learning approach, Krug said, is that it requires students to master skills in lessons and assessments before advancing. She is now also a K12 middle-school teacher and teacher trainer. Krug’s youngest son, Sam, has been attending the California Virtual Academies, a tuition-free and virtual public charter school, since first grade. According to K12, its 13 CAVAs statewide have grown on average at a rate of 20 percent annually since 2008. In California, there were 33 fulltime virtual schools serving 18,350 students in 2011-12; nationally, there are more than 200,000 elementary and secondary students in 39 states and the District of Columbia, according to the NEPC study. The state’s overall number of public-school students was 6.2 million in 2009-10. SN&R asked for the amount of tax dollars CAVA receives for its students but was unable to obtain said number. If K12 receives an average of $5,000 in state funding per student each year, the annual sum of taxpayer monies received could be upward of $70 million. The NEPC study urges no further growth of full-time virtual schools now, as their backers, focused on private profit, “are several years ahead of policymakers and researchers.” Ω

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by SN&R staff

SCORE KEEPER Sacramento’s winners and losers—with arbitrary points

After-hours radio returns to Sac State For a year now, Sacramento State University’s online-radio station couldn’t convince any of its student disc jockeys to host a show edging past midnight. (College kids these days, right?) But on May 10, KSSU will put on a one-night, late-night broadcast featuring 10 to 12 deejays splitting airtime between 10 p.m. and 2 a.m.—in case you wanted to know how many Hornet deejays it takes to stay up past midnight. “Maybe that will interest the deejays in the late-night slots as well,” said station manager Josue “Josh” Alvarez Mapp. C’mon, Hornets, take back the night!

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Justice, blind

Props go out to the police department’s northern district patrol squad, which hosted a mellow ride-along through the eastern Sacramento suburbs for one of SN&R’s reporters last week. The only calls during the Wednesday afternoon swing shift involved feuding trailer-park neighbors, a false residential alarm and a 14-year-old who was bumped off his bike by a car turning through a crosswalk. Asked to describe the driver, who left the scene after checking on the victim, the youth carefully answered, “Not to be racist, but she was Asian.” Ah, the burbs.

The Supreme Court of California slapped local marijuana advocates with a big setback this week. On Monday, the court ruled that cities and counties could legally ban marijuana dispensaries if they wanted to, citing that some regions may not be “equipped” to deal with weed clubs. Sacramento County, once home to nearly 100 dispensaries, which operated without incident, banned them in 2011.

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Lemonade for Lemon Hill Two months after halting plans to build a halfway house in their backyard without their consent, residents of The Avenues in the Lemon Hill neighborhood broke ground for the Louise Perez Community Center on MLKJ Boulevard and 41st Avenue. How’s that for a win?

+ 41

Happy anniversary As SN&R approaches its 25th year (cue quarter-life crisis!), it’s heartening to know we have an alternative-media big brother in The Sacramento Observer. Times have changed since the publication, which serves black communities, barnstormed the dialogue with a four-page pamphlet in 1962: The city has a black mayor and the nation a black president. And, last month, the pioneering newspaper celebrated its 50th anniversary with a three-day cruise to Baja out of Long Beach, Calif., hosted by embattled Carnival Cruise Lines, proving just how fearless the Observer’s owners and operators are.

+ 50


Bacteria on the beach

BEATS

New DNA tests provide more accurate data on water   quality, but cities and counties can’t afford them. Just in time for summer, federal researchers are touting a faster, more accurate water-quality test to keep beaches by open and people healthy. But it’s Brian Bienkowski expensive, and most of the nation’s cash-strapped cities and counties can’t afford it. Local officials traditionally check for bacteria in lake water and oceans with tests that take about 24 hours to complete. Now the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is recommending testing at the

do it at all, not for natural waters,” explained county spokesman John Rogers. His reasoning is that sampling would be really difficult, both because of the waterways’ continual flow and because they are open-water systems. “It’s user beware,” he said. Traditional tests involve waiting 24 hours to allow E. coli, coliform or enterococci to grow in a water sample, then counting the colonies. That means decisions to close

Can’t fake 911

know the water wasn’t clean. Sorry we couldn’t tell you in time,’” Kinzelman said. Racine still uses culture tests to check the reliability of the DNA testing. Kinzelman said over the years, the two different tests have been at about 90 percent agreement. But in Chicago, Cathy Breitenbach, director of lakefront operations for the city’s park district, said the new test is not economical. “We have 24 beaches. We’d have to move up and down 26 miles of coastline, take samples and get them to a lab,” Breitenbach said. “We’d have to start at 2 in the morning” in order to take advantage of the sameday benefits.

An estimated 3.5 million people get sick every year after a trip to the beach because of sewage overflows, spills and polluted runoff.

molecular level—tagging DNA and counting bacteria—which provides results within hours. “Water quality can change significantly in 24 hours,” said Meredith Nevers, a research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey who is studying the EPA’s new DNA test. “This way, we’re identifying threats to human health almost immediately.” An estimated 3.5 million people get sick every year after a trip to the beach because of E. coli or other pathogens from sewage overflows, spills and polluted runoff, according to the EPA. Exposure can cause gastrointestinal illness, skin rashes and infections. About 43 percent of beaches along the East and West coasts and the Great Lakes had at least one waterquality advisory in 2011, according to EPA data. Counties and cities test beaches routinely—often weekly, depending on the location and season. Beaches also are tested after spills to determine when they can be reopened. Sacramento, however, does not test its rivers and lakes. “We don’t

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed 2014 budget would eliminate federal funding for beach monitoring completely, which would save only $9.9 million. An estimated 3.5 million people get sick every year after a trip to the beach because of E. coli or other pathogens.

A version of this report was originally published by Environmental Health News.

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down beaches are based on samples collected the day before. The new method speeds up DNA replication. Researchers then use fluorescent probes to see how many bacteria are present in a water sample by counting the DNA copies that fragmented. Other same-day tests are in various stages of research, but all generally use two steps: capturing microbes and tagging them so they can be counted. But it’s not cheap. DNA testing requires new labs and newly trained staff—a significant hurdle for cities and counties. Experts say the new tests would cost about twice as much as the old ones. The only community using the method right now to make beachsafety decisions is Racine, Wisconsin. The city received clearance last year from the EPA to use the DNA test on its two beaches that frequently have too much bacteria, said Julie Kinzelman, a research scientist at the Racine Health Department. “We used to have to say, ‘Well, you swam yesterday, and now we

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STORY

No one is using the rapid method in California, said John Griffith, a marine microbiologist at the Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, a research institute that studies coastal pollution. “We barely have money to do our regular culture testing,” he said. The EPA should subsidize the DNA-test method for states, said Steve Fleischli, water-program director at the Natural Resources Defense Council, an environmental-advocacy group. “People want to know what the water is like when they’re in it—not what it was like days beforehand.” But Griffith said rapid testing only makes sense at certain beaches. “If a beach never has a problem, or if you have a chronically contaminated beach, you don’t need a rapid answer, and it’d be hard to justify this cost,” Griffith said. The EPA’s new proposed 2014 budget would eliminate federal funding for beach monitoring completely—a $9.9 million takeaway. States and others that used the funding “now have the ability and knowledge to run their own programs without federal support,” according to the budget proposal. Ω

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When the cops have you cornered and there’s no escape, why not just call in a bunch of fake emergencies to 911? Short answer: Because it doesn’t work. Sacramento police responded to reports of a scrum involving multiple combatants in a residential neighborhood known as Woodbine early in the morning on May 1. Upon arrival, one subject lit out and jumped into the back of a stationary vehicle, where he proceeded to call in a half-dozen fake emergencies to 911. The calls included bogus reports of a robbery, a sexual assault and a shooting, according to police logs. The suspect, identified as 28-year-old Ceasar Ruelas Martinez, ultimately surrendered when it became clear officers weren’t taking the bait. As of Monday, Martinez was in the Sacramento County Main Jail on a no-bail parole violation, as well as misdemeanor charges of reporting a false emergency and calling 911 with the intent to annoy or harass. According to police logs, the California Highway Patrol’s dispatch center, which fields all emergency calls in Sacramento, verified the fake calls originated from the suspect’s cellphone. Martinez was scheduled to appear in Sacramento Superior Court on Wednesday, May 8. (Raheem F. Hosseini)

Davis Dozen plea Twelve UC Davis Aggies went from facing 11 years in prison to serving 80 hours of community good. That’s the end game after more than a yearlong pretrial wait for the “Davis Dozen.” The 11 UCD students and one professor, who protested for weeks last year in front of the doorway to the campus’s lone U.S. Bank branch, were set to begin trial next month. The university never cited or arrested the protesters during their activism efforts, and the bank branch eventually shut down in February 2012. But afterward, the Yolo County District Attorney’s office retroactively slapped each of the Davis Dozen with a count of conspiracy and 20 of obstructing free will. Suddenly, the 12 faced the possibility of 11 years in prison. This past Monday, however, the dozen pleaded guilty to infraction charges of disturbing the peace, and with that, were sentenced to 80 hours of community service each. The Davis Dozen originally set up a blockade in front of the bank on the heels of the Occupy Wall Street movement in January 2012. The UCD U.S. Bank branch still remains closed. (Nick Miller)

Big homelessness bucks The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development may be shutting its Sacramento office down in the coming months, but it’s still writing out the checks. Sacramento Steps Forward, which oversees homeless outreach in the region, announced last week that on top of the $14.4 million awarded to the county in the “must-have” round of funding requests last March, it’ll now be taking in $711,526 in the Tier 2—or “would-really-appreciate”—round in the federal funding grant competition. According to SSF’s Keith Hart, Sacramento has succeeded in getting the green light in each of its funding requests so far this year. Next up, the county is waiting for word on two new projects: one for Steps Forward’s planning purposes and another to serve the chronically homeless. Expect word on that some time in the next two months. (Dave Kempa)

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License# OE86569

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I probably shouldn’t call out Sacramento Kings suitor/savior-elect Vivek RanadivĂŠ. He has a black belt in karate. But Sacramento’s promised the guy $300 million in free cheese to build a downtown arena, so it’s OK to feel scorned: Earlier this week, multiple media outlets reported that RanadivÊ—should he buy the team after the NBA board holds its final vote this coming Wednesday—will R e L IL by NIcK M forgo NBA revenue sharing. The NBA money machine ni c k a m @ne w s re v i e w . c o m works like this: Teams in worldclass cities—New York, Los Angeles—rake in more lucrative TV contracts than broke-ass Sacramento. But the NBA needs this cow town, apparently, so those big dogs share a few bones with runts like Sacto and Milwaukee; it’s the “a rising tide lifts all boatsâ€? thing. And these NBA subsidies are worth upward of $25 million a year, according to reports.

How many firearms have been stolen from gun dealers over the last five years in Sacramento? But RanadivÊ and Co. reportedly were worried that league owners would prefer Seattle over Sacto, since the Emerald City would be a payer into this revenue-sharing pot and not a moocher. So, they promised the NBA board of governors that they wouldn’t take any handouts once the new arena was built. RanadivÊ—who is part-owner of the Golden State Warriors, so he knows what he’s turning down—insists that there will be sufficient new-arena revenue to compensate the forsaken millions. But the move still baffles. And stings: Mayor Kevin Johnson fed us Sacramentans the line that billionaire whales wouldn’t be interested in our city unless we put out hundreds of millions in public funds to erect a new arena. That our market couldn’t compete, so we needed public subsidies. But now RanadivÊ says he doesn’t need the biggest subsidy of all? So much for that logic. The bummers abound this week: Liz Studebaker is leaving Midtown. The Midtown Business Association executive director, in her second year on the job, was doing the neighborhood right. Unlike so many city

leaders, she was actually out there, a face at events, which is so important: This city needs people who get it. She was accessible, sure, but she also actually knew how to navigate neighborhood and business interests without igniting a Midtown apocalypse. And she brought excellent projects to the community, like the new Saturday farmers market on J and 20th streets. Sadly, San Diego, Studebaker’s former home base, also knew she was the real deal. And a gig with that city down south apparently was too good for her to turn down. The MBA will begin its search for a new leader this month and hopes to lock in Studebaker’s successor by July. What won’t be leaving Midtown: guns. On Tuesday, a city council microcommittee was scheduled to discuss its latest firearm ordinance. Sacramento has little control over regulating guns outright, but can impact policy via zoning rules. The new ordinance introduces the idea of “conditional use permits� for gun shops, according to Randi Knott with the city. What this means is that, not unlike alcohol permits for bars and restaurants, restrictions can be placed on firearm stores within the city limits. Meanwhile, all existing gun shops, such as M & J Gun Trade on J and 23rd streets in Midtown, will remain. Which isn’t that big of a deal. As Knott explained, she was curious about “how many firearms have been stolen from gun dealers and firearms dealers over the last five years� in Sacramento. So, she poked around. “The answer was zero,� she told SN&R. Quick observation: What’s up with all the new Thai food spots on the grid? There’s one taking over the former Mati’s Indian Express location on 16th Street. And Sawasdee Thai Cuisine opened last week at the revolvingdoor former home of Mongo Mongo Mongolian BBQ and that short-lived garlic-mecca joint before it. That makes nearly 10 Thai spots on the grid—not counting the two dueling-neighbor Thai restaurants on Broadway. I’m all for a plate of rad na every so often. But the grid now has more than the Thai-restaurant capital of America: Davis. Ί


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Media matters

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On old, new and experimental journalism in Sacramento Bites is old, as far as media experiments go. When Capital Bites debuted, Bill Clinton was president and alternative-weekly newspapers made money. You can’t even find the first Bites columns online now. OK, so the late ’90s weren’t that long ago. Still, it feels weird to be writing a newspaper column in 2013. It’s a sort of vintage job, isn’t it? Like developing film or aRvin running a video store or dealing weed or by CoSMo G being a mailman. cos mog@ n ewsrev iew.c om And the pace of change in the altweekly industry seems to be accelerating. In the last year, the Village Voice Media chain disgorged papers it swallowed up in the 1990s and 2000s. In San Francisco, after a brutal legal battle in which the Bay Guardian accused the SF Weekly of predatory pricing in its advertising, both papers are now owned by the same company. Ironic, given the Guardian’s tradition of railing against monopolies like PG&E and Village Voice Media. The venerable Boston Phoenix closed its doors earlier this year, prompting a slew of “death of the alt weeklies” stories. Alt-weeklies aren’t dead. They are much thinner. Some are going to monthly publishing schedules. Many are going “digital first,” and trying to figure out where the money is in that. SN&R is something of an outlier, preferring to experiment mostly with print-advertising products and adopting a “wait and see” approach online. As in, “Let’s wait and see if the Internet goes away.” Everyone is experimenting. The public-media model is getting a lot of attention. Works great for outfits like Capital Public Radio, but most old media outlets can’t suddenly start running pledge drives. The Sacramento Bee and daily papers elsewhere are still trying to mug readers with pop-up ads and pay walls. Not sure if these techniques are revenue generating. They certainly have discouraged Bites from spending time on the Bee site. There are the online nonprofit heavy hitters like ProPublica and California Watch, which are great, as long as the foundation money lasts. And if only they covered City Hall. Then, there’s cohort of hyperlocal, shoestring and citizen-journalism experiments like Sacramento Press. Bites wanted to root for it when it got started in 2009. It was small and independent and had the potential to liven up the local media landscape. But for a long time, it was too hard to stomach Sac Press’ boosterism and Bee-lite editorial outlook, and the way it became a channel for press releases from business interests and government bureaucrats. And the badges. Ugh, the badges. Things got a lot better when Jared Goyette took over as editor a year ago. The guy cares

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about journalism and community and all that good stuff. He’s done well, it appears, despite an ever-shrinking budget. And the success or failure of the Sacramento Press experiment is now very much up to Goyette. “I just went from being the editor to being the publisher and CEO,” he told Bites a few days ago. They haven’t made a big deal about it on the site, but Sac Press’ owners, Ben Ilfeld and Geoff Samek, are cutting Sacramento Press loose from rest of their Web-design and Web-ads business. They’ll still own Sac Press, but it’s basically Goyette’s baby now, and he’s got to figure out how to pay the bills.

It feels weird to be writing a newspaper column in 2013. It’s a sort of vintage job, isn’t it? Like developing film or running a video store.

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Sometime over the summer, Sac Press will relaunch with a brand-new website. (With a new color scheme, Bites hopes?) The Press lost its paid staff writers because of budget cuts, but Goyette plans to beef up freelance contributions. The editorial focus will shift a bit away from neighborhood-based hyperlocalism to a more topical form of localism—centered on areas that readers care about, like food or bikes or tech. There will be more events, like the “Farm to Fork: Where’s the teeth?” panel it held at Urban Hive last week. Goyette will, out of necessity, be reporting and writing more. That’s a good thing. “You don’t get into journalism for the page views,” he says. Also good, the new system will require all articles from citizen contributors to go through some editing. But it’s not clear that any of this will work. Even if all goes according to plan, Goyette says the project still, for a while, will be spending money instead of making it. “But we’ve got a little wind in our sails. And we’ve got a better revenue-to-cost ratio than we’ve had in a long time.” Goyette is upbeat but not certain. “The thing that makes this valuable is our community. If we continue to focus on that, it will be around in some form or another.” Bites hopes the experiment succeeds. Ω

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Less is more Some public-safety cuts are actually good for public safety In Sacramento and beyond, law-and-order agencies are down to their lowest staffing levels in five years. Popular wisdom says these cuts are bad for public safety. But no one’s by Raheem asking the obvious follow-up: F. Hosseini Really? Local law-enforcement officials themselves admit that— ra h e e mh @ while they’re no fans of what attrition has wrought—their ne w re v ie w.c o m fiscal woes forced them to get smarter and humbler. An end to the budgetary largesse that resulted from the housing boom has meant more community engagement and less empire building. Departments along the criminaljustice chain are breaking down their silos and reaching out across county lines to sister agencies they once treated like competitors rather than partners. Poverty has made for a somewhat kinder, gentler justice system. Poverty has made Let’s check out some examples. for a somewhat Internal-affairs complaints to kinder, gentler both the police and county sheriff’s departments have dropped sharply justice system. since 2008, when staffing levels were at their peak and crime rates were higher. Investigators attribute this to better training procedures and new technology—like video cameras in every patrol cruiser—but also because there are fewer young officers on the street. Over at the county probation department, staffing is down from a 2008 high of 985 employees to 649 today. This has resulted in 10,000 low-risk probationers receiving no supervision whatsoever. Which is actually a good thing. This population reoffends at a low 5 percent clip, and recidivism rates actually climb with intense supervision, said Suzanne Collins, assistant chief probation officer. The county district attorney’s office shed 85 employees since 2009. As a result, the office no longer files cases on lesser misdemeanors, like arguing with the cops, some petty thefts and small-time drug charges. That’s the good news. One of the cases the DA declined to prosecute, if you recall, involved a bunch of Occupy Sacramento folks overstaying their welcome at Cesar Chavez Plaza. The crime of the century, it was not. Not all cuts are good for public safety. One of the DA’s surrendered positions was a community prosecutor that mediated recurring neighborhood problems like revolvingdoor drug dens and motel operators who turned a blind eye to prostitution, said assistant chief DA Karen Maxwell. And at the extreme end of the spectrum is Stockton, which had to bring in federal authorities to stop the nearbankrupt city from devolving into a demilitarized zone. Cut too much and you hit bone; but trim the fat, and you force us all to get healthier about how we view the role of law enforcement in a democratic society. For instance, more mental-health resources—not cops— will do more to stop a two-year hike in officer-involved shootings and protect officers from being the first responders when an unpredictable mental collapse occurs. Cops, prosecutors and jailers will always serve vital roles in protecting our society, but maybe the forced drawdown from a cruddy economy is the natural check our politicians were too cowardly to enact. As the city of Sacramento considers how to divvy money raised by a one-year sales-tax hike known as Measure U, that’s something to remember. Ω


This Modern World

by tom tomorrow

End the stigma It was Logan Noone’s 24th birthday. But he was the one giving away presents as he spoke to a crowd of hundreds at the annual National Alliance on Mental Illness walk in Sacramento’s Land Park. He told us how, a few years earlier, he had a psychotic break and had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. After he received treatment, his doctors suggested that he only L by JEff VoNKaENE reveal this information on a needj e ffv @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m to-know basis. These doctors see the stigma of mental illness every day. They fear that patients who are open about their illness will not only have to deal with the challenges of their illness, but will also face reactions, such as vicious gossip and possible rejection. They know that some employThey know that ers would rather walk barefoot over glass than to hire someone some employers who has bipolar disorder. Trying to protect Logan, the would rather doctors suggested that he divide walk barefoot his world into two: The majority who did not need to know about over glass than his condition and the very few to hire someone that did. Keeping his condition a secret who has bipolar made Logan feel ashamed and isolated. One member of his disorder. family who had suffered from bipolar disorder had committed suicide. He feared that this might be his future as well. He felt depressed and gained weight. When his job transferred him from Massachusetts to Sacramento, he decided to ignore the doctors’ advice. He told his new roommates here, whom he had met on Craigslist, that he had To watch logan bipolar disorder. He told them about what he noone’s video, go was doing to treat it and how they could help. To to http://youtu.be/ Logan’s relief, they accepted him. Their perspecbvdrFowzG94. tive was that everyone has problems, and together, For information they could help each other. about mental illness, Empowered, Logan started to feel better about treatment options, himself. He recorded a YouTube video to tell his support and other resources, go to story. He hoped to inspire those with mental illness www.nami.org. to get treatment and to connect with others in the mental-illness community. If you missed him at the NAMIWalk in April, his inspiring video is worth watching (see column note for link). His story was a present of hope, respect and dignity, wrapped up for us all with a nice bow. It was not so long ago that women would keep their breast cancer a secret. Today, they wear pink Jeff vonKaenel ribbons. is the president, Ceo and majority The times, they are a-changing. And there will owner of the news be a time in the not-so-distant future that a person’s & review newspapers mental illness will be accepted like any other illness. in sacramento, And 24-year-old Logan Noone is one of the reasons Chico and reno. why that day will come sooner rather than later. Logan Noone, I’d like to thank you for the inspiration. Ω

Keep Sacto’s big-box ban This big-box debate has labor and business Sacramento can’t have it both ways. It has to choose: interests at odds. Unions decry wages and Does it want to be the Farm-to-Fork practices at superstores like Walmart, while Capital, a destination for fresh, homegrown chamber-of-commerce types say allowing agriculture served every day at restaurants, megastores will kick-start a resurgence of grocery stores and farmers markets? economic growth and larger retail centers And, to that end, will it stay on the road to in Sacramento. Council members in general becoming an “Emerald Valley,” as the mayor have yet to show their cards put it: a national hub of on reversing the ban; they’ll eco-friendly living and Shuttling debate the matter in July. green-tech innovation? For us at SN&R, though, Or, will it settle for oranges and it’s straightforward. We all Walmart? celery from know megastores specialize Sacramento’s green fruits and vegetables that future was on the line far-flung locales in often are genetically modilast week as the city held the first of several doesn’t bode well fied, grown with pesticides and delivered from all over public workshops to for the region’s the world. discuss altering or Not very “farm-to-fork.” eliminating its 2005 Keep an eye on carbon footprint, sacramento’s Shuttling oranges and celery ordinance banning bigbig-box debate at from far-flung locales doesn’t box stores inside the city either. www.cityof bode well for the region’s limits. sacramento.org. carbon footprint, either. The now eightSo much for being an Emerald Valley. year-old law, which was passed out of fear SN&R insists that the city keep its big-box that Walmart would open a retail-grocery ban—and instead focus on nurturing smart superstore in the Downtown Plaza, prohibits retail spaces larger than 90,000 square feet and growth and sustainable local businesses that will make Sacramento eco-friendly and unique that boast at least 10 percent of space devoted for decades to come. Ω to groceries (members-only megaretail spots like Costco are excluded).

