Page 1

BOUNTY HUNTERS Local chefs insist that the city's 'Farm-to-Fork' vision has teeth

The Bee sTings Jerry brown see Feature Story, page 16

So-called fiscal

cliff-hanging see Capitol Lowdown, page 10 see Editorial, page 15

UndErgroUnd LimEriCk battLE

exposed!

BY

see 15 minutes, page 51

Christopher Arns PAGE PA AGE

SaCto’S

20

Man vS. Food challengeS see dish, page 27

Sacramento’S newS & entertainment weekly

|

Volume 24, iSSue 33

|

thurSday, noVember 29, 2012


BUILDING A

HEALTHY S A C R A M E N T O

A Fresh Perspective P

art of living in a healthy community is knowing all you can about it — from the residents to the businesses to the nonprofits to the parks and recreational areas. Healthy community members have a stake in their communities. Thanks to a grant from The California Endowment’s Sacramento Building Healthy Communities Initiative to Access Sacramento, Sacramento’s 25-yearold public access channel, young reporters in South Sacramento are reporting the news in their community via Neighborhood News Bureau on the website accesslocal.tv. These are things the local mainstream media often miss or things that might not be a priority for them, says Program Director Isaac Gonzalez. “The 5 o’clock news is ‘it bleeds, it leads’ sensationalism, weather and traffic,” Gonzalez says. “Through all the commercial side of things, they don’t get a chance to really talk about what’s going on our streets and specifically, the good things that are happening in South Sacramento.”

“MY WRITING SKILLS HAVE GOTTEN STRONGER AND I’VE BEEN ABLE TO GO INTO MY COMMUNITY AND FIND OUT ABOUT THINGS THAT I DIDN’T KNOW WERE AVAILABLE OR WERE GOING ON.” Neighborhood News Bureau is funded by The California Endowment’s Building Healthy Communities Initiative to promote and advocate for healthy communities. Currently, the program is at the end of its second year. Neighborhood News Bureau began with a trial run over the summer, but now has seven correspondents between the ages 16 and 21, who produce one article a week, one video a week and participate in a biweekly podcast. They are also responsible for recruiting one of their peers to create one video or write an article

BY MIKE BLOUNT

each month. For their time, all of the correspondents are paid a stipend. Gonzalez was astonished at the response he received when he was looking for people to participate. There were an overwhelming amount of youth that wanted to tell people about what was going on in their neighborhood. One of first people to get involved was 17-yearold Charles Chenault, a Parkway resident of South Sacramento. Chenault met Gonzalez through an internship and was part of the trial run of the program. He returned for the second incarnation of the group and says he has enjoyed watching the program and himself grow. “When I first started, I didn’t really have a strong interest in journalism, but since then, my writing skills have gotten stronger and I’ve been able to go into my community and find out about things that I didn’t know were available or were going on,” Chenault says. To Gonzalez, they are embracing their civic duty to inform the public of issues that are important and instructing them on how to get involved. And, if more youth are engaged in their communities, parental involvement increases and adults take notice. Gonzalez says he wants the youth involved with Neighborhood News Bureau to be critical thinkers and think outside of the box. So far, he says he has been impressed at the quality of work that has been submitted — and it’s only getting better as they go, he adds.

BUILDING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES In 2010, The California Endowment launched a 10-year, $1 billion plan to improve the health of 14 challenged communities across the state. Over the 10 years, residents, community-based organizations and public institutions will work together to address the socioeconomic and environmental challenges contributing to the poor health of their communities.

NEIGHBORHOOD NEWS BUREAU Neighborhood News Bureau is hyper-local online journalism created by young reporters in South Sacramento and affiliated with Access Sacramento, Sacramento’s public cable access station for the last 25 years. Visit accesslocal.tv to view content and learn more about the program.

www.SacBHC.org

PAID WITH A GRANT FROM THE CALIFORNIA ENDOWMENT 2   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12


20

Quitter Hating on Facebook doesn’t begin  with this column. There are hundreds  of clever elegies from the past year  foreshadowing the site’s demise.  But is it all just white whine? Can we  actually quit? And, if so, how else will  we be invited to holiday parties? We certainly don’t need the extra  drama. The latest Facebook conundrum, for instance, is whether users  need to copyright kitten pictures  (no) and if Facebookers can still vote  on Mark Zuckerberg’s proposed  changes to the site (no).  Three words: Time-suck hell.  This is not to mention Twitter and  Tumblr and Instagram and fantasy  sports leagues (yes, plural) and all  those other social-network time  wasters. It’s ridiculous. I even use an  online app called Untappd to share  what beers I drink, because getting  drunk with friends apparently no  longer suffices. Most of us have been online for at  least 15 years. And, while I personally am horrible at finding a digital  footprint that fits, I’d wager your  online boots aren’t made for walking  just yet, either. What to do? Well, I quit. For a  week. I’m logging off of Facebook. I tried weaning off it. Like millions others, I’d made the mistake  of friending anyone and everyone. I  was even “friends” with the Round  Table Pizza in Natomas. And while  I’m sure that Round Table boasts a  zesty salad bar, do we really need to  exchange birthday wishes? So I pruned, then purged Facebook connections. Perfect strangers  and pot clubs and people I hadn’t  seen in years—adiós. Nearly 1,300 so  far. Losing friends never felt so good.  But it wasn’t enough. The time  suck won. And so, just like Thanksgiving leftovers, I’m quitting cold turkey. Join me on the other side—hopefully with gravy? —Nick Miller

nic kam@ ne ws r ev i ew . com

30

38

36

November 29, 2012 | Vol. 24, Issue 33

04 05 07 13 15 16 20 24 27 31 32 34 36 51

STREETALK LETTERS NEwS GREEN DAYS opiNioN fEATuRE SToRY ARTS&cuLTuRE NiGhT&DAY DiSh ASK JoEY STAGE fiLm muSic 15 miNuTES COVER dEsign BY pRisCilla gaRCia BitEs is On VaCatiOn this wEEk.

our mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live. co-editors Rachel Leibrock, Nick Miller Staff writers Raheem F. Hosseini, Dave Kempa copy Editor Shoka Shafiee calendar Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial coordinator Kel Munger contributing Editor Cosmo Garvin proofreader Deena Drewis Editor-at-large Melinda Welsh Editorial intern Maddi Silva contributors Sasha Abramsky, Christopher Arns, Ngaio Bealum, Rob Brezsny, Joey Garcia, Becky Grunewald, Mark Halverson, Jeff Hudson, Jonathan Kiefer,

Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Patti Roberts, Steph Rodriguez, Seth Sandronsky, Amy Yannello

Distribution manager Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert

Design manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Design Melissa Arendt, Brian Breneman, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith contributing photographers Steven Chea, Wes Davis, Ryan Donahue, Taras Garcia, William Leung, Shoka, Justin Short, Anne Stokes

Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Nicholas Babcock, Walt Best, Daniel Bowen, Nina Castro, Danny Cladianos, Jack Clifford, Robert Cvach, Lob Dunnica, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Joanna Gonzalez-Brown, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Wendell Powell, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Lolu Sholotan, Jack Thorne president/cEo Jeff vonKaenel chief operations officer Deborah Redmond human Resources manager Tanja Poley Business manager Grant Rosenquist credit and collections manager Renee Briscoe Business Mary Anderson, Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Systems manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano

Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising consultants Rosemary Babich, Josh Burke, Vince Garcia, Dusty Hamilton, April Houser, Dave Nettles, Lee Roberts, Kelsi White Senior inside Sales consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services coordinator Melissa Bernard operations manager Will Niespodzinski client publications managing Editor Kendall Fields client publications writer/copy Editor Mike Blount Sales coordinator Rachel Rosin

1124 Del paso Boulevard, Sacramento, cA 95815 phone (916) 498-1234 Sales fax (916) 498-7910 Editorial fax (916) 498-7920 website www.newsreview.com SN&R is printed by The paradise post using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel. Advertising policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

WE BUY & paW paWn GOLD & GU GUns ns black december sale several other items on sale! AmmO sALe

TOP DOLLAR PAID GOLD • DIAMONDS • ELECTRONICS • TOOLS • GUITARS & MUCh MORE • LAYAWAY AVAILABLE

399.99

$

SIG SAUER SP2022 9MM oR 40 cAl PISTol-NEW, POLYMER FRAME, BLACK FINISH, ONE MAG, LOCK

380 cAl

159

$

40 cAl

.99

189

$

.99

hIGh PoInT PISTol-NEW, ONE MAG, LOCK

REMInGTon 9MM AMMo NEW FMj, .115 GRAIN, 50 ROuNdS $9.99 PeR bOx fEdERAl 40Sw AMMo NEW, .155 GRAIN, jHP, 50 ROuNdS, LAW ENFORCEMENt OvERStOCK $19.99 PeR bOx

Ad ExPP 12/05/2012

wE ARE GIvInG AwAy ThE woRld’S lARGEST chRISTMAS STockInG fUll of ToyS!

COME INtO tHE StORE tOdAY tO ENtER OuR FREE dRAWING. dRAWING WILL tAKE PLACE 12/22 At 5PM.

bu y s eL L T RA De I T A LL g u ns , j e w e LRy & LOAn cOm PAny

5725 STockTon blvd (Stockton Blvd & Fruitridge rd in the fruitridge shopping center) | 916.456.7296 | Mon - SAT: 9AM–7PM | GUn dEPT. oPEn 10AM-6PM | lIc#34040984 B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |    11.29.12     |   SN&R    

|

  3


“I have been growing it my whole life. It’s a pain in the ass.”

Asked in Midtown:

Mustaches: hot or not?

Aaron Brazier heavy-equipment operator

I’m Swedish and not very hairy; [my mustache] took a long time [to grow]. You’re looking at 10 years. It took forever and ever. My father had a beard and a mustache. I think the Movember thing is very fun.

Carin Brazier cancer-center worker

I had noticed a trend. I just thought it was that whole look coming back, like peg pants. I like them. When they are young [boys], I gotta pick on them a little bit.

Candace Gutierrez

Mike Roan

grocery-store worker

Lennie Dean

supervisor

I love them! I liked them way before they got superpopular and indie. I’m more pro-mustaches in the workplace and in the military. [Editor’s note: She shows a tattoo on her arm that says, “I mustache you a question but I’m shaving it for later.”]

musician

I wish my mustache was more intense. It’s getting there. One day, I will look like a fully grown man. I have been growing it my whole life. It’s a pain in the ass when it goes over your lip, then it goes in your mouth and you have to trim it. If you mess it up, you have to shave it all off. Start all over!

I’m 99 years old, and I’ve had my mustache for 98 years. Ever since I was a little kid, I liked the facial-hair thing. I have had beards, too. Lately, I shave everything else and leave the mustache. ... I get a lot of comments that I look like other people, like Willie Nelson, Jesus Christ and Big Jack Man.

Amanda Rue unemployed

Yeah, it’s hip. It’s all in the malls and stuff, the Hot Topic. I think it’s kinda cute. I have a lot of friends who have [gotten] mustache tattoos. They get it tattooed on their finger so they can just [put their finger on their upper lip]. They draw whiskers and a kitty nose. It is pretty popular.

NOW OPEN

HUGE NEW THRIFT STORE great finds! great prices!

tONs Of NEW & gENtly usEd itEms antiques | rare finds | consignment | furniture | appliances | dvd / vhs books | toys / games | electronics | Je w elry

OvEr 6,000 squarE fEEt! We are on the West side of the building around the corner from dollar tree

65th st

fol som blv d Kelly moore

dollar tree

a&a

★simply thrift

light rail

50

|

SN&R

|

11.29.12

6700 folsom blvd 916.452.7283

916.452.saVe

q st

4

simply thrift

5

$ 00

off

when you spend $25 or more good thru January 1st, 2013


Visit us at newsreview.com or e-mail sactoletters@newsreview.com

Re “Cottage, geez” by Raheem F. Hosseini (SN&R Frontlines, November 15): I think that Sacramento County Board of Supervisors Chairman Don Nottoli’s characterization of the cottage-food act’s controversy and passage gives a mistaken impression about the law. The Cottage Food [Bill] (or Assembly Bill 1616) was introduced by Assemblyman Mike Gatto on February 8, 2012. It passed over six months later, after five different committees analyzed and voted on it. There cannot be any more of a full and robust debate than was had on this legislation letter of (better than legislating via proposition, right?). The idea of the week fostering micro-entrepreneurship through the licensing and regulation of home-based food businesses was constant throughout the bill’s debate and was in no way “rammed through” the process. Of course, that isn’t to say there were not any last-minute changes to the bill. The chaptered version contained an amendment with new provisions for a statewide “cottage food” producer training program. The producer-specific program replaced previous requirements that cottage-food producers just take food-handler classes already available statewide that would have required no additional curriculum development. By the terms of the legislation, cottage-food operators will have three months before they must take the training class. I’m optimistic that the course will be developed and accommodations will be made to ensure that food micro-entrepreneurs may develop and grow their businesses.

photo by wes davis

Cottage food is good food first shot

Skater Eric Mills rides during last month’s Central Valley Region Architecture Festival; this shot is currently hanging in an exhibit at the American Institute of Architects Central Valley building at 1400 S Street, Suite 100.

Matt Read

S a c ra m e nt o

Boo for bias Re “No-limit politics and Sacramento’s newest casino” by Raheem F. Hosseini (SN&R Frontlines, November 21): As I sat down to eat dinner, I started reading SN&R and I came across an article by Raheem F. Hosseini, which I quote: “And now that the relocation is official, neighbors and opponents worry the card room represents a first step in bringing destination resort-style gambling to their redheaded stepchild of a community.” I’d really like to know where this expression, so long ago used as a derogatory and racially biased term, was obtained and deemed appropriate to use in this day and age. As I come from a family including redheads and my husband is a redhead, I take a highly distasteful liking to this kind of racially biased term! No longer was our meal enjoyable, and as far as reading the rest of your tripe, I am now seeking a way to put your offensiveness behind us, as we have seen enough of your insensitive remarks called “journalism.” It’s our hope that [Hosseini] gets sensitivity training after he’s been fired by SN&R! G. Feldmann Sacramento

Does that make Cosmo the turkey? Re “Final grades, exit interviews” by Cosmo Garvin (SN&R Bites, November 21): Today, on Thanksgiving, I’m thankful for a roof over my head and a good life. BEFORE

|

I wish many others all around the world could have a basic home, food, safety and freedom from fear. It always begins with truth, so I am very thankful for Cosmo Garvin, who always looks under the dirty rug, the floorboards, behind the curtain for that trail that leads back to the beginnings of shady deals, bad decisions and their consequences. Honestly, I look forward to his column more than anything I read in just about any paper, including the other pamphlet of a paper delivered ... to my doorstep every morning here in Sactown. Melba Duncan via email

Things are better in West Sac Re “Giving thanks, SN&R style” (SN&R Editorial, November 21): Amen! Well, I know it is not Sacramento, but it is West Sacramento, and I for one am thankful that I live here. I am thankful for our local government (and this from a devout cynic who worked for the City of Sacramento some time ago). Projects this city undertakes are completed under budget and on time. They are worthwhile projects focusing on people, the environment and economic realities pretty much in that order. What more could one ask for? Toba Goddard West Sacramento

FRONTLINES

|

F E AT U R E

STORY

Not enough on homelessness

More like a slam, he sez

Re “The real face of homelessness” by Nick Miller (SN&R Feature Story, November 15): I’m thrilled to see an article with breadth breaking the myopic stereotypes heaped on our homeless neighbors. Kudos, SN&R! I’m five months into a Central Valley Walk for the Homeless that started in July with a three-week stay in Sacramento. I have a substantial “labor of love” as a homeless visual journalist documenting the without-a-roof communities of Sacramento, Marysville, Yuba City, Oroville and Chico. Sacramento is my least favorite community. It had a veneer that was transient and artificial and was the only community where homeless transients were more prevalent than those that have lived extended periods in the local community. A city as large as Sacramento, and a state capital at that, should be doing far more for the homeless community. The powers that be seemed content isolating folks into the greater Loaves & Fishes, Salvation Army and the Union Gospel Mission areas. If an alien ship landed on Earth and went nowhere but to this area of Sacramento, they would return home with the experience not of community, but of an emergency-room triage operation. Our homeless men, women and children deserve something far greater and respectful than what the city of Sacramento provides. They are neighbors, not animals to be herded and harassed. Empathy, love and respect would be great reference and starting points for our elected officials and select biased Sacramento Bee reporters. Bill Mash Sacramento |

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

Re “Flight” by Jonathan Kiefer (SN&R Clips, November 1): It’s not my wont to read movie reviews, but I read the reviews in the Los Angeles Times and The New York Times—and then today, at the Coffee Garden, in SN&R—of Flight. I go to see films once a year and chose Flight for 2012. This review is ghastly. Flight is anything but a “public-service announcement” for Christianity. The short, brilliant scene in a hospital room with the Christian co-pilot and his über-Christian wife is a stunning slam of Christianity. The second dumb misreading is reference to “protracted moralizing.” There is none. A translation from psychobabble into English of “conflicted enablers” would have helped, too. Owen McGowan Courtland

have a great photo? email it to firstshot@ newsreview.com. please include your full name and phone number. File size must not exceed 10 Mb.

Margin Words In my darkened days, I will climb mountains, holding out for that Valhalla of my own imagination; a godless heaven where sinners rejoice. —Ashley Brown Lincoln

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

sN&r

|

5


3 TIME Winner Retailer of

the Year Award

E H T IN O J G N I GRAND OPEN CELEBRATION! Broadstone Plaza

FOLSOM

(Between Old Navy and Pier 1)

CA LIFO R NIA ! N R E H T R O N IN S E N O W 3 S U P E R S TO R

GRAND

OPENING

Every Weekend thru December 9th

SAVINGS

Join the Folsom Grand Openinng

WINE SAVINGS COUPON | Expires 12/9/2012

WINE TASTINGS, MUSIC AND MORE ! www.totalwine.com/ folsom-grandopening

SScan Sc an code code d att ri right, ight ht vi visit isitit ttotalwine.com ottallwiinee com m or see store sttore ffor or a ffull ullll sschedule chheddulle off event events. ts

with any other Total Wine & More WINE Coupon or Case Discount. Coupon valid in Northern CA only. Not valid on previous purchases. Offer valid thru 12/9/2012. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Valid in store only.

2

OFF SPIRITS

Cannot be combined with any other Total Wine & More SPIRITS Coupon. Coupon valid in Northern CA only. Not valid on previous purchases. Offer valid thru 12/9/2012. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Valid in store only.

GRAND OPENING! FOLSOM Broadstone Plaza

6   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

TotalWine

From Highway 50: Take exit 27. Drive 1 mile north on Bidwell. In former Borders location. Between Old Navy and Pier 1. HOURS: Mon-Sun 9am-10pm

HOME DEPOT

OFF

Cannot be combined with any other Total Wine & More BEER Coupon. Coupon valid in Northern CA only. Not valid on previous purchases. Offer valid thru 12/9/2012. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Valid in store only.

ROSEVILLE

dw

ell

Fairway Commons Shopping Center

S

t BROAD- . STONE PLAZA

ll e

BEER

CELEBRATE WITH US IN

Bi

vi

TotalWineAndMore

2765 E. Bidwell St. Folsom, CA 95630 (916) 984-6923

E.

rks C la

Prices and coupons good thru 12/9/2012. *Discount not valid on items ending in “7”. All beer prices + CRV. Not responsible for typographical errors, human error or supplier price increases. Products while supplies last. We reserve the right to limit quantities. Total Wine & More is a registered trademark of Retail Services & Systems, Inc. © 2012 Retail Services & Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Please drink responsibly. Use a designated driver.

2

$

Excludes items with prices ending in 7.

Take $2 off any 4-pk or 6-pk of beer priced $6.99 or higher. (Limit 4 packs)

BEL AIR MARKET

Total Wine

SPORTS AUTHORITY

Rd

.

y. kw

W FO HO O LE DS

5791 Five Star Blvd., Roseville, CA 95678 (916) 791-2488

SACRAMENTO

Arden Way & Howe Ave. 2121 Arden Way Sacramento, CA 95825 (916) 921-5328

SAC-12-1129GO-1111GO-TAB

Excludes items with prices ending in 7. Cannot be combined

$

Take $2 off any spirits item priced $14.99 or higher. (Limit 6 bottles total)

P

Take $10 off every $50 you spend on 750ml and/or 1.5L WINE.

www.totalwine.com

BEER SAVINGS COUPON | Expires 12/9/2012

SPIRITS SAVINGS COUPON | Expires 12/9/2012

Broa dst one

EVERY


PHOTO BY NICK MILLER

Gimme shelter New, possibly  last affordablehousing complex  opens in downtown  Sacramento It’s new. It’s energy efficient. It’s window-rich, centrally located and set to provide by affordable housing and medical care for Dave Kempa more than 150 working-class, homeless, disabled and elderly Sacramentans. d ave k@ news r evie w.c om And yet, it is the last of its kind. The 7th & H Street Housing Community is set to open its doors this December, providing sustainable shelter to formerly homeless and low-income residents. But, due to funding issues related to the economic crisis on both the local and federal levels, low-income-housing development has dried up in recent years. “We have a serious crisis on our hands if we want to end homelessness in our area,” said Bob Erlenbusch, executive director of the Sacramento Housing Alliance. This means that for Sacramento’s poorest citizens looking for affordable rent, once 7th & H opens its doors, that’s it. No more. There’s nothing else like this in the pipe for the foreseeable future. Find out more about the Tucked between the downtown jail 7th & H Street Housing and the Amtrak rail yard in the northCommunity at www. mercyhousing.org. west corner of Sacramento’s grid, 7th & H is an eight-story complex that includes studio and single-bedroom units, and Independent extensive ground-floor retail space. reporting for this For a lower- to working-class housstory is funded by a grant from Sacramento ing development, it is surprisingly indusEmergency Foodlink. trial chic, with concrete pillars peppering the main lobby, and tempered oranges and yellows coating the hallways. Residents of 7th & H will pay rent based on their economic status. With half of the 150 units (including all of the 28 single-bedroom apartments) reserved for Sacramentans fresh off the streets, rent will range from $200 to $591 per month. Each unit can legally hold up to two residents, but Mercy Housing Sacramento will make exceptions for couples with a single child in extenuating circumstances. The building provides an on-site medical clinic, comprehensive resident services and an impressive amount of indoor and outdoor community space—something greatly lacking in most of today’s affordable-housing communities. All of this is the result of years of hard work on the part of Mercy BEFORE

|

  FRONTLINES  

|

Want to see more quality affordable housing in Sacramento’s future? Too bad. The new 7th & H Street Housing Community set to open in the coming weeks will be the last of its kind for quite some time.

Housing, the Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Agency, and the city of Sacramento, and is part of the city’s 10-year plan to end chronic homelessness. In the eyes of those working on the project, it is an impressive success. But a look at the state’s current homeless situation shows that this project is just a drop in the bucket, with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development revealing that 62.7 percent of California’s homeless remain unsheltered. So it’s all the more distressing that the city has nothing like 7th & H to look forward to anytime soon. “Even if we instantly found a pot of money for something like this, it would take three to five years to produce,” said Erlenbusch. One of the major funding problems facing low-income housing for Sacramento and California at large stems from Gov. Jerry Brown and the state Legislature’s decision last year to dry up funding for redevelopment as a means to combat a massive budget deficit. As a result, hundreds of redevelopment agencies across the state disappeared. But the state and local homelessness problem is at least equally pandemic. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development also reported that while the national homeless population decreased by 2.1 percent in 2011, it increased by 2.3 percent in California, leaving the state with 21.4 percent of

the national homeless population. In Sacramento alone, it’s estimated that around 25,000 residents end up in some form of a homeless situation each year, and the Sacramento County school district last year reported more than 11,000 children living in homeless situations. “Clearly, the need is growing, but it’s also changing quite a bit,” said Stephan Daues of Mercy Housing. “The methods for solving homelessness for different individuals and different families need to

“We have a serious crisis on our hands if we want to end homelessness in our area.” Bob Erlenbusch executive director Sacramento Housing Alliance

continue to evolve.” Organizations such as Mercy Housing and the SHRA continue to explore new options. Mercy, for instance, has been looking into the prospect of buying existing buildings and remodeling them into low-income complexes. The good news on the federal level, according to Erlenbusch, is that the National Housing Trust Fund is set to

free up its cash, providing much needed assistance for the country’s homeless and extremely low-income earners. On the state level, the SHRA has its eye on the Legislature’s democratic supermajority. “This is a terrific chance to pass the California Homes and Jobs Act,” said Erlenbusch, referring to the currently unsponsored bill being championed by state-housing organizations looking to pull together more than $2.75 billion in federal, local and private funding in an attempt to jump-start affordable-housing development across California. Both of these prospects, of course, are dependent on government funding, something that a constituency swimming in a massive sea of debt may be reluctant to support. But Daues and Erlenbusch argue that legislation for funding affordable and low-income housing will actually save California money in the long run. According to Erlenbusch, providing one unit in the 7th & H Street Housing Community to a recently homeless, elderly or disabled person could cost about $42,000 per year, a price tag comparable to what the public pays in the same time frame for the average homeless person’s medical bills or prison expenses. “Do you want to spend $42,000 on housing people, or do you want to spend that much on [emergency-room] visits and jail time?” said Erlenbusch. “I think the smart choice, the ethical choice, is to help put a roof over their heads.” Ω

  F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |    11.29.12    

|

  SN&R    

|

  7


FREE

FOOD! *While Supplies Last

Thanksgiving Hangover? Sick of Leftovers? Come Visit Us!

NOVEMBER 29, 2012 2-4PM 825 East Street, Woodland, CA Hosted by Squeeze Inn

NOVEMBER 30, 2012 12-2PM 2440 Fulton Ave #14 Sacramento, CA Hosted by Krush Burger

GET SNAPPED AT THE TITAN PHOTOBOOTH PLAY GAMES & WIN GIFTS *While Supplies Last

Titan Insurance Sales, design and Superhero are service marks of THI Holdings (Delaware), Inc.

8

|

SN&R

|

11.29.12

Titan.com

Public grousing Land Park projects on hold as city leaders, developers reload For maybe the first time ever, a disgruntled developer and dozens of low-income Sacramento residents find themselves by Raheem F. Hosseini on the same side of a political issue. Of course, it’s for very different ra h e e m h @ reasons. ne w s re v i e w . c o m On November 20, the Sacramento City Council—acting in its guise as the city’s housing-authority board— agreed to take a deep breath on a major public-housing overhaul, one that many residents and neighbors are still learning about. But the pause may also buy the city time to shoehorn its preferred developer into the game. Northwest Land Park LLC wants to construct a retail-peppered, 825-unit subdivision along a vacant tract of empty industrial warehouses on the old Setzer property just south of Broadway. But Northwest’s proposal to also take on two adjacent public-housing sites—Marina Vista and Alder Grove, both nearby in Land Park—was rejected by a city selection committee. Instead, the seven-member committee recommended they work with publichousing bona fides made up of Related Companies of California, Mercy Housing California and Regis Homes of Sacramento. Meanwhile, city council members on the housing-authority board, who made their preference for Northwest known as early as June, seemed irked when the company wasn’t recommended. But housing advocates were pleased by the decision. “We were afraid [Northwest] was going to get it,” said Sacramento Resident Advisory Board treasurer Gale Morgan, whose organization went from protesting the city’s publichousing plans in July to cautiously supporting them last week after the Northwest bid was turned away. In a telephone interview with SN&R, Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Agency assistant director Chris Pahule explained that the selection committee identified “two [development teams] that were much more qualified.” At the same time that Northwest was jockeying for a second chance at the November 20 meeting, dozens of public-housing residents pressed for a slower process. “The shrouded nature of this development project has created distrust,”

contended Land Park resident Carl Hubbard. Rob Fong, the district’s outgoing councilman, suggested the board delay selecting a development team until the city can devise a more inclusive process that looks beyond the two aging structures. City Manager John Shirey cited a need to “almost start over.” Marina Vista and Alder Grove, located a mile apart just south of Broadway’s commercial strip, represent the city’s oldest and largest public-housing structures. Built out of hardy brickwork shortly before the days of World War II, they total 751 units swathing roughly 70 acres. The buildings’ 2,500-odd residents would have to relocate during the several years it would take to rebuild their homes, creating a mess of logistical issues that will need to worked out, Pahule said. Approving the development team would have given the city a six-month timetable to nail down an exclusive agreement before a lengthy planning phase begins. Instead, the housing authority will revisit the topic on January 8, when either Steve Hansen or Joe Yee will be sitting in Fong’s chair. Fong, who’s been trying to get something going in this neighborhood for half a decade, did acknowledge a desire to cast a vote its way before leaving office. But a more “practical” urgency, he said, was the 31-acre “blank-slate” Setzer property that sits in the belly of the public-housing structures. “The window that is Setzer is closing soon, because they do have a plan,” he said. Repeated mentions of that plan made Morgan’s cohorts at the resident advisory board think Northwest may still find a role. “I believe [the board is] still looking at that developer, because now it’s a bigger project,” SRAB vice president Barbara Stanton told SN&R. “Who knows what’s going to happen on January 8? All I care about is that the residents get to work with a good development team and are informed and included every step of the way.” Land Park residents got what they asked for on November 20, but it remains to be seen whether it’s what they need. Ω


Gift Card Special

Brought to you by Folsom Lake College bucks  trend of cashing in   on naming rights

20% More FREE

We will add 20% more with ANY gift card purchased now until 12.25.12 Managers Special Still Available @ $19.99 Additional fee for light trucks or SUV types. Prices may vary on any size and condition. Please present this coupon with payment. Not valid with other offers, specials or coupons. Expires 12/13/12 • Coupon Code 0209 OPEN THANKSGIVING DAY 8AM–2PM

2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010

Cash-strapped colleges seem to take every opportunity to rustle up funding from donors for naming rights. But here in the Sacramento area, the Los Rios Community by Erica Perez College District is bucking the trend. The board of trustees voted this summer to honor outgoing chancellor Brice Harris by naming the district’s performing-arts center after him—for free. That has some community leaders balking at what they say are lost opportunities. Two years after the opening of the $49.4 million Three Stages at Folsom Lake College in Folsom, the Los Rios district board voted unanimously to change the name to the Harris Center for the Arts. Harris retired from Los Rios this It’s not unusual year and recently was named chancellor of the California Community for colleges and Colleges system; he began work in his universities to new role in early November. The Folsom Lake College seek money for Foundation had hoped to find a donor would provide about $3 million naming rights. who for naming rights, though the search had been unsuccessful so far. In a September 18, letter to the trustees, Folsom Lake College Foundation board member Katherine Anastasi called the name change a bad business move. “I am disappointed that the members of the Board did not keep in mind their fiduciary responsibility by throwing away funds that can be used for education,” she wrote. Anastasi and others said in letters and interviews that they also are concerned about losing the name recognition of Three Stages, which has drawn the likes of the Joffrey Ballet and Rosanne Cash. They hoped any new moniker would have kept that branding—think the “Brice Harris Three Stages Theater.” “Everybody in the community in the Sacramento region has a debt of gratitude to the great work that Brice Harris has done,” said Folsom Mayor Kerri Howell. “We’d just hate to see all of the effort that’s gone into the branding of that fabulous venue lost because of the name change.” Supporters of the name change say it’s unrealistic that the foundation would have been able to find a donor interested in the naming rights. “If no one has stepped forward to do it now, I don’t know if they are going to find somebody to do it,” said David Younger, a board member for the Los Rios Foundation. Erica Perez is a writer At a time when higher education is strapped for cash, for California Watch. Read more stories at it’s not unusual for colleges and universities to seek www.california money for naming rights. College of the Desert in Palm watch.org. Desert named a new student-services center in 2008 in honor of donors Peggy and Donald Cravens, who gave $3.5 million. The college’s nursing and health-sciences buildings are named for the Coeta and Donald Barker Foundation, which pledged $2 million. Ω

1901 L Street

  FRONTLINES  

|

08

08 www.harvscarwash.com

Fall Special FREE NEW SPEAKERS with all desktop systems. Computers, LCD Monitors with Microsoft Windows – Office, Anti-Virus Software and a one year warranty: $100 – $200

COMPUTERS FOR CLASSROOMS 1124 Del Paso Blvd (off Garden HWY inside SN&R building)

Open Tues & Thurs 1-5pm

1–800–208–3482

Call Toll Free for more info:

Open to low-income families such as Medi-Cal, Section 8 Housing, Healthy Families, Free or Reduced lunch qualified and SSDI. Cash sales only. CFC is Microsoft Registered Refurbisher and R2-Certified Recycler. All hard drives are wiped completely or destroyed.

