Issuu on Google+

CHEF LOBBYISTS

COOK UP CAPITOL see Frontlines, page 8

HIGH ON

ROMNEY? see The 420, page 47

NORTH SAC

ELECTION SHOWDOWN see Feature Story, page 16

Rejoice, vegetarians and barnyard critters! SN&R reveals the region’s top meatless meals.

PAGE 19

OVER THE HILL,

ER, VOLCANO see Essay, page 14

DO THE 88°

ART WALK see Second Saturday, page 23

SACRAMENTO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 24, ISSUE 04

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THURSDAY, MAY 10, 2012


Don’t miss

our special insert in next week’s issue.

Bell Brothers Heating & air Conditioning

“tHe no SurpriSe guyS”

2   |   SN&R   |   05.10.12


INSIDE

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Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising Consultants Rosemary Babich, Josh Burke, Vince Garcia, Dusty Hamilton, April Houser, Cathy Kleckner, Dave Nettles, Kelsi White Senior Inside Sales Consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services Coordinator Melissa Bernard Operations Manager Will Niespodzinski Client Publications Managing Editor Kendall Fields Sales Coordinators Shawn Barnum, Rachel Rosin Director of First Impressions Jeff Chinn Distribution Manager Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Nicholas Babcock, Walt Best, Daniel Bowen, Nina Castro, Jack Clifford, Robert Cvach, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Ramon Garcia, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Wendell Powell, Warren Robertson, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Jack Thorne

15 MINUTES

13 GREEN DAYS

BEFORE

3

FRONTLINES

FEATURE STORY

SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available.

8

Greenlight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Plastic island grows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 An Inconvenient Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Eco-Hit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

SECOND SATURDAY . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Art picks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Art map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Hawaii four-0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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FRONTLINES

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FEATURE STORY

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It used to be that finding a good vegetarian meal in Sacramento was no easy feat. These days, however, the region’s growing foodie culture is more discerning—and embracing vegetarian eats. So, four SN&R writers with more than 70 years of vegetarianism between them rank Sacramento’s top 25 veggie dishes. Also this week: Greg Lucas sweeps the leg and Ninja Sushi, Nick Miller previews the beginning of the summer festival season, and Rachel Leibrock chats with “tapigami” master Danny Scheible. Sacramento’s 25 best veggie dishes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

OPINION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14

BEFORE

16

ARTS&CULTURE

GREEN DAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Advertising Policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

Events Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Hella horror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

The race for a seat on the Sacramento City Council is particularly competitive this year in District 2, which includes north Sacramento, Del Paso Heights, Ben Ali, Norwood, Hagginwood and Strawberry Manor. If there’s one thing all six candidates for the District 2 seat agree on, it’s that the north area hasn’t gotten its due. Each candidate—the pastor, the developer, the engineer, the activist, the auditor and the organizer—have their own ideas about how to fix that.

Political battles at the Capitol building take all shapes and sizes. This week, the debate centered on duck-billed birds, their livers, Sacramento’s chefs in white—and one very powerful California Democratic Party chairman, John Burton. Nick Miller reports on the wild ride that is the 2012 foie gras ban debate. Also this week: Seth Sandronsky reports on the day in the life of a Sacramento State hunger striker, the plastic island of trash in the ocean is still growing, and SN&R’s editorial board endorses the California Disclose Act. Bites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Ducking the debate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Beats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Appetite for change. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Blazing in north Sacramento. . . . . . . 11 You Are Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Sales Fax (916) 498-7910 Editorial Fax (916) 498-7920 Website www.newsreview.com

NIGHT&DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letter of the Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Poet’s Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Business Intern Carlos Zuluaga Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano

Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

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ART & CULTURE

Editor Melinda Welsh Managing Editor Nick Miller Senior Staff Writer Cosmo Garvin Arts & Culture Editor Rachel Leibrock Copy Editor Kyle Buis Associate Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Calendar Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Kel Munger Special Sections Editor Becca Costello Editorial Interns Valentín Almanza, Jonathan Nathan, Kate Paloy, Matthew W. Urner, Amy Wong Contributors Sasha Abramsky, Gustavo Arellano, Rob Brezsny, Larry Dalton, Joey Garcia, Jeff Hudson, Eddie Jorgensen, Jonathan Kiefer, Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Ann Martin Rolke, Garrett McCord, John Phillips, Patti Roberts, Steph Rodriguez, Seth Sandronsky, Amy Yannello Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Melissa Arendt, Brennan Collins, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Art Directors-at-large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn

VoÒume 24, Issue 04 | May 10, 2012

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DISH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Ninja Sushi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 The V Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Dish Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Eat It and Reap. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Food Stuff. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

COOLHUNTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 ASK JOEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 STAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Little Shop of Horrors . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Rx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Now Playing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Check out SN&R’s FREE searchable EVENTS calendar online at www.newsreview.com.

FILM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel . . . . 36 Clips. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

MUSIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 May music festivals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Sound Advice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Eight Gigs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Nightbeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

THE 420 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47

AFTER

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Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Adult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

AFTER

Popsmart, the weekly arts feature and Scene&Heard are on vacation this week.

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05.10.12

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COVER ILLUSTRATION BY MARK STIVERS COVER DESIGN BY HAYLEY DOSHAY

SN&R

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STREETALK

“It’s an honor, a privilege to celebrate this day.”

Asked at Downtown Plaza:

What would you rather do on Mother’s Day?

Irene Boubalos

Sherry Tam

state worker

Justin Lane

nutrition consultant

Well, my mother is deceased, so on Mother’s Day, I like to spend time with my boys or other family members in order to celebrate, because everybody is a mother sometimes.

I’d like to spend time for myself. Being a mother, I know it’s a lot of work. If I [don’t] have the time, I don’t need to visit my mother. Maybe do a pedicure or go to the spa. Get my hair done. Make myself pretty and happy.

body piercer

I like my mother, so there aren’t a lot of things I would rather do than visit my mother and my wife, who is the mother of our child. I want to make sure my mom feels valued on that day. It’s an honor, a privilege to celebrate this day. I don’t feel compelled, I feel blessed to do it.

Michael Alvarez

Kris Darby

Kelley Goodwin

state worker

tattoo artist

It better be something really awesome, like going to Disneyland or something like that. Maybe if I won a million dollars, or if I was buying my mother a house on Mother’s Day, it would be an excuse to not see her, but otherwise, she’s scary, and I don’t want to piss her off. She’s like 4-foot-11 and full of fury.

pizza maker

I suppose there are a few things I’d want to do, but honestly, that’s the one day that you should spend with her. If she gets no other day in the year, that’s the one day you should spend with your mother.

I’d rather work because my mom would just complain the whole time we hang out with her. So, I’d prefer to make money instead of spending money on someone who doesn’t appreciate it. … You don’t need a specific date to show how much you love your mother.

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LETTERS

Visit us at www.newsreview.com or email sactoletters @ newsreview.com

Make room for bikes

FIRST SHOT SN&R reader photo of the week PHOTO BY ANGELA HODGES

Re “Straddle the saddle” by Lovelle Harris (SN&R Arts&Culture, May 3): Thanks for all your coverage of May Is Bike Month. I hope there are even more bikes out on the roads this year than last year. However, I was dismayed to read this quote from Zach Waddle, manager of The Bicycle Business: “I don’t agree with people riding bikes on J Street. Unless you’re on a super-fast road bike, cars get irritated with bicyclists on J.” Really? From someone in the bike industry? With friends like these ... I’m sure Zach is aware that under California law, bikes are entitled to ride in general traffic lanes on any street that does not have a bike lane, unless it is a highway. But I guess, if I followed the advice of your article, I would “carefully LETTER OF plan” all of my rides through Midtown in order to avoid “irritating” THE WEEK any precious drivers. Never mind that when I get in a car, I can simply take the most direct and rational route to my destination. I’ll do the same on my bike, thank you very much. And sometimes, that means J Street. What about parallel streets? Well, I Street goes the wrong way and K Street dead ends at the Convention Center. Just how far out of my way do you expect me to go? Did you know that, based on California’s warped system of “environmental” review, a few seconds of added delay for cars is often considered a “significant environmental impact”? So don’t tell me I have to go several blocks out of my way every time I get on a bike. Drivers, guess what: There are two other lanes! Use them! Look around, practically all of the public right of way in this entire city has been designed to suit your needs. Time to make room for a few of the rest of us. See you on J Street! Rob Cunningham Sacramento

Ride, don’t die Re “Straddle the saddle” by Lovelle Harris (SN&R Arts&Culture, May 3) and “Biking rules” by Rachel Leibrock (SN&R Popsmart, May 3): Good article! Riding a bike as an adult should be as much fun as riding a bike as when you were a kid. You are much older now and, hopefully, a little smarter. Understand that a bicycle is still a vehicle, and, in order not to get run over, should be treated as such. When I went to school at UC Davis, many years ago, the first thing that was taught to us was that we need to obey all the traffic laws—the same ones that are used for cars. We don’t ride on the sidewalks, we ride on the streets, going with traffic, not against it. We stop at stop signs or stoplights, not run through them. We signal lane changes with hand signals. We get in line with the cars making left hand turns and go when it is our turn. We use lights at night. And we register our bikes, so when they find our stolen bike, we can get it back. The [Department of Motor Vehicles] provides pamphlets for bicycle riders free of charge, so everyone should pick one up once in their life, or maybe start printing some rules and regulations in your articles, or make an article about bicycle etiquette— not just for others walking on the sidewalks, but to keep you from getting killed. Mark Valenzuela Sacramento

What Target Excellence does Re “Off target” by Raheem F. Hosseini (SN&R Frontlines, April 26): Target Excellence has worked in the community for the last 15 years. We have BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

Young Cayden shows of his grill on Main Street in Old Roseville.

provided services at Jedediah Smith Elementary, Health Professions High, and the Marina Vista apartment complex to name some. This summer we’ll be holding a summer-service learning program at the Southside Park Clubhouse. Students will work on a park beautification project, a summer teen program, a kindergarten readiness fair and a senior citizens’ program for the area. The $35 daily rental fee us based totally on the cost of having staff available to open and close the facilities plus a minor cleaning deposit. In addition, Target Excellence also received a letter of thanks from the Southside Park Neighborhood Association in April for assisting them with their Easter egg hunt. Target Excellence is fully committed to providing free after-school programs to keep our children safe, inspire year-round learning and help working families have high-quality, supervised care. When community leaders work together it, makes a difference in children’s lives. Keith Herron CEO Target Excellence

away millions of local profits to national stores. I forgive Friedman because he is only a fan. He does not need to worry or understand why Sacramento does not have the billionaires and the healthy economy to support more developments and a sports arena. One more Starbucks will make him happy, with no regard to local issues. David Soohoo Sacramento

No girl trouble at all Re “Girl trouble” by Rachel Leibrock (SN&R Popsmart, April 26): I thought the whole point of the show Girls is to satirize how shallow, selfabsorbed and uninteresting upper-middle class white people are. I think the show is pretty brutal at times but really funny. I couldn’t help but think during the sex scenes—which are pretty realistic for TV, and icky, too—“Please don’t let these people reproduce!” As far as the show being too white and straight, let some up-and-coming black or gay writer come up with their own show that shows the side of black America or gay life that we don’t see every day. The truth is, we don’t mix all that much—check out the patio at any popular bar in Midtown, and you can see that. I like Girls.

Twenty years of failure Re “Here we build” by Paul Friedman (SN&R Guest Comment, April 26): Apparently, [Paul] Friedman does not know that the Mayor [Kevin] Johnson and developers already have a downtownrevitalization project that has been going on for 20 years now—and it is still failing. That revitalization is called the Downtown Plaza, with endless millions given to developers and chain stores. It pushed out local successful businesses, gave developers free money and gave |

FEATURE

STORY

author of this review. Overall, I enjoyed the performance, and [Alana] Matthews was fantastic! I do want to clarify a point about the accents. While [Carolyn] Gregory’s character was written to be English, Jeff Bagley’s character was to have been an Afrikaner (Boer), with a strong Dutch influence. As Dawid would have spoken Afrikaans as his first language, the expectation should have been that the three main characters had extremely distinctive accents representing their three different ethnicities. Flo Griffin Sacramento

POET’S CORNER Fast Food Chain

Dane Henas Sacramento

Different accents, same nation Re “After apartheid” by Maxwell McKee (SN&R Stage, April 26): I saw this show opening weekend and my opinion closely mirrors that of the |

A RT S & C U LT U R E

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Have a great photo? Email it to firstshot@ newsreview.com. Please include your full name and phone number. File size must not exceed 10 MB.

AFTER

Bon Faire market, about a quarter to nine, I’m standing in the cool wind handling the gas pump and a hawk loops over, wings cocked, as if to say, Fuck all this urban traffic, I’m hunting, and slid out of sight while I pumped and paid; as I’m turning onto 30th there it is again, holding a pigeon, one wing fanned, landing on the child care fence losing pigeon feathers and red pigeon guts with a stony grin, and the red fan of its own tail spread, its eye on me. —Crawdad Nelson

Sacramento |

05.10.12

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FRONTLINES Charters make their play The Sacramento County Office of Education isn’t in the news all that much. But there have been a run of stories in The Sacramento Bee lately setting the stage for SCOE board elections in June. by COSMO GARVIN Basically, Team Scoopy has framed the election as a contest between the well-meaning charter-school operators—Margaret Fortune in particular—and bloated union stooges who criticize charter schools. That’s trouble for Harold Fong, the only SCOE board member who opposed the Fortune Schools application last year. Margaret Fortune has reported giving $1,100 to Fong’s challenger, Christina Shipman. The Bee also just endorsed a slate of charter supporters, including Shipman. “They basically want to take out the person who opposed the Fortune charter. They want to send a message,” Fong told Bites. He opposed it partly because the Fortune charter application was explicitly about closing the “achievement gap” for black students. A worthy goal, to be sure. But given that other Fortune schools are somewhere around 80 percent African-American, “I had serious reservations that they were asking for a segregated charter school. I thought we should discourage that,” said Fong. Segregation is a scary word; you don’t just throw it around in a column or news story. Perhaps that’s why Fong’s segregation argument never got much play. But he was also troubled by the precedent set by SCOE’s approval of the Fortune schools. That’s because Fortune basically did an end run around local school districts—like Sacramento City Unified School District, or the Natomas schools, places that are actually struggling to pay the costs of charters— instead shopping the application to the more friendly SCOE board. There’s a good chance the SCOE board is about to get even “If they can take over friendlier. “It’s kind of a test the Sacramento case,” said Fong. “If they can take the Sacramento County County school board, over school board, in the capital of in the capital of California, they can over Yolo, you name it.” California, they can Shasta, While we’re on the subject of over Yolo, Shasta, SCOE and troubling precedents: Superintendent of you name it.” County Education Dave Gordon last week Harold Fong scotched a budget agreement Sacramento County Office of between the SCUSD and the

Education board member

Sacramento City Teachers Association.

The agreement is aimed at trying to close the school district’s $28 million budget gap. According to SCTA president Scott Smith, the union had also agreed to come back to the bargaining table if Gov. Jerry Brown’s tax ballot measure fails in the fall. That would worsen the SCUSD deficit by about $15 million. Good enough for district Superintendent Jonathan Raymond, who agreed to the conceptual deal. But not good enough for Gordon, who is bigfooting Raymond and taking the unusual step of inserting his own language. “Basically, they want to be able to reopen the contract for any reason at all,” said Smith. “If there’s any change in funding whatsoever, they can reopen the contract. It’s ridiculous.” Smith and Fong both told Bites that Gordon’s maneuver is unprecedented. And it’s not entirely clear that it’s legal. “SCOE has gone way beyond their authority,” said Smith. Getting to be a habit. Ω

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SN&R

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DUCKING

DEBATE

THE Ducking the debate

Sacramento chefs take to the Capitol in defense of foie gras Here’s a First World food fight: The world’s top chefs facing off against poll-sitting politicians and the F-bomb wielding leader of the state’s by Nick Miller Democratic party over the right to render ducks obese and sell their fatty livers. nickam@ Of course, such a fowl fracas could only go newsreview.com down under the rotunda of California’s Capitol. Sacramento born-and-raised chef Adam Pechal put on his kitchen whites last Tuesday, but didn’t start cooking at one his two popular central-city restaurants: He went to work lobbying state lawmakers. “I’d never stepped foot in that building before,” he admitted, “but then, next thing I know, we are running from office to office. Even some of the lobbyists were saying, ‘We’ve never had so many meetings in a day before.’” Pechal and more than 100 other California chefs don’t have much time: On July 1, the production and sale of foie gras— duck and goose liver thats been fattened by overgorging or force-feeding—will be banned in the state. And these chefs’ eleventh-hour campaign to reverse state law—which was authored back in 2004 by then-state senator, now California Democratic Party Chairman John Burton—does not come without controversy. Critics of foie gras, including activist groups such as People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and even Wolfgang Puck, say it’s unethical. They lambast the

use of a tube to force-feed birds, a process known as gavage, and say there are disconcerting health issues that arise by fostering a duck’s liver to become upward of 10 times its normal size. They also say California chefs are ducking the debate: How can they pride themselves on sourcing ethically farmed meats and poultry and fish, but make an exception when it comes to force-feeding birds for their lush livers?

“The farmer that has 12 geese wants to get 13 livers.” Darrell Corti But chefs at the Capitol insist foie gras is misunderstood. Similar to the feeling one gets after Thanksgiving dinner, they argue that ducks and geese in fact embrace the satiety they get from overgorging. Chefs also point out that the United States’ three foie gras production farms, including Sonoma-Artisan Foie Gras an hour south of Sacramento in Farmington, go to great lengths to ensure that ducks experience decent quality of life before the slaughter. Still, there’s no moral high ground here—all U.S. ducks and geese are force-fed during their final three weeks.


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Arenas and parks California’s cooks recently formed the Coalition for Humane and Ethical Farming Standards—or CHEFS, natch. Critics scoff at this humanitarian-minded acronym; CHEFS hope to persuade lawmakers to end the ban and also exploit California’s buying power to improve foie gras production standards from Canada to Israel. They’ve recruited the Golden Gate Restaurant Association and hired high-priced lobbying outfit Platinum Advisors, whose founder Darius Anderson—yes, that’s the same guy with the Ron Burkle new-Sacramento Kings-owner connection—to influence power. But the lobbying so far has been less than ducky. And chefs say politicians’ fear of reprisal from party chairman Burton is a problem. “He’s got a lot of Democrats scared,” he argued. “He is just an in your face, F-bomb dropping bully.” It’s true that Burton’s presence looms large. The 79-year-old former lawmaker even sent a memo to assemblymembers’ offices on May 1, insisting they uphold his law. And Burton—who in the past has praised soy imitation meat over the real thing—was forthright in his dismissal of CHEFS on Michael Krasny’s Forum radio program. “I would suggest that some of these chefs sit down at the table and let somebody just keep force-feeding them, jamming food down their throat into their esophagus, and see if they think it’s a worthy endeavor,” Burton said.

Chefs gather underneath the Capitol dome during foie gras lobbying efforts last week.

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Most chefs liken Burton to a quack. “It seems amazing to me,” began Matt Gordon, a celebrated San Diego chef who flew into Sacramento last week for a six-hour lobbying jaunt, “that there’s no general outcry that someone as respected as the chairman of the party can say he wants to force-feed me. “He threatened my life. I’m not a duck.” True, the physiology of ducks and geese is unique. They don’t have nerves in their throats and can devour large fish, oftentimes three times the size of what consumers buy in supermarkets.

“He’s got a lot of Democrats scared. He is just an in-yourface, F-bombdropping bully.” Adam Pechal local chef, on California Democratic Party Chairman John Burton Still, European Union studies of industrialized foie gras production abroad revealed problematic health concerns among forcefed ducks, including sometimes maggot infestations in the esophagi. But that’s Europe; domestic farms employ more humane force-feeding practices, CHEFS argue, including using the same feeder and preserving a bird’s access to outdoors and daylight. The state was supposed to delegate funds to agriculture programs at universities such as UC Davis to research and study gavage as an acceptable means of foie gras production. But upon passage of the 2004 law, Burton reneged on the promise, stating there were no longer monies available. This infuriated Sonoma-Artisan Foie Gras owner Guillermo Gonzalez, who insists his practices are ethical—and wants the chance to prove it. “I was informed that the funds for research were not available,” he recently wrote. “As a result, there was no study, and therefore, no way to exonerate my business and the only viable method for producing foie gras.” Yes, there are less feasible or industrialfriendly means of producing foie gras than gavage. Local food blogger Hank Shaw wrote in 2010 of hunting “wild foie gras” waterfowl, which had overeaten during the late summer and autumn and whose livers had developed “a fat layer comparable to that seen on a domestic duck, loads of fat around their gizzards and guts.”

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And Sacramento grocer and renowned foodie Darrell Corti told SN&R of a Spanish foie gras producer, Patería de Sousa, who instead of using gavage employed the nearly 5,000-year-old practice of leaving figs, acorns and beans on the ground for geese during the fall, which fattened the birds’ livers into award-winning, velvety foie gras. Corti called the California Legislature’s ban “embarrassing,” but also noted that the industrialization of food oftentimes leads to the mistreatment of animals. “The farmer that has 12 geese wants to get 13 livers,” he mused. The state’s ban on force-feeding birds will also impact other industries. The North Face, for instance, uses down in its jackets that is derived from feathers from force-fed ducks. Same goes for many pillows and comforter linings, among other products. “It’s not like when we were settling the West and shooting buffalo on trains and leaving them to rot,” said Kimio Bazett with Midtown bar-restaurant The Golden Bear, who also lobbied on behalf of CHEFS. “The whole animal is used.” Sacramento chefs Patrick Mulvaney, Mike Thiemann, Randall Selland and many others will continue engaging the Capitol in hopes of amending or repealing the ban—even if the July 1 deadline comes and goes. The Chicago City Council, for instance, banned foie gras in 2009, but later repealed the law. But while there are many powerbrokers in the Windy City, there’s no John Burton. SN&R obtained a copy of Burton’s private memo to state assemblymembers; in it, he blasted chefs for wanting to continue force-feeding birds, which he likened to “the equivalent of waterboarding, which is called torture when done to a human being.” Assembly speaker John Perez has stated there will be no bill repealing the foie gras ban this year, and nary an assemblymember has held out an olive branch to CHEFS. “He’s a powerful man,” Bazett said of Burton. “Not a lot of people want to go against him.” Still, the Sacramento-based CHEFS are targeting another compelling Capitol player—and likely a frequent customer: current Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg. “He is probably the most influential member we need to swing,” Pechal said. Or, as one local chef put it: “There has also been talk of blacklisting Steinberg from our restaurants!” Fowl play, indeed. Ω

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As a state senator announces a funding plan to keep open and possibly generate revenue from state parks, the city of Sacramento officially puts the lid on the new Sacramento Kings arena deal—for now. This Tuesday, Sen. Joe Simitian—known mainly for legislation to mandate renewable-energy goals—revealed a plan that could keep up to 50 of the 70 state parks scheduled for closure open and operating. The proposal includes many elements, such as extending liability coverage to nonprofits that help at parks, increasing fee collection, and using Department of Motor Vehicles funds to help maintain state park roads and trails. The Leland Stanford Mansion on N and Eighth streets and the Governor’s Mansion on H and 16th streets and are two central-city historic sites scheduled for closure this year. But those sites, or at least the governor’s former abode, might be rented out to pay for operating costs. Meanwhile, the city will move to repeal spending funds on predevelopement and other new entertainment and sports complex costs at Thursday’s planning commission meeting. Assistant City Manager John Dangberg’s report notes that the city spent approximately $680,000 on new arena consultant services. An additional $141,000 in consultant services were paid for by the National Basketball Association. Many argue that these numbers are on the low end, considering that they do not account for staff hours spent the arena project. (Nick Miller)

SN&R kudos SN&R wound up with an armful of awards—five first-place and three second-place—in the most recent California Newspaper Publishers Association’s Better Newspapers Contest. Winners were announced in San Jose on Saturday, May 5. Cosmo Garvin won first place in feature writing for his story about a father’s relentless effort to save his son from drug addiction (“The Oxycontin kid,” SN&R Feature Story, January 27, 2011). Garvin also won second place for his weekly column, Bites, and received a certificate of achievement in coverage of local government. He shared a certificate of achievement in First Amendment/Freedom of Information reporting with former SN&R staffer Hugh Biggar for their work on water rates and usage in Sacramento. Biggar also won a firstplace prize for sports writing for a story about the growing problem of concussions among local high-school football players (“Head games,” SN&R Feature Story, September 15, 2011). SN&R managing editor Nick Miller took the first place award for business, financial and economic news writing with his story “The college bubble” (SN&R Feature Story, October 6, 2011). The paper swept the category, as the secondplace award was won by Rachel Leibrock for her story on local home foreclosures (“Default!” SN&R Feature Story, December 16, 2010). Miller also earned a certificate of achievement in coverage of youth and education for his profile of Principal Allen Young at local charter high school The Met. Editor Melinda Welsh won first place for special issue for an interactive project on how local people plan for their deaths (“Everybody dies,” SN&R Feature Story, June 9, 2011). SN&R’s arts and entertainment section took first prize, local service member Paul Graham, who wrote of his experiences in Afghanistan, won a second-place writing award for “Medevac!” (SN&R Feature Story, September 29, 2011). And the paper also received certificates of achievement for front-page design and general excellence. (Kel Munger) |

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Appetite for change A day in the life of a Sacramento State student hunger striker Finals begin this Monday at Sacramento State, but senior Mildred Garcia has decided to add to the rigor of studying for exams by going on a hunger strike. by “I drink as much water as possible,” the 22Seth Sandronsky year-old social-work major said. “If I get dizzy, it’s time to drink something with sugar in it.” Garcia, who hails from Chicago by way of Guatemala, savors the American Dream of improvement through education, which is why she’s protesting the California State University system’s funding crisis. It’s a drastic, statewide protest: Garcia and 13 other students on six CSU campuses have been food-free since May 2 at midnight. “It hurts,” she said. “I miss food. Fasting is a hard thing, more mental than anything, but also very empowering.”