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Gina Lujan was 23 when she begged her family to pitch in for her first computer. “It will change everything,” she insisted. “I’m going to be superrich. I’ll be successful.” Lujan’s father-in-law stepped in to buy the coveted PC, but it would be two years before she put the machine to use. It wasn’t until the high-school dropout found herself pregnant again that she decided to launch a holistic, herbalmedicine website, cobbling together a page by stealing HTML from other sites. She still cracks up at the memory. “Herbs!” says Lujan with a laugh. “I didn’t have a business plan. I didn’t know the principles of business, it was stupid.” Naive maybe, but not stupid: Two decades later, Lujan has, at least in part, made good on that promise of success. It was almost the path not taken, but now her new tech outfit, Hacker Lab, is evidence of her achievements. The 10,500-squarefoot Midtown-based coworking

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business—where programmers, designers, engineers and entrepreneurs rent space and collaborate—has grown exponentially since its 2012 launch. It hosts classes and meet-ups and provides support for startups and youth education, and has also caught the attention of Congresswoman Doris Matsui and City Hall. And this week, Hacker Lab co-sponsors the inaugural Sacramento Techweek, a nine-day series of events that kicks off on May 10. But even with success come questions. Such as: Is Hacker Lab sustainable? Is Sacramento finally ready to become a tech town? And: Is Gina Lujan crazy? The 41-year-old mother of six has never been one much for convention. “I had five kids by the time I was 22,” Lujan says. “I was the poster child for welfare—for what happens when you come from a certain element without guidance and support.” That first website, however, did change everything. “From that point, everything I did was successful because of technology.”

Hacker Lab, also has an office there. In the back, a large warehouse area bears welding equipment, electronics and 3-D printers. One client manufactures giant, mechanical support arms for the federal government. There are plans to set up a fabric mill and, someday, a small corner nook will turn into a place for members to bead, sew and craft handmade goods. Lujan spends hours here: Her schedule runs the gamut of activities, from teaching and meeting with clients, to cleaning the bathroom.

see what will stick. Call it impulsive, call it insanity. Call it whatever, Ullrich says. It works. “Gina is definitely crazy,” he says. “She’s crazy—and she gets shit done.” Looking back, the idea for Hacker Lab was the next logical step after Lujan relocated to Sacramento in late 2011. She needed a spot to run her online graphic-design firm and wanted to find a place like the one she’d created in the Berkeley-based Blue Door Lab Coworking Space.

By March 2012, Lujan had opened Hacker Lab above Pangaea Two Brews Cafe in Curtis Park with Blas, the “first sane person” who’d answered her ad. Within weeks, the pair was hosting “hackathons” at a nearby coffee shop—gatherings in which developers and innovators pitched ideas to compete for prizes. They quickly outgrew the location, and Hacker Lab, now with Ullrich on board, pulled in investors to put a deposit down for a new lease in Midtown. Today, those 10,500 square feet embody everything Lujan wanted

Gina Lujan founded Hacker Lab in 2012 after she couldn’t find another suitable co-working space in Sacramento.

Startup   fever  Many of Lujan’s accomplishments are on display during a quick stroll through the cavernous Hacker Lab on I Street. The two-story space, once a tattoo studio, now houses private offices, conference rooms, a tiny kitchen and a chilly control hub where computers and servers emit a constant buzz of activity. There’s a bowl of fresh fruit and a pot of coffee by the front door and a giant “scrum” board where companies use colorful sticky notes to post goals and achievements. Nearby, a giant calendar advertises classes on HTML and Linux, “civil hacking” and “rapid game prototyping.” Here, the term “hacker” doesn’t refer to a person or group who accesses or changes a website or program through nefarious means. Instead, this definition celebrates innovation and creativity of all sorts. Big companies, such as Vision Service Plan, rent space, and there are numerous startups, too. In addition, approximately 85 people are signed up for a monthly membership, and anyone can drop in, pay a $10 daily fee, sit at one of Hacker’s big communal tables and tap into the Wi-Fi. Urijah Faber, the mixed-martialarts master whose gym neighbors

“Gina[Lujan]understandsthestart-up cultureandhasdoneatremendousjob bringingtogetherthetechcommunity.” CongresswomanDorisMatsui Eric Ullrich, who joined Lujan and co-founder Charles Blas in March 2012, says it’s this everevolving DIY ethos that first attracted him to Hacker Lab. “We don’t have a lot of meetings. We just get things done,” he says. And that, in turn, means good things for Sacramento, he adds. “It’s about building a community,” he says. “It’s about building strong relationships and trying new things and seeing what works.” Lujan has always been one to throw things out to the universe just to

Although such co-ops are on the rise, popping up nationwide, from MakerBar in Hoboken, N.J., and Brooklyn, N.Y.’s NYC Resistor to Noisebridge in San Francisco, local options proved scarce. At the time, Capsity was closed, undergoing renovation; ThinkHouse Collective sounded, well, quiet; and The Urban Hive was great, but too aesthetically clean for her grittier tastes. And so she put an ad on Craigslist: “Attention hackers and founders and enthusiasts, looking for hackers and makers and start-ups.”

when she arrived in Sacramento: a place to promote new concepts, share resources, educate and innovate. A place not just to hack, but to create, craft and push boundaries. A place to foster connections. She attributes its quick growth to equal parts planning, timing and sheer luck. “We all had this vision of what we thought Hacker Lab could be,” Lujan says. “It’s all been very serendipitous, from finding co-founders to building [a] community, to finding space.” But for as quickly as it came together, Lujan’s path there was rocky.

‘You’ve got  everything  against you’ Born in Los Angeles, Lujan spent much of her childhood bouncing between family members. Her mother, only 16 when she got pregnant with Lujan, was “unstable,” Lujan says. Her father, dealing with his own issues, didn’t fare much better. And then there were the incidents of sexual abuse at the hands of people close to the family, Lujan says. Those events repeatedly pushed her to flee. “I ran away from home for the first time when I was 8,” she says now. “I ended up living with so many different aunts and uncles; they were all wonderful, but I was a broken child, and when anything would bother me, I’d just run again.” By age 10, Lujan had moved in with an aunt on her father’s side. The house was out in Rolling Hills, an affluent city in the Palos Verdes area about a half-hour south of Los Angeles. The aunt, concerned for her niece, tried to introduce her to some hobbies, signing her up for ballet classes and buying her etiquette books and blank journals. As the weather warmed up, she decided Lujan needed to get out of the house. “She told me, ‘You’re going to school. You’re not hanging out with me all summer,’” Lujan remembers. And so she enrolled her niece in a computer camp that had just one objective: Learn coding by creating a computer video game. If your game didn’t work at the end of the camp session, you didn’t pass. Lujan took to it with a passion. “I coded that whole game out. Looking back, I didn’t realize for a long time that’s where it all started for me.” It would be years, however, before Lujan connected the dots between that experience, her first computer and everything that came after. By 14, she’d followed her mother and stepfather to Sacramento, but within a month, ran away again. She dropped out of school and ended up in a group home and then, later, a small camp down by the river. Frightened, she finally called the only friend she’d made since moving to town. “I’m scared,” she told her. “Come get me.” The friend and her boyfriend picked her up, but couldn’t offer a place to stay. Instead, they entrusted her to the care of a 25-year-old college student who,

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Gina Lujan and her Hacker Lab co-founders receive occasional stipends but don’t currently take a salary. The company is sponsored, in part, by Intel and School Factory, a Wisconsin-based nonprofit that supports similar groups.

Gina Lujan dreams of turning Midtown’s I Street into something of a “Silicon Alley,” populated with startups and enhanced with free fiber-optic Internet service. like Lujan, wasn’t happy with the arrangement. “We didn’t like each other.” At least not at first. The pair eventually married and had two children. Lujan’s oldest daughter was born when she was 16; her son arrived a year later. Living in an apartment at G and 14th streets, the couple started buying and selling salvaged cars at auction. They split when she was just 19, but before then, she says, her ex-husband had helped to reinforce a sense of resiliency—a drive to get by with whatever means necessary. “He told me, ‘You need to be an entrepreneur. You don’t have an

education, you’re a minority and you’re a girl: You’ve got everything against you.’” And so Lujan worked hard. Later, her second husband worked for a recycling firm, and Lujan, pregnant again, figured out she could sell the truckloads of slightly damaged, unwanted goods that it would otherwise dump: Pallets loaded down with designer purses and baby clothes and cleaning supplies. She carted them off to a flea market, netting $500 in just the first day. Finally, her father-in-law bought that computer which prompted the herbal website and, eventually, the online graphic-design firm.

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By 2008, she and her third husband, Reuben Lujan, had moved to Oakland where, Lujan realized, she needed a new office. “It was me, working from home with three teenagers, a dog, a hamster and a cat and a husband who’s a musician,” she says. “I couldn’t get anything done.” And so, not finding a ready-made alternative, Lujan opened the Blue Door Lab Coworking Space. Soon, Lujan was immersed in the Bay Area’s tech culture. She started attending hackathons, where she pitched ideas to investors. Lujan and a friend even talked of opening a “bootstrapping” space—a place where fledgling tech

companies would be prepped for business incubators. “I had startup fever,” she says. “I loved tech, I loved the culture. I just wanted the experience.”

The power of  community On a recent Wednesday, Lujan is nursing a persistent cold. She’s sniffling, achy and getting by on just hours of sleep. She can’t let a few sneezes get her down, however, during Hacker Lab’s bimonthly lunch meet-up at a Midtown restaurant. Throughout the course of the meal, she jumps out of her seat to greet regulars with a hug. There’s a Rancho Cordova-based video-game maker and myriad other software and hardware engineers and developers. In all, a dozen turn out to chat as they dine on hamburgers, salads and bowls of chili. Lujan orders a cup of tomato soup, a platter of fries and a Sprite—“This is the only thing that sounds good right now”—and makes a point to talk to everyone. Conversations are loose. The purpose, she says, is simply to

gather and socialize, maybe share tips or offer support. It’s Lujan’s signature style: endless hugs and wide smiles and genuine interest in those around her. “I want to know more about you,” she says to a new visitor, interrupting herself midconversation to switch gears. “I want to know more about what makes you you.” For Nascent Games founder Gabriel Gutierrez, Lujan’s intellect, energy and vision impress. “She’s entertainingly crazy, phenomenal and massively bright. I’ve never met someone so tied to the community.” But, he says, Hacker Lab is not just about socialization. “There’s always something being discussed, an idea that’s productive,” says Gutierrez, whose company develops video games. “It’s about [saying], ‘Maybe we can help each other.’” Lujan is driven by this idea of bringing people together. “I’m really intrigued by community spaces and how they affect the economy,” she says, pointing to the local Flywheel Arts Incubator and Forage, a San Francisco-based commercial co-op kitchen, as successful examples of collaborative workplaces.


“They’re really powerful. I love tech, and I love making things, but it’s the people that are the real joy.” Lately, Lujan’s been taking that message beyond Hacker Lab. In April, she spoke on the subject at an economic-development conference in Southern California. Congresswoman Matsui toured the Lab to learn more about ways to foster STEM—the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education Coalition—in schools and throughout the community. In 2012, the Sacramento Business Journal named Lujan one of the region’s top leaders. Matsui is optimistic about what Hacker Lab will bring to the region. “It is impossible to predict with certainty what the next big [technology] breakthrough will be, but we can make sure that we are providing the spark of creativity and imagination within our community so that innovation is occurring locally,” Matsui said in an email to SN&R. “Gina understands the start-up culture and has done a tremendous job bringing together the tech community and getting them excited about the future and Sacramento’s potential.”

“I had five kids by the time I was 22. I was the poster child for welfare.” Gina Lujan, founder Hacker Lab Such accomplishments and alliances are crucial to Hacker Lab’s health. The space currently operates, in part, as a nonprofit and receives sponsorship from Intel and School Factory, a Wisconsin-based nonprofit that supports similar groups nationwide. Lujan dreams of turning I Street into something of a “Silicon Alley,” populated with startups and enhanced with free fiberoptic Internet service. It’s about creating opportunity—for the city and for its big thinkers. “The tech scene is culture, and we want to attract that culture,” Lujan says. “If we don’t, then people [leave] and move to the Bay Area. I think we’ve proven we have talented people here.” Sacramento Techweek founder Adam Kalsey says the time is right. “There are mobile-development companies and app makers—everything from two guys doing a startup out of their garage to much larger companies.” And environments such as Hacker Lab are crucial to the region’s growth. “Community spaces have big value,” he says. “There are others in the region, of course, but Hacker Lab is big, and it’s really embraced new ideas.” It doesn’t hurt, too, that Lujan’s just a little bit nuts. “She is crazy,” Kalsey says with a laugh. “But all the best entrepreneurs are.”

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The hustler “Crazy” is nothing Lujan hasn’t heard before. “I’m OK with that. It’s just about thinking differently.” Certainly crazy makes for interesting. Unpredictable. Scary even. Lujan ended up back in Sacramento after their landlord’s money troubles forced them out their spacious East Bay home. Now, the couple and Lujan’s 14-year-old daughter face similar worries. (Her other five kids, whose ages range from 19 to 25, are currently scattered across the nation.) Their South Sacramento rental is in flux—the landlord won’t fix the air conditioner, and, as the temperatures creep upward, Lujan ponders her options. There aren’t many. None of the Hacker Lab co-founders take a salary, just the occasional stipend. Lujan and her husband, currently between work contracts, share one 10-year-old car. Frankly, they’re often broke. “Now we’re racing to get another house,” Lujan says with a sigh. Sometimes, too, she admits, it puts a strain on her relationships. Still, such struggles aren’t a deal breaker. “I don’t worry. As long as we keep our lifestyle to a minimum, we’re OK.” Reuben, her husband of four years, isn’t worried, either. “Most people, myself included, take the easy way out by getting a regular job and working for someone else just for the security,” he says. “Gina’s ambitious and headstrong—the kind of person who on Monday comes with a business plan, and by Friday, it’s up and running.” He’s not joking. A few days after the Hacker Lab lunchtime meet-up, Lujan is still sniffling and sneezing. It got so bad, she stayed home, only to spend the afternoon in bed, pecking away furiously at her laptop as she put the finishing touches on a new startup site, a classified hub for holistic medicines. “I had to finish it. I had to get it out into the universe.” Satisfied, she’s now turned her attention back to Hacker Lab. That means staying in motion. “I am a hustler,” she says, laughing. “Since I was a kid—literally living on the streets, and then having my own kids so young. You just go into fight-or-flight mode.” She’s excited about working with Matsui and says similar plans with City Hall could prove beneficial for the entire region. And yet, Lujan insists there’s no interest in formally partnering with anyone. Even if it meant not worrying about money. “Hacker Lab is very grassroots, and we want to ... keep that free-form spirit,” she says. “I’m in a position to make change. I feel validated, like I’ve finally done something really great, and I have something to show for it.” “In Sacramento, people are creating apps and building robotics—all of that is … the new industrialization. This is the future.” Ω

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STORY

Tech yourself Five Sacramento companies that should   be on your radar

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acramento Techweek kicks off Friday, May 10, and runs through  Saturday, May 18, with a series of events that put a spotlight on local  technology and innovation.  The goal, says Sacramento Techweek founder Adam Kalsey, is to  bring cohesion to a region that’s large in both geography and entrepreneurial scope.  “There are a lot of tech companies and startups in Sacramento, but everybody is working in small little bubbles—people [working] in Elk Grove don’t know  about [tech] stuff in Roseville,” he says. “Techweek is our attempt to give the  scene unity.” Scheduled events include the Sacramento Med Tech Showcase, Guerilla PR  Strategies for Tech Startups and the 13th annual UC Davis Big Bang! awards  ceremony, which showcases the five finalists in the UC Davis Business Plan  Competition, an event organized by MBA students of the university’s Graduate  School of Management.  Want to know what local tech looks like? The following are five companies  helping to put the Sacramento region in the international spotlight.

1

Leadwerks Engine

Founded by a UC Davis neurology student, this local startup specializes in multiplatform videogame development. Its first product, 3D World Studio, has been utilized by thousands of developers across the globe, and its latest offering, Leadwerks 3, puts the focus on building mobile games. www.leadwerks.com.

2

Marrone Bio Innovations

This Davis-based company recently hired Alison Stewart as its chief science officer. Previously, Stewart worked as a professor of plant pathology in the Bio-Protection Research Centre at Lincoln University in Lincoln, New Zealand. There, Stewart studied ways to create and use fungi strains to control pest populations in produce. That makes her a good fit for Marrone Bio Innovations’ already impressive work with bio-based pest-management products. www.marronebioinnovations.com.

3

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Chrometa Stop wasting time on the Internet (or at least get a better picture of how you’re killing off those seconds) with this Web-based | 

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timekeeping application. Chrometa, which runs in the background while you work, tracks computer usage data to fill time sheets, compile billable hours and (theoretically) improve productivity. In 2011, Forbes magazine named it a top entrepreneurial tool. www.chrometa.com.

4

Modera

Tired of Instagram? This Sacramento startup takes that popular photo-sharing app and ups the ante with “hot or not”styled contests. How it works: Snap a pic or upload one from another site (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc.), then share it with friends and lobby for votes. Winners get prizes from the likes of Krazy Mary’s Boutique, Sugar Shack Boutique and the Party Makers. www.modera.co.

5

Nicolas’ Garden

Created by 8-year-old entrepreneur Nicolas Come, this forthcoming app (scheduled to launch May 19) aims to teach children (and their parents) about healthy eating habits with easy recipes, nutritional info, and fun facts on farming, grocery shopping and working in the kitchen. This isn’t just kids’ play—young Come has teamed with the likes of Kurt Spataro and Soil Born Farms to get his message across. www.nicolasgarden.com. For more information on Sacramento Techweek and a list of scheduled events, visit www.sactechweek.com.

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photo by kayleigh mccollum

by Aaron Ca

rnes

Sacr amen to S i n ger Son gw r i ter kepi ghou li e pu tS mon S ter en er gy i nto hi S br i ghtly hu ed, hor r or -S how themed car toon ar t

F

Check out Kepi Ghoulie’s art and music on Saturday, May 11, at Naked Lounge Downtown at 1111 H Street at 8:30 p.m. Singer-songwriters Kevin Seconds and Jonah Matranga are also on the bill; $7 cover. Visit http://kepiland.com for more information.

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or the past 25 years, local pop-punk singer Kepi Ghoulie has carved out a niche distinctly his own. His songs—both with the Groovie Ghoulies as well as those released during a prolific solo career—all share the distinct characteristics of being fun and simple with themes that often embody ghosts, goblins and other monsters. These same attributes are also evident in his artwork, which he’s been actively making since 2000, and which he sells at his shows as a way to make extra money. His art features—no surprise—a lot of the same characters that populate his songs: werewolves, zombies, robots, aliens and other horror-show and B-movie creatures. All possess the sort of childlike, minimalistic style reminiscent of the artwork of Daniel Johnston. Now, Stardumb Records has compiled more than 500 of Ghoulie’s paintings for a new book, The Art of Kepi: The Rise of Kepiland 2000-2012. Ghoulie will host a book-release party on Saturday, May 11, at the Naked Lounge Downtown (1111 H Street), where he’ll have books and paintings for sale and will also be playing music. The Art of Kepi is structured in a way that groups Ghoulie’s characters together, so readers can see, for instance, how his bigfoot paintings have evolved over time, or how all of his Lizard King depictions sport the same big eyes. The pieces, he says, embrace the same ethos as his music. “My art is like punk rock in that it has that DIY-anyone-can-do-it mentality. It’s like my visual version of the Ramones or Chuck Berry,” Ghoulie says. His inspirations, he adds, are simple. “I was weaned on Disney movies and Warner Bros. cartoons, but I think I just


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Who you calling lazy?! See THE V WORD

It’s J-Gatz’s world See FILM

iMagecourtesyofkepighoulie

An instructor once told Kepi Ghoulie he couldn’t “make a living” with his art. These days, Ghoulie sells his works at shows and just published a collection of his paintings, The Art of Kepi: The Rise of Kepiland 2000-2012.