OVER 40 YEARS

OPEN SUNDAYS 12-4

Teeth Whitening only $

149

(normally $400) Coupon valid only through 12.13.12 Complete Whitening Includes Upper & Lower Arches

CLOSED MONDAYS

Teeth Cleaning $ only

59

($238 Value)

Includes examination, x-rays & consultation. Coupon valid only through 12.13.12 Coupon valid for patients without insurance. New patients only.

We love kids!

Most Insurance Welcome • Caring & Friendly Staff

Town & Country Dental Care Eddie M. Alazraki, D.D.S. UCLA School of Dentistry Graduate, over 18 years experience in Cosmetic & General Dentistry

487-0909 |

08

08

08

(Near Town & Country Village)

VOTED BEST OF THE BEST 10 TIMES BY SACRAMENTO 08 MAGAZINE 08

916.446.0129

(on the corner of 19th and L)

3071 Fulton Ave. • Sacramento

BEFORE

Gr stoc eat k stuf ing fer!

You Can’t Taste a Picture “T ASTE F OR Y OURSELF ”

BUY 1 GET 1 FREE

Buy a Single French Buger, and 2 orders of French Fries, and 2 Fountain Drinks at Regular Price, Get the 2nd French Burger of Equal or Lesser Value FREE. This offer not available in conjunction with any other offer. Offer expires 12/31/12.

www.nationwidefreezermeats.com 444-3286 • 1930 H Street Downtown Sacramento Just remember H 20 we’re on the corner of H & 20th - Must Present Coupon -

  F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |    11.29.12    

|

  SN&R    

|

  9


Fiscal cliff-hanging ANNIVERSARY 2012–13

Jogja Hip Hop Foundation NOV 29–DEC 1

The booming sound of Java’s hippest traditions.

Californians should be ready for   multibillion-dollar budget bumps and grinds They’re breaking out the bubbly over in the white sepulchre called the state Capitol. Rather than the past years of teeth-gnashing and garmentrending, the Legislature and Gov. Bald Is Beautiful need only close a $1.9 billion gap next year between revenues and spending commitments, according to a vaunted legislative analyst. Even though $1 billion doesn’t go nearly as far as it used S A C by GREG LU to, $1.9 billion seems like scads of greenbacks. Dividing it caplowdown@newsreview.com equally among the state’s 38 million residents would equal a $50 check for everyone. Those checks would be a sweet bit of pump priming, particularly this time of year when the cash likely would spur the economy by subsidizing holiday purchases and increasing retail sales, as well as the taxes paid on those sales, which are split by state and local government. California has squandered $1.9 billion (and more) on worse ideas.

There are 243,373 taxpayers with an income of $300,000 or more.

One Man Star Wars Trilogy with Charles Ross NOV 30

Charles Bradley and Menahan Street Band DEC 1

10TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON SPONSORS

Tickets and more: mondaviarts.org • 866.754.2787 10   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

Greg Lucas’ state-politics column Capitol Lowdown will appear every-other week in SN&R. He also blogs at www.californias capitol.com.

Sadly, that won’t happen this year, but maybe in 2014, the analyst says. If everybody is prudent and exercises fiscal restraint (was that somebody snickering?), “there is a strong possibility of multibillion-dollar operating surpluses within a few years.” That means more money for public schools and road repairs. Maybe a moratorium on college and university tuition and fee increases. Always better to be flush than flushed. For the ’Crats and the glad-handing mannequins beneath the dome, $1.9 billion is chump change. For the fiscal year that ends June 30, 2013, the state expects to rake in $133 billion in fees, assessments and taxes. Doing the math, the hole is 1.4 percent of total revenues. A rounding error. This is a bodaciously big deal given that the current year’s budget forced folks to fill a hole of $15.7 billion, a $26.6 billion mess the previous year. Relative to $1.9 billion, those aren’t gaps between spending and revenues, they’re yawning chasms over which Evel Knievel would flame out about one-third of the way across.

So who’s the state’s sugar daddy? Primarily, a less anemic economy and bogus rich people. The Armani-clad habitués of Needless-Markup. The insufferably beautiful people lighting Montecristo cigars with $20 bills in luxuriant 7,000-square foot, ocean view McMansions with Century Cinedome entertainment systems and 17-car garages. That was the pitch behind Proposition 30—hose the hoity-toity or hose schools by $5.5 billion. Voters thought California’s noblesse would oblige in kicking down more in income taxes for the next seven years and having everyone eat a one-quarterof-1-percent-sales-tax bump for four years was the better play. Maybe. Maybe not. There are 243,373 taxpayers with income of $300,000 or more. Their state tax rate will increase from 9.3 percent to 12.3 percent, depending on how much they sock away each year. Of the 243,373, roughly 34,000 had income of $1 million or more, according to state tax-board statistics for 2009, the most recent year available. Those 243,373 represent 1.6 percent of the state’s 14.6 million filers, but they already pay 40 percent of state income taxes. The analyst says laying more of the tax burden on these “richies” could create “multibillion-dollar swings” in revenue, since the income of these folks comes more from investments and business ventures than salaries and wages. Collections in an already volatile tax system will spike and trough even more dramatically. Some of these “big” earners are small businesses—LLCs, S corporations, mom-and-pop outfits that have blossomed into $1 million concerns— who pay income taxes instead of business taxes. A bigger state-tax nut, an increase of 30 percent for earners of $1 million or more, means no more hiring, no more expansion, just hunkering down and waiting for the strafing of the bottom line to subside. This state-tax increase coincides with various federal taxes likely going up as a result of the sure-tobe-rinky-dink steamer Congress and the president plop down to keep the country from plunging off the “fiscal cliff” on January 1. So don’t be shocked if the analyst sings a less up-tempo tune next year. Ω


BOOK SALE

warehouse

FRIENDS OF THE SACRAMENTO PUBLIC LIBRARY

Black eyes, beaucoup bucks

Saturday, December 1st Noon – 4pm

GrEAt pricES !

On illegal camping, brawling holiday shoppers and big-ticket playgrounds

What really caught my eye were the violent fights and frantic mobs at the Westfield Galleria at Roseville mall. Plus, emails from Midtown&Down readers on the issue also trickled in: “I was just wondering if you had any thoughts about how Black Friday shoppers can camp for days at a time without any harassment, but when homeless people camp it’s illegal due to [Sacramento’s] no-camping ordinance?” one email read. “Appears to be discrimination/criminalization of people trying to survive versus the mighty dollar.” Hmm. What really caught my eye, though, were the violent fights and frantic mobs at the Westfield Galleria at Roseville this past Black Friday. Witnesses recorded melees and posted them to YouTube. So many crazy white people, so few cops, was my first reaction. And then, in one video, titled “Black Eye Friday,” two men punch and stomp another man as dozens of mall rats rubbernecked (stomach it yourself at http://tinyurl.com/ blackfridayroseville). With nary a renta-cop or badged officer in sight. BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

|

It’s worth noting that there’s never been a violent incident during an Occupy Sacramento protest. Or a nasty brawl at Safe Ground. Yet the city and county of Sacramento have spent more than $1 million dollars—yes, that much—arresting protesters and homeless campers over the past few years. A lot of heads, including Mayor Kevin

Johnson’s, spun last month when the city thumped down $686,379 to rebuild McKinley Park’s playground. Located just off the grid, some jackass torched the structure in July, which was a bummer, for sure. But tragedy doesn’t preclude many Midtowners and downtowners from asking, “Hey, I thought we were broke?” Funny thing, the city has a rich history of hurling cheddar at playgrounds and so-called park improvements in the central city. Just last year, if you recall, we spent more than $800,000 to beautify—or render less friendly to homeless people, some argued—Cesar Chavez Plaza. These changes included such expenses as raised planter boxes, new ground cover, altered walkways. But no new playground. Was it worth it? Especially considering that just a decade earlier the city already had spent $1 million modifying the park? And then there’s that toxic dirt lot at 19th and Q streets near Safeway. The city wants this to be the first new Midtown park in years (some hope to name it Bobby Burns Park, after the departed carouser and musician). Nearly a quarter-million dollars has been spent so far on removing toxic crud from this lot. But it’s uncertain whether Sacto can actually afford further work on the park, let alone a snazzy playground like its freewheeling neighbors to the east. And don’t forget that in 2009, the city spent nearly $300,000 in grants and city fees to build those eyesore picnic tables in Southside Park. Basically, they took luscious fields of green, poured concrete, then slapped down a few tables and barbecues. For 300 big ones. That $686,379 is a mighty price tag—but, even with the fundraising, the city’s track record makes McKinley’s new monkey bars and teeter-totter seem like a bargain. Ω

FEATURE

HAPPY HOLIDAYS All the Best Holiday Gifts...Stop in and See!

University Art

Palo Alto STORY

|

Store books offered at regular low prices.

8250 Belvedere, Suite E • Off Power Inn Rd one block south of 14th Ave. For more information contact fspl@att.net or call (916)731-8493

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

In a region rich with breathless outdoor adventure, Sacramentans just can’t stop pitching tents outside of strip malls in anticipation of Black Friday. It’s a wack, undeniably American tradition, yes. But, as a recent Internet meme showed, camping on urban topography is illegal in most U.S. cities, including Sacramento—even if you have permission from a R e property owner. l Il M by nIcK So, then why does law enforcement permit Black ni cka m@ ne wsreview.c om Friday tents at Best Buys, but Occupy and homeless encampments are not only banned, but arguably criminalized? OK, I realize that comparing Black Friday to tent cities is possibly a too-cute distinction. But the popular Internet meme from last week—which juxtaposed pictures of camped-out shoppers and unruly Black Friday crowds against tranquil Occupy and homeless camps—kinda makes sense.

Book donations appreciated during open hours.

ARTS&CULTURE

|

AFTER

San Jose |

Visit UniversityArt.com

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

11


RIGHT FOR YOU? Call for more information!

VOCATIONAL NURSING MASSAGE THERAPY

1652 W. Texas Street, Suite 151

(888) 787-5959

ALCOHOL & DRUG COUNSELING STUDIES

ELECTRICAL TRAINING PROGRAM

Call today

HVAC TECHNICIAN

for more program information:

INTERCOAST ROSEVILLE 1200 Melody Lane, Suite 100

(888) 955-3939 INTERCOAST ELK GROVE 9355 E Stockton Blvd. Suite 100

(888) 955-3939

Job Placement Assistance | Financial Aid Available (if qualified)

InterCoastNow.com

For more information about graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program and other important information, visit www.intercoast.edu. Not all programs are available at all locations.

• 100% FREE Independent Study Charter High School • Flexibility to learn without all the drama

ENROLL TODAY!

• Free curriculum, technology, field trips and more!

VisionsHighSchool.org 12   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

YOU’RE WELCOME, TREES.

WHICH CAREER PATH IS

Two grandmothers The ‘fiscal cliff’ forces   us to choose I had two grandmothers. Two loving grandmothers who had little in common except for a totally reasonable but little-held belief that I was one of the most wonderful creatures on the planet. My dad’s mom, who lived closer and who I saw more often, lived in a working-class neighborhood in a working-class city in northern Ohio. The Depression was hard for her and her family. My grandfather died young, leaving the family without a breadwinner. During the Depression, they were not sure where their next meal was coming from. I assume foodl assistance programs helped them get through some by Jeff VonKaene scary times. j e ffv @ne wsr e v ie w.c o m I was told that my father’s brothers lied about their age in order to work in the steel mills and at other blue-collar jobs. They wanted to work, but often there were no jobs. When given an opportunity, they seized it. My aunt went to college and became a schoolteacher. My dad went to college on the GI Bill and became a doctor. My first memory of my mother’s mom was when I was around 5 or 6, visiting her in her gigantic home in southern Ohio. After divorcing my grandfather, my mother’s mom married the owner of a small factory who lived in a mansion. I remember going through all the rooms and the many floors wondering, “Why do two people need such a big house? Why do they need all those Cadillacs? Why do Which one of my they need a fish pond when they don’t fish?” grandmothers do you I spent that night in a room by myself. Believe want to support? me, with five brothers and sisters, this was an unusual experience. I did not like it. While I enjoyed being with my mother’s mom and riding on the golf cart and playing in the pool, I felt sad for her in the big house, all alone with my grandfather. This was in the early 1950s, a period when we had Jackie Calmes little income inequality in America. Now, we have much of The New York Times demystifies more. The rich have become much richer, and the poor the “fiscal cliff” at have become much poorer. The so-called fiscal cliff http://tinyurl.com/ is forcing us to choose between military and domestic TheFiscalCliff. programs, between whose taxes get raised and whose do not, and to choose which generation pays the deficit. At the end of the day, it really comes down to this question: Which one of my grandmothers do you want to support? There’s disagreement about which grandmother needs our help. Some say that supporting the wealthy Jeff vonKaenel will create jobs. But I think that the smart decision, and is the president, the most just decision, is the obvious decision, the one CEO and that I suggested when I was 5 years old. I thought my majority owner of wealthy grandmother should help out my working-class the News & Review newspapers in grandmother. When I asked my parents 56 years ago about why this Sacramento, Chico and Reno. wasn’t happening, they told me I would understand when I got older. I am still waiting. Ω


Nut job

by Auntie Ruth

Grover and Bill

The Sacramento region produces most of the nation’s walnuts—but cracking them open isn’t easy “I’m going to show you the real way to crack a walnut.” Susan Hassett should know. She’s been growing certified-organic walnuts on her farm, Buzzard’s story and photo by Roost Ranch, for about 20 years in nearby Winters. Kat Kerlin Rule No. 1: “You don’t use a nutcracker,” she said. Nutcrackers make fishing out the meat from the shell a pain in the neck. Instead, she took out a small, lightweight ball-peen hammer, held a walnut against a hard surface, then struck the nut. In one quick motion, she removed the shell, as if she were opening a tiny book, and popped the entire nut out whole, which looked like a miniature brown brain.

There are two kinds of households in America today:

it’s also an ideal walnut to grow organically because the hard, tightly sealed shell makes it impervious to most pests. High in antioxidants, walnuts in general have been touted for an array of nutritional benefits, such as lowering cholesterol and increasing sperm production. “Walnuts are a completely underrated nut,” said Hassett. Before Hassett showed us how to crack walnuts, she demonstrated how to get them off of the tree: With a hefty “walnut rake”—any large, hardy stick will do—you knock a branch, take cover and wait for the wholly satisfying sound of walnuts raining onto the ground. Then, rake them into a pile, pick them up and toss them in a bucket. Simple enough.

These days, there is a burgeoning movement on Eastern

The Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys produce 99 percent of the nation’s commercial walnuts.

My family and I had come to Hassett’s farm to pick walnuts from two of her Franquette walnut trees, each one more than 140 years old. The last English walnut to leaf out, the Franquette is a French variety that’s been grafted to a California black walnut tree, explained Hassett. (While she speaks, her Chesapeake Bay retriever, Dawn, happily cracks walnuts between her teeth.) The Franquette is also one of the few varieties that can be harvested at this time of year. In fact, when I mentioned to my husband that I’d like to pick walnuts on my birthday, I had no idea the task I’d set before him. The Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys produce 99 percent of the nation’s commercial walnuts, and California is the world’s largest exporter (though China produces more). So, I assumed that finding a farm where we could pick them wouldn’t be difficult. But my husband soon discovered that most local walnut farms don’t allow the public to pick. Of those who do, the walnuts—mostly Hartley and locally developed Chandler varieties—had already been harvested by early November. Buzzard’s Roost Ranch, however, was not only in the prime of its certified-organic-walnut harvest, but it also appreciated our help—free labor for them, a great day on the farm for us. The Franquette is a darker, more savory walnut than the slightly sweeter Chandler and Hartley varieties most often found in grocery stores. Hassett said

Tip: Don’t use a nutcracker to crack walnuts.

Buzzard’s Roost Ranch offers you-pick walnuts and olives by appointment only, plus horse-and-carriage rides and equine programs, and a venue for weddings or special occasions at 8290A Pleasants Valley Road in Winters; (530) 795-4084; www.buzzardsroost ranch.com. A longer version of this story is posted on Kat Kerlin’s blog, Farmophile, at www.farmophile .wordpress.com.

BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

|

ones in which Grover Norquist is a household name, and ones in which Bill McKibben is a household name. Auntie Ruth can explain. Norquist is the no-tax-pledge guy who stunned the world earlier this month when he told the National Journal that a carbon tax might be a possibility if it was swapped with cutting the income tax. Now that’s some pretty nifty no-tax pledging going on there, Grover, but before a crack in the dike of conservatism could spring out—that’s been one leaky wall as of late—the Koch-brothers-funded American Energy Alliance spanked Norquist and he reversed. Is your dinner-table chat Norquist or McKibben? Norquist understands maybe better than most the power of fighting an opponent you can name, one you can point a finger at, draw a firm circle around. Perhaps, just perhaps, McKibben is cut from the same cloth. His work on climate change has been clear-eyed and compelling for more years than most of us probably noticed.

I tend to think nearly any you-pick experience is good for kids, but some have not always been ideal—fruit too high for my daughter, Lily, to reach; berries too deep in prickly brambles to pluck. But picking freshly fallen walnuts is one task perfectly suited for a 2-year-old. After a couple hours, we hauled about 40 pounds of certified-organic walnuts to Hassett’s back porch, where we weighed them. Hassett only charges $2 per pound—several dollars cheaper than what I find at the store. But still, we gathered 40 pounds! What on Earth will we do with 40 pounds of walnuts? Well, we have a big family reunion coming up, and many of them will be transported there— along with a small hammer—for candied walnuts, pumpkin bread, oatmeal, salads and general mindless nut cracking. Hassett said walnuts also freeze very well, which I’m counting on. At least we’ll know how to crack them. Ω

college campuses demanding their administrations divest from fossil-fuel companies. McKibben, who it appears is playing the sacred role of village elder to the younger activists, is quick to compare this effort to the anti-apartheid divestment movement, a movement whose opponent was morally reprehensible and internationally dependent on corporate investment. It’s an apt comparison, apt and daunting. “Environmentalists, understandably, have been loath to make the fossil-fuel industry their enemy,” McKibben told Rolling Stone in July. The hope had been that Exxon Mobil Corp. et al., would transform from fossil-fuel companies to energy companies, that institutions that powerful could play for our side. And, oh well.

Don’t misunderstand—we’re all part of the problem, and we have our changes cut out for us. Reduce, reuse, recycle, repeat. But a movement is really what’s needed, and the seeds are in the ground, the trowel is right here: http://gofossilfree.org. There you’ll find the three little numbers that McKibben and the students are building their movement around— We bet your aunts 350—a little bit of arithmetic that puts the climate aren’t as cool as ours. crises in stark, even chilling, relief. Friend Auntie Ruth Actually, there are three kinds of houseon Facebook holds in America today, the third category and let’s hang out. being the majority of households in which neither Grover Norquist’s nor Bill McKibben’s name are tossed about with any frequency. But oh, goodness me, what do those households talk of over dinner? Ω

Green holiday gifting ’Tis the season to purchase a bunch of stuff for other people. For many of us, that means stuff that probably hurts the environment, isn’t used for very long or quickly finds itself in the trash as soon as it’s received. Thankfully, the green-friendly website TreeHugger—part of the Discovery Communications network—recently published its annual gift guide. This year, it even features subcategories, such as The Foodie, The Kid and The Fashion Buff. There are some innovative items listed and also some not-so-useful stuff, including a solar-powered radio and a disposable iPhone case. Check out the entire guide at www.treehugger.com/giftguide.

F E AT U R E S T O RY

—Jonathan Mendick |

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

AFTER

|

OK, this gift might be too green.

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

13


Encounter God & Come Alive Spiritually SATURDAY SERVICE: 5:10pm Casual Yet Sacred SUNDAY SERVICES: 7:30am Classical Language 9:00am Contemporary Organ & Piano 11:15am Classical Music

THINK

FREE.

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CATHEDRAL

Stake your claim When it comes to reporting other people’s unclaimed assets, California companies are on the honor system Apparently, I get ripped off a lot. I was reminded of this fact after receiving a letter in October from Pettinato & Associates, by Raheem a Sacramento private-investigation firm that F. Hosseini recovers unclaimed assets. The P&A letter claimed a credit-card company owed me more ra h e e m h @ than a grand in payment overages and asked ne w s re v i e w . c o m whether I would like it to collect on my behalf (for a 10 percent fee, of course). While I liked the idea of a toothpickchomping P.I. metaphorically taking a bat to the shins of some grafting Wall Street type, I’m not one to outsource my collection duties. On the website for the California State Controller’s Office, I learned that P&A’s claims were legit: A credit-card company did owe me a chunk of money. And so did about four other companies. In total, I was owed a little more than $1,500 by The Golden 1 Credit Union, a state health-care plan, Target National Bank and FIA Card Services, which held the largest vig.

what it said was an industrywide practice of cannibalizing the policies of dead people. The companies drew down the cash values of these Reverend Dr. Brian Baker “delinquent” policies until they were stone dry, and then canceled them without tossing a red cent to the beneficiaries. This happened even though the companies had access to what’s referred to as the “death master file” Sacramento Legal Line 7 days call night from the Social Security Office and were & 498.7949 a week or day and press a 4-digit code being contacted by the policy holders’ beneficiaries with “direct proof” of their loved ones’ 1001 Introduction to automobile accidents passing, Roper says. In other words, these 1002 Automobile damage claims 1003 Automobile injury claims companies knew better. 1004 Motorcycle accidents This callous practice went on for decades, 1005 Bicycle accidents Roper says. 1006 Uninsured & underinsured Four years after the audit, the Controller’s motorist coverage Office has now reached settlements with six 1007 Slip and fall accidents companies—including American International 1008 Bus and train accidents 1009 Airline accidents Group Inc., Nationwide, MetLife and 1010 Boating accidents Prudential. Forethought Group Inc., which SACRAMENTO 1011 Amusement ride accidents sells end-of-life policies through funeral (916) 455.4800 1012 Life insurance claims planners, agreed last month to pay back $25 STOCKTON 1013 Product liability accidents (206) 473.4800 million. The office is negotiating settlements 1014 Disability insurance claims www.davidallenlaw.com 1015 Social Security disability claims with another 20 to restore victims’ policy After a while, the little guy payouts to preliquidation levels. But Roper admits his office only caught gets tired of doing battle with wind of this fraud because of the meager a faceless corporate entity number of unclaimed assets the major insurwith a labyrinthine automated ance companies were reporting. There’s no telling how many companies out there phone tree and an endless are savvier about raising suspicions, Roper supply of legal letterhead. acknowledges. What he can say is that businesses are submitting fewer dormant assets to the state, but that has mostly to do with a change in the law in 2007. According to the Controller’s Office, All totaled, Californians received the Bank of America subsidiary that (mis) $516.3 million in unclaimed cash that year, managed my Visa credit card for a number NEWS & REV I E largest W B U S dollar I N E S Stotal U S Esince O N L at Y least the the of years was hoarding $1,013.14 in overpaid To learn more, call now: DESIGNER 1997-1998 ISSUE DATE ACCT.which EXEC.is as far back fiscal year, credit-card bills. I have a vague suspicion Scot Bernstein AL 06.18.09 REM graph goes. State as the Controller’s Office there’s more money I’m leaving on the table, Law Of fices of Scot D. Bernstein, FILE NAME REV. DATE residents also got back north of 39,000 but will never know for sure. A Professional Corporation TRINITYCATHEDRAL061809R1 02.19.09 shares of unclaimed securities during the Jacob Roper, a spokesman for the 1(800)916-3500 toll free (BOLD SELECTION) fiscal year. Controller’s Office, confirms there’s no way USP2010-2011 Free Confidential Consultation PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / UNIQUE As I can/ EXPERT attest, the state isn’t getting to to determine whether companies report every everyone with unclaimed property or money inactive financial asset or customer overchargCAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR there. (Remember: It was that P.I. firm’s ing to the state, adding, “But by reporting it,PLEASE out ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLOWING: GO TO FACEBOOK.COM/SACNEWSREVIEW letter that wised me up.) Roper calls the massive they remove their liability.” AD SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES) undertaking to reach every oblivious asset holder That may prevent big-ticket fraud by credit SPELLING in California “a work in progress.” lenders and other financial institutions, but NUMBERS & DATES Anyone can search the office’s website for the Interwebs are saturated with the stories of CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ETC.) and unclaimed property theADDRESSES, state has received everyday folks who were hit with exorbitant Plug in your name AS REQUESTED and see what, it has yet to receive. Unsurprisingly, fees even after they paid off their debts. AD APPEARSproperty if anything, BY: this has occasionally led to fraudulent claims, After a while, the little guy gets tiredAPPROVED of you are owed: which is why the Controller’s Office is delibdoing battle with a faceless corporate entity http://scoweb.sco. erate about vetting them. with a labyrinthine automated phone tree and ca.gov/UCP/ Default.aspx. All of this means I’m likely in for a slog as an endless supply of legal letterhead. That’s I try proving residence at an old address to get what happened to me, as well as thousands of that chunk of change from FIA. But I’ll do it. life-insurance policy beneficiaries throughout There’s no way I’m letting those bastards steal the state. any more of my money. Ω In 2008, the Controller’s Office n e w s & r e v i e w b u s i n e s s u s e o n ly participated in a 20-state audit of national designer MK issUe dATe 05.26.11 practices and ACCTcondemned eXeC REM insurance-company 2620 Capitol Ave. tvrbaker@trinitycathedral.org trinitycathedral.org

Looking for legal advice?

ATTENTION TRAVELERS

If you have made reservations with any of a large number of hotels in the last 18 months, or called certain other tollfree numbers, you may be owed money damages for privacy violations.

LIKE

US.

OR ELSE.

