Page 1

Letters............................ 3 Opinion/Streetalk............ 5 Sheila.Leslie.................... 6 Brendan.Trainor.............. 7 News.............................. 8 Green............................ 11 Feature......................... 13 Arts&Culture................ 18 Art.of.the.State............. 21

Foodfinds..................... 22 Film.............................. 24 Musicbeat.....................27 Nightclubs/Casinos....... 28 This.Week..................... 31 Advice.Goddess........... 32 Free.Will.Astrology....... 34 15.Minutes.....................35 Bruce.Van.Dyke............35

Chairs, Mates! See Left Foot Forward, page 6.

IF you can’t Say SomethIng nIce, LItIgate See news, page 8.

Forest

on a diet See green, page 11.

Is it still journalism after you’ve been to eight bars?

angry or Crazy? See Film, page 24.

RENo’s NEws & ENtERtaiNmENt wEEkly

|

VolumE

21,

issuE

14

|

may

21–27,

2015


2   |  RN&R   |  may 21, 2015


Send letters to renoletters@newsreview.com

The more things change

This one time at opposition camp

Welcome to this week’s Reno News & Review. I graduated with a journalism master’s at the University of Nevada, Reno last week. Since I’m a terminal screw-up, I managed to do everything on deadline but apply to graduate, so my name didn’t end up in the program or in the Reno GazetteJournal. I should have known I’d left a T uncrossed because I hadn’t paid the university any money for the pleasure of walking across the stage, but I did get the application in soon enough to officially finish. People keep asking me what’s next, and all I can really do is shrug. I have the only job in journalism in Nevada that I’d want, so I don’t go to school thinking I’m going to improve my financial lot. I just like learning new things. I still have about a year left to complete the English master’s I’ve been working on, but I’m thinking about trying to convert that master’s over to either an MFA or a Ph.D. I hope running a 4.0 GPA in each of my concurrent masters will be enough to recommend me, but I don’t assume anything. I’ve got a bit less than two years left to complete the Fatal Encounters database. I’m hoping at that point that the federal government will have proven that it’s committed to collecting the data with the same rigor that our team has been doing it. Honestly, though, machine-language learning, which is the method of writing a sophisticated script to perform internet searches the same way our volunteers do it, is advancing so fast, I think our human-powered efforts will be obsolete about the same time. Hunter, my son, is off to college in the fall, which is a golden opportunity to downsize my life. I’ve been trying to unload possessions for a few years, and while I love my house, I need four bedrooms like I need a third ear. So I guess the short answer is “Everything is next.” I’ve got a great summer planned with conferences and relaxation and exciting projects. It’s my guess you’ll be reading all about it.

Re “Fox News Lies” (Letters to the editor, April 23): The Reno News & Review has certainly provided plenty of opportunity to be in the opposition camp. J.R. Reynolds’ comments give me a perfect opportunity to respond to what in my humble opinion is a bunch of hogwash to be polite. His claims to “hardly” be “a member of the elite liberal progressive class,” are truly delusional. Over the years I have learned to recognize that almost all liberals think of themselves as elite no matter how much they deny it. As to his claim that Fox News lies on a daily basis, if so, I imagine he won’t have any problems providing examples as proof. Of course, his implication is also that no other news programs make mistakes. Oops, I suppose the concept of mistakes versus lies may in fact escape him. I hope that he also understands the difference between “News Reports” and opinion shows as most of Fox News shows tend to be. As to his comments regarding Jon Stewart’s commentary on his comedy show, however, I would advise against taking his take on news programming to have any news value. Reynolds’ comment, “Professor Rush, with his many degrees in science,” clearly exposes him as that elite liberal that he is. The proof is that he has no appreciation for exquisite sarcasm. I can appreciate Jon Stewart’s sense of sarcasm while vehemently disagreeing with his political point of view. While I have little doubt that many liberals have been persuaded of “climate change” and truly believe in the theory, conservatives also are true believers that it’s a hoax perpetrated by the “elite” liberal establishment purely for establishing a power base. What liberals believe to be proof is in fact theory and no more. Furthermore there have been numerous instances where the often quoted scientific establishment has been exposed as being frauds. Remember the “University of East Anglia’s Climatic Research Unit” emails? As to Reynolds’ claims of Republican members of Congress “vilifying the sitting president,” what part of disagreeing with his policies can’t

—D. Brian Burghart

brianb@ ne wsreview.com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

Our Mission To publish great newspapers that are successful and enduring. To create a quality work environment that encourages people to grow professionally while respecting personal welfare. To have a positive impact on our communities and make them better places to live.

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

you understand? I ask this with all due respect. I’m sure that Reynolds, as such a reasonable man, would be happy to compromise with me on that issue. Fred Speckmann Reno Editor’s note: Politifact did a fact check on 50 lies the Daily Show claimed Fox News told: www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2015/ feb/26/fact-checks-behind-dailyshows-50-fox-news-lies.

Abstinence only Re “Fertile fillies” (Green, April 23): The passion of my heart is, and has been, to emphasize how nature through its own mechanisms will and should be allowed to maintain natural ecological balance without human intervention. It does this through physiological differences, found within each species inside any given ecosystem. Each of those differences contribute as a vital factor in a broad ecological equation. It also accomplishes this through the numbers or density of any given species of animal or plant within that system, in conjunction with competitive species and the carrying capacity of the land. There is a misconception, even among advocates of the wild horses, that the only things that are necessary to check wild equine population growth are the presence of its predators and/or natural environmental factors. Although natural predation and environmental impacts are important, density dependent inhibition plays an important role also. In this scenario, this means the numbers or density of wild equines, versus competing ruminants, such as the pronghorn, each will fluctuate in response to the other based upon the carrying capacity of the land, yet always in perfect balance. In essence, the pronghorn need the presence of wild horses and burros, just as much as the wild horses need the pronghorn. Each population will have the effect of keeping the numbers of competing population at levels that are ideal for the carrying capacity of the land. Mankind’s sole responsibility has to be focused on keeping the restrictions off of nature, so that nature can be

Editor/Publisher D. Brian Burghart News Editor Dennis Myers Arts Editor Brad Bynum Special Projects Editor Georgia Fisher Calendar Editor Kelley Lang Contributors Amy Alkon, Woody Barlettani, Bob Grimm, Ashley Hennefer, Sheila Leslie, Eric Marks, Jessica Santina, Todd South, Brendan Trainor, Bruce Van Dyke, Allison Young

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

Creative Director Priscilla Garcia Art Director Hayley Doshay Associate Art Director Brian Breneman Ad Design Manager Serene Lusano Production Coordinator Skyler Smith Design Melissa Bernard, Brad Coates, Kyle Shine Advertising Consultants Joseph “Joey” Davis, Gina Odegard, Bev Savage, Jessica Wilson Senior Classified Advertising Consultant Olla Ubay Operations Coordinator Nanette Harker Kelly Miller

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

itself, and not an offspring of man’s seemingly brilliance. The moment mankind seeks to alter nature according to a fixed number, or an average of numbers, is the moment that nature and balance itself begins to break down. This has occurred in every branch of nature where mankind has endeavored to manage natural balance, assuming nature to be static and not dynamic. With these thoughts in mind, the tenacious destruction of a vital component of nature’s beauty and balance continues to be removed from the rangelands of the West, even the wild horses and wild burros, by the Bureau of Land Management. It has turned a blind eye to the solid science that opposes the idea that these creatures are a detriment to the ecosystems they exist in. Just as much, it is opposed to the myth that there is overpopulation of our wild equine. The ludicrous concept of the “appropriate management level” of wild horses in any area out west is a lie concocted by the bureau. This is based upon how much forage that the BLM is going to allow the mustangs, as opposed to how much they would actually consume. This is opposed to cattle and other competing ruminants in these same areas, which are allocated the major percentage of the forage by this same bureau. In a desperate attempt to curb devastating roundups many advocates are succumbing to the pressure of the BLM to utilize the PZP contraceptive on our wild horses. First, the numbers of the wild horses remaining in the wild are not the 20,000 to 30,000 that many assert are out there. The numbers of our wild ones are not even in the teens of thousands. This has its basis upon the liberal use of PZP, the thousands of wild horses and burros already removed, and the adjustment of sex ratios. Added to this are mortality rates in the wild that range between 19 percent to 75 percent annually, both first year and adult. The proponents of PZP aid the BLM in driving them to extinction. The only answer is to continue fighting for the truth, and to allow nature to remain untouched. Robert C. Bauer Manvel, Texas

Distribution Director Greg Erwin Distribution Manager Anthony Clarke Distribution Drivers Sandra Chhina, Steve Finlayson, Debbi Frenzi, Vicky Jewell, Angela Littlefield, Joe Medeiros, Ron Neill, Christian Shearer, Marty Troye, Warren Tucker, Gary White, Joseph White, Margaret Underwood General Manager/Publisher John D. Murphy President/CEO Jeff vonKaenel Chief Operations Officer Deborah Redmond Human Resource Manager Tanja Poley Business Manager Grant Rosenquist

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

Don’t give up Re “Voters exchange liberty for complacency” (Feature story, May 7): Everyone knows we have the best government money can buy! You posit the young may decide if nation states have reached the zenith of their power, but I despair such an event may ever occur. The monied classes are too entrenched and all others are too involved in the travails of daily survival to make time for the necessary steps of wresting power from the 1 percent. Political activism, at the national level, seems fruitless and doomed. While you use the term constitutional monarchy, I prefer oligarchy. I want so much to be optimistic, but I’m afraid the immortal words of Jiminy Cricket come to mind: “It’s hopeless, Pinocchio.” Steve Waclo Carson City

How do you know? Re “Water over the lawn” (Notes from the Neon Babylon, May 7): I would like to have some details on the bird watching tour Bruce Van Dyke went on. My brother-in-law up in Salem, Oregon, is quite the bird watcher, and he recently lost his wife of 45 years. I would like to encourage him to do something like this if he feels it worthy. And, have Van Dyke watch it with the “batshit crazy 70-year-old” remarks. I’m nearly there, and I’m not crazy yet! Remember, if 60 is the new 40, then 70 must be the new 50! Cheryl Fillinger Sparks

Clarification In “Beyond the Shadow of a Drought,” RN&R, May 14, we implied that Marlene Olsen of the Truckee Meadows Water Authority believes there is no drought. This is incorrect. Ms. Olsen’s point was that we live in the high desert in Northern Nevada and sustainable living requires that we fundamentally rethink how we use water.

Business Nicole Jackson, Kortnee Angel Sweetdeals Coordinator Courtney deShields Nuts & Bolts Ninja Christina Wukmir Lead Technology Synthesist Jonathan Schultz Senior Support Tech Joe Kakacek Developer John Bisignano System Support Specialist Kalin Jenkins 405 Marsh Ave., Third Floor Reno, NV 89509 Phone (775) 324-4440 Fax (775) 324-4572 Classified Fax (916) 498-7940 Mail Classifieds to classifieds@newsreview.com

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

Website www.newsreview.com Printed by Paradise Post The RN&R is printed using recycled newsprint whenever available. Editorial Policies Opinions expressed in the RN&R are those of the authors and not of Chico Community Publishing, Inc. Contact the editor for permission to reprint articles, cartoons or other portions of the paper. The RN&R is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts. All letters received become the property of the publisher. We reserve the right to print letters in condensed form.

Cover and Feature story design: Brian Breneman

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

3


special aDVeRTising secTion

special aDVeRTising secTion

It’s happen ing in EVENTS SUNDAY NIGHT MOVIE NIGHT!

Join us for Sunday night movie night. Kick back and relax while watching a flick. Enjoy our drink specials! Su, 6PM through 7/5, no charge. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799

BARE BONES

Jerry Snyder cut pieces of scrap plywood into shapes of individual bones, then glued the layers together, shaped them further with grinders and sanders, stained and finished the pieces. The work was inspired by Snyder’s involvement in building the Ichthyosaur Puppet Project, an ichthyosaur skeleton made of plywood which was installed at Burning Man in 2013 and is now permanently installed at the Terry Lee Wells Nevada Discovery Museum. M-Su through 5/27, free. For more information about this activity, contact (775) 232-5013. The Generator, Inc., 1240 Icehouse Ave.

ACTIVITIES RENO COIN CLUB MEETING

Reno Coin Club presents Coins of Constantine. David Elliott will present the “Coins of Constantine: Propaganda in Bronze.” Just how Christian was the first Christian emperor and what did he want the Roman people to know about him? All ages welcome. Early bird prizes, quarter pot, raffle, and more! Tu, 5/26, 7-9:30PM, free. Denny’s, 205 Nugget Ave. (775) 359-9053

SCHEELS PADDLE DEMO

Must be at least 18 years old or accompanied by a legal guardian to participate. Sa, 5/30, 10am-2PM, free! Sparks Marina, 325 Harbor Cove Dr. (775) 353-2376

LINE DANCING LESSONS AT GILLEY’S!

Free line dancing lessons from professional teachers. Two dances taught at a comfortable pace for everyone! W, 6-8PM through 10/21, free. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave (775) 356-3300

4   |  RN&R   |  may 21, 2015

CROCHET CONNECTION

!

Learn to crochet or share tips with other crochet enthusiasts. Th, 4-5:45PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway. (775) 424-1800

FOUR SEASONS BOOK CLUB

The book club meets the first Saturday of each month. Call to find out each month’s book title. First Sa of every month, 1-2PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

CONVERSATION CAFE

The drop-in conversation program meets on the first Saturday of each month, 2-4PM, free. Sparks Library, 1125 12th St. (775) 352-3200

BIKINI BULL RIDING AT GILLEY’S!

Get ready for a wild night with Bikini Bull Riding at Gilley’s! Get your favorite bikini on and show off those skills for the chance to win the CASH PRIZE! Su, 9PM through 10/25. Opens 4/12, $5 for bull ride. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

CLICKETS KNITTING GROUP

ARNOLD MITCHEM

F, 5/29, 7PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

THE P’S & Q’S WITH MEL WADE

Sa, 5/30, 7PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

OPEN MIC COMEDY

Th, 9PM, no cover. Great Basin Brewing Co., 846 Victorian Ave. (775) 355-7711

CYCO MIKE

Come dance the night away to Cyco Mike! Every Friday night, drink specials! F, 9PM through 9/25, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

LADIES NIGHT

Deep discounts just for the ladies from 8pm-10pm: $1 off all shots and specialty drinks. Sporting bootie shorts 20 percent discount. Parties of three or more 20 percent discount. Sa, 8-11PM through 8/29. Sparks Lounge, 1237 Baring Blvd (775) 409-3340

DJ RAZZ

Come dance the night away to DJ RAZZ! You can even karaoke if you like. Ladies Night every Friday night. Drink Specials all night. F, 9PM. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

KARAOKE

DANWISE AND FRIENDS

KARAOKE NIGHT

THURSDAY SHOWCASE

KARAOKE WITH BOBBY DEE

A free monthly comedy show featuring local talent. The event is BYOB and limited beer will be provided free as well. Third Th of every month, 8PM, free. The Generator, Inc., 1240 Icehouse Ave.

Join us for a rocking good time every Tuesday for Karaoke Night. Tu, 6:30PM through 7/7, no cover. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799

This class is for knitters of all ages and levels. Yarn and needles are available. First and Third Su of every month, 1:30-3PM, free. Spanish Springs Library, 7100A Pyramid Lake Highway, Spanish Springs (775) 424-1800

Showcase your act on the Sparks Lounge stage. We have a full backline for all your performance needs. Check the Sparks Lounge website or Facebook for upcoming shows. Th, 8PM through 8/28, no cover. Sparks Lounge, 1237 Baring Blvd. (775) 409-3340

Tu, 8PM, no cover. Morelli’s G Street Saloon, 2285 G St. (775) 355-8281

PERFORMANCE AND MUSIC

DJ NIGHTS AT GILLEY’S!

CYCO MIKE

CHAD BUSHNELL BAND

Th, 5/21, 8PM, F, 5/22, 8PM and Sa, 5/23, 8PM, no cover. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

9BELOWZERO

Talented blues band you will not want to miss. Sa, 5/23, 8PM, no cover. Elbow Room Bar, 2002 Victorian Ave. (775) 356-9799

CJ SIMMONS

Th, 5/28, 8PM, F, 5/29, 8PM and Sa, 5/30, 8PM, no cover. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave. (775) 356-3300

Come in and scoot your boots! The Dj plays the new favorites and the old hits. DJ is open to requests! W, 6PM through 10/28, Th, Su, 7PM through 10/25. F, Sa, 8PM through 10/24. No admission fee. Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave (775) 356-3300

ACOUSTIC WONDERLAND

This is a singer-songwriter showcase. Come down to Paddy’s and bring your acoustic instruments. Sign-ups are at 7:30PM and music begins at 8PM. Drink Specials all night! Th, 8PM, through 9/25, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave. (775) 358-5484

KARAOKE

Th-Sa, 9PM, no cover. Bottom’s Up Saloon, 1923 Prater Way (775) 359-3677 Come dance the night away to Cyco Mike! The best Karaoke show in Sparks! Every Friday night, drink specials! F, 9PM through 9/25, no cover. Paddy & Irene’s Irish Pub, 906-A Victorian Ave (775) 358-5484

KARAOKE WITH PSYCHO MIKE

Sa, 8PM, no cover. 50 Yard Line Bar & Grill, 400 S. Rock Blvd. (775) 358-8848


by Dennis Myers

ThiS ModeRn WoR ld

by tom tomorrow

What’s your favorite drink? Asked at the Reno Arch, Commercial Row and Virginia Street Joe Bartlett Corrections officer

I drink a lot of soda: a soda called Faygo Rock and Rye, from back East. It’s really good. It’s real sweet.