“M yartislikepunk rockinthatithasthat Diy-anyone-can-Do-it Mentality.it’slikeMy visualversionofthe raMonesorchuckBerry.” Kepi Ghoulie musicianandartist

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The jazz generator See SOUND ADVICE

“I’m glad people like my art and want it. It’s cheaper than a gallery, but it may also have a ding or a scratch, but that’s punk.” Ghoulie’s painted for as long as he can remember. Once in the ’90s, he took an art class at a community college. There, the art teacher mused that Ghoulie’s cartoon style wasn’t “real art.” “The teacher laughed at me for painting Godzillas and said that you can’t make a living doing this,” Ghoulie says. “Now, I’m trying to make a living doing this.” The teacher’s critique wasn’t a big deal, he adds. He simply switched to painting abstracts, but after the class was over, went back to drawing vampires. As a fixture on the punk scene, Ghoulie was already quite familiar with this idea that people believe that one kind of art is “real” while others are not. “It’s the same: ‘What is art? What is punk?’ It’s pretty much the same. ... That conversation will never cease,” he says. What was once just a hobby eventually evolved into a more serious pursuit. It started in 1999 when Ghoulie decided to give his paintings as Christmas gifts to friends. Then, in 2000, he advised an artist friend in need of money to make one painting every day for a month. If he sold each piece for $100, Ghoulie calculated, he’d walk away with $3,000. To help, Ghoulie approached the owners of the nowshuttered True Love Coffeehouse to see if they’d put on an art show for his friend. Instead, they offered Ghoulie two exhibits: one for his friend and one for him. And so Ghoulie took his own advice and also painted one piece a day for a month. At his showing, he sold 17 paintings, and within the next month, two other galleries had asked to exhibit his work as well. Since then, he says, art has been a major part of his creative life.

Dinosaurs, bats and monsters—Ghoulie’s work puts a colorful spotlight on “happy outcasts.”

“I was, and still am, totally excited,” he says. Now, he’s gone from simply selling art at his shows to doing more bona fide exhibits. For the past three years he’s also participated in an annual art run, where he and other artist friends tour Europe, playing music and showing art at galleries, on the street or where ever they can. The one area of art that Ghoulie avoids? Creating covers for his own records. It may seem like a natural fit, he says, combining his two main outlets of expression. Instead, he says he commissions his artist friends to create his album art. “My friends understand me. Visually they get my music easier than I could express it. I love doing art, but I don’t know if a record cover is sacred to me or if I truly believe that the record cover should tell you what’s inside,” Ghoulie says. “I just think my friend’s art [can] express that better than my own.” Ω STORY

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Mimosas for justice See 15 MINUTES

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SCENE& HEARD Meat your maker It’s Thursday night, and I’m about to get the meat

sweats.

iMagecourtesyofkepighoulie

draw the things that I like—I like bigfoot and bats and chupacabras,” he says. “I guess punks and outcasts always relate to Frankenstein, the guy who never fit it. All my characters are happy outcasts.” Ghoulie paints these characters endlessly, with some featured hundreds of times in various settings. This book contains only a fraction of his output, he says. In keeping both with the punk-rock spirit of songwriting and an inherent personal restlessness, he’s often working on several pieces at any given time. He credits the output to nothing short of hyperactivity. “I can bounce around while one dries and work on another, or do color of the same layer on a different piece,” he says. “I like to stay moving and just paint.” All of his pieces express a sort of cuteness or innocence that might conflict with some people’s notions of art as something that should be serious or provoke profound social criticism. Stardumb Records owner Stefan Tijs says he’s drawn to their “naivety.” “There’s this famous Picasso quote that goes, ‘It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child,’” Tijs says. “It seems like the latter comes all natural to Kepi.” For the artist, the purpose is just to make people smile. “I describe my art as bright and simple art for a dark and complicated world. I think you can find some real emotion in there somewhere, some love or a smile,” he says. “The fact that my art—or music—makes anybody happy makes me happy. The fact that it [makes] several hundred to several-thousand people [happy] blows my mind.” As an independent musician, selling art has proven to be a financial lifesaver, he adds—particularly in more recent years, as CD sales have declined. Selling $50 to $100 a night worth of paintings, in many cases, means being able to afford gas and food on tour. It helps, he says, that he keeps the prices in line with the punk community’s grittier ethos.

34

I’ve cut short a round of beers with a friend to go down to Streets of London Pub on J and 18th streets to test my gastrointestinal fortitude in the Ultimate Big Ben Challenge. For $25, takers get about 6 pounds of greasy bar fare: A four-patty bacon cheeseburger towering over an ungodly mass of french fries and deep-fried onion rings, as well as a tub of cole slaw. You have 40 minutes to consume everything on the plate. If you don’t finish, you get a T-shirt. If you do, you eat for free and still get the shirt. Is it worth it? Probably not. But here we are. I have no business doing this. To begin, I’m not much of an eater. I consume probably 1.75 meals per day and almost always need a to-go box. I’m tall, but marathon-runner thin. I weigh 160 pounds sopping wet. I get a food baby just from eating a slice of quiche. I’m told there are training methods for this. But none of those methods involve a turkey-bacon-avocado omelet for brunch and an early evening of beer on the Capitol lawn. I’m told that you’re supposed to gorge yourself on lettuce in the days leading up to the challenge to help your stomach expand. Suffice to say, this has not been a part of my regimen. One of the three pretty waitresses standing at my table tells me that in all her years at the pub, she’s only seen two people finish the plate. One of them was as skinny as me. Now, I understand I really have no chance of pulling off this culinary feat. I’m unfit. I’m unprepared. And I’ve approached tonight with a sense of comic dread. But I’ll be damned if, as soon as

the waitress starts that timer, I don’t give it

I’m tall, but marathonrunner thin. I weigh 160 pounds sopping wet. I get a food baby just from eating a slice of quiche.

everything I’ve got. I tear down the burger tower first, finishing off the buns and three of the four hamburgers in about eight minutes. I get woozy from all the sodium, so I have to turn my attention elsewhere. I hate onion rings, so I turn to the pile of fries, dipping them in water to make it easier for them to go down. By now, I’m sweating. A lot. I’m 25 minutes in, and maybe halfway through the food. I’m incapable of speech. My friend Chakira regales me with stories that always seem to end with someone vomiting. I want to tell her to shut up, but all I can do is shake my head and scowl as I stuff another round of fries in my mouth. I tap out just after 30 minutes. I’m nowhere near finished with the plate, but my stomach is at capacity. I stand up, careful to not draw any attention, and walk to the bathroom, where, drenched in sweat and failure, I will soon throw up. —Dave Kempa

d a v e k @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m You’ve got to see it to believe it: Check out Dave Kempa’s burger-challenge photos at www.newsreview.com.

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Iván Nájera 5)634%":t.": 1.

Sacramento Vedanta Reading Group Every Friday 7:00 - 8:30 pm · Free admission @ Sierra 2 Community Center, Room 6 2791 24th Street, Sacramento Parking in back For more information please see www.SacVRG.org

The whole world is your own. — Sri Sarada Devi

This (Self) is never born, nor does It die, nor after once having been, does It go into non-being. This (Self) is unborn, eternal, changeless, ancient. It is never destroyed even when the body is destroyed. – Bhagavad Gita (Song of the Lord) Chap. 2.20

Jazz up your summer nights at the Crocker! On every third Thursday evening from May through September, the Crocker will feature first-class musicians performing a wide range of jazz styles. Each concert begins at 6 PM in the Crocker’s E. Kendell Davis Courtyard. $6 MEMBERS t $12 NONMEMBERS PER CONCERT SUPPORTING SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSORS

This year’s jazz series is dedicated to the memory of long-time Crocker supporter and jazz devotee, Miles Treaster

crockerartmuseum.org 20

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May picks by SHOKA

“Grand Canal, Venice” by Donald Satterlee, archival photograph.

Wish you were here It’s hard work trekking all over the Tuscan countryside and the historic waterways of Venice searching for the perfect angle to shoot, waiting for the right glow of light or flock of birds to flutter by poetically. Really, it can be exhausting. But it can beautifully rewarding. Donald Satterlee, unfortunately, didn’t buy any of us a plane ticket to accompany him on his trek, but, fortunately, he is sharing the results of his toil in Elements of Atmosphere at Elliott Fouts Gallery this month. His photos of Italian landscapes look more like antique postcards than tourist snapshots: They are drained of color—sans a hint of sienna for that Old World feel—that makes the viewer wish that he or she was there. Where: Elliott Fouts Gallery, 1831 P Street; (916) 736-1429; www.efgallery.com. Second Saturday reception: May 11, 6 to 9 p.m. Through May 30. Hours: Tuesday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4p.m.

“Hoopoe” (detail) by Maria De Castro, ceramic.

Eight from the earth

“Afternoon” by Robert Pengelly, oil on canvas, 2012.

Like bones bleached by the desert sun, Julia Feld’s ceramic sculptures are smooth, matte, blanch objects that pique one’s curiosity. But unlike the remains of some expired creature found on the earth, her sculptures, made from the earth—feature vivid trompe l’oeil paintings over the surface—which also ignite one’s inquisitive tendencies. Feld is just one of eight ceramicists chosen by juror Lana Wilson for the Tsao Gallery at the Davis Art Center’s Eight from ACGA group show. Other artists include Gerald Arrington, Alice Corning, Susanne French, Patricia Griffin, Lee Middleman, John Schnick and Maria De Castro, the latter whose work is an amalgam of ancient mythologies and anthropomorphic creatures. Where: Tsao Gallery at the Davis Art Center, 1919 F Street in Davis; (530) 756-4100; www.davisartcenter.org. Second Friday reception: May 10, 7 to 9 p.m. Through May 25. Hours: Monday through Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Friday 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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It’s in the details It’s not surprising to discover that English-born artist Robert Pengelly worked as a cartographer and an architectural illustrator earlier in his career. A U.S. citizen since 2000, Pengelly has a penchant for painting buildings—houses, especially—but those of an older era. It makes sense that he gravitates to rendering Victorian structures, too, with their fanciful components, like rounded buttresses and fish-scale siding, which he paints with accuracy and mesmerizing detail.

Where: Archival Framing, 3223 Folsom Boulevard; (916) 923-6204; www.archivalframe.com. Second Saturday reception: May 11, 6 to 9 p.m. Through June 1. Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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2601 J Street 916-443-5721 2610 Marconi Ave. 916-484-1640

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ART MAP 7 BLUE LAMP 1400 Alhambra Blvd.,

MIDTOWN 1 ALEX BULT GALLERY 1114 21st St., (916) 476-5540, www.alexbultgallery.com

2 ART STUDIOS 1727 I St., behind Michaelangelo’s; (916) 444-2233

Palo Alto San Jose Sacramento UniversityArt.com

3 ARTFOX GALLERY 2213 N St., Ste. B; (916) 835-1718; www.artfox.us

Valid on regular priced items only. Excludes custom framing. Not valid on special orders, sale or clearance items, or previous purchases. No rain checks. May not be combined with any other offer. One coupon per customer per visit. Exp. 5/11/2013.

4 AXIS GALLERY 1517 19th St., (916) 443-9900, www.axisgallery.org

5 B. SAKATA GARO 923 20th St., (916) 447-4276, www.bsakatagaro.com

6 BARTON GALLERY 1723 I St., (916) 443-4025, www.sacartz.com

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University Art

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Bring this ad in for 20% OFF on one entire purchase!

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(916) 455-3400, www.bluelamp.com

8 BOWS & ARROWS 1815 19th St., (916) 822-5668, www.bowscollective.com

9 CAPITAL ARTWORKS 1215 21st St., Ste. B; (916) 207-3787; www.capital-artworks.com

10 CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART, SACRAMENTO 1519 19th St., (916) 498-9811, www.ccasac.org

11 CUFFS 2523 J St., (916) 443-2881, www.shopcuffs.com

12 DEEP ART AND YOGA 2030 H St., (916) 470-9959, www.deepartandyoga.com

13 ELLIOTT FOUTS GALLERY 1831 P St., (916) 446-1786, www.efgallery.com

14 GALLERY 2110 2110 K St., (916) 476-5500, www.gallery2110.com

15 INTEGRATE SACRAMENTO 2220 J St., (916) 594-9579, http://integrateservicessacramento.blogspot.com

16 KENNEDY GALLERY 1931 L St., (916) 716-7050, www.kennedygallerysac.com

17 LITTLE RELICS 908 21st St., (916) 716-2319, www.littlerelics.com

18 MIDTOWN FRAMING & GALLERY 1005 22nd St., (916) 447-7558, www.midtownframing.com

19 OLD SOUL CO. 1716 L St., (916) 443-7685, www.oldsoulco.com

20 PHONO SELECT 2312 K St., (916) 400-3164, www.phonoselect.com

21 RED DOT GALLERY 2231 J St., Ste. 101; www.reddotgalleryonj.com

22 SACRAMENTO ART COMPLEX 2110 K St., Ste. 4; (916) 476-5500; www.sacramentoartcomplex.com

23 SACRAMENTO GAY & LESBIAN CENTER 1927 L St., (916) 442-0185, http://saccenter.org

24 SHIMO CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2117 28th St., (916) 706-1162, www.shimogallery.com


2nd saturday at the BrIcKhoUse

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OpENINg RECEpTION SaTURday, may 11, 2013 | 2pm – 5pm ClOSINg RECEpTION SaTURday, may 25, 2013 | 2pm – 5pm createD By ParalyzeD artIst, carrisa rolfe UsInG the hanDs oF creatIve arts theraPIst, patricia ehnisz

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SaTURday, may 11, 2013 share yoUr oWn Poetry & lyrIcs! FeatUrInG malik sanders, hosteD By brother hypnotic $5 @ the Door | sIGn UP @6:30Pm oPen mIc 8-10Pm | aFter Party 10Pm - closInG

ENROll NOW...SUmmER 2013 aRTS ESSENTIalS Email us to learn more! befreewithart@gmail.com

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RENT THE BRICKHOUSE

FUnDraIsers | BooK sIGnInGs | PartIes | WeDDInGs BUsIness meetInGs | recePtIons | WorKshoPs

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aRT ClaSSES @ THE BRICKHOUSE

the brickhouse

2837 36th street, sacramento, ca

916.475.1240 | www.thebrickhousegalleryoakpark.com

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25 SHINY NICKEL ART GALLERY 1518 21st St., (916) 224-7051

35 ARTISTS’ COLLABORATIVE GALLERY 129 K St., (916) 444-7125, www.artcollab.com

26 TIM COLLOM GALLERY 915 20th St., (916) 247-8048, www.timcollomgallery.com

27 UNION HALL GALLERY 2126 K St.,

36 CROCKER ART MUSEUM 216 O St., (916) 808-7000, www.crockerartmuseum.org

37 E STREET GALLERY AND STUDIOS

I ARTISTIC EDGE 1880 Fulton Ave., (916) 482-2787; http://artisticedgeframing.com

II BLUE LINE GALLERY 405 Vernon St.,

1115 E St., (916) 505-7264

(916) 448-2452

28 UNIVERSITY ART 2601 J St.,

OFF MAP Ste. 100 in Roseville; (916) 783-4117; http://bluelinegallery.blogspot.com

38 LA RAZA GALERÍA POSADA

(916) 443-5721, www.universityart.com

29 THE URBAN HIVE 1931 H St., (916) 585-4483, www.theurbanhive.com

30 VIEWPOINT PHOTOGRAPHIC ART CENTER 2015 J St., (916) 441-2341, www.viewpointgallery.org

2700 Front St., (916) 446-5133, www.larazagaleriaposada.org

III THE BRICKHOUSE ART GALLERY

Ste. 100; (916) 446-4444; www.smithgallery.com

IV DEL PASO WORKS BUILDING GALLERIES 1001 Del Paso Blvd.

40 VOX SACRAMENTO 1818 11th St.,

V EVOLVE THE GALLERY 2907 35th St.,

www.voxsac.com

31 ZANZIBAR GALLERY 1731 L St.,

(916) 572-5123, www.evolvethegallery.com

(916) 443-5601, www.zanzibartrading.com

VI KNOWLTON GALLERY 115 S. School St.,

DOWNTOWN/OLD SAC EAST SAC

Ste. 14 in Lodi; (209) 368-5123; www.knowltongallery.com

41 ARCHIVAL FRAMING 3223 Folsom Blvd.,

32 APPEL GALLERY 931 T St.,

(916) 923-6204, www.archivalframe.com

(916) 442-6014, www.appelgallery.com

33 ART FOUNDRY GALLERY 1025 R St., (916) 444-2787

34 ARTHOUSE UPSTAIRS 1021 R St., (530) 979-1611, www.arthouse-saramento.com

42 FE GALLERY & IRON ART STUDIO 1100 65th St., (916) 456-4455, www.fegallery.com

VII PATRIS STUDIO AND ART GALLERY 3460 Second Ave., (916) 397-8958, http://artist-patris.com

VIII RECLAMARE GALLERY & CUSTOM TATTOO 2737 Riverside Blvd., (916) 760-7461, www.reclamareart.com

43 GALLERY 14 3960 60th St.,

(916) 456-1058, www.gallery14.net

44 JAYJAY 5520 Elvas Ave.,

IX SACRAMENTO TEMPORARY CONTEMPORARY

(916) 453-2999, www.jayjayart.com

BEFORE

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FEATURE

sunday, may 12th

2837 36th St., (916) 457-1240, www.thebrickhousegalleryoakpark.com

39 SMITH GALLERY 1020 11th St.,

STORY

1616 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 921-1224, http://stcgallery.webs.com

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o t c a s cles

NIGHT&DAY List your event! Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

cy

Yeah,

the Amgen Tour of California, which begins this week in Southern California, skipped the Sacramento area for the second year in a row. But who needs those professional ’roid ragers anyway? Sacramento has the untainted glory of May is Bike Month to whip up the region into a drug-free (except for a lil’ booze) frenzy for all things bicycle related. May is Bike Month events include small film screenings and huge bike festivals. Plus, you can check out www.mayisbikemonth.com to find bike resources, track your miles, compete in challenges with friends, and win prizes. Here are five highlights and happenings that SN&R recommends.

FESTIVALS Capitol BikeFest, happening on Thursday, May 9, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Capitol (10th Street and Capitol Avenue), is always a big event. The free annual festival generally features vendor booths, guest speakers and free bike parking. Scooter’s Clean Air Fun Fest and Bike Expo!, which happens on Saturday, May 18, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Fremont Park (1515 Q Street), offers a BMX bike team performance, safety demonstrations and music. It’s also free. Pro tip: Every Friday Night Concerts in the Park show (even beyond May) offers free valet bike parking via Sacramento Area Bicycle Advocates.

FILMS Midtown bike shop Pedal Hard premieres No Coast, a documentary film about a weeklong cycling adventure from Portland, Ore., to San Francisco. A free screening happens at Hot Italian (1627 16th Street) on Saturday, May 11, at 9 p.m. Another film, Believe & Achieve, documents the youngest team ever to participate in the Race Across America. It plays for free at the Byron Sher Auditorium in Joe Serna Jr. Cal/EPA Headquarters Building (1001 I Street) at noon on Monday, May 13.

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RIDES Highlights of the many rides happening this month include a ride with Sacramento City Councilman Allen Warren (Saturday, May 11), the women’s CycloFemme Ride (Sunday, May 12), a Ride of Silence (Wednesday, May 15), the NorCal AIDS Cycle (May 16-19) and the NBG American River Parkway HiWheel Ride (Sunday, May 19). But there are also way more rides happening throughout the greater Sacramento area that you can find out about at www.mayisbikemonth.com/events.asp.

DEALS The Midtown Business Association is partnering with local businesses to offer some sweet deals to cyclists. For example, Kupros Bistro is offering happy-hour prices and a special menu to cyclists, and Spanglish Arte is offering 15-percent discounts to bicyclists. To qualify for some deals, you just need to flash your helmet, while others require that you print your “miles-logged” sheet from the May is Bike Month website—so make sure to read the fine print first at www.mayisbikemonth.com/discounts.asp.

CLASSES Every Wednesday night at 6 p.m., Mike’s Bikes of Sacramento (1411 I Street) hosts free participant-determined classes that teach how to fix a flat tire and tuneup brakes, among other bike-related things. Peak Adventures bike shop on the Sacramento State University campus (6000 J Street) will host workshops every Thursday at 6 p.m. It’ll cover subjects such as how to ride safely in rough weather and how to fix a flat tire. Visit www.peakadventures.org for detailed information on these workshops and the May is Bike Month website for more classes. —Jonathan Mendick


09THURS Special Events FOOD-CYCLE CELEBRATION: Celebrate the local food-cycle and composting community with the restaurants, farms, schools and residents that “complete the food loop,” going from farm to table, back to the farm. It is an educational festival celebrating composting, the local food cycle and the preservation of our fertile Valley soils. Th, 5/9, 5pm. Free. Fremont Park, 1515 Q St.; www.grassacramento.org.