FiLe nAMe DAVIDALLEN052611R1

14

|

SN&R

|

11.29.12

reV dATe

03.02.06

please carefully review your advertisement and verify the following: Ad size (CoLUMn X inChes) speLLing nUMbers & dATes


ThiS ModERn WoRld

by tom tomorrow

High and dry? Last August, my family suffered a devastating house 100-year flood protected in 1998. We were fire. Fortunately, no one was injured and we later required to buy flood insurance by were fully insured. We were distraught over FEMA, but we did not imagine that if somethe loss of our possessions, but we were thing happened to our house, we wouldn’t comforted by the thought that our home be able to fix it. Neither FEMA nor the city would soon be repaired. informed us of this regulation. I’ve learned We didn’t know that because we live in that few people who live here are aware of Natomas, classified as a flood risk by the this regulation—including a FEMA worker Federal Emergency Management Agency, involved with levee upgrades. It’s the dirty we would be required to demolish what little secret of Natomas! remained of our home The insurance company by and rebuild a house has informed us that if we Jennifer Taylor that is elevated more cannot repair our house, a longtime homeowner It is ridiculous to than 20 feet. This they will give us the “fair in natomas and a market value” for the stay-at-home mom of demolish-and-rebuild require victims is not covered by structure—insufficient two toddlers of home damage insurance. to pay off the mortgage. We discovered We’ll be left to continue to elevate this FEMA regulation paying the mortgage on an when our contractor empty lot, with no money their house as applied for permits. remaining to rent or a condition of In the Natomas basin, purchase a new house. FEMA stipulates that if repairing it. It is ridiculous to the costs of repair are require victims of home greater than 50 percent damage to elevate their Have a comment? house as a condition of Express your views of the structure’s value repairing it. If we are allowed to purchase in 350 words on prior to the damage, the house must be a local topic demolished and elevated to 1 foot above the homes and to continue living here, then of interest. floodplain. we should be able to fix our home if it is Send an email to We bought our home 14 years ago damaged. This “substantial damage” regulaeditorial@ tion of FEMA’s needs to change! Ω newsreview.com. because FEMA certified the levees as

‘Fiscal cliffs’ vs. ‘austerity bombs’ Conventional wisdom says that an apocalypse will occur if Congress fails to act to avoid going off the “fiscal cliff.” But this “cliff” is a self-imposed problem. Despite the deficit and debt hawks’ cries, American debt is still a great investment. It sells so quickly that we’ve got historically low interest rates. Obviously, the people with the money to lend aren’t worried about the debt or deficit spending. No, what we need to fear isn’t the fiscal cliff; it’s what Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman has called the “austerity bomb.” That’s what happens when, in the midst of a fragile recovery from the recession, we raise tax rates on wage earners and cut spending. That’s the austerity deal being sold by the Republican Party, even as members of their leadership signal a willingness to compromise—if, they note, “entitlement reform” is on the table. This is a really, really bad idea. When you raise taxes on wage earners, they trim their household budgets, thus putting less money into the economy. When you cut spending, there’s less money being added to the economy by the government sector. In fact, what works on a recessionary economy Despite the deficit is stimulus—and plenty of it. and debt hawks’ And let’s be clear: What the cries, American Republicans mean when they say “entitlement reform” is altering debt is still a great Medicare and Social Security by investment. raising the age at which taxpayers can collect benefits. This, plus reducing the benefits. Oh, not for Granny and Gramps; that would be political suicide. Instead, the plan is to eliminate these programs for younger workers—the under-55 crowd who don’t have as much political clout and who won’t be eligible for benefits for more than a decade anyway. The goal of this entitlement reform is to gut the signature anti-poverty program of the 20th century and the first—incredibly popular—universal singlepayer health-care system in the country. It ignores the amount of “entitlements” that subsidize our supposedly free market—oil subsidies, anyone?—while making sure that more American workers die in the The Washington Post’s harness and those that live long enough to retire Ezra Klein regularly remain impoverished. on the Meanwhile, the top tier of income earners—notice blogs “austerity crisis.” that’s not wage earners, because the income doesn’t Read more about it at come from salary—get to avoid taxes on even larger www.washington post.com/blogs/ amounts of money. wonkblog. If the only way to get bipartisanship out of the Republican members of Congress is to talk entitlement reform, let’s talk. We can start with entitlements that could use some reform, like tax breaks and subsidies for fossil fuels and large agribusinesses. And let’s remember that the proposal they’re offering amounts to continued tax breaks for the very wealthy and austerity for everyone else. That didn’t work when former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was selling it. It shouldn’t work now. Don’t buy it. Ω

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

11.29.12    

|

  SN&R    

|

  15


Don’t look now, but one of the longestlasting vendettas in California political  history is playing out right here in  the River City.

by Bill

Bradley

. Jerry Brown. Newspapers Gov ing ack att of s ade dec r fou rly nea sts lters’ resume boa ise fragmented California GOP? The Sacramento Bee columnist Dan Wa erw oth an for n ma kes spo new the s lter Wa s—is up and down the state syndicate his writing Photo illustrations by Priscilla Garcia

16   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

Last May, newcomers to the Sacramento press corps—not exactly a small number these days—were surprised to see a press-conference confrontation between veteran Sacramento Bee columnist Dan Walters and Gov. Jerry Brown. Walters, eager for the past 30-plus years to hang crepe over Brown’s political career, demanded to know why the governor’s revised budget numbers were any more credible than the numbers rolled out in January. “Why should we believe you?” Walters insisted, acting as though the upward revision to the state-budget deficit was surprising. Which it was not, as Brown and other state officials had been commenting for months on emerging shortfalls. All one had to do, frankly, was add up various statements to get to Brown’s “surprise” May revised figure. Which is especially easy to do for someone like Walters, who writes almost every day about Capitol politics. But the conflict, which continued on Twitter between Walters and the governor’s press secretary, Gil Duran, was also no real surprise. Walters has a very long history of attacking Gov. Brown, going back to the beginning of his career in the mid1970s as a columnist and reporter for the far-right Sacramento Union newspaper. Yes, Walters has been doing the same job, writing about the same things for nearly 40 years. Given the frequently mind-numbing state of state politics, that is a rather frightening thought. He has used the perch afforded him by a near-daily column, albeit a brief one of about 400 words, to go after Brown’s top policy priorities. The governor’s moves to raise taxes on the rich, balance the budget, recast local and state agencies, control greenhouse-gas emissions, expand renewable energy, build a high-speed-rail system—all are fodder for Walters’ attacks. More recently, Walters prophesied doom for Brown’s Proposition 30 tax-hike initiative, speculating the Sunday before it passed that Brown would have to retire. In general, the columnist has done what a sophisticated state Republican spokesman would do, if there were such a person. Today, the California Republican Party—whose


chairman, Tom Del Beccaro, became best known in 2006-07 for trying to prevent Brown from becoming state attorney general on the grounds that he wasn’t really a lawyer—is in serious organizational disarray. It lacks a credible central voice. In the absence of that, Dan Walters will certainly do.

Birth of a Brown basher Dan Walters regularly hits Brown on the major issues of most concern to the Republican Party and its financial backers. And for those who are unaware of the backstory, he does so with credibility. While many in the capital city remember the history of Walters and his writings and know where he is coming from, many do not. Perhaps more to the point: Walters’ column is syndicated in smaller newspapers all over the state. It’s very regular and its small size makes it easy to fit into many formats. Walters, not surprisingly, isn’t too excited about discussing all this. He hasn’t returned calls. He began in journalism in what today would be a very unusual way: He dropped out of high school “because it interfered with [his] poker playing,” as he told the Times-Standard newspaper of Eureka, up on the far North Coast. He joined what was then the Eureka Times as a copy boy in 1960 and later worked for a variety of smaller papers, including a return stint at the Eureka paper in the early ’70s, this time as managing editor, before joining the right-leaning Sacramento Union as political writer and columnist in 1975. The Union was owned by right-wing billionaire Richard Mellon Scaife, a principal heir to an oil and banking fortune, who was one of the main national financiers for a network of conservative influencers and who played a major role in the impeachment of President Bill Clinton. Walters shifted over to The Sacramento Bee in 1984 as part of the paper’s long-term strategy to make Sacramento a one-daily town. He had been a popular conservative columnist in the city’s other daily newspaper, so removing Walters from the Union and adding him to the then-liberal Bee was a useful move for the Bee in its effort to attain a daily-paper monopoly. Nevertheless, despite such Machiavellian moves by the Bee, the Union—the oldest daily west of the Mississippi River, for which the great Mark Twain wrote much of his most famous journalistic work— hung around for another 10 years. But while the Bee did not encourage Walters, as the Union did, to expose supposedly nefarious linkages between left-wing groups and the Democratic Party, it did not discourage him from pursuing his stock-in-trade hobbyhorse of Brown bashing. Indeed, during a memorable pressroom blowout years ago at a California Democratic Party convention, then-Los

Angeles Times senior political writer John Balzar heatedly accused Walters of “building his entire career” on bashing Brown. Balzar, an ex-Marine and Vietnam War vet who was one of the last of the literary journalists at the Times during its heyday, insisted that Walters had latched on to Brown “like a moray eel” in his zeal to tear down the then-former governor. Given the vagaries of archiving in the digital era, most of Walters’ fervently flavorful work for the Union, though well remembered, is lost in the cracks of the journalistic past. The newspaper is dead, and there is no memorial to it, its quarters long gone, its presence vanished, though bound copies are stored at UC Davis.

Dan Walters   has a very long history of  attacking Gov. Jerry Brown,  going back to the beginning of  his career in the mid-1970s as a  columnist and reporter for the  right-leaning Sacramento   Union newspaper.

The Union was never online, and hence has no online archive, even via the WayBack Machine. The Sacramento Public Library does have much of the old Union on microfiche. However, it is essentially inaccessible. (I was told by a library staffer that volunteers back in the 1990s helped set up the system, producing a card file of articles in it. But the card file is very incomplete, with remarkably few references to Brown—who was merely the governor for eight years!—or to the work of Walters, the ultraconservative outlet’s leading columnist. It would take $20,000, I was told, to do a full index of the paper, and the still-terrific public-library system is already dealing with terrible cutbacks.) But not to fear, for one of the great things about Walters and his work is that he repeats it.

California dreamin’ Walters began working for the Bee in 1984, and despite the paper’s more liberal aspect, he continues many of his old Union themes. This is quite true with respect to Brown, especially obvious during Walters’ early years at the Bee, during which he was freewheeling in unleashing his venomous feelings for a politician he plainly loathed. In these years, as in the 1990s—with the very conservative Gov. George Deukmejian, who in today’s GOP would be a sedate moderate conservative— Walters believed that California was destined to remain a Republican state. He also was a special cheerleader for the corporate, conservative governorship of Pete Wilson. Walters told me several times during the ’90s that Gov. Wilson had domicreated a “new model” for ongoing Republican domi nance of the state’s electoral politics. (Wilson himself was to go on to mount a false-starting 1996 presidential campaign, hamstrung by revelations that the governor himself had long employed an illegal immigrant in his San Diego home.) Brown’s governorship was thus positioned by Walters as a freakish, fluky oddity, notwithstanding the then-wunderkind pol’s 20-point landslide of a gubernatorial re-election in 1978 after his late-starting, runner-up race for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1976. What was really happening, of course, was that California was moving in a very different direction than Walters supposed, driven by emerging demographics in addition to changing cultural mores and ideological attitudes. The Golden State had been the cradle of Republican presidents, producing first Richard Nixon and then Ronald Reagan, who defeated Brown’s storied father, Gov. Pat Brown, to win office in 1966, and whom Brown had replaced as governor the first time. But that was changing fast. By 1992, the state had moved into the Democratic column in the Electoral College. Clinton, behind whom Brown finished as runner-up for the Democratic nomination that year, won California handily. And it has remained Democratic in every presidential election since, so much so that Mitt Romney came here only to raise money from rich conservatives and to visit his beachside car elevator in La Jolla in San Diego. Walters saw things differently. Even as California grew blue, he insisted that Wilson’s governorship presaged an ongoing Republican future for California. It did not. A Republican did win the governorship later on. But that Republican, Arnold Schwarzenegger, was one unlike any other, a frequent maverick of sometimes kaleidoscopic ideology—more like a Republican version of, well, Brown, than Wilson, Deukmejian or Reagan.

“warofth18ewords” cont inued on page

BEFORE

|

  FRONTLINES  

|

  F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |    11.29.12    

|

  SN&R    

|

  17


words” “warofthe page 17 conti nued from

Neither Walters nor Schwarzenegger, who publicly chided the columnist for his dour attitude, warmed to one another. Walters urged Schwarzenegger aides, for instance, not to make Mary Nichols head of the Air Resources Board, which she had directed during Brown’s first governorship and where she would be the principal action officer on California’s landmark Assembly Bill 32 climate-change program, a frequent Walters target. But to no avail. Nichols went on to play a crucial role implementing A.B. 32 and was retained by Brown. During Brown’s first time as governor, Walters was a lead dog in the pack baying after Brown. The Union, with Mellon Scaife writing the checks and Walters delivering the prose, was deeply antithetical to Brown and most other Democrats. As Brown’s most persistent journalistic opponent, situated in California’s capital, Walters was a leading voice in the chorus that created and then decried the notion of “Moonbeam” Brown. Not that Walters coined that memorable term. There are, after all, reasons they called him Governor Moonbeam. There are also reasons why hard-boiled Chicago columnist Mike Royko, who came up with the term, tried to disavow it, indeed dismantle it. (In 1991 Royko called it an “idiotic, damn-fool, meaningless, throw-away line” and, in exasperation, tried to kill off his brainchild. “Enough of this ‘Moonbeam’ stuff,” he wrote. “I declare it null, void and deceased.”)

The Sunday before this fall’s election, Dan Walters suggested that Gov. Jerry Brown would finally retire if Proposition 30 didn’t pass. Wrong again.

18   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

But the moniker stuck, as did the notion, comfortable for some, that Brown’s ideas promoting renewable energy (“wood chips and windmills”!) and a state communications satel satellite were simply wacky. When Brown resurfaced—after stints as a lawyer, poverty worker with Mother Teresa in India and student of Zen Buddhism in Japan— first as California Democratic Party chairman, then as a presidential candidate, Walters was waiting. During Brown’s 1992 presidential campaign, Walters appeared in a faux exposé story on ABC News that alleged a Brown drug scandal, saying he had been at a Brown fundraiser where drugs were used (it later turned out to have been an Eagles concert where—gasp!—some attendees in the huge crowd smoked pot). No more was heard of the supposed drug scandal, and Brown ended as the distant runner-up for the Democratic nomination to Clinton. But Walters had gotten on Nightline.

A (more than) 30-year war In the world of Walters, there is little for which Brown can’t be blamed, no matter the outcome. The columns of today and those of 30 years ago, even at the “liberal” Bee, make a match in that regard. Brown, of course, in his varied career, went on to two terms as mayor of Oakland and a term as California’s attorney general. Then, he cleared the Democratic primary field for the governorship in 2010 and went on to a win over GOP opponent Meg Whitman

54 percent to 41 percent. And Walters quickly reform bona fides by cutting taxes for the rich emerged as the not-so-loyal opposition. and big corporations. Brown spent most of the first half-year Walters wrote: “Were Brown as committed of his governorship enacting big budget cuts to long-term impacts as he professes to be, and working to get the handful of Republican he’d have embraced tax reform to make the legislative votes needed to place an extenstate’s revenue stream more predictable and sion on the temporary 2009 tax hikes. But less dependent on how well a few rich people Republicans, who must be kicking themselves are doing on their investments. He would now that Brown’s Prop. 30 has passed and broaden the reach of sales and income taxes Democrats have two-thirds majorities in both and reduce rates to make California more houses of the Legislature, kept pressing for attractive to business investment.” more in their dealings. And now, they’ve This blame game echoes Walters’ work at ended up with nothing. the Union decades earlier. Walters kicked off 2012 with For instance, on December a New Year’s Day column 10, 1984, Walters baldly calling Brown a failure faulted Brown, who as governor. opposed Proposition “Brown claimed 13, for the decline of Walters saw   that having spent California schools, his adult life letting the propothings differently.   in politics and nents of Prop. 13 Even as California grew  already served off the hook: two terms as “California’s blue, he insisted that Pete  governor,” system of Wilson’s governorship  Walters wrote, public schools, “he had the once its pride presaged an ongoing  experience and and strength, knowledge to suffered terribly Republican future for  succeed where in the shift from California. others had failed. local to state financ financ“Wrong, at ing after Proposition least so far. 13. Jerry Brown was “Although Brown had largely disinterested in the spent eight years as attorney schools and allowed them to general prior to seeking the governorlanguish, without adequate financing ship again [note: Walters managed to get the or political support.” number of years Brown served as California For another easy example, on December 27, attorney general wrong, despite the fact that 1984, Walters fingered Brown for the entire taxBrown’s single term in that office just ended loophole phenomenon, a favorite of both parties at the beginning of last year], he had spent but especially the Republicans. Walters, presentvery little time in the Capitol and, therefore, ing then-President Reagan and conservative appears to have been shocked that it had Gov. Deukmejian as “tax reformers,” extolled become institutionally impotent.” Deukmejian’s proposal for a flat tax, long a I interviewed Brown during his negotia negotia- favorite of conservatives, as the way to go. tions with Republican legislators, and Meanwhile, Walters’ enmity for renewable he was not “shocked.” He hoped to energy—he frequently rips the state’s landmark do a deal if he found four reason reasonprograms, including those in support of efforts able Republicans. Failing that, he to halt so-called global warming—has long would do an initiative and place been on display. it not on a special-election Just a day after reveling in the notion of ballot, but on the 2012 Reagan the tax reformer, Walters trashed general-election ballot, when renewable energy, in particular wind energy— President Barack Obama now a mainstay of new power systems around headed the ticket. the world—insisting that the move away from While Brown’s plan A fossil fuels didn’t make sense. of getting Republican coop“It all started in 1978 when California’s eration failed, to Brown’s Legislature, as part of then-Gov. Jerry Brown’s dismay, his plan B—after alternative energy program, voted to give wind some floundering during the energy investments a liberal tax treatment. Prop. 30 campaign itself—proved to “Congress followed suit in 1980, expanding be a great success. the tax breaks. Wind farms became tax shelters Walters, of course, would weigh with other investment credits, depreciation in repeatedly about Brown’s allowances, etc. boneheaded fiscal ways before this “The technology works—after a fashion. definitive result (which, not surprisOne can stick a windmill in the air and get a ingly, he would pooh-pooh). spark of electricity from the other end, but it’s a In a Sunday column on technology that could not survive in a competiSeptember 16, Walters went tive market without the subsidies. And it’s a after Brown again for his Prop. technology that probably doesn’t make much 30 initiative, claiming that his sense now, except in remote areas where power forecasts were wrong and that is otherwise unavailable.” the initiative had “a dark side.” But Of course, helping label wind energy in Walters gave his conservative game California, then the world leader, as something away in his close, in which he says that that “doesn’t make much sense” is what helped “self-styled reformer” Brown should prove his other nations emerge as world leaders in the field. Even Texas was to surpass California in


Dan Walters began 2010, the year of the big Democratic wave in California, opining about the Golden State that “the only real certainty is that its predilection is uncertain,” saying that it could be a very big Republican year for California. It was a big Republican year, all right. In reverse. Despite waging the biggestspending nonpresidential campaign in American history, billionaire Meg Whitman lost to Brown in a landslide

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E AT U R E

Dealer!

Learn to be a

THINK FREE.

Battle, onward

as the Democrats swept every statewide office. Naturally, Walters’ disdain for Brown and his trademark issues, such as renewable energy, hasn’t gone away, despite its vindication over the past few decades. On May 21 of this year, Walters again derided renewables, placing the word in quotation marks as he decried the state’s sweeping program. “A major component of California’s crusade against global warming, one started by former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and embraced by successor Jerry Brown, is the legal mandate to have 33 percent of electric power sales from ‘renewable sources’ by 2020.” Not surprisingly, Walters’ dogged embrace of the old-energy economy extends to his vehement opposition to high-speed rail. Distortion and some soft reporting led to a false meme, based on a Field Poll, that getting high-speed rail going would kill Brown’s Prop. 30 initiative. Ironically, the people who were pushing this meme were mostly opponents not only of high-speed rail, but also of raising taxes on the rich. Principal among them was Walters. The columnist also was prominent in his silent stance on the massive money laundering that infested the No on 30 campaign. For someone who writes almost every day, it was a huge omission. But Walters did devote a column to the evil of educators, eyeing more big cuts if the initiative failed, urging a yes vote on Prop. 30. Brown had signed into law a new online voter-registration system, and young voters signed up in droves. Walters also wondered why Brown was wasting his time campaigning on college campuses. But polling private and public showed that many of them knew little about Prop. 30 and were undecided. Hence, Brown campaigned heavily with college students. The Sunday before the election, Walters suggested that Brown would retire, finally, if Prop. 30. didn’t pass. Of course, as you’ve seen, Walters has a very long history of saying Brown’s career is over or close to over. And while Brown’s campaign for Prop. 30 went right up to the edge of the abyss, which is a story in itself, it then soared across. Not surprisingly, Walters, after writing that Brown’s career would likely be ended by a Prop. 30 defeat, dismissed its big win even as the Legislative Analyst’s Office declared that it had ended the state’s chronic budget crisis and would lead to budget surpluses, assuming Brown holds the line on spending (as he has and as he vows to do). One thing’s for sure: You can’t say Dan Walters is not consistent. Ω

Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

wind energy, until Schwarzenegger reversed that bizarre phenomenon at the end of his term. Not long after Brown’s first two terms as governor, Walters, noting his active post-governorship of think tanks and help for potential allies, vehemently insisted that Brown had no future in politics. Walters commemorated Thanksgiving 1984 by trashing Brown as the Democratic Harold Stassen. His holiday communiqué betrayed little knack for prognostication: “Time flies when you’re having fun. It’s difficult to accept, therefore, that it’s been 10 years since a rather odd young man got himself elected governor of California. “Edmund Gerald Brown Jr., known to his friends as Jerry Brown and his detractors as ‘Pat’s kid,’ parlayed an instinct for mediamongering, public preoccupation with Watergate and his famous name into a narrow victory over Republican Houston Flournoy in the 1974 election. “Talking vaguely about a ‘new spirit,’ Brown loaded his staff with a batch of ex-poverty lawyers and continued to play to the media with symbols of what he called ‘an era of limits.’ ... “In 1982, with his governorship stumbling to an end (he would leave office with a billion-dollarplus hole in the state budget), Brown tried to capture a U.S. Senate seat being vacated by another well-known bumbler, Republican S.I. Hayakawa. ... “Jerry Brown, you see, still believes he has a political career. ... He thinks somebody out there still cares about him and his political meanderings. “The Republicans used to have a boy-wonder governor who didn’t know when to quit. His name was Harold Stassen.” Unfortunately, Walters’ assertions about the impending political demise of Brown aren’t limited to the 1980s and 1990s. For even in the 2010 election—which, of course, featured the despised Brown—Walters insisted that California’s blue hue wasn’t really true.

Classes Featured:

Poker ◆ Blackjack Pai Gow ◆ Roulette Mini Baccarat

50 Off $

CASINO COLLEGE

This week on exp 12/05/ ly! 12

9529 FOLSOM BLVD STE. E SACRAMENTO

916-638-3322

Job Placement Assistance

www.ideal21.com

are s r e d ! BartenDemanOd in ONEY | MEET PE PLE EM

N | MAK

HAVE FU

50 Off $

This week on exp 12/05/ ly! 12

(916)995-6518

www. ABCBartending .com

S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

11.29.12    

|

  SN&R    

|

  19


Farm local,

Go Global by Christopher Arns photos by Wes Davis

Sacramento is already the state’s de facto agricultural  hub, and now city officials push to make it a mecca,   declaring it the nation’s ‘Farm-to-Fork Capital’

It was a crisp Sunday morning in late October, and Randall Selland had just found the perfect broccoli.

Selland, who owns several fine-dining establishments in Sacramento, was shopping for his restaurants at the Central Farmers Market located under the freeway at Eighth and W streets. Standing in front of a table manned by the Suyenaga family, which grows vegetables in Natomas, Selland seized a gleaming stalk of broccoli and grinned. “You can just tell how fresh this is,” he gushed, tenderly holding the produce like an uncut diamond. “It doesn’t get any better than that.” Selland has stocked his restaurants this way for the past 20 years. The produce is often picked the same day his chefs prepare it. “It’s always been about serving the food that you’d want to eat yourself,” Selland said. It’s a simple concept. Veggies from the farmers market arrive directly from local growers instead of a climate-controlled warehouse— the place most restaurants find their grub. Still, the “farm-to-table” or “farm-to-fork” movement only became popular recently thanks to such gastro geniuses like Alice Waters and Michael Pollan. Buy local, eat local, they say. Now, Sacramento wants to corner the market.

Last month, Mayor Kevin Johnson held a press conference at Cesar Chavez Plaza and proclaimed Sacramento the Farm-to-Fork Capital of America. Not of the Central Valley, not of California, but the whole darn country. “We want to learn to play to our strengths,” said Johnson, as a crowd of local chefs stood behind him. “We know that one of our competitive advantages is certainly the weather, the climate, the natural resources— and agriculture and food.” It makes sense for the mayor and city officials. Sacramento is the de facto farming hub of the country’s most productive farming state. California’s largest certified farmers market is here—it’s the one held weekly at Eighth and W streets—along with 7,000 to 8,000 boutique farms and 50,000 agricultural workers. For those reasons and more, Johnson wants to host a food festival that will launch in September 2013 as a way to push the capital’s new identity as a foodie hot spot. The yearly gastro fest would include a huge farmers market on Capitol Mall, along with (fingers crossed) a cattle drive. Think Austin, Texas, with live music or New Orleans with Mardi Gras—that’s how the mayor wants to pair food with Sacramento. It’s Selland’s family that actually came up with the idea. His son, Josh Nelson, first pitched the concept to officials from the Sacramento Convention and Visitors Bureau about two years ago. Nelson said he hopes the mayor’s proclamation, signed by the city council, starts attracting more culinary tourists to the region. “It was just something that I felt our region had a unique advantage in, and I thought it was an opportunity for Sacramento to brand itself nationally and give it an identity,” he said. Sactown is, after all, famously known as a cow town to most outsiders. The region certainly has the farms—more than 70 percent

This carrot, picked by chef Adam Pechal from Tuli Bistro and Restaurant Thir13en with Shannin Stein from Feeding Crane Farms, just might end up on your dinner plate.

20   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12


Rich people’s houses! See NIGHT&DAY

24

of the Sacramento Valley and the Gold Country is covered by open space and agricultural land. But the capital might also have the chops to be a foodie hot spot, according to Linda Zavoral, travel editor and restaurant columnist for the San Jose Mercury News and Bay Area News Group. She said Sacramento’s vibrant culinary scene is underrated. “Modesto could claim to be a great farm town and Winters and a number of others, but do they have the fine-dining scene? No,” said Zavoral, who grew up in the capital. “Sacramento is in a pretty sweet spot there with both the farms and forks.” What goes on those forks is the key, said Patrick Mulvaney, who owns Mulvaney’s Building & Loan in Midtown. Mulvaney grew up in Manhattan and considered himself a New York food snob before moving to California. And now? Well, now Mulvaney has changed his mind. “I have chefs who have moved to New Orleans and Chicago and New York City,” he said. “Two of them are in Michelin-starred restaurants and say the vegetables aren’t as good [outside of Sacramento].”

Glutton vs. plate See DISH

27

Norman Rockwell’s real America See COOLHUNTING

But come on—really? This is Sacto we’re talking about. You know, home of greasy spoons serving cheese-skirted burgers and kraut dogs. No offense to the cheese skirts, but isn’t Sacramento overshadowed by classy destinations such as San Francisco and Napa Valley? Not according to Mulvaney, who thinks Sac’s culinary scene can hold its own. “I think Sacramento is ahead of those places, and so I’m not really concerned with what the rest of the world thinks,” he said. “I know what we have available to us.”

Roots of a movement One brisk sunny morning in Natomas in early November, Paul Poore picked baby carrots at Feeding Crane Farms, a boutique organic ranch growing 25 different crops within the city limits. “That one looks good. Yeah, that’s a yummy one,” said Poore, who is the farmers market manager at Feeding Crane, as he lovingly sorted through a bucket of thumb-size baby carrots. “As we harvest them, every once in a while we’ll wipe them off and eat them as we go.”

“I have chefs who have moved to New Orleans and Chicago and New York City. Two of them are in Michelin-starred restaurants and say the vegetables aren’t as good [outside of Sacramento].” Patrick Mulvaney, Mulvaney’s Building & Loan

30

Jealous much?

Poore smiled and looked around the farm’s 3.5 lush acres of organic kale, squash and other produce that he helps grow. “That’s the perk of being out here,” he said. Until recently, most of that produce went somewhere else. Sacramento’s residents only eat 2 percent of the region’s agricultural bounty. The rest gets exported. City officials say they hope the new “Farm-to-Fork” proclamation will turn those numbers around. Moreover, the goal is that 20 percent of the region’s produce will stay on local tables by the year 2020 . “This is also how we create a sustainable and local food movement,” Johnson said during the October press conference. “This is how we support our local farmers and chefs and local-restaurant community.” Tourism could also help prop up the movement. Currently, the area attracts 15 million tourists each year, generating $2.4 billion in revenue for Sacramento and the county. Steve Hammond, president and CEO of the Sacramento Convention and Visitors Bureau, said he hopes that even more travelers will show up looking for something to eat. “Once you’ve put a spotlight on this [proclamation], then the reputation starts to grow organically,” said Hammond. No pun intended, of course. But the idea seems to be working, at least for the next generation of Sacramento’s chefs. David Marr is a second-year culinary student at American River College who attended Johnson’s press conference with some classmates. He was excited about the proclamation and what it means for the area’s food scene. “It shows that we’re taking the time to actually prepare and do all the hard work and make [dishes] taste really good and healthy,” said Marr, 19.

Grow local, go global continued on page 23

See ASK JOEY

31

The sounds of Star Wars See EIGHT GIGS

38

SCENE& HEARD Sweaty pilgrims and other uncomfortable truths What did nearly 28,000 runners have in common as they  gathered along an East Sacramento street early on  Thanksgiving morning? A sadistic idea of a good time  bolstered by the karmic bonus of helping out the Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services.  The 19th annual Run to Feed the Hungry took form as  a sprawling, giggling mob of eager, bleary-eyed joggers  prepared to display their physical prowess for the KCRA  helicopters circling above. And while some may balk at  the notion that 9 a.m. is early or chide that 5 kilometers  is not that far, it was an epic scene to behold, and, for  nonrunners who rarely rise before noon (and I speak  mainly for myself here), a physical challenge paramount  to any we had ever faced before 10 a.m. on a Thanksgiving Thursday.  What they don’t tell you about a 5k race with 28,000  participants is that it takes a little while to get going.  It’s the Los Angeles rush hour of joggers. The pace is  halting or nonexistent for the first several hundred  meters before the crowd begins to spread apart, the  walkers falling back after their initial spirited burst and  the high-school track stars pulling forward with pure,  aerobic concentration. By the end of kilometer one, an  elaborate ballet of running, dodging and ducking ensues,  the participants motivated by a combined excitement of  finishing first and the very real fear of being trampled  by others. Grown men cut through yards in the Fabulous 40s neighborhood, leaping over hedges and carefully manicured lawns, as children look around wild-eyed  for a safe place to bend  down and tie their shoe. Certain runners dressed  up for the event, which is  difficult when it comes to  such a conceptual holiday. You don’t necessarily  decorate for Thanksgiving,  just as you don’t dress  up in commemoration of  it. Regardless, runners in headdresses and moccasins  pushed full-bore ahead followed closely by a group of  solemn, sweaty pilgrims. It was a scene that reminded  the contemplative jogger of the distasteful historical  atrocities associated with the holiday in question. Uncomfortable truths we choose to forget in lieu of pie and  family and the dull throbbing behind your left knee after  only a few kilometers. Turning onto the final straightaway, the amateur  jogger’s true colors emerged. There were side cramps,  expressions of concern and a palpable shared sense  of desperation. The finish-line banner glimmered in  the morning sun like a white flag of athletic surrender, a  promise of immediate respite lingering just there in the  middle distance. I pushed myself to finish strong, my  feet pounding the pavement across the finish line as I  raised my fists to the sky in triumph and immediately  wanted to puke. I did not puke. Instead, I was a champion, one of 28,000 other individuals who woke up early  to prove themselves to the world as capable and strong  and worthy of all the glories that come with completing  an optional 5k or 10k race before 10 a.m. on an American holiday morning otherwise known for gluttony and repose. And, of course, it was for a good cause. 

There were side cramps and a palpable shared sense of desperation.

—Julianna Boggs A crop of red amaranth grain, with richly hued leaves, grows tall at Feeding Crane Farms.

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

11.29.12    

|

  SN&R    

|

  21


life

Missing Something? Vedanta is a universal philosophy and religion that explores the nature of oneself, the world, and God or the True Self. Please join us for readings from the teachings and lives of spiritual luminaries who realized, taught and lived Vedanta. Every Friday except 3rd Fridays 7:00 - 8:30 pm Free admission

Sacramento Vedanta Reading Group For more information please see

SacVRG.org

Sacramento Yoga Center @ Sierra II Community Center 2791 24th Street • Sacramento Parking in back

Donald Kendrick Music Director

17th Concert Season 2012–2013

Become Opiate Free. We can help...

