Issuu on Google+

HOODIES, HUNGER GAMES

AND RACE see Streetalk, page 5 see Popsmart, page 22

MLB IN SACRAMENTO? see Frontlines, page 8

THE

ANTI-GAY GUYS see Frontlines, page 10

ORAGAMI FANNY PACKS A-GO-GO see Coolhunting, page 30

CITY’S ONLY FEMALE BIKE MESSENGER see 15 Minutes, page 47

SACRAMENTO’S NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

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VOLUME 23, ISSUE 51

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THURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2012


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INSIDE

VoÒume 23, Issue 51 | April 5, 2012

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THE 420

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

FRONTLINES

Editor Melinda Welsh Managing Editor Nick Miller Senior Staff Writer Cosmo Garvin Arts & Culture Editor Rachel Leibrock Copy Editor Kyle Buis Associate Copy Editor Shoka Shafiee Calendar Editor Jonathan Mendick Editorial Coordinator Kel Munger Special Sections Editor Becca Costello Editorial Interns Valentín Almanza, Jonathan Nathan, Matthew W. Urner, Amy Wong Contributors Sasha Abramsky, Gustavo Arellano, Rob Brezsny, Larry Dalton, Joey Garcia, Jeff Hudson, Eddie Jorgensen, Jonathan Kiefer, Jim Lane, Greg Lucas, Ann Martin Rolke, Garrett McCord, John Phillips, Patti Roberts, Steph Rodriguez, Seth Sandronsky, Amy Yannello

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Design Manager Kate Murphy Art Director Priscilla Garcia Associate Art Director Hayley Doshay Editorial Designer India Curry Design Melissa Arendt, Brennan Collins, Mary Key, Marianne Mancina, Skyler Smith Art Directors-at-large Don Button, Andrea Diaz-Vaughn Director of Advertising and Sales Rick Brown Senior Advertising Consultants Rosemarie Messina, Joy Webber Advertising Consultants Rosemary Babich, Josh Burke, Vince Garcia, Dusty Hamilton, April Houser, Cathy Kleckner, Dave Nettles, Kelsi White Senior Inside Sales Consultant Olla Ubay Ad Services Coordinator Melissa Bernard Events Interns Samantha Leos Operations Manager Will Niespodzinski Sales Coordinators Shawn Barnum, Rachel Rosin Director of First Impressions Jeff Chinn Distribution Manager Greg Erwin Distribution Services Assistant Larry Schubert Distribution Drivers Mansour Aghdam, Nicholas Babcock, Walt Best, Daniel Bowen, Nina Castro, Jack Clifford, Robert Cvach, Chris Fong, Ron Forsberg, Ramon Garcia, Wayne Hopkins, Brenda Hundley, Wendell Powell, Warren Robertson, Lloyd Rongley, Duane Secco, Jack Thorne, Kaven Umstead

ARTS&CULTURE

BEFORE

SN&R is printed by The Paradise Post using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in SN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. SN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form and to edit them for libel.

FRONTLINES

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ARTS&CULTURE

Going mainstream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 An Inconvenient Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Eco-Hit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

NIGHT&DAY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Events Calendar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 MOBS goodies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

OPINION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Facebook face-off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Editorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Guest Comment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

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FEATURE STORY

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Yes, there are still roller rinks out there. And Becca Costello reports this week on the young and old Sacramentans who are taking to four wheels and resurrecting the sport of figure skating. Also: Greg Lucas goes for the cannelloni, and Jonathan Kiefer returns to Titanic—in 3-D. Popsmart. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Wheels of fortune . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Scene&Heard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

GREEN DAYS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

FRONTLINES

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Sure, Sacramentans know about the balls—those all-night dance fests where gays of color set out to dress and dazzle with the best of them. They know about the runway sirens, they know about the vogue legends. But they also know the fabulous balls happen in the Bay Area, Los Angeles, Vegas—anyplace but here in Sacramento. Some locals are starting to ask: Will this town ever have its own ballroom scene? Lien Hoang brings us a look at a slice of Sac’s gay subculture.

We’re already building one home for a major sports team—maybe—so why not wonder: Could the Oakland Athletics move to Sacramento? The Major League Baseball season kicks off this week for real; Nick Miller fuels the flames of fandom, fact and fiction. Also this week: James Raia visits a growing local solar-energy firm, Alison Rood ponders playing Nirvana for your kindergartner and Sac’s editorial board gives reasons for optimism. Bring on the major league . . . . . . . . . . 8 Beats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Straight our the door . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Why the Davis Dozen? . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Advertising Policies All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message.

BEFORE

FEATURE STORY

Streetalk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Letter of the Week . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Poet’s Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resources Manager Tanja Poley Senior Accountant Kevin Driskill Credit and Collections Manager Renee Briscoe Business Shannon McKenna, Zahida Mehirdel Systems Manager Jonathan Schultz Systems Support Specialist Joe Kakacek Web Developer/Support Specialist John Bisignano Operations Intern Giovanni Sumulong 1124 Del Paso Boulevard, Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (916) 498-1234 Sales Fax (916) 498-7910 Editorial Fax (916) 498-7920 Website www.newsreview.com

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Eat It and Reap. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Food Stuff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

COOLHUNTING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 ASK JOEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 STAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Barrymore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 The Color Purple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Now Playing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

FILM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Titanic 3D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Clips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

MUSIC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Whiskey Dawn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Sound Advice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Eight Gigs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Nightbeat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

AFTER

Check out SN&R’s FREE searchable EVENTS calendar online at www.newsreview.com.

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Classifieds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Adult . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Free Will Astrology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 15 Minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

THE 420

INSIDE

COVER PHOTO BY WES DAVIS COVER DESIGN BY HAYLEY DOSHAY

DISH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Vince’s Ristorante . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 The V Word. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Dish Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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AFTER

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building a

HealtHy Sacramento

Great Grandmother Finds Hope Wendy Yang immigrated to the United States from France 6 years ago to join family and friends in Sacramento. She arrived with dreams of gaining an education and a good job. She hoped to spend lots of time with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. But Wendy has faced many unexpected challenges since immigrating – challenges that would have overwhelmed her if not for the help of the Hmong Women’s Heritage Association, part of the Capitol Community Health Network.

ear causing an inability to listen in a noisy classroom – make Wendy feel like her age stands in the way of her education and career dreams. “In the daytime I am fine, but at night I feel really sick and weak,” said Wendy. “I can’t speak for the younger generation that lives here, has the education, and has been here for a long time. But for me personally, it has been very hard.”

Wendy proudly claims the title of “two generation grandma.” Most the Hmong Women’s [Heritage of her 11 grandchildren now have association] has helped me with children of their own, including her oldest daughter’s family in a lot of things. I don’t know what France. Wendy recalls a time I would do without them. this when she lived in France that the grandchildren came to stay agency is my biggest hope. with her often. She misses them very much, and despite plans to fly back to France, she has not had Despite the challenges she has faced, Wendy is grateful for her enough money to visit. friends here in Sacramento. She enjoys spending time with them Her youngest daughter’s family is here in doing just about anything, but especially outdoor activities like Sacramento. But Wendy stays with friends in walks in the park or taking day trips to the mountains. South Sacramento, while her grandchildren She is also extremely grateful that her friends told her about the live across town. She lacks reliable Hmong Women’s Heritage Association. Staff at the association with transportation so misses out on the assistance of the Community Health Navigator Program helped opportunities to see them. Wendy find a doctor and even gave her a ride to the doctor’s office. To make matters worse, When English mail arrives in Wendy’s mailbox, she takes it to the Wendy has faced many association for translation and help filling out paperwork. other challenges since immigrating. She speaks only Hmong, which makes simple tasks like finding health care problematic due to language barriers. Health problems – including hearing impairment in her right

Strengthening Our Community The Hmong Women’s Heritage Association is a partner of Capitol Community Health Network. While the network provides the association with centralized support services, the association in turn strengthens members of the community. Together, the organizations strive to improve health outcomes of Sacramento residents. Capitol Community Health Network, founded in 1994, is a non-profit partnership of community clinics, health centers, and health education agencies. In addition to providing advocacy, the network

coordinates a Community Health Navigator project to assist its partners in identifying families in need of health interventions, providing health education, and helping families navigate the healthcare system to find permanent health solutions. Hmong Women’s Heritage Association, a non-profit community-based organization, focuses its efforts on Hmong, Mien and Lao women and their families. By providing healthy support systems for women like Wendy Yang, the association empowers the community to build relationships with one another and to work with government

agencies to improve health outcome as well as prevent youth violence. Together, both organizations work toward a vision of a region in which all persons, regardless of cultural background, income, education or citizenship status, can easily access quality healthcare services and health education in a welcoming environment. Contact Hmong Women’s Association at (916) 394-1405 or tap into the entire Capitol Community Health Network at (916) 447-7222.

www.SacBHC.org

www.CalEndow.org/ HealthHappensHere

www.HmongWomenHeritage.org

to learn more visit us at www.calendow.org

paid with a grant from the california endowment 4   |   SN&R   |   04.05.12


STREETALK

“If it is too baggy, then you are suspicious.”

Asked at Sacramento City College:

Hoodies: suspicious or stylish?

Frank Onofre

Mario Martinez

student

It depends if you are a part of a gang, if you are wearing red or you’re wearing blue. Let’s say you are in a red area and you are wearing blue, even if you are not in a gang, you might get shot or beat up and vice versa.

BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

student

Not really, because it is just clothes. People have their own style. I don’t think you should judge someone by their clothes. You should get to know someone before you get to judge them. It is based on stereotypes. Too many people judge before getting to know someone.

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FEATURE

Wendy Williams

Mark Burks

petitioner

student

I think it’s the eyes, because eyes are the windows to the soul. So if someone won’t look you in the eye, that makes them suspicious. I don’t pay attention to what they are wearing so much. If they are wearing the same color and there was a bunch of them dressed the same, I might wonder, but I never really go by that.

STORY

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student

What I think makes someone suspicious is someone walking around acting suspicious. Looking around like they’re ready, you know, to rob something—checking out the scenery, walking back and forth. Clothes in particular: maybe all black on a summer day, baggy pants on a summer day—but not no hoodie.

A RT S & C U LT U R E

Marcos Padilla

Lamont Beard

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student

It depends on how you wear it, how you present yourself and carry yourself. I feel like if it is too baggy, then you are suspicious. If you are wearing all black and not colorful, that means you are trying to be on the low.

AFTER

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04.05.12

I don’t think clothes have anything to do with it. I grew up in an area where everyone wore the cliché baggy clothes, which make them “suspicious.” It’s more of how they act: if they are acting funny or keep looking around. It’s more of the body language than what they are wearing.

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LETTERS

Visit us at www.newsreview.com or email sactoletters @ newsreview.com

Another effing dare

FIRST SHOT SN&R reader photo of the week PHOTO BY PRISCILLA GARCIA

Re “Are you there, God? It’s me, Josh.” by Josh Fernandez (SN&R Arts&Culture, March 22): Personal expression of spiritual beliefs, whether it be with hairstyles or clothing, may be an outward confirmation of a person’s profound connection to the faith within. And expressing one’s faith outwardly will probably attract other LETTER OF members of the faith, which builds a spiritual community. In this THE WEEK respect, each faith is the same and we are all one. So I encourage you, Josh, to stop judging different faiths based on the appearance of their practitioners, and set down the issues your dad laid on you for just a minute. Take a look within to find your own guide. I don’t just encourage you, I fucking dare you! Andria Chernis-Giorgi Sacramento

What the frack?! Re “Oh, frack!” (SN&R Feature, March 29): Gasland, the movie, says [former Vice President Dick] Cheney exempted fracking from clean-water bills. That movie is believable and horrific. Don’t live near fracking. Thanks for this story, and please stay on it. Alfreda Weiss Fair Oaks

GMO guinea pigs Re “GMO wars” by Jenn Walker (SN&R Frontlines, March 22): I really appreciate you running this story about [genetically modified organisms]. I don’t trust the [Food and Drug Administration] anymore, considering all the drugs that are currently [involved in] lawsuits because of side effects that have killed, permanently crippled or medically sidelined people over the past 20-plus years. I don’t trust industries like Monsanto to have our best interests at heart. Every day, there are more and more horror stories about what they are putting in our food to make money, and they have no conscience about what it is doing to people. The medical associations seem to be involved with big industry to cover up these horrors as well, and are actively using our older Medicare generation as their guinea pigs to tests the side effects of new drugs. All of this has to stop, and it is important to get the real truth out there and not allow the mainstream media to continue to turn a blind eye. Thanks again for your article, and print more just like it as long as you can. Jeanna Maynard via email

Perfectly ordinary Re “Ordinary people” by Pat Lynch (SN&R Essay, March 22): I was a friend of Bill Ayers’ brother when I lived in Chicago, and on a few occasions met Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn shortly after they surrendered to the FBI in 1980. I didn’t need personal encounters with the pacifist couple to suspect that their demonization in 2008 by [presidential candidate Sen. John] McCain supporters when BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

learning of Barack Obama’s distant association with Ayers was purely political. Still, the vigor of the Republican attacks and gross mischaracterization of Ayers were disturbing. I attended the Ayers-Dohrn appearance at California Stage. They spoke with clarity and passion about education, war, the Occupy movement and other issues, and confirmed my recollections of an intelligent, friendly couple whose Weathermen hearts were in the right place, even if some of their tactics were not. Both before and after the informal program, Ayers and Dohrn greeted and chatted with many of the attendees and conveyed sincere interest in the work being done by Sacramento-area activists. We reminisced about earlier times and mutual friends from Chicago, and they signed my friend Dave’s daughter’s highschool term paper about the [Students for a Democratic Society] in the ’60s. Nobody talked about professional basketball. It was an uplifting evening, and given the recurring “notoriety” of Ayers and Dohrn, it should have garnered some local media attention. Unless I missed something, though, there was nothing—until I read Pat Lynch’s superb essay. Thank you for being out there in the hard-to-find places that really matter.

SN&R’s own Priscilla Garcia took this photograph while standing beside an abandoned field near 11th and C streets, looking up at one of her favorite Sacramento landmarks, the Globe Mills building.

Altos [Avenue] between Grand [Avenue] and South. Kimberley Solorio Sacramento

That’s MBR to you!

Come to her church

James Wilson via email

Re “Are you there, God? It’s me, Josh.” by Josh Fernandez (SN&R Arts&Culture, March 22): I stumbled across this article while having breakfast at Sammy’s [Restaurant]. I really enjoyed it. If Josh is seeking the Lord, then look no further, because he dwells within you (us, everyone). There is a void within all of our souls that is meant to be filled with God (Holy Spirit). That is why we seek him. But he’s very mysterious, omnipotent and hard for our carnal minds to comprehend. The hand of those who wrote the Bible was guided by our Lord. We need his Holy Spirit to gain understanding of the Word (Bible). I found it in Zion. Have you ever visited an Apostolic Church? You are welcome to visit my home church. It’s on

FEATURE

STORY

Joseph Bruno Carmichael

Re “Are you there, God? It’s me, Josh.” by Josh Fernandez (SN&R Arts&Culture, March 22): Your paper has moved beyond antiChristian with this piece of offal, and now must be considered plainly anti-Christ. Firstly, you act as if Christianity, the religion our Lord gave his life to found, can be even considered in the same space as Satanism and witchcraft. Then you have a so-called “Christian” (a Christian in name only) using foul language in a phony attempt to evangelize an obvious Christ-hater. Why don’t you call yourself the Mark of the Beast Review?

John Morrison Sacramento

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enshrine their hateful bigotry into law. Vo’s so-called “homosexual agenda” is no more than a protest against the big government tyrannical oppression of the gay community by bigots.

What’s bigoted about protesting bigotry?

No cavities on the campaign trail! Re “Say something nice about a GOP presidential candidate” (SN&R Streetalk, March 15): I believe they all floss and brush regularly. Sharon Goodnight Sacramento

POET’S CORNER The Return:

Re “Opinions, not hate” (SN&R Letters, March 22): Jim Vo says that most of the bigoted behaviors he has seen has been from “the homosexual agenda.” To start with, how can an “agenda” be bigoted? I agree it is true that everyone has the right to express their bigotry, but the right wingers cross the line when they try to enshrine their bigoted opinion into law. This is not a simple matter of opinion, since they want to make gay marriage, homosexuality, abortion and contraception illegal. They have the right to abstain from all these activities, but they have no right to |

A RT S & C U LT U R E

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Have a great photo? Email it to firstshot@ newsreview.com. Please include your full name and phone number. File size must not exceed 10 MB.

AFTER

After five years had passed I came back to retrieve That missing piece It had fallen from me Like a childhood tooth Maybe rolling Into a gutter Off Watt Avenue My insides rattled On the plane ride home Like broken jigsaw bones Bouncing about my tin shell I came back to be again And end five years of hell —Matthew Travieso Williams

West Sacramento

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FRONTLINES

e h t n o Bring

Oakland Athletics mascot Stomper welcomes his team to Raley Field this past weekend.

If Sacramento builds for another pro-sports franchise, will they come? Sacramento loves gossip, and especially that of a professional-baseball franchise coming to town: “The Oakland Athletics want to leave by Nick Miller the Bay Area—and Sacramento is the perfect home!” nickam@ “Raley Field is an amazing stadium—and newsreview.com all you have to do is slap on a second deck of photos by seats for an Major League Baseball team!” Jonathan Mendick “The city’s building a Kings arena—so who not build a ballpark, too, while we’re at it!” This sort of chatter’s been strong since Saturday night, when the Oakland Athletics Matt Haines’ plan to bring a pro-baseball visited Raley Field in West Sacramento for an franchise to Sacramento exhibition game against its minor league affilis outlined at iate, the Sacramento River Cats. The game www.sacramento baseball.biz. It’s a was the pro squad’s first visit to the area in similar proposal to his five years, and some 11,000 braved the tail new Kings arena plan last end of a hearty storm to get a glimpse of the year (www.arena men in green. ontheriver.com), but this But really, could Sacramento actually time, he’s partnered with Stadium Capital Financing acquire a professional MLB franchise for Group to raise funds keeps? Everyone says it’s as simple as Raley (www.seatrights.com). Field adding an upper level. But is that even feasible? 8

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04.05.12

Sure, it’s true about Oakland’s attendance ignominy: The city has the lowest ticket sales in all of baseball, a paltry 18,000 people per game. And yes, the River Cats enjoy the top attendance records in the minors, some 8,455 fans per game last year. It’s also no secret the Athletics want to leave Oakland. For years, owner Lew Wolff has had his eyes on San Jose, where he made his name as a developer. But San Jose is currently San Francisco Giants territory, and the Giants, of course, aren’t going to let that happen, because it would mean giving up Silicon Valley’s wealthy corporate sponsors. Oakland has petitioned Commissioner Bud Selig to greenlight a San Jose relocation, but it’s been more than a handful of years, and the MLB still hasn’t made a decision on such a move. Understandably, the Athletics refuse to discuss possible relocation—they don’t want to upset the commissioner. But a source within the organization told SN&R that the process is now on Selig’s “front burner.”

Meanwhile, last week, a Sacramentobased grassroots movement that wants to bring an MLB team to town quietly launched a website and Facebook presence. The goal is to seduce investors, lure a franchise and build another stadium across the Sacramento River from Raley Field. And do all this with 100 percent private dollars.

“Anybody that had some reasonable knowledge knows you can’t slap an upper deck on it.” Joe Desko HNTB architect, on expanding Raley Field You’ve seen the movie: You build it, they come. Right? The catch is this: If an MLB franchise moves to town, it will likely mean the departure of the River Cats.


The anti-gay guys

See FRONTLINES

10

Sac-area solar power See GREEN DAYS

13

Used vs. new cars

13

Kurt Cobain day care

See AN INCONVENIENT RUTH

See ESSAY

14

Be optimistic See EDITORIAL

15

BEATS

Maloof moonwalk “There’s no city in America that’s home to both a major league and minor league team,” said Zak Basch, spokesperson for the River Cats. He and others explained that you cannot have both—a pro team and a minor league affiliate—so the River Cats, who moved to West Sacramento 14 years ago from Vancouver, would have to find new digs if the Athletics or another MLB franchise chose the River City. It’s no surprise then that the River Cats’ policy is to avoid such speculative discussion, despite a player-development contract with the Athletics as its triple-A team. Either way, there’s not much meat to said gossip, according to Basch. “I hear what you hear,” he conceded of the rumors. “‘Marcos Breton wrote a column.’ ‘It seems like a natural fit.’ But have I seen guys out here, engineers measuring stuff? No.” If engineers and architects were out on Raley Field exploring the idea of a possible expansion—let’s be clear, they’re not—then Joe Desko of HNTB architecture might be one of them. Desko worked on Raley Field, which opened its doors in May 2000 and was built for just $46.5 million. He remembers collaborating with Art Savage, who owned the team until his passing in 2009. In fact, he even recalls drafting up scenarios for an expansion of Raley Field. But, he explained, turning the West Sac stadium into an MLB-sized ballpark that could accommodate some 35,000 fans isn’t as easy as bringing in more seats.

“Anybody that has some reasonable knowledge knows you can’t slap an upper deck on it,” Desko explained. “To fill an upper deck doesn’t make sense.” The architect—who is currently working on the future home of the San Francisco 49ers in Santa Clara—did say that Raley Field’s footprint might expand to accommodate a larger ballpark, perhaps MLB size. But that this would be a much larger undertaking than adding a second level or more seats. “I think you could fit a major league stadium in there,” he said.

“I’m just looking for community-minded people who want to bring Major League Baseball to Sacramento.” Matt Haines founder of grassroots movement website Sacramento Baseball Critics are quick to point out, however, that building a stadium isn’t the largest hurdle to bringing a major league squad to the Sacramento area. It’s whether the region has the business community and sponsor dollars to sustain a pro franchise’s operations. A veteran source within the Athletics organization argued that where Sacramento falls short is in its corporate base. The city’s businesses may be able to keep an NBA franchise afloat—barely—but pro baseball plays 81 home games a year, nearly twice as many as the Kings, and attendance numbers at a

No, you could not just plop a second deck on Raley Field to accommodate a pro-baseball team.

BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

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ballpark would double that of Power Balance Pavilion. San Jose, however, is a much rosier destination. It’s the 10th-most-populated urban area in the nation. Eighty percent of the 200 most lucrative companies in the country reside in the Silicon Valley. San Jose’s mayor and city council—not to mention the heads of Cisco, Yahoo and eBay—have all asked Selig to allow the Athletics to relocate. It’s hard for Sacramento to compete with such a pedigree. But it may not have to. In 1989, the Giants wanted to leave San Francisco for Santa Clara. The team was in a similar situation as the Athletics are now: old stadium—in this instance, the former Candlestick Park—and a dwindling fan base. And so, the former Athletics owner— generous man that he was—granted the Giants’ then-owner territorial rights to six Bay Area counties, including the Silicon Valley and San Jose. Well, the Giants of course never moved south—but retained the territorial rights to this day, anyway. In fact, Oakland and San Francisco are the only franchises that own territorial rights in all of MLB. Not even the New York Yankees and the Mets, or the Baltimore Orioles and the nearby Washington Nationals, have contractually split turf like the two Bay Area teams. This means it will be a sticky situation for Selig, and league owners, to renege the Giants contract—which is why most experts speculate that they won’t. Which brings us again back to Sacramento. Last week, Matt Haines, a local restaurateur and businessman who owns 33rd Street Bistro, launched a website, Sacramento Baseball (www.sacramentobaseball.biz). His hope is to build a coalition of local leaders to invest in a pro baseball team. The goal is to raise $650 million (not a misprint) by preselling season-ticket packages, then use the funds to build a stadium and entice a franchise. “I’m just looking for community-minded people who want to bring Major League Baseball to Sacramento,” said Haines, who explained that he would be formally launching the effort in May. His grassroots campaign is partnering with Stadium Capital Financing Group, a company that sells ticket packages to raise private money for sports arenas and stadiums. And, while $650 million seems like an impossible chunk of change, consider: SCFG has raised almost $250 million for UC Berkeley’s stadium upgrade. It’s worth noting that this is $250 million of private money, unlike the quarter-million Sacramento residents are getting set to plop down on the new Kings home. Ω

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The in-house flack team at Maloof Sports and Entertainment apparently isn’t enough these days. Last week the family drafted a new talking head, Eric W. Rose of Los Angeles-based Englander, Knabe & Allen, for public relations. His task? Balk on the agreed-to-in-principle arena deal. That’s right, it’s another Measures Q-and-R moment. An encore performance of the Maloof moonwalk. SN&R readers certainly remember some kind of arena pact being forged a month ago. You know, those Maloof tears in Disney World? And the synchronized fist pumps with Mayor Kevin Johnson at a February 28 Kings game? Yeah, that deal. Well, those salad days are long gone. Consider flack Rose’s most recent email, from this past Monday, the latest in a series of cryptic blasts waffling on the arena accord: “The Kings saw the term sheet, one week before the deadline and the Kings made it very clear to all parties that we were not going to pay pre-development fees. That is one reason why we have never signed the term sheet.” It’s true, the Maloofs didn’t ink a deal. But no one—not the mayor, not AEG, not the NBA—signed the term sheet. It’s also worth noting that, in an interview last week with Sports Illustrated, George Maloof himself essentially called the mayor and city staff liars. And the moonwalk continues: On Tuesday, another Maloof agent—attorney Scott Zoelke of Loeb & Loeb—sent a six-page memo to assistant city manager John Dangberg doubting the feasibility of many parts of the so-called deal. These reservations include but sure weren’t limited to: the Sacramento Taxpayers Opposed to Pork signature-gathering effort, hiccups with the environmental-impact reports, lack of a finalized financing plan, and the ability to finish the arena project by the 2015-16 NBA season. (Nick Miller)

Coolest city in California? Sacramento is currently in a 12-month-long battle to have the cleanest carbon footprint. The city, along with five others in the state, is participating in the inaugural Cool California Challenge. The California Air Resources Board kicked off the competition on April 1, and the year-long contest will try to make city residents do such things as turn off their air conditioners in 100-degree weather and bike instead of drive when the air-quality goes orange. Anyway, CARB gave the city a cool grand as seed money to kickstart the program’s outreach; you can find out how to participate at www.coolcalifornia.org. (N.M.)