Film WARM BODIES: Catch a special outdoor film screening of Warm Bodies, the hit romantic zombie comedy starring up-and-coming actors Nicholas Hoult and Teresa Palmer. Th, 5/9, 8pm. Free. University Union Serna Plaza, 6000 J St. Sacramento State University; (916) 278-6997; www.sacstateunique.com.

Literary Events CONVERSATION WITH JAY FELDMAN: Join a free talk by the author of When the Mississippi Ran Backwards and Manufacturing Hysteria: A History of Scapegoating, Surveillance, and Secrecy in Modern America. Feldman has written for Smithsonian, Newsweek, Sports Illustrated and other magazines. Th, 5/9, 4-6pm. Free. 1 Shields Ave., 126 Voorhies Hall in Davis; (530) 752-1011.

Concerts PALESTRINA’S MISSA ISTE CONFESSOR: Renaissance Choir Sacramento performs Giovanni da Palestrina’s masterpiece from 1590 and works by Asola, Finck, Victoria and Frescobaldi—all based on an eighth-century Gregorian chant and with some presented in authentic alternatim fashion with organ. Th, 5/9, 7pm. Free. Christ the King Retreat Center, 6520 Van Maren Ln. in Citrus Heights; (916) 320-8423; www.renaissancechoir sacramento.com.

Sacramento State University’s jazz ensembles have performed at the renowned Monterey Jazz Next Generation Festival six years in a row. Th, 5/9, 8pm. $5-$10. Sacramento State Music Recital Hall, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5191; www.csus.edu/music.

DON’T MISS! WILD & SCENIC: Sacramento

Wild and Scenic Film Festival On Tour brings a selection of inspiring and entertaining short films dealing with themes of habitat conservation, outdoor adventure, local agriculture and environmental activism. An opening reception features local food and drink and the opportunity to meet festival sponsors. F, 5/10, 5pm. $10-$35. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (916) 444-0022; http://tinyurl.com/ sacwildandscenic2013.

BEFORE

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WANDA SYKES: Wanda Sykes

has been called “one of the funniest stand-up comics” by her peers and ranks among Entertainment Weekly’s 25 Funniest People in America. In October of 2009 her second HBO stand up special I’ma Be Me premiered. Taped at the Warner Theatre in Washington, D.C., she tackled topics like the first black president, gay cruises, being a new mom and aging. F, 5/10, 8pm. $49.75-$69.75. Sacramento Community Center Theater, 1301 L St.; (916) 808-5181; http://rbpconcerts.com.

cases Asian and Pacific Islander cultures and features lion dances, taiko drums, music, arts and crafts, community information, origami, a poker tournament, a mahjong tournament, food and a raffle. Sa, 5/11, 11am-5pm. Free. Historic Locke, 13916 Main St. in Walnut Grove; (916) 776-1661; www.lockeca.com.

MIDTOWN FARMERS MARKET:

GUITAR WORKSHOP: Luna Guitars will be hosting a guitar workshop featuring the Guitar Player magazine’s 2008 “Guitar Superstar” winner Vicki Genfan. Clinics are free and open to the public, and have been created to appeal to anyone who simply loves guitar. F, 5/10, 6pm. Free. Guitar Center Sacramento, 2120 Alta Arden Expressway; (916) 922-2132; http://stores.guitarcenter.com/ sacramento.

Sa, 8am-1pm through 12/28.

Free. Parking lot, 2020 J St.; (916) 442-1500; www.midtown farmersmarketsac.com.

Sacramento’s Second Saturday and a special all-day singathon, a fundraiser to support the Sacramento Gay Men’s Chorus. Sa, 5/11, 1-7pm. Free. St. John’s Lutheran Church, 1701 L St.; (877) 283-1567; www.sacgaymenschorus.org.

Concerts A VIEW FROM THE FOOTLIGHTS: Capella Antiqua will sing choruses from Monteverdi’s “Orfeo,” Purcell’s “The Fairy Queen,” Nicolai’s “The Merry Wives of Windsor,” Gilbert & Sullivan’s “The Gondoliers,” and Scott Joplin’s “Treemonisha.” A preconcert talk begins at 7pm. F, 5/10, 7:30pm. $10-$15. Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, 1017 11th St.; (916) 444-3071; www.capella-antiqua.org/ performances.html.

11SAT

ARTISAN EXPO: Fusion International Arts Center’s monthly Artisan Expo features gifts, handmade items, and crafts. Browse from 40 local vendors, hear live music and participate in art workshops.

Second Sa of every month, 11am-6pm. Free. Fusion

International Arts Center, 501 Arden Way; (916) 538-4008; www.fusioniac.com.

Art Galleries AMERICAN VISIONS ART GALLERY: Second Saturday Art Reception, view the works of landscape artist Rick Delanty and the Kumihimo Necklace collection by Diana Shiraishi of Jasmine Tea Designs. Sa, 5/11, 3-7pm. Free. 705 Sutter St. in Folsom; (916) 355-1492.

DON’T MISS! Celebrate the sixth annual National Train Day at the California State Railroad Museum and the Sacramento History Museum in Old Sacramento State Historic Park. Visitors will receive free admission to the two museums and enjoy special National Train Day activities. Sa, 5/11, 11am-5pm. Free. California State Railroad Museum, 111 I St.; (916) 445-6645; www.californiastate railroadmuseum.org.

THE ART STUDIOS: Art Fundraiser, purchase the works of Priscilla Ameneyro, with all proceeds being donated to Sacramento Food Bank. Sa, 5/11, 6-9pm. Free. 1723 I St. behind Michelangelo’s; (916) 847-6747.

ARTHOUSE UPSTAIRS: St. Francis High School, juried paintings, watercolors pastels, charcoals, photography, and drawings by St. Francis High School art students. Sa, 5/11, 5-9pm. Free. 1021 R St.; http://arthousesacramento.com.

Special Events BIG AL ON THE RIVER: Join a a three-hour cruise on the River City Queen riverboat featuring DJ Craig Gee spinning old-school jams, all-you-can-eat appetizers, a full bar and dancing. Sa, 5/11, 6-10pm. $45. River City Queen, 3505 S. River Rd. in West Sacramento; (916) 289-3589; www.facebook.com/rivercity queen. ion, fun, performances and shopping all to benefit Carrie’s Touch and their efforts in the breast-cancer community. Sa, 5/11, 5pm. $15-$20.

NEWS

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STORY

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Sa of every month, 3-10pm through 12/14. Free. 3460 Second Ave.; (916) 397-8958; http://patris studiogallery.blogspot.com.

CONCERT OF CONCERTOS: Treat mom to some great music this Mother’s Day when Camerata Capistrano, Sacramento State University’s popular baroque group, performs. It’s an all-concertos concert featuring several student soloists as well as guest bassoonist and professor David Wells. Su, 5/12, 4pm. $5-$10. Capistrano Hall Room 151, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5191; www.csus.edu/music.

exhibition of abstract landscapes “from another dimension.” Sa, 5/11, 4pm. Free. 2315 K St.; (916) 706-3302.

SMITH GALLERY: Reflective Contemporary Originals, the work of Wei Liu captures rare and soft memorable moments with interesting landscape compositions. Sa, 5/11, 6-9pm. Free. 1020 11th 100; (916) 446-4444.

Meetings & Groups ELK GROVE-SOUTH COUNTY DEMOCRATIC CLUB: The Elk Grove-South County Democratic Club will hold its regular monthly meeting. Assemblyman Roger Dickinson will be speaking on his package of legislative measures. Attendees will be able to ask questions about the purpose of any of these bills but will also be able to ascertain what they can do to help gain passage of any legislation in which they are interested. Tu, 5/14, 6:30-8pm. Free. Elk Grove Library, 8900 Elk Grove Blvd. in Elk Grove; (916) 479-2244.

Special Events

Classes

ARTS, CRAFTS & MORE FAIRE: Enjoy

CAKE BASICS: Learn the tricks to

YOUR ALLEY ART GALLERY: Second

these three classic cakes and get a chance to practice your decorating techniques: angel food cake with chantilly cream, carrot cake with cream-cheese frosting, and old-fashioned chocolate cupcakes. M, 5/13, 6-8:30pm. $35-$45. Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op Community Learning Center & Cooking School, 1914 Alhambra Blvd.; (916)868-6399; www.sacfoodcoop.com.

Saturday, see or purchase original artworks by some of the finest local artists in Sacramento. Hear music and enjoy refreshments. Second Sa of every month, 4-9pm. Free. 3431 Fourth Ave.; (916) 201-1404.

Museums CALIFORNIA STATE INDIAN MUSEUM: Plein Air Day, as part of the ongoing Arts in the Parks program, Northern California artists of all ages and skill levels are invited to participate in a special open-air painting event on the grounds of Sutter’s Fort State Historic Park. Sa, 5/11, 10am-2pm. Free. 2618 K St.; (916) 324-0971; www.parks.ca.gov/ indianmuseum.

14TUES

DON’T MISS! A CONVERSATION WITH MARIEL HEMINGWAY: Join

Mariel Hemingway at the Crest Theatre as part of Mental Health Month. Hemingway will show clips from her documentary Running From Crazy as she discusses the history of mental illness in her family. The conversation will continue with a panel of mental health experts and an opportunity to ask questions. Tu, 5/14, noon-1:30pm. Free. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (310) 317-0387; www.fymps.com.

Concerts PLACER POPS CHORALE: Trace the roots of American music, from soulful spirituals to stirring pop classics. Enjoy the iconic works of famed composer John Rutter and other contemporary and classic composers, in an uplifting program delivered by this talented chorale, one of the premier groups in the Sacramento region. Sa, 5/11, 7:30pm. $20-$35. Three Stages Peforming Arts Center, 10 College Pkwy. in Folsom; (916) 608-6888; www.threestages.net.

town Roseville featuires live bands, a farmers market, a children’s zone, a food court and a classic car show.

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AFTER

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Concerts SACRAMENTO STATE UNIVERSITY CONCERT: Sacramento State’s Symphonic Wind Ensemble and Concert Band join forces for a concert. Works include “Polly Oliver” by Thomas Root, and Sousa’s “White Rose March.” Master’s student artists are Jan-Ian Mason, conductor; Adam Brover, euphonium; and Cody Bennett, composer. W, 5/15, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Sacramento State Music Recital Hall, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5191; www.csus.edu/music.

OLD SACRAMENTO UNDERGROUND TOURS: Hidden beneath the city

Graham, Tom Tolley and James Scott discuss what everyday life was like for Sacramentans in the 1940s. They will cover a wide range of topics, including social life and entertainment, the Sacramento homefront and contribution to the war effort, businesses, schools, transportation and post-war changes. Tu, 5/14, 6-7:30pm. Free. Tsakopoulos Library Galleria, 828 I St.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

STREET FAIR: This fair in down-

Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

Special Events

CAPITAL DECADES: 1940S: Amanda

Kids’ Stuff

the fun of discovery as you view antiques, collectibles, art, and handmade creations by local businesses and the public. W, 4-8pm through 10/30. Free. The Market Place, 1325 Riley St. Commonwealth Shopping Center in Folsom; (916) 984-4220.

Wait, there’s more!

ONGOING

Special Events

This nationwide live reading series is coming to Sacramento for the first time in 2013. The cast of 15 local performers, including KCRA’s Deirdre Fitzpatrick, will take to the stage, reading stories of motherhood—from the hysterically funny to the soulful and poignant. Su, 5/12, 7pm. $20-$25. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (916) 201-6821; www.listento yourmothershow.com.

A RT S & C U LT U R E

5/7. Free. Roseville Downtown Tuesday Nights, 311 Vernon St. in Roseville; (916) 787-0101; http://dowtowntuesday nights.com.

13MON 15WED

Black and White, a raw abstract portrayal of Jill Jordan’s colorful and colorless experience of life. Sa, 5/11, 6-9pm. Free. 2126 K St.; (916) 448-2452.

LISTEN TO YOUR MOTHER: .

DEL PASO WORKS BUILDING: Second

FEATURE

2nd Saturday Art Walk and Art in Action, draw, paint or sculpt from a live model from 3 to 6pm or observe artists in action. Enjoy live music and an artist reception from 6 to 10pm. Second

DON’T MISS!

Carrisa Rolfe shares her art. Though Rolfe is unable to her hands and fingers, she finds hope in Creative Arts Therapist Patricia Ehnisz. With the use of Ehnisz’s hands, Rolfe’s vision is able to take form. Th-Sa, 2-5pm through 5/25. Opens 5/11. Free. 2837 36th St.; (916) 457-2502; www.brickhouseoakpark.com.

Saturday, enjoy a handbuilt ceramic sclupture gallery and ceramic artist studio featuring member art. Join a clay studio

PATRIS STUDIO AND ART GALLERY:

12SUN

BRICKHOUSE GALLERY & ARTS COMPLEX: Life in Collage, artist

BLUSH: Enjoy an evening of fash-

Cache Valley Drifters have been treating audiences to topnotch musicianship, rich harmonies and a unique blend of bluegrass, folk and Americana since the early ’70s when they were the backing band for folk icon Kate Wolf. Su, 5/12, 2-4pm. $18. The Strum Shop, 408 Roseville Square in Roseville; (916) 787-8786; www.cvdmusic.com.

UNION HALL GALLERY: Colors in

SACRAMENTO GAY MEN’S CHORUS SING-A-THON: Enjoy

Tu, 5-9pm through 7/30. Opens

CACHE VALLEY DRIFTERS: The

THE PLUM CAFE: Other Worldly, an

Hosted by the Midtown Business Association, this free, familyfriendly market will take place weekly on Saturdays. The Midtown Farmers Market will showcase local agriculture, prepared foods, artisans and crafters, while providing an opportunity for Midtown residents and business owners to discover regionally grown foods.

Classes

Concerts

group, which meets weekly on Wednesday. Second Sa of every month, 6-9pm through 10/12. Free. 1001 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 333-4833.

LOCKE ASIAN-PACIFIC SPRING FESTIVAL: This festival show-

NATIONAL TRAIN DAY:

SWING OUT WITH SACRAMENTO STATE UNIVERSITY JAZZ:

10FRI

DON’T MISS!

Sacramento State University, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-6011; www.blushshow.com.

for nearly 150 years, Old Sacramento’s underground has long been the capital’s bestkept secret. Now in its fourth season, visitors have the opportunity to uncover the facts behind the legends that lie below historic buildings and sidewalks. M-Su, 10:30am-3pm through 12/1. $10-$15. Old Sacramento, 1002 Second St.; (916) 808-7059; www.historicoldsac.org.

Dance STUDENTS TAKE CHARGE FOR ‘DANCE CONCERT’: Graduating Sacramento State dance students put their finals on stage with the Senior Dance Concert, directed by Professor Philip Flickinger. Each student creates, casts, and choreographs the numbers. Through 5/19. $8-$12. Sacramento State University, 6000 J St., Solano Hall Room 1010; (916) 278-6368.

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HIGH SCHOOL DIVISION (9TH – 12TH GRADE)

ADULT DIVISIONS (18+)

Best In Show 1st: $500 Dos gift card 2nd: $250 Dos gift card 3rd: $100 Dos gift card

Best In Show 1st: $500 Dos gift card 2nd: $250 Dos gift card 3rd: $100 Dos gift card

Fan Favorite 1st: $100 Dos gift card 2nd: $50 Dos gift card 3rd: $25 Dos gift card

Fan Favorite 1st: $100 Dos gift card 2nd: $50 Dos gift card 3rd: $25 Dos gift card

VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE ART AND WIN! All you have to do is “like us” on Facebook! Go to Dos Coyotes Facebook Page and vote for your favorite and be eligible to win one of six Dos gift cards!

ENTER AT ANY DOS COYOTES LOCATION! doscoyotes.com

Don’t f

orge

MOMt Sun, Ma

y 12 th

Our homemade pastries and breads are baked fresh daily

3 hours 3 bucks 3 fires 3pm – 6pm monday – friday • all well drinks $3 • all domestic beer $3 • house champagne, cab, chard & white zin $3

Estelle’s Patisserie is a charming, warmly lit French-style •small plates & flatbreads half off Este bakery and espresso bar in the heart of Sacramento, bak dedicated to quality and our community. Using fresh, local ingredients to make our pastries and desserts from scratch every day, Estelle’s also offers breakfast and lunch items.

Located on the corner of 9th & K in downtown Sacramento Open 7 days a week: M-F 7-6, Sat 8-6, Sun 8-4 | Wi-fi available Contact us at 551-1500 or via email at info@estellspatisserie.com

nominee

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1501 L St, Sac | 916.443.0500 www.3FiresLounge.com


Mother’s Lunch Is Day Served!

Dinner for breakfast

brunch

Buffalo Pizza & Ice Cream Co.

10AM – 2:30

2600 21st Street, (916) 451-6555, www.buffalobreakfastpizza.com

Tu-Fri

carved Prime rib

@ 11:30

belgian Waffles and Omelets Made to Order

I’m probably not the only one who has driven past Buffalo Pizza & Ice Cream Co. in the Curtis Park neighborhood and assumed it was closed by Jonathan Mendick or perhaps just a figment of my imagination. But with a simple phone order—for a j o nathan m@ personal “breakfast pizza” with pepperoni news review.c om and jalapeños, and a “lunch pizza” called a Cavaleros Creation (featuring chorizo, olives, onions and green peppers)—I finally proved those assumptions wrong. I soon ventured into the small storefront across from St. Joseph Catholic Cemetery to pick up the two pizzas. rating: The eatery has all the quirky characterisHHH 1/2 tics one might expect a local foodie to love: a unique product (breakfast pizza) and a small dinner for one: location (actually, it’s take-out or delivery $7 - $15 only, no dine in). It also has limited hours (7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Saturday). There are no tables, no fancy decorations and no credit cards accepted here; all of these give way to make room for Buffalo to deliver heavily on creativity and taste. Customers can choose from two types of pies: breakfast or lunch. There are 12 preset topping options for breakfast, and a dozen for lunch, too, or you can create your own. H Breakfast pizzas consist of standard pizza flawed dough, on top of which rests a thin layer of HH egg, cheese and toppings (read: no sauce). haS momentS They resemble quiches, but have the added HHH bonus of being ready to eat with your hands. appealing They also don’t have that pesky, overly buttered pastry-crust shell often found on HHHH authoritative quiches. In other words, these breakfast pizzas are a perfect morning food for people HHHHH epic who want to eat semigourmet chow on the run, or people who enjoy eating leftover pizza for breakfast (this critic included). My first morning pie, topped with pepperoni and jalapeños, appears to start off well, but then the dough disappoints. It doesn’t quite fit in either the “thick” or “thin” category; it’s not yeasty enough, and too chewy and firm. Still hungry? The egg doesn’t quite have the moistness of a Search Sn&r’s typical breakfast quiche, and the pepperoni is “dining directory” to find local just standard pizza-topping fare. On a different restaurants by name day, a mushroom-and-spinach quiche-styled or by type of food. pizza offers better texture, as well as the rich Sushi, mexican, indian, flavor one would expect of an eggy breakfast italian—discover it all in the “dining” pastry. The chorizo-and-jalapeño option, with section at its copious grease and spice, certainly qualifies www.news as a guilty pleasure. review.com. Lunch pizzas here are less unique, but still hit a nice mark via a few standout ingredients and several playful topping presets. Though it’s a bit on the dry side, the garlic pizza reaches a nice balance of sweet and salty with a creamy white garlic sauce, mushrooms, onions, pepperoni and sausage. The Whole Herd is Buffalo’s take on a combination pizza, with olives, mushrooms, Canadian bacon, salami, sausage and pepperoni (bell peppers

chilled Seafood

are optional). It tastes just like a standard combo pizza. Chorizo is the best stand-alone topping, while the garlic pizza and Cavaleros Creation were the two best standard offerings sampled. Overall, these breakfast pizzas are a great value. A large could easily be stored in the fridge and serve as breakfast for an entire week, or (as several reviewers on Yelp have suggested) used to cater a morning business meeting. Buffalo also offers Gunther’s Ice Cream, side salads, fried chicken and canned sodas, but there’s nothing particularly noteworthy about them. The breakfast pizza is likely drawing the majority of customers.

roasted Salmon Pasta al Pesto

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NEWS

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F E AT U R E

Eggs benedict Fresh Fruit Smoked Salmon Salads

Craft Beers & Cocktails

3295 adults | $2995 seniors 65+

$

$

17 kids 5 – 12 years 50

500 Leisure Lane Sacramento, cA 916.922.2020

Creative Comfort Food In East Sacramento!

R e s e R v at i o n s R e c o m m e n d e d

57th & Jst | 916-457-5600

we love you mama!

Luck be a lazy

$ 25 on spend get mama,

This column was almost called The Lazy Vegan instead of The V Word. That just means I prefer uncomplicated recipes that yield healthy and delicious results. That’s easy enough to accomplish, but once in a while, harvesting ideas from other slothlike cooks, such as the Vegan Lazy blog (http://veganlazy.wordpress.com), can be the cherry on top—or rather, the sweet butterscotch sauce on top—to enliven the next meal. The recipes here consist of ingredients that your little plant-eating face already has stocked in the kitchen, and they’re great for people who are transitioning to a vegan diet and don’t want to be overwhelmed with unfamiliar items. Or a Vitamix. Admittedly, there’s a few recipes on there that I won’t be trying—Vegenaiseslathered “eggplant parmesan”—but did I mention the butterscotch sauce?

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There is certainly plenty of pizza diversity in Sacramento. From Chicago-style deepdish pies to vegan Neapolitan pizzas cooked in 800-degree ovens, local pie lovers can find nearly every style imaginable. Many of Sacramento’s pizzerias enjoy strong cultlike followings. It would be surprising if Buffalo Pizza & Ice Cream Co.—which claims it’s the “home of the original breakfast pizza”— doesn’t already have its own. Ω

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Downtown Estelle’s Patisserie With its marble 

Where to eat?

