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Death and Drinking in Midtown see editor’s note, page 3

Public comment and

pimping the people see Frontlines, page 9

Beware

the broS

see Scene&heard, page 21

Democratic

superfail? see Feature Story, page 16

Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

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Volume 24, iSSue 49

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thurSday, march 21, 2013


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2   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13


Holiday Crime I walk my dog almost every morning in Midtown, but I am glad that what I witnessed recently is not common: a small crowd gathered around a memorial for a homicide victim. Fellow dog-walkers and even bicyclists ceased their routines to stop at the corner of P and 18th streets this past Monday, where photographs had been taped to a lamppost. The pictures depicted a smiling young man, Josiah Humphreys, 28, with friends and family, and flowers and lit candles decorated the sidewalk. A day earlier, at around 1 a.m. on St. Patrick’s Day, Humphreys was beaten to death by three others. The intersection at P and 18th streets is just three blocks from my apartment. In fact, I’d passed that very lamppost with my brother after sipping beer on R Street just hours before the murder. Also this past weekend, after 10 p.m. on St. Patrick’s Day, another man was walking in Midtown on D and 20th streets—the same street I live on—when two 30-something men approached him. One, a black man in a green T-shirt, spat anti-gay slurs at the victim, then the other, a white male, hit him in the groin with a bat. I walk everywhere, all over town, at all hours, and this holiday weekend was no exception. The people out were young and friendly, if not a special breed of good ol’ fashioned drunk. Many—perhaps too many— were severely intoxicated. But just like in San Diego or San Francisco or any other American city during St. Patrick’s Day, right? Here in Sacramento, crimes during big holidays continue to shock (let’s not forget New Year’s Eve in Old Sac). Is it the booze? The party? Is it Sacramento? Or is it... —Nick Miler

n ic kam@ n ews r ev i ew . com

March 21, 2013 | vol. 24, issue 49

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“The Hangover. … I do not remember anything that happened for the last week.”

Asked at Loehmann’s Plaza:

What movie is most like your life and why?

Cody Edwards security guard

The Road. I come into work every day and try to work as hard as I can. In the one scene, he tries to help his son, and it really connected with me.

Diana Aquino receptionist

(500) Days of Summer because we girls just don’t know what we want.

Mike McLevich accountant

The Big Lebowski because he is a nihilist. He believes in nothing. That must be exhausting.

Every day is another opportunity to show arthritis who’s boss. Living with arthritis pain? Time to show it who’s boss. Studies show that moderate physical activity — the kind that gets your heart rate up and keeps it up like walking, biking, or swimming — can actually reduce pain and stiffness, and improve your mood. But it’s more than just keeping busy, you need to get up and get active at least 5 days a week for 30 minutes each day. You can even do it for 10 minutes, 3 times a day. In just 4 to 6 weeks you’ll notice a difference. Get physically active and show arthritis who’s in charge. For more information, call 530-229-8431 916-368-5599 or or visit visit www.arthritis.org/wwe www.arthritis.org/wwe

Physical Activity. The Arthritis Pain Reliever. 4   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13

Grisha Polyak student

The Hangover because of the part where you wake up and there is a tiger in your living room, and you are in the bathroom. I know that feeling. I do not remember anything that happened for the last week.

Jill Valverde bookkeeper

How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, but there are [other] movies I wish my life was like.

Rosalie Deane retired

Mamma Mia! because of all of the music in it, all of the energy she has and the fun. To me, that is what life is all about. I have all girls and 15 grandchildren, and three of them are great-grandchildren.


Email your letters to sactoletters@newsreview.com.

BroWest knows better

THIS MODERN WORLD

TOM TOMORROW

Re “A trivial pursuit” by Nick Miller (SN&R Midtown&Down, March 14): The Marshall School/New Era Park Neighborhood Association has forged a healthy working relationship with most of the bar and restaurant owners on letter of 28th and J streets. MSNEP Neighborhood Association helped the week forge a compromise to save the sale of Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub. They also worked in good faith with Blue Cue to help them get through the building process to build an outside patio. MSNEP also has had no problems with Centro Cocina Mexicana or The Red Rabbit Kitchen & Bar to date. BarWest (a.k.a. BroWest) has been cited for selling alcohol to minors. BarWest also decided to host trivia night without seeking the needed city permits. Trevor Shults is an experienced nightclub operator who would presumably know the entertainment-permit regulations and be able to follow them. Also, Trevor told neighbors and the press that he would never apply for an entertainment permit. Then, BarWest decided to apply for the permit without notifying its neighbors. It seems at BarWest that profit is more important than following the law. All of the other restaurants/bars on 28th and J streets have no problem complying with the law. The Yelp reviews speak volumes for the problems at BarWest. Poor service and poor food are the common threads found in a lot of reviews. An entertainment permit isn’t going to fix BarWest. Trevor needs to hire more waitstaff and provide better service. Trevor may know how to run a nightclub, but he needs to bring in a quality restaurant professional to fix his woes at BarWest. Perhaps they should contact chef Robert Irvine of Restaurant: Impossible or chef Gordon Ramsay from Kitchen Nightmares to fix the restaurant. They could also consult with their co-owner Randy Paragary about improving the food and service at BarWest. He knows a thing or two about running a successful restaurant. Michael Murphy

S a c ra m e nt o

Charter schools can be effective

Crafts don’t make you a Stepford wife

Re “Preparing to fail” by Raheem F. Hosseini (SN&R Frontlines, March 14): There are important questions to answer about public education, but calling the other side names will never answer them. Among the questions we need to address are: 1. Why does Michelle Rhee’s movement gain traction? (Poor public-school results and resulting parent dissatisfaction.) 2. How would these closed schools attract students if they reopened as charter schools? (See answer No. 1.) 3. Why can a charter school function in a location where a district school couldn’t afford to? (Bureaucracy and union contracts don’t make it unaffordable?) 4. Why are companies successfully forming charters? (Academic freedom, elimination of bureaucracy, freedom from unions and profits.) 5. Are there models of education that are more relevant to teaching today’s kids, poor kids, limited-English kids? (Yes, there are models of success.) It is wrong to ignore these and many other important questions in order to demonize Michelle Rhee and her backers, even though some feel she deserves it. Demonization is the last resort of people who’ve run out of arguments; it is the abandonment of discourse. Look up Godwin’s Law. Benjamin Bannister Sacramento

Re “Hello, doily!” by Deena Drewis (SN&R Arts&Culture, March 14): I wanted to give another opinion, as I don’t feel like the author really “gets” the concept of HelloXOXO. While it’s great that you gave this new organization some press, and there are some good points here, overall, the article comes across as condescending. Why can’t people can’t have an appreciation for pretty things without being considered Stepford wifeish? Being into crafts and baking and decorating doesn’t make us old fashioned or trivial. It makes us self-sufficient. We can create beautiful things ourselves without having to go out and buy them, all while participating in something selffulfilling and therapeutic. It’s not so much that the new crop of women aren’t feminists—it’s just that the label “feminist” has such a bad connotation. I don’t think mainstream society really knows what it means. We need a better word to describe someone who advocates for women’s issues that isn’t automatically [synonymous] with “man-hater.” Bottom line is that the group provides encouragement and inspiration for

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women, whether it be through counseling, crafting, or just by offering a safe and cozy environment that’s empathetic and encouraging. Amy Cluck Sacramento

Smart meters made her sick? Re “Are SMUD smart meters a danger?” by Jeff vonKaenel (SN&R Greenlight, March 7): SMUD smart meters are a health danger, as I learned when PG&E smart meters were installed on my home. It took nearly two years before I experienced daily migraine headaches, heart palpitations and nosebleeds, which I’d never in my life had before. Combined with nausea, confusion and blurred vision, these symptoms led me to feel I was going downhill fast—like accelerated aging (I was only 50). At first, I didn’t know why I felt so bad, but when I traveled to a place for 10 days that at the time had no smart meters … all my symptoms stopped—only to start up again when I returned home. My symptoms matched those of microwave poisoning, so I had my smart meters removed. SMUD would be welladvised to follow the precautionary principle and reduce exposure to future

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lawsuits—not to mention making thousands of customers very ill. Cynthia Larson Berkeley

Smart Meter Awareness board speaks Re “Are SMUD smart meters a danger?” by Jeff vonKaenel (SN&R Greenlight, March 7): I am the director of Sacramento Smart Meter Awareness. Our board read your article and have several questions concerning the accuracy of your information published and the sources you used. [For instance], you published that “radio frequencies given off by Smart Meters are small compared to cellphones.” This is factually false and proven so by official SMUD documents that I have. We have information that is critical for the people of Sacramento to know about. You can be a hero and bring it to the people! Eric Windheim director Sacramento Smart Meter Awareness Editor’s note: Read a longer version of this letter at www.newsreview.com.

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YOU SEE THE DIFFERENCE 8   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13


PHOTO BY sTeveN cHea

Tuesday night live! Does Sacramento’s  passionate, if motley,  cabal of public commenters need more  time at city council? As City Hall deliberates possible changes to the rules for its weekly council meetings, by Mac Worthy—the most loyal, if notoriNick Miller ous, public commenter—probably has something to say. ni ckam@ news r eview.c om That’s because Worthy always gets a word in. He attends nearly every council meeting, often weighing in on multiple agenda items; at a recent one, he spoke on three items for a total of six minutes—but told SN&R he’d “hoped to talk on four for eight.” He claims to have only missed two meetings over the past couple years, a better attendance record than the mayor. And it’s also not unusual to spot him at committee hearings, county board of supervisor gatherings, local protests and other city’s council powwows. Heck, he was even eyed at the California Republican Party convention earlier this month. Worthy is, on the surface, Nick Miller regularly Sacramento’s model citizen. But regulars updates city council at these meetings and events chide him coverage live on Twitter. Follow him at as the guy who speaks too often, too fast, @NickMiller916. and too incomprehensibly, what with his Southern cadence and occasional rapidfire randomness. Even a police officer at City Hall, Worthy says, once told him that he “speaks too much.” The 71-year-old South Carolina native comments so frequently that he’s now Internet famous: Sacramento Kings supporters—de rigueur at council these days as well—recently created a popular online meme: a picture of Worthy standing at the podium with the words “pimping the people” emblazoned in large type across the photo. Indeed, “pimping the people.” It’s Worthy’s new mantra at Tuesday night council, and he, along with his coterie of fellow commenters, recites it often— perhaps ad nauseam—when lecturing city leaders on their wrongdoings. Worthy accepts that he has naysayers. But he points out that he also has fans. “I have people walk up to me and say, ‘Hey, you are that guy downtown. Keep doing what you’re doing,’” he says.

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Oak Park resident Mac Worthy is possibly the most loyal, if notorious, public commenter in the Sacramento region.

So goes the bizarre cult of anti-personality that sometimes plays out live each Tuesday night at city council. And a new proposal by local activist group Eye on Sacramento would give public commenters like Worthy more time in front of the dais each week. Craig Powell, executive director of EOS, said that a his group analyzed nearly a decade of council meetings and discovered that during Mayor Kevin Johnson’s tenure, they’re shorter than ever.

“And I think that the current mayor probably does not enjoy those meetings as much as his predecessor,” he added. Maybe this was why, a few years back, council voted to lower the amount of time the public was allowed to speak from three minutes to two. The goal here was to keep the meetings moving. Yet, according to the EOS study, this trim only saved an average of 21 minutes each meeting. “And it has really degraded the quality of the public comments,” Powell argued.

“A lot of kids come up to me and say, ‘You got to slow down with your talking, we don’t understand what you’re saying.’ That’s actually why I need more time.” Mac Worthy on why he needs three minutes instead of two to speak at city council As the report reads: “The average length of city council meetings over the past four years has been 2 [hours], 41 [minutes], down from 5 [hours], 24 [minutes] during the final four years of Heather Fargo’s tenure as mayor, a remarkable 50 [percent] reduction.” The gatherings are briefer now, Powell explained, because council members tend to talk less among themselves during meetings and more behind the scenes or outside of meetings, and items are often removed from the discussion agenda to the consent calendar (where they are up-down voted on without debate).

The EOS proposal asks that the public be permitted three minutes of comment for most council items—but with the caveat that there’s a cap on the total amount of minutes allowed. “We call this the ‘Mac Worthy Rule,’” he said. Worthy himself likes the idea. “A lot of kids come up to me and say, ‘You got to slow down with your talking, we don’t understand what you’re saying,’” he told SN&R. “That’s actually why I need more time, because I can’t get everything in there. In Roseville, you get five minutes!”

At another recent council meeting, a woman taps Worthy on the shoulder. “Early bird,” she says. He looks up, smiles, then continues shuffling through a notebook while seated in an aisle seat of the second row. It’s more than a halfhour before the meeting’s start. Tonight, there are few commenters, likely because there’s but one agenda item, an update on the Sacramento Kings situation. One praises the mayor and even sings, another rants about crack in Oak Park. And then there’s Worthy, blasting council over the prospect of using public money for private development. That’s right: “Pimping the people.” “Understand a pimp,” Worthy begins after the meeting, explaining his catchphrase. “What does a pimp do? Wait on his money. And that’s what the political people do. Wait on their money. They’re not doing anything.” Is this why, ostensibly, there are fewer people interested in making public comments? Powell, an on-off figure at council meetings for years, concedes that the public is seemingly less engaged with local government. “Yes, I think that’s true. “But I think part of it is that people get discouraged when they go down to council and they have 120 seconds to make their case.” Would an extra minute make a difference? Ω

  F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |    03.21.13    

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Dressed in a forest-green jumpsuit with his thinning black hair combed forward, Hafed Mohamed Thabet casts a by Raheem F. relaxed gaze through the oily jailhouse Hosseini window. In a few days, the 42-yearold convicted murderer will be ra h e e m h @ deported to his fractious home country ne w s re v i e w . c o m of Yemen—never to set foot back on American soil again—and he couldn’t be happier. In 1993, Thabet emptied a secondhand revolver into the back of Ahmed Ali Alharsami at a country gas station in Amador County, 50-odd miles east of Sacramento. The broad-daylight crime rocked the wooded hamlet but was a long-time coming for Thabet, who watched Alharsami pump his father full of machine-gun lead when he was just a boy. At the time he pulled the trigger, the 23-year-old Thabet knew little about the American justice system—hell, he didn’t even speak the language. He just knew the courts back home had sentenced this man to die, and that it was his sacred duty— even 18 years after the fact—to mete out that justice. Thabet spent nearly 20 years in Mule Creek State Prison before winning a parole date in September 2012. It took four appearances before state parole commissioners to squeeze out that decision, and another five months to learn whether the governor would overturn it. Thabet discovered the answer to that question when he called his niece, Sabah Algazali, in Stockton one Saturday and heard traditional Yemeni wedding music blasting through the prison payphone. “I asked him if he wanted an arranged marriage or was going to wait for true love,” giggled Algazali. Thabet’s initial response, she recalls, was one of skepticism: “He said, ‘Are you tripping?’” Thabet’s home for the past month has been a small cell on the sixth floor of the Sacramento County Main Jail, Read Scott Thomas where he’s floated in limbo with all Anderson and Raheem the other immigration holds of indeF. Hosseini’s feature terminate fate. But unlike those poor, story “Murder in the foothills” at huddled, arrested masses—Mexicans, http://tinyurl.com/ South Americans and at least one murderyemen. Australian—Thabet knew he was going back. He just wasn’t sure when. The accommodations have been less than stellar. Unlike that state prison in the bucolic foothills, this cramped tower of pods downtown offers no daylight or programming. Inmates can receive emails but not

letters, and can send letters but not emails. Evening phone privileges are suspended. But Thabet’s mind is elsewhere. His pending release has reawakened tensions between two interconnected families. Algazali is the eldest daughter of Alharsami and Thabet’s older sister; she has tried to bring peace to both sides by advocating Thabet’s freedom and putting an end to the 40-year-old feud that has seen at least five casualties. But members of the Alharsami family have focused their anger on Algazali, who broke with cultural tradition by speaking out about the families’ internecine history. The 40-year-old grandmother hopes to visit her sickly mother in Yemen some time this summer, and speaks casually about the possibility she might not make it back. “If this is what God wants, it’s already been set,” she said. Thabet, meanwhile, worries after the niece who reached out to him during his darkest moment. He has other concerns, too. Thabet was 19 when he left home, and spent his entire adulthood in the California penal system. If the man who is neither American nor fully Yemeni can’t build a home in Yemen, he’s already thinking of where he might try next. Egypt, Syria—the nations he once considered are buried in their own revolutionary chaos. “The old, historic buildings in Syria are mostly gone now,” Thabet reflected. He doesn’t know if he has a home yet, but it won’t be long before Thabet finds out. Early Tuesday morning last week, a couple of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents put Thabet on a plane bound for the Yemen capital of Sana’a. He touched down Wednesday night. When his mother—who fell from a three-story roof when she learned of her husband’s murder—set eyes on her long-gone son, she fainted. Thabet worried their reunion was too much for her. “I didn’t think me seeing her would kill her out of happiness,” he told Algazali. Once his mother regained consciousness, however, the Thabet family—finally intact—celebrated into the dawn. Ω


Downtown up New generation of downtown business owners, residents aim to take grid’s future into their own hands

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Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

People lament over it in the coffee shops, point out its potential while walking K Street and argue over best solutions while drinking beer at Capitol Garage. It’s a question by Dave Kempa every downtown 20- and 30-something central-city dweller has asked: How do we bring downtown davek@ Sacramento to its full potential? How do we make it ours? new sre view.c om Now, a group of young business owners and residents are taking the matter into their own hands. Turn Downtown Around, an organization started by local designer Demetri Gregorakis and Blackbird Kitchen & Bar chef and owner Carina Lampkin, held its first open forum on this past Monday, March 18, inside Downtown Plaza. The meeting was both an introduction to the people of downtown and also an opportunity for young, socially conscious members of the community to network and exchange ideas. “We need to build the city today, and not in 2020,” said Lampkin to the gathering of around 75 community members. “That’s what Turn Downtown Around is.” While in its nascent stage, TDA is already making things happen. Earlier this month, the group held its first fundraiser, “Beer Bust,” from which they managed to raise around $7,500. Lampkin says this money will be going “We need to build the city to fund a mural project: today, and not in 2020.” Local artists will display their talents over the fencing that Carina Lampkin now blocks off what is essenfounder, Turn Downtown Around tially a hole in the ground on the west end of downtown. The forum consisted of a panel including head of community news outlet Sacramento Press Jared Goyette, and the local historian William Burg, who presented a slideshow of downtown’s history. One attendee asked the group about how to deal with news outlets that focus less on the community and more on the future of the Sacramento Kings. “The short answer is: Be your own media,” said Goyette, a response that rang particularly true to this collective, which included members of Hacker Lab (a local technology cooperative) and social-media-fluent millennials. Asked what he thought the unifying factor for turning downtown around, Burg said, “I don’t think we know what it is yet.” Then he considered. “It’s the energy.” And the energy was certainly in the room on Monday when artist Danny Scheible stood up to speak at the close of the forum, urging everyone to get out and do their thing. Anything. “I don’t care what it is,” said the artist, who makes artwork out of tape and calls his style “Tapigami.” “It could be just looking good. … It all makes a difference.” At the moment, TDA hopes to gain its status as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, as well as build a relationship with community members in order to form a unifying front in dealing with local politicians. The group’s next fundraiser is set for June, and it hopes to pull in $75,000 that time around to help improve the quality of life downtown. Ω

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Quality verse Annual brouhaha over CEQA makes   mad flow for this writer If CEQA stood for “Challenge Everything, Question Authority” instead of California Environmental Quality Act, there probably wouldn’t be all this political drama. CEQA would be celebrated. Like YOLO. The Lonely Island might even follow up its “YOLO” song with a CEQA number: Don’t take no guff or calcified static. The system’s insane, got bats in the attic. Challenge everything! caplowdown@newsreview.com It’s the right way to go. Question authority! Don’t be no button-down schmo.

CAS by GREG LU

enteR sn&R’s 2013 College essay Contest! It’s time again to reward local high-school seniors for their writing skills with SN&R’s annual College Essay Contest. Seniors, we want to read your collegeapplication essays—and we’ve got cash prizes to help with school. We’ll give a $2,013 first-place award, a $750 second-place award and a $250 third prize. We’ll also print the winners in a May issue of SN&R. Rules: This contest is open to high-school seniors graduating in 2013 only. If you’re heading to college but did not write an essay for your application, feel free to do so now. Only one entry is allowed per student, and you must live in the Sacramento region to apply. Essays will be judged anonymously. No SN&R employees or their relatives may enter. Include this information with your entry: Your name; title of essay; your address, email and phone number; high school attended; college you applied to with this essay; and college you’ll be attending. DeaDline: Email your essay to collegeessay@newsreview.com by 5 p.m. on Friday, April 19.

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It’s harder—but not impossible— to build a catchy tune around the California Environmental Quality Act. Apparently, it’s also hard for a legislative session to go by without some major call for CEQA overhaul. For Republicans and moderate Dems, from the Central Valley and the Inland Em, CEQA’s so unwieldy and so expensive, the delay for projects is too extensive. The more that gets built, more people to employ, add it all together, you get economic joy.

As the head of the Senate, sure, Darrell’s got power. But so far, at least, he’s singing alone in the shower. “Modernize” is this year’s CEQA revise. Except what modernize means depends on the eyes. CEQA is supposed to keep the environment strong by examining projects to make sure they aren’t wrong. An impact report scopes the whole situation. If everything’s chill, there’s a negative declaration. It was a Republican idea back in 1970—even then-Gov. Ronald Reagan believed CEQA was heavenly. Forty years back, talkin’ hot pants and the first Earth Day, way before several members’ of the Assembly birthdays. Internet was a gleam in Al Gore’s eye; say “Text me” or “Google,” and people’d think you were high.