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Sacramento State students (left to right) James Damiani, Mildred Garcia and Yeimi Lopez haven’t had a bite to eat since Wednesday, May 2, in protest of higher-education cuts.

Learn more about Students for Quality Education at http://csusqe.org.

Avoiding pictures of food eases the pain of fasting. She naps more and sleeps deeper and longer during the night. But nights can also be fitful. “Sometimes I get up after sleeping for an hour because I’m hungry,” Garcia said. The Sac State strikers table at the school’s free-speech area until 6 p.m. “But Monday we closed early because we were feeling weak,” Garcia explained. After, she got a ride home and napped before rising to drink juice and finish schoolwork. The day ended with Garcia drinking more juice before turning in for the night. The fifth of six children, Garcia came to the Golden State right after high-school graduation to stay with her brother Josue. She attended Los Medanos College in the Bay Area before transferring to Sac State. And she says she’s grateful for her life here. “Especially my education,” she added, “knowing what it could have been if I stayed in Guatemala.” But Garcia is concerned that the CSU is increasingly becoming a “privatized” system that forces students into debt. Her view is political and personal. Like scores of students, Garcia’s debt load—$17,000 now—will rise until graduation, she said.

“I see injustice happening right in front of me,” Garcia said. “I feel a personal responsibility to do something about it.” U.S. immigrants such as Garcia have a history of involvement with popular movements, such as the fight for an eight-hour workday. She does not come from a family of activists; her politics emerged in a movement of students fed up with paying more for an education, but getting less from it. Garcia joined the Sac State chapter of CSU Students for Quality Education and last year, was part of the Sac State Spring, when she and other students occupied an administrative building for days to protest state underfunding of the CSU. Police in riot gear raided the encampment protest during the morning hours, and school management charged her and three others with violating a campus code of conduct. Yet Garcia is resilient. “The CSU funding crisis is only going to get worse if nobody does anything about it,” she said. This is why Garcia and Sac State fasters Yeimi Lopez, 22, and James Damiani, 25, rode a Greyhound bus to Long Beach this past weekend and visited strikers from five other CSU campuses. The Sac State hunger strikers also met face-to-face with CSU Chancellor Charles Reed. “Reed didn’t give us anything,” said Garcia, referring to the hunger strikers’ demands, which include rolling back top CSU’s executives’ pay to halting student-fee increases. Reed agreed to look into the hunger strikers’ demand to increase campus free-speech areas, according to her. “But being able to meet with him is a big deal and a win,” she said. Garcia had a physical at the Sac State Student Health Center prior to beginning the hunger strike. She got tips on how to be more aware of dehydration and low blood pressure during the fast.

“Fasting is a hard thing, more mental than anything, but also very empowering.” Mildred Garcia Sacramento State student hunger striker Like tens of millions of Americans, she lacks private health-care insurance. Yet Garcia remains steadfast in calling for an accessible and affordable CSU, as written in California’s 1960 Master Plan for higher education. “They have developed their own analysis and are taking their own action,” said Kevin Wehr, a sociology professor at Sac State and chapter president of the California Faculty Association, speaking of Garcia and her fellow fasters. “We are all feeling strong, though extremely hungry,” Garcia said. “We are staying on the hunger strike until our demands are met.” Ω


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GREENLIGHT

Lives to save Funding for early intervention and prevention of mental illness by JEFF VONKAENEL

I’m not afraid of blood. Poverty makes me sad and mad, but I’m not afraid of it. But mental illness is another story. With proper treatment, bleeding can be stopped. If we allocated more resources, poverty could be reduced or eliminated. But when someone’s mind is not functioning, the path to a solution seems more obscure. For years, I have received long, handwritten letters addressed to me at SN&R from people I assume suffered from mental illness. These letters went on for pages and were typically unintelligible. They were often somewhat threatening and always disturbing. I finally just started putting them in a drawer, unread. I did not know what to do. Then Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg called. Steinberg, the author of Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act, wanted me to understand the impact of his Senate President Pro Tem proposition, which levies a Darrell Steinberg has a 1 percent tax on California’s Currently, 25 simple message. What if millionaires. percent of this money goes to we accepted that as many early intervention and prevenas 25 percent of adults tion but Steinberg told me that, over time, he would like suffer from mental illness? to increase the amount of funding for these areas, where he believes the dollars can have the greatest impact. Preparing for my interview with him a few weeks back, I did some reading and talked with the directors of local mental-health organizations. This was really eye-opening for me. Pat Ryan, the executive director of the California Mental Health Directors Association, told me that most schizophrenics usually have their first episode in their late teens or early 20s. The key is getting them Want to read the into treatment right away. Without treatment, the proposition? View it in English or Spanish at episodes get much worse and their lives can spiral www.dmh.ca.gov/Prop_63. downward. That’s why programs that intervene early, like the ones on college campuses, are key. And recently, I have met and talked to quite a few people whose lives have been impacted by mental illness. An SN&R client told me about her nephew and niece, both who had schizophrenia. One is doing well, and the other is being released from an institution after he shot his mom and himself. Would early intervention have made a difference in his life? Maybe. My daughter is away at college. It’s an academic pressure cooker, and drugs are everywhere. Thank goodness there are programs there to help. Steinberg and Ryan have a simple message. What if we accepted that as many as 25 percent of Jeff vonKaenel is adults suffer from mental illness? And what if we the president, CEO and majority owner provided support to those who needed it? How of the News & Review many lives could we save? newspapers in Hopefully, the funds raised by Proposition 63 Sacramento, Chico will not only save lives, but also save us tax dollars and Reno. due to fewer hospitalizations and less jail time. Early intervention can make a difference. I know I’ve now heard this message, loud and clear. Ω


GREEN DAYS

AN INCONVENIENT

RUTH

Gen Y changes

Plastic island grows

So if change is slow, even in these times of climate crises, small victories still call for the waving of little flags. For instance, according to a recent study, Generation Y is

eschewing Mom and Dad’s desire for living in the burbs, preferring—in droves—smaller homes in walkable communities near the workplace. What’s more, there’s a stated preference for living car-free—something Mom and Dad couldn’t have fathomed. Environmentally speaking, this is fabulous—and more than half surveyed said that meeting “certain green objectives” in home and community design was key in home-purchasing decisions. Dunno what exactly these objectives are, but they point in a better direction.

New research says plastic pollution in the ocean likely underestimated The cause célèbre of plastic litter in the ocean is the Texas-sized, swirling island of debris thousands of miles off the coast by Susanne Rust of California in the Pacific Ocean. But researchers from the University of Washington, the University of Delaware and the Sea Education Association in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, say the story is much bigger—and scarier—than that. They say scientists have only skimmed the surface on the devastating pollution caused by plastic debris in the ocean, and the research community is likely underestimating the amount. According to new research, natural ocean processes such as wind, drag, turbulence and wave height can push the plastic deep down, where it is suspended underwater and unobserved by people examining the ocean’s surface. The research is published in the Susanne Rust is a writer for California journal Geophysical Research Letters. Watch. Contact Giora Proskurowski, the University her at srust@ of Washington researcher, said his calioforniawatch.org and read more at eureka moment happened while workwww.californiawatch.org. ing on a research sailboat 2,000 miles off the West Coast. Looking overboard, as the wind died down, he saw little white particles littered over the surface. “It was like a photograph coming into focus,” he said. As the rippled waves on the surface died, the white Green Days is on the specks appeared. lookout for innovative But half an hour later, as the wind sustainable projects throughout the picked it up, they all disappeared. He decided to take samples from Sacramento region. Turn us on at below the surface, at a depth of 16 sactonewstips@ feet. And there, he discovered plastic newsreview.com. moving through the water column. Taking the experiment a step further, Proskurowski looked at data that had been collected by the Sea Education Association from the 1990s and early 2000s. He also collected more samples from the North Atlantic at different depths, going down as far as 100 feet. “Almost every tow we did contained plastic, regardless of the depth,” he said. Using that data with wind measurements that had been collected, Proskurowski and his team were able to devise a simple model that can BEFORE

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New research shows that gyres of plastic pollution and garbage in the ocean are much larger because, it turns out, they extend far below the surface.

And yet, as in all things, gray is

potentially be used by others, including nonscientists, to match wind data with surface plastic collections to estimate how much was missed by only skimming the surface. “In order to make an accurate estimate, you need to consider the wind conditions under which that sample was taken,” he said.

Natural ocean processes such as wind, drag, turbulence and wave height can push the plastic deep down, where it is suspended underwater and unobserved. The team is hoping others will use this model to evaluate plastic pollution in the ocean. “I think what this research really shows is that I can go out in the middle of the ocean—five days away from land—into one of the remotest parts of the planet, and scoop up plastic,” he said. “I think it’s a stark reminder of the impact our society has on the planet. “And it should make us realize that any systematic cleanup approach we might make is going to be difficult,” he added. The American Chemistry Council, the chemical and plastics industry trade group, could not be reached for comment. Capt. Charles Moore of the Algalita Marine Research Foundation in Long Beach said the research supports the work his own organization has done, which also has found that plastic sinks in the water column and its presence is underestimated.

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“I’d suggest they start analyzing the sediments of the mouths of urban rivers,” where plastics heavier than water get mixed in with soils, Moore said. Moore said the presence of plastic in the ocean is concerning for a variety of reasons. His foundation has discovered that reeflike structures are forming on the plastic, with crabs, sea anemones, barnacles and even coral heads living on the plastic jetsam floating in the ocean. These reefs alter the deep ocean by blocking sunlight and alter the ocean’s chemistry. He said the plastics also are toxic, and as animals feed on them, these pollutants enter the food chain, carrying and amplifying them as animal after animal is exposed. “Then there’s just the straight ingestion issue,” he said, with evidence that whales, turtles and fish are filled with these plastics. “I wish there were a simple answer to fixing this,” he said. “But our economy is based on throwaway, packaged items.” Ω

the national color, and we wave the little flag, not the big one. According to developers’ surveys, this same study from the Metropolitan Wave the tiny flag. Research Center at the University of Utah said 43 percent of Americans still prefer big suburban homes, even if the rest don’t, which means that America has roughly 40 million big homes no one wants. The Urban Land Institute goes further in a report issued late in 2011. Of the 80 million plus Gen Y-ers, ULI states that more than half of them would trade lot size for living closer to work, a third of them will pay more to be able to walk to shops, work and entertainment (and a similar percentage of families with kids would swap out lot size for such livability). Again, wave the little flag, not the big one: Extending this concept to 2035, ULI estimates Sacramento will be overbuilt by about 193,000 “conventional lot” homes and be short, by about the same number, of meeting the demand for “small lot” homes.

Maybe those bigger homes will become multiresidential units. Or maybe they make a great place to practice your tagging skills, like in Elk Grove. Still, Auntie Ruth hopes somebody who’s good with hammers and saws and zoning and the thorny politics of development is paying heed. Mama Earth implores you. And hooray for Generation Y. Keep on doing this whole common-sense thing, and try not to sound too snide when talking to the folks. It just pisses ’em off. Ω

(Come friend Aunt Ruth on Facebook and let’s hang out.)

ECO-HIT He built a forest

Many people celebrated Earth Day last month by planting trees. Better yet, an Indian man may have already surpassed everyone’s efforts in that regard—by planting an entire forest. The Times of India reported last month that Jadav Payeng single-handedly planted a 1,360-acre forest over the course of 30 years. Payeng started the planting project as a teenager, and later moved into the forest to monitor its health. Located on a once-barren sandbar in the middle of a river, the forest is now home to thousands of tree species and wild animals as well as Payeng, his wife and three kids.

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This man truly lives “green.”

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ESSAY Hawaii four-0 Celebrating milestone birthdays with my father on a volcano I’ve been getting ready to turn 40 for many months now—psychologically preparing myself for a number that has by Sasha Abramsky always seemed intimidatingly large. A few months back, my father turned a an author, teacher and regular contributor far larger number: 70. to SN&R How to celebrate the two milestone birthdays? I decided that we needed an adventure, sans children, sans spouses. And so, in deepest secrecy, I planned a trip: When my parents came to visit me in Sacramento from London, I would take my dad on another journey, far out into the Pacific Ocean, and, away from the cares of daily life, we would celebrate.

PHOTO BY SASHA ABRAMSKY

A bubbling volcano represents a truly intimidating force of nature. Don’t get too close.

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remain. When the rocks cool, some owners rebuild—their small wooden houses rising up on stilts above concrete bases poured over the black rock. Others owners don’t rebuild but retain their landrights. When tourists want to see the lava, these owners charge $100 per person to guide them the many miles over the hard volcanic rocks to the places where the fires are emerging from the earth.

Finally, we approached the lava, something you feel before you see. It bubbles up out of the earth at about 2,000 degrees Celsius, creating a scorching blast of hot air. We thought it would be money well spent. So, at 11 a.m. on the Tuesday after we arrived, the four of us set off with a guide across the lava. It was a difficult, unforgiving walk, every step carrying the potential for a dangerous, or at least

scorching blast of hot air that traps you in its grip, swells your fingers, makes your hair stand on end. As you get closer, you see the rock color changing. You’re standing on solid black rock, but a few feet away the rock looks silver. You realize its liquid, moving toward you, continually shifting shapes. You hear otherworldly noises, cracking, sizzling sounds, like a gigantic bonfire. And then, you notice these huge welling red maws; holes in the earth that suddenly open up and spit out red lava toward you. They rise up, like supercharged blisters, expel their lava, fall in on themselves, and then new ones spew forth. One minute, you can detect a shape like a giant dragon’s face. The next you see what could be a carbuncled foot. You get close to take photos, and the skin on your face feels like it’s peeling off. Jesse carried a long wooden walking stick with him. We took it in turns to poke at the red lava and watch the end of the stick flare up like a sparkler. It was terrifying and yet, at the same time, supremely exhilarating. We ate lunch on the solid lava, then walked back over the desolate world created by the volcanoes. At one point, a giant rainbow spanned the rock field, the colors more defined against the black than those PHOTO COURTESY OF SASHA ABRAMSKY

And so we did. One early morning in late March, my dad and I headed to San Francisco International Airport. There, further rounding out the surprise I had set in motion, we met up with one of my father’s childhood friends, Andrew— who had moved from London to the Bay Area in the late ’60s, and Andrew’s son Jesse, whom I have known for decades. The four of us boarded a plane for Kona, on Hawaii’s Big Island. There, for the next six days, we experienced one of the most beautiful landscapes I have ever seen. Mornings, we all cooked together in the homes we had rented—the first a cabin in Volcano Village, the second a sprawling oceanfront home in the town of Puako. Afternoons, we made cocktails or sat beachside watching the world go by. Evenings, we ate in fancy restaurants and drank mai tais. I hadn’t traveled alone with my dad for more than a decade; Andrew and Jesse hadn’t traveled solo since Jesse

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was a child. We talked, read, relaxed. Too often, as adults, it’s hard to stay involved in your parents’ lives. There are young children to care for, careers to build and so on. It’s valuable, every so often, to step away from it all, and to simply get to know one’s parents again. Hawaii is, of course, a destination for sun-and-wave lovers and rum-on-thebeach aficionados. But the Big Island is also home to tropical forests, to a 13,000foot-tall mountain that one can ski down in winter, to patches of desert, to blackrock coasts and tide pools, within which giant tortoises sun themselves, to ruins and sacrificial sites dating back to the 13th century, and, most spectacularly, to the world’s most active volcano. And it was the volcanic scenery that had drawn me to the island in the first place. On the Big Island, there is always molten lava erupting out of the earth somewhere, adding layers of broken, sharp, barren, black rock to the already munificent amounts that cover large parts of the island. Volcanoes don’t do things by half-measures. A live volcano is one of the truly intimidating forces of nature. The 150-meter-wide Halema`uma`u Crater on Kilauea volcano has housed a cauldron of molten rock for centuries. Because of the dangerously high level of sulfur dioxide in the air near the crater, one can’t approach it closely enough these days to look into the fires directly; but one can hike on trails through the shattered landscape that surrounds it for many square miles. One can see the huge billowing sulfur clouds rising off of it during the day. And at night, from the observatory that has been built along Crater Rim Drive, one can stand under a sky more filled with stars than any I have ever seen before, and in the bitter cold watch the eerie red glow of the clouds against the darkness. But if the crater itself is out of bounds, the oozing, pulsating lava eruptions that emanate out of the ground from other volcanoes on the island, oftentimes tens of miles away from the crater itself, are accessible. Bizarrely, most of the dead lava fields are on private property; houses that once stood atop lush farmland get obliterated by the flowing fire, but the property lines

Left to right: Writer Sasha Abramsky’s father (who just turned 70) and Sasha (who just turned 40) join Jesse and Andrew for a walk on the scorched earth.

painful, fall onto the rocks; the weather changed constantly, hot and sunny one minute, the next a chill rain blowing into us near horizontally. Finally, at about 2 p.m., we approached the lava. It’s something you feel before you see. The lava bubbles up out of the earth at about 2,000 degrees Celsius, creating both an intense heat haze, and also a

of any rainbow I’ve seen before. It looked like a particularly sadistic, twisted, version of a Summer of Love poster. We spent the three days after our volcano hike exploring the west side of the island, and relaxing on the beaches with the wondrously blue island waters before us. It was as good a way to turn 40 as any other I can think of. Ω


OPINION

EDITORIAL

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

Up with pedal power! Let’s go back in time. If your last experience on a bike foothill communities. May is Bike Month was right before you received your driver’s (www.mayisbikemonth.com) has the most bikelicense, how did that work out for you? Were friendly routes, info on bike safety and events by your trips more social? Did you have more fun? that promote cycling. Joe Krovoza Get more exercise? Did you pay for parking? The costs we all pay for roads are huge, so the mayor of Davis Bike Month is an opportunity to ask, “Do I and the more pressure we take off our existing infrareally have to drive?” “Could a basket transstructure, the less we’ll have to spend on road Phil Serna form my bike into an expansion and repair. a Sacramento County errand-running Elected officials from The costs we all pay for Supervisor machine?” “Add an across the region just evening ride to dinner?” adopted a transportation roads are huge, and “Could an electric bike plan that prioritizes taking so the more pressure help me commute comcare of what we have and fortably, quicker and a bit we take off our existing investing greater amounts further?” “Could a foldin cycling, walking and infrastructure, the ing bike get me the last transit, all in a deliberate less we’ll have to spend mile after you commute effort to ease congesby transit?” tion—a 7-percent on road expansion We bet the answer decrease in daily congesand repair. is yes. tion for the average After your pedal-powperson by 2035. ered youth, you likely crept toward the virtual Bicycling means different things to everymono-culture of driving alone. Owning, fuelone. Kids like it because it gives them a sense ing, insuring, repairing and parking the average of freedom and adventure. Parents like it when car approaches $9,000 annually. If you get rid their kids have safe routes to school and around Have a comment? of a car, that’s thousands more in disposable their neighborhoods, because it means less time Express your views chauffeuring. in 350 words on income and savings. Our region is known nationally for bicySo answer the question, “Do I really have to a local topic of interest. cling. Our terrain is (mostly) flat, the weather is drive?” It’s easy, inexpensive and healthy. And Send an e-mail to great, and there are bike trails, lanes and routes who knows, it just may inspire an otherwise editorial@ long-lost youthful outlook. Ω newsreview.com. everywhere. For recreation, head to the American River Parkway, or our surrounding BEFORE

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Don’t get fooled As of the end of April, supporters of Proposition 29, the Tobacco Tax for Cancer Research measure on the June 5 statewide ballot, had raised $4.6 million in campaign funds. Opponents, mostly big cigarette manufacturers like Altria Group’s Philip Morris USA and R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, had generated $23.8 million. The only conclusion to be reached is that Big Tobacco is preparing to spend all that money because it’s worried the measure will do exactly what it seeks to do: reduce the number of smokers. Prop. 29, which would add $1 to the per-pack tobacco tax, bringing it to $1.87, would encourage many adults to quit smoking and discourage many young people from taking it up in the first place. Stanton A. Glantz, a professor of medicine Big Tobacco is going at UC San Francisco, estimates that the tax hike “will help so to spend whatever many people quit smoking that it takes to defeat they’ll spend a billion dollars less a year on cigarettes.” Proposition 29. The revenues raised, estimated at $735 million a year at first, would be used to fund cancer research, smokingreduction programs and tobacco law enforcement. Although the revenues will decline over time as the smoking rate declines, the funding inevitably will result in better treatments for cancer patients and other positive outcomes. For more information on the Tobacco California has had great success since 1988 with Proposition 99, which placed a 25-cent-per-pack tax on Tax for Cancer Research, check out cigarettes to support tobacco-education and smokingwww.californians prevention efforts. The state’s comprehensive approach foracure.org. has changed social norms around tobacco use and secondhand smoke and produced dramatic results. It’s estimated that the measure has saved more than 1 million lives and resulted in $86 billion worth of savings in health-care costs. Big Tobacco is going to spend whatever it takes to defeat Proposition 29. Voters should remember what this is really about: powerful, rich corporations trying to addict people to a deadly product. Ω

Pan’s the man Dr. Richard Pan is a no-brainer to support in the race for the newly redrawn Assembly District 9, which flows from Sacramento County on south to Lodi. Pan, a oneterm Democratic assemblyman whose redrawn district put him in conflict with Assemblyman Roger Dickinson, chose not to run against a Democratic incumbent he had much in common with. Instead, Pan moved back to where he lived when he first moved to California decades ago to run in the new District 9. A pediatrician and former college professor, Pan has demonstrated a grassroots ability to work with the entire community to solve problems. He’s smart and progressive, with a particularly admirable track record on public-health issues. Recently, he successfully introduced Check next week’s SN&R for June 5 a bill that bans the sale of expired infant formula and election endorsements. medicines in California. Pan was able to accomplish much in one term, despite the “us vs. them” politics so prevalent these days at the Capitol. We recommend returning him to the statehouse to represent the new District 9. Ω |

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THE TWO MOST COMPETITIVE RACES FOR SACRAMENTO CITY COUNCIL THIS YEAR ARE IN T W O V E RY DIFFERENT PA R T S O F T H E C I T Y. District 4 has it all: downtown, Midtown, Land Park, wealth and power. (We’ll tackle this race in an upcoming story.) District 2—which includes north Sacramento, Del Paso Heights, Ben Ali, Norwood, Hagginwood and Strawberry Manor—has high crime rates, high poverty and a decades-long history of neglect. If there’s one thing all six candidates for the District 2 seat agree on, it’s that the north area hasn’t gotten its due. Each has their own ideas about how to fix that. And most bring some baggage to the race, either their own or somebody else’s.