Anthony Widemon Security guard

Well, one of them could be Sprite. I’ve got to ease up with the soda. Pretty much ginger ale. I like the taste.

Josh Rudy Construction worker

I like Pepsi because it wakes me up in the morning. I’m just addicted to it, I think.

People first Hillary Clinton recently visited our state to talk about immigration and call for comprehensive reform that includes a path to “full and equal” citizenship. “We cannot,” she said, “settle for proposals that provide hard-working people with merely a second-class status.” She pledged that if she is faced with congressional inaction, she would go further than President Obama in using her executive powers to protect immigrant families. These are welcome words. Our broken immigration system tears families apart and pushes by those that remain into the shadows. With more Bob Fulkerson than 11 million immigrants living and working in America, every serious presidential candidate should support comprehensive immigration Bob Fulkerson reform that includes a path to citizenship. is the director While Clinton should be praised for her bold of Progressive leadership Alliance of commitments on immigration, she must chart nevada Action. equally bold positions on the other crises that are forcing millions of other Americans into second-class status. We need serious presidential contenders to get specific about policies that ensure all Americans succeed. We have some ideas about where the candidates should start. Promote Fair Trade, Not Free Trade: President Obama and his allies are pushing hard to fast track the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a trade deal being negotiated by corporate bigwigs behind closed doors. The deal would lower wages, working standards, and environmental protections for people on two continents, while OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

padding corporate profits. Serious candidates will unequivocally come out against TPP and commit to fair trade policies.

Support Fair Wages and Create a Tax Code That Levels the Playing Field: Americans are struggling

to get by, even as big businesses and CEOs rake in gargantuan profits. Serious candidates should support workers by demanding a significant increase in the minimum wage. Serious candidates should support taxes on high frequency trading and other proposals that would make big corporations and the ultra-wealthy pay more in taxes to invest in education, jobs, and infrastructure. Put People In, Get Money Out: As wealthy donors and corporations exercise unprecedented influence on our politics, millions of real people are being disenfranchised. From bogus voter ID measures to laws that prevent ex-felons from voting, people are being denied their basic democratic rights. We need candidates who support an amendment to overturn Citizens United. Serious candidates would push to put people back at the center of our democracy. As candidates cruise through Nevada, we’re ready to ask them the tough questions about these issues and more before they get our votes. At the heart of the matter is this: Are candidates ready to stand with us or are they going to kowtow to big money donors and the corporate elite? Ω

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

Carol Yetter Pediatric audiologist

Caipirinha. It’s made with Brazilian rum and lime and sugar and ice. It’s refreshing and light and lovely. We were just in Brazil.

Daryl Ishizaki Retiree

Tom Collins or a Manhattan, because my dad used to drink those at the country club when I was a kid and I thought it was the best drink.

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

5


Leadership rests on the chairs As the 2015 Legislative session winds down and most committee work is completed, it’s a good time to reflect on the performance of this year’s allRepublican committee chairs. Thanks to term limits and the Democrats’ former lock on the Assembly, none of the chairs had ever had the honor or by responsibility of managing a legislaSheila Leslie tive committee. Surprisingly, in the Senate, it was the first-term senators who excelled at the job. Brand new Sens. Patricia Farley and Becky Harris ran their committees fairly and politely, while managing some difficult issues. Farley established clear committee rules and was judicious in enforcing time limits, ensuring everyone had an opportunity to be heard. She was also appreciated for her sincere efforts to include minority views while moving bills forward in a bipartisan fashion. Harris revealed a patient and compassionate nature, listening to many stories of bullying from children and their parents without complaint. Veteran Sens. Joe Hardy and Greg Brower, were in a word, disappointing.

Sen. Hardy’s goal seemed to be speed, as he raced through hearing after hearing in record time, sometimes devoting less than five minutes per bill. His typical opening remarks were disheartening, as he asked witnesses to keep their testimony as brief as possible and often encouraged them to avoid testifying altogether. Hardy’s inexplicable desire to shortcut hearings led to some of the most shallow health and human services hearings in years. One would have expected Hardy to use his medical background and knowledge to lead in-depth discussions, delving deeply into these complicated issues, but it rarely happened. As chair of Judiciary, Sen. Greg Brower displayed an arrogance that many found condescending and sexist. He often cut short witnesses with whom he didn’t agree. As the session wore on, his whims worsened, culminating in a whiny scene widely circulated on social media as he sarcastically “welcomed” a Democratic tracker to his committee but only until he could “figure out a

way to kick you out.” According to Minority Leader Aaron Ford, Brower was so incensed by the tracker’s video camera, he impulsively pulled two Democratic bills from the work session agenda, and petulantly refused to hear “any more Democratic bills until she is gone.” When the media caught wind of the meltdown, Brower accused Ford of “overreacting,” saying “I told him [Ford] I had a real problem with that stupid tracker. ... It is part of the slow, steady devolution in civility.” Brower seemed to forget that every committee meeting is broadcast live and easily viewed later through the legislative website, thus enshrining his pettiness forever. In the Assembly, committee meetings ran fairly smoothly with chairs generally behaving politely to witnesses and the minority party. Assemblymember James Oscarson led a large Health and Human Services Committee, actively soliciting input from all members, thoroughly vetting each bill. Veteran Assemblymember Lynn Stewart used humor to defuse the often contentious Legislative

Operations Committee. Even Assemblyman Ira Hansen was usually well behaved, except when he saw himself as a personal champion for a “neglected” controversial cause such as abortion or guns. Floor sessions were another matter altogether. In the Assembly, it was messy and chaotic, thanks to a weak Speaker. In the Senate, it was more like dictatorship. A low point in the history of the Senate occurred last week when Majority Leader Michael Roberson pushed through new standing rules, effectively removing the Democrats’ ability to amend bills on the Senate Floor, inspiring a new twist on the Twitter hashtags #whyshowup and #novoice. During this deadline week there will be more shenanigans as legislators try desperately to prevail through the end-of-session morass. In just a few weeks, the 2015 regular session will be one for the history books, although we’ll live with the Republican legacy for at least two more years. Ω

To see Sen. Greg Brower’s leadership, check out: https:// youtu.be/ySkDjtvkRR0.

CASH with SOUL G I V E AWAY

Win a 2015 Kia Soul QUALIFYING DRAWINGS EVERY HOUR Fridays 9 pm - 11 pm Saturdays 5 pm - 11 pm Sundays 11 am - 5 pm

Finale Sunday, June 28 ✴ 7 pm

329-4777 6   |  RN&R   | 

MAY 21, 2015 

1 - 8 0 0 - M U ST- S E E

(6 8 7- 8 7 3 3)

silverlegacy.com


The problem is systemic white authority Many conservatives seem unmoved by this year’s revelations of police violence against black men. If you don’t instantly obey a “lawful command,” if you run from the police, if you resist an arrest no matter how petty the crime, you deserve anything you get. We constantly hear the “bad by Brendan apple” theory: Most police officers Trainor are brave, selfless heroes who leave home every day to keep us safe, not knowing if they will return to their families. But there are always a few bad apples. In fact, despite the recent tragic murders of New York City and Mississippi policemen, the number and rate of police officers killed on duty is on a decades-long decline. In Utah over the last five years, more citizens have been killed by police than by criminal gang members. Extra-judicial punishment like “nickel rides” for POP (Pissing Off Police) are now revealed as commonplace in police culture.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

Conservatives should admit that constantly talking about black-onblack crime is simply changing the subject. The discussion is about police violence, not crime statistics. We should all agree that being stopped for “driving while black” (or Latino) is a degrading experience and does not occur simply because people of color drive faster than whites. Liberals blame society, talk about poverty and racism, predatory lending and food deserts, about the need for new government programs, more training for police, electing more minority politicians and other well-worn nostrums. Conservatives are right to counter that Baltimore and other cities have received tender loving liberal care for over 50 years, and nothing much has changed. But when they do so, they tacitly admit that there is something wrong with society, that it is not just a lack of individual responsibility that results in violent confrontations with the police.

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

Liberals should reflect there is some truth in Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy’s widely condemned statement that black people in North Las Vegas might have been better off in slavery than government dependence. Yes, slave owners sometimes broke up families at the auction block. But under the surge of mass arrests and incarceration that white overseers like Hillary Clinton, Martin O’Malley and Joe Biden pushed through in the 1990s, black fathers and mothers are sent off to prison, destroying family cohesion in numbers surpassing the old South. At least slaves were considered property and had value to their owners. Today, only those who have government connections have value to the state. The police do not arrest far more blacks than whites for petty crimes simply because they are racist. They do so because if they raid white neighborhoods, the phones to the police chief, the DA and the mayor will ring with angry campaign contributors demanding they stop. It

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

is not just race but political connections that matter most. It is not just unaccountable cops, but unaccountable politicians. The Nevada Legislature has mandated body cameras for the police. That is a good first step. However, a report by the ACLU has revealed far too many bills pending in Carson City that would overcriminalize non-violent acts. In order to cease being seen as an occupying army, the opportunities for police confrontation with citizens needs to be limited. Urban knife control has the same racist roots as urban gun control. Poor people cannot afford the senseless fines and bench warrants meted out by greedy governments. It is state power, not racism, that is the real problem. Conservatives should instinctively understand that. Liberals should shed their naive belief in big-government solutions. If we really want freedom, opportunity and safety, we need to talk with each other, not at each other. Ω

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

Don’t get Brian started: www.fatalencounters.org/peoplesearch/#namesearch

|

RN&R

|

7


PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

During the Martinez matter last year, lawyers  Mike Malloy, Randy Drake and Kent Robison  awaited the start of a school board meeting.  Board member Howard Rosenberg is in the  foreground.

Could Nevada beat big mining? Most large mining companies operating in Nevada are Canadian, and U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts is using a dispute involving one of them to make her case against the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement. She argues that investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) procedures under trade agreements can override national and local mining regulation. ISDS is a means of international law that can allow investors to use dispute settlement against a government without going to court. In an essay released last week, Warren wrote, “I’ll give you a recent example of how it works: A big mining company wanted to do some blasting off the coast of Nova Scotia. The Canadian government refused to provide permits because it thought the blasting would harm the local environment and scare off fish that local fishermen needed to make a living. “Thanks to an ISDS provision in a past trade agreement, that mining company didn’t have to go to a Canadian court to challenge the permit decision—they went right to a special ISDS panel of corporate lawyers. Last month, the international panel ruled in favor of the mining company, and the decision cannot be challenged in Canadian courts. “Now the Canadian taxpayers may be on the hook for up to $300 million in ‘damages’ to the mining company—all because their government had the gall to stand up for its environment and the economic livelihood of its local fishermen. And the next time a foreign company wants a blasting permit, what will the Canadian government do?” Warren said there were similar outcomes in disputes in Egypt, Germany, and the Czech Republic. “Philip Morris is using ISDS right now to try to stop countries like Australia and Uruguay from implementing new rules that are intended to cut smoking rates—because the new laws might eat into the tobacco giant’s profits,” she wrote. She also wrote, “ISDS isn’t a one-time, hypothetical problem— we’ve seen it in past trade agreements.” Reinforcing that point, Warren this week issued another report, “Broken Promises: Decades of Failure to Enforce Labor Standards in Free Trade Agreements,” based on information from the General Accountability Office and federal agencies. In the report, Warren said that the Obama administration has not acted to police earlier trade agreements, undercutting the president’s claim that TPP would be a forward-looking agreement. “The United States does not enforce the labor protections in its trade agreements,” the report says. “Guatemala was named ‘the most dangerous country in the world for trade unionists’ five years after entering a trade agreement with the U.S. In Colombia, despite the existence of a special ‘Labor Action Plan’ put in place to address long-standing problems and secure passage of the Colombia FTA [free trade agreement], 105 union activists have been murdered and 1,337 death threats have been issued since the Labor Action Plan was finalized four years ago.”

Longer campaigns proposed Under a GOP bill making its way through the Nevada Legislature, Nevada primary elections would be held in February. State Republicans have long disliked the early Nevada presidential caucuses because of their identification with Harry Reid, who was instrumental in getting Nevada the early slot. The GOP bill, Senate Bill 421, would allow Democrats to continue having caucuses but would give Republicans a primary—though they would still have to hold caucuses (called precinct meetings in Nevada) to select nominating convention delegates. To save money, the state primary for local and state offices would be held on the same day in February as the presidential primary—and result in a very long election campaign. A similar measure passed by the 1953 legislature at the initiative of Democrats and first used in the non-presidential year of 1954 was so unpopular because of the long campaign that it was repealed in 1955 without ever being used for presidential purposes.

—Dennis Myers 8   |  RN&R   | 

MAY 21, 2015

Drake demoted School board mulls what to do about legal services The Washoe County School Board last week demoted its lawyer Randy Drake after months during which he reguby larly told them they were within the Dennis Myers bounds of the Nevada open meeting law when they were not—advising them, in effect, to break the law. But Drake, who originally faced termination and had hired an attorney, somehow imposed conditions on his demotion, including a gag rule that bars school board members from discussing him in any but positive terms. As a result, they cannot explain their positions to the public.

“They will not disparage or malign one another with respect to any matter relating to Drake’s employment.” Agreement between Washoe School Board and Randy Drake The deal was negotiated for the school board by a law firm it hired, Maupin, Cox and LeGoy. It is the second gag rule imposed on the board by legal negotiations. In the previous case, in September, fired schools superintendent Pedro Martinez came away with a legal prohibition that school board members “will not disparage or malign” him, thus

preventing them from explaining their actions to voters during the fall election campaign. In a July 22, 2014, meeting during which Martinez was suspended from office, board members several times consulted Drake to make sure they were following the law. At least five members—Barbara McLaury, Barbara Clark, John Mayer, David Aiazzi and Howard Rosenberg—later told Nevada attorney general’s office investigators that he had assured them they were in compliance with the law. “He [Drake] indicated it was fine to have this conversation regarding this issue,” Clark later told an investigator. But the attorney general penalized the board members for complying with that advice. Board members were fined for violating the open meeting law, though it had previously been state policy not to penalize officeholders for following the advice of their counsel. On Feb. 27 this year, the attorney general’s office argued that McLaury had broken the open meeting law by following Drake’s advice on a dispute involving public comment before the board. This time, no legal resolution was reached in court, but it was another embarrassment for the board. (Some news coverage has treated attorney general findings as legally conclusive.) The school board must now decide what to do for legal counsel. It will be using Maupin, Cox and LeGoy through September.

The board could appoint a new general counsel to replace Drake. It could hire a law firm on a permanent basis. Or it could turn to the Washoe County District Attorney’s office to provide a deputy, as the Washoe County Commission does. The choice poses risks for taxpayers. In Clark County, where the school district has an office of general counsel, it has become something of an empire. In 2011, Nevada Journal reported: “The Clark County School District Office of General Counsel has an annual budget exceeding $3 million and a legal team of 10 attorneys, nine secretarial and clerical staff, plus one administrator. Part of that $3 million each year is $500,000 allocated for the hiring of additional, outside attorneys. Nevertheless, in the last three school years the office has exceeded its outside-counsel budget and has paid out over $2.1 million to 10 private law firms. Of that, over $1.2 million went to two firms—Greenberg Traurig, and Lewis and Roca (now Lewis Roca Rothgerber), according to CCSD records reviewed by Nevada Journal. For this school year, the CCSD legal office is some $179,000 over its legal services budget.” In Washoe County, the Airport Authority was until 1989 provided with legal counsel by the district attorney’s office at a cost of $57,262 annually, plus benefits. In addition, it paid former Reno city attorney Clinton Wooster to handle some bond counsel matters he had done before leaving office as city attorney. Then the authority dropped the deputy D.A. and switched over to hiring law firms. In 1996, after seven years of law firms instead of a deputy district attorney, authority executive director Robert White—reacting to criticism of the growth of legal services— wrote a May 15, 1996, memorandum to board members that essentially described another empire underway. The memo said the authority had gone from one lawyer and one consulting attorney on the payroll to nine private law firms who were paid more than half a million dollars for the first nine months of the 199596 fiscal year. The bulk of the money went to two firms—Walther, Key, Maupin, Oats, Cox, Lee, and Klaich (now Maupin, Cox and LeGoy) and Vargas and Bartlett (later Jones Vargas, now Fennimore Craig).