Over the years, CEQA’s stayed largely the same. But in 2013, California’s got a new game. Now, CEQA just stomps on the bad, it doesn’t reward the good. Isn’t transit-friendly infill better than paving Muir Woods? Maybe a new project already fits a master plan. Doesn’t that deserve a quick CEQA scan? “Correct,” says Sen. Tom Berryhill, Modesto GOP. “‘I’ve got a bill’ makes CEQA like ‘one, two and three.’” Do right by the fish and the air and the other laws that protect them, no need to do it again in CEQA, assalamu alaykum. Quoth Sen. B.: “It’s a job issue for me. My bill’s all about efficiency.” Gov. Jerry Brown, Berryhill notes, says parts of CEQA need to go, create more “consistent standards” so approval’s not so slow. What exactly’s consistent, Jerry ain’t saying, but he just did a CEQA end run to build some solar arraying. Berryhill claims his bill makes CEQA more modern. Opponents say he turns logic on its noggin’. Go the Berryhill route and CEQA’s castrated, knowing a project’s overall impact all but negated. “I enter this debate at some personal peril. Some call me Steinberg. My first name’s Darrell. My CEQA riff is the choicest of all. I’m so on track, everything else smokes crack.” His goal is CEQA modernization, Steinberg says of his bill. But it’s def modernization, not that dub Berryhill. Steinberg says infill’s the kind, so a CEQA OK should be less of a grind. If there’s a similar project within short memory, no need to get all supplementary. CEQA gets sleek, California goes long—or so says Darrell—if we start singing his song. As the head of the Senate, sure, Darrell’s got power. But so far, at least, he’s singing alone in the shower. Enviros dig one part but spew over that. Business groups say bogarting CEQA is phat. Trial lawyers want to sue all parties with ease. If a compromise is found, it can’t Jerry displease. So what’s to be done, which way will it go? Depends how the wind blows. Too early to know. Ω


Not by the numbers Former teacher falls out of good graces with district over school-closure disagreement Karen Swett is something of a guru when it comes to school budgets, particularly in the Sacramento City Unified School District, where she was once a teacher. Though retired from the district, she was until a few weeks ago given access to the school district’s online budget data. It’s all public information, but most of us have to go through the district public-information vIN aR G office to get it. Swett got to pull informaO SM by CO tion for herself, accessing the online cosmog@ newsrev iew.c om system, called Escape, and the ability to generate reports on her own. She says the access came from Superintendent Jonathan Raymond himself, so that she might help the community better understand school budgets. Swett used her access and her knowledge to work with parents and with the many official school site councils—made up of teachers and parents and principals—who meet to figure out how to make the best of the limited dollars available to each school. She even formed a little nonprofit called Making Cents Work, to help school sites and residents navigate the sometimes bewildering terrain of school finance. For the most part, Swett kept a pretty low profile, even when she saw things at the district she didn’t agree with. But she couldn’t keep quiet about the district’s mass closure of schools in Sacramento low-income neighborhoods. It didn’t make any sense to her, didn’t save much money, and much more money was being wasted or left on the table in the form of “categorical” funds from the state. She said so, leading community meetings and working with others who are fighting school closures to come up with an “alternative budget.” She tried to talk some members of the Sac city school board of trustees, hoping to show them just how damaging and unnecessary the school closures were. But those men had already made up their minds long ago. Jonathan Raymond giveth, Jonathan Raymond taketh away. For wavering from the district’s line, the district cut Swett off from the valuable budget information. “It has become very clear to me that the information that you are providing to sites and to Board members does not clearly and accurately reflect the actual financial position of the District,” wrote Richard E. Odegaard, the district’s interim financial officer, to Swett. “Your access will be terminated effective today.” Swett was getting increasingly vocal about the fact that many of the schools slated for closure consistently have big chunks of restricted or categorical state money left over every year. You can see that clearly in the financial reports that the district has made public. The disagreement is merely over how much

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flexibility the district has with those funds. Swett says a lot, the district says none. And it’s pretty clear the district cut Swett off because she was contradicting them. “There has seemed to be a misunderstanding from some in the community about district budgets and available resources,” said district spokesman Gabe Ross. The “lack of context” around the budget data from the online system, said Ross, “may have contributed to the confusion, hence the timing of the decision.” A lot of people are still working hard to keep these neighborhood schools open—even as the district tries to shut up its critics and finish the deed. Perhaps that is why district officials are moving to clamp off public information. The new political group Hmong Innovating Politics is still organizing parents at the affected schools. A civil-rights lawsuit is in the works—students of color account for 93 percent of the kids displaced by the decision— as is a grand-jury complaint.

Many displaced students are getting shunted into schools they don’t want to go to. Some parents are pushing for recall of certain board members. That seems to Bites unlikely to succeed, unless the teachers’ union throw in money and volunteers in hopes of getting a new board and getting rid of Raymond. That would be morally complicated for them, however, since the union has been in favor of school closures in the past and was late in opposing this plan. It seems more likely that some board members will find it a bit harder to win re-election, or they may get the cold shoulder from some former allies when they reach for higher office—say, county supervisor. Bites figures the old rules still apply, and under the old rules the politicians who voted to close schools likely won’t pay the price for their actions. Poorer communities, the ones that are most hurt by this decision, are still the least likely to come out to the polls. But people are mad, and the district keeps giving them more reasons to be. Many displaced students are getting shunted into schools they don’t want to go to, even though they were promised “priority” in the openenrollment process. And the more the district does clumsy, autocratic things, like cutting its critics off from information, the madder folks will get. Ω

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I love sports. I love playing sports, I love watching sports, and I spend a considerable amount of time thinking about sports. At the final reckoning, I expect to tell St. Peter I was concerned about world peace and climate change, but he will probably point out that, based on my time sheet, I spent more time worrying about the Cleveland Indians and the Sacramento Kings. Pleading guilty, I will ask for reduced time in purgatory, because I have already spent so much time in sports purgatory with my losing teams, the Indians and the Kings. Neither has won a championl ne ae nK by Jeff Vo ship in my lifetime. While I love the teams and the players, it is j e ffv @ne wsr e v ie w.c o m painfully clear that the billionaire owners and millionaire players do not love me or their fans. In fact, they hold us in contempt. With such a crying need for schools, homeless shelters, libraries and bridges, how can they demand tax subsidies for their stadiums? They can because the sports leagues have been given special federal anti-trust exemptions, which allow them to form a sports monopoly. Since there are more cities than teams, the league can play one city off against The losers are the another, as we see with the taxpayers and the Seattle and Sacramento battle. The winners are the National fans, who have Basketball Association owners. losers are the taxpayers to provide higher The and the fans, who have to subsidies and pay provide higher subsidies and pay higher ticket prices if they higher ticket prices want to keep or gain a team. The NBA’s annual revenue if they want to keep is $4.3 billion. On the average, million per or gain a team. this equals $143 NEWS & REVIEW BUSINES year per team. With such a ISSUE DATE large revenueDESIGNER stream, the NBA AL 06.18.09 and other major-league sports teams should be able to build FILE NAME and pay for their own arenas and stadiums. Somehow, TRINITYCATHEDRAL061809R1 nearly all private-sector businesses pay for their own offices USP (BOLD SELECTI and factory buildings. / ATMOSPHERE / EXPE Some will argue that sports teams cannotPRICE afford to pay for their own arenas. It’s true that some sports teams PLEASE are losing money, but look at how much they pay theirCAREFULLY REV ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY T Jeff vonKaenel players. Players’ salaries are absurd. Believe me, the NBA SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES) is the president, does not need to worry about their players AD being recruited SPELLING CEO and away. Very few businesses have a pressing need to find an majority owner of NUMBERS & DATES the News & Review extremely tall person who can put a leather ball into a small CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDR newspapers in metal hoop. AD sports APPEARS AS REQUESTED Sacramento, It is time we re-examine the major-league antiChico and Reno. trust exemption. We could go to a system similar APPROVED BY: to youth soccer, where teams move up or down in position based on their win-loss record. These anti-trust exemptions for sports teams have enabled the team owners to extort subsidies from cities as the Maloofs are doing now with the competition between Seattle and Sacramento. This is a dysfunctional relationship. It is not healthy to love somebody who holds you in contempt. Ω


Hope for the pope? A papal conclave can be a bit like World Cup soccer: an exotic spectacle that makes international headlines every few years, full of colorful costumes and unfathomable rules, capable of rousing great passion in certain parts of the world but little more than a curiosity for most Americans. It all can seem archaic, irrelevant and even a bit comical—until you remember what’s at stake in choosing a spiritual leader for the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics. As leader of the world’s largest Christian denomination, the pope can have significant impact on a variety of issues, including abortion rights, same-sex marriage, population control and climate change. Whether or not you belong to the roughly 25 percent of Americans who identify as Catholic, you are affected by the appointment of a new pope—for better or worse. The elevation of Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, now known as Pope Francis, has been greeted with great joy in some quarters, particularly in his native Argentina. He is the papacy’s first Jesuit and the first to hail from Latin America, a region now home to 40 percent of the world’s Catholics. His quick appointment has been viewed as an acknowledgment that the future of the church is in the global south and as a pre-emptive strike against the possible rise of more aggressively reform-minded candidates. Unfortunately, reform is exactly what the church needs. Around the world, and especially in Europe and the United States, the percentage of Catholics practicing their faith—as measured by attenPope Francis’ dance at mass, number of priests résumé is a ordained and participation in sacraments—is in decline. There disappointment for are undoubtedly many reasons for this, including the Vatican’s everyone hoping for continued insistence on outdated sweeping changes. and unreasonable doctrines, such as its ban on contraception and refusal to ordain women, and the fallout from a sexual-abuse scandal involving more than 6,000 priests in the United States alone and tens of thousands of victims around the world. Pope Francis’ résumé is a disappointment for everyone hoping for sweeping changes. He is a theological conservative who has vigorously supported church bans on contraception, abortion, the ordination of women and same-sex marriage. And his record with regard to human rights is troubling: During the 1970s, he failed to stand up to his nation’s military dictatorship as it kidnapped, tortured and killed some 30,000 Argentinians. (In fact, there are allegations he secretly aided the regime in some instances.) But Pope Francis may have little choice but to work for change. The Catholic Church desperately needs to move away from a system of governance modeled on 17th-century monarchies and toward increased transparency, accountability and decentralization of authority. Without simple, common-sense changes in doctrines banning contraception, prohibiting priests from marrying, and barring women from the priesthood, there will be fewer priests and more empty pews with each passing year. A more reasonable, responsive and relevant Catholic Church could have an enormously positive influence as issues of gender equality, the rights of gays and lesbians, climate change, and other concerns reach their tipping points in coming years. We hope Pope Francis can rise to the occasion and lead the way to much-needed reforms. Ω

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03.21.13     |   SN&R     |   15


It 

seems as if California  Democrats are unchallengeable now. The  Republican Party is in a  shambolic state, down to 29  percent of the electorate  and falling, while Democrats  are ascendant, occupying  all statewide offices and  having recently won more  than two-thirds of the seats  in both houses of the state  Legislature, plus the California  congressional delegation.

They say everything that   goes up must come down.  Here are five ways California  Democrats could screw up   their supermajority.

Bill Bradley by

16   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13

However, despite the smashing victory for Gov. Jerry Brown and the Democratic Party last November with Proposition 30—which stands as a rebuke to the anti-tax atmosphere engendered more than 30 years ago by the passage of the Proposition 13 property-tax initiative—things could still go very wrong for Democrats. In fact, an early warning may have just arrived from heavily Democratic Los Angeles. In this month’s election, a half-cent sales-tax measure to fund cash-strapped Los Angeles city government went down big, 55 percent to 45 percent, despite backing from the Democratic city council and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. Former Gov. Gray Davis has a sense of how things can go well in politics and how things can go south. He was Brown’s chief of staff for seven years during his first two terms as governor in the 1970s and early 1980s. Davis went on to win two statewide offices before winning two terms of his own as governor, only to be recalled in the midst of a budget crisis and in the aftermath of an electric-power crisis. “Everything that goes up,” as he noted in a recent discussion, “can also come down.” The question is: How might that happen? And how soon? Democratic strategist David Townsend argues that the Republican Party is “too white, too right and too uptight.” But Townsend does see a major problem on the horizon. “I think,” he says, “that someday, the pension balloon is going to come crashing down and could give a Republican a shot of riding it to the governor’s office. Short of that, the Republicans can’t get out of their own way. I think California is going to stay blue a long time.” Republicans are sounding pretty modest these days. New California GOP chairman Jim Brulte says he is “dedicated to the nuts and bolts” of reviving his party. He promises little more than a “legitimate” candidate to run against Brown, who has made no announcement but shows every sign of going for a record fourth term as governor. “I doubt any Dems run against the governor, but I think the GOP should be able to field a legitimate candidate,” says Aaron McLear, who was the chief spokesman for the No on 30 campaign against Brown’s 2012


revenue initiative. Prior to that, he was a Republican National Committee staffer and former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s last gubernatorial press secretary. “The Dems will overreach,” he predicts, “and run a government that continues to serve public-employee unions at the expense of all else. The question is whether and when the GOP can take advantage of that.” Here are five potential pitfalls for the ascendant Democrats. It might well take a combination of troubles for the Democrats to fall:

1. ShortageS in public penSionS and retiree health care There are lots of estimates of the shortfall in public pensions. But it seems clear that there is a shortfall of $150 billion or more. Brown signed legislation that raises the retirement age for new state employees, limits annual benefits to $132,120 and requires increased contributions from state workers who aren’t contributing half of their retirement costs. But that’s for the future. An unfunded liability remains. McLear argues that Democrats have already done the damage to themselves. “They already did screw it up on pensions,” he states. “Brown got rolled and agreed to far less than his initial plan, which he said was the ‘minimum’ that needs [to be] done. Now that they’ve checked the box on pensions, they won’t come back to it, which means employee costs will continue to grow and crowd out welfare, higher ed, K-12, parks, transportation and all else.” The numbers when it comes to shortfalls in retiree health care are not as daunting as the pension numbers. But they are still big. In contrast to the pension system, which creates a fund that can generate earnings to cover expenses, the state’s retiree health-care system operates on a payas-you-go basis. But as State Controller John Chiang reported early this year, the state has a more than $60 billion gap over the next 30 years. How the governing Democrats deal with this over time will prove very interesting. So far, there are few indications.

2. overdelivering to the democratic baSe, underdelivering to the democratic baSe In the latest Field Poll, 57 percent of California voters say Democrats favor “too many big government projects that the state cannot afford right now.” Democratic constituencies have many agendas, from the social-safety network to the environment and beyond. There’s always a danger in going too far. When Davis came in as governor following 16 years of Republican governorships, he was beset by many demands from constituencies that had gone wanting. While he initially resisted much of the many wish lists he received, he did go along with quite a few things after being weakened in the electric-power crisis. That, and Republican refusal to raise taxes, helped produce a budget crisis. But as Davis notes now, Brown does not have quite the same scale of demands today, as Schwarzenegger was more moderate than the two

Republicans, Pete Wilson and George Deukmejian, who preceded the Davis governorship. Conversely, there is a danger in doing too little. If nothing happens to change people’s lives for the better, cynicism can set in and Democratic-base enthusiasm can flatten.

3. too many taxeS, a Sour economy The failure of this month’s tax-hike measure in Democratic-friendly Los Angeles was telling, proving again that voters require a serious selling job to approve new revenues, especially coming from themselves and especially when they’re suspicious about how the money’s being spent.

I think that, someday,  the pension balloon is  going to come crashing  down and could give  a Republican a shot  of riding it to the  governor’s office. david townsend Democratic strategist

Los Angeles, like other cities, has a local government that is finding an increasing share of its revenue going to compensation and benefits for current public employees and retirees, while public services continue at the same level or even decline. Two Democrats will fight it out in the May runoff for mayor; a Republican challenger finished a distant third with a measly 16 percent of the vote, so the tax-hike measure wasn’t trounced by a flood of Republicans. Democratic prospects in L.A. aren’t hurt in this election cycle by the crunch between spending and revenues. But in the long run, they may well be. And California as a whole is not nearly so Democratic as Los Angeles. There is also a lot of debate about where California ranks among the states on the level of taxation. But there is little debate that that level has gone up. We did, after all, just enact Prop. 30, which places a sizable surcharge on high-income taxpayers and a quarter-cent increase in the sales tax. The Field Poll finds that 52 percent of voters worry about “tax policies that are hurting California’s economy.” That’s a number today.

But prior to Brown’s trip east last month for the National Governors Association conference, a major Washington Post story ran with leading economists debunking conservative claims that Prop. 30 will negatively impact California’s economy. The question is when the tax burden will have an impact beyond a few professional golfers. Meanwhile, California is turning around. The economy has improved significantly since the depths of the great global recession. Unemployment is still 9.8 percent. That’s two percentage points above the national rate. However, the state economy has grown a great deal over the past year. California’s unemployment rate fell by 1.4 percentage points in 2012. That’s twice as good as the national improvement during the same time period. But the national economic recovery is anemic, with threats all over. The federal budget sequester has had little immediate impact, but could weigh on the economy over time. The continuing crisis of the eurozone is a worrying factor, as is economic slowdown in China. Then there is the possibility of war, with conflict over Iran’s nuclear program always looming on the horizon. A big spike in oil prices would devastate California. These are mega-factors that no governor or legislative leadership can affect. But as Davis pointed out, “The people in charge get the credit for good times and the blame for bad times. That’s the way it works.”

4. ScandalS and cronieS A governing party can become a ruling party. As California moves ever closer to becoming a oneparty state, the prospect of scandal becomes greater. We’ve seen it in neighboring Mexico, where the longruling PRI (Institutional Revolutionary Party) finally lost power after being engulfed in scandal. (Only to win it back from the new conservative party, but that’s another story.) And we’ve seen it in Japan, where the long-ruling Liberal Democratic Party was also engulfed in scandal and also lost power. Only to win it back in the wake of massive governmental fumbling around the 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. Although there have been a few scandals here and there, especially at the level of local government, California has been largely free of political scandal. But if that were to change, for the party in power at the center, things could become problematic for Democrats. Also problematic: 47 percent of California voters in the Field Poll say Brown “favors organized labor too much.” Being seen as the creature of any one powerful constituency is never a good thing in politics. As Republicans are noting with regard to the wealthy. Put this perception together with other problems, especially dissatisfaction with public services, and Democrats have a significant problem.

“pin the fail on the donkey” contuned on page 19

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03.21.13     |   SN&R     |   17


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Baagan Hawks La Huaca Restaurant Mikuni Kaizen Paul Martin’s American Grill

Best Burger

California Burgers Five Guys Burgers and Fries The Habit Burger Grill Smashburger Squeeze Inn

Best Breakfast    or Brunch

Four Sisters Cafe The Original Pancake House Pacific Street Cafe Venita Rhea’s Waffle Barn

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Blue Nami Ichiban Sushi Izumi Sushi Kenro’s a Taste of Japan Mikuni Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar Raku Sushi Sushi House Sushi Mon by Sky

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Bombay Bistro India Oven Mehfil Indian Restaurant Namaste Nepal Tandoori Nights

Best coffeehouse Bloom Coffee & Tea Edwin’s Coffee & Tea Extreme Java Jungle Cafe Lollicup Coffee & Tea Shady Coffee and Tea

Best spot    for cocktails

Basic Bar & Kitchen The Boxing Donkey Irish Pub Crush 29 The Onyx Club Owl Club Perfecto Lounge The Place Sammy’s Rockin’ Island Bar & Grill Sports Page Restaurant and Bar The Station The Trocadero

Best place to get your  hair lookin’ good Avalon Day Spa & Salon The Garage Hair & Skin Lounge Gloss Salon The Headgame Naveah Shades Hair Color Bar and Salon Sola Salon Studios Willo Aveda

Best yoga spot

Aerie Yoga East Wind Yoga Purple Moon Hot Yoga ShriKula Yoga Veera Yoga Zuda Yoga

Best golf course

Diamond Oaks Golf Course Morgan Creek Golf Club Sunset Whitney Golf Club Whitney Oaks Golf Club Woodcreek Golf Club

Best of folsom SN&R BeSt of the BuRBS NomiNeeS foR the gReateR-folSom aRea

Best restaurant

Back Wine Bar & Bistro Bamiyan Afghan Restaurant Chez Daniel LO: Land Ocean New American Grill Sergio’s Steak & Seafood

Sienna Restaurant Sutter Street Grill Sutter Street Steakhouse

Best Burger

Bidwell Street Bistro Burgerocity Folsom Sports Garage, Sports Bar and Grill Relish Burger Bar Samuel Horne’s Tavern

Best sandwich

Beach Hut Deli The Black Rooster Dominick’s NY Pizza & Deli Great Harvest Bread Co. Jacks’ Urban Eats Mama Ann’s Italian Market, Deli & Bakery Mr. Pickle’s Sandwich Shop San Francisco Sourdough Eatery Selland’s Market-Cafe

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Aloha Sushi Blue Nami Chiyo Sushi Ginza Sushi Bar & Grill Jinju Sushi Sky Sushi Sushi Kuma Suishin Sushi Sushi Unlimited Taiko Sushi

Best chinese

Folsom Palace Folsom Sunny Garden Hop Sing Palace Rice Express T2Yan Yummy Kitchen

Best pizza

The Cellar Wine Bar Chicago Fire Ciro’s Pizza Cafe Dominick’s NY Pizza & Deli Girasole Pizza Pete’s Restaurant & Brewhouse Pizzeria Classico Pronto’s New York Pizzeria Skipolini’s Pizza

Best place for a Beer

Best sandwich

Best yoga spot

Best Breakfast    or Brunch

36 Handles The Fat Rabbit Public House Lockdown Brewing Co. Manderes Pete’s Restaurant & Brewhouse Samuel Horne’s Tavern Sudwerk Riverside Restaurant & Brewhouse Bikram Yoga Folsom Broadstone Racquet Club GoTa Yoga Hot Yoga at Sunrise Kevala Yoga Leap Yoga Radiant Yoga Zuda Yoga

Best of elk GRove SN&R BeSt of the BuRBS NomiNeeS foR the gReateR-elk gRove aRea

Best restaurant

Boulevard Bistro Silva’s Sheldon Inn Thai Chili Restaurant Happy Garden De Vinci’s Delicatessen & Catering Yoshi Japanese Restaurant Red Chopstix Loving Hut Todo Un Poco Brick House Restaurant & Lounge Mikuni Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar

Best place    to get a Burger

Boulevard Bistro Brick House Restaurant & Lounge Cheese Steak Restaurant Coach’s Classic Bar & Grill Elk Grove Sports Bar & Grill The Habit Burger Grill Sheldon Bar & Grill Silva’s Sheldon Inn Stagecoach Restaurant Superb Subs

votiNg BegiNS thuRSday, maRch 28, at www.NewSReview.com. 18   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13

Baguettes Deli Beach Hut Deli Cheese Steak Restaurant De Vinci’s Delicatessen & Catering La Bou Mr. Pickle’s Sandwich Shop Nugget Markets Pho Huy Hoang’s banh mi

Boulevard Bistro Brick House Breakfast Restaurant & Lounge Stagecoach Restaurant Mr. Perry’s Original Perry’s Mimi’s Cafe Berts Diner The Original Mike’s Diner Mel Dog’s Cafe Jah Cafe

Best sushi

Crazy Sushi Fuji Sushi Buffet Kame Japanese Seafood Buffet Kintaro Sushi Bar Mikuni Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar Osaka Sushi Japanese Restaurant Satori Sushi & Teriyaki Grill Suki Sushi Wasabi Japanese Steak House Yoshi Japanese Restaurant

Best pizza

Cool River Pizza Fat Mike’s Pizza Laguna Pizza Lamppost Pizza Master Pizza New York Pizza Old Town Pizza & Tap House Original Pete’s Paesanos Pizza Bell


“pin the fail on the donkey” continued from page 17

5. No more Jerry BrowN One of the main reasons Prop. 30 passed was due to voter trust in Brown, which is more than 60 percent in the latest Field Poll. “Brown keeps the Democrats from looking out of control,” opines one leading Republican consultant who doesn’t want to offend now-dominant Democratic legislators. It would have been difficult for a candidate less established than Brown to have withstood billionaire Republican Meg Whitman’s avalanche of spending in 2010. While Brown has had a health scare or two—minor skin cancer and successfully treated prostate cancer— he seems good to go for another term. But then, term limits, enacted after his first governorship of the 1970s and 1980s, go into effect for him, too. And Democrats, in a post-Brown era, will have to hope that the party is still ahead of the game. Meanwhile, this year’s election cycle is well underway. Brown has some very nice polling numbers from the latest Field Poll. His job approval is up to 57 percent, the highest it’s been in this go-round as governor. Only 31 percent disapprove. And a plurality of California voters now believes the state is heading in the right direction, the highest that

It’s very hard to see how a Republican can beat Brown. Meanwhile, more numbers from the Field Poll carry more signs of a shift to the left by California voters. Same-sex marriage is now overwhelmingly favored by California voters, 61 percent to 32 percent, an almost exact turnaround over the past 36 years. In 1977, when Field first polled on gay marriage, it was overwhelmingly opposed, 59 percent to 28 percent. Same-sex marriage is now supported by all the major groupings in the state—ethnic, geographic, sociological, ideological, partisan, religious—with only three exceptions: conservatives, Republicans and Protestants. Or, put another way, the folks who met at the California Republican Party convention. Who weren’t at all happy about the Field Poll showing a whopping 90-percent level of voter support for granting longtime illegal immigrants a pathway to citizenship, as well as a majority backing drivers licenses for illegal immigrants. That followed polling showing strong support for California’s landmark climate-change program—70 percent of California voters back this controversial bête noire of the political right and fossil-fuel advocates—and for more stringent gun controls. There

Summer Starts Here

Independent Catholics Striving to live the Gospel message of love, peace & justice

Stations of the Cross & Reconciliation Service Friday, March 22, 7pm at Good Shepherd

Good Friday Friday, March 29, noon - 3pm at Good Shepherd

Easter Vigil Mass Saturday, March 30, 7pm at St. Michael’s There will be no Mass on Easter Sunday. Spirituality Series continues on April 7, 6:30pm at Good Shepherd. Sacred Stories: Gateways to the Divine - Joan Stockbridge

St. Michael’s Independent Catholic Church 920 Drever St. West Sacramento

5460 5th St. Rocklin Rocklin Parks & Rec Complex

Mass 5pm Sunday (916) 538–4774 www.GoodShepherdCommunity.org

Mass 5pm Saturday (916) 415–8688 www.StMichaelsRocklin.org

Independent Communities in the Catholic Tradition

The Dems will overreach and run  a government that continues to  serve public-employee unions at  the expense of all else. aaron Mclear Republican strategist

number has been since 2007, i.e., before the great global recession. A big majority, 55 percent to 39 percent, likes the fact that both houses of the Legislature are now in supermajority Democratic control. Republicans have until next year to come up with a candidate for governor, which they don’t have yet, even though at every state convention at this stage of the process in the past, there was a major candidate or two on hand to do the developmental work that anyone must do to mount a serious campaign.

is even a new Field Poll showing a 54-percent-to-43-percent majority of California voters now support legalizing marijuana. This is the highest, as it were, level ever. In 1969, only 13 percent favored legalization. After that rendition, the lights of 2014 look bright, indeed, for California Democrats. But as former Gov. Davis notes, “It’s important for Democrats not to get overconfident.” For the lights of present success can blind one to dangers on the horizon. Ω

Kickoff yours with

Summer Shandy Please drink responsibly.