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Becky Grunewald, Greg Lucas, Ann Martin Rolke, Garrett McCord and Jonathan Mendick, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

tables and light wooden chairs,  there’s an airy atmosphere,  casual and cozy. Estelle’s offers  an espresso bar and a wide  assortment of teas and muffins and rolls for the breakfast  crowd as well as sweets,  including DayGlo macarons. For  the lunch-inclined, there are  soups, salads, sandwiches and  meat or meatless quiche. One  of the authentic touches is the  spare use of condiments. The  smoked salmon is enlivened by  dill and the flavor of its croissant. Its tomato bisque is thick  and richly flavored, and, in a  nice touch, a puff pastry floats  in the tureen as accompaniment. There’s a lot to like about  Estelle’s—except dinner. Doors  close at 6pm. French. 901 K St.,  (916) 551-1500. Meal for one:  $5-$10. HHH1⁄2 G.L.

Grange Restaurant & Bar You  won’t find any “challenging”  dishes on this menu—just  delicious local and seasonal  food such as the Green Curry  & Pumpkin Soup, which has a  Southeast Asian flair. A spinach  salad features ingredients that  could be considered boring  elsewhere: blue-cheese dressing, bacon, onion. But here,  the sharply cheesy buttermilk  dressing and the woodsy pine  nuts make it a salad to remember. Grange’s brunch puts  other local offerings to shame.  The home fries are like marvelously crispy Spanish patatas  bravas. A grilled-ham-andGruyere sandwich is just buttery enough, and an egg-white 

frittata is more than a bone  thrown to the cholesterolchallenged; it’s a worthy dish   in its own right. American.   926 J St., (916) 492-4450. Dinner  for one: $40-$60. HHHH B.G.

Zia’s Delicatessen Zia’s  Delicatessen isn’t really about  trying every sandwich: It’s  about finding  your sandwich.  In addition to a large selection of salumi, there’s the  worthy eponymous offering,  served with a wedge of zucchini frittata, a slice of provolone, romaine lettuce, grainy  tomato, and a simple dash of  vinegar and oil that adds tang.  Order it hot, so that the provolone melts into the bread.  Also tasty: the hot meatball  sub with small-grained,  tender meatballs bathed  in a thin, oregano-flecked  tomato sauce that soaks into  the bread. A tuna sandwich  is sturdy, if not exciting. It  is just mayonnaisey enough,  with tiny, diced bits of celery.  A rosemary panino cotto with  mozzarella could benefit from  a more flavorful cheese. For a  meatier option, try the Milano:  mortadella, salami, Muenster;  all three flavors in balance.  The turkey Viareggio has a  thin spread of pesto mayo,  and the smoked mozzarella  accents rather than overpowers.  American. 1401 O St.,  Ste. A; (916) 441-3354. $5-$10.  HHHH B.G.

Midtown 24K Chocolat Cafe This cafe serves  a solid, if very limited, brunch 

and lunch menu. One offering is  a firm wedge of frittata with a  strong tang of sharp cheddar  that almost but doesn’t quite  jibe with the slightly spicy mole  sauce on the plate.The spinach  curry, made creamy by coconut  milk rather than dairy, comes  topped with cubes of tofu and  tiny diced scallion and red bell  pepper and rests atop a smooth  potato cake. A side of garbanzobean salad is well-flavored with  the surprising combination of  mint and apricot. The place,  located inside Ancient Future,  has “chocolat” in the name,  and chocolate is in many of the  menu offerings, including a tiny  cup of hot Mexican drinking  chocolate, and chocolatecherry scones served crisp and  hot, studded with big chunks of  bittersweet chocolate and tart  dried cherries. American.   $10-$15. 2331 K St.,   (916) 476-3754. HHH B.G.

Hook & Ladder Manufacturing Co. The restaurant, by the same  owners as Midtown’s The Golden  Bear, sports a firefighting  theme (a ladder on the ceiling  duct work, shiny silver wallpaper with a rat-and-hydrant  motif, et al) and a bar setup  that encourages patrons to talk  to each other. An interesting  wine list includes entries from  Spain and Israel; there are also  draft cocktails and numerous  beers on tap. The brunch menu  is heavy on the eggs, prepared  in lots of ways. One option is the  Croque Madame, a ham-andGruyere sandwich usually battered with egg. This one had a  fried egg and béchamel, with  a generous smear of mustard 

inside. The mountain of potato  hash alongside tasted flavorful and not too greasy. The  menu also features pizzas  and house-made pastas, but  one of its highlights includes  an excellent smoked-eggplant  baba ganoush, which is smoky  and garlicky and served with  warm flatbread wedges and  oil-cured olives. The bananas  foster bread pudding is equally  transcendent, accompanied  by very salty caramel gelato,  pecans and slivers of brûléed  bananas. American. 1630 S St.,  (916) 442-4885. Dinner for one:  $20-$40. HHH1/2 A.M.R. 

LowBrau This place specializes in  beer and bratwursts. Both are  done smashingly. The sausage  is wrapped in a tight, snappy  skin like a gimp suit, which gets  nicely charred by the chefs.  Within it lies a beguilingly spicy  and juicy piece of meat. Get it  with a pretzel roll for a truly  exciting experience. There are  vegan options,  too: The Italian,  an eggplantbased brat, has  a surprisingly  sausagelike texture that no  self-respecting carnivore will  turn it down for lack of flavor.  Toppings include sauerkraut,  a “Bier Cheese” sauce and  caramelized onions. The idea  behind Duck Fat Fries is a  glorious one, yet somehow still  falls short. You just expect  something more when you  see the words “duck fat.” The  beer selection is epic. If you’re  lost and confused, the staff  will help guide you to the right 

brew via questionings and  encouraged tastings. German.  1050 20th St., (916) 706-2636.  $10-$15. HHHH G.M.

East Sac Istanbul Bistro Turkish chef  Murat Bozkurt and brother  Ekrem co-own this paean to  their homeland, with Ekrem  usually at the front of the  house, infusing the space  with cheer. Turkish cuisine  features aspects of Greek,  Moroccan and Middle Eastern  flavors. The appetizer combo  plate offers an impressive  sampling. Acili ezme is a  chopped, slightly spicy mixture of tomatoes, cucumber  and walnuts that’s delicious  paired with accompanying flatbread wedges. For  entrees, try the borani, a  lamb stew with garbanzos,  carrots, potatoes and currants. The meat is very  tender, while the veggies  arrived nicely al dente. Also  good is the chicken shish plate  (souvlaki), which features two  skewers of marinated grilled  chicken that’s moist and succulent. There are also quite a  few choices for vegetarians,  including flatbread topped like  pizza, with spinach and feta  or mozzarella and egg.   Turkish. $15-$20. 3260-B J St.,   (916) 449-8810. HHH1/2 A.M.R.

North Sac Asian Café Asian Café serves both  Thai and Lao food, but go for  the Lao specialties, which rely  on flavoring staples such as fish 

sauce, lime juice, galangal and  lemongrass, lots of herbs, and  chilies. One of the most common  dishes in Lao cuisine is larb,  a dish of chopped meat laced  with herbs, chilies and lime. At  Asian Café, it adds optional offal  add-ons—various organ meats,  entrails, et al—to three versions of the dish: beef with tripe,  chicken with gizzards, or pork  with pork skin. The beef salad  offers a gentle respite from  aggressive flavors, consisting  of medium-thick chewy slices of  eye of round with red bell pepper, chopped iceberg and hot  raw jalapeño. The single best  dish here is the nam kao tod, a  crispy entree with ground pork  that’s baked on the bottom of  the pan with rice, then stirred  and fried up fresh the next day  with dried Thai chilies and scallions. Thai and Lao. 2827 Norwood  Ave., (916) 641-5890. Dinner for  one: $10-$15. HHHH B.G.

South Sac Blue Moon Cafe and Karaoke In Sac,  most people equate Hong Kongstyle cuisine with dim sum, but  this restaurant, which also features private karaoke rooms,  serves up tasty, familiar food by  way of rice plates, sandwiches,  noodle bowls, soups and stirfries. A few random Japanese  (ramen, fried udon), French  (sweet or savory crepes),  Russian (borscht), Korean (beef  and kimchi hot pot) and Italian  (various pastas) foods add to  the feeling that whatever your  cultural background, you’ll find  a comfort dish from your childhood to wrap its arms around 

rethink Mother’s Day Mother’s Day May 12: Celebrate with your family! Chef Jay has prepared a delightful threecourse prix fixe menu with a choice of seven entrées. Special kid’s menu available for $9.95. Currently accepting lunch and dinner reservations.

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Arden/ Carmichael El Pollo Feliz For a restaurant dubbed “the happy chicken,” El Pollo Feliz sure smokes a lot of birds. These chickens get one heck of an afterlife: Their parts are rubbed with earthy Mexican spices and then slowcooked in a smoker for hours. The restaurant’s signature dish is barbecue chicken, and customers can purchase wings, breasts, drumsticks and thighs in a variety of amounts. You can also order it covered in a chocolatey and peppery mole-poblano sauce; shredded and scattered atop a plate of nachos; on top of a salad; inside a torta-style sandwich; or stuffed into a burrito. There’s a friendly neighborhood vibe here, and much of the cooking happens in the parking lot directly in front of the momand-pop joint. 4717 Whitney Ave., Carmichael; (916) 485-4446. Mexican. Dinner for one: $5-$15. HHHH J.M.

Skip’s Kitchen You know you’re at an American restaurant when a cheeseburger is one of the healthiest items on the menu. Sure enough, Skip’s Kitchen features a lot of calorie-rich items, such as fried macaroniand-cheese balls, ravioli, chicken strips, chicken wings

and shrimp, plus creamy Oreo milkshakes. There are salads, too, but the best dish on the menu is the burger. All five styles (original, mushroom and Swiss, bacon and cheddar, three-cheese, and Western) are served on a brioche bun and cooked “medium,” unless otherwise specified. The kitchen offers a house-made veggie burger as well. If there’s such a thing as a “gourmet” burger that can rightfully sell for $10, this is probably it. American. 4717 El Camino Ave. in Carmichael, (916) 514-0830. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH1/2 J.M.

Land Park/ Curtis Park The Hideaway Bar & Grill This bar fills a niche Sacramento might not have known it lacked with its vague rockabilly vibe, lots of greased hair on the men, brightly dyed hair in retro styles and cat-eye glasses on the ladies, and an abundance of black clothes and tattoo sleeves for all. The liquor selection is basic (no craft cocktails here). The menu’s heavy on fried appetizers, salads, sandwiches and burgers, the latter of which are architectural, towering assemblages. Happily, the fluffy charred buns are sturdy enough to hold up when the tower is squeezed to a more realistic height. A meaty veggie burger (one of three veggie sandwich options) gets crunch from fried pickles and sweet heat from barbecue sauce. Overall, the Hideaway offers cheap beer, adequate bar food and a comfortable place to hang with out friends. American. 2565 Franklin Blvd., (916) 455-1331. Dinner for one: $10-$15. HHH1/2 B.G.

Taqueria Garibaldi One of this restaurant’s biggest pulls is its choice of meats. The chorizo is red, crispy and greasy in all the best ways. The lengua (tongue) is soft and dreamily reminiscent of only the most ethereal bits of beef. The fish is fine and flaky and the cabeza and pork are herculean in flavor options worthy of note, too. Tacos are small and served on two tiny tortillas (flour or corn, your call) with a bit of house salsa that has all the kick of a pissed off Girl Scout who’s just tall enough to nail you right under the kneecap. Or, feel free to customize, too, courtesy of the fully loaded salsa bar. Be sure to pick up a glass of the homemade horchata, which is sweet and milky with seductive whispers of cinnamon. You will want seconds. Mexican. 1841 Howe Ave., (916) 924-0108. Dinner for one: $8-$10. HHH G.M.

Pangaea Two Brews Cafe Tables, tall and short, are large and communal, fostering that casual camaraderie that should be the goal of any selfrespecting brewpub. There’s a fairly extensive menu, including breakfast items. Not to put too fine a point on it: Pangaea’s offerings are not beers that will be found at a Save Mart Supermarket or even Nugget. They are nuanced. Brewed with

IllustratIon by Mark stIvers

you and give you a hug. Cultural diversity aside, one of Blue Moon’s best dishes is the braised pig ear with soy sauce and peanuts. Asian. 5000 Freeport Blvd., Ste. A; (916) 706-2995. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH J.M.

artisanship. In some cases, for hundreds of years. There’s the usual panoply of French dip, hot pastrami, Reuben and so on. Among the signature offerings is The Gobbler. Turkey, natch. Cranberry sauce, natch. Then red onion, several roma tomato slices, a thicket of green leaf and pepper jack cheese, all shoehorned into a big baguette. Brewpub. 2743 Franklin Blvd., (916) 454-4942. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH1⁄2 G.L.

Davis Davis Noodle City What sets this place apart from other joints is the fact that most of its food is not Chinese-American, but true Chinese cuisine. Fried tofu arrives looking like deep-fried marshmallows. Beneath the crispy coating is a sweet, custardy center that billows with steam. The scallion pancakes are bits of naanlike dough packed with slivered scallions. A popular street food in China and Korea, it takes skill to prepare these in a way so they’re light, crispy and not at all greasy. DNC nails it. The Sichuan eggplant is also a delight: The eggplant is velvety and soft, with a sauce that tastes sweet and enticingly sour. Unlike the traditional way of using a fistful of chilies to prepare the dish, this one is intended for an American audience, and as such, is a caged lion, but DNC will take the lock off if you ask. The noodle dishes are gargantuan enough to feed a marathon runner adequately. Chinese. 129 E St., #1D in Davis; (530) 757-2618. $8-$12. HHH G.M.

Chowing and crawling Here’s a thought: Instead of eating at just one restaurant, sample a handful of eateries for one price. This is the concept that makes food crawls so appetizing. Enter Dishcrawl, a San Jose-based startup that hosts food crawls in dozens of cities around the United States. The company hires local “ambassadors” from different towns to lead the events; ambassador Julia Simpson kicked off the Davis branch of Dishcrawl last month with a tour that visited Seasons Restaurant, Café Méditerranée, Monticello, and Village Pizza & Grill. At these intimate monthly affairs (maximum 40 people), each restaurant serves several dishes and some offer drinks and conversations with restaurant managers or owners. The catch is that you don’t know the names of the locations until the day of the event—which, at a cost of $45, is a bit of a gamble. For more information, or to purchase tickets for the Davis Dishcrawl on Saturday, May 25, visit www.dishcrawl.com/dav25. —Jonathan Mendick

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Unfriended My best friend of eight years and I are drifting apart. That’s bad enough, but this is worse: She is friends with all of the same people that I’m friends with. I feel like I’m getting shut out. I never saw it before, but she is the person everyone wants to hang out with, not me. I guess I was lucky because she always used to invite me along. What can I do so that I don’t lose everyone? by Joey ga Try to stop worrying that rcia you are losing everyone. Worrying is a distraction a skj oey @ ne wsreview.c om from the real work of loving yourself and your friends through this difficult situation. The Joey need to belong is deeply ingrained is taking a class in every human being. Historically, on Mary Magdalene. this sensibility saved us from expulsion from the tribe, family or society that made physical survival easier. The need to belong has also imbued us with a tendency to overreact to signs of potentially not belonging. And that means we sometimes flinch at the slightest shift in people’s attitude toward us. I know I have done this; I bet you have, too.

Sometimes relationships run their course. We can do nothing about their demise. Try this reflection exercise: Sit quietly and invite images of times with friends to play across your mind. Do you see yourself saying or doing something that pushes friends away? In day-today living it’s easy to ignore or dismiss subtle signs of a friend’s discomfort or weakening patience. But noticing their responses to your words or behavior may help you to understand their pullback. Please note that I am suggesting you notice your behavior. Don’t criticize or blame yourself. If you start cringing at things you said or did, stop. Forgive yourself, and when the timing is right, apologize to your friends. Doing so may not stop these relationships from going sideways, but you will grow in self-confidence, and that is worthwhile. Of course, the distancing may have nothing to do with you. Sometimes relationships run their course. We can do nothing about their demise. The good news is

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

that loss leads to new life. You may feel pain now, but it will subside. Yes, it will. Believe me. In the meantime, reach out to new people and develop fresh friendships. Try not to compare these fledgling relationships with your friend group. Instead, enjoy each person as he or she is. What do you think it means to be truly happy with your life? And what do you do if you are just unhappy? True happiness is the art of accepting my life and my limitations while also embracing my capacities for spiritual growth, passion, service, play, joy, personal power, limitlessness and creation. In other words, happiness is rooted at the intersection of being fully human and becoming divine. It is not about materials things, but it is about substance. What we call happiness is more often a spike in pleasant emotions. Pleasure, contentment or satisfaction (all versions of “happy”) can be inspired by discovering greater meaning for our lives or from being recognized and valued. Personality also contributes to our experience of happiness. It is easier for an idealist, optimist or realist to be happy than for a pessimist or cynic. Personal strength and interpretations of loyalty are factors, too. A person who submits to a lifestyle that does not fit but draws the approval of others is less happy than someone who lives from the core of who they are but lacks the approval of others. If you are unhappy, find what brings you fully alive and give yourself to it. Don’t look to status symbols. Look to the arts, social justice or other vital ways of contributing to the world. A psychotherapist or spiritual director can help you shed unhappiness and find the path back to joy. Ω

Meditation of the Week “Laziness is nothing more than  the habit of resting before you get  tired,” wrote the French author  Jules Renard. Do you schedule time  for meditation, silence and reflection  every day?

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FREE lunch! You’re invited to a Titan Insurance Neighbor Appreciation Lunch provided by Drewski’s food truck!

STAGE Twin studies Blood Brothers

Friday, May 10 12:00-2:00pM

Blood Brothers is an ’80s musical about twins separated at birth, mothers with secrets, social disparities, colliding worlds and brotherly bonds. It’s an odd, by Patti Roberts not-well-known musical that shouldn’t work by its description and storyline, but ends up a compelling, suspenseful and satisfying show. Green Valley Theatre Company’s production of Blood Brothers adds to the allure of this peculiar, yet haunting, musical by combining an exceptionally talented cast under the watchful eye of director Carly Sisto with an impressive six-member live orchestra.

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Blood Brothers, 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday; 7 p.m. Sunday; $18. Green Valley Theatre Company at The Grange Performing Arts Center, 3823 V Street; (916) 736-2664; www.greenvalley theatre.com. Through May 19.

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of capturing young characters without making them seem cloying, sappy or overly awkward. They are joined in the childhood and teen portrayals by two additional talents—Mary Katherine Cobb as the scrappy tomboy who wins both the twins’ hearts, and Nathan Stewart as Sammy, the rebel. A live orchestra, performing under the solid direction of Christopher Cook, caps off the production. Here, six skillful musicians not only provide accompaniment to the songs, but also add a subtle and evocative soundtrack that emotionally pulls story and characters together. Ω

The story, based in early ’60s Liverpool, starts with a narrator (the rich-toned Mark Ettensohn) describing the story’s conclusion (a double killing), and then brings the audience back to the beginning. A cleaning woman, Mrs. Johnstone (hauntingly played by Lauren Ettensohn), is pregnant when her husband walks out on their large family. Her employer, Mrs. Lyons (a multilayered Sara Haugland), can’t have children. So when it’s discovered that Mrs. Johnstone is carrying twins, a scheme is born, twins are divided, and the brothers are brought up in two different worlds. The plot, which entails the brothers finding each other and becoming secret best friends without knowing their true relationship, does require a leap of faith and suspension of disbelief, but once established and accepted by the audience, it’s both emotionally captivating and entertaining. And the soundtrack is notable, not for its catchy tunes, but rather for clever lyrics in the songs that add to the atmosphere while advancing our knowledge of the characters. Eric Alley and Elio Gutierrez portray the fraternal twins at various ages from 7 to late teens; both deliver heartfelt performances. The two successfully tackle the extremely hard task

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FOUL

FAIR

GOOD

WELL-DONE

SUBLIME-DON’T MISS

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You gotta have faith Next Fall

Resurrection Theatre boasts a big advantage in the production of this tightly woven story about a relationship built on a basic philosophical conflict: It’s about as perfectly cast as it’s possible to get. Geoffrey Nauffts’ Next Fall is the story of two men in love—Luke (Rob August), a gorgeous young actor who happens to be a devout, rapturebelieving Christian, and Adam (Jon Jackson), an older, somewhat neurotic and nebbishy agnostic. That descriptor—“agnostic”—is chosen deliberately: While Adam finds belief unbelievable, he doesn’t completely discount the possibility. He does, however, have an incredibly sensitive hypocrisy detector, and it’s a source of discomfort for himself and others. The play is the story of Luke and Adam’s relationship, told in flashbacks, while Adam waits with Luke’s father Butch (Jes Gonzales), mother Arleen (Shaleen Schmutzer-Smith), and friends Holly (Kellie Yvonne Raines) and Brandon (Casey Worthington) to see if Luke will survive a life-threatening accident. Oh, and Luke’s Bible-believing parents? They don’t know he’s gay. It’s a recipe for disaster, but Nauffts’ play doesn’t opt for easy hits. Instead, the characters struggle realistically with the ways in which faith—whether that’s faith in a god or faith in a lover—shape and create our lives. Directed by Benjamin T. Ismail, with a lovely set design by John Ewing, Next Fall never descends into pathos. It does, however, make clear that we don’t have to agree with each other in order to love—and respect—each other, and that’s a pretty hard mark to hit. —Kel Munger

Next Fall, 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday; 8 p.m. Thursday, May 23; $15-$20. Resurrection Theatre at the Three Penny Playhouse in the California Stage complex, 1723 25th Street; (916) 223-9568; www.resurrectiontheatre.com. Through May 24.