In addition, airport staffers and board members said at the time that few of the invoices from the firms— such as a $119,123 billing described as “general business”—were scrutinized or questioned. They tended to be paid routinely. Thus, in just seven years the airport authority’s legal bills had more than quintupled—and that relied on a listing of only three quarters of the 1995-56 fiscal year for a comparison. Disclosure of those figures caused the airport to throttle back some in succeeding years. According to an airport spokesperson, the amount paid in legal fees for fiscal year 2013-14 was $461,865. Of that, $316,677 was paid to Fennimore Craig and the rest of the fees were paid for specialty legal services. State agencies receive their legal counsel from deputies attorney general and the Reno and Sparks city councils are served by elected city attorneys. The language in the agreement between Drake and the school board that prevents them from talking about him (unless they can

+PJOVTGPS UIFTFFWFOUT

say something nice) is as follows: “The Parties further agree they will not disparage or malign one another with respect to any matter relating to Drake’s employment or service as Chief General Counsel, their professionalism, professional competence, ethics, work ethics, character or integrity of any of them, either collectively or individually, save and except it shall be permissible for the Parties or individual Trustees: (a) to say that the Parties agree to utilize Drake’s experience, skills, and background in his new position in the Grant Department instead of as WCSD’s Chief General Counsel; (b) to mention or refer to any provisions of the 2013 Employment Agreement, which by the terms of this Agreement is terminated, without disparaging or maligning one another; and/or (c) in the event any individual Trustee should vote ‘no’ at a public meeting of the Board of Trustees in regard to his/her approval of this Agreement, such individual Trustee may state that his/her ‘no’ vote is related only to the overall costs to the WCSD associated with implementation of this Agreement.” Ω

Memorial Day Weekend May 23 - 25, 2015

Ultimate Painting Event May 29, 2015 7:00 p.m. Circus Circus Reno Mandalay Ballroom

Credit is due PHOTO/DENNIS MYERS

Spring Revival May 29 - 30, 2015 10 a.m. - 7 p.m.

Street Vibrations

®

SPRING RALLY June 5 - 7, 2015 Please visit our website at circusreno.com for more information.

Politician, journalists and lobbyists—a building full of them—don’t seem like the best credit risks in the world, but the cafe in the Nevada Legislature does let them run up tabs. But the operators do make sure to collect on those tabs before they all leave town.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

9


This message brought to you by the Washoe County Health District with grant funding from the CDC through the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health.

10   |  RN&R   |  may 21, 2015


Night at the Museum RN&R 5/12/15 5:15 PM Page 1

Various government agencies, a private landowner and at least one nonprofit are tag-teaming to fell trees and watch water quality on a private Carson City development.

A Night at the Museum!

Donner Memorial State Park Visitor Center Preview Gala

Chipping away

State Parks Excursions Auction

Friday, June 5th, 2015 7pm Exclusive preview tour of the Museum exhibits

A big forest-thinning project is underway on private land

Fine Wines & Hors d’Oeuvres, Music & Not-so-Silent Auction

8pm Elegant Dinner, Auction Finale

Help to ensure the Visitor Center stays open for all to enjoy

Forest thinning is pretty much what it sounds like: You cut down trees in order to help others grow, reduce fire risk and foster a cleaner watershed. Dry conditions have apparently made the practice all the more urgent in by Georgia Fisher Northern Nevada, and a variety of government agencies and NGOs are working in tandem to get the job done. geo rg iaf@ “All along the Sierra Front, it’s all hands on deck,” says Nature newsr evie w.c om Conservancy project director Duane Petite. At the moment, the second phase of an especially large thinning project is wrapping up on private land in Carson City. (Dubbed “Phase 1” for reasons too wonky to get into here, it’s not really the first round of work.) The site encompasses roughly 800 acres in the Clear Creek watershed, and apart from a handful of grants, the effort is funded by developer Jim Taylor, whose vision for the Clear Creek Tahoe property includes a golf course surrounded by a planned community. The project, which entails a large degree of water monitoring, is in the hands of the nonprofit Nature Conservancy and around 15 government agencies, including the U.S. Geological Survey and the Nevada Division of Forestry. “It’s entirely voluntary,” Petite said, when asked if the work could be likened to eminent domain, or if Taylor had to oblige. “Absolutely not.” Actually, Taylor gave up various development rights back in 2008 to create a conservation easement, and originally considered public access for mountain biking and the sort of “forest health project” that’s currently under way, Petite said. The Carson River District worksite is adjacent to a U.S. Forest Service thinning project, and another belonging to the Washo Tribe. The lumber, valued at around $400,000, will become mulch, firewood, construction fodder and wood chips to fuel an electricity generating plant. “If you think of the trees, there are just too many straws trying to sip out of an almost empty glass of water,” Petite explained. “By thinning, we’re reducing competition, so we’re training the remaining trees to grow healthier and stronger and more resilient to the drought. When you have a forest that’s overcrowded like this one, it’s going to get thinned one way or another. We can either wait for insects and disease or wildfire to do the thinning, or we can do it in a thoughtful and controlled manner.” But what of all the creatures that call the place home? It’s hard to imagine a displaced bird or mountain lion caring much about forest health. “We’re resetting the clock, if you will, trying to get past human actions like the Comstock-era logging and the fire suppression to take it to a more natural state,” Petite said. “Then the animals … are going to find a home that’s more to their liking—more like what would have been there in the past.” In any case, the work is ongoing and widespread, especially on public lands. “It is actively happening all over the place,” said NDS program coordinator Ryan Shane. “There’s a lot of acreage planned in the next 10 years for implementation.” Ω

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

KEOKI GALLERY

Experience history in the making ... at this once-in-a-lifetime event!

|

FOODFINDS

|

Tickets $150 per person

Limited capacity, Truckee formal Tickets on line at www.SierraStateParks.org Presented by the Sierra State Parks Foundation 530.583.9911

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

11


uine n e G

Northern Nevada LIVE MUSIC

Health Shoppe

GRAND OPENING EVENT • • •

Changing office s? puter comFRIDAY, MAY 29 • 5-9PM

Donate your Villa Donato old equipment!

• Your donation supports schools, low-income families, non-proďŹ ts, locals with disabilities and small business • Responsible recycling of non-usable parts BREAKFAST ¡ LUNCH ¡ DINNER OPEN SUNDAYS, CLOSED MONDAYS

725 SOUTH CENTER STREET

• System/virus cleanup

Margaret and Toni are • Windows rebuild here for Call today! • From just you! $25 www.budgetservicesnv.com (775)329-1126 1547 S. Virginia St. #4 • Reno

new2ucomputers.org CALL FOR APPOINTMENT • 775.324.2277

775-432-1085

Reno HydRo

hundreds of local products and gift • Largest hydroponic superstore in FHUWL¿FDWHVIRUVHUYLFHV Northern Nevada

• Consulting services GRRUSUL]HVL3DGUDIÀH • Commercial wholesale accounts • Greenhouses & outdoor growing entertainment supplies • Offering custom soil blends & truck tour of load famous delivery automobile collection • Low price guarantee

Saturday, Novemberwww.RenoHydro.com 3rd 775.284.8700 • 5635 Riggins Ct., #21

East on Neil Rd. exit from 395. National Automobile Museum 1/2 mi. R on Meadow Wood Ln, • 1st R on Riggins Ct. 10 S. Lake Street D I S C O V E R O N E O F R E N O ’ S 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

BEST KEPT SECRETS!Genuine Admission is $2 or cans of food. Free parking, including parking and shuttle at lot on the corner of Virginia and Court Streets.

COME SEE US IN MIDTOWN!

ZZZ5HQRJRY

22   ||   RN&R  OCTOBER 25, 2012 12   |  RN&R   |  may  14,|| 2015

sH and u r e H T beaT r card now geT you lizing in iaVirginia 822cS. Also spe sicals y h P D.O.T.

a physician Work directly With l over toWn no need to run al

• Our 37th year in business • CDs, vinyl, DVDs, Tapes, VHS • In or out of print, we’ll order for cost + a few bucks • Buy, sell, trade (Selling? Call 1st!) • Knitting Factory ticket outlet

call Today

775-870-1545

BUY-SELL TRADE

MIDTOWN RENO OPEN ‘TIL 7PM WEEKDAYS 822 S. Virginia (North of Junkee, South of SĂźp) 826-4119 • recrecreno.com

reno TH cenTer of HolisTic Heal 106 e iT su , ay w 1135 TerMinal reno, nv 89502 no.com althcenterofre tic www.Holis He

LEADING AUCTION HOUSE

IN NORTHERN NEVADA

FOR OVER 25 YEARS! •ANTIQUES AND COLLECTIBLES •ESTATE SALES •BUSINESS LIQUIDATIONS •USED VEHICLES •APPRAISAL SERVICES •QUALITY CONSIGNMENTS •BANKRUPTCIES

Northern Nevada

Open 7 Days 10am-5PM (weather permitting) • 10200 N. Virginia St., Reno, NV 89506 • 775-677-1101 Donations welcome at www.SierraSafariZoo.org

the Take a break from our by p sto & ffic tra Kietzke Lane store. Our new MidTown ! store is open, too

THE MOANA CONSTRUCTION SUCKS!

ONLINE ONLY AUCTION HOUSE SPECIAL MILITARY, SENIOR & GROUP RATES!

THE MOANA CONSTRUCTION SUCKS!

l a c i d e M Bankruptcy? Wa !na a N'T DiOju Er M Immigration? cards

Call new2u!

• Affordable diagnosis & repair

• We’ll pick up from you for just $25

• •

blue? ComputerDivorce?

EvEry guy should your girlFriend’s bE hErE. Forget salon, say goodbye to mom’s stylist, its time to man uP!!! PEriod. your

25% off

full service

WWW.LIGHTNINGAUCTIONS.COM JOSH ARIAS at MAybeRRy SAlOn And bARbeRS 1460 Mayberry dr., Reno nV 89509 775-333-9900 | barberArias.com

hair cut, shave & shampoo (GREAT GIFT IDEA)

775-331-4222 • 870 S. ROCK BLVD, SPARKS, NV 89431


H

ave y’all met Georgia Fisher yet? She moved here from Texas in fall 2013, and almost immediately started freelance writing for the RN&R. She became our special projects editor in January. She does our supplements, like the family guides, puts together some other features, and writes our weekly story on environmental issues. Nice gal, with a bit of Southern twang and a goofy sense of humor. She’s fitting in nicely at the office, although she does tend to apologize for things that warrant no apologies, like correcting somebody’s grammar or mentioning sex toys, which is especially disconcerting in a newsroom full of hardened journalists accustomed to cussing and yelling at one another. Anyway, Georgia likes to wax poetic about how much she loves Reno. At least once or twice a day, she’ll drift off into a reverie about how nice the weather is or how friendly the security people are at the airport. But until recently, she hadn’t really taken advantage of one of the great cultural advantages of living here: 24-hour availability of alcohol and generally lax attitudes about public drunkenness. So, being the cordial colleague I am, I offered to show her around a few of the local watering holes, and because we at the RN&R can’t do something simple like take a coworker out for an after-shifter without making a big fucking production out of it, we decided to turn our little bar tour into a game: bar bingo. We came up with a list of common barroom practices and experiences, like “hearing a song by the Beatles,” “winning a game of pool,” or “talking to somebody named Chris.” We assigned each item a number of points from 1 to 5. “See a bare nipple” was worth 2 points, for instance. “Get punched” was only worth 1 point. “Seeing somebody else vomit,” only 2 points, but actually “vomiting yourself”? 4 points. The first person to reach 5 points at each place would win the round, and then we’d head to the next destination. I had a loosely planned route in mind, which included places I hadn’t checked out yet, beloved old haunts and new favorites. Since we’re responsible about our binge drinking, we headed out on foot.

By Br ad By nu m an d Ge or Gi a Fi sh er

—Brad Bynum Brad and I share a cubicle wall, guys, and I rarely correct his goddamn language. But yeah, I’m sorry about it. He’s also the sort of colleague who’ll scream something in the background when you’re doing a phone interview with an elected official, or come to work with glue in his hair because he wore faux horns to a dance party the night before. He’s endearing for the same reasons. As for our little drinking game, you should know I’m not a party kid at all anymore, but I used to be. And as fast as I’ve fallen for Reno, few of my local friends are alcoholics or mentally ill or wild children or whatever. I miss the crazy, in other words, so it’s time to make some of my own. I also have a distracted way of matching my companion beer for beer, whether that person is a teetotaler or an adult male metalhead who’d put “do cocaine” as an option on our bingo list—which Brad did. Anyway, the plan was to wrap before midnight, as I was helping host a big baby shower later that morning, and Brad had a full calendar of his own. Spoiler alert: We failed.

Is it still journalism after you’ve been to eight bars?

—GeorGia Fisher

RN&R writers Brad Bynum and Georgia Fisher ended a debaucherous bingo night at 40 Mile Saloon.

“BAR BINGO”

photos by Eric Marks

continued on page 14

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

XMONTHX XX, 2015

|

RN&R

|

13


“BAR BINGO”

continued from page 13

PIGNIC PUB & PATIO 235 Flint St. 376 -1948 Brad : Around 6 p.m., Georgia and I left the RN&R office and headed a few blocks north to Pignic. It was raining lightly, always a welcome novelty in Reno. I’d never been to Pignic before, but I was vaguely familiar with the place’s concept, which includes grills set up outside where customers can cook their own meat. GeorGia: Basically it’s B.Y.O.-food-and-tryto-cook-it, which sounds like one of those creative first dates a nice man plans without realizing he’s making you tired. Still a fun scene, though. Brad : It seems more like a drinking game that involves food than an actual dining experience, and it might have been fun if I was in the right mindset, but it was raining and cooking anything just seemed like a ton of work at the time. Pignic seems like a good spot for an after-work beer—maybe watch a game, cook some meat, sit outside on a warm evening. The two bartenders, Jason and Annalisa, told us some funny stories and were very welcoming. I had a beer and a shot of tequila. Georgia drank some nasty beer that tasted like somebody dosed it with a partially chewed wad of watermelon Bubblicious gum.

14   |  RN&R   | 

MAY 21, 2015

GeorGia: It was Hell or High Watermelon, and I loved it. Brad : I won the round of Bingo by having two drinks and hearing somebody say the word “awesome.”

ROYCE 115 Ridge St. 440 -1095 GeorGia: Royce is a relaxing place with a dim, cushy aesthetic, and because Brad was the only male patron around for awhile, the mood was almost like that of a girls’ night out. I also thought the bathroom was gorgeous, and a random straight dude said the same thing later, so it must be true. Brad : Royce is owned by the same guys who own Imperial and Lincoln Lounge, but the atmosphere couldn’t be further removed from those mega popular bars. I came up with an analogy that I was probably inordinately proud of while we were there. (I repeated it several times to increasing indifference.) Filmmaker Joss Whedon directed the two Avengers movies. The first one is one of the biggest money-making movies ever, and the sequel is on target to match that. But between making those two blockbusters, Whedon made a little blackand-white adaptation of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing. It’s witty, low-key and calibrated for discriminating tastes. Royce is kind of the bar equivalent of that. I’ve already spent a fair amount of time

there because I’m in love with Margot, one of the bartenders. She wasn’t working when Georgia and I stopped in, but Kaitlin Bryson, a great local artist and a dear friend, was behind the bar, and we had a pleasant conversation about bees, vegetarianism and auras, because Kaitlin is a hippie. GeorGia: Kaitlin is a cerebral sweetheart who talked with us about natural food, Vonnegut, her ecologically and artistically minded graduate studies, her love of bees, and the nature of happiness itself. Good company. In time we had a charcuterie plate with a perfect mustard sauce and La Tranche Le Retour, a beaujolais Brad said tastes like “licking a sweaty woman.” That’s a direct quote. “Wait, this isn’t gross at all,” I exclaimed after a sip. “It’s good!” “Right. You misunderstand what I’m getting at.” “Ohhh.”

THE LOVING CUP 188 California Ave. 322-2480 GeorGia: This up-and-comer was briefly dead when we walked in, populated only by manager Pete Barnato and a pretty girl with platinum hair who looked exactly like him. Loving Cup is kind of sophisticated; the drinks are as high-end as you want them to be, and Pete has near-encyclopedic knowledge of the liquors he peddles, which include a fair selection of Japanese scotch.

Brad : It’s in the former location of the Biggest Little City Club, but it has some of the same fun energy that made another previous incarnation of the location, the Satellite Lounge, the best bar in Reno a decade ago. GeorGia: Pete made me a sazerac in a cool glass, and I nursed it as I took in the scenery: lush wallpaper, velvet art that looked more cool than kitschy, and a growing flood of customers, many of whom knew Brad. People high-five a lot in this town, by the way. You can be the choicest hipsterwhatever in the world, but if you high-five me, it feels like we’re 12 and celebrating the fact that we just threw something out of a school bus window. I love it. Brad : I won the round quickly, with a rapid succession of hugs, making it clear that as someone who has been drinking in Reno bars for 20 years, I had some unfair advantages over Georgia, fresh off the boat from Texas. (And yeah, I’ve been drinking in Reno bars for 20 years despite only being 35. Back in ye ol’ 1990s, children, crappy fake IDs were tolerated to the point of encouragement. Mine was literally just a Polaroid picture of me standing in front of a poster that looked vaguely like a driver’s license. Nobody cared.)