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

03.21.13     |   SN&R     |   19


Paint it

O N   T H E   E v E   O f   H I S   9 0 T H   B I R T H d A Y,    G R E G O R Y   K O N d O S   d I S C U S S E S   A   L I f E T I M E  O f   L A N d S C A P E S ,   H I S   L O v E   f O R   S A C R A M E N T O  ANd WHY HE’S BIG IN CHINA BY JIM CAMERON

J

ust a few weeks shy of his 90th  birthday, Gregory Kondos still  displays the intellectual vigor  and acuity of a man one-third  his age. The old master pulls no  punches, displaying the honesty and  candor that’s been a highlight of his  approach to life.  Consider: “When I was asked to do a major piece of work for Terminal A at the [Sacramento International] Airport years ago, I took the job, even though the money was peanuts,” Kondos says. And where other artists turned down the job “because of the price,” he adds, “I did it because I owe that to the community. That’ll be my legacy. This is my city.” Kondos is just as direct when asked, “Why paint?” “Why live?” he responds. “Painting has been my life for over 60 years. I love it and can’t imagine doing anything else.” A snapshot of that life is currently on display at the Crocker Art Museum. A Touch of Blue: Landscapes of Gregory Kondos highlights the artist’s famed landscapes. Kondos, who will discuss his works at the museum on Saturday, March 23, also has works on display at the Blue Line Arts gallery in Roseville; in April, Sacramento City College will feature his black-and-white sketches. The Crocker exhibition is vast in its scope with 70 of the artist’s signature landscapes—pieces that appear deceptively simple. Here, there are no tricks or gimmicks or scenes meant to shock or titillate, just beautiful images that exude warmth and peace, yet also awaken the senses with the provocative color and composition.

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Kondos’ signature blue paint prominent, he employs bold brush strokes, adding touches of pinks, yellows, reds, purples and greens in unusual ways. Throughout the landscapes, Kondos’ distinctive trees and mountains are shaped in a style that’s often emulated by a legion of imitators. Of course, Kondos is not without his own influences. The artist’s acknowledged reverences for French postimpressionist painter Paul Cézanne and the Dutch abstract impressionist Willem de Kooning weave their way into the viewer’s consciousness. “If you can get just a piece of Cézanne in your art, you’ve accomplished a great deal,” Kondos says. “I believe I’ve been able to do that, and studying the boldness of de Kooning’s work helped release me from a more conservative style.” Kondos didn’t always think about being an artist; he didn’t start painting seriously, in fact, until he was 25. “I was serving in the Navy when I saw a Life magazine artist sketching scenes aboard ship. So, I tried sketching,” Kondos recalls. “He told me I was good. Then the captain noticed me and asked me to sketch him in exchange for beer. That sounded good to me, and that’s when it all started.” After his discharge from the Navy, Kondos studied art at Sacramento State University with the approval of his parents. “My parents weren’t art people and never saw a show of mine. But they always supported me,” he says. Now, Midtown’s Elliott Fouts Gallery owner Elliott Fouts calls Kondos “a giant.” “[He’s] defined the Sacramento landscape,” Fouts says. “Through years of devotion to this subject, he’s taken ownership of it,” he adds. “His selfless sharing of his insights through classroom and seminar settings over the last 60 years have ensured that three generations of painters carry on the traditions he established and, at 90, still perfects.”

Courtesy of CroCker Art MuseuM

blue PHOTOS BY WILLIAM LEUNG


Exiled in Sactown See NIGHT&DAY

24

The real Veganville See THE V WORD

27

Dancing ’til the end of time See COOLHUNTING

30

Hanging on the telephone See ASK JOEY

31

SCENE& HEARD Just say no, bro

“  I   d I d   I t    b e c a u s e   I   o w e  t h a t   t o   t h e  c o m m u n I t y.  t h a t ’ l l   b e   m y  l e g a c y.   t h I s  I s   m y   c I t y. ” Gregory Kondos on creating artwork for the Sacramento International Airport’s Terminal A

A Touch of Blue: Landscapes of Gregory Kondos is on display at the Crocker Art Museum (216 O Street) through May 19. Kondos will discuss his work at the museum on Saturday, March 23, at 1 p.m. The event is free with admission, $5-$10. For more info, visit www.crockerartmuseum.org. Landscape Interpretations by Greg Kondos and Mya Louw is on display through April 13, at Blue Line Arts, 405 Vernon Street, Suite 100 in Roseville; (916) 783-4117; www.rosevillearts.org. Happy 90th Birthday Gregory Kondos will be on display April 2-26, at the Gregory Kondos Gallery (inside the Fischbacher Fine Arts Building) at Sacramento City College, 3835 Freeport Boulevard; www.kondosgallery.org.

blue Paint it

“why are you wearing glasses? Are you on drugs?” the gelled-up fella leans over the bar and again barks  at the woman sporting an arm tattoo and prescription  lenses in 1950s frames. “are you on drugs? because I am.” “big-time,” she says, deadpan, and slides three Irish car bombs to a nearby patron. It’s 2:30 on sunday afternoon, but Kbar is brimming  with cologne-soaked bros and pretty, plastic gals. they’ve  come out for the K Street Krawl, a st. Patrick’s day pubcrawl celebration hosted by nine of the struggling city  center’s drinking establishments. the Krawl seems like a hit so far. but it’s certainly not  my style. It’s pulled in the slurring, sloppy crowd that I’ve  been avoiding since junior year in college.  you know the scene: the guys’ shirts are a little too  tight. the girls’ faces a bit too orange. top 40 songs  blasting, oppressive, over the sweaty venue’s sound  system. you can’t easily hold a conversation in here,  but you can belt out your favorite party calls—“woo.”  “yeah.” “Fuck yeah.”—or sing along with taylor swift  when the moment calls for it. some bars are more palatable than others. gallagher’s Irish Pub features live  music. tequila museo mayahuel, salsa dancing and cheap Mexican beer. district 30 is a  nightmare, but it’s an empty nightmare this afternoon, so  you can at least sit and reflect in peace under the green disco ball on what brought  you to make the decisions  you’ve made with your life,  and why you do these things  to yourself. as the sun goes down, the  Warning: This drink may tone of the Krawl takes on  turn you into a bro. something of an edge. shit  talking in bathroom lines.  Scuffles in the streets. a dark bmw swerving up and  down “the Kay,” carrying with it a hint of the pepper spray spewed forth by someone, somewhere, between  dive bar and social nightclub. the flavor of the evening is encapsulated for me by  a young man named Rich, who stops me as I’m walking  through Pizza Rock. “hey, are you an accountant?” no, I’m a journalist.  “you’re an accountant. are you a Jew?” nope. “what are  you?” atheist, I guess. “no, I mean nationality.” For the  sake of simplicity, I answer, Polish. “oh. you’re a Jew.” Oy. I ask Rich if he thinks it’s oK to ask people that kind of  thing, and he responds, “what are you going to do about  it?” write about it, I say. this is when a large man sidles past us on his way to  the bathroom. “you hear that?” says Rich. “he apologized to me.” I think Rich is trying to make a point, and I think that  point is that he is alpha as fuck. but so are all of the  other bros here, so I’m having a hard time understanding how this all shuffles out. we can’t all be prom queen,  can we? as I’m saying goodbye to Rich and his crew, he recommends that I go to a nearby club, and to tell someone  named shorty that he sent me. I nod. thanks, Rich. but  if it’s anything like this bro Krawl, I’m going to pass. 

c o n t I n u e d   o n    Pag e   2 2

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

—Dave Kempa

d a v e k @ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m

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blue Paint it

c o n t i n u e d   f r o m    pag e   2 1

Sacramento fabric artist Merle Axelrad agrees; for her Kondos’ impact reaches far beyond technique. “Thirteen years ago when I rented a studio on R Street, Greg had a studio just across the hall, and he’d often stop in to comment on my work,” Axelrad says. “His observations were always clear and insightful, with an eye to paring things down to a focused and strong statement. It’s a hallmark of his work that I value.” Kondos, who taught at Sacramento City College for 27 years, says he sees such mentorships as opportunity. “My celebration of life is the work that I do. I get a lot of pleasure from helping young people with their painting,” he says. Kondos’ latest venture is a foray into China, where culture-hungry art patrons have greeted his landscapes with enthusiasm. Ningbo and Shanghai, in particular, are at the epicenter of Kondos’ new adventure. In 2010, the Ningbo Museum of Art hosted an exposition of Kondos’ work and two of his paintings, “French Irises” and “The Pacific Coast” were added to the museum’s permanent collection. Likewise, the Shanghai Art Museum placed “El Capitan” in its collection of modern traditional pieces and pop art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Shanghai added “Half Dome” to its permanent collection. Kondos’ global reach is vast. The son of Greek immigrants, Kondos’ first visit to Greece in 1963 was instrumental in establishing the style and tenor of his work, and he has since been back 43 times. “I never really knew who I was, and in Greece, I began to understand what my beginnings were all about,” Kondos says. “I carried water with villagers from wells to their tiny homes, ate their food and walked with shepherds as they tended to their flocks. I’ve sat alone and sketched the countryside for hundreds of hours. I immersed myself in nature and soaked up the culture of my forebears.” Crocker Art Museum director Lial Jones says Kondos’ work captures “the spirit of the land.” “His paintings of the Sacramento Valley and the Delta are as iconic and picturesque as any other places on Earth,” Jones says. “Through his stunningly beautiful painting we learn to better appreciate the abstract and colorful artistry of the world around us.” Kondos’ own assessment of his work is simpler. “I record nature without a camera.” Ω 22   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13

Gregory Kondos, 89, didn’t start painting seriously until he was 25.

snapshots Quintessential

i

f you’re vacation starved  like most americans, then  an hour visiting gregory  Kondos’ new crocker   art museum exhibit is a   vicarious getaway. But it  also might make you jealous.

his work welcomes relaxation, via celebrated  malibu beaches or dodger-blue lake tahoe  waters—soak in some of the golden state’s  premier leisure space, the painter invites. or, if you’re up for adventure, visitors can  behold the stupendous monoliths of yosemite  national park, in some cases, on 6-foot-tall  canvases.  all of this is part of the mix at the nearly  90-year-old Kondos’ latest local show, a touch of  Blue: landscapes by gregory Kondos, which overtakes a large swath of the crocker’s third floor. spend too much time at the sacramento  painter’s new exhibit, however, and you may  begin to feel miffed about your lack of time off.  or your inadequate savings account. locales such as california’s silicon Valley,  carmel-by-the-sea and yountville and classic 

the  magic  of  gregory  K ond os ’  land s cap es  exis ts   in  how  they  cap ture  moments    that  no  longer  exis t

scenes of greek beaches and the french countryside are timeless. But also privileged. lush northern  california vineyard landscapes and paintings of  his wife’s iris gardens in toulouse, france, aren’t  everyman scenery. one must pay to play. But you, nonwary nontraveller, ultimately  understand that jealousy gets you nowhere. and  that, when it comes to Kondos, the landscapes  are vital because they capture moments in  nature that oftentimes no longer exist. “it is always high noon on a summer day  in greg Kondos’ paintings” is how longtime  sacramento Bee art critic Victoria dalkey  described his specific brand of magic hour,  or the way in which Kondos’ work functions  as quintessential snapshots of the earth’s  most immortal topography. places now mostly  overtaken by humankind. consider Kondos’ 2001 portrait of emerald  Bay, arguably lake tahoe’s most memorable  cove. the skies are clear, creamy white. the  steel-blue waters glow like icing. a lone tree  pokes its branches upward in the foreground.  and the island—undersized and lacking detail,  like a navel lost in an ocean—conveys a sense of  privacy, solitude. it’s the perfect moment alone  in nature—even though, in the real world, visiting  emerald Bay can be the ultimate tourist trap.

so much of Kondos’ work on display now at  the crocker seizes this “high noon on a summer  day” vibe and preserves popular california  iconography in its natural, unaffected state. “half dome,” yosemite’s most legendary rock,  glows with blood-orange tears at the crest, as  if the sun’s giving the towering formation a rare  kiss. its walls glimmer with piercing white and  silver. and there’s nary a hiker in sight! even Kondos’ sacramento Valley landscapes— work from his own backyard—are river scenes  at their terrence malick best: shadows from  tree canopies contrast sharply with luminescent,  periwinkle waters. tawny and fern-green brush  overtake the shore. latte beaches sparkle.  the sacramento river never looked as good  as under Kondos’ brush. and there’s no waterskiers, riverboat revelers or beachcombers to  be found. indeed, it’s not jealousy because the painter  shows us places we only dream of going. or the  exclusivity of his landscapes, such as santorini  in greece. it’s Kondos’ ability to capture the  world’s beauty at its most complete that invites  resentment. Because, oftentimes, the landscapes’ moments are, sadly, no longer.

—Nick Miller nic k a m@ ne wsr e v ie w.c o m


Courtesy of GreGory Kondos GAllery

Many of his paintings reflect his life in the Sacramento region; “Rutherford Vineyard,” oil, 1989.

Inspired by a Life magazine artist working aboard his ship, Kondos started sketching while in the Navy; “Cairo,” black-and-white drawing, 1977.

“  H i s   p a i n t i n g s   o f   t H e    s a c r a m e n t o   V a l l e y   a n d  t H e   d e l t a   a r e   a s   i c o n i c  a n d   p i c t u r e s q u e   a s   a n y  otHer places on eartH.” Lial Jones director, Crocker Art Museum

Courtesy of CroCKer Art MuseuM

Although the artist uses a multihued palette, Kondos is most famous for his use of blue paint.

The son of Greek immigrants, Kondos has visited Greece 43 times since 1963; “Kalamata Beach, Greece,” oil on canvas, 2006.

This Kondos landscape “Mont Sainte-Victoire” (oil, 2011) depicts a province in France and is one of the artist’s favorites.

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

03.21.13     |   SN&R     |   23


NIGHT&DAY DON’T MISS! WINE APPRECIATION: Many

locals know there is no need to journey to the Napa Valley to experience distinctive California wines. If you need a little navigational help, join Certified Specialist of Wine Susan Brown as she introduces you to some enjoyable wine produced locally, including Chenin Blanc and Barbera varietals. Th, 3/21, 6:30-8:30pm. $35-$45. Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op Community Learning Center & Cooking School, 1914 Alhambra Blvd.; (916) 868-6399; www.sacfoodcoop.com.

List your event! Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Comedy MICHAEL MANCINI: Check out a comedy night featuring Michael Mancini, with special guests Tommy Broome and Griffin Daley. Mancini is a police officer and a stand-up comedian. He earned the title of World Funniest Cop from Jay Leno. This is also a police and firefighter appreciation night, with partial proceeds going go to the Matt Redding Foundation. Th, 3/21, 7pm. $15. Halftime Bar & Grill, 5681 Lonetree Blvd. in Rocklin; (916) 626-3600, ext. 2; www.strikesrocklin.com.

Classes BEER CLASS: What’s your favorite style of beer? Find out more about different beer styles and categories. Get to know your own tasting preferences while enjoying a beer tasting. Seating is limited, so call for advance reservations. Th, 3/21, 6:30-8:30pm. $15. Total Wine & More, 2765 E Bidwell St. in Folsom; (916) 984-6923; www.totalwine.com.

Concerts COMMERCIAL MUSIC ENSEMBLE: The Sacramento City College Commercial Music Ensemble will be performing songs of a variety of contemporary pop and commercial styles: jazz-rock fusion, R&B, soul, folk, country, and Latin. Th, 3/21, 7pm. Free. Sacramento City College Performing Arts Center, 3835 Freeport Blvd.; (916) 558-2243.

JAZZ BY GOODWIN AND MINGUS: Sacramento State’s Jazz Ensemble will play music by Duke Ellington, Gordon Goodwin, Charles Mingus and more. The band has been invited to perform at the prestigious Monterey Jazz Next Generation Festival several years running. Find out why. Th, 3/21, 8pm. $5-$10. Sacramento State Music Recital Hall, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5191; www.csus.edu/music.

22FRI Kids’ Stuff

FUNDERLAND’S EASTER BASH: Funderland’s Easter Bash will include egg hunts, rides, the Easter Bunny, Happy the Squirrel and craft projects. 3/22 to 3/24, 10am-6pm. Free. Funderland Amusement Park, 1350 17th Ave.; (916) 456-0131; www.funderlandpark.com.

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03. 21.13

LEO KOTTKE: Grammy-nominated acoustic guitarist Leo Kottke will return to Sacramento to play a solo concert at the Crest Theatre. This show, presented by UpWest Arts, marks Kottke’s first show in Sacramento in three years. Now 66 years old, Kottke has recorded more than 30 albums that showcase his barnstorming fretwork and quirky songwriting. F, 3/22, 8pm. $25-$35. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (800) 225-2277; www.leokottke.com.

23SAT

DON’T MISS! MIDTOWN SPRING CLEANUP:

Celebrate the start of spring by cleaning up Midtown. The Midtown Business Association is partnering with local neighborhood associations to host a spring cleanup with support from the Volunteer Center of Sacramento. Volunteers will remove trash, graffiti and help beautify the Midtown community from 16th to 29th streets, between G and O streets. Sa, 3/23, 9am-noon. Free. Parking lot at 2020 J Street; (916) 442-1500; www.exploremidtown.org.

Special Events THE BODIL WENNBERG MUSIC FESTIVAL: Witness an uplifting showcase featuring 450 students in eight different orchestras from Davis school orchestra programs. Special guest, 2013 Davis High School Concerto Competition Winner Jacqueline Liu, will perform with the Davis High School Symphony for the finale. Sa, 3/23, 2:30-5pm. $9-$17. Robert and Margrit Mondavi Center for the Performing Arts, 9399 Old Davis Rd. in Davis; (530) 754-2787; www.mondaviarts.org.

Kids’ Stuff EASTER EGG HUNT FOR DOGS: Bring your furry friend and join Wag Hotels’ fourth annual Easter Egg Hunt for dogs. Enjoy finger foods and live music while your dog sniffs out eggs filled with tasty treats and valuable prizes. There will be photo opportunities with the Easter Bunny and a professional photographer will be on site to snap photos of this fun day. Sa, 3/23, 11am-2pm. $15-$20. McKinley Park, 601 Alhambra Blvd.; (888) 924-5463; http://wseasteregghunt fordogs.eventbrite.com.

EGG HUNT & CARNIVAL: Celebrate spring at Fulton-El Camino’s Egg-O-Rama. This fun-filled day will include games for all ages, an egg hunt, bounce house, face painting and a special visit from the Easter Bunny. Bring family and friends to enjoy this community event. Sa, 3/23, 9:30am-noon. $4-$9. Howe Avenue Park, 2201 Cottage Way; (916) 927-3802, ext. 125; www.fecrecpark.com.

Concerts ANANDA ORATORIO: This annual performance, featuring a 50-person choir and instrumentalists, marks the beginning of a spiritual Easter. Sa, 3/23, 3-5pm. Donations accepted. Ananda Sacramento, 10450 Coloma Rd. in

PHOTO BY HILARY WALSH

21THURS

Concerts


26TUES

Rancho Cordova; (916) 361-0891; www.anandasacramento.org.

CLASSICAL HORN MUSIC: The Folsom Symphony’s horn section will perform some of the most magnificent pieces ever written for these instruments. Schumann’s energetic Konzertstuck is a musical tour de force; Brahms’ Symphony No. 3 is poignant and emotional; Vaughan Williams’ “Fantasia on a Theme” by Thomas Tallis is a lush exultation of a rich string serenade. Sa, 3/23, 7:30pm. $20-$42. Three Stages Peforming Arts Center, 10 College Pkwy. in Folsom; (916) 608-6888; www.threestages.net.

Now Playing

IN THE MOOD: This 1940s musical revue is returning for an encore performance. Don’t miss singers and dancers appearing in the String of Pearls Big Band Orchestra. The music and arrangements are as authentic as it gets. Tu, 3/26. $16.50-$43.50. Hutchins Street Square, 125 S. Hutchins St. in Lodi; (209) 333-5550; www.hutchinsstreetsquare.com.

27WED

LONG BEACH REHAB: Catch Long Beach Rehab—which features Q-Ball from Sublime, as well as members of Bad Brains and Smashmouth— performing in West Sacramento. Openers include Some Fear None and tribute band Sublime LBC. Sa, 3/23, 7pm. $15. River’s Edge Bar & Grill, 2125 W. Capitol Ave. in West Sacramento; (916) 374-9155; www.facebook.com/somefearnone.

OVERCOMING CORPORATE

PERSONHOOD: Learn how you can get involved in the campaign to end corporate personhood and demand real democracy. David Cobb, a fiery speaker, lifelong activist and 2004 Green Party Presidential Candidate, is touring the country giving his talk “Creating Democracy & Challenging Corporate Rule.” W, 3/27, 7:30-9pm. Free. Valley Hi-North Laguna Library, 7400 Imagination Pkwy.; (916) 421-1836; https://move toamend.org/events/ sacramento-ca-barnstorming-event-david-cobb.

DON’T MISS! BLVD PARK: Back a few

M

att Costa’s looming career as a pro skateboarder ended with a broken leg at the age of 19, and so the Orange County native eventually shifted his focus to music. He recorded his debut album Songs We Sing in 2005 with the help of No Doubt guitarist Tom Dumont, and rereleased it on Jack Johnson’s Brushfire Records in 2006. Costa wrote much of his breakout second album, Unfamiliar Faces, in Sacramento while visiting a girlfriend. Now, he returns to town to play at Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub (2708 J Street) on Sunday, March 24, at 8:30 p.m. (tickets cost $18). SN&R chatted on the phone with Costa about his experience in Sacramento, recording his latest album in Scotland with producer Tony Doogan (Belle & Sebastian, Mogwai, Snow Patrol) and John Steinbeck.

H OW ’ D YO U G E T P I C K E D U P BY BRUSHFIRE RECORDS? Through Emmett Malloy. He did surf films, and he wanted to use one of my songs in one of the films. So he did. From there, [Johnson] heard it, and they invited me out to do a tour. … It blew my mind how many people were there. And so, we were on the road then, and halfway through the tour, he asked if we wanted to release the record again through his label.