Pot still back-burnered The nation’s pre-eminent university—for weed—was raided this past Monday by the federal government. Oaksterdam University in downtown Oakland was just the latest headline in the federal government’s ongoing, now seven-month-old crackdown on medical cannabis. Meanwhile, the Sacramento City Council will vote this week to extend the freeze on its medical-cannabis-dispensary permit program. Last year, the city halted all permitting because the California Supreme Court was to rule on cases that could impact its medical-marijuana ordinance’s legality. The city attorney is monitoring the situation. It also takes three city employees to monitor local pot dispensaries. But, if the permit freeze continues through the year’s end, the program won’t pay for itself. So, the city also will vote this week on whether to dip into its $750,000 in marijuana-tax revenue to pay for the staffers until the smoke clears. (N.M.) |

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Firm principal leaves amid anti-gay PR controversy Sacramento-based political-consulting outfit Schubert Flint Public Affairs, which helped design the Yes on Proposition by 8 campaign in California, never Kel Munger wanted to be known as the “samekelm@ sex marriage firm.” But reports newsreview.com released last week again underscored the company as the go-to guys for anti-gay public relations. And now, this past Tuesday, firm principal Frank Schubert—the driving force behind the Schubert Flint’s efforts to repeal same-sex-marriage legislation nationwide—announced he would be leaving the company amid controversy. “I don’t want my work on social issues to continue to overshadow the people who work for me,” he said in a statement. “I’ve chosen to try to make a difference fighting for families, faith and the principles of the American founding, endowed by God.”

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“I’ve chosen to try to make a difference fighting for families, faith and the principles of the American founding, endowed by God.” Frank Schubert Schubert’s resignation comes on the heels of new internal documents from the National Organization for Marriage, a big player in the fight against marriage equality; the documents make all sorts of references to Copies of the National Proposition 8 and Schubert Flint. Organization for This in addition to discussions of Marriage internal a strategy aimed to “drive a wedge documents that mention between gays and blacks” by “fanSacramento-based ning the hostility raised in the wake Schubert Flint Public Affairs and the of Prop. 8.” Proposition 8 campaign These new developments are are posted on Kel piled on top of Schubert Flint’s Munger’s SN&R blog, involvement in Maine’s 2009 antiKel’s Hot Flash at www.newsreview.com/ gay-marriage initiative. NOM also hotflash. consulted with Schubert Flint on plans to overturn Washington, D.C.’s, marriage-equality law as well. Unsealed on March 26, the docuRead previous coverage ments were part of an ongoing on the topic, “Is campaign-finance investigation by Sacramento’s Schubert Flint Public Affairs the Maine into NOM, which was heav‘same-sex marriage’ ily involved in the state’s Question 1 firm?” SN&R Frontlines, initiative, along with Schubert Flint, January 26, at and also has been fighting to keep its www.newsreview.com. records secret. n e w s & r e v i e w b u s i n e s s u s e o n ly Interesting items revealed REM unhappy designer MK issUe dATe 05.26.11 include plans ACCTto eXeC recruit FiLe nAMe DAVIDALLEN052611R1 reV dATe 03.02.06 children of gay parents and also

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identify “non-intellectual elite” celebrities to support “traditional marriage.” They also detail NOM’s plans for repealing marriage equality in Washington, D.C., including a statement that “Schubert Flint’s preliminary campaign budget suggests that Stand for Marriage D.C. will need to raise around $6 million for victory,” and further promises that NOM will raise one-third of that amount. Schubert was traveling this week but responded to SN&R’s questions via email. He conceded that while NOM is not currently a client of Schubert Flint, the firm has “done some work with them over the years, mostly on statewide ballot measures and similar campaigns.” He also told SN&R that his former company was “involved with NOM and others in early organizational efforts in 2009 to mount a referendum and/or an initiative to preserve traditional marriage” in Washington, D.C. “Unfortunately, the District of Columbia government refused to allow such a vote,” Schubert explained, “and the courts did not overturn that decision. Thus, no campaign was mounted and none is under way.” The Sacramento firm is also credited in the documents with planning a special campaign aimed at young Latinos. Its words: “[The] ultimate goal is to make opposition to gay marriage … a badge of youth rebellion to conformist assimilation to the bad side of ‘Anglo’ culture.” Schubert acknowledged working with NOM and the Susan B. Anthony List on a campaign aimed at adult Latino voters as part of Carly Fiorina’s unsuccessful challenge to Sen. Barbara Boxer, but said that Schubert Flint did not target younger Latinos. Much attention has been directed at the sections of the documents which address “fanning hostilities” between blacks and gays; SN&R asked Schubert what he would advise a client about such a campaign. “We would not suggest to any client—NOM or otherwise—that they adopt a strategy of ‘fanning hostility,’” Schubert said, “and [we] would not be involved in implementing such a strategy.” He did add, however, that taking advantage of so-called “wedge issues” is simply “common-sense politics.” Ω


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Campus activists face ‘retroactive’ UC Davis-requested charges for bank blockade UC Davis never arrested a single protester during a nearly two-month blockade outside of the campus’ U.S. Bank branch. So why then are 12 by individuals—who recently were coined as the Nick Miller Davis Dozen—each now facing a maximum of nickam@ 11 years in prison? newsreview.com “That’s obviously, ultimately, a question you would have to ask the university,� explained Yolo County district attorney Michael Cabral, whose office filed misdemeanor charges against 12 of the protesters last week. The DA says the university presented a case to him recently, and his office selected 12 activists to face 20 counts each of “willfully and maliciously� obstructing free movement in a public place, plus conspiracy to commit such acts. The students are scheduled to appear in court on April 27. The Occupy UC Davis-related bank blockade began in early January, and the branch finally closed its doors for good on February 28. Two days later, U.S. Bank’s counsel then sent a letter to the Regents of the University of California, citing the student blockade as “intolerable.� The bank also accused UCD of defaulting on its contract, which could cost the university hundreds of thousands, if not more. The UC Regents’ counsel has countered the bank’s allegation of default, arguing that fifthlargest commercial bank in the nation is liable for termination of the partnership. Meanwhile, the gravity of the charges against the Davis Dozen—and the fact that UCD waited

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nearly three months to file them—now begs the question: Do the prosecutions have more to do with the university’s U.S. Bank liability than with the protesters’ alleged crimes? UC Davis spokesman Barry Schiller denied such accusations to SN&R, stating that “if they had not broken the law, we would still not be talking about this.â€? Representatives from Occupy UCD argue, meanwhile, that the charges show the administrations new strategy of “retroactive repression,â€? or delayed prosecution so as to avoid media attention. Schiller dismissed this claim. “If they hadn’t been warned every day, if people had not been there every day, I would find that argument to be a bit more credible,â€? the spokesman said. He added that written warnings of misdemeanor charges were delivered to the protesters each day for two weeks in February. UCD professor of English Joshua Clover, who is one of the 12 charged, declined to comment for this story. Activists did post recently on the Occupy UC Davis website (www.occupyucdavis.org) that the blockade was “real battle against the privatization agenda, and its closure is a victory.â€? A rally to support the Davis Dozen is planned for this Thursday, April 5, at 2 p.m. at the campus Memorial Union patio; more than 150 people on Facebook said they’ll attend as of Tuesday afternoon. â„Ś

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GREEN DAYS

Solar-energy outfit AEE Solar thrives, expands in Sacramento

RUTH

PHOTO COURTESY OF AEE SOLAR

Going mainstream

AN INCONVENIENT

Long may you run Feast your eyes on Auntie Ruth’s odomoter (pictured below). That’s no Photoshop trick, kids. That’s real life—a real car in real time. A car that’s been on the road a while and will be on the road a while more. Of the distinctly American fetishes, the fixation on new cars puzzles Ruth the most. The minute a new car leaves the lot, it plunges in value. And that doesn’t speak to how “as much as 28 percent of the carbon-dioxide emissions generated during the life cycle of a typical gasoline-powered car can occur during its manufacture and its transportation to the dealer,” according to Scientific American. Shop ’til you drop? Hell no. Cruise ’til you stop.

Local outfit AEE Solar recently opened a new 63,000-square-foot facility in Natomas, which will bring dozens of green-energy jobs to Sacramento, and process more than 50,000 outbound shipments annually.

Last year, The Solar Foundation, a more than three-decade-old nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., released its by James Raia second-annual job report on the solar industry. For the first time, more than 100,000 people in the country had jobs in the solar field. More than one-quarter of the jobs, or 25,575, were in California. And, because it’s an affordable place to do business, Sacramento, according to local energy outfit AEE Solar, is an attractive destination within the state. “I can’t speak for other companies, but Sacramento ... [is] an epicenter for the green-business environment, and it’s a vibrant business community, overall,” said Ben Higgins, who directs government affairs for AEE and two sister companies. “It’s an efficient and affordable place to own a business.” One of the nation’s top distributors of solar-energy systems and equipment, AEE Solar takes pride Learn more at in being efficient. Although headwww.aeesolar.com. quartered in San Luis Obispo, several of the company’s Northern California operation and distribution spots were recently consolidated into one facility in Natomas. This includes a new Green Days is on the 63,000-square-foot location at 1227 lookout for innovative Striker Avenue (near the intersecsustainable projects tion of Interstate 80 and Truxel throughout the Road), which will process more Sacramento region. Turn us on at than 30,000 outbound shipments sactonewstips@ a year. newsreview.com. The shipments will serve AEE Solar’s distribution partners in all 50 states and provide solar panels, racking, and equipment for sister company REC Solar’s regional installation branches in California, Hawaii, Oregon, Arizona, Colorado and New Jersey. Needless to say, the new AEE Solar location meant and will continue to mean good things for the local job market. Founded in 1979 as Alternative Energy Engineering by David Katz,

by AUNTIE RUTH

the company began, according to its website, “with the goal of bringing renewable, non-polluting power to homes and businesses in our foothills community in the northern California coastal redwood region.” Two years ago, AEE Solar employed about 45 people at its Sacramento warehouse. With the recent local growth, however, it now has more than 65 employees, with an additional 17 to 20 hires expected by the end of the year. About half of the total employees work in managing inbound and outbound shipments, a quarter in sales and customer service, and the rest in production and light assembly.

“We’ve also installed solar on approximately 700 homes and a number of businesses in Sacramento.”

A used car. It’s a known quantity (to somebody). reasons well-known in the industry: California is the nation’s solar leader in several key areas. It has the most solar-related companies, the most employees working in the solar industry and the most solarpower output created by those companies. Combined, AEE and its sister companies have compiled impressive statistics, which Higgins likes to point out. “Our company has branches in six states, has installed solar systems—more than 8,000 total—in 16 states and Puerto Rico, and through AEE Solar sells solar equipment to all 50 states,” said Higgins, who worked in Sacramento for 10 years and then relocated to San Luis Obispo a few years ago. “We’ve also installed solar on approximately 700 homes and a number of businesses in Sacramento. “Together, our strategy of installing solar, selling solar and manufacturing solar equipment via multiple brands makes us more competitive and cost efficient. And it helps us bring solar power to the mainstream.” Ω

Ben Higgins AEE Solar

It’s a proven steed. It has quirks to it, no doubt—those that don’t annoy may come to enamor. You can use phrases like “vintage” to describe your car (and never mind those folks with their Model T’s and ’66 Mustangs. That’s not “vintage.” That’s “time capsule,” “fetish” in reverse). Slate noted that the average American gets rid of a car every eight years, but then “a well-made vehicle will typically last 15 years”; The New York Times noted that 200,000 miles is the No tricks. new 100,000. Blame it on the recession, sure. But demands made by the Environmental Protection Agency and CalEPA have pushed catalytic converters to “perform within 96 percent of their original capability at 100,000 miles,” according Jagadish Sorab, a technical leader for engine design at Ford Motor Company, in a NYT story. “Materials are so much better. We can use very durable diamaond-like carbon finishes to prevent wear.”

Aunt R’s spousal unit always buys used cars. Has for years and—knock on tire tread—has never bought a lemon. Buys models known for good value and longevity, always visits the owner at home and gets a feel for the kind of owner he or she is. Always checks the VIN against the national databases for any record of damage, always has a trusted mechanic look the car over before purchase. And the oil gets changed often, with a religious fervor. An old car feels right—environmentally speaking, of course, but also in that wizened way of a consumerista that knows her bounds. There was a time not long ago when the odomoter in a car only went up 99,999 miles. That’s a puppy of a car. Barely housetrained. Long may you run. Ω (Come friend Aunt Ruth on Facebook and let’s hang out.)

The new Natomas facility, which was unveiled in a ribboncutting ceremony March 13, featured remarks by Lee Johnson, CEO of Mainstream Energy Corporation, AEE Solar’s parent company, which also has a local presence in the Sacramento area and more than 700 employees nationwide. AEE Solar’s sibling is REC Solar, which specializes in grid-tied residential and commercial installations and its vendors vary from school districts to regional Costco centers. AEE Solar chose Sacramento, and specifically Natomas, for

ECO-HIT Green growth

Going “green” helps company stock. According to a joint UC Davis and UC Berkeley study released on January 29, companies that disclose “green” efforts see a spike in stock prices. The report, written by Paul Griffin of UCD and Yuan Sun of UCB, studied 172 companies that made voluntary disclosures of carbon-emission information between 2000 and 2010. In the five days surrounding these announcements, companies saw an average of nearly half a percent increase in stock prices. For small companies, “green” announcements had an even greater positive effect on stock prices. To read the full report, visit http://ssrn.com/abstract=1995132.

Stocks rise with “green” announcements.

—Jonathan Mendick BEFORE

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My opinion that Nirvana isn’t appropriate music for a pre-kinderarten class ignited an argument 3,000 miles away. I’d related to my Virginia cousin, Karen, via Facebook, how by appalled I was when the music teacher at the elementary Alison Rood a freelance writer and school where I work showed junior kindergartners the classroom aide who video, “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” George, our mutual enjoys chanting Facebook friend, jumped into the conversation, defending “One potato, two the lesson. potato, three potato, “Nirvana was my daughter’s favorite band when she four” with junior was pre-kindergarten age,” he protested. “Lily loved kindergarteners ‘Lithium’… and ‘Rape Me’ is a great song about violence against women!” “But Lily listened to that music at home, not as part of a pre-kindergarten curriculum,” argued Karen, a college professor with a 3 1/2-year-old daughter. “Were you explaining the lyrics to her? The masterpiece that is ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ might be a bit overwhelming for 4-year-olds. I hate to ever say that Nirvana is inappropriate, but yes, I will say, Nirvana is really not appropriate for 4- to 5-year-olds.” “I think it was totally appropriate, it sounds like a teachable moment, as they say,” George shot back. “I always vote in favor of exposure and not sheltering kids. … Colonials sheltered their kids African music because it “Nirvana was my from was too disturbing.” daughter’s favorite band “This is ridiculous,” said when she was pre- Karen. “I love grunge, but I wouldn’t want my daughter kindergarten age. … ‘Rape exposed to it in daycare! Kids Me’ is a great song about thrive on the music for their age and I would much rather violence against women!” have teachers gauge their material to be age specific and George let me decide the other stuff. Facebook friend of the author Kids like Barney for a reason, and adults don’t like Barney for a reason.” “It sounds like this teacher has seen School of Rock one too many times,” she added. “Well I’m sticking to my guns,” George said. “I’m committed to not sheltering kids, period.” “We played everything from R.E.M. to Harry James to Tanya Tucker at our house when our kids were small,” I offered, but they were never listening for any overt messages, they just liked the music. I would have been horrified if a teacher played a song like ‘Rape Me’ without my permission.” “Exactly,” Karen said. “I just had too many incidences in my childhood where I was exposed to things I wasn’t ready for. I love that my daughter lets me know what she’s ready for and not ready for. The other day she wondered who the Road Runner character was, and when I showed her a clip of a cartoon she didn’t like it because it was too violent.” “When my son Nick was 3 he loved Bugs Bunny, but he got upset when Elmer Fudd tried to hurt him,” I said. “So, George, you don’t approve of ‘age appropriate’ as a concept?” Karen pressed. “Because I think Kurt Cobain himself would not think his music was classroom ready for 4-year-olds.” George, however, had exited the Facebook discussion. But not before posting The Muppets’ version of “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” OK, maybe that would work. Ω


OPINION

EDITORIAL

THIS MODERN WORLD

BY TOM TOMORROW

Things are looking up

Time to rise A few weeks ago, I shared the viral Kony 2012 video on So I’ll say a little prayer for Russell, my website and wrote to government officials because, in keeping with the Lenten season, to call for action in the matter of “invisible he’ll likely wind up crucified at the altar of children,” whether in Sacramento or halfway fickle public opinion. No, I’m not comparing around the globe. I’d seen a shorter film about him to Jesus. I’m saying this: Our culture can’t Uganda’s boy soldiers before—in church, I abide the complexity of humanness and our think—but it hadn’t registered the same way. flawed attempts to make the world a little bit Apathy? A sense that the problem was too big kinder. We want heroes or villains. It’s simpler or too far away? that way. And then, an underwear-clad man was It’s also our excuse to do nothing. spotted in San Diego, pounding the sidewalk, Flawed or not, Russell gave it a shot. by Rather than judge him, we’d do well to look at Terri Enborg-Kent screaming incoherently. That man was Kony 2012’s creator and coourselves. What a Rocklin-based founder of Invisible manner of “shot” are writer, artist and we taking, in the teacher who lives with Children Inc., Jason Our culture can’t her husband, their Russell. world and in our own daughter and an His situation is likely Let’s not abide the complexity backyards? anxiety disorder far more complex than is use one man’s diffiyet known. I’d bet a culties as an excuse to of humanness. nickel that he’s suffering lay back on our from a mental illness, couches, click on Two and a Half Men and Have a comment? but let’s not be quick to Express your views throw the proverbial baby out with the bathsay to ourselves, “Another nut. I told you the in 350 words on water. Shakespeare told us, “Though this be problem was too big. Why bother?” a local topic madness, yet there is method in’t.” Sometimes In the Christian tradition, Lent is a time to of interest. a good idea, one that seeks to illuminate or contemplate and, these days, there is much to Send an e-mail to solve a problem in a new and different way, is meditate on. But after Lent, there is rising; editorial@ newsreview.com. a little mad in the beginning. there is movement. Rather than point out the Oversimplified or not, Russell’s method got specks in others’ attempts to rise, may we dispeople’s attention, including mine. It got people card our own logs. Put down our remotes. thinking, “Maybe together we can do someMay we ascend from our couches. Ω thing about this,” and some of use took action. BEFORE

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Remember those high-pitched voices singing to Dorothy and her friends as they walk out of the scary old forest and see the yellow-brick road stretching out before them to the city of Oz? The song they’re singing—“You’re out of the woods”—is called “Optimistic Voices,” as they urge the little group forward with a surge of cheerful goodness. We could use a few of those optimistic voices. Spring is here—that season of new beginnings and fresh starts—but you’d hardly know it for the pessimism in which we seem to be drenched. Yes, things are still rough for a lot of people. More cuts are ahead in some areas, and we’ve got a long way to go before we’re out of the economic mess. But some things are looking up. We might take heart from recent indications that unemployment is at least slowing. The number of new unemployment claims was at a four-year low in the U.S. Bureau of Labor report for February, released earlier this month. What’s more, ongoing unemployment claims were lower than at any time since We know there August 2008. Even better, the economy will be setbacks. outpaced the predictions of the optimists last month, We hope they won’t adding almost a quarter-milinvolve a wicked lion new jobs—227,000 to be precise. The only reason witch putting that the unemployment rate us all to sleep didn’t drop is because we also had more people looking with poppies or for work. That’s not a bad thing. It threatening us with means that people who may a burning broom. have given up on finding new jobs have begun looking for work again. If it’s a trend, it’s a good one, and there’s evidence that it might possibly be a trend—because the United States also added jobs in December and January. And even though California’s unemployment rate persists at 10.9 percent, there are also some optimistic predictions there; UCLA’s quarterly Anderson Forecast suggests we can expect to see the state’s unemployment rate begin to drop as well. In fact, their most recent forecast predicts continuing job growth. And, while the report’s authors suggest we curb our enthusiasm, a slow recovery is still a recovery. We know there will be setbacks. We hope they won’t involve a wicked witch putting us all to sleep with poppies or threatening us with a burning broom, but considering the state of politics in both California and the rest of the country, one can never be sure about these things. So maybe the improvement isn’t enough to sing about—but it’s spring. It’s time to get re-energized and take our places in the struggle for a better, more equitable state and nation—and despite all the work that entails, we can’t help but feel a bit optimistic. Ω

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is all it takes. In 30 seconds, a night out dancing opens Sacramento’s tiny rabbit hole into an underground, mostly black world carving its legacy into LGBT culture. 16

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It’s Sunday night at Club 21 in Midtown, and Rihanna’s “We Found Love” comes on. In the crowd, the body of a gay black boy is telling him, it’s time to go. A circle opens up, and he tries to catch a techno beat. His hands don’t just vogue like Madonna, they flip and flare and apply makeup from an imaginary compact. His abs twist and curve with perfect timing. Drums and pulses pound, and then, in dramatic fashion, he dips supine with the song’s finale. It’s over. The rabbit hole closes. Those few seconds on the occasional club night are about as close as it gets to ballroom life here. Otherwise, Sacramento is off the radar when it comes to this party scene.

Which is not to say Sacramentans know nothing about balls—those all-night dance fests where gays of color set out to stake their majestic claims. Sacramentans know about the ball’s fabulous ensembles, about the contests that throw together dance, looks and verve—and especially about the voguing. They know because they go. Every few weekends, as individuals or in a group, locals will escape Sacramento in search of a ball where they can see and be seen. They dance and dazzle at rented community centers or bars, starting a little before midnight, ending sometimes at 6 a.m. They pay respect to vogue legends;

they throw shade at imitators. Gays, butch queens, transsexuals, cross-dressers work it for the crowd and for the judges, hoping to snatch trophies in their categories: American Runway. Sex Siren. Realness (for those who can best pass off as straight). Those who would be invisible (or worse) in daily life can, for a night, feel as fierce as Beyonce, or as heterosexual, as white, as wealthy as they want to be. Their Cinderella transformations happen in the Bay or Los Angeles or Vegas. Occasionally, they escape to Atlanta or New York. Just never Sacramento. Here, the ballroom subculture is concealed from all but a small percentage familiar with


it, and an even smaller number actually have vogued or gone to balls. Over the years, there has been the occasional whisper about bringing a ball here. One of the latest whisperers is Dennis Alexander. The 25-year-old has started to reach out, talking to people inside Sacramento and outside, people who go to balls and people who haven’t been in years. He is recruiting a business partner and assistant and designing a website that he wants to be a hub of a Sacramento ball and voguing scene. In his perfect world, the capital city could have its own ball by this summer. Right now, though, it’s just a conversation. Before people will seriously imagine a ball here, the believers still have quite a lot to prove. And so does Sacramento.

THE HOUSE THAT SAC DIDN’T BUILD Lucas Orizaba linked up with Alexander when he heard about the possibility of a ball right in his own backyard. Orizaba, who studies apparel marketing and fashion design, as well as psychology, at Sacramento State, has seen a few balls. He has attended them and seen Paris Is Burning, the 1990 documentary still held up as a cinematic Bible of the ball universe. Where now are the feathers and gold-sequined gowns from the film? Where are the glamorous, New York-raised divas and dancers? Like so much else in the world of balls, Orizaba, 20, wants Sacramento’s comingout party to be grand. The problem is, as he puts it, “You can’t have a ball with no houses.” And we have no “houses,” something like a gay cross between a fraternity and a neighborhood gang. Black, Mexican and Chinese, Orizaba is among the subgroup who smirk at the suggestion that there are houses in Sacramento. With a little exasperation, his lips tighten as he explains that the halfdozen or so social clans here that call themselves “houses” aren’t real because they don’t compete at the balls. Yeah, they hit the clubs together and call each other “Mother,” “Brother,” “Cousin.” But a true house would be as many as 50 locals—black or other minorities, few if any identifying as straight—who have chosen one another as a surrogate family. They don’t live together, but they go out as a group, here and (most importantly) to out-of-town balls. They prepare for competitions and have hierarchical titles, all reporting to the house mother, who can be a man, woman or anything in between. The mother should be a ballroom legend who founded her local house as one of many chapters under the auspices of a national house. In collaborating with Alexander, Orizaba is courting houses in other cities to open chapters here.

Houses probably never reached such great heights in Sacramento, but what remains of them now certainly have seen better days. In the ’90s, Kima LaRue founded a local branch of the national House of LaRue and changed her legal name to match. One of her former children, Tajay Davis, still pays homage, saying LaRue helped lay the groundwork for the local house community. LaRue, 35, says she has walked just about every major ball on this coast, and at its peak, her house might have numbered two dozen members. It’s been a couple years since she’s made an appearance on the scene, and her house has declined along the way. She’s down to maybe two people she can trust these days, the rest having left by her choice or theirs. LaRue gives different reasons for each kid, all of them exiting in conflict. Some jumped houses or made false claims to them, she said. Others couldn’t take the sharp critique of a house mother trying to ready them for the ball. The worst, she says, stole from her even after she took them into her (physical) house in South Sacramento. LaRue wanted her house to stay above the fray and out of the fights that too often end balls. Some here say the violence is what made the parties too ghetto for them to keep making the trek to them. Something about the competition-fueled adrenaline of

the night, mixed with larger-than-life egos and impetuous tongues, makes the clashes unsurprising. And LaRue knows about attitude. She came into the world as a black boy with female hormones, and in her teens, she took more hormones to push the transition, Dcups and all, to live life as a woman. Now, when job interviewers or strangers at parades ask, “What are you?” she doesn’t play nice: “What do you see in front of you, honey?” A woman. “Then that’s what I am.” Attitude comes with the house and ball territory, and so does crime. Most in the ball community own up that theirs is a lawless one. If balls are about fantasy, then ballgoers must don the air and attire of the rich and famous—even if, for those without fairy godmothers, it means pulling a rut. “Everybody knows a gay person is a booster,” says Davis, a former LaRue who founded his own chapter of the national House of Royalty. “We have to live above our means.” Davis, who lives 2 miles away from his former mother, says he spent a couple of years in the G-Parkway Mobb, and the only difference between that gang and a house is that one is gay. They both have signature signs or calls. They roll out in groups. They share tattoos (in his house: a crown hugging a diamond).

They battle for reps. They mix drugs, violence and, yes, crime.

LGBT SANCTUARY Davis, 28, is a tall man with a long face and drooping eyes. Born in Trinidad and Tobago, he came of age in the birthplace of the ball scene, New York. His height, smooth skin and impossibly slender-yetbroad shoulders primed him for modeling, whether at professional agencies, or in the runway categories (dramatic and European) that he walked at balls. He counts more than 100 balls attended, at one point going almost every weekend. A few years after he moved to Sacramento, Davis says he created Royalty for young gays coming up and coming out. One transsexual writes off his house as “cute,” and Davis admits it’s not an active one. His house is out of town once or twice a week, showing their faces at balls and other gay functions, but not competing. Instead, they get together to make cookies at home, smoke or watch movies, at least during times of low drama. They have family meetings to talk about fashion or school, or about the latest kid to get put out by his biological parents. There’s a physical house, “a headquarters” in Natomas that Davis, who works at Gap, likes to think of as a safe place. Houses exist for “protection, identity, security and comfort.”