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GUYS AND DOLLS

A visually stunning and ambitious take on this classic musical takes a big gamble and pretty much breaks even in this City Theatre production. The songs’ clever lyrics are not always best served by the performers, but Christine Nicholson’s direction keeps the plot flowing smoothly to its sure-bet happy ending. F, Sa 8pm; Su & 5/11 2pm. Through 5/12. $10-$15. City Theatre at Sacramento City College Performing Arts Center, 3835 Freeport Blvd.; (916) 558-2228; http://citytheatre.net. J.C.

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This sex farce-turnedHollywood satire/exposé features naked ambition, naked emotions and a couple of briefly naked bodies. The debut production by Closet Door Theatre Company is an auspicious beginning for the city’s new LGBT theater company. F, Sa 8pm. Through 5/11. $12-$20. Closet Door Theatre Company at the Ooley Theatre, 2007 28th St.; (916) 222-4932; www.closetdoortheatre.org. J.C.

VOTED BEST OF THE BEST 10 TIMES BY SACRAMENTO 08 MAGAZINE

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A Little Princess: “Wait—I thought there was a princess in this play!”

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A LITTLE PRINCESS

Set in London circa 1905, this musical features a Scroogelike boarding-school headmistress (the icy Deborah Tranelli); a Cockney-ish beggar (David McDaniel); a stout constable (Jeffrey Lloyd Heatherly), with funny deadpan lines; and a maid named Mariette. But primarily, this is a father-daughter tale of riches to rags to riches again, involving perky Sara Crewe (Lauren Metzinger and Alyssa Middleton) and Captain Crewe (Jerry Lee, as living dad and paternal ghost). W, Th 12:30pm

& 6:30pm; F 8pm; Sa 2 & 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 5/19. $15-$38. Sacramento Theatre

N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N LY

Company, 1419 H St.; (916) 443-6722; www.sactheatre.org. J.H.

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DESIGNER

AL

ISSUE DATE

06.18.09

FILE NAME TRINITYCATHEDRAL061809R1

PRIVATE EYES

This comedy about the emotional twists of infidelity and deception by Steven Dietz relies on some neat narrative tricks—and a fantastic trio of actors (Bert Anderson, Kristine David and Dan Featherston) to keep the audience guessing and laughing. Jouni Kirjola directs, with strong supporting work from Nina Collins and Gregory Smith. Th, F, Sa 8pm. Through 5/25. $10-$16. Big Idea Theatre, 1616 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 960-3036; www.bigideatheatre.com. K.M.

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02.19.09

USP (BOLD SELECTION) PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLOWING: AD SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES) SPELLING NUMBERS & DATES CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDRESSES, ETC.)

Short reviews by Jim Carnes, Jeff Hudson and Kel Munger.

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2 5 0 8 L A N D PA R K D R I V E L A N D PA R K & B R O A D WAY F R E E PA R K I N G A D J A C E N T T O T H E AT R E “A RIVETING, RESONANT POLITICAL THRILLER.”

“ROUSING AND THOROUGHLY ENJOYABLE.”

KON TIKI

THE COMPANY YOU KEEP

“POWERFUL.”-Moira MacDonald, SEATTLE TIMES

“ELLE FANNING MESMERIZES.”

- Ian Buckwalter, NPR

STARTS FRI., 5/10 FRI-TUES: 11:00AM, 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10:00PM

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- Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

Fair to middling The Great Gatsby

WED/THUR: 11:00AM, 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00PM FRI-TUES: 11:05AM, 1:40, 4:20, 7:05, 9:45PM - Todd McCarthy, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

GINGER&ROSA

WED/THUR: 1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 9:50PM FRI-TUES: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30PM

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F O R A D V A N C E T I C K E T S C A L L FA N D A N G O @ 1 - 8 0 0 - F A N D A N G O # 2 7 2 1

Comedian

ANDREW NORELLI

What’s more obnoxious and overbearing than a Baz Luhrmann movie? A Baz Luhrmann movie in 3-D. When Warner Bros. announced that the by Jim Lane release of Luhrmann’s movie of the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel was being postponed from August 2012 to now, I wrote my colleague, fellow SN&R film critic Jonathan Kiefer, “You know what that means: It stinks, and everybody at Warner Bros. knows it.” Well, now the movie’s here, and it doesn’t stink. But it doesn’t smell too sweet, either. It’s easy to wonder if the release was postponed eight months so Warners’ research department could have time to make sure Fitzgerald was good and dead.

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This is the fourth screen adaptation of Gatsby. The only one during Fitzgerald’s lifetime was a 1926 silent; it’s presumed lost, but reviews suggest it was fairly faithful, coming when the Jazz Age was at its hottest and “flaming youth” movies were the rage. Then came a 1949 remake with Alan Ladd, which, aside from Ladd himself, was insanely miscast from top to bottom and sanitized to conform to the Motion Picture Production Code. Most notoriously, 1974 saw a heavily hyped version with Robert Redford and Mia Farrow that laid a thoroughly fossilized egg at the box office. Now comes the Australian Luhrmann with his (and co-writer Craig Pearce’s) take on Fitzgerald’s melancholy tale of the mysteriously debonair Jay Gatsby and his wistful obsession with his former (and, he hopes, future) lover, the winsome Daisy Buchanan. Say what you will about Baz Luhrmann, he’s not hampered by the genteel reticence that left director Jack Clayton’s RedfordFarrow version stone dead. Luhrmann does nothing halfway. If Fitzgerald describes Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio) and narrator Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire) driving from Long Island into New York City, Luhrmann stages the drive like three laps of the Daytona 500. Where the novel had them taking lunch at a discreet midtown restaurant, Luhrmann

shoots it in a teeming speakeasy with a raucous Cotton Club floor show. Luhrmann never cuts or dissolves from one borough of New York to another when he can swoop through the sky like a drunken seagull, buzzing every building and half the pedestrians from point A to point B. As for Gatsby’s wild weekend parties, Luhrmann shoots each one like a simultaneous replay of all 47 Super Bowl halftime shows, plus all the tailgate parties in the parking lots. Each party, though set in 1922, comes with a mashed-up soundtrack of musical anachronisms—Motown, disco, hip-hop—as if Luhrmann can’t imagine what people did for fun before 1969. Luhrmann never understates when shouting will do. Even his introduction of the title character— with the simple statement, “I’m Gatsby”—is accompanied by a lastdays-of-Pompeii blast of fireworks and roaring fanfare from Rhapsody in Blue loud enough to blow George Gershwin right out of his grave. And yet, against all odds, splinters of Fitzgerald’s meticulous, diffident prose somehow keep floating to the surface of the vulgar CGI varnish slathered over every frame of the movie. This is Baz Luhrmann’s fifth feature in 20 years (after Strictly Ballroom, Romeo + Juliet, Moulin Rouge! and Australia), and in most of them he’s made a style of getting bad performances from good actors. With Gatsby, either he’s changing his ways or these actors were just too good for him. They all seem to have read the book, which is more than you can say for the 1949 or 1974 versions.

Director Baz Luhrmann never understates when shouting will do. As Gatsby, if anybody notices, Leonardo DiCaprio gives one of his best performances, catching the paradoxical blend of worldliness and naiveté at the heart of Fitzgerald’s antihero. Carey Mulligan, luscious as a lemon drop, embodies Daisy’s dangerous brand of selfish allure. Tobey Maguire was born to play Nick Carraway, though Luhrmann oddly has Nick narrate the story to a psychiatrist in a sanitarium (Jack Thompson), as if he were permanently unhinged by the events rather than merely sadder but wiser. Joel Edgerton has the brute energy of Daisy’s loutish husband Tom. And as the lithe, terminally sexy Jordan Baker, newcomer Elizabeth Debicki is a real discovery, one to keep an eye on. Call it The Not-Half-Bad Gatsby. Or rather, it is half-bad, but the not-bad half turned out better than expected. Ω


by JONATHAN KIeFeR & JIM LANe

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Arthur Newman

A Florida man (Colin Firth) fakes his suicide and hits the road with a new identity to start a new life. He teams up with a woman who’s also fleeing from her past (Emily Blunt), and they embark on a spree of breaking into people’s homes, dressing in their clothes and having sex in their beds. Becky Johnston’s script tries for a kind of Harold and Maude vibe, but director Dante Ariola can’t quite summon the iconoclastic style such an approach would require, and the movie just kind of lies there in a drab, schlubby puddle. The stars do what they can with their roles—which, under the right circumstances, can be considerable— but the material defeats them. Anne Heche, as Firth’s abandoned girlfriend, and Lucas Hedges, as the son who hates him, contribute nice cameos that feel like side trips to a different movie. J.L.

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The Big Wedding

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remained unpublished). What makes it watchable is Kosinski’s (and cinematographer Claudio Miranda’s) gift for breathtaking pictorial images—plus, of course, Cruise’s undiluted star power. Supporting work from Morgan Freeman, Olga Kurylenko and Nikolaj Coster-Waldau doesn’t hurt. J.L.

Disconnect

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Mud

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On an Earth rendered uninhabitable by a nuclear war against alien invaders (we won the war but lost the planet), a patrolman (Tom Cruise) and his mate and partner (Andrea Riseborough) maintain a fleet of drones extracting resources and mopping up surviving aliens—or so they think. Written by director Joseph Kosinski, Karl Gajdusek and Michael Arndt, the story is muddled and murky and, for a script based on a graphic novel, awkwardly dependent on exposition and narration (maybe that’s why the novel, by Kosinski and Arvid Nelson,

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NEWS

The Place Beyond the Pines

A carnival motorcycle stunt rider (Ryan Gosling) returns to a small town to see an old flame (Eva Mendes) and learns that he got her pregnant on the last trip; he impulsively settles down and in time, turns to robbing banks to support the son he didn’t know he had—which puts him on a collision course with a rookie cop (Bradley Cooper). Writer-director Derek Cianfrance has a good cast (Ray Liotta, Rose Byrne and Harris Yulin are there, too), and they do their best. Good moments here and there—especially from Cooper and Liotta—contend with an unfocused and scattershot script that undercuts the actors too often. Cianfrance’s story supposedly spans 15 years, but everybody looks the same after all that time except that Gosling and Cooper’s infant sons have grown into teenagers (Dane DeHaan, Emory Cohen). J.L.

Oblivion

BEFORE

Pain & Gain

Between October 1994 and June 1995, three Florida bodybuilders (Mark Wahlberg, Dwayne Johnson, Anthony Mackie) go on a spree of kidnapping, torture, extortion, murder and dismemberment. It’s a more-orless true story that director Michael Bay, with his usual sensitive artistry, decided was just the material he needed for a rollicking comedy in the style of The Hangover. The story wasn’t funny, and neither is the movie—besides, comedy is hardly Bay’s forte (is anything?). Other actors trapped in the mess include Ed Harris, Tony Shalhoub and Rob Corddry. Writers Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely (adapting magazine articles by Pete Collins) change many names, but not those of murder victims Frank Griga and Krisztina Furton, whose families are reportedly offended by the movie. It’s hard to blame them. J.L.

Two Arkansas teenagers (Tye Sheridan, Jacob Lofland) discover on a small island in the Mississippi River a boat stranded in a tree by some flood—and living in it, a scruffy character (Matthew McConaughey), who appears to be on the run, with a backstory that they boys are irresistibly drawn into. Writer-director Jeff Nichols’ movie has a story that doesn’t always persuade, yet there’s something oddly compelling, even haunting about it. Despite an almost sluggish pace, Nichols nevertheless finds the rhythm of Southern rural village life with its wary think-hard-before-you-speak watchfulness. Performances are excellent, especially by the two boys; others include Ray McKinnon and Sarah Paulson as Sheridan’s parents, Michael Shannon as Lofland’s uncle, and Reese Witherspoon as McConaughey’s damaged girlfriend. J.L.

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Iron Man 3

Billionaire superhero Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) contends with two villains: a terrorist called The Mandarin (Ben Kingsley) and an urbane think-tank tycoon (Guy Pearce), who may be working with the terrorist. Director and co-writer (with Drew Pearce) Shane Black takes over from Jon Favreau (now playing Stark’s head of security), and his movie, while less memorable than the first Iron Man, is at least less instantly forgettable than its sequel. The action set pieces become enervating after a while, so patently CGI that nothing’s really ever at stake. The movie works mainly due to its acting: Downey, of course; Gwyneth Paltrow as gal Friday/sweetheart Pepper Potts; Don Cheadle as Stark’s military pal; and Kingsley. The most pleasant (and only) surprise is a sprightly youngster, Ty Simpkins, as a whiz kid who helps Stark. J.L.

Director Henry Alex Rubin has only helmed documentaries before Disconnect, so it seems fair to cut him some slack for dramatic creakiness. Some. Rather late to the table with its hand-wringing about the way we live now, Rubin’s film, from a didactic script by Andrew Stern, wrangles Facebook bullying, credit fraud and underage porn into an issue-driven patchwork of lives at once frayed and braided. A distracted dad (Jason Bateman) strikes up a yearning instantmessage rapport with the stealth tormentor (Colin Ford) of his loner son (Jonah Bobo); a young husband and wife (Paula Patton, Alexander Skarsgard) fail to cope with losing both their child and their financial security; a TV reporter (Andrea Riseborough) gets too deep into her story about an online rent boy (Max Thieriot). Too diluted by its fussy, phony comprehensiveness, the case being made here just doesn’t seem credible: How can a movie about what the Internet does to us be so devoid of spontaneity? J.K.

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A divorced couple (Diane Keaton, Robert De Niro) has to pretend to still be married because their adopted son (Ben Barnes) has invited his birth mother (Patricia Rae) to his wedding, and she doesn’t know about the divorce. With a cast like this (including Katherine Heigl, Amanda Seyfried, Susan Sarandon, Topher Grace, Robin Williams, Christine Ebersole, David Rasche), someone like Robert Altman might have done something—in fact, he did, in A Wedding (1978)—but writer-director Justin Zackham (adapting an obscure Franco-Swiss picture) doesn’t seem to know it’s 2013, and his mosscovered plot hasn’t worked since Eisenhower was president. Zackham fritters away a great cast on a dreary, predictable, unfunny comedy. It’s by-the-book moviemaking when the book is so out-of-date it should have “Gutenberg” stamped on the spine. J.L.

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The Sapphires

In the Australian outback of the 1960s, four singing Aborigines (Deborah Mailman, Jessica Mauboy, Miranda Tapsell, Shari Sebbens) form a girl group to tour Vietnam entertaining the troops, with a down-onhis-luck musician (Chris O’Dowd) as their manager. Directed by Wayne Blair and written by Tony Briggs and Keith Thompson (loosely based on the experiences of Briggs’ mother and her sister and cousins), here’s

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F E AT U R E

STORY

To find out more information and to learn if you are qualified to participate, please contact the University of California, Davis Medical Center confidential recruitment line, 916-734-6846. Qualified participants will receive at no cost: • Study related physical & Gynecologic exams • Compensation for time and travel (over the duration of the study)

another one of those lovely, unexpected surprises that sail north out of Australia every now and then. The movie tends to slide into clichés whenever the music stops, but fortunately, the music never stops for long, and it’s just about irresistible. Meanwhile, the clichés are rendered painless by excellent performances from the five principles, with O’Dowd and Mailman particularly standing out. J.L.

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Trance

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Upstream Color

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A London auction-house employee (James McAvoy) is the inside man in the theft of a multi-million-pound painting, but a blow on the head makes him forget what he did with it, so his partner in crime (Vincent Cassel) takes him to a hypnotist (Rosario Dawson) to try to jog his memory— and she quickly realizes there’s more at stake here than a lost set of keys. With a script by Joe Ahearne and John Hodge, adventurous director Danny Boyle barges into Christopher Nolan territory, fashioning a convoluted Chinese box mystery with overtones of two Nolan classics, the where-haveI-been riddle-fest Memento and the dream worlds of Inception. It’s a well-crafted puzzle, more teasing than tantalizing, more pat than satisfying. It even ends with an unanswered question like Inception, albeit without the same resonance. J.L.

“Spooky action at a distance” was Albert Einstein’s skeptical phrase for quantum entanglement, and as good a summary as any for the mysteries at play in Shane Carruth’s Upstream Color. It’s the sort of darkly gleaming sci-fi maze that leaves a critic feeling inadequate and sheepishly quoting the official synopsis: “A man and woman are drawn together, entangled in the life cycle of an ageless organism. Identity becomes an illusion as they struggle to assemble the loose fragments of wrecked lives.” Such is Carruth’s gift that the audience, too, struggles with that assembly. For some, it amounts to an hour-and-a-half of “Huh?” Others will be in hog heaven (actual pigs figure into the story, too). This is only Carruth’s second film, after the microbudget 2004 indie puzzle Primer, and his resourcefulness continues apace: The new film, an assured and artfully ragged mosaic of glassy nonlinearity, stars fellow filmmaker Amy Seimetz as the woman and Carruth himself as the man; he also wrote, produced, shot, co-edited, scored and distributed it. J.K.

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Success hasn’t spoiled them yet Three decades in, Yo La Tengo still has it It’s been nearly 30 years since Georgia Hubley and Ira Kaplan formed Yo La Tengo in Hoboken, New Jersey, and 21 years since James McNew by Rachel Leibrock joined the married couple as the band’s bassist. In the years since, the trio’s honed its sound rachell@ to near-perfection, making music that runs the newsreview.com gamut of noisy jams and feedback frenzy to dreamy love songs. Always, the music’s shored up by smart lyrics and a bittersweet, emotional core. On the eve of the Yo La Tengo’s latest tour, which arrives in Sacramento on Sunday, May 12, singer-songwriter Kaplan battled a bad phone connection to chat with SN&R about its latest album Fade, songwriting and what it’s like to open for yourself at a show. PHoTo bY JeSPeR ekLow

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ROOT OF HAPPINESS 1949 Zinfandel Dr. // Rancho Cordova, CA 36   |   SN&R   |   05.09.13

What’s up with the tour—what can people expect? We’re doing two sets for each show—one quiet and one loud. We’re basically our own opening act.

OK, so how did that come about? We were trying to come up with a way to present songs from Fade—so many of them are quiet, and we didn’t know how to incorporate them without disrupting the pace—wait, “disrupting” isn’t quite the right word. In any case, we’d done a few [shows] like that when we played with Calexico, and it seemed to work.

Fade is the band’s shortest album in years— there are no really long freak-out jams. Was that intentional?

It’s intentional that the album as a whole is shorter. It’s something we’d been trying to do for years but failing at. When we got a little closer to [going into the studio], when we were within striking distance and knew that there were a few songs that needed to be left off, we just started pruning away [the longer ones]. But none of the other stuff was; we never do anything long or short on purpose. How much of the songwriting revolves around jamming as a band in the studio as opposed to working out the songs before you even start recording? We just start playing and see what happens. Sometimes a song just pops out, and sometimes something happens in the studio, and then we never hear it again, or if we do it again, it’s completely different. It’s a very open-ended process. I’ve heard that you won’t play songs live before you record them—why is that? The philosophy on that goes way back. For a long time, the record that I think we felt least warm about was [1992’s] May I Sing With Me. That was a record for which we’d been playing the songs live for a long time. It was James’ first record with the band, and we’d played the songs with a variety of different bass players and taught them a number of times. Rightly or wrongly, we came to the conclusion that we knew the songs too well—we’d lost that sense of discovery, and were instead just documenting what we’d already found out.

“Ifyousetagoaland you’refocusedonthat goal,thenyourunthe riskoflosingsightof whatmightbejustas goodorbetter.” Ira Kaplan Yo La Tengo After 30 years, how do you keep it fresh for the band? Do you set goals? We try not to set goals. I think if you set a goal and you’re focused on that goal, then you run the risk of losing sight of what might be just as good or better. For example, in the most obvious way, if your goal is to get a gold record, then anything short of selling 500,000 records is a failure—but amazing things can happen along the way. If we were to read our rock biographies carefully, we’d see that success is not all it’s cracked up to be. Ω


WELCOME BACK

★ TO THE NEW ★

Break out your short shorts This is your summer jam: The organizers for the Concerts in the Park series made a lot of smart bookings for this season’s lineup, including incomparable dance punkers Chk Chk Chk on May 31. The band members split time in various cities, but the band known by three consecutive exclamation points will always have its roots in Sacramento. Chk Chk Chk, which features members of past local bands including the Yah Mos and Pope Smashers, has toured the world with its dance grooves and frontman Nic Offer’s short shorts. In the final moments of April, Chk Chk Chk released its fifth studio album Thr!!!er. Names like Jim Eno of Spoon and Sonia Moore (who sang on MC Hammer’s “Too Legit to Quit”) make for headline hype, but at the heart of a Chk Chk Chk song always exists an endless supply of sinewy bass lines. If the single “One Girl/One Boy” was too fluffy, don’t let it scare you off Thr!!!er. I highly advise getting to know this record prior to the Friday it takes the stage in Cesar Chavez Plaza. I can only hope that as the sun sets on downtown, the boys will treat friends and family to an after-party, like those days when they’d hole up for an entire weekend at The Press Club. Ah, those sweaty, halcyon days of ’07. Check out the entire CIP lineup at http://downtownsac.org/events/ concerts-in-the-park.