WELLS FARGO HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS A Sacramento tradition that ushers in the holiday spirit

Radiant music for Christmas—A candlelit procession, audience singalong, new and familiar choral orchestral holiday songs. Merriment guaranteed! Works by: Bass, Bradford, Anderson, Berlin, Leavitt

PREMIERE of new work

commissioned for the Sacramento Children’s Chorus (SCC) and the SCSO by Randol Alan Bass celebrating the SCC’s 20th anniversary

Guest Chorus: Sacramento Children’s Chorus Lynn Stevens, Director

Saturday, Dec 8, 2012 at 8:00 PM Sacramento Memorial Auditorium 1515 J Street, Sacramento

TICKETS | $45 Main Floor | $35 1st Balcony | Students 50% discount

Community Center Box Office 916.808.5181 | TICKETS.com 22   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

CRC Health Group is the nation’s leader in treating chemical dependency throughout the country. Our doctors and counselors are certified professionals specializing in addiction.

Suboxone Healthcare Center A member of the CRC Health Group

Call Today for a FREE Consultation CRC Health Group • Sacramento Toll Free: 855.625.0367

THINK FREE.

The whole world is your own. — Sri Sarada Devi


Harvest

BOON by Christopher Arns

Hungry? Follow the food from grower to plate.

W

hy is Sacramento the “Farm-to-Fork Capital of America”? It’s all about the farms. Dozens of local growers supply the region’s fine-dining scene with meat and just-picked produce. Sure, it can be pricey—buying locally isn’t always necessarily a bargain—but chefs insist there’s no better way to find high-quality, fresh ingredients. And tasting locally sourced grub is easy. Area chefs are currently working their culinary magic with produce from these farms. Check out the following picks to find what just may be the tastiest way to travel farm to fork.

Twin Peaks Orchards

“Louie” salad with Watanabe radish tops, arugula and mizuna. Reservations only. 2225 Hurley Way, (916) 568-7171, www.thekitchenrestaurant.com.

Riverdog Farm

Randall Selland (pictured below) regularly uses local farm-fresh produce in the dishes he sells at his namesake Selland’s Market-Cafe.

Farm it: Depending on the season, you can find just about

anything at Riverdog Farm, a family-owned farm located in the lush Capay Valley. Beans, melons, corn, potatoes, eggplant and peppers are just a few of its crops. “I think it’s important for consumers and eaters at restaurants to know where their food is coming from,” said co-owner Trini Campbell. (530) 796-3802, http://riverdogfarm.com. Fork it: The Waterboy makes a delicious broccoli and

cauliflower salad using Riverdog produce. 2000 Capitol Avenue, (916) 498-9891, www.waterboyrestaurant.com.

Farm it: Five generations of the Enriquez family have

tended this Newcastle ranch for almost 100 years. They grow apples, cherries, persimmons, citrus and peaches among other fruits and vegetables. The orchard also sells produce at various local farmers markets every week. (916) 663-3270, www.twinpeaksent.com. Fork it: Selland’s Market-Cafe currently serves Twin Peaks’ mandarins and fuyu persimmons in a yummy fruit salad. 5340 H Street, (916) 736-3333, www.sellands.com.

Passmore Ranch Farm it: Chefs from Sacramento’s finest restaurants

swear by the fish raised at this Sloughhouse farm. The Passmore family produces rainbow trout, catfish, white sturgeon, silver carp and two species of bass. (916) 688-3900, www.passmoreranch.com.

Kingbird Farms Farm it: This microfarm in Galt tends an acre of

veggies, another acre of fruit trees and 150 hops plants. Yep, that’s right—beer grows here. The farm supplies local craft brewers and hobby brew-meisters. www.kingbirdjournal.com. Fork it: Taste this farm’s produce at Magpie Café,

which serves a braised pork shoulder with Kingbird quince. Magpie’s chefs also whip up heirloom polenta from the farm’s red corn. 1409 R Street, Suite 102; (916) 452-7594; www.magpiecaterers.com.

Azolla Farm

Fork it: Try some at Mulvaney’s Building & Loan, which whips up a mouthwatering trout prepared on the griddle. 1215 19th Street, (916) 441-6022, www.mulvaneysbl.com.

Farm it: Both of Azolla Farm’s owners once worked with legendary chef Alice Waters in Berkeley, so they know a few things about food. This Pleasant Grove farm specializes in greens such as arugula, collards and Swiss chard, along with green beans, beets, cucumbers, squash and other vegetables. http://azollafarm.blogspot.com.

Feeding Crane Farms

Fork it: Chef Steve Toso at Biba Restaurant currently

Farm it: This small ranch in Natomas grows 25 different

crops, including squash, mixed greens, carrots and other veggies. Everything is organic. Despite being fairly new, Feeding Crane Farms already delivers produce to many of Sacramento’s most popular restaurants. (916) 698-5171, www.feedingcranefarms.com. Fork it: David English, head chef and owner at The

Press in Midtown, currently serves the farm’s butternut squash stuffed in a house-made ravioli. 1809 Capitol Avenue, (916) 444-2566, www.thepressbistro.com.

Watanabe Farms Farm it: Love heirloom tomatoes? This West

Sacramento farm grows more than 50 varieties on 7 acres. The Watanabes also produce squash, edible flowers and microgreens. (916) 798-4752.

serves a roasted-beet salad for dinner made with Azolla beets and sweet onions. 2801 Capitol Avenue, (916) 455-2422, www.biba-restaurant.com.

Soil Born Farms Farm it: This farm actually has two plots within 15

minutes of downtown Sacramento—one off of Hurley Way and the other in Rancho Cordova. Soil Born is another farm growing just about everything under the sun, including kale, herbs, lettuce, squash, potatoes, melons and beans. (916) 363-9685, www.soilborn.org. Fork it: Chef Oliver Ridgeway often serves Soil Born tomatoes, salad greens, onions, peppers and other veggies at Grange Restaurant & Bar. Earlier this year, Ridgeway even featured the farm’s grass-fed lamb on his menu. 926 J Street, (916) 492-4450, www.grangesacramento.com. Ω

Fork it: If you feel like splurging, The Kitchen

Restaurant’s second course features a Rock Shrimp BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

|

F E AT U R E S T O RY

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

Grow local, go global continued from page 21

Ultimately, the city’s push for foodie glory probably depends on how well farmers and chefs can work together. For people such as Selland and Mulvaney who buy their ingredients from markets and local growers, that’s the easy part. Poore also attended Johnson’s press conference last month, although technically, he was working. Poore was busy tending a produce stand at the Cesar Chavez Plaza’s Wednesday market when Selland approached, still wearing his white chef smock donned just for the occasion. He was doing— what else—a little shopping for his restaurants, along with wife Nancy. Selland warmly greeted Poore while eyeing the piles of fresh squash, carrots and pumpkins behind them. |

AFTER

|

“How are ya?” Poore asked. “I’m just showing my wife what you guys do,” Selland said with a chuckle, holding a bulging sack of produce in one hand. Poore grinned and turned back toward the crowds milling around the plaza. In the background, someone played Radiohead’s “Creep” on saxophone as the market wrapped up. The press conference was long over, but Poore was still mulling over the farm-to-fork movement. “The whole ‘buy local, eat local’ thing is going to help our local economy instead of trying to help people in San Francisco or the Bay Area,” he said. “I wish we would’ve started much sooner.” Ω

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

23


NIGHT&DAY DON’T MISS! BROTHER ALI: Catch a hip-

hop show with Brother Ali, plus special opening guest the Addict Merchants. The show is produced by Sacramento State Unique Events. Th, 11/29, 7:30pm. $12-$17. Sacramento State University Union Ballroom, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-6997; www.sacstateunique.com.

List your event! Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Special Events AN UPDATE ON SYRIA: Longtime Iranian-American activist Mazda Majidi will discuss the various forces and interests involved in the conflict in Syria, their agenda, role and backers. He will also address the situation faced by ordinary Syrians. Majidi has written many articles on the Middle East, including articles about Syria. Th, 11/29, 7pm. Free. Sacramento Area Peace Action, 909 12th St.; (916) 448-7157; www.sacpeace.org.

Concerts APPLE Z: Sporting a roster of seasoned musical veterans in many genres, Apple Z provides unique and clever treatments to the timeless catalog of popular music everyone knows and loves. Th, 11/29, 6pm-2am. $5. Reunion Nightclub, 4370 Town Center Blvd., Ste. 100 in El Dorado Hills; (916) 939-0777.

30FRI

DON’T MISS! THE MIKES COMEDY TOUR:

Five well-known Sacramento comics, all named Mike, join forces for a new comedy tour. They are: Mike Betancourt, Michael Calvin Jr., Michael O’Connell, Mike Osborn and Mike Sinclair. Each brings his own unique style to the mix, and the result is a diverse comedy experience. F, 11/30, 9-11pm. $12. Sacramento Comedy Spot, 1050 20th St., Ste. 130; (916) 784-6453; http://sac comedyspot.com/mikes.

Comedy IMPROV-A-THON: Enjoy a 26.5-hour improv-a-thon benefitting Toys For Tots. Tickets can be bought in two-hour blocks or—if you want to burn the midnight oil—for the entire show. F, 11/30, 8pm. $12 (or $5 with the donation of a toy) for two hours. $15-$25 for the whole show. ComedySportz Theater, 2230 Arden Way; (916) 243-8541; www.comedysportz sacramento.com.

Concerts BLAME SALLY: Blame Sally is an innovative band from the Bay Area, with a blend of vocal, instrumental and lyrical talent. The group has been compared favorably to such disparate performers as Fleetwood Mac, the Indigo Girls and the Dixie Chicks. F, 11/30, 8pm. $25. Auburn Placer Performing Arts Center, 985 Lincoln Way in Auburn; (530) 885-0156; www.livefromauburn.com.

24

|

SN&R

|

11. 29.12

University’s Jazz Singers have been named best in the nation by Downbeat magazine several consecutive years. The American River College Vocal Jazz Ensemble, with eight Downbeat awards, joins them in concert. Selections include “Eleanor Rigby,” “Sent for You Yesterday” and Pat Metheny’s “Phase Dance.” F, 11/30, 7pm. $5-$10. CSUS Music Recital Hall, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5191; www.csus.edu/music.

WINTER’S EVE: A CELTIC SOLSTICE: Open the holiday season and celebrate the coming Winter Solstice with an evening of music. Sacramento Baroque Soloists and friends anticipate the beginning of winter with music to lift the spirits in their upcoming “Winter’s Eve” concerts featuring vocal and instrumental Celtic music as well as originals. F, 11/30, 7:30pm. $10-$25. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1430 J St.; (916) 549-3806; www.sacramentobaroque.org.

PET-FOOD DRIVE: The Sacramento Cat Hospital is hosting its fourth annual pet-food drive, benefiting the Sacramento Pet Food Bank. Providing enough food is an ongoing challenge for shelters, charitable organizations, animal rescue groups, and pet owners who may be having a tough time making ends meet. Sa, 12/1, 9am-2pm. Free. Sacramento Cat Hospital, 4115 Manzanita Ave. in Carmichael; (916) 488-4161; www.sacramentocat hospital.com.

MODELING COMPETITION: Designers and models will create looks and compete for prizes. The emcee is former Miss Capitol City and Miss California contestant Racher Walter. Comedy

will be provided by Queenie T.T. Judges include April Taylor, Eric Epperson, and Ronnie Cobb. Sa, 12/1, 7-10pm. $10-$15. Moon River Inn, 8201 Freeport Blvd.; (916) 247-2229.

ROSE-PRUNING CLASS: Volunteers and propagators will conduct a hands-on rose-pruning class. Learn the art of rose pruning using techniques for various types of roses, with information on tools, gloves, fertilizer and more. Sa, 12/1, 10am. Free. Old City Cemetery, 10th St. and Broadway; (916) 264-7839; www.oldcitycemetery.com.

SCOTTISH FESTIVAL: Featuring Scottish food, bagpipes, Highland dance, Celtic harp, tartans, Scottish songs and the

poetry of Robert Burns. Sa, 12/1, 1-4pm. Free. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 7850 Watt Ave. in Antelope; (916) 320-8423.

Classes LAUGHTER YOGA: Experience what many people throughout the world have discovered: Laughter Yoga is a way to relieve stress, elevate your mood, eliminate sleepless nights, lower blood pressure and allow you to be more productive. Sessions are lead by Certified Laughter Yoga Leader Judy Knott. Sa, 12/1, 9am. Free. Elk Grove Library, 8900 Elk Grove Blvd. in Elk Grove; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

DECOUPAGE: Juanita Howell will teach you decoupage techniques to create three dessert plates just in time for the holidays. In this class, you will use papers, adhesives, sealants, and tools to decorate three 6-inch round or square glass dessert plates. Sa, 12/1, 1-3:30pm. $40. Trezhers Gift Shop, 3214 Riverside Blvd.; (916) 538-6584; www.trezhersgifts.com.

Kids’ Stuff HAPPY HEART, HEALTHY EATING DAY: Sacramento Children’s Museum is hosting this event to promote healthy eating and good exercise habits for museum attendees. Incorporating healthy habits with fun

WINTERSONGS BY KITKA: Wintersongs is Kitka’s winter holiday program showcasing seasonal music from a wide variety of Eastern European ethnic and spiritual traditions. F, 11/30, 7pm. $20-$25. Miners Foundry Cultural Center, 325 Spring St. in Nevada City; (530) 265-5040; www.minersfoundry.org.

01SAT

ILLUSTRATIONS BY PATT ILLOULI

29THURS

JAZZ GROUPS: Sacramento State

DON’T MISS! TRUCK & MORTAR

THROWDOWN: Join some of Sacramento’s finest restaurant and food-truck chefs as they team up—and compete—to feed you and raise money for the U.S. Marine Corps’ Toys for Tots program and the California Fire Foundation. Tickets will include sweet and savory dishes based on the day’s not-so-secret ingredients: pork and honey. Sa, 12/1, noon. $45. Sacramento Central Farmers Market, 800 W St.

Special Events

R E A L LY NICE homes for the holidays

CHRISTMAS IN THE VILLAGE: Bring the family for old-fashioned holiday fun in Fair Oaks Village. Shop at vendor booths, visit Santa Claus, hear holiday music and watch a fashion show, tree lighting and a parade. Sa, 12/1, 10am-7pm. Free. Fair Oaks Village, 10239 Fair Oaks Blvd. in Fair Oaks; (916) 967-2903; www.fairoakschamber.com.

AIDS DAY GALA: Join a gala featuring live performances by singer Frenchie Davis and spokenword artist Jovi Radtke. This fancy affair, benefiting the ninth-annual NorCal AIDS Cycle, will feature select panels of The Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, special guest speakers on the subject of HIV/AIDS and presentation of communityservice awards—all accompanied by dinner and entertainment. Sa, 12/1, 5-11pm. $50-$75. West Sacramento Civic Center Galleria, 1110 West Capitol Ave. in West Sacramento; (916) 447-2437; http://wadgalasacramento.com.

by JONATHAN MENDICK

I F T H E R E ’ S A N Y T H I N G C A T H O L I C S L O V E AS MUCH A S J E S U S ,

it just might be architectural splendor—see: St. Peter’s Basilica in Vatican City, Notre Dame de Paris in France and the Spanish missions in California. Now, they’re “crashing” East Sacramento with the Sacred Heart Holiday Home Tour. Happening Friday through Sunday, the 39th annual tour will feature five renovated East Sacramento homes decked out in all their Christmas glory. The event raises funds for Catholic education at Sacred Heart Parish School.


activities is important for children and adults alike. Sa, 12/1, 9am-5pm. Free. Sacramento Children’s Museum, 2701 Prospect Park in Rancho Cordova; (916) 638-7225; www.sackids.org.

Concerts IRIS DEMENT: The Miners Foundry Cultural Center welcomes back one of the most celebrated country-folk performers of her day, singer-songwriter Iris DeMent. Honing her skills at open-mic nights, she won acclaim thanks to her pure, evocative vocal style and spare, heartfelt song craft. Sa, 12/1, 6:30pm. $25-$45. Miners Foundry Cultural Center, 325 Spring St. in Nevada City; (530) 265-5040; www.minersfoundry.org.

THE NEW RIDERS OF THE PURPLE SAGE: David Nelson, Buddy Cage and the rest of the New Riders of the Purple Sage return to the special stage of the Auburn Event Center for a weekend celebration. Opening the show will be a special appearance of the Pacific Pinetree Allstars.

Sa, 12/1, 7pm-midnight. $20-$25.

Auburn Event Center, 145 Elm Ave. in Auburn; (530) 823-8310; www.nrps.eventbrite.com.

snacks and a raffle. Su, 12/2, 2-5pm. $30-$45. The Flower

(916) 447-4444; www.chateau capitolavenue.com.

Farm Inn, 4150 Auburn Folsom Rd. in Loomis; (916) 782-6667.

CHRISTMAS CRAFT FAIR: Come to an alternative Christmas fair with products from local and global non-profit agencies, artists and craftspeople. Avoid the mall and shop local.

02SUN

DON’T MISS! AFTERNOON OF MUSIC: The

Asian Community Center (ACC) Guitar Ensemble is a sextet of experienced acoustic guitarists and vocalists who enjoy sharing their eclectic mix of folk, pop, jazz, swing and country music. Su, 12/2, 1-2:30pm. Free; donations accepted. Sacramento Japanese United Methodist Church, 6929 Franklin Blvd.; (916) 421-1017; www.sacjumc.com.

Sports & Recreation CALIFORNIA INTERNATIONAL MARATHON: The California

Su, 12/2, 8am-12:30pm; Su, 12/9, 8am-12:30pm. Free. Trinity

International Marathon is a 26.2-mile road race. The fast course begins at the Folsom Dam, passes through semirural Sacramento suburbs into Midtown and has a finish in front of the California State Capitol. Su, 12/2, 7am. $145. California International Marathon, 5050 Arden Way in Carmichael.

Episcopal Cathedral, 2620 Capitol Ave.; (916) 451-6292; www.trinitycathedral.org.

ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE AND HOLIDAY TEA: Enjoy yummies and

Special Events HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE: Join for a day of local holiday shopping fun. There will be door prizes throughout the day, along with hot cider and cookies to tantalize your taste buds. There will be a wide array of vendors to find that perfect gift for someone special and yourself. Su, 12/2, 10am-3pm. Free. The Chateau on Capitol Avenue, 2701 Capitol Ave.;

English teas with English Country dancing and live music at the Sacramento Country Dance Society’s Holiday Tea Celebration. Beginners are welcome, and no partners are necessary. First-timers should come to the 1:30 p.m. introductory lesson preceding the 2 p.m. dance. Su, 12/2, 2-6pm. $5-$10. Roseville Masonic Temple, 235 Vernon St. in Roseville; (916) 739-8906; www.sactocds.org.

Concerts BALINESE MUSIC: Balinese music and dance will be featured when Gamelan Sekar Jaya performs at Sacramento State as part of the World Music Series. The 60-member company plays various types of bronze and bamboo percussion instruments and has performed throughout the United States and Bali. Su, 12/2, 3pm. $8-$15. Sacramento State Music Recital Hall, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5191; www.csus.edu/music.

Kids’ Stuff TEDDY BEAR TEA: Enjoy the holidays by joining Roseville Homestart for their Holiday Teddy Bear Tea event. It is for parents and children alike, featuring teddy bears, performances from The Nutcracker, pictures with Santa, holiday stories, tea,

THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS: Showcasing vocal harmony to El Dorado County and beyond

for 20 years, Cantare Chorale presents its holiday performance of choral music for all ages, under the direction of Dr. Jeffrey Nelson. Su, 12/2, 3-5pm. $15. Three Stages Peforming Arts Center, 10 College Pkwy. in Folsom; (916) 608-6888; www.threestages.net.

A HOLIDAY CELEBRATION: The American River Chorus, a 60member male vocal ensemble working primarily in the barbershop style, is joined by Chanteuses, an 18-member allwomen troupe, for an impressive evening of choral work. Su, 12/2, 2-4pm & 7-9pm. $10-$35. Three Stages Peforming Arts Center, 10 College Pkwy. in Folsom; (916) 608-6888; www.threestages.net.

MERRY MADRIGAL CONCERT: To bring the traditional splendor of an Old England’s holiday season to the community, the Davis High Madrigal Singers will perform, dressed in full costume authentic to the Renaissance period, as guests step back into history to enjoy the festive season. Su, 12/2, 1pm. $5-$20. Odd Fellows Hall, 415 Second St. in Davis; (530) 758-1838; http://davismadrigals.com.

GAY MEN’S CHORUS HOLIDAY CONCERT: The Sacramento Gay Men’s Chorus will kick off its 28th season with a new director, Steven Johnson, at the helm and a new holiday-themed show, Light Your World. Join for this wonderful celebration of the holiday season. Su, 12/2, 4pm. $22-$25. First United Methodist Church, 2100 J St.; (877) 283-1567; www.sacgay menschorus.org.

03MON HOLIDAY CONCERT: This concert by

BEFORE

|

the Sacramento Concert Band will include holiday favorites as well as works by Sousa, Huckeby, Vaughan Williams, and others. M, 12/3, 7:30pm. Free. Christ Community Church, 5025 Manzanita Ave. in Carmichael; (916) 691-7632; www.cccnow.com.

04TUES

|

FEATURE

STORY

THE REJECTS OF STANDUP: The Rejects of Standup tour includes comedians Stephen Ferris, Chris Schiappacasse, Johnny Squires, Suraj Menon, Keon Kobra, and some of their friends. Rejected from comedy clubs as stand-alone acts, they’ve banded together using their skills in branding and marketing to create this tour. W, 12/5, 7:30pm. $5-$10. Tommy T’s, 12401 Folsom Blvd. in Rancho Cordova; (916) 357-5233; www.tommyts.com.

Classes BUSINESS PLANNING: Learn how to create a functional business plan designed by you specifically for your business. Learn how to create: a unique business plan that grows with your business and changes as your needs do. W, 12/5, 11:30am1:30pm. $25. Round Table Pizza, 9138 Kiefer Blvd.; (916) 800-2633; www.drande.com/events.html.

ONGOING 12 DAYS OF MIDTOWN: Each year from December 1-12, Midtown kicks-off the holiday season with events and specials. This event showcases local businesses and organizations through festive activities that engage the public to make Midtown a part of their holiday traditions. 12/1-12/12. Call for pricing. 20th St., between J and K streets; (916) 442-1500; www.exploremidtown.org/ 12daysofmidtown.

WINTER PLAY FOR DOGS: This December, treat your dog to the ultimate winter experience exclusively for dogs. This 12-day camp features unique themes and activities designed to be both fun and engaging. M-F, 7am-7pm through 12/18. Opens 12/3. Call for pricing. WAG Hotel, 1759 Enterprise Blvd. in West Sacramento; (916) 373-0300; http://waghotels.com/ winter-camp.cfm.

PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON:

FRONTLINES

Comedy

Special Events

DON’T MISS! Sacramento Speaker Series presents President Bill Clinton. After leaving the White House, President Clinton established the William J. Clinton Foundation with the mission to strengthen the capacity of people in the United States and throughout the world to meet the challenges of global interdependence. He is currently the UN Special Envoy for Haiti. Tu, 12/4, 8pm. $205-$420. Sacramento Community Center Theater, 1301 L St.; (916) 808-5291.

The boutique will offer food, gifts and holiday decorations for sale. Buying said decorations will probably be necessary, because—let’s face it: Our own humble abodes will seem uninspired after seeing the five homes on this tour. The Sacred Heart Holiday Home Tour happens on Friday, November 30, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, December 1, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Sunday, December 2, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets cost $25 in advance and $30 the day of. For more information, call (916) 556-5050 or visit http://sacredhearthometour.com.

05WED

DON’T MISS!

Concerts

For those who aren’t familiar with the neighborhood, East Sacramento is home to numerous million-dollar homes. Many houses in the area are architectural marvels, and the holiday lights in this Fabulous 40s section of town are a draw for regional visitors and photographers. The Sacred Heart Holiday Home Tour adds an additional layer of style by displaying the works of local interior and landscape designers such as Beyond the Garden Gate, Holiday Home Sacramento, Kerrie Kelly Design Lab, Lumens Light + Living, and Twiggs Floral Design Gallery. Each home on the tour—featuring Tudor-, Mediterranean Revival- and American Crafstman-style architecture—features its own unique holiday décor from one of the aforementioned designers. The whole tour takes about two hours from start to finish, or you can take it slowly over the course of three days. Each ticket is good for one-time admittance to any home at any time during the tour. When you’re finished, you can warm up at the Holiday Boutique and Cafe at the Sacred Heart Parish School.

facts regarding its production. Drama, comedy, adventure and romance filmed between the 1920s through the 1970s will be screened in the West Meeting Room. First Tu of every month through 12/4. Free. Sacramento Public Library (Central Branch), 828 I St.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Wait, there’s more! Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

FESTIVAL OF TREES AND LIGHTS: Purchase Christmas trees, gift baskets, and holiday gifts to buy for yourself or to give to a charity and enjoy holiday entertainment at this event.

Sa, 12/1, 10am-8:30pm; Su, 12/2, 8:30am-9pm. Free. Cathedral of the Blessed Sacrament, 1017 11th St.; (916) 444-3071.

Film CLASSIC MOVIE NIGHT: Join for a series of classic movies handpicked by staff who will share the reason for their choice, the historical context of the movie and interesting behind-the-scenes

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

25


GREGG ALLMAN & JAIMOE’S JASSSZ BAND

N<;E<J;8P A8EL8IP(- :I<JK K?<8K<I ('(*BJK×J8:I8D<EKF#:8 /1''GDJ?FN×8CC8><J K@:B<KJ8M8@C89C<=IFD K@:B<KJ%:FD×:?8I><9P G?FE<($/''$)),$))..

EdIWb[

=I@ ('1''8D

JJHL8I<G<>:FE:<IKJ%:FD

=I@;8P=<9IL8IP(, :I<JKK?<8K<I

('(*BJK×J8:I8D<EKF#:8×.1*'GDJ?FN×8CC8><J K@:B<KJ8M8@C89C<=IFDK@:B<KJ%:FD :?8I><9PG?FE<($/''$)),$))..

J8KLI;8P=<9IL8IP(- :I<JKK?<8K<I ('(*BJK×J8:I8D<EKF#:8×.1*'GDJ?FN×8CC8><J K@:B<KJ8M8@C89C<=IFDK@:B<KJ%:FD :?8I><9PG?FE<($/''$)),$))..

ÈK?<><EKC<>@8EKÉ

=I@;8P8GI@C)-:I<JKK?<8K<I ('(*BJK×J8:I8D<EKF#:8×.1*'GDJ?FN×8CC8><J K@:B<KJ8M8@C89C<=IFDK@:B<KJ%:FD×:?8I><9PG?FE<($/''$)),$))..

26   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12


DISH

Gringo-wiches See FOOD STUFF

Eat big or go home It’s glutton vs. plate when it comes to Sacramento’s best food challenges On the Travel Channel show Man v. Food, host Adam Richman traveled the country, taking on various food challenges. Such tests mostly by consisted of eating ridiculously spicy dishes or Jonathan heaping 5-pound plates of food. Richman is Mendick currently retired from competitive eating (he’s jonathanm@ since moved on to finding America’s best newsreview.com sandwiches on Adam Richman’s Best Sandwich in America), so now’s the time for the rest of us to pick up the slack. Sacramento has its own food challenges—from incredibly large plates of chili dogs to massive bowls of pho. Here are seven ongoing local challenges and giganticbut-delicious dishes for you to gorge on. And all I get is this lousy T-shirt?!

Behold the Pho Challenge: Finish 2 pounds of noodles and 2 pounds of meat in less than an hour and get crowned as the next Pho King. Seriously—the payoff is a special shirt that reads “Pho King.” Even if you don’t finish the $22-bowl of Vietnamese noodle soup, you’ll still get a poster. If you do finish it, however, you get the shirt, the meal for free, your picture on the wall of champions and surely, some stomach issues. Pho Bac Hoa Viet, 3110 Bradshaw Road; (916) 361-3888; www.facebook.com/ phochallengesacramento. Go ahead, we dare you

Dare to order the Knucklehead Challenge ($29.95) and you’ll receive a 5-pound platter of hot dogs and fries—all smothered in chili, nacho-cheese sauce and pickles. Eat the entire dish in less than 20 minutes and it’s free. Adam Richman tried the challenge when the eatery was called Parker’s Hot Dogs on Man v. Food, but the Knucklehead Challenge won. Knucklehead Hot Dog Diner, 7456 Foothills Boulevard in Roseville; (916) 782-0338; www.knuckleheadhotdogs.com. Wolf down the gigantic 18 Wheeler burger ($40) in an hour and you’ll eat it for free, receive a T-shirt and get a photo on the wall. Sound easy? Check this: You’ll need to make it through 5 pounds of burger patty, 10 slices of bacon, 8 slices of cheddar cheese, half a head of lettuce, a whole tomato and a burger bun the size of a hubcap. Approximately 25 people have failed to complete the challenge, according to Andrew Blaskovich, the dish’s creator and owner of Drewski’s Hot Rod Kitchen. Republic Bar & Grill featuring Drewski’s Hot Rod Kitchen, 908 15th Street; (916) 822-5152; www.republicsac.com.

Search SN&R’s “Dining Directory” to find local restaurants by name or by type of food. Sushi, Mexican, Indian, Italian— discover it all in the “Dining” section at www.newsreview.com.

Heart attack for two

If you’re hungry enough to scarf down the Hot Mess breakfast plate ($16.95) at BarWest, you’ll consume two English muffins, potatoes, four BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

Just sign here

Think sushi isn’t filling? Then you’ve never attempted this challenge: Eat four of any of Suki Sushi’s specialty rolls (three for women), plus soup and a salad—in less than an hour. If you’re successful, the $29 meal is on the house (oh, and you’ll get the requisite photo on the wall, too). Before attempting the feat, however, you must sign a waiver of liability. Advance reservation is required. Suki Sushi, 7311 West Stockton Boulevard, Suite 130; (916) 681-6688; www.sukisushirestaurant.com. All hail the king

Philly cheesesteaks have a lot of calories, and a Sacramento branch of a fast-food franchise might boast the biggest calorie bomb in the area. The Cheese Steak Shop’s King of Sacramento challenge invites participants to win a T-shirt and a photo on the wall by downing two 15-inch cheesesteaks, large fries, a large drink and a Tastykake—all in less than 60 minutes. The Cheese Steak Shop, 4332 Watt Avenue, Suite 30; (916) 487-4677; www.cheesesteakshop.com/sac. Ω

CHRISTMAS EVE

BRUNCH:

BRUNCH:

DINNER:

DINNER:

CHRISTMAS DAY

BRUNCH:

BRUNCH:

DINNER:

DINNER:

BRUNCH:

BRUNCH:

DINNER:

DINNER:

CELEBRATION:

CELEBRATION:

BRUNCH:

BRUNCH:

DINNER:

DINNER:

NEW YEARS’ EVE NEW YEARS’ DAY

for RSVP and more info visit

theporchsacramento.com or capitolgarage.com

MAKE IT A NIGHT OUT

THE V WORD Simple yet stunning Although the voting system for October’s

Sacramento Vegan Chef Challenge

Keep on truckin’

Still hungry?

slices of bacon, four sausage links, six eggs, shredded cheese and hollandaise sauce. Served on a pizza tray, it’s described on the menu as “big enough for two.” BarWest, 2724 J Street; (916) 476-4550; http://mybarwest.com.