HOW DID SACRAMENTO T R E AT YO U ? I liked living in Sacramento. Every time I bring up Sacramento to my wife now, though, she gets bummed out because I went up there for a girl. … So, to her, Sacramento means my ex-girlfriend. It doesn’t mean that I actually just genuinely liked it there. But I did. I lived over off of the Cannery [Business Park] area there. I’d walk down to the river every day. And I’d ride my bike down to the [Sacramento and American river] confluence.

BEFORE

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… I liked picking wild blackberries at the river’s edge. [A song called] “Never Looking Back” … was about when that train bridge burned down. … I was in McKinley Park the day of, and I saw this big black plume of smoke rising in the sky, and I ran back because I thought my house was on fire.

YOU RECORDED WITH YOUR LATEST, A SELFTITLED ALBUM, WITH TONY DOOGAN. WHAT WAS THAT LIKE? [He] introduced me to the Belle & Sebastian folks, and having a number of the guys in that band back up the record was really fantastic. They’re great guys, and we have a lot of similar tastes in music, and I’d been a fan of theirs for a long time as well.

D O YO U H AV E PLANS TO RECORD WITH TOM DUMONT AG A I N ? A R E YO U STILL CLOSE? I talk to him really rarely now, maybe like once or twice a year. I actually owe him … this book that’s been sitting on my

FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

bookshelf for a while. … He [gave] me Tortilla Flat, this John Steinbeck book. I [subsequently] went through all of [Steinbeck’s] books. I just read [Steinbeck: A Life in Letters] that Steinbeck wrote to everyone: [his] publisher, wife, friends, enemies. I’m looking at it [now] on the bookshelf. I’m going to drop it off on his doorstep, along with returning his copy of Tortilla Flat, which I’ve held on to for 10 years.

D O YO U H AV E A MUSICAL-CAREER HIGHLIGHT? Probably about two years ago or so, I got a call from Donovan. And I sang “Sunshine Superman” with him onstage. We opened up the show and sang it together. That was a big moment. Not only being on the stage with him, but just being around him. That’s one of those things—it’s just cosmic. For ticket information, visit http://mattcosta.com or www.harlows.com. For the full interview, visit www.tinyurl.com/ mattcostainterview.

STORY

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years ago when Blvd Park lived in Sacramento, they regularly performed Sunday nights at the Shady Lady Saloon, and now they’re back for one night only. Don’t be afraid to dress up. Su, 3/24, 8pm. $5. Shady Lady Saloon, 1409 R St.; (916) 231-9121; www.blvdpark.info.

Literary Events SUICIDEGIRLS BOOK SIGNING AND PARTY: A few SuicideGirls will be signing a hardcover photo book of tattooed pinup girls called Hard Girls, Soft Light. After the book signing, join local SuicideGirls for an official after-party at Shady Lady Saloon. W, 3/27, 5-6pm. Free. Metropolis Comix, 8241 Bruceville Rd.; (916) 689-2009; www.face book.com/events/115473381971661.

Special Events FAMILY CONCERT WITH CAMELLIA SYMPHONY: Enjoy a family concert, instrument petting zoo and crafting with the Camellia Symphony Orchestra. Children will meet musicians and learn how their instruments are played. Kids can also create art related to the musical experience with volunteers. Then, the orchestra will perform a variety of classic music selections from well-known movie scores. Su, 3/24, 1pm. Free. Sacramento Public Library (Central Branch), 828 I St.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Concerts MARTIN BEAL ALBUM-RELEASE PARTY: Join in celebrating the release of Martin Beal’s new album, Smile. Get your toes tapping as Beal presents an evening of classic jazz with some Latin standards thrown in for extra spice. Tunes will be provided by Joe Gilman, Matt Robinson, Rick Lotter, Tom Peron and Darius Babazadeh. W, 3/27, 7-9pm. Free. Red Lion Woodlake Hotel, 500 Leisure Ln.; (415) 412-2409; www.martinbeal.com.

Concerts THE SONGS OF ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER: Revisit Jesus Christ Superstar, Evita, Cats, Starlight Express, and Broadway’s longest running musical, Phantom of the Opera. All performers in this variety show are Broadway stars. Su, 3/24, 2 & 7pm. $24-$39. Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10 College Pkwy. in Folsom; (916) 608-6888; www.threestages.net.

ONGOING Special Events OLD SACRAMENTO UNDERGROUND TOURS: Hidden beneath the city

25MON

for nearly 150 years, Old Sacramento’s underground has long been the capital’s best-kept secret. Now in its fourth season, visitors have the opportunity to uncover the facts behind the legends that lie below historic buildings and sidewalks. M-Su,

Classes

HEALTHY DINNERS FROM AROUND THE GLOBE: Join Terese Esperas as she shares her menu for health-conscious dinners from around the globe that don’t skimp on flavor. This is a demonstration-style class. M, 3/25, 6:30-8:30pm. $35$45. Sacramento Natural Foods Co-op Community Learning Center & Cooking School, 1914 Alhambra Blvd.; (916) 868-6399; www.sacfoodcoop.com.

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AFTER

Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

DON’T MISS!

24SUN

Wait, there’s more!

10:30am-3pm through 12/1. Opens 3/23. $10-$15. Old Sacramento, 1002 Second St.; (916) 808-7059; www.historicoldsac.org.

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3 hours 3 bucks 3 fires

LOSE FAT NOT MUSCLE! Lose up to ONE POUND of REAL FAT per day DAY 1

DAY 30

100 O

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on Dr. O

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1501 L St, Sac | 916.443.0500 www.3FiresLounge.com

ame, every g lay, every p

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aRden

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OFFICIA L

TOURNA MENT t o u r n a EXCUSES ment “e xcuses ” just

Easter – March 31 Bring your family and friends to enjoy our modified menu with Easter Specials, including Leg of Lamb, House-Cured Ham, and Dungeness Crab Omelet. Kids menu available. Reservations are recommended.

1022 Second Street

2012 Diners’ Choice Award

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10750 Olson Drive (916) 638-2449

day spec 3/ 14 & 3/ 15: ials: 3/21 & 3/2 Free Fried Pickle s* 2: Purch ase on Shrimp (10 e order of Buffa lo or 20 pie ce) and 3/28 & 3/2 receive a secon d order 9: Buy 10, for free* Get 10 Fre e Wings (boneles s *w/ purcha or tradit ional)* se of a drin k

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03.21.13

13-0088 EASEL BOTTOM - HOOTERS ONLY V3.indd 1

1785 Challenge Way (916) 927-9464

2/18/13 1:45 PM


HOPPA HOPPA ON OVER TO

A rung above

OPA! OPA!

Hook & Ladder Manufacturing Co.

5

$ OO

1630 S Street, (916) 442-4885, http://hookandladder916.com

OFF any order $20 or more

tax not included. pLEASE PRESENT COUPON. NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER OFFER. Not valid w/ variety platter. EXP: 3/28/13

The sure sign that a city boasts a vibrant food culture is if it possesses a wide variety of venues: not by too heavy on the fast food or booming dance Ann Martin Rolke clubs, or even too many solemn, high-end establishments. Until recently, it has been a bit scarce when it comes to restaurants for adults who want to socialize in style in Sacramento. Fortunately, Hook & Ladder Manufacturing Co. has come to the rescue. The restaurant, from the same owners as Midtown’s The Golden Bear, has been open for five-and-a-half months. The chef, Brian Mizner, rating: worked at Hot Italian and L Wine Lounge and HHH 1/2 Urban Kitchen. Here, they’ve redesigned the interior of the former Hangar 17 Quonset hut to dinner for one: include clever nods to the firefighting theme: $20 - $40 a ladder on the ceiling duct work, shiny silver wallpaper with a surprising rat-and-hydrant theme. Wooden pallets on the walls and a fabric-covered ceiling help dampen the noise. My dining companion and I first sit at the communal table by the bar. This setup encourages patrons to talk to each other and gives the place a community feel. There’s also a similar lounge area with a sofa where patrons can curl up and enjoy a terrific cocktail, like the H weekly “brunch punch” or the nonalcoholic flawed seasonal shrub. HH The punch I tried had rum, honey, chamhaS momentS pagne and lime juice—a fizzy but light spring HHH drink. The shrub, which is a Colonial-era libaappealing tion of fruit, vinegar and sugar, was surprisingly refreshing. Even more spectacular, though, was HHHH authoritative the West Indies Sour, made with St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram, brandy, lime juice and red wine. HHHHH epic Hook & Ladder’s interesting wine list includes entries from Spain and Israel; there are also draft cocktails and at least eight beers on tap. The food follows suit. First, though, pull out your cellphone to light up the menu, which has a faint type and small font. I saw several tables doing just that, despite great light fixtures throughout the space. Both of our meals started with compliStill hungry? mentary amuse-bouches. Quartered muffins Search Sn&r’s at brunch were tasty but a bit dry. Better was “dining directory” the dinner offering of a crisp square of cheesy to find local potatoes Anna with zesty Calabrian chili aioli. restaurants by name The brunch menu is heavy on the eggs, but or by type of food. Sushi, mexican, indian, they’re prepared in lots of ways. One option is italian—discover it the Croque Madame, a ham-and-Gruyere sandall in the “dining” wich usually battered with egg. This one had a section at fried egg and béchamel, with a generous smear www.news review.com. of mustard inside. The mountain of potato hash alongside tasted flavorful and not too greasy. I have very high standards for biscuits, but the biscuits and gravy here are a bit disappointing. They’re supposed to be made with jack cheese and pancetta, but are light on those ingredients and are not flaky enough. Still, the peppery gravy adds good flavor. Pizzas are featured on all the menus; we sampled the one with house-made chili BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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sausage and roasted artichokes. The meat was juicy if a bit scant, but there was plenty of fresh, raw arugula on top to balance the rich cheese and sausage. The crust had great chew, but needed another day or two of fermentation to develop a really good flavor. Pastas are also house made, and the olive cavatelli sounded intriguing. But while the rock shrimp were perfectly sweet and tender, tossed with chunks of eggplant, tomato and mushrooms, unfortunately the fresh pasta was so overcooked it felt gummy. The revelations of the dinner included the excellent smoked-eggplant baba ganoush, which is smoky and garlicky and served with warm flatbread wedges and oil-cured olives. 08

The bananas foster bread pudding is transcendent, accompanied by very salty caramel gelato and slivers of brûléed bananas.

’10

09

’10

’10

5644 J Street

08

Phone orders welcome!: 916.’10451.4000 07

07

Sun-Wed 10:30am - 9:00pm, Thurs - Sat 10:30am -9:30pm ’10

www.EatAtOpa.com

The bananas foster bread pudding is equally transcendent, accompanied by very salty caramel gelato and slivers of brûléed bananas. Chunks of banana and pecan studded the tender, custardy pudding. Perhaps like the volunteer 1850s Mutual Hook & Ladder Company for which it is named, the restaurant is a great idea that needs a bit more coordination. A few tweaks to quality and detail will have it rescuing diners from hunger for years to come. Ω

BOUNTIFUL GOODNESS EASTER SUNDAY MARCH 31

BRUNCH BUFFET: 10AM-3PM

Historyville

BUFFET WILL FEATURE:

That’s right, Justin Timberlake dressed up like a block of tofu and did a song and dance to try to convince you to “bring it on down to Veganville” on a recent Saturday Night Live episode. But you know who brought it down to Veganville long before Babe gave sausage chompers pause? Amos Bronson Alcott, a.k.a. Louisa May Alcott’s papa. A philosopher, educator and abolitionist, he lived from 1799-1888, and was a strict vegetarian (that’s “vegan” in 21st-century speak). He was a man ahead of his time, though he wasn’t perfect. His utopian live-off-the-land commune Fruitlands, located in Harvard, Mass., failed (it’s a museum now), but at least he tried. What’ll your legacy be?

F E AT U R E S T O RY

ASSORTED FRESHLY BAKED MUFFINS, FRENCH TOAST W/ BOURBON MAPLE SYRUP, BISCUITS AND GRAVY, KUPROS BREAKFAST POTATOES, A VARIETY OF SALADS, AND MUCH MORE... $32 INCLUDES: BOTTOMLESS MIMOSAS, COFFEE, JUICE, SODA $12 CHILDREN UNDER 13 RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED

1217 21st St | 916.440.0401 | KuprosBistro.com

—Shoka |

A RT S & C U LT U R E

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AFTER

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Where to eat?

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Becky Grunewald, Greg Lucas, Ann Martin Rolke and Jonathan Mendick, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

tables and light wooden chairs,  there’s an airy atmosphere,  casual and cozy. Estelle’s offers  an espresso bar and a wide  assortment of teas and muffins and rolls for the breakfast  crowd as well as sweets,  including DayGlo macarons. For  the lunch-inclined, there are  soups, salads, sandwiches and  meat or meatless quiche. One  of the authentic touches is the  spare use of condiments. The  smoked salmon is enlivened by  dill and the flavor of its croissant. Its tomato bisque is thick  and richly flavored, and, in a  nice touch, a puff pastry floats  in the tureen as accompaniment. There’s a lot to like about  Estelle’s—except dinner. Doors  close at 6pm. French. 901 K St.,  (916) 551-1500. Meal for one:  $5-$10. HHH1⁄2 G.L.

Midtown 24K Chocolat Cafe This cafe, located in a labyrinthine Spanishcolonial-style structure that  also houses meditation classes,  a gift shop heavy on the crystals and clowning workshops,  serves a solid, if very limited,  brunch and lunch menu. One  offering is a firm wedge of frittata with a strong tang of sharp  cheddar that almost but doesn’t  quite jibe with the slightly spicy  mole sauce on the plate.The  spinach curry, made creamy  by coconut milk rather than  dairy, comes topped with cubes  of tofu and tiny diced scallion  and red bell pepper and rests  atop a smooth potato cake. A  side of garbanzo-bean salad is  well-flavored with the surprising combination of mint and  apricot. The place, located inside  Ancient Future, has “chocolat”  in the name, and chocolate is  everywhere: for sale, along  with tea and coffee in the small  boutique area, and in the form  of truffles plated on a side table.  It’s also in many of the menu  offerings, including a tiny cup of  hot Mexican drinking chocolate,  and chocolate-cherry scones  served crisp and hot, studded  with big chunks of bittersweet  chocolate and tart dried cherries. American. $10-$15. 2331   K St., (916) 476-3754. HHH B.G. 

Grange Restaurant & Bar You  won’t find any “challenging”  dishes on this menu—just  delicious local and seasonal  food such as the Green Curry  & Pumpkin Soup, which has a  Southeast Asian flair. A spinach  salad features ingredients that  could be considered boring  elsewhere: blue-cheese dressing, bacon, onion. But here,  the sharply cheesy buttermilk  dressing and the woodsy pine  nuts make it a salad to remember. Grange’s brunch puts other  local offerings to shame. The  home fries are like marvelously  crispy Spanish patatas bravas.  A grilled-ham-and-Gruyere  sandwich is just buttery enough,  and an egg-white frittata is 

North Sac Asian Café Asian Café 

serves both Thai and  Lao food, but go for  the Lao specialties,  which rely on flavoring staples such as  fish sauce, lime juice,  galangal and lemongrass, lots of herbs, and  chilies. One of the most 

common dishes in Lao cuisine  is larb, a dish of chopped meat  laced with herbs, chilies and  lime. At Asian Café, it  adds optional offal add-ons— various organ meats, entrails,  et al—to three versions of the  dish: beef with tripe, chicken  with gizzards, or pork with pork  skin. The beef salad offers a  gentle respite from aggressive  flavors, consisting of mediumthick chewy slices of eye of  round with red bell pepper,  chopped iceberg and hot  raw jalapeño. The single  best dish here is the nam  kao tod, a crispy entree with 

South Sac named for its signature dish, a  Vietnamese egg crepe. Each one  completely fills an oval-shaped  platter and is served shatteringly crisp on the outside  and soft on the inside. Bánh 

WHEN YOU MENTION THIS AD. RESTRICTIONS APPLY.

Happy Hour All Day Sunday Mon-Sat 3-7 pm

e fCrhee ese Steak Sandwich

With purchase ue, of equal or greater val s. & 1 reg drink & 1 frie

on. Not valid with At regular menu price. With coup . Exp 04/04/13. other offers. Cannot combine offers

9584 Micron Ave. Sacramento, CA (916) 369-5681

6

$ 99

Buy Buy 1 1 adult adult BuFFet BuFFet and and 2 2 drinks drinks get get 2nd 2nd 50% 50% oFF oFF

Sac, most people equate Hong  Kong-style cuisine with dim  sum, but this restaurant,  which also features private  karaoke rooms, serves up  tasty, familiar food by way of  rice plates, sandwiches, noodle 

Y KIND ANY SIZE,ofAN Cheese Steak

HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY

50% 0FF

Blue Moon Cafe and Karaoke In 

Bánh Xèo 46A Bánh Xèo 46A is 

—Daniel Barnes

*Can’t be combined w/ other offers Dine-in only

Draft Beer $ 2 . 7 5

Xèo also offers nem nuong, or  grilled pork sausages on skewers, and chao tom, a grilledshrimp dish that arrives as a  flamingo-pink paste melded  into a sausage shape around  juicy sugarcane. Vietnamese.  7837 Stockton Blvd., Ste. 700;  (916) 476-4895. Dinner for one:  $10-$20. HHHH1⁄2 B.G.

I always taste great new beers and attend fun events during Sacramento  Beer Week, but I think I enjoy the weeks following the end of SBW even more.  Bars and restaurants that loaded up on rare beers start selling off their  remaining stock, so you can resample some of your SBW favorites without  the hoopla and crowds—and often at reduced prices. Pangaea Two Brews  Cafe (2743 Franklin Boulevard) was still serving Montreal-based Brasserie Dieu du Ciel’s remarkable barley wine Solstice d’Hiver two weeks after its  Shelton Brothers Importers event. New releases like Stone Brewing Co.’s  oak-smoked Stone Old Guardian Barley Wine have started showing up   on store shelves. Even the usually pedestrian Streets of London Pub  (1804 J Street) taps are spruced up with the likes of Ballast Point Brewing Company’s Indian-spiced Indra Kunindra and Sierra Nevada Brewing  Co.’s barrel-aged Bigfoot.

OPEN AT 8AM NOW SERVING BREAKFAST!

0

ground pork that’s baked on  the bottom of the pan with rice,  then stirred and fried up fresh  the next day with dried Thai  chilies and scallions. Thai and Lao. 2827 Norwood Ave.,   (916) 641-5890. Dinner for one:   $10-$15. HHHH B.G.

Sacramento Beer Week leftovers, cont.

MIMOSA!

2

Hokkaido Noodle House

So many bars try to do bar  snacks, and so many fail. Shady  Lady, however, nails it. The fried  green tomatoes are punched  up with a tarragon rémoulade  and the huge charcuterie board  is more like a groaning board,  stocked with abundant   regional meats   and cheeses. The  pickle plate  looks like  Peter Rabbit’s  dream, all teeny  turnips and tangy  carrot chunks.  Generally excellent,  the saloon’s cocktail  list veers from the  classics with a list of  bartender-created  drinks with unusual,  but wisely considered  flavor combinations:  cilantro and tequila,  blackberry and thyme,  and the surprisingly  sublime mixture of  celery and pineapple. American.  1409 R St., (916)  231-9121. Dinner  for one: $10-$20.  HHH1⁄2 B.G.

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more than a bone thrown to the  cholesterol-challenged;   it’s a worthy dish in its own  right. American. 926 J St.,   (916) 492-4450. Dinner for one:  $40-$60. HHHH B.G.

Estelle’s Patisserie With its marble 

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28   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13

China Buffet

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★★★★ –SN&R

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Elk Grove 8555 Elk Grove Blvd • 54 .74 86 6.6 91


Tacos & Beer This is one of the area’s best Michoacán restaurants. Of its regional dishes, the enchiladas Apatzingán are unusual, filled with only a smattering of sharp cheese and diced onion, soaked in a vinegary sauce, and smothered in very lightly pickled, shredded cabbage with raw hunks of radish and avocado slices. Another specialty is the morisqueta—the ultimate comfort dish due to the unique texture of the white rice, which is as soft as an angel’s buttock. Mexican. 5701 Franklin Blvd., (916) 428-7844. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH1⁄2 B.G.

Famous Kabob It seems like if

Arden/ Carmichael El Pollo Feliz For a restaurant dubbed “the happy chicken,” El Pollo Feliz sure smokes a lot of birds. These chickens get one heck of an afterlife: Their parts

you’ve had one kebab, you’ve had them all. But as its name implies, Famous Kabob doesn’t disappoint. A skewer of juicy steak sports a nice chew to satisfy any craving. Another of ground beef is flavored with chopped onion and a hint of cinnamon. The braised lamb shank in a tomato-and-saffron sauce tastes best when the sauce has cooled a little bit and the lamb fat coats the meat like a silken sauce. With deft use of dried herbs and acidic flavors that brighten the dishes and

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are rubbed with earthy Mexican spices and then slow-cooked in a smoker for hours. Their flesh becomes fall-off-the-bone soft and infused with an aromatic wood-chip flavor. The restaurant’s signature dish is barbecue chicken, and customers can purchase wings, breasts, drumsticks and thighs in a variety of amounts—from as few as two to 12 pieces. An eight-piece combo is basically an entire chicken. You can also order it covered in a chocolatey and peppery mole-poblano sauce; shredded and scattered atop a plate of nachos; on top of a salad; inside a torta-style sandwich; or stuffed into a burrito. There’s a friendly neighborhood vibe here, and much of the cooking happens in the parking lot directly in front of the mom-and-pop joint. 4717 Whitney Ave., Carmichael; (916) 485-4446. Mexican. Dinner for one: $5-$15. HHHH J.M.

bowls, soups and stir-fries. A few random Japanese (ramen, fried udon), French (sweet or savory crepes), Russian (borscht), Korean (beef and kimchi hot pot) and Italian (various pastas) foods add to the feeling that whatever your cultural background, you’ll find a comfort dish from your childhood to wrap its arms around you and give you a hug. Cultural diversity aside, one of Blue Moon’s best dishes is the braised pig ear with soy sauce and peanuts. Asian. 5000 Freeport Blvd., Ste. A; (916) 706-2995. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH J.M.

will be found at a Save Mart Supermarket or even Nugget. They are nuanced. Brewed with artisanship. In some cases, for hundreds of years. There’s the usual panoply of French dip, hot pastrami, Reuben and so on. Among the signature offerings is The Gobbler. Turkey, natch. Cranberry sauce, natch. Then red onion, several roma tomato slices, a thicket of green leaf and pepper jack cheese, all shoehorned into a big baguette. Brewpub. 2743 Franklin Blvd., (916) 454-4942. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHH1⁄2 G.L.

stimulate the taste buds, these are meals that are quietly hearty and nourishing. Persian. 1290 Fulton Ave., (916) 483-1700. Dinner for one: $10-$20. HHHH B.G.

Jin Men The restaurant bills its itself as Chinese, but it actually specializes in Korean-Chinese food. The most popular Korean specialty dish is its ja jang myun, based on the Chinese dish zhajiangmian (fried noodles with sauce). Jin Men’s rendition is made with little squares of chewy pork and tiny shrimp mixed with lots of sweet sautéed onions and slightly salty blackbean paste. This addictive dish is served in a bowl just the right size to keep all to yourself. The jambong is a spicy seafood soup nicely spiked with chili and perfect for curing a cold. Chinesestyle offerings include mu shu chicken and a ho-hum vegetable fried rice. Much better was the Hot Spicy Bean Curd—a large portion of silky tofu in a zingy sauce with peas and carrots. Asian. 3212 Fulton Ave., (916) 779-3353. Dinner for one: $5-$10. HHH A.M.R.