PUBLIC HOUSE 33 St. Lawrence Ave. 657-8449 GeorGia: My friend Jason says Public House looks like something from Fight Club, and I’d agree. You can only hear bass lines over the din of patrons, but it all sounds

good and feels right alongside the exposed brick, muted lighting, robust beards and so on. The crowd that night was mostly under 30, present editors excluded, and we drank saison beers and hung out with some polite Millennials who seemed impressed with

Jason Kell and Annalisa Suarez of Pignic Pub & Patio do their version of the crawl.

our jobs and interested in networking. Brad traded business cards with them, disappeared for a minute, and then made a special announcement in front of God and everyone. “I won! I don’t know how much taking a dump or getting a hug or getting a phone number is worth, but I just did all those things!”

was around. I won’t peg their names because I didn’t properly warn them about this report, but I met a couple of gracious and talented Reno musicians (one of whom’s going on a European tour, which of course warrants a toast); got a bunch of ideas for our Green beat; drank cheap beer and almost lost a credit card. Whee.

Brad : I took advantage of Public House’s nice, spacious bathroom with a locking door to relieve myself of a gut burden. The long line outside of the bathroom as I was leaving might have embarrassed me if I wasn’t already shameless and intoxicated. Anyway, after I proudly proclaimed my victory to Georgia, she replied, “Oh, I stopped even keeping track. I know you’re going to win every round,” which did make me feel like an ass. We decided to abandon the game.

Brad : At the bar, I introduced Georgia to Ryan and Dave from Cranium, the excellent, long-running local progressive rock band. I left her in their noble company while I went to go watch two pretend lesbians make out by the pool table. Dave is interested in environmental issues, and Georgia told me afterward that she got a few ideas for Green stories from him. I replied that, for the arts section, going out to Reno bars is where at least 60 percent of my story ideas originate. We bumped into a lot of great Reno characters at Shea’s, including local filmmaker and sketch artist Kaleb Temple and legendary Reno party animal Jon Shown, the 90-pound man who can drink dudes three times his size under the table and then steal their girlfriends.

SHEA’S TAVERN 715 S. Virginia St. 786 - 4774

Brad : Next, we headed to Shea’s, the perennial winner of “best dive bar” in this newspaper’s reader-voted Best of Northern Nevada contest. It’s a strange, beautiful continent unto itself, a real anything-goes kind of place, where nobody would ever worry about feeling like an ass.

GeorGia: I was getting loose enough not to care about the minutiae real journalists are supposed to record. Know what I’m saying? It was time to ambush some strangers with

GeorGia: Shea’s is your quintessential dive with an Irish-y name—a loud, easy sort of place on South Virginia where Brad and I had our own conversations with whomever

FRIDAY, JUNE 19

FRIDAY, AUGUST 7

“BAR BINGO”

continued on page 16

SUNDAY, AUGUST 9

(775) 789-2000 • GrandSierraResort.com OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

15


“BAR BINGO”

continued from page 15

my life story. It was also time to quit pouring alcohol down my gullet.

DEATH & TA XES 26 Cheney St. 324 -2630 Brad : Next we went to Death & Taxes, a bar with a great reputation that I had somehow never been to before, despite being a big fan of Midtown Eats, the nearby restaurant owned by the same people. GeorGia: I’d heard high praise of this bar, including from a person who buys $100 wines like they’re grape drink, and the Goth exterior is intriguing on its own. The interior was purposefully dark when we visited, with Cuban music on the stereo and a gaggle of universally hot male bartenders sporting embarrassing floral shirts. I ordered “Fields of Oaxaca,” a sublime $12 concoction with Patron roca silver, cocchi bianco (like I know what that means), mandarin syrup and lemon. I’d planned to just have a sip and write about it, but you know when you’re on a diet and someone makes you a stellar gourmet meal anyway, and then it becomes an art experience that’ll only happen once—not to mention a matter of etiquette—so you might as well eat up? That’s how this drink was—like glowing fairy nectar in a glass. Ninety seconds later, I was a full-on rogue drunk person. I’m barely even drunk on New

16   |  RN&R   | 

MAY 21, 2015

Year’s Eve, y’all. Shit. Brad : Georgia described the bartenders, three handsome guys all wearing bizarrely ugly Hawaiian shirts, as “beautiful, miserable people.” We ordered mixed drinks, which I don’t remember clearly other than that they were terrific. My notes about the place: “The cocktails were delicious; The shirts were horrendous; The dudes were indifferent.” I might have accidentally been rude to them. I don’t know. In which case, apologies, dudes. It was pretty late at that point, and I was pretty deep in my cups. Besides, it can be difficult to interact with people from the outside world after spending serious time in Shea’s.

CHAPEL TAVERN 1099 S. Virginia St. 324 2244 GeorGia: This place has a sprawling, floorto-ceiling shelving unit behind the bar, with a liquor selection of mythic proportions and the sort of rolling ladders that libraries and bookstores use. Chapel also offers craft beers, including one called Yeastus Christ Supersour. Props for hilarity. Brad : A quick note about methodology: I took my notes on my phone and also recorded voice memos to myself as we went about each place. The memos got increasingly erratic and slurred, and the sequence makes little sense: Bar Bingo 1, Bar Crawl 2, Bar Crawl 3, Bar Bingo 3. The usually popping Chapel was pretty

slow by the time we arrived, though that was probably mostly because it was after 1 a.m., but I recorded some of best voice memos there, all slurred, and with the lilting cadence of a happy drunk: “I don’t even need any more alcohol for like two days. At this point, it’s just fun. … We’re at Chapel now. I ordered a beer. I don’t even know what it is.” GeorGia: “I love you,” I heard Brad say several times into his phone before realizing he was just leaving voice memos for himself. No joke. Around 2 a.m. he also informed me that I’m a bad editor, which was sweet. I was about a cocktail away from believing him, so that made for a good ending note. Brad : Despite the fact that we’d abandoned the Bar Bingo concept a couple of stops earlier, I was still recording every point-scoring opportunity. As we were walking out, I recorded an addendum: “We had some drinks—we had one drink, and then we decided fuck it with the game because we weren’t going to score any points. It was time to leave”—ominous pause—“I just threw up. That’s worth some points.”

40 MILE SALOON 1495 S. Virginia St. 323-1877 Brad : We made it to 40 Mile, the old location of Chapel—now a fun rock ‘n’ roll bar. But we weren’t there very long. We went there partly because my bandmate and next door neighbor, Clint, was DJ-ing that night, and I hoped he

and I might catch a ride or split a cab together. I’d texted him when we were at Chapel, and he had still been at 40 Mile. But by the time we arrived, he was apparently missing, which was extra mysterious because he had apparently vanished, records and all. So Georgia and I just called a cab. The cab dropped me off at the same time that Clint arrived with sober driver Tim. Clint jumped out of Tim’s car with what looked like a giant grocery bag of Taco Bell. “We had to get food,” he said. I snagged a couple of anonymous tacos and stuffed them down my throat—my biggest regret of the evening—before stumbling inside and collapsing into a heap of snores, saliva and strange odors. GeorGia: I don’t remember 40 Mile, woefully enough, so instead I’ll just tell you about the baby shower I helped with the next morning. It was in an immaculate home full of elegant women, some of whom are my husband’s colleagues. I prepared by vomiting for the first time in years and trying to get the bar smell out of my hair without actually washing it. “Look at that tiny romper,” people squealed as our dear friend opened gifts and I steadied myself against walls and counter tops, leaving sweaty handprints on everything I touched. “And those itty bitty shoes!” Not my finest hour, but worth it. This is a hell of a town. Ω


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

may 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

17


BY JOSIE LUCIANO

The app and website Parlor Shows connects musicians with home venues

inger-songwriters Liam Kyle Cahill and John White played at a recent house concert called “Folk All-Stars.” On the surface it felt like many other house shows: small space, lots of people, very intimate and great sounding.

S

But unlike other house concerts, this one played out in front of a backdrop that read “Parlor Shows,” while the Emmy-winning Reno Sessions film crew recorded the concert for … posterity? Novelty? Probably for a short film. Either way, it felt like the beginning of something bigger and cooler than the name “Folk All-Stars” might suggest.

18   |  RN&R   | 

MAY 21, 2015

Step into m y pa r l o r The idea behind Parlor Shows is simple: connect musicians with house venues directly. This is accomplished the way all things are accomplished these days: as a two-part app and website platform. Currently in the beta stages of development, the Parlor Shows app is due to launch later this month. This platform will make it possible for bands and hosts to contact one another and set up shows in private homes, effectively cutting out the middlemen—promoters—and saving time and cash. “It’s the Airbnb of house shows,” said co-founder Ashley Jennings. In addition to creating Parlor Shows, Jennings is a musician in her own right, one-half of a dark and sleepy electronic duo called Agitprop.

“The reason we’re trying to solve this problem is because my husband and I have a band and although I’m pretty connected in Reno, I was still having a hard time booking shows and getting paid,” she said. The idea of starting a booking app based loosely on the Airbnb model came from Jennings’ own experience using Airbnb to save money on lodging while she was on the road. Slowly, the idea of creating a physical community grounded in online interaction seeped into Jennings’ musical brain, and Parlor Shows was born. The app itself is slick. It’s easy to look at, simple to use, and has lots of automated features. Users—whether they sign up as musicians or hosts—can make profiles that advertise their preferred music genre, set ticket prices, and match venues along Google Maps routes. There


is also a gallery feature that allows bands to view the venue before booking, as well as a sliding scale for hosts to choose what percentage (if any) they would like to take from the show. According to Jennings, most hosts aren’t terribly interested in getting paid, but the app still gives them the option. Vanessa Vancour is a host who will not take a cut. “I see the whole purpose of Parlor Shows being to support independent music,” she said. Vancour will host an outdoor Parlor concert later this summer in her backyard. “I would love to have my friends over and have a concert. … I just want to host it.” Another feature of the app is its rating system. Like Airbnb, Yelp and other review sites, Parlor Shows gives its users a way to keep each other honest. If a band trashes a house, the host is going to write about it in a review. If the host posts photos of a sizable backyard for an outdoor concert and only delivers a city balcony, bands will be able to warn other musicians. Even concert-goers can get in on the action. Tickets are purchased through the app, so in addition to getting a notification that discloses the “secret location” of the concert, consumers also receive reminders for other shows based on their preferences. After going to a concert, attendees can rate both the venue and the musicians, providing yet another layer of data for future Parlor users. “We believe the market will decide itself,” said Jennings. “We’re tying to create a product where reputation and trust are first and foremost.”

had a pretty good idea about how the app could enhance his profession. “I spend 90 percent of my time either booking shows, sending emails, making phone calls, or promoting shows. … The hardest part for me is that it leaves a lot less time for actually writing songs, playing shows and performing. I plan to use it as a supplement. I’m always going to want to have other shows, anchor shows that you lock in first to know where you’re going to be. But the best part about a house show is that you can plan it a month in advance.” The intimate house concert setting also appeals to musicians. John White, the other “Folk All-Star,” said that at the house show, “people listened to the lyrics … or at least they were quiet enough to make me imagine that they were.” To get a better sense of what it takes to operate in the music booking industry, Parlor’s main competitor is Sofar Sounds—which stands for “Sounds From A Room … Sounds.” And while the name is a bit redundant, Sofar has the advantage of maintaining its hype after being around for more than six years. Like Parlor, Sofar sets up house concerts. The website—there is no app—plays up the exclusive nature of its house shows for both bands and attendees, stating, “We put on 100+ secret concerts every month in 105+ cities, featuring talent carefully curated by our teams.” This “careful curation” is a difference between Parlor and Sofar. While aspiring Sofar musicians and concertgoers must apply for the privilege of playing and attending a Sofar show (and even then only a small percentage get in), Parlor takes away the need for staff and volunteers by simply handing over control to its users. This eliminates a bit of the exclusivity factor, but it also cuts down on waiting time and opens up the playing field to everyone. In other words, it becomes scalable—the golden feature of any app worth its weight in silicon. Ω

ASHLEY JENNINGS

Songs from a room Parlor Shows has a new downtown office, a cool logo, and two people who know what they’re doing (Jennings’ co-founder is Seattlebased CTO Casey Mees). Each day, the network of hosts and musicians grows—right now, by word of mouth and soon through the app. Even before performing at Parlor’s inaugural house concert, “Folk All Star” Liam Kyle Cahill

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

90 Auto Center Dr.

For more information, visit blog.parlorshows.com |

ARTS&CULTURE

|

IN ROTATION

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

19


20   |  RN&R   |  may 21, 2015


shop local aNd save

Power of the press Reno Press/Studio 3 “Not everybody’s going to be a Rembrandt,” says Gary Castagne, clad in an inksmeared apron and rolled-up sleeves. by Kris Vagner But he does think that folks not planning to be trailblazing, Dutch masters of Renaissance etchings might as well get their hands dirty and make some art. Photo/Kris vagner

Castagne’s mission is to make that easy by making printmaking as accessible as possible. He opened Reno Press/Studio 3 in January inside a tiny storefront on Virginia Street, across from City Plaza. He welcomes seasoned printmakers who’d like to bring in their own etching plates or linoleum blocks and run an edition on his Sturgis press. And, in the spirit of The Clay Canvas or Picasso and Wine, where people can drop by to learn to paint ceramics or canvases, he’s also set up to cater to complete beginners. He explains, “My idea was, instead of buying a piece, you could make a piece for $20.” A printmaking session costs $45, which includes instruction, studio time and materials to make two poster-sized prints. Most of Castagne’s clients start with monoprinting. It’s an easy process in which ink is spread onto a clear plate of acrylic, designs or images are made in the ink, and the plate is pressed onto paper to make one original print. The same plate can then yield several variations of that image, but no two will be exactly alike.

Gary Castagne’s mission is to make printmaking accessible.

reno Press/studio 3 is located at 3 n. virginia st. hours are usually noon-6 p.m., but can vary. Calling in advance is recommended: 250-4879.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

“This is to have people get the idea of what a monoprint is,” Castagne says. “That gets you ready to do other processes.” When someone comes in with an idea for a finished image and prior knowledge of the process, Castagne shows them the inks and the press and lets them have at it. For beginners, he’s got the equivalent of artschool training wheels at the ready: A scrapbook of about 400 photos of animals, nudes, portraits, landscapes and abstracts to help you choose a subject. He’ll demonstrate how to transfer an image onto mylar or cut a stencil of the picture using a heat tool. Then he’ll demonstrate an assortment of techniques and tools to choose from, giving as much or as little guidance as needed. Getting artist’s block just thinking about it? Castagne has a wealth of solutions, a resourceful nature and a knack for making the process look easy. “After you take the first class, you’re going to know how to do this,” he says. He demonstrates how a small rubber kitchen spatula makes marks that look like wide blades of grass. He gestures to lines in a finished print that look like dimensional, twisted thread and says, “If you want to do one of those marks, you take one of these cards.” He points to a small pile of one-inch square scraps of mat board. Those alone make at least a dozen different textures in the thinly spread ink. “It’s supposed to be spontaneous,” he says. He finds that people get into the process easily, becoming absorbed with what they’re making. Many, including Castagne, find printmaking meditative. “Once you lay ink out the rest of the world goes away—Baltimore and the Middle East,” he says. In about an hour, he takes newcomers through the entire process of making a monoprint. “This is to show people you can do anything in art,” he says. Reno Press/Studio 3 is in its nascent stages, and Castagne is still determining which direction it’ll take. He’s considering offering workshops for guest printmakers in the near future. Currently, it’s a destination on the monthly Reno Art Walk, and he welcomes calls or texts requesting hour-long, learn-to-print sessions. Ω

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

RN&R ReadeRs Receive up to 50% off Gift ceRtificates to local meRchaNts

RN&R

w w w. n e w s r e v i e w.c o m |

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

21


Mixed up Chin Chin Restaurant

REAL TEXAS BBQ

THE WAY

222 Los Altos Parkway, 570-9595 As one of the newest dining options in the Spanish Springs area, Chin Chin Restaurant has an uphill climb. The by Todd South decor is more polished than most strip-mall restaurants, lending an ambiance that says “date night” more than “bring the kids.” It offers delivery service, which might help it compete with the numerous Asian cuisine options in the area, and Chin Chin’s mix of Chinese, Thai and Hibachi dishes makes for interesting options.

you WANT IT

MENTION THIS AD & RECEIVE A DELICIOUS PIECE OF SWEET POTATO PIE... ON MANUEL!

yfish & fresh dailyfish / take-out daily / take-out orders welcome orders welcome / full bar/ with full bar hot with & cold hotsake & cold sake

highest quality & fresh fish daily, take-out

a/ Week Monday / Monday - Saturday - Saturday 11:30am 11:30am - 9:30pm - 9:30pm /with Sunday / 11:30am Sunday 11:30am - 9:00pm- 9:00pm orders welcome, full bar hot & cold sake

open 7 days a week at 11:00am

Last Seating: 7 ateline stateline y50., / take-out orders welcome /9:30pm full bar with sake Mon Sat & hot Sun& cold 9:00pm eh casinos of the casinos ay Saturday 11:30am 9:30pm / Sunday 11:30am 9:00pm oe.com 1507 So. Virginia St. - Midtown, Reno - 775.825.5225

1295 E. Moana Lane Corner of Neil & Moana

THAT’S HOW WE ROLL

775.448.9803

A& Historical Delicious Experience!