ULTRA-HELPFUL HOLIDAY FESTIVITIES CHECKLIST

|

FEATURE

seemed a bit confounding, The V Word would like to call attention to one of the participants, 58 Degrees & Holding Co. (1217 18th Street). The restaurant’s offerings for the competition in 2011 were sublime, and this year was no different. The appetizer flatbread was a mildly sadomasochistic delight with raw slices of green jalapeño, unusual raisin cherry tomatoes and mustard-yellow nutritional-yeast flakes atop a heavenly pillow of bread. The Autumn Roughage salad was equally inspired; its presentation on a long, rectangular sable dish was as gorgeous to the eyes as it was to the taste buds, with deep-purple Lolla Rosa lettuce, strips of parsnips and pickled carrots, and sprinkled with ruby pomegranate seeds. A simple yet stunning use of excellent ingredients.

MODERN INDIAN CUISINE WITH AUTHENTIC FLAVORS

231 E STREET, SUITE C DAVIS, CA

—Shoka STORY

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

27


DISH

Downtown

Estelle’s Patisserie With its marble tables and light wooden chairs, there’s an airy atmosphere, casual and cozy. Estelle’s offers an espresso bar and a wide assortment of teas and muffins and rolls for the breakfast crowd as well as sweets, including DayGlo macarons. For the lunch-inclined, there are soups, salads, sandwiches and meat or meatless quiche. One of the authentic touches is the spare use of condiments. The smoked salmon is enlivened by dill and the flavor of its croissant. Its tomato bisque is thick and richly flavored, and, in a nice touch, a puff pastry floats in the tureen as accompaniment. Everything is surprisingly reasonable. Half a sandwich and soup is $7.25. A caprese baguette is $5.25. Ham and cheese is $5.75. There’s a lot to like about Estelle’s—except dinner. Doors close at 6pm. French. 901 K St., (916) 551-1500. Meal for one: $5-$10. ★★★1⁄2 G.L. Grange Restaurant & Bar You won’t find any “challenging” dishes on this menu—just delicious local and seasonal food such as the Green Curry & Pumpkin Soup, which has a Southeast-Asian flair.

6

$ 99

Midtown

1132 16th St., (916) 446-0888. Dinner for one: $15-$20. ★★★ B.G.

Shady Lady Saloon

So many bars try to do bar snacks, and so many fail. Shady Lady, however, nails it. The fried green tomatoes are punched up with a tarragon rémoulade and the huge charcuterie board is more like a groaning board, stocked with abundant regional meats and cheeses. The pickle plate looks like Peter Rabbit’s dream, all teeny turnips and tangy carrot chunks. Generally excellent, the saloon’s cocktail list veers from the classics with a list of bartender-created drinks with unusual, but wisely considered flavor combinations:

Firestone Public House A sports bar with a focus on craft beer isn’t exactly a groundbreaking concept, but two local and prominent restaurant families, the Wongs and the DeVere Whites, know what Sacramento wants: good beer; solid pub grub; and a casual, unpretentious atmosphere. Here, the bar is the centerpiece with a full stock of liquor and 60 beers on draught. The menu features savory appetizers—the tortilla soup with poached chicken, avocado and tomato is particularly noteworthy—and a selection of sandwiches and pizzas, including a simple pie with fresh mozzarella and tomato sauce. American.

cilantro and tequila, blackberry and thyme, and the surprisingly sublime mixture of celery and pineapple. American. 1409 R St., (916) 231-9121. $10-$20. ★★★ 1 ⁄ 2 B.G.

North Sac

Asian Café serves both Thai and Lao food, but go for the Lao specialties, which rely on flavoring staples such as fish sauce, lime juice, galangal and lemongrass, lots of herbs, and chilies. One of the most common dishes in Lao cuisine is larb, a dish of chopped meat laced with herbs, chilies and lime. At Asian Café, it adds optional offal add-ons—various

organ meats, entrails, et al—to three versions of the dish: beef with tripe, chicken with gizzards, or pork with pork skin. The beef salad offers a gentle respite from aggressive flavors, consisting of medium-thick chewy slices of eye of round with red bell pepper, chopped iceberg and hot raw jalapeño. The single best dish here is the nam kao tod, a crispy entree with ground pork that’s baked on the bottom of the pan with rice, then stirred and fried up fresh the next day with dried Thai chilies and scallions. Thai and Lao. 2827 Norwood Ave., (916) 641-5890. Dinner for one: $10-$15. ★★★★ B.G.

South Sac

Giò Cha Duc Huong Sandwiches With banh mi, it’s the bread that sets the tone. Giò Cha Duc Huong Sandwiches goes against the grain with bread that’s more football shaped than submarine shaped, garlic bread, and a selection of premade grab-and-go sandwiches right by the counter. And, with its substitution of butter for mayonnaise and the emphasis on pâté, Duc Huong shows a stronger than usual French influence.These details may seem trivial, but with banh mi, such small variations make all the difference. The small menu is limited to eight sandwiches (mostly pork) and two soups: chicken curry soup and a beef stew called bo kho

BREW THE RIGHT THING Minor in beer snobbery

O SH AY H AY LE Y D TI O N BY

Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations by Becky Grunewald and Greg Lucas, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

A spinach salad features ingredients that could be considered boring elsewhere: blue-cheese dressing, bacon, onion. But here, the sharply cheesy buttermilk dressing and the woodsy pine nuts make it a salad to remember. Grange’s brunch puts other local offerings to shame. The home fries are like marvelously crispy Spanish patatas bravas. A grilled-hamand-Gruyere sandwich is just buttery enough, and an egg-white frittata is more than a bone thrown to the cholesterol-challenged, it’s a worthy dish in its own right. American. 926 J St., (916) 492-4450. Dinner for one: $40-$60. ★★★★ B.G.

HOT

IL LU ST RA

Where to eat?

FRIED CHICKEN & LUMPIA

s

MUST DRINK:

Sacramento State University students, where’s your excuse for swilling warm PBR? That’s right, you don’t have one, because less than a mile from campus is Hot City Pizza. This hole-in-the-wall has a great fridge full of remarkable bottles—the vinous Abbaye de Saint Bon-Chien sour, a couple Mikkellers, plus more affordable IPAs and the like. There are also killer drafts, such as offerings by Ontario, Ore.’s Beer Valley Brewing Company, or the Cuvee des Jacobins Rouge, a tart Flanders red. And, of course, the hoppy stuff, including locals Berryessa Brewing Co. and Knee Deep Brewing Company. Plus, Hot City sells bottles to go; get a minor degree in beer snobbery. Hot City Pizza, 5642 J Street; (916) 731-8888; www.eastsacpizza.com.

Beer: Allagash Curieux (Belgian barrel-aged) Brewer: Allagash Brewing Company Where: Nugget Markets, various locations; www.nuggetmarket.com

Beer: Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale Brewer: Boulevard Brewing Co. Where: Pangaea Two Brews Cafe,

2743 Franklin Boulevard; (916) 454-4942; www.pangaeatwobrews.com

Beer: Estate Homegrown Ale Brewer: Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Where: Tres Hermanas, 2416 K Street;

(916) 443-6919; www.treshermanasonk.com

—Nick Miller

50% 0FF Buy Buy 1 1 adult adult BuFFet BuFFet and and 2 2 drinks drinks get get 2nd 2nd 50% 50% oFF oFF

• FRIED CHICKEN & GRAVY • CHICKEN/PORK ADOBO • PANCIT • HALO HALO

original coupon only • no copies

1 coupon per table. cannot be combined with any other offer. expires 12/13/12

★★★★ –SN&R

SACRAMENTO

1402 Broadway 916.930.0888

9174 FRANKLIN BLVD • ELK GROVE • 916.395.3905

BEER - WINE - 16 ITEM SALSA BAR

CITRUS HEIGHTS

5623 Sunrise Blvd. 916.961.6888

Sun-Thurs 11am-10pm • Fri & Sat 11am-10:30pm PARTY ROOMS AVAILABLE • NOW SERVING BEER & WINE

China Buffet

chinabuffetrestaurant.com

HAPPY HOUR ALL DAY SUNDAY Happy Hour also Mon-Sat 3-7pm

+NFL TICKET

BUY 1 COMBO, GET 1 FREE SAL’S TACOS 400 C STREET - WEST SACRAMENTO - 372.3892 28

|

SN&R

|

11.29.12

9584 Micron Ave. Sacramento, CA (916) 369-5681

Please drink responsibly.


Pho King 2 Pho King 2 takes diners on a trip to crazy-delicious town with its salads, including one off-the-menu salad featuring cold, pink tendon smothered in pickled daikon, carrot, crunchy garlic chips and peanutss and served with sweet fish sauce dressing. A beef with lemon salad, with thin slices of eye of round “cured” in lemon juice, is coated with sesame oil, herbs and chili flakes and is meant to be piled on rice crackers studded with black sesame seeds. It’s an incredible dish, and one you won’t find on a menu very often. Vietnamese. 6830 Stockton Blvd., (916) 395-9244. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★ B.G.

La Victoria Mercado y Carniceria No. 2 If you breakfast or lunch here on a weekend, you’ll likely encounter parties of bleary-eyed men conversing over large bowls of menudo, but La Victoria has plenty of other dishes on offer: breakfast plates, chile verde and roja, tacos, and tortas. In general, the food here has a reliable mid-level heat, but it distinguishes itself with its “normal” tacos, especially the cow-based ones, such as cabeza and lengua, and also its asada, which demonstrates a mastery of the cow: fatty, well-salted steak with a hint of garlic. They are

served on tortillas fried in oil— which just adds to the decadence of the piled-up tacos. Mexican. 6830 Stockton Boulevard, (916) 427-1745. Breakfast or lunch for one: $5-$10. ★★★ B.G.

Tacos & Beer This is one of the area’s best Michoacán restaurants. Of its regional dishes, the enchiladas Apatzingán are unusual, filled with only a smattering of sharp cheese and diced onion, soaked in a vinegary sauce, and smothered in very lightly pickled, shredded cabbage with raw hunks of radish and avocado slices. Another specialty is the morisqueta—the ultimate comfort dish due to the unique texture of the white rice, which is as soft as an angel’s buttock. Diners also have the option to order hand-shaped, griddled-to-order tortillas. They are warm, soft, taste like corn and barely resemble those cardboard things you get at the store. Mexican. 5701 Franklin Blvd., (916) 428-7844. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★1⁄2 B.G.

Arden/ Carmichael

Bowl & Ramen Randomness yields wonderful rewards at Bowl Ramen, a ramen eatery under the same ownership as Mana Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar. This venture may explain the miso soup, not a common occurrence in other Korean joints, which is proffered here, along with the eight banchan dishes. It also explains the initially incongruous ramen and California Roll combo. For the less intrepid and the spice-averse, there’s nine ramen options, including ones that

feature dumplings, cold buckwheat noodles and potato noodles. If not a believer in the miracle of sundubu, Bowl & Ramen offers conversion. This unique tofu stew has mushrooms, veggies, onions and an egg on top but simply reciting the ingredients doesn’t do the combination justice. Here, the bibimbap is presented in an artful way; among the dish’s vegetables are small cubes of zucchini that appear out of place but skillfully augment the other flavors. Korean. 2560 Alta Arden Expy., (916) 487-2694 Dinner for one: $9-$15. ★★★1⁄2 G.L.

ILLUSTRATION BY MARK STIVERS

banh mi, which comes with bread. There’s a thick float of chili oil on top of the yellow, turmeric and lemongrass-laced curry soup, which, at first, is off-putting until you realize it can be dipped into the yeasty, crusty, fluffy bread. Vietnamese.6825 Stockton Blvd., Ste. 200; (916) 428-1188. Dinner for one: $5-$10. ★★★1⁄2 B.G.

and traditional nigiri, but it also changes seasonally and features some uncommon offerings: Kinpira gobo with renkon (braised lotus and burdock-root salad) comprises matchstick-sized fibrous pieces of burdock root and juicy slices of lotus in a sweet mirin soy sauce. It also features inventive desserts. The “uji kintoki parfait” (it translates roughly to “Best. Dessert. Ever.”) is served in a sundae glass filled with layers of green-tea ice cream and sweet red beans, and it’s topped with whipped cream, chocolate Pocky candy, salty sesame crackers, peanut clusters, and warm, soft squares of mochi. Sushi. 132 E St. in Davis, (530) 753-0154. Dinner for one: $10-$25. ★★★ 1⁄2 B.G.

Famous Kabob It seems like if you’ve had one kebab, you’ve had them all. But as its name implies, Famous Kabob doesn’t disappoint. A skewer of juicy steak sports a nice chew to satisfy any craving. Another of ground beef is flavored with chopped onion and a hint of cinnamon. The braised lamb shank in a tomato-and-saffron sauce tastes best when the sauce has cooled a little bit and the lamb fat coats the meat like a silken sauce. With deft use of dried herbs and acidic flavors that brighten the dishes and stimulate the taste buds, these are meals that are quietly hearty and nourishing. Persian. 1290 Fulton Ave., (916) 483-1700. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★ B.G.

Rosemont

Ninja Sushi Like its namesake, Ninja delivers food with swiftness and skill. Naturally, there are other offerings besides fish bits. There are a dozen lunches starting at $6.95 and 17 dinner entrees beginning at $11.95 with chicken, beef, tempura, gyoza, tonkatsu, donburi and curry all part of the mix. But they’re way at the back of the colorful sushi-centric, heavily illustrated menu. There are more than 85 rolls here: Old Auburn, deepfried fake crabmeat with salmon on the outside; Brandi’s Special Roll, with spicy crabmeat, avocado, yellowtail and spicy tuna; and Folsom Blvd., with freshwater eel, avocado and cream cheese are just some notables. Overall, festive and crammed with options. Leave the nunchucks at home, sensei. Sushi. 8937 Folsom Blvd., (916) 369-1935. Dinner for one: $10-$25.

Davis

Zen Toro Japanese Bistro

& Sushi Bar Zen Toro features a large sushi menu, made up of both the steroidal Americanized rolls

Glögg instead of nog Before drinking nasty eggnog again this winter, try out glögg, a popular winter drink in Sweden and other Scandinavian countries. I first tasted the hot wine-based drink when my Swedish cousin-in-law brought some on a family ski trip. Here’s his recipe: Break five cinnamon sticks into small pieces, crush a tablespoon of cardamom, and stir these two together with a piece of crystallized ginger, 20 cloves, and a teaspoon of bitter orange zest. Stick them in a jar and pour in just a bit less than half a cup of eau de vie, cognac or another brandy. Let that soak for a day or two, and then remove the solids from the mixture. Pour the spiced brandy into a pot, add a 750-milliliter bottle of red wine, 13-and-two-thirds tablespoons of sugar, and threequarters of a tablespoon of vanilla extract. Heat the drink up to 172 degrees Fahrenheit. Serve hot and add blanched almonds and raisins to each cup. —Jonathan Mendick

5 Wines ∙ 5 Courses!

Authentic Japanese Ramen in the heart of Land Park

December 6th at 6:30pm

Wine Maker’s Dinner Featuring Morse Wines & Il Gioiello Winery

(Amador County)

Special Pairing Menu by Gonul

Buy any entree, get 50% off 2nd entree of equal or lesser value

826 J Street Sacramento, CA 916.444.7454 Call for reservations

Can’t be combined w/any other offers. Dine-in only. Exp 11/30/12.

Hokkaido Noodle House

1724 Broadway • 916.492.2250

Fresh. Seasonal. Local.

COME TO OUR HOUSE

RECYCLE

FOR THE HOLIDAYS!

THIS PAPER.

book your holiday party today! For a liMitEd tiME, purChaSE a $100 GiFt Card & rECEiVE a COMPLIMENTARY $20 GIFT CARD

YOU’RE WELCOME, EARTH.

Please drink responsibly. BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

|

FEATURE

STORY

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

808 2nd St, daviS | (530) 757-1232 |

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

29


e s e h t s l a e D ! k c o r Save up to 50% off theSe upcoming eventS!

FIND OF THE WEEK

When life gives you blueberries ... December 1st

insight Coffee roasters’ BlueBerry iCe tea

Keep Smilin’ preSentS the new riderS of the purple Sage $25 for $12.50

Blueberry ice tea is a great afternoon pick-me-up  any time of the year, and Insight Coffee Roasters’  version gives a burst of flavor that can  DRINK only be enhanced by asking for a shot of  lemonade in it. Instead of relying on caffeine-fueled  energy drinks, opt for natural antioxidants and  vitamin C. The mixture of the two creates a whole  new world of flavor. The blueberry tea is $2.50, and a  lemonade shot adds another $1.50. After a hard day,  it’s a relief to soak in the Zen ambience at Insight and  enjoy an afternoon-brightening glass. 1901 Eighth  Street, (916) 930-0367, www.insightcoffee.com. 

December 9th a1J1 preSentS gerald albright $30 for $15

December 12th

—Maddi Silva

ace of SpadeS preSentS never Shout never $20 for $10

There will be blood BleeDing skull CanDle The ThinkGeek shopping website has featured some  pretty cool items in the past, but its curators may  have outdone themselves this time with the  Bleeding Skull Candle. What is truly awesome  about this candle is how ordinary it seems  at first glance—“Hey, it’s just another skull  candle.” Ah, but the beauty begins once it is lit.  As the red internal wax melts, “blood” pours  out of the left eye and down  STUFF the front of the skull. It’s like  watching a horror movie—but in slow motion.  Priced at $12.99, it’s a good deal, particularly  as a gift. The only problem: It’s good for just one burn.  www.thinkgeek.com/product/efd9.

December 14th ace of SpadeS preSentS the engliSh beat $20 for $10

December 15th Keep Smilin’ preSentS melvin SealS & the Jgb band $25 for $12.50

—Aaron Carnes

All this jazz

December 29th ace of SpadeS preSentS turquoiSe Jeep $15 for $7.50

live at the village vanguarD ns of Scan to view doze le now! ab ail gif t certificates av

newsreview.com 30   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

With just a click of a mouse you can venture down  the seven basement steps of the legendary Village  Vanguard club in the West Village of Manhattan in  MUSIC New York City for a monthly live audio  broadcast featuring some of the most  prominent and emerging jazz musicians in the world.  Busy that night? No problem. Each show dating  back to April 2008 is archived and complemented  with photos of the event, bios and set lists. Past  performers include the Heath Brothers, Geri Allen,  Robert Glasper, Lee Konitz, the Bad Plus and New  Orleans icon Allen Toussaint. All this jazz—and no  cover charge! www.npr.org/series/90611896/  live-at-the-village-vanguard. —Mark Halverson

An American story “Big Dreams, small shoulDers” Norman Rockwell, whose work is  on display through February 3, at  the Crocker Art Museum in an exhibition titled American Chronicles: The Art of Norman Rockwell,  is probably most well-known for  his World War II-era Four Freedoms series (produced for the  United States Postal Service) and  ART the whimsical, illustrated  covers he created for The  Saturday Evening Post between  1916 and 1961. But Rockwell also  possessed a deep commitment to  social issues that’s perhaps best  exemplified in his 1960s-era work,  most notably, the 1963 painting  “The Problem We All Live With.”  Created as a cover illustration for  Look magazine, the image  depicts young Ruby Bridges’ historic walk to school  on November 14, 1960. After  a court-ordered mandate to end segregation,  the 6-year-old Bridges  became the first black  child to attend an all-white  elementary school in the  South. The painting depicts  the scene from Bridges’ perspective as she’s accompanied to class  by U.S. marshals. Now, nearly 50  years later, the painting, recently  on display at the White House and  now at the Crocker, remains as  dramatic—and disturbing—as  ever. Getting the chance to see  the piece is a powerful experience  in its own right, but on Thursday,  November 29, the “Big Dreams,  Small Shoulders” interactive panel  discussion will use lecture, music,  poetry and dance to explore its  enduring significance.   6:30 p.m., free with museum  admission; $5-$10; Crocker Art  Museum, 216 O Street;   www.crockerartmuseum.org. —Rachel Leibrock


Amazing

EUROPEAN DETOXIFYING

Jealousy and other bendy thoughts My best friend’s boyfriend is an ass, but she doesn’t see it. He’s a gym rat and criticizes her for not working out and for what she eats. She says he’s helping her. I say he puts her down. Whenever he says, “Babe, do you really want to eat that?” or “Babe, shouldn’t you slow down a little at the trough?” I want to puke. This look of pain flashes in her eyes for a second, then she smiles or giggles, pushes by Joey ga the plate away and says, rcia “Thank you, baby.” I think he’s bad for her self-esteem. a s kj oey @ ne wsreview.c om When I tell her, she pushes me away. He’s her first real boyfriend. How do I get her to see Joey what he’s really doing? You can’t pinch people awake, loves the sushi at Sprouts honey. Your best friend believes Farmers Market. that what she is experiencing is love. She could be right. Real love is a paradox: We are loved as we are and we are challenged to become our best selves. So your friend probably asked her man to be the guardian of her gastronomy. If she did, he’s just fulfilling her request, his way. It may seem outrageous to you, but it’s her life. She has the right to decide how she prefers to be encouraged, reminded and reprimanded. Since she has not complained to you, she doesn’t

Sometimes, things that upset us are just the universe’s call to heal our own wounds. have a problem. After all, you describe her man as being annoying and disrespectful in this one regard, but not abusive, right? Studies do show that new habits take hold faster when reinforced with positive thoughts. For example, while eating, your friend could engage in self-talk like, “I love eating the right, healthy portions for my body.” But many people still believe that a harsh approach to self-discipline is ideal. Your friend and her man may be devotees of the latter approach. The real question is why your friend’s situation irks you. Does the relationship between your best

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question—all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

|

BODY WRAP Lose inches, cellulite and detoxify your body at the same time

friend and her man trigger your own memories of being criticized? Are you jealous of their relationship and searching for something wrong with him to justify your feelings? It’s important that you drill down and uncover what lurks beneath your concern. Sometimes, things that upset us are just the universe’s call to heal our own wounds. Yes, that’s correct. This situation may have nothing to do with your friend, food or her man. I’ve been hanging out with these two guys in my dorm totally casually, but both of them took it the wrong way. Now, they’re mad at me, and I keep feeling like I did something wrong, like led them on or something, even though I didn’t do anything. I told them up front that I am not interested in dating. I like these guys as friends, but the whole thing has become really awkward. Actually, you did do something wrong. You taught yourself to feel guilty when someone is unhappy with you. So, either you really did behave in a way that you’re now in denial about (and that inspires your guilt), or you did nothing wrong and are allowing others to intimidate you into taking total responsibility for their feelings. Whew! That’s a lot of bendy thoughts. Don’t you have some homework that would benefit from all of that energy? Let’s stop your mind from distracting you with worry about what these guys think about you. Here’s a new assignment: Tell your mind that you are in charge. The next time it tells you stories, say “Thank you.” Then, imagine the thought deflating like an untied balloon. Return your focus immediately to something important. If you continue to practice these mental calisthenics daily, the payoff will be inner peace. Ω

49

95

$

Plus, get a e FREE needle-fre lancing acupuncture ba treatment worth $30.00 with every wrap.

Lo ok fo r di sc ou nt s on

Your skin will rfeebeol rn! like you are

916.721.6566

SUNRISE HOLISTIC COLLECTIVE 7601 Sunrise Blvd. • Citrus Heights

CASH FOR YOUR CLOTHES 850 E Bidwell, Folsom (next to Trader Joes) 916.985.3733

OUTLET STORE 911 Washington Blvd. Roseville, 916.773.3733

Meditation of the Week “The secret of happiness is freedom. The secret of freedom is courage,” wrote the ancient Greek historian Thucydides. Do you have the courage to stand by your heart?

F E AT U R E S T O RY

C A S H FO R YO U R C LOT H E S !

BUY / SELL / TRADE MEN’S AND WOMEN’S FASHIONS |

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

31


STAGE Dressed to impress Professional costumer Jessica Minnihan’s designs help actors build character For one of Sacramento’s busiest professional costumers, it all started with a broken light board. Undergraduate theater majors usually start by with tech work, while onstage roles go to juniors Kel Munger and seniors. When Jessica Minnihan studied as a kelm@ theater major at Central College in Pella, Iowa, newsreview.com she was sent to learn lighting design on her first production. PHOTO BY ANNE STOKES

Buy 3 Gift CArds, Get One free!

Jessica Minnihan knows how to dress up a show.

You can “Mellow Out” all your loved ones with the purchase of 3 Gift Cards of any dollar amount & get 1 Gift Card FREE. (Of equal or lesser value. Offer expires 12/31/12.)

Massage

Facials

Body Wraps

Nails

Waxing

Spray Tanning

Gift Cards Available 1120 Fulton Ave

(Between Arden & Fair Oaks Blvd)

555 Capitol Mall, Suite 276 (2nd Floor, in BofA bldg on corner of 5th & Capitol)

Open 7 days 9am–9pm

916-482-2spa

www.MellowMeout.com New loCatIoN Coming Soon! Arden Wy & Watt Ave.

32

|

SN&R

|

11.29.12

VoteD #1 DaY spa ‘06, ‘07, ‘08, ‘11, ‘12

“When I tried to set up lights, a bunch of sparks flew, so they sent me down to the costume shop,” she said. “Since I knew what a sewing machine was, they were glad to have me. And it turned out I was good at it.” These days, she works during the winter “season”—September through April—as the costume-shop manager and resident costume designer for the Sacramento Theatre Company. When the short summer season rolls around, she’s the head costume-crafts artisan with Sacramento’s musical favorite, Music Circus. That comes after internships at the Des Moines Metro Opera and with Walt Disney World Resort as a costumer. For Disney, she worked on the princess characters’ costumes. “It was a couple of summers playing with shiny objects,” she said. After a post-graduation stint in charge of the costume shop at Iowa’s Simpson College, Minnihan was hired by STC— which puts her in the enviable position of being a full-time professional theatrical costumer. Costumes are every bit as important to a show as lighting, scenery and, yes, acting. Not only do well-done costumes support the

theatrical illusion, good costumes support the rest of the work. “My goal is to help actors build the characters through what they’re wearing,” Minnihan said. Sometimes that’s not easy, given budgetary restraints on productions. “A director may ask for the moon and only have $200, and that’s a challenge,” Minnihan said. “But the real problem is the current climate for the arts, with the funding difficulties. That leads us to make something out of nothing, which is always a challenge, but can also be fun.” Her most recent projects include work with KOLT Run Creations on its sell-out extended run of Caryl Churchill’s Vinegar Tom, as well as STC’s season opener, The Miracle Worker. With The Miracle Worker, the play based on events in the life of Helen Keller and her teacher, Anne Sullivan, the design process found Minnihan “surrounded by children’s books.” It’s not enough to put children in pint-sized versions of adult clothing from the period—the late 19th century. Instead, she looked in children’s literature for images of the well-dressed kid of the times. “I was obsessed with what they would have worn,” she said. In Vinegar Tom, the characters were fictional, but the play was set in 16th-century England among working-class rural people. “I wanted to figure out what their life is like in order to know what they would be wearing,” Minnihan said. “With KOLT Run, it’s never really cut-anddried,” she said, pointing out that the company was not only doing Churchill’s plainly feminist work, but was also using original music, some multimedia elements and an empty swimming pool for a performance space. That meant they’d need “more realistic costumes instead of a set.” Minnihan’s favorite work—at least, so far—is a bit harder to nail down. She took some time to think about it, and noted that she likes “the tech stuff that goes with [costuming]—the dye work and the millinery work.” Ultimately, she settled on the pieces she did for STC’s 2010 production of The Importance of Being Earnest. “The director, Matt K. Miller, gave me a lot of freedom for the costumes, and I’ve got an amazing crew that executed my vision so well,” she said. “Lady Bracknell, in particular, had a detailed costume that was perfectly fit. My stitcher and draper did such a wonderful job. “It was having the freedom to go for it and see how it turned out,” Minnihan said. Of course, that’s the whole point of theater, even from behind the curtain. Ω See Jessica Minnihan’s additions to the original B.Moderndesigned costumes in A Christmas Carol, playing 7 p.m. Wednesday; 12:30 and 7 p.m. Thursday; 7 p.m. Friday; 2 and 7 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday; $20-$40. Sacramento Theatre Company, 1419 H Street; (916) 443-6722; www.sactheatre.org. Through December 23.


Save-On Cleaners Standard Shirts Laundered

Now Playing

4

PREPAID CASH DISCOUNT

THE GIFT OF THE MAGI

Jerry R. Montoya’s left-field holiday surprise is loosely based on the O. Henry story, with talking animals in a sputtering 1930s town (the railroad’s closing), domestic comedy à la The Honeymooners, and a hilarious birth scene. It’s loopy, funny and full of heart. Sa, Su 1 & 4pm; special performances 12/26, 27 & 28. Through 12/30. $18-$27. B Street Theatre, 2711 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. J.H.

4

why pay more?

OPENING December 1st

1014 24th St Sacramento, CA (916) 337–3370

Mark (Dan Fagan) is a charming and beautiful man who may or may not have been on the roof with Jeremy (Kevin Kirtland) when Jeremy fell or deliberately stepped off the building to his death. After the funeral, he works his way into the lives of Jeremy’s sister and her husband (Elise Hodge, Eric Baldwin). As lies mount up, lies are also exposed in this intense drama, directed by Kara Ow. For adult audiences only: strong language, some nudity and adult themes. F, Sa 8pm; Su 7pm. Through 12/8. $15-$20. EMH Productions at the William J. Geery Theater, 2130 L St.; www.emhpros.weebly.com. K.M

Dog Bakery & Boutique

any Garment Cleaned & pressed Excluding jumpsuits, leather, gowns and downs.

ate eliminholes moth inter clothes

ur w Clean yeofore storing! b

5

5

MISTAKES WERE MADE

(just behind mcDonald’s)

(916) 649-2333

*Same day service at this location only

advantage

250

$

all other forms of payment $2.95

Mon–Fri 7am-7pm • Sat 7am-6pm

Woof you there!

CASH PRICE exp 12/15/12

in natomas!

Reg. Price

2820 Del paso RD. (916) 419-8616

Mon–Fri 7am-6pm • Sat 9am-5pm

295

$

A HEALTH PLAN CREATED BY PEOPLE WHO WOULD

.