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PASTOR When he was 10 years old, Jason Sample’s family moved from Texas to Sacramento’s Strawberry Manor neighborhood. A year later, Sample’s house was underwater, literally, due to the flood of 1986. “The water was up to the roof line. We lost everything,” Sample told SN&R. After that, the family was homeless and lived for a while with fellow church members. They stood in line at the Robertson Community Center in Del Paso Heights to receive their “block of Reagan cheese.” So perhaps it’s not surprising that Sample—now Pastor Sample— grew up concerned about the poor and working-class residents of Sacramento’s north side, and why those folks figure prominently into his campaign for the District 2 council seat. Sample’s résumé includes several years with the Mutual Assistance Network of Del Paso Heights, where he ran drop-out-prevention programs, then later set up financial and money management for area residents. That’s when he started to think about the “economic infrastructure” of the community. “In this community,

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you’ve got two banks, but 11 check-cashing places,” Sample explained. Compare that to East Sacramento.

ALLEN WARREN FAULTS CURRENT COUNCILWOMAN SANDY SHEEDY FOR THE FACT THAT DISTRICT 2 DOESN’T HAVE RESOURCES, LIKE A GROCERY STORE. In 2000 to 2004, Sample served on the Grant Joint Union High School District Board. Sample also served on the Sacramento County First 5 Commission, which helps divvy up money for child health and education programs. That’s where he learned that the north Sacramento ZIP codes have some of the highest child-death rates in the city.

Three years ago, Sample took over as pastor of the True Life Ministries when Sample’s father, who had been pastor, passed away. As he’s campaigned, he says the large majority of people he’s talked to oppose public money being used for a new Sacramento Kings arena. “The arena is not going to be in District 2. So what are you going to do for the people who can’t afford those $118 tickets? What are you going to do for the working men and women in this area?” Sample’s got the endorsement local public employees unions, like Stationary Engineers Local 39 and American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 146. He also won the support of the current District 2 Councilwoman Sandy Sheedy, who decided not to run for re-election. He said Sheedy’s endorsement is “a blessing and a curse,” because some people assume that he’ll pick up Sheedy’s long running feud with

Mayor Kevin Johnson. But Sample he said he has “no preconception” about the mayor. If he does win, he says he’ll set up his office in north Sacramento, not downtown at City Hall. If he doesn’t win, he’s got plenty to do in the district, anyway. “Win or lose, on June 6, I’m going to sit back down at this desk and try to figure out how to move this area forward.”

THE

DEVELOPER Allen Warren also grew up on Sacramento’s north side. “When I was growing up, we had grocery stores and bowling alleys—resources in the district. You didn’t have to drive out of the area to get what you needed.” Today, he notes, north Sacramento “doesn’t even have a mainstream grocery store.” He faults Sheedy, the current councilwoman, for that and said as the owner of New Faze Development, “I’m the only candidate who’s really run a business and who has created jobs,” says Warren. Perhaps the biggest success was the Del Paso Nuevo redevelopment project, which early on won recognition for revitalizing the depressed


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By contrast, he thinks the Sacramento City Council spends too much time micro-managing, and not enough time leading. He said he would import some of the ideas of “performance based government” to the city council. Kerth says he’ll introduce one-year and five-year plans for each of the neighborhoods of District 2, and focus on getting north Sacramento its fair share of city services. “North Sacramento is where all the streetlights are out,” he said. Kerth’s critics say he’s running because he needs a job. Kerth’s abrupt departure as director of the Midtown Business Association set off rumors that he’d been fired. (Actually, the rumors started before he left.) Kerth says that he told the MBA board more than a year ago that he was planning to run for city council. He does enjoy the endorsements of a long list of local elected officials and Sacramento County Democratic Party, the Sacramento Central Labor Council, the International Association of Fire Fighters Local 522, the North Sacramento Chamber of Commerce and the Sacramento Rainbow Chamber of Commerce. Kerth said he found the last arena deal “baffling” given the city’s deep and immediate problems. Asked his thoughts on the strong-mayor system of government pushed by the mayor, he replied, “I’m agnostic.” “It’s the wrong question, really. The public wants a responsive government. You can have that with either form.” As for his potential relationship with the mayor? “I’m the guy Kevin needs on the council. Not the guy he wants.” Needs him because, “I figure things out, and I get stuff done.” Doesn’t want him because, “I don’t do what I’m told. Ever.”

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neighborhood. Later phases of the project bogged down in the real-estate downturn, and litigation, including a lawsuit the city of Sacramento brought last year, complaining that Warren’s company failed to make $3 million worth of improvements, like power lines and streetlights, in the project area. The city dropped its complaint against Warren’s company, Nuevo Partners LLC, because it went bankrupt. But the city is still suing the insurance company backing the project. Warren said the suit was politically motivated. “It was all politics. It was an attempt to get me not to run. That was before Sheedy decided not to run.” But Warren’s business woes have had other consequences. He’s fallen far behind on the property taxes on several properties he owns in District 2. He owes more than $100,000 in back taxes on his New Faze Development property at 1825 Del Paso Boulevard, he’s $40,000 behind on the Carol’s Books building at 1913 Del Paso Boulevard. Warren said the delinquent taxes are due to losses in the real-estate downturn. “Those properties all hit rock bottom.” Still, the vast majority of property owners—96 percent, according to county officials—manage to pay their property taxes every year, despite the economic downturn. “That’s your choice,” argues Warren, adding his taxes, “will be sorted out in time.” Warren received the endorsement of Mayor Johnson, as well as that of The Sacramento Bee, and half the endorsement of the Sacramento Metro Chamber of Commerce (they also endorsed Kim Mack). BEFORE

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Rob Kerth is a Stanford Universityeducated engineer, also with long ties to the area. His family owns the Iceland skating rink, which burned down in March of 2010, but reopened as a nonprofit in January of 2011, thanks in part to volYA J unteer help from the community. (Sheedy, the current District 2 representative, initially didn’t want the structure to reopen without a roof—the latest in series of clashes between the Kerths and Sheedy over the years.) Volunteerism is one of the main themes of the Kerth campaign. “Volunteerism is how were going to solve our problems from the inside out,” he says.

ROB KERTH SAID HE’LL GET DISTRICT 2 ITS FAIR SHARE OF CITY SERVICES. “NORTH SACRAMENTO IS WHERE ALL THE STREETLIGHTS ARE OUT,” HE SAID. Kerth was the city councilman for the area from 1992 to 2000. Ask him what he got done during that time and he might whip out a nine-page, 10point-type list: beefed up flood control for Strawberry Manor, major expansions of light rail during his tenure on the Sacramento Regional Transit Board, construction the Arden-Garden Connector. He even claims some of the credit for Warren’s Del Paso Nuevo, which was approved during Kerth’s tenure on the council. Kerth ran against Heather Fargo for mayor in 2000, but lost in a runoff. He backslid into politics in 2008, winning a seat on the board of the Sacramento Municipal Utility District. He said he’s learned a lot. “SMUD is famous for letting staff do their jobs,” Kerth said, and the utility consistently wins awards for customer satisfaction.

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ACTIVIST Actually, Sondra Betancourt hates being called a “neighborhood activist,” probably because it’s a huge oversimplification. But so is “engineer” or “developer.” Betancourt grew up thinking her part of town was called “Norsac.” That’s how her older Norwegian relatives pronounced it. Her family came to the area in 1906, and were among the founding families of the Bethel Lutheran Church. Betancourt a now-retired Caltrans personnel manager, has lived in the Ben Ali neighborhood for 38 years. She got involved in local policy, and eventually became president of the Ben Ali Community Association,

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after she learned that her neighborhood was going to be rezoned—she says without meaningful input from the residents there. When the city’s budget crisis hit, she went to bat for police and fire departments, becoming a spokesperson for the Protect Sacramento campaign. Police and fire didn’t take the same damage as other departments. Still, Sheedy supported very unpopular cuts to public safety. “I was approached by people in the police and fire departments,” said Betancourt. “They said, ‘You need to get that woman out.’” Despite her dedication, she lost the Sacramento Police Officers Association endorsement to Kim Mack. Betancourt said she was told explicitly during the endorsement process that she would have to support Mayor Johnson’s strong-mayor initiative in order to win support of the police union. She refused. She’s not bitter now. “Do I bear a grudge? Absolutely not. I will back them no matter what.” Betancourt has scored the endorsements of the Sacramento County Republican Party, and the Sacramento County Taxpayer’s League, but hasn’t raised the money some other candidates like Kerth, Mack and Allen. “I have got faith in people’s ability to make a decision based on the facts, regardless of how much heavyweight glossy paper comes to their doorstep.”

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AUDITOR Misty Yaj is running perhaps the lowest profile campaign of the six council candidates. Yaj—an auditor with Bank of America who also coowns a small grocery store—had just a little more than $1,200 in the bank according to her last campaign report. But she is counting on the support of District 2’s large Hmong community and its small-business owners. “I want to bring more businesses into the district. And I want to limit or reduce the code requirements that make is very hard for businesses to get up and running,” Yaj told SN&R. She also said she would work with banks and lending institutions to invest more in north Sac, and suggested a program of mentors for small-business owners. Yaj said the arena had been a big issue in the campaign. “I don’t hear from a lot of people who are all that interested in the Maloofs or the arena. Mostly, people are more interested in getting this area revitalized.”

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ORGANIZER On the other hand, Swanston Estates resident Kim Mack said the citizens of District 2 are “angry to the point of action” about the dysfunction in city hall. “I think there are votes happening on the basis of personality, rather than what’s best for the city.” It’s clear that Mack is referring to the friction between Mayor Johnson and departing District 2 rep Sheedy, as well as some other members of the council. And it’s clear Mack sides with the mayor. Asked for an example, Mack mentioned the recent flap on the city council over redistricting, specifically the scrum over UC Davis Medical Center, between Mayor Johnson and his council ally Jay Schenirer going against Elmhurst Councilman Kevin McCarty.

KIM MACK SAID THE CITIZENS OF DISTRICT 2 ARE “ANGRY TO THE POINT OF ACTION” ABOUT THE DYSFUNCTION IN CITY HALL. It had little to do with District 2, but Mack said, “people were very angry about redistricting, that they weren’t being listened to.” Mack said District 2 voters are also angry that they didn’t get to vote on Mayor Johnson’s strong-mayor plan, an issue that you might have thought was settled. “For whatever reasons, it’s something the mayor is really focused on. Once you see a new council seated, it’s going to come back,” Mack said, adding that she would likely support such a plan. Despite being simpatico with the mayor on redistricting, and strong mayor, as well as generally supporting the last arena deal, Mack didn’t get the mayor’s endorsement, losing out to developer Allen Warren. (Warren also supports strong mayor.) She has however won the endorsement of the Sacramento Police Officers Association and said she would fight to bring public safety back to pre-layoff levels. “There is no greater priority for local government than public safety,” Mack says. Mack ran the local campaign for Barack Obama in 2008, and has worked for other Democractic candidates like Ami Bera and Richard Pan. She’s running her own council campaign for the time being, and said she’s knocked on more than 3,000 doors during this campaign. If she wins, she promises to keep organizing. “I’m going to continue to knock on doors after I’m elected.” Ω

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SACRAMENTO’S

25 BEST

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t used to be that finding a good vegetarian meal in Sacramento was no easy feat. Sure, we’re nestled in one of the nation’s most fertile agricultural regions, but try telling that to the restaurant owners, who were once content to just nuke a frostbitten veggie burger or serve up an unappetizing plate of pasta and zucchini to those looking for a meat-free option.

VEGGIE DISHES

These days, however, the region’s growing foodie culture—as well as an increasing tendency to rethink menu options based on such factors as health, the environment, and, of course, animal rights—means that diners are more discerning. And why not? According to a 2008 study conducted by Vegetarian Times magazine, approximately 7 million Americans follows a vegetarian diet, while 1 million are vegan, meaning they consume no animal products at all. Similarly, approximately 22.8 million people say they follow a plant-based, vegetarian-inclined diet. Whatever your reasons for going meatless, the region boasts myriad options these days. Members of SN&R’s crack editorial team (made up of two vegans, one vegetarian and one former vegetarian, with more than 70 years of vegetarianism between them) hunkered down to select their favorite dishes including Sacramento’s top five (based on a totally unscientific five-point ranking system, of course) as well as another 20 dishes we swear you have to try now. And while there were a few heated debates—fake meat vs. no fake meat?—all the options on the resulting list fit the most important set of criteria: animal friendly and totally yummy.

Rejoice, vegetarians and barnyard critters! SN&R reveals the region’s top meatless meals. by BECCA COSTELLO, RACHEL LEIBROCK, NICK MILLER AND SHOKA photos by SHOKA illustrations by Look for a directory MARK STIVERS of Sacramento-area

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vegetarian restaurants and more on SN&R’s website. BEFORE

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TOP 1

You’ve never had it so good Mysore Masala Dosa at Kaveri Madras Cuisine

Never heard of a dosa? Without hyperbole, the Mysore Masala Dosa at Kaveri Madras Cuisine will amaze your mouth—and eyes. For first-timers, when the waitress brings you your order, eyes will bulge: The dosa, a South Indian specialty, is a crispy, savory golden crepe made from fermented lentil flour, and here it’s rolled into 2-foot-long cylinder. Once you’ve composed yourself and realize that you are actually going to eat this thing, you tear off of a piece from an end and—that’s right, silverware be damned, it’s OK to eat with your hands—discover the mélange of spices in the Mysore chutney that coats the interior of this tasty tunnel. You dig deeper, along the way, dipping pieces into the accompanying mint, red pepper and coconut chutneys, as well as the sambar, a spicy lentil soup. And then, pay dirt: In the center, you find the masala— golden potatoes, onions, peas, carrots, mustard seeds. And for just eight bucks, this dish is a treasure. 1148 Fulton Avenue, Suite A; (916) 481-9970; www.kaverimadrascuisine.com. S.S.

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King of the soups

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Spicy Vegan Ramen at Shoki Ramen House

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There’s usually a wait at this tiny hot spot, and with good reason. Shoki’s Ramen House’s ramen is healthfully constructed to be low in sodium and artificial additives, and filled with slow-cooked flavor. The Spicy Vegan Ramen bowl comes loaded with spinach, noodles, bamboo shoots, seaweed, scallions and more. Customize your soup with additional toppings. We recommended adding corn and fresh tofu from the Sacramento Tofu Company, plus a healthy spoonful of pureed garlic from the jar on your table. 1201 R Street, (916) 441-0011; 2675 24th Street, (916) 454-2411; http://shokiramenhouse.com. B.C.

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COST: 5—$7.90, additional ingredients extra. CREATIVITY: 4—The ramen is traditional, but you can get as creative as you want with your order. HEALTH: 4.5—The ramen can be modified for gluten-free and other special diets.

THE LEGACY VEGGIE BURGER No camera trickery: Diner Gyan Parmar proves Kaveri Madras Cuisine’s Mysore Masala Dosa really is a hefty dose of Indian fare.

COST: 5—It’s a relative bargain at $7.95. CREATIVITY: 5—It’s a traditional South Indian dish, but one executed with aplomb. HEALTH: 4—The lentil dosa and lentil soup provide plenty of filling protein.

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Put this between your buns

COST: 4—At $11.95, this burger may seem bit pricey, but you’ll be really full, guaranteed. CREATIVITY: 5—Where else can you find this flavor combo on a vegan burger? HEALTH: 3.5—Or 4.5 if you sub a salad for the fries. But those fries are super tasty with the peanut sauce. 20

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East African Veggie Burger at Tower Cafe

Listen, normally we’d be totally loathe to suggest you dip your toes into the world of vegan eating by noshing on, of all things, a veggie burger. How horribly cliché and predictable, right? Tower Cafe’s East African Veggie Burger, however, completely redefines the notion of what to put between two buns. Chomp down on a vegan patty made up of ground peas, sweet potato, garbanzo beans, and corn mixed with African spices and then coated with sesame and sunflower seeds and topped with super yummy roasted red pepper. Bonus: The burger is accompanied by the most delicious peanut sauce ever to grace the planet. For reals. 1518 Broadway, (916) 441-0222, www.towercafe.com. R.L.

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Nutburger at Sunflower Drive In When it comes to vegetarian food in the Sacramento area, there’s no arguing with the Sunflower Drive In. This tiny walk-up burger joint has been a staple since 1978. The classic nutburger ($5.69), topped with crisp vegetables and vegan special sauce, is perfect with an iced tea, vegan potato salad and the live chickens cruising the parking lot. Sunflower is one of only 30 restaurants in the country to receive a 29 food score from Zagat, the highest level the guide bestowed this year. 10344 Fair Oaks Boulevard, (916) 967-4331, www.sunflowernaturalrestaurant.com. B.C.

4

Do it family style Vegetarian Combination plate at Queen Sheba

Ethiopian cuisine is meant to be eaten with the hands and shared with friends. A Vegetarian Combination plate provides a meal with plenty to spare, since every savory bite is wrapped in injera, the sourdough flatbread used to scoop up the food. The combo arrives on a large platter; the dishes laid side by side in a colorful wheel of African delicacies. Spicy lentils, chunky potatoes, greens, crisp salad, smoky yellow peas and other vegetables are sautéed and stewed into a medley of tastes you won’t find anywhere else in Sacramento. 1704 Broadway, (916) 446-1223, www.queenshebas.com. B.C. COST: 4.5—$9.50 for lunch, $10.99 for dinner. CREATIVITY: 4—The Queen Sheba experience is unique. HEALTH: 3.5—Injera adds carbs fast.

5

Maximum Mexican food All-you-can-eat vegan taco night at El Papagayo

All-you-can-eat vegan anything is a restaurant rarity, which makes Wednesdays at El Papagayo extra exciting. For $8.99, diners can enjoy six varieties of vegan tacos: baja tofu, soy chorizo, nopales (cactus), spicy potato, grilled mushroom, and chayote squash. You can try to eat them all, but the unlimited vegan refried beans, Spanish rice, tortilla chips and salsa bar might fill you up first. 5804 Marconi Avenue in Carmichael, (916) 487-7742, http://elpapagayo.net. B.C. COST: 5—$8.99 for all you can eat? Really? Really. CREATIVITY: 4—There are six varieties of tacos and at least as many fresh salsas. HEALTH: 3—Overeating is a danger.

Sweet Potato & Avocado Panini at Sugar Plum Vegan When it comes to meat-free sandwiches, most restaurants are content to slap some veggies (roasted, if you’re lucky) on a French roll and consider their work done. Thank goodness for Sugar Plum Vegan. Not only does it boast an extensive vegan menu (as the name would imply, duh), but the dishes offer a fresh take on standard deli fare. The Sweet Potato & Avocado Panini ($9), for example, may seem like an unusual combination on the page, but here the two starring ingredients are complemented by roasted onions, tomatoes, vegan cheese and a poppy-seed aioli for a filling meal rich in texture and insane taste. 2315 K Street, (916) 706-3309, www.sugarplumvegan.com. R.L.

AWESOME SAUCE Spicy Noodles at Thai Paradise There’s some kind of magic in Thai Paradise’s Spicy Noodles entree. Maybe it’s something the chef slipped into the garlic-chili sauce—though it’s certainly not fish sauce. Whatever it is, it made this excellently spiced dish of rice noodles, tofu, onions and bean sprouts memorable,


ANTI-STREET CRED

as did the vegan-friendly staff. 2770 E. Bidwell Street, Suite 100 in Folsom; (916) 984-8988; www.thaiparadisefolsom.com. S.S.

Veggie tacos special at Chando’s Tacos Chando’s are kind of the anti-street tacos. The small-plate sized corn tortillas are always warm and never stale. The ranchero-style mushrooms belie any signs of mush. Ditto the green peppers and onions. The tomatillo salsa provides the sweetness, the avocado salsa proffers the punch, and the (upon request) habanero sauce wields the punishment. Garnish with peppery radish and lime wedges, and the three tacos and horchata special at Chando’s sets vegetarians back only $6. The lunch-rush line, however, will cost you at least 15 minutes. But like all Sacramento lines— Gunther’s Ice Cream Shop, La Bonne Soupe Café—there’s a damn good reason. 863 Arden Way, (916) 641-8226, www.chandostacos.com. N.M.

FONDUE, HOLD THE CHEESE

TAKEOUT—AND KINDNESS—RULES Vegetarian Meal for 2 at Mati’s Indian Eats Takeout rules at this modest Midtown spot: two generous portions of naan cooked to order (choose garlic); three sides, including palak paneer (spinach and Indian cheese) every other day; rice and veggie samosas; plus some of the spiciest chutneys you’ll ever continue dousing. All for $16.99, which is practically free when it comes to Indian food bartering. And this is not to mention more than one—read: generous—vegan and gluten-free option, such as Mati’s interesting take on aloo gobi. Worth noting: The young guys manning the counter are supremely kind. Also worth noting: I wish they wouldn’t use plastic wrap in the dish trays. 1501 16th Street, (916) 341-0532, www.matisindianeats.com. N.M.

Vegetarian shabu at Heat Shabu Baru As much fun to make as it is to eat! A $10 order of vegetarian shabu (Japanese fondue) comes with an array of raw vegetables, tofu, noodles, herbs and rice—all to be cooked at your table in your own personal pots of broth. Not all broth choices are vegetarian, so be sure to get the rundown from your waiter (we recommend the spicy miso and the tom yum). The atmosphere is sleek and modern, and the interactive nature of shabu makes this a fun meal to share with friends. 2416 18th Street, (916) 930-9888, www.heatshabu.com. B.C.

YOU’RE GONNA GET SO FAT Mint-chip bon bons at Here’s the Scoop! Upon the first bite of a chocolate-covered mint-chip soy ice-cream bon bon from Here’s the Scoop!, you will realize that you have may have just found the food that will make you so fat that you’ll have to start wearing jeans with elastic waistbands—and you’re totally OK with that. This dreamy dessert is made in house without a stolen drop of milk from another species. Six bon bons will only set you back $3.50, thereby making the temptation even more difficult to resist. 3051 Freeport Boulevard, (916) 446-4478. S.S.

some tangy marmalade, and you’ve got a breakfast worth the Goose’s legendarily long waits. 1001 R Street, (916) 443-8825, www.foxandgoose.com. R.L.

DEATH BY AVOCADO Chocolate avocado mousse at Magpie Cafe Not only does Magpie Cafe’s chocolate avocado mousse not have butter, there’s no cream or eggs, either. Instead, this inventive take on the classic dessert relies on the creaminess of avocado, blended with dark chocolate for a treat that’s at once elegant and sinfully satisfying ($6.50). Too full for dessert? That’s what take-out containers were invented for, silly. 1409 R Street, (916) 452-7594, www.magpiecaterers.com. R.L.

NOW, THAT’S ITALIAN! Vegetarian moussaka at Latitudes There’s a giant statue of a 49er panning for gold just off Interstate 80 in Auburn, and I don’t think “vegetarian Greek lasagna” is what a miner would expect just a block away at the beloved-by-locals Latitudes restaurant. Known for its reliable world-food eats, owners Pete and Pat Enoch also have a flair for vegetarian options. Such as this standout: tempeh, instead of minced meat, sautéed in wine, then layered between grilled eggplant, topped with the requisite béchamel sauce. Bake it till the top is crispy gold, then top with seasonal tomatoes,

feta and garnish. The earthiness of the tempeh doesn’t detract from moussaka’s traditional richness; you’ll hardly know you’re vegetarian. 130 Maple Street in Auburn, (530) 885-9535, www.latitudesrestaurant.com. N.M.

MEDITERRANEAN FEEDING FRENZY Happy hour at Kasbah Lounge We’re not even talking about the drinks. Kasbah is on this list purely on the strength of its delicious and unbelievably cheap happyhour appetizers. Two dollars buys a generous selection of gourmet olives, a dish of hummus with warm pita bread, or a plate of spicy chickpeas. Big spenders can shell out $3 for a large serving of crisp french fries or fresh-cooked falafel balls with green tahini sauce. Happy hour prices are available Monday through Friday from 5 to 7 p.m., and Sundays through Thursdays after 10 p.m. 2115 J Street, (916) 442-4388, www.kasbahlounge.com/happy-hour. B.C.

THE FISH WILL THANK YOU Aden Roll at Kru Restaurant Yes, vegetarian sushi makes as much sense as decaf coffee. But if you, vegetarian, do happen to find yourself stuck at a sushi spot sans options, hope for the best. Namely, seated in front of Billy Ngo at Midtown’s Kru. For popular chef Ngo or his able staff will certainly not complain to whip up an

Shoki Ramen House’s Spicy Vegan Ramen has Ietetsu Ueyama loosing his noodle.