Natomas Pork Belly Grub Shack Pork Belly Grub Shack encourages customers to pig out with menu items that include a catfish po’boy, steak options and several burgers. For vegetarians there’s the Porkless Bella Burger, a portobello mushroom and jack cheese sandwich with tomato and mixed greens. But who the hell wants steak and chicken and big-headed mushrooms at a place that so proudly promotes pork belly? Go whole hog with the Big Piggin. The first bite is salty and sweet with a rich beef patty, barbecue sauce, cheddar, a strong splash of garlic aioli and sliced pork belly. The Hot Mess is similar, sans pork belly burger and served on sourdough with a fried egg. This kind of hog-wild legerdemain is what elevates this grub shack to well beyond a simple sandwich place. American. 4261 Truxel Rd., (916) 285-6100. Dinner for one: $8-$12. HHHH G.L.

Land Park/ Curtis Park Pangaea Two Brews Cafe Tables, tall and short, are large and communal, fostering that casual camaraderie that should be the goal of any selfrespecting brewpub. There’s a fairly extensive menu, including breakfast items. Not to put too fine a point on it: Pangaea’s offerings are not beers that

Have a seat, take a stand Filmmakers Kristi Jacobson and Lori Silverbush released a food-related documentary earlier this month. Their film, A Place at the Table, highlights the approximately 50 million Americans who go hungry every day. While appearing as guests on The Daily Show With Jon Stewart in February, the co-directors explained that the film chronicles the history of hunger in the United States. The film also calls upon people to view hunger as a social problem with a proven history of being entirely solvable given enough public motivation. A Place at the Table is currently playing at select theaters nationwide (the closest is in Berkeley, Calif.), but it’s also available on iTunes and cable On Demand. Coinciding with the film is the release of the companion book A Place At The Table: The Crisis of 49 Million Hungry Americans and How to Solve It and a large outreach effort to increase public involvement (visit www.takepart.com/place-at-the-table for more information). Sacramentans can take action to fight hunger by hosting film screenings, contacting legislators and volunteering. —Jonathan Mendick

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7 Things You Must Know Before Putting Your Home Up for Sale Sacramento Homeowners - A new report has just been released which reveals 7 costly mistakes that most homeowners make when selling their home,and a 9 Step System that can help you sell your home fast and for the most amount of money. This industry report shows clearly how the traditional ways of selling homes have become increasingly less and less effective in today’s market. The fact of the matter is that fully three quarters of homesellers don’t get what they want for their homes and become disillusioned and - worse - financially disadvantaged when they put their homes on the market. As this report uncovers, most homesellers make 7 deadly mistakes that cost them literally thousands of

dollars. The good news is that each and every one of these mistakes is entirely preventable. In answer to this issue, industry insiders have prepared a free special report entitled “The 9 Step System to Get Your Home Sold Fast and For Top Dollar”. To order a FREE Special Report, visit www.916SellerCostlyMistakes.com or to hear a brief recorded message about how to order your FREE copy of this report call toll-free 1-800-507-9208 and enter ID # 1000. You can call any time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Get your free special report NOW to find out how you can get the most money for your home.

This report is courtesy of Lochan Real Estate DRE Lic # 01845576. Not intended to solicit buyers or sellers currently under contract. Copyright © 2012

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team we are now hiring for the following positions: • Executive Coordinator • AR Specialist • Advertising Consultant

for more information, visit www.newsreview.com/sacramento/jobs.

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FIND OF THE WEEK

Crash-landing in crime residenT alien Volume 1: Welcome To earTh! Not every alien is out to kill us. In Resident Alien   Volume 1: Welcome to Earth! (Dark Horse, $14.99), the  GRAPHIC NOVEL visitor who crash-landed  here is a pretty nice guy  who can pass for human by altering our perceptions.  He’s been hiding out as a semi-retired doctor in a small  tourist town, hoping that his people get the emergency  message (yep, he “phoned home”) and come for him  soon. But a murder gets him called upon to assist the  police—and fill in for the town doctor—and he finds  himself, well, having fun as he plays detective. What’s  an alien to do when he’s surprisingly human? Peter  Hogan and Steve Parkhouse have created one of the  nicest guys you’d ever want to have coffee with—as  long as you don’t know he’s not from around here.  —Kel Munger

Fit for a tiny king Game of Thrones iron Throne replica Even if you haven’t yet seen HBO’s Game of  Thrones, surely you’re aware of the series’  iconic Iron Throne. A full-sized replica would no  doubt set you back a year’s salary, but the folks  at ThinkGeek offer a reasonable alternative.  For a mere $299.99, you can get a 14-inch tall,  extremely detailed and hand-painted replica of  the show’s medieval royal chair. Not sure what  you can do exactly with such a thing—other  than use it as a jump-off point for lengthy,  FANTASY nerdy discussions about  the strengths and  weaknesses of the Game of Thrones books  vs. the television series, of course. Money well  spent. www.thinkgeek.com/product/f0ba. —Aaron Carnes

Bliss by the bowl meGami BenTo-Ya resTauranT’s udon soup Megami Bento-Ya Restaurant is home to a variety  of Japanese cuisine, and, as a family-run business,  FOOD it just might have the sweetest staff  you’ll ever encounter. The low prices  and savory food are enticing, and the udon soup, in  particular, is worth a try. Here, the broth is infused  with rich flavors and fresh ingredients. I recommend  ordering it with shrimp and calamari, accompanied  with scallops. 1010 10th Street, (916) 448-4512,   http://megamirestaurant.com. —Maddi Silva

30   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13

Join the circus Traces Skateboarding. Dance. Basketball. All involve intense physical  movement and, as executed by  PERFORMANCE the performers  of Traces, all represent a way of  trying to answer the question: “If  the world ended tomorrow, what  traces would you leave behind?”  The Montreal-based troupe  7 Fingers (or Les 7 Doigts de la  Main), acclaimed for its blend of  theater and dance, attempts to  answer that query in Traces. This  energetic show takes the Cirque  du Soleil model—think almost  surrealistic high-flying acrobatics—and places its principals on  skateboards. With the action set  in an abandoned warehouse in a  world that seems set on the edge  of the apocalypse, the story  here is told through a group  of young urban friends who,  hunkered down in their grim  shelter, design ways to leave  their mark on whatever is  left of society. The result,  which Time magazine  declared as one  of 2011’s top 10  plays or musicals,  is a breathtaking  show that’s at once  hyperactive and athletic yet also  supremely graceful. During the  course of the show’s 90 minutes,  the performers flip and leap, twirl  and twist—all without seemingly  breaking a sweat.  The 7 Fingers troupe performs  Traces on Monday, March 25, at  7:30 p.m.; and Tuesday, March  26, at 3 and 7:30 p.m. Tickets  are $24.65-$59. Three Stages at  Folsom Lake College, 10 College  Parkway in Folsom; (916) 608-6888;  www.threestages.net. —Rachel Leibrock


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Epic fantasy fail I have phone conversations with a man in Canada who I met dating online. After two months, he said a longdistance relationship was impractical. He reminded me that he had warned against attachment. Finally, he admitted interest in someone else. One friend advised me to enjoy him and his words at face value. Another said she didn’t trust him or understand why I didn’t end by Joey ga it. I took some space, but rcia after a week, I missed him. He got a phone card and we a s kj oe y @ ne wsreview.c om talked. Things felt better until he said he avoids compliments because he doesn’t want Joey to lead me on. If you like someone, why not act on those feelings? is ahead of her time We spend lots of time talking, but but behind the clock. when he avoids certain topics I feel like my behavior is being managed. Am I unwise to keep contact? Yes, it is unwise and unkind to force yourself on a man who has been clear about his lack of interest. It’s worrisome, too, that you cling to crumbs and tell yourself a tidbit is nourishing. He bought a phone card to call you? That could signify guilt, not affection. Long phone chats? He’s bored and has no better way to occupy time.

You believe that if he changes his mind and (cue the music) suddenly expresses his mad love for you, it proves you are loveable.

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

Each call returns him to drama: He doesn’t desire or cherish you but appreciates being desired and cherished by you. And you, darling, are using this situation to polish your sales skills. On each call, you try to close the deal on a relationship. Like a shopper on a car lot, he is “just looking,” but you continue trying to break him down. Coiled beneath every conversation is the demand that he submit to your will and sign on the dotted line to become your man. Oh my, those are harsh words, aren’t they? That’s what real friends do: tell us the truth. One of your friends, a straight shooter, said she didn’t understand why you continue talking to your Canadian

phone pal. Your other friend, afraid, perhaps, of your aching need for a man who does not see you as a potential mate, suggests that you enjoy the conversations. But she also cautions you to accept his ultimatum. You tried, but missed the phone chats. That’s because you have convinced yourself those chats are significant. And yes, you are attached to the rhythm of interacting with him. You believe that if he changes his mind and (cue the music) suddenly expresses his mad love for you, it proves you are loveable. Better yet, it proves you were right: This is an epic romance. Unfortunately, that’s a fantasy. This is reality: You are amazing. And an amazing woman deserves a man who knows she is amazing and believes he is, too. A friend has had a debilitating illness for a decade. Initially, I drove her to appointments, cooked meals, did errands. Then, I backed off because she doesn’t follow her doctor’s orders. She says I don’t understand her illness. This is true. But I want to be around people who are disciplined in mind and body to face difficult issues and improve. I feel guilty about abandoning her. How do I release guilt and keep boundaries? Admit that you rushed in to save her, and when you realized that nothing you did would be enough, resentment ensued. Yours. In the future, lend a hand because it brings you joy, not because you expect kindness to be medicine. Do this soon. Obsessing over failures, perceived or true, can seed the stress that causes illness. If your mind embraces so much guilt that your body becomes ill, you will have to birth extravagant amounts of discipline to overcome the illness and prove you are different from your friend. And that’s a waste of life energy. Ω

Meditation of the Week “Tell me what a person finds sexually  attractive and I will tell you their  entire philosophy of life. Show me the  person they sleep with and I will tell  you their valuation of themselves,”  wrote Ayn Rand. How well do you  know yourself?

Are you embarrassed by your hands? Do they look old and wrinkled to you? Do you hide them so others won’t notice?

I

t’s a fact: Your hands age faster than any other part of your body. Skin there is thinner and more delicate than the skin on our faces. Symptoms of rapidly aging hands include: lines, wrinkles, crepey texture, age spots, loss of tone, smoothness and radiance. You take great care of the rest of you: your hair, makeup, nails and clothes -- all to make you look young. But your aging hands are a dead giveaway! Now Reverse The Signs Of Aging On Your Hands With Hand Perfection®: The First And Only Anti-Aging Hand Care System Hand Perfection® is a breakthrough in the way to treat and reverse the appearance of old-looking hands, a 2-step regimen of skin care formulations that work together -- day and night -- to repair symptoms of aging hands and help them look as young as the rest of you. Developed By America’s Top Hand Model Who Is Still In Demand, Years After Others Her Age Have Retired You’ve seen Ellen Sirot’s beautiful hands in thousands of magazine ads and TV commercials for a generation. She is now 49 and still working, competing with models half her age. Since having younglooking hands is Ellen’s only livelihood, she’s developed secrets for keeping her hands younger looking. Working with top cosmetologists and scientists, she developed remarkable skin care formulations designed specifically for the delicate skin on hands.  These formulations work together to reverse the visible signs of aging on hands. Now you can get the same results too!  Guaranteed! Hand Perfection®: Why It’s Different From All Other Hand Lotions And Creams These exclusive hand treatments are like nothing you have ever tried before. Made with remarkable ingredients you could previously only find in high-end facial products, this is the first time such a superior combination of ingredients have ever been offered in hand care formulations. Our RevitaStim™ Active Complex

contains Olivem 1000 to rebuild the protective moisture barrier plus natural Peptides, Hyaluronic Acid, Omega 3 and 6 in Vitamins A, B, C and E and Shea butter to nourish and improve skin and turn hands young again. Giving You Hands-On Care Around The Clock Ellen says: “Hand Perfection® is like having a spa treatment on your hands day and night. You’ll feel the difference right away”! Nourishing Day Cream with SPF15 hydrates, nourishes and replenishes skin all day long, protecting hands from exposure to harsh elements like sunlight, cold weather and constant hand washing. Rejuvenating Night Cream works while you sleep to help repair damage and symptoms of aging skin like crepey texture and lost tone, replenishing moisture the aging process took away. Hand Perfection® Is Clinically Proven To Reverse Visible Signs Of Aging You’re going to see a diminished appearance of lines and wrinkles. You’ll notice an improvement of skin radiance and brightness. A visible reduction of that dreaded crepey appearance. Skin texture looks and feels improved, as hands are no longer starving for nourishment. These benefits have been clinically proven. You’ll see the difference in days! See What Our Loyal Users Are Saying: “Within a week my hands look younger and feel better, fuller and supple. It works – no fooling! “Thank you, Ellen!” -Mrs. Jane G.** “It felt great, it wasn’t greasy and it made my hands look 5 years younger.” -Mrs. Mary C.**

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B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

03.21.13     |   SN&R     |   31


STAGE coming live t o t h e C r e s t !

Puppetry of the politically incorrect Avenue Q

march 22 Leo Kottke 04: 26: 27: 30: 02: 04: 31: 12:

march 30 The Mavericks

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Sacramento Has Talent Don Williams The Vagina Monologues Jay & Silent Bob’s Super Groovy Cartoon Movie Amy Schumer David Sedaris T.C. BOYLE John Hiatt and The Combo

PHOTO COURTESY OF RUNAWAY STAGE PRODUCTIONS

apr apr apr apr may may may Sep

Runaway Stage Productions gets frisky and risky with this raunchy—and inordinately funny and offensive—musical comedy. A talented cast, by Jim Lane the bulk of them first-timers with the company, runs riot with the innuendo, sex jokes and politically incorrect humor in this grown-up version of Sesame Street. Princeton, a recent college graduate, comes to New York City in hopes of finding his “purpose,” only to discover that his ideas about what life would be like after college were overly optimistic. He rents an apartment in a building on Avenue Q, where Gary Coleman

Tickets for these shows & more available at Tickets.com | (800) 225–2277 & at the Crest Box Office 1013 K St | (916)442.7378 | www.thecrest.com

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March 30 – April 28 at the R25 Arts Complex • 2509 R St Fri & Sat 8pm • Sun 2pm $25 Gen. Admission | $20 Students & Seniors $15 for groups of 6 or more. FREE PARKING!

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To reserve, call (916)451–5822 or go online www.CalStage.org SN&R | 03.21.13

Who you calling a slut?

Avenue Q, 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday; $18-$25. Black Box Theatre at the West Sacramento Community Center, 1075 W. Capitol Avenue in West Sacramento; (916) 207-1226; www.runawaystage.com. Through March 31.

(Helen Ventura) is the building’s super, and residents are represented by a mix of people and people-operated puppets. Brian (Scott Minor) and his live-in, Christmas Eve (Eimi Taormina) portray the people, while the nonpeople characters in the production are operated and voiced by actors who are visible to the audience. Scott Bolt (in the dual roles of Princeton and closeted investment banker Rod) leads the cast, with Amanda Goldrick (as the virtuous Kate Monster and loose Lucy) and Andy Hyun (as Nikky and Trekkie Monster). All are excellent at differentiating characters as they switch puppets and personalities. Hyun is especially fine performing “If You Were Gay” and (with Ventura) “Schadenfreude.” But two songs, taken together, present the show’s big problem: While preaching tolerance, acceptance and avoidance of stereotyping (“Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist”), it takes too much joy in making fun of the

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Asian character Christmas Eve (“The More You Ruv Someone”). A case of “do as I say, not as …”? In a home away from Runaway Stage’s usual home in the 24th Street Theatre, director Bob Baxter makes wise use of the Black Box Theatre. The seating arrangement—the audience sits on three sides—puts the puppets and puppeteers into the open space. The show also features suspended TV screens used for instructional videos, a superior sound system and excellent musical accompaniment provided by a five-piece band led by Deann Golz—all of which make this production of the 2004 Tony-winning musical something truly special. Ω

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Lifeless letters Echoes in the Heart

Sacramentan Susanne Sommer was just a baby when her parents escaped from Germany just before the invasion of Poland in 1939. It took more than three years for her family to get to America, and even then many strings were pulled and numerous favors called in so that the family could make it to the United States. Echoes in the Heart, written by Sommer and Leo McElroy, chronicles the plight of her family and its exodus from Germany through dramatized readings of actual letters. The play, in execution, has the audience watching these characters write letters to people on the other side of the stage. The first time this happens, it feels unique and interesting. By the end of the play, however, it’s a wonder anyone has paid attention for this long. The actors do with the production what they can. Unfortunately, the repetitive nature of the script just features the actors reading out loud as they are writing or standing onstage, silently reacting to letters as they’re read over in narration. A lot. The product is a biographic litany of injustices large and small committed against Jews in the late 1930s. It also just feels like a laundry list. The play possesses no arc; indeed, every scene here is just a fresh slice of difficulty from that era. It gives an interesting firsthand account of history, but unfortunately is done in a way that moves slowly, restates the same sentiments over and over again, and just generally lags from watching people reading a letter as it’s being narrated over the sound system. If history is your bag and you don’t mind hearing a story of hardship that never really resolves, check this one out. —Maxwell McKee

Echoes in the Heart, 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday; $15. Presented at the Geery Theater, 2130 L Street; (916) 447-2137; www.wjgeerytheater.com. Through April 7.


ATTENTION TRAVELERS

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FINDING OUR VOICE: SUSAN B. AND THE WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE MOVEMENT

Writer David Pierini’s play for young audiences provides a timely reminder that American women had to protest for decades before they got the right to vote—and it was by no means an easy battle. Acting intern Sarah Clancy plays a determined 20-year-old who takes up the cause, Jamie Jones plays feisty old Susan B. Anthony in her final years. Sa, Su 1 & 4pm. Through 4/14. $18-$27. B Street Theatre, 2711 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. J.H.

3

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A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM

Director Christine Nicholson favors physical humor and constant action in this fast-paced staging, with just nine actors (and a lot of double casting) and American accents. It’s funny and easy to follow, and always played for laughs. Th 12:30 & 6:30pm; F 8pm; Sa 2 & 8pm; Su 2pm, W 6:30pm. Through 3/24. $15-$38. Sacramento Theatre Company, 1419 H St.; (916) 443-6722; www.sactheatre.org. J.H.

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This well-intentioned dramedy, a new play by Leslie David Perry and directed by Ray Tatar, has a bit of melodrama, yet rests easily on the shoulders of lead actors Gladys Imperio Acosta (Loretta) and Wayne Cook (Henry). In east Los Angeles, a homeless Latina woman flees domestic violence with her two daughters (a pair of young scene-stealers, Alejandra Iskow and Alejandra Montezuma) and is helped by a lonely African-American security guard, all of which offers the opportunity to address issues of housing, immigration, violence and intra-ethnic prejudice. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 3/24. $12-$20. California Stage at the Wilkerson Theatre, 1721 25th St.; (916) 451-5822; www.calstage.org. K.M.

$

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Director Jac Royce locates moments of darkness in this Irish-themed production of the classic Shakespeare comedy, rather than playing the lovers’ quarrels entirely for laughs. A handsome set by Mike Edwards, a bit of Celtic music and good costumes by Sharon Olson lend added appeal. Th 7pm; F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 3/23. $15-$35. Sierra Stages Community Theatre at the Nevada Theatre, 401 Broad St., Nevada City; (530) 346-3210; www.sierrastages.org. J.H.

4

ORDINARY DAYS

New York City is the fifth character in this four-person musical about people who come to the city with hopes and dreams, some which are realized, some that are altered along the way. New Helvetia Theatre gathers some of its talented regulars to portray two couples—one romantic pairing, one a budding friendship, with New York both as a backdrop and as a central theme. Wonderful nuanced performances by Connor Mickiewicz (who also directs), Tristan Rumery, Kiera Anderson and Courtney Glass, backed up by the talented pianist Erik Daniels. Th, F, 8pm; Sa 2 & 8pm;. Through 3/30. $30. New Helvetia Theatre, 1028 R St.; (916) 469-9850; www.newhelvetia.org. P.R.

3

ROBYN IS HAPPY

B Street Theatre hosts the world premiere of playwright Michael Elyanow’s look at the unspoken code of honesty and loyalty among girlfriends—when is it appropriate to butt in when friends are making questionable choices in love or life? Three lifelong pals judge and battle with and against each other with biting humor, captured by good performances by all three actresses, Amy Kelly, Elisabeth Nunziato and Melinda Parrett. The problem lies in inconsistencies with the play’s tone and intent. Overthe-top raucous, mean-spirited humor runs rampant. Th, F 8pm; Sa 5 & 9pm; Su 2pm; Tu 6:30pm; W 2 & 6:30pm. Through 4/14. $23-$35. B Street Theatre, 2711 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. P.R.

Short reviews by Jeff Hudson, Kel Munger and Patti Roberts. BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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STORY

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Hitchcock and bull Stoker

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Some movies send you out of the theater vaguely dissatisfied, sensing that some vital ingredient was missing. Only later, upon sober reflection, by Jim Lane do you realize that the picture was a ridiculous crock of hopeless hooey from the word go, with never a chance of being anything else. Such a movie is Stoker. According to the official synopsis from Fox Searchlight Pictures: “India Stoker (Mia Wasikowska) was not prepared to lose her father and best friend Richard (Dermot Mulroney) in a tragic auto accident. The solitude of her

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woodsy family estate, the peace of her tranquil town, and the unspoken somberness of her home life are suddenly upended by not only this mysterious accident, but by the sudden arrival of her Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode), whom she never knew existed. When Charlie moves in with her and her emotionally unstable mother Evie (Nicole Kidman), India thinks the void left by her father’s death is finally being filled by his closest bloodline. Soon after his arrival, India comes to suspect that this mysterious, charming man has ulterior motives. Yet instead of feeling outrage or horror, this friendless young woman becomes increasingly infatuated with him.” I quote the studio publicity at length because judging from the movie itself, it is wrong in almost every detail. Let’s take the last point first. Mia Wasikowska is a good actress: I think she could show us infatuation if she wanted to. Her India never appears infatuated with her Uncle Charlie. On the contrary, she’s suspicious of and hostile to him from the start. As for the “mysterious, charming” Uncle Charlie, it seems to me that “creepy and charmless” would be closer to the mark. This may simply be my reaction to Matthew Goode, whom I have seldom found an actor of conspicuous charm. But we can’t hang this one on Goode: Most of Stoker’s problems are the work of director Chan-wook Park, who has never made a movie in English before, and the actor-turned-screenwriter Wentworth Miller,

who has never written a screenplay at all. When a supposed suspense thriller centers around a teenage girl and her Uncle Charlie, there might as well be a neon billboard flashing “Homage to Alfred Hitchcock” in the lobby. The model is Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt (1943), in which teen Teresa Wright suspects that her adored Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotten) is a notorious serial killer. The resemblance ends there. Hitchcock considered Shadow of a Doubt his one picture that would have no problem with “the plausibles”—those who found his plots far-fetched or unconvincing. To be sure, Shadow is all too plausible, but no such burden troubles Stoker. Wentworth Miller peppers his script with implausibilities, most of which can’t be detailed here without arousing the Spoiler Police. But some can. For example, the idea that for India’s birthday every year, somebody gives her a gift of the same pair of ugly saddle shoes, each a size larger than the year before, and each pair is left in a tree in a white box tied with a yellow ribbon. Compounding the implausibility, India has kept every single pair and lies with them around her in a circle when she’s feeling moody— which is most of the time. Then there’s India’s treatment from a highschool jock, which would get him expelled for sexual harassment anywhere in America. Or her one sympathetic friend (Alden Ehrenreich of Beautiful Creatures), who turns into a rapist when it suits what we’ll laughingly call Stoker’s plot. Or her remaining in that daffy old house even after she finds the first body in the basement freezer. The crowning implausibility is Uncle Charlie’s “secret” when it’s finally revealed. But why go on? Director Park imbues the movie with the visual folderol that sometimes

Director Chan-wook Park imbues the movie with the visual folderol that sometimes passes for style. passes for style, and was sufficiently brazen in his idiotic Oldboy (2003) to win him an award at Cannes Film Festival. Nobody bothered to tell Mr. Park that there was an even farther-fetched story here than he worked with in Oldboy. Finally, there’s the question of Nicole Kidman, whose role amounts to little more than a diva cameo. Well, she worked with Wentworth Miller 10 years ago in The Human Stain. Maybe she was doing a favor for an old friend. Now he owes her one. Ω


by JONATHAN KIeFeR & JIM LANe

2

A Good Day to Die Hard

Tough cop John McClane (Bruce Willis) flies to Russia to check up on his son (Jai Courtney) who has landed in jail—only to learn that Junior is really CIA, and it’s all part of his mission to spirit a political prisoner (Sebastian Koch) out of the country. Now Daddy is in the middle of things and about to either ruin everything or save the day—or both. This series ran out of gas with the first sequel and has been on life support ever since; writer Skip Woods and director John Moore fail to revive it here, but they cram in all they can think of, with Willis and Courtney surviving concussions, broken bones, explosions and outrunning machine-gun bullets. Is Courtney being groomed to take over when Willis finally has enough? What’s next? Never Say Die Hard? Do or Die Hard? Who cares? Die hard, already! J.L.