His earlier work might be likened to Santana’s collaborative album Love Devotion Surrender, with John McLaughlin of the Mahavishnu Orchestra. In 2012, though, after 14 years of playing, Hammond assembled a quartet bearing his name. The Ross Hammond Quartet received numerous critical accolades in 2012 for Adored, an album dedicated to Hammond’s daughter Lola. On Sunday, as part of the festival lineup, the RHQ will perform at Antiquité Maison Privee (2114 P Street at 6:30 p.m.) for a release party for its follow-up, Cathedrals. The new album is more free in its form, with leanings toward hard bop and plenty of winding, rolling, fragmented tangents. If it’s possible to use “fussy” as a positive note, it applies here. Where much of Adored was subdued, lovely and written as lullabies for a 2-year-old girl, Cathedrals was written by and for impressive jazz minds. It is here that the genre becomes intimidating again, as the exclusivity of inside jokes finds its way into the track listing of “Run, Run Ibex!” and “This Goes With Your Leather.” Love it, which you should, or give it an honest ear as a challenge to your radio presets. The festival is happening now through Tuesday, May 14. Visit www.intheflowsacramento.com for a complete schedule of events.

NEWS

nathan thomas band sat, may 11

terry sheets band every wednesday

country karaoke the wrangler

8945 Grant Line rd, eLk Grove ★ 217-5585 ★ www.thewranGLerbar.com

ON STANDS MAY 16

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fri, may 10

JHL8I<G<>:FE:<IKJ%:FD

J8:I8D<EKF >8PD<EËJ:?FILJ N<;D8P(, :I<JKK?<8K<I

Details, finally: If you took the bait on $9 presale tickets for the

School yourself: Jazz intimidates many. Not only are there countless genres, but those genres often fuse and collide to form new ones, and each city with a celebrated music history seems to have its own style. For me, it took an introductory course in college that counted toward nothing, but simply existed in my transcript for a semblance of a footing. Yes, I once caused myself further student-loan debt— outside of my academic focus—to understand jazz. I get jazz though, or I think I do. Rather than enroll or come to me with questions, I suggest the In the Flow Festival, particularly the music of founder Ross Hammond, as an economical and far more rewarding alternative. Hammond is one of Sacramento’s greatest jazz generators and arguably its most accessible. He plays guitar, which is a less jarring instrument than, say, the clarinet or saxophone, blending blues and folk melodies into the improvisation of free jazz. BEFORE

aLL coUntry aLL the time

Sacramento Electronic Music Festival, the handsome reward has finally arrived via a lineup announcement. The 2013 roster includes Pictureplane, Antwon, Sister Crayon, Free the Robots, Eprom, RAC and Jerome LOL. The four-day event, which takes place from Tuesday, May 28, through Saturday, June 1, kicks off at LowBrau (1050 20th Street), spends three days breaking in the new Assembly (1000 K Street), and then finally wraps it all up Saturday at a secret-location after-party. Saturday’s lineup remains a mystery, however. All that’s known is that there will be low ceilings, cement floors, plenty of piping and could very well be a DIY rager for the annals of local raving. Tickets are $12 per night; visit http://sacelectronicmusicfest.com for more info.

('(*BJK×J8:I8D<EKF#:8×.1*'GDJ?FN×8CC8><J K@:B<KJ8M8@C89C<=IFDK@:B<KJ%:FD :?8I><9PG?FE<($/''$)),$))..

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—Blake Gillespie

|

FEATURE

STORY

('(*BJK×J8:I8D<EKF#:8 .1*'GDJ?FN×8CC8><J K@:B<KJ8M8@C89C<=IFDK@:B<KJ%:FD :?8I><9PG?FE<($/''$)),$))..

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ARTS&CULTURE

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AFTER

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05.09.13

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SN&R

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37


10FRI

10FRI

Lauren Cole Norton

BottleRock Napa

Middle Class Rut

Crocker Art Museum, 5 p.m., $5-$10

Napa Valley Expo, 11:45 a.m., $139-$599

Catch local (by way of Ireland) singer Lauren  Cole Norton as part of a Crocker Art Museum  program called Art Mix/Chain Reaction. Part  of the May is Bike Month campaign, the event  also features a bicycle show, a bike-themed  mural by Danielle Fodor, a dance performance  by Core Dance Collective and tunes by the  Phono Select Sound System. Norton, who also  FOLK/JAzz fronts local group the  Souterrain, will sing and  perform spoken-word. Her unique sound combines aspects of Irish folk music, Americana,  jazz and indie-pop—hinting at influences  such as Lisa Hannigan and Norah Jones. She  recorded her solo debut What Ails You in 2012  and is working on a follow-up. 216 O Street,   www.facebook.com/laurencolenorton.

—Jonathan Mendick

10FRI

PHOTO by EMIly IbARRA

09THURS

Carolina Chocolate Drops

Cesar Chavez Plaza, 5 p.m., no cover

When Alabama Shakes, Cake and Jane’s  Addiction don’t get top billing at a festival, you know it’s going to kick ass. From  Americana (Tift Merritt)  FESTIVAL to pop rock (Tristan  Prettyman), R&B and soul (Allen Stone)  to punk (Bad Religion), country (Dwight  Yoakam) to alternative (the Wallflowers),  this multiday festival has it all. In addition  to Alabama Shakes and Prettyman, Friday’s  lineup includes the Black Keys (pictured),  the Shins, Vintage Trouble and the Flaming  Lips. Augmenting the musical awesomeness  will be a number of great wines and delicious food, and a host of causes and organizations will benefit from this festival. It  continues through Sunday. 575 Third Street  in Napa, www.bottlerocknapavalley.com. 

24th Street Theatre, 7:30 p.m., $27.50-$30

Since 2008, Sacramento-based duo Middle  Class Rut has released several EPs—including the 25 Years EP, which was also released  on vinyl—and its first full-length, No Name  No Color. In anticipation of its second fulllength album, Pick Up Your Head, scheduled  to drop June 25, the band recently released  “Aunt Betty,” the album’s lead single. In  March, USA Today highlighted the single on  its Playlist feature. In addition to receiving critical acclaim, MC Rut has performed  with Alice in Chains, Linkin Park and Social  Distortion. At this Concerts in  ROCK the Park show, it’ll be joined by  Jonny Craig (of Dance Gavin Dance fame),  DogFood, I’m Dirty Too and Rck:Rmx.   910 I Street, http://mcrut.com.

This Grammy Award-winning North Carolina  group got its start resurrecting the sound of  African-American Piedmont pickers, mentored  by octogenarian fiddler Joe Thompson. Though  heavily informed by bluesy mountain bluegrass  FOLK/STRING and traditional instrumentation (jug, washboard), it also possesses modern sensibilities.  This meld of old and new is most apparent in  the striking covers of Blu Cantrell’s “Hit ’Em   Up Style” and Run-D.M.C.’s “You Be Illin’.”   The departure of primary vocalist Justin  Robinson forces Rhiannon Giddens and Dom  Flemons to pick up the slack on last year’s  Leaving Eden. The sounds change, subtly   growing from a trio to quartet on what feels  like a transitional album. 2791 24th Street,   www.carolinachocolatedrops.com. 

—Trina L. Drotar

—Brian Palmer

—Chris Parker

2708 J Street Sacramento, CA 916.441.4693 www.harlows.com - May 9 -

head for the hills

- May 11 -

good nights

Doowhutchalike Party with Shock-G

with dj anthony vincent

May 19

Todd Morgan and Emblems

10pm • $20 adv

May 20

The Neighbourhood

May 22

Atlas Genius

May 23

Relic 45

yo la tengo

May 25

Foreverland

May 26

Murder By Death The Builders & The Butchers

8pm • $20 adv

May 29

Big K.R.I.T.

May 30

Young Dubliners

Jun 01

Bilal

Jun 05

Beth Orton

Jun 09

Ryan Bingham

Jun 11

Girl in a Coma

Jun 13

Inner Circle

- May 12 -

- May 13 -

- May 11 -

steelin’ dan the music of steely dan

man or astro man? 7pm • $15 adv

- May 16 -

dinner show

sizzling sirens

5:30pm • $15 adv

7pm • $10-20 adv

38   |   SN&R   |   05.09.13

Coming Soon Tainted Love

petty theft 9pm • $15 adv

chuck fenda

May 18

- May 10 -

(tom petty & u2 covers)

- Tue May 28 • 9:30pm • $30adv -

May 17

7pm • $12 adv

and zoo station

just announced

burlesque experience • dinner show

follow us hARLOwSNITECLuB hARLOwSNIGhTCLuB hARLOwSNIGhTCLuB


PHoTo By Emmy ETié

11SAT Paul Collins Beat

11SAT

16THURS

16THURS

Bleedin’ Hearts

Folsom Lake Concert Choir

Light-Skinned Creole

Bows & Arrows, 7 p.m., $7

Fox & Goose, 9 p.m., $5

Ever wondered why British ska band the  Beat was known as “the English Beat” here  in the United States? We already had a  band called the Beat, arguably one of the  best underrated yet prolific power-pop  bands of the late 1970s. Though it never  had a big hit like power-pop peers Cheap  Trick or the Knack, lead singer Paul Collins  was a machine. He always maintained  a formula of driving beats, heavy riffs,  thick harmonies and strong vocal hooks,  but somehow each song was its own wellcrafted pop gem that  POWER POP stood on its own. By  its sophomore album, the group changed  its name to the Paul Collins Beat. 1815 19th  Street, www.thepaulcollinsbeat.com. 

Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 8 p.m., $5-$10

Honky-tonk is a little bit like bacon: It comforts you at the same time it’s coating your  heart in grease and  HONKY-TONK is generally difficult  to dislike. With an abundance of booze and  ramshackle romance, local group Bleedin’  Hearts is a purveyor of what it refers to as  “high energy swagger”—something like a  rock group holed up in a rough-and-tumble  bar in the Southwest playing honky-tonk  classics. Influences include Buck Owens,  Hank Williams and the late George Jones.  Expect a rollicking good time backed up  by locals KB & the Slingtones and San  Francisco’s Akron Engine. 1001 R Street,  www.facebook.com/bleedinhearts.

—Deena Drewis

—Aaron Carnes

Igor Stravinsky’s The Rite of Spring caused  uproar when it premiered in 1913. To celebrate the centennial of this innovative yet  scandalous piece, the Folsom Lake College  music department presents “A Hundred  Year Retrospective.” The FLC choir will  premiere new works by Eliot Drell and FLC  music department chair Larry Metcalf. And  it’ll perform A. Oscar Haugland’s “Magazine  CLASSICAL Madrigals” and “Havenu  Shalom Alechem,” an  Israeli folk song. Joining the FLC Concert  Choir are FLC’s Jazz Choir, Jazz Experience,  Afro-Cuban Funk Band (pictured) and  Chamber Orchestra to perform works from  the last 100 years, including selections from  The Rite of Spring. 10 College Parkway in  Folsom, www.threestages.net.

Blue Lamp, 9 p.m., $5 Local rapper Light-Skinned Creole is originally from Louisiana, and just like Louisiana  cooking, he brings a vast array of flavors to  hip-hop. There are elements of West Coast,  HIP-HOP East Coast and Southern rap  styles. At times, he brings a  wild party vibe, a tough-as-nails gangsta  persona and a serious socially conscious  tone. But rather than bouncing around  between flavors, he mixes it all together, like  a hip-hop jambalaya of sorts. The final result  is a strange mellow rap that lurks with a  certain mystery. With his tight but surreal  rapping, he seems to shout and whisper at  once. The beats are hard-hitting, but still  kind of float in outer space. 1400 Alhambra  Boulevard, www.facebook.com/LSC916.

—Aaron Carnes

—Trina L. Drotar

FOR TICKETS TO ALL SHOWS VISIT AssemblySacramento.com

JEANNE ROBERTSON MAY 19TH đ 7:30PM THREE STAGES

FRIDAY MAY 10TH AT 7PM

YOUNG DUBLINERS MAY 30TH đ 7PM HARLOWS

BILL PAYNE OF LITTLE FEET

WEDNESDAY MAY 22ND 7PM

THURSDAY MAY 23RD AT 9PM

DAUGHTER OF HANK WILLIAMS JR

WITH TREVOR SIMPSON THE DAGGER TOUR

HOLLY WILLIAMS

SATURDAY MAY 11TH 9PM

THURSDAY, MAY 30 & FRIDAY, MAY 31, 10PM

URBAN INFUSED FUNK, SOUL, JAZZ & MORE

SACRAMENTO ELECTRONIC MUSIC FESTIVAL

FRIDAY MAY 24 9PM

WEDNESDAY JUNE 5TH 7PM

AND SPECIAL GUEST

BASS PLAYER FROM SLY & THE FAMILY STONE

SATURDAY MAY 25TH

THURSDAY JUNE 6TH 9PM

SUNDAY MAY 26TH 7PM

SUNDAY JUNE 9TH 7:30PM

FEVA IN DA FUNKHOUSE SEMF FESTIVAL

FRENCH HORN REBELLION LARRY GRAHAM

JAKE SHIMABUKURO SEPTEMBER 9TH đ 8PM THE CREST THEATRE

FOR ALL TICKETS VISIT SBLENTERTAINMENT.COM twitter.com/SBLConcerts đ facebook.com/SBLEntertainment

BEFORE

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  NEWS

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  F E AT U R E

inc. THE FUTURE OF R&B

LADY RIZO AND SPECIAL GUEST

STORY

OZOMATLI

UPCOMING SHOWS IRIS DEMENT - 6/26 LARRY CARLTON - 7/1 WANG CHUNG - 8/4 THE PSYCHEDELIC FURS - 8/31 LEON RUSSELL - 10/20 VIENNA TENG - 11/22

THE CATARACS W/ TREVOR SIMPSON ROBERT EARL KEEN THE ROAD GOES ON..

  |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

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  AFTER

  |    05.09.13    

1000 K Street Sacramento CA 95814 |

  SN&R    

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  39


NIGHTBEAT ASSEMBLY

1000 K St., (916) 832-4751

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

BADLANDS

2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

THURSDAY 5/9

FRIDAY 5/10

SATURDAY 5/11

B Street: Live!, 7pm, $15

BILL PAYNE, 7pm, $25-$30

B Street: Live!, 7pm, $15

Tipsy Thursdays, Top 40 deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Fabulous and Gay Fridays, 9pm, call for cover

Saturday Boom, 9pm, call for cover

CHOP TOPS, AVENUE SAINTS, TONY T, THE PENDLETONS; 9pm, call for cover

PSYCHOSOMATIC, TOE TAG, WORLD OF LIES, SOLANUM; 8pm, $8

BLUE LAMP

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

Sin Sunday, 8pm, call for cover

Mad Mondays, 9pm M; Latin videos, Wii bowling, 7pm Tu; Trapacana, 10pm W

1ST PLACE, LIL BIT, HUNNID, EASTMUR-

DEAD BY NIGHTFALL, ARTEMIS GONE, THE TECHNICOLORS, FICTIONIST, RACE OF ARSON, ASHES IN AUGUST; 7pm, $12 TO THE BOTTOM, NIGHTLINE; 8pm, $12

NO BRAGGING RIGHTS, BEING AS AN OCEAN, LEGION; 6:30pm Tu, $12-$14

BOWS & ARROWS

ELEMENT BRASS BAND, GENTLEMAN SURFER, LOVELY BUILDERS; 6pm, $10

THE LAURELS, THE FLEETING JOYS, IVO; 8pm, $5

PAUL COLLINS BEAT, THE DECIBELS, THE ENGLISH SINGLES; 7pm, $7

WEEK OF WONDERS, ORCA TEAM, PURE BLISS, DOG PARTY; 8pm Tu, $5-$8

JUNIOR BROWN, T-BUCK AND THE BAD DREAMS; 8pm, $25-$28

SARA WATKINS, KRIS ORLOWSKI; 8pm, $20-$22

Community music jam, 6:30pm M, no cover

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 DAALLSTAR$; 8pm, call for cover 1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

MARK SEXTON BAND, BONE MACDONALD; 9pm, $8

SIMMS BAND, 8pm, $10

DISTRICT 30

EDM, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Jason Davis, 9pm, call for cover

DJs Penthaus and Jurts, 9pm, call for cover

RUBY & THE EMERALDS, MIDWAY MARVELS, GERARD MORAN; 8pm, no cover

O STREET DUB, AUSTIN ROBINS; 9pm, $5

AKRON ENGINE, KB & THE SLINGTONES; 9pm, $5

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

FOX & GOOSE

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

G STREET WUNDERBAR HARLOW’S

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693

Electronic Dance Music, 9:30pm, call for cover

DIAMOND DEZ, DJ Oasis, 9pm W, no cover Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; Northern Soul, 8pm W, no cover

DUSTONIOUS MAXIMUS, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

Hey local bands!

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/13-5/15

THE BOARDWALK

1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

SUNDAY 5/12

HEAD FOR THE HILLS, 8pm, call for cover

PETTY THEFT, ZOO STATION; 10pm, call for cover

THE HIDEAWAY BAR & GRILL 2565 Franklin Blvd., (916) 455-1331

STEELIN’ DAN, 7pm, $15-$18; Good Nights w/ DJ Anthony Vincent, 10pm

YO LA TENGO, 9pm, $20-$30

MAN OR ASTRO MAN?, 8pm M, $15

COLONEL JIMMY & THE BLACKFISH, STORYTELLERS, PEACE KILLERS; 5pm, $7

DJs Austin & Tim Matranga, 9pm M; Game Night, 4pm Tu; Karaoke, 9pm W

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

DAVE LYNCH GROUP, STEVE ADAMS & SCOTT WALTON DUO, INERTIA; 7:30pm

ANDREW HOLTZ, ADAM BALBO, DEVEN FARREN; 8:30pm, $5

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

MARILYN’S ON K

“Rock On” Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

GOLDEN CADILLACS, BELLYGUNNER, THE WOODEN REVOLT; 9pm, $5

SNAKES ‘N CIDER, SCOTT PAUL GRAHAM, 9pm, $5

BELMONT LIGHTS, THE BELL BOYS, SPENCER BORUP; 8pm W, $5

Get Down to the Champion Sound, reggae and dancehall deejays, 10pm, $5

Phuture Global Discotheque w/ D.A.M.B., Funktion and Jon Maestro, 10pm, $3-$5

1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931 908 K St., (916) 446-4361

MIDTOWN BARFLY

1119 21st St., (916) 549-2779

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN

Gothic, Industrial, Darkwave, EBM, Retro, 9:30pm-2am, $5

KISSES, YALLS, SURVIVAL GUIDE, ADAM JAY, OANA; 8pm M, $7-$10

1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

INSTAGON, GHOST PINES, STEP JAYNE; 8:30pm, $5

TAO JIRIKI, THE DIRTY FEET, THE REAL MCKNEALY; 8:30pm, $5

KEVIN SECONDS, KEPI GHOULIE, JONAH MATRANGA; 8:30pm, $7

Jazz, 8pm M; TURN DOWN THE STONES, RUSTY MAPLES; 8:30pm W, $5

OLD IRONSIDES

Music Box w/ Missy Mark, 9pm, $3

58 FURY, BLOSSOM ROCK, MIXED FRICTION; 9pm, $10-$12

Fascination: ’80s new-wave deejay dancing, 9:30pm, $5

Karaoke w/ Sac City Entertainment, 9pm Tu; Open-mic, 8:30pm W, no cover

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

KRIPPLER, WHITE KNUCKLE RIOT, SOLITARY PRIAPISM, CAESIUM; 8pm, $5

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504 670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731

Open-mic comedy, 9pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

RESTAURANT ss BAR BAR CLUB ss RESTAURANT COMEDY COMEDY CLUB

VOTED BEST COMEDY CLUB BY THE SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW!

FEATURED ARTISTS ac myles – MAY 18 A.C. Myles, guitarist and singer, has traveled the US, Europe and the Middle East as guitarist/vocalist in Blues, Soul/R&B, Rock and Modern Country acts both as an indiviual sideman and as an ever-charismatic front man. He just recently spent 2 years as touring guitarist for acclaimed R&B/Soul/Blues artist John Nemeth, touring 200 nights a year primarily in the US, Canada and Europe.

THE bongo furys – MAY 21 What started as a Zappa tribute band in 2006 has diverged into a four piece collective of talented musicians fusing a blues and jazz foundation with a twist of latin rock influences. Along with special guest Michael Rosencrans, blues harmonica and vocalist from Sacramento’s Spotted Dog Blues Review, the Bongo Furys will be channeling some good time entertainment all night long.

freeway revival – MAY 22 The Freeway Revival is sure to bring not only a consistent high quality of music, but also a high quality of entertainment. Once you hear the beautiful guitar harmonies, subtle vocal harmonies, accompanied with an assortment of mesmerizing piano and organ melodies, the spell is cast; the listener is pulled into a barrage of classic sounding music that is firsthand lived and felt.

lonesome locomotive – MAY 23 Lonesome Locomotive is a fresh take on American Roots, Rock, Jam and Soul. Tight harmonies, big bass, drums and familar melodies drive this SF quartet! They have shared the stage with Yonder Mountain String Band, Melvin Seals & JGB, Leftover Salmon, Poor Man’s Whiskey, Dead Winter Carpenters & more. Don’t miss this show!

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THURSDAY 5/9 - SUNDAY 5/12 VOTED FUNNIEST COMEDIAN AT NY COMEDY FESTIVAL!

DAN SODER

MATT MORALES, CASEY LEY

SPECIAL EVENT, NO PASSES

TUESDAY 5/14 FROM WILD N OUT AND AMERICA’S GOT TALENT!

NICK CANNON

ONE NIGHT ONLY!

SPECIAL EVENT, NO PASSES FRIDAY 5/17 - SUNDAY 5/19

FRIDAY 5/24 - SATURDAY 5/25

THERE GOES THE NEIGHBORHOOD WITH JOEY GUILA

FRIDAY 5/31- SUNDAY 6/2 FROM CASH CAB!

THURSDAY 6/6 - SATURDAY 6/8 FROM WHITNEY AND WORKAHOLICS!