HELLA FALAFEL Falafel sandwich at Pita Kitchen Plus Before you roll your eyes because another sandwich landed on the list, remember two things: No. 1, sandwiches are rad; and No. 2, every veg-head needs a reliable falafel dispensary in their mental Rolodex. Thus, the falafel sandwich at Pita Kitchen Plus. It’s perfectly fulfilling with its crispy chickpea-and-herb deep-fried balls nestled in a pita with bits of cucumber and tomato, all drizzled with creamy tahini sauce, and for just five bucks. Hella beats a similarly priced ubiquitous franchise sub. 2989 Arden Way, (916) 480-0560, www.pitakitchenplus.com. S.S.

DON’T FORGET TO TAKE THE NEXT BITE Mushroom Reuben at Fat Face The first time I bit into the Mushroom Reuben ($9) served at the Fat Face cafe tucked away inside Bows and Arrows, I just about zoned out in pure bliss. The sandwich seems simple enough: sautéed portobello mushrooms, tangy sauerkraut and gooey Swiss cheese (for a vegan version, order without), all slathered in a housemade Russian dressing and grilled on hearty walnut bread. Seriously, this sammie is so good, I found myself staring at it, lovingly, between bites, which meant it took a long, long time to finish. And that’s a good thing, 1815 19th Street inside Bows & Arrows, (916) 822-5668, www.bowscollective.com/cafe. R.L.

TOFU WORTH THE WAIT Curry Tofu Scramble at Fox & Goose While more restaurants now offer a tofu-scramble option, the resulting dishes tend to be boring—chunks of tofu stir-fried with some sort of dry seasoning mix. Blech. Not at the Fox & Goose, however. Not only does this British pub defy vegetarian menu expectations, it does so with verve. In particular, the Curry Tofu Scramble ($7.95), served with a pickle (!) on the side borrows liberally from the U.K.’s Indian influences for a dish that won’t make you feel like a vegan kid left out of the fun at the adult meat-eaters’ table. Order a side of the tempeh bacon, slather that side of toast with

“25 BEST VEGGIE DISHES” continued on page 22

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“25 BEST VEGGIE DISHES” continued from page 21

Aden Roll: tempura vegetables, such as asparagus or sweet potato, folded into mildly sweet sushi rice and soy wrap, topped with thinly sliced, chilled avocado, generous micro greens and a spicy-sweet, chili-glaze sauce. Only $8, so order two. 2616 J Street, www.krurestaurant.com. N.M.

ONE OF EVERYTHING Vegan thali at Kathmandu Kitchen The rich selection of plant-based dishes at Nepalese and Indian restaurants can paralyze vegetarians with indecision. How to pick just one entree? Kathmandu’s vegan thali provides the solution. For $11.95, you get samosas, Tibetan momos, chana masala, vegetable

tortillas are rolled up alongside, so you can make your own breakfast burritos. 3440 C Street, (916) 442-7370, www.orphanbreakfast.com. B.C.

A HOLEY BLAST Lemon-lavender vegan doughnut at Doughbot Donuts It’s totally unnecessary to go dunking doughnuts by Doughbot Donuts, because these golden rings are gourmet, wholly—or holey, whatever—created from scratch vs. a premade mix. Ranging from $1.50 to $2 a pop, the slew of vegan flavors include the classic (maple) and the unusual (malasada), but the superstars are the seasonal fruit flavors, particularly, the lemon lavender: It will embrace your taste buds with tender sweetness and then deploy its tart blast. 2226 10th Street, (916) 444-5157, http://doughbotdonuts.com. S.S.

DAMN, THAT’S HOT

Waitress Rachel Wilens shows off how to make your own breakfast burrito at Orphan Breakfast House with the Papas Loco.

Vegetarian wonton soup at Noodle City The bowl size is troughlike, the soup is the hottest you’ll ever be served, and the wontons don’t fall apart immediately—all reasons to adore the vegetarian wonton soup at Noodle City. This charming little eatery with its equally charming name also includes house-made noodles in the bowl for $6.50—just make sure to order it with vegetable broth. These wontons rule the 916 and 530. 129 E Street, Suite D1 in Davis; (530) 757-2618. S.S.

ENDLESS SWEETNESS Thai ice tea at Andy Nguyen Vegetarian For the record, there are plenty of items at Andy Nguyen Vegetarian—downtown Sacramento’s longest standing veg eatery—that are fulfilling and lovely and have enlightened names such as Awakening Mind Chow Fun, to boot. But to its Thai ice tea, let us bow in praise. The beverage is often off-limits to strict vegetarians, since it’s usually made with condensed milk, but Andy’s version of the blacktea beverage is made with either soy or coconut cream. This iced treat is only $3.50 with—wait for it—endless refills. Endless! 2007 Broadway, (916) 736-1157, www.andynguyenvegetarian restaurant.com. S.S. curry, rice, puri, and an assortment of chutneys and dipping sauces. Everything is served thali-style, on a neatly compartmentalized steel tray. 1728 Broadway, (916) 441-2172, www.kathmandukitchen.com; 234 G Street in Davis, (530) 756-3507, http://kathmandukitchendavis.com. B.C.

THE CARBO-LOAD BREAKFAST Papas Loco at Orphan Breakfast House Sometimes, all you want for breakfast is potatoes. Orphan Breakfast House will never judge. For $8.25, it’ll serve up a plate of Papas Loco, the rosemary-grilled spuds so crazy they’re covered with black beans, fresh salsa, jalapeños, avocado and cilantro. (Plus jack cheese and sour cream, if that’s your thing.) Fresh-made 22

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AIN’T NO PALTRY PASTRY Raspberry-lemon scone at Azna Gluten Free A well-made scone is, unfortunately, a rarity for herbivores to find. Azna Gluten Free’s raspberrylemon scone, fortunately, is both well-made and, now, found. Its patent-pending gluten-free flour mix yields a perfectly palatable texture. The bakery may be located a bit out of the way, but this tasty pastry won’t have you missing the wheat or the dairy of a conventional scone. 2647 Cameron Park Drive in Cameron Park, (530) 677-5810, www.aznaglutenfree.com. S.S. Ω


May picks by SHOKA

Necklace made out of recycled inner tubes by Marirose.

Like it or not Risky business Joel Reber’s sculpture has a tendency to be a little rough around the edges, physically clunky and nostalgic. But its quirkiness is, as Blue Moon Gallery owner Carol Brewer said, “intriguing.” The artist himself said people “either like my work or they don’t.” And people have had the opportunity to like or not his work for some time, now: The Sacramento State alum has been exhibiting since the 1950s. His sculptures are at the Blue Moon this month with abstract painter Gloria Woolley.

Gwenna Howard admits it: “We’re taking a risk here.” Instead of the usual art show for the month of May, her Skinner/Howard Contemporary Art gallery will be hosting a “pop-up shop.” For those who attended the Sellout Buyout events (RIP), the idea is similar. Howard wrote: “We have selected many different vendors, artists [and] jewelers who drop off their wares and the organizing group will merchandise it and set up the whole gallery as a store.” In addition to art, there will be clothing, jewelry, furniture and home accessories for sale. And Howard is hopeful that if the pop-up is a success, she’d like to invite “more indie designers and give them an outlet once in a while.” The shop pops up on Saturday and Sunday, May 12-13; and Saturday and Sunday, May 19-20. There’s also a preview on Friday, May, 11, with food trucks standing by to round it off.

Where: Blue Moon Gallery, 2353 Albatross Way; (916) 920-2444; www.bluemoongallerysacto.com. Second Saturday reception: May 12, 6-9 p.m. Through June 2. Hours: Wednesday through Saturday, noon-5 p.m.

Where: Skinner/Howard Contemporary Art, 723 S Street; (916) 446-1786; www.skinnerhowardart.com. Preview: Friday, May 11, 5-7 p.m. Second Saturday and Sunday: May 12, noon-8 p.m.; May 13, noon-5 p.m. Closing weekend: Saturday, May 19, noon-5 p.m.; Sunday, May 20, noon-4 p.m.

“Viastora” by Joel Reber, wood.

Twin towers Local photographer Richard Gilles recently relocated to Redding, but he maintains a presence in Sacramento with his Towers exhibition. This body of work returns to his panoramic style of capturing inanimate objects in desolate landscapes interrupted by humans. This time, the photographs are a result of his scouring of California since 2007 for twin monoliths of various kinds—silos, water tanks, nuclear cooling towers—and “the most recent one was shot last week,” he said. All of the locations are anywhere from Death Valley to Santa Rosa, he said, adding “you don’t find these things every day.” Well, except for at Axis Gallery for the month of May. Where: Axis Gallery, 1517 19th Street; (916) 443-9900, www.axisgallery.org. Preview reception: Thursday, May 10, 6-8 p.m. Second Saturday reception: May 12, 6-9 p.m. Through May 27. Hours: Saturday and Sunday, noon-5 p.m.; or by appointment.

“Cooling Towers” by Richard Gilles, photograph, 2008. BEFORE

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BROADWAY

FREE ts from t e Swe Trea ndies a Kobasic C s! for Mom

The 2 nd Sunday of Every Month 630am – 330pm

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ART MAP MIDTOWN 1 ART STUDIOS 1727 I St., behind Michaelangelo’s; (916) 444-2233

2 ARTFOX GALLERY 2213 N St., Ste. B; (916) 835-1718; www.artfox.us

3 AXIS GALLERY 1517 19th St., (916) 443-9900, www.axisgallery.org

4 B. SAKATA GARO 923 20th St., (916) 447-4276, www.bsakatagaro.com

5 BARTON GALLERY 1723 I St., (916) 443-4025, www.sacartz.com

6 BEATNIK STUDIOS 2421 17th St., (916) 443-5808, www.beatnik-studios.com

7 BLUE LAMP 1400 Alhambra Blvd., (916) 455-3400, www.bluelamp.com

8 BOWS & ARROWS 1815 19th St., (916) 822-5668, www.bowscollective.com

9 CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 1519 19th St., (916) 498-9811, www.ccasac.org

10 CUFFS 2523 J St., (916) 443-2881, www.shopcuffs.com

11 DEEP ART AND YOGA 2030 H St., (916) 470-9959, www.deepartandyoga.com

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The whole world is your own. — Sri Sarada Devi

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12 GALLERY 2110 2110 K St., (916) 501-3455, www.gallery2110.com

13 INTEGRATE 1529 28th St., (916) 594-9579, http://integrateservicessacramento. blogspot.com

14 KENNEDY GALLERY 1114 20th St., (916) 446-1522, www.kennedygallerysac.com

15 LA RAZA GALERÍA POSADA 1022 22nd St., (916) 446-5133, www.larazagaleriaposada.org

16 LITTLE RELICS 908 21st St., (916) 716-2319, www.littlerelics.com

17 MIDTOWN FRAMING & GALLERY 1005 22nd St., (916) 447-7558, www.midtownframing.com

18 OLD CITY ART GALLERY 2512 Franklin Blvd., (916) 952-4810

19 OLD SOUL CO. 1716 L St., (916) 443-7685, www.oldsoulco.com

20 PHONO SELECT 2312 K St., (916) 400-3164, www.phonoselect.com

21 SACRAMENTO ART COMPLEX 2110 K St., Ste. 4; (916) 501-3455; www.sacramentoartcomplex.com


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22 SACRAMENTO GAY & LESBIAN CENTER 1927 L St., (916) 442-0185, http://saccenter.org

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32 ZANZIBAR GALLERY 1731 L St., (916) 443-5601, www.zanzibartrading.com

23 SHINY NICKEL ART GALLERY 1518 21st St., (916) 224-7051

24 SIDE SHOW STUDIOS 5635 Freeport Blvd., Ste. 6; (916) 391-6400; www.sideshowstudios.net (916) 956-2491, http://tangent-gallery.com

26 UNION HALL GALLERY 2126 K Street, (916) 448-2452 (916) 443-5721, www.universityart.com

28 THE URBAN HIVE 1931 H St., (916) 585-4483, www.theurbanhive.com

33 APPEL GALLERY 931 T St., (916) 442-6014,

43 TEMPLE COFFEE 1010 Ninth St.,

www.appelgallery.com (916) 444-2787

35 ARTHOUSE UPSTAIRS 1021 R St., (530) 979-1611 St., (916) 444-7125, www.artcollab.com

37 CROCKER ART MUSEUM 216 O St., (916) 808-7000, www.crockerartmuseum.org

38 E STREET GALLERY AND STUDIOS

29 VERGE CENTER FOR THE ARTS 625 S St., (916) 448-2985, http://vergeart.com

30 VIEWPOINT PHOTOGRAPHIC ART CENTER 2015 J St., (916) 441-2341, www.viewpointgallery.org

1115 E St., (916) 505-7264

39 MILK GALLERY 212 13th St., (916) 873-5920, www.facebook.com/milkartgallery

40 PAMELA SKINNER/GWENNA HOWARD CONTEMPORARY ART 723 S St., (916)

31 VOX SACRAMENTO 1818 11th St.,

(916) 397-8958, www.artist-patris.com

42 SMITH GALLERY 1020 11th St.,

36 ARTISTS’ COLLABORATIVE GALLERY 129 K

27 UNIVERSITY ART 2601 J Street,

41 PATRIS STUDIO GALLERY AT S12 1200 S St.,

DOWNTOWN/OLD SAC 34 ART FOUNDRY GALLERY 1025 R St.,

25 TANGENT GALLERY 2900 Franklin Blvd.,

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Ste. 100; (916) 446-4444; www.smithgallery.com (916) 443-4960, www.templecoffee.com

EAST SAC 44 ELLIOTT FOUTS GALLERY 4749 J St., (916) 736-1429, www.efgallery.com

45 EVOLVE THE GALLERY 2907 35th St., (916) 572-5123, www.evolvethegallery.com

46 FE GALLERY & IRON ART STUDIO 1100 65th St., (916) 456-4455, www.fegallery.com

47 GALLERY 14 3960 60th St., (916) 456-1058, www.gallery14.net

48 JAYJAY 5520 Elvas Ave., (916) 453-2999, www.jayjayart.com

446-1786, www.skinnerhowardart.com

www.voxsac.com.

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NIGHT&DAY 10THURS DON’T MISS! THE ENGLISH BEAT & THE ROMANTICS: The English

Beat and special guest the Romantics will perform at the Dixon May Fair. The English Beat manages to fuse all of its musical influences—soul, reggae, pop and punk—into a unique sound that is highly danceable. One of Detroit’s best exports from the ’80s, the Romantics are best known their hits like “Talking in Your Sleep” and “What I Like About You.” Th, 5/10, 7pm. $20-$25. Dixon May Fair Grounds, 655 S. First St. in Dixon; http://dixonmayfair.com.

List your event! Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Special Events SACRAMENTO JOB FAIR: Meet face to face with top employers at the National Career Fairs Job Fair. Register online to receive the company list and online job-fair guide. Free résumé reviews will be available at the event from two local career experts. Th, 5/10, 11am-2pm. Free. Red Lion Sacramento Inn, 1401 Arden Way; (916) 649-4852; www.nationalcareerfairs.com/ career_fairs.

THIS AMERICAN LIFE—LIVE!: Ira Glass, host of the critically acclaimed radio show This American Life, returns to movie screens nationwide with This American Life—Live!, a special live performance. Broadcast live from the Skirball Center at New York University, Glass will present stories by writer David Rakoff, comedian Tig Notaro and Snap Judgment host Glynn Washington. Th, 5/10, 8pm. Call for pricing. Century Stadium 14, 1590 Ethan Way; (916) 922-7044; www.fathomevents.com/ originals/event/thisamerican life2012.aspx?d=5/10/2012.

Wait, there’s more! Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

UCP HUMANITARIAN OF THE YEAR AWARD DINNER: United Cerebral Palsy of Sacramento and Northern California will hold its 19th annual Humanitarian of the Year Award Dinner. The group, which empowers people with developmental disabilities, will honor Chevo Ramirez, regional vice president of Wells Fargo Foundation for the Northern and Central California Region. The event includes a gourmet dinner and auctions. Th, 5/10, 6-9pm. Call for pricing. Sheraton Grand Sacramento, 1230 J St.; (916) 283-8317; www.ucpsacto.org.

Concerts CRAZY JAZZ: The Sacramento City College Jazz Ensemble plays popular songs including the “Pink Panther Remix,” “Attack of the Killer Tomatoes,” “On Green Dolphin Street,” “Yankee Doodle” and more. Th, 5/10, 7pm. Free. Sacramento City College Student Center, 3835 Freeport Blvd.; (916) 558-2515; www.scc.losrios.edu.

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DON’T MISS! SPRING INTO BEER:

Sacramento has a rich beer history. Participate in that tradition by touring the town and tasting what there is to offer. This tour includes four tastes at each site, a special session with the brewers and a tour of at least one brewery. F, 5/11, 4-8pm. $65. Hoppy Brewing Company, 6300 Folsom Blvd.; (916) 335-4427; http://brewyourown adventures.com/Spring_ into_Beer.html.

Special Events SEXY, SINGLE, SOLD: A BENEFIT CONCERT: This benefit concert and charity auction benefits the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. Enjoy the music of the Chris Gardner Band and Mercy Me while you bid on things like an autographed guitar or one of Sacramento’s most eligible bachelors or bachelorettes. All proceeds from this event benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. F, 5/11, 7pm-midnight. $10-$12. The Dante Club, 2330 Fair Oaks Blvd.; (916) 925-8230.

Art Galleries 1801 L ST.: 1801 L Courtyard Art Show, join for an evening of creative arts, music and inspiration in a beautiful outdoor venue right in the heart of Midtown. F, 5/11, 5-9pm. Free. 1801 L St.

THE GALLERY: Second Friday ArtAbout, the gallery located inside US Bank will feature local professional and student (Sac State and UC Davis) artists showing work in mixed media, photography, paintings, sculptures and more. Refreshments will be served. F, 5/11, 4-7pm. Free. 304 F St. in Davis; (916) 646-4374.

SACRAMENTO STATE: The Art Ball, roll on over to Sac State for the annual Art Ball. The University will be overflowing with art displays. Student paintings, photography, sculpture, electronic art and more will be displayed in Kadema Hall galleries and studios, the Library Gallery, the Art Sculpture Lab and Mariposa Hall. A reception in the Kadema Courtyard will offer music and refreshments. Parking permits will be available in the Kadema office. F, 5/11, 5-8pm. Free. 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5155.

Concerts KELLIE PICKLER AND PHIL VASSAR: Kellie Pickler, featured on the fifth season of American Idol, landed a contract with 19 Recordings/BNA Records, launching a career that is still going. Phil Vassar’s self-titled debut made him country’s leading piano man with the success of songs like “Carlene,” “Just Another Day in Paradise” and “Six-Pack Summer.” Every concert ticket includes admission to the Dixon May Fair. F, 5/11, 7pm. $29-$65. Dixon May Fairgrounds, 655 S. First St. in Dixon; http://dixonmayfair.com.

12SAT

DON’T MISS! BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S FILM & FOOD EVENT: The

Nevada City Film Festival, Miners Foundry Cultural Center and Emily’s Catering and Cakes will present Breakfast at Tiffany’s, the classic, 1961 romantic-comedy film starring Audrey Hepburn and George Peppard, followed by a plentiful spread of hors d’oeuvres, plus live music and dancing. Sa, 5/12, 4:30pm. $35-$38. Miners Foundry Cultural Center, 325 Spring St. in Nevada City; (530) 265-5040; www.minersfoundry.org.

Special Events IS YOUR NUMBER IMPORTANT?: This event is a dialogue about the alarming rates of sexually transmitted infections and HIV within the African-American community. According to the Center for Disease Control, STI and HIV rates in the AfricanAmerican community are eight times higher than other ethnic groups in the United States. Sa, 5/12, 6-9pm. $5. Carol’s Books, 1913 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 565-3845.

WINE, BERRIES AND CHOCOLATE: Celebrate berry season this Mother’s Day weekend with wine and berry pairings, chocolate treats and vendors offering gifts to delight mothers. Sa, 5/12, 11am-5pm. Free admission. Old Sugar Mill, 35265 Willow Ave. in Clarksburg; (916) 765-5345; www.oldsugarmill.com.

Art Galleries CREATIVE IMPRESSIONS GALLERY: Second Saturday Vacation Memories, join for an evening of beautiful vacation-photo giclee art by Bobby and Denise Rinkle, handmade wire art and handmade gourd art. There will also be a special Mother’s day raffle and live music from local band In The No. Sa, 5/12, 6-10pm. Free. 917 Seventh St., (916) 600-6980.

THE GALLERY: Second Saturday Art Show, the gallery located inside US Bank will feature local professional and student (Sac State and UC Davis) artists showing work in mixed media, photography, paintings,

sculptures and more. Refreshments will be served. Sa, 5/12, 4-7pm. Free. 2264 Fair Oaks Blvd., (916) 646-4374.

SACRAMENTO GAY & LESBIAN CENTER: THEshow’s mission is to showcase both emerging and established artists of the Sacramento region in an environment of creativity, love and acceptance. Second Sa of every month, 5-9pm through 12/8. Free. 1927 L St., (916) 442-0185.

SHIMO CENTER FOR THE ARTS: Betty Bailey, Larry Fox, Mick Brown, view drawings by Betty Bailey, paintings by Larry Fox and sculpture by Mick Brown in this new gallery space. Sa, 5/12, 6-9pm. Free. 2117 28th St., (916) 706-1162.

SOL COLLECTIVE: Still closing reception. Still is the newest group exhibition presented by Sol Collective. It features collage and photography work from Northern California artists Bobby Mull, Liz Donner, Jesse Vasquez, Savannah Macias, Brandi Scott, Dominick Porras, Robby Moncrief, Trent Liddicoat, Paloma Glasser, and Carlos Amaya. Sa, 5/12, 7-10pm. Free. 2574 21st St., (916) 832-0916, www.solcollective.org.

STUDIO 24: DeviantSac Group Art Show, DeviantSac members will show works ranging from illustrations, paintings, sculptures, jewelry to photographs. DeviantSac is composed of local

INTRO TO A RESOURCE-BASED ECONOMY: The Zeitgeist Movement will be holding a presentation at the Whole Earth Festival on the University of California Davis campus. The festival promotes education, music and art. The Zeitgeist Movement is a sustainability advocacy group that looks at environmental and social issues and solutions. Sa, 5/12, 10:30am12:30pm. Free. UC Davis, Young Hall Room 194, 1 Shields Ave. in Davis; (530) 752-1011; http://wef.ucdavis.edu.

artists who are members of www.deviantart.com and trying alternative ways to exhibit their art works through out the greater Sacramento area. Sa, 5/12, 4-9pm. Free. 2220 K St., (916) 442-8262, www.studio24.com.

UNION HALL GALLERY: Out of My Mind, ceramicist Sandy Fong Whetstone combines whimsy and human form, sculptures credible and incredible. Bob Miller’s paintings complement Whetstone’s works. Sa, 5/12, 6-9pm. Free. 2126 K St., (916) 448-2452.

Kids’ Stuff ORANGEVALE TOUCH-A-TRUCK EVENT: See cool trucks and support the American Cancer Society at the first annual Orangevale Touch-A-Truck event. Children and adults are encouraged to climb inside firetrucks, police cars and dump trucks as well as a variety of other vehicles. Owners and operators will be on hand to answer questions about their vehicles. Sa, 5/12, 10am-2pm. $3. Casa Roble High School, 9151 Oak Ave. in Orangevale; (916) 712-7904.

Poetry THE SHOW: A POETRY AND MUSIC EVENT: Experience “The Show,” an ongoing open-mic poetry and music event. It’s guaranteed to

KIM STANLEY ROBINSON & PAOLO BACIGALUPI: Kim Stanley Robinson is an American science-fiction writer known for his award-winning Mars trilogy. His work delves into ecological and sociological themes. Paolo Bacigalupi is the author of The Drowned Cities, The Windup Girl, and others. Both will deliver a lecture. Sa, 5/12, 1-4pm. Free. UC Davis, Young Hall Room 194, 1 Shields Ave. in Davis; (530) 752-1011; http://wef.ucdavis.edu.