Located in wn Reno’s Midto district since

1947

Burgers • Hot Dogs • Wings • Sandwiches • Shakes • Craft Beer 1300 S. Virginia St., Reno • 775-870-1333 • 11AM-7PM Mon-Sat www.facebook.com/beefysreno 22 | RN&R |

MAY 21, 2015

Recycle this paper

os

of veggies, chicken and scallops in a savory, slightly spicy sauce. The veggies were cooked with just a bit of crunch. No complaints about the meat—quite tender and tasty. My choice of Black Pepper Delicacy was less successful. A shallow dish of diced bell pepper and onion in a dark gravy comprised the “black pepper sauce,” perhaps so-named for its color. I certainly couldn’t detect any peppercorn in this condiment served with battered shrimp, scallops, and “crab” (obviously surimi, a.k.a. krabwith-a-K). The batter was similar to tempura, though lacking in crunch or flavor. I dunked the first couple pieces in gravy, but eventually gave up and freed the seafood from its dense, spongy cocoon. Though I don’t mind surimi per se, I’d really love it if all restaurants would identify it as such instead of calling it crab. Our dining companions chose to order single entrees, which meant I got to try a couple more dishes. A dish of Singapore rice noodles was agreed to be everyone’s favorite ($9.99), a bed of thin vermicelli supporting chicken, shrimp, bean sprouts, onion, and scallion in a spicy curry sauce redolent of Chinese Five Spice blend. An order of teriyaki New York strip steak rounded out the meal, with chunks of medium rare beef and al dente veggies ($15.99). Though our overall meal was pleasant, there were service snafus throughout. The wrong soup was delivered, then replaced, and everyone’s entrees arrived with considerable time gaps between them. Last to the table was a mistake plate of some chicken dish rather than the steak, so time was lost waiting for its replacement. When the correct plate finally arrived, the vegetables were nice and hot, but the beef was barely warm. There were plenty of good flavors, but the staff have a lot to learn about timing. My order of hot sake ($5.99) didn’t arrive until after the appetizers and one of the entrees. Chin Chin has only been open a few weeks, so hopefully it'll find it's path up that hill. Ω Photo/ALLison Young

all you can eat all you can eat all you can eat

sushi all the time sushi all the time sushiall the time

we’ve arrived! FINALLY...

Singapore rice noodles are "everyone's favorite" at Chin Chin Restaurant.

For more information, visit chinchinnv.com.

After being seated, we were served fried wonton strips with (canned?) sweet and sour sauce and Chinese hot mustard. The hostess was friendly, but we had a pretty severe language gap with our server. Thankfully, the hostess came back and sorted things out. My wife and I chose Combination Dinner C (for two or more, $15.99 per person). The meal is served with a choice of entree from a list of 11 options, steamed or fried rice, and one of several soups. The appetizer plate featured two pieces each of crab rangoon, fried prawns, beef sticks and vegetable egg rolls. My wife’s hot and sour soup needed more heat. My order of wonton soup was better—nothing special, but acceptable. The appetizers were pretty good. The beef sticks were skewers of marinated, tender flank steak served with teriyaki sauce. Butterflied prawns were breaded and crispy, as were fried triangles of wonton wrapper and cheese. Unfortunately, the vegetables inside the egg rolls were undercooked and stringy, making it nearly impossible to bite through without leaving the contents all over the plate. My wife’s Hibachi Triple Delight entree was quite good, with a mix


Think

Committed to Supporting Local Farmers Proud to serve organic meals

Free

crack the code

404 Scytale Barrel-Aged IImperial Stout is delicately crafted using ingredients in of the highest order and guided by our love of brewing – this is one deeply comp complex and intimate Imperial Stout weighing in i at 13% ABV. Aged in whiskey barrels for precisely precis 404 days, the result is a layered tapestry of su sublime aromas and tastes that will lead you on o an unexpected journey – in more ways th than one.

Available as a li limited release at our brewpubs and select beEr stores whil while it lasts.

Mention this ad to join our email list and

Reno:

5525 S. Virginia St. 775.284.7711

Sparks:

846 Victorian Ave. 775.355.7711

greatbasinbrewingco.com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

may 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

23


Saturday, May 30th

The Reno Bead Shop and Too Soul Tea

Max varoom Mad Max: Fury Road George Miller has been trying to follow up Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome for 30 years. He was all set to go with Mel Gibson in a fourth movie for the franchise before the first of many setbacks interrupted the flow of things. Then, of course, Mr. Gibson said some very bad words during an arrest and on his girlfriend’s answering machine, making him by virtually unmarketable due to his temper and Bob Grimm generally bad outlook on things. Unfortunately for Mel, the character wasn’t named Mad But b g ri m m @ ne w s re v i e w . c o m Also Extremely Bigoted, Sexist, Anti-Semitic and Stupid Drunk Max. So here we are, 30 years since Tina Turner put on that goofy wig and sang that lame song for Thunderdome. After a bunch of films involving talking animals (Babe: Pig in the City, Happy Feet), Miller is back in his post apocalyptic world messing around with fast rigs on desert landscapes. He also has a new Max, that being Tom Hardy, and Charlize Theron along for the ride.

4

"Watch out! Those spicy burritos made me explode!"

1 Poor

2 Fair

3 Good

4 Very Good

5 excellent

24 | RN&R |

MAY 21, 2015

The results are a blast, probably the best in the franchise when it comes to action. I’m going to have to give a few points to Gibson over Hardy for his Max portrayal. Hardy is good in the role, but Gibson is the original and best Max, even if he is a total asshole. The film starts off with a shot reminiscent of The Road Warrior (a.k.a. Mad Max 2), and then it just goes berserk. Max gets himself captured by a really disgusting looking, villainous ruler named Immortan Joe (Hugh Keays-Byrne) and finds himself hanging upside down and providing blood for a pale, bald Joe minion, Nux (Nicholas Hoult). A shaven-headed Theron shows up as Imperator Furiosa, a one-time loyalist of Immortan Joe, who tricks him and kidnaps

his wives, intent upon taking them to some sort of green promised land. When Joe figures out she’s making a run for it, his soldiers (who look a little like the cave creatures from The Descent) take off after her. This includes Nux, with Max strapped to the front of his car wearing a facemask reminiscent of his Bane getup in The Dark Knight Rises. As far as plot goes, that’s about it. Theron and the wives try to drive really fast, and those pursuing her drive really fast, too. Along the way, they pick up a few other characters and some folks get mulched under car wheels. You get the picture. What makes Miller’s latest a cut above the rest is a major reliance on practical effects for the stunts. Sure, CGI shows up (and when it does, it’s very well done), but much of what we see is stunt people doing crazy, crazy things in front of cameras. The folks who put the look of this movie together, from it’s terrific cinematography, to its costuming to its incredible stunt work, all deserve praise and extra beers. The pounding soundtrack and the editing work to help to make this a true pulse racer. It must be said that no matter how frantic the action gets, there’s a certain visual clarity to everything happening in the movie. It’s easy on the eyes, even when the edits are rapid paced. Theron brings a nice bit of gravitas to this blockbuster. Sporting a CGI mechanical arm, face paint and a permastern expression, she makes for one badass rebel. Again, Hardy is fine in the Max role, but the really great performance in this film belongs to Theron. Hardy actually spends much of the movie silent, especially in the early going. He looks great, even when he’s playing the part of a Blood Bag. Hoult actually manages to be quite moving under all of his makeup as the kamikaze who has a change of heart. This is supposed to be the first in a new trilogy, but it should be noted that Pitch Perfect 2 kicked its ass at the box office, so it isn’t exactly setting the world on fire. Let’s hope that critical praise and word of mouth result in a healthy worldwide run for Mad Max: Fury Road. I want more. Ω


4

The D Train

4

Ex Machina

Men playing with microchips learn that perhaps highly intelligent robots aren’t the best idea in this competent and exciting directorial debut from Alex Garland, who also wrote the script. Computer programmer Caleb (Domhnall Gleeson) wins a weekend hanging out with his eccentric, reclusive boss Nathan (Oscar Isaac) at his secluded house in the middle of nowhere. Shortly after arriving, Caleb learns that he’s to take part in an experiment where he must interact with Nathan’s latest creation: a mightily attractive and lifelike robot named Ava (Alicia Vikander). Caleb is told to analyze Ava’s legitimacy as a full-blown A.I., a thinking robot with emotional capability. He does this, and develops a robot crush along the way. Not only is Nathan playing god, but he’s totally using Caleb as a guinea pig. While Garland could’ve easily made this a Caleb vs. Nathan affair, he tosses in enough variables and throws plenty of curveballs to keep the audience guessing. The film works as a thriller, science fiction, a mystery, and even passes a few horror movie tests. Isaac is developing into one of his generation’s best actors, and he’s quite the chameleon. His Nathan is a slithery, hard-drinking, narcissistic, brilliant mess of a human, and a far cry from the grouchy folk singer he played in Inside Llewyn Davis. Garland has been kicking around Hollywood for years, delivering solid screenplays for the likes of 28 Days Later, Dredd and Sunshine. His work behind the camera here definitely points to a future directing if he wants it.

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

The latest Furious movie says goodbye to series mainstay Paul Walker while taking car chases to seriously outlandish and fantastical extremes. In some ways, the film has become more of a science fiction offering rather than a car chase movie, and that’s fine by me. I have to admit that part of me got uncomfortable watching Paul Walker racing around in cars a little over a year after he died in a fiery car crash. You can say Walker died doing something he loved, but I’m thinking irresponsible and reckless speeding dropped way down on his favorite things list during the final moments of his life. Like, to the way, way bottom of that list. That said, Furious 7 does spark some life into a very tired franchise by going totally bananas, and it’s pretty remarkable how Walker, who had allegedly only filmed half of his scenes before he died, is inserted into the movie posthumously. Director James Wan, primarily known for horror movies like Saw and The Conjuring, has delivered the franchise’s best offering since the first one. This movie gets my blessing for the sequence involving Vin Diesel’s Dominic Toretto and Walker’s Brian O’Conner jumping a car through not one but two skyscrapers in Abu Dhabi. Will there be an eighth film, even though Walker is no longer with us? Um, given that the movie made nearly $144 million in its opening weekend, I think it’s a foregone conclusion that Universal will find a way to keep the engines running on this sucker.

are you receiving less than $8.25 an hour or $90.00 for a 12 hour shift (not including tips) ?

If yes, you may have a claim for unpaid minimum wages. Please call 702-383-6085 for a FREE, NO OBLIGATION, CONFIDENTIAL CONSULTATION with an Attorney with extensive experience in the handling of unpaid minimum wage claims. Or visit our website:

4

Slow West

Michael Fassbender just keeps on rolling with this one, a gritty, appropriately downbeat Western from writer-director John Maclean. Fassbender plays Silas, a cynical, grouchy rider on the American frontier in the 19th century who comes across Jay, a Scottish boy (Kodi-Smit McPhee) traveling alone in search of Rose (Caren Pistorious), a girl he loves. She and her father had to flee to America after an accident, and now they have a bounty on their heads. Silas knows of the bounty, but he doesn’t tell Jay. After coming across a group of bandits led by Payne (the ever reliable Ben Mendelsohn), Silas must decide on whose side he’s going to back, the boy or the bandits. It’s a great ride, with a vivid depiction of the Old West unlike any I’ve seen before. By the time the action reaches Rose’s farm, a single house out in the middle of nowhere, you get a sense of just how few people were inhabiting that part of the world at this time. McPhee is heartbreaking as a young man who just doesn’t get it, and Fassbender continues to prove he’s a cinematic treasure. They make for a great screen duo. (Available for rent on iTunes, Amazon.com and On Demand during limited theatrical release.)

RECYCLE THIS PAPER.

I have never attended a high school reunion, for my high school is very far away and, quite frankly, there are just a few too many Long Island, New York, douchebags from the mid-’80s that I fear have become superduper douchebags here in the now. Sorry, but I just can’t share a punch bowl with some of those tools. I mean, one of those shitheads put my winter coat in the boy’s locker room toilet. I have, however, seen many a high school reunion movie, and this is one of the better ones. Dan Landsman (Jack Black) is the self-proclaimed chairman of his school’s reunion committee (Hey, he has the password to their Facebook page). Dan wasn’t very popular in his high school days with his classmates, and those same classmates aren’t all that crazy about him now. One night after a typically humdrum evening with his wife Stacey (Kathryn Hahn), Dan spies a commercial for Banana Boat sunscreen that has a familiar face in it. It’s Oliver Lawless (Marsden), the coolest kid from his high school, and he has apparently made the big time out in Los Angeles. Dan plots to get Oliver to attend the reunion, thinking it will boost attendance and make him a hero for getting the coolest kid in class to attend. He flies to L.A., woos Oliver, and things happen. Black and Marsden wonderfully perform the aftermath of the L.A. visit and their behavior at the actual reunion is priceless. When this one comes out on video, it will make for a helluva double feature with Grosse Pointe Blank.

OPINION

3

Furious 7

You can’t accuse director Joss Whedon of “second verse, same as the first” with this sequel. As things turn out, perhaps it would’ve been OK to retain more of the good humor, camp and non-cluttered thrills that made the original Avengers such a gas. This latest convergence of Marvel superheroes is a flat affair. Nothing of any real consequence happens here other than a bunch of scenes teasing future Marvel movies and some action sequences that lack clarity. With the exception of an interesting smackdown between Iron Man and the Hulk, the action sequences feel repetitive. The main villain, Ultron, is a series of robots voiced by James Spader looking to wipe humans off the face of the Earth. It’s surprising how underwhelming his efforts wind up being. If you’re an Avengers fan, I guess you have to see Age of Ultron simply because it sets up a series of other films and you might find yourself lost when watching future movies. As for Whedon, perhaps he was the wrong man for the gig. He’s gone on record as saying he didn’t have the best of times making this movie, and the fatigue shows. The sequel searches for a darker tonal shift, a sort of Empire Strikes Back for the Avengers. The result is one of the year’s most crushing cinematic letdowns.

taxi drivers

YOU’RE WELCOME, NATURE.

2

Avengers: Age of Ultron

1

Unfriended

There have been some good—actually great—horror movies released in the last couple of years. This, the latest entry in the tired found-footage subgenre, isn’t one of them. What you get here is an entire film that requires you to watch somebody’s computer screen where a bunch of obnoxious teens are skyping one another. A ghostly presence inexplicably enters the conversation and knocks off the kids, one by one, while they scream and plead for mercy. They, of course, never go out of frame for too long and always manage to take their camera with them no matter how much their lives are in danger. The chat starts with Blaire (Shelley Hennig) and Mitch (Moses Jacob Storm … yes, that’s his name), a boyfriend and girlfriend talking about the dirty things they will do on prom night when a bunch of their friends rudely join the chat party. They all goof on each other and wonder who the unidentified person is who has mysteriously joined the chat. As it so happens, the chat is taking place on the oneyear anniversary of their friend Laura’s suicide. Laura (Heather Sossaman) couldn’t stand the public ridicule she endured after somebody posted a video of her passed out and dumping her pants at a party. Now it appears Laura, or somebody pretending to be Laura by using her social networking accounts, is out for revenge. If you like horror, go with The Babadook or It Follows. Those films actually have real narratives where the protagonists actually leave the house and there are real cinematographers and editors involved. If you have strong urge to see this, just Skype a couple of your friends, call them some bad names, and stare at them while they yell at you on your home screen for 82 minutes. It’s basically the same thing, and would probably be far more entertaining.

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

taxidriverlawsuits.com leon greenberg, esq. 2965 south Jones Boulevard las vegas, nevada 89146

702-383-6085

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

25


uine n e G

Northern Nevada Health Shoppe

Donate your Marijuana

GRAND OPENING EVENT windchimes, tapestries, • • • • •

old ! NS EV Aequip L U Ament TIO

clothing, stickers, patches, jewelry & piperoom

• AIDS • Muscle Spasms • Chemotherapy • Cancer • Seizures • PTSD • We’ll pick up from• Severe you forNausea just $25• MS • Glaucoma • Cachexia • Severeschools, Pain low-income families, donation supports • Your non-proďŹ ts, locals with disabilities and small business

œAnd don’t forget to Try our fresh dipped incense!œ

10 free sticks

• Responsible recycling of non-usable parts

Kind Releaf C O N S U LTA N T S

WITH THIS COUPON. EXP 6-3-15.

(775) 224-2344 • WWW.KINDRELEAFNV.WEBS.COM

Palm Readings Call new2u!