2

The Call

A 911 operator (Halle Berry) loses her nerve when she feels responsible for a kidnap and murder; six months later, she fields a call from a victim in a car trunk (Abigail Breslin) who may have fallen into the clutches of the same killer. The artless sadism works for a while, thanks to Berry’s strong performance and support from Roma Maffia as her sympathetic boss and Morris Chestnut as her cop fiancé. Alas, Richard D’Ovidio’s script (from a story by himself, Nicole D’Ovidio and Jon Bokenkamp) runs out of ideas; the killer’s contrived backstory takes over, and the movie degenerates into a low-rent The Silence of the Lambs, turning Berry into a low-rent Jodie Foster. Director Brad Anderson, short on ideas himself, can only tighten the screws on the audience, and the movie becomes more unpleasant by the minute. J.L.

1

The Croods

A prehistoric family is forced to face the outside world when their teenage daughter (voiced by Emma Stone) meets a handsome stranger (Ryan Reynolds). It’s recycled Flintstones, only without even the meager inspiration of that oldie-but-not-very-goodie. At least William Hanna and Joseph Barbera ripped off The Honeymooners; writer-directors Kirk De Micco and Chris Sanders can only think to rip off some of the worst animated features of all time: Rio, Ice Age, Madagascar—distended shorts that mistake frantic activity for energy and flailing invention for ingenuity. With negligible characters and a threadbare story, there’s nothing to pass the time but identifying the voices. Nicolas Cage is dad, Catherine Keener is mom and Cloris Leachman is grandma. There now, I’ve saved you the trouble of seeing it at all. J.L.

2

Dead Man Down

The henchman (Colin Farrell) of a New York gangster (Terrence Howard) is really an undercover vigilante planning to bring the man down for killing his family. Meanwhile, he strikes up a halting romance with a neighbor (Noomi Rapace) who wants him to kill the drunk driver who disfigured her in a car crash. Director Niels Arden Oplev and a strong cast (Dominic Cooper, Isabelle Huppert and F. Murray Abraham are also rattling around in there somewhere) contend against the patent absurdity of J.H. Wyman’s over-the-top script. Their efforts are not entirely in vain—Farrell and Rapace have some surprisingly touching moments amid the mayhem, and Oplev establishes an effective (if overfamiliar) gritty texture, and the picture is compulsively, albeit repellently, watchable. French icon Huppert is largely wasted. J.L.

2

Emperor

As the United States occupies Japan after World War II, Gen. Douglas MacArthur (Tommy Lee Jones) assigns Gen. Bonner Fellers (Matthew Fox) to investigate whether Emperor Hirohito should be prosecuted for war crimes—with a broad hint that he should not. This could have made a good movie, but writers Vera Blasi and David Klass and director Peter Webber largely botch it. The two stars are miscast: The handsome Fox is a poor match for the stolid Fellers, while Jones plays MacArthur the way he played Thaddeus Stevens in Lincoln—though his last scene with Hirohito himself (Takatarô Kataoka) has the ring of truth. The movie also gives Fellers a fictional prewar romance with a Japanese woman (Kaori Momoi) and makes his efforts to find her in the ruins of Japan appear more important than the investigation at hand. J.L.

BEFORE

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2 5 0 8 L A N D PA R K D R I V E L A N D PA R K & B R O A D WAY F R E E PA R K I N G A D J A C E N T T O T H E AT R E “A THRILLER OF SAVAGE BEAUTY.”

“ONE OF THE BEST SELECTIONS AT CANNES.”

“FLUSHED WITH HUMOR AND TENDERNESS.”

STOKER NO QUARTET - Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

STARTS FRI., 3/22

STARTS FRI., 3/22

FRI-TUES: 10:20AM, 12:35, 2:55, 5:15, 7:35, 9:55PM

FRI-TUES: 10:50AM, 1:35, 4:15, 7:00, 9:35PM

WED-TUES: 10:30AM, 12:45, 3:00, 5:10, 7:30, 9:40PM

“POTENT ENOUGH TO ALTER HOW YOU SEE THE WORLD.”

“WINNING MUSICAL DETECTIVE STORY.”

“TRANSFIXING AND EXTRAORDINARILY TOUCHING.”

- Kenneth Turan, LOS ANGELES TIMES

4

AMOUR - Owen Gleiberman, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

- Dennis Harvey, VARIETY

THE GATEKEEPERS

SUGAR MAN

WED/THUR: 10:25AM, 12:35, 2:50, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30PM

WED: 2:30, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15PM THUR: 2:30, 4:45PM

ENDS THUR., 3/21

Get ready for it—this is our big number!

- Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

- Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

SEARCHING FOR ENDS THUR., 3/21

ENDS THUR., 3/21

WED/THUR: 11:45AM

F O R A D V A N C E T I C K E T S C A L L FA N D A N G O @ 1 - 8 0 0 - F A N D A N G O # 2 7 2 1

No

Revisiting the 1988 plebiscite by which Chile shook off a terrible dictatorship, director Pablo Larraín’s film nicely subdues feel-good instincts in favor of nuanced, stoic insight. It depicts the surreally historic moment when international pressure forced a referendum on the Pinochet regime, and pro and con campaigns sprang up to duke it out on Chilean TV. Gael García Bernal stars as a hotshot ad exec who takes charge of the risky bid to rally fellow citizens against eight more years of official brutality. Told he needs an anthem, he shrewdly insists on a jingle instead—“Chile, happiness is coming!”—and the battle for freedom takes shape as a contest between callow, too-chipper “advertising language” and duplicitous fear-mongering propaganda. Daringly, the whole movie was shot on U-matic video, for that visually parched, late ’80s look. With the TV imagery and the jean jackets looking equally washed out, Larraín’s aesthetic cleverly enlists the audience in yearning for a more beautiful future. It also illuminates a moral intelligence that’s rare among retrospective election movies: something beyond just black and white. J.K.

EVERY THURSDAY.

REEL REVIEWS. YOU’RE WELCOME, FILM GEEKS.

AN ADRENALINE SHOT”

TO THE CEREBRAL CORTEX! – Marshall Fine, HUFFINGTON POST

3

The Gatekeepers

Documentarian Dror Moreh interviews six former chiefs of Shin Bet, the intelligence agency charged with defending Israel against terrorism, espionage and the release of state secrets. The movie begins by telling us they have never been interviewed about their work—leaving us to fill in the implied “until now” ourselves. Moreh largely eschews the agitprop buffoonery of a Michael Moore (though he can’t resist a few swipes at Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whom he plainly despises), modeling his movie on the more subtly persuasive Errol Morris of The Fog of War, a particular favorite of his. Moreh’s thesis, that the Israeli right and the occupation of the West Bank and Gaza both threaten long-term disaster for Israel, is shared by his subjects with unsettling (and maybe even suspicious) unanimity. J.L.

2

Greedy Lying Bastards

Activist Craig Scott Rosebraugh steps into the documentary game with this directorial debut, unfortunately, just another one of those smarmy, quasi-journalistic, sign-this-petition spiels. Rosebraugh’s Al Franken-style title only highlights his comparative humorlessness, without even elaborating what the movie’s really about, which is the pernicious political influence of moneyed climate-change deniers (and their big-energy benefactors). It’s the usual talking heads and peppy infographics, and it’ll be catnip for viewers already inclined to indignation about the greedy lying bastards who value profits over planet health. But Rosebraugh’s narration seems more smug than sincere—like a borrowed voice, or one synthesized from those of all the similar documentaries whose style he apes. Worse, his appetite for ironic scenes of weather-wrought catastrophe verges on its own kind of insensitive opportunism. J.K.

3

Oz the Great and Powerful

As Tim Burton took on Lewis Carroll, so Sam Raimi has a go at L. Frank Baum: under the deadening influence of Disneyfication. It’s not Raimi’s fault that never again will any movie have the cultural staying power of The Wizard of Oz, but still his quasi-prequel seems to lack perspective. Before becoming the man behind the curtain, he was James Franco, as a Kansas con man with a two-bit carnival magic act. Good idea, theoretically, but Oz as protagonist needs more than the nonpersonality of a perpetually stoned,

FRONTLINES

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spread-thin performance artist. Too much CGI doesn’t help. Over the rainbow and abetted by an orphaned broken-legged porcelain doll and a servile flying monkey with the voice of Zach Braff, he tangles with a trio of variously meddlesome witches (Mila Kunis, Rachel Weisz, Michelle Williams). The thing about Oz-related entertainment properties, which indeed have become abundant over the past century, is the spirit with which they’re carried off. Some tornadoes are stronger than others. J.K.

2

Phantom

4

Zero Dark Thirty

“ONE

OF THE MOST ARTFUL CHILLERS IN AGES.” – John DeFore, THE HOLLY WOOD R EPORT ER

In writer-director Todd Robinson’s waterlogged thriller of Cold War brinksmanship, Ed Harris plays a Russian submarine captain with an unexpected chance to save the world. All that stands in his way is a fellow Russian played by David Duchovny. Weird, right? The true events from which Phantom jumps off are fewer than its opening titles imply. It would be fine to credit Robinson with an imaginative fabrication, had he used more imagination. But for all its suspense-stoking theatrics, his movie has the lethargy of a lazy mash-up, like every grave-situation-on-a-submarine film of the past 20 years, plus maybe a couple of Star Trek episodes, rolled into one unabashedly corny and somewhat budget-challenged chamber drama. Sometimes it is solid in a no-nonsense way, like some workmanlike B-movie from a bygone Hollywood. Most times, it’s stilted as hell. J.K.

Unavoidably the movie of the year, Kathryn Bigelow’s controversial quasijournalistic thriller, dramatized from original reporting by screenwriter Mark Boal, surveys the decade-long quest to bring down Osama bin Laden. A taut procedural spun from the point of view of Jessica Chastain’s lone wolf CIA analyst, the film seems temperamentally more tenacious than triumphalist, and maybe therefore also as lucid an elaboration of the “war on terror” as we can ever hope to get from Hollywood. But has anyone asked why we should ever hope to get such a thing from Hollywood? Neither the Obama re-election commercial nor the torture apologia some blowhards feared it would be, Zero Dark Thirty certainly captures the cultural legacy of 9/11 and reveals the euphemized brutalities of recent American foreign policy. It’s also a superb example of contemporary political-thriller vernacular, all the way through to its methodical and disturbingly amazing night-vision climax. J.K.

F E AT U R E S T O RY

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MUSIC BY

COPRODUCERS PRODUCED BY WRITTEN BY

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS

DIRECTED BY

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iss ® NOMINEE ACADEMY AWA n’t MRD Do BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

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HIGHEST RATING

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The Joy Formidable confronts its   internal struggles head-on

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SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW

THUR 3/21

for meaning with lyrics such as, “Where are we going? / What are we doing? … What came of, of goodness? / Of fairness?” Likewise, the swelling rock number “Tendons” is striking with references to tendons stretching and pulling that serve as great metaphors for the stresses all relationships endure. That track in particular, however, has attained an even deeper meaning in recent months due to a broken relationship within the band. “It’s strange because even though it wasn’t written that long ago it ... almost acts as a premonition now,” Bryan says. “We wrote it when [Joy Formidable bassist] Rhydian [Dafydd] and I were together, and now we’re not a couple anymore, so it was almost like we were seeing the unraveling of our relationship,” she continues. “When we wrote it, we wanted to celebrate this extraordinary friendship and relationship, how dynamic it is, and how under the strain of everything, we still managed to pull together.” These days, she says, it’s fraught with new significance. “It’s definitely taken on a new, heightened level of meaning and emotion.” The song is also emblematic of the record’s content as a whole. The notion of the band pressing on in spite of difficulties rather than lying down and giving up is a major theme. phoTo CouRTeSy oF big hASSle

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Those who’ve already listened to Wolf’s Law, the latest release from U.K. rock act the Joy Formidable, already know full well how massive this record by Brian Palmer is. Filled with infectious melodies, roaring guitars and thunderous drums, this is the kind of collection that makes you want to air guitar and air drum along to every song. Toss in singer and guitarist Ritzy Bryan’s razor-sharp lyrics and sprightly vocals, and you have the blueprint for one of this year’s most dynamic albums.

Despite such sonic aggressiveness, however, it’s the record’s orchestral flourishes that do most to give the music a grandiose, almost operatic feel. The inspiration behind this choice was largely nostalgic and prompted by tragedy, says Bryan, who’ll make a stop in Sacramento with her band on Saturday, March 23, at Ace of Spades. “[I] lost my grandfather in January 2012 when we were recording in Maine,” says Bryan, “and there was just that sense of wanting to be nostalgic.” Indulging in that nostalgia meant revisiting old favorites, she says. “One of the first movies I saw with my grandparents was Snow White [and the Seven Dwarfs], and I remember listening to that soundtrack, by Frank Churchill, by itself without the visuals while we were in Maine, and really admiring it and realizing that this is a masterpiece,” she says. “Not just the masterpiece that Disney created, but on its own it’s absolutely a beautiful soundtrack. It’s very evocative.” “Evocative” aptly describes Wolf’s Law’s content, tone and themes because it takes the listener on a roller-coaster ride across a variety of emotional landscapes. The album’s first single, “This Ladder Is Ours,” is an uplifting blast of energy as Bryan encourages someone not to let struggles defeat them. On “Cholla,” the crunchy guitars and hypnotic vocals and melodies augment the singer’s internal struggle

“There’sthissense,onthe album,oftryingtobattle throughandreconcile relationshipsthathave brokendown.” Ritzy Bryan The Joy Formidable Certainly, it seems, this trio’s members have no interest in letting its trials defeat them. “There’s this sense, on the album, of trying to battle through and reconcile relationships that have broken down,” Bryan says. “We wanted to fill the record with that idea of having a spirit of tenacity.” For Bryan and the rest of the band, there is no sense in dwelling on the past. “We touch on many things, but that’s one of the sentiments that informed this album,” Bryan says. “That sense of trying to make up for lost time and saying, ‘Let’s move forward and start fresh.’” Ω


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Namaste, y’all

Cathedrals, Escalades and brats: As for me, my plan is to not plan much. On Friday, my first morning in town, I wake up, grab some kimchi french fries from the

BEFORE

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Chi’Lantro food truck, and head out to see Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell. The Radio Day Stage set up in an exhibition hall of the convention center isn’t a suitable cathedral for one of the high priestesses of Americana, but sterile as the room is, it falls away when she and Crowell cover Kris Kristofferson’s “Chase the Feeling.” Later on the same stage, I catch Seattle band Pickwick, a neo-soul five-piece that sounds a bit like the Black Keys on performance-enhancing drugs. The band’s enormous confidence is nascent and endearing, and frontman Galen Disston’s voice is a thing to behold. Dawes follows, hawking its sincere tunes to an enthusiastic and mostly sober crowd, which is refreshing in its own way. That evening, I head over to an indie-rock showcase for Sacto locals Brown Shoe (full disclosure: the band’s guitar player is the Kurt Russell to my Goldie Hawn), and I’m pretending to help load gear when a black Cadillac Escalade rolls up next to us and Warren G pops his head out of the window.

The audience seems to be about 80 percent white male music bloggers.

the hippest person there. I try some impressive vegan queso. Around 9 p.m., instead of trying to see Prince, the Smashing Pumpkins or Justin Timberlake, I forcibly drag some folks to go see Kitty (the artist formerly known as Kitty Pryde). If you don’t know who Kitty is, she’s a former Claire’s accessories employee around the age of 17, who raps about being a girl. On this particular evening, she asks the crowd if they know what “incontinence” means, and asks us not to tell her mom when she starts grinding on the bar. Are her crass verses supposed to melt your heart? Is she an abomination to the hip-hop world? I have no idea. I don’t have much to contribute other than this: She is brazenly vulnerable, very 17-ish. The audience seems to be about 80 percent white male music bloggers, whatever that signifies. I’m still trying to puzzle that 30 minutes of my life out. On Sunday, the city empties out quickly, I stick it out for four or five more Lone Star Beers and one final showcase at the legendary Stubb’s BBQ. I’m glad I did, too, because I got to catch Austin locals the Wheeler Brothers. Watching them, you get the feeling that this alt-country five-piece killing it and the crowd loving it is a standard affair—confirmation that while there may be a lot of annoying packaging to tear through, the old SXSW spirit isn’t so hard to find once you stop making demands of it.

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—Deena Drewis

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Anyway. The showcase is full of pleasant surprises: Austin natives Boy + Kite remind me of the Silversun Pickups crossed with Metric; Sad Baby Wolf (consisting of former members of the Shins) weave tight harmonies with poppy folk. Postshow, I have the good fortune of eating a “spoiled brat”—a gyro stuffed with beef, lamb, chicken and falafel—from food trailer Kebabalicious. I go to bed indigestion-riddled but happy, feeling the SXSW magic.

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Vegan queso and melty hearts: When I wake up the next morning, however, I’m feeling pretty bereft of said magic. After a considerable effort to get out of bed around 3 p.m., I head to the BrooklynVegan party, where Did this guy everyone there is hipper than

FRONTLINES

4 wEEk TRaInInG pROGRamS

• experienced trainers

photo by Caroline bonarde UCCi

Everything’s hipper in Texas: It’s been four years since I last braved the overwhelming crush of Sixth Street in Austin for the South by Southwest Music Festival, and among the cacophony of a punk band, an indie band, a honky-tonk trio, a dubstep deejay and a hip-hop collective bearing down on all sides from rooftop bars, freshmen Longhorns vomiting into the nearest trash can in any given direction and the general smell of rot riding the breeze, I’m trying hard to keep my inner killjoy at bay. I’m trying harder than I normally do, anyway, in spite of the zoo, because I have arrived in Austin, Texas, unwilling to buy into what seems to have been a popular sentiment among media critics leading up to this year’s festival: namely, that South by Southwest, once a scrappy, dirtencrusted dingo, is now Boo the Pomeranian, and this year’s festival is but a soiree for the bourgeoisie during which Justin Timberlake is scheduled for a “secret” show in order to shit on the dreams of all the just-about-to-break singer-songwriters that would’ve otherwise caught their big break, if only everyone had come to their shows at restaurants-turned-venues in east Austin instead of his. I will give the cynics this much: The corporate folk don’t make it easy to ignore the logofication of everything. The poor pedicabbies have sold their calf space to Tito’s vodka and pedal around town in branded kneesocks; some dumblooking TV show called Hannibal is hawking cannibalism-punned fare from a shiny food truck. But what’s a little commercial deluge in the face of what is still one of the largest music celebrations in the country? To the naysayers I pass on a bit of advice that I gleaned from a T-shirt upon arriving in Austin: “Namaste, y’all.” If you’re feeling a little disgusted by the whole corporate takeover, I suggest you channel your anger at Doritos into patience, because you’re going to need a lot of it if you want to catch that Macklemore & Ryan Lewis show.

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AFTER

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03.21.13

BODY FOUnDRY Ver Lorega

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37


22FRI

23SAT

23SAT

23SAT

Destructikonz

Fort Lean

Folsom Symphony

Tao Jiriki

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 10:30 p.m., $10 The name alone, Destructikonz (which is  pronounced like the evil Transformers,  HIP-HOP Decepticons), should make it  clear: This is a rap crew with a  sense of humor. It also straddles an interesting line between underground and mainstream rap. There is a funky rawness and  offbeat sensibility to the music that almost  makes it fall into the alternative-hip-hop  category. Yet the beats are so smooth and  the choruses have such infectious hooks,  you can almost picture these guys on the  radio. Almost. Personally, I like that they  don’t quite fit into the radio box. I hope  they never lose their offbeat charm and  natural creativity. 2708 J Street,   www.facebook.com/destructikonz.

—Aaron Carnes

Ace of Spades, 7 p.m., $15 This may open me up to accusations of  being a hipster sympathizer, but whatever:  When a band like Fort Lean comes to town  (opening for the Joy Formidable), I breathe  a sigh of relief. Because how many more  shitty punk bands and screamo bros can  Sacto endure? Sure, the Brooklyn band’s  Facebook page photo features lead singer  Keenan Mitchell in a denim jacket. And,  yeah, he’s got ironic ’80s hair-band hair.  But there are good musicians backing all  that up. It’s of-the-moment New York rock  ROCK (think the Walkmen) bumping  back against ’60s rock (think the  Zombies), and it makes for a refreshing  change of scene in these parts. 1417   R Street, www.facebook.com/fortlean.

—Deena Drewis

Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 7:30 p.m., $20-$55 Maestro Michael Neumann will conduct the  Folsom Symphony through three important  pieces in a program called Our Magnificent  Horns. Robert Schumann’s “Konzertstück” in   F major for Four Horns and Orchestra, op. 86 is  CLASSICAL considered a “masterwork  for the full quartet” and  features the horn throughout, showcasing the  instrument family’s range. Johannes Brahms’  Symphony No. 3 was composed for the natural horn and features a horn solo. The only  20th-century piece is Ralph Vaughan Williams’  “Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis,”  which will be a wonderful counterbalance to  Schumann and Brahms because it’s focused  on the string section. 10 College Parkway in  Folsom, http://folsomsymphony.com.

Shine, 8 p.m., $5 Who would have thought that an instrumental duo with just a keyboardist and  a drummer would go into experimental  free-form territory? Well, maybe that’s  no surprise. But you know what is? The  degree to which Tao Jiriki actually makes  quite accessible dance music. Jazz is the  predominant influence, although there are  elements of blues, funk and hip-hop. It sort  of weaves in and out of these sounds, locking into hard-hitting grooves, then shifting  into some weird, cerebral avant-garde  jams—which works out great, because  when you’re all worn out from dancing, you  can sit down and  EXPERIMENTAL be blown away by  the duo’s innovative musicianship. 1400   E Street, www.reverbnation.com/taojiriki.