RESTING IN THE FACES DRESSING ROOM, LARUE GRIPS A JÄGERMEISTER WITH 6-INCH FINGERNAILS AND DRINKS THROUGH A ROW OF GOLD TEETH. “BITCH, I DON’T FALL,” SHE RESPONDS TO A COMMENT ABOUT HER HIGH HEELS. Mizz Monique Moore, a local transsexual, is hostess of Dragalicious at Faces Nightclub. The regular drag show is the closest thing Sacramento has to the ballroom life.

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Copyright © UC Regents, Davis campus, 2012. All Rights Reserved.

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Kima LaRue, 35, a femme de force in the local gay establishment, founded a branch of the national House of LaRue and changed her legal name to match. LaRue has walked just about every major ball runway on the West Coast.

Lucas Orizaba would like to see more “houses” in Sacramento, leading to the launch of a local ballroom scene. Balls can teach LGBT youth “how to be classy, how to carry yourself,” he said.

In other words, they’re support networks, says Kevin Wehr, an associate professor of sociology at Sac State who identifies as neither straight nor gay. “Some of it evolves from, ‘My real family doesn’t support me, so I’ll find my own family.’” That’s Davis’ solution to the feeling that there are lost people, often young, struggling with their sexuality and eager for succor. Orizaba, the would-be architect of Sacramento’s first ball, sees those LGBT youth seeking relief in clubs, alcohol and sex. In a small way, he hopes the ball could be an upgrade, teaching kids “how to be classy, how to carry yourself.” LaRue, on the other hand, is starting to talk like someone on a much loftier mission. She is starting to wonder if God kept her, after a bullet to the head, after a car accident from which she still has back problems, to help others. Most days she styles hair out of her one-story, where wooden masks and elephants line the walls, and where her nieces run and hide from their Pomeranian. But on Sundays, she is another person. If it’s Sunday, then LaRue is in a black, floor-length gown, singing “Testimony” or “I Remember Mama,” getting not a few arm-raising, hand-clapping “amens” from the crowd. And LaRue’s ministry—that’s her word choice—is at Faces Nightclub. For 20 years, she has been seducing the weekly revelers congregated at Faces’ Dragalicious show with lip-syncs of Jill Scott and Karen Clark Sheard. Gospel has always made up one-half of her performances, but now she is getting the idea that

it fills a void for people the church has left behind. Less and less she is asking, “Am I doing the right thing by doing these songs in the club?” More and more she is preaching, “You can have God and love who you want.” At the drag shows, she is listening less to the people who predict hell in her future, and more to the people who find sanctuary in song.

A LITTLE RESPECT Drag no longer dominates balls, as it did a half-century ago. “In the ’60s, a handful of black queens finally got fed up and started holding balls of their own in Harlem, where they quickly pushed the institution to heights undreamed of by the little gangs of white men parading around in frocks in basement taverns,” writes Michael Cunningham (yes, that Michael Cunningham—the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Hours). For LaRue, the drag shows at Faces are now the closest reminders of ballroom life that’s just about invisible in her hometown. Resting in the dressing room during a rare Friday-night gig, LaRue grips a Jägermeister with 6-inch fingernails and drinks through a row of gold teeth. “Bitch, I don’t fall,” she responds to some comment about high heels. “I’m a professional.” “Yeah, a professional hooker,” quips Mizz Monique Moore, another transsexual and hostess of the show. To call theirs a love-hate relationship would oversimplify. They’re about the same age and attitude, but Moore runs Dragalicious and LaRue has been there more than a decade longer.

KIMA LARUE CAME INTO THE WORLD AS A BLACK BOY WITH FEMALE HORMONES. IN HER TEENS, SHE TOOK MORE HORMONES TO PUSH THE TRANSITION, D-CUPS AND ALL, TO LIVE LIFE AS A WOMAN. In the same dressing room, Moore pulls down her zebra-print dress to change for the next act, revealing her new silicone duo with black tape over the nipples. “They’re big, huh?” she asks, gripping them proudly. She makes her own outfits at her house in Oak Park. She also makes costumes for the ballbound. And while she’s never been to one, Moore is clearly curious. “My girls say, ‘They couldn’t take you, girl, you’d be fierce!’” She snaps her fingers, as required. It’s obvious she’d like to walk a ball, and for obvious reasons. They deliver the same reward as her drag shows: attention. Moore has danced, presurgery, to Paula Abdul music in front of Abdul on The Tonight Show With Jay Leno, and she has gone on Maury and Ricki Lake to disclose her lifestyle. She is no stranger to attention. Moore, who is Hispanic, doesn’t consider herself a part of the house scene. But she sometimes calls her children the House of Moore, or Family of Moore, with a tattoo to match. The name is as important as molding her children to be “polished” to perform— for now in drag shows, but someday, maybe on the ball floor. Most who ultimately compete at balls for the prize money, trophies and bragging rights have similar desires. The thinking goes, as Wehr describes it: “I want approval and respect from my peers. I’m not going to get it in the mainstream, so I’m going to

search for respect and acceptance and status within this smaller subculture.” They’re not so different, Wehr says, from academics who want to publish or journalists who want Pulitzers.

GOING VOGUE Everyone wants to shine but fears getting burned. No one is immune, not even such a femme de force in the local gay establishment as LaRue. Beneath the confident veneer are questions about how to return to the ball scene, whether to walk, and what sort of catty characters she’ll meet again. Like new ball kids terrified of getting chopped by judges as soon as they walk out for a category, LaRue doesn’t know what to expect. Her house has never sponsored a ball, though LaRue says she’s thought about it. She might be a little gun-shy after the resistance she met in putting together a gay prom seven years ago for those who couldn’t dress the way they wanted at their own proms. The dance happened eventually, but it took a few tries to get a Sacramento venue that wasn’t skittish about the concept. Now LaRue speaks with a mindset that the city deserves its own ball. “There’s

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CA$H FOR GOLD & SILVER!

continued from page 19

nothing out here,” she says. “And we’re and the shablams were creeping into supposed to be the capital?” mainstream dance competitions. Alexander, the website-building ball dreamer, approached LaRue about his PRIDE AND PRESTIGE plans, which she received with skeptical optimism. If Sacramento is ever to host a Alexander knows he needs to start walkball, it needs a network of houses. It needs ing the walk. some embracing from the straight comFor years, he has had entrepreneurial munity. It needs more than a patch of visions of grandeur, of revolutionizing the Lavender Heights to compete with the LGBT community, of tilting at windmills L.A. and Bay scenes that draw gays and of discrimination and diseases, of making transgenders every weekend. It needs tala name for himself in the ballroom cirented voguers. cuit. But sometimes chasing boys ranked Whereas drag once defined balls, over slightly higher than the business classes time, voguing became the essential ingrehe was taking at American River College. dient. Plenty of His website, and other contests all that comes with it, make up a ball THE BALLROOM is supposed to be the night: House memanswer. Set to launch SUBCULTURE IS CONCEALED bers snag trophies this spring, Ovah!live by looking most IN SACRAMENTO FROM ALL (www.ovahlive.com) “executive,” or be a virtual BUT A SMALL PERCENTAGE would having the freshest public square for ball face or wearing the FAMILIAR WITH IT. AND AN people, listing events most extravagant and houses, archiving clothes. But, in one EVEN SMALLER NUMBER video clips, compilballgoer’s opinion: music, and selling ACTUALLY HAVE VOGUED ing “Without voguing, DVDs of past balls. there is no ball.” OR GONE TO BALLS. The site would be the A flamboyant anchor for an entercombination of tainment company and the organizing modeling and dance, voguing burst onto tool for Sacramento’s first ball. the pop scene with Madonna’s 1990 Alexander doesn’t walk the balls, but music video for the single “Vogue.” he seeks glory like those who do. In their Two decades later, it enjoyed a national catwalks and catcalls, ballgoers are comresurgence when Vogue Evolution municating, they are performing gender charted new LGBT terrain on America’s and identity. It doesn’t matter if the ball is Best Dance Crew. in a glitzy club, an elegant gallery or a “I really think Vogue Evolution helped drab meeting hall. For a few hours, attenput voguing on the map,” says Tramon dees care as much or as little as they want Traywick, a local choreographer who to about race, money, sex and sexuality. threads some voguing into his routines. For a few hours, they put on whatever Traywick, 30, teaches master classes and sparkly masks they feel like. Or take hip-hop exercises, working dance conven- them off. tions and tournaments. After the TV show All of that, of course, happens hours aired, he noticed dancers asking for vogue away from Sacramento. That is, at least lessons and registering “vogue” in their until Alexander and Orizaba find a few contest submissions. Suddenly, the handmore people who want a ball here as face gestures, the duck walks, the spins much as they do. Ω

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ARTS&CULTURE POPSMART Revealing and disheartening When The Hunger Games raked in $152 million during its opening weekend—making it the third-highestgrossing debut ever—I thought we’d be talking about the by RACHEL LEIBROCK film’s badass heroine Katniss Everdeen and what her character means for strong female film protagonists. Instead, we found ourselves talking about race. In the days after the film’s premiere, teenagers across the country took to Twitter to decry the movie’s film’s casting of key roles. “[C]all me racist but when I found out rue was black her death wasn’t as sad,” tweeted one moviegoer, apparently, upset that the role of Rue, a young tribute in the film, was played by African-American actress Amandla Stenberg. Another disgruntled watcher offered this: “Why does Rue have to be black … not gonna lie, kinda ruined the movie.” And then there was this: “Cinna and Rue aren’t supposed to be black … why did the producer make all of the good characters black?” Never mind that in the book Cinna’s character is ethnically ambiguous or that author Suzanne Collins describes Rue’s character as having dark skin, the real issue here is more disturbing—our society is decidedly at odds on the topic of how we talk and think about race in America. Certainly, pop culture often holds up a disturbing mirror to our beliefs and actions and the circumstances; our reactions to real world news events are even more revealing—and disheartening. The Trayvon Martin case is, of course, a prime example of this. More than a month after the black Florida teen was killed—supposedly in an act of self-defense by self-appointed neighborhood-watch coordinator George Zimmerman—questions, accusations and Our society is anger continue to simmer. The question isn’t why are we so outraged decidedly at odds about Martin’s murder. The question is why did it on the topic of how take the death of 17-year-old, hoodie-wearing kid to jumpstart this conversation? we talk and think Regardless of what you think of about race in Zimmerman’s character—he’s been painted as everything from a violence-prone vigilante to a America. mild-mannered citizen—and his claims of selfdefense, Martin’s death has reopened old wounds and scars on the subject of race. The intensity and deep sociological implications of which are only underscored by those teenagers’ reactions to The Hunger Games or the latest viral video—a clip uploaded to YouTube in which Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum supposedly almost drops an N-bomb. “We know ... we know the candidate Barack Obama, what he was like,” Santorum told a roomful of enthusiastic supporters. “The anti-war, government nig—uh, the, uh, America was a source for division around the world.” What did Santorum really mean to say? Not surprisingly, he’s denied the accusation— well, his spokesman did anyway, calling the allegation “unbelievable.” So, what’s the real truth? We may never know—the candidate’s yet to offer an explanation. And we certainly may never know when it comes to Martin—it’s now Zimmerman’s word against a young man who will never speak again. This much we do know: Martin’s death is at once inarguably polarizing and eye-opening. From Geraldo Rivera’s claim that the hoodie was as responsible for Martin’s death as was Zimmerman’s gun to President Obama’s assertion that, “If I had a son, he would look like Trayvon Martin”—Martin’s murder has set the stage for a national conversation on race and our hypocrisies and prejudices—some rooted in our unconscious, others front and center—on the subject. Clearly, whether we’re talking about the life of a young man, politics or movies on the big screen, this is a conversation that is long overdue. Ω

Smarted by Popsmart? Got something to say? Let Rachel know: popsmart@newsreview.com.

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In Sacramento, athletes young and old take to roller rinks to revive the sport of artistic figure skating by

Becca Costello beccac@ newsreview.com photos by

Taras Garcia

Sunrise Rollerland is dark.

The front doors are locked, but it’s possible to slip in through a side door. Inside, unplugged video-game machines lurk beyond the vacant snack bar. It’s Wednesday afternoon, too early for a skate session. Although the rink is illuminated, there’s no music playing, no red-light/green-light action. An adult woman balances on one skate, carefully rolling over painted circles on the floor. A couple of teenage girls in shiny skating skirts and T-shirts execute intricate footwork on the rink’s perimeter while a tiny, dark-haired boy in black velour pants practices jumps. The athletes cross paths, but never collide. They spin, jump and occasionally fall—immediately popping up with arms outstretched. It’s a practiced gesture of resiliency to impress the (currently absent) judges. Coaches stand at the rink’s edge, shouting commands. “You’re on your heel! Stay centered!” “And walk! Two! Three! Four!” This is practice time for the Sunrise Crusaders Artistic Roller Skating Team. It happens almost daily,

World Team Figure Skating Championship skater Brittany Pricer gets ready to take a spin.

with various combinations of the club’s 50 members sneaking in workouts between public sessions and private parties when most of us assume the rink is closed. Artistic roller-skating is virtually unknown in this roller-derby town, though nearly every rink in the Sacramento area has an artistic team with dozens of members ranging in age from toddlers to seniors. The sport consists of three competitive events: figures (skating precisely over circles painted on the rink floor), dance (essentially ballroom dancing on wheels) and freestyle (a wheeled version of Olympic ice figure skating, complete with axels and salchows). Though artistic figure skating has suffered a national decline in popularity since the 1980s, the sport thrives in Sacramento. The Cal Neva Skating League, which includes the Sacramento area, Chico, and Rohnert Park, boasts 40 coaches and 160 competitors. “I am proud to say the Cal Neva League continues to be one of the most viable, healthy leagues in the nation,” said league president Jody Harrah. “There are many states who do not have as many skaters in the


Good movies, big screen See NIGHT&DAY

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Pass the cannelloni See DISH

Origami and fanny packs

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See COOLHUNTING

Ladies, don’t play therapist

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See ASK JOEY

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Country and whiskey See MUSIC

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Earth angels? whole state as we do in our league.” Cal Neva athletes took 11 national first-place titles last year.

GOING FOR THE GOLD Two award-winning skaters are practicing at Sunrise Rollerland this afternoon. The darkhaired boy is 8-year-old Aditya Seth, national primary boys’ champion in loops and figures. The 24-year-old blonde who just rolled onto the floor, the hem of her shiny red skating costume fluttering in the wake of her strides, is Brittany Pricer. A two-time World Team Figure Skating Championships skater and the sole U.S. representative for women’s artistic freestyle skating in the 2011 Pan American Games, Pricer is the best in the region. Pricer picks up speed. She’s just finished a shift as a server at a local sushi restaurant, and now she’s struggling to shake off the work vibe and get into practice mode. She executes several spins, one leg out, whipping around so fast that her ponytail obscures her face. “She skates more carefully ever since she hurt her ankle,” says Joyce Allen, the head coach at Sunrise, who watches from the sidelines. Allen has coached artistic skating for more than 40 years. She speaks of Pricer, the team’s star athlete, with obvious pride and a little concern. Indeed, Pricer’s endured a tumultuous year. After skating in the World Games in 2009 and 2010, in Germany and Portugal, she sprained her ankle in February 2011 during a late-night practice. “It was on the double axel, too!” Pricer said. “That’s my best jump.” She was out of commission for months, and then worked quickly to get in shape for nationals, held annually in Nebraska in July. Although she failed to qualify for the 2011

world team, Pricer did earn a place in the Pan American Games in Guadalajara, Mexico. “She missed the world team, but she won the glory spot!” Allen said. Pricer’s trip to the Pan Am Games was funded by the United States Olympic Committee, and any recognition from the Olympic Committee is huge for artistic roller skaters. The campaign to include artistic roller skating in the Olympic Games has continued for decades. Freestyle roller skating requires the same spins, jumps and skills as ice figure skating, and its practitioners would love to benefit from the same popularity and sponsorship money. Artistic roller skating currently is a class-A sport, meaning it is recognized by the Olympic Committee, but until it catches on in more countries outside of Europe, the United States and South America, it will likely stay out of the Olympics.

Brittany Pricer picks up speed and executes several spins, one leg out, whipping around so fast that her ponytail obscures her face. Skating at the Pan Am Games in Guadalajara was an entirely different experience for Pricer. “It was the first time I ever skated outside,” she said. “It was very hot, and the floor was soft, so it was like skating on mud. At night, the floor was fine, but the lights brought out these big bugs.” She laughed and then hastened to add, “I had an amazing time.”

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STORY

Hundreds of hoodie-clad demonstrators rallied at the Capitol on March 29, to speak out against the murder of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed Sanford, Florida, teen who was shot and killed in February by a neighborhoodwatch captain. As with similar gatherings in the area, Sacramento Guardian Angel leader, Patrick Kent, gathered with his members and headed out to patrol the site. They wanted to make sure there were no fights, Kent explained, and that the police treated the crowd respectfully. But, Kent says, during the event, it was his team that came under fire as attendees confronted the Guardian Angels. “They wanted to know what my purpose was,” Kent says. “Some of them accused the Guardian Angels [of being] a racist group.” One demonstrator, Kent says, even threatened the group, yelling: “We need to kill you white people.” The Guardian Angels left at that point, but Kent says his group is really “a diverse and accepting organization that is, in fact, meant to combat tensions that threaten unity in our city. “Unfortunately, after two hours, it became very uncomfortable for us,” he says. Still, Kent says he understands the simmering tensions. “I understand why people are upset,” he says of the events surrounding Martin’s death. “No one knows what really happened. Our organization supports neighborhood watch, yet [we] are against injustice.” Anti-crime activist Curtis Silwa founded the Guardian Angels in New York in 1979, and the Sacramento chapter of the volunteer citizen crime-patrol organization has been a community fixture since the late ’80s. These days, a small group of volunteers can be often be seen around town, clad in white T-shirts, cargo pants and their signature red berets. At a recent Occupy-related student protest held at the Capitol in March, for example, Kent and other volunteers lined up side by side to create a barrier that separated riot-geared police from protesters. But even as the Guardian Angels increase their visibility in Sacramento in response to an evershrinking law-enforcement presence, the group remains something of an enigma. Kent explains their purpose as such: “We are the middle men. We are the mediators.” They include a group of volunteers that use verbal communication to keep the peace. Their volunteers include of a bodyguard for the band Blue Oyster Cult, former bounty hunters and mothers. In addition, Kent and his group meet weekly to think of ways to help; a huge project for the spring and summer months is the patrolling of the bike trails along the river. The organization is seeking bike and safetygear donations so its members can patrol the trails. Aside from protecting bikers and joggers, Kent says they will contribute to the beautification of the area by picking up trash and remnants of homeless camps. Whatever their mission—and regardless of other’s reactions to their presence—Kent says the group focuses on keeping the peace. Guardian angels don’t carry weapons, and their primary defense is education. “If we have to use any physical force, we have lost.”

YOU SKATE, YOU FALL, YOU GET BACK UP AGAIN With little money or fame in the offing, artistic skating is a labor of love, community funded and family supported. “Some people, it’s their church,” said Tammy Kendrick, one of six coaches for the Foothill Artistic Skate Team at Sacramento’s Foothill Skate Inn. “I do it because I love working with kids.” On a recent Monday afternoon at Foothill, Kendrick set up a pot of homemade chicken and rice in the otherwise empty snack bar for her students, along with a plate of cornbread. “That way, no one has to cook,” she said, “because we’re here until 6:30 p.m.” The petite 70-year-old, who coaches in bright-white skates and a black tracksuit with “FAST” embroidered on the jacket, knows artistic skating can hook you for life. She’s coached at Foothill for 25 years, long enough to see students grow up, get married and bring their children to learn the sport. “When their kids are 5 or 6, they come back,” she said. “We even have grandchildren now. It comes in waves.” Kendrick is less interested in pushes for titles or Olympic glory. “They’ve been pushing for that since I was knee-high to a grasshopper,” she laughed. Her motivation is helping young students gain sportsmanship and self-esteem. “I tell them, ‘If you fall down, you just get up.’ Everybody falls down. It’s part of skating,” she said. It’s true whether you are a wobbly toddler or a world-class athlete aiming for an international title. It’s true whether or not your sport is in the Olympics, whether or not your hometown knows how hard you work after hours in a darkened suburban roller rink. You skate, you fall. You get up, and sometimes, you shine. Ω Artistic skating show with Brittany Pricer and the Sunrise Crusaders Artistic Roller Skating Team, May 6, 11 a.m. to noon, with open skating to follow. $6. Sunrise Rollerland, 6001 Sunrise Vista Drive in Citrus Heights; (916) 961-3333; www.sunriserollerland.com.

Solid gold: Not surprisingly, Pricer prefers wood rinks to mud. BEFORE

Travel is a huge motivation for Pricer, who cites “getting to see the world” as her favorite aspect of the sport. She’s currently practicing a minimum of 18 hours a week in hopes of making the 2012 world team. “This year, they’re going to New Zealand!” she said excitedly. Of course, being a world-class athlete in an obscure sport means paying your own way. Pricer funds her trips with savings from her day job. The Crusaders help out with fundraisers such as spaghetti feeds and exhibition shows at the rink.

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—Alia Cruz For more information on the Sacramento chapter of the Guardian Angels, visit http://sacramento.guardianangels.org. |

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NIGHT&DAY 05THURS

List your event!

DON’T MISS! WOMEN ART REVOLUTION:

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview. com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Judy Chicago, Miriam Schapiro, Judith Baca and other legendary artists paint a new picture of the feminist art movement in this documentary. Through interviews with her colleagues over four decades, director Lynn Hershman Leeson—an award-winning artist herself—traces the history of the movement from its beginnings to the emergence to feminist art today. Th, 4/5, 6:30pm. $5-$8. Crocker Art Museum, 216 O St.; (916) 808-7000; www.crockerart museum.org.

Special Events AN EVENING WITH GROUCHO: The Sacramento Ballet will present award-winning actor Frank Ferrante in his one-man show, An Evening With Groucho. The performance will benefit the Sacramento Ballet’s General Fund. Th, 4/5, 7:30pm. $25-$35. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (916) 442-7378; www.sacballet.org.

PURRSES FOR PETS: Enjoy a girl’s night with hors d’oeuvres and desserts from The Melting Pot, Arden Hills, Ettore and Icing on the Cupcake, as well as libations from Michael David Winery and Earth Friendly Distilling—all while shopping for more than 100 purses, accessories and more. All proceeds benefit the Sacramento SPCA. Th, 4/5, 6-8pm. $45. Arden Hills Resort Club & Spa, 1220 Arden Hills Ln.; (916) 504-2802; www.sspca.org.

Literary Events RONDA GIANGRECO: Former comedienne and radio talk-show host Ronda Giangreco will sign copies of her memoir, The Gathering Table: Defying MS With a Year of Pasta, Wine & Friends. With a foreword by renowned Napa Valley chef Michael Chiarello, The Gathering Table is a recollection of how the author, after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, takes her life in her hands by hosting 52 dinner parties in one year. Th, 4/5, 7pm. Free. Time Tested Books, 1114 21st St.; (916) 447-5696; www.thegatheringtable.net.

Wait, there’s more! Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

06FRI

Special Events LADIES’ NIGHT AT VINTNER’S: Grab your BFFs and join a fun relaxing evening where you can hang out with your friends with delicious wine and appetizers. Ticket price includes two glasses of your favorite wine, appetizers, a massage, hand spa treatment and prizes. F, 4/6, 6-9pm. $20-$25. Vintner’s Cellar Winery, 12401 Folsom Blvd., Ste. 204 in Rancho Cordova; (916) 985-2675; http://985cork.com.

Comedy DON FRIESEN: Watch a performance by stand-up comic Don Friesen, the only two-time

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winner of the San Francisco International Comedy Competition. F, 4/6, 8pm. $19-$29. Thunder Valley Casino, 1200 Athens Ave. in Lincoln; (916) 408-7777; www.thundervalleyresort.com.

Literary Events WRITERS NETWORK MEETING: California Writers Club, Sacramento Branch hosts its monthly Writers Network breakfast meeting. The California Writers Club is an educational nonprofit corporation dedicated to educating writers of all levels of expertise in the craft of writing and in the marketing of their work. F, 4/6, 9-11am. Free. IHOP, 2216 Sunrise Blvd. in Rancho Cordova; (916) 213-0798; www.cwcsacramento writers.org.

Teens GRAND OPENING OF CLUB XOXO: This spring-break bash is a safe and supervised environment for teens to dance, blow off steam and meet people. Parents can drop off kids while they go out and enjoy a night on the town. Dress code is enforced; no baggy clothes, no backpacks or big purses and no hats. F, 4/6, 8pm-12:30am. Call for pricing. Vega’s Nightclub & Sports Bar, 910 Second St.; (916) 514-1112.

Concerts MOBIUS TRIO: Mobius Trio performs new music and expands the guitar-chamber repertoire. Formed in 2010 by guitarists Robert Nance, Mason Fish and Matthew Holmes-Linder, the group has already collaborated with up-and-coming and established composers. F, 4/6, 8-10pm; F, 5/4, 8-10pm. $5-$15. Davis Art Center, 1919 F St. in Davis; (530) 756-4100; www.davisartcenter.org.

07SAT

DON’T MISS! GHANA INDEPENDENCE DAY

CELEBRATION: Join a gala celebration featuring the renowned group Hedzoleh Soundz, whose blend of West African rhythms fused with jazz and Latin music has taken the world by storm. Enjoy authentic Ghanaian cuisine, cultural performances and a special presentation by Dr. Halifu Osumare. Sa, 4/7, 6pm-midnight. $40-$45; $15 for children ages 12-18. Citrus Heights Community Center, 6300 Fountain Square Dr. in Citrus Heights; (916) 230-3951; www.gascal.org.

Special Events 2012 MISS ASIA SACRAMENTO PAGEANT: On this night, reigning Queen Namy Herr will relinquish her crown to the new Miss Asia Sacramento 2012, which will be one of the following eight contestants: Judy Lee, Helena Chow, Jenny Mo, Christina Lee, Pinhwa Su, Kalai Lam, Samantha Termizi or Regina Zhu. Sa, 4/7, 7-9pm. $25-$30. Radisson Hotel, 500 Leisure Ln.; (916) 922-2020; www.missasiasacramento.com.

BLUSH SHOW BENEFITTING CARRIES: Come enjoy and evening of fashion, live entertainment and shopping while supporting a good cause. Kasha’s Creations, Closet Keepsakes and Jasmine’s Wings present a night of fashion fun while supporting the efforts of Carrie’s Touch to help the breastcancer-survivor community. Sa, 4/7, 6-9pm. $12. The Dante Club, 2330 Fair Oaks Blvd.; (916) 925-8230; www.blushshow.com.

EASTER BONNET PROMENADE & SPRING BALL: The Historic Old Sacramento Foundation invites people to dress up in their favorite Easter finery—or other historic apparel—to celebrate in high style during the 17th Annual Living History Easter Bonnet Promenade. Sa, 4/7, 11am. Free. Sacramento History Museum, 101 I St.; (916) 213-4373; www.historicoldsac.org.