LOVE’S LABOUR’S LOST

PREPAID CASH DISCOUNT WITH THIS COUPON

2310 FaIR oaKs BlVD.

exp 12/15/12

www.save-oncleaners.com

aLL Dry CLeaNING

GRAND OPENING CELEBRATION December 8th

LIAR

1

50

$

Big Idea Theatre continues its streak of well-updated takes on the Bard with this rock ’n’ roll fantasy of a comedy. Think Shakespeare meets This Is Spinal Tap as a band named the Kings of Navarre swear off booze, drugs and sex for a year—only to be seriously tempted by the arrival of an all-grrrl band on the scene. Director Michael R.J. Campbell does magnificent work with a cast that includes Kirk Blackinton and Kristine David. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2:30pm. Through 12/8. $10-$15. Big Idea Theatre, 1616 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 960-3036; www.bigideatheatre.com. P.R.

CHOOSE THIS HEALTH PLAN

Eric Wheeler plays Felix Artifex, a minor-league New York theatrical producer scrambling to bring a show together. It’s phone hell, with a goldfish puppet (designed by retired Sacramento State University professor Richard Bay) to share his misery. Hilarious inside-showbiz humor, with a touch of pathos at the end; directed by Carolyn Howarth. W 7pm; Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 12/16. $22-$32. Capital Stage, 2215 J St.; (916) 995-5464; www.capstage.org. J.H.

4

A PAIL OF GRACE

A tycoon who finds God and decides to shed all his worldly wealth hits obstacles thrown up by his family in Buck Busfield’s new holiday show. Laughs abound in this comedy that’s full of genuine good will toward men (and women). With B Street regulars Kurt Johnson, Stephanie McVay, Elisabeth Nunziato, David Pierini and David Silberman. Tu 6:30pm; W 2 &

6:30pm; Th, F 8pm; Sa 5 & 9pm; Su 2pm. Through 12/30. $23-$35. B Street Theatre, 2711 B St.;

(916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. J.C.

2

WAITING TO BE INVITED Celebration Arts limps through S.M. ShephardMassat’s play about mid-60s Atlanta, Georgia. The script deals with overcoming racial boundaries in the newly integrated South, but the lack of professionalism from every angle is astounding for this multiple-award-winning theater. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 12/15. $8-$15. Celebration Arts, 4469 D St.; (916) 455-2787; www.facebook.com/CelebrationArts. M.M.

5

THE YEAR OF MAGICAL THINKING

Joan Didion, Sacramento native, wrote this stage adaptation of her own memoir of grief. It becomes a one-woman tour de force for the outstanding Janis Stevens, who evokes a deep and profound sense of loss while still managing to be intelligent, snarky and more than a little funny. Ray Tatar directs this West Coast premiere. Th 7pm; F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 12/2. $15-$25. California Stage in the Wilkerson Theatre, 1723 25th St.; (916) 451-5822; www.calstage.org. K.M.

Created by health care professionals who understand your needs. Who better to create the perfect health plan but health care professionals with families of their own. So that’s just what we did. Almost 15 years ago, UC Davis Health System, Mercy Healthcare/Dignity Health and NorthBay Healthcare came together to create a quality alternative to national HMOs. The result is a health plan committed to improving the health and well-being of our community. So, if you’re interested in getting just what the doctor ordered, give us a call advantage you at 916-563-3198. westernhealth.com

Short reviews by Jim Carnes, Jeff Hudson, Maxwell McKee, Kel Munger and Patti Roberts.

BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

|

FEATURE

STORY

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

33


2 5 0 8 L A N D PA R K D R I V E L A N D PA R K & B R O A D WAY F R E E PA R K I N G A D J A C E N T T O T H E AT R E “AN INTOXICATING SPECTACLE THAT BREATHES NEW LIFE INTO THE CLASSIC.”

“A FILM OF TENDERNESS AND HUMOR.” - Peter Debruge, VARIETY

Anna Karenina THE SESSIONS - Claudia Puig, USA TODAY

STARTS FRI., 11/30

FRI-TUES: 10:30AM, 12:00, 1:20, 3:00, 4:10, 6:00, 7:00, 9:00, 9:50PM

WED-THUR: 11:00AM, 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00, 10:15PM FRI-TUES: 10:35AM, 12:45, 2:55, 7:30PM NO TUES 7:30PM

“GRACEFUL AND BEGUILING.”

“A SMALL, SHINING GEM OF A MOVIE.”

wallflower

WED/THUR: 10:30AM, 12:50, 3:10, 5:20, 7:45, 10:00PM

perks of being a A Late Quartet - Owen Gleiberman, ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

the

- Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

ENDS THUR., 11/29

WED/THUR: 10:40AM, 1:00, 3:15, 5:30, 7:50, 10:05PM FRI-TUES: 5:15, 9:45PM • NO TUES 5:15PM

F O R A D V A N C E T I C K E T S C A L L FA N D A N G O @ 1 - 8 0 0 - F A N D A N G O # 2 7 2 1

REEL

REVIEWS.

Czar-crossed lovers Anna Karenina In Anna Karenina, director Joe Wright and writer Tom Stoppard assume that the viewer has at least a passing familiarity with Leo Tolstoy’s novel by Jim Lane and with Russian literature. For those who do, this latest retelling of the doomed Anna (Keira Knightley, as alarmingly assertive as ever), her lover Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson, wisely playing the dashing cavalry officer as a callow pretty boy) and her stiff-necked husband Karenin (Jude Law, making the man more than a cardboard villain) is a bracing and stimulating experience. But given today’s movie audiences, Wright and Stoppard’s assumption may have been reckless. At the press screening I attended, at least one person in the small audience seemed to resent the effort it took to follow the story and to keep all those Russian names straight.

4

EVERY THURSDAY. YOU’RE WELCOME, FILM GEEKS.

WE INVITE YOU AND A GUEST

It’s all fun and games until someone jumps in front of a train.

1 Poor

2 To receive two tickets, email your name and mailing address to NorCal@43kix.com, subject line “Nutcracker Sacramento”. Visit FathomEvents.com for tickets and theatre locations.

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Passes are limited. Limit one pass per person. Winners will be drawn at random from all eligible entries.

Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5 excellent

34   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

In a nutshell—Russian-lit majors may skip this paragraph—the story deals with Anna, whose marriage to a staid bureaucrat is comfortable but passionless. When she is pursued by the impetuous Vronsky, she at first resists, but finally surrenders to him, finding passion beyond her dreams, but at the cost of ostracism, possessive jealousy, spiraling despair and suicide. The affair of Vronsky and Anna is contrasted with two parallel stories: First, the philandering of Anna’s brother Oblonsky (Matthew Macfadyen), despite his love for his wife Dolly (Kelly Macdonald); and second, Dolly’s younger sister Kitty (Alicia Vikander), whose infatuation with Vronsky nearly costs her the love of the shy and awkward Levin (Domhnall Gleeson). So much for the plot; as for the Russian names, you’re on your own. In his last adaption of 19th-century literature, 2005’s Pride & Prejudice (also with Knightley and Macfadyen), Joe Wright treated Jane Austen’s book with stark, even merciless realism. The Bennet family’s home was spare and slightly seedy, with pigs and chickens having the run of the house; clothes were often rumpled and coarse; when people got caught in the rain, they became drenched and bedraggled. Austen might well have recognized it, but it was a cold dose of

reality to those accustomed to the Masterpiece Theatre brand of Regency romance. For Anna Karenina, Wright and Stoppard go to the opposite extreme, stylizing the production to a fare-thee-well. The movie opens in an ornate theater, elegantly appointed but clearly having seen better days. The curtain announces the title, then rises to reveal another curtain saying “Imperial Russia, 1874.” That curtain rises, and the action begins, ostensibly in Oblonsky’s office—but, in fact, we’re still in that theater. It’s a bold stroke, risking confusion in the audience, and it was probably the inspiration of master playwright Stoppard, never one to spoonfeed an audience; you either stay with him, or you get left hopelessly behind. Almost the entire movie takes place in this handsome, slightly rundown theater—a setting clear to us but invisible to the characters. When they walk the bustling streets of Moscow or St. Petersburg, we see that they’re actually negotiating the catwalks in the fly space high above the stage. Even the famous steeplechase scene takes place there, the spectators packing the dress circle as the horses gallop across the stage. Significantly, the movie ventures outdoors only in visits to Levin’s country estate. The change underlines Levin’s connection to the land and the sharp contrast with the rigid artificiality of life in the cities, where everybody has their designated role and is expected to play it as assigned. Everything in this high society is strictly choreographed, from the paper shuffling of the clerks in Oblonsky’s office to the dances at the ball where Vronsky slowly but surely seduces Anna away from conventional “decency.”

Joe Wright and Tom Stoppard expect us to get it, not to scratch our heads and wonder why the hell they’re running a horse race in a theater. If you can make that leap, their boldness pays off handsomely. Again, all this assumes a basic familiarity with the original material. Wright and Stoppard expect us to get it, not to scratch our heads and wonder why the hell they’re running a horse race in a theater. If you can make that leap, their boldness pays off handsomely. But if not, or if you just can’t get around those Russian names, you might knock this review’s rating down a notch or two. Ω


by JONATHAN KIeFeR & JIM LANe

4

3

Red Dawn

A former Marine (Chris Hemsworth), his teenage brother (Josh Peck) and assorted friends (Josh Hutcherson, Adrianne Palicki, Isabel Lucas, Connor Cruise) take to the hills when North Korea invades the Pacific Northwest, and form a band of resistance guerillas calling themselves the Wolverines. If you can swallow the premise of this remake (back in 1984, the invaders were Russian, Cuban and Nicaraguan), it’s a decent action flick. Writers Carl Ellsworth and Jeremy Passmore and director Dan Bradley soft-pedal the right-wing politics (it’s just as easy to spin the story in the opposite direction as a parable for Iraqi insurgents or Afghan resistance against the Soviets) in favor of blood-and-thunder urban warfare. Performances are sketchy but competent, action scenes are swift-paced and efficiently brutal. J.L.

3

Rise of the Guardians

Happy-go-lucky Jack Frost (voiced by Chris Pine) is recruited into the Guardians—Santa Claus (Alec Baldwin), the Easter Bunny (Hugh Jackman), the Tooth Fairy (Isla Fisher) and the Sandman (no voice)—to defend children from the Boogey Man (Jude Law). Adapted from William Joyce’s kid-lit books by David Lindsay-Abaire and directed by Peter Ramsey, the movie has beautiful colors and smooth, subtle animation but a weak story that fails to resonate emotionally. It’s an overeager mash-up of holidays (Easter, Christmas) and metaphors (Sandman, Jack Frost) that tries so hard to be about all of them that it ends up not really being about anything. The movie’s fallback position: toss in lots of roller-coaster action and zippy magic fights. The audience’s option: Sit back and watch the pretty pictures. J.L.

4

Samsara

Co-conceived and co-edited by producer Mark Magidson and cinematographer-director Ron Fricke, this wordless dialogue between humanity and eternity is a natural extension of the duo’s earlier works: just another nonverbal, non-narrative survey of cultural and natural and industrial wonders of the world, shot on 70-millimeter film in 25 countries over the course of five years. Its title is the Sanskrit word for “the ever-turning wheel of life,” which should be said to include death and rebirth. Samsara is a film that seems equally inspired by grounded planetary exploration as by the most cosmic bits of 2001, or what you’d get from Terrence Malick were he brave enough to just ditch the the notion of plot altogether. Not for everyone, but certainly a reward for the receptive. J.K.

5

The Sessions

A 38-year-old man (John Hawkes) decides to lose his virginity—despite the fact that he’s a quadriplegic confined to an iron lung. So he consults a priest (William H. Macy) on the spiritual aspects of his quest, and a sexual surrogate (Helen Hunt) on the physical. The story of real-life poet and journalist Mark O’Brien, who died at 49 in 1999, was the subject of an Oscar-winning 1997 documentary, and don’t be surprised if this dramatized version picks up a few more statuettes. Written and directed by Ben Lewin, the movie navigates all the pitfalls inherent in the basic situation (just imagine what Judd Apatow would have done with it!) to become truly and honestly moving, brimming with wit and warmth and sparked

BEFORE

|

Opening Friday nOv. 30

the waiting room

opening friday, nov 30

argo

Argo

In November 1979, as Iranian revolutionaries overrun the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and take the staff hostage, six Americans manage to escape and find refuge in the residence of the Canadian ambassador (Victor Garber). A CIA exfiltration expert (Ben Affleck) hatches an elaborate cover story to smuggle the Americans out disguised as members of a Hollywood film crew. Director Affleck and writer Chris Terrio fictionalize a real-life story, the CIA component of which wasn’t declassified until 1997—and is here emphasized somewhat to the detriment of the Canadian contribution, which was considerable and highly risky. Still, it’s a crackling good suspense thriller, told with mounting tension and just the right splashes of humor. John Goodman plays Oscarwinning makeup artist (and CIA contractor) John Chambers. J.L.

Show timeS valid nov 30- dec 6, 2012

Rated R Fri-Sun 11:30 2:15 5:00 7:50 Mon-Thu 5:00 7:50

now playing

A ROYAL AFFAIR Rated R Fri-Sun 1:15 7:10 Mon, Tue, Thu 7:10 nightly Not playing Wed. Dec. 5

Not Rated Fri-Sun 12:30 3:15 5:20 7:30 Mon-Thu 5:20 7:30

now playing

SaMSara

Slightly unstable, hella attractive.

4

Rated PG-13 Fri-Sun 4:30 only Mon, Tue, Thu 4:30 nightly Not playing Wed. Dec. 5

1013 K Street - 916.442.7378 join the list - www.thecrest.com

Silver Linings Playbook

Recently out of a mental institution but far from stable, a man (Bradley Cooper) obsesses about reconciling with his ex-wife, even as he meets a woman (Jennifer Lawrence) who is equally emotionally fragile. Writer-director David O. Russell adapts Matthew Quick’s novel in his usual quirky manner, and the movie takes a while to reel us in. Cooper’s character is at first as exasperating to us as to his harried parents (Robert De Niro, Jacki Weaver). But before we can completely turn off to this annoying nutcase, Lawrence comes along with a fearless performance that not only captures us but, within the story, calms and humanizes this nervous wreck without his even knowing it. Russell builds this romantic dramedy patiently, and the patience pays off; that inevitable warm feeling at the end is honestly earned. J.L. by powerhouse performances from Hawkes and (more quietly and even more fearlessly) Hunt. J.L.

4

Skyfall

We’ve had James Bond movies for 50 years now, and this one treats the benchmark like a special occasion. It’s clever how Daniel Craig still is becoming the devilish 007 we’ve always known, even as his third outing in the role applies a framework of fussing over oldness and possible obsolescence. Part of Skyfall’s project is sorting relics from ruins. The movie does right by its major players, including the impeccably tailored Craig and the immortally matriarchal Judi Dench, plus it welcomes franchise newcomers Ralph Fiennes, Ben Whishaw and Naomie Harris. Its blowback plot involves Javier Bardem delighting in villainy and a rather cheeky British take on Freudian mama’s-boy anguish. Urbane yet never too serious and beautifully shot by Roger Deakins, this all seems a good fit for director Sam Mendes, who’s made his career imposing a sort of British pretense on American movies. The posh popcorn-muncher seems like just what the Bond experience always was all about. Nice to see there’s a future in it. J.K.

3

Smashed

An alcoholic schoolteacher (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) finally realizes, after too many blackout nights and hungover mornings, that she must dry out—but her newfound sobriety only emphasizes the fact that her relationship with her husband (Aaron Paul) depends entirely on both of them being constantly drunk, and he doesn’t want to quit. The script by Susan Burke and director James Ponsoldt avoids over-thetop melodrama, but in its low-key naturalism it neglects to develop a strong dramatic arc, always promising more than it ultimately delivers. Still, there are many things to admire: Winstead’s breakthrough performance chief among them, but also strong support from Paul, Octavia Spencer as Winstead’s Alcoholics Anonymous sponsor, Nick Offerman as a co-worker and Megan Mullally as the principal at Winstead’s school. J.L.

2

The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn—Part 2

The vampire newlyweds (Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson), their werewolf buddy (Taylor Lautner) and various allies square off against the Volturi, led by the sinister Aro (Michael Sheen, in a campy performance that’s equal parts Mike Myers and Davy Jones of the Monkees, only less threatening). It’s probably not over—this series is too lucrative to end now—but be that as it may, Lautner, while no great shakes as an actor,

FRONTLINES

|

at least has screen presence and a twinkle of humor in his eyes; Stewart and Pattinson remain monumentally dull, stiff and lifeless as the pod people from Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Director Bill Condon injects a modicum of visual style, and Melissa Rosenberg’s script adds a cheap-shot ending that, though it departs from Stephenie Meyer’s novel, will probably please the fans. J.L.

4

The Waiting Room

3

Wreck-It Ralph

Pete Nicks’ documentary asks how Oakland’s Highland Hospital cares for its unfortunate abundance of mostly uninsured patients, then actually listens to the long answer. Punctuated only with discreet flourishes of music and time lapse, Nicks’ style feels more retro than novel: the fly on the wall during a day in the life. And indeed, what makes The Waiting Room worth visiting is how well it does without the usual narcotizing doc tactics: There’s not a single animated interlude or hectoring infographic, and scene after scene goes by without any polemical point scoring. The closest Nicks comes to narration is overlaying episodes of patients’ stoic triage endurance with their self-told tales of recent layoffs, lost wages and lack of coverage. Rather than press suffering people into service as political pawns, he judiciously allows them a nonreductive sort of anonymity and allows the audience a felt experience instead of mere recorded testimony. J.K.

The villain in a classic 1980s videogame (voice by John C. Reilly) gets tired of being the bad guy, but his efforts to prove himself a good guy end up jeopardizing every game in the arcade. This animated feature has a lot going for it: clever writing in the early scenes, good voice work (Reilly, Sarah Silverman, Jane Lynch—even the usually annoying Jack McBrayer), and brilliant animation that wittily spoofs the evolution of vid-game graphics over the past 30 years (the design of the climactic Sugar Rush game is particularly clever). But the story dissolves into a puddle of familiar to-thineown-self-be-true bromides, and from there, it becomes a matter of been here, played this. Not a bad time killer, but with a bit more sustained inspiration, this might have been a classic, like Who Framed Roger Rabbit. J.L.

F E AT U R E S T O RY

THE BEST LOVE STORY SEEN ON FILM IN YEARS!” “

++++! INTOXICATING!”

K E I R A

K N I G H T L E Y

J U D E

L A W

S TARTS F RIDAY, N OVEMBER 30

ROSEVILLE SACRAMENTO SACRAMENTO UA Olympus Pointe Stadium 12 Century Stadium 14 Tower Theatre (800) FANDANGO #516 (800) FANDANGO #922 (800) FANDANGO #2721 CHECK THEATRE DIRECTORIES OR CALL FOR SOUND INFORMATION AND SHOWTIMES

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

AFTER

|

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS NO PASSES OR DISCOUNT COUPONS ACCEPTED

11.29.12

|

SN&R

SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW

|

35


TATTOOS • PIERCINGS • BODY JEWELRY • TATTOO SUPPLIES

$25 NAME ❆ ❄ TATTOOS

BUSINESS CARD SIZE • SELECTED FONTS

Art vs. ego The ladies—and lone guy—in Blame Sally balance  personalities to create a raw, yet well-crafted sound

BUY 1 GET 1 FREE PIERCINGS (EXCLUDES DERMALS) DERMAL IMPLANTS $60 ROSE TATTOO (PALM SIZE)

BALLERZ INK

5290 FRUITRIDGE ROAD • 916.736.2782

wintEr surf spECiaL buy 1 ride, get 1 free! *

In this era of The Voice, American Idol, Duets and The X Factor ad nauseam, it was the Bay Area band Blame Sally’s appearance on a KVIE Public by Saunthy Television fundraiser last summer that lured Nicolson-Singh me to the TV and then to the band’s September Harlow’s Restaurant & Nightclub gig. It was a packed house—mostly female— when Blame Sally hit the stage: Pam Delgado on percussion and vocals; Renee Harcourt on guitar, mandolin and vocals; Rob Strom on bass; Jeri Jones on guitar, bass and vocals; and Monica Pasqual on piano, accordion and vocals.

PhOTO COurTeSy OF BLAme SALLy

heated water!

indoor surfing 3443 Laguna BLvd #115 • ELk grovE, Ca 916.676.4747 • sxsac.com • facebook.com/sxsac Tue-Thu 5pm-9pm • Fri 5pm-11pm • Sat 10am-11pm • Sun 10am-8pm *Exp. 12/31/12. Free pass must be same or greater value as purchased pass/session. No cash value. Not valid with any other promotion. All sales are final.

ARE YOU A HEALTHY WOMAN AGE 20-28? Donate your eggs Earn $7000 - $7500

Blame Sally, pictured here minus Rob Strom, is usually 80 percent estrogen, 20 percent testosterone.

Call: Fertility Connections 415.383.2553 www.fertilityconnections.com Fertility Connections is a certified registered member of ASRM

Chronic Pain? Unable to work? Let us help. Social Security Income for Adults & Children Free Consultation!

916.480.9200 You don’t pay unless we win! Law Office of Steven H. Berniker 2500 Marconi Ave Ste 212 www.familylawfirmsac.com 36   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

“Monica and I met in 1990 at a songwriter competition in Napa. She won,” Harcourt said with a laugh. Pasqual was working on a solo project, and a mutual acquaintance recommended a female guitar player, Jones, who was already playing music with Delgado. “Monica got us together,” Jones recalled. “It was really fun to play.” At the time, no one was really interested in a serious band commitment. “We had our own projects and disappointments,” Pasqual said, “and were kind of tired of the business of music and thought, ‘Nothing is gonna happen; we’re way past our prime.’” Then they landed at the Bazaar Café in San Francisco. “People started coming. We didn’t have one bummer of a gig,” Delgado said. The group released a demo, and the gigs flowed—as did five albums. With all that estrogen and some strong minds, it’s easy to imagine a major war of egos. But not so with the Sallies, as they call themselves. “Our main influence is the love of our songs and acoustic harmonies. There isn’t a front person,” Pasqual explained. “People also make a big deal about our being a girl band, but that isn’t what this is about.” Plus, with Strom, Blame Sally really isn’t just a girl band.

Catch Blame Sally on Friday, November 30, at 8 p.m. at Auburn Placer Performing Arts Center at the State Theatre, 985 Lincoln Way in Auburn. Online tickets are sold out, but contact the venue at (530) 885-0156 or visit www.livefrom auburn.com for other options.

“Hands tied behind my back, watch the train run off the track, / do you want your money back, do you want.” Harcourt’s vocal range was clear and plaintive, earnest and angry on “Throw Me a Bone”—a mélange of emotions that paired beautifully with Jones’ guitar riffs. The women fronted the stage straight across, with Delgado standing at a “cocktail set” of drums and Pasqual vacating her stool occasionally to play the accordion. There are no fog machines, no pyrotechnics, no prancing dancers. They didn’t need them. Rather, this is music that’s well-crafted yet still raw. Indeed, when Delgado finally finished a gut-wrenching rendition of “Chain of Fools” with Strom on upright bass, the audience stood stunned. These mostly 40-somethings, who will appear Friday, November 30, at the Auburn Performing Arts Center in Auburn, craft songs and amazing harmonies around life experiences, offering sharp social commentary or vivid narratives of love, yearning, illness, motherhood and betrayal. Couple that with a finely honed musical score that melds rock and country with Celtic, Latin and Middle Eastern flavors, and it’s no wonder Blame Sally’s music resonates with fans. At a rehearsal last month in a cavernous hall kept by its Berkeley-based record label Ninth Street Opus, Blame Sally minus the ailing Strom (who is also not pictured), revealed how its music came together.

“Ourmaininfluence istheloveofour songsandacoustic harmonies.There isn’tafrontperson.” Monica Pasqual Blame Sally “Rob’s been with us for three years,” Jones said of Strom, who manages a bass guitar just as expertly as he handles an upright bass. A full-time member of the band, Jones lauds Strom and what she calls his low-key, grounded “bass personality.” “[It’s] easy to be around him, and that’s rare to find in a guy to fit in with the four of us,” she said. In the end, the band members say it’s about art over ego. “It’s about what’s the best for the song,” Pasqual said. “We’re also critical with each other. If it’s not working or good, we say it— it is honest.” Ω


Your Downtown Service Shop

Death’s throes Spin’s take on the band is simple: In this age of socialmedia-as-star maker, it writes, “Death Grips are the first band to unmake themselves via the Internet. They’re a band computer-savvy enough to leak records directly to geek-download havens.” Actually, not everyone at the magazine loves the Sac band—in an earlier review of the album, writer Rob Harvilla griped that the band’s so-called bite was actually pretty dull: “It’d be nice if the alleged cutting edge in hip-hop/metal/noise fusion sounded more menacing and engaging than Kid Cudi on his cell phone at Electric Daisy Carnival yelling at a FreshDirect customer service rep for forgetting his avocados again.” Ouch. Fighting words, maybe, but again, Artist of the Year, so blah, blah, blah, right? Sure, but well, personally—not that you asked, of course—Death Grips leaves me more than a little meh. At its best, the band cranks out some admirably rough and raw tunes. No excess finery here, just some teeth-grindingly intense shit. At its worst, however, this is hard, cold and brittle music that seems to fit our current techno-fueled ethos in what feels like the most depressing and nihilistic kind of way. I mean, not to germ this up with feelings and everything, but on its surface, much of what Death Grips drones on and on about about doesn’t sound that revolutionary. It just sounds angry and meaningless in that tryingso-hard-to-say-nothing-but-meansomething kind of way. I mean, check these lyrics, from Money Store’s “Bitch Please”: “When shit goes down / I’ll be there / Wit’ my hand on my gun, and my eyes on the road / Ghost ridin’ to hell fuck if I care ... who wanna catch my droze / Give a fuck blood, I ain’t goin’ nowhere.” Genius or two-bit thug life? You decide. Then again, the track would make a nifty ring tone. So, yeah, Artist of the Year. Kudos and all that. What’s next for the band? Who knows, but it’ll likely be either really epic (pun intended) or a major crash and burn. Whatever the case, the urban legend grows. —Rachel Leibrock

r achel l @ne w s re v i e w . c o m

2575

$

OIL

FREE

CHANGE

EMISSIONS DIAGNOSTIC

2399

$

(reg 49.75) most cars. Call for details. Same day. Fast In/Out $

w/repairs at time of service. (reg $120) most cars. For renewal reg. only. Call for details.

Call for details.

916 554-6471 2000 16th St Sacramento M-F 7:30 -5:30 Sat 8 -4 sacsmog.com Bring in any competitor’s smog check coupon and we will match it - plus give you an additional $5 OFF

www.newsreview.com

Sactown represent: Listen, I’m not even going to pretend I’ve been aboard the Death Grips bandwagon this whole time—especially now that Spin has gone and named the Sacramento band its 2012 Artist of the Year. The truth is, I find the hip-hop/punk/death metal/whatever band’s tunes just kinda all right (more on that later). The band’s ever-growing mythology, however? Pass the popcorn, we got ourselves a show. Y’all probably got the history down pat at this point, but the truncated, “previously on ... ” version goes something like this: The band forms in 2010 with Stefan Burnett churning out staccato rap, Andy Morin programming beats and samples, and Zach Hill driving it all home on the kit, a grinding deconstruction of all things verse, chorus, verse and melody. Death Grips release an EP in early 2011 and quickly follows it with Exmilitary. Both albums are free. The band plays shows that become damn-straight legendary for their intensity. Adding to the mystique is a distrust and distaste for most things music journalism (read: no interviews, nada) and the group builds itself a persona for which the Internet and music junkies fall head-over-heels gaga. Then, it gets signed to a major label, Epic Records. Sweet. Eh, or not. Death Grips version 2012 releases Money Store, which represents, to say the very least, an aggressive uptick to the approach of the band’s previous efforts. Like, you might need a few Valium to come down after listening to it. Just a suggestion, anyway. But things are still totally fine and mostly dandy at this point even as the band’s legend grows— blow its advance at a hotel? Sure, why not? That’s sticking to the man, all right! But then Epic refuses to release the band’s second album (well, in 2012, anyway), No Love Deep Web, so Death Grips release it online. For free. Oh yeah, and the album art? It’s got some serious johnson action going on. Ahem. Cue the majorlabel dumping. Then Morin kind of unceremoniously disappears from the band’s lineup. No explanation. Nothing. Anyhoo … so all of you indie diehards, I hope you’re taking notes, because this is how it’s done, apparently: genre-busting tunes delivered gratis and attitude in spades.

SMOG CHECK

Use your smart phone QR reader for more specials

V T E bE O T p US TO S fix ylacE whipOUr

35

5

With Certificate ($8.25 Value) INCLUDES 1996+ car, suv, mini-van, truck

We offer complete automotive service & repairs

Brake Special

Lube, Oil & Filter

$15.98

$30.00 OFF

$3 addition for multi-grade oil Good at Fulton location only Most vehicles savings of $7

1700 Fulton at Arden Way, Sacramento

Call for details Good at Fulton location only

481-1192 OPEN MON-SAT 8-6 • SUN 9-4

www.econolubeatfultonandarden.com

3950 Attawa Ave Sac, Ca 95822

*

(916) 456-3040

Are you ready for winter?? It may not seem like it now, but Old Man Winter is almost here! Come see Stephans Auto Haus for a tune and winterizing!

* * *

Factory Trained Techs 30-60-90k Maintenance Asian and European

* * *

ASE Certified 2yr or 24k Warranty 15% First Time Discount

S T E P H A N S A U T O H A U S . C O M BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

|

FEATURE

STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

37


One Man Star Wars Trilogy

Serpent & Seraph

Mondavi Center, 8 p.m., $10-$50

What happens when the attitude of Brian  Hanover (of Hanover Saints) mixes with the  post-punk influences of Patrick Shelley from  ROCK the Charles Albright crew? They  make sweet, sweet musical love,  of course. These two musicians combined  forces with their friend Steve Price on guitar  and started the punk-rock trifecta Union  Hearts. The music is catchy and upbeat, but  don’t let that turn you off: Let the brawny  voice of Hanover and the hard-hitting percussion, courtesy of Shelley, turn you on  to this band. Performances this night also  include City of Vain, Kill the Precedent, Lonely  Kings and a little band called 7Seconds.   1417 R Street, www.unionhearts.net.

—Steph Rodriguez

01SAT Blind Boys of Alabama

Blue Lamp, 8 p.m., $5

Take a trip to a galaxy far, far away with  comedian, singer and actor Charles Ross as  he recreates the original Star Wars trilogy  in a 60-minute monologue. In Ross’ comedic  take on the film series, he performs all the  characters, sings from John Williams’ score,  recites dialogue and makes his own sound  effects. Add in some physical comedy (flailing around with light sabers, crawling on  the floor, and utilizing his arms as Jabba  the Hutt’s lips, for example) and the oneman show becomes an entertaining mix  PERFORMANCE of bizarre and  funny. Check him  out, nerds: Ross also stages a One Man Lord  of the Rings. 9399 Old Davis Road in Davis,  www.onemanstarwars.com.

Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 8 p.m., $35-$48

Saying that Serpent & Seraph is a femalefronted black-metal band should in no way  suggest it is some Evanescence rip-off. Lead  singer Kas is a downright intense vocalist  with a serious death-metal growl. But she  can sing too, which is still pretty damn eerie  METAL and dark. Calling the group  “metal” isn’t even entirely  accurate. Sure, it plays a bit of double-bassdrum pounding death metal, but it also plays  some haunting Halloween-worthy songs,  early-’80s gothic rock and even some blasts  of spastic circus music. It twists and changes as much as Kas’ oddly diverse singing  styles. Whatever Serpent & Seraph’s playing,  it’s always creepy. 1400 Alhambra Boulevard,  www.facebook.com/serpentandseraph.

—Jonathan Mendick

During the course of seven-plus decades, the  Blind Boys of Alabama have toured the world,  released scores of albums, won five Grammy  Awards, collaborated with the likes of Prince  and Mavis Staples, and performed at the  White House during three different administrations. Not bad for a blues and gospel  group that started out playing nothing but  churches in the Deep South. The group will  be performing songs from its 2003 Christmas  GOSPEL release, Go Tell it on the  Mountain, which includes a  funky version of “Born in Bethlehem,” a bluesy “Away in a Manger” and a soulful a capella  version of “Joy to the World.” 255 S. Auburn  Street in Grass Valley, www.blindboys.com.

Proudly Presents:

LIVE MUSIC with Pacific Pinetree Allstars

Sat. December 1, 2012

at Auburn Event Center Tickets Available at: The Beat, All Dimples, Cherry Records, Clock Tower Records, Yabobo & Tribal Weaver www.newriders.eventbrite.com www.jerryband.eventbrite.com www.KeepSmilingPromotions.com

THURSDAY & SATURDAY’S SATURDAY S @9pm 9pm

DECEMBER 1ST-CRESCENT KA KATZ ATZ 6th-JORDAN KELLY 8th-CROSSROADS 13th-KERRI CARR BAND 15th-BE BRAVE BOLD ROBOT

$20 Advance / $25 Day of Show

38   |   SN&R   |   

11.29.12

—Brian Palmer

—Aaron Carnes

Saturday, December 15

Happy Hour Specials Monday-Friday 3-6p Thursday 9pm-close

Melvin Seals & JGB

Sat/Sun Brunch 10-2

www.KEEPSMILINPROMOTIONS.com

57th & Jst | 916-457-5600 916

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

Ace of Spades, 7 p.m., $12

30FRI

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

Union Hearts

30FRI

phoTo By FRAnk RAnney

phoTo By dIno RICCoBene

30FRI


The Mike Dillon Band

Mondavi Center, 8 p.m., $12.50-$59

Blue Lamp, 8 p.m., $10

Charles Bradley was performing as his  James Brown alter ego, Black Velvet, in New  York City’s Tar-Heel Lounge Inc. in Brooklyn  when he was “discovered” by a co-founder  of Daptone Records. He was ushered into  the studio in 2002 for a series of singles  that led to last year’s album No Time for  Dreaming. Now in his 60s, Bradley instills his  incendiary and sweat-drenched songs of  sorrow, heartache and pain with a relentless urgency that makes the hair on the  back of one’s neck stand up. He’ll share the  SOUL stage with the muscular Menahan  Street Band, featuring members  of the Dap-Kings, Antibalas and the Budos  Band. 9399 Old Davis Road in Davis,   http://thecharlesbradley.com.

Mike Dillon has an infectious stage presence. Whether percolating a funky brew  on stand-up percussion, weaving an  EXPERIMENTAL intricate vibraphone storm or  throwin’ down manic go-go raps, he is an  adroit force. As a member of groups such  as Garage a Trois and the Dead Kenny Gs,  Dillon has established himself as a versatile  player. Within his own quartet, Dillon’s  energy is equaled by trombonist Carly  Meyers, a youngster who plays and dances  like there’s no tomorrow. Often letting her  brass lead the way, she is a whirling, dipping  blur who slithers and two-steps about with  such rhapsodic joy that you will be inclined  to join her. 1400 Alhambra Boulevard,   www.facebook.com/themikedillonband.

—Mark Halverson

04TUES

05WED

Jazz Jam with Jason Galbraith & Friends

Danú Mondavi Center, 8 p.m., $12.50-$55

Shine, 8 p.m., no cover Join Shine coffeehouse every Tuesday for  an evening of jazz with Jason Galbraith. As a  saxophonist, Galbraith not only loves jazz, but  he’s also formally educated in the field, holding  bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music performance and jazz studies from Sacramento  State University. A house band opens the night  at 8 p.m., then a swarm of jazz musicians and  JAZZ vocalists take over the stage. The  public is invited to bring an instrument and participate. The sounds of trumpets  and snares really perk up the Mansion Flats  neighborhood. There’s no cover, but warm  your hands with a cup of tea to satisfy the  one-drink minimum. 1400 E Street,   www.reverbnation.com/jasongalbraith.

—Paul Piazza

—Steph Rodriguez

Danú, named after the Celtic goddess,  hails from historic County Waterford in  Ireland. Recipients of awards from Irish  Music magazine and BBC Radio 2, this group  of seven musicians has performed before  CELTIC standing-room-only audiences  throughout Ireland. Its highenergy performances mix ancient and contemporary Irish music. Instruments include  flute, tin whistle, fiddle, button accordion,  bouzouki and percussion. Lead singer and  flutist Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh sings in the  sean nos and folk traditions in both Irish  and English. Celebrate An Nollaig in Éirinn,  Christmas in Ireland, at Mondavi with songs  such as “Molly Na gCuach Ní Chuilleanáin” in  Irish and “County Down” in English. 9399 Old  Davis Road in Davis, www.danu.net.

—Trina L. Drotar

CELEBRATING OUR 20TH ANNIVERSARY ALL YEAR LONG!

RESTAURANT ss BAR BAR COMEDY CLUB CLUB ss RESTAURANT COMEDY

ThUrSdayS

rocK on live Kar//aoKe bandic rocK 9pm // Free acouSt FrI 11/30

oh! the band cover band 8:30pm // $7 SaT 12/01

humble wolF

the honey wilderS 9pm

TUES 12/04

happy hour live SerieS muSic // Free 5:30pm

“GrEaTEST STOrIES EVEr TOld” grateFul dead tribute // jam weeKly 8pm // Free wEd 12/05

denniS johnSon & the miSSiSSippi ramblerS blueS // 8pm // $8

ticKetS now on Sale For these upcoming shows at www.marilynsonk.com $3 TallbOy Pbr

UPCOMING EVENTS: crowne point grex, jack o’ the clock autumn sky

908 K Street // 916.446.4361

++Free parking aFter 6pm with validation @ 10th & l garage+

VOTED BEST COMEDY CLUB BY THE SACRAMENTO NEWS & REVIEW!

DECEMBER 5 & 6

2 FOR 1 ADMISSION!! (WITH THIS AD)

THURSDAY 11/29 - SATURDAY 12/1

FROM THE ERIC ANDRE SHOW AND ANIMAL FURNACE

fri dec 21 $12

HANNIBAL BURESS SUNDAY 12/2

FLIPS & BEANERS COMEDY JAM JIMMY EARLL, ANTHONY GUZMAN, STEPH GARCIA, SEAN PEABODY

2 FREE TIX WITH THIS AD!

WEDNESDAY 12/5

SACRAMENTO COMEDY SHOWCASE

THURSDAY 12/6

SCIENTIST TURNED COMEDIAN - TIM LEE

DAVID ALAN GRIER

StuCk WITH TRIBe OF LevI & BeLL BOYS

Coming Soon Dec 9 Dec 10 Dec 12 Dec 13

Christmas Kanikapila The Sword Charlie Hunter sat dec 1 7pm $20 adv Al Stewart & Dave Nachmanoff Dec 15 Corrosion Of Conformity (C.O.C.) & YOB Dec 20 Sizzling Sirens Dec 28 Dr. Dre Tribute by ZuhG (BeATLeS TRIBuTe) Dec 31 Midnight Players sat dec 1 10pm $12 adv Jan 10 Anothony B Jan 13 Cat Stevens Tribute Band Jan 20 Pinback Jan 21 Whiskey & Stitches fri dec 7 10pm $10 adv Jan 25 Tom Rigney & Flambeau Jan 30 Paul Thorn Jan 31 Nick Bluhm & The Gamblers WITH DJ HOuSe SHOeS Feb 9 Steelin’ Dan sat dec 8 10pm $20 adv Feb 13 Queen Ifrica Feb 16 ALO Feb 24 Tyron Wells Feb 26 Galactic Dress CoDe enforCeD (Jeans are oK) • Call to reserve Dinner & Club tables • all times listeD are showtimes

THe ReuNION ANTHOLOGY

guilty simpson

THURSDAY 12/13 - SUNDAY 12/16

THE PITBULL OF COMEDY IS BACK!

BOBBY SLAYTON

ROBERT DUCHAINE, COLLEEN WATSON

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER! ;>0;;,9*647<5*/305,:(*‹-(*,)662*6473:(*

WWW.PUNCHLINESAC.COM

CALL CLUB FOR SHOWTIMES: (916) 925-5500

2 DRINK MINIMUM. 18 & OVER. I.D. REQUIRED.

fri nov 30 1opm $10 adv

MIDNIGHT PLAYeRS

FRIDAY 12/7 - SUNDAY 12/9 FROM IN LIVING COLOR AND CHOCOLATE NEWS!

2100 ARDEN WAY sIN THE HOWE ‘BOUT ARDEN SHOPPING CENTE

MuSTACHe HARBOR

R

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE CLUB BOX OFFICE WITH NO SERVICE CHARGE.

phoTo By CoLM hENry

Charles Bradley

02SUN

phoTo By pAUL piAzzA

phoTo By kiShA BAri

01SAT

bilal

2708 J Street • Sacramento • 916.441.4693 • www.harlows.com

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

11.29.12     |   SN&R     |   39


NIGHTBEAT

THURSDAY 11/29

BLUE LAMP

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

FRIDAY 11/30

SATURDAY 12/1

SERPENT & SERAPH, STALKING DISTANCE, SOULTORN, MALCOLM BLISS; 8pm

THE N-MEN PARTY, THE JINGOES, ONE LESS ZERO; 8pm, call for cover

THE BOARDWALK

TRULY TERRIFYING, WEARING IT OUT IN

THE MOTELS FT. MARTHA DAVIS, LARISA BRYSKI, RED RADIO; 8pm, $20-$25

BOWS AND ARROWS

Pompsicle: live figure drawing event, 6pm, $10

SAINT MOTEL, PETS, MIDNIGHT TRANSPORT; 8pm, $6-$8

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 PUBLIC, FAR FROM HOME; 8pm, $10 1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 274-8384

THE COLONY

BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA, 8pm, $35-$40 STREETLIGHT FIRE, BRAVE SEASON, STAND OUT STATE, ECLECTIC; 8pm, $5

PHENOMENAUTS, MOANS, 9:00 NEWS, ABANDONED GENERATION; 7:30 pm, $8

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

ANNE ROOS, DOUG ADAMZ; 8pm, $8-$10

ELKHORN SALOON

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

THE MIKE JUSTIS BAND, 8-11pm, no cover

G STREET WUNDERBAR Hey local bands!

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

THE GOLDEN BEAR

2326 K St., (916) 441-2252

BENT LEFT, KILLDEVIL; 8pm M, $5; WHITE WARDS, GAG; 7pm W, $8

ART & LACY LEE, 6:30pm, no cover

18398 Old River Rd., West Sacramento; (916) 371-2277

FOX & GOOSE

TEDxGrassValley, 4pm, $35

DJs Jules and Penthaus, 9pm, call for cover

DJ JB, 9pm, call for cover

1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

A BULLET FOR PRETTY BOY, CASINO MADRID, BEFORE YOU FALL; 7pm W

THE CHRIS ROBINSON BROTHERHOOD, 8-11pm, $30-$35 KILLGASM, APOCRYPHON, EMBODIED TORMENT, CHRONANEXUS; 8pm, $5

DISTRICT 30

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/3-12/5

KING TUFF, DOG PARTY, DJ MIke C; 7:30pm, $8-$10

3512 Stockton Blvd., (916) 267-7576 594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

SUNDAY 12/2

DJ Shaun Slaughter, 10pm, call for cover

MIKE BLANCHARD AND THE CALIFORNIOS, DANIELLE FRENCH; 9pm, $5

GOLDENER, SEA OF SOUND, THE BENEFICIARIES; 9pm, $5

DJ Smilez, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

DJ Alazzawi, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

DJ Crook One, 10pm, call for cover

DJ Whores, 10pm, no cover

HARLOW’S

Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; JIM RAINES, JIM FUNK; 8pm W, no cover

Industry Night, 9pm, call for cover

THE REUNION ANTHOLOGY, 7pm, call for cover; MIDNIGHT PLAYERS, 10pm

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

KELLY ROGERS, EAT CAKE, PLAYBOY SCHOOL; 8pm, $6

ANCIENT ASTRONAUT, XOCHITL, HONYOCK; 8pm, $6

MARILYN’S ON K

“Rock On” Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

OH! THE BAND, 8:30pm, $7

THE HONEY WILDERS, HUMBLE WOLF; 9pm, $7

MIX DOWNTOWN

DJs Eddie Edul and Peeti V, 4pm-2am, $10

DJ Elliot Estes, 9pm, $15

DJ Mike Moss, 9pm, $20

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

World’s Worst Doctors Comedy Improv, 8:30pm, $5

SCARVES, HUMBLE WOLF; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz session, 8:30pm M, no cover

OLD IRONSIDES

DJ Krave Deez, 9:30pm, $5

BLAQUELISTED, WHITE MINORITES, Lipstick Weekender w/ DJs Shaun ONELOSTMC, DJ UpperCutz; 9:30pm, $5 Slaughter and Roger Carpio, 9:30pm, $5

MONKS OF MELLONWAH, DARKLINE, THE NUANCE; 8pm M, $5; Karaoke, Tu

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

SYSTEM ASSAULT, CAPITAL BASTARD, THE LEFT HAND, SKRUNT; 8:30pm, $6

1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931 908 K St., (916) 446-4361 1531 L St., (916) 442-8899

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504 670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731

SIMPLY THE BEST

1st Place Two Years In a Row...

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

DJ Gabe Xavier, 9pm, $10

Open-mic comedy, 9pm, no cover

&

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

SA red Cr di Am ng en to BEWARE OF IMITATIO NS!

$

new patients

55 with copy of this ad

$

renewals

45 with copy of this ad

WE’LL MATCH ANY LOCAL M.D. OWNED CLINIC AD! GET APPROVED OR NO CHARGE! 24/7 Verifications! HIPAA Compliant 100% Doctor/ Patient Confidentiality be seen in privacy, face-to-face with a live m.d. the way prop 420 intended. no skype b.s.!

DOWNTOWN SACRAMENTO

2015 Q Street, 95811 • (916) 476-6142 Open Mon-Sat 11am - 6PM VALID THROUGH 12/31/12 40

|

SN&R

|

11.29.12

Must Present Ad • Expires 12/06/12 • ID Cards Available

We’Ve moVed • 2614 el Camino Avenue

Corner of Fulton & el Camino, Sacramento 95821 • 1647 Hartnell Ave Ste 13, redding 96002 Monday thru Friday • 916.973.1766 • 877.563.4156


THURSDAY 11/29

FRIDAY 11/30

SATURDAY 12/1

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

TOM RIGNEY & FLAMBEAU, 8:30pm, $20 CHRIS THOMAS KING, 8pm, $20

THE PARK ULTRA LOUNGE

DJ Eddie Edul, 9pm-2am, $15

DJ Peeti V, 9pm, $15

13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825 1116 15th St., (916) 442-7222

SUNDAY 12/2

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 12/3-12/5

Asylum Downtown: Gothic, industrial, EBM dancing, 9pm, call for cover

PINE COVE TAVERN

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm-1:30am, no cover

PJ’S ROADHOUSE

DJ Old Griff, 9pm, no cover

DJ Old Griff, 9pm, no cover

MARK SEXTON BAND, 9pm, $5

POWERHOUSE PUB

JASON BUELL, 9:30pm, call for cover

FAST TIMES, 10pm, $10

SUPERLICIOUS, 10pm, call for cover

JOHN NEMETH, 3pm, $10

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

Sunday Night Soul Party, 9pm, $5

502 29th St., (916) 446-3624 5461 Mother Lode, Placerville; (530) 626-0336 614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586

THE PRESS CLUB

2030 P St., (916) 444-7914

SAMMY’S ROCKIN’ ISLAND

BACK ALLEY BUZZARDS, SHE’S A GENIUS; 8pm, $5

1400 E St., (916) 551-1400

Karaoke, M; DJs Alazzawi, Rigatony, Tu; ZUHG, CHRISTIAN DEWILD; 9pm W, $5

SOL COLLECTIVE

2574 21st St., (916) 832-0916

GENE SMITH LIVES, DIRT NAP BAND, THE ASCETIC JUNKIES; 8-11pm, $5

THE TULPA EFFECT, DESARIO, THE ALCOHOL PLAGUE; 8pm, $5

Open jazz jam w/ Jason Galbraith & Friends, 8pm Tu, no cover

ELEANOR IN FATHOMS, ANDROMEDA PROJECT, GWEN SCHOLL; 6:30pm, $13

GIFT OF GAB, A-PLUS, DEFEYE, SLEEPROCKERS, DESTRUCTIKONZ; 8pm

The Curanderismo Series, a look at traditional Mexican healing, call for cover

Microphone Mondays, 6pm M, $1-$2; Liberation Permaculture, 6pm Tu

STONEY INN/ROCKIN RODEO

THE DAVE RUSSELL BAND, 9:30pm, no cover

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

DEPARTURE: A TRIBUTE TO JOURNEY, 5:30pm, $3-$7

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Bluebird Lounge open-mic, 5pm Tu, no cover

TORCH CLUB

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797

X TRIO, 5pm, no cover; POLE CAT, HUCKLE; 9pm, $5

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm, no cover; SOLSA, 9pm, $12

JOHNNY KNOX, 5pm, no cover; LARA PRICE, 9pm, $8

Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; STEVE ROTH, 8pm, $5

LEW FRATIS, 9pm Tu, $4; Open-mic, 5:30pm W; HOWELL DEVINE, 9pm W, $5

TOWNHOUSE LOUNGE

Deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023

1517 21st St., (916) 613-7194

Anne Roos with Doug Adamz 8pm Saturday, $8-$10. The Cozmic Café Celtic harp music

COVER ME BADD, 10pm, no cover

238 Vernon St., Roseville; (916) 773-7625

SHINE

Battle of the Musicians, 9pm Tu; Openmic, 10pm Tu; Trivia, 9pm W, no cover

Open-mic, 9pm M, no cover; Eyewitness Wednesdays, 9pm W, no cover

Pop Freq w/ DJ XGVNR, 9pm, $5

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

RMBR, JEFF WATSON, DAVE RUDE, BILL CHURCH; 7pm, $20

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300

7SECONDS, KILL THE PRECEDENT, CITY OF VAIN, UNION HEARTS; 7pm, $12

BEATNIK STUDIOS

HONYOCK, AWKWARD LEMON, ADRIAN BELLUE; 9pm, no cover

2421 17th St., (916) 443-5808

CLUB RETRO

1529 Eureka Rd., Roseville; (916) 988-6606

LUIGI’S SLICE AND FUN GARDEN 1050 20th St., (916) 552-0317

Gift of Gab with A-Plus, Defeye, Sleeprockers and Destructikonz 8pm Saturday, call for cover. Sol Collective Hip-hop

CITADEL, BEFORE ME, FOR ALL THAT STANDS, NEVER ENDING; 6:30pm, $12 DIRTY GHOSTS, ZIGZAGS, BABS JOHNSON GANG; 5pm, $5-$8

ZUHG LIFE STORE

LABRADOR MIX, 6:30pm, no cover

545 Downtown Plaza, Ste. 2090, (916) 822-5185

Where Compassion Meets Unquestioned Quality and Passion Grape Ape • OG Kush • Blue Widow • Purple Urckle • God’s Gift • Blueberry Sour Diesel • Afgoo • Soma’s Lavender • Sour Grape Haze • Green Cheese

✹ Professional, discreet and fast at NORCANNA

20% OFF

✹ 18 strains to choose from ✹ Clones, concentrates, hash, tinctures, edibles ✹ Min. $68 for free delivery ✹ Emerald triangle meds!

Exp 12/31/12

ORDER BY PHONE

877-420-2015

Open 7 days a week - 10am-6pm

Delivery Serving Greater Sacramento

BEFORE

|

FRONTLINES

|

FEATURE

STORY

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

|

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

41


WHAT’S ON YOUR

HORIZON? Join Horizon Non-Profit today for safe access to a wide variety of high quality medical cannabis. Whether you prefer flowers, extracts, edibles or topicals, indica or sativa, we have the right medicine for you. Whatever your medical condition or employment situation, you can come to Horizon knowing that we respectand hold your

HEALTH, WELL–BEING & PRIVACY AS OUR HIGHEST PRIORITY. OPEN TO ANYONE 18 OR OLDER WITH VALID CA I.D. AND DR’S RECOMMENDATION FOR MEDICAL CANNABIS

HORIZON NON-PROFIT COLLECTIVE Mon-Thur 10am - 7pm | Fri-Sat 10am - 9pm | Sun 12pm - 7pm 42   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

3600 Power Inn Rd Suite 1A Sacramento, CA 95826 916.455.1931


Banned in the 916 The city of Sacramento says I can’t grow medicinal marijuana outdoors anymore? What gives? —Outdoor Moore Yeah. Cities and counties banning outdoor growing is all the rage these days. Fresno, Placerville, Roseville and now Sacramento are just a few. Lawmakers claim they need to regulate outdoor grows in order to cut down M BEALU by NGAIO on complaints from neighbors and reduce the threat of violent crime caused by garden robbers. Medicalcannabis patients argue that cities are contravening state law (which allows growing) and imposing an a sk420@ n ewsreview.c om undue burden on financially disadvantaged patients by forcing them to buy expensive indoor-growing equipment. So, what gives? Good question. First of all, different cities have different regulations. Fresno’s ban is a nightmare, and that city is already facing a lawsuit. The Sacramento ban is fairly reasonable and was endorsed by both the California branch of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws and the Emerald Growers Association. It’s not a total ban on outdoor growing; you can build a greenhouse. I asked James Anthony, cannabis-zoning-law expert extraordinaire, about the Sacramento ban. He said: “Hey look, it’s a transitional phase. This ordinance is reasonable. I wouldn’t recommend this in rural or agricultural areas, but in an urban area there has to be some regulation. If tomatoes were worth $2,000 a pound, you would probably have to grow them inside, too. I agree with James. Even though arrests for cannabis growing in Sacramento is down from the past few years and the police say they don’t get that many complaints about cannabis grows, a few good regulations shouldn’t really cramp your style. The biggest thing is to cut down on odor and to not be a target for thieves. Although I am sure a big-ass greenhouse will be just as ripe a target as an open garden. Greenhouses aren’t always the most secure buildings, what with the glass walls and whatnot. There will be a few unintended consequences from this ordinance; there always are. That being said, obey the law, and www.greenhousemegastore.com should be able to hook you up.

Ngaio Bealum is a Sacramento comedian, activist and marijuana expert. Email him questions at ask420@ newsreview.com.

I’m looking to find out more about vapor pens or electronic portable vaporizers. I just started vaporizing for my health and want a portable option. —Sunshine Cannabis vaporizers have made great technological strides in the past few years. Vaporizers work by heating the crystals on cannabis to the point where they become vapor. Since the crystals burn at a much lower heat than the actual cannabis leaf, the resulting vapor is less harsh on the throat and lungs. Plus, many portable vaporizers these days produce very little odor and no smoke, making them perfect for situations where discretion is advised. If you are just smoking cannabis flowers, I like the Magic-Flight Launch Box (www.magic-flight.com). They are really easy to use, and they don’t cost very much. If you are looking to vaporize hash or hash oils, try the Omicron (www.omicronvaporizer.com). A good guide to vaporizers can be found at www.vape-nation.com. Please invite me over to help you try out your new device. I will bring snacks. Ω

Bring in any competitor’s coupon and we’ll beat it by $5 Must present competitor’s ad. Restrictions apply.

VOTED 2ND BEST PHYSICIA N IN SAC!

Sacramento

420 Doc

MEDICAL MARIJUANA EVALUATIONS

FALL COMPASSION SPECIAL Medical Marijuana Cards Starting as low as: *Price does not include Letter of Recommendation. Call for details.

916.480.9000 2 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

2100 Watt Ave, Unit 190 | Sacramento, CA 95825 | Mon–Sat 11am–7pm 2633 Telegraph Ave. 109 | Oakland, CA 94612 | 510-832-5000 | Mon–Sat 10am–5pm RECOMMENDATIONS ARE VALID FOR 1 YEAR FOR QUALIFYING PATIENTS WALK-INS WELCOME ALL DAY EVERYDAY

YOUR INFORMATION IS 100% PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO BOOK YOUR APPOINTMENT ONLINE 24/7 AT

www.Sac420Doc.com

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

11.29.12     |   SN&R     |   43


Get Your Recommendation! North Of Hwy 50 @ Bradshaw & Folsom Blvd ReNewalS

medical cannabis collective

w/ couPoN exP. 12/05/12 SNR

New PatieNt w/ couPoN exP. 12/05/12 SNR

NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS

Blvd om Fols

l a r G e s el e c ti o n o f s ati va | in dic a | h y brid f rie n dly, k n ow l e d Ga bl e s ta f f

5711 florin perkins rd | sacramento, 95828 916.387.8605 44   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

Bradshaw

fa ir p ric e s | $ 10 Gr a m s | w ide va rie t y o f e dibl e s

50

Photo ID Available for $15

- Mon-Sat 10am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm - Physician Evaluations - 24/7 Online Verification - Walk-Ins / Appts

Routier

CLOUD 9

40 $50 $

Open 54 hours a week THE MOST IN SACRAMENTO!

caNN-Medical

- Cultivators Welcome

9719A Folsom Blvd. Sacramento, CA 916-822-5690 • www.cannmedical.org


K N I H T .

E E R F

HARVEST SPECIAL

2 FREE GIFTS FOR NEW PATIENTS

Free

$10

2oz = $160*

TOP-SHELF GRAMS

delivery ☛ ☛ $100 OZ’s ☛

1oz Killer Bud, 1oz Killer Shake

EDIBLES • FLOWERS • CONCENTRATES & MORE!

A Compassionate Collective

916.289.0683 Mon-Sat 11am–6pm

916.640.7713 | Mon–Sat 9am–6pm

FREE DELIVERY WITH $70 DONATION | 8AM–8PM 7 DAYS A WEEK

Dr. recommendation & CA ID required | *While Supplies Last

COMPLIANT WITH CA215, SB420 & 11362 OF HSC

11 GRAMS = $65

3 FREE GIFTS EVERY TImE

FREE PRE-ROLL FREE EDIBLE FREE HASH

1 OZ TOP SHELF $180 INDICA | SATIVA | HYBRID

THAT’S $5.90 PER GRAM. WOW!

30 gRAm Oz PINEAPPLE JACK

$170

blueberry widow

1/8th FOR FREE when you donate for one

Indoor

(916) 541–7036 OPEN MON–SUN

M-F 11am-7:30pm 21+ TAX INCLUDED

DR. RECOMMENDATION & CA ID REQUIRED

deliVery oNly 916-224-8497 PATieNT SiGN uP & MeNu

Log on to MMJMeNu.CoM/MedS

Where Compassion Meets Quality Free deliVery w/$60 donation

Non-Profit Collective Operating in Strict Compliance w/ Sb420 Prop 215

expires 12/06/12

EGAL GET L W NO

NEW HOURS

P:(916)484-1200 OPEN MON- SAT 11- 6

Hurley rise erp

Howe

936 Enterprise Drive Sacramento 95825

RENEWALS

CLONES

“No evaluation, no charge”

CARE CENTER

Hindu Skunk Grand AK

NEW PATIENTS

MUST PRESENT THIS AD

BEST 420

The Nameless (PAK 47 x Blackberry Kush)

Ent

55 $45 $

Al’s Burganberry Bubba Kush Cali Gold Blue Widow Royal Kush Pineapple Express Purple Cindy OG Kush Cherry AK-47* Sour Grapes* Al’s Purple Ak47* Girl Scout Cookies*

$25 1/8THS

Better Service. Better Value. Better Care. CA Licensed Independent Physician Evaluations for the use of Medical Marijuana

BLACKBERRY KUSH

STRAINS

Combinable Coupons

MEYERS COLLECTIVE

ST

PATIENTS COMPASSION

DELIVERY ONLY | (855)422–9656 WWW.HEAVENS2BETSEY.COM | FACEBOOK.COM/H2BYOLO

Must present valid CA I.D. Dr. Recommendations required.

TE

Indica, Sativa, Hybrid | FREE Delivery | Ask about our FREE Edible

Heavens 2 Betsey

Direct Meds

FA S

Northrop

Master Kush Green Crack Girl Scout Cookies D.J. Short’s Blueberry Purple Cindy Bubba Kush Grape Ape

ALSO AVAILABLE EAR WAX HASH • EDIBLES

FREE GIFT

FOR NEW MEMBERS W/DONATION

A1 PROPAGATOR COOPERATIVE INC.

916-381-1036 8101 Elder Creek Rd, unit H

Dr. recommendation & CA ID required

10am–7pm Mon-Sat 12pm-7pm Sun *Private Reserve $50 1/8ths

B E F O R E   |   F R O N T L I N E S   |   F E A T U R E S T O R Y   |    A R T S & C U L T U R E     |    A F T E R   |   

11.29.12     |   SN&R     |   45


MASSAGE THERAPISTS All massage advertisers are required to provide News & Review a current valid business license or somatic establishment permit issued by either the city or county in which they are operating in in order to run a printed advertisement.