• crystals • herbs • candles • tarot readings • spells & classes • Affordable diagnosis & repair • incenses & oils • System/virus cleanup • Windows rebuild magick you ca • From just $25 n feel (775)329-1126 new2ucomputers.org

1004 S. Wells Ave. 775-722-6317

THE MOANA CONSTRUCTION SUCKS! Anything Grows Hydroponics 'T!1999 WE DONSince

everything in the discounted % %

the Take a break from entire store our by p sto & ffic tra re. sto e Lan e Kietzk Our new MidTown ! store is open, too

10 - 40

will beat any local price by 5% Reno

190 W. Moana Ln 775.828.1460

with receipt pRi c e

LoWest uA

G

1921 Victorian Ave., Sparks NV • (775) 331-8554 Mon-Sat 11-7 • Sun 12-5

FREE 5 Minute er blue? mput Co

ed

Medical

Changing office computers?

RAnte

822 S. Virginia AnythingGrowsHydro.com

Think Free THE MOANA CONSTRUCTION SUCKS!

hundreds of local products and gift FHUWLÂżFDWHVIRUVHUYLFHV

GRRUSUL]HVL3DGUDIĂ€H entertainment

tour of famous automobile collection

Saturday, November 3rd

National Automobile Museum 10 S. Lake Street 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Admission is $2 or cans of food. Free parking, including parking and shuttle at lot on the corner of Virginia and Court Streets.

ZZZ5HQRJRY

ine u n e G

Northern Nevada

EvEry guy should your girlFriend’s bE hErE. Forget salon, say goodbye to mom’s stylist, its time to man uP!!! PEriod. your

25% off

JOSH ARIAS at MAybeRRy SAlOn And bARbeRS 1460 Mayberry dr., Reno nV 89509 775-333-9900 | barberArias.com

22   |   RN&R  OCTOBER 25, 2012 ||    RN&R 26   |  may  21,||  2015

full service

hair cut, shave & shampoo (GREAT GIFT IDEA)


Good sports Team Francis A good band needs shared goals, common passions, and a sense of camaraderie. A good band needs teamwork. by Kent Irwin Sometimes, this means wearing uniforms. The members of Team Francis, a new indie-pop outfit based in Carson City, aren’t afraid to match outfits, occasionally sporting red tracksuits at gigs and photo shoots. There’s no specific sport present in the band’s theme, though they admit they’ve considered doubling Team Francis as a bowling or synchronized swimming team. Photo/Kent IrwIn

To add to the embarrassment, the onstage musicians included Ivan and Samantha’s parents, Carolyn and Vince Gates. Luckily, the elder Gates were well accustomed to stage mishaps. Carolyn has played in many notable bands in Northern Nevada, including drumming for local indie favorite Blunderbusst. Vince has been a member of the music scene for many years, and currently owns Play Your Own Music in Carson City. “The best part about growing up in a musical family was that we never lacked the gear we needed,” said Samantha. “If we needed drums, amps, whatever—it was all there.” Samantha and Ivan’s upbringing left them with the ability to play many instruments in many different styles. In addition to singing and playing guitar, Samantha is adept at violin and saxophone. Ivan is skilled in both guitar and bass, playing an upright bass in an acoustic country band with Samantha. The multi-instrumental talent isn’t just limited to the Gates siblings, however. Altus also displays his talent for hip-hop verse in Team Francis, rapping into a mic while keeping the beat on his drum set during one of the band’s songs. Team Francis cite electronic artists, new wave and contemporary experimental bands as influences. However, their live shows lend themselves to more of a rock direction. “We can’t play slow, beautiful songs,” said Samantha. “I’ve tried to write them, but any time I bring them to the band they take it to this whole other place.” Team Francis’ energy level plays a compelling dynamic with Samantha’s lyrics, which are often intimate and emotional confessions, accented by moments of metaphor and symbolism. “Our songs are very danceable, so that’s part of the reason it doesn’t feel like I’m reading my diary onstage,” said Samantha. Team Francis enjoy being close to their audiences, literally and figuratively. The trio agrees that their music lends itself best to small rooms, preferably basements and living rooms. “It’s great to be on the same level as the audience,” said Ivan. Ω

The sports-team theme is primarily an aesthetic choice, but has also helped to strengthen the bond between the members, who regrouped after a previous incarnation—Ladies and Gentlemen— disbanded. Their previous singer parted with a majority of the band’s songbook, allowing singer/keyboardist Samantha Gates to explore her own songwriting as leader of Team Francis. Since paring down, she believes the group has become a stronger, more tight-knit unit. “The team is the three of us,” said Samantha. “You can’t be on Team Francis, but you can be on team Team Francis.” Bonds between the three musicians were forged long before the formation of the band. Samantha and bassist/guitarist Ivan Gates are siblings, whose first performance as a band was at a first-grade talent show covering Blondie. Drummer Bryce Altus has a history of performing with Ivan, including an ill-advised show at the Knitting Factory as a part of a classic-rock cover band called The Cutters. “I broke a bass string 10 seconds into the first song,” recalled Ivan.

A close-knit band: Bryce Altus, Ivan Gates and Samantha Gates are Team Francis.

For more information, visit www.facebook. com/teamfrancisreno.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

27


THURSDAY 5/21 3RD STREET

Anima Stereo, 9pm, no cover

5 STAR SALOON

Karaoke, 10pm, no cover

Dance party w/DJ DoublePlay, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after

Dance party w/DJ DoublePlay, 10pm, no cover before 10pm, $5 after

Karaoke, 10pm, Tu, W, no cover

BAR OF AMERICA

Rustler’s Moon, 8pm, no cover

Paul Covarelli, 8pm, no cover

Paul Covarelli, 8pm, no cover

816 Highway 40 West, Verdi; (775) 351-3206

BRASSERIE ST. JAMES

901 S. Center St., (775) 348-8888

CARGO AT WHITNEY PEAK HOTEL

JJ Grey and MoFro, Mark Sexton Band, 8pm, $25

255 N. Virginia St., (775) 398-5400

CEOL IRISH PUB

538 S. Virginia St., (775) 329-5558

Pub Quiz Trivia Night, 8pm, no cover

COMMA COFFEE

COTTONWOOD RESTAURANT & BAR 10142 Rue Hilltop, Truckee; (530) 587-5711

3rd Street, 125 W. Third St., 323-5005: Comedy Night & Improv w/Patrick Shillito, W, 9pm, no cover

EL CORTEZ LOUNGE

Catch a Rising Star, Silver Legacy, 407 N. Virginia St., 329-4777: Steven Michael Quezada, Mike Robles, Th, Su, 7:30pm, $15.95; F, 7:30pm, 10pm, $15.95; Sa, 7:30pm, 10pm, $17.95; Nick Rutherford, Tu, W, 7:30pm, $15.95

FUEGO

Reno-Tahoe Comedy at Pioneer Underground, 100 S. Virginia St., 686-6600: Quinn Dahle, F, 8:30pm; Sa, 6:30pm, 9:30pm; Su, 7:30pm, $10-$15

|

RN&R

|

MAY 21, 2015

2002 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-9799

Traditional Irish Tune Session, 7pm, Tu, no cover

Sean McGuinness, 9pm, no cover

Carson Feet Warmers, 11:30am, Tu, no cover Dave Leather, noon, W, no cover

Hellbilly Bandits, 9:30pm, no cover

Burn Thee Insects, 7pm, M, Karaoke, 9pm, Tu, Open Mic/Ladies Night, 8:30pm, W, no cover

9BelowZero, 8pm, no cover

Karaoke Night, 6:30pm, Tu, no cover

Live flamenco guitar music, 5:30pm, no cover

170 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-1800

THE GRID BAR & GRILL

Karaoke w/Andrew, 9pm, no cover

8545 N. Lake Blvd., Kings Beach; (530) 546-0300

HANGAR BAR

Karaoke Kat, 9pm, no cover

10603 Stead Blvd., Stead; (775) 677-7088

HARRY’S SPORTS BAR & GRILL

Bass Heavy, 9pm, W, $TBA

Canyon White Open Mic Night, 8pm, no cover Open mic, 7pm, no cover

1100 E. Plumb Ln., (775) 828-7665

HIMMEL HAUS

Open Mic Night, 9pm, M, no cover Trivia Night, 9pm, W, no cover

3819 Saddle Rd., South Lake Tahoe; (530) 314-7665 140 Vesta St., (775) 742-1858

Strange on the Range, 7pm, W, no cover

DJ Trivia, 9pm, no cover

ELBOW ROOM BAR

THE HOLLAND PROJECT

Monday Night Open Mic, 8pm, M, no cover

Sheldon Felich, 7pm, no cover VooDoo Dogz, 9:30pm, no cover

275 E. Fourth St., (775) 324-1917

235 W. Second St., (775) 324-4255

The Improv at Harveys Cabaret, Harveys Lake Tahoe, Stateline, (800) 553-1022: Tommy Savitt, Francis Dilorinzo, Th-F, Su, 9pm, $25; Sa, 8pm, 10pm, $30; Scott Henry, Matt Knudsen, W, 9pm, $25

Darcy & Lucas, 7pm, no cover

DAVIDSON’S DISTILLERY

Carson Nugget, 507 N. Carson St., Carson City, 882-1626: Kirby St. Romain, F, 9pm, $15-$18

Neil O’Kane, 9pm, no cover

Post show s online by registering at www.newsr eview.com /reno. Dea dline is the Friday befo re publication .

World Dance Open Floor, 8pm, no cover

312 S. Carson St., Carson City; (775) 883-2662

Comedy

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/25-5/27

Cosmic Boogaloo, 9pm, no cover

BAR-M-BAR

May 21, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory 211 N. Virginia St. 323-5648

SUNDAY 5/24

125 W. Third St., (775) 323-5005

10042 Donner Pass Rd., Truckee; (530) 587-2626

28

SATURDAY 5/23

DG Kicks, 9pm, Tu, no cover After Mic, 11:30pm, W, no cover

132 West St., (775) 329-2878

Grieves

FRIDAY 5/22

Blues jam w/Blue Haven, 9:30pm, no cover

L.A. Witch, Has A Shadow, Budz, 8pm, $7

Black Sheep Wall, Colombian Necktie, Glacier, Mustakrakish, 7:30pm, $5-$7

Ed Schrader’s Music Beat, Ghost Friends LTD, Franc Friday, 8pm, Tu, $5


THURSDAY 5/21 5/21 THURSDAY

JUB JUB’S JUB’S THIRST THIRST PARLOR PARLOR JUB 71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652

FRIDAY 5/22 5/22 FRIDAY

SATURDAY 5/23 5/23 SATURDAY

NBK, Type Two, Tino, Dom J, JBLegit, NBK, Type Two, Tino, Dom J,Suave JBLegit, Motivated Motion Dancers, Boys, Motivated Suave$16 Boys, Mob Liven,Motion RoachDancers, Gigz, 7:30pm, Mob Liven, Roach Gigz, 7:30pm, $16

Casting Competition of Bombshells Casting Competition of Bombshells & Burlesque, 9pm, $10 & Burlesque, 9pm, $10

71 S. Wells Ave., (775) 384-1652 1) Showroom 2) Main Bar 1) Showroom 2) Main Bar

SUNDAY 5/24 5/24 SUNDAY

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/25-5/27 5/25-5/27 MONDAY-WEDNESDAY Strung Out, Red City Radio, La Armada, Strung City Radio, La Armada, Pears, Out, 7pm,Red Tu, $18 Pears, 7pm, Tu, $18

THE JUNGLE JUNGLE THE 246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

Outspoken: Open Mic Night, Outspoken: 7pm, M, no Open coverMic Night, 7pm, M, no cover Apocalyptica, Art of Dying, Apocalyptica, Art of Dying, 8pm, W, $20-$40 8pm, W, $20-$40

246 W. First St., (775) 329-4484

KNITTING FACTORY FACTORY CONCERT CONCERT HOUSE HOUSE KNITTING 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648 211 N. Virginia St., (775) 323-5648

Grieves, Grayskul, The Halve Two, Grieves, Grayskul, The Halve Two, 8pm, $13-$30 8pm, $13-$30

THE LOVING LOVING CUP CUP THE 188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

Whatitdo Wednesday, 9pm, W, no cover Whatitdo Wednesday, 9pm, W, no cover

188 California Ave., (775) 322-2480

MOODY’S BISTRO BISTRO BAR BAR & & BEATS BEATS MOODY’S 10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688 10007 Bridge St., Truckee; (530) 587-8688

Truth Cartel, 8pm, no cover Truth Cartel, 8pm, no cover

George Souza Trio, 8:30pm, no cover George Souza Trio, 8:30pm, no cover

George Souza Trio, 8:30pm, no cover George Souza Trio, 8:30pm, no cover

O’SKIS PUB PUB & & GRILLE GRILLE O’SKIS 840 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 359-7547 PADDY & & IRENE’S IRENE’S IRISH IRISH PUB PUB PADDY 906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484 906-A Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 358-5484

May 26, 8 p.m. May 26, 8 p.m. Holland Project Holland Project 140 Vesta St. 140 Vesta St. 742-1858 742-1858

Shamrockit Open Mic Night, Shamrockit Open Mic Night, 6pm, no cover 6pm, no cover

840 Victorian Ave., Sparks; (775) 359-7547

Acoustic Wonderland Singer-Songwriter Acoustic Wonderland Singer-Songwriter Showcase, 8pm, no cover Showcase, 8pm, no cover

Karaoke w/Cyco Mike, 9pm, no cover Karaoke w/Cyco Mike, 9pm, no cover

POLO LOUNGE LOUNGE POLO 1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

Johnny Lipka’s Gemini, 9pm, no cover Johnny Lipka’s Gemini, 9pm, no cover

RED DOG DOG SALOON SALOON RED 76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

Rose’s Pawn Shop, Six Mile Station, Frankie Rose’s PawntheShop, SixLine, Mile Station, Frankie Boots and County 8pm, $12-$16 Boots and the County Line, 8pm, $12-$16

1559 S. Virginia St., (775) 322-8864

76 N. C St., Virginia City; (775) 847-7474

Johnny Lipka’s Gemini, 9pm, no cover Johnny Lipka’s Gemini, 9pm, no cover

RUBEN’S CANTINA CANTINA RUBEN’S 1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, W, no cover Open Mic Night, 7pm, M, W, no cover Reggae Night, 10pm, no cover Reggae Night, 10pm, no cover

1483 E. Fourth St., (775) 622-9424

SHEA’S TAVERN TAVERN SHEA’S 715 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-4774

Kevin Seconds, Lucas Young and the Kevin Seconds, Young7pm, and $5-$7 the Wilderness, NickLucas Ramirez, Wilderness, Nick Ramirez, 7pm, $5-$7

SINGER SOCIAL SOCIAL CLUB CLUB SINGER 219 W. Second St., (775) 657-9466

Blues Jam Thursday, 7pm, no cover Blues Jam Thursday, 7pm, no cover

SPARKS LOUNGE LOUNGE SPARKS 1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 409-3340

Thursday Showcase, 8pm, no cover Thursday Showcase, 8pm, no cover

715 S. Virginia St., (775) 786-4774

219 W. Second St., (775) 657-9466

1237 Baring Blvd., Sparks; (775) 409-3340

Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover Hip Hop Open Mic, 10pm, W, no cover

Marones, South Shore Riot, 8pm, $5 Marones, South Shore Riot, 8pm, $5

Local Music Night w/local bands Local Music bands or local DJs,Night 9pm,w/local no cover or local DJs, 9pm, no cover Patrick Shillito, Paul Spock, Meghan Patrick Paul Spock, Meghan Simons,Shillito, Jenny PezdeSpencer, 8pm, $5 Simons, Jenny PezdeSpencer, 8pm, $5

445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

STUDIO ON ON 4TH 4TH STUDIO 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 737-9776 432 E. Fourth St., (775) 737-9776

Tuesday Night Trivia, 8pm, Tu, Reno Beer and Tuesday Nightw/guest Trivia, 8pm, Reno Beer and Record Club DJs,Tu, 9pm, W, no cover Record Club w/guest DJs, 9pm, W, no cover

Dance party, 9pm, no cover Dance party, 9pm, no cover

Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover Sunday Jazz, 2pm, no cover

17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

WILDFLOWER VILLAGE VILLAGE WILDFLOWER 4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769

1) The Writers’ Block Open Mic,

1) Reno Music Project Open Mic, 1)7pm, Reno noMusic coverProject Open Mic, 7pm, no cover

1) The Writers’ Block Open Mic, 4275-4395 W. Fourth St., (775) 787-3769 1) Golden Rose Cafe 2) Green Fairy Pub 3) Cabaret 7pm, no cover 1) Golden Rose Cafe 2) Green Fairy Pub 3) Cabaret 7pm, no cover

THESE DON’T MIX

3) Jack Di Carlo, 5pm, no cover 3) Jack Di Carlo, 5pm, no cover

1) Comedy Power Hour Open Mic, 1)8pm Comedy Tu, noPower cover Hour Open Mic, 8pm Tu, no cover

hour A happy RI, 4PM-7 PM NEVERER MON-F DRINKS & COV GE $2$2 WELL BUD/BU D LIGHT CHAR

THESE DON’T MIX

VooDooDogz

| |

GREEN GREEN

| |

FEATURE STORY FEATURE STORY

| |

ARTS&CULTURE ARTS&CULTURE

| |

IN ROTATION IN ROTATION

| |

Drink specials $5 DOMESTIC PITCHERS ON SAT, 10AM-6PM AND ALL DAY SUNDAY MEMORIAL WEEKEND

Friday, May 22nd • 9:30pm Saturday, May 23nd • 9:30pm Sunday, May 24th • 9:30pm

Think you know your limits? Think again. If you drink, don’t drive. Period.