PLANT SALE PREVIEW: Gardeners thinking about adding new plants to their home landscapes can visit the demonstration plantings at the UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery during a special tour. The tour will focus on the best plants for our garden climate, including the Arboretum AllStars, plants selected by the Arboretum’s horticultural staff for their beauty, reliability, heat and drought tolerance, and value in attracting butterflies, hummingbirds, and other pollinators. Sa, 4/7, 2pm. Free. UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery, Garrod Dr. in Davis; (530) 752-4880; http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu.

READ & FEED TEACHING GARDEN: The Sacramento Public Library is helping make the community greener with the new Read & Feed Teaching and Demonstration Garden at its Colonial Heights branch. The public is invited to attend the garden’s groundbreaking ceremony featuring free refreshments, family storytime and garden craft-making program. Sa, 4/7, 10:30am. Free. Colonial Heights Library, 4799 Stockton Blvd.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

SYMBOLISM & VICTORIAN MOURNING PRACTICES: Explore and uncover the hidden meaning behind intriguing symbols left on the headstones by our Victorian ancestors. Parking is located across the street from the 10th Street gate. This workshop is free; however, donations are appreciated and go toward restoration and preservation of cemetery artifacts. Sa, 4/7, 10am-noon. Free. Old City Cemetery, 1000 Broadway; (916) 264-7839; http://oldcitycemetery.com.

Comedy LOUIE ANDERSON: Catch a standup comedy performance by Louie Anderson, best known as the former host of Family Feud and creator of the animated series Life With Louie. Sa, 4/7, 8:30pm. $32.50-$42.50. Thunder Valley Casino, 1200 Athens Ave. in Lincoln; (916) 408-7777; www.thundervalleyresort.com.

Classes SCREENWRITING 101: This fourhour workshop conducted by Gary Michael Weinberg introduces students the basics of

screenplay format and structure, plot and character development, construction of great dialogue, and tips on getting a script seen by the very people who can greenlight the project. Sa, 4/7, 1-5pm. $50. R25 Arts Complex, 2509 R Street; (916) 952-6108.

Kids’ Stuff EARTH FEST: Learn how to protect and preserve the Earth with environmental, wildlife and conservation organizations. During the day, visit Wildlife Wagons to explore animal bioartifacts; participate in storytelling and activities in the Discovery Room; come face to face with the outreach animals; and listen as keepers present enrichment talks in the afternoon. Sa, 4/7, 9am4pm. Free with zoo admission. Sacramento Zoo, 3930 West Land Park Dr.; (916) 808-5888; www.saczoo.org.

EGG HUNT AND PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Hop on over and have some flapjacks before participating in a free event for kids. Pancakes will be served between 7-11 a.m. at a cost of $5 for adults and $3 for children ages 12 and under. The egg hunt, for kids ages 8 and younger, begins at 10 a.m. Sa, 4/7, 7am. Free. Carmichael Park, 5750 Grant Ave. in Carmichael; (916) 489-1785; www.carmichaelpark.com.

Literary Events PLOT WHISPERER MARTHA ALDERSON: California Writers Club, Sacramento Branch welcomes International Plot Consultant Martha Alderson. The lectures give consideration to the dramatic (action), emotional (character development) and thematic aspects of story. Sa, 4/7, 9am-3pm. $85-$109. The Dante Club, 2330 Fair Oaks Blvd.; (916) 213-0798; www.cwc sacramentowriters.org.

Concerts FLAMENCO CONCERT WITH KINA MENDEZ: The Flamenco tradition will be displayed with a performance by Kina Mendez from Jerez, Spain. Mendez grew up in the Mendez clan of Gypsy artists from Jerez. She began singing under the influence of her aunt, legendary singer La Paquera de Jerez. The show includes a dance performance. Sa, 4/7, 8pm. $13-$15. Village Homes Community Center, 2661 Portage Bay East in Davis; (530) 867-1032; www.timnatalmusic.com.

GUITAR AND VIOLIN DUO PLAY WORLD MUSIC: Sacramento State’s World Music Series presents the Aksak Duo, featuring guitarist Mesut Ozgen and violinist Cihat Askin. Ozgen has performed throughout the United States, Spain and Turkey and won the dean’s prize at Yale. Askin studied at the Royal College of Music in London and is the music director of the Istanbul Chamber Orchestra. Sa, 4/7, 8pm. $8-$15. Sacramento State Music Recital Hall, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5155; www.csus.edu/music.

JOE: Catch a concert by the popular R&B singer Joe Thomas, whose stage name is his first name. He’s best known for his 2001 No. 1 hit “Stutter,” featuring Mystikal. Sa, 4/7, 8pm. $45-$69. Cache Creek Casino Resort, 14455 Hwy. 16 in Brooks;

(888) 772-2243; www.cachecreek.com.

08SUN

DON’T MISS! RAINBOW FAMILY EGG HUNT & GLBT STORYTIME: All families

are invited to the library’s Rainbow Egg Hunt. The fun starts at 11am with crafting decorated bags for egg collecting, followed by a special storytime that celebrates families with two mommies, two daddies or any combination of people—since love is what makes a family. Egg hunting begins at noon. Su, 4/8, 11am-2pm. Free. Ella K. McClatchy Library, 2112 22nd St.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Special Events EASTER SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICE: Celebrate Christ and power of spirit. Sunday School is available for children. Su, 4/8, 10am-noon. Free. Ananda Sacramento, 10450 Coloma Rd. in Rancho Cordova; (916) 361-0891; www.anandasacramento.org.

CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP SERVICE: Busy Sunday mornings? Join a service at 5pm instead. This service features a casual atmosphere, discussion relevant to your life and a nurturing community. Su, 4/8, 5pm. Free.

Faith United Methodist Church, 3600 J St.; (916) 452-7637; http://FaithUMCSacramento.org.

Film EASTER SUNDAY SCHOOL: Come out and be amazed again by creepy Christian kids’ shows and weirdly excessive Christian scare films. Quality is guaranteed to be pretty lousy, but content is guaranteed to be jaw-dropping. Even though children were originally exposed to nearly everything in this, this program is recommended for sinners 18 years of age and older. Su, 4/8, 7:30pm. $5. Guild Theater, 2828 35th St.; (916) 732-4673.

Now Playing WILL THE BEST MAN WIN?: The Best Man portrays the ugly fight between two political candidates for the presidential nomination of their unnamed party. Each man has a secret in his past, which if brought to light would end his political career. The original production of The Best Man ran for 15 months in New York in 1960, and it is amazing how little things have changed in the last 40 years. Su, 2pm through 4/1. $12-$14. Unitarian Universalist Society of Sacramento, 2425 Sierra Blvd.; (916) 489-4248; www.theaterone.org.


pA i D ADveRtiSiNg

SA Ac NcRA c&RA R ’me meA S AN Nto Nto N uAR AReA ARl A le ADDiNiN DN D iN iN Ni i iNNg Ngg g Ng g u iiDe D Dee

Pamper your palate Pa g e

on the cover: pyramid Breweries

Hops & heart Pa g e

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SN&R’S ANNuAl DiNiNg guiDe

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Voted

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Dine at the Best A modern twist on Old Sacramento

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Fresh, local and seasonal fare in a contemporary, casual chic ambiance Eat Drink Relax in the spacious outdoor patio 24 Beers on tap FREE live music Friday and Saturday nights Ten22 Caters to You! Full-service staffed events, delivery or pick-up Join us on Facebook to learn about special offers.

1022 Second Street 916.441.2211 Ten22oldsac.com valet and validated parking available Like us on Facebook and we’ll like you back with special offers!

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916.442.4772 FirehouseOldSac.com 1112 Second Street, Old Sacramento Valet Parking Available

Named Zagat’s Top 100 Restaurants

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A speciAl Advertising supplement


Welcome

Dinner is Served & Dessert is

pA i D A Dv e Rt i S i N g

to Sacramento’s new dining guide: indulge.

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in the upcoming pages, we will make your stomach rumble for Sacramento’s sizzling restaurant scene; educate you on the heart-warming and palate-pleasing projects pyramid Breweries has cooking; delight your curiosity by having some of sacramento’s hottest chefs describe what their lip-smacking last meal might be; entice you to eat a decadent dessert before dinner for a change; and whisk you faraway to an exotic locale with sumptuous mediterranean cuisine right in our own backyard. Whenever you eat out in sacramento, be sure to pack your culinary passport (and this helpful guide) and get ready to sink your teeth into the rich, multicultural cuisine sacramento offers. now read, enjoy and eat. Just try not to drool on the paper.

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8 Chef Talk: last supper

10 Restaurant Listings

14 Simple Pleasures 17 Passport to the Mediterranean

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A speciAl Advertising supplement

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JOIN. LEAD. SHARE. You might be surprised by how much your local Starbucks does for your community besides serving everybody their morning coffee. According to Scotty Wilson, store manager of the Starbucks at 5th and I streets, he along with the downtown partners are planning to log 500 hours of community service helping Meals on Wheels during the month of April.

Meals on Wheels fits well with our principles at Starbucks

“Meals on Wheels fits well with our principles at Starbucks,” Wilson said. The volunteers will spend their time putting meals together to be delivered to the elderly. Aside from the project with Meals on Wheels, Wilson said Starbucks has volunteered at the ASPCA as well as Loaves and Fishes, the latter of which they’ve worked with for nearly four years. So, the next time you order your beverage, keep in mind that the person behind the counter is also serving your community.

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The volunteers will spend their time putting meals together to be delivered to the elderly.

A speciAl Advertising supplement


Pamper your palate pA i D A Dv e Rt i S i N g

By Jeff Chinn

L

ife is too short to eat bad food. Whether it’s your mom’s mustard-gas-emitting broccoli or fast food’s tasteless renditions of everything from tacos to burgers, you shouldn’t waste another second on a meal that doesn’t make your taste buds explode. Indulge in the appetizers, desserts and entrees that set your soul on fire and make your tongue dance. Lucky for all of you Sacramentans, you are in the perfect city to have an amazing meal every morning, noon and night. Many people often overlook the fact that Sacramento has achieved cable channel stardom for not one, not two but six of our local eateries. And while visiting Golden Bear, Café Rolle and Jamie’s Bar & Grill is on my bucket list, I have had more than one amazing meal at each of the others. The Squeeze Inn struck fame due to its crispy, salty cheese skirt. Their meaty patties are already fantastically juicy, but the cheese skirt takes the experience to a new height.

“Many people often overlook the fact that Sacramento has achieved cable channel stardom for not one, not two but six of our local eateries.” Dad’s Kitchen serves an inside-out burger that is encrusted with mounds of bacon and blue cheese, surrounding a bevy of juicy, grass fed beef. But I believe the crème de la crème of Sacramento’s famous burger joints would have to be Gatsby’s Diner with their seasonal blood orange burger. Their 8-oz patty is covered with smoky bacon, sweet and spicy blood orange marmalade, creamy Gouda and garlic mayo. Topped with lettuce, tomato and onion and then placed in a freshly toasted bun, this burger has my palate swimming through the immaculate fusion of flavors with every bite. If you are interested in fare a bit more exotic than burgers, then pack your culinary passport and travel the world’s flavors throughout Sacramento.

Bombay Bar & Grill is the beginning and end of Indian food for me. Their creamy and spicy lamb tikka masala goes extraordinarily well with their fluffy basmati rice and fresh-from-the-tandoor tasting naan. Mediterranean lovers can visit Pita Kitchen to taste some of their bright tabouleh, perfectly seasoned falafel, and their earthy and oh-so-creamy hummus and fresh baked pita that delivers a wondrous chew. Fans of Peruvian cuisine can find a table at Macchu Picchu and feast on the acidic and refreshing ceviche or savor a plate of arroz con pollo. The chicken is so tender the meat falls off the bone, and the partnering green rice goes magnificently with the velvety smooth huancaina sauce. Even something as foreign to the American palate as Ethiopian food is available to Sacramentans thanks to Queen Sheba. Their doro wat, a chicken stew, is thick and hearty and its robust spices show a depth of flavor few other dishes do. Sopping up the leftover sauce with their spongy injera bread is often the highlight of my meal. Looking for a place with fantastic eats that also offer good drinks to you get buzzed? Burgers and Brew on the R Street corridor serves plump, juicy burgers topped with crisp and fresh produce, not to mention their wide selection of ice cold, thirst-quenching suds. Flaming Grille Cafe on El Camino offers a more exotic take on burgers with their 1/3-pound patties antelope, elk, llama, ostrich and yak, and their beer selection grants you the choice from multiple malty lagers and crisp ales. Luigi’s Slice at J and 20 streets supplies my favorite pie in town with their pesto pizza. The herbal notes of the basil-rich pesto, the slight sweetness of the tomato and the saltiness of the cheese blend together to create the perfect topping for their delightfully chewy crust. And they are one of the few places to have on tap my favorite brown ale: Moose Drool. Its hints of cocoa and all-around rich body create a near perfect beer experience. There’s more than just Luigi’s as far as pizza in Sacramento goes, though. Zelda’s Gourmet Pizza has the best deep dish around, and their vegetarian supreme pizza is covered in delicious hunks of zucchini, broccoli, spinach and cauliflower. Those roasted, earthy vegetables have never been so welcomed in a pizza. And I can’t write about Zelda’s without mentioning their one-of-a-kind service. Some call it terse, I call it love.

A SPECIAL ADvERTISING SuPPLEMENT

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APRIL 5, 2012

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Hot Italian is another pizza option if you’re looking for a thin crust. They carved out a place in my heart and stomach thanks to their Bellucci pizza, which is adorned with their house made fennel sausage, mozzarella and ricotta cheese. The pizza is elegant and simple, melding together the creamy ricotta, the hearty sausage and the almost cracker like crust. The K Street located Pizza Rock is another must visit pizza place in Sac. Thanks to their rosemary, white rose potato and chorizo pizza, potatoes are now a welcome addition to my pizza. The potatoes are airy and toothsome, the rosemary is wonderfully aromatic and the pork chorizo adds the satisfyingly filling body to the pie. And this is just the tip of the iceberg. No matter the area of Sacramento, no matter the cuisine your stomach is growling for, we have a restaurant that will sate your stomach and taste buds alike. There’s Mama Sue’s Soul Food Kitchen in Rancho Cordova, The Eatery in West Sacramento, Samurai Sushi in Folsom, Thai Chili in Rocklin and the list goes on. So, put down that waterlogged broccoli, stop eating those microwaved, pink slime, pseudo-meat patties and get yourself some real food. Indulge!

f lo u r l e s s Va l r h o n a To r T e By 58 degrees P h oTo B y a n n e s To k e s

SN&R’S ANNuAl DiNiNg guiDe

indulge 5


58

A Grown-Up Night Out...

Lunch 11am - 4pm Dinner 4pm - Close CLOSED TUESDAYS Sat & Sun Brunch 10am - 2pm

@.0?.:2;A<  1.C6@ Â&#x2018; 12C2?2@=B/0<:

6 indulge

SN&Râ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ANNuAl DiNiNg guiDe

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April 5, 2012

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1217 18th Street Sacramento, CA 916.442.5858 www.58degrees.com

A speciAl Advertising supplement

www.newsreview.com

Not Your Average Pub Food.


Hops & heart

pA i D A Dv e Rt i S i N g

Pyramid Brewing Co. | Seattle | Portland | Berkeley | walnut Creek | SaCramento

taP into

by Sukhi brar

s i h T

S ac r a m e n to’ S P y r a m i d b r e w e ry S e r v e S f o o d, b e e r a n d t h e c o m m u n i t y

K

ristela Nazario, Pyramid Brewery‘s award-winning Executive Chef, is familiar with cooking with wine but would like to fill everyone in on an even better ingredient to cook with. “Beer is the new wine,” said Nazario. “There are a lot of things you can do with beer that cannot be done with wine. You can extract many more flavors from earthy to grassy, even caramel flavor. Beer is one of the most versatile liquids to cook with.”

“Beer is the new wine.” Many dishes served at Pyramid’s Sacramento brewery include beer as an ingredient. It creates rich flavors, as showcased in the sausage sampler, and improves upon old favorites like pizza. “We use our award-winning Hefeweizen in our pizza dough. The yeast in the beer adds to the yeast in the dough making the pizza crust extra fluffy,” explained Nazario. P h oto b y a n n e S to k e S

One of Nazario’s favorite recipes that people can try at home is a marinated chicken using Pyramid’s Alehouse Amber. This dish is “sweet and delicious,” calling for one bunch of cilantro, two cups of honey, two cups of Pyramid Ale House Amber, half a bunch of parsley, a teaspoon each of coriander, chili powder and black pepper. It’s enough to marinade a pound of chicken about half an hour before grilling. This dish is served in the brewery with all natural chicken breast in keeping with Pyramid’s commitment to use local, sustainable fresh ingredients. The Alehouse Amber and other beers are available for patrons to take home in jugs or “growlers” filled right from the tap. Pyramid also specializes in food and beer pairings. Once a month, Pyramid offers a special “beer-paired dinner” to showcase the versatility of its beer. “Our sausage sampler goes perfectly with Pyramid’s Thunderhead IPA or the Draft Pale Ale,” said Nazario. “As an accompaniment, beer is easier to drink than a bottle of wine. We create a special menu that pairs specific beers with the dishes that they go well with.” Other events include, Pyramid’s new program to help people in the Sacramento community with charitable fundraising efforts. “Our program is geared towards supporting people who are trying to fundraise by doing things like walks for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society or an MS walk or run. We can host bigger events such as crab feeds or galas too,” said Sarah Sonn, Pyramid’s Alehouse Community Development Manager. “We really wanted to put together something that is really easy and fun that people can share with their friends and family. It is a fun alternative to sending out a website link asking your friends for money,” said Sonn. You can call Pyramid Brewery at (916)498-9800 or find them at 1029 K Street, online at www.pyramidbrew.com, and on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ pyramidsacramento.

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Pyramid alehouse

1029 K Street, Sacramento, ca www.PyramidBrew.com 916.498.9800

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APrIL 5, 2012

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SN&R’S ANNuAl DiNiNg guiDe

indulge 7


Chef talk

A c c o r d i n g t o p o p u l A r b e l i e f, t h e M A y A n c A l e n d A r predicts the end of the world this deceMber, i f i t ’ s t r u e . . . w h At w o u l d b e yo u r l A s t M e A l ? ”

Biba Caggiano

Fred Haines

Deneb Williams

Craig Hixon

Davin Vculek

Chef at Biba Restaurant

Chef at 33rd Street Bistro

Chef at Firehouse

Chef at Morton’s

Chef at Mini Burger

i will probably have a nice plate of pasta such as carbonara with bacon, eggs, and parmigiano....one of my favorites. then i will open a nice bottle of red wine.

i’d want a bone-in rib eye, grilled over a wood grill with scalloped potatoes. And then i’d like black & green milk chocolate for dessert......and a diet coke

most people would assume i would want foie gras, truffles, caviar, blah, blah blah. But, for my last meal on earth it’s simple comfort food that i would want. Oven roasted chicken (sea salt, lemon and rosemary) with homemade macaroni & cheese (fontina and smoked gouda) and a steamed whole artichoke. Oh yes and of course a bottle of 2005 domaine de la romanee-conti la tache drc. it’s my last meal, after all.

Our menu just changed, my favorite dish right now is the pork chop. i just came here for my birthday, and that’s what i had. i’m really excited about it!

For me it would just be a steak. that’s my favorite food. it would probably be a snake river Farms rib eye, a real fatty steak from idaho. it’s American Waygu, basically Kobe. And then i’d just have it with creamed leeks to add some more fat to it. if it was my last meal, i’d be pretty gluttoness. And then i’d might add a vegetable on there just to round it out. i’m a pretty simple eater. i like good ingredients.

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2831 S Street | Sacramento, CA | 916.444.7711 | www.revolution-wines.com

8 indulge

Come & Get It

April 5, 2012

|

1102 2nd St ✠ Old Sac 916.612.0042 Mon-Thur 8am-3pm ✠ Fri-Sun 8am-5pm

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Chef talk

pA i D A Dv e Rt i S i N g

Bruno Amato

Suleka Linley

Patrick Mulvaney

Chando Madrigal

Taro Arai

Chef at Il Fornaio

Chef at Thai Basil

Chef at Mulvaney’s Building & Loan

Chef at Chando’s Tacos

Chef at Mikuni

tiramisu! die with something sweet in your mouth!

that’s easy! my mom’s cooking”

i’d crank up the barbeque, and it would be grilled delta asparagus, Kristy’s chicken from cache creek,and finish off with beautiful local strawberries from the gardens around sacramento.they’re small and super sweet and they only last one day, so you have to eat em’ right away. if it’s the end of the world, i’d make sure to eat them all.

man, that’s a tough one. i’m known to drive to tJ just to have tacos de Birria from tacos el moreno. Absolutely Amazing!! But then there’s my mom’s mole with freshly hand made tortillas and a lil cabbage on the side—mOneY! can i have 2 last meals??

did you hear about the tuna that just sold for $768,000? the untouchable blue fin tuna... i wish i could try one piece! i know this tuna will be out of this world! this tuna is from Japan, those are the harder ones to get.”

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A speciAl Advertising supplement

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5301 POWER INN RD SACRAMENTO, CA 95820 916.386.8599 www.squeezeinn.com M-F 10-7 | Sat 10-6 | closed Sun

April 5, 2012

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SN&R’S ANNuAl DiNiNg guiDe

indulge 9


Restaurant Listings R e s ta u R a u n t

10 indulge

$ : under $10 $$: $11-30

l o c at i o n

houRs

900 12th street sacramento, ca 95814 916–443–5588

11:00 am–9:30 pm, everyday

2801 capitol avenue sacramento, ca 95816 916–455–2422

l/tu–sat: 11:30 pm–2:00 pm; d/M–th: 5:30pm–9:00pm; F–sat: 5:30pm–10:00 pm

1315 21st street sacramento, ca 95811 916–441–7100

sun–th: 11:00 am–10:00 pm; F–sat: 11:00 am–11:00 pm

1249 howe avenue sacramento, ca 95825 916–922–6673

M–th, sun:11:00am–10:00 pm; F–sat:11:00 am–11:00 pm

1537 howe avenue, ste 116 sacramento, ca 95825 916–779–0737

M–sat: 11:00 am–8:30 pm

1500 K street sacramento ca 95814 916–444–3633

M–th: 6:00 am–12:00 am; F: 6:00 am–2:00 am; sat–sun: 8:00 am–2:00 am

5641 J street sacramento, ca 95819 916–457–5600

M: 4 pm–10:00 pm tu–F: 11:00 am–10:00 pm; sat–sun: 10:00 am–10:00 pm

1521 l street sacramento ca 95818 916–231–9947

M–F: 11:00 am–2:00 am; sat–sun: 9:00 am–2:00 am

6601 Folsom blvd sacramento, ca 95819 916–455–8945

M–th: 11:00 am–10:00 pm; F: 11:00 am–12:00 am; sun: 11:00 am–9:00 pm

7753 Roseville Road sacramento, ca 95842 916–727–1200

M–th: 10:00 am–9:00 pm; F: 10:00 am–10:00 pm; sat: 8:00 am–9:00 pm; sun: 8:00 am–8:00 pm

901 K street sacramento 95814 916–551–1500

M–F: 7:00 am–6:00 pm; sat: 8:00 am–5:00 pm

855 57th street suite c sacramento, ca 95819 916–452–3896

tu–sat: 8:00 am–9:00 pm; sun: 9:00 am–3:00 pm; 8:00–

1785 challenge Way sacramento, ca 95815 916–927–9464

M–tu: 11:00 am–11:00 pm; W–sat: 11:00 am–12:00 am; sun: aa:00 am–10:00 pm

1627 16th street sacramento, ca 95814 916–444–3000

M–th: 11:30 am–9:30 pm; F–sat 11:30 am–11:30 pm

555 capitol Mall suite 155 sacramento ca 95814 916–498–9924

M–tu: 11:00 am–2:00 pm; W–F: 11:30 am–9:00 pm; sat–sun: closed

2730 n street sacramento, ca 95816 916–456–2800

M–tu: 11:30 am–1:00 am; W–th: 11:30am–3:00 am; F: 11:30am–4:00am; sat: 9:00am–4:00am; sun: 9:00am–1:00am

2115 J street sacramento, ca 95816 (916) 442-4388

sun–W: 5:00 pm–12:00 am; thu: 5:00 pm–2:00 am; F-sat: 5:00 pm–3:00 am

SN&R’S ANNuAl DiNiNg guiDe

|

April 5, 2012

happy houR

lunch specials

l at e night e at s

$ : under $10 $$: $11-30

pA i D A Dv e Rt i S i N g

l o c at i o n

houRs

1215 19th street, sacramento, ca 95811 (916) 441–6022

lunch: tu–F: 11:30 am – 2:30 pm; dinner: tu–sat: 5:00 pm–10:00 pm; closed: sun & M

5644 J street, sacramento, ca 95819 (916) 451–4000

sun–W: 10:30 am–9:30 pm; th–sat: 10:30 am–10:00 pm

2726 capitol avenue, sacramento, ca 95816 (916) 443–1180

M–th: 7 am–9 pm, F: 7 am–10 pm; sat: 8 am–10 pm; sun: 8 am–2 pm

1431 R street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 930–9191

M–W: 7 am–9 pm; th– F: 7 am–10 pm; sat: 8 am–10 pm; sun: 8 am–9 pm

$

234 d street, davis, ca 95616 (530) 750–5101

M–W: 7 am–9 pm; th–F: 7 am–10 pm; sat: 8 am–10 pm; sun: 8 am–9 pm

$

1029 K street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 498–9800

M–th: 11:30 am–9 pm; F: 11:30 am–11 pm; sat: 12 pm–10 pm; sun: 12 pm – 7 pm

916 2nd street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 443–6852

M–W: 11:30 am–1:30 am; th–sun: 11:30 am–2 am

5301 power inn Road sacramento, california (916) 386-8599

M–Friday: 10 am–7 pm; sat: 10 am–6 pm; sun: closed

$

1630 K street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 492–2499

M: closed; tu–th: 11 am–9 pm; F–sat: 11 am–11 pm; sun: 11 am–6 pm

$

2115 J street, sacramento, ca 95816 (916) 442–4353

M–sun: 11:30 am–Midnight

1022 2nd street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 441–2211

M–sun: 11:30 am–10 pm

1815 K street, sacramento, ca 95811 (916) 444–2423

sun–thu: 11 am–9:30 pm; F–sat: 11 am–10:30 pm; brunch on sundays: 10 am–3 pm

1112 2nd street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 442–4772

lunch: M–F: 11:30 am–2:30 pm; dinner: sun–thu: 5 pm–9:30 pm; F–sat: 5 pm–10 pm; bar: M–F: 11:30 am–11 pm; sat: 5 pm–11 pm; sun: 5 pm–9:30 pm