BH SPA

30

$

Massage

/30min

/60min

❄$ odels These are m

Chinese Style Massage 7 days a week • 10 am to 9 pm

(916) 726–1166 7530 Auburn Blvd Ste D • Citrus Heights

New Massage Therapist

New Massage Therapist $ OFF w/ ad 5

Violet Massage 3260 J St #A Sacramento 95816 (916) 442-1888

11275 Folsom Blvd. #201 • Rancho Cordova

916-851-1118

certified + professional massage

3999/hr

$

Free Table Shower Combination Massage Couples Room Avail. Chinese Cupping

5 OFF

with coupon

This is a model

Rainbow Massage Therapy

3000 Arden Way #3, Sacramento (Near Morse Ave) 916-979-1188 • 10am-10pm daily

ANNA

SPECIAL PROMOTION $ 55 1 hour massage $ 35 1/2 hour massage

MASSAGE

Free

Table Shower

5 OFF

$

1H : $ 45 | 1/2H : $ 35

This is a model

tui na, full body, hot oil, back walking, cupping, deep tissue, swedish, hot stone, shower available

5841 Fair Oaks Blvd Unit B • Carmichael 916-640-8898 • 10am-9pm Daily

w/ad

This is a model

Swedish Deep Tissue • Healing Integrated Herbal Oil for Pain Relief • Feet Reflexology 916.688.9626 • 8876 Vintage Park Dr #103, Sacramento 7 days a week 10am -10pm Access • Mastercard • Visa • American Express • Discover

PERFECT STYLE

NEW MANAGEMENT

Special

Table Showers Available Relaxation • Swedish

$

Deep Tissue

39 99 1 hour

w/coupon exp. 12/31/12

Swedish, Reflexology, Deep Tissue Massage, Shoulder Massage, Aromatherapy, Free Dry Sauna & Body Shampoo. Walk-ins Welcome. Male CMT by appt. Get your gifts today!

Showers Available Walk-ins Welcome

916.429.7270

1355 Florin Rd, Ste.13 Sacramento, CA 95822

Gift Certificates Available |

SN&R

|

11.29.12

This is a model

green spa 6039 Greenback Lane Citrus Heights, CA 95621

916.722.9090

Grocery Outlet

★ 80 Greenback

Auburn

Thai • Swedish

San Juan Ave.

This is a model M-F 9am-9pm Sat/Sun 11am-9pm Closed Wednesdays

Winding Wy.

00

1 Hr. Massage With this ad. Eastern Therapy 2030 28th St. U St •Midtown

456-8886

Flamingo Massage 2264 Fair Oaks Blvd #102 Sacramento 95825 (916) 646-1888

Good Massage Grand Opening

GRAND OPENING

$

These are models

Combination Massage Open Daily • 10am - 10:30pm Walk-Ins & Couples Welcome

you’ll find what you need here! fashion Massage

5 OFF

99

Free Table Shower

46

holiday special Tired? In pain? Let us massage your troubles away.

40

$

39 for 1hr

$

Massage Therapy

Full body massage • Deep tissue • Swedish • Hot stone • Hot oil • Back walking 9am-10pm 7 days a week

Open:10am-11pm

Reward Yourself ❄

FO R T H E H O L I D AYS

❄ THIS IS A MODEL

RELAX • REVIVE • RESTORE • REJUVENATE

Z’S MASSAGE

1911 DOUGLAS BLVD #80 • ROSEVILLE • 916.772.5222 gr a n d open i ng

10% off {with this ad}

free table shower

deep tissue swedish gentle massage reflexology pain treatment Accepting all Credit Cards

Sunset Ave.

Fair Oaks

4810 San Juan Ave., Fair Oaks, CA 95628 • 916.200.0555 Sun-Thur 10am-10pm • Fri 10am-5pm • Open Sat Evenings

H e av e n ly m a s s ag e

1730 Santa Clara dr #3 | roseville 95661 10am – 10pm daily | 916.781.2828


haven therapy

massage

Grand OpeninG 5817 Watt Ave N. Highlands, CA 95660 (916) 338–2258

ROLLING TOUCH MASSAGE •

BEST MASSAGE IN TOWN •

BODY SHAMPOO

with coupon

SWEDISH • DEEP TISSUE REFLEXOLOGY • SHOWERS STEAM ROOM • GIFT CERTIFICATES WALK-INS WELCOME

Open Daily 9am-10pm

IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN ADVERTISING WITH US, PLEASE CONTACT CLASSIFIEDS AT 916-498-1234 EXT. 1338.

$10 OFF

*this is a model

The

OPEN MON–SAT 10-9 • SUN 1-8

8075 GREENBACK LANE 916.726.0451

Always Perfect Massage

110 RAILROAD AVE #F • SUISUN CITY, CA (707) 426-4279 9:30AM - 10PM • 7 DAYS A WEEK

BODY

Therapeutic Massage at Land Park

Deep Tissue • Swedish • Reflexology • Free Chinese therapies Sauna & Shower Available 7 Days a Week 10a-10p

WWW.MASSAGEALWAYSPERFECT.COM

5 OFF

$

916.395.7712 7271 55th St. #D

3401 FREEPORT BLVD #5 SACRAMENTO CA 95818 916-326-5600

Sacramento 95823 All Credit Cards Accepted

W/AD

Grand Opening

Friendly, Skillful Massage Therapists

This is a model

SuN SAN

★ Cottage Way

5911Auburn Blvd, Ste D • Citrus Heights (916) 334.7768 • 9am – 9pm Daily

Arden Way Fulton

80

Ethan

El Camino

ENING

916.449.8888

XT MASSAGE SpA

GRAND OP

1 hr = $40 ½ hr= $30

Free body shampoo w/ massage Deep tissue

$30 - 30 MIN $40 - 60 MIN $60 - 90 MIN

9:30am-10pm Daily 1714 16th Street Sacramento, CA 95811

Swedish

A1 Feeling

OFF MASSAGE at $35

free

garfield

fr E E TA b lE S h ow E r

OCEAN SPA

1133 Coloma Way, Roseville CA 95661 916-772-1789 • 10am-1opm daily

$

Accupressure Deep Tissue sweDish

w

1116 24th St

GARDEN HWY.

Midtown Sacramento, 95816 Between K St. & L St.

37

$

These are models

May Spa

99/HR

4-Hand Massage

$70 an hour

Couples Massage

(IF YOU PAY WITH CASH)

$70 an hour

GRAND OPENING SPECIAL

Full Body

1 hour - $40 30 min - $30

1192 35TH AVE SACRAMENTO 916.395.6789

This is a model

FEATURE STORY

|

FREE TABLE SHOWER REGULAR SHOWER AVAILABLE

NEW ASIAN MASSAGE Open Daily 9am-11pm 1850 Douglas Blvd #910 Roseville, CA 95661

Near VIC’S Supermarket

3110 Arden Way • Sacramento, 95825 (on the side of Office Max, facing Morse Ave) 916.333.4463 • 10am–10pm daily |

This is a model

SPECIAL

LAND PARK SPA

2860 Florin road Sacramento 95822 daily 9am-9pm 916.231.9498

FRONTLINES

Watt Ave

Morse Ave

SPECIAL PROMOTION

Coupleses 916.448.5315 & eLlcaodmie! We accept:

1620 W. El Camino Ave, Sacramento CA 95833

f $5StOvifSit Grand OpeninG asian massaGe 1 Arden Way Office Max

Open 7 days a week 10AM-11PM

W. EL CAMINO AVE.

916.564.2828

916.331.6188 • 10am–10pm daily

MASSAGE THERAPY

• Additional Parking in Rear

Gentle Massage

5412 Madison ave #160 • sacraMento 95841

GREEN JADE

|

• deep tissue • reflexology • sw edish • 4 - hand • couples

I5

auburn

80

madison

• Swedish Massage • Deep Tissue Massage • Pain Relief • Backwalking • Chinese Therapies • Shower Available • Walk-ins Welcome

massage starts

TRUXEL RD.

This is a model

Hot oil

3210 FULTON AVE • SACRAMENTO • 95821 916-487-8241 • 9:30AM - 10PM DAILY

$5

table shower & hot stone

Full body

THIS IS A MODEL

916.772.3929

Hwy 80 Sunrise Blvd

Gift Certificates available

This is a model

Chinese Massage - Walk-in - Appt.

- Swedish - Deep Tissue - Combo Foot & Body Massage - Free Chinese dumpling & hot flower tea w/massage - Hot Stone Massage

this is a model

1 hr = $70 1/2 hr = $30

Deep Tissue - Swedish - Back Walking

BEFORE

916.752.4782

$5 OFF

30 min = $30 60 min = $40 (foot & body combo)

55 1 hour massage $ 35 1/2 hour massage

www.head2toecatering.com

NEW MANAGEMENT

with this coupon

2548 Cottage Way - Sacramento 916.568.6888 - 10am–10pm daily

MASSAGE & WAXING

Lulu

New Management! GRAND New Opening OPENING

GRAND OPENING

Massage Kea

MEN’S DEN

GRAND OPENING

Douglas Blvd TJ Maxx N

Now accepting all major credit cards.

ARTS&CULTURE

|

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

47


Treat yourself to gift certificates up to 75% OFF! Visit www.newsreview.com

Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (916) 498-1234 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (916) 498-1234 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 9am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

Online ads are

STILL

FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

SCHOOLS AND TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenduraOnline.com (AAN CAN)

BARTENDERS NEEDED:

Make $25-40/hour. Don’t be ripped off by “no experience necessary” scams. Work ready in two weeks. ABC Bartending Schools 888.901.TIPS or www.abcbartending.com.

GENERAL $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

AIRLINE CAREERS Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888-242-3214

INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

Wish Your Car Could Pay You Back? Get paid to help us advertise by helping others do the same. Make up to $4,600 monthly + bonuses. Call Kim 831-238-6448 (AAN CAN)

more jobs online

www.newsreview.com

ATTORNEYS HEALTH/PERSONALS/ MISCELLANEOUS: WERE YOU IMPLANTED WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA DEFIBRILLATOR LEAD WIRE between June 2001 and December 2010? You may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727

Wanted Older Guitars! Martin, Fender, Gibson. Also older Fender amps. Pay up to $2,000. 916-966-1900

MUSICIAN SERVICES Anyone Can Play Piano Studio - Natomas To find out more call Katie at 415-272-7581. Mention this ad and get 30% of your first month of lessons! Learn Sax or Clairnet from experienced professional player and CA credential teacher. Positive no-pressure method. Any age, any level. Horn rental avail. 530-889-2310.

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

GENERAL

Double Delight!

Delightful massage! Private upscale home w/ shower. By appt only in Fair Oaks (Sunset & Minnesota). Special rates for seniors *82-916-961-3830

Oriental Magic Hands

Jason Shimomura CMT 601-1292 (9am-9pm daily)

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (AAN CAN)

CUTE KITTENS Looking for homes. Spayed & Neutered, shots, dewormed, defleaed. Small fee. Twin Siamese Kittens, chocolate pointm must go together. Call Louisa 916-723-0103 Purebred Pomeranian Puppy female, 3 months. All 3 shots, dewormed. Own birth parents. Potty pad trained. Loved like family. $350 OBO 530-693-4550

WANTED TO BUY CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

HOLIDAY MASSAGE

Help Wanted!! Make $1000 a week mailing brocures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingcentral.com (AAN CAN) Senior Accountant in Sacramento, CA. Implement monthly financial close and posting of AR, AP, payroll and general ledger transactions. Requires BS accounting or equivalent plus 5 yrs. progressive exp. and CPA license. Send resume to: Goodwill Industries of Sacramento Valley & Northern Nevada, Inc., ATTN HR, 6648 Franklin Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95823

PETS NEEDING A HOME

Wheatland Senior seeking roommate to share my home. Prefer senior, bi-friendly. $300/mo. Must have vehicle. There is no other transportation. Also, I am not a care giver. Mikey 530-633-2570

Wake up your spirit, mind & body with a massage & sauna. $35/hr 9am-9pm. Gift Cert Avail.

AUTOS

916-372-7334 916-599-9588

LAND 20 ACRES FREE BUY 40 - GET 60 ACRES. $0 DOWN, $168/MONTH. MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com (AAN CAN)

ROOMS FOR RENT ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundres of online listings with phots and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

BULLETIN BOARD HAVE A $1000 IDEA TO IMPROVE HEALTHCARE IN AMERICA? SUBMIT IT TODAY AT www.peopleschoice.org TO WIN CASH+TRIP TO KICKOFF. REGENSTRIEF INSTITUTE WILL CONDUCT STUDY ON WINNING IDEA. (AAN CAN)

The Cabin

Get a Great Massage! Sauna & Spa

916-729-0103

YOGA YOGA CLASSES Mon/Thu Night. BeginningIntermediate

916-729-0103

Notice of caution to our Readers! Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services.

Impound Cars for Sale ‘97 Pontiac Grand Prix $1950 ‘96 Nissan Altima $2650 ‘06 Chevy Trailblazer $9800 ‘94 Toyota Camry $1250 ‘01 Chrysler Sebring $3950 ‘91 Honda Accord $1350 ‘98 Ford Windstar $1450 www.T-RexTowing.com 916-332-6995

PARTS, SERVICE AND REPAIR Cash for Cars Same day free pick up. Cash on the spot. 916-992-5447

more cars online

ine

more mind body & spirit onl

www.newsreview.com

www.newsreview.com

To place an adult ad, call (916)498-1234 ext.5 SENSUAL TOUCH *IN THE MOOD* WITH HOT OIL Pleasurable & Irresistible Massage. Softest hands ever. Strawberry blonde 31 yr old, 5’6” 135 lbs, slender, very pretty CMT. 3pm-11pm Incall/Outcall Holly 916-910-8907 by appt. Mon-Fri *Blondie With A Body!* Come enjoy a sensual / therapeutic massage in a private discreet location. Showers, sensual oils, soft jazz music & so much more. Unrushed service, 100% satisfaction guaranteed. By appointment only. Early morning and light nighters are welcome. Call Lisa 916-678-9926

Fingertip Massage 9-9 Daily 916-722-7777 Ann Absolute Deluxe Massage Red Crystal Red Lace Massage. $70 for 2 hours, Incall also, outcalls always. Great hands with a great girl. Marvelous lemon or plain oils. In call special $38. Call til late 916-256-7093

HO HO HO!

Erotic Xmas Specials. Male or female sensual therapist.

916-277-3520

48   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12

Therapeutic Massage Pretty Winter Specials 1hr=$50 / 90min=$65 All styles of massage. Dark-haired Asian mix beauty: Long Hair, Pretty face. Try me, book now! Kylee’s Hideaway 916-236-8107 Available mornings & afternoons until 6pm. Incall Only Fantastic Full Body Massage w/ tantric style She puts the Mmm in Sensual Massage. Upper thigh massage included. Daily/Nightly appts until 3am 916-256-7093 FULL BODY MASSAGE Come spend some time with a petite sensual blonde in my serene discreet home. Convenient location. Ask for Fall Specials 916-812-5330

Coco Nice, slow FB massage, B shamp, Nice cozy home. $35 special. 916-681-5573

PHONE ENTERTAINMENT MEET HOT GAY & BI MEN Browse & Respond FREE! 916-340-1414 CODE 5908, 18+ FIND LOVE LOCALLY ON LAVALIFE! Instant live phone connections with local women and men! Try it FREE! 18+ 916-374-8333 www.lavalifevoice.com

Vibrational Tantric Massage

CALL SEXY SINGLES ON QUEST! Live Local Chat Try us FREE! 18+ 916-282-2300 530-760-1010 www.questchat.com

Antelope

CALL QUEST & MEET SOMEONE TONIGHT! Connect with more than 5,000 local men and women. FREE trial! 18+ 916-282-2300 530-760-1010 1-888-257-5757 Good Girls and Naughty Chat Call FREE! 916-480-6200 or 800-700-6666 WHERE MEN MEET MEN Send Messages FREE! 916-340-1414, CODE 7929, 18+

Ann, CMT

new hours!

Come enjoy a relaxing full-body massage with me at my home.

9am-9pm Daily • $80+

Open 7 days a week 12 noon – 10pm

SpA & BoDy ShAMpoo

916-628-8217

916-722-7777


GO TO FACEBOOK.COM/SACNEWSREVIEW

LIKE

US.

OR ELSE.

TRY

BEFORE

TODAY

|

FRONTLINES

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

AFTER

|

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

49


TOTALLY NUDE

STORE OPEN 10AM

Club O OPEN 5PM

Fanotoasy admission B th open 2pm

coupon

ARCA el DE

dancer

daily

lunch specials

come see the new & improved

WeD December 5th–Sat December 8th

Jynx maze

over 160 xxx movies

GAY & Bi LOCALS

Sacramento

(916) 340.1414 For other numbers call:

1-888MegaMates

TM

0((7

REAL

EXp 12-15-12 1 pER cUSTOmER

0(1

SACRAMENTO

5 pack dvds

mad mondays

$5 topless table dances every hour

9.69

2-4-1 tuesdays

$

3000 SUNRISE BLVD. #2 RANCHO CORDOVA, CA

916.631.3520

CODE

2054

AftER 6pm INCL. DRINk

w/cOUpON Reg. $12.69 AD EXpIRES 12-15-12 1 pER cUSTOmER

USE FREE

fantasy remodel

$

43 chann

auditions

5

great food

TotallyNude Totally

MEET HOT LOCAL MEN!

nominated for several avn awards wed10pm, 12:30am frinoon, 9:30, 11:30, 1:30am thurs 10pm 12:30am sat 9:30, 11:30,1:30am

store signing fri & sat 6-8pm everyday - 11:30am - 7pm • sun mon Tue wed Thur open To close • all vip dances $10 w/ $5 vip wrisTband

thursdays

Live top 40 DJ mix Open pool table - no charge for pool

2–4–1 Cover after 7pm $10 Lapdances all night

fantasy fridays

college/military night

seductive saturdays

$5 cover 8pm–11pm with college or military ID

Live top 40 DJ mix

Live top 40 DJ mix

sunday

USE FREE

Industry Night - $5 cover with proof

food served

CODE

All day & night

2358

new dancers 1 month no stage fees!!!

group rates

Call in advance for Bachelor/B-day Weddings/Divorce/Graduation Parties

851 RichaRds blvd. dOWNTOWN sac • 916.447.4475 | suN-ThuRs 3pm - 3am • fRi-saT 3pm - 4am facEbOOK.cOm/clubfaNTasYsac | WWW.GENTlEmENsclubfaNTasY.cOm cONvENiENT lOcaTiON: 5 miNs fROm pOWER balaNcE paviliON, 10 miNs fROm sac iNTERNaTiONal aiRpORT, 5–10 miNs fROm all majOR dOWNTOWN hOTEls

GAY & Bi LOCALS

Sacramento

(916) 340.1414 For other numbers call:

1-888MegaMates

TM

24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634-2628 18+ ©2012 PC LLC www.MegaMatesMen.com

puregold showgirls

www.Goldclubcenterfolds.com

24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634-2628 18+ ©2012 PC LLC www.MegaMatesMen.com

open for the holidays

amateur contest/auditions every monday

9:30 pm - $450.00 caSh prize

friendly attractive dancers hired daily call 349-7166 for sign up info

free admit w/ad $5.00 value

Valid anytime With Drink purchase

25,000

Sacramento

916.340.1414

adult dvds

Davis

$0.49 - $9.99 birthdays:

free admission, drinks & vip + – 5 DaYS OF BirthDaY

(530) 760.1011

TRY FOR

FREE

916.480.6200

We BuY uSeD aDult DVDS

Tell-AFriend

BachelOr / DiVOrce partieS 916.484.4774

REWARDS

FREE to listen & reply to ads!

Full SerVice reStaurant

FREE CODE :

Open 7 DaYS a WeeK

SpOrtS actiOn On Our Giant Screen tV

Sacramento News & Review

11363 Folsom Blvd, rancho cordova (Between Sunrise & hazel)

858-0444

M-Th 11:30-3 • Fri 11:30-4 • Sat 12-4 • Sun 3-3 Gold club centerfolds is a non-alcohol nightclub featuring all-nude entertainment. adults over 18 only.

FREE Discrete Chat Guy to Guy TRIAL

916.480.6215

For other local numbers call:

1-888-MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2012 PC LLC 2357

50   |   SN&R   |   11.29.12 50919235.indd 1

12-11-20 11:03 AM


by ROB BREZSNY

FOR THE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 29, 2012

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “They are

trying to make me into a fixed star,” complained religious leader Martin Luther a few centuries ago. “I am an irregular planet.” I invite you to use that declaration as your own in the coming weeks. You have every right to avoid being pinned down, pigeonholed and forced to be consistent. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you need abundant freedom to mutate your identity. You deserve a poetic license that allows you to play a variety of different roles and explore the pleasures of unpredictable self-expression.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “The Star-

Spangled Banner” is America’s national anthem. It features the lyrics of a patriotic poem written by Francis Scott Key. But the melody itself is entirely lifted from a bawdy old song that celebrates Bacchus, the ancient god of wine and ecstatic dancing. I love it when things are repurposed as dramatically as that. Do you? The coming weeks will be prime time to repurpose stuff with creative abandon. Make the past useful for the future, Taurus. Turn good old ideas into fantastic new ones. Don’t just recycle, transform.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’m guessing

that in the coming weeks you will be receiving a multitude of inquiries, invitations and temptations— probably more than you feel capable of responding to and certainly more than you should respond to. A few of these opportunities might be appealing and lead to interesting adventures. But some will be useless, diversionary or trivial. Will you be able to tell the difference? That’s your big challenge. If you’d like help dodging unwanted solicitations, give out this phone number as your own: (212) 479-7990. It’s a free service provide by The Rejection Line at ww.rejectionline.com. People calling that number will be politely told you aren’t available.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): For millen-

nia, the plant known as the yellow avalanche-lily has thrived on mountain slopes and meadows throughout western North America. It blooms early in the spring, just in time for broad-tailed hummingbirds that migrate from Central America to sip the flower’s nectar. But now there’s a problem with that ancient arrangement. Due to global warming, the lily now blossoms 17 days earlier than it used to. But the hummingbirds haven’t made an adjustment in their schedule, so they’re barely showing up in time to get their full allotment of nectar. I suspect this is a metaphor for a shift you may be facing in your own life rhythm. Fortunately, you’ve been forewarned, and you can adjust better than the hummingbirds.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In our calendar,

there is no special holiday devoted to honoring the joy and power of rebellion. This oversight confounds me. All my experience tells me that the urge to revolt is a fundamental human need. Every one of us has a sacred duty to regularly rise up and overthrow a stale status quo that is oppressing us—whether that’s an organized group effort we’re part of or our own deadening routine. I’m telling you this, Leo, because it’s an excellent time to celebrate your own Rebellion Jubilee. Your vitality will soar as you shed numbing habits and decaying traditions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Recently,

you’ve had resemblances to an 8-yearold kid wearing the pajamas you loved when you were 5. Your bare arms are jutting out beyond where the sleeves end, and there’s a similar thing going on with your legs. The fabric is ripped here and there because it can’t accommodate how much you’ve grown. You’re feeling discomfort in places where the overly tight fit is squeezing your flesh. All of this is somewhat cute but mostly alarming. I wish you would wean yourself of the past and update your approach.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A lot of leop-

ard frogs live on Staten Island, one of New York City’s five boroughs. Most of them make a sound that resembles a long snore or a rapid chuckle. But over the years, biologists have also detected a third type of frogly expression: a clipped, repetitive croak. Just this year, they finally figured out that this belonged to an entirely distinct

BEFORE

|

species of leopard frog that they had never before identified. It’s still so new it doesn’t have a name yet. I expect a metaphorically similar development in your life, Libra. You will become aware of a secret that has been hiding in plain sight. You will “find” something that actually revealed itself to you some time ago.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Tom

Tolbert is a sports talk-show host on San Francisco radio station KNBR. I am amazingly neutral about him. Nothing he says fascinates me or mirrors my own thoughts. On the other hand, he never makes me mad and he’s not boring. I neither like him nor dislike him. I simply see him for who he is, without any regard for what he can do for me. He has become a symbol of the possibility that I’m able to look at a human being with complete impartiality, having no wish for him to be different from what he is. In the coming week, I suggest you try to achieve this enlightened state of mind on a regular basis. It’s prime time, astrologically speaking, to ripen your mastery of the art of objectivity.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If

you say “rabbit, rabbit, rabbit,” as soon as you wake up on the first day of the month, you will have good luck for the next 30 to 31 days. At least that’s how reality works according to a British superstition. But judging from your astrological omens, I don’t think you will have to resort to magic tricks like that to stimulate your good fortune. In the next four weeks, I suspect you will be the beneficiary of a flood of cosmic mojo, as well as a surge of divine woowoo, a shower of astral juju, and an upwelling of universal goo-goo gaga. If it would give you even more confidence to invoke your favorite superstitions, though, go right ahead. Even scientists say that kind of thing works: http://tinyurl.com/SuperstitiousBoost.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

According to Greek myth, Perseus cut off the head of Medusa. She was the creature whose hair was composed of snakes and whose gaze could turn a person into stone. The immortal winged horse Pegasus was instantaneously born from Medusa’s blood. He ultimately became an ally to the nine Muses, and Zeus relied on him to carry thunder and lightning. I predict that while you’re sleeping, Capricorn, you will have a dream that contains elements of this myth. Here’s a preliminary interpretation of that dream: You are undergoing a transition that could, in a sense, give you the power of flight and more abundant access to a muse.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It’s time

for you to be leader of the pack, Aquarius; to take your gang to the next level; to make sure the group mind isn’t suppressing innovation and enforcing peer pressure but is rather inspiring every member of the tribe to be as creative as they dare to be. And if it’s not realistic for you to wield that much power, then do whatever you can to synergize the alliances that hold your posse together. Build team morale. Gossip constructively. Conspire to animate an influx of fresh magic.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): If you’re a

food company that wants to sell chicken in the shape of a chicken wing, it must have actual chicken wing meat in it. Otherwise, the law says you’ve got to call your product “wyngz.” I’ve always thought that there’s a lot of information the media presents as “news” that is really as fake as wyngz. That’s why I advocate calling the bogus stuff “newzak” (rhymes with “Muzak”). Your assignment in the coming weeks, Pisces, is to make sure you’re not putting out any wyngz- or newzak-like stuff in your own chosen field. The fates will help you rather dramatically if you put a high premium on authenticity.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

FRONTLINES

|

FEATURE

15 MINUTES

by

RAHEEM F. HOSSEINI PHOTO BY RICHARD SCHMIDT

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

The lyric moment Credit a dream-killing college adviser for Jeff Knorr’s career in poetry. The avid outdoorsman and onetimestruggling bio major wanted a job at Yosemite National Park when his blunt-talking adviser at California State University, Chico set him straight: “Dude, this is trouble.” Knorr took his adviser’s heed and plunged himself into humanities courses before he found his cometo-Jesus moment during a revelatory modern drama class. These days, Knorr teaches literature and creative writing at Sacramento City College. He’s also authored three books of poetry and was recently named Sacramento’s new poet laureate. Knorr talked to SN&R about his new gig, why poetry still matters and how the road less traveled sometimes isn’t a road at all.

When you told your parents you wanted to be a professional poet, how upset were they? (Laughs.) I don’t know that I told them I ever wanted to be a professional poet. I kept that a secret for a long time. I remember having a conversation with them when I was living in Spain … and I remember telling my folks, “I think I wanna write!” And I remember my dad saying, “Well, how much money can you make doing that?”

How did you become Sacramento’s poet laureate? Was there an underground limerick battle involved? (Laughs.) We didn’t really go toe-to-toe in a limerick battle, but there was an official selection process. The program is sponsored by the Sacramento Metropolitan Arts Commission. They take nominations … [and] SMAC collected all the nominations, whittled those down to finalists … and then had [the finalists] do a little minireading.

What’s your responsibility as poet laureate? For two years you’re out there in front as sort of a spokesman for the rest of the poetry community, really. It also means working with agencies and organizations to be a proponent for poetry as a general piece of culture, both in our immediate region of Sacramento—in the city and county—and also the state. And then, of course, SMAC would like you to engage in a project of sorts as well. What I’d really like to do is raise money and help get some writers from the community out into classrooms—fourth-, fifth- and sixth-grade classrooms.

STORY

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

Let’s say you’re going somewhere trying to get kids excited about poetry. What do you open with? It depends what age. Some kids are just fired up about it, and some kids aren’t. So I’ve had some kids say, “Why does poetry matter?” It’s a fair question, right? And oftentimes I’ll say, “How many people have ever written a song or a story or something, and you’ve given it to a friend and they don’t quite get the same meaning you had?” Hands will go up. And I’ll say, “How many people have ever felt like you were being misunderstood?” More hands will go up. And I’ll say, “That’s why poetry matters. Because if we can write poems and we can read poems, it sharpens our sensibility about language. And when we can sharpen our sensibility about language, it allows us to explain things more clearly and get the fine details where they need to be and, ultimately, explain to people how we feel.”

When you look at the different forms of literature, poetry is a truncated form. It’s a laser-fine point of meaning. It totally is. I’m always telling my students, “Compress, compress, compress.” And that compression of language, oftentimes for poetry, is what makes it spark. It’s like banging rocks together. So that whole notion of texting, Twitter and all that, it’s closer to poetry than other forms. It is compression.

|

AFTER

|

Does modern technology make the step into poetry a little more natural? It could. The thing that’s not happening in that language is that we’re not looking for a lyric moment. It really is about information being delivered. But to counter that—to argue with myself a little bit—maybe it does deliver in some ways a lyric moment in that that’s why people throw up a tweet or they shoot a text message to someone. Which, in some ways, is kind of a lyric moment. It’s not quite the quiet or poetic moment of mystery, but in some ways, maybe it’s a contemporary, social lyric moment.

Finish this famous couplet: “There once was a man from Nantucket …” (Laughs.)

I’ve never heard how that ends. Who grabbed a bucket of fish so he could chuck it. (Laughs.)

Very well done. We got a double rhyme in there with “bucket” and “chuck it.”

Jeff Knorr will read poetry during a fundraiser for the Sacramento Poetry Center on Thursday, November 29, at 1224 40th Street, from 6 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $30 or $20 for SPC members. Visit www.sacramentopoetrycenter.com for info.

11.29.12

|

SN&R

|

51


ACE OF SPADES FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

ALL AGES WELCOME!

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8

TWO DOOR STREETLIGHT CINEMA CLUB MANIFESTO MONDAY, DECEMBER 10

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15

PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

HOSTAGE CALM - LIONIZE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14

WILLIAM BECKETT OF THE ACADEMY IS... ANARBOR - PLUG IN STEREO

STREET URCHINZ

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27

COMING SOON

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16

11/29 RMBR 12/21 Capital Cities 12/29 Turquoise Jeep 01/14 Of Mice & Men 01/15 Sum 41 01/12 Tribal Seeds 01/17 Slighty Stoopid 01/19 Down 01/24 Gojira 01/26 Fallrise 01/27 Action Item 02/07 Hot Water Music 02/17 Soulfly 03/01 Meshuggah 03/05 Reverend Horton Heat

LIL BIT - K-OTTIC - PLAYAH K - WHO RIDE

03/06 Black Veil Brides

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202

S-2012-11-29  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you