—Trina L. Drotar

—Aaron Carnes

LIVE MUSIC 9PM Fri 3/22

TORTILLA SOUP Latin • $10 Sat 3/23

MAPLETONES Acoustic • $10 Fri 3/29

MAGIC MIKE NIGHT Ladies Delight 9-11pm Food & Drink Specials $15 Adv • $20 Door

Open to the public after 11pm with DJ

EASTER BRUNCH

Saturday, March 23 9:30pM – 1aM

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Every Friday 9pm All Ages & No Cover

MERCY ME 3443 LAGUNA BLVD • ELK GROVE FACEBOOK.COM/PINSNSTRIKES PINSNSTRIKES.COM • 916.226.2695

38   |   SN&R   |   

03.21.13

the foreSockS a tribute to the red hot chili pepperS

Fri 3/30

Old School • Funk Jazz • R&B $10

Special appearance by

57th & Jst 916-457-5600

Happy Hour M-F 3-6 pm & Thur 9-1am


23SAT

24SUN

25MON

28THURS

Tel Cairo

Caveman

The Pimps of Joytime

Ab-Soul

Blue Lamp, 9 p.m., $7

Blue Lamp, 8 p.m., $10-$12

Lo-fi hip-hop duo Tel Cairo has been busy  collaborating with a variety of Sacramento  musicians for its newest album Voice of  Reason, due to be released on April 16. Band  members Cameron Others and 7evin called  upon the talents of Terra Lopez from Sister  Crayon as well as hip-hop artists Tais,  Mahtie Bush and members of Tribe of Levi  to pack this 11-track concept album full of  surprises. Since Tel Cairo’s record-release  party isn’t until April 4 (at Midtown BarFly),  join the group this Saturday with rock ’n’  HIP-HOP roll three-piece Lonely Kings  and Fly High. Who knows,  maybe Tel Cairo will perform a song from its  upcoming album? 1400 Alhambra Boulevard,  www.telcairo.com.

—Steph Rodriguez

Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 8 p.m., $15

Caveman, a five-piece indie-pop band  from New York City’s Brooklyn borough,  will release a self-titled album on April 2.  INDIE-POP The first single, “In the  City,” is anthemic with  four-part harmonies, psychedelic keys and  muddled guitars. This song alone illustrates  Caveman’s willingness to experiment with  different sounds. Still, the group isn’t  straying too far from its debut album CoCo  Beware, where singles like “Old Friend” with  chunky guitar riffs and catchy drum beats  gained the band buzz back in 2011. Caveman  creates relaxed rock or calming sounds that  are easy listening, but not boring or dull. It’s  definitely a band for those who enjoy the  dreamier qualities of music. 1400 Alhambra  Boulevard, www.cavemantheband.comtalics.

Ace of Spades, 8 p.m., $20

The Pimps of Joytime, a Brookyln, New York  City-based group with roots in New Orleans  and Los Angeles, updates an old-schoolfunk sound by blending it with modern  influences. Its latest album, Janxta Funk!,  released in 2011 and named after the portmanteau of “gangster” and “janky,” melds  a number of genres, including electronic  music and hip-hop. Guest appearances by  Roy Ayers and Art and Cyril Neville add a  FUNK partylike atmosphere to the  album. The Pimps extend this  vibe into high-energy shows that turn  audiences into passionate dancers. Expect  to see a group of Midtowners at Harlow’s  getting really funky and janky on the dance  floor—on a Monday. 2708 J Street,  www.thepimpsofjoytime.com. 

—Steph Rodriguez

—Jonathan Mendick

ACE OF SPADES

ALL AGES WELCOME!

SATURDAY, MARCH 30

FORT LEAN

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

GEORGE CLINTON & PARLIAMENT FUNKADELIC

THE JOY FORMIDABLE ENTER SHIKARI ARCHITECTS - HEARTIST - CROSSFAITH MAID OF THE MIST

04/14 ALT–J 04/17 The Selecter & Lee “Scratch” Perry 04/19 The English Beat

TECH N9NE

BROTHA LYNCH HUNG - KRIZZ KALIKO KUTT CALHOUN - CES CRU RITTZ - AMERICAZ MOZT HAUNTED THURSDAY, APRIL 4

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

DJ MUSTARD

04/6 Soul Asylum

04/13 The Expendables

TUESDAY, APRIL 2

THURSDAY, MARCH 28

SOON

04/12 Andre Nickatina

SEVENDUST & COAL CHAMBER LACUNA COIL - CANDLELIGHT RED

MINDLESS SELF INDULGENCE

COMING 04/11 The Rocket Summer

FRIDAY, MARCH 31

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 27

AB-SOUL

—Jonathan Mendick

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

SATURDAY, MARCH 23

SUNDAY, MARCH 24

Don’t worry if you forgot where you heard  Ab-Soul’s name before. Spare the Google  search and just know that he’s in the Los  Angeles-based hip-hop collective Black Hippy  with Kendrick Lamar, Jay Rock and Schoolboy  Q. He’s released two solo albums, a couple mixHIP-HOP tapes and is featured on tons  of other Black Hippy releases.  Are these references still too obscure? Well,  his underground hip-hop cred extends to  appearances on mixtapes and albums with  Talib Kweli, Macklemore and Childish Gambino.  Anyway, Ab-Soul, who’s only 26, suffers from  a rare skin disorder called Stevens-Johnson  syndrome, which may explain why his lyrical  material is about overcoming struggle and  what some might call “conscious.” 1417   R Street, www.facebook.com/absoulmusic.

04/20 Foals 04/22 Queensryche 04/24 Alex Clare 04/25 Katchafire 04/26 Taj He Spitz 05/04 Some Fear None 05/08 Machine Gun Kelly

YG

05/18 Dillinger Escape Plan 05/22 Turbonegro 05/31 Capital Cities

FRIDAY, MARCH 29

VALU FA TEKI - FINN THE GROOVAH & UNITED

DISTRICTZ - IRIE LOVE - YB LB - SANGA KINGI & PISTALLION - DJ REEF

06/01 Finch

FRIDAY, APRIL 5

JONNY CRAIG

06/08 Bret Michaels

KURT TRAVIS - HAIL THE SUN THE SEEKING - JAMES CAVERN - VISITING DAYS

06/18 Memphis May Fire 07/27 Y&T

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

03.21.13     |   SN&R     |   39


NIGHTBEAT List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

THURSDAY 3/21

FRIDAY 3/22

SATURDAY 3/23

SUNDAY 3/24

BLUE LAMP

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

CHERRY RED, MARVALESS, CENTURY GOT BARS, 9pm, $5-$7

BROWN HUSTLAS, GATHERING OF MINDS, LSC, QBALL, SHOTTY SHOT; 9pm

LONELY KINGS, TEL CAIRO, FLY HIGH; 9:30pm, $8

CAVEMAN, 8:30pm, call for cover

THE BOARDWALK

CALIREP, CHUCK DEEZLE, CITRUS C, LIL

PDP, AGHORI, LEGION’S REQUIEM, JOURNAL, BISPORA; 7:30pm, $10-$12

I WISH WE WERE ROBOTS, MERCHANTS, OUTSIDERS, LIFEFORMS; 6pm, $10-$12

BOWS & ARROWS

Pompsicle: live figure drawing event, 6pm, $10

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

The Starz Show: Nevada County dance community showcase, 7pm, $12-$15

The Starz Show: Nevada County dance community showcase, 2pm and 7pm

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

RUSTY BUCKETS, SOL BRIDGE, TAMRA GODEY, CIDNEY CUNNINGHAM; 7pm

UNCOMMON GROUND, 8pm, $7

DJ Spindizzy, 8pm, call for cover

DJ Amy Robbins, 9pm, call for cover

Deejay dancing and karaoke, 9pm, $3

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

LOW TIDE RIOT, FONTAINE CLASSIC; 8-11pm, no cover

KEVIN SECONDS, NOAH NELSON, BOBBY JORDAN; 9pm-midnight, $5

O STREET DUB, HANS AND THE HOT MESS, SACTO SOUL REBELS; 9pm, $5

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 G, GUERO, C-DUBB; 8pm, call for cover 1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

DISTRICT 30

1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

FACES

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798

FOX & GOOSE

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

GENIUS, SEAN NICHOLAS SAVAGE, AGOR, DOLDRUMS; 8pm, $5

G STREET WUNDERBAR

Community music jam, 6:30pm M, no cover

Queer Idol, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, $5; DJ Alazzawi, 9pm W, $3

Dragalicious, 9pm, $5

Open-mic, M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; ANDY GARCIA, AVI JONES; 8pm W

HARLOW’S

MURS, FASHAWN, PROF; 10:30pm, $16-$19

I LIKE IT, I LOVE IT, 7pm, call for cover; DESTRUCTIKONZ, 10:30pm

MIDNIGHT PLAYERS, 10pm, call for cover

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

MARK LEMAJRE & TWILIGHT, STEPPING STONE, BOB EASTWALL; 8pm, $6

DAN FRECHETTE, LAUREL THOMPSON; 8pm, $6

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

MARILYN’S ON K

“Rock On” Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

MATT LARSON, PATRICK WALSH, WOLFHOUSE; 9pm, $5

LUCKY LASKOWSKI, THE SHEETS, 50 WATT HEAVY; 9pm, $7

Live music series, 7:30pm Tu; DOUG CASH, THE OOO LA LAS; 8pm W, $5

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

REGGIE GINN, LINDSEY PAVAO, AJ JOHNSON; 8:30pm, $5

CHRIS TWOMEY, KENNY REGO AND THE LAW OF ONE BAND; 8:30pm, $5

ZOO HUMAN PROJECT, CRAZY BALLHEAD, NSAA, JENILYNN; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz, M; DELTA CITY RAMBLERS, ISLAND OF BLACK AND WHITE; W, $5

OLD IRONSIDES

DJ Micah J, 7pm, $3

SOUTHLOT, JULIET COMPANY, SWAHILI PASSION, ANMARIE FIELDING; 9pm, $5

GROOVIN’ HIGH, NORTHBOUND TRAIN, RIOT ACT; 9pm, $5

EVENT HORIZON, MONOMYTH INCEPTION; M; Karaoke, Tu; Open-mic, W

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

CAESIUM, BEERIJUANA, PETE & REPEET; 9pm, $5

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Open-mic comedy, 9pm, no cover

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

LOAFER’S GLORY, 8pm, $25

I SEE HAWKS IN LA, RED MEAT; 8:30pm, $20

ROB WALLER & THE GOSPEL ACCORDION, I SEE HAWKS IN LA; 2pm, $15

THE PARK ULTRA LOUNGE

DJ Eddie Edul, 9pm, call for cover

DJ Peeti V, 9pm, $15

Asylum Downtown: Gothic, industrial, EBM dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

SELF PROCLAIMED, 8pm, no cover

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693

Hey local bands!

GREX, PECK THE TOWN CRIER; 7:30pm Tu, $5; GHOST TO FALCO, 8pm W, $5

THE CARLY DUHAIN BAND, SOUTH LOT, THE DIVA KINGS; 8pm, call for cover

228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/25-3/27

1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931 908 K St., (916) 446-4361

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504 670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731 13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825 1116 15th St., (916) 442-7222

PINE COVE TAVERN

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

502 29th St., (916) 446-3624

MATT COSTA, CARLY RITTER, SAM OUTLAW; 8:30pm, $18

THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME, VOKAB KOMPANY; 8pm M, $15

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

Open-mic, 10pm-1am Tu, no cover; Trivia, 9-10pm W, no cover

RESTAURANT ss BAR BAR CLUB ss RESTAURANT COMEDY COMEDY CLUB

ThUrSdayS

Follow us /HarlowsNiteclub

MAR 21 9PM $10-20ADV

SIZZLING SIRENS

MAR 21 10:30PM $16ADV THE ROAD TO PAID DUES TOUR

MURS

WITH FASHAWN AND PROF MAR 22 7PM $10ADV

I LIKE IT, I(TIMLOVE IT MCGRAW TRIBUTE)

MAR 22 10PM $10ADV

MAR 24 8:30PM $18ADV

MATT COSTA CARLY RITTER / SAM OUTLAW

MAR 25 8PM $15ADV

PIMPS OF JOYTIME WITH VOKAB KOMPANY MAR 29 6:30PM $25ADV

CRYSTAL BOWERSOX

MAR 29 10PM $15ADV

CHEESEBALLS

DESTRUCTIKONZ HOT BUTTERED RUM MAR 30 10PM $15ADV

MAR 23 10PM $12ADV

MIDNIGHT PLAYERS

MAR 31 8PM $15ADV

HEARTLESS BASTARDS W/ JONNY FRITZ

FrI 03/22

Apr 04 Patterson Hood (Singer of Drive-By Truckers) Apr 05 Lord Huron Apr 06 Conflict Minerals / Dogfood / Allinaday Apr 10 Snarky Puppy / ZuhG Apr 11 Polica / Night Moves Apr 13 Toad The Wet Sprocket Apr 25 Yonder Mountain String Band Apr 26 Built To Spill Apr 27 Tom Rigney Apr 28 Blame Sally May 07 Infamous Stringdusters / The Brothers Comatose May 08 Todd Snider May 10 Petty Theft and Zoo Nation May 11 Steelin’ Dan May 12 Yo La Tengo May 13 Man or Astro Man? May 17 Tainted Love May 22 Atlas Genius May 23 Relic 45 May 25 Foreverland

paTrich walsh wolfhouse grundgE // Funk // bluEs // 9pm // $5

2708 J Street • Sacramento • 916.441.4693 • www.harlows.com |

SN&R

|

03.21.13

rock-n-roll // 9pm // FrEE

COMING SOON

DRESS CODE ENFORCED (JEANS ARE OK) • CALL TO RESERVE DINNER & CLUB TABLES • ALL TIMES LISTED ARE SHOWTIMES

40

rock on live band kar aoke maTT larson SaT 03/23

lucky laskowski band The sheeTs 50 waTT heavy country // rock // 9pm // $7 TUES 03/26

GreaTesT sTories ever Told trIbutE // JAm // 7:30pm // FrEE WEd 03/27

jeordie

douG cash AmErIcAnA // IndIE // pop // 8pm // $5

TickeTs now on sale for these upcoming shows at www.marilynsonk.com $

4

TallbOy TECaTE

UPCOMING EVENTS:

3/29 val starr & the blues rocket 3/30 unmata live.love.Dance

908 K Street • sac 916.446.4361

VOTED BEST COMEDY CLUB BY THE SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW!

MARCH 24 & 27

2 FOR 1 ADMISSION!! (WITH THIS AD)

THURSDAY 3/21 - SATURDAY 3/23 FROM THE JOE ROGAN EXPERIENCE AND BEAUTY AND DA BEAST!

JOEY ‘COCO’ DIAZ CASEY LEY

SUNDAY 3/24

COMEDY KILL!

JOHNNY TAYLOR, CARLOS RODRIGUEZ, NICK ARAGON, KATE WILLET, JACLYN WELAND, MATT RAYMOND, ALFONSO PORTELA

WEDNESDAY 3/27

FOR THE PEOPLE COMEDY FRANKIE QUINONES AND MORE!

THURSDAY 3/28 FROM CHELSEA LATELY AND AFTER LATELY!

JOSH WOLF

FRIDAY 3/29 - SATURDAY 3/30 FROM WEEDS AND SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE!

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STEVE MAZAN, NICK ARAGON

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER! ;>0;;,9*647<5*/305,:(*‹-(*,)662*6473:(*

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CALL CLUB FOR SHOWTIMES: (916) 925-5500 2100 ARDEN WAY sIN THE HOWE ‘BOUT ARDEN SHOPPING CENTER

2 DRINK MINIMUM. 18 & OVER. I.D. REQUIRED.

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CLUB BOX OFFICE WITH NO SERVICE CHARGE.


THURSDAY 3/21 PINS N STRIKES

3443 Laguna Blvd., Elk Grove; (916) 226-2625

FRIDAY 3/22

SATURDAY 3/23

TORTILLA SOUP, 9pm, $10

THE MAPLETONES, 9pm, $10

SUNDAY 3/24

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 3/25-3/27

PISTOL PETE’S

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

STONE KOLD, 9pm, $5

BIG BAD, POLITICAL PLUM; 9pm, $5

PJ’S ROADHOUSE

DJ Old Griff, 9pm, no cover

ROCKIN DOWN THE HIGHWAY, 9pm, $5

GOOD SAMARITANS, ATLANTIS RISING, ZUHG, ELEMENT OF SOUL; 9pm, $5

POWERHOUSE PUB

CALIFORNIA COWBOYS, 9:30pm, call for cover

TAINTED LOVE, 10pm, $15

SPAZMATICS, 10pm, $10

DENNIS JONES, 3pm, call for cover

THE PRESS CLUB

2030 P St., (916) 444-7914

BLACKOUT, BRAIN RASH, GRIM TIDE; 9pm, no cover

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

BLACK MACKEREL, KEY OF SOLOMON, TENDER CINDERS, 9pm M, $5; MOANS, PEACEKILLERS; 4pm, $5; Soul Party, 9pm ENLOWS, STRANGE PARTY; 8pm W, $5

SAMMY’S ROCKIN’ ISLAND

ANT BEE, 7pm, no cover

BOYS OF SUMMER, 9:30pm, $10

SHINE

Shticks, a comedy night, 8pm, $5

TAO JIRIKI, GROOVE HEROES, GROOVINCIBLE; 8pm, $5

CHRIS TRAPPER, 7pm, $12

Open jazz jam, 8pm Tu; Poetry With Legs with Bill Gainer, 7pm W, call for cover

Sacramento Area Youth Speaks slam poetry semifinals, 5pm, $5

Microphone Mondays, 6pm M, $1-$2

140 Harrison Ave., Auburn; (530) 885-5093 5461 Mother Lode, Placerville; (530) 626-0336 614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586

238 Vernon St., Roseville; (916) 773-7625 1400 E St., (916) 551-1400

SOL COLLECTIVE

RE-ROC, APRIL FOOLZZ, BAMMER BABI, BLAKBOY PAMPER; 6:30pm, $11-$13

THE ANDROMEDA PROJECT, 6:30pm, $11-$13

SOPHIA’S THAI KITCHEN

IVAN & ALYOSHA, THE HORDE AND THE HAREM; 9:30pm, $7-$10

WILD ONES, CHEERS ELEPHANT; 9:30pm, $5

2574 21st St., (916) 832-0916 129 E St., Davis; (530) 758-4333

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, W, no cover

Country Karaoke, 9pm M, call for cover; DJ Alazzawi, DJ Rigatony, 10pm Tu, $3

STONEY INN/ROCKIN’ RODEO

THE BUCK FORD BAND, 9pm, $5

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Bluebird Lounge open-mic, 5pm Tu, no cover

TORCH CLUB

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

X TRIO, 5pm, no cover; BLACK MARKET III, 9pm, $5

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm, no cover; THE NICKEL SLOTS, 9pm, $8

JOHNNY KNOX, 5pm, no cover; JELLY BREAD, 9pm, $8

Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; OTIS HEAT, 8pm, $5

ISLAND OF BLACK & WHITE, 9pm Tu, $5; Acoustic open-mic, 5:30pm W, no cover

TOWNHOUSE LOUNGE

Wild w/ DJ Billy Lane, 9pm, no cover

Shaun Slaughter, 9pm, call for cover

DJs X-GVNR and Fame Change, 9pm, $5

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023

1517 21st St., (916) 613-7194

Dog Party 8:30pm Friday, $6. Luigi’s Fun Garden Rock

Open-mic, 9pm M; Grimey: dubstep and bass-heavy music, 9pm Tu, $10

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

THE JOY FORMIDABLE, FORT LEAN; 7pm, $15

CLUB RETRO

INCOMPLETE DENIAL, FRAILED SANITY, EROTICUS, FALL OF MAN; 6:30pm, $10

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300 1529 Eureka Rd., Roseville; (916) 988-6606

DOWNTOWN PLAZA (LOWER LEVEL) THE OTHER BRITTANY, 6pm, no cover DOG PARTY, 8:30pm, $6

1050 20th St., (916) 552-0317

ZUHG LIFE STORE

|

FRONTLINES

Ivan & Alyosha with the Horde and the Harem 9:30pm Friday, $7-$10. Sophia’s Thai Kitchen Folk-pop

NIGHTCLUB, PETS, UGLY BUNNY; 8pm, $6

STOLAS, THESE COLORS, 7:30pm Tu, $6; PONY VILLAGE, 7:30pm W, $6

GYPSY FISH, KASSIE ORTEGA; 1pm, no cover

545 Downtown Plaza, Ste. 2090, (916) 822-5185

BEFORE

MINDLESS SELF INDULGENCE, 6:30pm W, $22.50

BAND OF EGYPT, 1pm, no cover

547 L St., (916) 822-5185

LUIGI’S SLICE AND FUN GARDEN

ENTER SHIKARI, THE ARCHITECTS, HEARTIST, CROSSFAITH; 6:30pm, $13

|

FEATURE

STORY

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

AFTER

|

03.21.13

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SN&R

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WHAT’S ON YOUR

HORIZON? Join Horizon Non-Profit today for safe access to a wide variety of high quality medical cannabis. Whether you prefer flowers, extracts, edibles or topicals, indica or sativa, we have the right medicine for you. Whatever your medical condition or employment situation, you can come to Horizon knowing that we respect and hold your

HEALTH, WELL–BEING & PRIVACY AS OUR HIGHEST PRIORITY. OPEN TO ANYONE 18 OR OLDER WITH VALID CA I.D. AND DR’S RECOMMENDATION FOR MEDICAL CANNABIS

HORIZON NON-PROFIT COLLECTIVE Mon-Thur 10am - 7pm | Fri-Sat 10am - 9pm | Sun 12pm - 7pm 42   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13

3600 Power Inn Rd Suite 1A Sacramento, CA 95826 916.455.1931


How’s it goin’? Colorado and Washington have legalized marijuana for adults. How is that going? —Sara It’s going quite well, actually. The Colorado task force assigned to come up with recommendations for marijuana regulation has just ended, and the recommendations are now in committee. There should be a bill on the floor in a few months. Washington is still looking for a “marijuana BEALUM czar,” but the delay has been because it has by NGAIO received a ton of applications for the position. The feds have not yet responded. U.S. Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. has said that a sk420 @ n ewsreview.c om the Department of Justice is close to making an announcement. Some legislators have expressed support for upholding Colorado and Washington state law. Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi had this to say to The Denver Post: “[T]o answer your question, what is my position regarding the states that have medical marijuana or recreational marijuana as the law of their states: I think that has to be respected. I think tax and regulate.” Her statement should U.S. Attorney General give hope to people in that if we do Eric H. Holder Jr. California pass a cannabis-legalization has said that the measure, there will be support in Washington, D.C. Department of Justice So far this year, there have been 11 states that is close to making an introduced medicalannouncement. marijuana legislation, and about six more states have made attempts at decriminalization. The tipping point of the tipping point has been reached. If we go hella hard right now, we could see full-on nationwide legalization by 2016-2020. Is it true that you either have to have your grow shielded by lead or buried 15-feet underground to keep federal agents from peering in your room? If so, why? What else can you do to shield yourself?

Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@ newsreview.com.

—John Yes. Yes, you do. But the most important thing to remember is to keep your tinfoil hat in a tricornered shape. A round shape doesn’t scramble the gamma rays they use to track us through the fillings in our teeth. That’s why flossing is important. If you don’t have fillings, they can’t track you. In all seriousness, the best thing to do is to keep your garden low-key. Not everyone needs to know you are growing the crazy-fire O.G. at your house. Make sure you are on good terms with your neighbors, and if you are growing indoors, add an extra filter to minimize odor. The biggest threats to small grows are pissed-off neighbors and petty thieves. Keep everything cool, and you should be fine. If you are growing more than 200 plants, then, yes, you should grow in an underground bunker. Preferably one with lead shielding, a holodeck and a danger room. Ω

Bring in any competitor’s coupon and we’ll beat it by $5 Must present competitor’s ad. Some restrictions apply.

VOTED 2ND BEST 420 PHYSICIAN IN SAC!

Sacramento

420 Doc MEDICAL MARIJUANA EVALUATIONS

MARCH COMPASSION SPECIAL

34 44

$

$

RENEWALS

NEW PATIENTS

Must bring ad. Limit one per patient. Some restrictions apply.

Must bring ad. Limit one per patient. Some restrictions apply.