2431 J street, sacramento, ca 95816 (916) 442–7690

sun–thu: 11 am–9 pm; F–sat: 11 am–10 pm

$$

1518 broadway, sacramento, ca 95818 (916) 441–0222

M–thu: 8 am–10 pm; F–sun: 8 am–11 pm sat-sun brunch: 8:00 am–2:00 pm

$–$$

1214 18th street, sacramento, ca 95811 (916) 442–5858

sun–M: 11 am–10 pm; tu: closed; W–thu: 11 am–11 pm; F–sat: 11 am–12 am; sat-sun brunch 10:00 am–2 pm

cost

|

outdooR dining

$$$: $31+

$–$$ $$– $$$ $–$$ $$ $ $–$$

$$ $$ $–$$

$–$$

$

$$

$–$$

$$ $$

A speciAl Advertising supplement

bRunch

R e s ta u R a u n t

cost

outdooR dining

happy houR

lunch specials

$$$: $31+

l at e night e at s

bRunch

$$$

$ $

$$

$

$$

$$

A speciAl Advertising supplement

$$

$$$

$$

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$$

$$

April 5, 2012

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SN&R’S ANNuAl DiNiNg guiDe

indulge 11


Restaurant Listings R e s ta u R a u n t

10 indulge

$ : under $10 $$: $11-30

l o c at i o n

houRs

900 12th street sacramento, ca 95814 916–443–5588

11:00 am–9:30 pm, everyday

2801 capitol avenue sacramento, ca 95816 916–455–2422

l/tu–sat: 11:30 pm–2:00 pm; d/M–th: 5:30pm–9:00pm; F–sat: 5:30pm–10:00 pm

1315 21st street sacramento, ca 95811 916–441–7100

sun–th: 11:00 am–10:00 pm; F–sat: 11:00 am–11:00 pm

1249 howe avenue sacramento, ca 95825 916–922–6673

M–th, sun:11:00am–10:00 pm; F–sat:11:00 am–11:00 pm

1537 howe avenue, ste 116 sacramento, ca 95825 916–779–0737

M–sat: 11:00 am–8:30 pm

1500 K street sacramento ca 95814 916–444–3633

M–th: 6:00 am–12:00 am; F: 6:00 am–2:00 am; sat–sun: 8:00 am–2:00 am

5641 J street sacramento, ca 95819 916–457–5600

M: 4 pm–10:00 pm tu–F: 11:00 am–10:00 pm; sat–sun: 10:00 am–10:00 pm

1521 l street sacramento ca 95818 916–231–9947

M–F: 11:00 am–2:00 am; sat–sun: 9:00 am–2:00 am

6601 Folsom blvd sacramento, ca 95819 916–455–8945

M–th: 11:00 am–10:00 pm; F: 11:00 am–12:00 am; sun: 11:00 am–9:00 pm

7753 Roseville Road sacramento, ca 95842 916–727–1200

M–th: 10:00 am–9:00 pm; F: 10:00 am–10:00 pm; sat: 8:00 am–9:00 pm; sun: 8:00 am–8:00 pm

901 K street sacramento 95814 916–551–1500

M–F: 7:00 am–6:00 pm; sat: 8:00 am–5:00 pm

855 57th street suite c sacramento, ca 95819 916–452–3896

tu–sat: 8:00 am–9:00 pm; sun: 9:00 am–3:00 pm; 8:00–

1785 challenge Way sacramento, ca 95815 916–927–9464

M–tu: 11:00 am–11:00 pm; W–sat: 11:00 am–12:00 am; sun: aa:00 am–10:00 pm

1627 16th street sacramento, ca 95814 916–444–3000

M–th: 11:30 am–9:30 pm; F–sat 11:30 am–11:30 pm

555 capitol Mall suite 155 sacramento ca 95814 916–498–9924

M–tu: 11:00 am–2:00 pm; W–F: 11:30 am–9:00 pm; sat–sun: closed

2730 n street sacramento, ca 95816 916–456–2800

M–tu: 11:30 am–1:00 am; W–th: 11:30am–3:00 am; F: 11:30am–4:00am; sat: 9:00am–4:00am; sun: 9:00am–1:00am

2115 J street sacramento, ca 95816 (916) 442-4388

sun–W: 5:00 pm–12:00 am; thu: 5:00 pm–2:00 am; F-sat: 5:00 pm–3:00 am

SN&R’S ANNuAl DiNiNg guiDe

|

April 5, 2012

happy houR

lunch specials

l at e night e at s

$ : under $10 $$: $11-30

pA i D A Dv e Rt i S i N g

l o c at i o n

houRs

1215 19th street, sacramento, ca 95811 (916) 441–6022

lunch: tu–F: 11:30 am – 2:30 pm; dinner: tu–sat: 5:00 pm–10:00 pm; closed: sun & M

5644 J street, sacramento, ca 95819 (916) 451–4000

sun–W: 10:30 am–9:30 pm; th–sat: 10:30 am–10:00 pm

2726 capitol avenue, sacramento, ca 95816 (916) 443–1180

M–th: 7 am–9 pm, F: 7 am–10 pm; sat: 8 am–10 pm; sun: 8 am–2 pm

1431 R street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 930–9191

M–W: 7 am–9 pm; th– F: 7 am–10 pm; sat: 8 am–10 pm; sun: 8 am–9 pm

$

234 d street, davis, ca 95616 (530) 750–5101

M–W: 7 am–9 pm; th–F: 7 am–10 pm; sat: 8 am–10 pm; sun: 8 am–9 pm

$

1029 K street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 498–9800

M–th: 11:30 am–9 pm; F: 11:30 am–11 pm; sat: 12 pm–10 pm; sun: 12 pm – 7 pm

916 2nd street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 443–6852

M–W: 11:30 am–1:30 am; th–sun: 11:30 am–2 am

5301 power inn Road sacramento, california (916) 386-8599

M–Friday: 10 am–7 pm; sat: 10 am–6 pm; sun: closed

$

1630 K street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 492–2499

M: closed; tu–th: 11 am–9 pm; F–sat: 11 am–11 pm; sun: 11 am–6 pm

$

2115 J street, sacramento, ca 95816 (916) 442–4353

M–sun: 11:30 am–Midnight

1022 2nd street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 441–2211

M–sun: 11:30 am–10 pm

1815 K street, sacramento, ca 95811 (916) 444–2423

sun–thu: 11 am–9:30 pm; F–sat: 11 am–10:30 pm; brunch on sundays: 10 am–3 pm

1112 2nd street, sacramento, ca 95814 (916) 442–4772

lunch: M–F: 11:30 am–2:30 pm; dinner: sun–thu: 5 pm–9:30 pm; F–sat: 5 pm–10 pm; bar: M–F: 11:30 am–11 pm; sat: 5 pm–11 pm; sun: 5 pm–9:30 pm

2431 J street, sacramento, ca 95816 (916) 442–7690

sun–thu: 11 am–9 pm; F–sat: 11 am–10 pm

$$

1518 broadway, sacramento, ca 95818 (916) 441–0222

M–thu: 8 am–10 pm; F–sun: 8 am–11 pm sat-sun brunch: 8:00 am–2:00 pm

$–$$

1214 18th street, sacramento, ca 95811 (916) 442–5858

sun–M: 11 am–10 pm; tu: closed; W–thu: 11 am–11 pm; F–sat: 11 am–12 am; sat-sun brunch 10:00 am–2 pm

cost

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outdooR dining

$$$: $31+

$–$$ $$– $$$ $–$$ $$ $ $–$$

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A speciAl Advertising supplement

bRunch

R e s ta u R a u n t

cost

outdooR dining

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lunch specials

$$$: $31+

l at e night e at s

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LAND PARK’S

MIDTOWN’S NEWEST ICO N

GOURMET SANDWICH SPOT

THURSDAY NIGHTS $

2

CAPTAINS & CORONAS 9pm - Midnight

OPEN BAND JAM featuring

Mike’s Lost and Found ★★★★ ★★★ 9pm - Close

URGERS SQUEEZE B GERS U VEGGIE B R NDWICHES A S EAK SQUEEZEST

Bring you instrument or just come and watch the talent

#13 Capitol City Classic

Double decker bacon, lettuce, tomato, and avocado

916.444.7187

TU-THUR 11AM -9PM FRI-SAT 11AM-11PM SUNDAY 11AM-6PM CLOSED MONDAYS

1630 K St • Sacramento • 916-492-2499

2108 11TH AVE, SACRAMENTO, CA 95818 MON-FRI 10-8 SAT 10-5 SUN 11-5

916 2ND ST.•OLD SACRAMENTO www.TheRiverCitySaloon.com

L a nd

Park

spotlight on...

We’re MORE than just

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Y P A H H Oy – FridaRy 3pm – 7pm

Delicious Food & Hooterific Service!

It’s impossible to leave Hooters without feeling better, because Hooters is guar anteed to make you happy! At Hooters, best selling items lik e Buffalo Shrim p and Chicken W ings are alway s paired with ou t going and friendly servic e, guaranteeing your experience will always be memorable. Equipped with multiple TV sc reens and a full stocked bar, ch oose Hooters when searchin g for a place to watch your favo rite game! Wed – Sat: 11am – 12am Sun – Tues: 11 am – 11pm

Monda

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12 indulge

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A speciAl Advertising supplement


e h t f $3-$5-$7 o e m o H

Mon-Fri Happy Hour

&

BOTTOMLESS MIMOSA BRUNCH SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS! Live Music Tuesdays from 6-8pm featuring Clemon Charles.

Clark’s Corner is where classic American cooking meets creative pub fare.

OPEN DAILY

We’re a modern, family-friendly establishment with a delicious selection of appetizers, pizzas and flatbreads, salads, sandwiches and comfort food favorites.

LUNCH Tu-Su 11am-4pm DINNER Daily 4-10pm HAPPY HOUR Mon 4-6pm Tu-F 3-6pm BREAKFAST Sat & Sun 10am-2pm

5641 J STREET,

From our classic wine list to our unique hand-crafted cocktails, we have a little something for everyone.

CORNER OF

57TH & J | SACRAMENTO CA 95819 | 916.457.5600

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pA i D A Dv e Rt i S i N g

Simple pleasures by Shawn barnum

P h oto b y a n n e S to k e S

F

rom time to time, we all get so absorbed in the daily grind of life that we tend to forget how important it is to slow down and take a break. Whether it’s work, kids, school or our relationships that drain all of our spare moments of free time, we somehow don’t allow ourselves to indulge. like many of you, i am guilty of this. every once in awhile, though, i think it’s important to put my hectic schedule on pause and treat myself to the simple pleasure of eating dessert with a cup of coffee. if we allowed ourselves to give into the desires of our sweet tooths’ once in while, our problems and stresses wouldn’t seem so major. trust me, there isn’t anything a piece of chocolate cake can’t fix. there’s nothing more satisfying than slowly sipping on the perfect cup of espresso while having a stimulating conversation and artfully nibbling on a decadent piece of chocolate lava cake. Ahh, chocolate lava cake! i often find myself sitting at work dreaming of sinking my teeth into that luscious rich cake and when it gives me her sweet surprise of the warm gooey fudge in the middle followed with a sip of intense coffee ... it’s pure bliss. When my day seems too much to bear, i find that this simple act of indulgence makes all my worries waft away just like the steam from my coffee cup. And with only a few bites of cake, i can find order in life’s chaos again. When i need to escape from my day, there a few local spots in sacramento that always seem to satiate my craving and give me the recharge that i need. like sacramento’s iconic Java city at

18th and capitol. i love how from the moment i step inside their storefront the bold earthy aroma of roasting coffee beans immediately engulf me. i can just sit in this quaint cafe for hours while i savor my rich and complex latte. it’s a great way for me to release. Another place i frequent is chocolate Fish coffee on 3rd and Q streets. By far the best cappuccinos in town are made here. plus, who can deny that those gorgeous hand-crafted milk foam designs that float so delicately on top of each cup is anything but pure barista talent. this beautiful touch makes every cup feel like an edible work of art.

Trust me, there isn’t anything a piece of chocolate cake can’t fix. taking time out of the day, whether to spend it with friends or by yourself to recharge, is important and shouldn’t be neglected. so, take a page from my book and remember to slow down occasionally and enjoy the simple pleasures in life like coffee and dessert. i’m a firm believer in having my cake and eating it too … with an espresso!

LOCALLY OWNED LOCALLY ROASTED SEASONALLY SOURCED

Wholesale | Barista Training | Coffee Education | Equipment www.ChocolateFishCoffee.com | 916.710.1023 | Corner of 3rd & Q

Tastthee e c n e r e f Dif

Come enjoy our new patio!

A Gourmet Dessert IN

EVERY

CUPCAKE

2600 Fair Oaks Blvd. #103 Monday-Friday 8am-7pm • Saturday-Sunday 9am-6pm 916-481-4800 • estherscupcakes.com

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3445 Freeport Blvd Sacramento, CA

916.444.6579

2 blocks from Sac City

A speciAl Advertising supplement

5635 H St Sacramento, CA

916.452.4218


AMSINESS ICIENCRBEU S THAT’S ALWA1Y9 SININSTCYELE! 47

This Spring and Summer

experience the BEST... Vic’s Ice Cream. For over 65 years Sacramento has been preparing for all occasions with this handmade delight. So scoot on over for the delicious flavors of the season. Made-to-order sandwiches, ice-cream cakes and pies are always available at Burr’s and Vic’s.

3199 Riverside Blvd.

448-0892

It’s The BEST!

BURR’S FOUNTAIN 4920 Folsom Blvd.

452-5516

Willie’s Burgers

5050 Arden Way

488-5050

NO

WO

PEN

!

we make awesome donuts

Estelle’s Patisserie is a charming, warmly lit French bakery and espresso bar dedicated to quality and our Sacramento community. Estelle’s uses fresh, local ingredients to make our breakfast and lunch items Croissants, French macarons, tarts, breads, soups, sandwiches, and a full espresso menu. Wholesale orders, catering and delivery are also available. Please call or email for details.

resistance is futile

Located at the corner of 9th and K We are dedicated to using high–quality ingredients in downtown Sacramento *Wi-Fi available toL fill N E W S & R E V I E W B U S I N E S S U S E O N Y sacramento’s gourmet donut hole. Open M–F, 7am–6pm • Now open Saturdays 8am-5pm DESIGNER ISSUE DATE ACCT. EXEC. Contact us at (916) 551–1500 or via email DES MM.DD.YY REP 2226 10th street • sacramento at info@estellespatisserie.com sat & sun: 7am – 2pm • mon – fri: 5am – noon • closed tues FILE NAME REV. DATE ADNAMEMMDDYYR1 MM.DD.YY

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April 5, 2012

PRICE / ATMOSPHERE / EXPERT / UNIQUE PLEASE CAREFULLY REVIEW YOUR ADVERTISEMENT AND VERIFY THE FOLLOWING: AD SIZE (COLUMNS X INCHES) SPELLING

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SIMPLY DELICIOUS

HAPPY

join us for

HOUR

TOSTADA | $1.75 Enjoy your choice of Chando’s Signature Meat Selection topped with fresh Cilantro, delicious Diced Onions, creamy Guacamole and tangy Salsa served atop a crispy corn tortilla.

QUESADILLA | $5.50

$1 TACOS | $3 WELL DRINKS mon - fri | 3-6pm $2 DOMESTIC BEER | $5 APPETIZERS (no tues)

Select your favorite of Chando’s Signature Meat and enjoy it sandwiched between a giant flour tortilla that is grilled to perfection with creamy melted Jack Cheese and topped with Pico-de-Gallo, Guacamole, Sour Cream and Salsa.

MULITA | $2.50 Expertly made by layering jack cheese and your choice of meat between two corn tortillas. Top it off with Chando’s signature fresh Cilantro, delicious Diced Onions, Creamy Guacamole and tangy Salsa for an instant flavor explosion.

BURRITO | $5.50 Enjoy your choice of Chando’s Signature Meat Selection served with Jack Cheese, fresh Cilantro, Diced Onions, creamy Guacamole, Lettuce, fresh Pico-de-Gallo, Sour Cream and tangy Salsa expertly wrapped and rolled into a Monster Four Tortilla.

marinated in Chando’s Carne Asada CARNE ASADA: Steak Spices and a touch of Citrus Juice. Beef Stew Meat marinated in Moms Multi-Chile BIRRIA: Spicy Pod Sauce slowly cooked to perfection. in Chando’s Homeade Achiote CHICKEN: Marinated Spices and Citrus Juice Sauce

El PATRON MEXICAN GRILL

cooked to perfection PORK CARNITAS: Slowly in Chando’s Caso.

7753 Rosevill Road, Ste B 916 727 1200

Pork marinated in Chando’s ADOBADA: Savory Homemade Adobada Sauce

EL PATRON BAR & GRILL

seasoned Pork Belly BUCHE: Deliciously for the brave!

6601 Folsom Blvd 916 455 8945

fish, marinated in Chando’s FISH: Fresh Homemade Citrus Juice Sauce

863 Arden Way | (916) 641–8226 | www.ChandosTacos.com

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A speciAl Advertising supplement


pA i D A Dv e Rt i S i N g

Spain

Passport to the Mediterranean

only on J Street

by Rachel Rosin

T

Beyond

wine • beer • cocktails happy hour nightly

here is nothing quite like the mediterranean. it is a sparkling turquoise

5-7pm & 10pm-12am

gem that glitters in the sun and seductively beckons me to bask in the

hookah on the patio

warmth of its shores. But when it comes to traveling, it isn’t the scenery alone that grabs my attention. like most indulgent-minded people, the way to capture my attention is through my stomach. the memory of an unforgettable meal can trump that of the most breathtaking scenery or culturally enriched experiences, and one of my favorite places in the world to indulge is mediterranean region. Just thinking about the mediterranean reminds me of the warmth of the sun on my face, the church bells of st. Francis of Assisi, and the best gnocchi i’ve ever tasted in a tiny tuscan ristorante. But, as we all know, traveling is expensive, and when you add the cost of a plane ticket, hotels, passports, tours and lets face it, a special wardrobe for travel, the tab is more than i make in two months. As the saying goes, though, necessity is the mother of invention, and my meager check book has forced me to become more inventive in ways to satiate my urge to travel. With a little bit of help of the local sacramento dining scene, i can relive the memory of my travels without ever stepping outside the confines of the city. sure our river isn’t as pristine as the glittering pool that is the mediterranean, but our wines are on par with any of those offered in europe.

Spanish & World Cuisine

Middle Eastern Cuisine

Sacramento’s most extensive wine list Live Guitar 7 nights a week Service from 11:30am- MIDNIGHT

Bellydancing every evening Live Music Thursdays Weekends until AM

442.4353

442.4388

And our food is no exception either!

2115 J Street

Continued on page 18 A speciAl Advertising supplement

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Continued from page 17

pA i D A Dv e Rt i S i N g

so, when i glance at my shockingly pale winter skin and miss the warmth of the greek isles, i visit cafe europa and indulge in a delicious chicken gyros topped with a refreshing and tangy tzatziki sauce. When the only monuments i see are the new sacramento international terminal or power Balance pavillion and i long for real culture, i close my eyes and sink my teeth into Hot italian’s flavorful cannavaro pizza. i could even argue Hot italian is better than italy, because

When only

THE BEST

will do

• Pizza • Pasta • Sandwiches • Salads • Beer & Wine • Gluten Free Options

instead of dodging speeding mopeds and ducking the wildly animated gestures of italians with road-rage, the only thing that stands between me and my pizza is the vespa that’s parked in the restaurant as decoration. And when the yearning for the mediterranean becomes unbearable, it is best to use a two-pronged attack. i pop

DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS

in Under the Tuscan Sun and order a heaping bowl of Bucatini Ala enzo from Buca di Beppo to-go. the delicious, fresh

Starting at $6.99 • Lunch served 11am-4pm Mon-Fri

25% Off

pasta sauteed with mushrooms, peas, pancetta and crispy prosciutto paired with the endearing trials and tribulations of diane lane always succeed in masking

Excludes lunch specials. Cannot be combined with other offers. Expires July 5, 2012

the urge to frolic abroad. With a little bit of creativity and a lot of help from the local restaurants, i find i don’t need a plane ticket and a passport, because the best of the mediterranean can be experienced right here in our own backyard!

Sun-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm

7753 Roseville Rd Suite #A • Sacramento 95842 (916) 727-7055 •www.thetasteoftuscany.com

CHICKEN & SAUSAGE ZITI

,WDOLDQLVPRUHIXQDW%XFD

Delicious, family-style food and all the fun of an Italian gathering. It’s a recipe for good times.

ROSEVILLE

1212 Galleria Boulevard • 916.771.9463

SACRAMENTO

1249 Howe Avenue • 916.922.6673

BUCADIBEPPO.COM

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April 5, 2012

YOUR MEAL

|

A speciAl Advertising supplement


Sacramento’s First & Only

GET YOUR HUNGRY A ΣΣ IN HERE!

Olive Oil & Balsamic SPECIALTY SHOP

EAT HEre... EAT HEALTHY... LIVE LONGER...

Chefs’ Olive Mix is an extraordinary specialty store in Historic Old Sacramento where you can taste 13 Ultra Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oils, 12 Fused & Infused Olive Oils, 21 Dark & White Balsamics, 2 Specialty Vinegars and 5 Gourmet Oils. When you first walk into this delightfully charming upscale tasting room, you can’t help but be dazzled by the 54 shiny stainless steel tanks that line the walls like proudly decorated soldiers.

$5OO OFF OF Any ENTREE

Once you take your 1st taste, you’ll be surprisingly and flavorfully “WOWED” and simultaneously hooked! At that very moment, your eyes will light up and images of cuisine possibilities will start to emerge. So, come down and have your own ‘WOW’ experience’!!

($899 or more) W/ PURCHASE OF regular drink PLEASE PRESENT COUPON. NOT VALID W/ ANY OTHER OFFER. Not valid w/ variety platter. EXP: 4/30/12

IS YOUR OLIVE OIL FRESH & HEALTHY? Does it list a Crush Date ? Does it list Antioxidant Units? Does it list a Free Fatty Acid Level? Does it list a Peroxide Value? If not…it might not be as Fresh and Healthy as you think! Bring Your Olive Oil to Chefs’ Olive Mix, compare your olive oil to ours and RECEIVE 20% OFF ANY 200ml bottle of Ultra Premium Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

08

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131 J Street • Old Sac (916) 706–3105 www.chefsolivemix.com

A speciAl Advertising supplement

’10 916. 451.4000 Phone orders welcome!

07

Sun-Wed 10:30am - 9:30pm Thurs - Sat 10:30am -10:00pm

www.eatatopa.com |

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MIDTOWN

|

.N E T

HOT ITALIAN

PUBLIC MARKET


09MON 10TUES DON’T MISS!

DON’T MISS!

Dreams tells the inspirational story of the men and women who are brave enough to attempt the toughest race in the world: The Race Across America. They are seekers, madmen, and angels eager to set out on a daunting cross-country odyssey. M, 4/9, 7pm. $11-$15. Varsity Theatre, 616 Second St. in Davis; (603) 209-5010; www.bicycledreams movie.com.

concert is hosted by the California Restaurant Association and Broadcast Music Inc. It features Ed Roland of Collective Soul and Kevin Griffin of Better Than Ezra. Includes free popcorn and soda. Roland and Griffin have been performing across the country as the Southern Gentlemen. Tu, 4/10, 6:30pm. $15-$20. Crest Theatre, 1013 K St.; (800) 765-4842.

BICYCLE DREAMS: Bicycle

ROCK ’N’ RESTAURANTS: This

Now Playing

Special Events

THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES:

CROCKER DIRECTOR TO SPEAK AT SAC STATE: Lial Jones, CEO and

Sacramento Women Take Back the Night and V-Day Sacramento are once again participating in the worldwide V-Day Campaign by hosting a benefit production of Eve Ensler’s The Vagina Monologues. This year, event proceeds will go to support the 2012 V-Day Spotlight Campaign on Haiti and local organizations Community Against Sexual Harm, My Sister’s House and WEAVE. M, 4/9, 6pm. $18-$20. Guild Theater, 2828 35th St.; (916) 732-4673; www.vdaysacramento.org.

director of the Crocker Art Museum, is the next guest speaker in Sacramento State’s Professions of Art lecture series. Jones has led the Crocker for 13 years. Tu, 4/10, 6:30pm. Free. Sacramento State, Kadema Hall Room 145, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-6166; www.al.csus.edu/art.

FROM MUSICIAN TO ARTIST TO ENTREPRENEUR: A discussion of the evolution of copyright in the music industry and the role the law plays in the lives of musicians. A reception will follow with a performance by the Brubeck Fellows. Tu, 4/10, 5pm. Free.

Special Events

University of the Pacific McGeorge School of Law, 3200 Fifth Ave.; (916) 739-7316; http://go.mcgeorge.edu/ musiclaw.

WALK WITH WARREN: Join Arboretum superintendent emeritus Warren Roberts for a lunchtime stroll in the UC Davis Arboretum’s native-plant collections. Enjoy the early spring weather, learn about the arboretum’s collections, see spring wildflowers in bloom, and get a little exercise. W, 4/11, noon. Free. Walter A. Buehler Alumni & Visitors Center, Old Davis Rd. in Davis.

Classes HEALTHY MEALS ON A LEAN BUDGET: Brenna Gorman, a registered dietitian, will bust the myth that healthy food is expensive. She will discuss tips on navigating grocery stores, stocking pantry essentials and buying the most nutritious food for your money. Sponsored by Friends of Belle Cooledge Library. Tu, 4/10, 6pm. Free. Belle Cooledge Library, 5600 South Land Park Dr.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

Film IT GETS BETTER VIDEO FILMING DROP-IN: Noted columnist Dan Savage and his partner Terry Miller created the It Gets Better project as a response to the increasing number of GLBT teen suicides as a result of bullying. Attendees will be asked to share their personal stories which will be videotaped and later posted on YouTube to let teenagers know that support is out there, they are not alone and it will get better. W, 4/11, 11:30am-1:30pm. Free. Sacramento Public Library (Central Branch), 828 I St.; (916) 264-2920; www.saclibrary.org.

11WED

DON’T MISS! AUTHOR DISCUSSES SPIRITUAL ENVY: Public-

radio talk-show host Michael Krasny will discuss his book, Spiritual Envy: An Agnostic’s Quest. Krasny is host of KQED’s Forum, a news and public-affairs program. His presentation will be part of the Friends of the Library annual meeting. W, 4/11, 3pm. Free. Sacramento State Library Gallery, 6000 J St.; (916) 278-5954; www.library.csus.edu.

Kids’ Stuff PICNIC IN THE PARK CONCERT: Shop the Davis Farmers Market; enjoy Americana music by the Anderson Gram Duo; buy dinner at the International Food Faire; drink wine and beer;

jump around in bounce houses; scale a rock-climbing wall; and more. W, 4/11, 4:30-8:30pm. Free. Davis Central Park, 401 C St. in Davis; (530) 756-1695; www.davisfarmersmarket.org.