NEWS NEWS

May 26, 7 p.m. May 26, 7 p.m. Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor Jub Jub’s Thirst Parlor 71 S. Wells Ave. 71 S. Wells Ave. 384-1652 384-1652

The 7 Deadly Sins Burlesque, The Deadly Sins Burlesque, 9pm,7 $10-$20 9pm, $10-$20

WILD RIVER RIVER GRILLE GRILLE WILD 17 S. Virginia St., (775) 284-7455

| |

Strung Out Out Strung

Jazz Jam Tuesday w/First Take, Jazz Tuesday 8pm,Jam Tu, no cover w/First Take, 8pm, Tu, no cover

ST. JAMES JAMES INFIRMARY INFIRMARY ST. 445 California Ave., (775) 657-8484

OPINION OPINION

Ed Schrader’s Schrader’s Ed Music Beat Music Beat

ART OF THE STATE ART OF THE STATE

| |

FOODFINDS FOODFINDS

| |

FILM FILM

| |

MUSICBEAT MUSICBEAT

| |

The Hellbilly Bandits

Burn Thee Insects

DAVIDSONS DISTILLERY 275 E. 4TH ST., RENO, NV • DOWNTOWN • 3 BLOCKS EAST OF VIRGINIA ST. NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS | THIS WEEK | MISCELLANY | MAY 21, 2015 | RN&R NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS | THIS WEEK | MISCELLANY | MAY 21, 2015 | RN&R

| |

29 29


ATLANTIS CASINO RESORT SPA 3800 S. Virginia St., (775) 825-4700 1) Grand Ballroom Stage 2) Cabaret

CRYSTAL BAY CLUB

14 Hwy. 28, Crystal Bay; (775) 833-6333 1) Crown Room 2) Red Room

The Relationship May 23, 7:30 p.m. Harrah’s Lake Tahoe 15 Highway 50 Stateline 588-6611

ELDORADO RESORT CASINO 345 N. Virginia St., (775) 786-5700 1) Showroom 2) Brew Brothers 3) NoVi

GRAND SIERRA RESORT

THURSDAY 5/21

FRIDAY 5/22

SATURDAY 5/23

SUNDAY 5/24

MONDAY-WEDNESDAY 5/25-5/27

2) Cook Book, 8pm, no cover

1) LeAnn Rimes, 8pm, $55-$75 2) Cook Book, 4pm, no cover In A Fect, 10pm, no cover

2) Cook Book, 4pm, no cover In A Fect, 10pm, no cover

2) In A Fect, 8pm, no cover

2) Atomika, 8pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

2) Hirie, Ethan Tucker, 9pm, no cover

2) Just Chill, 10pm, no cover

1) Naive Melodies, 9pm, no cover

1) AJ Ghent Band, 10pm, no cover

2) The London Souls, 10pm, W, no cover

1) Tap Factory, 7pm, $26.95

1) Tap Factory, 7pm, $26.95 3) DJ Roni Romance, 9pm, no cover Tom Drinnon, 10pm, no cover

1) Tap Factory, 7pm, 9:30pm, $26.95 3) DJ Roni Romance, 9pm, no cover Tom Drinnon, 10pm, no cover

1) Tap Factory, 7pm, $26.95

1) Tap Factory, 7pm Tu, W, $26.95 2) Live Band Karaoke, 10pm, M, DJ Chris English, 10pm, Tu, Cash Presley, 10:30pm, W, no cover

2) DJ Rick Gee, 10pm, $15-$30 3) Boots & Daisy Dukes w/DJ Jamie G, 10pm, no cover

2) DJ Peeti V, 10pm, $15 3) County Social Saturdays w/DJ Jamie G, 10pm, no cover

2) Country Night with Jamie G, 10pm, $TBA

1) Cemetery Sun, 9pm, no cover

1) Jon Wayne and the Pain, 9pm, no cover

2) DJ JosBeatz, 10pm, $20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

1) The Relationship, 7:30pm, $27 2) DJ Rick Gee, 10pm, $20 3) Arty the Party, 9pm, no cover

2) Flirt Thursdays, 10pm, no cover

2500 E. Second St., (775) 789-2000 3) Honky Tonk Thursdays w/DJ Jamie G, 1) Grand Theater 2) Lex Nightclub 3) Sports Book 10pm, no cover 4) Summit Pavilion 5) Silver State Pavilion

HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO 50 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (844) 588-7625 1) Vinyl 2) Outdoor Arena

HARRAH’S LAKE TAHOE

1) Josh Budro Band, 9pm, W, no cover

Karaoke

15 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (775) 588-6611 1) South Shore Room 2) Peek Nightclub 3) Center Stage Lounge

Cobra Lounge at Asian Noodles, 1290 E. Plumb Lane, Ste. 1, 828-7227: Cash Karaoke w/Jacques Simard, Sa, 8pm, no cover

1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 1) Nashville Unplugged: The Story Behind 219 N. Center St., (775) 788-2900 the Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 the Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 the Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 the Song, 8pm, $29.50-$40.50 the Song, 8pm, M, $29.50-$40.50 1) Sammy’s Showroom 2) The Zone 3) Carolyn Dolan, 8pm, no cover 3) Carolyn Dolan, 8pm, no cover 3) Sapphire Lounge 4) Plaza 5) Convention Center

HARRAH’S RENO

Money Bar, 180 W. Peckham Lane, Ste. 1070, 823-9977: Steve Starr Karaoke, F, 9pm, no cover

MONTBLEU RESORT

Spiro’s Sports Bar & Grille, 1475 E. Prater Way, Ste. 103, Sparks, 356-6000: F-Sa, 9pm, no cover

NUGGET CASINO RESORT

West Second Street Bar, 118 W. Second St., 384-7976: Daily, 8pm, no cover

PEPPERMILL RESORT SPA CASINO

1) Boz Scaggs, 9pm, $55.50-$65.50 2) The Male Room, 8pm, $23

55 Hwy. 50, Stateline; (800) 648-3353 1) Theatre 2) Opal 3) Blu 4) Cafe del Soul 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks; (775) 356-3300 1) Celebrity Showroom 2) Rose Ballroom 3) Gilley’s 2707 S. Virginia St., (775) 826-2121 1) Tuscany Ballroom 2) Terrace Lounge 3) Edge 4) Capri Ballroom

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover Chad Bushnell Band, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover Chad Bushnell Band, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover Chad Bushnell Band, 8pm, no cover

3) DJ/dancing, 5pm, no cover

3) DJ/line dancing lessons, 6pm, W, no cover

2) Jimbo Mathus and the Tri-State Coalition, 7pm, no cover

2) Jimbo Mathus and the Tri-State Coalition, 7pm, no cover 3) Fixx Fridays, 7:30pm, $10 after 8pm

2) Jimbo Mathus and the Tri-State Coalition, 7pm, no cover

2) Everett Coast, 6pm, no cover

2) Everett Coast, 6pm, M, Tu, W, no cover

SANDS REGENCY CASINO HOTEL

2) Utility Players Improv Show, 8pm, $15

345 N. Arlington Ave., (775) 348-2200 1) 3rd Street Lounge 2) Jester Theater

SILVER LEGACY

2) Banzai Thursdays w/DJ Trivia,

8pm, no cover 407 N. Virginia St., (775) 325-7401 1) Grand Exposition Hall 2) Rum Bullions Island Bar 3) University of Aura, 9pm, no cover 3) Aura Ultra Lounge 4) Silver Baron Lounge

30

|

RN&R

|

MAY 21, 2015

2) Flock of 80z, 9pm, no cover 3) Fashion Friday, 9pm, no cover 4) Rebekah Chase, 9pm, no cover

2) Flock of 80z, 9pm, no cover 3) Seduction Saturdays, 9pm, $5 4) Rebekah Chase, 9pm, no cover

1) Blues Jam Wednesday, 7pm, W, no cover 2) Recovery Sundays, 10pm, no cover 3) Industry Night, 9pm, no cover

2) Trey Valentine’s Backstage Karaoke, 8pm, Tu, no cover Country-Rock Bingo w/Jeff Gregg, 9pm, W, no cover


For a complete listing of this week’s events, visit newsreview.com/reno

3 - Minu t e F il M CoM pe t i t ion SCreening The Holland Project, KNPB and the Nevada Museum of Art present the seventh annual film competition screening. Budding filmmakers of all ages were invited to submit films in any genre, any style and any technology as long as the finished product clocked in at three minutes or less. See the top films selected by jurors and vote for your favorite. The screening begins at 6 p.m. on Thursday, May 21, at the Nevada Museum of Art, 160 W. Liberty St. Tickets are $5. Call 329-3333 or visit www.nevadaart.org or www.hollandreno.org.

—Kelley Lang

reno St ree t F ood The gourmet street food event in Reno returns for the summer with more than 20 food, craft dessert, beer, wine and mixed drink vendors, including Still Rollin Food Truck, Shanghai Express Truck, Kenji’s Food Truck, BoDawgs, St. Lawrence Pizza Co., Pho Real, Bangkok Cuisine and Muha’s Indian Tacos. Local musicians provide free live entertainment each week. The kickoff party on Friday, May 22, features music by the Jason King Band. The event takes place from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. every Friday through Oct. 2 at Idlewild Park, 1900 Idlewild Drive. Call 825-2665 or visit www.facebook.com/ RenoStreetFood.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ASt ronoM y: Coun t down to plu to

AniMA l Ark Chee tAh 50 0 Watch the world’s fastest land mammal approach speeds up to 70 miles per hour during Animal Art’s popular event. Cheetahs will race off leash across the Ark’s cheetah field. Children must be 8 years or older to attend. Tickets are $40 for adults, $35 for seniors age 62 and older and $30 for kids age 8-16. The event begins at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 23, at the Animal Ark, 1265 Deerlodge Road, about 25 miles north of Reno. Reservations are required. Call (775) 970-3431 or visit www.animalark.org.

Get the latest info on the National Aeronautics Space Administration’s New Horizons space probe. After nine years and 3 billion miles, the spacecraft is nearing its closest approach with the PlutoCharon system. Gigi Giles, a NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory ambassador who also teaches astronomy at Sierra Nevada College, will talk about New Horizons’ mission and what scientists have discovered so far about the mysterious dwarf planet and its moon. The talk begins at 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 23, at the Galena Creek Visitor Center, 18250 Mt. Rose Highway. Admission is a $5 suggested donation. Call 849-4948 or visit www. galenacreekvisitorcenter.org.

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

MAy Arbore t u M wil d l iF e

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

The May Arboretum Society hosts guided walking tours of the Wilbur D. May Arboretum and Botanical Gardens on the third Saturday of each month from May through September. This month’s walk focuses on the wildlife that call the Arboretum home. Arborist Phil Brazier will guide the tour across the park, which includes wetlands, woodlands and gardens. The walk begins at 10 a.m. on Saturday, May 23, at the Ranch House at Wilbur D. May Arboretum in Rancho San Rafael Regional Park, 1595 N. Sierra St. Admission is $5 and free for May Arboretum Society members. Call 785-4153 or visit www.mayarboretumsociety.org.

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

31


FADE IT OUT

for new real estate or shatter it for good! The Worlds Most Advanced Tattoo Removal Laser

6 TReATMenTs

4 TReATMenTs

Less discoMfoRT

beTTeR ResuLTs

feWeR sessions

4-6 sessions, 6-8 weeks apaRT

10401 Double R blvD. • Reno, nv • 775.322.3454 • nevaDaTaTTooRemoval.com

The shoo must go on I’ve been dating this guy long distance for six months. He’ll often fail to return texts for an entire day or even a few days. I keep breaking up with him, but he keeps apologizing, acknowledging that he can be “distracted” and then offering convincing excuses or making me feel I’m overreacting. This is getting old. Is there some crater somewhere where all his promises go to die? There is sometimes a good reason your boyfriend can’t return your text for days, like that it’s 790 B.C. and there’s a snowstorm and he’s sending his eunuch with the bum knee over the Alps with a set of stone tablets. When there is no good reason, his acknowledging an error, like by admitting to being “distracted,” is a first step in mending his ways. That is, except when he shows you—repeatedly—that it’s his only step (perhaps because it’s tricky to text you back when his other, more local girlfriend is sitting right next to him). Getting somebody to respect your boundaries starts with appearing to have them. Sure, there are sometimes allowances to be made, like for an all-nighter at work or an illness. As a friend of mine once wrote: “Sorry I didn’t respond to your email; I was in a coma.” But a man who cares about you generally acts in ways reflecting that—like by dashing off a text to tell you “sleepy - w/write u in am” or “kidnapped. w/be in touch w/ransom demand.” Instead, this guy gives you yet another apology—which basically translates to “Sorry that it’ll be a few days before I can do this to you again.” To have a caring, attentive man, you’ll need to make room for him in your life. You do this the same way you make room for a new TV: by putting the old broken one out on the curb. It’s tempting to keep believing the excuses, which allows you to believe that you’re loved. Unfortunately, believing you’re loved never plays out like actually being loved. The problem is, in the moment, our emotions are our first responder, and reason—that slacker—burrows under the covers, hoping it won’t get called in to work. Overriding wishful thinking-driven gullibility takes planning—having a pre-packed set of standards for how you want to be treated and then pulling them out at excuse o’clock and holding them up to how you’re actually being treated. This is how you end up with a boyfriend who keeps

32   |  RN&R   | 

MAY 21, 2015

his word. Keeps it and puts it on his phone and texts it to you—as opposed to keeping it in a drawer with slightly used chopsticks, old answering machine tapes, and a Ziploc baggie of his sister’s hamster’s ashes.

Socks and the city I’m a 31-year-old straight guy. I dress pretty boringly— except for my socks. I go for crazy colors and patterns. My buddy says these make me look “weird” and “less manly.” Come on. Do women really want you to be a carbon copy of every black-sock-wearing dude out there? In the sock department, as in other areas, it’s the nuances that count. So, go ahead and make a statement—but maybe one that stops short of “I’m really a Japanese schoolgirl!” Novelty sock wearing for men has actually been a thing in North America for a few decades. The really wacky ones may work as what anthropologists and animal behaviorists call a “costly signal.” This is an extravagant or risky trait or behavior that comes with a substantial price—handicapping a person’s or critter’s survival or chances of mating—thus suggesting that it’s a reliable sign of their quality. An example is a peacock with a particularly lush and heavy tail. His managing to escape predators while dragging around big feathered hindquarters like a train on a royal wedding dress tells peahens that he must be a real Chuck Norris among big feathery birds. Still, there are costly signals—“I’m man enough”—and too-costly signals: “It’s raining men! Hallelujah!” To figure out where the line lies for you, average all the variables: degree of manliness, girliness of sock choice, occupation (like if you’re a British graphic designer or a guy who goes to work in oversize red shoes), and the eccentricity level of the women you like. But keep in mind that certain socks are risky for any man, such as—and yes, these actually exist—Superman insignia socks, complete with tiny red capes attached. Sure, let your socks tell a woman that you want to take her home with you—but maybe not so you can tear off all your clothes and make her watch as you play with your action figures in your Superman Underoos. Ω

Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave., No. 280, Santa Monica,CA 90405, or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com).


WHO: Mark McKinnon WHAT: President/Artist WHERE: Marked Studios Marked Studios is the brain child of Mark and Moses. The tattoo industry has dictated that if anyone opens a new shop in town it should be done different than anyone else’s…so that’s what we did! We came up with the concept of Marked Studios over late night phone calls from Reno to Seattle where Moses was at the time. So after many months of planning, Mark sold off EVERY earthly possession, including his 1970 fastback Mustang, in order to fund the project. Our biggest challenge has been coming alongside the forerunners in Reno who have paved the way for a really vibrant tattoo industry here. Some just do not see us as a help to the industry as a whole and yet we will continue to prove ourselves as a worthy ally in Reno.

Have a piece from one of these shops or artists that you'd like to feature? Email a JPG file to contest@newsreview.com and put “Ink'd Reno” in the subject line. Include your full name, age and daytime phone. Entries will be featured on our Facebook Fan Page.