LARRY THE CABLE GUY: Larry the Cable Guy and special guest Reno Collier will perform at the Dixon May Fair. With his signature catchphrase, “Git-r-Done,” Larry the Cable Guy is currently the host of Only In America with Larry the Cable Guy for the History Channel, now filming its second season. Ticket price includes admission to the fair. Sa, 5/12, 7pm. $35-$75. Dixon May Fairgrounds, 655 S. First St. in Dixon; http://dixonmayfair.com.

SCAVENGER HUNT MEETS JAPANESE GAME SHOW: The Asobuyo Photo Scavenger Hunt is a terribly fun and engaging way to play and get to know people in ways you normally wouldn’t. In teams, work together to complete social challenges and provide proof through videos and pictures. Some challenges are easier but worth fewer points, and others are harder and worth more points. Sa, 5/12,

ILLUSTRATION BY HAYLEY DOSHAY

11FRI

2-6pm. $10. Midtown Village Cafe, 1827 I St.; (916) 672-2112; www.letsplay.eventsbot.com.

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be family-friendly entertainment in a positive uplifting environment. This edition is a Mother’s Day-themed event featuring M.E. Miller, T.D. Trice, Malik Saunders, Jamie Jackson, Terry Moore and the band LSB. An open-mic follows. Sa, 5/12, 7-9pm. $5. Florin Business Arts Complex (Obama Room), 2251 Florin Rd.; (916) 208-7638.

Sports & Recreation FLY FISHING CLINIC AND SWAP MEET: California Fly Fishers Unlimited and Fulton-El Camino Parks District invite you to join a day of fly fishing instruction and fun. This event is open to beginning fly fishers and experienced ones. There will also be events for the kids including fish games and face painting. Sa, 5/12, 9am-3pm. Free. Howe Avenue Park, 2201 Cottage Way; (916) 927-3802; http://cffu.org.

13SUN

DON’T MISS! NAKBA COMMEMORATION: This

event is an evening of remembrance, food and celebration of the preservation of Palestine’s rich cultural heritage. Featured speakers include Thaer Ahmad, Hatem Bazian and Awad Hamdan. Su, 5/13, 5-9pm. $5. Citrus Heights Community Center, 6300 Fountain Square Dr. in Citrus Heights; (916) 727-4778.

14MON 15TUES

world of insects through the lens of cultural entomology based on how they influenced the emergence of the human civilization, and what they mean to us today in our everyday lives. Su, 5/13, 11am-1pm. Call for pricing. UC Davis Young Hall 194, 1 Shields Ave. in Davis; (530) 752-1011; http://wef.ucdavis.edu.

Special Events

Special Events INSECTS: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE: The Whole Earth Festival presents Emmet Brady, an innovator in the emerging field of Cultural Entomology and creator of the Insect News Network. Emmet Brady will explore the

Mother Race is a women-only 5k race held on Mother’s Day. The day begins at 8 a.m. with a kid’s one-mile race followed by the 5k at 8:30 a.m. It is a great way for husbands and children to cheer on mom as she accomplishes a goal of her own. There will be a post-race celebration for families. Su, 5/13, 8am. $40. Morse Park, 5540 Bellaterra Dr. in Elk Grove; (916) 765-2516; www.runlikeamotherrace.com.

SACRAMENTO STATE UNIVERSITY UNION BALLROOM: Design stu-

CAPITAL DECADES: A 1930S FASHION SHOW: Join for a

ever think all you need is love? If you’re looking for that puppy love, or have love fever, My Sister’s House has just the show for you to see. Join My Sister’s House and emcee, West Sacramento Mayor Christopher Cabaldon, for a pre-show reception followed honoring heroes in our community who have made a real difference to women in crisis. M, 5/14, 5-8:30pm. $50-$100. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (916) 448-2881; www.ydnetwork.org.

MOTHERS DAY 5K: The Run Like a

Art Galleries

DON’T MISS!

STOP! IN THE NAME OF LOVE: Do you

Kids’ Stuff

www.2025events.com/5701/ index.html.

dents exhibit works, The best photos, graphic designs and interior designs by Sac State students will be on display at the annual Department of Design Spring Show. Tu, 5/15, 10am-8pm. Free. 6000 J St.; (916) 278-6997.

1930s fashion show featuring vintage ensembles presented by Sacramento Art Deco Society president Doreen Sinclair. Tu, 5/15, 6-7:30pm. Free. Tsakopoulos Library Galleria, 828 I St.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

16WED

Special Events 2012 SPRING DANCE PERFORMANCE:

Concerts

The Movement Alliance School and Holt Ballet Conservatory will present its 2012 Spring Concert. The spring performance will feature premiers and repertoire by Marissa Hernandez, Lovie Bucknell, Azriel LaMarca, Brie Cohn and Yelena Holt, along with student choreography. Tu, 5/15, 6pm. $12-$15. Miners Foundry Cultural Center, 325 Spring St. in Nevada City; (530) 265-5040; www.minersfoundry.org.

STRING PROJECT PLAYS AT SAC STATE: Sacramento’s young musicians gather for the annual spring performance of the String Project. The String Project provides group lessons in violin, cello and bass for local children in the third grade and up, taught by Sac State students. M, 5/14, 7pm. Free. Sacramento State Music Recital Hall, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5155; www.csus.edu/music.

Special Events LIVE WITH THE CHEF: BERRY INFUSION: Chef Rina will demonstrate special cooking techniques and share secrets for incorporating fresh blackberries, raspberries and strawberries into dishes to create low-calorie but high-impact recipes. W, 5/16, 6pm. $20. Arden Hills Resort Club & Spa, 1220 Arden Hills Ln.; (916) 213-4373; www.ardenhills.net.

Wait, there’s more! Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

CAR SHOW AND STREET FAIR: The “High Octane Street Fair” on Vernon Street in downtown Roseville features live bands playing every Tuesday, food, a beer and margarita garden, a farmers market and fun zone for kids. A classic car show features more than 120 classic cars from before 1973.

Tuesdays, 5-9pm; Through 7/31. Free. Vernon St. in Roseville; (916) 786-2023;

LA

F

rom the creators of the Saw film franchise and Repo! The Genetic Opera, comes another dark horror film: The Devil’s Carnival. Currently on a spring screening tour, the musical theater-filled film—complete with its rock soundtrack and horror-carnival theme—makes its way to The Colonial Theatre this Friday. This flick advertises itself as the unlikely mash-up of Glee and Tales From the Crypt. It stars veteran actors Sean Patrick Flanery (The Boondock Saints, Saw 3D: The Final Chapter), Briana Evigan (Step Up 2: The Streets) and Paul Sorvino (Goodfellas, Law & Order), as well as gothic-Victorian singer-songwriter Emilie Autumn and Slipknot’s percussionist Shawn Crahan. The film’s dark plot weaves the stories of a thieving kleptomaniac, a teenager and an obsessed father who all face moral problems. The three subsequently purchase tickets to the Devil’s Carnival where they’re introduced to a cast of Lucifer’s creepiest carnies. Sounds like a good opportunity for a song-and-dance routine, no? Needless to say, like a modern-day Rocky Horror Picture Show, the crowd is encouraged to dress up in horror-core clown costumes, satanic garb and other scary clothing in hopes of winning a costume contest. Singalongs and a Q-and-A session with director Darren Lynn Bousman and writer Terrance Zdunich add glam to the one-night only film screening. A soundtrack can be purchased on iTunes, and a trailer (as well as satanicthemed graphic design and Web animation) can be found at the film’s website. The Devil’s Carnival, 8 p.m. Friday, May 11. Tickets cost $21.55 for general admission and $32.33 for the show and a signed poster. The Colonial Theatre, 3522 Stockton Boulevard; www.thedevilscarnival.com.

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DISH

Gringo-wiches See FOOD STUFF

The Zen of fish bits

Squeeze in n the Sun!

Ninja Sushi 8937 Folsom Boulevard, (916) 369-1935, www.ninjasushisac.com by GREG LUCAS

Rating:

★ ★ ★ 1/2 Dinner for one:

$10 - $25

FLAWED

★★ HAS MOMENTS

★★★ APPEALING

★★★★ AUTHORITATIVE

★★★★★ EPIC

Still hungry?

Search SN&R’s “Dining Directory” to find local restaurants by name or by type of food. Sushi, Mexican, Indian, Italian— discover it all in the “Dining” section at www.newsreview.com.

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There’s nothing stealthy about Ninja Sushi. In fact, entry can give one a start as Julian, the effusive host, offers a loud and longish greeting in Japanese that drowns out the din of the other diners at this former drive-thru. Even on busy Fridays, when the sake bombs are 99 cents. But like its namesake, Ninja delivers food with swiftness and skill. Often Julian will sit down and enjoy the chef’s creations at various tables. Or send over a special treat such as two pillars wrapped in saba and crowned with sauces that spill down and swirl across the small square plate. Julian is a fitting poster guy for Ninja’s motto: “Good Food. Fun. Great Deals.” Naturally, there are other offerings besides fish bits: Like the two-dozen lunches starting at $6.95 and 17 dinner entrees beginning at $11.95 with chicken, beef, tempura, gyoza, tonkatsu, donburi and curry all part of the mix. But they’re way at the back of the colorful sushi-centric, heavily illustrated menu. There are more than 85 rolls here, which is perhaps 10 more than the wide-ranging selection at Sushi Hook over on Howe Avenue. There’s no shortage of rolls with place names, those with names that honor events such as a Hole in One, or those crediting various individuals who helped inspire the roll’s creation. Old Auburn, deep-fried fake crabmeat with salmon on the outside; Brandi’s Special Roll, with spicy crabmeat, avocado, yellow tail and spicy tuna; and Folsom Blvd., with freshwater eel, avocado and cream cheese are just some notables. But then there are the rolls named for Annie, Kayla, Jess, Sari, Lindsay, Akira, Kim Bob, David, Rhonda, Jenny, Koji, Melody, Peter, King Kong, Snow White and (the no doubt fiendish) Dr. Lorenzo. Short of systematically powering through the multi-pages of listings, where should a sushi swain begin? In keeping with the rigorous scientific methodology employed here to render each week’s precise appraisals, the best starting point is somewhere that’s been visited before (that has sort of a Zenlike ring to it. Now snatch the wasabi from my hand, Grasshopper). Creating this foundation for comparison at Japanese eateries is Hawaiian poke and what’s usually called “pepperfin.” These two dishes trend toward the sashimi end of the sushi spectrum—pepperfin usually comprises slices of fish lying in a slick of ponzu with jalapeño and a splash of green onions on top. But that allows a taste of the fish and provides a largely agreed-upon universe of components. Ninja breaks the mold on poke. Its is a leafy green salad of FRONTLINES

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iceberg that, because of its inclusion, seems long on lettuce and short on tuna. Downtown’s Zen Sushi, for instance, offers a jumbled pile of ahi cubes with some daikon threads and a bit of wakame. Actually, there’s a fair amount of tuna in Ninja’s version accompanied by some long, thin cucumber strips and a dusting of sesame seeds. Poke isn’t an entree at Zen Sushi. At Ninja, it sure could be. The pepperfin falls squarely within the norm presented as a volcano of seared ahi, studded with bits of jalapeño and adorned with plenty of daikon threads.

urgerS Squeeze b gerS Veggie bur ndwicheS a S eaK SqueezeSt

Ninja Sushi breaks the mold on poke.

Tu-Thur 11am -9pm Fri-SaT 11am-11pm Sunday 11am-6pm CloSed mondayS

Also sampled is the Spicy Rhonda, of whose identity the server has “no idea.” The combination of spicy and deep-fried tuna with salmon, tuna and crabmeat on top needs way more jalapeño to live up to its claim. Servers allege the Flaming Dragon—served on fire, obviously—is unique to Ninja although the folks at Sushi Cafe on Freeport Boulevard feature something comparable. The Kim Bob offers a changeup. It’s centered on a core of teriyaki beef or chicken counterbalanced with pickled daikon, cucumber and avocado and a bit of seaweed salad. Overall: Festive—although a quiet corner can be elusive—crammed with options and brightened by the presence of its owner. Leave the nunchaku at home, sensei. Ω

1630 K St • Sacramento • 916-492-2499

we love you mama!

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THE V WORD

all s mama

Crush the damn cups There are numerous videos of a squirrel or a skunk with a Yoplait yogurt container stuck on its head on YouTube—and it’s not funny. Animals reach inside discarded cups to lick out the remainder of sugary yogurt. But because of its signature design—narrower at the top than at the base—the animal can’t pull it off. If the critter doesn’t suffocate, it may starve to death, or like in one disturbing video (http://tinyurl.com/damnyogurt), the oxygen- and sensory-deprived skunk wanders into oncoming traffic. If you’re a lacto-vegetarian, abstain from buying this product, and if you see the containers, crush them. It’s an unexpected example of yet another way in which dairy products cause harm.

eat free!

Up to a $7.99 value when you purchase $20 on other food you love! exp. 2/14/10

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Phone orders welcome!: 916. 451.4000

’10 Sun-Wed 10:30am - 9:30pm 07 07• Thurs - Sat 10:30am -10:00pm

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Up to $10.99 when Mama’s Family spends $25 or more on other food & drink. Exp. 5/20/12. Not valid w/other offers.

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DISH Where to eat? Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

Midtown

Mati’s There’s a reason “Indian Express” was part of Mati’s previous title. A variety of dishes are offered daily in a buffet, but Mom serves instead of diners slopping stuff onto their own plates. Options are fairly straightforward: A small dish at $6.99 with rice and two items, and a large, which has up to four items, at $8.99. Subtract $1 if going vegetarian. There’s five dishes in the daily veg rotation, most of them vegan. Offerings run the gamut from mild to spicy, although the temperature of spicy is well within tolerance, except for the most heat adverse. This is straightup, nicely prepared Indian food without frills. Mom and daughter make it even more appealing. Indian. 1501 16th St.; (916) 341-0532. Dinner for one: $9-$12. ★★★ The Porch The Porch is light and white with a vibe that suggests the airy sweep of an antebellum Charleston eatery. One can only envy the extensive on-site research conducted by chef Jon Clemens and business partners John Lopez and Jerry Mitchell, creators of Capitol Garage. The most enjoyable menu selections are salads or seafood sandwiches or entrees. Slaw on the barbecue

pork sandwich elevates its status, and its pickled vegetables are sweet and tart, adding an additional dimension. The shrimp and grits dish, while laden with cheddar and gravy, is a synergistic mélange— perhaps The Porch’s trademark dish. Also in the running is the purloo, the low country’s version of jambalaya, with andouille, crunchy crawfish appendages, and the same sautéed bell peppers and onions that also appear in the grits. Southern. 1815 K St., (916) 444-2423. Dinner for one: $20-$30. ★★★

The Press Bistro There are flashes of Greece, such as the crisscross rows of bare light bulbs over the front patio. Or the summery small plate of stacked watermelon squares with feta and mint. Even Italian vegetarians get cut into the action with mushroom ravioli and its corn, leek and dill triumvirate. Another special is a colorful small plate of pepperonata—slightly-pickled-in-champagne-vinegar stripes of peppers awash in olive oil. Speaking of olive oil, it’s all that’s needed to accompany the fluffy, light focaccia, whose four rectangles come neatly stacked. Share The Press with someone you love. Mediterranean. 1809 Capitol Ave., (916) 444-2566. Dinner for one: $15-$30. ★★★1⁄2

A number of items from the “Farm to Plate,” “Tasty Snacks” and “Buns” sections of the menu land high in the plus column, however. Any place that offers chimichurri rocks hard. Here it enlivens the Farm Animal Lollipops snack—particularly the lamb—and the mayor-ofMunchkin-City-sized lamb bocadillas. American. 2718 J St., (916) 706-2275. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★1⁄2

Italian deli should be and more, right down to the Louie Prima on the box and the timpano in the refrigerated display case. Several lobbyists, who elect to drive the six to seven blocks from their offices near the capitol, to pick up sandwiches or—in one instance—five meatballs, begin spewing superlatives when asked their views on Sampino’s. Italian Deli. 1607 F St., (916) 441-2372. Dinner for one: $7-$15. ★★★★1⁄2

Sampino’s Towne Foods

Thir13en From the start—and, lo,

Sampino’s Towne Foods turns out to be a bright jewel in a drab Alkali Flat strip mall of paycheck cashers and laundromat. It’s everything an

these many weeks hence—the situp-take-notice plate remains the pork tonnato sandwich. It’s the Italian peasant spread or sauce

The Red Rabbit Kitchen & Bar Resistance is futile when it comes to Red Rabbit’s desserts. The berry-infused ice-cream sandwich is bright and refreshing with a chewy shell that dovetails neatly with the smooth fruity interior. But there’s less effusiveness for the entrees. The Bastard Banh Mi doesn’t improve on the original.

EAT IT AND REAP

made with tonno—tuna—tonnato that empowers this open-face masterwork. Spread on a toasted half baguette, the tonnato is the foundation upon which the pork rests. Above the pork is an awning of mixed greens, with a generous overhang, sprinkled with not enough crispy onions and paperthin slices of pickled fennel. There isn’t space to wax poetic about the cordon bleu sandwich, the burger, the designer cocktails or the fizzy water from Wales. See for yourself. Very authoritative. American. 1300 H St., (916) 594-7669. Dinner for one: $12-$20. ★★★★1⁄2

East Sac

Formoli’s Bistro Formoli’s is the other half of the restaurant swap on J Street that sent Vanilla Bean Bistro (formerly known as Gonul’s J Street Cafe) to Formoli’s old warren and brought Formoli’s into its current high-ceilinged, spare, dark cranberry space of black tables and chairs just six blocks away. Flavor combinations are a big part of the Formoli playbook, and the blend of the tower’s components is the payoff just as it is in the salad of beets—wafer-thin enough to be used interchangeably in the carpaccio—with shaved fennel, frisée, a few orange segments and

by ANN MARTIN ROLKE

Retro summer treat It’s just starting to get warm enough that my thoughts turn to ice cream. Or is that a brain freeze? In any case, I’m looking forward to a retro treat this summer: ice-cream sandwiches. I used to like to squish melty vanilla ice cream out of the chocolate cookies around it, but my tastes have matured. At The Red Rabbit Kitchen & Bar (2718 J Street), I noticed a honey-and-black-raspberry ice-cream sandwich listed on the chalkboard. Ginger Elizabeth Chocolates (1801 L Street, Suite 60) has transcendent ice creams nestled

between large macarons. It’ll definitely be featuring pistachio-lemon and salty-caramel versions. If you’re feeling creative, you can make your own ice-cream sandwich at What’s the Scoop? (6350 Folsom Boulevard). Choose a cookie flavor and an ice cream, and they’ll make it while you wait. I think Bing cherry between peanut-butter cookies would be a good start. Of course, an old local favorite is the Oatwheel from Gunther’s Ice Cream Shop (2801 Franklin Boulevard). You can’t go wrong with vanilla ice cream, oatmeal cookies and the whole lot covered in chocolate. Mmm … summer!

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and fresh—in many dishes. And the tabbouleh delivers a roundhousepunch flavor combination. Turkish. 3260-B J St., (916) 457-1155. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★1⁄2

Mamma Susanna’s Ristorante Italiano There’s

The Wienery The Wienery is won-

something endearing, almost Norman Rockwell-esque about a neighborhood restaurant that is most commonly referred to by its patrons as the neighborhood restaurant. There is no shortage of options on the menu with nearly a dozen or so pastas, even more types of pizzas, a smattering of salads and various entrees, including the piccata chicken or veal dish that Mamma Susanna’s counts as one of her specialties. Of the pastas and pizzas, the norcina tastes like and looks like an orangey vodka sauce with roasted red-pepper slices and sausage rounds tossed in a bed of penne. While the menu claims spicy, some red chili flakes do the trick. Italian. 5487 Carlson Dr., (916) 452-7465. Dinner for one: $12-$20. ★★★

Vanilla Bean Bistro Gonul’s J Street Cafe has moved up the street and evolved into the Vanilla Bean Bistro. Its narrow, lowceilinged coziness is consonant with its understated, whateverthe-impulse-inspires alchemy that owner/chef Gonul Blum, has shown over the past eight years. Blum hails from Turkey. That country’s culinary tradition provides a sturdy foundation, but for her, it serves more as a launching pad. A recurring feature practiced here is the inclusion of fruit—preserved

drous, metaphysical, even. This 35year-old East Sacramento landmark sells old-fashioned steamed franks and sausages. The menu warns that the Fiesta Dog— refried beans, onions, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and taco sauce—is “surprisingly good.” Who can quarrel with truth in advertising? Even a simple, straightforward creation such as the Ranch Dog, starring—natch—ranch dressing, can engender a “Whoa, tasty!” The sausages—such as the Polish or Tofurky Kielbasa—are grilled as is the bacon-wrapped dog with its not-easily forgettable jalapeño relish. American. 715 56th St., (916) 455-0497. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★

Land Park/ Curtis Park

Pangea Two Brews Cafe Tables, tall and short, are large and communal, fostering that casual camaraderie that should be the goal of any self-respecting brewpub. There’s a fairly extensive menu, including breakfast items. Not to put too fine a point on it: Pangaea’s offerings are not beers that will be found at Save Mart or even Nugget. They are nuanced. Brewed with artisanship. In some cases, for hundreds of years. There’s the usual panoply of French dip, hot pastrami, Reuben and so on. Among the signature offerings is

The Gobbler. Turkey, natch. Cranberry sauce, natch. Then red onion, several roma tomato slices, a thicket of green leaf and pepper jack cheese, all shoehorned into a big baguette. Brewpub. 2743 Franklin Blvd., (916) 454-4942. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★1⁄2

ILLUSTRATION BY MARK STIVERS

pistachios laced with a stentorian balsamic vinaigrette. Mediterranean. 3839 J St., (916) 448-5699. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★★★

volunteers what is apparent after one mouthful: real crab is used. A word about the freebie salad that accompanies each meal: expect mixed greens, a dash of carrot shreds, cucumber chunks, a quarter of a tomato, a spattering of sesame seeds and what taste like fried shallots. All this with a tamarind emboldened dressing. Sabaidee is a quality meal for the price. Thai/Laotian. 8055 Elk GroveFlorin Rd., (916) 681-8286. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★1⁄2

North Sac

Enotria Restaurant and Wine Bar Enotria is an enophile’s dream. The waiters here speak fluent wine and their knowledge is both capacious and definitive. Enotria promises “Food made for wine made for food,” and it delivers on the pledge. The paella remains Enotria’s signature dish. A recent $32 prix-fixe meal begins with a rectangular plate upon which is served an alternating line of caramelized plantains and campaign-button size pork tenderloins. The accompanying wine is a 2008 white burgundy, Olivier LeFlaive “Les Setilles.” The one-two punch here is, obviously, the food and wine. But the knock-out punch—at least when all cylinders are firing— is the delivery. American. 1431 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 922-6792. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★★★1⁄2

Siam Restaurant It could take many months to work through Siam’s lengthy menu. There’s red, green, yellow and panang curry, Pad Thai—of course—drunken noodles and another 14 stir-fry options with tofu, chicken, pork, beef and eggplant. The spicy rice with squid is monstrously portioned, flavored with a steady Thai burn that leaves lips and tongue tingling. The best on Siam’s salad list is the aptly named Yum Seafood. Here, the combination is warm shrimp, calamari and mussels on the half-shell, scattered willy-nilly in a thicket of crisp squares of iceberg and jumbled with lemongrass, dry chilies, cashews, onions, mint and cilantro, with some squirts of lime juice for good measure. There’s probably enough for two, but it’s too good to share. Thai. 5100 Franklin Blvd., (916) 452-8382. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★

South Sac

Sabaidee Thai Grille If the menu is any indication, pumpkin and other squashes play a major role in Laotian cuisine, which, in turn, plays a major role at Sabaidee. The khalii khapou, listed as “curried crab stew” on the menu, comes from the hometown of the matriarch who is happy to answer questions about the ingredients and

A berry delicious season Some say that summer officially starts on the summer solstice, June 20. Others might say it starts when strawberries ripen. For said group, this weekend’s BerryFest in Roseville (Placer County Fairgrounds, 800 All America City Boulevard) must be a welcoming party of sorts for the delicious (and hot) season. Happening Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., the annual celebration features family entertainment and a gourmet menu of strawberryinfused foods—like strawberry pizza and strawberry beer. Other unique festival events include a strawberry shortcake-eating contest, a car show and cooking demonstrations. For more information, visit BerryFest’s website (www.feedmestrawberries.com) or Facebook page (www.facebook.com/berryfest). And if you can’t make it out this weekend but still want to eat local strawberries, check out a digital map of local strawberry farms and stands created by the University of California’s Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources at http://strawberrymap.ucanr.org. —Jonathan Mendick

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COOLHUNTING A very French state of mind Charlotte Gainsbourg’s ‘Paradisco’ Daughter of iconoclastic French musician Serge Gainsbourg and model Jane Birkin, Charlotte Gainsbourg is a provocateur in her own MUSIC right. A career actress best known for her the studio. work in Lars von Trier’s Antichrist and Melancholia, in urg bo ins Ga e arlott Beck (left) and Ch Gainsbourg has released three albums on the side. Stage Whisper is a compilation of unreleased songs from her previous albums. Written by Beck, “Paradisco” is the album’s standout track. Gainsbourg’s nonchalant vocals give world-weary credibility on a song about unrestrained values—about a state of mind—that’s out to create. —Amy Wong

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Louise Krug thought she’d have the perfect life. Krug, a pretty 22year-old Kansas journalist prepping for a move to California with her handsome French boyfriend, found her world imploding after a ruptured cavernous angioma—a brain bleed, in layman’s terms—forces her to undergo an emergency craniotomy. What followed, as chronicled in Krug’s compelling memoir Louise: Amended (Black Balloon Publishing, $14), is the story of a woman who—even as she endured extensive rehabilitation for among other afflictions, BOOK double vision and facial paralysis—also faced an existence in which her usual crutch—physical beauty—had suddenly disappeared. Krug’s book is at once darkly funny and touching as she details what it was like to rely on others for what once seemed the simplest of tasks, all while trying to figure out the future. —Rachel Leibrock

No relaxing vacation Tucker and Dale vs. Evil Disappointed by The Cabin in the Woods? Rather than going on another Firefly binge to remember what Joss Whedon is capable of, watch Tucker and FILM Dale vs. Evil instead. A pair of rednecks, Tucker (Alan Tudyk, a.k.a. Wash from Firefly) and Dale (Tyler Labine) try to enjoy their new vacation home in the woods. Through a series of unfortunate coincidences, the two friends are hunted by a group of preppy, horror-film-victim caricatures who channel their fear Ninto E W Sa series & REV W B U Smostly I N E S Sunintentional U S E O N L Y deaths. It’s available on Netflix and a great way to ofI Epainful, DESIGNER ISSUE DATE ACCT.out EXEC. wash that terrible-horror-movie taste of your mouth. www.netflix.com. MTH 08.20.09 ANS —Kyle Buis

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—Mark Halverson


ASK JOEY mondavi center The art of rejection 

by JOEY GARCIA

Joey

is astonished by In Paris at Berkeley Repertory Theatre.