Concerts A SINGLE SECOND: Local post-punk and hardcore rock band A Single Second perform as part of Sacramento State’s Unique Programs’ ongoing Wednesday Nooner concert series. W, 4/11, noon. Free. University Union Serna Plaza, 6000 J St. Sacramento State University; (916) 278-6997.

ONGOING DON’T MISS! NINTH ANNUAL DAVIS FILM FESTIVAL: The 2012 Davis Film

Dance JESS MEETS ANGUS: 2011 Alpert Award-winner and UC Davis Ph.D. candidate in performance studies, Jess Curtis will perform his latest work, Jess Meets Angus, as part of the Department of Theatre and Dance’s Institute for Exploration in Theatre, Dance and Performance. Th, 4/5, 8pm; F, 4/6, 8pm. Free. Wright Hall, Lab A, 1 Shields Ave. in Davis.

Teens SPRING BREAK CAMP: Do you need a safe and fun place for your kids to go during the hours they would be at school? Bring kids ages 7-14 to Sacramento State Aquatic Center’s Spring Break Camp. Their camp activities will include boatingsafety activities, sailing, stand-up paddling, kayaking and team building. Through 4/5,

8am-4pm; Through 4/12, 8am4pm. $230. Sacramento State

Festival will showcase films from around the world and our own backyard. Shorts and feature-length films (narrative, documentaries, animation and experimental) will be presented. Prizes will be awarded for Best Feature, Best Short and Audience Award. F, 4/6, 7-

Aquatic Center, 1901 Hazel Ave. in Gold River; (916) 278-2842.

Wait, there’s more! Looking for something to do? Use SN&R’s free calendar to browse hundreds of events online. Art galleries and musems, family events, education classes, film and literary events, church groups, music, sports, volunteer opportunies—all this and more on our free events calendar at www.newsreview.com. Start planning your week!

10:30pm; Sa, 4/7, 12:30-10pm.

$20 for a festival pass. Veterans Memorial Theatre, 203 E. 14th St. in Davis; (530) 383-1711; www.davisfilmfest.org.

R

unning a film night is a thankless

Movies on a Big Screen goes down on Sundays at the Guild Theater, 2828 35th Street; times and prices vary; visit www.movieson abigscreen.com for more information.

BEFORE

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FRONTLINES

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FEATURE

STORY

arts-and-culture line of work right up there with booking shows or curating a gallery: It takes a passionate mastermind—and even then, people aren’t just going to show up to witness your amazing contribution to the Sacramento scene. But you’ve got to keep on going. And going. And then, someday, people will start using the word “institution” to define what you do. I’m not sure Movies on a Big Screen, the weekly film series curated by Robert McKeown and DeeAnn Little, is an institution just yet. But they’ve been showing odd, quirky, unseen or never-seen-the-light-of-day-in-Sacramento films on Sunday nights at the Guild Theater since 2006. If anything, it’s become an awesome local cineaste tradition. And the month of April is chock-full of MOBS goodies: Easter Sunday, April 8, is Sunday school—MOBS style (think “creepy Christian kids’ shows and weirdly excessive scare films”). And, later in the month, conspiracy-theory flick The Truth Is Out There with The X-Files’ Ringo character showing up at the screening; a reproductive-rights documentary sponsored by the League of Women Voters and Planned Parenthood Mar Monte (with a guest panel, too) on Sunday, April 22; and the last Sunday in April, short films by Mira Loma High School students. Start times vary this month. Visit www.movies onabigscreen.com for details. And don’t flake. —Nick Miller

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THREE STAGES AT FOLSOM LAKE COLLEGE PRESENTS

GREAT SHOWS. UP CLOSE! BOBBY HUTCHERSON QUINTET

THE COLOR PURPLE The National Tour

Bobby Hutcherson Quintet SAT 4/14

A rare performance by one of jazz’s greatest vibraphonists. He has worked with some of the most important artists in jazz, including Herbie Hancock and McCoy Tyner (who describes Mr. Hutcherson simply as “one of the best musicians in the world”). His ensemble includes Sacramento’s own Joe Gilman (“one of the greatest pianists I’ve ever heard,” Dave Brubeck). Sponsored by Capital Public Radio. 8 pm

INDIA JAZZ SUITES

TUE 4/10–THU 4/12 “Pure heart…a Broadway hit!” (USA Today). Based on the Pulitzer Prizewinning novel by Alice Walker and the film by Steven Spielberg, The Color Purple was nominated for 11 Tony Awards including Best Musical. “Soaring & joyful!” (Time). 7:30 pm

India Jazz Suites FRI 5/11

A thrilling collaboration: Pandit Chitresh Das, a foremost master of North Indian dance joins Emmy winner Jason Samuels Smith, one of the world’s fastest tap dancers. Accompanied by six top jazz and Indian classical musicians, the SF Chronicle named this “#1 Dance Performance” in its SF premiere. Sponsored by Capital Public Radio. 8 pm

TICKETS ON SALE

916-608-6888 ThreeStages.net 26   |   SN&R   |   04.05.12


DISH

G ET IN SU RANC E WITHOUT LEAVING YOU R COUC H!

Gringo-wiches See FOOD STUFF

Pass the cannelloni

We can in sure you right o ver the phone

Vince’s Ristorante 8901 Elk Grove-Florin Road in Elk Grove, (916) 685-2161, www.vincesristorante.com by GREG LUCAS

Rating:

★ ★ 1/2 Dinner for one:

$10 - $25

FLAWED

★★ HAS MOMENTS

★★★ APPEALING

★★★★ AUTHORITATIVE

★★★★★ EPIC

Still hungry?

Search SN&R’s “Dining Directory” to find local restaurants by name or by type of food. Sushi, Mexican, Indian, Italian— discover it all in the “Dining” section at www.newsreview.com.

BEFORE

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In this seemingly soulless world of endlessly replicated Subways, Starbucks, Applebee’s, Chili’s, Pizza Huts and Denny’s, there is still Vince’s Ristorante. Like ol’ Alfred Lord Tennyson says in “Ulysses”: “Tho’ much is taken, much abides,” and what abides here is a 50-yearold windowless brick edifice with green, white and red trim (the colors of Italy’s flag) with a pediment in front supported by two dark green Corinthian columns. A tall, white and cursive “Vince’s” adorns the wall to the right of the entrance. Entering Vince’s it’s hard to ignore the vibe of being in some vanished Mad Men world, a tiny vestige of the pre-Laguna era Elk Grove where the population still hovered under 11,000, and there are no stoplights and plenty of tractor traffic. A place where a basket of saltines accompanies the minestrone or salad starter. Most of the patrons appear to largely harken back to that era, too. On one visit, the apparent de riguer hair color is gray— except for one of the veteran waitresses who admits to recently dying her long ponytailed hair black. “I’m a great-grandmother, I can do whatever I want,” she tells one customer. The restaurant’s layout includes an elevated L of booths along two brick walls; the tables feature polished wood and plastic lace runners down the center. Wooden balusters with a white handrail sets the booths off from the rest of the dining area. There’s some confusion in one patron’s mind as to whether this Vince’s is related to Vince’s Ristorante in West Sacramento, another long-serving Italian restaurant. Yes and no. Back when the earth cooled, two brothers-in-law, Victor Talani and Vincent Frugoli, decided to open a pizzeria. They tossed a coin to see whose name they would use. Victor lost. Pizzeria profits built West Sac’s Vince’s whose profits, in turn, created Elk Grove’s Vince’s. Today, the West Sac eatery is run by another family. Elk Grove remains Talani territory. Portions are prodigious and the prices relatively paltry. There are seven $6.95 lunch specials including lasagna, ravioli, manicotti and cannelloni as well as sausage and meatball sandwiches. Each is accompanied by minestrone or salad. A more-than-enoughfor-two steak-and-shrimp dinner special costs $20. The standard cannelloni is $9.95. Vince’s chicken marsala—a specialty—is $10.95 at lunch. The dimensions that the servers approximate for the full steak sandwich, however, are woefully inadequate when it comes to describing its actual girth. FRONTLINES

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Rates as lowonaths

Suffice to say, the half a steak sandwich is plenty: a lesson learned the hard way. The full order consists of two fillets—1-inch high by 3inches wide—that crush two pieces of garlic bread. The rest of the platter is littered with— what else?—humongous steakhouse fries. The salad is mundane—although recommended over the minestrone by Mary Ann, the friendly, albeit formal waitress. She likes blue cheese. The honey mustard and Italian are lighter. Regardless of dressing, it’s a bed of iceberg with six or seven kidney beans, around 10 garbanzos and between three and five sliced green beans. Red onions are readily brought, but it seems like they should be a natural to include in the first place.

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While a bit incongruous, Vince’s taco salad—romaine for a change—offers a somewhat lighter choice, although this is a restaurant that is long on meat and carbs and, by no means, a vegan vacation getaway. The Alfredo sauce that adorns one half of the 12inch by 4-inch plate of cannelloni—the other half buried in a hearty ground-beef-heavy marinara—is creamy and cheesy. Attempt to clear the plate at your own peril. Stick with half-orders and leave space for the terrific tiramisu, made from a 75-yearold recipe of which Vince’s justifiably boasts. Like West Sac’s The Club Pheasant Restaurant or the now shuttered Aldo’s, Vince’s is a delightful dinosaur. Ω

THE V WORD On the radar Since 2008, Mylapore Ethnic Vegetarian Indian Cuisine (1760 Prairie City Road, Suite 160 in Folsom) has been quietly nestled in a shopping center near the Intel Corporation campus. The coolest thing about this place is that its menu is all vegetarian—as its name indicates— with a solid number of vegan offerings, too. Because of its location, this modestsized eatery may not have blipped on your radar yet, but if you find yourself passing through the burg, try the impressively spiced and chili-laden Mylapore Special dosa. Or the fiery Kara dosa, which the menu declares is not for the faint hearted. This one’s got your name on it, Greg Lucas. —Shoka STORY

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DISH Where to eat? Here are a few recent reviews and regional recommendations, updated regularly. Check out www.newsreview.com for more dining advice.

Midtown

Mati’s There’s a reason “Indian Express” was part of Mati’s previous title. A variety of dishes are offered daily in a buffet, but Mom serves instead of diners slopping stuff onto their own plates. Options are fairly straightforward: A small dish at $6.99 with rice and two items, and a large, which has up to four items, at $8.99. Subtract $1 if going vegetarian. There’s five dishes in the daily veg rotation, most of them vegan. Offerings run the gamut from mild to spicy, although the temperature of spicy is well within tolerance, except for the most heat adverse. This is straightup, nicely prepared Indian food without frills. Mom and daughter make it even more appealing. Indian. 1501 16th St.; (916) 341-0532. Dinner for one: $9-$12. ★★★ The Porch The Porch is light and white with a vibe that suggests the airy sweep of an antebellum Charleston eatery. One can only envy the extensive on-site research conducted by chef Jon Clemens and business partners John Lopez and Jerry Mitchell, creators of Capitol Garage. The most enjoyable menu selections

are salads or seafood sandwiches or entrees. Slaw on the barbecue pork sandwich elevates its status, and its pickled vegetables are sweet and tart, adding an additional dimension. The shrimp and grits dish, while laden with cheddar and gravy, is a synergistic mélange— perhaps The Porch’s trademark dish. Also in the running is the purloo, the low country’s version of jambalaya, with andouille, crunchy crawfish appendages, and the same sautéed bell peppers and onions that also appear in the grits. Southern. 1815 K St., (916) 444-2423. Dinner for one: $20-$30. ★★★

The Press Bistro There are flashes of Greece, such as the crisscross rows of bare light bulbs over the front patio. Or the summery small plate of stacked watermelon squares with feta and mint. Even Italian vegetarians get cut into the action with mushroom ravioli and its corn, leek and dill triumvirate. Another special is a colorful small plate of pepperonata—slightly-pickled-in-champagne-vinegar stripes of peppers awash in olive oil. Speaking of olive oil, it’s all that’s needed to accompany the fluffy, light focaccia, whose four rectangles come neatly stacked. Share The Press with someone you love. Mediterranean. 1809 Capitol Ave., (916) 444-2566. Dinner for one: $15-$30. ★★★1⁄2

Sampino’s Towne Foods Sampino’s Towne Foods turns out to be a bright jewel in a drab Alkali Flat strip mall of paycheck cashers and laundromat. It’s everything an Italian deli should be and more, right down to the Louie Prima on the box and the timpano in the

refrigerated display case. Several lobbyists, who elect to drive the six to seven blocks from their offices near the capitol, to pick up sandwiches or—in one instance—five meatballs, begin spewing superlatives when asked their views on Sampino’s. Italian Deli. 1607 F St., (916) 441-2372. Dinner for one: $7-$15. ★★★★1⁄2

Thir13en From the start—and, lo, these many weeks hence—the situp-take-notice plate remains the pork tonnato sandwich. It’s the Italian peasant spread or sauce made with tonno—tuna—tonnato that empowers this open-face masterwork. Spread on a toasted half baguette, the tonnato is the foun-

dation upon which the pork rests. Above the pork is an awning of mixed greens, with a generous overhang, sprinkled with not enough crispy onions and paperthin slices of pickled fennel. There isn’t space to wax poetic about the cordon bleu sandwich, the burger, the designer cocktails or the fizzy water from Wales. See for yourself. Very authoritative. American. 1300 H St., (916) 594-7669. Dinner for one: $12-$20.

East Sac

Formoli’s Bistro Formoli’s is the

Street Cafe) to Formoli’s old warren and brought Formoli’s into its current high-ceilinged, spare, dark cranberry space of black tables and chairs just six blocks away. Flavor combinations are a big part of the Formoli playbook, and the blend of the tower’s components is the payoff just as it is in the salad of beets—wafer-thin enough to be used interchangeably in the carpaccio—with shaved fennel, frisée, a few orange segments and pistachios laced with a stentorian balsamic vinaigrette. Mediterranean. 3839 J St., (916) 448-5699. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★★★

other half of the restaurant swap on J Street that sent Vanilla Bean Bistro (formerly known as Gonul’s J

EAT IT AND REAP

Vanilla Bean Bistro Gonul’s J Street Cafe has moved up the street and evolved into the Vanilla Bean Bistro. Its narrow, lowceilinged coziness is consonant with its understated, whatever-theimpulse-inspires alchemy that owner/chef Gonul Blum, has shown over the past eight years. Blum hails from Turkey. That country’s culinary tradition provides a sturdy foundation, but for her, it serves more as a launching pad. A recurring feature practiced here is the inclusion of fruit—preserved and fresh—in many dishes. And the tabbouleh delivers a roundhousepunch flavor combination. Turkish. 3260-B J St., (916) 457-1155. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★1⁄2

by GARRETT MCCORD

Oblong orange orbs I discovered kumquats by plucking them from a tree between the English and art buildings on Sacramento State’s campus. Each March, only a handful of students climb the tree during school hours to curious stares and hushed jokes. I was the one in the tree filling my backpack until it overflowed. Once in a while, someone would come up ask what I was doing. I’d show them the little oblong orange orbs, teach them how to eat them (seeds, skin and all). They’re delightfully sweet and sour— and also often $5 a pint at grocery stores.

A whole, unguarded tree is a gold mine. If you happen to come across a kumquat tree (or just some kumquats in the store), do take the dive—or perhaps climb—and try them out. Muddled with some mint and rum, they make for wonderful mojitos. Slice and stuff them into fish or chicken for a citrus flair. Or slice them in half and pack them with salt and preserve them. And maybe candy them in simple syrup, or even pickle them for a unique treat. Some Vietnamese families even crush them and brew them in hot water for kumquat tea.

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drous, metaphysical, even. This 35year-old East Sacramento landmark sells old-fashioned steamed franks and sausages. The menu warns that the Fiesta Dog—refried beans, onions, cheese, lettuce, tomatoes and taco sauce—is “surprisingly good.” Who can quarrel with truth in advertising? Even a simple, straightforward creation such as the Ranch Dog, starring—natch—ranch dressing, can engender a “Whoa, tasty!” The sausages—such as the Polish or Tofurky Kielbasa—are grilled as is the bacon-wrapped dog with its not-easily forgettable jalapeño relish. American. 715 56th St., (916) 455-0497. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★★

Land Park/ Curtis Park

Pangea Two Brews Cafe Tables, tall and short, are large and communal, fostering that casual camaraderie that should be the goal of any self-respecting brewpub. There’s a fairly extensive menu, including breakfast items. Not to put too fine a point on it: Pangaea’s offerings are not beers that will be found at Save Mart or even Nugget. They are nuanced. Brewed with artisanship. In some cases, for hundreds of years. There’s the usual panoply of French dip, hot pastrami, Reuben and so on. Among the signature offerings is The Gobbler. Turkey, natch. Cranberry sauce, natch. Then red onion, several roma tomato slices, a thicket of green leaf and pepper

jack cheese, all shoehorned into a big baguette. Brewpub. 2743 Franklin Blvd., (916) 454-4942. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★1⁄2

North Sac

Enotria Restaurant and Wine Bar Enotria is an enophile’s dream. The waiters here speak fluent wine and their knowledge is both capacious and definitive. Enotria promises “Food made for wine made for food,” and it delivers on the pledge. The paella remains Enotria’s signature dish. A recent $32 prix-fixe meal begins with a rectangular plate upon which is served an alternating line of caramelized plantains and campaign-button size pork tenderloins. The accompanying wine is a 2008 white burgundy, Olivier LeFlaive “Les Setilles.” The one-two punch here is, obviously, the food and wine. But the knock-out punch—at least when all cylinders are firing— is the delivery. American. 1431 Del Paso Blvd., (916) 922-6792. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★★★1⁄2

South Sac Sabaidee Thai Grille If the menu is any indication, pumpkin and other squashes play a major role in Laotian cuisine, which, in turn, plays a major role at Sabaidee. The khalii khapou, listed as “curried crab stew” on the menu, comes from the hometown of the matriarch who is happy to answer questions about the ingredients and volunteers what is apparent after one mouthful: real crab is used. A word about the freebie salad that accompanies each meal: expect mixed greens, a dash of carrot

shreds, cucumber chunks, a quarter of a tomato, a spattering of sesame seeds and what taste like fried shallots. All this with a tamarind emboldened dressing. Sabaidee is a quality meal for the price. Thai/Laotian. 8055 Elk GroveFlorin Rd., (916) 681-8286. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★1⁄2

can be served in those big vaseshaped “yard” glasses. On the menu, there’s a big selection of wines, designer martinis, burgers, pizza, seafood and steak—and even a big selection of garden offerings; and a trademarked soy, wheat-and-so-forth meat substitute. While colossal, the 1,665-calorie barbecue-chicken salad— there’s a reason the calorie count is not on the menu—has disparate ingredients that combine artfully. Yard House is over-the-top, a bit overwhelming and mustn’t be overlooked. American. 1166 Roseville Pkwy., Roseville; (916) 922-6792. Dinner for one: $20-$40. ★★★★

Rancho Cordova Ichi Maki Ichi Maki looks decep-

tively small from the outside, but enter through the front doors and look past the sushi bar into a lengthy dining room. Given the maki in the name, it’s no wonder there are more than 50 types of rolls, along with a sizable selection of sashimi: Hamachi, salmon and tuna being the most obvious. In the maki bull pen there’s avokyu—a bargain-basement $3.50 avocado-and-cucumber roll—and the aptly named Sumo—featuring shrimp tempura, spicy tuna, bell pepper, hamachi, avocado and more, with the whole kit-and-caboodle landing near the $14 mark. Most of the rolls lie within the $10 range. Overall, a good value and a good time. Sushi. 11291 Folsom Blvd., Rancho Cordova; (916) 635-8880. Dinner for one: $10-$20. ★★★

Arden/ Carmichael

Ambience It’s not surprising the folks at Zagat have done a fair amount of hyperventilating over Ambience, the decidedly upscale eatery on Fair Oaks Boulevard. Where else in Carmichael can you find a $222 meal for two—without alcohol? There is coulis and confit and soufflé and brûlée and reductions and stuff that’s sliced wafer thin and, of course, vast white real estate that surrounds the small portions served on the plates. As the meal progresses, the presentation of the food gets better, as does the complexity of the offerings. Baked Alaska for dessert is as rich and decadent. Kudos to chef and owner Morgan Song for a truly memorable meal. American. 6440 Fair Oaks Blvd., (916) 489-8464. Dinner for one: $60 and up. ★★★★★

Roseville

Yard House Everything about Yard House is big. It’s a big brick building in the big Fountains at Roseville shopping center. The beers are big, even the samplers. Some

S

SN&R wants to see your college application essays—and we’ll reward the best with money. That’s right, cash. Semolians. Scratch. The stuff that disappears so quickly when you’re going to college.

We first met at a friend’s birthday party. She had a glistening golden-brown complexion and emitted a sweet, intoxicating aroma. They said she was Filipino. She was a delicious pastry. Her name was señorita bread. Of course, despite a name that literally means “miss bread” in Spanish, she wasn’t a real person. Yet, she’s dangerously close to being my future missus. Señorita bread, made by Starbread Bakery (6127 Mack Road in South Sacramento), is light and fluffy, with a caramelized sweetness coming from a filling reminiscent of condensed milk. It’s nearly impossible to eat just one of these mini-doughnut-sized breads. Tip: Don’t burn yourself by eating señorita bread immediately after baking. Her molten center can drip out and scald your mouth. Also, try the store’s other breads, especially the purple yam buns. And don’t leave without at least a 20-piece box of señorita bread—if you want it to last more than a day. —Jonathan Mendick

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! T S E T N O C Y A S S E E COLLEG

Fill out the entry form below (photo copies OK), attach it to a copy of your essay, and send it to us by April 13. If you submit via email, make sure to include all that info at the top of the submission. We’ll print the finalists in a May issue of SN&R, and the winners will get a little something to help with all those college expenses. First prize is $2,012. Second prize is $750, and third prize is $250. Second and third prize are being sponsored by InterWest Insurance Services, Inc.

This contest is open to seniors graduating in 2012 only. If you’re heading to college but did not write an essay for your application, feel free to do so now. Essays will be judged anonymously. No employees or relatives of employees of SN&R may enter. Only one entry per student, so if you wrote more than one application essay, pick your best.

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I ran into a guy that I had a huge crush on 10 years ago when we worked together. He’s gorgeous, and I was thrilled when he asked me out. We had a great time, but he spent the whole evening talking about his recent separation from wife No. 2. I listened and made suggestions about dealing with her. He seemed to really appreciate me. He kept squeezing my hand and, later, he kissed me good night. I realized that I really like this guy. I could see myself with him long term. Then, on our fifth date, he starts talking about some 20-year-old woman he met at a party and who is his soul mate. What am I missing here? How did I go from the person he was calling and texting daily, having wonderful dates with, to the person he talks to about women he’s crushing on? Actually, how did you go from five dates to being heart invested? Oh, I know: You had your eye on him back in the day. Running into him again and breaking bread together is not a sign that Cupid has coupled you for a lifetime. Maybe the sole, uh, I mean, soul purpose of being his gal pal was to companion him, briefly, through the messy aftermath of marriage No. 2. And, since luck is in your corner, this dating experience gave you a glimpse of his immaturity. He’s still attached to wife No. 2 but fantasizing about another woman as his soul mate while tossing you a few crumbs to keep you in his dating pool. Whew! Aren’t you relieved he’s interested in someone else?

When a man you’re pining for is walking wounded because of an unresolved relationship, don’t play therapist.

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co-dependent, he won’t think of you as the perfect romantic partner. He will think of you as the friend who helps him solve problems with women. It’s also kind to practice self-discipline. Don’t give yourself completely, even in thought, to a man who is separated. He may think of himself as divorced, but he’s not. The raw emotions and messy finances are clear signs of a clouded life. Why get involved? He can’t give himself to you fully when he is still attached, mind, body and household, to someone else. So let him run after the 20-something. You deserve a man whose maturity matches your own. I started my own massage practice and am struggling to earn enough money to live on. I have plenty of clients, but most of them tell me that they can’t afford my full fee. If I continue to provide reduced-rate services, I will have to take a second job. Some business books say I should turn away clients who can’t pay my fee. That worries me, because I don’t know if it will ruin my business. If the primary feedback you receive is that your fee is too high, you may be targeting the wrong segment of the population. Move your practice to a zip code where more high-income earners live and work. Or reduce your fee and serve the people contacting you. If you choose the latter, opt to designate a percentage of your practice to those on a tight budget (moms-to-be or newly unemployed, for example) and fill the rest of your schedule with loyal, full-fee clients. But remember, most of us struggle financially, so make your service beneficial enough that we include it in our monthly budget. After all, massage is as essential to health as a gym membership, right? Ω

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*Proceeds will go to benefit the California Restaurant

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Meditation of the week:

Now, jot this down in the notebook of your memory: When a man you’re pining for is walking wounded because of an unresolved relationship, don’t play therapist. Yes, he may be grateful if you do. However, unless he is BEFORE

C R A A N D B M I P R O U D LY P R E S E N T

“Don’t be trapped by dogma— which is living with the results of other people’s opinions. Don’t let the noise of other people’s opinions drown out your own inner voice,” said Steve Jobs. Is the road less taken still waiting for you?

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Actor John Barrymore was a handsome scion in an acting dynasty. At 24, he was on tour in San by Francisco (playing a drunken telegrapher) Jeff Hudson when the 1906 earthquake struck. Since the jef f h@ disaster canceled performances, Barrymore newsreview.com spent his time drinking and concocting an (exaggerated) eyewitness account of the devastation, which he hoped to peddle. When the show departed for Australia a few days later, Barrymore wasn’t on the boat.

4

The Teahouse of the August Moon By John Patrick Directed by Diane Fetterly

Barrymore, 12:30 and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday; 6:30 p.m. Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday; $15-$38. Sacramento Theatre Company, 1419 H Street; (916) 443-6722; www.sactheatre.org. Through May 6.