Ink’d by: Josh Weeks Valor Tattoo Parlor • 141 Vesta Street (775) 324-0404 • www.valorparlor.com

Ink’d by: Jason McKillip Body Graphics Tattoo • 460 S. Wells Avenue (775) 322-8623 • www.renotattoo.com

Ink’d by: Jay Gonzales A Toda Madre Tattoos • 1465 S. Wells Avenue (775) 622-8189 • /ATMTATTOOS

Ink’d by: Lori Mueller Distinct Ink • 934 Corbett St • Carson City (775) 883-6878 • /Distinct-Ink-Tattoos

Ink’d by: Moses Marked-Studios, Inc. • 945 W. Moana Lane (775) 209-1612 • www.markedstudios.com

Ink’d by: Sarah McGraw Pulsing Canvas Tattoo, Piercing & Art Studio

Full color fading for your next cover-up! Reno Tattoo Removal • 425 Marsh Ave (775) 200-0623 • www.renotattooremoval.com

Ink’d by: Anthony Velazquez Black Widow Ink • 487 E. Plumb Lane (775) 329-4369 • www.blackwidowink.com

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

|

ART OF THE STATE

|

FOODFINDS

|

1939 Prater Way • (775) 622-1023 •

Ink’d by: Archie Wood Battle Born Tattoo • 1717 S. Wells Ave. (775) 327-4465 •

Ink’d by: Cody Holler Reno Tattoo Company • 143 N. Virginia Street (775) 322-6393 • www.renoTatco.com

/Pulsing-Canvas-Art-Tattoo

Ink’d by: Melissa Varney Black Cat Tattoo • 905 S. Wells Ave (775) 324-9900 • /Black-Cat-Tattoo FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

/BattleBornTattooReno

Ink’d by: Monica Gurnari Artistic Traditions • 2975 Vista Blvd, #104 (775) 626-2400 • |

MISCELLANY

|

may 21, 2015

/ArtisticTraditions |

RN&R

|

33


FREE!*

*Nominal fee for adult entertainment. All advertising is subject to the newspaper’s Standards of Acceptance. Further, the News & Review specifically reserves the right to edit, decline or properly classify any ad. Errors will be rectified by re-publication upon notification. The N&R is not responsible for error after the first publication. The N&R assumes no financial liability for errors or omission of copy. In any event, liability shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by such an error or omission. The advertiser and not the newspaper assumes full responsibility for the truthful content of their advertising message. Train for an Exciting Career in Beauty! Finacial aid for those who qualify. Employment services for graduates. Day & evening classes. Milan Institute of Cosmetology Reno Campus Call Now 1-877-205-4113 MilanInstitute.edu

AIRLINE CAREERS start here - if you’re a hands on learner, you can become FAA Certified to fix jets. Job placement, financial aid if qualified. Call AIM 800-481-8389

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN)

Train for a New Career in Healthcare, Massage, Information Technology or Business! Employment services for graduates. Day & evening classes. No Registration Fee. Milan Institute Sparks Campus 1-866-467-0094 MilanInstitute.edu

Start your Humanitarian Career at One World Center and gain experience through international service work in Africa. Program has costs. Info@OneWorldCenter.org

ROOMS FOR RENT in downtown Reno for only $516/month. Fully furnished, free utilities, and free cable tv. All rooms have small fridge and microwave. We have flexible payment options. Move in today! No deposits, no credit checks! (775) 298-6944. ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

DISH TV Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 months) SAVE! Regular Price $34.99 Ask about FREE SAME DAY Installation! CALL NOW! 888-992-1957 (AAN CAN)

BRAND NEW STUDIO APARTMENTS Fully renovated, brand new furniture, appliance, flooring, and air conditioning. Starting at $625/month. Fully furnished, free utilities, free cable tv. Safe and clean downtown living! (775) 434-0073.

Notice of caution to our Readers! Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services.

DOWNTOWN HIGHRISE APARTMENTS Starting at $689/month. Completely furnished, free utilities, free cable television with premium channels. No deposits, move in today. Safe & clean downtown living. (775) 298-8858. SPARKS APARTMENTS next door to “The Nugget”. Beautiful Victorian Square views, newly renovated building. Rents start at $732 for fully furnished, all utilities paid, free cable tv with premium channels. Move in today! (775) 298-6558.

Feel The Sensation & Relaxation Of Massage Swedish, Deep Tissue Call David 762-7796 Office $55 Outcall $85 Lic #NVMT1086

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $25/MONTH! Call 855-977-9537. (AAN CAN) CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

more wheels online

www.newsreview.com

WARNING HOT GUYS!

Dating Easy made

Reno

775.323.7575

Reno

775.334.6666 Carson City

Carson City

775.888.9100

775.888.9995 FREE to listen & reply to ads!

FREE

To Listen and Reply to Ads!

FREE CODE: Reno News For other local numbers call

MegaMates.com

1-888-MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 3128

34   |  RN&R   | 

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/ New Mexico/Indiana (AAN CAN)

MAY 21, 2015

w w w. n e w s r e v i e w. c o m

STILL

Are you in trouble with the IRS? Owe 10k or more in taxes? Call US Tax Shield 800-507-0674

Gift certificates to local merchants for up to 50% off

Phone hours: M-F 8am-5pm. All ads post online same day. Deadlines for print: Line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Adult line ad deadline: Monday 4pm Display ad deadline: Friday 2pm

For Sale Excelsior accordian. Suggested sale price by Michael Arralde is $1,000. Call Mary Lou (530) 824-3322

FREE CODE: Reno News For other local numbers:

1-888MegaMates

TM

24/7 Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ ©2013 PC LLC 2575

RN&R

Online ads are

Gift certificates to local merchants for up to 50% off

Print ads start at $6/wk. www.newsreview.com or (775) 324-4440 ext. 5

ARIES (March 21-April 19): James McNeill

Whistler was an influential painter in the latter half of the 19th century. He advocated the “art for art’s sake” credo, insisting that the best art doesn’t need to teach or moralize. As far as he was concerned, its most important purpose was to bring forth “glorious harmony” from chaos. But the immediate reason I’m nominating him to be your patron saint for the coming weeks is the stylized signature he created: an elegant butterfly with a long tail that was actually a stinger. I think you’ll thrive by embodying that dual spirit: being graceful, sensitive and harmonious and yet also feisty, piquant and provocative. Can you manage that much paradox? I think you can.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Renowned

author George Bernard Shaw was secure in his feeling that he did good work. He didn’t need the recognition of others to validate his self-worth. The British prime minister offered him a knighthood, but he refused it. When he found out he had been awarded a Nobel Prize for Literature, he wanted to turn it down but his wife convinced him to accept it. The English government also sought to give him the prestigious Order of Merit, but he rejected it, saying, “I have already conferred this order upon myself.” He’s your role model for right now, Taurus. Congratulate yourself for your successes, whether or not anyone else does.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Aha!” is

your mantra for the coming weeks, Gemini. Keep it on the tip of your tongue, ready to unleash. This always-ready-to-besurprised-by-inspiration attitude will train you to expect the arrival of wonders and marvels. And that will be an effective way to actually attract wonders and marvels! With “Aha!” as your talisman, all of your wake-up calls will be benevolent, and all of the chaos you encounter—or at least most of it—will be fertile.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Do you

chronically indulge in feelings of guilt? Do you berate yourself for the wrong turns and sad mistakes you made in the past? These behaviors may be sneaky ways of avoiding change. How can you summon enough energy to transform your life if you’re wallowing in worries and regrets? In presenting the possibility that you might be caught in this trap, I want you to know that I’m not sitting in judgment of you. Not at all. Like you, I’m a Cancerian, and I have periodically gotten bogged down in the very morass I’m warning you against. The bad news is that right now you are especially susceptible to falling under this spell. The good news is that right now you have extra power to break this spell.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In the TV comedy-

drama Jane the Virgin, the fictional character known as Rogelio de la Vega is a vain but lovable actor who performs in telenovelas. “I’m very easy to dress,” he tells the wardrobe supervisor of a new show he’ll be working on. “Everything looks good on me. Except for peach. I don’t pop in peach.” What he means is that his charisma doesn’t radiate vividly when he’s wearing peachcolored clothes. Now I want to ask you, Leo: What don’t you pop in? I’m not simply talking about the color of clothes that enable you to shine, but everything else, too. In the coming weeks, it’s crucial that you surround yourself with influences that make you pop.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Are you will-

ing to entertain an outlandish possibility? Here’s my vision: You will soon be offered unexpected assistance, either through the machinations of a “guardian angel” or the messy blessings of a shape-shifting spirit. This divine intervention will make it possible for you to demolish a big, bad obstacle you’ve been trying to find a way around. Even if you have trouble believing in the literal factuality of my prophecy, here’s what I suspect: It will at least come true in a metaphorical sense—which is the truest kind of truth of all.

by rob brezsny

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Glory” is the

theme song of the film Selma. It’s an anthem about the ongoing struggle for equal rights by African-Americans. I want to borrow one of its lines for your use in the coming weeks: “Freedom is like a religion to us.” I think those will be good words for you to live by. Are you part of a group that suffers oppression and injustice? Are you mixed up in a situation that squashes your selfexpression? Are you being squelched by the conditioned habits of your own unconscious mind? It’s high time to rebel. The quest for liberation should be your spiritual calling.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): If you’re

planning on breaking a taboo, sneaking into a forbidden zone, or getting intimate with an edge-dweller, don’t tell boastful stories about what you’re doing. For now, secrecy is not only sexy; it’s a smart way to keep you safe and effective. Usually I’m fond of you telling the whole truth. I like it when you reveal the nuanced depths of your feelings. But right now I favor a more cautious approach to communication. Until your explorations have progressed further, I suggest that you only discuss them sparingly. As you put your experiments in motion, share the details on a need-to-know basis.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

There are many possible ways to create and manage a close relationship. Here’s one of my favorite models: when two independent, self-responsible souls pledge to help each other activate the best versions of themselves. If you don’t have a partnership like this, the near future will be a favorable time to find one. And if you already do have an intimate alliance in which the two of you synergize each other’s quest for individuation, the coming weeks could bring you breathtaking breakthroughs.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s a

challenge to drive a car through Canada’s far north. For example, if you want to get from Dawson in the Yukon Territory to Inuvik in the Northwest Territory, you take Dempster Highway. It’s gravel road for the entire 417-mile trip, so the ride is rough. Bring a spare tire and extra gasoline, since there’s just one service station along the way. On the plus side, the scenery is thrilling. The permafrost in the soil makes the trees grow in odd shapes, almost like they’re drunk. You can see caribou, wolverines, lynx, bears and countless birds. Right now, the sun is up 20 hours every day. And the tundra? You’ve never seen anything like it. Even if you don’t make a trip like this, Capricorn, I’m guessing you will soon embark on a metaphorically similar version. With the right attitude and preparation, you will have fun and grow more courageous.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian

author James Joyce wrote Ulysses, one of the most celebrated and influential novels of the 20th century. The narrative is both experimental and tightly structured. Its chaotic stream-of-consciousness passages are painstakingly crafted. (Anyone who wonders how the astrological sign of Aquarius can be jointly ruled by the rebellious planet Uranus and the disciplinarian planet Saturn need only examine this book for evidence.) Joyce claimed he labored over Ulysses for 20,00 hours. That’s the equivalent of devoting eight hours a day, 350 days a year, for more than seven years. Will you ever work that hard and long on a project, Aquarius? If so, now would be an auspicious time to start.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The English

writer and caricaturist Max Beerbohm moved away from his native land when he was 37 years old. He settled in Rapallo, Italy, where he lived for much of the rest of his life. Here’s the twist: When he died at age 83, he had still not learned to speak Italian. For 40 years, he used his native tongue in his foreign home. This is a failing you can’t afford to have in the coming months, Pisces. The old proverb “When in Rome, do as the Romans do,” has never been so important for you to observe.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at (877) 873-4888 or (900) 950-7700.


by Georgia Fisher PHOTO/GEORGIA FISHER

Love shack Greg Peters Greg Peters cut his teeth as a salesman, and he’s owned a handful of businesses over the years, including a dog kennel and a restaurant. The newlywed dad now mans a pair of Adam & Eve franchises in Reno and Carson—colorful stores that runneth over with lingerie, adult toys, sexy bridal and Burner gear, and extras such as therapeutic lubricants for women who are recovering from cancer. Women and couples are the bulk of Adam & Eve customers, actually, and Peters says 60 percent of patrons are female. Men are welcome too, of course, and some ask Peters for rather personal advice. He’s happy to dish it out.

So you say you save marriages? Tell us about that. A hero story I have: This guy and this gal came in, and they didn’t want to talk, and part of our job is to get people to open up and tell us what they’re trying to accomplish. So he finally opened up, and he said, “Greg, I had prostate surgery eight months ago. I’m never going to be able to ejaculate again. I can get it up, but I have trouble keeping it up.” And I said, “OK, let’s start with a movie, some bath salts, do some massage, try a [supplement] pill, a penis pump, a cock ring.” He calls a week later and says, “Greg, you saved my marriage.” I was like, “Yes!” That’s why we pride ourselves on the educational side. We have an education night the third week of every month … People come in

There are a lot of guys out there who feel like a toy is going to replace them, and that is absolutely not true. There’s so much more about sex for a woman. For guys, it’s more about getting your rocks off. Can a woman have an orgasm with just a vibrator? Of course, but it’s not the same. There’s no connection. So, something simple like a [vibrator] is the easiest way to start. Or a cock ring. They’re all a little bit different. ...

How’d you get into this, anyway? and learn something. A couple weeks ago, we had The Safety Side of BDSM. We had a dominatrix here, Michelle [McHardy], who actually teaches some sexual health stuff at UNR. She knows what she’s doing.

OPINION

|

NEWS

|

GREEN

|

I was looking for a business to start, and thought this would be a perfect fit. And it is. I love it.

So what else can our readers know about you?

Helping people as much as you do, does anything shock you anymore?

I recently got married, and I have a couple of kids. They’re 11 and 17, and they’re not involved in the business. They know we have it, but they’ve never been inside the store.

Ha! Oh, yes. People use their bodies in all kinds of ways. This was shocking: A guy walks in and goes over to our lube bar [then proceeds to squirt the product into his hand], and goes, “Can I use your bathroom?” It’s like, “Nooo!” That sort of thing really doesn’t happen often, though. We call them creepers, and we really don’t get the creepers too much. But one of the craziest things I’ve heard to date—OK, did you see Meet the Fockers, with the fake boob to breastfeed the kid? So there’s these fake boobs, and a guy wanted one of those. And I said, “I don’t really have that. You can try a maternity store or something, but why?” He said, “Well, we’re into infantilism … .” We don’t judge. Whatever turns you on. I don’t care.

The thrill’s still here The Great Man was sitting backstage with about 15 minutes until showtime. To no one in particular, he said, “Those damned crackers out there are gonna wanna hear That Goddamn Song tonight, and boys, I just don’t know if I can muster it up to play That Goddamn Song.” He looked around the room wearily. It was the 157th performance of the year, and the insanity of the schedule was beginning to take a toll. The rest of the band heard The Great Man, and they all chuckled and chortled knowingly. They’d heard his crabbin’ before. They all mumbled in reply, things like, “Yeah, boss,” and ”I hear that,” and “I’m with ya, boss.” And they also knew that when the time came for the opening notes of That Goddamn Song, The Great Man would face the drummer, give the signal to hit it, and then, being the complete pro that he was, he would play the batbomb bejesus out of “The Thrill is Gone” and send all those folks in the audience to the moon.

What would you suggest for a person or couple who’s new to this sort of thing?

Do they know what kind of store it is, though? It’s not really discussed. If they ask, it’s a lingerie shop, a little clothing boutique, and they’re just not allowed in. But my daughter, she’ll be 18 soon, and she has a very good idea, if you will. She’s apparently proud of it. She’s told a few of her friends at school, which we’ve told her not to do— don’t involve other people in our business.

Can I print that?

∫y Bruce Van Dye brucev@newsreview.com

I don’t know if that scenario ever took place, it’s just easy to imagine that it did. “The Thrill is Gone” was to B.B. King what “Free Bird” was to Lynyrd Skynyrd, what “Stairway to Heaven” was to Led Zep, what “Teen Spirit” was to Nirvana—the song that most in the audience expect to hear, the song that got them to shell out for the ticket, the song that made mailbox money a reality. All of those artists are, of course, so much more than that One Great Smash Hit. B.B. certainly was. I just spent the weekend driving around listening to his four-CD box set called King of the Blues. Talk about a knockout kickass collection. Talk about a Solid Legacy of Wow. 1980—my first days in Reno, back when we cashed our paychecks at Harrah’s in order to get free drink tokes. Those tokes were more than just free beers. They were currency, because they would get you into The Cabaret, which was a nifty little performance space in the heart of

FEATURE STORY

|

ARTS&CULTURE

Ω

Sure.

|

ART OF THE STATE

the casino. To get in, all you needed was two tokes. That was it. Not only did you get a seat, but your first two cocktails were on the table. Unbeatable scene! And good god, y’all, the performers we would see for two lousy drink tokes. Redonkulous. Delbert McClinton. Tower of Power. Elvin Bishop. Sam & Dave. The Turtles. Many more I’ve forgotten. And yes, B.B. King with his full band. Dayam. What an insanely great treat, to see B.B. and his boys in this dinky little cabaret where they could go ahead and just blow the Brylcreem right off your hairpiece. And when it came time for “The Thrill,” B.B. and company fired it up, brought it home, made it happen, and made us happy. That Goddamn Song is one goddamned great song. I’ll tell you this— The Great Man earned that mansion in Vegas. Ω

|

FOODFINDS

|

FILM

|

MUSICBEAT

|

NIGHTCLUBS/CASINOS

|

THIS WEEK

|

MISCELLANY

|

MAY 21, 2015

|

RN&R

|

35


RN&R May 21, 2015  

R 2015 05 21

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you