Got a problem?

Write, email or leave a message for Joey at the News & Review. Give your name, telephone number (for verification purposes only) and question— all correspondence will be kept strictly confidential. Write Joey, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815; call (916) 498-1234, ext. 3206; or email askjoey@ newsreview.com.

After reciprocal swing-by-thecubicle kibitzing, shared lunches and finally, dinner with a coworker, I told her I was attracted. She was flattered but preferred our friendship. Now, our conversation is brief and not as personal. I can acknowledge that I have pulled back and imagine this is reciprocal. Am I a bad friend for not maintaining the same level of interaction as before? Or was it unrealistic? Let’s still the pendulum and stop those thoughts from swinging. At the heart of both questions is a curiosity about where to place the blame. But neither inquiry is useful in discovering the deeper truth. The real problem is your discomfort with rejection. Have you read The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles by Steven Pressfield? It’s a skinny book that offers wise counsel about how artists, entrepreneurs and visionaries can demolish blocks to success. Much of what Pressfield relates is the spiritual approach to life. Consider this nugget: “When people say an artist has a thick skin … what they mean is that he has seated his professional consciousness in a place other than his personal ego. It takes tremendous strength of character to do this, because our deepest instincts run counter to it.”

Accept the awkward stage your friendship is now in. Acknowledge what this experience can teach you. Having an “aha” moment? You don’t have to be a creative type to understand that your real work is to not pout when you don’t get what you want. Think of it this way: You hung out with a co-worker and liked her enough to propose shifting into courtship. She declined. You pulled away. Why? If she is as much fun as you say, she should be a welcome addition to your friend group. Oh, you can whine that she pulled away first or just as much. What

BEFORE

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does that matter? Accept the awkward stage your friendship is now in. Acknowledge what this experience can teach you. Start here: Friendship is an excellent foundation for a healthy romantic relationship, but a spark doesn’t mean that romance is inevitable or even necessary. And, no, it is not unrealistic to make your pitch, be turned down and maintain platonic status. It just requires a willingness to tuck in your ego. My father is in frail health and needs support. I am single and my two sisters are married, one sister has a child. My sisters insist that I serve as primary care for our father, moving in with him or allowing him to move in with me. They think I am free to devote my life to his care because I am single. The worst of it is that I was never my father’s favorite, and he made that clear throughout my life. I expect it will be clear in his will, too. How do I get my sisters to see that their demands are outrageous? Also, what would be a fair solution?

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What are your father’s wishes? Please give him an opportunity to weigh in on how he wants to live. Of course, if he is unable or unwilling to decide, you must. If your father is financially fit, tap his assets to pay for a licensed 0RQGDYL61 5 inhome caregiver. Or split the cost 3DJH9HUWLFDO with your sisters. This maintains your freedom and ensures that µZLGHE\µ your father is supervised. It is essential that each of you visit 58160$< him often to see that all is well in his household. But before you do, shed your resentment. Enter into this new phase of your life with an open heart and mind. Instead of grumbling about not being Dad’s favorite, reset the clock. You’re an adult. You have the privilege of helping out a fellow human being when he is at his most vulnerable. Can you feel the freedom now? Ω

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Meditation of the week: “I like pressure. If I am not on the edge of failure, I am not being sufficiently challenged,” says the singer Jewel. What environment do you thrive in?

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Sacramento Theatre Company wraps up its season of “mystery, music and mayhem” with a pleasant by little parody that combines all of those eleJim Carnes ments—plus a killer plant. Little Shop of Horrors is a deceptively simple comedy; a horror-rock musical that puts a meek Skid Row florist in the uncomfortable position of making a Faustian bargain with the devil, who happens to be a maneating alien plant. It has blood, guts, guns, a sadistic dentist, a damsel in distress, and— ”Give it a 10, Dick”—it has a beat you can dance to.

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Little Shop of Horrors, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, 12:30 and 6:30 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. $15-$38. Sacramento Theatre Company, 1419 H Street; (916) 443-6722; www.sactheatre.org. Through May 20.

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Michael Laun, STC’s producing director, takes a deft tongue-in-cheek approach, making this Little Shop one of the best productions you’re likely to see. Ω

SUBLIME-DON’T MISS

A Greek chorus named after ’60s girl groups (Miranda Lawson as Crystal, Ure Egbuho as Ronnette and Gabriella “Ella” Isaguirre as Chiffon) introduces the tale and provides running commentary. Andrew J. Perez plays Seymour, the nerdy would-be botanist who discovers a “strange and interesting” plant, which, when tended, turns out to be far more strange than anyone could imagine. Audrey (Jessica Goldman) is the object of Seymour’s unspoken affections—and of Orin Scrivello, DDS’s dangerous obsession. Michael R.J. Campbell is lovably shlubby as Mushnik, the owner of the flower shop where Seymour and Audrey work and where Audrey II, the hungry plant (operated by Aaron Hitchcock and voiced by Jeffrey Lloyd Heatherly) is on display, drawing more and more attention and becoming more and more demanding. Then people begin to disappear as Audrey II contemplates world domination. Little Shop of Horrors is based on the lowbudget 1960 Roger Corman science-fiction film of the same name. The musical retains the dark humor and spirit of the original, as well as its time frame, adding tunes in the style of early ’60s rock ’n’ roll, doo-wop and Motown—all exceptionally well-done and accompanied by a smokin’ four-piece band led by Dan Pool.

Rx

The winning aspects of the new show at the B Street Theatre stem not from innovative breakthroughs—there aren’t many—but rather from the pleasing variations that director Buck Busfield and his B Street regulars spring in this romantic comedy. Kate Fodor’s script involves a pharmaceutical megafirm piloting one new drug designed to counteract workplace depression and a second intended to counteract heartbreak. The laughs involve satire of corporate rules and procedures; an icy, limitlessly ambitious manager; struggling little people finding meaning in life; and the whole notion of improving your outlook with prescriptions— easy targets, mostly. And there’s an on-and-off love story. And, oh yeah, some confessional scenes in the women’s underwear section at a discount shop. The fun resides in the side dishes that accompany this accustomed comic entree. Kurt Johnson is delightful as a disheveled conceptual scientist. Jason Kuykendall displays some slick hair and alternative-comic chops as a facile office opportunist. Leading man Peter Story—who previously specialized in tubby-grubby John Belushi-style comedy— has slimmed down and stakes out some new territory as an actor to go with his new look. Stephanie Altholz does another pluckywoman-down-on-her-luck character, but differentiates this one from the others she’s played recently. Savvy director Buck Busfield juices this two-hour show in clever ways that make it feel faster, funnier and more meaningful than the agile (if conventional) comedy it ultimately is. Its fun, it’s perky, it’s comfy like your favorite shoes—the kind of warmweather audience-pleaser that’s been a B Street staple for years. —Jeff Hudson

Rx, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, 2 and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 5 and 9 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. $23-$35. B Street Theatre, 2711 B Street; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. Through June 10.


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Teutonic trickery and British bravado collide in Ron House’s sequel to his original melodramatic take on English spies. Five actors take the stage by force and keep the laughs constant with this hilarious script’s debut. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 7pm. Through 5/13. $15. Green Valley Theatre Company at the Grange Performing Arts Center, 3823 V St.; (916) 736-2664; www.greenvalleytheatre.com. M.M.

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HANSEL AND GRETEL

This play-with-songs for younger kids is “loosely based” on the Brothers Grimm, adapted by B Street’s Jerry Montoya and son Malachi (a fifth grader). Rick Kleber and Amy Kelly are a hoot as a witch and a goblin; John Lamb manipulates waist-high puppets; the music by Noah Agruss is a nice touch. Sa, Su 1pm & 4pm. Through 6/3. $18-$27. The B Street Theatre, 2711 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. J.H.

5

THE KING STAG

Falcon’s Eye Theatre goes old school with this commedia dell’arte work about a king in search of an honest bride, complete with fart jokes, tumbling and masks. Th, F 8pm; Sa 2pm & 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 5/13. $5-$15. Falcon’s Eye Theatre at the Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway, Folsom; (16) 608-6800; www.falconseyetheatre.com. M.M.

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LAWRENCE AND HOLLOMAN

What happens when an optimistic asshole and a depressive sociopath cross paths? Laughter and disaster, in this smooth-running production directed by Ed Claudio, with Matt Moore as the relentlessly self-promoting Lawrence, and Eason Donner as his misanthropic friend, Holloman. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 6/3. $15-$17. The Actor’s Theatre in the Three Penny Theatre in the California Stage Complex, 25th and R St.; (916) 501-6104. K.M.

3

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THE MEANING OF IT ALL

Local playwright Robert Lautz sets this comedy in Renaissance Pisa, Italy, where the tower leans and everybody wants to get ahead. Alchemist Calvino (Brennan Villados) hints to his future father-in-law that he can turn to lead to gold, which leads the local famiglia to send a button man (Mahlon Greenhalgh) to snoop around. With a love interest (Chelsea Barone) and a free-thinking brother (Tony Hutto), this alchemist’s got his house, head and heart filled up. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 5/27. $12$20. California Stage in the Wilkerson Theatre at the California Stage complex, 25th and R streets; (916) 451-5822; www.calstage.org. K.M.

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May 19, 2012 (Armed Forces Day) Starts at 6:00 pm

SMUDGE

Rachel Axler’s tragicomedy about a young couple with a new baby that isn’t quite what they expected gets a fantastic production at KOLT Run Creations with Lisa Thew directing. Kelley Ogden, Barry Hubbard and Eric Baldwin are all outstanding in this disturbing, funny and thought-provoking show. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 5/20. $15-$20. KOLT Run Creations at the Ooley Theatre, 2007 28th St.; (916) 454-1500; www.koltruncreations.com. K.M.

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Place: National Guard Facility, Corporation Yard Road, Roseville, 95678

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Celebration Arts stages the legendary Athol Fugard’s examination of post-apartheid South Africa, as the recently deceased white liberal Dawid (Jeff Bagley) is remembered by two women: his white wife (Carolyn Gregory) and his black mistress (Alana Mathews). Complicating matters is his angry, illegitimate biracial daughter (La Keisha Star Mondy). Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 5/26. $8-$15. Celebration Arts, 4469 D St.; (916) 455-2787; www.facebook.com/ CelebrationArts. M.M.

purchase tickets at CONTACT INFO (PHONE, ADDR y AD APPEARS AS REQUESTED http://www.sacramentobluestarmoms.org/Upcoming-Community-Events.html APPROVED BY:

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Short reviews by Jeff Hudson, Maxwell McKee and Kel Munger. Longer reviews of these plays are available online at www.newsreview.com/sacramento/home.

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Outsourced and exotic The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel Upon arrival at the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, its first guests cannot conceal their disappointment. “You Photoshopped it!” one says, aghast at how by shabby the place looks when compared with its Jonathan Kiefer enticing pamphlet. “I offered a vision of the future,” replies the beaming young manager, apparently believing his own PR. Fine, but time is running out on the future, and for that matter, so is money. Those first guests are seven British retirees who’ve been compelled, for various reasons, to outsource their retirement. Evelyn (Judi Dench), recently widowed, has been left in debt and had to sell her London flat. Muriel (Maggie Smith), a grouchy bigot, needs a cheap new hip. The Ainslies, Douglas and Jean (Bill Nighy, Penelope Wilton), went broke bankrolling their daughter’s failed startup. Graham (Tom Wilkinson), a just-retired High Court judge, lived in India once before and has returned with a regretful memory of lost love. Madge (Celia Imrie), merely hopes for one last chance at romance, while Norman (Ronald Pickup) hopes for one more one-night stand, followed if possible by another and then another.

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So here they all are in Jaipur, in decline. This setup smacks of post-colonial apologia, but apparently some internal consensus determined that to be too taxing. Why not make things easier, and limit ourselves to a humane and diverting little rally for affirmation over resignation? True, his name is Sonny and he’s played with deferential mania by the kid from Slumdog Millionaire, but our young manager (Dev Patel) is just so sincere about his entrepreneurial ambition—which, by the way, seeks a diversified clientele made up not only of doddering Brits but also people from “many other countries where they don’t like old people, too.” Although conceivable as one of those tooschematic contemporary French or Italian farces, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel breathes most easily when seeming unabashedly British. As adapted by Ol Parker from Deborah Moggach’s novel These Foolish Things, and stocked with that posh ensemble, it offers the familiar charms of poise and eloquence as trade-offs to any discomfiting residue of imperial impulse. And it

gives director John Madden, most famously of Shakespeare in Love, everything he needs to mount a sturdy counter-programming campaign against early-onset summer blockbusters. For moviegoers of a certain age, unconcerned about demographic reductionism so long as it’s within their own demographic, this means a most happy Sunday matinee.

Time is running out on the future, and for that matter, so is money. The hotel’s first guests are seven British retirees who’ve been compelled, for various reasons, to outsource their retirement. Of course, its setting is a pastiche of received ideas: the vividly teeming streets, the propulsive drift of microtonal melodies, the food that wreaks havoc with delicate digestive systems. And of course it has all the expected turning points: a breakup, a hookup, a death in the makeshift family. The slightly crowded story inevitably strains credulity, too, as when Muriel’s racism seems magically redeemed by empathy for invisible servitude, thus unfairly stranding Smith’s performance in a pinched mode of “Downton Abbey dowager countess no more, thank you very much.” Or when Evelyn gets a job in a call center, instructing its operators, including Sonny’s girlfriend (Tena Desae), on conversational manners. Evelyn also blogs about her experiences, affording occasional superfluous narration. (“Could there be anywhere else in the world that is such an assault on the senses?” she asks. Guess not.) Importantly, though, the movie also has strong sparks of life, as when Sonny applies his grasping upbeat spin to the impending marriage that’s been arranged for him by his domineering mother (Lillete Dubey); or when Douglas and Jean discover their own unhappy marriage eroded by clashing worldviews beyond the safety of politeness; or, especially, when Graham tells Evelyn about his history here, in a stunningly subtle duet scene that seems about as good as movie acting gets. Even a self-selecting audience likely will cotton more to some of these characters than others, and not necessarily in a vitalizing way. But Madden manages a baseline of decency and compassion, and therefore comes by his affirmations honestly enough. Like its namesake, the movie itself too readily courts to the unnatural gloss of the would-be tourist trap, and it needs a little time to get over that. Agreed, it could use some sprucing up, but even as it is this is not the worst Exotic Marigold Hotel. Ω


by JONATHAN KIEFER & JIM LANE

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The Cabin in the Woods

Five 20-something pals take off for a weekend retreat, where they are set on by murdering zombies. Producer Joss Whedon (who co-wrote with director Drew Goddard) has built a career on making silk purses out of sow’s ears, but sometimes a pig’s ear is just a pig’s ear. Here the hog gristle in question is the same dumbass slasher-movie hokum as last year’s Shark Night 3D, with cliché characters walking around marked “Kill me first” and “Kill me next.” Press materials warn reviewers against disclosing the movie’s “secrets,” but anyone with an IQ larger than their shoe size will see it all coming an hour ahead of time. Whedon is on probation now; he’d better be extra-good from here on out. Chris Hemsworth, Kristen Connolly, Richard Jenkins, Sigourney Weaver and others struggle to make this turkey fly. J.L.

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Damsels in Distress

Three coeds at a mid-level Ivy League college (Greta Gerwig, Megalyn Echikunwoke, Carrie MacLemore) spend their days running a suicide prevention center with a program of tap-dance therapy, and their nights dating their “intellectual inferiors” as an act of mercy. Writer-director Whit Stillman takes his time between movies—this is his first in 13 years, and only his fourth overall—but his wry smartypants wit always makes them seem worth the wait. The movie has a paradoxical aura of weighty triviality, and it takes place in a sort of vacuum—no iPhones, computers or Facebook— not unlike the vacuums in the three young ladies’ heads. Gerwig’s straight-faced earnestness is, in its diffident way, hilarious, and Stillman ices this airy pastry with an endearingly awkward musical number to wrap things up. J.L.

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Dark Shadows

Johnny Depp shines, albeit pallidly, in Tim Burton’s over-the-top take on the late-’60s supernatural soap. Returning in 1972 after two entombed centuries to his coastal Maine homestead—and to an amorous feud with a jealous spurned witch (Eva Green)— Depp’s blue-blooded bloodsucker yearns for his true love (Bella Heathcote), befriends his baffled descendants (Michelle Pfeiffer, Jonny Lee Miller, Chloë Grace Moretz), and piques the interest of their in-house shrink (Helena Bonham Carter). With an exquisite collaboration between cinematographer Bruce Delbonnel and production designer Rick Heinrichs, and an occasionally hilarious but uneven script by literary-mashup maestro Seth Grahame-Smith (see also: Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter), Burton’s movie sometimes gets away from him, blurring its own otherwise beguiling camp-gothic clarity. Depp’s soulful deadpan is the best thing about it—even when climactic contrivance or giddy overacting doesn’t agree with everyone else in the cast, which also includes Jackie Earle Haley and Alice Cooper as himself. J.K.

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The Deep Blue Sea

In post-war London, an emotionally volatile young woman (Rachel Weisz) flees her marriage to an aloof magistrate (Simon Russell Beale) for an affair with a differently aloof ex-RAF pilot (Tom Hiddleston). Destruction ensues. As adapted and directed by Terence Davies, Terence Rattigan’s 1952 play transcends merely tasteful period English melodrama; expectedly well-appointed and well-shot, it’s also somehow newly vitalized, a smoldering cauldron of soft lamplight and exquisitely intense feelings. Davies’ directing style is a carefully modulated meditation, and the script eschews sentimentality in favor of abetting elegant performances. What a pleasure, if also a heartbreak, to see how well these three actors respond. For aspiring thespians, or anyone who appreciates great displays of range, a Hiddleston double-feature of this and The Avengers is recommended. J.K.

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The Five-Year Engagement

Faced with geographically opposed career opportunities, a newly engaged couple discovers that their life together has gotten in the way of their life together. And with this casually yet not automatically comedic concept, stars Jason Segel and Emily Blunt comport quite well. A Judd Apatow production, it runs purposefully long, loosening the corset of rom-com conventions to accommodate presumed authenticity, even if that includes misfired humor (beyond awkwardly funny, there is something nervier and more poignant: awkwardly not funny). As if in solidarity with all noncommittal young lovers

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2 5 0 8 L A N D PA R K D R I V E L A N D PA R K & B R O A D WAY F R E E PA R K I N G A D J A C E N T T O T H E AT R E “A PLEASURE-FILLED JOURNEY.”

“AN EXHILARATING GIFT OF A COMEDY.”

- David Rooney, HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

THE BEST

EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL STARTS FRI., 5/11

FRI-TUES: 11:00AM, 12:00, 1:40, 2:40, 4:20, 5:20, 7:00, 8:00, 9:40, 10:30PM

“A DISTINCT DELIGHT.”

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The Avengers

Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Captain America (Chris Evans), Thor (Chirs Hemsworth), the Incredible Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) band together to defend the world from the dreams of conquest of Thor’s rogue brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) and a warmongering alien race called the Chitauri; the focus of their conflict is a source of infinite energy called a Tesseract, stolen by Loki, coveted by the Chitauri, and the key to the defense of Earth. Writer-director Joss Whedon (working from Zak Penn’s story and the Marvel Comics characters created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby) is back in top form, and the movie is tremendous fun—lighter and faster than Christopher Nolan’s Batman movies, and feeling an hour shorter. J.L.

DAMSELS in DISTRESS WED/THUR: 11:30AM, 2:00, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40PM FRI-TUES: 3:00, 5:10, 10:00PM

ENDS THUR., 5/10

BULLY

WED/THUR: 1:20, 4:20PM

WED/THUR: 11:00AM, 7:20, 10:00PM

“HARROWING AND REWARDING EPIC.”

- Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

- V.A. Musetto, NEW YORK POST

SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN WED/THUR: 11:15AM, 1:45, 4:15, 7:00, 9:30PM FRI-TUES: 12:30, 7:30PM

The Avengers : You can trust everything to the man who wears the star.

- Peter Travers, ROLLING STONE

“SOBERING.” - Ronnie Scheib, VARIETY

ENDS THUR., 5/10

F O R A D V A N C E T I C K E T S C A L L FA N D A N G O @ 1 - 8 0 0 - F A N D A N G O # 2 7 2 1

SHOW TIMES VALID MAY 11-MAY 17, 2012 OPENING FRI, MAY 11

STEVE JOBS:

NOW PLAYING

THE SALT OF LIFE Not Rated

THE LOST INTERVIEW

Fri-Sun 1:00 3:20 8:20 Mon-Thu 8:20 NOW PLAYING

everywhere, director Nicholas Stoller, Segel’s co-writer and fellow Apatow protégé, doesn’t push, instead just letting the movie coast along on baggy charm. A female co-writer might have kept some details in better check, but to complain of this is to seem stubbornly hard-hearted. The amiable supporting cast includes Chris Pratt, Rhys Ifans and Alison Brie. J.K.

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LOL

A Chicago teenager (Miley Cyrus) has boy trouble—broken up with Chad (George Finn), falling for best friend Kyle (Douglas Booth)—and parent trouble with her mother (Demi Moore), mainly because she and Mom are really so much alike. Writer-director Lisa Azuelos adapts her own French-language movie, and makes a lot of mistakes. For example, the casting of Finn and Booth—they look so much alike that it takes half the movie to be able to keep them straight, and it’s hardly worth the trouble; they’re as bland and faceless as Calvin Klein underwear models. Cyrus and Moore do their best, but their characters are more annoying than dramatic; besides, it’s hard to work up any concern for the “plight” of a bunch of well-off adolescents on their class trip to Paris, France (poor babies!). Humdrum all the way. J.L.