April 12 to May 5, 2012 Nevada Theatre in Nevada City

Shakin’ out the blues

Produced by CATS (Community Asian Theatre of the Sierra) Tickets: www.catsweb.org

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The Color Purple

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Repeatedly, he calls on his long-suffering prompter (Sean Patrick Nill, offstage) to provide a line when memory fails. North’s piercing gaze, bright smile and regal bearing embody Barrymore’s gallant manner, alcoholic tremors and impulsiveness. North and director Greg Alexander keep this talky show interesting, with one or two minor lapses. This production fares better than the 1998 Broadway tour’s ill-fated visit to the humongous Community Center Theater. That production starred Christopher Plummer—but Plummer wouldn’t wear a mic, rendering his sterling performance almost inaudible past row J. STC’s intimate Pollock Stage is a far more appropriate venue for this play. Ω

Barrymore shot to fame in the 1920s as a Shakespearean in New York and London. His noble profile also got him work in Hollywood. But drinking and carousing took a toll. By the time he was in his 50s, Barrymore could no longer remember his lines. He died in May 1942, just after he turned 60, a washed-up celebrity. That Barrymore is still remembered, 70 years on, is a testament to his talent and notoriety. William Luce’s play presents the actor in his final days—charming, undisciplined, dissipated. He wants to remount Richard III and has rented a dingy theater to rehearse. It’s a portrait of brilliance gone to seed. The Sacramento Theatre Company presents the show in the cozy 85-seat Pollock Stage, which is cluttered with old props. Veteran actor Gregory North (Barrymore) arrives with a leather satchel containing booze. He regales us with ribald limericks and tales of his divorces (“bus accidents”), periodically breaking into a Shakespearean soliloquy (not always from the right play).

It’s the perfect show for the small—and acoustically near-perfect—venue at Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, which means we’ll get a treat when the national tour of The Color Purple pulls into town for a limited midweek run. The story, based on both Alice Walker’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel and Stephen Spielberg’s film, is the tale of Celie, an early 20th-century black Southern woman who bears two children to her abusive stepfather—both are taken from her and given up for adoption—and is separated from her beloved sister, Nettie, before being married off to an abusive husband, Mister. But it’s not a tale of misery; it’s a tale of resistance and resilience, as Celie makes a family of the heart that includes jazz singer Shug Avery, and an entire community that resists the Jim Crow of the period any way they can. Spanning 40 years and including jazz, blues and pop songs from a century of American music, The Color Purple is both historical drama and uplifting musical. Originally produced on Broadway by Oprah Winfrey and Quincy Jones, it features a libretto by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Marsha Norman. To offset the midweek run, the show begins at 7:30 p.m., and yes, it certainly is worth staying up late on a weeknight. Even if you’re a bit drowsy in the cubicle the next day, at least you’ll be humming something good. —Kel Munger

The Color Purple, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday; $39-$59; premium tickets $69. Three Stages at Folsom Lake College, 10 College Parkway in Folsom; (916) 608-6888; www.threestages.net. Through April 12.


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Playwright Jane Martin writes 11 monologues in a variety of women’s voices, Resurrection Theatre provides the 11 local actresses. It’s an intriguing, insightful show—a theater buffet where both the writing and performances vary in strength, but you leave satiated and satisfied. Wonderful to witness so many talented women in one production. Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 4/21. $12-$15. Resurrection Theatre at the Artisan Theatre, 1901 Del Paso Blvd.; (916) 838-0618; www.resurrectiontheatre.com. P.R.

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The Actor’s Workshop of Sacramento takes a look at parochial schools and dogma with Casey Kurtti’s Catholic School Girls, directed by Eason Donner. Four women act out multiple parts as both school girl and nun and create a fast-paced and funny production. In repertory with Be Aggressive, which opens March 29. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 4/21. $15. Actor’s Theatre of Sacramento at the Wilkerson Theatre in the R25 complex at 25th and R streets; (916) 501-6104. M.M.

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Absence, anxiety, loss and loneliness are at the heart of Canadian playwright Morris Panych’s latest play, getting its American debut here. An excellent cast—Elisabeth Nunziato, Kurt Johnson, David Pierini, Jamie Jones and Dan Fagan—tackles the wordy and sometimes problematic script with supreme confidence. Tu 6:30pm; W 2pm &

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YOUNG TOM EDISON

This hour-long Family Series show is primarily for younger kids. The script is somewhat inchoate, but there are marvelous cameos, including Rick Kleber’s wild scene as a cowboy; children in the theater giggled with delight. There’s also a fine scene on a moving train, an ingenious low-tech illusion. Sa, Su 1 & 4pm. Through 4/15. $13-$22. B Street Theatre, 2711 B St.; (916) 443-5300; www.bstreettheatre.org. J.H.

5

TRUE WEST

Battling brothers Austin (Cole Alexander Smith), a bookish writer, and Lee (Jonathan Rhys Williams), a drunken burglar-turned-mystic, find out how alike they are in their differences. Sam Shepard’s best-known play has staying power, and this production is note-perfect. Directed by Stephanie Gularte, with Eric Baldwin and Janis Stephens in well-played supporting roles. W 7pm; Th, F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 4/22. $18-$28. Capital Stage, 2215 J St.; (916) 995-5464; www.capstage.org. K.M.

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WOODY GUTHRIE’S AMERICAN SONG

This musical biography of the troubadour of the working man gets a workmanlike production at the hands of City Theatre. Great songs, fine music— but several actors who need to grow into their roles. F, Sa 8pm; Su 2pm. Through 4/29. $12-$15. City Theatre at the West Sacramento Community Center, 1075 West Capitol Ave., West Sacramento; www.citytheatre.net. J.C.

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1. It was kind of a thing once, and that was only in 2-D! As James Cameron’s 15-year-old blockbuster resurfaces in theaters, it’s fair to ask: How by did an adolescent love story set in 1912 on a Jonathan Kiefer famously ill-fated ocean liner become the biggest box-office grosser ever, at least until a later movie about alien rainforest superSmurfs came along from the same director? No one really knows, but now you may pay extra for another, deeper look.

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2. It’s a period piece—from the future!

Just as Titanic the boat may seem like a relic from an earlier era, so does Titanic the movie. But that wily Cameron—ocean enthusiast, old-fashioned Hollywood showman, stager of spectacles, tacky Oscar-speech quoter of his own mediocre dialogue—always has known a thing or two about human destiny. Even in 1997 he foresaw how 21st-century audiences would want to be entertained: by wasting many hours staring at a screen, envying other people’s make-believe status, and witnessing one big epic fail. It’s only just now that 3-D technology has at last caught up with this visionary. 3. Now with even more morbid curiosity!

Just as Titanic the movie capitalized on the poignancy of retrospect, so does the act of releasing it again many years later. Ah, to think of a time when Kate Winslet didn’t try so hard and Leonardo DiCaprio still did. They were so impossibly young and unspoiled then, before the respective bodyimage issues and the coke bloat or whatever it is; just the wistful beauty from Heavenly

Creatures and the Future Great Actor Who’d Outgrown Growing Pains, together in the salty breeze, surfing that tsunami of Celine Dion. So poignant, in fact, that it makes you a little seasick. 4. It’s time to send those Hollywood fat cats a message as regards the shameless commerce of 3-D-retrofitted former blockbusters!

Hey, not all of us can afford to have submarines custom made for ourselves in order to visit the ocean floor while also publicizing a ludicrously profitable movie we made more than a decade ago. So no, Titanic is not just some adorable little DIY opus in need of Indiegogo funding. But we must consider it in the context of our other forthcoming 3-D re-release options. If it’s really either this or the Star Wars prequels, then we all know what we need to do. Well played, Cameron.

If it’s really either this or the Star Wars prequels, then we all know what we need to do. Well played, James Cameron. 5. You missed it the first time!

Well, it’s possible. All of us were busy in the ’90s. Younger, fresher, more willing to go out and try new things. (There wasn’t yet much of an Internet to speak of.) Maybe you had other stuff going on and just never got around to it. Or maybe you gave Titanic a pass because you knew how it ends. Well, you still know how it ends. Or do you? Stay past the credits for a surprise. No, just kidding. Same deal: It sinks, he dies, her heart goes on. Look, it’s about the journey. Ω


Show timeS valid apr 6-apr 12, 2012

by JONATHAN KIEFER & JIM LANE

2

4

The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye

One charming feature of Marie Losier’s new documentary is its total failure of expository consideration. If The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye seems randomly beamed in from outer space, that just goes to show its commitment to the material. For the sake of easier access, here’s some background: Once upon a time, one Genesis P-Orridge, frontman of proto-industrial noise outfit Throbbing Gristle, fell in love with a pretty young dominatrix called Lady Jaye. Their partnership was a charmed accumulation of poignant whimsy and unbridled creativity; eventually, maybe inevitably, it involved an ultimate consummation, the “Creating the Pandrogyne” project, in which the soul mates underwent plastic surgery to more closely resemble each other. When Lady Jaye died in 2007, or “dropped her body,” as Genesis nicely puts it, hearts were broken but the spell was not. Appropriately enough, Losier’s crazy quilt of home-movie and performance footage seems giddily undomesticated. Reveling unaplogetically in the selfexploratory allures of bohemian East Village chic, this is simply one sincere and affecting answer to the question of how to really live and love like an artist. J.K.

3

Casa de Mi Padre

Two Mexican brothers (Will Ferrell, Diego Luna) struggle to protect their father’s ranch from a ruthless drug kingpin (Gael García Bernal); meanwhile, Ferrell’s dim-bulb Armando finds himself falling for his brother’s voluptuous fiancée (Genesis Rodriguez). Ferrell and his old Saturday Night Live colleagues Andrew Steele (here, the writer) and Matt Piedmont (director) parody—by faithful imitation—the torrid conventions of the telenovelas of Spanish-language TV. They try to do what Blazing Saddles did for Westerns—right down to the overwrought title tune sung by a smoldering Christina Aguilera— but an overextended SNL skit is exactly what the movie feels like, with chuckles instead of genuine laughs. Still, the chuckles are plentiful, and everyone is gamely straight-faced about being over the top. J.L.

4

Friends With Kids

Two platonic best friends (Adam Scott and writer-director Jennifer Westfeldt) agree to have a kid together, no strings attached, so they can get “the parent thing” out of the way and continue their separate searches for Ms. and Mr. Right. We know where this is heading, but the beauty of Westfeldt’s script is that the characters are so three-dimensional that we want it to go there, and there are a lot of knowing laughs along the way. First-time director Westfeldt, a veteran actress and writer of 2001’s Kissing Jessica Stein, has something like the wit and insight of Woody Allen at his best, and her movie is a bracing antidote to shallow rom-coms like Failure to Launch and Made of Honor. She has a great cast, too (Maya Rudolph, Jon Hamm, Kristen Wiig, Chris O’Dowd), and gives them plenty of good lines. J.L.

3

The Hunger Games

Adolescents from a dozen districts of some future former America annually are chosen by lottery for a woodsy death match on live TV. Two of them, played by Jennifer Lawrence and Josh Hutcherson, hold our interest. This comes from the first book of Suzanne Collins’ bestselling sci-fi trilogy, and the script, by Collins, Billy Ray and director Gary Ross, has its own battles to fight against pseudo-suspense and other bloating filler. Reportedly inspired by Collins’ experience of

JIRO DREAMS OF SUSHI

now playing

wE NEED TO TALK ABOUT KEVIN Starring tilda Swinton

A Thousand Words

A fast-talking, insincere literary agent (Eddie Murphy) finds a magic tree in his backyard that loses a leaf for every word he says; when the last leaf is gone, he and the tree will both die. How does he know this? It has something to do with a simpering New Age guru (Cliff Curtis), but really, don’t ask—it’s just one of the gaping holes in Steve Koren’s script, which seems to be suffering from some mysterious strain of screenplay blight. The movie is equal parts labored allegory without resonance and forced comedy without laughs. Murphy does what he can but is reduced to flailing and grimacing; his considerable talents don’t extend to making a bad script better, and neither do the far more modest skills of director Brian Robbins. Kerry Washington, Clark Duke and Alison Janney flounder in support. J.L.

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Starring jaSon Segel & ed helmS Rated R We Need to Talk About Kevin : We also need to talk about Thom Yorke doppelgangerisms.

2

flipping channels between war coverage and reality TV, it seems appropriately more mindnumbing than groundbreaking or actively satirical. Peripheral not-quite-characters are played with brightly costumed monotony by Elizabeth Banks, Woody Harrelson, Toby Jones, Stanley Tucci, Lenny Kravitz and Donald Sutherland. But Hutcherson commits to his sudsy subplot, and Lawrence anchors it all with enough presence and genuine vulnerability to reward the patient attention of those many people who’ve been waiting in line to watch since before you began reading this. J.K.

Jeff, Who Lives at Home

A 30-year-old stoner/slacker (Jason Segel) ventures out of his mother’s basement on an errand, but quickly gets sidetracked on a search for a mysterious “Kevin,” a name he feels sure came to him as a sign from the universe. Before the day is through, his quest will involve his mother (Susan Sarandon), brother (Ed Helms, in the kind of part he plays so well), sister-in-law (Judy Greer)—and yes, several Kevins. The writingdirecting team of brothers Jay and Mark Duplass have a way of making movies that hardly seem written or directed at all, just earnestly improvised and captured on the fly. This one galumphs along from one episode to the next with a somehow lovable sense of ramshackle inevitability toward a sweet and extremely satisfying conclusion. Rae Dawn Chong tags along as Sarandon’s co-worker. J.L.

4

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We Need to Talk About Kevin

OK, so if there wasn’t really anything to say, why exactly did We Need to Talk About Kevin? Director Lynne Ramsay’s adaptation (with Rory Kinnear) of Lionel Shriver’s novel contemplates the perpetrator of a high-school massacre. With its emptily evil brat embodied at various ages by Rock Duer, Jasper Newell and Ezra Miller, the nonstory plays out as a mannered retrospective litany of warning signs, cut against his mother’s stoic guilt. Tilda Swinton dignifies this exercise with such skill that for a few moments we even stop asking why she would, but basically it’s just some hyperpretentious horror flick. Complete with self-congratulating music cues, and John C. Reilly as the malefactor’s too-credulous father, Ramsay’s shriveled vision regresses us to the pretentious indie rubbish of the 1990s. It’s an outdated, unexamined pose of nihilism, somehow at once sneering and ingratiating—which, to some tastes, might indeed seem “masterful.” J.K.

4

not playing Friday Sat-Sun 2:15 5:00 7:15 Mon-Thu 5:00 nightly

John Carter

A Civil War veteran and gold prospector in 1880s Arizona Territory (Taylor Kitsch) is miraculously transported to the planet Mars, where his superior strength and agility make him a mighty warrior, while his valor, honor and good looks win the heart of a beautiful Martian princess (Lynn Collins). Edgar Rice Burroughs’ seminal 1912 pulp-fiction adventure, after influencing fantasy and science fiction for 100 years, comes to the screen courtesy of Disney, Pixar and writers Mark Andrews, Michael Chabon and Andrew Stanton (who also directed). The result is great fun, true to the spirit of the original and, with some tweaks and adjustments, reasonably faithful to the letter as well. Burroughs fans everywhere (he still has millions) can rest easy, and hope that Stanton and company can keep the series going. J.L.

1

Project X

Three high-school losers (Thomas Mann, Oliver Cooper, Jonathan Daniel Brown) plan a huge parents-out-of-town party to put them on the social map, but things get immediately out of hand, and before the night is over, their neighborhood looks like Baghdad on a bad day. Written by Matt Drake and Michael Bacall and directed by Nima Nourizadeh—and couched once again in the form of found-footage video, a style fast becoming tiresome—the movie seeks to be the ultimate party flick. It certainly pulls out all the stops, with all the sex, booty shots, bare

www.newsreview.com

“3D HAS MADE A GREAT FILM

EVEN GREATER”.

boobs and destruction-without-consequences that a 15-year-old dweeb could possibly want, even though he wouldn’t be old enough to get into this R-rated show on his own. But underneath all the jacked-up mayhem, it’s a lame, laughless, pathetic little comedy. J.L.

3

Thin Ice

2

This Means War

4

Wanderlust

LOU LUMENICK, NEW YORK POST

A sleazeball insurance agent (Greg Kinnear) hustles his way through life never playing straight with anyone—then he meets a senile old farmer (Alan Arkin) with a rare violin he doesn’t know the value of, and plots to rip the old fool off. Throw in a psycho locksmith (Billy Crudup), a sudden murder and escalating blackmail, and the agent’s life gets worse than he ever imagined. The script by sisters Jill and Karen Sprecher (Jill also directed) is nicely unpredictable, and the spiraling black comedy yanks you along breathlessly, wondering where it’s all leading. Where it’s leading is so complicated that the Sprechers can only resolve it with too much here’s-what-happened narration, but the ride is pretty giddy up to then. Lea Thompson plays Kinnear’s estranged wife, Bob Balaban the violin’s appraiser. J.L.

Two CIA agents and close buddies (Chris Pine, Tom Hardy) find themselves dating the same woman (Reese Witherspoon) at the same time they’re more or less following the case of an international thief (Til Schweiger) who’s out to avenge their having killed his brother. Timothy Dowling, Simon Kinberg and Marcus Gautesen’s script is a fantasy for stunted adolescent boys masquerading as an action rom-com—too much action, not enough comedy, and no romance at all. Director McG (full name Joseph McGinty Nichol, whose body of work makes Michael Bay look like Woody Allen) manages to waste both Angela Bassett and Rosemary Harris in less-than-nothing roles. For that matter, he wastes Witherspoon too; she serves as a beard for Pine and Hardy’s characters; these two spies are obviously in love only with each other. J.L.

Two New Yorkers (Jennifer Aniston, Paul Rudd) lose their apartment and are forced to move in with his brother in Atlanta (Ken Marino, co-writer with director David Wain); on their way south, they stumble across a hippie commune and decide they’d rather live here than with the obnoxious brother and his liquor-addled wife (Michaela Watkins). Be warned: The script is raunchy, profane and studded with producer Judd Apatow’s trademark frontal nudity, but if you leave your prudery at home, you probably won’t see a funnier movie all year. Aniston and Rudd’s comic rapport, sharpened on Friends and 1998’s The Object of My Affection, hasn’t lost its edge, especially when the good lines come as fast and thick as they do here. Great supporting cast, too: Alan Alda, Justin Theroux, Kathryn Hahn, Linda Lavin, etc. J.L.

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Local outfit Whiskey Dawn is a new-country band with an old-country sound. Johnny Myers chalks this up to everyone in the band coming from a different background. by Brad Bynum “I grew up playing heavy rock stuff,” he explained. “Troy [Ferris], our lead singer, is pure country. Our drummer [Kevin Maxwell] has a funk, fusion, jazz background. And Mikey [Cook], our bass player, is into the ’90s alternative scene.”

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36

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9312 GREENBACK LN • ORANGEVALE 916.989.1408 • WWW.SACINK.COM TATTOO • PIERCING SN&R | 04. 05.12

Whiskey Dawn plays this Friday, April 6, at The Wrangler, 8945 Grant Line Road in Elk Grove; 9 p.m.; call for cover; (916) 799-0104; www.whiskeydawn.com. Whiskey Dawn also opens for Travis Tritt at the Bob Hope Theatre in Stockton on Monday, April 16.

When you mix it all together, we’re still country for sure, but it’s got sort of a modern edge to it.” Half of the band resides here in Sacramento, but Myers and Maxwell live up the hill in Reno. It’s no matter: The group is on the road most of the time; Myers says they even recently played a couple of successful dates in Nashville. He’s originally from Virginia—and has the slow drawl to prove it. Before hooking up with Whiskey Dawn, he played guitar in country band Clear Blue 22. He became friends with the other guys in Whiskey Dawn shortly after moving to the West Coast, and he joined the band a year and a half ago.

He says that it took some effort to develop the honky tonkin’ guitar style he now employs in Whiskey Dawn. “When a lot of people think of country guitar, everybody thinks that rock is the way to go, and that’s the hard stuff,” he says. “But in country, you’ve got to cover—especially as a four-piece—I’ve got to cover the guitar parts and so many other instruments.” When performing cover songs, Myers transposes pedal steel, fiddle and mandolin parts to guitar. Country music also requires a guitarist to be more supportive of the vocal melody, and finding just the right musical spaces to fill. “With the rock stuff, it’s really guitardriven music, so you can play loud, and you don’t have to compete with a lot of other things,” says Myers. “But in country, it’s all about the vocals, so you have to come up with cool parts and still be mindful of staying out of the lead singer’s way.” Depending on the venue, the group plays a lot of cover songs—Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard, Garth Brooks and Toby Keith—and some sets are all covers. Myers estimates they’ll play about 70 percent covers, though he says he prefers to play original tunes. “We usually get a good reaction to our original songs,” says Myers. “We get more requests for our stuff than whatever’s hot on the radio at the time or other people’s songs. That’s always a huge compliment. It’s always cool to play your own songs and see fans out in the audience who know every word to your original songs.”

“When you mix it all together, we’re still country for sure, but it’s got sort of a modern edge to it.” Johnny Myers Whiskey Dawn Ferris is the group’s principal lyricist, though Myers writes the guitar riffs and helps arrange the tunes. One new original song that Myers is particularly proud of helping write is “Leavin’ Man.” “It’s about being in the music business and trying to have a relationship, have a girlfriend, when you’re gone five days a week traveling across the country,” he says. A familiar story, perhaps. Ω


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There’s always sushi Sacramento girl has The Voice: Here at SN&R’s headquarters, we have good things—ping-pong—and bad things—deadlines. And it was the latter—Tuesday at 4 p.m.—that prevented me from knowing whether Sacramento native Lindsey Pavao would continue on as a contestant on NBC’s American Idol knockoff The Voice. But let’s not dwell on not knowing her fate, which was revealed on Tuesday night’s show. Let’s instead dwell on her mediocre performance of Gotye’s “Somebody That I Used to Know” on Monday’s episode. First, it’s a tough song—because no one’s heard of it. How can you expect fans to download it on iTunes, which you need to win, if no one has ever heard your tune? And especially if your competition is running around with a waxed chest, flirting with Christina Aguilera and roaring Bon Jovi’s “Livin’ on a Prayer”? Which is what Pavao was living on. It also didn’t help that—while she wowed in the past on The Voice, especially with her cranky, shiny alto on a cover of Trey Songz’s “Say Aah”—she seemed nervous. Her head sunk into her shoulders. Face hiding behind her hair during the judges’ feedback.

The show is called The Voice, though, so she may still has a chance. If not, there’ll likely be work waiting for her back home: Her Facebook profile says she’s a bartender at Zen Sushi on 15th Street.

According to Pitchfork, the sampler was inspired by “Mercury being in retrograde”—so, now we also know the band goes deep on wacky astrology. Which is cool. But still wacky.

Death Grips new toy: It seems like everything local noise-punk-rap trio Death Grips gets their cold, dead hands on lately turns to gold. Consider: The band, who will play Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival and also drops a new record this month, released a strange but addictive video project called “Retrograde” on Monday (http://thirdworlds.net/retrograde). The band told Pitchfork that the project is an “infinite GIF sampler,” which is tech lingo for a sort of instrument featuring 109 graphics that briefly animate and also include sound. These GIFs can be played all at once, or you can play as many as they want one at a time at your own discretion. The result is your very own sort of Death Grips production tool, which might be useful, you know, if you ever want sequence kinetic snare runs, lo-fi beats and “Yuh! Yuh! Yuhs!” ad nauseam (which I admittedly did for at least an hour on Monday night).

Give a hoot, again: The Punk Rock Hootenanny II—which was described to me as a spin on the open-mic night, but for punk dudes—goes down this Wednesday, April 11, at The Press Club (2030 P Street, 8:30 p.m., $5). Solo artists Bear Williams, Nick Ripley, Patrick Hills and Dead Friday will spin the guitar, but there’s the promise of “special guests” waiting in the wings. If those guests don’t end up satisfying your special quotient, there’s also $2, 22-ounce PBRs to make you forget all promises made. SN&R reps its own: Shout-out to up-and-coming local chanteuse Olla, who not only works at SN&R, but also will open for popular Bay Area emcee K.Flay this Friday, April 6, at Luigi’s Fun Garden, 1050 20th Street; 8:30 p.m.; $8.

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BEFORE

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EIGHT GIGS

05THURS 05THURS 06FRI 07SAT Cat & Mouse Trio Old Ironsides, 8 p.m., $5

Sacramento has produced its fair share of artsy indie bands. Cat & Mouse Trio is new to the scene and wants to share this local tradition of bizarre musical experimentation. Its MO is to play instrumental, jazz-influenced math-rock jams in a standard rock-trio setting. The music is kinetic and spazzes all over with complex guitar finger tapping and heavily accented accompanying rhythms on the drums. It’s organized musical EXPERIMENTAL chaos. It’s a lively African drum circle done on a bass, a guitar and drum set. Even mellow songs are crazy because the trio never stops experimenting and playing weird rhythms. 1901 10th Street, www.facebook.com/catmousetrio.

—Aaron Carnes

Mazzy Star

Ozomatli

Futurewang Old Ironsides, 9 p.m., $5 We’re not sure what a Futurewang is exactly. But for one night, the word will translate to a night of elegantly noisy sonic diversions when three bands riff on jazz, math rock JAZZ and other off-the-cuff meanderings. The show includes the Know Hassle Project and Chikading! (pictured), both featuring keyboardist Tony Passarell. Also on the bill: Jon Bafus’ Genetic Makeup, whose latest, Bountiful Ore, is a compelling collection of short instrumental tunes. Here, songs embody a rich soundtrack of quirky instrumentation—it’s hard to believe tracks were written from a studio apartment. Apparently, small spaces can produce really big sounds. Maybe that’s the future. 1901 10th Street, www.reverbnation.com/chikading.

Harlow’s, 7:30 p.m., $23

Ace of Spades, 7 p.m., $20 Ozomatli is a musical bunker buster. Its funky multicultural mélange digs deep and levels a place with explosive energy. The Los Angeles group’s blend of hip-hop, Latin, reggae, soul, pop and rock reflects both its broad collective tastes and open-minded, open-hearted attitude. Shows simmer with a palpable sense of community amplified by the ass-loosening grooves. After leaning more toward FUNK/HIP-HOP dance-floor fire starters its prior two releases, 2010’s Fire Away pares down to a septet and refocuses on hooks and melodies. The result is an infectious easygoing vibe epitomized by the catchy “It’s Only Paper,” featuring Jack Johnson. 1417 R Street, www.ozomatli.com.

David Roback and Hope Sandoval of duo Mazzy Star transfixed the ’90s with the single, “Fade Into You” and subsequently, faded from the mainstream music scene into a 15-year hiatus. But last October, Roback and Sandoval ALT ROCK ended their silence with the release of a two-song digital download titled, “Common Burn/Lay Myself Down.” They have since booked select performances in Northern California before a stop at Coachella and a European tour. If you’re not satisfied with the two-song tease, plans for a full-length album—before the end of 2012—are in the works, according to an interview with Rolling Stone magazine. 2708 J Street, www.hopesandoval.com.

—Steph Rodriguez

—Chris Parker

—Rachel Leibrock

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IEL “BAMBAATA” MARLEY LIVE! DAN (SON OF ZIGGY / GRANDSON OF BOB MARLEY) & PURE ROOTS W/ANDREW BLOOD SUNDAY 4/8

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Recycle this paper

DIRTY HOUSE • ELECTRO • EDM


07SAT 07SAT 10TUES 11WED Daniel Marley

Prairie Dog If you’ve never ventured up Highway 50 to see a show, now is the time. Prairie Dog, a group which features the talented Sarah Nelson, is finally dusting off the cobwebs and playing live again. A staple of the Sacramento scene many years ago, it’s been a while since Prairie Dog played in the vicinity. Also on the bill is Rusty Miller’s other project, Nightgown. After the demise of Jackpot, it was only natural that he would end up on a bill at his old INDIE stomping grounds in the Placerville hills. And while gas prices are high, a low cover charge should entice you. 594 Main Street in Placerville, www.myspace.com/prairiedogmusic.