916.480.9000 2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

2100 Watt Ave, Unit 190 | Sacramento, CA 95825 | Mon–Sat 11am–7pm 2633 Telegraph Ave. 109 | Oakland, CA 94612 | 510-832-5000 | Mon–Sat 10am–5pm RECOMMENDATIONS ARE VALID FOR 1 YEAR FOR QUALIFYING PATIENTS WALK-INS WELCOME ALL DAY EVERYDAY

YOUR INFORMATION IS 100% PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT ONLINE 24/7 AT

www.Sac420Doc.com B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

03.21.13     |   SN&R     |   43


E A R LY S P R I N G S P E C I A L

30% OFF REGULAR PRICE*

NEW PATIENTS & RENEWALS *WITH PURCHASE OF LAMINATED I.D. CARD FOR $20. REGULAR PRICE: $60 FOR NEW PATIENTS, $50 FOR RENEWALS. MUST PRESENT THIS AD. EXPIRES 03/28/13.

CA Licensed Independent Physician Evaluations for the use of Medical Marijuana

$40 1/8THS

P:(916)484-1200

e

Ent

NEW HOURS

OPEN MON- SAT 11- 6

Al’s Burganberry Hindu Skunk Strawberry Cough

Hurley se i r p r

Green Crack

Howe

CARE CENTER

Al’s Purple AK-47

EGAL GET L W NO

“No evaluation, no charge”

BEST 420 936 Enterprise Drive Sacramento 95825

DELIVERIES ONLY

Better Service. Better Value. Better Care.

Hindu Kush

Northrop

$30 1/8THS

REDDING & SACRAMENTO

Girl Scout Cookies

ALSO AVAILABLE Ear Wax Hash Edibles

FREE GIFT

FOR NEW MEMBERS W/DONATION Must Present Ad • Expires 04/04/13 • ID Cards Available

WE’VE MOVED

• 2614 El Camino Avenue Now open Saturdays 11am – 3pm Monday thru Friday • 916.973.1766 • 877.563.4156

Corner of Fulton & El Camino, Sacramento

BEWARE O IMITATIO F NS!

7 Days a Week 10am - 9pm

A1 PROPAGATOR COOPERATIVE INC.

916-381-1036

Dr. recommendation & CA ID required

1647 Hartnell Ave Ste 13, Redding 96002

SIMPLY THE BEST! Get Your Recommendation! Winner 2 years in a row! North Of Hwy 50 @ Bradshaw & Folsom Blvd ReNewalS

40 $50 $

w/ couPoN exP. 03/28/13 SNR

New PatieNt w/ couPoN exP. 03/28/13 SNR

50

- Sacramento News and Review Readers’ Poll -

Photo ID Available for $15

Voted 2nd Best 420 Physician in Sac 2012 - Mon-Sat 10am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm - Physician Evaluations - 24/7 Online Verification - Walk-Ins / Appts

Routier

Bradshaw

Blvd om Fols

Best Medical Marijuana clinic

caNN-Medical 44   |   SN&R   |   03.21.13

- Cultivators Welcome

9719A Folsom Blvd. Sacramento, CA 916-822-5690 • www.cannmedical.org

$

NEW PATIENTS

55 with copy of ad.

$

RENEWALS

45 with copy of ad.

WILL MATCH ANY LOCAL ADS FROM CLINICS THAT ARE CA MEDICAL BOARD STANDARDS COMPLIANT GET APPROVED OR NO CHARGE! 24/7 Verifications! HIPAA Compliant 100% Doctor/Patient Confidentiality be seen by a real m.d. the way SB 420 intended. no skype b.s.!

DOWNTOWN SACRAMENTO

2015 Q Street, 95811 • (916) 476-6142 Open Mon-Sat 11am - 6PM • valid through 03/31/13


buy 1 * get 1 free *Donate for an 1/8th at the reg. price, get 1 free (house choice). Exp 03/31/13. Top Shelf Only. Only 2 weeks left!

CLOUD 9 medical cannabis collective

GOLDEN HEALTH & WELLNESS 1030 Joellis Way, Sac

• $20 & $25 1/8THS select strains

916.646.6340 Mon - Sat 10am - 7pm Sun closed

• Now offeriNg orgaNic

Arden Way

me

B lu

Joellis Way

nfe

ld D

r

• free pre-roll

80

160

• over 20 straiNs

• tiNctures, hash, capsules, kief, edibles

NEW YEAR–NEW PRICES! $ 35 CAP ON 1/8THS $ 5 GRAMS FA IR P RIC E S | $ 10 GR A M S | W IDE VA RIE T Y O F E DIBL E S L A R G E S EL E C TI O N O F S ATI VA | IN DIC A | H Y BRID F RIE N DLY, K N OW L E D GA BL E S TA F F

5711 FLORIN PERKINS RD | SACRAMENTO, 95828 916.387.8605 BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

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F E AT U R E S T O RY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

AFTER

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03.21.13

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SN&R

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MASSAGE THERAPISTS

420 party bus on 4/20, 2013!

a $275 value for only

Heavens 2 Betsey is hosting a party bus to san jose’s hempcon!

package Breakfast at Perkos Sacramento | Seat on our 26 passenger Party Bus | FREE Vape & Edible Bar includes: Games & Prizes | Goodie Bag/Meds | Entrance for Hempcon 2013 all fOr $130!!! seating is limited! call & reserve your space today! 855.422.9656

Delivery Only | (855)422–9656 | www.heavens2betsey.cOm | facebOOk.cOm/h2byOlO Free delivery with $70 donation | 10am–8pm, closed sun | compliant with ca215, sB420 & 11362 oF hsc

We offer complete automotive service & repairs

Lube, Oil & Filter

$

1598

MASSAGE THERAPISTS

1700 Fulton at Arden Way, Sacramento

Brake Special

$

$3 addition for multi-grade oil Good at Fulton location only Most vehicles savings of $7

rent valid city or county

3000 OFF

FREE dElIvERy for orders with $70 minimum

Heavens 2 Betsey

Free delivery with $70 donation | 10am–8pm, closed sun | Compliant with Ca215, SB420 & 11362 of hSC

MASSAGE THERAPISTS

All massage advertisers are required to provide News & Review a current valid business license or somatic establishment permit issued by either the city or county in which they are operating in in order to run a printed advertisement.

Call for details Good at Fulton location only

481-1192 OPEN MON-SAT 8-6 • SUN 9-4

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING WITH US, PLEASE CONTACT CLASSIFIEDS AT 916-498-1234 EXT. 1338.

2575

$

CHANGE

2399

$

FREE

EMISSIONS DIAGNOSTIC

916 554-6471 2000 16th St Sacramento M-F 7:30 -5:30 Sat 8 -4 sacsmog.com Bring in any competitor’s smog check coupon and we will match it - plus give you an additional $5 OFF

rent valid city or county

Use your smart phone QR reader for more specials

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING WITH US, PLEASE CONTACT CLASSIFIEDS AT 916-498-1234 EXT. 1338.

10 OFF

FREE*

ANY OIL CHANGE

40

$

DIAGNOSTICS

SMOG INSPECTION

*$90 fee waived with repair

Includes Certificate ($8.25 Value)

$

at $35

free hoT sTone

• deep tissue • reflexology • sw edish • 4 - hand • couples

Birdcage St Ste C license • Citrus Heights, CA 95610 News & Review a6201 current valid business or somatic establishment permit issued by either the city or county in which they are operating in in order to run a printed advertisement.

•BMW & VOLVO EXPERT •DIAGNOSTICS & SERVICE •COMPLETE REPAIR ON ALL MAKES & MODELS

A1 Feeling •IF Swedish YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING Massage US, PLEASE CONTACT CLASSIFIEDS •WITHDeep Tissue Massage AT 916-498-1234 EXT. 1338. • Pain Relief • Backwalking • Chinese Therapies • Shower Available • Walk-ins Welcome

ISTS 46

|

w a current valid

SN&R

|

03.21.13

4810 San Juan Ave., Fair Oaks, CA 95628 • 916.200.0555 Sun-Thur 10am-10pm • Fri 10am-5pm • Open Sat Evenings

SPECIAL 35

MASSAGE THERAPISTS Coupleses 916.448.5315 & eLlcaodmie! We accept:

Midtown Sacramento, 95816 Between K St. & L St.

Sunset Ave.

Fair Oaks

$

• Additional Parking in Rear

1116 24th St

MASSAGE THERAPISTS NEW CMT

Open 7 days a week 10AM-11PM

5681 FRANKLIN BLVD #C, SACRAMENTO • M–F 8–6, SAT 9–5 422–5522 • WWW.SACPRESTIGEAUTOWORKS.COM

Swedish, Reflexology, Deep Tissue Massage, Shoulder Massage, Aromatherapy, Free Dry Sauna & Body Shampoo. Walk-ins Welcome. Male CMT by appt. Get your gifts today!

Winding Wy.

916.723.2828 All massage advertisers are required to provide

•FACTORY QUALITY

39 99 1 hour

w/coupon exp. 3/31/13

Asian Massage

FRIENDLY, QUALITY SERVICE $

Spring Sale

massage starts

MASSAGE THERAPISTS

w/repairs at time of service. (reg $120) most cars. For renewal reg. only. Call for details.

Call for details.

OFF MASSAGE

San Juan Ave.

STS

(reg 49.75) most cars. Call for details. Same day. Fast In/Out $

OIL

PERFECT STYLE

$5

This is a model

Your Downtown Service Shop

G WITH US, 98-1234 EXT. 1338.

$45 MINIMUM

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING WITH US, PLEASE CONTACT CLASSIFIEDS AT 916-498-1234 EXT. 1338. Delivery Only | (855)422–9656 | www.heavens2betsey.cOm | facebOOk.cOm/h2byOlO A Compassionate Collective

www.ardeneconolube.com

SMOG CHECK

$10 clOnes

$45 on allto1/8ths All massage are cAp required provide News & Review a current valid $ 130advertisers$10 top-shelf gramspermit issued by either the city or county business license or somatic establishment in which they are operating in inGIFts order tonew run patients a printed advertisement. 3 FREE for

to

STS

WAX BOGO

buy one get one half off se le ct e d wax / oi ls / bud d e r

w

This is a model

99

/HR

IF YOU PAY WITH CASH. MUST PRESENT COUPON.

THIS IS A MODEL

LAND PARK SPA

1192 35TH AVE • SACRAMENTO 916.395.6789 Near VIC’S Supermarket


NEW MANAGEMENT

GRAND OPENING

5 OFF

5 off

$

30 min = $30 60 min = $40 (foot & body combo) Chinese Massage - Walk-in - Appt. Friendly, Skillful Massage Therapists

19

$

99

1 hour foot massage

Fulton

XT MASSAGE SpA

ENJOY YOUR RELAXING MASSAGE WITH A NICE MASSUESE

garfield

FULL BODY OIL MASSAGE

madison

80

PRIVATE ROOM SHOWERS This is a model

{with this ad}

deep tissue swedish gentle massage reflexology pain treatment

Sheldon Rd

This is a model

H e av e n ly m a s s ag e

1730 Santa Clara Dr #3 | Roseville 95661 10am – 10pm Daily | 916.781.2828

916.681.8888

Thai • Swedish Showers Available Walk-ins Welcome

916.331.6188 • 10am–10pm daily

Accepting all Credit Cards

www.headtotoemassagespa.com

Gift Certificates Available

F $5STOVIFSIT GRAND OPENING ASIAN MASSAGE 1

new staff

MASSAGE

5412 Madison ave #160 • sacraMento 95841

6910 65th St #103, Sacramento 95823 10:30am - 10pm daily

10% off

Massage Spa

ANNA

fr E E TA b lE S h ow E r

916.393.2268

gr a n d open ing

7431 W. Stockton Blvd #150 Sacramento, CA 95823

1 hr = $40 ½ hr= $30 auburn

Ethan

LILY MASSAGE

Pkwy

5948 Auburn Blvd, Ste D, Citrus Heights, CA 95621 916.339.9829 • 10am-9pm daily

Arden Way

916-851-1118

free table shower

Calvine Rd 99

Power Inn Rd

★ Cottage Way

r Cente

80

Aura Spa

El Camino

2548 Cottage Way - Sacramento 916.568.6888 - 10am–10pm daily

This is a model

Bruceville Rd

Massage Kea

11275 Folsom Blvd. #201 • Rancho Cordova

916.632.1888

10 types of massage including Swedish, Deep Tissue & Hot Stone

w/massage

Gift Certificates available

Campus Plaza Shopping Center

5050 Rocklin Road A-19 Rocklin, CA 95677

Exp. 3/31/13 Regular price $40/1hr Must present coupon

Free Sauna

Deep Tissue - Swedish - Back Walking

Red Massage

80 N

9:30am-10pm Daily

massage

w/coupon (discount for body massage only)

with this coupon

Rocklin Rd

you’ll find what you need here! fashion Massage

RED MASSAGE

GRAND OPENING $ 5 off

Under New Management

$

/60min

Arden Way Office Max

Watt Ave

Flamingo Massage 2264 Fair Oaks Blvd #102 Sacramento 95825 (916) 646-1888

40

$

These are m

FRIENDLY & WELL TRAINED STAFF

1241 Alamo Dr Ste #3 Vacaville, CA 95687 Open 10am–8pm daily (707) 452–0818

THIS IS A MODEL

Violet Massage 3260 J St #A Sacramento 95816 (916) 442-1888

/30min

Morse Ave

This is a model

30

$

this is a model

New Massage Therapist $ OFF w/ ad 5

Full body massage • Deep tissue • Swedish • Hot stone • Hot oil • Back walking 9am-10pm 7 days a week

odels

BEST ASIAN MASSAGE

Sierra College Blvd

Combination Massage Open Daily 10am - 10:30pm Walk-Ins & Couples Welcome

GRAND OPENING

Pacific St

Massage Therapy

These are models

This is a model

May Spa

M-F 9am-9pm Sat/Sun 11am-9pm Closed Wednesdays

3110 Arden Way • Sacramento, 95825 (on the side of Office Max, facing Morse Ave) 916.333.4463 • 10am–10pm daily

916.429.7270

1355 Florin Rd, Ste.13 Sacramento, CA 95822

GRAND OPENING BH SPA

Massage

in Folsom

40

$

3999 for 1hr

$

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FEATURE STORY

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03.21.13

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by ROB BREZSNY

FOR THE WEEK OF MARCH 21, 2013

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Nourish

beginnings, let us nourish beginnings,” says poet Muriel Rukeyser in her poem “Elegy in Joy.” “Not all things are blest,” she continues, “but the seeds of all things are blest. The blessing is in the seed.” I urge you to adopt this perspective in the coming weeks, Aries. Be extra sweet and tender and reverent toward anything that is just sprouting, toward anything that is awakening, toward anything that invokes the sacredness of right now. “This moment,” sings Rukeyser, “this seed, this wave of the sea, this look, this instant of love.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): As you seek

more insight on your current situation, consider the possibility that the bad guys may not be as bad as they seem. They might simply be so deeply under the spell of their own pain that they can’t see straight. And as for the good guys: I wonder if they are as purely good as they would like you to imagine. It might be the case that they are at least partially serving their own self-interest, while pretending to be utterly altruistic. If there’s any truth to these speculations, Taurus, you’d be wise to stay uncommitted and undecided for now. Don’t get emotionally riled up, don’t get embroiled in conflict and don’t burn any bridges.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here’s your

mantra: “I get fresher under pressure.” Say it 10 times right now, and then repeat it in 10-repetition bursts whenever you need a tune-up. What it means is that you stay cool when the contradictions mount and the ambiguities multiply. And more than that: You actually thrive on the commotion. You get smarter amid the agitation. You become more perceptive and more creative as the shifts swirl faster and harder. Tattoo these words of power on your imagination: “I get fresher under pressure.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Stories

happen to those who tell them,” said the ancient Greek historian Thucydides. Modern radio journalist Ira Glass goes even further. “Great stories happen to those who can tell them,” he has said. Let’s make this strategy a centerpiece of your life plan in the weeks ahead, Cancerian. I have a suspicion that you will need firsthand experience of novel, interesting stories. They will provide the precise nourishment necessary to inspire the blooming of your most soulful ambitions. One way to help ensure that the best stories will flow your way is to regale receptive people with transformative tales from your past.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Rob: I’m

spreading the word about Beer Week in your town, and I’d love to see you and your beer-loving readers at some of the events. Any chance you can include some coverage of Beer Week celebrations in your upcoming column? Cheers, Patricia.” Dear Patricia: I don’t do product placement or other forms of secret advertising in my horoscopes. To allow it would violate the sacred trust I have with my readers, who rely on me to translate the meaning of the cosmic signs without injecting any hidden agendas. It is true that Leos might be prone to imbibing great quantities of beer in the coming week, simply because they’d benefit from lowering their inhibitions, getting in touch with their buried feelings, and expanding their consciousness. But to be frank, I’d rather see them do that without the aid of drugs and alcohol.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Hoping to stir

up some fun trouble, I posted the following message on my Facebook page: “Don’t judge someone just because they sin differently than you.” A torrent of readers left comments in response. My favorite was from Sue Sims, who said, “Yeah, they might be better at your kind of sin and you might learn something!” That advice is just the kind of healing mischief you need right now, Virgo. It’s a bit ironic, true, but still: Take it and run with it. Study the people who have mad skills at pulling off the rousing adventures and daring pleasures and interesting “sins” that you’d like to call your own.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The French

verb renverser can be translated as “to turn upside-down” or “to reverse the flow.” The adjectival form is renversant, which means “stunning” or “astonishing.” I think you may soon have experiences that could be described by those words. There’s a good chance that a dry, impoverished part of your life will get a juicy, fertile infusion. A deficiency you have worried about might get at least half-filled. An inadequacy that makes you feel sad may be bolstered by reinforcements. Alas, there could also be a slight reversal that’s not so gratifying. One of your assets may temporarily become irrelevant. But the trade-off is worth it, Libra. Your gains will outstrip your loss.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Professor

Martyn Poliakoff creates short YouTube videos to help teach the public about chemistry. In one video, he explains why an explanation he gave in a previous video was completely mistaken. “It’s always good for a scientist to be proved wrong,” he confesses cheerfully. Then, he moves on to speculate about what the right answer might be. I love humility like that! It’s admirable. It’s also the best way to find out the truth about reality. I hope you will summon a similar attitude in the coming weeks, Scorpio: a generous curiosity that makes you eager to learn something new about stuff you thought you had all figured out.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): On

the one hand, menopausal women are no longer able to bear children. On the other hand, they often overflow with fresh possibilities and creative ideas. More time is available to them because their children have moved out of the house or don’t require as much care. They can begin new careers, focus on their own development and devote more attention to their personal needs. So, in one way, their fertility dries up; in another way, it may awaken and expand. I suspect that whether or not you are menopausal, you are on the cusp of a comparable shift in your fecundity: one door closing, another door swinging open.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The TV

reality show Freaky Eaters profiled a woman named Kelly who had eaten nothing but cheesy potatoes for 30 years. Her average intake: 8 pounds of potatoes and 4 cups of cheese per day. “I love cheesy potatoes,” she testified. “They’re stewy, gooey and just yum-yum-yummy. They’re like crack to me.” I’m a bit concerned that you’re flirting with behavior comparable to hers. Not in regards to cheesy potatoes, of course, but to some other fetish. I will ask you to make sure that you’re not starting to overspecialize. It would be wise to avoid obsessing on a single type of anything.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the

17th century, polite people referred to mountains as “warts” and “boils on the Earth’s complexion.” So says Robert Macfarlane in his book Mountains of the Mind. Annie Dillard describes the peculiar behavior of educated European tourists in the 18th century. When they visited the Alps, she writes in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, “they deliberately blindfolded their eyes to shield themselves from the evidence of the earth’s horrid irregularity.” Don’t be anything like those dumb sophisticates, Aquarius. When you spy irregularities in the coming weeks, consider the possibility that they are natural and healthy. This will allow you to perceive their useful beauty.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You are not

for sale. Remember? Your scruples and ideals and talents cannot be bought off for any amount of money. You will not be cheated out of your birthright, and you will not allow your dreams to be stolen. Although it’s true that you may have to temporarily rent your soul from time to time, you will never auction it off for good. I’m sure you know these things, Pisces, but I suspect it’s time to renew your fiery commitment to them.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

BEFORE

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FEATURE

15 MINUTES

by KEL

MUNGER PHOTO BY LISA BAETZ

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Beware the asteroid? It’s always fun to run across a scientist who’s fascinated by the end of the world, and Thomas A. Cahill fits the bill. He’s a particle physicist at UC Davis, best known for his work on the environmental impact of the 9/11 attacks on World Trade Center. But he’s also a science-fiction writer, and his new book Ark: Asteroid Impact (EditPros LLC, $16.95) depicts what happens when the Earth (and its people) takes a hit from an asteroid. According to Cahill, it’s a likely scenario. The latest asteroids to threaten the planet passed by the Earth last month and in December 2012—without consequence, it should be noted. Cahill talked to SN&R about dangerous space debris, climate change and the possibility of another ice age.

Should we be scared of these close calls with asteroids? Last December 12, [2012], one went by even closer, and we didn’t know it until it passed. We had another one that went by outside the moon and was spotted very late, so it was almost missed. … What we’ve learned, in the last 20 years, is that the Earth has been bombarded regularly by asteroids. The most famous was the K-T event in the Yucatan, which some argue led to the extinction of the dinosaurs.

But you don’t study asteroids. My field of expertise is climate change. We used to talk about nuclear winter, but it occurs to me that it’s much more likely for an asteroid to hit us and cause the sort of climate change we once believed would follow a nuclear war. So I wrote this novel with as much science as I could in it. I use the 4179 Toutatis as the example—it’s a large asteroid that comes close to the Earth periodically, as it did last December. It’s always missed us. The scenario in my novel is that it bounces off an unknown small asteroid, which changes its course in the last day or two, and it strikes the Earth with very little notice. This is a worst-case scenario. The heroes of the book are scientists and students from a local university. They’re torn, because if they’re wrong about the asteroid, they’ll look like idiots. But if they’re right, they’ll be dead. I wanted to put myself—and the readers—in their shoes [and ask the question]: If the president came on TV tonight and said an asteroid is going to hit the Earth tomorrow, what would happen? How would people react?

What would we experience? First, there would be tsunamis all around the Earth. This is what happened when the Yucatan asteroid hit. Second, there would be a dust cloud that would most likely cause a new ice age.

STORY

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

The question is: What would civilization do? Some people get lucky, that’s all. Each small group may have a shot at surviving, and those survivors will have to put together new ecosystems, new cultures. My book is pretty optimistic. The externals are terrible, but they have their wits about them. They have to deal with 20 meters of snow covering the country from coast to coast, and with 350 million people lost. It’s massive and shocking. But it also leaves this completely new world there to be discovered, and it’s a book of discovery with as much science as I [could] get into it.

Tell me about your areas of research. One involves global climate change and the effects of airborne particles on both the present climate and the paleoclimate. Right now, we’re studying particles in the ice core in Greenland. These wonderful ice cores in Greenland go back 100,000 years, and there’s dust in them. We’re examining that dust and comparing it to current dust to try and understand what the climate was like in the past.

What else are you working on? I’m also working on particles in the air near highways. We’re doing a lot of work on highways. It’s not just exhaust that releases |

AFTER

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particles into the air. For instance, brake drums on cars are releasing metals like iron and copper, but in a very small particle that gets deep in your lungs and can be extremely toxic.

And you started by studying nuclear winter? Yes, I did. But the science behind nuclear winter was not very good. It was good in that it may have helped discourage nuclear war, but in terms of the nuclear blasts, there wasn’t enough aerosol, and it didn’t last very long. It wouldn’t have caused the sort of planetary climate change that we’ve seen from other kinds of dust. I also worked on the aerosols on the burning oil wells in Kuwait after the first Gulf War. Those aerosols didn’t cause as many problems as we thought they would, because the aerosols stayed low in the atmosphere. Now, with an asteroid strike, the dust particles will definitely be high in the atmosphere.

How did you get into writing fiction? This is just recreation. I wrote it to relax, because it was fun to write. It was cheaper than therapy and less damaging than liquor. Ω

03.21.13

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SN&R

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