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The Pirates! Band of Misfits

The leader of a band of well-meaning but inept buccaneers (voice by Hugh Grant) hopes to win the Pirate of the Year award, and his clumsy efforts lead to an improbable alliance with the young Charles Darwin (David Tennant)— while catching the evil eye of the villainous Queen Victoria (Imelda Staunton). Villainous Queen Victoria? Yep, that’s typical of the wacky turns in Gideon Defoe’s script (based on his novel). The plot of this farce from Britain’s Aardman Animations never quite becomes fully engaging— the participation of Nick Park of Chicken Run and Wallace & Gromit fame is sorely missed—but Defoe and directors Peter Lord and Jeff Newitt pepper the edges of the frame with enough amusing throwaway gags to keep us entertained. The starry cast helps: Jeremy Piven, Salma Hayek, Anton Yelchin, etc. J.L.

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The Raven

Edgar Allan Poe (John Cusack) helps investigate a series of murders patterned on his own macabre stories. The idea has promise (even though it was swiped, slightly altered, from Se7en), but director James McTeigue, a decent cast (Luke Evans, Alice Eve, Brendan Gleeson, Sam Hazeldine) and a good production design (Roger Ford) contend in vain against one of the most moronically stupid screenplays since the advent of talking pictures—for example, the movie says Poe’s last days are a mystery (true), then has his every move plastered on the front pages of Baltimore newspapers (invented). The perpetrators of this anachronism-riddled mess are actor-turnedwriter Ben Livingston (turn back, Ben, turn back!) and someone named, no kidding, Hannah Shakespeare. (What’s in a name? In this case, absolutely nothing.) J.L.

FRONTLINES

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Safe

A former cage fighter and sudden widower (Jason Statham) fends off battalions of corrupt New York cops and thugs both Russian and Chinese just to protect a little girl (Catherine Chan) who’s memorized a valuable code. Boring us with superfluous setup, writer-director Boaz Yakin does at least take care to spread a pulp of uniform coarseness; at its best, his dialogue approximates the grimly expository B-noir patter of half a century ago. The problem, inasmuch as this stuff even deserves critique, is that it’s a thrill-less thriller, without even enough cathartic brutality. Quick cuts and camera jitters make the action hard to see and therefore less worth waiting for. Badness of this sort is not offensive, just deadeningly mediocre. James Hong, Chris Sarandon, and Robert John Burke co-star. J.K.

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Salmon Fishing in the Yemen

3

Think Like a Man

THE DEEP BLUE SEA Rated R Fri-Sun 12:30 3:00 5:25 7:40 Mon-Thu 5:25 7:40

Not Rated Fri-Thu 5:45 nightly

MAY 10, 16, 19 & 26 THE BEATLES

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A British fisheries expert (Ewan McGregor) is approached by a publicrelations consultant (Emily Blunt) to help a Yemeni sheikh (Amr Waked) realize his dream of bringing the sport of fly-fishing to his homeland. Writer Simon Beaufoy and director Lasse Hallström turn Paul Torday’s novel into a thoroughgoing delight. McGregor and Blunt make an engaging team—they’ve always been able to bring out the best in their co-stars, and here they bring out the best in each other. Waked plays the sheikh with just the right blend of exotic dignity and friendly warmth, and Kristin Scott Thomas has wicked fun as the no-nonsense press secretary to the prime minister, giving the movie an edge of political satire that nicely balances the sheikh’s visionary mysticism and the blossoming romance between Blunt and McGregor’s characters. J.L.

tattoo parL parLor par

Four couples (Michael Ealy and Taraji P. Henson; Romany Malco and Meagan Good; Jerry Ferrara and Gabriel Union; Terrence J and Regina Hall) travel the rocky road of romance, with the women taking tips from Steve Harvey’s book Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man. Keith Merryman’s script isn’t an adaptation of Harvey’s book, it’s a commercial for it, and a none-too-subtle one; Harvey makes several guest appearances, of course, and we half-expect him to say, “Operators are standing by.” Director Tim Story huffs and puffs trying to juggle all the stories, and things tend to bog down in the third act. Still, the actors are all extremely appealing (Henson and Union, as usual, particularly shine), and the movie goes down easily enough. Kevin Hart, as a newly divorced pal of the guys, has most of the best lines. J.L.

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9312 Greenback Ln oranGevaLe 95662 916.989.1408 www.sacink.com SN&R | 37


MUSIC

Help wanted

Best of the fest A sneak peek at In the Flow, the Dixon May Fair, Operation: Restore Maximum Freedom and the party formerly known as the Sacramento Jazz Jubilee

Business Manager Sn&r is now hiring a Business manager. you will be responsible for ensuring the accurate and timely operation of all financial functions of the news & review’s three papers, including general ledger, payroll, accounts payable and receivable, credit and collections, budgets and financial reporting, business filings, and insurance. this position is responsible for creating ongoing improvements and enhancements to the overall operation and effectiveness of the accounting function. you will interact with the bank, accounting firm, vendors, management team and our awesome staff. requires 2+ years supervision/management experience and Ba/BS degree, preferably in accounting or Business.

You know it’s the time of year for music festivals again when tract-home drunkards return to the America River’s banks and bros riding soupedby up cruisers are all up on Midtown’s sidewalks. Nick Miller Nothing says the sound of music like sweaty nickam@ sunshine and suburban simplemindedness. newsreview.com Anyway, rejoice, because with unmitigated arm tattooage and copious C-Minus barbecue digestif comes great music. Such as this week’s Dixon May Fair. Turn your attentions to the one and only Snoop Dogg, who will headline the party on Wednesday, May 9. (This paper officially comes out on Thursday, but some of you will be reading this on Wednesday. Feel lucky.) PHOTO BY STEVEN CHEA

To read the full announcement and apply online, go to

www.newsreview.com/jobs

equal opportunity employer

Snoop Dogg says don’t miss the Dixon May Fair—or In the Flow festival, or Operation: Restore Maximum Freedom, or even the party formerly known as the Sacramento Jazz Jubilee.

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Anyway, Snoop Dogg previously visited Sacramento in September of last year; it was a monumental pop-culture experience. For Sacramento. Here’s what I wrote back then: “I grew up in suburban Sacramento and, when Snoop Dogg’s Doggystyle dropped in 1993, it was a seed that fomented a new breed of suburban teenager: young white bros pretending they could rap, going on about G’s being up and hoes being down and ever-present mammoth phalluses. … Not sure what the point is, but last night rapper, marijuana activist and undeniable popculture shaker Snoop wowed a capacity crowd at Ace of Spades with a high-energy mix of rap, funk and pop, including almost all the hits. “I was shocked by Snoop’s showmanship.” One Block Radius opens for Snoop. The English Beat and the Romantics grace the stage on Thursday, May 10; Kellie Pickler and Phil Vassar do Friday, May 11; and Larry the Cable

Guy (not a musician) closes the fair out on Saturday, May 12. Find out more at www.dixonmayfair.com. This week also marks the arrival of the annual In the Flow Festival, a celebration of jazz, poetry, spoken word, improvisational, electronic and blues. The kickoff is Wednesday, May 9, and it goes on every day, all day, until Monday, May 14. Venues include the Sacramento Poetry Center, Luna’s Café & Juice Bar, Bows & Arrows, Phono Select, Antiquité Maison Privée—that’s right, pretty much every dope spot in Midtown. See page 40 for more festival preview info and visit www.intheflowsacramento.com for details and tickets. May marks the 12th-annual Operation: Restore Maximum Freedom festival in Woodland, courtesy UC Davis’ college radio station KDVS. This year’s affair is heavy on Bay Area and Sacramento bands, per usual, including some electronic treats: Dibiase and Raleigh Moncrief, both from the 916. I first wrote about O:RMF in 2006, for the fourth-annual festival: “KDVS DJs Rick Ele, Brendan Boyle and Joe Finkel were hunkered away in the basement of UC Davis’ eclectic radio station when they created Operation: Restore Maximum Freedom, the moniker for KDVS’ biannual music festival. … It [is always] held at Plainfield Station, a restaurant and bar in Woodland with a back patio and a sprawling lawn where artists cut loose on a ramshackle stage. ‘The place has a right-wing stigma, and KDVS has a left-wing stigma,’ Boyle said, ‘so it’s real cool to have the two come together.’” O:RMF 12 goes down on Saturday, May 19, at Plainfield Station, 23944 County Road 98 in Woodland; 1 p.m.; $10; all ages; www.kdvs.org.

Rejoice, because with unmitigated arm tattooage and copious C-Minus barbecue digestif comes great music. And then there’s the jazz festival in Old Sacramento, which has retained its old Web address (www.sacjazz.com) but adopted a dazzlingly banal new moniker: Sacramento Music Festival! Longstanding producer Jerry Perry was recruited to spice up the array of jazz and blues acts, and he’s added Musical Charis, Dog Party, Parie Wood, Foxtails, Buster Blue, Kepi Ghoulie, Fierce Creatures and others to the usual mix of piano-player Bob Ringwald, Mick Martin, Jimmy Pailer and the Nibblers. Catch it Friday, May 25, to Monday, May 28; day passes $20-$45, allevents pass $110. So, tattoo it on your arm, or put a note on your beer can: “See live music in May, OK?” Ω


SOUND ADVICE Dropping out sounds chill Park blowouts, dearth gigs and a weekend update: Due to all sorts of decision-making fails last week, I did not represent at Friday Night Concerts in the Park’s season debut. Which was regrettable: Sources—of which there are thousands—say it was packed, unlike years before, including four food trucks, a deejay booth, sidewalk-to-sidewalk crowds and you could take your beer anywhere. DJ Shaun Slaughter, who mixed funk and dance in between acts, said he was impressed by the turnout. So, impress yourself and don’t miss this Friday’s gig at 5 p.m., with headliner Middle Class Rut. Turnout, meanwhile, was an issue for Death Grips this weekend: The most popular musical group in Sacramento bailed on its hometown gig Saturday night at Harlow’s, part of the otherwise well-attended Sacramento Electronic Music Festival. And the dearth of Death Grips is part of a larger, perhaps cryptic MIA moment for the band. On Friday night, this post from the trio popped up on Facebook and Twitter: “we are dropping out to complete our next album NO LOVE. see you when it’s done. (there are no longer any scheduled shows).” Dropping out is an understatement: The band had a 30-date world

tour starting May 18 in Dublin. This on the heels of the breakthrough of its second album, The Money Store: No. 3 on the Billboard “Heatseeker”

charts, and the No. 14 best-selling rap album in the country. With the band’s sudden fall off the radar, of course, come rumors. Including: “They just didn’t want to go on tour,” “Death Grips broke up,” or “That’s so punk.” Meanwhile, some venues across the globe are upset and also not yet divvying out refunds for tickets sold. Billboard, however, is reporting that a representative has confirmed the canceled tour. The group’s management at Big Hassle told SN&R that “Their Twitter post is really the comment. Nothing to add at this juncture.” Needless to say, the guys didn’t return SN&R’s email—and I didn’t bother calling. —Nick Miller

nickam@newsreview.com

Quest for hyphy: Last week was all about rough choices for Sacramento hip-hop fans. On Sunday, it was either Curren$y or Murs. And this past Thursday, the main dilemma for me was between the Sleeprockers/Hieroglyphics show at Sac State and the E-40 show at Ace

of Spades. I decided to branch out from my normal backpackery and go on the pursuit of hyphy. The first act on this quest let me down. M Theory was like promethazine for the crowd, only not as fun as it sounds in Lil’ Wayne songs. Bueno, on the other hand, was a refresher course on how to put one in the stands for the hometown crowd. There’s a reason this guy was recently on WorldStarHipHop. Sacramento breeds a uniquely rugged originality in its emcees, and Bueno is a shining example. Someone get me an interview with this guy. Apparently, I’ve been sleepin’. E-40, the ambassador of the Bay, ran through everything from “Captain Save a Hoe” to “Tell Me When to Go.” For the past 20 years, the godfather of the independent rap hustle and official slangologist has stayed relevant in an ever-changing rap scene. It was easy to map the keys to this success watching him perform Thursday night. His style remains one of the most innovative (and imitated) in the world of rap. His presence is bigger than life. And, underneath the stunner shades and excessive ecstasy use, the hyphy movement has always been about fun. —Andrew Bell

EYE-FI Sacramento live-music scene grabs PHOTO BY NICHOLAS WRAY

Yes, it really was a huge crowd at this season’s first Friday Night Concerts in the Park; Tyler Campbell of Arden Park Roots snaps a grab. Get in on the crowd this Friday, May 11, with headliners Middle Class Rut.

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EIGHT GIGS

11FRI

11FRI

11FRI

11FRI

Middle Class Rut

Andre Nickatina

India Jazz Suites

Tipper

Cesar Chavez Plaza, 5 p.m., no cover Finally old enough to partake in the Budweiser beer garden is Sacramento’s Friday Night Concerts in the Park series, celebrating its 21st birthday this year. The second week of the annual series features as headliner the alternative rock duo Middle Class Rut, which gained local recognition when the song “New Low” was voted top song of 2008 by KWOD 106.5 FM radio listeners. Zack Lopez and Sean Stockham have since found themselves ROCK opening for bands like Alice in Chains, Social Distortion and even completed a five-date tour in London. Now the duo is back in town performing alongside bands Lite Brite, Horseneck and DJ Whores. 910 I Street, www.mcrut.com.

—Steph Rodriguez

Ace of Spades, 6:30 p.m., $25 In 20 years in the rap game, Andre Nickatina never gained mainstream notoriety, but that hasn’t stopped him from making 18 albums including several collaborations. This San Francisco HIP-HOP emcee has acquired a cult following through his ability to combine genius productions and relentless wordplay that doesn’t stop until the track is over. Don’t believe me? Last time I checked, Nickatina is the only rapper to make a song with Irish bagpipes listenable. Come to think of it, he might be the only rapper to ever try to do so; the man is a pioneer. Fashawn and Mumbls open this show at Ace of Spades. 1417 R Street, www.andrenickatina.com.

—Anthony Nathan

Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 8 p.m., $21-$39 If you’re a fan of world and jazz music and would like a little cultural dance lesson thrown in for good measure, I can’t recommend enough the upcoming performance dubbed “India Jazz Suites.” For the uninitiated, this fusion of Indian and American dance has already received great praise in the Bay Area and features top-notch musicians including the WORLD/JAZZ Marcus Shelby Jazz Trio. Rather than spending your hardearned cash haphazardly at a local watering hole, I highly suggest venturing up Highway 50 for a night of unabashed song and dance. Three Stages produces shows for the ages and, of course, for all ages. 10 College Parkway in Folsom, www.kathak.org.

Freeborn Hall, 8 p.m., $12-$16 British electronic artist Tipper is known for something few other electronic musicians are: good live shows. That’s in part because he plays mostly unreleased compositions at his shows. But it’s also because Tipper gives his songs a live ELECTRONIC element to them— meaning he scratches his own samples over his music. Tipper has been around long enough to remember the good old ’90s, when every electronic song and hip-hop track was packed with sampling, an art form not nearly as revered as it used to be. Tipper plays an artistic mix of ambient sounds and trip-hop beats with an upbeat breakbeat tempo. 1 Shields Avenue in Davis, www.tippermusic.com.

—Aaron Carnes

—Eddie Jorgensen

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Contact Ad Services for advertising information on this special section (916) 498-1234 40

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Brake Special

$30.00 OFF Call for details Good at Fulton location only

481-1192 OPEN MON-SAT 8-6 • SUN 9-4

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12SAT 12SAT Maceo Parker

In the Flow Festival

12SAT

12SAT

Social Studies

Geographer

Thunder Valley Casino and Resort, 8:30 p.m., $28-$38

Antiquité Maison Privée, noon, $10 I won’t pretend to be familiar with all 10 groups performing at this all-day show on Saturday, part of this week’s In the Flow Festival, organized by prolific guitarist Ross Hammond (pictured). But each group gets an hour, and at a price of $10 for the whole shebang, that comes out to $1 per group—or about the price of a Del Taco bean burrito per group. Ten burritos buys you 10 hours of music by Take 5, Instagon, Polarity Taskmasters, the JAZZ Mentones, Nagual, Lords of Outland, E Squared, Ross Hammond Quartet, Broun Fellinis and Tony Passarell’s Thin Air Orchestra. The festival continues through Monday. 2114 P Street, www.intheflowsacramento.com.

Saxophonist and vocalist Maceo Parker was immortalized by James Brown shout-outs in the 1960s while a key member of Brown’s bands. He has also FUNK/SOUL recorded and performed with such diverse artists as George Clinton, Ani DiFranco, Bryan Ferry, the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Prince. Since the early 1990s, Parker’s live shows as bandleader run for an average of two-and-a-half hours as he spews forth volcanic soul and funk from his steamy alto, occasionally cools off the crowd with splashes of jazz, and challenges his crackerjack sidemen to whip audiences back into near-religious tent-revival euphoria. Amen! 1200 Athens Avenue in Lincoln, www.maceo.com.

Geographer is the very definition of a bigsized band playing a small-sized stage. Every one of its songs screams epic gold, whether that be from the amazing talent of Nathan Blaz on the electric cello, the golden vocals of Mike Deni or the percussional INDIE perfection of Brian Ostreicher. Yet for some reason the arenas haven’t been calling. Yet. I saw Geographer open for Miami Horror at a grossly underattended show at Sacramento State, and its performance was solid: clinically catchy songs such as “Kites” and “Original Sin.” I strongly recommend checking this synth-pop gem before it’s far too big for Old Ironsides. By the way, this is Lipstick’s 12th-anniversary night. 1901 10th Street, www.geographermusic.com.

It’s not surprising that San Francisco band Social Studies was picked up by Antenna Farm Records. The label’s love for quirky female vocalists is apparent in its pickup of Austin-based Sacramento transplant Agent Ribbons. While Social Studies has a different sound than Ribbons—vocalist Natalia Rogovin has a strong Adrianne Verhoeven-like sound—the band has INDIE ROCK similiar influences of the gypsy and Russian variety, with the addition of synths, keyboards and strings. Social Studies brings experimental to the indietwee sound, and the only possible result is nostalgia and dancing. The group opens for Ramona Falls. 129 E Street in Davis, www.facebook.com/socialstudies101.

—Mark Halverson

—Jonathan Mendick

Old Ironsides, 9 p.m., $8

Sophia’s Thai Kitchen, 8:30 p.m., $7

—John Phillips

—John Phillips

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BEFORE

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STORY

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jewelry • electronics • guitars (electric & acoustic) • tools

get caSh now! we buy gold! buy sell trade it all • guns, jewelry & loan company 5725 stockton blvd • 916.456.7296 • mon - sat: 9am–7pm

ARTS&CULTURE

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NIGHTBEAT

THURSDAY 5/10

FRIDAY 5/11

SATURDAY 5/12

SUNDAY 5/13

BLUE LAMP

THE SESSION, 9pm, call for cover

SMIRKER, THE STONE GHOSTS, GENTLEMAN CALLER; 9pm-1am, $8

CASH PROPHETS, DRY COUNTY DRINKERS; 9pm, $8

Wax Appeal: DJ and hip-hop night, 8pm, call for cover

THE BOARDWALK

808, TURF TALK, TO 3, YOUNG GASZ, BINK, REGGY B, MONEY MO; 8pm, $12

K-OTTIC, SIDE FX BAND, 2HK, QUEN, SUNNY B, NEW ERA, CELL; 8pm

SMILE EMPTY SOUL, BURN HALO, THE VEER UNION, IONIA; 7pm, $15-$18

PSYCHOSTICK, DOWNTOWN BROWN, THEA SKOTIA; 7pm, $13-$15

BOWS AND ARROWS

PLUCK, VIM VIGOUR, HEARTS+HORSES, POST PAINT, AND AND AND, THE LOST TRIO, CAVE WOMEN; 7pm, $10 BABS JOHNSON GANG; 8pm, $5

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247 1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

THE CAVE

3512 Stockton Blvd., (916) 317-9999

FALCON A, BYPASSING OBLIVION, LOOKING AT MY ENEMY; 8pm, $5

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

IVAN NAJERA, 8pm, $20-$25

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 271-7000 Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

GWYNETH & MONKO, 8pm, $12

Healing arts celebration, 11am-4pm, call for cover

DISTRICT 30

COSMIC GATE, RAY REVERSE, TRENIX; 9pm, call for cover

MC RUT, DJ Solarz; 9:30pm, $5-$10

DJ Foley, 9pm, call for cover

FOX & GOOSE

THE HEY NOWS, CAMPFIRE CROONERS, KEVIN SECONDS, DAVID AND OLIVIA; CALENDAR KIDS; 8-11pm, no cover 9pm-midnight, $5

1016 K St., (916) 737-5770 1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

G STREET WUNDERBAR HARLOW’S

LEDWARD KAAPANA, 7pm, $25

VOKAB KOMPANY, 10pm, $10

JAVALOUNGE

THE SPEAK LOW, STEPHEN MARCH, KENNI FALLS; 8pm, $5

JILT VS JONAH, DONNER, T.H.I.E.F.; 8pm, THE OLD SCREEN DOOR, BRIDGE ROOT; $5 4pm, $5; ASTRAL CULT, 8:30pm, $6

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

INSUU BUNKAI, DAVE LYNCH GROUP, HELL BENT IN THE PACIFIC; 7pm, $10

MARILYN’S ON K

“Rock On” Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN

THE TREES, THE BROTHERS NUNEZ, LOVE IS OVER; 8:30pm, $5

OLD IRONSIDES

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504

ON THE Y

2708 J St., (916) 441-4693

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

TOMMY NEAR, LOVELORN, STREET URCHINZ; 9pm-midnight, $5

Traditional Irish Jam, 8-11pm W; Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu

THE SOFT BOMBS, 10pm-1:15am, no cover

228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

Hey local bands!

Encore, a performing arts variety showcase, 2pm, $15

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/14-5/16

2416 16th St., (916) 441-3945 1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931 908 K St., (916) 446-4361 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731

TAINTED LOVE, 10pm, $15 THE LOVE BIRDS, 99-100, OLLA; 8pm W, $5

Presentation by Dr. Jonathan Young, 68:30pm, $5

Nebraska Mondays, M; JUSTIN & DEVIN FARREN; 8pm Tu, $5; Comedy night, W

RENDEZVOUS WITH COOL BEANS, PLAYBOY SCHOOL; 9:30pm, $15

MRQ, 5:30pm Tu, no cover; CONFLICT MINERALS, 9pm W, $5

TODD MORGAN & THE EMBLEMS, THOMAS SMITH; 8:30pm, $5

HARDBOILED WONDERLAND, ODD MONIKER, JAROBA; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz session, M; MATT MCCLEAN, Tu; WEST NILE RAMBLERS, 8:30pm W, $5

BARREL FEVER, THE REMEDIES; 9pm, $5

JUPITER, THE VERGE, MAJOR POWERS, THE LOW-FI SYMPHONY; 9pm, $5

Lipstick Weekender, 9:30pm, $5

STRAPPED FOR CASH, NUANCE; 7:30pm M; Karaoke, 9pm Tu; Open-mic, W

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

PSYCHOSOMATIC, ANGERHEAD, HELLPIG, BLOWNLOAD; 8pm, $5

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

JANIVA MAGNESS, 8:30pm, $20

MATTY T BAND, 8:30pm, $15

THE PALMS PLAYHOUSE

13 Main St., Winters; (530) 795-1825

THE PARK ULTRA LOUNGE 1116 15th St., (916) 442-7222

DJ Eddie Edul, 8pm-2am, no cover before 11pm, $10 after

DJ Crooked, DJ Gabe Xavier, 9pm-2am, $15

DJ Peeti V, 9pm-2am, $15

PISTOL PETE’S

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

8 TRACK MASSACRE, 9pm, $5

BEAM, 9pm, $5

140 Harrison Ave., Auburn; (530) 885-5093

MIKE LAPLANTE, 11am; THE BAND DROIDZ, LIGHT BRIGADE; 8pm, $5

Open-mic comedy, 10pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

Asylum Downtown: Gothic, industrial, EBM dancing, 9pm, call for cover Karaoke, 9pm W, no cover

CELEBRATING OUR 20TH ANNIVERSARY ALL YEAR LONG!