—Eddie Jorgensen

The Sandwitches

Mat Kearney

TownHouse Lounge, 9 p.m., $10-$15

Cozmic Café, 8 p.m., $5

Bows & Arrows, 8 p.m., $8

Colonial Theatre, 7:30 p.m., $25-$30

Sure, Daniel “Bambaata” Marley is the son of Ziggy and grandson of Bob Marley. But he doesn’t sound like either of them. Daniel’s inclination to blend hip-hop, dancehall and roots reggae is HIP-HOP/REGGAE more reminiscent of his uncles Damian, Stephen and Ky-Mani Marley. Daniel’s sound is more urban-American than his aforementioned relatives, something between Cali Swag District and K’naan. Beats are fun and danceable, while flows are inherently influenced by the Marley brand of social consciousness and rebellious spirit. His debut full-length is expected later this year. 1517 21st Street, www.facebook.com/ danielbambaatamarley.

From partying wild in Chico to selling infectious Christianish commercial pop, Mat Kearney has somehow figured out the key to creating songs that both capture the attention of millions and provide soundtracks to much of “prime-time” television. By my count, he has been featured on 23 television programs (of course, Grey’s POP Anatomy is one of them; it seems like everyone has a G.A. credit)—which is actually a commendable feat for any musician these days. Besides, Kearney has a concrete voice for commercial folk. His singer-songwriter motif may be a bit outplayed, but the man is solid as both a singer and a songwriter. 3522 Stockton Boulevard, www.facebook.com/matkearney.

—Jonathan Mendick

Here’s a lesson: All-female rock-pop trio from San Francisco the Sandwitches do not sound like Vivian Girls, all right? Lesson No. 2: Every all-girl trio in the 21st ROCK century does not have to sound like Vivian Girls, all right? Sandwitches— who’ve been putting out releases since 2009—boast an airier, perhaps you might say groovier, West Coast vibe than garageier contemporaries. And this is refreshing; why not slow things down with some bright, pristine electric guitars, high-soaring balladeering and a good crash-pop drum shuffle every once in a while? Deep Time from Austin and Sacramento’s own Peggy Benks (don’t miss!) open. 1815 19th Street, www.thesandwitchesjam.com.

—Nick Miller

—John Phillips

aCe Of SpaDeS

1417 R Street, Sacramento, 95814 www.aceofspadessac.com

All Ages Welcome!

COMING

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Friday, april 6

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Saturday, april 7

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Sunday, april 8

Friday, april 20

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5/6

Curren$y

5/7

Imagine Dragons

5/8

Delta Spirit

5/11

Andre Nickatina

5/12

Kid Ink & Kirko Bangz

5/16 The Supervillains

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minnesota

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4/29 Hyper Crush

buZZCOCkS

stand out state - first class act - todd morgan & the emblems - the rooftop underground - the downbeat crowd

Tech N9NE

4/27

4/28 All Shall Parish

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4/25

5/21

Fear Factory

5/24 The Real McKenzies 5/25 Destruction 5/31

(HED) Pe & Mushroomhead

monday, april 9

6/1

Saturday, april 21

awOLnaTIOn

CaLI SwaG DISTRICT who ride - j. sirus - status goes

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Suicidal Tendencies

6/2

Yo Gotti

6/8

Dredge

6/17

My Darkest Days

6/19

Mayer Hawthorne & The County

6/22 Arden Park Roots

Sunday, april 22

Friday, april 13

6/28 Who’s Bad (Michael Jackson Tribute)

eVe 6

ICOnOCLaST RObOT stuck - rick james project - bell boys music one lost mc - kodac visualz w/ joey gorgeous

the audition - hero’s last mission taking’s not stealing

7/17

Reverend Horton Heat

9/5

Powerman 5000

10/11 D.R.I

tickets available at all dimple records locations, the Beat records, and armadillo records, or purchase by phone @ 916.443.9202 BEFORE

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ARTS&CULTURE

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04. 05.12

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NIGHTBEAT BADLANDS

2003 K St., (916) 448-8790

List your event!

Post your free online listing (up to 15 months early), and our editors will consider your submission for the printed calendar as well. Print listings are also free, but subject to space limitations. Online, you can include a full description of your event, a photo, and a link to your website. Go to www.newsreview.com/calendar and start posting events. Deadline for print listings is 10 days prior to the issue in which you wish the listing to appear.

Saturday Boom, 9pm, call for cover

TIMES OF DESPERATION, WAH WAH EXIT WOUND, WAIT, WANING; 8pm, $7

THE JACKS, BLACKEYED DEMPSEYS; 9pm, call for cover

JACK RUSSELL’S GREAT WHITE, WINGS OF INNOCENCE; 7pm, $20-$25

RHINO BUCKET, JAXX, COSMONAUTS, DOWNSHIFT, END OF DAYS; 8pm

1400 Alhambra, (916) 455-3400

THE BOARDWALK

9426 Greenback Ln., Orangevale; (916) 988-9247

LOWER LEVEL, AMERICAZ MOZT HAUNTED, DIVIDED ALLEGIANCE; 7:45pm

BOWS AND ARROWS

SATURDAY 4/7

SUNDAY 4/8

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 4/9-4/11

Sin Sunday, 8pm, call for cover

Mad Mondays, M; Latin video flair and Wii bowling, 7pm Tu

MALAIKAT DAN SINGA, SAN KAZAKGASCAR, CARSON MCWHIRTER; 8pm, $5

1815 19 St., (916) 822-5668

CENTER FOR THE ARTS

JACKIE GREENE, 8pm, $30-$35

THE TED NASH QUARTET, REFLECTIONS; 8pm, $20-$22

CLUB 21

Salsa Fridays, 9pm, $5

GOD-DES & SHE, 7:30pm, $8-$10 SAN SIMILAR, PRAIRIE DOG, NIGHTGOWN; 8pm, $5

314 W. Main St., Grass Valley; (530) 271-7000 1119 21st St., (916) 443-1537 Open-mic, 7:30pm, no cover

JOHNNY MOJO, FRANKIE SOUL, NO CONTROL; 8pm, $8

DISTRICT 30

EC Twins, 9pm, call for cover

Deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

FACES

Deejay dancing and karaoke, 9pm, $3

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

Hip-hop and Top 40 Deejay dancing, 9pm, $5-$10

FOX & GOOSE

MOONSHINE MULE, WHITEWALLS; 811pm, no cover

THE BENNYS, JAMES CAVERN, BOB DUKE-I; 9pm-midnight, $5

KEVIN SECONDS, KEPI GHOULIE, FRANZ NICOLAY, DEBUTANTE HOUR; 9pm, $5

CHRISJOHN, ROB LOOTCHI, JO VEGAS, Dj Chrispix; 10pm-1:15am, no cover

THE SMALL DINOSAURS, ALOHA SCREWDRIVER; 10pm-1:15am, no cover

594 Main St., Placerville; (530) 642-8481

1001 R St., (916) 443-8825

G STREET WUNDERBAR 228 G St., Davis; (530) 756-9227

THE SANDWITCHES, DEEP TIME, PEGGY BENKS; 8pm W, $8

Big Band Swing DJ, 8-11pm Tu, $6; Top 40, R&B, House, 10pm W, $7

Latin music and Top 40, 9pm, $7

THE COZMIC CAFÉ

2000 K St., (916) 448-7798

Want to be a hot show? Mail photos to Calendar Editor, SN&R, 1124 Del Paso Blvd., Sacramento, CA 95815 or email it to sactocalendar@ newsreview.com. Be sure to include date, time, location and cost of upcoming shows.

FRIDAY 4/6 Fabulous and Gay Fridays, 9pm, call for cover

BLUE LAMP

1016 K St., (916) 737-5770

Hey local bands!

THURSDAY 4/5 Tipsy Thursdays, Top 40 deejay dancing, 9pm, call for cover

Gogo Competition, 9pm W Queer Idol, 9pm M, no cover; Latin night, 9pm Tu, $5; DJ Alazzawi, 9pm W, $3

Dragalicious, 9pm, $5

Open-mic, 7:30pm M; Pub Quiz, 7pm Tu; STEVE MCLANE, 8pm W, no cover

THE GOLDEN BEAR

DJs Flow, Dogtones and Epik, 10pm-2am, DJ Crook One, 10pm, call for cover no cover

DJ Whores, 10pm, no cover

Industry Night, 9pm, call for cover

HARLOW’S

FIREHOSE, VICTIM’S FAMILY, TERA MELOS; 8pm, $18-$20

JEANETTE HARRIS, 7pm; DJ Wreck and DJ Mario V, 10pm, call for cover

MAZZY STAR, 7:30pm, $22.50

OVER THE RHINE, 7pm, $22

JAVALOUNGE

ARDELLAS CROWN, ERIN & THE PROJECT, MASON REX; 8pm, $5

BOATS, BLUE SKIES FOR BLACK HEARTS, THE ENLOWS; 8pm, $5

CROW CANYON, 4pm,$5; BROKEN PROMISES, WALKING DEAD; 8pm, $6

LUNA’S CAFÉ & JUICE BAR

Joe Montoya’s Poetry Unplugged, 8pm, $2

LUZ GAXIOLA, THE BLACK HATS; 8-11pm, call for cover

MARILYN’S ON K

“Rock On” Live Band Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

NYTESHIFT, 9:30pm, $10

ALMA DESNUDA, 9:30pm, $8

HOT CLUB DE CARMICHAEL, BOB WOODS DUO, MRQ; 5:30pm Tu, no cover

NAKED LOUNGE DOWNTOWN 1111 H St., (916) 443-1927

THE SPEAK LOW, STEPHEN MARCH, KENNI FALLS; 8:30pm, $5

GROVER ANDERSON, MINOR BIRDS, KRISTA WHITE, THOMAS SMITH; 8:30pm

RICHARD MARCH, MIKE BLANCHARD, BASKET HOUSE; 8:30pm, $5

Jazz session, M; ROSS HAMMOND, CHRIS FERREIRA’S HUM HUM; 8pm Tu, $5

OLD IRONSIDES

CHIKADING!, 8pm, $5

BLINDED BY VIOLENCE, CALICAGO, SICFUS, ASTRAL CULT; 9pm, $5

Lipstick Weekender, 9:30pm, $5

STRAPPED FOR CASH, NUANCE; M; Karaoke, 9pm Tu; Open-mic, 8:30pm W

ON THE Y

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

KILLGASM, NUNFUCK, CHRONAEXUS, AZATHOTH, FIENDS AT FEAST; 8pm, $6

Karaoke, 9pm, no cover

2326 K St., (916) 441-2252 2708 J St., (916) 441-4693 2416 16th St., (916) 441-3945 1414 16th St., (916) 441-3931 908 K St., (916) 446-4361

1901 10th St., (916) 442-3504 670 Fulton Ave., (916) 487-3731

Nebraska Mondays, 7:30pm M, $5-$20; Comedy night, 8pm W, $6

Open-mic comedy, 9:30pm, no cover

Karaoke, 9pm Tu, no cover

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THE REmEDiES rockin Blues sat aPr 14 6:30PM $22.50 aDv

thomas dolBy time capsule tour with

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sun aPr 15 7PM $22 aDv

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yonder mountain string Band

plus Brown Bird

apr 19 apr 19 apr 20 apr 20 apr 21 apr 25 apr 26 apr 27 apr 28 apr 29 apr 30 May 2 May 2 May 3-5

Grouplove Sizzling Sirens billy blackburn arden Park roots Midnight Players Midnite skatalites tainted love aggrolites anthony Coleman’s big band Girl in a Coma Diego’s umbrella March fourth Marching band sacramento electronic Music festival May 6 Murs May 10 ledward Kaapana May 18 Cheeseballs May 19 Midnight Players May 23 Clap Your Hands Yeah May 26 b-side Players May 31 Young Dubliners June 1 Cash’d out June 8 Cream of Clapton June 19 Parlotones June 22 the Hits July 19 asleep at the Wheel aug 8 ottmar liebert

Dress CoDe enforCeD (Jeans are oK) • Call to reserve Dinner & Club tables

2708 J Street • Sacramento • 916.441.4693 • www.harlows.com 40

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SPECIAL EVENT, NO PASSES

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|

FRONTLINES

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BEST

OF

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A RT S & C U LT U R E

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AFTER

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04.05.12

|

SN&R

|

41


Online ads are free. Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (916) 498-1234 ext. 5 Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (916) 498-1234 ext. 5 Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

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42   |   SN&R   |   04.05.12

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POWER

to the

(POT) PEOPLE

WHY ARE MORE AND MORE MEDICAL-CANNABIS WORKERS UNIONIZING? by Ngaio Bealum April 5, 2012

3 A weekly look at medical cannabis in the Sacramento region


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APRIL 5, 2012

The 420


The 420 Last October, more and more medical-cannabis workers turned to Dan Rush. They were wary of the federal intervention in California’s medical-cannabis communities, and Rush— national director of the United Food and Commercial Workers’ Medical Cannabis and Hemp Division—offered to help. UFCW has shown an increased interest in unionizing medical-cannabis dispensaries in recent months; they have signed up collectives in Los Angeles, Oakland, San Francisco and San Diego. SN&R chatted with Rush to see what was smokin’.

to the

POWER (POT) PEOPLE

DAN RUSH EXPLAINS WHY MORE MEDICAL-CANNABIS WORKERS ARE UNIONIZING by Ngaio Bealum

environment and society that is oppressing and disparately impacting the workers. The UFCW is here to create and maintain an environment of equality and justice for our members and the workers in this industry that are being oppressed and discriminated against by society and the federal government. So, is this just dispensary workers? Or growers and trimmers and lab techs? Our responsibility is to workers in dispensing, which includes retail, and to workers in production, which includes workers in greenhouses, nurseries, outdoor farms, indoor cultivators, labeling, medical, laboratory, packaging, food processing and all of the ancillary equipment and supply services. But don’t get me wrong, the UFCW has every intention of helping preserve patients’ rights to cultivate at home and for caregivers to cultivate for them. We really only want to pursue registration and membership for commercialized medical cannabis.

Tell us a little bit about UFCW and how it came to be interested in medical cannabis? UFCW is the result of a merger between many aspects of the retail-clerks union. It includes the grocery, pharmacy, department store, hardware [store], car salesmen, meat cutters, barbers and cosmetologists, wooliers, furriers, wine and distillers ... fruit pickers, food processors, and, finally, the textilesgarment workers unions—all rolled into one. Do any of the bills currently in The UFCW is now the third-largest union in the Legislature have a chance? the world and the largest retail, agriculture, Assembly Bill 2312 in California food-processing and textiles-workis our bill. … ers union in North America. We are going to give this In other words, we everything we have. are the commercial“We are going It is the only chance we production-for-humanto give this everything have here in California. consumption union of For now. North America. We we have. It is the only are most commonly chance we have here What about any known as the in California. For now.” of the legalization grocery, pharmacy, initiatives in agriculture, foodDan Rush the state? processors and national director Well, I think most meat-cutters union. Medical Cannabis and Hemp Division of the people in the drugUnited Food and Commercial Workers, policy-reform movement So, does UFCW see on legalization of medical cannabis and the medical-cannabis regulation and taxation industry know that I worked of medical cannabis in hard on Proposition 19, and that I California’s future? gave it my all. I also brought many of The UFCW sees full, statewide the mainstream coalition partners into Prop. regulation as the only answer. There is no other 10th Amendment protection for anything 19—kicking and screaming, I might add—and we all still enjoy all working together today. less than statewide regulation. Cities and I did it because I want to bring $1.4 billion counties have no exemption or right to 10th in sales-tax revenue into our beloved state Amendment protections. Only states have by creating 100,000 UFCW union jobs to those rights. That’s why the only way to be California. So my work on Prop. 19 should protected by that right is to have statewide tell everyone something about me and my regulation and an agency that enforces the personal feelings about legalization. borders of the state to keep our activities out Now, as far as UFCW’s Medical Cannabis of our neighboring states. Border enforcement and Hemp Division, I think that we need to is the action that allows states to exercise 10th get a medical infrastructure straightened out Amendment protections. for patients and for my members in the industry. I think we have a lot of work to do in Why should medical-cannabis medical cannabis, the laws, rescheduling, etc. workers join a union? I have done extensive polling all over A union’s job is to deliver equality and justice the nation, and unfortunately, [cannabis to workers who are oppressed and unjustly legalization] is not going to happen soon— or disparately impacted. Historically, it has except, perhaps, in Colorado. I am watching been the bosses that perpetrated injustice Colorado closely. and oppression on workers. However, in this industry, it’s the political and legal

A weekly look at medical cannabis in the Sacramento region

The 420

APRIL 5, 2012

3


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The 420

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by ROB BREZSNY

FOR THE WEEK OF APRIL 5, 2012

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Please study

this testimony: “Born in a rancid, batinfested cave at the base of the smoldering Sangay Volcano, I was raised by the halfbear demon princess Arcastia. At the age of 4 my training as a ninja shaman began when I was left naked and alone next to a stream of burning lava with only two safety pins, a package of dental floss, and a plastic bag full of Cheerios. My mission: to find my way to my spiritual home.” Now, Aries, I’d like you to compose your own version of this declaration: a playful, over-the-top myth about your origins that gives you a greater appreciation for the heroic journey you’ve been on all these years.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Our ances-

tors owned slaves and denied education to girls. What were they thinking? Time magazine asked renowned historian David McCullough if there was anything we do today that our descendants will regard as equally insane and inexcusable. His reply: “How we could have spent so much time watching TV.” I’ll ask you, Taurus, to apply this same exercise on a personal level. Think of some things you did when you were younger that now seem incomprehensible or ignorant. Then explore the possibility that you will look back with incredulity at some weird habit or tweaked form of selfindulgence you’re pursuing today. (P.S. It’s an excellent time to phase out that habit or self-indulgence.)

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “I can’t tell if

I’m dealing well with life these days or if I just don’t give a sh-- any more.” I stumbled upon that comment at Someecards.com, and I decided to pass it along for your consideration. You may be pondering the same riddle: feeling suspicious about why you seem more relaxed and tolerant than usual in the face of plain-old everyday chaos. I’m here to tell you my opinion, which is that your recent equanimity is not rooted in jaded numbness. Rather, it’s the result of some hard work you did on yourself during the last six months. Congrats and enjoy!

CANCER (June 21-July 22): What excites

you, Cancerian? What mobilizes your selfdiscipline and inspires you to see the big picture? I encourage you to identify those sources of high-octane fuel, and then take extraordinary measures to make them a strong presence in your life. There has rarely been a better time than now for you to do this. It could create effects that will last for years. (P.S. Here’s a further nudge from Ralph Waldo Emerson: “Every great and commanding movement in the annals of the world is the triumph of enthusiasm. Nothing great was ever achieved without it.”)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): While browsing in a

bookstore, I came across a book and deck of cards that were collectively called Tarot Secrets. The subtitle of the kit was A Fast and Easy Way to Learn a Powerful Ancient Art. I snorted derisively to read that claim, since I myself have studied tarot intensively for years and am nowhere near mastery. Later, though, when I was back home meditating on your horoscope, I softened my attitude a bit. The astrological omens do indeed suggest that in the upcoming weeks and months, you just might be able to learn a rather substantial skill in a relatively short time.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Writing in The

New Yorker, Joanna Ravenna paraphrased German philosopher Nietzsche: “The best way to enrage people is to force them to change their mind about you.” I’d like to see you mutate this theory in the coming weeks, Virgo. If possible, see if you can amuse and entertain people, not enrage them, by compelling them to change their minds about you. I realize that’s a tricky proposition, but given the current astrological omens, I have faith that you can pull it off.

BEFORE

|

by TED

COX

Libra: What seemed like the main event could turn out to be secondary, or what seemed incidental might become a centerpiece. Is there something you are overvaluing at the cost of something you are undervaluing?

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): People in

intimate relationships are hypersensitive to negative comments from their partners. Psychologists say it takes five compliments to outweigh the effects of a single dash of derogatory criticism. I’m sure the ratio is similar even for relationships that aren’t as close as lovers and spouses. With this in mind, I urge you to be extra careful not to dispense barbs. They would be especially damaging during this phase of your astrological cycle—both to you and to those at whom you direct them. Instead, Scorpio, why not dole out an abundance of compliments? They will build up a reservoir of goodwill you’ll be able to draw on for a long time.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

Researchers report that the typical man falls in love 5.4 times over the course of his life, while the average woman basks in the glow of this great mystery on 4.6 occasions. I suspect you may be close to having a .4 or .6 type of experience, Sagittarius: sort of like infatuation, but without the crazed mania. That could actually be a good thing. The challenging spiritual project that relationship offers may be most viable when the two people involved are not electrifyingly interwoven with every last one of their karmic threads. Maybe we have more slack in our quest for intimacy if we love but are not obsessed.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I

couldn’t wait for success,” said rich and famous comedian Jonathan Winters, “so I went ahead without it.” I love that approach, and I suggest you try it out. Is there any area of your life that is held captive by an image of perfection? Consider the possibility that shiny concepts of victory and progress might be distracting you from doing the work that will bring you meaning and fulfillment. If you’re too busy dreaming of someday attaining the ideal mate, weight, job, pleasure and community, you may miss out on the imperfect but amazing opportunities that are available right now.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): On Reddit,

Kaushalp88 asked the question, “What is the most badass thing that you have ever done, but that other people aren’t impressed by?” Here’s his story: “I was once at an icecream shop. At the exit, there was a small raised step that I didn’t see. I tripped over the step with my ice-cream cone in my hand. The ice-cream ball fell out of the cone. I [instinctually] reached my hand out for it. Also instinctual, I tucked my head into my chest, so as not to hit it against the pavement. I ended somersaulting and saving my ice cream.” I suspect you will soon have comparable experiences, Aquarius— unusual triumphs and unexpected accomplishments. But you may have to be content with provoking awe in no one else beside yourself.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Worry often

gives a small thing a big shadow.” So says a Swedish proverb. Can we talk about this, please, Pisces? Of course, there are real hazards and difficulties in life, and they deserve your ingenious problem solving. But why devote any of your precious energy to becoming embroiled in merely hyped-up hazards and hypothetical difficulties? Based on my analysis of the astrological omens, now is a propitious time to cut shadows down to their proper size. It’s also a perfect moment to liberate yourself from needless anxiety. I think you’ll be amazed at how much more accurate your perceptions will be as a result.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1892, when

Wrigley was just starting out as a company, its main product was baking powder. Free chewing gum was included in each package as a promotional gimmick. But soon the freebie became so popular that Wrigley rearranged its entire business. Now it’s a multibillion-dollar company that sells gum in 140 different countries—and no baking powder. Maybe there’s something like that on the verge of happening in your own life,

15 MINUTES

PHOTO BY SHOKA

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

You can call Rob Brezsny for your Expanded Weekly Horoscope: (900) 950-7700. $1.99 per minute. Must be 18+. Touchtone phone required. Customer service (612) 373-9785. And don’t forget to check out Rob’s website at www.realastrology.com.

FRONTLINES

|

FEATURE

Speedy delivery Downtown resident Melissa Dye was laid off from her job at the state Capitol last year—yet another victim of the economic downturn. Not one to sit around all day, she found work with a courier service and is now Sacramento’s only female bike messenger. A lifelong cyclist, Dye took a few minutes to talk about making a living on two wheels.

How did you get the job as a bike messenger? I had ridden around on the weekend with some people that I had met in the Capitol and networking through there. There’s this individual, S.K. Lindsey, and she lives down the street, and we had ridden together quite a bit. One of the clients at her office was Professional Couriers Inc., and they asked if she knew of anyone that was good at riding, that would be able keep up with bike “messengering,” and she suggested me. And I was tried out for two weeks with Trogg, the main rider in the company. And I managed to keep up. I was really fast in traffic. I was good with clients and caught on quite easily, and they offered me the position.

Tell me more about your tryout. It was training for two weeks. I shadowed the main rider and I went with him and met all the clients. He showed me different routes. We went on distance rides to West Sac, East Sac, just to feel how long I could go for riding at a higher rate and how I handled traffic and dealing with riding alongside cars and in between them and whatnot. We clicked rather well. By the second week, I was taking longer rides on my own and picking up shifts as soon as they were offered to me, because I was just interested in getting to work.

STORY

|

A RT S & C U LT U R E

You’ve been a cyclist for a while, right? Yes. Well, I’ve been biking since I was a little kid. I just grew up with bicycles and using that as transportation to get around town. [Radio noise crackles in the background.] Can we stop for a minute? [She responds to the radio.]

Are you on-call right now? Well, because I’m downtown, I’m on-call all the time. [It’s] just as an easier option, because the other rider that is on full-time does distance rides during the day, and when he’s gone, I’m usually around.

How many miles do you ride a week? Per week, during the busy time it can get up to, like, 100 miles. During the slow times, 20 to 30, up to 40. Not as many as I would like.

That’s some good exercise. I know! The amount of weight I’ve lost is amazing. It’s like getting paid to go to the gym, except it’s way more interesting and you get to talk to people.

What are some of the other benefits of being a bike messenger? I love the freedom of this job. I love being on a bike. I love just being able to have the best parking everywhere, and being paid to do something I love so much. Every day is an adventure. I get to go out in the sunshine, be in the streets, not trapped in a car, not trapped in an office. I have the freedom to just enjoy the outdoors when most people rarely see the sunshine during the work week.

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AFTER

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I meet a lot of clients because of all the different buildings I have to go into. I’ve met a lot of security guards at the entrances to each of the bigger buildings. And it’s nice to have that sort of sense of community around here, because now when I ride around, more people wave to me. It’s comforting to have that sense that someone else is looking out for you, and you know someone on your block.

Do you ever get any flack from the other bike messengers? It’s sort of like a brotherhood with the other riders. They’re cordial to me. They’ll wave and say hi because they see me going out of the buildings and they understand that I’m a messenger. I don’t know if they know how to deal with having a female in the brotherhood, but I’m not trying to get in their way or steal their job. It’s just something I love, and I appreciate the opportunity, and if they don’t want to talk to me, that’s fine. A lot of people second-guess me in the elevators when I have to go into the buildings. They double-check, “Are you a messenger, or are you just dressed like that for fun?”

Will you go to back to full-time work? It’s hard because each time I get a notification for an interview in an office, part of me wants to say no, because I love what I’m doing so much. And I know that if I get this position, the fun’s over. You’ve got to settle back down and go back indoors and not have the adventurous days that I have each day that I work. Ω

04.05.12

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SN&R

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47


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