CHRIS D’ELIA MYLES WEBER

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05.09.13

FrI 5/10

The golden cadillacs, bellygunner, The wooden revolT

amEricana // soul // roots rock // 9pm // $7 SaT 5/11

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scoTT paul graham

greaTesT sTories ever Told triButE // Jam // 7:30pm // FrEE wEd 5/15

belmonT lighTs, The bell boys, spencer borup alt // pop // rock // 8pm // $5

BEN BAILEY

916.443.2797 | www.torchclub.net |

rock-n-roll // 9pm // FrEE

TUES 5/14

CALL CLUB FOR SHOWTIMES: (916) 925-5500

SN&R

rock on live band kar aoke

9pm // $5

CHRISTOPHER TITUS

904 15th St.

Btwn I & J Downtown Sac (Across from Memorial Auditorium) 40

MAY 9 & 12

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Mr. December The Daniel Castro Band Bump City Laurie Morvan Ronnie Montrose Band Remembered Renegades – A Tribute to Styx

* Single Tickets - $10, VIP Tickets $20 (Includes admission, a beer & a burger) All 6 ticketed shows for $40. Tickets Available only at www.crystalbasin.com Premium Gold Country Wines 3550 Carson Rd., Camino, CA 95709


THURSDAY 5/9

FRIDAY 5/10

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

SATURDAY 5/11

SUNDAY 5/12

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/13-5/15

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

MECHANIZM, 8pm, no cover

Open-mic, 10pm-1am Tu, no cover; Trivia, 9-10pm W, no cover

2ND LEVEL BAND, 9pm, call for cover

A-YOUNG, 9pm, call for cover

Mother’s Day Comedy Appreciation Show, 8pm, $20

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

Sunday Night Soul Party, 9pm, $5

BOBBY JOE EBOLA AND THE CHILDREN MACNUGGITS, 8pm M, $7

JOE FRIDAY, 9:30pm, $10

REBEL YELL, 9:30pm, $10

The Sol Mercado and Kid’s Day,1pm, no cover

Microphone Mondays, 6pm M, $1-$2

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Bluebird Lounge open-mic, 5pm Tu, no cover

SHANE DWIGHT, 8:30pm, $20

13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

PINE COVE TAVERN

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

502 29th St., (916) 446-3624

PINS N STRIKES

3443 Laguna Blvd., Elk Grove; (916) 226-2625

PJ’S ROADHOUSE

DJ Old Griff, 9pm, no cover

THE PRESS CLUB

UNION HEARTS, THE LOSS, ALARMS; 8pm, $5

5461 Mother Lode, Placerville; (530) 626-0336 2030 P St., (916) 444-7914

SAMMY’S ROCKIN’ ISLAND

238 Vernon St., Roseville; (916) 773-7625

SHENANIGANS

Comedy Night and DJ Selekta Lou, 9pm, $5

705 J St., (916) 442-1268

Meliza Banales, Serafine, Atypical Love, Dawn Da’Jet and DJ Val G, 7pm, $5

SOL COLLECTIVE

JESSICA DYATLOV, STEVE SPIFFLER, TAKTICS, DCEASED; 8pm, $10

2574 21st St., (916) 832-0916

SOPHIA’S THAI KITCHEN 129 E St., Davis; (530) 758-4333

STONEY INN/ROCKIN’ RODEO

JASON BUELL & THE DOUBLE BARREL BAND, 10pm, $5

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023

SWABBIES

5871 Garden Hwy, (916) 920-8088

EL RADIO FANTASTIQUE, 9:30pm, $5

MISS LONELY HEARTS, THE GOLDEN CADILLACS, 9:30pm, $5

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

SOUL SHAKER, 6-10pm, $3

RIFF RAFF, SKID ROSES, 3-10pm, $8

SKIPPINBROOK, 2-6pm, no cover Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; THE CRY, 8pm, $5

TORCH CLUB

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

X TRIO, 5pm, no cover; DIPPIN’ SAUCE, 9pm, $5

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm; THE TWILIGHT DRIFTERS, 9pm, $8

JOHNNY KNOX, 5pm, no cover; THE INCITERS, 9pm, $8

TOWNHOUSE LOUNGE

Wild w/ DJ Billy Lane, 9pm, no cover

DJ Shaun Slaughter w/special guests playing dance tracks, 9pm, $5

DJs Fame Change and X-GVNR, 9pm, $5

1517 21st St., (916) 613-7194

Diamond Dez with DJ Oasis 9pm Wednesday, no cover. District 30 Pop

CHRIS ZANARDI & HIS HIGH BEAMZ, 9pm Tu, $5; KERI CARR BAND, 9pm W, $5 Open-mic, M; Fame-Change, DJ Whores, 9pm Tu, $5; DJ Crescendo, 9pm W

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

REHAB, BNMC, ANGEL’S CUT; 6:30pm, $15

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300

MUSHROOMHEAD, FINAL TRIGGER, DEAD IN SECONDS; 6:30pm, $16

LOVERANCE, CLYDE CARSON, SAGE THE B-LEGIT, SCORPIO, RAY LUV, ARISTOTLE, GEMINI, PRICELESS DA ROC; 7pm, $20 ICE DOGG, GUNJI, CHOPPA; 6pm, $20

DOWNTOWN PLAZA (LOWER LEVEL) SONNY FAIRLEY, 6pm, no cover

TURQUOISE JEEP, THOM STOCKTON, PENNY, N8TIV, D WRECK; 7pm Tu, $15

Track Fighter with Madison Avenue and Overwatch 9pm Wednesday, $5. PowerHouse Pub Rock

KASSIE ORTEGA, KEN KOENIG; 1pm

547 L St., (916) 822-5185

LUIGI’S SLICE AND FUN GARDEN

KEVIN SECONDS, HAYMARKET SQUARES; 8:30pm Tu, $5

1050 20th St., (916) 552-0317

ZUHG LIFE STORE

JOE HUMAN, EROTICUS; 1pm, no cover

545 Downtown Plaza, Ste. 2090, (916) 822-5185

ACE OF SPADES

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

ALL AGES WELCOME!

COMING

THURSDAY, MAY 16

THURSDAY, MAY 9

SOON

AN EVENING WITH

PEPPER

REHAB

BOTH ACOUSTIC & LIVE SETS PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

BNMC - ANGEL’S CUT

05/25 John Hart 05/26 Twista & Rae Rock

FRIDAY, MAY 17

FRIDAY, MAY 10

05/31 Capital Cities

TYLER, THE CREATOR & SPECIAL GUEST EARL SWEATSHIRT

MUSHROOMHEAD FINAL TRIGGER - DEAD IN SECONDS LYDIA CAN’T BREATHE - CHERNOBOG - IONIA SATURDAY, MAY 11

06/02 Fear Factory 06/04 Logic 06/08 Bret Michaels

SATURDAY, MAY 18

BLUE FLAME CONCERT: SACRAMENTO

DILLINGER ESCAPE PLAN

LOVERANCE CLYDE CARSON - SAGE THE GEMINI

06/09 The Maine 06/11 Nekromantix

THE FACELESS - ROYAL THUNDER - JOURNAL

PRICELESS DA ROC - KIDD SWAGG SUNDAY, MAY 12

06/01 Finch

06/17 We Came As Romans 06/18 Memphis May Fire

SUNDAY, MAY 19

B-LEGIT & SCORPIO

MOBB DEEP

RAY LUV - ARISTOTLE - ICE DOGG - GUNJI CHOPPA - BALLA BILLION DOLLAR BILL - FHOD

06/19 Krizz Kaliko 07/27 Y&T

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

07/30 Fitz & The Tantrums 08/01 J Boog

TUESDAY, MAY 14

TURQUOISE JEEP

09/05 Launch Festival Kick-Off

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22

TURBONEGRO

Party

TORCHE

THOM STOCKTON - D-WRECK - N8TIV

09/11 Adam Ant

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202 BEFORE

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NEWS

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FEATURE

STORY

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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AFTER

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WHAT’S ON YOUR

HORIZON? Join Horizon Non-Profit today for safe access to a wide variety of high quality medical cannabis. Whether you prefer flowers, extracts, edibles or topicals, indica or sativa, we have the right medicine for you. Whatever your medical condition or employment situation, you can come to Horizon knowing that we respect and hold your

HEALTH, WELL–BEING & PRIVACY AS OUR HIGHEST PRIORITY. OPEN TO ANYONE 18 OR OLDER WITH VALID CA I.D. AND DR’S RECOMMENDATION FOR MEDICAL CANNABIS

HORIZON NON-PROFIT COLLECTIVE Mon-Thur 10am - 7pm | Fri-Sat 10am - 9pm | Sun 12pm - 7pm 42   |   SN&R   |   05.09.13

3600 Power Inn Rd Suite 1A Sacramento, CA 95826 916.455.1931


Bring in any competitor’s coupon and we’ll beat it by $5

To clone or not to clone?

Must present competitor’s ad. Some restrictions apply.

I just moved back to California from Buffalo, N.Y., at the end of summer last year, and the day after I got here, I found SN&R. If nothing else, I read your article every week. Keep it up! Your excellence in writing proves “potheads” are not mentally deficient! To the point: I’d like to grow in my backyard this summer. I’m going small due to lack of space with all my other vegetables and flowers, so I’m thinking two or three plants. I’ve read that clones grow nowhere near the size BEALUM of a seed plant, due to their inability to produce a by NGAIO taproot. Is there any truth to that? Also, I’m looking for where I can get a couple high-quality clones for cheap, if not donated. In a sk420 @ ne wsreview.c om exchange, I am willing to share some of the crop. Do you know of any co-ops or anything like that? —Mike I would say go with clones, mostly because you plan on growing a few small plants. If you start with seeds, you will have to wait for them to start flowering before you know if you have male or female plants. Planting seeds and ending up with nothing but “The City will boy plants is a drag. For shorter, bushier aggressively identify plants, try an indica. Sativas illegal outdoor marijuana usually grow tall and lanky. grows in an effort to Pot plants are a lot like goldfish in that they will promptly enforce the grow to fit the size of their new marijuana environment. They are unlike goldfish in that you can cut cultivation law.” them down to size if they get too big. email from the city of Sacramento Also, be sure to look into the laws concerning outdoor growing in your area. Many cities and counties have made growing cannabis outdoors illegal unless certain requirements are met. We got this message last month in an email from the city of Sacramento: “As you are likely aware, late last year, we took a recommendation to City Council amending city code related to medical marijuana cultivation. In light of the spike in serious violent crime that occurred at outdoor marijuana grow sites last year this year the City will be taking a zero tolerance approach. Outdoor marijuana grows and the money they generate through illegal sales has created a magnet for crime, including home invasions and robbery. The City will aggressively identify illegal outdoor marijuana grows in an effort to promptly enforce the new marijuana cultivation law and reduce the threats to the health and safety of the adjacent neighbors and public at large.”

Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@ newsreview.com.

It is a challenge to find quality clones. Most clubs in Sacramento don’t carry them, but Harborside Health Center in Oakland carries an extensive selection of healthy plants. A good clone will run you between $12 and $25, depending on the strain and the size of the plant. You could probably ask some of your cannabis-using friends if they know anyone that has a few clones lying around. Have fun in your garden, and send pics in October! Ω BEFORE

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  NEWS

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  F E AT U R E

STORY

VOted 2nd best 420 physician in sac!

Sacramento

420 Doc MeDiCaL Marijuana evaLuations

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Your information is 100% private and confidential Visit our website to book your appointment online 24/7 at

www.sac420Doc.com   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E    

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  SN&R    

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NEWS

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FEATURE

STORY

F RIE N DLY, K N OW L E D GA BL E S TA F F

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916.387.8605 | OPEN 10AM – 8PM 7 DAYS A WEEK ARTS&CULTURE

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AFTER

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Choosing a Medical Marijuana Doctor can be difficult

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SN&R   |  05.09.13

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STORY

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by Raheem F. hosseini

ARIES (March 21-April 19): The

Tarahumara Native American people of northwestern Mexico are renowned for their ability to run long distances. The best runners can cover 200 miles in two days. The paths they travel are not paved or smooth, either, but rather the rough canyon trails that stretch between their settlements. Let’s make them your inspirational role models in the coming week, Aries. I’m hoping that you will be as tough and tenacious as they are—that you will pace yourself for the long haul, calling on your instinctual strength to guide you.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You may

have only a dim idea about how your smartphone and computer work, but that doesn’t prevent you from using their many wonderful features. While you’re swimming, you know almost nothing about the physiological processes that are active inside you, and yet you have no problem making all the necessary movements. In that spirit, I’m not worried about whether or not you will grasp the deep inner meaning of events that will be unfolding in the coming week. Complete understanding isn’t absolutely necessary. All you need to do is trust your intuition to lead you in the direction of what’s interesting and educational.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I need

not sell my soul to buy bliss,” says a character in Charlotte Brontë’s 19thcentury novel Jane Eyre. “I have an inward treasure born with me, which can keep me alive if all extraneous delights should be withheld, or offered only at a price I cannot afford to give.” This would be a great speech for you to memorize and periodically recite in the next two weeks. Do it in front of your mirror at least once a day to remind yourself of how amazingly resourceful you are. It will also help you resist the temptation to seek gifts from people who can’t or won’t give them to you.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): What is

the big adventure you’ve been postponing forever because it hasn’t been convenient? How about an intriguing possibility you have always wanted to experiment with but have consistently denied yourself? Or what about that nagging mystery you’ve been wishing you had the time and energy to solve? Wouldn’t your life change for the better if you finally dived in and explored it? In the next two weeks, Cancerian, I urge you to consider giving yourself permission to pursue something that fits one of those descriptions.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Right now, Leo,

you are a majestic and mysterious mess of raw power. You are a fresh, flaming fountain of pure charisma. Irresistible! That’s you! Unstoppable! You! Impossible to fool and immune to the false charms of heartfelt mediocrity! You! You! You! In your current condition, no one can obstruct you from seeing the naked truth about the big picture. And that’s why I am so sure that victory will soon be yours. You will overcome the fuzziness of your allies, the bad vibes of your adversaries, and your own inertia. Not all conquests are important and meaningful, but you will soon achieve the one that is.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A character

in Herman Hesse’s novel Demian says the following: “I live in my dreams. Other people live in dreams, but not in their own.” Whose dreams do you live in, Virgo? What is the source of the fantasies that dominate your imagination? Are they the authentic outpourings of your own soul? Or did they originate with your parents and teachers and lovers? Did they sneak into you from the movies and songs and books you love? Are they the skewed result of the emotional wounds you endured or the limitations you’ve gotten used to? Now is an excellent time to take inventory. Find out how close you are to living in your own dreams.

you might be the beneficiary of a similar kind of mojo, Libra. A good deed you did or a smart move you made in the past will finally get at least some of the recognition or response you’ve always wanted.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “There are no right answers to wrong questions,” says science-fiction writer Ursula K. Le Guin. And that’s why you must be so conscientious about coming up with the very best questions. Right, Scorpio? All your efforts to hunt down solutions will be for naught unless you frame your problems elegantly and accurately. Now here’s the very good news: Your skill at asking pertinent questions is at a peak. That’s why I suggest you make this Focused Inquiry Week. Crisply define three questions that will be important for you to address in the next seven months.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Charlie Parker was a great jazz musician. As a saxophonist and composer, he was an influential innovator. Unfortunately, he also had an expensive heroin addiction. It interfered with his ability to achieve financial stability. There’s a famous story about him showing a bystander two veins on his arm as he prepared to shoot up. “This one’s my Cadillac,” he confessed. “And this one’s my house.” I’m bringing this up, Sagittarius, in the hope that it will provide a healthy shock. Are you doing anything remotely like Charlie Parker? Are you pouring time and energy and money into an inferior form of pleasure or a trivial distraction that is undermining your ability to accomplish higher goals? If so, fix that glitch, please.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

“I hate a song that makes you think that you are not any good,” said iconic songwriter Woody Guthrie. “I hate a song that makes you think that you are just born to lose. … Because you are too old or too young or too fat or too slim too ugly or too this or too that. Songs that run you down or poke fun at you. … I am out to sing songs that will prove to you that this is your world.” Amen, brother Woody! I have the same approach to writing horoscopes. And I’m happy to advise you, Capricorn, that you should have a similar attitude toward everything you put out and take in during the coming week. Just for now, reject all words, ideas and actions that demoralize and destroy. Treat yourself to a phase of relentless positivity.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “I know

not what my past still has in store for me,” testified the Indian spiritual poet Tukaram. I believe most of us can say the same thing, and here’s why: The events that happened to us once upon a time keep transforming as we ripen. They come to have different meanings in light of the ever-new experiences we have. What seemed like a setback when it first occurred may eventually reveal itself to have been the seed of a blessing. A wish fulfilled at a certain point in our history might come back to haunt us later on. I bring up these ideas, Aquarius, because I think you’re primed to reinterpret your own past.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): According

to legend, Jennifer Lopez’s butt is insured for $300 million. Bruce Springsteen has supposedly insured his voice for $31 million, and wine expert Angela Mount is said to have insured her taste buds for $16 million. In that spirit, Pisces, I encourage you to consider insuring your imagination. To be clear, I don’t anticipate that you will have occasion to collect any settlement. Nothing bad will happen. But taking this step could be a fun ritual that might drive home to you just how important your imagination will be in the coming weeks. Your power to make pictures in your mind will either make you crazy with unfounded fantasies and fearful delusions, or else it will help you visualize in detail the precise nature of the situations you want to create for yourself in the future.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Charles Ives

was a renowned American composer who lived from 1874 to 1954. Because his music was experimental and idiosyncratic, it took a long time for him to get the appreciation he deserved. When he was 73 years old, he won the prestigious Pulitzer Prize for a symphony he had written when he was 30. I expect that in the near future

BEFORE

|

NEWS

PHOTO by LISA bAETZ

by Rob bRezsny

For the week of May 9, 2013

you can call Rob brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18 or older. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com. |

F E AT U R E

STORY

Toasting to Armageddon With opposition to gay marriage toppling like dominoes (welcome to the wedding party, Rhode Island) and California’s homegrown bill, Proposition 8, teetering before the highest court in the land, the time is right to check in with an expert on the subject of marriage equality. But not just any expert. Sure, Elizabeth “Beth” Freeman easily fields questions on the legal knot of “judicial standing,” but go read a law review for that. The 46-year-old associate professor of English at UC Davis, who teaches courses on race, gender and sexuality, and lesbian literature, has also authored two related books, including

The Wedding Complex: Forms of Belonging in Modern American Culture, and coedits the Queer Temporalities journal. In other words, Freeman’s interests are as vast as her wit is sharp. The former Sarah Lawrence College professor chatted with SN&R about group marriage, butch-lesbian bachelor parties and just who, exactly, is the queerest Supreme Court judge.

UC Davis lists you as one of the university’s five gay-marriage experts. How did an English professor break that glass ceiling? If you look at something for a long, long, long time, you become informed enough to bore anyone when you talk about it.

Do you and the four other experts ever argue about whose expertise is more expert? No. We are group-married to one another, and we think that’s the next step in marriage rights.

You’re well-versed on gay and lesbian marriage, as well as the broader American wedding culture. I’m not going to ask something obvious, like whether you support gay marriage, but what do you think about marriage? Oy vey. Here’s one serious, political answer: Marriage is a way of organizing property rights around inheritance and channeling publicly funded benefits through kinship. I’d rather see marriage disestablished from the state and returned to the churches, leftover accumulated property returned to the public from whence it was earned, and benefits distributed to individuals regardless of whether or not they belonged to families.

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

When it comes to gay and lesbian weddings, bachelor(ette) parties and bridal showers, what does the etiquette dictate? Anything goes! I’ve seen butch-lesbian bachelor parties for one, femme-on-femme bridal showers for two, and forgoing the shower altogether for a Kickstarter fund for the honeymoon. Thankfully, straights are catching up and doing their own thing, too.

My parents’ neighbors think there are more gay people today than there were a generation ago and didn’t agree when I suggested they were wrong. Settle this dispute? They are so right! The more opportunity people have to question the inevitability of heterosexuality, the more they might actually make other choices. This is why conservatives are so scared.

In your 2010 book Time Binds: Queer Temporalities, Queer Histories, you posit that we’re living in a post-gay world. What’s so post-gay about it? Have you read my book? I so did not say that. We’ll be in a post-gay world when people stop being thrown out of their families for expressing same-sex desire. We’re in a queer world, though, where gays can affiliate with single moms, pregnant |

AFTER

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teenagers, S&M practitioners, Mormon polygamists—anyone who gets stigmatized for their sexual desires and practices—to form broad coalitions.

Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts suggested gay marriage is potentially too new a phenomenon for the court to weigh in on. What kind of temporality is he experiencing? Only slightly post-premodern, I guess. See John Boswell, Same-Sex Unions in Premodern Europe. I imagine that Roberts would think that newfangled lute music was ruining the kids today, too.

Going back to the original definition of the words, who is the queerest Supreme Court justice and why? Who’s the gayest? Sonia Sotomayor [is the queerest], because I like her the best. But Ruth Bader Ginsburg looks most adorably like the proto-lesbian spinsters of 19th-century women’s literature.

How long after gay marriage is legal will civilization crumble and the seas turn into fire? Like, six days? Yes! Then we’ll all go get mimosas on our day of rest. Ω

05.09.13

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The sutterdistrictpresents

on the

patios S AT U R D AY M AY 18

27th & 28th / J - N Streets Food & drink specials at all locations NOON Giveaways all day to 6 PM Visit all Sutter District patios and be entered to win a special prize.

W W W. T H E S U T T E R D I S T R I C T. C O M


S-2013-05-09