5(67$85$17‡ %$5 %$5 &20('<&/8% &/8% &20('< & /8% ‡‡ 5(67$85$17‡

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THU MAY 10 7PM $25

LEDWARD KAAPANA FRI MAY 11 10PM $10

THU MAY 17 9PM $15

SIZZLING SIRENS PRESENT

“COMIC STRIP TEASE”

FRI MAY 18 10PM $12

CHEESE BALLS SAT MAY 19 7PM $15

VOKAB KOMPANY STEELIN SAT MAY 12 10PM $15

TAINTED LOVE WED MAY 16 SACCAROCKS LOCAL MUSIC SHOWCASE FEATURING

IMPOTENT NINJA WITH NATE PINELL AND GUESTS

DAN

SAT MAY 19 10PM $12 ADV

MIDNIGHT PLAYERS WED MAY 23 8PM $16 ADV CLAP YOUR HANDS AND SAY YEAH THE DARCYS

COMING SOON May 24 Holmes Brothers May 26 B-Side Players May 26 Jon McLaughlin May 31 Young Dubliners June 1 Cash’d Out June 1 Reminisce June 2 Juliana Zachariou June 3 A Silent Film June 4 JD McPherson June 8 Cream of Clapton June 8 Tommy Castro & The Painkillers June 14 Darrell Scott June 16 The Blues Broads June 19 Parlotones June 20 Joe Craven June 21 Sizzling Sirens June 22 The Hits June 23 Midnight Players June 24 Muriel Anderson June 27 Russian Circles June 29& 30 Tainted Love July 3 James Hunter July 7 Joel The Band July 19 Asleep at the Wheel Aug 8 Ottmar Liebert Aug 13 Heartless Bastards Aug 18 Mother Hips Aug 24 Dan Curcio Aug 25 Hapa

DRESS CODE ENFORCED (JEANS ARE OK) • CALL TO RESERVE DINNER & CLUB TABLES

2708 J Street • Sacramento • 916.441.4693 • www.harlows.com 42

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acouSt 9:30pm // no cover

FrI 5/11

robert wynia, le Second a Sing ative // rocK // 9:30pm // $10 altern

SaT 5/12

rendeZvouS playboy School cool beanS 9:30pm // $8

MAY 10 & 13

2 FOR 1 ADMISSION!! (WITH THIS AD)

THURSDAY 5/10

FLIPS AND BEANERS COMEDY JAM

SEAN PEABODY, ANTHONY PADILLA, JUSTIN RIVERA, JIMMY EARLL SPECIAL EVENT, NO PASSES

FRIDAY 5/11 - SATURDAY 5/12

WAYNE BRADY LIVE!

SUNDAY 5/13

CHICANO COMEDY ALLSTARS

DUSTIN YBARRA, DILLON GARIA, BIG AL GONZALES

TUES 5/15

Q mr acouStic // 5:30pm // Free

open mic acouStic Se // 8pm // Free talent Showca

wEd 5/16

t mineralS conFlic // $5 rocK // 9pm

ticKetS now on Sale For these upcoming shows at www.marilynsonk.com $3 TallbOy Pbr

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THURSDAY 5/17 - SUNDAY 5/20

FROM RED-NEXICAN AND HICK-SPANIC!

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FRIDAY 5/25 - SATURDAY 5/26

COMEDY ALLSTARS

KIRK MCHENRY, TOM MCCLAIN, FRANKIE QUINONES, LAURA ROSENBERG

THURSDAY 5/31 - SUNDAY 6/3

DAT PHAN

LARRY “BUBBLES” BROWN, MYLES WEBBER

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THURSDAY 5/10

FRIDAY 5/11

SATURDAY 5/12

SUNDAY 5/13

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/14-5/16

JAMES HARMAN, 9pm, $20

Blues Jam, 2pm, no cover

Open-mic comedy, 9pm M; Jam with Dave Channell, 7pm Tu; Trivia, 7pm W

PO’ BOYZ BAR & GRILL

Jam with Roharpo, 7pm, no cover

POWERHOUSE PUB

WHISKEY ROW, 9:30pm, call for cover

LOVE FOOL, 8:30pm, no cover

APPLE Z, 10pm, $10

THE PRESS CLUB

NACHO BUSINESS, GRAVYS DROP, THE CROISSANTS; 8:30pm, $5

Top 40 w/ DJ Rue, 9pm, $5

Top 40 Night w/ DJ Larry Rodriguez, 9pm, $5

Sunday Night Soul Party, 9pm, $5

SUPPORT THE RABID, DC FALLOUT; 8:30pm M, $5; RIOT RADIO, 8:30pm W

SHENANIGANS

Comedy Night and DJ Selekta Lou, 9pm, $5

TRIBE OF LEVI, THE STORYTELLERS; 9pm, call for cover DJ LINL Witchie, DJ Crush Delight, 710pm, no cover

The Sol Mercado and Kid’s Day, 1pm, no cover

Microphone Mondays, 6pm M, $1-$2

Comedy open-mic, 8pm M; Barbecue, blues jam, karaoke; Tu, call for cover

9580 Oak Avenue Pkwy., Folsom; (916) 987-2886 614 Sutter St., Folsom; (916) 355-8586 2030 P St., (916) 444-7914 705 J St., (916) 442-1268

SOL COLLECTIVE

2574 21st St., (916) 832-0916

SOPHIA’S THAI KITCHEN 129 E St., Davis; (530) 758-4333

STONEY INN/ROCKIN RODEO

WHISKEY DAWN, 9pm, $10

1320 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 927-6023

SWABBIES

5871 Garden Hwy, (916) 920-8088

DJ Alazzawi, DJ Rigatony; 10pm Tu, $3; HIGHWAY 12, 9pm W, $5

CHRIS PUREKA, EMY REYNOLDS BAND, HALSTED; 9pm, $5

RAMONA FALLS, SOCIAL STUDIES, YOU ARE PLURAL; 9pm, $7

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dancing, 7:30pm, no cover, $5 after 8pm

Country dance party, 8pm, no cover

ROCKIN DOWN THE HIGHWAY, 6-10pm, call for cover

RIFF RAFF, SKID ROSES; 4pm, $8

SKIPPINBROOK, 3-7pm, no cover Blues jam, 4pm, no cover; TESSIE MARIE PETE ANDERSON, 9pm Tu, $10; OpenAND THE POOR MAN BAND, 8pm, $5 mic, 5:30pm W; MERLE JAGGER, 9pm W

TORCH CLUB

X TRIO, 5pm, no cover; BONNIE & THE BANG BANG, 9pm, $5

PAILER AND FRATIS, 5:30-7:30pm, no cover; VOLKER STRIFLER, 9pm, $8

JOHNNY KNOX, 5pm, no cover; MIA DYSON, 9pm, $8

TOWNHOUSE LOUNGE

Live music and deejay dancing, 9pm, no cover

DJ Roger and special guests, 9pm, $5, no cover before 10pm

Pop Freq w/ DJ XGVNR, 9pm, $5

904 15th St., (916) 443-2797 1517 21st St., (916) 613-7194

Janiva Magness 8:30pm Friday, $20. The Palms Playhouse Soul and blues

Open-mic, 9pm M, no cover

All ages, all the time ACE OF SPADES

1417 R St., (916) 448-3300

CLUB RETRO

ANDRE NICKATINA, FASHAWN, PROF, MUMBLS, QUETTE DADDIE; 6:30pm, $25

KID INK, KIRKO BANGZ, KID SWAGG, TORREY TEE, SUPAFICIALZ; 7pm, $28

Open-mic, 7pm, no cover

JAMES CROCI, 7pm, no cover

SUPERVILLAINS, KAYAVIBE, OFFICIAL RESPONSE, DOGFOOD; 6:30pm W, $10

TERIN THOMPSON, MOBFIOSO SQUAD BOYZ, SPITTLEZ; 6:30-11pm, $10-$13

1529 Eureka Rd., Roseville; (916) 988-6606

JERICHO COFFEE

8711 Sierra College Blvd., Roseville; (916) 771-5726

LUIGI’S DAVIS

DAVE NACHMANOFF, HARDWATER; 7:30pm, $10

213 E St., Davis; (530) 231-5177

MICHAEL TOBIAS AND THE ACIDIC SWAMP BAND; 8:30pm, call for cover

LUIGI’S SLICE AND FUN GARDEN 1050 20th St., (916) 552-0317

HONYOCK, THE HUNGRY, SIMPL3JACK; 8:30pm, $5

THE REFUGE

BO STEWART, BLCK STAR; 7pm, $7

THE SHINE CAFÉ

1723 L St., (916) 764-5598 Blues jam, 8pm, call for cover

1400 E St., (916) 551-1400

ZUHG LIFE STORE

545 Downtown Plaza, Ste. 2090, (916) 822-5185

JUSTIN FARREN, BE BRAVE BOLD ROBOT, JOHN LUDINGTON; 8:30pm W, $5 PHENOMENAUTS, MOANS, LEFT HAND, ONE MORE LAST TRY; 7:30pm, $8

KEPI, DOG PARTY, POTENTIAL LUNATICS; 7:30pm Tu, $5

GINO & AMANDA VIDECHE, ROBIN REYES, DIANA CAMPOS; 8pm, $4

WALKING SPANISH, DICIEMBRE GRIS; 6pm, $5

Open jazz jam, 8pm Tu; Music and poetry event, 8pm W, call for cover

BELL BOYS, 2pm, no cover

KEN KOENIG, SICFUS, DEVOID OF REALITY; 1pm, no cover

JESI NAOMI, ZUHG, SAM PHELPS; noon, no cover

ACE OF SPADES

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

ALL AGES WELCOME!

FRIDAY, MAY 11

THURSDAY, MAY 24

PROF - MUMBLS - QUETTE DADDIE & OPTIMIZTIQ ILL EFFECT - A-MAD-G - 53ZIPBOYS

CIVIT & WHISKEY - STITCHES

ANDRE NICKATINA

Open-mic, 6-8pm Tu, no cover

THE REAL MC KENZIES

SATURDAY, MAY 12

FRIDAY, MAY 25

KID INK & KIRKO BANGZ

DESTRUCTION

KID SWAGG -TORREY TEE - SUPAFICIALZ HIGHER LEARNING - DJ OASIS

WARBRINGER - VITAL REMAINS - PATHOLOGYSOLANUM

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16

THE SUPERVILLAINS KAYAVIBE - OFFICIAL RESPONSE DOGFOOD - EAZY DUB

THURSDAY, MAY 31

SHADOWS FALL - THE BROWNING - THE DEVASTATED LEGACY OF DISORDER

6/3

Left Over Crack

6/8

Dredg

6/9

Mickey Avalon

6/16

Damage Over Time

6/17

My Darkest Days

6/19

Mayer Hawthorne & The County

Jackson Tribute) 6/29 Jonny Craig 7/15

The Casualties

7/17

Reverend Horton Heat

7/21

Moonshine Bandits

7/27

The Demon Hunter

8/17

Great White

8/25 Full Blown Stone

(HED) PE & MUSHROOMHEAD

FEAR FACTORY

Yo Gotti

6/28 Who’s Bad (Michael

MICAH BROWN - MASSIVE DELICIOUS

MONDAY, MAY 21

Suicidal Tendencies

6/2

WINDS OF PLAGUE

MISHKA/ANUHEA

ESCALON - SOME SEEK FORGIVENESS - THE MOTH ANATOMY – CITADEL - JOURNAL - THEY CALL IT MERCY

SOON

6/1

6/22 Arden Park Roots

SUNDAY, MAY 27

COVENTRY SQUARE

COMING

SATURDAY, MAY 26 A HOLY GHOST REVIVAL - ELLIPSIS - SALYTHIA

SATURDAY, MAY 19

Tribe of Levi with the Storytellers 9pm Friday, call for cover. Shenanigans Hip-hop

AMERICAN HEAD CHARGE - CORVUS TENAFLY VIPER - AMERICAZ MOZT HAUNTED

9/4

David Allen Coe

9/5

Powerman 5000

10/11 D.R.I

Tickets available at all Dimple Records Locations, The Beat Records, and Armadillo Records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202 BEFORE

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OF

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o t p u e v a S

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! F OF No limi t means that yo as many as y u can buy ou want!

Discounts areWsuhile supplies last. bject to change without notice.

44   |   SN&R   |   05.10.12

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THE 420

Medical Evaluation

High on Romney

for use of

Will cannabis advocates cast a protest vote? Patients, dispensary owners and pretty much anyone else who regularly turns to medical marijuana seems to feel burned by President Barack Obama. Their beef? Obama stated by Nick Miller during his presidential campaign four years ago that he’d more or less take a hands-off approach to regulating mednickam@ ical cannabis in states where it was legal. newsreview.com But as it turns out, hands-off apparently meant the dismantling and criminalization of the California medical-cannabis industry. Marijuana advocates are blazing mad, and many argue Obama’s federal policy has been worse than that of his predecessor, President George W. Bush. But is it enough to turn them against Obama and vote for, say, Mitt Romney or Ron Paul? Cannabis experts agree that Obama’s pot policy will at the very least impact his re-election efforts. “While Obama is definitely the worst president by far when it comes to respecting medical marijuana,” argued Morgan Fox with Washington, D.C.,-based Marijuana Policy Project, “it’s arguable that Romney could be worse.” Fox reminded that, unlike Obama, Romney does not even believe in cannabis’ efficacy. “He does not see it as medicine,” he said. It’s also true that Romney, who claims to have never tried marijuana, has said very little that would hint at the scope of his cannabis policy. But according to Fox, his limited statements on marijuana “have all been resoundingly negative.” And “Massachusetts is obviously not a medical-marijuana state,” noted Kris Hermes, with California-based medical-cannabis advocacy “While [President Barack] group Americans for Safe Access. Obama is definitely “But I can’t see a trementhe worst president by dous difference between the far when it comes to Republicans and the Democrats on this issue,” he respecting medical said. “They’re both toeing the marijuana, it’s arguable drug-war line.” This comes as a surprise to that [Mitt] Romney many. In 2008, Obama stated could be worse.” on the campaign trail that he would not “use justice departMorgan Fox ment resources to try and Marijuana Policy Project circumvent state laws about medical marijuana.” But then in October of last year, the U.S. attorneys in California began a new phase in the federal crackdown on medical cannabis. In the April 25 issue of Rolling Stone magazine, Obama defended this ratcheted-up crackdown on Golden State dispensaries and cultivators. The president told Rolling Stone: “I never made a commitment that somehow we were going to give carte blanche to large-scale producers and operators of marijuana—and the reason is, because it’s against federal law. I can’t nullify congressional law. I can’t ask the Justice Department to say, ‘Ignore completely a federal law that’s on the books.’” “That’s not good enough,” Hermes said. “We need a public-health policy around medical marijuana.” MPP’s Fox says that he thinks some who voted for Obama in ’08 will vote for Paul or Gary Johnson as some kind of protest vote. He also thinks Obama will struggle with youth turnout and 420-friendly donors. “Obama’s marijuana policies,” Fox concluded, “are going to hurt his chances.” Ω BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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MEDICINAL MARIJUANA conducted by

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by ROB BREZSNY

FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 10, 2012

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In one of your

past lives, I think you must have periodically done something like stick your tongue out or thumb your nose at pretentious tyrants—and gotten away with it. At least that’s one explanation for how confident you often are about speaking up when everyone else seems unwilling to point out that the emperor is in fact wearing no clothes. This quality should come in handy during the coming week. It may be totally up to you to reveal the truth about an obvious secret or collective delusion. Can you figure out a way to be relatively tactful as you say what supposedly can’t or shouldn’t be said?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus

actor Daniel Day Lewis will star as American President Abraham Lincoln in a film to be released later this year. Hollywood insiders report that Lewis basically became Lincoln months before the film was shot and throughout the entire process. Physically, he was a dead ringer for the man he was pretending to be. Even when the cameras weren’t rolling, he spoke in the cadences and accent of his character rather than in his own natural voice. It might be fun for you to try a similar experiment in the coming weeks, Taurus. Fantasize in detail about the person you would ultimately like to become, and then imitate that future version of you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The idea of a housewarming party comes from an old British tradition. People who were moving would carry away embers from the fireplace of the home they were leaving and bring them to the fireplace of the new home. I recommend that you borrow this idea and apply it to the transition you’re making. As you migrate toward the future, bring along a symbolic spark of the vitality that has animated the situation you’re transitioning out of.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): My friend

Irene has a complicated system for handling her cats’ food needs. The calico, Cleopatra, demands chicken for breakfast and beef stew at night, and all of it absolutely must be served in a pink bowl on the dining room table. Caligula insists on fish stew early and tuna later. He wants it on a black plate placed behind the love seat. Nefertiti refuses everything but gourmet turkey upon waking and beef liver for the evening repast. If it’s not on the basement stairs, she won’t touch it. I’m bringing your attention to this, Cancerian, because I think you could draw inspiration from it. It’s in your interests, at least temporarily, to keep your loved ones and allies happy with a coordinated exactitude that rivals Irene’s.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The moon’s pale

glow shimmers on your face as you run your fingers through your hair. In your imagination, 90 violins play with sublime fury, rising toward a climax, while the bittersweet yearning in your heart sends warm chills down your spine. You part your lips and open your eyes wide, searching for the words that could change everything. And then suddenly you remember you have to contact the plumber tomorrow and find the right little white lie to appease youknow-who and run out to the store to get that gadget you saw advertised. Cut! Cut! Let’s do this scene again. Take five. It’s possible, my dear, that your tendency to overdramatize is causing you to lose focus. Let’s trim the 90 violins down to 10 and see if maybe that helps.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “We all need a

little more courage now and then,” said poet Marvin Bell. “That’s what I need. If you have some to share, I want to know you.” I advise you to adopt his approach in the coming days, Virgo. Proceed on the assumption that what you need most right now is to be braver and bolder. And consider the possibility that a good way to accomplish this goal is by hanging around people who are so intrepid and adventurous that their spirit will rub off on you.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the Byrds’

1966 song “5D (Fifth Dimension),” the singer makes a curious statement. He says that during a particularly lucid state, when he was simply relaxed and paying attention, he saw the great blunder his teachers had

BEFORE

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15 MINUTES

by RACHEL

LEIBROCK PHOTO BY KAYLEIGH MCCOLLUM

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY made. I encourage you to follow that lead, Libra. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now would be an excellent time for you to thoroughly question the lessons you’ve absorbed from your important teachers—even the ones who taught you the best and helped you the most. You will earn a healthy jolt as you decide what to keep and what to discard from the gifts that beloved authorities have given you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What are

the most beautiful and evocative songs you know? What are the songs that activate your dormant wisdom and unleash waves of insight about your purpose here on Earth and awaken surges of gratitude for the labyrinthine path you have traveled to become the person you are today? Whatever those tunes are, I urge you to gather them all into one playlist, and listen to them with full attention while at rest in a comfortable place where you feel perfectly safe. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you need a concentrated dose of the deepest, richest, most healing emotions you can tap into.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Tourists rarely go to the South American nation of Guyana. That’s mostly because much of it is virgin rain forest and there are few amenities for travelers. In part it’s also due to the reputation-scarring event that occurred there in 1978, when cult-leader Reverend Jim Jones led a mass suicide of his devotees. Last year, after travel writer Jeff Greenwald announced his trip to Guyana, his friends responded with a predictable joke: “Don’t drink the Kool-Aid!”—a reference to the beverage Jones spiked with cyanide before telling his followers to drink up. But Greenwald was glad he went. The lush, tangled magnificence of Guyana was tough to navigate but a blessing to the senses and a first-class adventure. Be like him, Sagittarius. Consider engaging with a situation that offers challenging gifts. Overcome your biases about a potentially rewarding experience.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “You

have more freedom than you are using,” says artist Dan Attoe. Allow that taunt to get under your skin and rile you up in the coming days, Capricorn. Let it motivate you to lay claim to all the potential spaciousness and independence and leeway that are just lying around going to waste. According to my understanding of the astrological omens, you have a sacred duty to cultivate more slack as if your dreams depended on it. (They do!)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you’ve

been tuning in to my horoscopes during the past months, you’re aware that I have been encouraging you to refine and deepen the meaning of home. You know that I have been urging you to get really serious about identifying what kind of environment you need in order to thrive; I’ve been asking you to integrate yourself into a community that brings out the best in you; I’ve been nudging you to create a foundation that will make you strong and sturdy for a long time. Now it’s time to finish up your intensive work on these projects. You’ve got about four more weeks before a new phase of your life’s work will begin.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Is your B.S.detector in good condition? I hope so, because it’s about to get a workout. Rumors will be swirling and gossip will be flourishing, and you will need to be on high alert in order to distinguish the laughable delusions that have no redeeming value from the entertaining stories that have more than a few grains of truth. If you pass those tests, Pisces, your reward will be handsome: You’ll become a magnet for inside information, valuable secrets, and unusual but useful clues that come from unexpected sources.

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

Check the tape Sacramento artist Danny Scheible employs humble everyday materials, most notably masking tape, to build his visions: Vast, sprawling pieces that, at first glance, resemble a mythical underwater city composed of coral and sea anemone. Scheible’s art installations don’t just occupy an exhibition space, they take over, seemingly moving and breathing with a tangible energy. Scheible, whose work will be on display May 10 to 13, at the Whole Earth Festival in Davis, spoke to SN&R about creating his life-sized interactive pieces and why cities shouldn’t just display art, they should become it.

You dress up in their clothes?

I’ve seen your work described as “origami.” Is that accurate?

I don’t create singular pieces of artwork. I’ve been creating one piece of art for seven years. It’s an expanding social structure; it’s an exhibit, it’s an installation, so they are, inherently, not a single piece of art.

It’s “tapigami.”

How would you describe it? I make interactive social art, and I create the materials. I create physical objects with everyday materials, materials found at house and hardware stores—ideally stuff that people have handled before and have in their everyday lives.

What kind of materials do you specifically use? I use many different kinds of tape, wire hangers, recycled fabrics, garments, cable ties. I also do screen-printing—T-shirts—and I draw as well. There’s a difference between what I exhibit publicly and what I make for myself.

Can you give me an example? I go to people’s houses and take portraits of myself wearing their clothes. That’s not ready for exhibit.

STORY

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

A lot of my artwork deals with who you are and how you exist and you relate to people in the world. You can be whomever you want. It’s up to you to decide, if possible. But in other people’s minds, they put a label on you. The point of this is to create a stronger bond with people. It’s very personal work. … It helps me have a social connection with people. I think I’ll exhibit it eventually, but I haven’t been focused on it as much lately. I’ve been focused on the masking-tape work.

How many pieces have you made?

What inspires these pieces? A lot of times I’ll see an artist and take what I like from them. I’ll appropriate ideas and integrate them into my sculptures. The piece of work, when it exists in a physical sense, exists like a gondola—always different in a different space. It always has a different focus depending on the space.

How much time do you spend on them? I couldn’t tell you. I work 10 to 12 hours a day on it and different aspects. Whether it’s going out and making art in public places or alone in my studio, it just happens every day.

What kind of reactions do you get? Depends on the context—whether it’s in the context of an installation or me hanging out with a roll of tape at a bar or with friends at a party or at the library or department store, everyone has a different reaction. It’s |

AFTER

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important to remind people that it’s an open process; that they’re free to talk to me about it. I want to share it with them. Most of the time, if I’m out in public, I give the art to the people I engage with. If someone comments on it, I hand it to them and say, “This is my art. It’s important to me.” It’s redefining how you interact with art [and] letting them know that an artist’s daily work is not different than their daily work.

I imagine children are really open to that idea. Often they’re surprised. They don’t know what to do. The art challenges them. ... There’s no reason to sacrifice your childhood at the cost of your maturity. Some adults are open and creative and some kids are just as hard as adults; they have assumptions.

Your first tapigami show was at Fools Foundation in 2005. Then, you explained your works as being “about a city becoming a sculpture.” What did you mean by that? Art in Sacramento is not very public. Other cities have mural districts and more sculptures in buildings and more businesses with art on the walls. You need to have artists cycle through and a healthy environment for customers and employees. I’m always excited when I find a business that wants to integrate art into the daily lives of people. My friends and I have an art incubator, the Flywheel, [which] exists through the Arts and Business [Council of Sacramento]. We’re accepting applications through May 10 and [want to create] art, time and entrepreneurial support for people. Ω To see more of Danny Scheible’s artwork, visit www.facebook.com/tapigami. For more info on the Whole Earth Festival, visit http://wef.ucdavis.edu.

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S-2012-05-10